WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing recreation opportunities

  1. 78 FR 73820 - Publicly Managed Recreation Opportunities, Recreation Fees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ... Forest Service RIN 0596-AD09 Publicly Managed Recreation Opportunities, Recreation Fees AGENCY: Forest... final directive providing direction on recreation fees in chapter 30 of new Forest Service Handbook (FSH) 2309.13. This chapter enumerates the requirements for recreation fees charged by the Forest Service...

  2. Federal outdoor recreation trends: effects on economic opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric White; J.M. Bowker; Ashley E. Askew; Linda L. Langner; J. Ross Arnold; Donald B.K. English

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor recreation is a central way that people interact with the natural environment. Federal land agencies are key providers of settings, facilities, and landscapes for recreation. Outdoor recreation is also an important driver of economic activity in rural communities near recreation destinations and across the United States. Future participation in outdoor...

  3. Federal outdoor recreation trends: Effects on economic opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric M. White; Michael Bowker; Ashley E. Askew; Linda L. Langner; J. Ross Arnold; Don English

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor recreation plays a significant role in American lives. It provides physical challenges and well-being, helps develop lifelong skills, provokes interest and inquiry, inspires wonder and awe of the natural world, and often provides an alternative to daily routines. Recreation contributes greatly to the physical, mental, and spiritual health of individuals, bonds...

  4. Use of the recreation opportunity spectrum in natural protected area planning and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavo Perez-Verdin; Martha E. Lee; Deborah J. Chavez

    2008-01-01

    The use of the Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) framework, widely used in planning and managing wildland recreation in the United States, was tested for managing recreation opportunities in southern Durango, Mexico. Two natural protected areas were used as case studies to evaluate the ROS criteria and standards for land classification of outdoor recreation...

  5. Macro-linkages between health and outdoor recreation: the role of parks and recreation providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall S. Rosenberger; Terry R. Bergerson; Jeffrey D. Kline

    2009-01-01

    Physical inactivity, overweight, and obesity are growing national concerns owing to their associations with chronic diseases and overall well-being. Parks and recreation providers play a pivotal role in addressing these public health issues by providing the public with infrastructure that enables outdoor physical activity. Our analysis of county-level data for Oregon...

  6. The recreation opportunity spectrum: a framework for planning, management, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger N. Clark; George H. Stankey

    1979-01-01

    The end product of recreation management is a diverse range of opportunities from which people can derive various experiences. This paper offers a framework for managing recreation opportunities based on six physical, biological, social, and managerial factors that, when combined, can be utilized by recreationists to obtain diverse experiences.

  7. 18 CFR 8.11 - Information respecting use and development of public recreational opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... POWER ACT RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AND DEVELOPMENT AT LICENSED PROJECTS § 8.11 Information respecting... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information respecting use and development of public recreational opportunities. 8.11 Section 8.11 Conservation of Power and...

  8. Toward the improvement of trail classification in national parks using the recreation opportunity spectrum approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Yoshitaka

    2013-06-01

    Trail settings in national parks are essential management tools for improving both ecological conservation efforts and the quality of visitor experiences. This study proposes a plan for the appropriate maintenance of trails in Chubusangaku National Park, Japan, based on the recreation opportunity spectrum (ROS) approach. First, we distributed 452 questionnaires to determine park visitors' preferences for setting a trail (response rate = 68 %). Respondents' preferences were then evaluated according to the following seven parameters: access, remoteness, naturalness, facilities and site management, social encounters, visitor impact, and visitor management. Using nonmetric multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis, the visitors were classified into seven groups. Last, we classified the actual trails according to the visitor questionnaire criteria to examine the discrepancy between visitors' preferences and actual trail settings. The actual trail classification indicated that while most developed trails were located in accessible places, primitive trails were located in remote areas. However, interestingly, two visitor groups seemed to prefer a well-conserved natural environment and, simultaneously, easily accessible trails. This finding does not correspond to a premise of the ROS approach, which supposes that primitive trails should be located in remote areas without ready access. Based on this study's results, we propose that creating trails, which afford visitors the opportunity to experience a well-conserved natural environment in accessible areas is a useful means to provide visitors with diverse recreation opportunities. The process of data collection and analysis in this study can be one approach to produce ROS maps for providing visitors with recreational opportunities of greater diversity and higher quality.

  9. National forest trail users: planning for recreation opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    John J. Daigle; Alan E. Watson; Glenn E. Haas

    1994-01-01

    National forest trail users in four geographical regions of the United States are described based on participation in clusters of recreation activities. Visitors are classified into day hiking, undeveloped recreation, and two developed camping and hiking activity clusters for the Appalachian, Pacific, Rocky Mountain, and Southwestern regions. Distance and time traveled...

  10. Outdoor Recreation in America. Trends, Problems, and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Clayne R.

    Containing 14 chapters of information about agencies, programs, problems, and trends related to outdoor recreation, this book is designed to cover the field of study and (1) to interpret the present and future significance of outdoor recreation, (2) to describe the responsibilities of the numerous agencies and organizations involved, (3) to cover…

  11. Locating opportunities for outdoor action and adventure recreation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper indicates how modern spatial computing technology can be used for developing spatial policy for, and planning of outdoor action and adventure recreation and tourism (OAART). An application was performed in the Western Cape Province of South Africa. The research overviews spatial recreation and tourism ...

  12. Relationships between motivations, activities and settings: the recreation opportunity spectrum within the Delaware State Park system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans Vogelsong; Alan R. Graefe; John J., Jr. Confer; Dave S. Solan; Jennifer K. Kramp

    1998-01-01

    The Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) was first developed by the US Forest Service to classic lands available for recreation by activities, settings, and visitor expectations. This paper examines the relationship between these three criteria within the Delaware State Park System. Respondents were asked to rank the importance of 22 reasons for visiting a state park...

  13. Extending the Recreation Opportunity Spectrum to nonfederal lands in the Northeast: an implementation guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas A. More; Susan Bulmer; Linda Henzel; Ann E. Mates

    2003-01-01

    The Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) is one of the most powerful recreation inventory tools ever devised. Originally formulated in the late 1970?s for use on public lands in the Western United States, the ROS was quickly adopted by federal land-management agencies. However, its application to public lands in the east proved problematic, as did its extension to...

  14. Adventure Recreation: What's New for Resource Managers, Public Policy Analysts, and Recreation Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Alan; Galloway, Shayne

    2001-01-01

    Describes the phenomenon of risk taking in and through recreational activities, reviewing the use of adventure in recreation; summarizing salient research findings on adventure education within the past decade (perceived risk and individual involvement); and offering remarks related to what researchers know and do not know about the deliberate use…

  15. Private Assistance in Outdoor Recreation. A Directory of Organizations Providing Aid to Individuals and Public Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    In an effort to aid private recreation area developers and operators, and other individuals interested in outdoor recreation, this Bureau of Outdoor Recreation publication lists a number of professional societies and national organizations providing low-cost publications and other aids to planning, development, and operation of outdoor recreation…

  16. Outdoor recreation resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter J. Betz; Donald B.K. English; H. Ken Cordell

    1999-01-01

    The authors examine recreation resources and opportunities by the four types of providers: Federal, State, local governments, and the private sector. They discuss the trend of partnerships in the provision of outdoor recreation opportunities, especially two types that emerged in the 1990’s: Scenic Byways and Watchable Wildlife opportunities. Where possible, the authors...

  17. Providing Recreation Services for all Individuals: The Connection of Inclusive Practices to Commercial, Community, and Outdoor Recreation Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatt, Jennifer A.; Jorgensen, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities currently represent the largest minority group in the United States, yet recreation undergraduate students often perceive this as a population they may or may not provide services to in their future careers. The activities presented in this paper, Inclusion Knowledge Audits (IKA), are developed to make the connection…

  18. Angler apps as a source of recreational fisheries data: opportunities, challenges and proposed standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturelli, Paul A.; Hyder, Kieran; Skov, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Recreational fisheries surveys are limited in time and place in many countries. This lack of data limits scientific understanding and sustainable management. Smartphone applications (apps) allow anglers to record the details of their fishing trips and catches. In this study, we describe the oppor......Recreational fisheries surveys are limited in time and place in many countries. This lack of data limits scientific understanding and sustainable management. Smartphone applications (apps) allow anglers to record the details of their fishing trips and catches. In this study, we describe...... the opportunities and challenges associated with angler apps as a source of recreational fisheries data, and propose minimum standards for data collection via angler apps. Angler apps are a potentially valuable source of conventional and novel data that are both frequent and extensive, and an opportunity to engage...... that the angler app market is diverse, competitive and unpredictable, we emphasize minimum standards for data collection as a way to ensure large and reliable data sets that can be compared and integrated across apps. These standards relate to trips and catches, and angler demographics and behaviour, and should...

  19. Management implications of changes in recreation activity motivation across physical settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    David A Graefe; Rudy M. Schuster; Gary T. Green; H. Ken. Cordell

    2010-01-01

    Outdoor recreation management frameworks suggest that a diverse set of recreation opportunities is necessary to meet the needs and desires of a diverse population of recreationists. Managers of recreation resources must understand recreational demand if they wish to provide high-quality recreation opportunities to their users. The purpose of this study was to examine...

  20. perspective on opportunities for research and interventions provided

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-11

    Jun 11, 2013 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 89 No. 5 May 2012. PERSPECTIVE ON OPPORTUNITIES FOR RESEARCH AND INTERVENTIONS PROVIDED BY COMMUNITY BASED. HEALTH INFORMATION SYSTEM ILLUSTRATED BY THE POTENTIAL USE OF MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING. INTERVENTION.

  1. perspective on opportunities for research and interventions provided

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-06

    Nov 6, 2013 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 89 No. 5 May 2012. PERSPECTIVE ON OPPORTUNITIES FOR RESEARCH AND INTERVENTIONS PROVIDED BY COMMUNITY BASED. HEALTH INFORMATION SYSTEM ILLUSTRATED BY THE POTENTIAL USE OF MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING. INTERVENTION.

  2. Opportunities provided in language textbooks to develop learners ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is a report on a study that investigated the opportunities provided in language textbooks to develop learners\\' full potential. Howard Gardner\\'s theory of multiple intelligences, which is used as a theoretical framework, claims that learners have different combinations of intelligences and that the various ...

  3. Effects of subdivision and access restrictions on private land recreation opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; Donald B.K. English; Sharon A. Randall

    1993-01-01

    Continuing conversion of woodlands, greater restrictions on recreational access, and subdivision are trends seeming to have important implicaitons for future public recreation supply. The nature of these implicaitons has not been adequately explored in previous research, a void that has led to questions about the actual effects these factors have on future recreational...

  4. Practices and attitudes of Indian catch-and-release anglers: identifying opportunities for advancing the management of recreational fisheries

    OpenAIRE

    Nishikant Gupta; Shannon D. Bower; Steven J. Cooke; Danylchuk, Andy J.; Rajeev Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    Recreational fishing, a popular leisure activity, can potentially support conservation of species and provide socio-economic benefits to local economies.  Nonetheless, there are ecological concerns regarding this pastime, especially in developing economies such as India where little information is available concerning impacts on fish populations.  An online survey targeting recreational anglers practicing catch-and-release (C&R) in India (n=200) revealed 25 states/union territories as pri...

  5. Does zoning winter recreationists reduce recreation conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrey D. Miller; Jerry J. Vaske; John R. Squires; Lucretia E. Olson; Elizabeth K. Roberts

    2017-01-01

    Parks and protected area managers use zoning to decrease interpersonal conflict between recreationists. Zoning, or segregation, of recreation - often by nonmotorized and motorized activity - is designed to limit physical interaction while providing recreation opportunities to both groups. This article investigated the effectiveness of zoning to reduce recreation...

  6. Physical activity and the recreation opportunity spectrum: differences in important site attributes and perceived constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.A. Wilhelm Stanis; I.E. Schneider; K.J. Sinew; D.J. Chavez; M.C. Vogel

    2009-01-01

    Both legislation and professional organizations call for parks and recreation agencies to address the need for greater physical activity among those living in the United States. A greater understanding of factors that facilitate and constrain physical activity in parks and recreation areas may improve agencies’ ability to address obesity and sedentary lifestyles. This...

  7. Outdoor recreation opportunities and land use change in Vermont's Lake Champlain Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    John J. Lindsay

    1995-01-01

    Outdoor recreation resources are eroding in Vermont's Lake Champlain Basin due to urban expansion. This study measured urban growth in the Basin and identified critical areas for open space protection. The study's hypothesis, that there was no difference between the Champlain Basin and other parts of urbanizing New England that have lost outdoor recreation...

  8. Participation in sport and recreation in a poor community : perceived constraints and opportunities : physical activity and health

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, D.F.; J Surujlal

    2014-01-01

    Participation in physical activity and sport has many health benefits and contributes to well-being of individuals. In a broader context it could even bring communities together and improve social cohesion, especially in rural areas. This article focuses on constraints and opportunities associated with participation in sport and recreation in a rural setting. An empirical and quantitative research approach was used to collect primary data through a household survey in the Sicelo township, Gau...

  9. Health care providers' missed opportunities for preventing femicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharps, P W; Koziol-McLain, J; Campbell, J; McFarlane, J; Sachs, C; Xu, X

    2001-11-01

    Homicide of women (femicide) by intimate partners is the most serious form of violence against women. The purpose of this analysis of a larger multisite study was to describe health care use in the year prior to murder of women by their intimate partner in order to identify opportunities for intervention to prevent femicide. A sample of femicide cases was identified from police or medical examiner records. Participants (n = 311) were proxy informants (most often female family members) of victims of intimate partner femicide from 11 U.S. cities. Information about prior domestic abuse and use of health care and other helping agencies for victims and perpetrators was obtained during structured telephone interviews. Most victims had been abused by their partners (66%) and had used health care agencies for either injury or physical or mental health problems (41%). Among women who had been pregnant during the relationship, 23% were beaten by partners during pregnancy. Among perpetrators with fair or poor physical health, 53% had contact with physicians and 15% with fair or poor mental health had seen a doctor about their mental health problem. Among perpetrators with substance problems, 5.4% had used alcohol treatment programs and 5.7% had used drug treatment programs. Frequent contacts with helping agencies by victims and perpetrators represent opportunities for the prevention of femicide by health care providers. Copyright 2001 American Health Foundation and Academic Press.

  10. Collegiate Recreation Student Employee as Student Leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Cara W; Carr, Julia Wallace

    2015-01-01

    Collegiate recreation student employment opportunities are found in such areas as facilities, intramurals, aquatics, fitness, and outdoor adventure. Recreation is one of the largest providers of student employment opportunities on campuses across the country with an important role in student employee leadership development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  11. Managing for Recreational Experience Opportunities: The Case of Hikers in Protected Areas in Catalonia, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farías Torbidoni, Estela Inés

    2011-03-01

    Planning and management for recreational activities in protected areas involves an understanding of many complex factors. Segmentation of recreation demand and of the main physical or sporting activities can contribute to the design of more efficient management strategies, which may help to maintain or significantly enhance satisfaction with the recreation experience, and this in turn could improve the interest in and appreciation of the natural environment. The current study examined the motivations of hikers in three small Natura 2000 protected areas. It establishes a typology or categorization as a contribution to better management based on a survey conducted through on-site personal interviews with a representative sample of 569 hikers. Through an analysis of the principal intervening components by means of cluster analysis, we identified three groups of hikers based on three motivational dimensions: (1) nature-minded hikers, (2) sporting hikers and (3) general-purpose hikers. The most striking results were the significant differences among group variables related to visit behaviour (frequency and duration of visits and number of people per group), previous knowledge (protection status of the areas) and recreational frequentation (trail categories and protected areas visited). A positive correlation between the degree of sympathy for nature and the degree of satisfaction with the recreational experience (including positive evaluation of the public facilities, signposting and services offered) was also observed. The results are discussed in terms of their applicability and implications in hiking management in protected natural areas such as those of Natura 2000.

  12. Scientific advances provide opportunities to improve pediatric environmental health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.; Reddy, Micaela B.; Reddy, Carol F.

    2004-01-01

    The health consequences of contaminants in the environment, with respect to the health of children and infants, recently have been dramatically brought to public attention by the motion pictures Erin Brockovich and A Civil Action. These productions focused public attention on the potential link between water contaminants and pediatric health, a continuing subject of public concern. As a consequence of the increasing production of new commercial chemicals, many chemicals have appeared in the scientific and public awareness as potential threats to health. These new or novel compounds eventually distribute in the environment and often are termed emerging contaminants. Gitterman and Bearer stated, "Children may serve as unwitting sentinels for society; they are often the youngest exposed to many environmental toxicants and may become the youngest in age to manifest adverse responses." The discipline of pediatric environmental health is still in its adolescence, but it will be increasingly important as new chemicals are generated and as more is learned about the health effects of chemicals already in commerce. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in biomonitoring and environmental monitoring of environmental contaminants including emerging contaminants. Our purpose in writing this commentary is to make pediatricians aware of the current resources available for learning about pediatric environmental health and of ongoing research initiatives that provide opportunities to improve pediatric environmental health.

  13. The science of trail surveys: Recreation ecology provides new tools for managing wilderness trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Jeffrey L.; Wimpey, Jeremy F.; Park, Logan O.

    2011-01-01

    Recreation ecology examines the effects of recreation on protected area ecosystems. One core focus of recreation ecology research is trail science, including the development of efficient protocols to assess and monitor the type and severity of resource impacts, analyses to improve knowledge of factors that influence trail conditions, and studies to assist land managers in improving trail design, maintenance, and visitor management. This article reviews alternative trail survey methodologies most useful for the management of wilderness and backcountry trail networks. Illustrations and implications from survey data for trail planning, design, and management are included.

  14. Recreational Fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agencies shall, to the extent permitted by law and where practicable, improve the quantity, function, sustainable productivity, and distribution of U.S. aquatic resources for increased recreational fishing opportunities

  15. Mapping Pedagogical Opportunities Provided by Mathematics Analysis Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Robyn; Stacey, Kaye

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a taxonomy of the pedagogical opportunities that are offered by mathematics analysis software such as computer algebra systems, graphics calculators, dynamic geometry or statistical packages. Mathematics analysis software is software for purposes such as calculating, drawing graphs and making accurate diagrams. However, its…

  16. When girls have no opportunities and women have neither time nor energy: the participation of Muslim female cleaners in recreational physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenneis, Verena; Pfister, Gertrud Ursula

    2017-01-01

    minority ethnic women in Denmark and to identify key influences which shape(d) their PA attitudes and practices. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 26 female migrant cleaners from various non-Western countries. The interviews revealed that a lack of previous experience of sport and recreational...... PA and life circumstances constrained participation in recreational PA. In contrast, religion did not provide an explanation for the women’s lack of engagement in recreational PA....

  17. Proceedings of the 2001 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon. Comp, ed. Todd

    2002-01-01

    Contains 71 articles presented at the 2001 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium which seeks to foster quality information exchange between recreation, tourism, and resource managers and researchers throughout the Northeast. The forum provides opportunities for recreation and tourism research managers from different agencies, state, and government levels, as well...

  18. Practices and attitudes of Indian catch-and-release anglers: identifying opportunities for advancing the management of recreational fisheries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishikant Gupta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recreational fishing, a popular leisure activity, can potentially support conservation of species and provide socio-economic benefits to local economies.  Nonetheless, there are ecological concerns regarding this pastime, especially in developing economies such as India where little information is available concerning impacts on fish populations.  An online survey targeting recreational anglers practicing catch-and-release (C&R in India (n=200 revealed 25 states/union territories as prime angling locations, with Mahseer (Tor spp. constituting the main target species group (53%.  Angling season (28% and pristine river surroundings (14% were stated as major factors important for angling, while overfishing (31% and the use of illegal fishing techniques were highlighted as chief threats to fish species.  Respondents were in favour of strictly adhering to C&R guidelines (23%, controlling illegal fishing techniques and pollution (18% and spreading awareness and education among local stakeholders (18% to protect fish.  Over 75% of respondents were also willing to contribute both their time and money to conservation initiatives focusing on key sport fish.  With anglers targeting multiple fishing locations throughout India, there is a need for consistent governance structures and policy instruments to support the development of sustainable recreational fisheries while minimising conflict with other stakeholder groups.  The impacts of C&R fisheries interactions on individuals and populations (especially for threatened species need to be studied in the Indian context.  Direct participation by recreational anglers in C&R research could strengthen broader conservation and management initiatives throughout the country by increasing stewardship.  

  19. Minimizing conflict between recreation and nature conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    1993-01-01

    Most greenways are created with multiple goals in mind. Two of the foremost are providing recreational opportunities and conserving nature. Although these two goals frequently enhance each other, sometimes pursuing both simultaneously can result in conflicts. In some cases, recreational use can so severely degrade an area that not only is the environment damaged but...

  20. Contraception and Adolescent Males: An Opportunity for Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Molly J; Peters, Marissa; Sheeder, Jeanelle; Kaul, Paritosh

    2016-03-01

    To examine young men's awareness of emergency contraception (EC) and its association with their contraceptive decision-making contributions within a relationship. A convenience sample of English-speaking male patients aged 13-24 years were surveyed regarding their childbearing intentions, contraceptive awareness (including EC), perceived contraceptive knowledge, and communication about birth control with providers and within a relationship. An ethnically diverse sample of adolescent males was recruited with a mean age of 18.9 years. Most had previously been sexually active (75%) and felt it was important to avoid pregnancy (84%) and 61% reported ever having spoken to a health care provider about birth control (other than condoms), but only 42% had heard of EC. Participants who had heard of EC were more likely to have spoken to a health care provider about contraception in the past (51.5% vs. 29.8%; p = .050), to feel they should participate in contraceptive decisions in a relationship (97.4% vs. 76.5%; p = .006), and to have discussed contraception with a partner (76.9% vs. 29.2%; p contraceptive decisions within a relationship if they do not desire fatherhood. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Methodology for the Valuation of Forest Recreation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Termansen, Mette

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this report #1 is to provide an overview and description of the methodology and data sources used in order to evaluate forest recreation in terms of monetary values and visitor numbers on a spatially explicit basis using an indirect valuation methodology. Report #2 reports the main...... ele-ments used to predict and upscale visitor flows and site values to the region of North Zealand and the results. Background to the report is the development of the Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) model developed by JRC, which maps the recreation potential in Europe. The ROS is based...... on a recreation service supply approach where indices of recreation potentials are linked with zoning of areas in terms of proximity versus remoteness from where people live. The ROS maps opportunities rather than the actual recreation taking place. A validation of the ROS model has been made using revealed...

  2. Social-Psychological Factors Influencing Recreation Demand: Evidence from Two Recreational Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jordan W.; Moore, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional methods of estimating demand for recreation areas involve making inferences about individuals' preferences. Frequently, the assumption is made that recreationists' cost of traveling to a site is a reliable measure of the value they place on that resource and the recreation opportunities it provides. This assumption may ignore other…

  3. When girls have no opportunities and women have neither time nor energy: the participation of Muslim female cleaners in recreational physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenneis, Verena; Pfister, Gertrud Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Statistics about the recreational physical activity (PA) of minority ethnic Muslim women reveal very low participation rates. Drawing on approaches to socialization and Bourdieu’s concepts of habitus and taste, the aim of this study was to investigate the (lack of) PA participation of Muslim...... minority ethnic women in Denmark and to identify key influences which shape(d) their PA attitudes and practices. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 26 female migrant cleaners from various non-Western countries. The interviews revealed that a lack of previous experience of sport and recreational...... PA and life circumstances constrained participation in recreational PA. In contrast, religion did not provide an explanation for the women’s lack of engagement in recreational PA....

  4. Sustaining visitor use in protected areas: Future opportunities in recreation ecology research based on the USA experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher A. Monz; David N. Cole; Yu-Fai Leung; Jeffrey L. Marion

    2009-01-01

    Recreation ecology, the study of environmental consequences of outdoor recreation activities and their effective management, is a relatively new field of scientific study having emerged over the last 50 years. During this time, numerous studies have improved our understanding of how use-related, environmental and managerial factors affect ecological...

  5. Provider-based Medicare risk contracting and subcontracting: opportunities and risks for provider sponsored organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, H A; Zenner, P A; Kipp, R A; Whitney, E L

    1997-01-01

    Provider sponsored organizations (PSOs) are increasingly acquiring the risk for the management of Medicare Risk patients by accepting capitation directly from the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) or through contracts with HMOs or other organizations contracting with HCFA. The Medicare population and the requirements that the federal administration has put into place with respect to risk contracting are unique and demand specific responses on the part of the PSO for a contract to be successful. The PSO is cautioned to understand the actuarial risk, the clinical uniqueness of the Medicare beneficiary, Medicare reimbursement regulatory requirements, utilization management needs, and necessary reporting before entering into a contractual arrangement. This article attempts to describe some of the more common issues a provider organization must consider.

  6. Sustaining visitor use in protected areas: future opportunities in recreation ecology research based on the USA experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monz, Christopher A; Cole, David N; Leung, Yu-Fai; Marion, Jeffrey L

    2010-03-01

    Recreation ecology, the study of environmental consequences of outdoor recreation activities and their effective management, is a relatively new field of scientific study having emerged over the last 50 years. During this time, numerous studies have improved our understanding of how use-related, environmental and managerial factors affect ecological conditions and processes. Most studies have focused on vegetation and soil responses to recreation-related trampling on trails and recreation sites using indicators such as percent vegetation cover and exposed mineral soil. This applied approach has and will continue to yield important information for land managers. However, for the field to advance, more attention needs to be given to other ecosystem attributes and to the larger aspects of environmental conservation occurring at landscape scales. This article is an effort at initiating a dialog on needed advances in the field. We begin by reviewing broadly generalizable knowledge of recreation ecology, to separate what is known from research gaps. Then, based on the authors' perspective of research in the USA and North America, several research directions are suggested as essential for continued progress in this field including theoretical development, broadening scale, integration with other disciplines, and examination of synergistic effects.

  7. Sustaining visitor use in protected areas: Future opportunities in recreation ecology research based on the USA experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monz, Christopher A.; Cole, David N.; Leung, Yu-Fai; Marion, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Recreation ecology, the study of environmental consequences of outdoor recreation activities and their effective management, is a relatively new field of scientific study having emerged over the last 50 years. During this time, numerous studies have improved our understanding of how use-related, environmental and managerial factors affect ecological conditions and processes. Most studies have focused on vegetation and soil responses to recreation-related trampling on trails and recreation sites using indicators such as percent vegetation cover and exposed mineral soil. This applied approach has and will continue to yield important information for land managers. However, for the field to advance, more attention needs to be given to other ecosystem attributes and to the larger aspects of environmental conservation occurring at landscape scales. This article is an effort at initiating a dialog on needed advances in the field. We begin by reviewing broadly generalizable knowledge of recreation ecology, to separate what is known from research gaps. Then, based on the authors’ perspective of research in the USA and North America, several research directions are suggested as essential for continued progress in this field including theoretical development, broadening scale, integration with other disciplines, and examination of synergistic effects.

  8. Sustaining Visitor Use in Protected Areas: Future Opportunities in Recreation Ecology Research Based on the USA Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monz, Christopher A.; Cole, David N.; Leung, Yu-Fai; Marion, Jeffrey L.

    2010-03-01

    Recreation ecology, the study of environmental consequences of outdoor recreation activities and their effective management, is a relatively new field of scientific study having emerged over the last 50 years. During this time, numerous studies have improved our understanding of how use-related, environmental and managerial factors affect ecological conditions and processes. Most studies have focused on vegetation and soil responses to recreation-related trampling on trails and recreation sites using indicators such as percent vegetation cover and exposed mineral soil. This applied approach has and will continue to yield important information for land managers. However, for the field to advance, more attention needs to be given to other ecosystem attributes and to the larger aspects of environmental conservation occurring at landscape scales. This article is an effort at initiating a dialog on needed advances in the field. We begin by reviewing broadly generalizable knowledge of recreation ecology, to separate what is known from research gaps. Then, based on the authors’ perspective of research in the USA and North America, several research directions are suggested as essential for continued progress in this field including theoretical development, broadening scale, integration with other disciplines, and examination of synergistic effects.

  9. Construction of Genetically Engineered Streptococcus gordonii Strains to Provide Control in QPCR Assays for Assessing Microbiological Quality in Recreational Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantitative PCR (QPCR) methods for beach monitoring by estimating abundance of Enterococcus spp. in recreational waters use internal, positive controls which address only the amplification of target DNA. In this study two internal, positive controls were developed to control for...

  10. Does Zoning Winter Recreationists Reduce Recreation Conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aubrey D; Vaske, Jerry J; Squires, John R; Olson, Lucretia E; Roberts, Elizabeth K

    2017-01-01

    Parks and protected area managers use zoning to decrease interpersonal conflict between recreationists. Zoning, or segregation, of recreation-often by non-motorized and motorized activity-is designed to limit physical interaction while providing recreation opportunities to both groups. This article investigated the effectiveness of zoning to reduce recreation conflict in the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area in Colorado, USA. Despite a zoning management system, established groomed travel routes were used by both non-motorized recreationists (backcountry skiers, snowboarders, snowshoers) and motorized recreationists (snowmobilers). We hypothesized that persistent recreation conflict reported by non-motorized recreationists was the result of recreation occurring in areas of mixed non-motorized and motorized use, mostly along groomed routes. We performed a geospatial analysis of recreation [from Global Positioning System (GPS) points, n = 1,233,449] in the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area to identify areas of mixed non-motorized and motorized use. We then surveyed non-motorized recreationists (n = 199) to test whether reported conflict is higher for respondents who traveled in areas of mixed-use, compared with respondents traveling outside areas of mixed-use. Results from the geospatial analysis showed that only 0.7 % of the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area contained recreation from both groups, however that area contained 14.8 % of all non-motorized recreation and 49.1 % of all motorized recreation. Survey analysis results showed higher interpersonal conflict for all five standard conflict variables among non-motorized respondents who traveled in areas of mixed-use, compared with those traveling outside mixed-use areas. Management implications and recommendations for increasing the effectiveness of zoning are provided.

  11. Sports and recreation for persons with limb deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, J B; Levy, C E; Bryant, P R; Prusakowski, P E

    2001-03-01

    Opportunities for persons with limb deficiency to participate in sport and recreational activities have increased dramatically over the past 20 years. Various factors have contributed to this phenomenon, including an increased public interest in sports and fitness as well as improvements in disability awareness. An even more essential element has been a consumer-driven demand for advances in prosthetic technology and design. Whether the activity is a music performance, a friendly round of golf, or a high-level track-and-field competition, the benefits of participation in sports and recreation are numerous both at the individual and at the societal level. This article provides an overview of the development and scope of sport and recreational opportunities available to persons with limb deficiency. In addition, specific prosthetic considerations for several common sport and recreational activities are presented in a case-discussion format. To review the development and scope of sport and recreational opportunities available to persons with limb deficiency.

  12. What Educational Opportunities Should Professionals in Aging Provide?: A Pilot Community Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dussen, Daniel J.; Leson, Suzanne M.

    2010-01-01

    With the aging workforce and the increase of older adults, educational needs of the workforce in aging services are broadening. The pilot study used a survey to examine the types of educational opportunities and needs of professionals providing services to older adults in eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania. Respondents (25.9%) reported learning…

  13. Does Zoning Winter Recreationists Reduce Recreation Conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aubrey D.; Vaske, Jerry J.; Squires, John R.; Olson, Lucretia E.; Roberts, Elizabeth K.

    2017-01-01

    Parks and protected area managers use zoning to decrease interpersonal conflict between recreationists. Zoning, or segregation, of recreation—often by non-motorized and motorized activity—is designed to limit physical interaction while providing recreation opportunities to both groups. This article investigated the effectiveness of zoning to reduce recreation conflict in the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area in Colorado, USA. Despite a zoning management system, established groomed travel routes were used by both non-motorized recreationists (backcountry skiers, snowboarders, snowshoers) and motorized recreationists (snowmobilers). We hypothesized that persistent recreation conflict reported by non-motorized recreationists was the result of recreation occurring in areas of mixed non-motorized and motorized use, mostly along groomed routes. We performed a geospatial analysis of recreation [from Global Positioning System (GPS) points, n = 1,233,449] in the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area to identify areas of mixed non-motorized and motorized use. We then surveyed non-motorized recreationists ( n = 199) to test whether reported conflict is higher for respondents who traveled in areas of mixed-use, compared with respondents traveling outside areas of mixed-use. Results from the geospatial analysis showed that only 0.7 % of the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area contained recreation from both groups, however that area contained 14.8 % of all non-motorized recreation and 49.1 % of all motorized recreation. Survey analysis results showed higher interpersonal conflict for all five standard conflict variables among non-motorized respondents who traveled in areas of mixed-use, compared with those traveling outside mixed-use areas. Management implications and recommendations for increasing the effectiveness of zoning are provided.

  14. OPPORTUNITIES OF GUIDED TOURS IN PAZARDZHIK: ISLAND-PARK "FREEDOM"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodora Dudova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Аn emblematic place is presented for the town of Pazardzhik and the region, providing opportunities for art, culture, sports, recreation and entertainment, but also opportunities for guided tours. The combination of the rich history of the town and the place for recreation and tourism has the potential for development of the region in tourism and entertainment.

  15. American Therapeutic Recreation Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) Research Grant Opportunities Publications MDS 3.0 Tools International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - World Health Organization (ICF/WHO) Marketing Links RecreationalTherapynet New Publications & Items Promotional Items Publications ...

  16. Primary 4T1 tumor resection provides critical "window of opportunity" for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghochikyan, Anahit; Davtyan, Arpine; Hovakimyan, Armine; Davtyan, Hayk; Poghosyan, Anna; Bagaev, Alexander; Ataullakhanov, Ravshan I; Nelson, Edward L; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2014-02-01

    It is believed that primary tumor resection modulates host-tumor immune interaction, but this has not been characterized in a stringent breast cancer tumor model. This report, using the 4T1 murine mammary tumor model, characterizes for the first time the dynamic longitudinal changes in immunosuppressive and effector components of the immune system after resection of an established orthotopic primary tumor with a defined natural history of developing lung metastases. More specifically, we analyzed changes of absolute numbers and frequencies of MDSC, regulatory T cells (Treg), as well as activated CD4 and CD8 positive T cells in spleens and, in some studies, lungs of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice and mice after primary tumor resection. Importantly, using mathematical analyses we established that primary resection of an orthotopic tumor had created a "window of opportunity" with decreased tumor-associated immune suppression that existed for approximately 10 days. Although tumor resection did slightly prolong survival, it did not affect the ultimate development of metastatic disease since animals with resected tumors or intact primary tumors eventually died by day 47 and 43, respectively. This window of opportunity likely occurs in humans providing a rationale and parameters for integration and testing of immunotherapeutic strategies in this critical "window of opportunity" to combat the development of metastatic disease.

  17. Opportunities and Challenges for Water and Wastewater Industries to Provide Exchangeable Services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparn, Bethany [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hunsberger, Randolph [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-11-13

    Water and wastewater treatment plants and distribution systems use significant amounts of energy, around 2 - 4% of the total electricity used in the US, and their energy use is projected to increase as populations increase and regulations become more stringent. Water and wastewater systems have largely been disconnected from the electric utilities' efforts to improve energy efficiency and provide energy efficiency and provide grid services, likely because their core mission is to provide clean water and treated wastewater. Energy efficiency has slowly crept into the water and wastewater industry as the economic benefit has become more apparent, but there is still potential for significant improvement. Some of the larger, more progressive water utilities are starting to consider providing grid services; however, it remains a foreign concept to many. This report explores intrinsic mechanisms by which the water and wastewater industries can provide exchangeable services, the benefit to the parties involved, and the barriers to implementation. It also highlights relevant case studies and next steps. Although opportunities for increasing process efficiencies are certainly available, this report focuses on the exchangeable services that water and wastewater loads can provide to help maintain grid reliability, keep overall costs down, and increase the penetration of distributed renewables on the electric grid. These services have potential to provide water utilities additional value streams, using existing equipment with modest or negligible upgrade cost.

  18. Out on the Playing Field: Providing Quality Physical Education and Recreational Opportunities for Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher S.; Oswalt, Sara B.; Wyatt, Tammy J.; Peterson, Fred L.

    2010-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth may be at a higher risk for depression, suicide, and negative risk-taking (Bontempo & D'Augelli, 2002; DuRant, Krowchuk, & Senal, 1998; Garofalo, Wolf, Kessel, Palfrey, & DuRant, 1998; Hershberger & D'Augelli, 1995; Moon et al., 2000; Rosario, Hunter, & Gwadz, 1997; Rotherum-Borus,…

  19. Improving Science and IT Literacy by Providing Urban-Based Environmental Science Research Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, K. E.; Corazza, L.; Liang, J.

    2007-12-01

    A U.C. Berkeley-based outreach program known as Environmental Science Information Technology Activities has been in operation over the past four years. The primary aim of the program is to provide opportunities for grades 9 and 10 students in diverse East San Francisco Bay Area communities to develop deeper understandings of the nature and conduct of science, which will increase their capacity to enroll and perform successfully in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses in the future. Design of the program has been informed by recent research that indicates a close relationship between educational activities that promote the perception of STEM as being relevant and the ability to foster development of deeper conceptual understandings among teens. Accordingly, ESITA includes an important student-led environmental science research project component, which provides participants with opportunities to engage in research investigations that are directly linked to relevant, real-world environmental problems and issues facing their communities. Analysis of evidence gleaned from questionnaires, interviews with participants and specific assessment/evaluation instruments indicates that ESITA program activities, including after-school meetings, summer and school year research projects, and conference preparations and presentations has provided students with high-quality inquiry science experiences that increased their knowledge of STEM and IT concepts, as well as their understanding of the nature of the scientific enterprise. In addition, the program has achieved a high degree of success in that it has: enhanced participants' intellectual self-confidence with regard to STEM; developed deeper appreciation of how scientific research can contribute to the maintenance of healthy local environments; developed a greater interest in participating in STEM-related courses of study and after school programs; and improved attitudes toward STEM. Overall

  20. Maine 4-H Afterschool Academy--A Professional Development Opportunity for Out-of-School-Time Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobley, Jennifer; Ouellette, Kristy L.

    2013-01-01

    The Maine 4-H Afterschool Academy trained 369 after-school and out of school time providers in 2011. This easy-to-adapt professional development opportunity used blended learning, a combination of in-person and Web-based opportunities. Providers successfully learned concepts and practical knowledge regarding 4-H, specifically 4-H Science. In…

  1. The Respite and Recreation: An Innovative Recreation Service to Adopted Children with Special Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heewon Yang

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Often, youth in the foster care system have traumatic experiences associated with abuse and separation from their biological family. These experiences may lead to emotional, psychological, and behavioral problems that challenge the new adoptive family dynamic. This article introduces the Respite and Recreation (R & R program in a Midwestern area. R & R combines faculty, staff, and graduate students from a local University, local community resources, and staff from a local adoption agency to provide recreation, respite, and professional support services for children with special needs and their adoptive parents. The R & R program provides the adopted children with structured recreation programs for their growth, the parents with a break from stress, and volunteer students with opportunities to incorporate their academic learning into real life situations. Service learning programs such as the R & R also provide university faculty with excellent opportunities to conduct action research.

  2. Re-creating Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the importance of the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board guidelines for recreational and sports areas and their ancillary spaces. Examples of how the guidelines affect specific areas are highlighted, such as team seating areas, fitness centers, tennis courts, swimming pools, and locker rooms. (GR)

  3. Fragmentation of maternal, child and HIV services: A missed opportunity to provide comprehensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyn J. Haskins

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In South Africa, coverage of services for mothers and babies in the first year of life is suboptimal despite high immunisation coverage over the same time period. Integration of services could improve accessibility of services, uptake of interventions and retention in care.Aim: This study describes provision of services for mothers and babies aged under 1 year.Setting: Primary healthcare clinics in one rural district in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.Methods: All healthcare workers on duty and mothers exiting the clinic after attending well-child services were interviewed. Clinics were mapped to show the route through the clinic taken by mother–baby pairs receiving well-child services, where these services were provided and by whom.Results: Twelve clinics were visited; 116 health workers and 211 mothers were interviewed. Most clinics did not provide comprehensive services for mothers and children. Challenges of structural layout and deployment of equipment led to fragmented services provided by several different health workers in different rooms. Well-child services were frequently provided in public areas of the clinic or with other mothers present. In some clinics mothers and babies did not routinely see a professional nurse. In all clinics HIV-positive mothers followed a different route. Enrolled nurses led the provision of well-child services but did not have skills and training to provide comprehensive care.Conclusions: Fragmentation of clinic services created barriers in accessing a comprehensive package of care resulting in missed opportunities to provide services. Greater integration of services alongside immunisation services is needed.

  4. Striving to provide opportunities for farm worker community participation in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, J L; Keifer, M C; Salazar, M K

    2008-04-01

    Hispanic farm workers and their families in the U.S. face a number of environmental and occupational health risks, yet they are rarely given the opportunity to choose the focus of the research and interventions that take place in their communities. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) can be one effective approach to changing this situation. CBPR is an approach to research that makes community members partners in research rather than subjects of research. This article describes the experience of El Proyecto Bienestar (The Well-Being Project), a CBPR project in the Yakima Valley, Washington, with the aim of facilitating the Hispanic community's involvement in the identification and prioritization of occupational and environmental health issues among farm workers. The project utilized three forms of data collection (key informant interviews, community surveys, and a town hall meeting) to create a list of environmental and occupational health issues of concern. Investigators strove to provide opportunities for community participation in the various stages of research: study concept and design, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, conclusions, and dissemination of results. This article describes the involvement that community members had at each stage of the three forms of data collection and outlines the basic findings that led the Community Advisory Board to prioritize four areas for future work. In addition, it describes the challenges the project faced from the researcher perspective. Using examples from this experience, we conclude that this model may be an effective way for farm workers and their families to have a voice in prioritizing health and safety issues for research and action in their communities.

  5. 76 FR 38307 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Recreational Management Measures for the Summer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ... to enable greater commercial and recreational harvest opportunities while preventing overfishing on the scup stock. Recreational management measures are similarly intended to ensure that overfishing the... the overfishing level (OFL) and any other scientific uncertainty and, as such, is designed to provide...

  6. Opportunities of E-Service Providing Intermediaries in Transactions of Business Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalė Dzemydienė

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research: to analyze the transaction methods and tools through a virtual intermediary providing electronic services and functions based on virtual agent generated added value to small and medium-sized business enterprises (SMB based on transaction cost theory. Used methodology: through a complex and multi-faceted relationship analysis examining the virtual intermediary services to small and medium-sized enterprises, evaluating their performance, highlighting the added component of the value chain and benefits. The research methodology is based on the scientific literature, generalization and comparative analysis. The practical significance: the activities of business enterprises (corporations, organizations are profitable, if usage of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT is effective. ICT is becoming increasingly important in reducing business operating costs. E-services used in business transactions acquire special significance. European Union (EU in the inner space in more than 20 million of SMEs and their work areas include more than 170 activities. Both internal and external competition encourages SME operators to increase operational efficiency. The article analyzes the cost-cutting options related to services provided by virtual intermediaries and has practical significance in the national and international companies. Originality/value: looking at cost reduction opportunities through a virtual agent functionality and value-added SME operator justification.

  7. Challenges and Opportunities to Engaging Emergency Medical Service Providers in Substance Use Research: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragh-Bass, Allysha C; Fields, Julie C; McWilliams, Junette; Knowlton, Amy R

    2017-04-01

    knowledge of substance abuse treatment modalities, and fearing negative repercussions from supervisors and/or patients. Despite reservations, several EMS providers expressed inclination to deliver brief motivational messages to encourage substance-using patients to consider treatment, given adequate training and skill-building. Emergency Medical Service providers may have many demands, including difficult case time/resource limitations. Even so, participants recognized their unique position as first responders to deliver motivational, harm-reduction messages to substance-using patients during transport. With incentivized training, implementing this program could be life- and cost-saving, improving emergency and behavioral health services. Findings will inform future efforts to connect substance users with drug treatment, potentially reducing EMS over-use in Baltimore. Maragh-Bass AC , Fields JC , McWilliams J , Knowlton AR . Challenges and opportunities to engaging Emergency Medical Service providers in substance use research: a qualitative study. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(2):148-155.

  8. Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models.

  9. Recreational Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State & Area Data Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for recreational therapists. Similar Occupations Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of recreational therapists with ...

  10. Introducing a method for mapping recreational experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Dempsey, Nicola; Burton, Mel

    2013-01-01

    The provision of recreational opportunities forms an important and long-standing urban planning and management objective. However, considering a range of experiences encountered when in such spaces currently does not form part of existing open space assessment tools in the UK. In this paper, ‘rec......-mapping’, an innovative method of analysing and mapping positive recreational experiences in urban green spaces is explored and piloted within the UK planning context. Originating in the Nordic countries, this on-site method can provide urban planners and designers with data about the extent to which specific green...... spaces provide and support a range of recreational experiences. The exploration reported here is based on a short review of the methods background and an application in two test sites in Sheffield, South Yorkshire in early summer 2010. This paper critically appraises the application of rec...

  11. Does hospital admission provide an opportunity for improving pharmacotherapy among elderly inpatients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Oliveira de Melo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The purpose of the work was to assess the incidence of potential drug interactions (pDDI, major pDDI, and the use of potentially inappropriate medication (PIM at hospital admission, during hospitalization, and at discharge to evaluate whether hospital admission provides an opportunity for improving pharmacotherapy in elderly patients at a University hospital that has a clinical pharmacist. A prospective cohort study was carried out using data from the medical records of patients admitted to an internal medicine ward. All admissions and prescriptions were monitored between March and August 2006. Micromedex(r DrugReax(r and Beers Criteria 2015 were used to identify pDDI, major pDDI, and PIMs, respectively. A comparison of admission and discharge prescriptions showed the following: an increase in the proportion of patients using antithrombotic agents (76 versus 144; p<0.001, lipid modifying agents (58 versus 81; p=0.024, drugs for acid-related disorders (99 versus 152; p<0.001, and particularly omeprazole (61 versus 87; p=0.015; a decrease in the number of patients prescribed psycholeptics (73 versus 32; p<0.001 and diazepam (54 versus 13; p<0.001; and a decrease in the proportion of patients exposed to polypharmacy (16.1% versus 10.1%; p=0.025, at least one pDDI (44.5% versus 32.8%; p=0.002, major pDDI (19.9% versus 12.2%; p=0.010 or PIM (85.8% versus 51.9%; p<0.001. The conclusion is that admission to a hospital ward that has a clinical pharmacist was associated with a reduction in the number of patients exposed to polypharmacy, pDDI, major pDDI, and the use of PIMs among elderly inpatients.

  12. International Observe the Moon Night: Providing Opportunities for the Public to Engage in Lunar Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, B. C.; Bleacher, L.; Day, B. H.; Daou, D.; Jones, A. P.; Mitchell, B.; Shaner, A. J.; Shipp, S. S.

    2010-12-01

    International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) is designed to engage lunar science and education communities, our partner networks, amateur astronomers, space enthusiasts, and the general public in annual lunar observation campaigns that share the excitement of lunar science and exploration. InOMN enables the public to maintain its curiosity about the Moon and gain a better understanding of the Moon's formation, its evolution, and its place in the sky. For 2010, members of the public were encouraged to host their own InOMN events. InOMN hosts such as astronomy clubs, museums, schools, or other groups could find helpful resources and share information about InOMN events they organized on the InOMN website (http://observethemoonnight.org). Images, feedback, and lessons learned from the 2010 InOMN event will be shared in order to encourage increased planning and hosting of InOMN events in 2011. From various interpretations of the lunar “face,” early pictograms of the Moon’s phases, or to the use of the lunar cycle for festivals or harvests, the Moon has an undeniable influence on human civilization. We have chosen the 2011 InOMN theme to provide an opportunity for individuals to share their personal or cultural connections to the Moon. For 2011, the InOMN website will include a ‘lunar bulletin board’ where InOMN participants can post pictures and share stories of what the Moon means to them. The 2011 InOMN contest will encourage people to submit their works of art, poems, short stories, or music about the Moon all centered around the theme “What does the Moon mean to you?” As with the winners of previous contests, winning entries will be incorporated into the following year’s InOMN advertisements and events.

  13. Windows to the Future: Can the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals Provide Opportunities for Nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, David C; Ferguson, Stephanie L

    2016-01-01

    Windows of opportunity are wide open for the nursing profession to actively participate and engage in the policy implementation, evaluation, and achievement of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Nurses bring valuable perspectives as members of diverse governance structures and offer a range of solutions that can help governments pursue and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and targets by 2030.

  14. Federal Outdoor Recreation Programs and Recreation-Related Environmental Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This is the first revision of "Federal Outdoor Recreation Programs," updating information first provided in May, 1968, by the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation in cooperation with other Federal agencies. Programs described in this publication broadly reflect the scope of Federal involvement in outdoor recreation and related environmental efforts. The…

  15. Improving Attitudes Toward STEM By Providing Urban-Based Environmental Science Research Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, K. E.; Molinaro, M.

    2005-12-01

    Over the past decade, numerous calls have been made for the need to increase the participation of the nation's underrepresented population in science, technology, engineering, and technology (STEM) fields of endeavor. A key element in improving the less than impressive conditions that now exist with regard to this issue, is the development of effective approaches that result in positive changes in young people's attitudes toward education in general, and STEM subject matter in particular during the early stages of their intellectual development. The Environmental Science Information Technology Activities (ESITA) program provides opportunities for under-represented grades 9 - 10 students in the East San Francisco Bay Area to learn about and apply key STEM concepts and related skills. Consisting of two-year-long after school programs at community center and school-based sites, as well as a Summer Research Institute, the ESITA program engages participants in a combination of STEM content learning activities and environmental science research projects that address issues relevant to their communities. Design of the ESITA program has been informed by: 1) pilot-study data that indicated key elements necessary for ensuring high levels of participant enthusiasm and interest; 2) a conceptual framework for development of instructional materials grounded in recent research about student learning of STEM content; and 3) research about effective after school programs that present academic content. Throughout the program's two-year existence, ESITA students have participated in the following projects: investigations of the distribution of elevated lead levels in drinking water samples from Washington, D.C.; air and water quality studies in and around a popular lake situated within the nation's oldest wildlife refuge, located in downtown Oakland, California; and studies of the relationship between airborne particulate matter concentrations in Richmond, California, and activity at

  16. Divine service, music, sport, and recreation as medicinal in Australian asylums 1860s-1945.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Dolly

    2009-01-01

    Australian asylum records (circa 1860 to circa 1945) demonstrate that medical staff went to great lengths to provide recreation to suitable patients. This article examines how the demarcation of Australian institutional spaces along gender divisions was also mirrored by the gender-specific recreational activities provided in purpose-built facilities. Using Australian examples I demonstrate how the main forms of recreation-that is divine service, music and dance, and sport-were justified to governments on medical grounds. Some designated recreational spaces even offered select female and male patients the opportunity to mix under medical supervision. Recreation was therapeutic because of its psychological, physical, social, and moral benefits, and government authorities funded the construction of costly chapels, recreation halls, and sports grounds expressly for this medical purpose.

  17. Spatial analysis and facility characteristics of outdoor recreational areas in Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Fatih; Demirci, Ali

    2010-05-01

    This article reports the results of a study that explored whether outdoor recreational areas are sufficient in Istanbul in terms of their surface area and facility characteristics. All the municipalities in 32 subprovinces of Istanbul were sent a survey in 2007 and asked to prepare a list of their outdoor recreational areas including their names, addresses, size, and facilities. All the data collected from the municipalities were used to create a GIS-based inventory by using GIS and remote sensing. As the study revealed, the outdoor recreational areas in Istanbul are far behind meeting the recreational needs of the residents in terms of area per person and facility characteristics. There are 2,470 areas which were dedicated to outdoor recreational activities in Istanbul. Total surface area of all these outdoor recreational areas is 19,2 sq kilometers; this means 1.52 m(2) recreational area per person in the city. This value is very low when compared to that of many cities in Europe and USA. As the study also revealed, the majority of outdoor recreational areas in Istanbul are poor in facility. Majority of the existing outdoor recreational areas are small and do not provide the public with many opportunities to engage in different outdoor activities. A more sustainable and efficient recreational plan is needed in Istanbul to meet the various recreational needs of its residents.

  18. PROVIDING AGRICULTURAL RISKS IN THE REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA: TRENDS, PROBLEMS AND OPPORTUNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia CAPRIAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the author presents results of scientific researches on the problems which farmers of the Republic of Moldova are facing in the field of risk management and insurance. In conclusion, the author formulates recommendations on farm managers’ opportunities to benefit from subsidized insurance, but also some recommendations resulting from the research of the experience of other countries from the European Union aimed to ensure the entrepreneurial risks in agricultural entities.

  19. 28 CFR 551.115 - Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation. 551.115 Section 551.115... Pretrial Inmates § 551.115 Recreation. (a) When consistent with institution security and good order... opportunities: (1) One hour daily of outside recreation, weather permitting; or (2) Two hours daily of indoor...

  20. A Youth Perspective on Outdoor Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardin, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Arizona Outdoor Recreation Coordinating Commission and Arizona State Parks Board conducted a survey of students in grades 4-12 to gather information on their recreation needs and desires. Results provided recreation planners and providers with a profile of the young outdoor recreation customer to help them develop the most appropriate…

  1. Impact of mild to severe hemophilia on engagement in recreational activities by US men, women, and children with hemophilia B: The Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities into Solutions (B-HERO-S) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Kimberly; Hernandez, Grace; Witkop, Michelle; Peltier, Skye; Dunn, Spencer; Cutter, Susan; Frick, Neil; Haugstad, Kimberly; Guelcher, Christine; Frey, Mary Jane; Rotellini, Dawn; Clark, David B; Iyer, Neeraj N; Cooper, David L

    2017-04-01

    The psychosocial impact of hemophilia on activities was recently investigated in the Hemophilia Experiences, Results and Opportunities (HERO) study (675 people with hemophilia and 561 caregivers of children with hemophilia in 10 countries). The impact of hemophilia B may not be accurately reflected in the HERO results, as ~75% of respondents described issues affecting males with hemophilia A. To address the needs of this population, the Bridging Hemophilia B Experiences, Results and Opportunities Into Solutions (B-HERO-S) was developed as a pilot study in the United States in collaboration with the hemophilia community. The analysis reported here assessed engagement in recreational activities and changes to treatment regimens around activities as reported by 299 adults with hemophilia B and 150 caregivers of children with hemophilia B. Nearly all adults with hemophilia B (98%) experienced a negative impact on their participation in recreational activities due to hemophilia-related issues, and most caregivers (90%) reported that hemophilia B had a negative impact on their child's engagement in recreational activities. One of the main reasons identified for discontinuing past activities was the risk of bruising or bleeding (adults/children with hemophilia B, 49%/41%). In particular, adults with hemophilia B reported a history of activity-related bleeding, and most adults decreased their participation in high-risk activities as they aged. Substantial percentages of adults and children with hemophilia B (including mild/moderate severity) altered their treatment regimens to accommodate planned activities. These findings may help inform guidelines for individualizing treatment regimens around participation in recreational activities based on hemophilia severity, baseline factor level, and activity risk and intensity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Harmonizing outdoor recreation and bird conservation targets in protected areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, Rogier; Sierdsema, Henk; Foppen, Ruud P.B.; Henkens, René J.H.G.; Opdam, Paul F.M.; Eupen, van Michiel

    2017-01-01

    In protected areas managers have to achieve conservation targets while providing opportunities for outdoor recreation. This dual mandate causes conflicts in choosing between management options. Furthermore, the persistence of a protected species within the management unit often depends on how

  3. The recreational value of coral reefs: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brander, L.M.; van Beukering, P.J.H.; Cesar, H.S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Coral reefs are highly productive ecosystems that provide a variety of valuable goods and services, including recreational opportunities. The open-access nature and public good characteristics of coral reefs often result in them being undervalued in decision making related to their use and

  4. Providing a setup and opportunities for better training of postdoctoral research fellows in an academic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghayur Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of young researchers come from different parts of the world every year to take up postdoctoral (postdoc research fellowship positions in the developed countries. In the US alone, there were 48,601 postdocs in the year 2005 working in different labs in the fields of science, health and engineering. Many pursue this option for lack of other alternatives. Expectedly, these individuals face a lot of difficulties in making this transition from being a student to becoming an employee of an institution. Many institutions are prepared to make this transition and period of stay easy for their fellows while others are not equipped at all. The presence of a postdoc office (established by an institution or an association (formed by the fellows can be of immense help to postdocs. Additionally, the availability of institutional professional development and leadership programs can also help to nurture and polish postdoc fellows into future faculty members and valuable members of the community at large. To name a few, these professional development programs can focus on communication and presentation skills, medical education, teaching and learning, bioethics and mentorship. There is an urgent need to address some or all of these issues so that better training environment and opportunities are available to this group of postdoc fellows.

  5. ‘God is my forest’ – Xhosa cultural values provide untapped opportunities for conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susi Vetter

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa conservation is still largely framed in terms of Western scientific values, with a focus on material benefits to local communities, whilst little is known about the intangible values local people attach to nature and biodiversity. We explored the cultural, spiritual and emotional relationships with nature expressed by Xhosa people, within the Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany Hotspot, as well as the activities that mediate this relationship. A descriptive research approach was applied to document the emotions, meanings and values associated with landscape elements. This approach included group and individual interviews and ‘walk-in-the-woods’ interviews and participatory mapping exercises. Respondents portrayed a strong, although not always easily articulated, appreciation for nature, especially ihlathi lesiXhosa (‘Xhosa forest’, vegetation types within the Thicket Biome. Activities such as collecting fuelwood and other resources, hunting and time spent at initiation schools were described as key opportunities for spending time in nature. The benefits of being in nature were ascribed not only to the physical experience of the forest environment and its biota, but also to the presence of ancestral spirits. Being in nature thus contributes significantly to the physical, mental and spiritual well-being of local people, and is also integral to their sense of cultural identity. This study has made it clear that maintenance of biodiversity and natural vegetation is as much in the interest of the local community’s well-being as it is in the interest of conservation planners. We recommend that cultural values be incorporated into local conservation plans.

  6. Characterization and communicative analysis of wildlife managers and recreational users of Virginiaâ s Wildlife Management Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Carrozzino-Lyon, Amy L

    2012-01-01

    The Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF) manages wildlife management areas (WMAs) to provide wildlife habitat and hunting and fishing opportunities, along with opportunities for compatible wildlife-related recreation. Despite having responsibility for managing 39 WMAs, comprising more than 200,000 acres, VDGIF had only anecdotal information about who recreated on Virginiaâ s WMAs, to what extent, and how they felt about management of the WMAs. My goals were to (1) deter...

  7. Practicing provider-initiated HIV testing in high prevalence settings: consent concerns and missed preventive opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Shayo Elizabeth H; Blystad Astrid; Njeru Mercy K; Nyamongo Isaac K; Fylkesnes Knut

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Counselling is considered a prerequisite for the proper handling of testing and for ensuring effective HIV preventive efforts. HIV testing services have recently been scaled up substantially with a particular focus on provider-initiated models. Increasing HIV test rates have been attributed to the rapid scale-up of the provider-initiated testing model, but there is limited documentation of experiences with this new service model. The aim of this study was to determine the ...

  8. Environmental analysis and monitoring for recreational farms in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Chuan; Lin, Chun-Nan; Wongchai, Anupong

    2017-11-01

    The rapid growth of recreational farms and leisure industry has fiercely faced competitive in a Taiwan’s market to achieve business development sustainability trends. Effective business development strategy has become a key of the business performance management to help develop and implement growth opportunities. Recreational farms have functional products, culture, and natural resources as essential elements for the business development of local cuisine. The purpose of this study is, based on the SWOT analysis, to understand the current situation of catering business in recreational farms in Taiwan and to analyze the trends in development to discover how to operate local food restaurant business in recreational farms successfully and create long-term value for a business from customers, markets, and related parties. This research collected a total of 300 questionnaires from recreational farm tourists and excellent recreational farm entrepreneurs, as well as on-site staffs in an outstanding recreational farm. The results of this study provided a reference and guidelines of trends in development for the entrepreneurs to create a modern niche market.

  9. Integrating Primary Care Providers in the Care of Cancer Survivors: Gaps in Evidence and Future Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; O’Malley, Denalee M.; Hudson, Shawna V.

    2017-01-01

    For over a decade since the release of the Institute of Medicine report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition, there has been a focus on providing coordinated, comprehensive care for cancer survivors that emphasized the role of primary care. Several models of care have been described which primarily focused on primary care providers (PCPs) as receivers of cancer survivors and specific types of information (e.g. survivorship care plans) from oncology based care, and not as active members of the cancer survivorship team. In this paper, we reviewed survivorship models that have been described in the literature, and specifically focused on strategies aiming to integrate primary care providers in caring for cancer survivors across different settings. We offer insights differentiating primary care providers’ level of expertise in cancer survivorship and how such expertise may be utilized. We provide recommendations for education, clinical practice, research and policy initiatives that may advance the integration of primary care providers in the care of cancer survivors in diverse clinical settings. PMID:28049575

  10. Making non-discrimination and equal opportunity a reality in Kenya's health provider education system: results of a gender analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Constance; Kimeu, Anastasiah; Shamblin, Leigh; Penders, Christopher; McQuide, Pamela A; Bwonya, Judith

    2011-01-01

    IntraHealth International's USAID-funded Capacity Kenya project conducted a performance needs assessment of the Kenya health provider education system in 2010. Various stakeholders shared their understandings of the role played by gender and identified opportunities to improve gender equality in health provider education. Findings suggest that occupational segregation, sexual harassment and discrimination based on pregnancy and family responsibilities present problems, especially for female students and faculty. To grow and sustain its workforce over the long term, Kenyan human resource leaders and managers must act to eliminate gender-based obstacles by implementing existing non-discrimination and equal opportunity policies and laws to increase the entry, retention and productivity of students and faculty. Families and communities must support girls' schooling and defer early marriage. All this will result in a fuller pool of students, faculty and matriculated health workers and, ultimately, a more robust health workforce to meet Kenya's health challenges.

  11. Human disturbance provides foraging opportunities for birds in primary subalpine forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DuBay, Shane G.; Hart Reeve, Andrew; Wu, Yongjie

    2017-01-01

    to species that naturally occur in edge, open, or disturbed habitats. With observations and experiments we provide evidence of insectivorous birds exploiting human disturbance in primary subalpine forest in the mountains of southern China, displaying behavioral flexibility to gain novel foraging...

  12. An Enterprise System and a Business Simulation Provide Many Opportunities for Interdisciplinary Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreie, Jennifer; Shannon, James; Mora-Monge, Carlo A.

    2011-01-01

    Enterprise systems provide companies with centralized data management, business process support and integrated data flow between functional areas. Thanks to academic alliances offered by companies such as SAP, Oracle, Microsoft and others, universities can also take advantage of the integrated features of enterprise system to give business…

  13. Science in Sync: Integrating Science with Literacy Provides Rewarding Learning Opportunities in Both Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Carolyn S.; Coffey, Debra

    2016-01-01

    The "Next Generation Science Standards'" ("NGSS") eight scientific and engineering practices invite teachers to develop key investigative skills while addressing important disciplinary science ideas (NGSS Lead States 2013). The "NGSS" can also provide direct links to "Common Core English Language Arts…

  14. Access to high-volume surgeons and the opportunity cost of performing radical prostatectomy by low-volume providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzi, Afsaneh; Klein, Eric A; Daneshmand, Siamak; Gill, Inderbir; Quinn, David I; Sadeghi, Sarmad

    2017-07-01

    Evidence suggests that redirecting surgeries to high-volume providers may be associated with better outcomes and significant societal savings. Whether such referrals are feasible remains unanswered. Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data, SEER 18, and US Incidence data were used to determine the geographic distribution and radical prostatectomy volume for providers. Access was defined as availability of a high-volume provider within driving distance of 100 miles. The opportunity cost was defined as the value of benefits achievable by performing the surgery by a high-volume provider that was forgone by not making a referral. The savings per referral were derived from a published Markov model for radical prostatectomy. A total of 14% of providers performed>27% of the radical prostatectomies with>30 cases per year and were designated high-volume providers. Providers with below-median volume (≤16 prostatectomies per year) performed>32% of radical prostatectomies. At least 47% of these were within a 100-mile driving distance (median = 22 miles), and therefore had access to a high-volume provider (>30 prostatectomies per year). This translated into a discounted savings of more than $24 million per year, representing the opportunity cost of not making a referral. The average volume for high- and low-volume providers was 55 and 13, respectively, resulting in an annual experience gap of 43 and a cumulative gap of 125 surgeries over 3 years. In 2014, the number of surgeons performing radical prostatectomy decreased by 5% while the number of high- and low-volume providers decreased by 25% and 11% showing a faster decline in the number of high-volume providers compared with low-volume surgeons. About half of prostatectomies performed by surgeons with below-median annual volume were within a 100-mile driving distance (median of 22 miles) of a high-volume surgeon. Such a referral may result in minimal additional costs and substantially improved outcomes. Copyright

  15. The Hellenic Open University: providing opportunities for personal and professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Koziori

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines and discusses the position of the Hellenic Open University (HOU as the main provider of higher adult education via Open and Distance Education (ODE in Greece, and the role it plays both locally and internationally. It also attempts a clear, albeit brief, presentation of the structure and organisation of the MEd course for English as a Foreign Language (EFL teachers provided by the HOU, which along with a postgraduate course in ODE, were the first courses offered by the HOU in 1998 when it admitted its first students. Such presentation is followed by a discussion of the true training and developmental nature of the course based on the elements constituting O’Brien’s EROTI model. Finally, suggestions are made with regard to the improvement of the postgraduate course under examination so as the effects thereof are granted permanence status and, therefore, being really beneficial for its participants, who then will not only be able to constantly pursue their personal and professional development through a reflective approach to teacher education, but also integrate more learner-centred techniques in their daily practice for the benefit of their students.

  16. LOANS PROVIDED BY CHINESE GOVERNMENT: OPPORTUNITIES AND RISKS FOR THE REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina SOLOVIOVA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As external development partners have put on hold their financial support for Moldova, contracting loans from China sparks an increasing interest. Because debates on this topic take place with very little information available, in this article we have made a synthesis of official data disseminated by the Chinese authorities, estimations made by the OECD and other organizations, records from the archive of the National Bank of Moldova, documents from the state register of legal acts, as well as of data published by the press. The results show that, although loans provided by the Chinese government are not an alternative to the loans offered by the IMF and other traditional creditors for budget and balance of payments support, they have a range of peculiar advantages and can be a convenient means of financing projects in the area of energy, industry, and agriculture.

  17. Challenges, health implications, and advocacy opportunities for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender global health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Jason M

    2017-01-01

    In this commentary, I reflect on challenges with conducting global health research internationally as a lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) person, grapple with decisions related to coming out in regions with anti-LGBT laws, and outline the risks and benefits of different advocacy options related to the promotion of LGBT health globally. Despite significant advances in LGBT rights in many countries, homosexuality remains illegal in many others. Using a critical medical anthropology framework, I argue that anti-LGBT laws constitute structural violence and have many detrimental consequences including discrimination and violence; poorer mental and physical health outcomes; and risky sexual behaviors. As a global health provider, there are many options for the promotion of LGBT health worldwide.

  18. Vitamin Variation in Capsicum Spp. Provides Opportunities to Improve Nutritional Value of Human Diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantar, Michael B; Anderson, Justin E; Lucht, Sarah A; Mercer, Kristin; Bernau, Vivian; Case, Kyle A; Le, Nina C; Frederiksen, Matthew K; DeKeyser, Haley C; Wong, Zen-Zi; Hastings, Jennifer C; Baumler, David J

    2016-01-01

    Chile peppers, native to the Americas, have spread around the world and have been integrated into the diets of many cultures. Much like their heat content, nutritional content can vary dramatically between different pepper types. In this study, a diverse set of chile pepper types were examined for nutrient content. Some pepper types were found to have high levels of vitamin A, vitamin C, or folate. Correlations between nutrient content, species, cultivation status, or geographic region were limited. Varietal selection or plant breeding offer tools to augment nutrient content in peppers. Integration of nutrient rich pepper types into diets that already include peppers could help combat nutrient deficiencies by providing a significant portion of recommended daily nutrients.

  19. Vitamin Variation in Capsicum Spp. Provides Opportunities to Improve Nutritional Value of Human Diets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Kantar

    Full Text Available Chile peppers, native to the Americas, have spread around the world and have been integrated into the diets of many cultures. Much like their heat content, nutritional content can vary dramatically between different pepper types. In this study, a diverse set of chile pepper types were examined for nutrient content. Some pepper types were found to have high levels of vitamin A, vitamin C, or folate. Correlations between nutrient content, species, cultivation status, or geographic region were limited. Varietal selection or plant breeding offer tools to augment nutrient content in peppers. Integration of nutrient rich pepper types into diets that already include peppers could help combat nutrient deficiencies by providing a significant portion of recommended daily nutrients.

  20. The impacts of human recreation on brown bears (Ursus arctos): A review and new management tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin-noreus, Jennifer; Rode, Karyn D.; Hilderbrand, Grant V; Wilder, James; Farley, Sean; Jorgensen, Carole; Marcot, Bruce G

    2016-01-01

    Increased popularity of recreational activities in natural areas has led to the need to better understand their impacts on wildlife. The majority of research conducted to date has focused on behavioral effects from individual recreations, thus there is a limited understanding of the potential for population-level or cumulative effects. Brown bears (Ursus arctos) are the focus of a growing wildlife viewing industry and are found in habitats frequented by recreationists. Managers face difficult decisions in balancing recreational opportunities with habitat protection for wildlife. Here, we integrate results from empirical studies with expert knowledge to better understand the potential population-level effects of recreational activities on brown bears. We conducted a literature review and Delphi survey of brown bear experts to better understand the frequencies and types of recreations occurring in bear habitats and their potential effects, and to identify management solutions and research needs. We then developed a Bayesian network model that allows managers to estimate the potential effects of recreational management decisions in bear habitats. A higher proportion of individual brown bears in coastal habitats were exposed to recreation, including photography and bear-viewing than bears in interior habitats where camping and hiking were more common. Our results suggest that the primary mechanism by which recreation may impact brown bears is through temporal and spatial displacement with associated increases in energetic costs and declines in nutritional intake. Killings in defense of life and property were found to be minimally associated with recreation in Alaska, but are important considerations in population management. Regulating recreation to occur predictably in space and time and limiting recreation in habitats with concentrated food resources reduces impacts on food intake and may thereby, reduce impacts on reproduction and survival. Our results suggest that

  1. Temporal upregulation of host surface receptors provides a window of opportunity for bacterial adhesion and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kc, Rajendra; Shukla, Shakti D; Walters, Eugene H; O'Toole, Ronan F

    2017-04-01

    Host surface receptors provide bacteria with a foothold from which to attach, colonize and, in some cases, invade tissue and elicit human disease. In this review, we discuss several key host receptors and cognate adhesins that function in bacterial pathogenesis. In particular, we examine the elevated expression of host surface receptors such as CEACAM-1, CEACAM-6, ICAM-1 and PAFR in response to specific stimuli. We explore how upregulated receptors, in turn, expose the host to a range of bacterial infections in the respiratory tract. It is apparent that exploitation of receptor induction for bacterial adherence is not unique to one body system, but is also observed in the central nervous, gastrointestinal and urogenital systems. Prokaryotic pathogens which utilize this mechanism for their infectivity include Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis and Escherichia coli. A number of approaches have been used, in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models, to inhibit bacterial attachment to temporally expressed host receptors. Some of these novel strategies may advance future targeted interventions for the prevention and treatment of bacterial disease.

  2. Opportunities and challenges provided by cloud repositories for bioinformatics-enabled drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalpé, Gratien; Joly, Yann

    2014-09-01

    Healthcare-related bioinformatics databases are increasingly offering the possibility to maintain, organize, and distribute DNA sequencing data. Different national and international institutions are currently hosting such databases that offer researchers website platforms where they can obtain sequencing data on which they can perform different types of analysis. Until recently, this process remained mostly one-dimensional, with most analysis concentrated on a limited amount of data. However, newer genome sequencing technology is producing a huge amount of data that current computer facilities are unable to handle. An alternative approach has been to start adopting cloud computing services for combining the information embedded in genomic and model system biology data, patient healthcare records, and clinical trials' data. In this new technological paradigm, researchers use virtual space and computing power from existing commercial or not-for-profit cloud service providers to access, store, and analyze data via different application programming interfaces. Cloud services are an alternative to the need of larger data storage; however, they raise different ethical, legal, and social issues. The purpose of this Commentary is to summarize how cloud computing can contribute to bioinformatics-based drug discovery and to highlight some of the outstanding legal, ethical, and social issues that are inherent in the use of cloud services. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Developmental windows of breast cancer risk provide opportunities for targeted chemoprevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Holly A.; Lyons, Traci R.; Giles, Erin D.; Borges, Virginia F.; Schedin, Pepper

    2014-01-01

    The magnitude of the breast cancer problem implores researchers to aggressively investigate prevention strategies. However, several barriers currently reduce the feasibility of breast cancer prevention. These barriers include the inability to accurately predict future breast cancer diagnosis at the individual level, the need for improved understanding of when to implement interventions, uncertainty with respect to optimal duration of treatment, and negative side effects associated with currently approved chemoprevention therapies. None-the-less, the unique biology of the mammary gland, with its postnatal development and conditional terminal differentiation, may permit the resolution of many of these barriers. Specifically, lifecycle-specific windows of breast cancer risk have been identified that may be amenable to risk-reducing strategies. Here, we argue for prevention research focused on two of these lifecycle windows of risk: postpartum mammary gland involution and peri-menopause. We provide evidence that these windows are highly amenable to targeted, limited duration treatments. Such approaches could result in the prevention of postpartum and postmenopausal breast cancers, correspondingly. PMID:23664839

  4. The role of futures forecasts in recreation: some applications in the third nationwide outdoor recreation plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meg Maguire; Dana R. Younger

    1980-01-01

    This paper provides a quick glimpse into the theoretical applicability and importance of futures forecasting techniques in recreation policy planning. The paper also details contemporary socioeconomic trends affecting recreation, current recreation participation patterns and anticipated social changes which will alter public recreation experiences as developed in the...

  5. Financing of Private Outdoor Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A survey of financial institutions was undertaken by the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation to evaluate the demand and availability of private credit for enterprises that provide outdoor recreation. The survey provided basic information for (1) evaluating legislative proposals for loan guarantee programs, (2) nationwide planning, and (3) assessing the…

  6. Technology-aided recreation and communication opportunities for post-coma persons affected by lack of speech and extensive motor impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; D'Amico, Fiora; Sasanelli, Giovanni; De Tommaso, Marina; Megna, Marisa

    2013-09-01

    This study assessed technology-aided intervention programs for two post-coma men who had re-acquired consciousness, but were unable to engage in personally or socially relevant occupations, given their lack of functional speech and their extensive motor disabilities. The microswitches used for accessing the program contents consisted of (a) a pressure sensor fixed in the palm of the first man's hand that could be activated with a small hand closure movement, and (b) an optic sensor fixed under the chin of the second man that could be activated by mouth opening movements. The programs' content consisted of recreation and communication options, which involved activating music, videos, and basic requests, sending and receiving (listening to) text messages, and placing phone calls. The results showed that the men (a) used the technology-aided programs successfully to manage the recreation and communication options available and (b) showed consistent preference for the sessions with the technology-aided program over other daily events. Family and staff members interviewed about the participants' programs (seven members for each participant) thought that the participants enjoyed the intervention sessions with the programs and that the programs had beneficial effects for them. Implications of the findings are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Recreational Assets in the State of Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This dataset is meant to be a comprehensive database of recreational assets in public areas. Recreational assets are considered amenities provided to the public for...

  8. Outdoor recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. M. Bowker; Ashley Askew; H. Ken Cordell; John C. Bergstrom

    2013-01-01

    Key FindingsBy 2060, the number of southern adults participating in each of 10 different popular outdoor recreation activities is projected to increase. Depending on future demographic, economic, land use, and population changes, the activity demonstrating the least growth in participants is hunting (8–25 percent). The activity projected to...

  9. Missouri Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri State Inter-Agency for Outdoor Recreation, Jefferson.

    The document is a summary of the Missouri State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan, which was designed to provide guidelines for allocation of resources for needed recreation facilities. The plan identifies the present and future needs for outdoor recreation and recommends ways of meeting these needs. This 1967 document provides a brief history…

  10. The Use of Online Citizen-Science Projects to Provide Experiential Learning Opportunities for Nonmajor Science Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Kridelbaugh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Citizen science is becoming even more accessible to the general public through technological advances in the development of mobile applications, facilitating information dissemination and data collection. With the advent of “big data,” many citizen-science projects designed to help researchers sift through piles of research data now exist entirely online, either in the form of playing a game or via other digital avenues. Recent trends in citizen science have also focused on “crowdsourcing” solutions from the general public to help solve societal issues, often requiring nothing more than brainstorming and a computer to submit ideas. Online citizen science thus provides an excellent platform to expand the accessibility of experiential learning opportunities for a broad range of nonmajor science students at institutions with limited resources (e.g., community colleges. I created an activity for a general microbiology lecture to engage students in hands-on experiences via participation in online citizen-science projects. The objectives of the assignment were for students to: 1 understand that everyone can be a scientist; 2 learn to be creative and innovative in designing solutions to health and science challenges; and 3 further practice science communication skills with a written report. This activity is designed for introductory science courses with nonmajor science students who have limited opportunities to participate in undergraduate research experiences.

  11. Continuous quality improvement programs provide new opportunities to drive value innovation initiatives in hospital-based radiology practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph R; Schomer, Don F

    2009-07-01

    Imaging services constitute a huge portion of the of the total dollar investment within the health care enterprise. Accordingly, this generates competition among medical specialties organized along service lines for their pieces of the pie and increased scrutiny from third-party payers and government regulators. These market and political forces create challenge and opportunity for a hospital-based radiology practice. Clearly, change that creates or builds greater value for patients also creates sustainable competitive advantage for a radiology practice. The somewhat amorphous concept of quality constitutes a significant value driver for innovation in this scenario. Quality initiatives and programs seek to define and manage this amorphous concept and provide tools for a radiology practice to create or build more value. Leadership and the early adoption of these inevitable programs by a radiology practice strengthens relationships with hospital partners and slows the attrition of imaging service lines to competitors.

  12. Opportunities Provided by the Design of a Website Focused on the Promotion of Collaborative Projects Within European IT Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru CAPATINA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Our paper emphasizes the opportunities provided both for the academic research and business partnerships by the design of a website which promotes the collaborative projects within European IT industry. From the academic perspective, the companies registered in the website database will represent the sample for different researches focused on cross-cultural interactions, intellectual capital components and competitive intelligence strategies. From the business perspective, the registration of the companies will allow the access to the list with all the potential future partners’ in the field of software development. In the first part of the paper dedicated to literature review, we highlighted the main types of IT collaborative projects; then, we presented the tools provided by the website that was designed in view to increase the awareness of the European IT companies. In the last part of the paper, we tested by means of chi-square statistical method the correlation between R&D investments and average length of time for software design in the case of a sample of 58 IT companies included in the database. We also revealed our future research intentions related to the domain of IT partnerships patterns.

  13. Intimate partner violence, mental health disorders, and sexually transmitted infections: important screening opportunities for pediatric healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattishall, Amy E; Cruz, Mario; Spector, Nancy D

    2011-12-01

    This article addresses three critical areas where pediatric healthcare providers must employ effective screening techniques to ensure the best care for patients: intimate partner violence (IPV), mental health issues, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). IPV is now recognized as an important issue impacting the health of children. While long-term outcomes secondary to positive screening results are not known, routine, sensitive questioning can identify at-risk children and help connect families to resources in the community. Routine use of validated screening tools for mental health disorders (MHDs) in the office setting is now recommended. STIs disproportionately affect adolescents and young adults, yet timely diagnosis is often challenging because infections are frequently asymptomatic and adolescents may not be forthcoming about risk-taking behaviors. There is significant opportunity for pediatricians to improve screening rates of adolescents. Screening is an essential aspect of healthcare for pediatricians. An understanding of current screening recommendations for IPV, MHDs, and STIs will assist providers in earlier detection of medical problems in their patients and will likely improve patient outcomes.

  14. Managing recreation areas for quality user experiences: a theoretical framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas A. More; Gregory J. Buhyoff

    1979-01-01

    The production of opportunities for high-quality visitor experiences is a basic goal of recreation management. Recreation quality can be interpreted using concepts from psychological field theory to relate emotion to the strength of motivation. Applications to on-site management for recreation quality and use regulation are suggested.

  15. Selected Outdoor Recreation Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    In this recreational information report, 96 tables are compiled from Bureau of Outdoor Recreation programs and surveys, other governmental agencies, and private sources. Eight sections comprise the document: (1) The Bureau of Outdoor Recreation, (2) Federal Assistance to Recreation, (3) Recreation Surveys for Planning, (4) Selected Statistics of…

  16. Duration of suicide process among suicide attempters and characteristics of those providing window of opportunity for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattimani, Shivanand; Sarkar, Siddharth; Menon, Vikas; Muthuramalingam, Avin; Nancy, Premkumar

    2016-01-01

    There is limited cross-cultural literature on the duration of suicide process among attempters. The primary aim was to assess the duration of suicide process among suicide attempters attending the Crisis Intervention Clinic. We also aimed to identify the characteristics of those who reported a longer duration for this process. In this retrospective record-based study, we collected the duration of the suicidal process from the records of all the suicide attempters evaluated over a 3-year period (n = 319). Attempters were divided into four groups based on the quartile value of the duration of the suicidal process. For analysis, the characteristics of those in the last quartile with suicide process time of >120 min (n = 75) were compared with those in the first three (n = 244). Those in the last quartile were considered to provide a window of opportunity for intervention. The median time for the suicidal process was 30 min (interquartile range of 5 min to 120 min). Seventy-five (23.5%) subjects belonged to the fourth quartile (duration of suicide process >120 min). A significant proportion of them came from urban areas (P = 0.011), had a diagnosis of mood disorder (P = 0.028), had visited a health professional in the recent past (P = 0.015), and had lower rates of attempt under intoxication (P = 0.005). A lesser proportion of them showed problem-focused disengagement style of coping strategy (P = 0.015). The suicide process time among Indian suicide attempters is short. However, a quarter of them has suicide process duration of 2 h which provides some scope for intervention. Individual and community level interventions need further evaluation for their potential efficacy in preventing the progress of the suicidal process.

  17. Recreation and the Environment as Cultural Dimensions in Contemporary American Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; Carter J. Betz; Gary T. Green

    2002-01-01

    This paper broadly explores changing outdoor recreation demands, environmental opinions and demographics in the United States. With this country's population predicted to more than double by the end of this century, it is imperative that we understand these trends and their implications for better managing our natural envimnment and providing opportunities for...

  18. A Career with Meaning: Recreation, Parks, Sport Management, Hospitality, and Tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Cheryl A.; Murphy, James F.; Allen, Lawrence R.; Sheffield, Emilyn A.

    2010-01-01

    "A Career with Meaning" is a tailor made journey that enables individuals to match their core beliefs and values with numerous professional opportunities within the leisure industry. Leading experts provide detailed discussion and insight for 11 primary areas related to recreation, parks, sport management, hospitality and tourism. Once you have…

  19. Sun protection provided by regulation school uniforms in Australian schools: an opportunity to improve personal sun protection during childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Denise; Harrison, Simone L

    2014-01-01

    Childhood sun exposure is linked to excessive pigmented mole development and melanoma risk. Clothing provides a physical barrier, protecting skin from ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Extending sleeves to elbow length and shorts to knee length has been shown to significantly reduce mole acquisition in preschoolers from tropical Queensland. We used publicly available uniform images and guidelines from primary schools in Townsville (latitude 19.25°S, n = 43 schools), Cairns (16.87°S, n = 46) and the Atherton Tablelands (17.26°S, n = 23) in tropical Australia to objectively determine the body surface proportion covered by regulation school uniforms. Uniforms of nongovernment, large (≥800 students), urban, educationally advantaged schools with comprehensive sun protection policies covered more skin than those of government schools (63.2% vs 62.0%; P schools (63.4% vs 62.3%; P = 0.009), rural (62.7% vs 61.9%; P = 0.002) and educationally disadvantaged schools (62.8% vs 62.3%; P school uniforms covered identical body surface proportions (62.4%, P = 0.084). Although wearing regulation school uniforms is mandatory at most Australian primary schools, this opportunity to improve children's sun protection is largely overlooked. Recent evidence suggests that even encouraging minor alterations to school uniforms (e.g. slightly longer sleeves/dresses/skirts/shorts) to increase skin coverage may reduce mole acquisition and melanoma risk, especially in high-risk populations. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  20. FAQ about Recreational Therapy/Therapeutic Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... biological, and behavioral sciences and recreation and leisure theory. How can I get RT/TR services? Many ... facilities, as was daycare programs for individuals with disabilities." About the American Therapeutic Recreation Association: The American ...

  1. 36 CFR 71.11 - Collection of Federal recreation fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... recreation fees. 71.11 Section 71.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION FEES § 71.11 Collection of Federal recreation fees. The bureaus of the Department of the Interior administering outdoor recreation programs shall provide for the collection of...

  2. Experience preferences as mediators of the wildlife related recreation participation: Place attachment relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D.H.; Fulton, D.C.

    2008-01-01

    The human dimensions literature challenges the notion that settings are simply features and attributes that can be manipulated to satisfy public demand; instead, people view specific recreation settings as unique kinds of places. Land managers provide recreation experience opportunities, but most conventional management frameworks do not allow managers to address the personal attachment of people to places. This study examined the relationships among activity participation, recreation experience preferences (REP), and setting and place attachment. Study data was obtained from a visitor study conducted in 2000-2001 at U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Waterfowl Production Areas in Minnesota. We used structural equation modeling to explore whether recreation experience preferences mediate the relationship between types and frequencies of recreation participation and place attachment at Minnesota's Waterfowl Production Areas. Results offer empirical evidence that recreational experience preferences associated with activity participation may be instrumental to one's development of place attachment to a recreation site. Thus, research in these two areas may be more complementary than has been apparent in the literature. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  3. Reverse Inclusion: Providing Peer Social Interaction Opportunities to Students Placed in Self-Contained Special Education Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoger, Kimberly D.

    2006-01-01

    The social and academic benefits of inclusion for students with disabilities have been well researched and well documented. Unfortunately, inclusion opportunities are limited by lack of qualified staff, logistics, scheduling and other difficulties encountered when attempting to meet students' unique needs in the general education setting. As a…

  4. Providing Opportunities for Student Self-Assessment: The Impact on the Acquisition of Psychomotor Skills in Occupational Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Julie; Owen, Antonette

    2016-01-01

    The Occupational Therapy department at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa is responsible for ensuring students achieve psychomotor skill proficiency, as it is an essential component of health care practice. The aim of this study was to determine whether the introduction of opportunities to afford self-evaluation better prepared…

  5. Adaptive thermal comfort opportunities for dwellings: Providing thermal comfort only when and where needed in dwellings in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noortje Alders

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research presented in this thesis is to design the characteristics of an Adaptive Thermal Comfort System for Dwellings to achieve a significantly better energy performance whilst not compromising the thermal comfort perception of the occupants. An Adaptive Thermal Comfort System is defined as the whole of passive and active comfort components of the dwelling that dynamically adapts its settings to varying user comfort demands and weather conditions (seasonal, diurnal and hourly depending on the aspects adapted, thus providing comfort only where, when and at the level needed by the user, to improve possibilities of harvesting the environmental energy (e.g. solar gain and outdoor air when available and storing it when abundant. In order to be able to create an Adaptive Thermal Comfort System to save energy knowledge is needed as to where, when, what kind and how much energy is needed to provide the thermal comfort. Therefore, this research aimed to gain insight in the dynamic behaviour of the weather and the occupant and the opportunities to design the characteristics of an Adaptive Thermal Comfort System for Dwellings to achieve a significantly better energy performance whilst not compromising the thermal comfort perception of the occupants answering the main research question;  What are the most efficient strategies for delivering thermal comfort in the residential sector with respect to better energy performances and an increasing demand for flexibility in use and comfort conditions? To answer the main research question three steps were taken, which also represent the three parts of the research: 1. The dynamic information of the factors influencing the thermal heat balance of the dwelling was gathered in order to determine their opportunities for adaptivity. A multidisciplinary approach to Thermal Comfort Systems is followed taking into account the dynamic of occupancy profiles, weather, building physics, HVAC and controls. A

  6. Adaptive thermal comfort opportunities for dwellings: Providing thermal comfort only when and where needed in dwellings in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noortje Alders

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research presented in this thesis is to design the characteristics of an Adaptive Thermal Comfort System for Dwellings to achieve a significantly better energy performance whilst not compromising the thermal comfort perception of the occupants. An Adaptive Thermal Comfort System is defined as the whole of passive and active comfort components of the dwelling that dynamically adapts its settings to varying user comfort demands and weather conditions (seasonal, diurnal and hourly depending on the aspects adapted, thus providing comfort only where, when and at the level needed by the user, to improve possibilities of harvesting the environmental energy (e.g. solar gain and outdoor air when available and storing it when abundant.In order to be able to create an Adaptive Thermal Comfort System to save energy knowledge is needed as to where, when, what kind and how much energy is needed to provide the thermal comfort. Therefore, this research aimed to gain insight in the dynamic behaviour of the weather and the occupant and the opportunities to design the characteristics of an Adaptive Thermal Comfort System for Dwellings to achieve a significantly better energy performance whilst not compromising the thermal comfort perception of the occupants answering the main research question; What are the most efficient strategies for delivering thermal comfort in the residential sector with respect to better energy performances and an increasing demand for flexibility in use and comfort conditions?To answer the main research question three steps were taken, which also represent the three parts of the research:1. The dynamic information of the factors influencing the thermal heat balance of the dwelling was gathered in order to determine their opportunities for adaptivity. A multidisciplinary approach to Thermal Comfort Systems is followed taking into account the dynamic of occupancy profiles, weather, building physics, HVAC and controls

  7. An Ecosystem Approach to Recreation Location Quotients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Vogel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the widespread agreement on the importance of preserving ecological integrity in conservation and outdoor recreation decision-making processes, traditional metrics analyzing the supply of and demand for conservation and recreation resources have focused on geographical and population-centric units of measurement rather than ecological ones. One tool past researchers have used to inform recreation resource planning is the recreation location quotient (RLQ. While simple park-to-population ratios or acres-per-capita metrics provide a base measure of carrying capacity and are often useful to set broad recreation supply standards, the RLQ offers a more nuanced snapshot of supply and demand by comparing regional ratios to a standardized reference region. The RLQ is thus able to provide a statistic or quotient that highlights regions where recreation resources are particularly abundant and/or scarce relative to a reference area. This project expands the past RLQ analyses by investigating the distribution of recreation resources across the 10 ecological sections found within the US state of Minnesota. RLQs were calculated using recreation trail mileage, natural resource and recreation area acreage data, and recreation facility data from federal, state, and local agencies. Results found notable differences in supply of recreation resources across ecological sections. Some sections were considerably underrepresented in recreation resources-per area (e.g., Red River Valley and North Central Glaciated Plains while others were underrepresented in recreation resources-per capita (e.g., Minnesota and Northeast Iowa Morainal. The RLQ statistics and resulting maps illustrating relative surplus or deficiencies can inform future land acquisition decisions and highlight the need for cross-jurisdictional planning in order to ensure outdoor recreation systems are ecologically representative. Possible implications and recommendations for future planning

  8. Proveer igualdad de oportunidades educativas para los estudiantes con conocimientos limitados del idioma ingles (Providing Equality of Educational Opportunity for Students with Limited Knowledge of the English Language).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office for Civil Rights (ED), Washington, DC.

    This brochure, entirely in Spanish, provides information on federal policy concerning equal educational opportunity for limited-English-proficient (LEP) individuals. It first summarizes the provisions of Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and the subsequent major Civil Rights Office directives concerning that legislation. It then outlines…

  9. Recreation users fees on federal lands: a test of structural change between 1995 and 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.M. Bowker; Gary Green; Dan MuCullom; Ken Cordell

    2008-01-01

    Federal lands provide many recreation facilities and services. On some of these lands, fees have been and are currently being charged for certain recreational services. This study examined the attitudes of users, between 1995 and 2003, towards recreation user fees on public lands. Data from the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment on recreational...

  10. A pilot training program to develop physical recreation leaders for work with emotionally disturbed children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, L; Wright, T S; Hilsendager, D R; Jack, H K

    1967-06-01

    Preliminary findings in a pioneer training project under NIMH auspices to prepare physical education graduate students to assume leadership roles in recreation work with emotionally disturbed children are reviewed and discussed. An 80-day, year-round program exposes the trainees to a variety of experimental opportunities in both day-camping and community recreation settings. A six-credit curriculum is provided by Temple University, while the field training sequences are established by Buttonwood Farms. Students receive intensive mental health guidance, supervision, and training and both individual and group counseling.

  11. Managing recreation on mountain summits in the northern forest region of Maine, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly Goonan; Robert Manning; Carena J. van Riper; Christopher. Monz

    2010-01-01

    Land managers in the Northern Forest region of Maine, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont face the challenge of providing high-quality recreation opportunities and experiences while also protecting fragile summit resources. The goals of this study were to identify indicators and standards of quality for visitor experiences and summit resources for three mountains with...

  12. Outdoor recreation in forest policy and legislation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Carsten; Pouta, Eija; Gentin, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    The benefists of outdoor recreation and the need for recreation inventories and monitoring are described in various policy and legislation documents at the European level. The objective of this paper is to analyse how these recreational aspects are reflected at the national level in core forest...... indicates that a consistent forest recreation monitoring system, linked to sustainable forest management, as describes for example in the Helsinki process, should be better transferred into national policuy and legislation. Compareable data across Europe could then provide a sound base for making decisions...

  13. Interacting coastal based ecosystem services: recreation and water quality in Puget Sound, WA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitler, Jason; Papenfus, Michael; Byrd, Kristin; Labiosa, William

    2013-01-01

    Coastal recreation and water quality are major contributors to human well-being in coastal regions. They can also interact, creating opportunities for ecosystem based management, ecological restoration, and water quality improvement that can positively affect people and the environment. Yet the effect of environmental quality on human behavior is often poorly quantified, but commonly assumed in coastal ecosystem service studies. To clarify this effect we investigate a water quality dataset for evidence that environmental condition partially explains variation in recreational visitation, our indicator of human behavior. In Puget Sound, WA, we investigate variation in visitation in both visitation rate and fixed effects (FE) models. The visitation rate model relates the differences in annual recreational visitation among parks to environmental conditions, park characteristics, travel cost, and recreational demand. In our FE model we control for all time-invariant unobserved variables and compare monthly variation at the park level to determine how water quality affects visitation during the summer season. The results of our first model illustrate how visitation relates to various amenities and costs. In the FE analysis, monthly visitation was negatively related to water quality while controlling for monthly visitation trends. This indicates people are responding to changes in water quality, and an improvement would yield an increase in the value of recreation. Together, these results could help in prioritizing water quality improvements, could assist the creation of new parks or the modification of existing recreational infrastructure, and provide quantitative estimates for the expected benefits from potential changes in recreational visitation and water quality improvements. Our results also provide an example of how recreational visitation can be quantified and used in ecosystem service assessments.

  14. Interacting coastal based ecosystem services: recreation and water quality in Puget Sound, WA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Kreitler

    Full Text Available Coastal recreation and water quality are major contributors to human well-being in coastal regions. They can also interact, creating opportunities for ecosystem based management, ecological restoration, and water quality improvement that can positively affect people and the environment. Yet the effect of environmental quality on human behavior is often poorly quantified, but commonly assumed in coastal ecosystem service studies. To clarify this effect we investigate a water quality dataset for evidence that environmental condition partially explains variation in recreational visitation, our indicator of human behavior. In Puget Sound, WA, we investigate variation in visitation in both visitation rate and fixed effects (FE models. The visitation rate model relates the differences in annual recreational visitation among parks to environmental conditions, park characteristics, travel cost, and recreational demand. In our FE model we control for all time-invariant unobserved variables and compare monthly variation at the park level to determine how water quality affects visitation during the summer season. The results of our first model illustrate how visitation relates to various amenities and costs. In the FE analysis, monthly visitation was negatively related to water quality while controlling for monthly visitation trends. This indicates people are responding to changes in water quality, and an improvement would yield an increase in the value of recreation. Together, these results could help in prioritizing water quality improvements, could assist the creation of new parks or the modification of existing recreational infrastructure, and provide quantitative estimates for the expected benefits from potential changes in recreational visitation and water quality improvements. Our results also provide an example of how recreational visitation can be quantified and used in ecosystem service assessments.

  15. Integration of physical and spiritual recreation of youth in the socio-educational animation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimovskaya N.A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - to reveal the possibilities of physical and spiritual recreation by combining them in the process of socio-educational animation. It examines the conceptual apparatus, which is the basis of development of methodology for the study of the recreational potential of the animation. Investigated the social and educational value of the integration of physical and spiritual recreation during the implementation of the animation activity among young people. The paper summarizes the current trends of social and pedagogical aspects of physical recreation. We consider the interpretation of the essence of the animation, which is to enhance the personality of its involvement in activities account recreational and educational opportunities animation. Defended the idea that the physical recovery - the basis of social optimism and social creativity. Settles integrated approach to social and educational animations to enhance the physical and social activity of the young man, the prevention of social passivity. Provides advanced methods and forms of recreation during the implementation of the animation business. It is proposed to use intensively games, theatrical performances, tourist travel, sports event.

  16. Main Elements for Upscaling Recreation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Termansen, Mette

    2012-01-01

    This report provides information on the main elements used to scale up modelled local visitor flow data to regional level based on recreational de-mand models. These models are described in Report #1. This report also provides information on data sources such as spatial data (e.g. land cov...

  17. Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge River Recreation Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge River Recreation Management Plan is to provide guidance and direction for management of recreational...

  18. An Opportunity for Healing and Holistic Care: Exploring the Roles of Health Care Providers Working Within Northern Canadian Aboriginal Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Zaida; Holmes, Dave; Chartrand, Larry

    2016-05-22

    The purpose of this qualitative study was exploring what the roles and challenges of health care providers working within Northern Canadian Aboriginal communities are and what resources can help support or impede their efforts in working toward addressing health inequities within these communities. The qualitative research conducted was influenced by a postcolonial epistemology. The works of theorists Fanon on colonization and racial construction, Kristeva on semiotics and abjection, and Foucault on power/knowledge, governmentality, and biopower were used in providing a theoretical framework. Critical discourse analysis of 25 semistructured interviews with health care providers was used to gain a better understanding of their roles and challenges while working within Northern Canadian Aboriginal communities. Within this research study, three significant findings emerged from the data. First, the Aboriginal person's identity was constructed in relation to the health care provider's role of delivering essential health services. Second, health care providers were not treating the "ill" patient, but rather treating the patient for being "ill." Third, health care providers were treating the Aboriginal person for being "Aboriginal" by separating the patient from his or her identity. The treatment involved reforming the Aboriginal patient from the condition of being "Aboriginal." © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Education and Outdoor Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A special study was conducted to determine the needs and demands of the public for outdoor recreation. Increasing amounts of leisure time of the American people are being used for outdoor recreation activities. Ways in which education can help people realize optimum benefit from recreational use of the outdoor environment are discussed.…

  20. Economics of Outdoor Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clawson, Marion; Knetsch, Jack L.

    Written for the purposes of presenting an overview of outdoor recreation in the United States and defining the significant outdoor recreation policy issues of the next 10 to 20 years, this document also includes major sections on recreation resources and economic considerations. Projections to the year 2000 are made for a national time budget,…

  1. Outdoor recreation participation trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; Barbara L. McDonald; R. Jeff Teasley; John C. Bergstrom; Jack Martin; Jim Bason; Vernon R. Leeworthy

    1999-01-01

    As part of the national assessment of outdoor recreation trends, the authors have taken a look at participation patterns and levels of participation across activities and across segments of our society. The primary source of data is the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment (NSRE). The NSRE is the latest in the continuing series of National Recreation...

  2. Latinos and Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah J. Chavez

    2012-01-01

    The research reported here includes a number of studies conducted in southern California. It was aimed at better understanding the recreation needs and desires of Latino populations. Generally, the findings indicate that Latinos have many of the same recreation needs as other groups, such as places to recreate and reasonable accommodations. But it also indicates they...

  3. 75 FR 1333 - Notice of New Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (Title VIII, Pub. L. 108-447)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Notice of New Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act... new recreation fees are established. The intent of this notice is to give the public an opportunity to....Recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. The National Recreation Reservation Service charges a fee for...

  4. Providing Opportunities to Learn in Home-Based Child Care Settings: Observations of Learning Contexts and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusby, Julie C.; Crowley, Ryann; Jones, Laura B.; Smolkowski, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: This observation study investigated the prevalence and correlates of learning contexts provided to preschool-age children in 133 registered child care homes in below-average-income neighborhoods in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. On average, 30% of the observed proportion of time was spent in structured teacher-led activities, 51%…

  5. Recreation settings, scenery, and visitor experiences: a research assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel R. Williams

    2007-01-01

    A core task of recreation research is to understand the relation between settings, scenery, and visitor experiences. This paper uses environmental psychology to describe four conceptual models underlying these relations: inherent/aesthetic, opportunity/goal-directed, symbolic, and expressive. The paper then describes some challenges to applying results to recreation...

  6. Multiple-use management for recreation in the east

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Prausa

    1971-01-01

    An overview of the complex management problems that confront the administrator of National Forest lands in the eastern United States, with emphasis on the conflicts that occur and will intensify as a result of the many demands for different kinds of recreation opportunities on National Forest System lands. The need to identify and measure the kinds of recreation...

  7. Defining and managing the quality of wilderness recreation experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Manning; David W. Lime

    2000-01-01

    There is a substantial body of scientific literature on defining and managing the quality of wilderness experiences. Two conceptual frameworks derived from this literature—carrying capacity and the Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS)—suggest that wilderness recreation experiences can be defined through indicators and standards of quality, and that wilderness...

  8. Increasing Outdoor Recreation Participation through the Schools: A Critical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Claude

    1989-01-01

    This article examines the rationale for increasing outdoor recreation participation through schools; it attempts to demonstrate that very little is known about the intensity of participation in schools, and opportunities for such participation seem limited; finally, it suggests strategies to increase youth participation in outdoor recreation. (IAH)

  9. Education and training in recreation management at tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tertiary institutions should realise the gaps and opportunities that could be filled in recreation management training. The current article reviews literature focussing on the importance of recreation participation, the benefits of participation and the impact it has on society in order to lead a quality life. International and national ...

  10. Evidence-based training in the era of evidence-based practice: Challenges and opportunities for training of PTSD providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Raymond C; Ruzek, Josef I; Karlin, Bradley E

    2017-01-01

    There is a pressing global need for trained and competent mental health clinicians to deliver evidence-based psychological therapies to millions of trauma survivors in need of care. Three model, large-scale training programs were initiated a decade ago, one in the United Kingdom (U.K.), and two in the United States (U.S.), to disseminate high-quality, evidence-based psychological care to traumatized children and adults in need of assistance. Milestone contributions to implementation science have been made by each of these training programs, although limitations and challenges remain to be considered. In contrast, culturally adapted and simplified PTSD interventions and therapy training programs have also been developed and tested during the past decade, three of which show particular promise for broader implementation. These simplified but evidence-based interventions have been developed for use by lay counsellors or health technicians with minimal or no prior mental health training. Finally, a growing range of technology-based and technology-assisted training models for PTSD providers have also been developed and disseminated in the past decade. This trend is expected to accelerate as more providers become accustomed to acquiring clinical training in this modality or format, although significant barriers to technology-based training will need to be overcome. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Urban Recreational Fisheries in the Australian Coastal Zone: The Sustainability Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl P. McPhee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recreational fishing is an important wildlife harvesting activity in urban coastal areas, and recreational harvest in these areas can frequently exceed the commercial harvest. Recreational fishing is a key way that many members of the public experience the environment. The activity enhances social capital, promotes respect for nature, provides health benefits and can provide economic benefits to coastal communities. It is also an important driver of the science on aquatic animals and habitats, and an important tangible reason for many members of the public to conserve and protect aquatic resources. Overall, there has been little specific consideration of urban recreational fisheries management in Australia, despite the paramount importance of urban areas as a focus of recreational fishing activity. This paper identifies that in order to maximize individual and societal benefits from recreational fishing, there needs to be a refocussing of management with the aim of being more holistic. Historically, fisheries management in Australia has focused on maximum sustainable yield (MSY or maximum economic yield (MEY which is relevant for the commercial fishing sector, but neither of these is directly relevant to recreational fisheries. This paper identifies that Urban Fisheries Management Plans are required that recognize the specific issues associated with urban recreational fisheries. These plans need to coordinate within and between levels of government and have clear management objectives relevant to urban recreational fisheries. Enhanced opportunities for meaningful citizen science can be incorporated at multiple levels within these plans and this can engender public support for environmental stewardship, as well as fill a very important gap in the knowledge base necessary for managing the activity. As urban recreational fisheries are often occurring in highly modified or degraded habitats, a central element of these plans needs to be habitat

  12. Planners guide for estimating cost per user-day of proposed recreational facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger D. Fight

    1980-01-01

    In the absence of prices for nonmarketed outdoor recreational services provided by public agencies, it is not possible to do a complete benefit cost analysis for proposed facilities for recreation. Good information on the cost of providing recreational services to the public is nonetheless important. This paper provides a step-by-step procedure that recreation planners...

  13. Clubes de Ciencia: Intensive science workshops in Mexico provide a unique opportunity for teaching, scientific and cultural exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bras, I.; Rosengard, S.; Estefania, M.; Jinich, A.

    2016-02-01

    Clubes de Ciencia, which translates to "Science Clubs" is an initiative started by a group of graduate students at Harvard University in 2014 to encourage scientific exchange between the US and Mexico. These science clubs are one-week long intensive workshops taught by graduate students and/or postdocs on a subject of their choice in six Mexican cities. Instructors apply to teach a workshop by sending a proposal to the organizing committee, who is looking for workshops that emphasize hands-on, practical ideas. The instructors, primarily graduate students in the US, are paired with local co-instructors who assist and often co-teach the workshop. Local student participants, who are in their last two years of high school and the first two years of college, are selected based on their interest and enthusiasm. Each class has about 15-20 students, so that the classroom setting is intimate and interactive Sponsors, who fund instructor stipends, class supplies and program development, include the Mexican department of energy (SENER), the Mexican national science foundation (CONACYT), Harvard and MIT. Host universities also provide space and resources. In this presentation we focus on clubs that were taught in January 2015 on ocean physics and July 2015 on ocean chemistry, both taught in Ensenada, Baja California at the national autonomous university. Both workshops included a combination of data analysis, lectures, experiments and computational modeling. The ocean physics class was also recorded intermittently and is being used as a test case for an online course. The format provided an intensive teaching and networking experience and could be interesting to implement in other contexts.

  14. Heel Pain in Recreational Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzoli, Allan S.; Pollina, Frank S.

    1989-01-01

    Provides physicians with the signs, symptoms, and management of heel/sole pain in recreational runners (usually due to plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, and calcaneal stress fractures). Remedies involve palliative treatment of symptoms, correction of underlying biomechanical problems, and flexibility exercises. (SM)

  15. Providing accurate near real-time fire alerts for Protected Areas through NASA FIRMS: Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilavajhala, S.; Davies, D.; Schmaltz, J. E.; Wong, M.; Murphy, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Fire Information for Resource Management System (FIRMS) is at the forefront of providing global near real-time (NRT) MODIS thermal anomalies / hotspot location data to end-users . FIRMS serves the data via an interactive Web GIS named Web Fire Mapper, downloads of NRT active fire, archive data downloads for MODIS hotspots dating back to 1999 and a hotspot email alert system The FIRMS Email Alerts system has been successfully alerting users of fires in their area of interest in near real-time and/or via daily and weekly email summaries, with an option to receive MODIS hotspot data as a text file (CSV) attachment. Currently, there are more than 7000 email alert subscriptions from more than 100 countries. Specifically, the email alerts system is designed to generate and send an email alert for any region or area on the globe, with a special focus on providing alerts for protected areas worldwide. For many protected areas, email alerts are particularly useful for early fire detection, monitoring on going fires, as well as allocating resources to protect wildlife and natural resources of particular value. For protected areas, FIRMS uses the World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) supplied by United Nations Environment Program - World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC). Maintaining the most up-to-date, accurate boundary geometry for the protected areas for the email alerts is a challenge as the WDPA is continuously updated due to changing boundaries, merging or delisting of certain protected areas. Because of this dynamic nature of the protected areas database, the FIRMS protected areas database is frequently out-of-date with the most current version of WDPA database. To maintain the most up-to-date boundary information for protected areas and to be in compliance with the WDPA terms and conditions, FIRMS needs to constantly update its database of protected areas. Currently, FIRMS strives to keep its database up to date by downloading the most recent

  16. Whole Blood Metabolomics by (1)H NMR Spectroscopy Provides a New Opportunity To Evaluate Coenzymes and Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagana Gowda, G A; Raftery, Daniel

    2017-04-18

    Conventional human blood metabolomics employs serum or plasma and provides a wealth of metabolic information therein. However, this approach lacks the ability to measure and evaluate important metabolites such as coenzymes and antioxidants that are present at high concentrations in red blood cells. As an important alternative to serum/plasma metabolomics, we show here that a simple (1)H NMR experiment can simultaneously measure coenzymes and antioxidants in extracts of whole human blood, in addition to the nearly 70 metabolites that were shown to be quantitated in serum/plasma recently [ Anal. Chem. 2015 , 87 , 706 - 715 ]. Coenzymes of redox reactions: oxidized/reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+) and NADH) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+) and NADPH); coenzymes of energy including adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP); and antioxidants, the sum of oxidized and reduced glutathione (GSSG and GSH) can be measured with essentially no additional effort. A new method was developed for detecting many of these unstable species without affecting other blood/blood plasma metabolites. The identities of coenzymes and antioxidants in blood NMR spectra were established combining 1D/2D NMR techniques, chemical shift databases, pH measurements and, finally, spiking with authentic compounds. This is the first study to report identification of major coenzymes and antioxidants and quantify them, simultaneously, with the large pool of other metabolites in human blood using NMR spectroscopy. Considering that the levels of coenzymes and antioxidants represent a sensitive measure of cellular functions in health and numerous diseases, the NMR method presented here potentially opens a new chapter in the metabolomics of blood.

  17. Index to Selected Outdoor Recreation Literature. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A partial index to selected outdoor recreation literature received by the Department of the Interior Library during 1966 provides 991 abstracts retrievable by subject index, name index, geographic index, and publications appendices. Subject categories include outdoor recreation resources, administration of resources and programs, recreation users'…

  18. 36 CFR 7.51 - Curecanti Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Curecanti Recreation Area. 7... SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.51 Curecanti Recreation Area. (a) Hunting... to operate within the boundaries of Curecanti National Recreation Area provided: (1) That the...

  19. Recreation in the Bear Lake basin

    OpenAIRE

    Palacios, Patsy; Luecke, Chris; Robinson, Justin

    2007-01-01

    Bear Lake has a long history of recreation and tourism. Activities such as waterskiing, swimming, and sailing are popular during the summer seasons. In the winter snowmobilers and ice anglers are drawn to the area. In January, fishing for the rare Bonneville cicso is a major event for local fishermen and tourists. No other lake in the continental United States offers such an opportunity....

  20. Outdoor recreation in American life: a national assessment of demand and supply trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; Carter Betz; J. Michael Bowker; Donald B.K. English; Shela H. Mou; John C. Bergstrom; R. Jeff Teasley; Michael A. Tarrant; John Loomis

    1999-01-01

    Outdoor Recreation in American Life is the United States' only ongoing, comprehensive assessment of the trends, current situation, and likely future of outdoor recreation demand and supply. New and different aspects of national demand, resemblances to the past, and trends in the supply of outdoor recreation opportunities, both from the private and public sectors,...

  1. 78 FR 64531 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension, Sacramento Pass Recreation Area; Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension, Sacramento Pass Recreation Area..., but not from leasing under the mineral leasing laws, to protect the Sacramento Pass Recreation Area... recreation opportunities such as hiking, horseback riding, and low-impact camping. The use of a right-of-way...

  2. Recreation Embedded State Tuning for Optimal Readiness and Effectiveness (RESTORE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Alan T.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III

    2005-01-01

    Physiological self-regulation training is a behavioral medicine intervention that has demonstrated capability to improve psychophysiological coping responses to stressful experiences and to foster optimal behavioral and cognitive performance. Once developed, these psychophysiological skills require regular practice for maintenance. A concomitant benefit of these physiologically monitored practice sessions is the opportunity to track crew psychophysiological responses to the challenges of the practice task in order to detect shifts in adaptability that may foretell performance degradation. Long-duration missions will include crew recreation periods that will afford physiological self-regulation training opportunities. However, to promote adherence to the regimen, the practice experience that occupies their recreation time must be perceived by the crew as engaging and entertaining throughout repeated reinforcement sessions on long-duration missions. NASA biocybernetic technologies and publications have developed a closed-loop concept that involves adjusting or modulating (cybernetic, for governing) a person's task environment based upon a comparison of that person's physiological responses (bio-) with a training or performance criterion. This approach affords the opportunity to deliver physiological self-regulation training in an entertaining and motivating fashion and can also be employed to create a conditioned association between effective performance state and task execution behaviors, while enabling tracking of individuals psychophysiological status over time in the context of an interactive task challenge. This paper describes the aerospace spin-off technologies in this training application area as well as the current spin-back application of the technologies to long-duration missions - the Recreation Embedded State Tuning for Optimal Readiness and Effectiveness (RESTORE) concept. The RESTORE technology is designed to provide a physiological self

  3. Community involvement in planning and management for outdoor recreation in New Zealand protected areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Sutton; Gordon Cessford

    2007-01-01

    Managing New Zealand’s protected natural and historic heritage falls largely on the Department of Conservation (DOC), which manages close to a third of the country’s land area and increasing proportions of the coastal/marine setting. Providing public access to this shared heritage through a range of recreation opportunities is a key management outcome for DOC. This...

  4. [The spa-health resort and touristic-recreational facilities of the region: the methodological aspects of their development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilina, V M; Kolesnikova, N V; Kolesnikov, N G

    2016-01-01

    well as personnel training for the sake of improvement of services to the visitors. The analysis of various aspects of recreation and tourism development has demonstrated that the services provided by the recreational and tourist systems in cooperation with the health resort infrastructure open up new employment opportunities and thus reduce the risk of social tension. The prospects for the continuation of investigations along these lines are associated with the extension of the recreational and touristic activities over the rural and countryside localities with special reference to the trans-border interactions as well as specific features of the tourist and recreational resources of the given regions and territories.

  5. Opportunities of mHealth in Preconception Care: Preferences and Experiences of Patients and Health Care Providers and Other Involved Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, Matthijs R; Koster, Maria Ph; Rosman, Ageeth N; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine Pm

    2017-08-17

    The importance of the preconception period and preconception care (PCC) are broadly acknowledged and the potential benefits regarding health promotion have been studied extensively. PCC provides the opportunity to identify, prevent, and treat modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors to optimize the health of couples trying to become pregnant. The prevalence of modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors in these couples is high, but the uptake of PCC remains low. The aim of this study is to identify the preferences and experiences of women and men (patients) trying to become pregnant and of health care providers and other involved professionals regarding mobile health (mHealth), in particular the coaching platform Smarter Pregnancy, and its potential role in PCC. Patients who participated in the Smarter Pregnancy randomized controlled trial (RCT) and health care providers and professionals also involved in PCC were invited to participate in a qualitative study. The barriers, benefits, and opportunities of big data collection by mHealth were discussed in focus group sessions, prompted with statements regarding PCC. We composed five focus groups, consisting of 27 patients in total (23 women and 4 men), who participated in the RCT, and nine health care providers and other professionals. Of the patients, 67% (18/27) were familiar with the concept of PCC, but only 15% (4/27) received any form of PCC. A majority of 56% (combined percentages of statements 1 [n=18], 2 [n=11], and 3 [n=16]) of the patients believed in the benefit of receiving PCC, and all agreed that men should be involved in PCC as well. Patients did not have a problem using anonymized data obtained from mHealth tools for scientific purposes. Patients and health care providers and other professionals both acknowledged the lack of awareness regarding the importance of PCC and stated that mHealth provides several opportunities to support clinical PCC. Our findings substantiate previous studies addressing the

  6. Ecological Settings and State Economies as Factor Inputs in the Provision of Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siderelis, Christos; Smith, Jordan W.

    2013-09-01

    State parks play a substantial role in the provision of outdoor recreation opportunities within the United States. Park operators must make crucial decisions in how they allocate capital expenditures, labor, and parkland to maintain recreation opportunities. Their decisions are influenced, in part, by the ecological characteristics of their state's park system as well as the vitality of their state's economy. In this research, we incorporate the characteristics of states' ecosystems and their local economies into a formal production analysis of the states' park systems from the years 1986 to 2011. Our analysis revealed all three factors of production were positive and inelastic. Expenditures on labor had the largest effect on both park utilization and operational expenditures. Our analysis also found a large degree of variability in the effects of ecological characteristics on both utilization and operating expenditures. Parkland utilization and operational expenditures were more elastic in areas such as Oceania and Mediterranean California relative to other ecological regions. These findings lead us to conclude that state park operators will experience variable levels of difficulty in both accommodating increasing demands for recreation from state parks and maintaining the existing quality of outdoor recreation provided within their system.

  7. Ecological settings and state economies as factor inputs in the provision of outdoor recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siderelis, Christos; Smith, Jordan W

    2013-09-01

    State parks play a substantial role in the provision of outdoor recreation opportunities within the United States. Park operators must make crucial decisions in how they allocate capital expenditures, labor, and parkland to maintain recreation opportunities. Their decisions are influenced, in part, by the ecological characteristics of their state's park system as well as the vitality of their state's economy. In this research, we incorporate the characteristics of states' ecosystems and their local economies into a formal production analysis of the states' park systems from the years 1986 to 2011. Our analysis revealed all three factors of production were positive and inelastic. Expenditures on labor had the largest effect on both park utilization and operational expenditures. Our analysis also found a large degree of variability in the effects of ecological characteristics on both utilization and operating expenditures. Parkland utilization and operational expenditures were more elastic in areas such as Oceania and Mediterranean California relative to other ecological regions. These findings lead us to conclude that state park operators will experience variable levels of difficulty in both accommodating increasing demands for recreation from state parks and maintaining the existing quality of outdoor recreation provided within their system.

  8. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics and Value of Nature-Based Recreation, Estimated via Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonter, Laura J; Watson, Keri B; Wood, Spencer A; Ricketts, Taylor H

    2016-01-01

    Conserved lands provide multiple ecosystem services, including opportunities for nature-based recreation. Managing this service requires understanding the landscape attributes underpinning its provision, and how changes in land management affect its contribution to human wellbeing over time. However, evidence from both spatially explicit and temporally dynamic analyses is scarce, often due to data limitations. In this study, we investigated nature-based recreation within conserved lands in Vermont, USA. We used geotagged photographs uploaded to the photo-sharing website Flickr to quantify visits by in-state and out-of-state visitors, and we multiplied visits by mean trip expenditures to show that conserved lands contributed US $1.8 billion (US $0.18-20.2 at 95% confidence) to Vermont's tourism industry between 2007 and 2014. We found eight landscape attributes explained the pattern of visits to conserved lands; visits were higher in larger conserved lands, with less forest cover, greater trail density and more opportunities for snow sports. Some of these attributes differed from those found in other locations, but all aligned with our understanding of recreation in Vermont. We also found that using temporally static models to inform conservation decisions may have perverse outcomes for nature-based recreation. For example, static models suggest conserved land with less forest cover receive more visits, but temporally dynamic models suggest clearing forests decreases, rather than increases, visits to these sites. Our results illustrate the importance of understanding both the spatial and temporal dynamics of ecosystem services for conservation decision-making.

  9. Recreation for Me Too.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Social Services and Community Health, Edmonton.

    This five-part manual is concerned with recreational activities for disabled persons. The first part defines four terms commonly used in reference to the disabled--impairment, disability, handicap, and inconvenience. Reasons for including the disabled in recreational activities and for developing activities for the disabled, discussed in the…

  10. Trends in Therapeutic Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ralph W.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the rapid, dramatic changes taking place in therapeutic recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The article notes the impact of changes in managed care, examines programming trends in therapeutic recreation (adventure/outdoor education, competitive sports, handcycling, health enhancement activities, and…

  11. Outdoor recreation and ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentin, Sandra

    similarities and differences in outdoor recreation patterns of adolescents with ethnic Danish and ethnic minority background. There are e.g. no differences in the number of days spent on outdoor recreation pr. year. Among both the ethnic Danish and ethnic minority group adolescents, the stated reasons...... for visiting natural areas were most often social, such as being with family and friends, and health and well-being reasons (exercise and relaxing from stress). However, the ethnic minority adolescents more often stated “to be with family” as an important reason for visiting green spaces compared...... to their ethnic Danish counterparts. The adolescents use different areas for outdoor recreation: the adolescents with ethnic Danish background use sports grounds for outdoor recreation, while adolescents with ethnic minority backgrounds use urban green spaces for outdoor recreation. For activities reported...

  12. Attitudes and Training Needs of New England HIV Care and Addiction Treatment Providers: Opportunities for Better Integration of HIV and Alcohol Treatment Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Brian T; Kahler, Christopher W; Colby, Suzanne M; McHugh, R Kathryn; Squires, Daniel; Fitzgerald, Brianne; Operario, Don; Gallagher, Donna; Monti, Peter M; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2015-03-01

    Unhealthy alcohol use is common among HIV-infected patients and contributes to co-morbidities, cognitive decline, unprotected sex, and poor medication adherence. Studies consistently show missed opportunities to address unhealthy alcohol use as part of care. Although treatment of other drug use has been integrated into HIV care in some settings, more information is needed regarding provider attitudes regarding the need for integration of alcohol treatment and HIV care. We surveyed 119 HIV and 159 addiction providers regarding the following domains: existing knowledge, desire for new knowledge (with subdomains relative advantage, compatibility, and complexity of integrating knowledge), and individual and program development needs. Scale scores for each domain were correlated with demographics to identify factors associated with training need. Both HIV and addiction providers reported agreement with statements of existing knowledge and the need for additional skills. The priority attributed to training, however, was low for both groups. Knowledge and perceived prevalence of HIV and unhealthy alcohol use increased with years of experience. Perceived prevalence correlated with compatibility but not the relative advantage of training. Though addressing alcohol use and HIV was acknowledged to be important, the priority of this was low, particularly early career providers. These providers may be important targets for training focusing on motivating coordination of care and skills related to assessment and counseling.

  13. Natural areas and urban populations: communication and environmental education challenges and actions in outdoor recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah J. Chavez

    2005-01-01

    Challenges, opportunities, and actions exist in areas where large urban populations interface with natural areas, such as outdoor recreation sites in southern California. Challenges in the interface include intense recreation use, public safety issues, and complex information strategies. Research results on communications and environmental education offer opportunities...

  14. Providing Feedback, Orientation and Opportunities for Reflection as Key Elements for Successful Mentoring Programs: Reviewing a Program for Future Business Education Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Riebenbauer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction to teaching is critical for novice teachers. Near the end of their master’s program, students of Business Education and Development in Austria spend one semester at an assigned school. They are introduced to teaching, while being assisted by peer students, mentoring teachers, and a companion course. Mentors receive special training and preparation in advance, thus contributing to a high quality mentoring program. The program is organized threefold: (1 providing feedback, (2 opportunities for reflection and (3 career orientation. The purpose of this paper is to assess key elements of successful mentoring programs and to question which competences of mentors contribute most to the success of those programs. Between 2012 and 2015, 188 persons (student teachers and their mentors responded to an online survey at the end of their mentoring program. Additionally, data from a study (1,245 questionnaires regarding the student teachers’ perception of their own competence was utilized, allowing for a comparison of student teacher confidence in their abilities before and after the mentoring program. The present results provide insight into the key elements of successful mentoring programs; both from a student teacher’s and mentor’s perspective. During the semester, students showed an increase regarding their self-perception of their professional competences. It was found that students and mentoring teachers valued feedback after each lesson more than feedback in regular meetings. Opportunities for reflection (e.g. exchange with peer students, learning diaries were considered helpful. The mentoring program helped students to decide whether to become a teacher or not.

  15. Assessment of Recreational Facilities in Federal Capital City, Abuja, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Kanayo Ezeamaka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abuja Master Plan provided development of adequate Green Areas and other Recreational Facilities within the Federal Capital City (FCC, as part of its sustainability principles and provided for these recreational facilities within each neighborhood (FCDA, 1979. However, there have been several recent foul cries about the negative development of recreational facilities and the abuse of the Master Plan in the FCC.  The motivation for carrying out this study arose from the observation that recreational facilities in Phase 1 of the Federal Capital City Abuja are not clearly developed as intended by the policy makers and thus, the need to identify the recreational facilities in the Phase 1 of FCC and observe their level of development as well as usage. The field survey revealed that the Central Business District and Gazupe have higher numbers of recreational facilities with 45 and 56. While Wuse II (A08 and Wuse II (A07 Districts have lesser recreational facilities with 10 and 17. The field survey further revealed that all the districts in Phase 1 have over 35% cases of land use changes from recreational facilities to other use. The survey shows that over 65% of these recreational facilities are fully developed. The study also shows that just about 11% of the recreational sporting facilities were developed in line with the Abuja Master Plan in Phase 1. The study revealed that recreational facilities in Phase 1 of the FCC, Abuja has not being developed in compliance with the Abuja Master Plan.

  16. Recreational System Optimization to Reduce Conflict on Public Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilling, Fraser; Boggs, Jennifer; Reed, Sarah

    2012-09-01

    In response to federal administrative rule, the Tahoe National Forest (TNF), California, USA engaged in trail-route prioritization for motorized recreation (e.g., off-highway-vehicles) and other recreation types. The prioritization was intended to identify routes that were suitable and ill-suited for maintenance in a transportation system. A recreational user survey was conducted online ( n = 813) for user preferences for trail system characteristics, recreational use patterns, and demographics. Motorized trail users and non-motorized users displayed very clear and contrasting preferences for the same system. As has been found by previous investigators, non-motorized users expressed antagonism to motorized use on the same recreational travel system, whereas motorized users either supported multiple-use routes or dismissed non-motorized recreationists' concerns. To help the TNF plan for reduced conflict, a geographic information system (GIS) based modeling approach was used to identify recreational opportunities and potential environmental impacts of all travel routes. This GIS-based approach was based on an expert-derived rule set. The rules addressed particular environmental and recreation concerns in the TNF. Route segments were identified that could be incorporated into minimal-impact networks to support various types of recreation. The combination of potential impacts and user-benefits supported an optimization approach for an appropriate recreational travel network to minimize environmental impacts and user-conflicts in a multi-purpose system.

  17. Recreational system optimization to reduce conflict on public lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilling, Fraser; Boggs, Jennifer; Reed, Sarah

    2012-09-01

    In response to federal administrative rule, the Tahoe National Forest (TNF), California, USA engaged in trail-route prioritization for motorized recreation (e.g., off-highway-vehicles) and other recreation types. The prioritization was intended to identify routes that were suitable and ill-suited for maintenance in a transportation system. A recreational user survey was conducted online (n = 813) for user preferences for trail system characteristics, recreational use patterns, and demographics. Motorized trail users and non-motorized users displayed very clear and contrasting preferences for the same system. As has been found by previous investigators, non-motorized users expressed antagonism to motorized use on the same recreational travel system, whereas motorized users either supported multiple-use routes or dismissed non-motorized recreationists' concerns. To help the TNF plan for reduced conflict, a geographic information system (GIS) based modeling approach was used to identify recreational opportunities and potential environmental impacts of all travel routes. This GIS-based approach was based on an expert-derived rule set. The rules addressed particular environmental and recreation concerns in the TNF. Route segments were identified that could be incorporated into minimal-impact networks to support various types of recreation. The combination of potential impacts and user-benefits supported an optimization approach for an appropriate recreational travel network to minimize environmental impacts and user-conflicts in a multi-purpose system.

  18. Outdoor recreation and ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentin, Sandra

    to their ethnic Danish counterparts. The adolescents use different areas for outdoor recreation: the adolescents with ethnic Danish background use sports grounds for outdoor recreation, while adolescents with ethnic minority backgrounds use urban green spaces for outdoor recreation. For activities reported...... often reported using green areas to “drink beer with friends” and “do sunbathing”. The third paper reflects on the different national approaches towards ethnic minorities’ access to natural areas, in four example-countries Germany, Denmark, United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. This was done through...

  19. Tablet and Face-to-Face Hybrid Professional Development: Providing Earth Systems Science Educators Authentic Research Opportunities through The GLOBE Program at Purdue University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, K.; Branch, B. D.; Smith, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program is a worldwide hands-on, primary and secondary school-based science and education program (www.globe.gov). GLOBE's vision promotes and supports students, teachers and scientists to collaborate on inquiry-based authentic science investigations of the environment and the Earth system working in close partnership with NASA, NOAA and NSF Earth System Science Projects (ESSP's) in study and research about the dynamics of Earth's environment. GLOBE Partners conduct face-to-face Professional Development in more than 110 countries, providing authentic scientific research experience in five investigation areas: atmosphere, earth as a system, hydrology, land cover, and soil. This presentation will provide a sample for a new framework of Professional Development that was implemented in July 2013 at Purdue University lead by Mr. Steven Smith who has tested GLOBE training materials for future training. The presentation will demonstrate how institutions can provide educators authentic scientific research opportunities through various components, including: - Carrying out authentic research investigations - Learning how to enter their authentic research data into the GLOBE database and visualize it on the GLOBE website - Learn how to access to NASA's Earth System Science resources via GLOBE's new online 'e-Training Program' - Exploring the connections of their soil protocol measurements and the history of the soil in their area through iPad soils app - LIDAR data exposure, Hydrology data exposure

  20. Expanding & strengthening outdoor recreation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter S. Hopkins

    1971-01-01

    Though the Forest Service has pioneered in outdoor recreation research, the funding for recreation research has been inadequate. Specific needs for research are outlined. There is a need to define recreation and recreation research in terms that busy legislators can understand.

  1. Outdoor Recreation Action. Report 25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This report from the Department of Interior presents information concerning individual state actions and projects related to the broad topic of outdoor recreation. Included are data on the following topics: rights-of-way for recreation; federal financing of outdoor recreation; state and local financing of outdoor recreation; federal acquisition…

  2. Trends in outdoor recreation legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    George H. Siehl

    1980-01-01

    The two decades which have passed since the era of the Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission (ORRRC) have been active and fruitful in terms of Federal recreation legislation. The Commission and its final report "Outdoor Recreation for America" strongly influenced the burst of recreation legislation in the 1960's. Even today, the studies prepared...

  3. Attitudes towards recreational hunting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamborg, Christian; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard

    2017-01-01

    a negative attitude to recreational hunting. Older respondents and rural residents had more positive attitudes towards hunting than younger and urban residents. Some of the conditions under which hunting occurs affected attitudes negatively, especially the hunting of farm-reared and released game birds...... to the commercial aspect of hunting and this could result in tighter regulation with further effects on management practices. Management Implications The public opinions and public preferences concerning recreational hunting are complex. However, this study revealed some factors relevant for regulatory...... and managerial development in relation to outdoor recreation: age (younger respondents were least supportive of hunting), urbanisation (living in an urban environment enhanced negative attitudes), compatibility of recreational hunting with other outdoor leisure activities....

  4. Outdoor Recreation Sites Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The RECSITES data layer contains a wide range of recreational sites in Vermont. This point data layer includes parks, ski areas, boat access points, and many other...

  5. Recreational Boating Statistics 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Every year, the USCG compiles statistics on reported recreational boating accidents. These statistics are derived from accident reports that are filed by the owners...

  6. Recreational Angler Attitudes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Fisheries implemented a national survey of saltwater recreational anglers beginning in February 2013. The survey was implemented in six regions including the...

  7. Recreational Boating Statistics 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Every year, the USCG compiles statistics on reported recreational boating accidents. These statistics are derived from accident reports that are filed by the owners...

  8. Recreational Boating Statistics 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Every year, the USCG compiles statistics on reported recreational boating accidents. These statistics are derived from accident reports that are filed by the owners...

  9. Elbrus – chronology, recreation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergii Bershov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to conduct research of the historical and geographical factors of becoming and development of the Elbrus region as a center of tourism and mountaineering, to consider the use of mountain and natural complexes for active rest, to give a recreational assessment of the use of mountain natural complexes. Material & Methods: analysis of literature sources, analysis of documents, organizational analysis. Results: the historical and geographical analysis of the mountain-natural territory of the Elbrus region is carried out, the recreational assessment of the use of mountain natural complexes for active recreation is displed. Conclusions: analysis of the spatial assessment of the recreational and tourism-mountaineering potential of mountain natural territorial systems, allows choosing the safest and most attractive routes and classifying them according to complexity and safety.

  10. Care coordination between specialty care and primary care: a focus group study of provider perspectives on strong practices and improvement opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bo Kim,1,2 Michelle A Lucatorto,3 Kara Hawthorne,4 Janis Hersh,5 Raquel Myers,6 A Rani Elwy,1,7 Glenn D Graham81Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research, Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial VA Hospital, Bedford, 2Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 3Office of Nursing Services, Department of Veterans Affairs, 4Chief Business Office, Purchased Care, Washington, DC, 5New England Veterans Engineering Resource Center, Boston, MA, 6SJ Quinney College of Law, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 7Department of Health Policy and Management, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 8Specialty Care Services (10P4E, Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, DC, USAAbstract: Care coordination between the specialty care provider (SCP and the primary care provider (PCP is a critical component of safe, efficient, and patient-centered care. Veterans Health Administration conducted a series of focus groups of providers, from specialty care and primary care clinics at VA Medical Centers nationally, to assess 1 what SCPs and PCPs perceive to be current practices that enable or hinder effective care coordination with one another and 2 how these perceptions differ between the two groups of providers. A qualitative thematic analysis of the gathered data validates previous studies that identify communication as being an important enabler of coordination, and uncovers relationship building between specialty care and primary care (particularly through both formal and informal relationship-building opportunities such as collaborative seminars and shared lunch space, respectively to be the most notable facilitator of effective communication between the two sides. Results from this study suggest concrete next steps that medical facilities can take to improve care coordination, using as their basis the mutual understanding and respect developed between SCPs and PCPs through relationship-building efforts

  11. Lost opportunities to identify and treat HIV-positive patients: results from a baseline assessment of provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling (PITC) in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Saeed; Schwarz, Monica; Flick, Robert J; Rees, Chris A; Harawa, Mwelura; Simon, Katie; Robison, Jeff A; Kazembe, Peter N; Kim, Maria H

    2016-04-01

    To assess implementation of provider-initiated testing and counselling (PITC) for HIV in Malawi. A review of PITC practices within 118 departments in 12 Ministry of Health (MoH) facilities across Malawi was conducted. Information on PITC practices was collected via a health facility survey. Data describing patient visits and HIV tests were abstracted from routinely collected programme data. Reported PITC practices were highly variable. Most providers practiced symptom-based PITC. Antenatal clinics and maternity wards reported widespread use of routine opt-out PITC. In 2014, there was approximately 1 HIV test for every 15 clinic visits. HIV status was ascertained in 94.3% (5293/5615) of patients at tuberculosis clinics, 92.6% (30,675/33,142) of patients at antenatal clinics and 49.4% (6871/13,914) of patients at sexually transmitted infection clinics. Reported challenges to delivering PITC included test kit shortages (71/71 providers), insufficient physical space (58/71) and inadequate number of HIV counsellors (32/71) while providers from inpatient units cited the inability to test on weekends. Various models of PITC currently exist at MoH facilities in Malawi. Only antenatal and maternity clinics demonstrated high rates of routine opt-out PITC. The low ratio of facility visits to HIV tests suggests missed opportunities for HIV testing. However, the high proportion of patients at TB and antenatal clinics with known HIV status suggests that routine PITC is feasible. These results underscore the need to develop clear, standardised PITC policy and protocols, and to address obstacles of limited health commodities, infrastructure and human resources. © 2016 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Examining the nutritional quality of food and beverage consumed at Melbourne aquatic and recreation centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelsen-Robinson, Tara; Chung, Alexandra; Khalil, Marianne; Wong, Evelyn; Kurzeme, Ariana; Peeters, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Examine the nutritional quality of food and beverages consumed across a sample of community aquatic and recreation centres in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Interviewer-administered surveys of randomly selected patrons attending four aquatic and recreation centres were conducted to ascertain food and beverage items consumed over two data collection periods (May-June 2014, January-February 2015). We selected centres in and around metropolitan Melbourne with a sit-down cafeteria and children's swimming classes. We classified items by government nutrient profiling guidelines; 'green' (best choice), 'amber' (choose carefully) or 'red' (limit). A total of 2,326 surveys were conducted (response rate 63%). Thirty-five per cent of surveyed patrons consumed food or beverages while at the centre; 54% of patrons purchased from the café and 61% brought items to the centre. More than half the food consumed from the café was 'red', increasing to 92% for children. One in five children visiting the centre consumed a 'red' item bought from the centre café. The nutritional quality of food and beverages consumed at recreation centres was generally poor, with the on-site cafés providing the majority of discretionary items consumed. Implications for public health: Community aquatic and recreation centres provide an opportunity to promote healthy eating by increasing the provision of healthy options and limiting discretionary food and drink items. © 2017 The Authors.

  13. EnviroAtlas - Recreation, Culture, and Aesthetics Metrics for Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    This EnviroAtlas web service supports research and online mapping activities related to EnviroAtlas (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas). The Recreation, Culture, and Aesthetics category in this web service includes layers illustrating the ecosystems and natural resources that provide inherent cultural and aesthetic value or recreation opportunity, the need or demand for these amenities, the impacts associated with their presence and accessibility, and factors that place stress on the natural environment's capability to provide these benefits. EnviroAtlas allows the user to interact with a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services for the conterminous United States. Additional descriptive information about each attribute in this web service is located within each web service layer (see Full Metadata hyperlink) or can be found in its associated EnviroAtlas Fact Sheet (https://www.epa.gov/enviroatlas/enviroatlas-fact-sheets).

  14. Myocardial infarction & sudden death in recreational master marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Suzanne Elizabeth; Coviello, Jessica

    2011-02-01

    This review of the current literature on myocardial infarction and sudden death in recreational master marathon runners aims to help raise awareness of the scope of the problem to primary care providers, and to provide guidelines for educating and screening in recreational master marathon runners.

  15. Assessing the Recreation Value of Urban Woodland Using the Ecosystem Service Approach in Two Forests in the Munich Metropolitan Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Lupp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recreation is considered an important ecosystem services (ES in urban woodlands and puts pressure on other ES. Visitor management strategies can be tools to safeguard biodiversity and ES. On-site data are necessary to evaluate the demand for outdoor recreation opportunities in urban woodlands, but also for providing more reliable values for monetization as a basis for multifunctional forest management, and for raising awareness for the importance of urban proximate forests. Such information can also be used for the assessment and monetization of socio-cultural ES, and hence, contribute to developing market-based mechanisms or to promoting these ES. In our paper, we demonstrate methods to describe recreational demand by collecting data from interviews and using camera traps in two forests in the north of Munich for visitor counting. Visitor numbers in the forests were much greater than rough estimations; visitors also had quite long travelling distances to the forests. Jogging or Nordic walking were proven to be important recreational activities. In some of the monitored locations, almost half of the recreationists carried out these sports. Depending on the method chosen, the calculative monetary value of recreation reached up to 15,440 Euro per hectare per year.

  16. Outdoor recreation and ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentin, Sandra

    The thesis has three aims: The first aim is to review the existing knowledge about ethnic minorities’ outdoor recreation in Europe. The second aim is to investigate similarities and differences in outdoor recreation patterns between adolescents with ethnic Danish and ethnic minority background...... carried out during some part of the year, “going for a walk”, “barbequing”, “taking a trip with family” were frequently cited by both groups, but more common among adolescents with ethnic minority background. “Walking the dog” was much more common among adolescents with Danish background, who also more...

  17. Design & layout of recreation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard R. Orr

    1971-01-01

    Design and layout of recreation facilities is a problem solving process that must be divorced from the emotionalism that has shrouded outdoor recreation and must deal deliberately with the growing information concerning people and natural resources.

  18. 77 FR 36250 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ... Forest Service Recreation Resource Advisory Committees AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Call for nominations for the Pacific Northwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Secretary of Agriculture has established the Pacific Northwest Recreation Resource Advisory Committee (Recreation RACs...

  19. Using social media to quantify nature-based tourism and recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Spencer A; Guerry, Anne D; Silver, Jessica M; Lacayo, Martin

    2013-10-17

    Scientists have traditionally studied recreation in nature by conducting surveys at entrances to major attractions such as national parks. This method is expensive and provides limited spatial and temporal coverage. A new source of information is available from online social media websites such as flickr. Here, we test whether this source of "big data" can be used to approximate visitation rates. We use the locations of photographs in flickr to estimate visitation rates at 836 recreational sites around the world, and use information from the profiles of the photographers to derive travelers' origins. We compare these estimates to empirical data at each site and conclude that the crowd-sourced information can indeed serve as a reliable proxy for empirical visitation rates. This new approach offers opportunities to understand which elements of nature attract people to locations around the globe, and whether changes in ecosystems will alter visitation rates.

  20. 76 FR 33778 - Notice of Intent To Collect Fees on Public Land in the San Joaquin River Gorge Special Recreation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ... collect fees at all specialized recreation sites, or where the BLM at Federal expense provides facilities... would purchase a Recreation Use Permit (RUP) to cover the standard amenity day use fee to recreate... Recreation Pass do not have to pay the standard amenity fee and are also entitled to discounts on expanded...

  1. Gateway National Recreation Area, Jamaica Bay Unit alternative transportation feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    The National Park Service Gateway National Recreation Area (GATE) was created to provide convenient access to outdoor recreation in the National Park System for residents and visitors to the New York City (NYC) area. The Volpe Center completed a numb...

  2. Private recreation enterprise economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm I. Bevins

    1971-01-01

    Cash returns to recreation enterprise labor and management are low. Low returns are associated with poor location, small size, and short season. Land-value appreciation may offset low returns for some operators and explain why they stay in business. Profit maximization is not always the prime entrepreneurial goal: personal and noneconomic considerations or long-run...

  3. Mental Recreation in Wonderland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendlebury, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The author argues that children's books are not, as commonly held, either didactic or entertaining and that successful juvenile literature teaches what Lewis Carroll, who wrote "Alice in Wonderland," termed "mental recreation." Pendlebury contends that learning and play, far from being opposites, can closely resemble one…

  4. Job satisfaction among recreation practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin Parks; Andrew Holdnak

    2002-01-01

    Job satisfaction among recreation professionals can be affected by many working conditions. This study has investigated the impact fourteen variables had on the job satisfaction of recreation practitioners. The sample consisted of 106 responses from members of the Resort and Commercial Recreation Association (RCRA). The results of the regression analysis for job...

  5. Updated outdoor recreation use values on national forests and other public lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John. Loomis

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes more than 30 years of the literature on net economic value of outdoor recreation on public lands. The report provides average net willingness to pay or consumer surplus per day for 30 recreation activities at the national level. Values per day by recreation activity are also presented by census region of the United States. Detailed tables provide...

  6. Exploring quality circles in the provision of therapeutic recreation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhite, B; Terry, B; Yoshioka, C F; McLean, D D

    1983-01-01

    This article provides a discussion of the advantages of implementing a Quality Circles program into a therapeutic recreation setting. Quality Circles, a Japanese management concept, has received increased support in American industry and human service organizations. It is founded on the principle of employee involvement and concern for the improvement of the organization. Disadvantages of Quality Circles include: (1) lack of management support; (2) time required to implement; (3) failure to hire consultants; and (4) improper composition of Circles. Advantages of Quality Circles are (1) improved communication; (2) management awareness of employee job-related concerns; (3) personal growth and development; (4) enhanced decision making skills; (5) increased individual power; (5) improved motivation; and (6) opportunities for recognition of individual improvement.

  7. Contributions of the US state park system to nature recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siikamäki, Juha

    2011-08-23

    Nature recreation in the United States concentrates in publicly provided natural areas. They are costly to establish and maintain, but their societal contributions are difficult to measure. Here, a unique approach is developed to quantifying nature recreation services generated by the US state park system. The assessment first uses data from five national surveys conducted between 1975 and 2007 to consistently measure the amount of time used for nature recreation. The surveys comprise two official federal surveys and their predecessors. Each survey was designed to elicit nationally representative, detailed data on how people divide their time into different activities. State-level data on time use for nature recreation were then matched with information on the availability of state parks and other potentially important drivers of recreation, so that statistical estimation methods for nonexperimental panel data (difference-in-differences) could be used to examine the net contribution of state parks to nature recreation. The results show that state parks have a robust positive effect on nature recreation. For example, the approximately 2 million acres of state parks established between 1975 and 2007 are estimated to contribute annually 600 million hours of nature recreation (2.7 h per capita, approximately 9% of all nature recreation). All state parks generate annually an estimated 2.2 billion hours of nature recreation (9.7 h per capita; approximately 33% of all nature recreation). Using conventional approaches to valuing time, the estimated time value of nature recreation services generated by the US state park system is approximately $14 billion annually.

  8. Promoting recreation and leisure in the workplace | Gungaphul ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leisure and recreational activities provided to employees give them a medium to balance the work load with other leisure interests and a platform to socialise. Employees are spending more time in their workplace than ever before, and have less time to devote to leisure and recreational activities outside their workplace.

  9. 36 CFR 30.4 - Recreation District II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... permitted in Recreation District II, provided the Shasta County Planning Commission has issued a use permit..., and greenhouses. (ii) Stands for retail sales of products produced on the premises. (iii) Measures to... operations will cause a minimum of interference with public recreational use and enjoyment of the area. (viii...

  10. Leadership for Recreation, Parks, and Leisure Services. Fourth Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edginton, Christopher R.; Hudson, Susan D.; Scholl, Kathleen G.; Lauzon, Lara

    2011-01-01

    "Leadership for Recreation, Parks and Leisure Services" presents new perspectives on the importance of leadership in the profession. Integrating theory with practice, the book provides foundational perspectives in the study of leadership at all levels--direct service, supervisory, managerial and community/civic--in recreation, parks and…

  11. A systematic review of recreation patterns and preferences of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Students with physical disabilities at higher education institutions are often excluded from recreational activities due to lack of appropriate inclusive integration programmes. This study systematically reviewed literature that identified recreational patterns and preferences of students with physical disabilities to provide ...

  12. Index to Selected Outdoor Recreation Literature. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A partial index to selected outdoor recreation literature received by the Department of the Interior Library during late 1966 and the first six months of 1967 provides 847 abstracts which are retrievable by subject, name, and geographic indexes. Subject categories include outdoor recreation resources, administration of resources and programs,…

  13. Outdoor recreation in shifting societal and natural landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda H. Mockrin; J. M.  Bowker; Katherine  Smith; Cindi  West

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor recreation contributes to public health, supports hundreds of thousands of jobs, and  provides billions of dollars annually to rural economies. Visitors to federal lands alone spent $51  billion in 2012 in nearby communities during their trips to recreate on public lands and waters  (Forest Service National Center for Natural Resources Economic Research 2014)....

  14. An assessment of recreational bank angling in the Free State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recreational angling is an important form of utilisation of inland fisheries in South Africa but there is little information on this sector. The objective of this study was to provide an assessment of recreational bank angling in the Free State Province using licence sale and tournament data. During 2013 and 2014, 8 256 and 7 ...

  15. Recreational potential of Kiev region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Poltavets

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It analyzes the recreational potential of the territory of the Kiev region, which focuses on all types of land on the main intended purpose. The most favorable conditions for recreation are formed on the lands of recreation, recreation, historical and cultural, natural reserve fund and other environmental protection, forestry purposes, and water resources. The area of land corresponding categories are significantly (3‐5 times inferior standards adopted in the European Union. The main directions of development of recreational land use for the future are determined.

  16. Assessing Nature-Based Recreation to Support Economic Development and Environmental Sustainability Extension Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Bi, Xiang; Larkin, Sherry; Longanecker, James

    2016-01-01

    In support of community development, natural resource, and other Extension programs, the research reported here aimed to identify current and potential outdoor recreational opportunities in the St. Johns River Basin, an inland area in northeastern Florida. We identify the characteristics of the visitors participating in the recreational activities…

  17. Black/white outdoor recreation preferences and participation: Illinois State Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Dwyer; Paul H. Gobster

    1992-01-01

    Black/white comparisons of outdoor recreation preferences and behavior from a statewide survey identify a significantly greater black orientation to “developed sites” and “social interaction.” Strategies are recommended to enhance outdoor recreation opportunities for blacks, and long-term research needs are identified.

  18. An exploratory study of the outdoor recreation participation of families who have a child under sixteen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob Du Lee; Alan Graefe; Robert Burns

    2007-01-01

    Family recreation has been recognized as an effective way to nurture family customs and promote healthy youth development. In particular, outdoor-based recreation that includes inherent challenges often offers opportunities for a family to grow together and promotes family cohesion and youth development. Building on earlier research, this study attempts to further...

  19. Long-term Outdoor Recreation Participation Projections for Public Land Management Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hof, John G.; Kaiser, H. Fred

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical structure for projecting long-term outdoor recreation demand is presented and demonstrated, using data from an outdoor recreation survey by the United States Department of Interior. Since the availability of opportunities seems to influence participation significantly, future planning should take into account supply-demand…

  20. Vandalism and outdoor recreation: symposium proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam S. Alfano; Arthur W. [tech. coord.] Magil

    1976-01-01

    Resource managers, law enforcement officers, designers, and social scientists provide 24 papers giving an overview of vandalism on outdoor recreation areas; a measure of the difficult control problems which must be solved; some insights for design of buildings, fixtures, and site layouts to reduce or repel vandalism; and a profile of vandals, with respect to the...

  1. Measuring users' response to higher recreation fees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen D. Reiling; Hsiang Tai Cheng; Cheryl Trott

    1992-01-01

    One of the arguments against higher fees at publicly-provided recreational facilities is that higher fees may force low-income users to reduce their use of facilities more than high-income users, or force them to stop using the facilities altogether if they cannot afford the higher fee. Measuring the impact of higher fees on current users with different income levels...

  2. Description and Initial Evaluation of a Text Message Based Reporting Method for Marine Recreational Anglers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Scott Baker Jr; Ian Oeschger

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Despite the large number of marine recreational anglers in the United States, there exist few opportunities for individuals to contribute self-reported effort and catch data directly to fisheries managers...

  3. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recreation resource management challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald T. Purvis

    1980-01-01

    This paper provides a brief legislative history of Corps responsibilities for public recreation, outlines its relationships with non-federal agencies and organizations and describes a number of environmental concerns it sees in its new outlook for management of recreation resources. A Recreation- Resource Management System is also described that contains data on the...

  4. From recreation to niche tourism: The transformation of birdwatching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Birdwatching is a subsector of wildlife tourism that focuses explicitly on looking at bird populations. Over the past decade there has emerged a growing international literature about the role of birdwatching as a recreational activity and increasingly as a niche form of tourism. Recognition of the potential opportunities ...

  5. 36 CFR 1002.23 - Recreation fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation fees. 1002.23... RECREATION § 1002.23 Recreation fees. (a) Recreation fees shall be charged in the area administered by the Presidio Trust to the same extent that recreation fees have been established for the Golden Gate National...

  6. 36 CFR 2.23 - Recreation fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation fees. 2.23 Section... PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.23 Recreation fees. (a) Recreation fees shall be established as... sites, facilities, equipment or services, or participating in group activities, recreation events, or...

  7. Recreational Fishing Plan : Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the Recreational Fishing Plan for Cypress Creek NWR. The Plan provides an introduction to the Refuge, information about conformance with statutory...

  8. Survey of recreational fishing in Canada, 2005

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    The 2005 Survey of Recreational Fishing in Canada collected information about recreational fishing activities to assess the economic and social importance of recreational fisheries to Canada's provinces and territories...

  9. Recreational Limits in a World of Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dustin, Daniel L.

    1984-01-01

    The responsibility of recreation professionals is to encourage others to recreate in more sensitive ways, rather than highly consumptive, power-based ways. The psychology of affluence and limits on resources and their influence on recreational activities are discussed. (DF)

  10. Social media: opportunities for quality improvement and lessons for providers-a networked model for patient-centered care through digital engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornkessel, Alexandra; Furberg, Robert; Lefebvre, R Craig

    2014-07-01

    Social media brings a new dimension to health care for patients, providers, and their support networks. Increasing evidence demonstrates that patients who are more actively involved in their healthcare experience have better health outcomes and incur lower costs. In the field of cardiology, social media are proposed as innovative tools for the education and update of clinicians, physicians, nurses, and medical students. This article reviews the use of social media by healthcare providers and patients and proposes a model of "networked care" that integrates the use of digital social networks and platforms by both patients and providers and offers recommendations for providers to optimize their use and understanding of social media for quality improvement.

  11. To the matter of the educated development of the construction industry of recreational territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermakov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rational creation of the consumer quality of constructions, which is taking into account some cultural, historical and other, accepted for society development paradigms enters to replace mass sustainable development of the industry of a construction in case of development of the recreational territories around megalopolises, using intellectual systems in a construction, ecological, energy-saving technologies in increase in a consumer evaluation of quality. For the residential development of the recreational territories of cities it is important to provide not only complex conditions of their development, to keep their potential for future generations, providing their social-and-economic development, to consider national and climatic features, but also to use their potential opportunities and traditions of the people inhabiting them, rationally and economically. The educated development of the construction industry is the new term entered into the use of constructors, when the consumer quality of building and structures meets national preferences taking into account traditions and advanced achievements in the use of materials, architectural and project decisions, production technologies and climatic opportunities with the minimum damage to the environment. Its accomplishment assumes enhancement and introduction of local-and-standard regulation with implementation of innovative solutions.

  12. Three approaches to time valuation in recreation demand: a study of the Snake River recreation area in eastern Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, John R; Johnson, Donn; Taylor, R G

    2012-12-15

    Three travel cost models are used to estimate non-fishing recreation demand at the Snake River reservoirs recreation area in eastern Washington. The opportunity cost of time is specified in the "traditional" and McConnell-Strand models as a fraction of the exogenous market wage rate and in the two-step decision model as a function of socioeconomic attributes of the recreationists. Benefits per person per trip were $90, $35, and $46 respectively, for the three models. Boaters visit the site more than three times as often as non-boaters resulting in higher annual benefits for boaters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Medical Care Provided Under California's Workers' Compensation Program: Effects of the Reforms and Additional Opportunities to Improve the Quality and Efficiency of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Barbara O; Timbie, Justin W; Sorbero, Melony E

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, significant changes have been made to the California workers' compensation (WC) system. The Commission on Health and Safety and Workers' Compensation (CHSWC) asked the RAND Corporation to examine the impact that these changes have on the medical care provided to injured workers. This study synthesizes findings from interviews and available information regarding the implementation of the changes affecting WC medical care and identifies areas in which additional changes might increase the quality and efficiency of care delivered under the WC system. To improve incentives for efficiently providing medically appropriate care, California should revise its fee schedule allowances for services provided by hospitals to inpatients, freestanding ambulatory surgery centers, and physicians, create nonmonetary incentives for providing medically appropriate care in the medical provider network (MPN) context through more-selective contracting with providers and reducing medical review requirements for high-performing physicians; reduce incentives for inappropriate prescribing practices by curtailing in-office physician dispensing; and implement pharmacy benefit network regulations. To increase accountability for performance, California should revise the MPN certification process to place accountability for meeting MPN standards on the entity contracting with the physician network; strengthen Division of Workers' Compensation (DWC) authorities to provide intermediate sanctions for failure to comply with MPN requirements; and modify the Labor Code to remove payers and MPNs from the definition of individually identifiable data so that performance on key measures can be publicly available. To facilitate monitoring and oversight, California should provide DWC with more flexibility to add needed data elements to medical data reporting and provide penalties for a claim administrator failing to comply with the data-reporting requirements; require that medical cost

  14. Recreation economic values for estimating outdoor recreation economic benefits from the National Forest System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall S. Rosenberger; Eric M. White; Jeffrey D. Kline; Claire. Cvitanovich

    2017-01-01

    Natural resource professionals are often tasked with weighing the benefits and costs of changes in ecosystem services associated with land management alternatives and decisions. In many cases, federal regulations even require land managers and planners to account for these values explicitly. Outdoor recreation is a key ecosystem service provided by national forests and...

  15. Opportunity Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Louise Møller; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Tollestrup, Christian

    2012-01-01

    or development oriented, the act of ‘recognition’ is still a central part of the definition. Recently the term “Opportunity Design” has been introduced, suggesting that opportunities can be proactively and intentionally designed. However, the relatedness between the opportunity recognition process...... and opportunity design is not clear. Furthermore, there is still a lack of approaches, methods and tools, which can support entrepreneurs in designing the entrepreneurial opportunities. In this paper, we take steps towards defining opportunity design in respect to the opportunity recognition process, and identify...... some of the specific approaches applicable to the design of opportunities. By looking at industrial designers working with entrepreneurial opportunities, it becomes evident that there is a set of approaches, which can turn the opportunity recognition process into an intentional and proactive process....

  16. The geography of recreational physical activity in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, Esther; Jones, Andy P

    2011-01-01

    Levels of physical activity have declined considerably over recent decades in England, and there is evidence that activity patterns vary across areas. Previous studies of the geography of physical activity have frequently relied on model based synthetic estimates. Using data from a large population survey this study develops a direct measure of recreational physical activity and investigates variations in activity patterns across English Local Authorities. For both sexes the results show a distinct geography of recreational physical activity associated with north/south variations and urban/rural status. The environmental and behavioural factors driving those patterns are still poorly understood. We conclude that the variations observed might reflect recreational opportunities and the socio-cultural context of areas. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Association Between Perceived Health Care Provider Support and Satisfaction with Insulin Pumps in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Opportunities for Pharmacists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Brooke Jowers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to describe parents’ perceived healthcare provider support for integrating technology, satisfaction with insulin pump use in their child with T1DM, and the relationship between parents’ perceived healthcare provider support and satisfaction with insulin pump use. Methods: A cross-sectional, correlational design was used to collect data for the present study. The study was conducted through an Internet survey among Mid-South parents who have a child with T1DM, 18 years old or younger using an insulin pump and/or continuous glucose monitoring (CGM. Frequencies, descriptive statistics, and correlation coefficients were calculated. Results: Most of the parents surveyed used an endocrinologist/pediatric endocrinologist as their primary diabetes healthcare provider and considered three to four healthcare professionals as part of the diabetes healthcare team who helped them utilize insulin pumps and advanced technologies. Parents (23.4% indicated a pharmacist was part of the healthcare team who helped them utilize technology. Parents appeared to perceive support for using insulin pumps; however, there is room for improvement. The more perceived support for integrating technology, the more satisfied the parents were with using insulin pumps (r=0.431, p=0.005. Conclusions: Results from this study suggest that parents and children need continued education, support and training to integrate insulin pumps into diabetes self-management. As more patients attempt to adopt insulin pumps and other advanced technologies, it will be important for pharmacists to support the adoption and integration of these technologies and be knowledgeable and helpful if asked about technology-related challenges.   Type: Student Project

  18. Biomedical health assessments of the Florida manatee in Crystal River - providing opportunities for training during the capture, handling, and processing of this endangered aquatic mammal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Robert K.; Garrett, Andrew; Belanger, Michael; Askin, Nesime; Tan, Luke; Wittnich, Carin

    2012-01-01

    Federal and state researchers have been involved in manatee (Trichechus manatus) biomedical health assessment programs for a couple of decades. These benchmark studies have provided a foundation for the development of consistent capture, handling, and processing techniques and protocols. Biologists have implemented training and encouraged multi-agency participation whenever possible to ensure reliable data acquisition, recording, sample collection, publication integrity, and meeting rigorous archival standards. Under a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wildlife research permit granted to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Sirenia Project, federal biologists and collaborators are allowed to conduct research studies on wild and captive manatees detailing various aspects of their biology. Therefore, researchers with the project have been collaborating on numerous studies over the last several years. One extensive study, initiated in 2006 has focused on health and fitness of the winter manatee population located in Crystal River, Florida. During those health assessments, capture, handling, and work-up training has been afforded to many of the participants. That study has successfully captured and handled 123 manatees. The data gathered have provided baseline information on manatee health, reproductive status, and nutritional condition. This research initiative addresses concerns and priorities outlined in the Florida Manatee Recovery Plan. The assessment teams strive to continue this collaborative effort to help advance our understanding of health-related issues confronting manatees throughout their range and interlacing these findings with surrogate species concepts.

  19. Using existing programs as vehicles to disseminate knowledge, provide opportunities for scientists to assist educators, and to engage students in using real data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. C.; Wegner, K.; Branch, B. D.; Miller, B.; Schulze, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    Many national and statewide programs throughout the K-12 science education environment teach students about science in a hands-on format, including programs such as Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE), Project Learning Tree (PLT), Project Wild, Project Wet, and Hoosier River Watch. Partnering with one or more of these well-known programs can provide many benefits to both the scientists involved in disseminating research and the K-12 educators. Scientists potentially benefit by broader dissemination of their research by providing content enrichment for educators. Educators benefit by gaining understanding in content, becoming more confident in teaching the concept, and increasing their enthusiasm in teaching the concepts addressed. This presentation will discuss an innovative framework for professional development that was implemented at Purdue University, Indiana in July 2013. The professional development incorporated GLOBE protocols with iPad app modules and interactive content sessions from faculty and professionals. By collaborating with the GLOBE program and scientists from various content areas, the Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences at Purdue University successfully facilitated a content rich learning experience for educators. Such activity is promoted and supported by Purdue University Libraries where activities such as Purdue's GIS Day are efforts of making authentic learning sustainable in the State of Indiana and for national consideration. Using iPads to visualize soil transitions on a field trip. Testing Water quality in the field.

  20. Crime and the Legalization of Recreational Marijuana

    OpenAIRE

    Dragone, Davide; Prarolo, Giovanni; Vanin, Paolo; Zanella, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    We provide first-pass evidence that the legalization of the cannabis market across US states may be inducing a crime drop. Exploiting the recent staggered legalization enacted by the adjacent states of Washington (end of 2012) and Oregon (end of 2014) we find, combining county-level difference-in-differences and spatial regression discontinuity designs, that the legalization of recreational marijuana caused a significant reduction of rapes and thefts on the Washington side of the border in 20...

  1. Facilitating "flow" through therapeutic recreation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, G D; Witt, P A; Aguilar, T

    1983-01-01

    The rationale and means for facilitating flow for disabled individuals in situational and community recreation settings is discussed. The flow model and arousal model are discussed and implications of leadership aimed at facilitating flow are delineated. Specific principles discussed are: attracting attention, arranging complexity to provide optimal challenge, narrowing the stimulus field, minimizing extrinsic rewards, arranging for immediate feedback, and minimizing the individual's awareness of and focusing on the outcomes of involvements.

  2. Historical, theoretical methodological foundations of recreational activity of different population groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Andreeva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to justify and develop historical, theoretical and methodological foundations of recreational activity to meet the recreational needs of different population groups. Material and Methods: analysis and systematization of the special scientific and methodological literature and informational Internet resources; comparative method, historical analysis; systemic approach. The study involved school and college students and adults, in total of 1150 persons. Results: historical backgrounds of formation and development of recreation in the world and Ukraine are analyzed. Theoretical generalization of certain concepts of motivation in the area of physical recreation is provided, as well as theoretical and organizational principles of leisure and recreation in foreign countries are discussed. Conclusions: historical backgrounds of development of knowledge about recreation are identified and conceptual approaches to development of the theoretical and methodological foundations of recreational activities of various population groups are determined.

  3. Final Report: Education, Public Access, and Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    supervision was provided by Mr. Roger Hamilton, Chief, RAB; Mr. Chegter 0. Martin , Acting Chief, SB; Mr. J. L. Decell, Acting Chief, NRD; and Dr. John...Alicia Ridell, Outdoor Recreation Planner National Park Service George H. Siehl , Specialist in Natural Resources Policy Congressional Research Service...Spectrum for Outdoor Recreation Planning on Army Installations," Technical Report N-124, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA. Siehl

  4. Providing farmers, ranchers, and foresters in California with actionable climate information: opportunities and obstacles for California's USDA Regional Climate Sub Hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, A. C.; Steenwerth, K. L.; Stine, P.; Chambers, J.; Fischer, C.; Kiger, L.; Hedt, T.; Gonzales, O.; Tse, R.; Tse, A.; Gunasekara, A.; Henly, R.; DeLaRosa, J.; Battany, M.; Pathak, T.; Parker, D.; Schwartz, M.; Tjeerdema, R.; Kalansky, J.; Kehmeier, E.; Xides, A.; Marshall, A.; Jagannathan, K.

    2015-12-01

    California is the #1 agricultural state in the US, with output worth $50 billion in 2014. California produces half the nation's specialty crops (fruits, vegetables, and nuts) and is a leader in beef and dairy production. California also has 10% of the forestland west of the Mississippi, including many economically and ecologically important forest types. The USDA Regional Climate Sub Hub for California was created in 2014 to help land users (farmers, ranchers, and forest land owners) cope with climate variability and change, via two-way linkages with producers of climate information. In its first year and a half, the Sub Hub has formed partnerships with California's many other climate-focused organizations, including state and federal government, universities, and NGOs. The Sub Hub coordinates climate-related work among several USDA agencies (ARS, FS, NRCS, and others), which formerly had no mechanism to do so. The Sub Hub also works with other federal climate programs (such as the DOI's CA Landscape Conservation Cooperative, with which the Sub Hub is engaged in a multi-year assessment to balance conservation and agriculture in the Central Valley). State government agencies, such as the Natural Resources Agency and the Department of Food and Agriculture, are key partners for priority-setting and data-sharing. One of the Sub Hub's crucial synergies is with UC Cooperative Extension, which provides insight into land users' needs and provides an outlet to deliver Sub Hub products on the ground. In response to stakeholder concerns, the Sub Hub's 2015-16 emphasis is the ongoing California drought. The Sub Hub's current stakeholder-focused projects include (1) a climate vulnerability assessment of California rangelands, including detailed maps of likely vegetation change and suggestions for location-specific adaptation options; (2) a comprehensive climate-related update of Cooperative Extension's widely used Forest Stewardship Series for private landowners; (3) a study on

  5. A Program for Outdoor Recreation Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC.

    The categorical sections of the proposed program for outdoor recreation research are (1) principal findings and recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences, (2) the social and behavioral dimensions of outdoor recreation, (3) the economics of outdoor recreation, and (4) the operation of recreation service systems. Among the specific topics…

  6. 18 CFR 801.10 - Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recreation. 801.10... POLICIES § 801.10 Recreation. (a) The use of surface water resources of the basin for recreation purposes... private agencies in the planning and development of water-related recreation and fish and wildlife...

  7. 43 CFR 17.270 - Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recreation. 17.270 Section 17.270 Public... OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap § 17.270 Recreation... operation of programs or activities involving recreation. (a) Accessibility in existing recreation...

  8. Healthy Swimming/Recreational Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tub/Spa Test Strips Inflatable & Plastic Kiddie Pools Water Play Areas & Interactive Fountains Swim Diapers & Swim Pants Breastfeeding in Pools & Hot Tubs/Spas Recreational Water Illnesses Diarrheal Illness Rashes Ear Infections Respiratory Infections ...

  9. Massachusetts Recreational Fishing Demand Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Stated preference choice experiment data were collected in 2012 from Massachuestts saltwater recreational fishermen. Saltwater anglers fishing in Massachusetts (MA)...

  10. Recreation and Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cure for glaucoma Give now Recreation & Quality of Life People who have glaucoma may find it difficult ... can continue to enjoy a full and productive life. From Dependence to Independence With glaucoma, the extent ...

  11. Effects of recreational football on women's fitness and health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Peter; Helge, Eva Wulff; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2018-01-01

    The review describes the fitness and health effects of recreational football in women aged 18-65 years. The review documents that 2 × 1 h of recreational football training for 12-16 weeks causes marked improvements in maximal oxygen uptake (5-15%) and myocardial function in women. Moreover, mean...... losses of 1-3 kg and improvements in blood lipid profile. Lastly, 2 × 1 h per week of recreational football training for women elevates lower extremity bone mineralisation by 1-5% and whole-body bone mineralization by 1-2% within 4-12-month interventions. These training adaptations are related......-intensity interval training (HIIT), endurance training and strength training, thereby providing optimal stimuli for cardiovascular, metabolic and musculoskeletal fitness. Recreational football, therefore, seems to be an effective tool for prevention and treatment of lifestyle diseases in young and middle-aged women...

  12. 75 FR 3487 - Notice of Public Meeting: Recreation Subcommittee of the Sierra Front-Northwestern Great Basin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... to provide advice and recommendations on recreation fees and fee areas in each state or region for... LXSS006F0000 261A; MO 4500011786; 10-08807; TAS: 14X1109] Notice of Public Meeting: Recreation Subcommittee of..., Agriculture. ACTION: Notice of recreation advisory subcommittee meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the...

  13. Harmonizing outdoor recreation and bird conservation targets in protected areas: Applying available monitoring data to facilitate collaborative management at the regional scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouwels, Rogier; Sierdsema, Henk; Foppen, Ruud P B; Henkens, René J H G; Opdam, Paul F M; van Eupen, Michiel

    2017-08-01

    In protected areas managers have to achieve conservation targets while providing opportunities for outdoor recreation. This dual mandate causes conflicts in choosing between management options. Furthermore, the persistence of a protected species within the management unit often depends on how conservation areas elsewhere in the region are managed. We present an assessment procedure to guide groups of managers in aligning outdoor recreation and bird conservation targets for a regional scale protected area in the Netherlands. We used existing bird monitoring data and simulated visitor densities to statistically model the impact of outdoor recreation on bird densities. The models were used to extrapolate the local impacts for other parts of the area, but also to assess the impact on conservation targets at the regional level that were determined by the national government. The assessment shows impacts of outdoor recreation on Nightjar (Caprimulgus europaeus), Stonechat (Saxicola torquata) and Woodlark (Lullula arborea), reducing the regional population by up to 28 percent. The Woodlark population size was reduced below the level of the politically determined conservation target. The output of the regression models provides information that connects implications of local management to regional scale conservation targets. The spatial maps of bird densities can help in deciding where reducing visitor disturbance is expected to result in increasing bird populations, or where alternative measures, such as improving the habitat conditions, could be effective. We suggest that by using our assessment procedure collaborative decision making is facilitated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. CERN-EU relationship provides various opportunities

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony-Kittelsen

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between the EU and CERN continues to grow stronger, as the Director-General and the President of Council recently visited Brussels to discuss the progress made since the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) in July 2009. With financial cuts and budget reductions plaguing research programmes across the world, the MoU is a solid basis for enhancing existing or developing new synergies between the two parties.    Rolf Heuer, Michel Spiro and other members of the CERN delegation photographed with Máire Geoghegan-Quinn, EU Commissioner for Research, Innovation and Science, during the 2010 Annual CERN-EC meeting. Credits: © European Union, 2010 In recent times, due to the global economic downturn and reductions in national research budgets, the competition for funding from the EU's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7, 2007-2013) has become extremely tough. However, given the large number of CERN proposals accepted by the EC since the start of FP7...

  15. Recreation as a component of the community youth development system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outley, Corliss; Bocarro, Jason N; Boleman, Chris T

    2011-01-01

    In an era of fragmented school systems and budget cuts, many educators and youth leaders seeking to solve the problems that youth face are turning to out-of-school-time programs. In many communities, these programs are seen as essential in the development of youth into fully functioning adults. One such area of the out-of-school-time sector is the provision of recreation services. Recreational services have a vital role in connecting youth to their communities, as well as enabling youth and adult allies to improve challenging conditions. This chapter outlines the historical role that recreation has played in community youth development programs and shows how community youth development has evolved. It then looks at how organizations in three communities--the Youthline Outreach Mentorship program in Minneapolis, a 4-H initiative in Parker City, Texas, and the Hockey Is for Everyone program--have successfully applied the theoretical knowledge. Best practices from these programs illustrate that the role of recreation in community youth development is changing. No longer are recreation programs about providing just "fun and games." Recreation organizations are now placing more value on the development of the community as a whole, in addition to the individual well-being of young people. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  16. Perceptions of Northeastern United States Recreation Directors regarding the Impact of Recreation Centers on Students, the Campus Community, and Institutional Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreozzi, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recreation center growth on college campuses has garnered national attention. According to Reisberg (2001), today's students have grown accustomed to utilizing elaborate workout facilities and have begun to demand that their college or university of choice provide that space. Through investing money into recreation facilities, college and…

  17. Hunting the Opportunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løwe Nielsen, Suna; Rind Christensen, Poul; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2017-01-01

    This paper bring together the two research fields of design and entrepreneurship in order to stimulate new knowledge on opportunity creation. A shared theoretical framework on new opportunity creation that illustrates that design and entrepreneurship can advantageously complement each other in th...... in the opportunity design process. Practical insights into the robustness of the framework are provided by a short illustrative case on electric cars....

  18. Female Consumers Recreational Shopping Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbjot Singh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the core meaning of intrinsic shopping to understand their experimental aspects of recreational and leisure shopping. The study focus only on female shoppers of age group ranging from 25-30, and understand their mall experiences because this segment is newly transform into self dependent segment which have less social and familial liabilities and have enough enthusiasm to explore the world or their boundaries. The Grounded theory use for identification of recreational shopping themes which are (a seeking experiences and (b experimental shopping and each have respective sub themes. The themes are connected to the key idea that shoppers are motivated by their expectations and desires. The study uses social constructivism to find and understand the shopper meanings in real terms rather than imposing and judgment on them. The findings described the way people do recreational shopping and how shopping malls use as leisure space and become facilitators of recreational shopping activities. Females use malls to fulfill their recreational and leisure shopping experiences as this is the great way of enjoying shopping for females of small towns. In malls females not only enjoy product experiences but services experiences also which makes their shopping interesting. The way the female of this age category use malls help the marketers and retailers to understand this segment shopping patterns.

  19. Opportunity Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løwe Nielsen, Suna; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Nielsen, Louise Møller

    2013-01-01

    Entrepreneurship is about transforming novel ideas into future business, but it requires an entrepreneurial opportunity to be exploited via an effective strategic and organizational design. While the entrepreneurship literature says much about how to implement and organize new opportunities...... in a market setting (the back-end of entrepreneurial processes), it pays less attention to how entrepreneurs purposely design opportunities (the front-end of entrepreneurial processes). Drawing on methods and processes from the creative design literature, the paper introduces a framework of “opportunity...... design”. The framework explains how opportunities intentionally and pro-actively can be designed from methods and processes of moving-in and moving-out. An illustrative case of opportunity design within the area of sustainable energy and electric cars is presented to link the theoretical discussion...

  20. Energy expenditure on recreational visits to different natural environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Lewis R; White, Mathew P; Taylor, Adrian H; Herbert, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Physical inactivity poses a significant challenge to physical and mental health. Environmental approaches to tackle physical inactivity have identified natural environments as potentially important public health resources. Despite this, little is known about characteristics of the activity involved when individuals visit different types of natural environment. Using Natural England's Monitor of Engagement with the Natural Environment Survey, we examined 71,603 English respondents' recreational visits to natural environments in the past week. Specifically, we examined the intensity of the activities they undertook on the visits (METs), the duration of their visit, and the associated total energy expenditure (MET minutes). Visits to countryside and urban greenspace environments were associated with more intense activities than visits to coastal environments. However, visits to coastal environments were associated with the most energy expenditure overall due to their relatively long duration. Results differed by the urbanity or rurality of the respondent's residence and also how far respondents travelled to their destination. Knowledge of what types of natural environment afford the highest volumes and intensities of physical activity could inform landscape architecture and exercise prescriptions. Isolating activity-supporting characteristics of natural environments that can be translated into urban design is important in providing physical activity opportunities for those less able to access expansive environments. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. The nexus of fun and nutrition: Recreational fishing is also about food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Twardek, William M.; Lennox, Robert J.; Zolderdo, Aaron J.; Bower, Shannon D.; Gutowsky, Lee F. G.; Danylchuk, Andy J.; Arlinghaus, Robert; Beard, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Recreational fishing is a popular activity in aquatic ecosystems around the globe using a variety of gears including rod and line and to a lesser extent handlines, spears, bow and arrow, traps and nets. Similar to the propensity to engage in voluntary catch-and-release, the propensity to harvest fishes strongly varies among cultures, locations, species and fisheries. There is a misconception that because recreational fishing happens during non-work (i.e. leisure) time, the nutritional motivation is negligible; therefore, the role of recreational fishing in supporting nutrition (and thus food security) at regional, national or global scales is underappreciated. We consider the factors that influence whether fish will be harvested or released by examining the motives that underlie recreational fishing. Next, we provide an overview of the magnitude and role of recreational fishing harvest in supporting nutrition using regional case-studies. Then, we address issues such as contaminants and parasites that constrain the ability of fish harvested by recreational fishers to be consumed. Although recreational fishing is foremost a leisure activity, the harvest of fish for personal consumption by recreational fishers has contributed and will continue to contribute to human nutrition by providing an accessible, affordable and generally highly sustainable food source, notwithstanding concerns about food safety and possibly overfishing. Attempts to better quantify the role of fish harvested by recreational fishers and the relative contribution to overall food security and personal nutrition will provide resource managers and policymakers the information needed to guide management activities and policy development.

  2. Measuring recreational visitation at U.S. National Parks with crowd-sourced photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, Carrie; Wood, Spencer A; Rabotyagov, Sergey; Fisher, David M

    2016-12-01

    Land managers rely on visitation data to inform policy and management decisions. However, visitation data is often costly and burdensome to obtain, and provides a limited depth of information. In this paper, we assess the validity of using crowd-sourced, online photographs to infer information about the habits and preferences of recreational visitors by comparing empirical data from the National Park Service to photograph data from the online platform Flickr for 38 National Parks in the western United States. Using multiple regression analysis, we find that the number of photos posted monthly in a park can reliably indicate the number of visitors to a park in a given month. Through additional statistical testing we also find that the home locations of photo-takers, provided voluntarily on an online profile, accurately show the home origins of park visitors. Together, these findings validate a new method for measuring recreational visitation, opening an opportunity for land managers worldwide to track and understand visitation by augmenting current data collection methods with crowd-sourced, online data that is easy and inexpensive to obtain. In addition, it enables future research on how visitation rates change with changes in access, management or infrastructure, weather events, or ecosystem health, and facilitates valuation research, such as travel cost studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Problem solving through recreational mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Averbach, Bonnie

    1999-01-01

    Historically, many of the most important mathematical concepts arose from problems that were recreational in origin. This book takes advantage of that fact, using recreational mathematics - problems, puzzles and games - to teach students how to think critically. Encouraging active participation rather than just observation, the book focuses less on mathematical results than on how these results can be applied to thinking about problems and solving them. Each chapter contains a diverse array of problems in such areas as logic, number and graph theory, two-player games of strategy, solitaire ga

  4. Opportunity versus Necessity

    OpenAIRE

    Calderon, Gabriela; Iacovone, Leonardo; Juarez, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Entrepreneurs that voluntarily choose to start a business because they are able to identify a good business opportunity and act on it -- opportunity entrepreneurs -- might be different along various dimensions from those who are forced to become entrepreneurs because of lack of other alternatives -- necessity entrepreneurs. To provide evidence on these differences, this paper exploits a un...

  5. Training needs of recreation staff at recreation centres: Supervising ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results suggest that staff do not possess the basic recreation knowledge and that, in turn, may lead to unnecessary work pressure on the supervising area manager. In the local government, procedures are already in place that could help the staff if they needed funding for further training. Unfortunately, the available ...

  6. Białystok inhabitants’ preferences concerning forest recreational services – the need for landscape diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smoleński Marcin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the market segmentation of recreational forest services using the concept of ‘sensation seeking’ to describe expectations of town dwellers towards recreation. In this approach, the variable of landscape dissimilarity is evaluated based on the landscape preferences of town dwellers for recreational purposes. The urban agglomeration of Białystok and the Knyszyn Forest (North-Eastern Poland were chosen as the target for this case study. The results of the research suggest that the potential market of recreational forest services of the urban agglomeration of Białystok includes and provides for about 30% of the inhabitants. The emerging true market of the recreational services of the Knyszyn Forest reaches only about 22% of the inhabitants of Białystok. These market limitations and the characteristics of the forest landscape are inacceptable for outdoor recreation for the majority of town dwellers.

  7. Management of Recreation and Nature Based Tourism in European Forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pröbstl, U.; Wirth, V.; Elands, B.H.M.; Bell, S.

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a Europe-wide overview on the state of the art of management of recreation and nature tourism in forests. It describes the current situation and conflicts in the different regions of Europe and provides solutions illustrated by good practise examples. It addresses traditions,

  8. Private lands and outdoor recreation in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Jeff Teasley; John C. Bergstrom; H. Ken Cordell; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Paul Gentle

    1999-01-01

    Outdoor recreation on private land is influenced by myriad factors. To provide background and context on these factors, this chapter first overviews the private land situation in the United States and provides general information and discussion related to ownership and tenure, land-use patterns, legal restrictions, and economic conditions, including taxation issues....

  9. Policies to promote the community use of schools: a review of state recreational user statutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, John O; Carroll, Michael S; Connaughton, Daniel P; Evenson, Kelly R

    2010-07-01

    Concern over liability is a barrier to allowing community use of school property for the purpose of engaging in active sport and recreational activities. Recreational user statutes have the potential to limit liability for public schools when use occurs outside of regular school hours, reduce the fear of liability among school administrators, and increase opportunities for access to school facilities for recreation and physical activity by community members. The purpose of this study was to examine the applicability of recreational user statutes to public schools when the use of school facilities for recreational purposes would occur outside of regular school hours. A review of recreational user statutes from all 50 states was conducted in 2007 and 2009. Characteristics of those statutes from states with laws potentially applicable to public school recreation and sport facilities were described in detail. Forty-two states had recreational user statutes that would potentially offer protection from liability for public schools. Protected activities listed in state statutes were summer sports (n=2); winter sports (n=22); athletic competition (n=1); sporting events and activities (n=1); exercise (n=4); and any other outdoor sport, game, or recreational activity (n=2). Specific protected physical activities listed were playing on playground equipment (n=1); running/jogging (n=2); roller-skating and rollerblading (n=4); skateboarding (n=2); disc golf (n=1); and bicycling (n=16). This study suggests the need for further statutory liability protections for public schools, and immunity provisions that target activities conducive to physical activity, common on school grounds, and popular among community residents. It further suggests that empirical studies be conducted to examine school administrator's perceptions relevant to liability as a potential barrier to opening school sport and recreational facilities to members of the community outside of regular school hours

  10. 36 CFR 71.10 - Special recreation permits and special recreation permit fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special recreation permits and special recreation permit fees. 71.10 Section 71.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION FEES § 71.10 Special recreation permits and special...

  11. Recreation conflicts on Mt. Evans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerry J. Vaske; Karin Wittmann; Susan Laidlaw; Maureen P. Donnelly

    1995-01-01

    This study examines recreation conflict at Mt. Evans, Colorado; a high visibility area that attracts both hunters and non-hunters. Two types of conflict were distinguished: goal interference and conflict of values. Data were obtained from a series of on-site and mailed surveys. For hunting related events (e.g. seeing an animal being shot, hearing...

  12. Writing of water and recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda E. Kruger

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a personal perspective on water and recreation including challenges for managers and researchers and approaches to contemporary issues. The article explores the relationship between group identify and connection to place, developed through trecreation activities, and engagement in stewardhsip and sustainability activities.

  13. Water Demand at Recreation Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Simon; Hughes, Trevor C

    1980-01-01

    Design criteria for drinking water systems at recreation developments, particularly summer home type, cause frequent confrontations with regulatory agencies. Developers claim extremely low water use rates due to low occupancy rates, but regulatory agencies are concerned about changes over time from essentially weekend use to more permanent residency and also about occasional peak day water demands similar to those...

  14. Water Recreation and Illness Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Background: The health endpoint of prior studies of water recreation has been the occurrence gastrointestinal (GI) of illness. The use of this dichotomous health outcome fails to take into account the range of symptom severity among those with GI illness, as well as thos...

  15. Publically Funded Recreation Facilities: Obesogenic Environments for Children and Families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Patti-Jean; Bridgewater, Laura; Purcell, Megan; Ostry, Aleck; Wekken, Suzanne Vander

    2010-01-01

    Increasing healthy food options in public venues, including recreational facilities, is a health priority. The purpose of this study was to describe the public recreation food environment in British Columbia, Canada using a sequential explanatory mixed methods design. Facility audits assessed policy, programs, vending, concessions, fundraising, staff meetings and events. Focus groups addressed context and issues related to action. Eighty-eighty percent of facilities had no policy governing food sold or provided for children/youth programs. Sixty-eight percent of vending snacks were chocolate bars and chips while 57% of beverages were sugar sweetened. User group fundraisers held at the recreation facilities also sold ‘unhealthy’ foods. Forty-two percent of recreation facilities reported providing user-pay programs that educated the public about healthy eating. Contracts, economics, lack of resources and knowledge and motivation of staff and patrons were barriers to change. Recreation food environments were obesogenic but stakeholders were interested in change. Technical support, resources and education are needed. PMID:20623020

  16. Publically Funded Recreation Facilities: Obesogenic Environments for Children and Families?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti-Jean Naylor

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Increasing healthy food options in public venues, including recreational facilities, is a health priority. The purpose of this study was to describe the public recreation food environment in British Columbia, Canada using a sequential explanatory mixed methods design. Facility audits assessed policy, programs, vending, concessions, fundraising, staff meetings and events. Focus groups addressed context and issues related to action. Eighty-eighty percent of facilities had no policy governing food sold or provided for children/youth programs. Sixty-eight percent of vending snacks were chocolate bars and chips while 57% of beverages were sugar sweetened. User group fundraisers held at the recreation facilities also sold ‘unhealthy’ foods. Forty-two percent of recreation facilities reported providing user-pay programs that educated the public about healthy eating. Contracts, economics, lack of resources and knowledge and motivation of staff and patrons were barriers to change. Recreation food environments were obesogenic but stakeholders were interested in change. Technical support, resources and education are needed.

  17. Publically funded recreation facilities: obesogenic environments for children and families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Patti-Jean; Bridgewater, Laura; Purcell, Megan; Ostry, Aleck; Wekken, Suzanne Vander

    2010-05-01

    Increasing healthy food options in public venues, including recreational facilities, is a health priority. The purpose of this study was to describe the public recreation food environment in British Columbia, Canada using a sequential explanatory mixed methods design. Facility audits assessed policy, programs, vending, concessions, fundraising, staff meetings and events. Focus groups addressed context and issues related to action. Eighty-eighty percent of facilities had no policy governing food sold or provided for children/youth programs. Sixty-eight percent of vending snacks were chocolate bars and chips while 57% of beverages were sugar sweetened. User group fundraisers held at the recreation facilities also sold 'unhealthy' foods. Forty-two percent of recreation facilities reported providing user-pay programs that educated the public about healthy eating. Contracts, economics, lack of resources and knowledge and motivation of staff and patrons were barriers to change. Recreation food environments were obesogenic but stakeholders were interested in change. Technical support, resources and education are needed.

  18. CONSUMER PREFERENCES AND DRIVERS OF CHOICE REGARDING LOCAL RECREATION SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria SAVA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the rapidly growing industry of leisure has displayed some signs of overcrowding on account of the diminished capacities of turning employed resources into profit and the lowered personnel productivity in Romania. Economic agents striving to succeed in this rapidly evolving economic sector should reconsider their position and plan a strategy to grow or reinforce their business. The present paper provides a starting point in outlying the local recreation market specificity by investigating consumer preferences and drivers of choice. Results show that although there is an active demand for commercial recreational activities, its quantum is rather low. Moreover, the study shows that service-related factors (such as quality, personnel qualification, price and novelty appear to have the highest importance for consumers, that positive word of mouth is a rather strong influencer, while advertising and location-related factors rank lowest on the list of priorities when choosing a recreation provider.

  19. 36 CFR 12.11 - Recreational activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreational activities. 12.11 Section 12.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL CEMETERY REGULATIONS § 12.11 Recreational activities. Engaging in a recreational activity...

  20. 50 CFR 36.31 - Recreational activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recreational activities. 36.31 Section 36... Recreational activities. (a) Public recreational activities within the Alaska National Wildlife Refuges are authorized as long as such activities are conducted in a manner compatible with the purposes for which the...

  1. 46 CFR 67.23 - Recreational endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recreational endorsement. 67.23 Section 67.23 Shipping... DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Forms of Documentation; Endorsements; Eligibility of Vessel § 67.23 Recreational endorsement. (a) A recreational endorsement entitles a vessel to pleasure use only. (b) Any vessel eligible...

  2. AN ASSESSMENT OF THE RECREATIONAL AND COMMERCIAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of the recreational and commercial skiboat linefishery in the Transkei was conducted from March 1997 to April 1999. Effort by commercial skiboats was substantially higher than by recreational skiboats, and catch rates on commercial boats were much higher than rates on recreational boats. Catch rates in the ...

  3. Large Indoor Sports and Recreation Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, Todd

    This paper presents an overview and analysis of field houses, stadiums, arenas, and campus recreation centers. All are large indoor sports or recreation facilities. In general, stadiums and arenas are spectator facilities while field houses and campus recreation centers are primarily designed for activity. A college field house is a structure that…

  4. Projected participation in marine recreation: 2005 & 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon R. Leeworthy; J. Michael Bowker; Justin H. Hospital; Edward A. Stone

    2005-01-01

    Background and Definitions. NSRE 2000 is the first National Survey to include a broad assessment of the Nation’s participation in marine recreation. Approximately every five years since 1955, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has conducted a National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife Associated Recreation. But the marine component of recreation was only broken...

  5. Sustainable Development of Lithuanian Seacoast Recreational Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Abromas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Recreational architecture is a branch of architectural activity whose main object is formation of recreational spaces (territories, buildings, complexes and equipment. The goal of recreational architecture is to create optimal (comfortable, lovely and realizable environment for all recreation types and forms. This goal is realized by projects which are based on scientific research and recommendations. This activity needs more than casual work and living environment. It needs special space and equipment: territory, water area, buildings, and rooms. Everything can be called recreational environment. Recreational environment can be of various dimensional scales: enormous seaside or lake areas intended for recreation, resorts, recreational institution complexes and many single buildings, beaches, forest parks, pools. Recreational environment is possible not only out of town but in town as well. Beginning of recreational architecture is observed in antique cultures, but as a separate specific architectural activity branch it rapidly began to spread in last century first half and in Lithuania – in the last four decades. In this work, analysis of evaluating recreational architecture is made seeking to reveal recreational architecture evaluating criteria and their use .Article in Lithuanian

  6. New Hampshire - an outdoor recreation trend leader

    Science.gov (United States)

    George T. Hamilton

    1980-01-01

    It seems appropriate (at least to me) that a national symposium focusing on trends in outdoor recreation be held in the Granite State; a state which has played historically a role in the evolution of a variety of recreation activities far out of proportion to its size and population. After all, outdoor recreation is more than 150 years old here in New Hampshire.

  7. Let's Take a Risk with Adventure Recreation!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Stewart; Meier, Joel F.

    1982-01-01

    Three main concepts relating to risk recreation are: (1) understanding how an individual evaluates a recreational activity; (2) understanding that the reasons individuals initially participate in risk recreation may be different from those which perpetuate participation; and (3) understanding that factors other than the individuals and the…

  8. Trends in outdoor recreation activity conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    John J. Lindsay

    1980-01-01

    Conflict caused by outdoor recreation activity groups competing for the same physical and psychological space has given rise to recreation resource planning, allocation and management problems. Research has shown recreation managers can expect certain types of users to be involved in significant conflict about 25 percent of their occupancy time. Well planned and...

  9. A National Study of Recreation Impact Fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Paul B.; Frank, James E.

    1984-01-01

    To determine the usage and character of recreation impact fees, a national survey (using a two-stage mail questionnaire) of parks and recreation agencies was conducted. The use of recreation impact fees was observed in 12 states. Details are given as to the various uses. (CJB)

  10. 36 CFR 261.17 - Recreation fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation fees. 261.17 Section 261.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.17 Recreation fees. Failure to pay any recreation fee is prohibited...

  11. Approaches to measuring cultural diversity in recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieh-Lu Li; James D. Absher; Yi-Chung Hsu; Alan R. Graefe

    2008-01-01

    Measuring cultural diversity in recreation has become an important topic because of the increasing coverage of and interest in ethnicity and cross-cultural aspects of recreation. Introducing theories and methods from established disciplines other than leisure studies/recreation and park studies is necessary to understand this important issue. In this article, we first...

  12. Opportunity cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Carolyn

    2011-05-01

    Opportunity cost and trade-off - similar concepts with slightly different meanings and definitions in different fields - are concepts that we were all probably first exposed to as a toddler. For most women however, opportunity cost and trade-off is a part of their daily lives as they try to balance their needs, including their health needs, with the demands of their families, careers and never-ending 'to do' lists.

  13. Lessons Learned: An Open Letter to Recreational Therapy Students and Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, David R.

    2010-01-01

    "Lessons Learned" provides a personalized approach and a fresh, bold guide for students and practitioners in recreational therapy. This thought-provoking, inspiring, and accessible text will help the next generation of recreational therapists to find purpose, meaning, and fulfillment in their own lives and to bring health and happiness to their…

  14. Recreational Water Contact and Fish Consumption Assessment to Inform Risk Estimates and Evaluate Ecosystem Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Surface waters provide invaluable ecosystem services, including drinking water, food, waste water disposal, and recreation. The nature and frequency of recreational contact with surface waters is a critical consideration in evaluating benefits to human well-being (e.g...

  15. Parables and paradigms: an introduction to using communication theories in outdoor recreation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Absher

    1998-01-01

    Studies that employ communication theories are rare in recreation resource management. One reason may be unfamiliarity with communication theories and their potential to provide useful results. A two-dimensional metatheoretical plane is proposed, selected recreation and communication theories are located in it, and functional comparisons are made among eight disparate...

  16. The Place of Recreation in the (6-3-3-4) Educational System in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current 6-3-3-4 system of education is the most concrete demonstration towards improving the quality of education and particularly, recreation in Nigeria. The awareness that recreation provides a wide variety of activities to meet the needs and interests of the entire population has gradually increased in our educational ...

  17. Trends in state outdoor recreation from periodic to process planning: the Minnesota example

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. Becker; George Orning

    1980-01-01

    After a decade of trial, a change in federal planning philosophy is forcing many state recreation planning programs to change. Ten years of experience showed that plans produced periodically - every five years - grew stale and failed to provide the flexibility necessary to meet changing recreation markets and environmental problems. Recognizing these problems, the...

  18. Climate change and outdoor recreation participation in the Southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.M. Bowker; Ashley E. Askew; Neelam Poudyal; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Lynne Seymour; H. Ken Cordell

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we begin to assess the potential effects of climate change on future outdoor recreation in the South, a region spanning 13 states from Virginia to Texas (Chapter 1). Our goal is to provide some useful insights about future natural resource-based recreation-an important nontimber product derived from southern forests-in the face of climate change. We...

  19. Construction and validation of the national survey on recreation and the environment's lifestyles scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary T. Green; H. Ken Cordell; Carter J. Betz; Christine DiStefano

    2007-01-01

    This study sought to construct and validate a lifestyle scale that would capture for leisure professionals a more holistic picture of people's interests. A broader profile of their customers would allow recreation professionals to tailor information of their services. Public sector recreation managers would provide better serviced by learning about how customers...

  20. The provision of recreation services for the aged in the Durban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigated the provision of recreation services for the aged in the Durban Metropolitan Area (DMA). The main argument in the research is that the aged like any other age groups need to be provided with recreation services. The objectives underpinning this investigation include the following: •To reveal the ...

  1. A Modified Importance-Performance Framework for Evaluating Recreation-Based Experiential Learning Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitas, Nicholas; Murray, Alison; Olsen, Max; Graefe, Alan

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a modified importance-performance framework for use in evaluation of recreation-based experiential learning programs. Importance-performance analysis (IPA) provides an effective and readily applicable means of evaluating many programs, but the near universal satisfaction associated with recreation inhibits the use of IPA in…

  2. Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novachek, James

    The Northern Arizona Hospitality Education Program is an exemplary three-year project designed to help students, mainly Indian, obtain job skills and attitudes necessary for successful employment in the hospitality industry. Nine high schools from Apache, Coconino, and Navajo Counties participated in the project. Objectives included providing an…

  3. Exploring industry perspectives on implementation of a provincial policy for food and beverage sales in publicly funded recreation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Wekken, Suzanne; Sørensen, Susanne; Meldrum, John; Naylor, Patti-Jean

    2012-03-01

    To explore industry perspectives on the transition to healthier food and beverage sales in publicly funded recreation facilities and specifically (a) the awareness of the BC provincial Guidelines and implementation supports; (b) challenges encountered in the transition to healthier products; and (c) thoughts on future trends and opportunities in the snack and beverage business. We used a qualitative research design (semi-structured interviews) with thematic analysis to explore the data collected. Overall, the industry was aware of the BC Guidelines and philosophically supported the transition to healthier choices in public recreation facilities. Main challenges in implementing the Guidelines were the: (1) perceived limitations of the Guidelines; (2) issues stocking healthy products; (3) competition in food sales environments; and (4) negative impact on profits. Interviewees believed that consumer choice is increasingly influenced by environmental and health priorities and that adapting to these trends would be important for future business success. The food and beverage industry needs time, resources and expertise to adapt their business model and to find new palatable products that meet healthy Guidelines. Strategies that strengthen accountability, provide opportunities for economic development and enhance private-public sector communication will help industry partners support implementation of nutrition policies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Recreational football as a health promoting activity: a topical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Peter; Aagaard, Per; Nybo, Lars

    2010-01-01

    on muscles and bones. Recreational football training in untrained men results in marked improvements in maximum aerobic power, blood pressure, muscle capillarization and intermittent exercise performance, and those effects are similar to interval training and more pronounced than moderate......The present review addresses the physiological demands during recreational football training and the effects on central health variables that influence the risk of life-style diseases of young and middle-aged men. Recent studies have established that recreational football, carried out as small......-sided games can be characterized as having a high aerobic component with mean heart rates of 80-85% of maximum heart rate, which is similar to values observed for elite football players. In addition, the training includes multiple high-speed runs, sprints, turns, jumps and tackles, which provide a high impact...

  5. The Recreational Using of Water Resources of Küre Mountains National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Belkayalı

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Water is a basic need in order to survive all living beings. The functional use of water through the ages of living space formatted directed, has a significant influence on environmental design. In addition to the use of water for various purposes has refreshing climatic features, to create a living suitable environment for all living things and has the visual aesthetics features, to become an indispensable element in the landscape has provided. Despite the abundance of recreational activities, humans are mostly enjoyed water-based recreational activities. Water-based recreation is no doubt that the increase of needs. Naturally, the water surface provides great advantages in terms of recreation. Water in recreational areas, both inland and coastal water-based activities is an important element. For example, streams, lakes, ponds and dams’ coast, walking, cycling, water sports, picnics, etc. for recreational activities are indispensable elements of life. Core zone and buffer zone of Kure Mountains National Park is a rich area in underground and surface water resources. Canyons, waterfalls, sinkholes and water resources increase the recreational use potential of the area and these unique natural resources in national park make a difference compared to other areas. In this study, recreation potential of water resources in the Kure Mountains National Park was determined in accordance with suitability assessment, in this context national park was evaluated according to the land capability classes, view, vegetation, slope, current land use, recreational infrastructure, water resources, topography and the proximity to the road factors and suitability map was produced. Suggestions for active and passive recreational activities can be done in the appropriate spaces for recreation have been developed.

  6. Does getting a dog increase recreational walking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knuiman Matthew W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examines changes in socio-demographic, environmental and intrapersonal factors associated with dog acquisition in non-dog owners at baseline to 12-months follow-up and the effect of dog acquisition on minutes per week of recreational walking. Methods RESIDE study participants completed self-administered questionnaires (baseline and 12-months follow-up measuring physical activity, dog ownership, dog walking behavior as well as environmental, intrapersonal and socio-demographic factors. Analysis was restricted to 'Continuing non-owners' (i.e., non-owners at both baseline and follow-up; n = 681 and 'New dog owners' (i.e., non-owners who acquired a dog by follow-up; n = 92. Results Overall, 12% of baseline non-owners had acquired a dog at follow-up. Dog acquisition was associated with working and having children at home. Those who changed from single to couple marital status were also more likely to acquire a dog. The increase in minutes of walking for recreation within the neighborhood from baseline to follow-up was 48 minutes/week for new dog owners compared with 12 minutes/week for continuing non-owners (p p p > 0.05 after further adjustment for change in baseline to follow-up variables. Increase in intention to walk was the main factor contributing to attenuation of the effect of dog acquisition on recreational walking. Conclusion This study used a large representative sample of non-owners to examine the relationship between dog acquisition and recreational walking and provides evidence to suggest that dog acquisition leads to an increase in walking. The most likely mechanism through which dog acquisition facilitates increased physical activity is through behavioral intention via the dog's positive effect on owner's cognitive beliefs about walking, and through the provision of motivation and social support for walking. The results suggest that behavioral intention mediates the relationship between dog acquisition

  7. Recreation cyclists, drivers, and challenges to sharing the road: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to combine an analysis of 550 on-line responses with a review of the literature to gain insight about issues important for cyclists, motorists, and recreation practitioners. The comments, when analyzed provided a range of popular arguments about whether cyclists should have the right to the ...

  8. Recreation and scenic resources in Alaska: an annotated bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert M. Muth; Sally Anne Fitchet

    1976-01-01

    This bibliography provides descriptions of material published on recreation and scenic resources in Alaska. Included are publications on research and supporting material in the form of studies and reports, proposals, plans, historical and cultural references, bibliographic documents, and popular books and articles describing the resources of Alaska and issues relating...

  9. Measuring Service Quality in Recreational Programs with SERVQUAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, Joel R.

    Many directors of college recreational programs are feeling pressure for increased accountability in the face of shrinking financial resources and increased demand for services. One method of providing that accountability and learning about the strengths and weaknesses of services offered is by assessing the level of client satisfaction. Developed…

  10. Assessment of leisure and recreation research in Africa | Goslin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leisure and recreation are now accepted as identifiable research areas. Retrospective and prospective assessments of research in the field are therefore not only desirable but also necessary to consolidate what has been learned, clarify concepts and theories and provide a focus for future research. No such assessments ...

  11. Low-impact recreational practices for wilderness and backcountry

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    1989-01-01

    Describes low-impact practices that can contribute to minimizing problems resulting from recreational use of wilderness and backcountry. Each practice is described and information is provided on such subjects as rationale for the practice, importance, and costs to visitors. Practices that may be counter-productive are described, as are important research gaps.

  12. The value of research in recreation fee project implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    James D. Absher; Daniel W. McCollum; J. Michael Bowker

    1999-01-01

    In a survey of Forest Service managers responsible for implementation of recreation fee programs, research skills were perceived to provide little benefit to business or communications planning. A majority of managers reported, however, that they used research data they collected or contracted for when developing and implementing their fee programs. They rated the...

  13. Good Practice in European Recreation Planning and Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaae, B.C.; Pröbstl, U.; Wirth, V.; Bell, S.; McCormack, A.; Elands, B.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes a number of good practice examples in outdoor recreation and nature-based tourism collected from different European countries. The examples provide trans-national inspiration on how to solve some of the problems and challenges identified in the previous chapters. Furthermore,

  14. Department of the Interior U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service : Final Environmental Assessment for Recreational Fishing Plan : Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The primary purpose of the proposed action is to consider recreational fishing opportunities on Cypress Creek NWR. This EA analyzes four different fishing...

  15. Emerald ash borer impacts on visual preferences for urban forest recreation settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arne Arnberger; Ingrid E. Schneider; Martin Ebenberger; Renate Eder; Robert C. Venette; Stephanie A. Snyder; Paul H. Gobster; Ami Choi; Stuart Cottrell

    2017-01-01

    Extensive outbreaks of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis; EAB), an invasive forest insect, are having serious impacts on the cultural ecosystem services of urban forests in the United States and other countries. Limited experience with how such outbreaks might affect recreational opportunities prompted this investigation of visitors to a...

  16. Methodological innovations for measuring economic impacts of long-distance recreation trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noah Pollock; Lisa C. Chase; Jane Kolodinsky

    2008-01-01

    Rural communities are increasingly interested in understanding the economic impacts of visitors drawn to their region for recreational opportunities. Economic impact assessments often rely on input-output (I/O) modeling software, which requires estimates of visitation rates and visitor expenditures. Collecting sufficient data for I/O models is relatively...

  17. Benefits and risks of adopting the global code of practice for recreational fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinghaus, Robert; Beard, T. Douglas; Cooke, Steven J.; Cowx, Ian G.

    2012-01-01

    Recreational fishing constitutes the dominant or sole use of many fish stocks, particularly in freshwater ecosystems in Western industrialized countries. However, despite their social and economic importance, recreational fisheries are generally guided by local or regional norms and standards, with few comprehensive policy and development frameworks existing across jurisdictions. We argue that adoption of a recently developed Global Code of Practice (CoP) for Recreational Fisheries can provide benefits for moving recreational fisheries toward sustainability on a global scale. The CoP is a voluntary document, specifically framed toward recreational fisheries practices and issues, thereby complementing and extending the United Nation's Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries by the Food and Agricultural Organization. The CoP for Recreational Fisheries describes the minimum standards of environmentally friendly, ethically appropriate, and—depending on local situations—socially acceptable recreational fishing and its management. Although many, if not all, of the provisions presented in the CoP are already addressed through national fisheries legislation and state-based fisheries management regulations in North America, adopting a common framework for best practices in recreational fisheries across multiple jurisdictions would further promote their long-term viability in the face of interjurisdictional angler movements and some expanding threats to the activity related to shifting sociopolitical norms.

  18. Shark recreational fisheries: Status, challenges, and research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Austin J; Hammerschlag, Neil; Danylchuk, Andy J; Cooke, Steven J

    2017-05-01

    For centuries, the primary manner in which humans have interacted with sharks has been fishing. A combination of their slow-growing nature and high use-values have resulted in population declines for many species around the world, and to date the vast majority of fisheries-related work on sharks has focused on the commercial sector. Shark recreational fishing remains an overlooked area of research despite the fact that these practices are popular globally and could present challenges to their populations. Here we provide a topical overview of shark recreational fisheries, highlighting their history and current status. While recreational fishing can provide conservation benefits under certain circumstances, we focus our discourse on the relatively understudied, potentially detrimental impacts these activities may have on shark physiology, behavior, and fitness. We took this angle given the realized but potentially underestimated significance of recreational fishing for shark conservation management plans and stock assessments, in hopes of creating a dialogue around sustainability. We also present a series of broad and focused research questions and underpin areas of future research need to assist with the development of this emergent area of research.

  19. Fuel used for off-highway recreation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, P.S.; Trumble, D.; Lu, A.

    1994-07-01

    The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) established a National Recreational Trails Funding Program and the National Recreational Trails Trust Fund. ISTEA requires that tax revenue generated from the sales of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation by transferred from the Highway Trust Fund to the Trails Trust Fund for recreational trail and facility improvements. In order to apportion the Trails Trust Fund of individual states equitably, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) asked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to estimate the amount of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation at the state level by different vehicle types. This report documents this estimation procedure. For this estimation procedure, off-highway recreational fuel use was defined as Federally taxed gasoline, gasohol, diesel fuel, or special fuel used in recreational motorized vehicles on recreational trails or back country terrain. Fuel used in outdoor non-engine recreational equipment, such as camp stoves, heaters, and lanterns, was excluded from the analysis. Vehicle types included in this study were: pickup truck, light utility vehicle, motorcycle, all terrain vehicle (ATV), and snowmobile.

  20. Risk and protective factors for recreational and hard drug use among Malaysian adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, Muzafar Mohd; Kliewer, Wendy

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated risk and protective factors for recreational and hard drug use in Malaysian adolescents and young adults. Participants (n = 859; M age = 17.24 years, SD = 2.75 years, range = 13-25 years; 59% male) were recruited from secondary schools, technical colleges, a juvenile detention center and a national training center in Malaysia. A version of the Communities That Care survey validated for use in Malaysia (Razali & Kliewer, 2015) was used to assess study constructs. One in 6 adolescents and 1 in 3 young adults reported lifetime recreational and hard drug use, with greater use reported by males across all drug categories. Structural equation modeling was used to determine the strongest risk and protective factors for recreational and hard drug use. The overall pattern of findings was similar for recreational and hard drug use. Shared risk factors for lifetime recreational and hard drug use included early initiation of antisocial behavior, peer antisocial behavior, and peer reinforcement for engaging in antisocial behavior; shared protective factors included religious practices and opportunities for prosocial school involvement. Multiple group analyses comparing adolescents and young adults indicated that patterns of risk and protective factors predicting drug use differed across these age groups. There were fewer significant predictors of either recreational or hard drug use for young adults relative to adolescents. Results suggest that interventions should target multiple microsystems (e.g., peer groups, family systems, school environments) and be tailored to the developmental stage of the individual. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Geomorphological Prerequisites of Recreation and Tourism Development in the Basin of Bolshaya Golubaya River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnyakov Nikolay Vladimirovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The basin of the Bolshaya Golubaya river is a promising region for the development of recreation, due to the unique natural conditions and rich historical and cultural heritage of this territory. The article demonstrates geomorphological features of the basin of Bolshaya Golubaya and their influence on the prospects of recreational use of this area. The author analyses the literature data on the geomorphology of the region and supplements it with his own field studies. The nature of this region is picturesque and multifarious. There are a lot of ravines, gullies, terraces, chalk cliffs and other landforms here. The author discovers the opportunities of organization of different recreational types in the study area in light of its geomorphological features. Recreational characteristics of this territory make it suitable for hiking, skiing and cycling tourism, horse riding. The results of this research can be used at the stage of creating of tourist-recreational projects, when designing and conducting excursion trips, sports and health touristic events. These studies contribute to the expansion of practical knowledge about the geography of the territory which has a positive effect on the possibility of carrying out mentioned above recreational projects.

  2. The Evaluation of the Recreation Potential of Dalyan Destination within the Tourism Product Diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay ÖZALTIN TÜRKER

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The different stress sources such as intense working tempo, increasing usage of technology, adverse living conditions, population crowd, noise and environmental pollution, artificial human relationsh ips causes physical and emotional frazzles on humans. At this point people start to turn though the nature as they start to see the recreational activities as a necessity to protect themselves against the physical and emotional frazzles. So the places that host the recreation areas connected to the nature, water, watching and sports should be organized though the availability usage of the locals and tourists at the highest level. In this context, the aim of this study is to identify the recreational potenti al of Dalyan destination. To determine the potential of the recreation area of Dalyan, the method developed by Gülez (1990 in accordance with the conditions of our country that supply the opportunity to analyze the potential of the in forest and outdoor r ecreational potential. In the study, the data taken from the interviews with Koycegiz Governorship, Koycegiz Governorship, Ortaca Municipality, Dalyan Tourism Information Bureau, Koycegiz Forestry Administration, Dalaman Meteorological Department and the s econdary data sources were used. The findings obtained from the analysis, the recreation potential of Dalyan have been identified according to the landscape value, the climate value, accessibility value, recreation conveniences value and negative factors v alue criteria.

  3. The use of recreation planning tools in U.S. Forest Service NEPA assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerveny, Lee K; Blahna, Dale J; Stern, Marc J; Mortimer, Michael J; Predmore, S Andrew; Freeman, James

    2011-09-01

    U.S. Forest Service managers are required to incorporate social and biophysical science information in planning and environmental analysis. The use of science is mandated by the National Environmental Policy Act, the National Forest Management Act, and U.S. Forest Service planning rules. Despite the agency's emphasis on 'science-based' decision-making, little is known about how science is actually used in recreation planning and management. This study investigated the perceptions of Forest Service interdisciplinary (ID) team leaders for 106 NEPA projects dealing with recreation and travel management between 2005 and 2008. Our survey data show how managers rate the importance of social and biophysical science compared to other potential 'success factors' in NEPA assessments. We also explore how team leaders value and use multi-disciplinary tools for recreation-related assessments. Results suggest that managers employ a variety of recreation planning tools in NEPA projects, but there appears to be no common understanding or approach for how or when these tools are incorporated. The Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (ROS) was the most frequently used planning tool, but the Visitor Experience and Resource Protection (VERP) framework was the most consistently valued tool by those who used it. We recommend further evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of each planning tool and future development of procedures to select appropriate planning tools for use in recreation-related NEPA assessments.

  4. Community-based recreational football

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Ditte Marie; Bjerre, Eik; Krustrup, Peter

    2014-01-01

    is limited and the majority of prostate cancer survivors remain sedentary. Hence, novel approaches to evaluate and promote physical activity are warranted. This paper presents the rationale behind the delivery and evaluation of community-based recreational football offered in existing football clubs under...... the Danish Football Association to promote quality of life and physical activity adherence in prostate cancer survivors. The RE-AIM framework will be applied to evaluate the impact of the intervention including outcomes both at the individual and organizational level. By introducing community-based sport...

  5. Proceedings of the 2003 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, comp., ed. Murdy; ed. comp.

    2004-01-01

    Contains articles presented at the 2003 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium. Contents cover planning issues, communications and information, management presentations, service quality and outdoor recreation, recreation behavior, founders? forum, featured posters, tourism and the community, specialized recreation, recreation and the community, management issues in...

  6. 36 CFR 71.9 - Establishment of recreation use fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Establishment of recreation... THE INTERIOR RECREATION FEES § 71.9 Establishment of recreation use fees. (a) Recreation use fees shall be established by all outdoor recreation administering agencies of the Department of the Interior...

  7. 36 CFR 30.3 - Recreation District I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation District I. 30.3... WHISKEYTOWN-SHASTA-TRINITY NATIONAL RECREATION AREA: ZONING STANDARDS FOR WHISKEYTOWN UNIT § 30.3 Recreation... Whiskeytown-Shasta-Trinity National Recreation Area delineated as “Recreation District I” on a map bearing the...

  8. Outdoor Recreation Benchmark 1988: Proceedings of the National Outdoor Recreation Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan H. Watson

    1989-01-01

    BENCHMARK 1988: A National Outdoor Recreation and Wilderness Forum was the first national recreation assessment meeting. The need for this meeting grew out of the desire to incorporate scientific, planning, and administrative peer review into the 1989 RPA Assessment of Outdoor Recreation and Wilderness. This meeting brought together many university and government...

  9. Outdoor Recreation in Florida: A Comprehensive Program for Meeting Florida's Outdoor Recreation Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Natural Resources, Tallahassee.

    A comprehensive program for meeting outdoor recreational needs in Florida is described in this planning and reference document in terms of objectives for the program through the year 1975 (with projections to the year 2000). The scope and nature of outdoor recreation are defined, and a justification for an outdoor recreation program is presented.…

  10. 76 FR 10915 - Notice of Use Authorizations; Special Recreation Permits, Other Than on Developed Recreation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Use Authorizations; Special Recreation Permits, Other Than on Developed Recreation Sites; Adjustment in Fees AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is adjusting certain special recreation permit fees for...

  11. Mapping landscape potential for outdoor recreation using different archetypical recreation user groups in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komossa, Franziska; van der Zanden, Emma H.; Schulp, Catharina J.E.; Verburg, Peter H.

    2018-01-01

    Engagement with the natural environment and public enjoyment of access to farmland and woodland often takes the form of outdoor recreation. Numerous studies on landscape preferences of outdoor recreation have focused on individual characteristics and attitudes of recreation users. Although the

  12. Recreation fees: attitudes and perceptions of Region 6 Forest Service employees in recreation positions and non-recreation positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen Robinson; Robert C. Burns; Alan Graefe

    2007-01-01

    This study explored the attitudes and perceptions of U.S. Forest Service employees concerning the Recreation Fee Demonstration Program (RFDP) in the Pacific Northwest Region (Region 6, Oregon and Washington), and their perceptions of how recreation fees should be used once the money is collected. Employees who reported that they were in a recreationrelated position...

  13. Spatial Vegetation Data for Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Vegetation map of the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River provides local park-specific names for vegetation types, as well as crosswalks to the National...

  14. Providing Compassion through Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Royeen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meg Kral, MS, OTR/L, CLT, is the cover artist for the Summer 2015 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. Her untitled piece of art is an oil painting and is a re-creation of a photograph taken while on vacation. Meg is currently supervisor of outpatient services at Rush University Medical Center. She is lymphedema certified and has a specific interest in breast cancer lymphedema. Art and occupational therapy serve similar purposes for Meg: both provide a sense of flow. She values the outcomes, whether it is a piece of art or improved functional status

  15. Parents’ Perceived Barriers to Accessing Sports and Recreation Facilities in Ontario, Canada: Exploring the Relationships between Income, Neighbourhood Deprivation, and Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W. Harrington

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sports and recreation facilities provide places where children can be physically active. Previous research has shown that availability is often worse in lower-socioeconomic status (SES areas, yet others have found inverse relationships, no relationships, or mixed findings. Since children’s health behaviours are influenced by their parents, it is important to understand parents’ perceived barriers to accessing sports and recreation facilities. Data from computer assisted telephone interviews with parents living in Ontario, Canada were merged via postal codes with neighbourhood deprivation data. Multivariable logistic regression modeling was used to estimate the likelihood that parents reported barriers to accessing local sports and recreation facilities. Parents with lower household incomes were more likely to report barriers to access. For each unit increase in deprivation score (i.e., more deprived, the likelihood of reporting a barrier increased 16% (95% CI: 1.04, 1.28. For parents, the relationships between household income, neighbourhood-level deprivation, and barriers are complex. Understanding these relationships is important for research, policy and planning, as parental barriers to opportunities for physical activity have implications for child health behaviours, and ultimately childhood overweight and obesity.

  16. Recreational boating site choice and the impact of water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Curtis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines whether water quality has an effect on recreational boating activity. The analysis is based on survey data collected by face-to-face interviews with recreational visitors to 10 waterway sites across Ireland. We model the respondent's choice decision to travel to a specific site for the purposes of beginning their recreational boating activity. Water quality data is from European Union Water Framework Directive monitoring stations. Across recreational sites, which have generally high water quality levels within our sample, we find that boaters favour sites with better water quality; as indicated by biological oxygen demand and phosphates metrics. We also find that for each additional 10 km distance from respondents' homes the probability that a site is visited declines by up to 10%. Preferences for other site attributes, such as boat slipways, parking and toilet facilities, were counter to expectation but reflects the fact that all boat users do not necessarily access or need all facilities provided. Keywords: Economics, Geography

  17. Swimming as physical activity and recreation for women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yfanti Maria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reviews all data that establish swimming as an everyday lifestyle and recreational activity for women, since it promotes wellness, well-being and longevity. Swimming as a natural, physical activity is one of the most effective ways of exercise, since it affects and work outs the whole body. It is the most suitable sport for all age groups, because it combines beneficial results, for both body and soul and is also a low-risk-injury physical exercise. Aim of this study is to record the effect of recreational swimming in physical condition indexes and in quality of life in women. In particular to record the benefits, since studies have shown that swimming can help in prevention and treatment of chronic diseases and improves quality of life, of well-being and longevity. Results of all studies showed that swimming, as a great natural recreational activity has multiple beneficial effects on the female body that are not limited to the physical characteristics but are extended to the mental ones. Challenges for the application and development fields of this particular method of exercise, are the quality of service provided and the staffing of departments and programs in multiple carriers, private or public. Researchers and writers agree that there are great prospects for growth for women through partnerships, with programs and systematic research in the field of recreational swimming.

  18. 76 FR 4281 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees Charter Reestablishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... Forest Service Recreation Resource Advisory Committees Charter Reestablishment AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to reestablish the Recreation Resource Advisory Committees. SUMMARY: The Secretary of Agriculture intends to reestablish the charter for 5 Forest Service Recreation Resource...

  19. Proceedings of the 2000 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard Kyle

    2001-01-01

    Contains articles presented at the 2000 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium. Contents cover management and planning, economics of outdoor recreation and tourism, tourism, characteristics of outdoor recreationists, ethnicity and culture, methodological issues, and marketing and management in outdoor recreation and tourism.

  20. Recreational scuba divers' knowledge regarding the audiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The sport of scuba diving may be associated with possible injuries, especially those concerning the auditory system. Research available focuses on the implications of recreational scuba diving on the auditory system. However, there is a lack of information regarding the knowledge of recreational scuba divers ...

  1. Campus Recreation and Perceived Academic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragheb, Mounir G.; McKinney, Jennifer

    1993-01-01

    Examined interrelationships among campus recreation participation, leisure satisfaction, and academic stress. Findings from 343 university and community college students revealed that the more students participated in recreation activities, the less they perceived academic stress, and that the greater satisfaction with leisure that students…

  2. Carrying capacity: maintaining outdoor recreation quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Lime; George H. Stankey

    1971-01-01

    A discussion of (1) what is meant by the concept of recreational carrying capacity; (2) what is known about capacities in terms of both how resources and experience of visitors are affected by recreational use; and (3) what alternative procedures the administrator can use to manage both resources and visitors for capacity.

  3. Adapting Activities for Therapeutic Recreation Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exceptional Parent, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Recreational activities can be adapted for disabled persons by using a functional device (such as a handle or extension), using an alternative stimulus (such as using tactile cues for blind persons), changing the participation technique (such as wheelchair basketball), or creating transitional recreation experiences (teaching prerequisite skills…

  4. Sustainability in outdoor recreation and tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Winter; Kelly Bricker; Jeremy. Schultz

    2013-01-01

    Outdoor recreation and tourism represents a major service by which the public identifies with and better understands natural resources, even to the extent that it can foster environmental stewardship (for example, see Winter and Chavez 2008). Yet, myriad threats to recreation and tourism exist which need to be addressed. Addressing these threats can be...

  5. Factors Influencing Recreational Use of Private Woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald F. Dennis; Donald F. Dennis

    1990-01-01

    Probit analysis was used to estimate relationships between the probability that forest land was used for recreation and characteristics of the forest, owner, and surrounding community. Land held by owners with more formal education or those reared in large cities was more likely to be used for recreation while the opposite was true for land held by older owners....

  6. A Cross-Regional Comparison of Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieh-Lu Li; Harry C. Zinn; Susan C. Barro; Michael J. Manfredo

    2003-01-01

    We studied outdoor recreation patterns among older hunting license holders in Pennsylvania and Colorado to better understand aspects of five trends that promise to impact outdoor recreation preferences, behavior, and management priorities: Sunbelt population growth, declining residential stability, urbanization, aging, and increasing levels of formal education. Results...

  7. Stakeholders' perceptions about recreational events within Marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stakeholders' perceptions about recreational events within Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in the South Coast of KwaZulu- Natal, South Africa. ... The evidence shows that MPAs can support tourism and recreational activities andthey can be used as a tool to enhance tourism growth and local economic development.

  8. 36 CFR 294.1 - Recreation areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation areas. 294.1 Section 294.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL AREAS Miscellaneous Provisions § 294.1 Recreation areas. Suitable areas of national forest land, other than wilderness...

  9. Solid Waste Management in Recreational Forest Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Charles S.

    The Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture, requested the Bureau of Solid Waste Management to conduct a study of National Forest recreation areas to establish waste generation rates for major recreation activities and to determine the cost of solid waste handling for selected Forest Service Districts. This report describes the 1968 solid…

  10. A behavioral intervention tool for recreation managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.M. Burn; P.L. Winter

    2008-01-01

    Depreciative behaviors and other undesirable recreationist actions continue to be a topic of great interest for recreation management (fig. 1). Maintaining park ecosystems involves responding to and preventing damage from depreciative recreationist behavior, and recreation managers are charged with developing and selecting eff ective tools to address the costly and...

  11. Physical Education and Recreation in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, M. L.; Van Vliet, M. L.

    Physical education and research programs, and recreational and athletic facilities, in Yugoslavia, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, England, and the U.S.S.R. are examined by two faculty members from the University of Alberta. This publication is an abridgement of their report on European approaches to physical education and recreation, giving their…

  12. United States of America: outdoor recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.Ken Cordell; G.Theodore Green; V.R. Leeworthy; R. Stephens; M.J. Fly; Carter J. Betz

    2005-01-01

    the first nationwide survey of outdoor recreation in the USA was conducted in 1960 for the outdoor recreation resources review commission (ORRC, 1962; Cordell et al., 1996). since that time, seven additional national surveys have been conducted, in 1965, 1970, 1972, 1977, 1983, 1995, and 2000/01 - summary details are presented in Table 16.1.

  13. Outdoor Recreation Action: Federal, State, Local, Private.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, George M., Ed.

    This booklet reports on outdoor recreation actions taken at the federal, state, local, and private levels. The Land and Water Conservation Fund and the financing of outdoor recreation on all levels are discussed. New agencies, personnel, reorganizations, resolutions, and recommendations for the organization and administration of outdoor recreation…

  14. UNBC: Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Pat

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the University of Northern British Columbia's (UNBC's) Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management (ORTM) Program, which focuses squarely on the management of outdoor recreation as it relates to conservation (i.e., in and around parks and protected areas), tourism that is both based in and concerned with the natural/cultural…

  15. Projections of outdoor recreation participation to 2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Michael Bowker; Donald B.K. English; H. Ken Cordell

    1999-01-01

    The authors project future outdoor recreation participation and consumption, in days and trips, well into the next century, as mandated by the Renewable Resources Planning Act (RPA). The chapter begins with a brief description of the data and methods used. They report indexed projections of future recreation participation (by millions of participants aged 16 and over)...

  16. 75 FR 19608 - Recreation Resource Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    ... recommendations regarding recreation fees to both the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) as... contact. Additional information about recreation fees and REA is available at http://www.fs.fed.us... / Thursday, April 15, 2010 / Notices#0;#0; [[Page 19608

  17. Rugged Practices: Embodying Authenticity in Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda-Cook, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    When people recreate outdoors, they value the quality of the experience. This study examines rhetorical practices that sustain or undermine perceived authentic outdoor recreation experiences. I conducted a rhetorical analysis of my fieldnotes gathered through participant observation and interview transcripts of online and in-person interviews. I…

  18. Connecting Collegiate Recreation and Athletics to Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Cara W; Stenta, Donald A

    2015-01-01

    Collegiate recreation and intercollegiate athletics have an impact on individual, group, and community development of students who are participants, employees, and athletes and learn leadership within these environments. This chapter explores and applies leadership frameworks in recreation and athletics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  19. Intelligence and Past Use of Recreational Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmoth, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    One motivation for trying recreational drugs is the desire for novel experiences. More intelligent people tend to value novelty more highly and may therefore be more likely to have tried recreational drugs. Using data from a national survey, it is shown that intelligence tends to be positively related to the probabilities of having tried alcohol,…

  20. Recreation trends: indicators of environmental quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Feuchter

    1980-01-01

    As you probably know, tomorrow is Earth Day-80, the 10th anniversary of the original Earth Day, so it is certainly appropriate that we talk these next few days about environmental quality and the relationship of outdoor recreation to that quality. However, perhaps the title should be more of a question such as: Are recreation trends indicators of environmental quality...

  1. Methodology of physical recreation: problems, experience, recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaytsev V.P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article contains methodical approaches in the process of conducting practical classes with the students on discipline «Physical recreation». The methodical reception is shown, also their definition, the importance of definitions during the life of the person, including the student. The essence of physical recreation in the understanding of students for passive and active recreation is uncover, as well as formulating the tasks in forming, recovering, strengthening and preserving the health of different age groups of the population. The methodological principles of physical recreation described in detail in the context of its performance by students. It uses traditional principal means for physical culture ((physical exercise, movement modes, natural factors, massage, occupational therapy, mechanotherapy. They are distinguished by various forms, methods, and activities, bearing recreational character.

  2. Cognitive performance amongst recreational users of "ecstasy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, J

    2000-07-01

    Previous work has suggested that memory impairments have been associated with the recreational use of "ecstasy". This previous work, however, has not taken into consideration the additional use of cannabis amongst those examined. Cannabis use has also been associated with memory impairment. There is therefore a clear need to explore the impact of both of these illicit substances upon memory ability. To determine whether recreational use of ecstasy impairs memory and attentional ability and to explore the impact of the concomitant use of cannabis upon these cognitive functions. In addition, an exploration of subjective accounts of cognitive ability was undertaken to determine whether objective impairments were perceived by users in everyday functioning. Cognitive functioning was examined in three groups of young people: 15 regular users of ecstasy; 15 regular users of cannabis who had never taken ecstasy and 15 control subjects who had never taken any illicit substances. The Weschler Memory Scale (revised) and a computerised reaction time task were administered on a day when the subjects claimed to be drug free. In addition, subjects completed a biographical questionnaire and the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) in order to assess subjective accounts of cognitive slips. Performance was similar across all three groups for measures of visual reaction time, auditory reaction time, complex reaction time, visual memory and attention and concentration. Significant impairment was found on measures of verbal memory in both cannabis users and ecstasy users. A significant impairment in performance was found on measures of delayed memory for the ecstasy users compared to both the cannabis group and the control group. Despite these findings, no differences in subjective ratings of cognitive failures were found between the groups. The present study provides additional evidence for longterm neuropsychological sequelae associated with the use of ecstasy, particularly with

  3. According to the Method of Gulez Evaluation of the Recreational Potential of Kafkasör Urban Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal Yılmaz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Urban people not only attempt to satisfy their hunger for nature by performing some recreational activities in natural areas in their proximities but also they challenge to regain disappeared natural areas in and around their cities in order to make residential areas more liveable. When considered the conditions today, urban trees and forests have turned out to be obligatory facilities for urban people since they provide not only recreational services but also contributions to city aesthetics, public health (with clean air and oxygen supply, human psychology, city and national economy and urban ecology. In this study, it was aimed to determine the existent recreational potentials of Kafkasör urban forest in Artvin city by evaluating the recreational conditions of urban forests. For this aim, recreational value of Artvin Urban Forest tried to be calculated according to Gülez’s method in order to determine existent potentials of recreational areas. As the result of the study, it was found that recreational potential rate of the area was 66.9 %, which shows the area has high recreational potential. The most important factor affecting this high potential was found to be the landscape characteristics the area has and recreational facilities the area provides.

  4. Fuel Used for Off-Highway Recreation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, P.S.

    1994-01-01

    The Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA) established a National Recreational Trails Funding Program and the National Recreational Trails Trust Fund. ISTEA requires that tax revenue generated from the sales of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation be transferred from the Highway Trust Fund to the Trails Trust Fund for recreational trail and facility improvements. In order to apportion the Trails Trust Fund to individual states equitably, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) asked the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to estimate the amount of motor fuel used for off-highway recreation at the state level by different vehicle types. This report documents this estimation procedure. For this estimation procedure, off-highway recreational fuel use was defined as Federally taxed gasoline, gasohol, diesel fuel, or special fuel used in recreational motorized vehicles on recreational trails or back country terrain. Fuel used in outdoor non-engine recreational equipment, such as camp stoves, heaters, and lanterns, was excluded from the analysis. Vehicle types included in this study were: pickup truck, light utility vehicle, motorcycle, all terrain vehicle (ATV), and snowmobile. Two factors governed the development of this estimation procedure. First, individual state shares of the total Trust Funds need to be developed using a uniform approach. Second, data needed for the estimation procedure should be publicly available and easily obtainable so that estimates for all subsequent years can be generated easily. Estimates were developed based on existing data sources. Adjustment factors were developed to take into account different vehicular off-highway recreational usage among states.

  5. Perceptions amongst Tasmanian recreational scuba divers of the value of a diving medical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Carol

    2013-12-01

    An online survey was offered to recreational divers in Tasmania to ascertain if they have an understanding of how pressure affects their health and if they considered an annual dive medical necessary. A total of 98 recreational divers completed the survey, five of these had never had a dive medical while 74 felt that if they passed their dive medical they do not have any potential illness. Sixty five saw the dive medical as a comprehensive health check. This project provided an insight to Tasmanian recreational divers' understanding of and attitude towards the value of a dive medical.

  6. Evaluation of instruments for measuring the burden of sport and active recreation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Nadine E; Gabbe, Belinda J; Wolfe, Rory; Cameron, Peter A

    2010-02-01

    Sport and active recreation injuries are common. Participants are generally young, healthy and physically active individuals and as a result their injuries can have long-ranging effects for both the individuals and society. Accurate and appropriate measurement of the outcomes of sport and active recreation injuries is essential for understanding the time frame and quality of recovery, and quantifying the burden of these injuries. The WHO has developed a framework that can be used for studying health-related outcomes called the International Classification of Function (ICF). As such, the ICF is a useful tool for assessing the suitability of outcome measures for general sport and active recreation populations. This article provides a review of outcome measures that are potentially suitable for use in a general sport and active recreation injury population, assessed within the framework of the ICF. An extensive literature search was performed to identify instruments used in sport and active recreation (and general) injury populations that would be suitable for measuring the outcomes and burden of sport and recreation injuries and return to physical activity. The search identified six health status and health-related quality-of-life (HR-QOL) measures and five functional outcome measures. Of the outcome measures reviewed, the Short Form-36 was the most commonly used and covered many of the areas relevant to a sport and active recreation population. The comprehensiveness of the Sickness Impact Profile-36 meant that it contained many relevant items; however, its usefulness is limited by its high level of responder burden. The Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment provided a detailed measure of function, appropriate to a sport and active recreation population, and the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended can provide a suitable global measure of function. The Short International Physical Activity Questionnaire is a potential means of measuring return to physical activity for this

  7. Recreating Daily life in Pompeii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose an integrated Mixed Reality methodology for recreating ancient daily life that features realistic simulations of animated virtual human actors (clothes, body, skin, face who augment real environments and re-enact staged storytelling dramas. We aim to go further from traditional concepts of static cultural artifacts or rigid geometrical and 2D textual augmentations and allow for 3D, interactive, augmented historical character-based event representations in a mobile and wearable setup. This is the main contribution of the described work as well as the proposed extensions to AR Enabling technologies: a VR/AR character simulation kernel framework with real-time, clothed virtual humans that are dynamically superimposed on live camera input, animated and acting based on a predefined, historically correct scenario. We demonstrate such a real-time case study on the actual site of ancient Pompeii.

  8. Limitations of recreational camera traps for wildlife management and conservation research: a practitioner's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newey, Scott; Davidson, Paul; Nazir, Sajid; Fairhurst, Gorry; Verdicchio, Fabio; Irvine, R Justin; van der Wal, René

    2015-11-01

    The availability of affordable 'recreational' camera traps has dramatically increased over the last decade. We present survey results which show that many conservation practitioners use cheaper 'recreational' units for research rather than more expensive 'professional' equipment. We present our perspective of using two popular models of 'recreational' camera trap for ecological field-based studies. The models used (for >2 years) presented us with a range of practical problems at all stages of their use including deployment, operation, and data management, which collectively crippled data collection and limited opportunities for quantification of key issues arising. Our experiences demonstrate that prospective users need to have a sufficient understanding of the limitations camera trap technology poses, dimensions we communicate here. While the merits of different camera traps will be study specific, the performance of more expensive 'professional' models may prove more cost-effective in the long-term when using camera traps for research.

  9. Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness: Opportunities and Potential for Near-term Cost Reductions; Proceedings of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop and Summary of Feedback Provided through the Hydrogen Station Cost Calculator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. W.; Steward, D.; Penev, M.; McQueen, S.; Jaffe, S.; Talon, C.

    2012-08-01

    Recent progress with fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) has focused attention on hydrogen infrastructure as a critical commercialization barrier. With major automakers focused on 2015 as a target timeframe for global FCEV commercialization, the window of opportunity is short for establishing a sufficient network of hydrogen stations to support large-volume vehicle deployments. This report describes expert feedback on the market readiness of hydrogen infrastructure technology from two activities.

  10. Exercise/recreation facility for a Lunar or Mars analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Discussed here is a project to design an exercise/recreation station for an earth based simulator of a lunar or Martian habitat. Specifically, researchers designed a stationary bicycle that will help people keep fit and prevent muscular atrophy while stationed in space. To help with motivation and provide an element of recreation during the workout, the bicycle is enhanced by a virtual reality system. The system will simulate various riding situations and the choice of mountain bike or road bike. The bike employs a magnetic brake that provides continuously changing tension to simulate actual riding conditions. This braking system will be interfaced directly with the virtual reality system. Also integrated into the virtual reality system will be a monitoring system that regulates heart rate, work rate, and other functions during the course of the session.

  11. Decrease in eccentric quadriceps and hamstring strength in recreational alpine skiers after prolonged skiing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Arnold; Fuchs, Birgit; Leichtfried, Veronika; Schobersberger, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Background To effectively prevent injury in recreational alpine skiing, it is important to identify modifiable risk factors that can be targeted through exercise and training. Fatigue is a potential risk factor in recreational skiing, but no investigations have evaluated concentric/eccentric quadriceps and hamstring fatigue in recreational skiers. We tested the hypothesis that recreational skiing is associated with more pronounced eccentric as compared with concentric muscle fatigue. Methods Twenty-four healthy and fit recreational skiers (14 male and 10 female) performed an isokinetic muscle test 1 day before, 1 h after, and 24 h after a 4 h skiing session. The testing protocol consisted of concentric and eccentric quadriceps and hamstring contractions for both legs. Results Eccentric peak hamstring torque (both thighs) and eccentric peak quadriceps torque (left thigh) were reduced in male and female participants (pskiing session. There were no other significant findings. Summary Recreational skiing is associated with prolonged (at least 24 h) eccentric quadriceps (left thigh) and hamstring (both thighs) fatigue in men and women. Eccentric quadriceps and hamstring fatigue may be a potential injury risk factor in male and female recreational skiers. This provides some justification for judicious use of additional eccentric training modalities for alpine skiing. PMID:27900115

  12. Unexpectedly high catch-and-release rates in European marine recreational fisheries: implications for science and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferter, K.; Weltersbach, M.S.; Strehlow, H.V.; Graaf, de M.; Hammen, van der T.

    2013-01-01

    While catch-and-release (C&R) is a well-known practice in several European freshwater recreational fisheries, studies on the magnitude and impact of this practice in European marine recreational fisheries are limited. To provide an overview of the practice and magnitude of C&R among marine

  13. Linking wilderness research and management-volume 3. Recreation fees in wilderness and other public lands: an annotated reading list

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annette Puttkammer; Vita Wright

    2001-01-01

    This annotated reading list provides an introduction to the issue of recreation fees on public lands. With an emphasis on wilderness recreation fees, this compilation of historical and recent publications is divided into the following sections: historical context, arguments for and against fees, pricing mechanisms and the effects of price, public attitudes toward fees...

  14. Analysis of Recreational Fisheries in the Croatian Areas of the Sava and Danube Rivers

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Matulić; Nikica Šprem; Marina Piria; Tea Tomljanović; Tomislav Treer; Roman Safner; Ivica Aničić

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the research was to provide an overview of the status of recreational anglers in the Croatian areas of the Sava and Danube rivers in many aspects: social and demographic characteristics, preferences, level of fishing experience and involvement, understanding of legal regulations, consumptive orientation, attitudes and satisfaction levels, the dynamics of fishing and the structure of catch, etc. A questionnaire of 48 questions was issued and distributed among the recreational...

  15. Recreational Physical Activity Experiences Among Guatemalan Families With Children With Visual Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columna, Luis; Fernández-Vivó, Margarita; Lieberman, Lauren; Arndt, Katrina

    2015-08-01

    Nationwide research indicates that children with visual impairment have limited participation in recreational and sport activities than their peers. This is due in part to the lack of recreational opportunities and facilities, as well as a lack of awareness by parents of how and where their children can participate. The purpose of the current study was to explore the experiences of Latino families of children with visual impairments living in Guatemala regarding physical recreation. Participants were Latino parents (N = 13) who have children with visual impairments recruited from a sport camp. Qualitative data were gathered through one-on-one interviews that were transcribed and analyzed through a constant comparative analysis. Participating Latino families who resided in Guatemala City participated at least once a month in low budget recreational activities with their children with visual impairments. Activities were mostly done in local surroundings and led mainly by their mother. Benefits identified by the participants related to relaxation, socialization, and sense of independence, with minimal mention of health related benefits. There is a need to disseminate information to the Latino community with children with visual impairments regarding the multiple benefits that arise from being involved in recreational physical activities.

  16. Recreational Interests of Visitors and Their Effects on Miankaleh Wildlife Refuge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Masoodi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, ecotourism is a major tourist activity around the world. Ecotourism is one of the strategies for supporting conservation and ensuring income in the protected areas. When implemented within the capabilities of natural systems evaluated based on natural and socio-economic factors, ecotourism can simultaneously lead to regional prosperity and environmental protection. The goal of research is determination of natural potential, recreational opportunity, and effective factors in their choice in natural areas. The area is located south of the Caspian Sea in Mazandaran and Golestan Provinces. We used questionnaires and field survey for collecting public opinions. Results indicated the high tendency of visitors for bird watching, swimming, nature photography and filming and boating among all the suggested recreational activities. Also, the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used for assessment of the relationships between age, sex and visitor groups and recreational activities. We found significant relationships between the groups in many of recreational activities such as research, resting and photography and filming of nature. The results of this study showed this area lacked sufficient facilities for visitors, therefore planning, preparation and implementation of comprehensive tourism infrastructure are essential to attract more ecotourists that can also reduce negative effects of recreational activities on the environment.

  17. Outdoor Recreation Activities at Cispus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cispus Environmental Center, Randle, WA.

    Most of the activities in this booklet have been developed around skills related to the outdoors and, in particular, to the logging industry and forest fire fighting. The activities attempt to develop muscles, coordination skills, and teamwork. They also give the students (junior high school or high school) and staff the opportunity to do…

  18. Outdoor Recreation at Brock University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Mary; O'Connell, Tim; Hutson, Garrett

    2007-01-01

    Brock University offers both undergraduate and graduate programs and is host to approximately 17,000 students. It is the only Canadian university located in a World Biosphere Reserve--the Niagara Escarpment. The Bruce Trail passes through campus, and offers ample opportunities for hiking, mountain biking, nature interpretation and outdoor…

  19. Examining Associations of Environmental Characteristics with Recreational Cycling Behaviour by Street-Level Strava Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yeran; Du, Yunyan; Wang, Yu; Zhuang, Liyuan

    2017-06-15

    Policymakers pay much attention to effectively increasing frequency of people's cycling in the context of developing sustainable and green cities. Investigating associations of environmental characteristics and cycling behaviour could offer implications for changing urban infrastructure aiming at encouraging active travel. However, earlier examinations of associations between environmental characteristics and active travel behaviour are limited by low spatial granularity and coverage of traditional data. Crowdsourced geographic information offers an opportunity to determine the fine-grained travel patterns of people. Particularly, Strava Metro data offer a good opportunity for studies of recreational cycling behaviour as they can offer hourly, daily or annual cycling volumes with different purposes (commuting or recreational) in each street across a city. Therefore, in this study, we utilised Strava Metro data for investigating associations between environmental characteristics and recreational cycling behaviour at a large spatial scale (street level). In this study, we took account of population density, employment density, road length, road connectivity, proximity to public transit services, land use mix, proximity to green space, volume of motor vehicles and traffic accidents in an empirical investigation over Glasgow. Empirical results reveal that Strava cyclists are more likely to cycle for recreation on streets with short length, large connectivity or low volume of motor vehicles or on streets surrounded by residential land.

  20. Examining Associations of Environmental Characteristics with Recreational Cycling Behaviour by Street-Level Strava Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeran Sun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Policymakers pay much attention to effectively increasing frequency of people’s cycling in the context of developing sustainable and green cities. Investigating associations of environmental characteristics and cycling behaviour could offer implications for changing urban infrastructure aiming at encouraging active travel. However, earlier examinations of associations between environmental characteristics and active travel behaviour are limited by low spatial granularity and coverage of traditional data. Crowdsourced geographic information offers an opportunity to determine the fine-grained travel patterns of people. Particularly, Strava Metro data offer a good opportunity for studies of recreational cycling behaviour as they can offer hourly, daily or annual cycling volumes with different purposes (commuting or recreational in each street across a city. Therefore, in this study, we utilised Strava Metro data for investigating associations between environmental characteristics and recreational cycling behaviour at a large spatial scale (street level. In this study, we took account of population density, employment density, road length, road connectivity, proximity to public transit services, land use mix, proximity to green space, volume of motor vehicles and traffic accidents in an empirical investigation over Glasgow. Empirical results reveal that Strava cyclists are more likely to cycle for recreation on streets with short length, large connectivity or low volume of motor vehicles or on streets surrounded by residential land.

  1. Experience patterns: capturing the dynamic nature of a recreation experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.B., IV Hull; William P. Stewart; Young K. Yi

    1992-01-01

    A recreation experience is not static, it varies over the course of an engagement. Yet, most recreation research operationalizes recreation benefits andoutcomes as essentially static in nature (i.e., satisfaction). "Experience patterns" capture the dynamic nature of a recreation experience and thus might prove useful as units of analysis in the management and...

  2. Effects of pretesting with the Adventure Recreation Model instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson Young; Lynn Anderson; Dale Anderson

    2002-01-01

    The Adventure Recreation Model, first proposed and tested by Ewert and Hollenhorst (1989), attempts to describe participant characteristics and patterns of use in adventure recreation activities. The Adventure Recreation Model is based on the relationship of level of engagement in an outdoor recreation activity (ranging from beginner, to development, to commitment)...

  3. Proceedings of the 2006 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Burns; K., comps. Robinson

    2007-01-01

    Contains articles and posters presented at the 2006 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium. Contents cover tourism marketing, fish and wildlife, place meaning, leisure and gender, recreation resource allocation, nature-based tourism, methods, leisure motives, outdoor recreation management, tourism impacts, outdoor recreation among specific populations, leisure...

  4. Proceedings of the 2008 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. Klenosky; Cherie LeBlanc Fisher; eds.

    2009-01-01

    Contains articles and posters presented at the 2008 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium. Contents cover tourism marketing, fish and wildlife, place meaning, leisure and gender, recreation resource allocation, nature-based tourism, methods, leisure motives, outdoor recreation management, tourism impacts, outdoor recreation among specific populations, leisure...

  5. Proceedings of the 2007 northeastern recreation research symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherie LeBlanc; Christine, comps. Vogt

    2008-01-01

    Contains articles and posters presented at the 2007 northeastern recreation research symposium. Contents cover tourism marketing, fish and wildlife, place meaning, leisure and gender, recreation resource allocation, nature-based tourism, methods, leisure motives, outdoor recreation management, tourism impacts, outdoor recreation among specific populations, leisure...

  6. Motivations and sensation seeking characteristics of recreational storm chasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuangyu Xu; Sonja Wilhelm Stanis; Carla Barbieri; Jiawen. Chen

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about recreational storm chasing, a type of risk recreation that has increased in popularity since the 1990s. This study was conducted to understand factors associated with participation in recreational storm chasing in the United States. Particularly, this study assessed the motivations and sensation seeking attributes of recreational storm chasers, as...

  7. Predicting quantitative and qualitative values of recreation participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood L., Jr. Shafer; George Moeller

    1971-01-01

    If future recreation consumption and associated intangible values can be predicted, the problem of rapid decision making in recreation-resource management can be reduced, and the problems of implementing those decisions can be anticipated. Management and research responsibilities for meeting recreation demand are discussed, and proved methods for forecasting recreation...

  8. 76 FR 27002 - Information Collection; National Recreation Program Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ...-6814) authorizes the Forest Service to issue permits and charge fees for recreation uses of Federal... authorized to collect recreation fees and/or issue recreation permits. Name and contact information will be... Forest Service Information Collection; National Recreation Program Administration AGENCY: Forest Service...

  9. 40 CFR 230.52 - Water-related recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water-related recreation. 230.52... Effects on Human Use Characteristics § 230.52 Water-related recreation. (a) Water-related recreation... or fill disposal is to impair or destroy the resources which support recreation activities. The...

  10. Impact of Place Attachment and Recreation Involvement on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Place attachment, recreation involvement and satisfaction are key indicators explaining future behaviour in nature-based recreation. This study examined a behavioural model using latent variables of place attachment, recreation involvement, recreation satisfaction and future behaviour of surfers. In total, 1140 usable ...

  11. 36 CFR 71.2 - Types of Federal recreation fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Types of Federal recreation... INTERIOR RECREATION FEES § 71.2 Types of Federal recreation fees. There shall be three types of Federal recreation fees: (a) Entrance fees, charged either on an annual or single-visit basis, for admission to any...

  12. High Biodiversity of Green Infrastructure Does Not Contribute to Recreational Ecosystem Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Sikorska

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Urban lakes, especially those of natural origin, provide ecosystem services, recreation being one of the most important and highly valued by city dwellers. Fulfilling the needs of city residents to relax and have contact with nature has become a priority in urbanized areas and has been proven to positively affect people’s health and well-being. The recreational potential of water bodies was identified to be the most important aspect of ecosystem services to the residents of the neighboring areas. An assessment of recreational ecosystem services (RES provisioning to society based on the real time spent by the citizens and housing values in the urban–rural gradient revealed that the economic benefits of lakes differ in urbanized, suburban and rural landscapes. The growth of cities has led to an increased population density in the surroundings of ecologically valuable areas, resulting in higher pressure from visitors seeking recreational areas. Along with urbanization, the impoverishment of ecosystem functions takes place, limiting their capability to provide ecosystem services. In this work, the provisioning of recreational ecosystem services of 28 floodplain lakes located along the urban–rural gradient of the Warsaw agglomeration was assessed. The relationship between the ecological value of the water bodies, measured using naturalness indices, and the recreational ecosystem services they can provide was assessed. The results showed that the floodplain lakes located along the urban–rural gradient are of great importance to the citizens due to their recreational potential. The provisioning of recreational ecosystem services is poorly connected with the ecological characteristics of the floodplain lakes. Only hemeroby was significantly correlated with provisioning, and there was no relationship with factors such as naturalness of vegetation or water quality, demonstrating that public preference was not generally influenced by high

  13. New Opportunities for Appalachian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Sidney Saylor

    2003-01-01

    The New Opportunity School for Women in Berea, Kentucky, is a 3-week residential program for low-income women who need jobs. The program offers courses in resume writing, interview skills, computer basics, and building self-esteem. Women are placed in jobs on Berea College's campus, cultural opportunities are provided through field trips, and…

  14. Quadriceps Muscle Function during Recreational Alpine Skiing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kröll, Josef; Wakeling, James M; Seifert, John G; Müller, Erich

    2010-01-01

    .... The three-part aim of this recreational skiing study was to analyze functional differences within the quadriceps muscle, to analyze the topographical influence, and to apply a time-frequency analysis...

  15. Microbial (Pathogen)/Recreational Water Quality Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertaining to Recreational Human Health Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Microbial Organisms (Pathogens). These documents include safe levels for cyanotoxins microcystin and cylindrospermopsin, and Coliphage to protect human health.

  16. National Marine Recreational Fishing Expenditure Survey 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine recreational fishing is a popular pastime across the United States that generates significant economic impacts to both local economies and to the nation. In...

  17. EAARL Topography - Gateway National Recreation Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model or DEM) of Gateway National Recreation Area was produced from remotely-sensed,...

  18. Greening the Golden Gate National Recreation Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Golden Gate National Recreation Area was recognized a 2016 Federal Green Challenge Award for making significant strides to reduce its carbon footprint with the goal of becoming a carbon neutral park.

  19. Costs of abandoned coal mine reclamation and associated recreation benefits in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shruti K; Hitzhusen, Frederick J; Sohngen, Brent L; Guldmann, Jean-Michel

    2012-06-15

    Two hundred years of coal mining in Ohio have degraded land and water resources, imposing social costs on its citizens. An interdisciplinary approach employing hydrology, geographic information systems, and a recreation visitation function model, is used to estimate the damages from upstream coal mining to lakes in Ohio. The estimated recreational damages to five of the coal-mining-impacted lakes, using dissolved sulfate as coal-mining-impact indicator, amount to $21 Million per year. Post-reclamation recreational benefits from reducing sulfate concentrations by 6.5% and 15% in the five impacted lakes were estimated to range from $1.89 to $4.92 Million per year, with a net present value ranging from $14.56 Million to $37.79 Million. A benefit costs analysis (BCA) of recreational benefits and coal mine reclamation costs provides some evidence for potential Pareto improvement by investing limited resources in reclamation projects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental justification of indicative microbiological values for the safety of water bodies in the recreation areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е.V. Drozdova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the assessment of the microbiological values of water bodies if they are used for recreational purposes and distinguishes the epidemiologically significant parameters. In order to validate the indicative safety values taking into account the existing conditions of the recreational use of water we conducted the hygienic assessment of water in the water bodies used for recreational purposes under the indicative microbiological values (total microbial count, thermotolerant coliform bacteria, E. coli; enterococcus, spores of sulfite-reducing Clostridia; coliphages; Ps. aeruginosa and the content of pathogenic microorganisms; also the microbiological profile of water was identified. The obtained data will be used to improve the system for monitoring of water bodies in the recreation areas.

  1. 75 FR 5759 - Notice of New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... Forest Service Notice of New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII... Recreation Fee Sites. SUMMARY: The Soda Springs Ranger District of the Caribou-Targhee National Forest is... appreciate and enjoy the availability of developed recreation campground and picnicking facilities. This...

  2. 75 FR 4340 - Notice of New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... Forest Service Notice of New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Recreation Lands Enhancement Act (Title VII, Pub. L. 108-447) directed... new recreation fee areas are established. The Caribou-Targhee National Forest currently has nine other...

  3. 75 FR 33763 - Notice of Proposed New Recreation Fee Sites; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (Title VIII...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... Forest Service Notice of Proposed New Recreation Fee Sites; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act...: Notice of three proposed new recreation fee sites. SUMMARY: Moss Knob Shooting Range, Nantahala National..., Recreation Program Manager, 828-524-6441, Nantahala Ranger District, Nantahala National Forest, 90 Sloan Road...

  4. Opportunizing: A classic grounded theory study on business and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ólavur Christiansen

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Opportunizing emerged as the core variable of this classic GT study on business and management. Opportunizing is the recurrent main concern that businesses have to continually resolve, and it explains how companies recurrently create, identify, seize or exploit situations to maintain their growth or survival. Opportunizing is the recurrent creation and re-creation of opportunities in business. Opportunizing is basically what business managers do and do all the time. The problematic nature of opportunizing is resolved by a core social process ofopportunizing and its attached sub-processes that account for change over time and for the variations of the problematic nature of its resolution.Opportunizing has five main facets. These are conditional befriending (confidence building & modifying behavior,prospecting (e.g. information gaining, weighing up (information appraisal & decision-making, moment capturing (quick intervention for seizing strategic opportunities, andconfiguration matching (adjusting the business organization to abet the other activities of opportunizing.On a more abstract level, opportunizing has three more organizational facets: the physically boundary-less, the valuehierarchical, and the physically bounded. The first of these called perpetual opportunizing. This emerges from the conjunction of conditional befriending and prospecting. The second facet is called triggering opportunizing. It arises from the coming together of weighing up and moment capturing. The final facet is called spasmodic opportunizing. This happens when moment capturing and configuration matching unite.

  5. The role of discretion in recreation decision-making by resource professionals in the USDA Forest Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teressa Trusty; Lee K. Cerveny

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores opportunities for administrative discretion in decision-making for natural resource management. We carried out an exploratory study in the USDA Forest Service to understand factors affecting administrative actions related to recreation use in riparian areas. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 27 resource professionals from a national...

  6. Defining a Safe Operating Space for inland recreational fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Stephen R; Brock, William A.; Hansen, Gretchen J. A.; Hansen, Jonathan F.; Hennessy, Joseph M.; Isermann, Daniel A.; Pedersen, Eric J.; Perales, K. Martin; Rypel, Andrew L.; Sass, Greg G.; Tunney, Tyler D.; Vander Zanden, M. Jake

    2017-01-01

    The Safe Operating Space (SOS) of a recreational fishery is the multidimensional region defined by levels of harvest, angler effort, habitat, predation and other factors in which the fishery is sustainable into the future. SOS boundaries exhibit trade-offs such that decreases in harvest can compensate to some degree for losses of habitat, increases in predation and increasing value of fishing time to anglers. Conversely, high levels of harvest can be sustained if habitat is intact, predation is low, and value of fishing effort is moderate. The SOS approach recognizes limits in several dimensions: at overly high levels of harvest, habitat loss, predation, or value of fishing effort, the stock falls to a low equilibrium biomass. Recreational fisheries managers can influence harvest and perhaps predation, but they must cope with trends that are beyond their control such as changes in climate, loss of aquatic habitat or social factors that affect the value of fishing effort for anglers. The SOS illustrates opportunities to manage harvest or predation to maintain quality fisheries in the presence of trends in climate, social preferences or other factors that are not manageable.

  7. Toxigenic fungi and mycotoxins in outdoor, recreational environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudakin, Daniel; Fallah, Payam

    2008-09-01

    Some epidemiological studies of damp buildings have focused on health risks from indoor exposure to toxigenic fungi and mycotoxins. Most of these studies have not considered assessment of these hazards in outdoor environments. The purpose of this investigation was to assess for toxigenic fungal species in outdoor recreational environments through the microbial analysis of locations representing opportunities for human exposure. A screening assessment was also conducted using commercially available ELISA kits to assess for trichothecene mycotoxins in outdoor samples. Ten swab and tape-lift samples were obtained from a city park. Swabs were cultured and identified by a trained mycologist. Bulk samples of grasses were screened for deoxynivalenol using a commercial ELISA assay. A pilot study of 6 bulk samples was screened for macrocyclic trichothecenes using a commercial ELISA assay. Tape-lift samples contained trace to moderate spores. Penicillium and Aspergillus-like spores were identified in 50% of tape-lift samples. 50% of swab samples contained potentially toxigenic species of Penicillium (P. citrinum, P. brevicompactum, P. chrysogenum). None of the bulk samples tested positive for deoxynivalenol. 3 of 6 (50%) bulk samples were positive for macrocyclic trichothecenes (> 0.2 ppb), however both negative control samples also tested positive. Potentially toxigenic fungi were commonly encountered in an outdoor, recreational environment. Future epidemiological studies need to consider outdoor activities in hazard and exposure assessment. Further work is needed to define the accuracy of commercially developed ELISA kits that are being used for the detection of mycotoxins in environmental samples.

  8. Relation of Adolescents' Physical Activity to After-School Recreation Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Christina M; Cain, Kelli L; Conway, Terry L; Kerr, Jacqueline; Saelens, Brian E; Frank, Lawrence D; Glanz, Karen; Sallis, James F

    2017-05-01

    The after-school period provides an opportune context for adolescent physical activity. This study examined how characteristics of after-school recreation environments related to adolescent physical activity. Participants were 889 adolescents aged 12 to 17 (mean = 14.1, SD = 1.4) from 2 US regions. Adolescents reported on whether their school offered after-school supervised physical activity, access to play areas/fields, and presence of sports facilities. Outcomes were accelerometer-measured after-school physical activity, reported physical activity on school grounds during nonschool hours, attainment of 60 minutes of daily physical activity excluding school physical education, and BMI-for-age z-score. Mixed regression models adjusted for study design, region, sex, age, ethnicity, vehicles/licensed drivers in household, and distance to school. School environment variables were all significantly associated with self-reported physical activity on school grounds during non-school hours (P < .001) and attainment of 60 minutes of daily physical activity (P < .05). Adolescents' accelerometer-measured after-school physical activity was most strongly associated with access to supervised physical activity (P = .008). Policies and programs that provide supervised after-school physical activity and access to play areas, fields, and sports facilities may help adolescents achieve daily physical activity recommendations.

  9. Benefit Transfer of Outdoor Recreation Demand Studies, 1968-1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Richard G.; Johnson, Donn M.; McKean, John R.

    1992-03-01

    The accumulation of studies on outdoor recreation demand creates an opportunity to apply the growing science of reviewing research for purposes of benefit transfer. The process involves developing an understanding of the variables that explain the observed difference in estimates. This paper illustrates how the results of previous studies could be adjusted to develop some tentative estimates of nonmarket values for future policy analysis. Also, the evaluation of some potentially important variables should help improve statistical analysis and the allocation of resources to new studies. The challenge is to build each subsequent work on the knowledge gained from previous ones. In this experimental phase, there is a need to examine additional variables that might conceivably be more important than those considered in the past.

  10. Sex differences in knee loading in recreational runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, J; Selfe, J

    2015-07-16

    Patellofemoral pain is the most common chronic pathology in recreational runners. Female runners are at greater risk of developing patellofemoral pain, although the exact mechanism behind this is not fully understood. This study aimed to determine whether female recreational runners exhibit distinct knee loading compared to males. Fifteen males and 15 females recreational runners underwent 3D running analysis at 4.0 ms(-1)±5%. Sagittal/coronal joint moments, patellofemoral contact forces (PTF) and pressures (PCP) were compared between sexes. The results show that females exhibited significantly greater knee extension (p<0.008, pη(2)=0.27: males=3.04; females=3.47 N m kg(-1)) and abduction (p<0.008, pη(2)=0.28: males=0.54; females=0.82 N m kg(-1)) moments as well as PTF (p<0.008, pη(2)=0.29: males=3.25; females=3.84 B.W.) and PCP (p<0.008, pη(2)=0.26: males=7.96; females=9.27 MPa) compared to males. Given the proposed relationship between knee joint loading and patellofemoral pathology, the current investigation provides insight into the incidence of patellofemoral pain in females. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Design of ropeways of the mountain recreational centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tseva Anna Victorovna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ropeways are an eco-friendly and economically viable transport used for transportation of passengers and shipment. Ropeways are widely applied during construction in the conditions of a mountainous relief. The state programs aimed at the development of mountain recreational centers (MRCs stipulate ropeways construction in accordance with the MRC situational plan. Safety and comfort of a ropeway are defined not only by its technical characteristics, but also by its linking to the relief, MRC facilities and infrastructure. The article describes the main design stages of a ropeway starting from the concept, a choice of its axis, determination of capacity, type of a ropeway, requirements to the track before the design of drop-off/pick-up zones. For each design stage the explanations, which reflect real work specifics, are provided, together with the technical characteristics for calculations and solution samples. The concept defines the functional purpose of a ropeway: ski slopes/ tourist zones/ recreation areas; the season of ropeway operation, the scheme of communications with the MRC objects, the capacity of reception base, the minimum distance from the bottom stations to residential complexes. The critical decisions of axis and track design are carried out by a coalition of designer-planners, expert designers and ropeway technologists. The ropeway, which performs transport function, unites all the objects of the mountain recreational center into a single complex. The optimum placement of a ropeway deals with the questions of comfort, safety and profitability, therefore greatly contributing to the quality of the whole ropeway project. During the MRC development one should consider the questions of infrastructure expansion, year-round ropeway operation and increasing ski tracks capacity, which will demand ropeway modernization and/ or changes in the situational plan of the mountain recreational center.

  12. Modeling large-scale winter recreation terrain selection with implications for recreation management and wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucretia E. Olson; John R. Squires; Elizabeth K. Roberts; Aubrey D. Miller; Jacob S. Ivan; Mark Hebblewhite

    2017-01-01

    Winter recreation is a rapidly growing activity, and advances in technology make it possible for increasing numbers of people to access remote backcountry terrain. Increased winter recreation may lead to more frequent conflict between recreationists, as well as greater potential disturbance to wildlife. To better understand the environmental characteristics favored by...

  13. Recreation visitor preferences for and perceptions of outdoor recreation setting attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Tarrant; Erin Smith; H. Ken Cordell

    1999-01-01

    Between 1990 and 1994, a comprehensive national survey was conducted by the USDA Forest Service (FS), Southern Research Station, to measure visitor preferences for, and perceptions of, setting attributes at a variety of outdoor recreation sites. Over 11,000 visitors at 31 outdoor recreation sites across the country were interviewed in this study. The study was entitled...

  14. CHARACTERISTICS OF SPORTS RECREATIONAL TOURISM IN MONTENEGRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ognjen Jovović

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Basic for realization of tourist movements lays in meeting cultural and recreational needs of potential customers. If we know that largest number of tourists represents part of recreational ones, than is not hard to realize how large potential lays in that number of potential guests. On this fact should be built strategy of movement of tourist offer of Montenegro for it extreme potentials on which can be founded concrete project. In this work are given basic assumptions for development of sport recreational shapes of tourism with stress to natural potentials that directly determine shape of sport recreational activities that represent basis of tourist offer. Offer should be created in that way that it is adapted to wide segment of recreational guests and not professional sportsmen, although they also should not be underestimated but one should know that in order to create conditions for arrival of sports professionals offer has to be completely different and more specialized that requires creating of conditions of existence of highly developed sports infrastructure, while for amateurs a lot can be done in “system of improvising”, satisfying basic criteria – recreation in conditions of untouched and well preserved nature with securing maximal level of security and protection of guests, in order to prevent possible unwilling consequences that can lead to injury of guests and for development and realization of such project one need a much less funds than is building of facilities that should meet standards of professional sportsmen. The aim is to create good offer at good infrastructure, logistics and with good equipment with securing maximal security, adaptation to various wishes of guests, taking in consideration their structure is conditioned by age, health condition, physical fitness as personal wishes toward sports and recreational activities.

  15. Recreational Use of the Countryside: No Evidence that High Nature Value Enhances a Key Ecosystem Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornigold, Karen; Lake, Iain; Dolman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In Western Europe, recreational amenity is presented as an important cultural ecosystem service that, along with other values, helps justify policies to conserve biodiversity. However, whether recreational use by the public is enhanced at protected areas designated for nature conservation is unknown. This is the first study to model outdoor recreation at a national scale, examining habitat preferences with statutory designation (Site of Special Scientific Interest) as an indicator of nature conservation importance. Models were based on a massive, three year national household survey providing spatially-referenced recreational visits to the natural environment. Site characteristics including land cover were compared between these observed visit sites (n = 31,502) and randomly chosen control sites (n = 63,000). Recreationists preferred areas of coast, freshwater, broadleaved woodland and higher densities of footpaths and avoided arable, coniferous woodland and lowland heath. Although conservation designation offers similar or greater public access than undesignated areas of the same habitat, statutory designation decreased the probability of visitation to coastal and freshwater sites and gave no effect for broadleaved woodland. Thus general recreational use by the public did not represent an important ecosystem service of protected high-nature-value areas, so that intrinsic and existence values remain as the primary justifications for conservation of high nature value areas. Management of 'green infrastructure' sites of lower conservation value that offer desirable habitats and enhanced provision of footpaths, could mitigate recreational impacts on nearby valuable conservation areas.

  16. Decrease in eccentric quadriceps and hamstring strength in recreational alpine skiers after prolonged skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Arnold; Fuchs, Birgit; Leichtfried, Veronika; Schobersberger, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    To effectively prevent injury in recreational alpine skiing, it is important to identify modifiable risk factors that can be targeted through exercise and training. Fatigue is a potential risk factor in recreational skiing, but no investigations have evaluated concentric/eccentric quadriceps and hamstring fatigue in recreational skiers. We tested the hypothesis that recreational skiing is associated with more pronounced eccentric as compared with concentric muscle fatigue. Twenty-four healthy and fit recreational skiers (14 male and 10 female) performed an isokinetic muscle test 1 day before, 1 h after, and 24 h after a 4 h skiing session. The testing protocol consisted of concentric and eccentric quadriceps and hamstring contractions for both legs. Eccentric peak hamstring torque (both thighs) and eccentric peak quadriceps torque (left thigh) were reduced in male and female participants (pfatigue in men and women. Eccentric quadriceps and hamstring fatigue may be a potential injury risk factor in male and female recreational skiers. This provides some justification for judicious use of additional eccentric training modalities for alpine skiing.

  17. A temporal importance-performance analysis of recreation attributes on national forests: a technical document supporting the Forest Service update of the 2010 RPA Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley E. Askew; J.M. Bowker; Donald B.K. English; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Gary T. Green

    2017-01-01

    The outdoor recreation component of the 2010 Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment provided projections and modeling of participation and intensity by activity. Results provided insight into the future of multiple outdoor recreation activities through projections of participation rates, numbers of participants, days per participant, and total activity days. These...

  18. Remote sensing as a source of data for outdoor recreation planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, W. E.; Goodell, H. G.; Emmitt, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Specific data needs for outdoor recreation planning and the ability of tested remote sensors to provide sources for these data are examined. Data needs, remote sensor capabilities, availability of imagery, and advantages and problems of incorporating remote sensing data sources into ongoing planning data collection programs are discussed in detail. Examples of the use of imagery to derive data for a range of common planning analyses are provided. A selected bibliography indicates specific uses of data in planning, basic background materials on remote sensing technology, and sources of information on environmental information systems expected to use remote sensing to provide new environmental data of use in outdoor recreation planning.

  19. Incorporating community and multiple perspectives in the development of acceptable drinking water source protection policy in catchments facing recreation demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syme, Geoffrey J; Nancarrow, Blair E

    2013-11-15

    The protection of catchment areas for drinking water quality has become an increasingly disputed issue in Australia and internationally. This is particularly the case in regard to the growing demand for nature based and rural recreation. Currently the policy for the protection of drinking water in Western Australia is to enforce a 2 km exclusion zone with a much larger surrounding area with limited and prescribed access to recreators. The debate between recreators and water management agencies has been lively, culminating in a recent state government enquiry. This paper describes the second phase of a three phase study to develop a methodology for defensible policy formulation which accounts for the points of view of all stakeholders. We examine general community, active recreators and professionals' views on the current policy of catchment protection and five proposed alternatives using a social judgement theory approach. Key attitudinal determinants of the preferences for policies were identified. Overall the recreators did not support the current policy despite strong support from both the general community and the professional group. Nevertheless, it was evident that there was some support by the community for policies that would enable a slight relaxation of current recreational exclusion. It was also evident that there was a significant proportion of the general community who were dissatisfied with current recreational opportunities and that, in future, it may be less easy to police exclusion zones even if current policy is maintained. The potential for future integration of recreational and water source protection is discussed as well as the benefits of community research in understanding policy preferences in this regard. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Wildfire Risk Management: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M.; Calkin, D. E.; Hand, M. S.; Kreitler, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this presentation we address federal wildfire risk management largely through the lens of economics, targeting questions related to costs, effectiveness, efficiency, and tradeoffs. Beyond risks to resources and assets such as wildlife habitat, watersheds, and homes, wildfires present financial risk and budgetary instability for federal wildfire management agencies due to highly variable annual suppression costs. Despite its variability, the costs of wildfire management have continued to escalate and account for an ever-growing share of overall agency budgets, compromising abilities to attain other objectives related to forest health, recreation, timber management, etc. Trends associated with a changing climate and human expansion into fire-prone areas could lead to additional suppression costs in the future, only further highlighting the need for an ability to evaluate economic tradeoffs in investments across the wildfire management spectrum. Critically, these economic analyses need to accurately capture the complex spatial and stochastic aspects of wildfire, the inherent uncertainty associated with monetizing environmental impacts of wildfire, the costs and effectiveness of alternative management policies, and linkages between pre-fire investments and active incident management. Investing in hazardous fuels reduction and forest restoration in particular is a major policy lever for pre-fire risk mitigation, and will be a primary focus of our presentation. Evaluating alternative fuel management and suppression policies could provide opportunities for significant efficiency improvements in the development of risk-informed management fire management strategies. Better understanding tradeoffs of fire impacts and costs can help inform policy questions such as how much of the landscape to treat and how to balance investments in treating new areas versus maintaining previous investments. We will summarize current data needs, knowledge gaps, and other factors

  1. Spatial preference heterogeneity in forest recreation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildtrup, Jens; Garcia, Serge; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the preferences for recreational use of forests in Lorraine (Northeastern France), applying stated preference data. Our approach allows us to estimate individual-specific preferences for recreational use of different forest types. These estimates are used in a second stage...... of the analysis where we test whether preferences depend on access to recreation sites. We find that there is significant preference heterogeneity with respect to most forest attributes. The spatial analysis shows that preferences for forests with parking and picnic facilities are correlated with having access...... to such forests while for the other attributes considered (dominant tree species, trekking paths and presence of lake and rivers) we find no correlation between stated preferences and accessibility. This implies that the problem of endogenous distances in the travel cost method (Parsons, 1991) may be present...

  2. The choice of forest site for recreation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agimass, Fitalew; Lundhede, Thomas; Panduro, Toke Emil

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the factors that can influence the site choice of forest recreation. Relevant attributes are identified by using spatial data analysis from a questionnaire asking people to indicate their most recent forest visits by pinpointing on a map. The main objectives of the s......In this paper, we investigate the factors that can influence the site choice of forest recreation. Relevant attributes are identified by using spatial data analysis from a questionnaire asking people to indicate their most recent forest visits by pinpointing on a map. The main objectives...... logit as well as a random parameter logit model. The variables that are found to affect the choice of forest site to a visit for recreation include: forest area, tree species composition, forest density, availability of historical sites, terrain difference, state ownership, and distance. Regarding...

  3. Fish assemblages in central and southern California using fish catch and effort data from the Recreational Fisheries Information Network

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset was provided by the Recreational Fisheries Information Network (RecFIN), and contained GPS coordinates for 680 CPFV trips during 1999 and 2001 at depths...

  4. Fish diversity in central and southern California using fish catch and effort data from the Recreational Fisheries Information Network

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset was provided by the Recreational Fisheries Information Network (RecFIN), and contained GPS coordinates for 680 CPFV trips during 1999 and 2001 at depths...

  5. Gateway National Recreational Area - Sandy Hook Unit : automated fee entrance plaza and intelligent transportation system technical requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center) is providing technical : support to Sandy Hook, a unit of the Gateway National Recreation Area, in the planning and : concept development for possible Intelligent Transportation Systems ...

  6. Meeting the challenge of providing flexible learning opportunities: Considerations for technology adoption amongst academic staff | Relever le défi de fournir des occasions d’apprentissage flexibles : considérations pour l’adoption de la technologie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Mirriahi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a subset of findings from a larger study investigating resistance from academic staff to the integration of technology with on-campus foreign language teaching at one North American higher education institution. The study revealed that the factors influencing technology adoption paralleled Davis’ Technology Acceptance Model’s tenets of perceived usefulness and ease of use. Further, this study supports Lai and Savage’s (2013 assertion of a lack of attention to the pedagogical affordances of technology when adoption decisions are made by instructors, thus we highlight the need for higher education leaders to determine strategies promoting awareness of the benefits technology-enabled teaching and learning can bring to advance educationally-rich flexible learning opportunities. Cet article traite d’un sous-ensemble de résultats provenant d’une étude plus vaste ayant enquêté sur la résistance des universitaires envers l’intégration de la technologie à l’enseignement en langue étrangère sur le campus dans un établissement nord-américain d’études supérieures. L’étude a révélé que les facteurs ayant une influence sur l’adoption de la technologie coïncident avec les principes du modèle d’acceptation de la technologie de Davis sur l’utilité perçue et la facilité d’utilisation. De plus, cette étude appuie l’assertion de Lai et Savage (2013 d’un manque d’attention envers les affordances pédagogiques de la technologie lorsque les décisions d’adoption sont prises par les formateurs. Nous soulignons donc le besoin, pour les meneurs de l’éducation supérieure, de déterminer les stratégies qui favorisent la connaissance des avantages de l’enseignement et de l’apprentissage que permet la technologie pour faire progresser les occasions d’apprentissage flexibles et riches sur le plan éducatif.

  7. DEMFIL - treatment of stormwater for recreational use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørud, Mai; Nielsen, Katrine; Skau Damskier, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Decoupling of stormwater (road runoff) in a residential area has been implemented in order to reduce flooding and to increase the hydraulic capacity of a lake with a high recreational value. The object here was to evaluate a disc filter technology in combination with a green polymer for flocculat......Decoupling of stormwater (road runoff) in a residential area has been implemented in order to reduce flooding and to increase the hydraulic capacity of a lake with a high recreational value. The object here was to evaluate a disc filter technology in combination with a green polymer...

  8. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  9. Willingness to pay for highlands' agro-tourism recreational facility: A case of Boh Tea plantation, Cameron Highlands, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Syamsul Herman M.; M, Nur A'in C.; S, Ahmad; S, Ramachandran

    2014-03-01

    The increase in tourist demand for highland experience is inevitable. Cameron Highlands, established as a Tea Plantation Estate during the British Colonial era in 1929, has evolved into a major highland tourism destination providing a cool climatic experience coupled with scenic beauty in the midst of Tudor concept architecture which enhances the destinations historical value. Realising such tourism potential, the Boh Plantation management has provided a visitor centre as recreational facility for tourist utilisation. However, the absence in imposing an entrance fee has left a vacuum in determining the recreational economic value of this facility as the benefit of this agro-tourism product to tourists remains unknown. It would be important for the management to identify the benefit since the development and maintenance of the facility is costly. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to estimate the benefit of such establishment in highlands area by assessing visitor's Willingness to pay (WTP). The study examines, explores and debates the issues in a critical yet supportive environment especially highlands. The study obtained 179 usable questionnaires from visitors during weekends, weekdays and public holidays. The result showed that 59% of the visitors were willing to pay for the agro-tourism product. The WTP was estimated at RM 7.21 (1.81). Three factors were found to be influencing WTP which were monthly income, years of education and perception on scenery. Although the study was conducted post development, the finding indicated the WTP for current management practise. Should the management change its style, it would also affect WTP and also the total economic value. Since WTP is established concept, the finding of the study reflects on the opportunities, barriers and challenges inherent in embracing post-disciplinary approaches to research and suggest ways to further enhance the approach.

  10. Behavior Management in Physical Education, Recreation, and Sport: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavay, Barry

    1986-01-01

    This bibliography contains references specifically pertaining to physical education, recreation, or sport and to behavior management. The references are classified into areas of behavior management overview, reinforcement systems, motor performance, physical fitness, recreation, and sport. (MT)

  11. Proceedings of the 1991 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gail A. Vander Stoep

    1992-01-01

    Contains 48 research and management papers on the following subjects: social science in resource management; outdoor recreation planning and management; fisheries and wjldlife management; specialization theory; travel, tourism and community development; urban recreation; and geographic information systems.

  12. Chronic recreational physical inactivity and epithelial ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannioto, Rikki; LaMonte, Michael J.; Risch, Harvey A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite a large body of literature evaluating the association between recreational physical activity and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk, the extant evidence is inconclusive, and little is known about the independent association between recreational physical inactivity and EOC ri...

  13. Cluster attacks responsive to recreational cannabis and dronabinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Tarshish, Sara; Solomon, Seymour; Grosberg, Brian M

    2009-06-01

    Pharmacological preparations of cannabinoid compounds have a variety of therapeutic uses in medicine, including different pain syndromes, but have not been previously reported as beneficial for cluster headache. We present a patient with cluster headache who was refractory to multiple acute and preventive medications but successfully aborted his attacks with recreational marijuana use; subsequent use of dronabinol provided equally effective pain relief. The beneficial effect may be related to the high concentration of cannabinoid receptors in the hypothalamus, which has been implicated as a site of dysfunction in neuroimaging studies of patients with cluster headache.

  14. Linking the Leadership Identity Development Model to Collegiate Recreation and Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stacey L

    2015-01-01

    The Leadership Identity Development (LID) Model (Komives, Owen, Longerbeam, Mainella, & Osteen, 2005) provides a stage leadership development model for college students that can be applied to collegiate recreation student staff, volunteers, participants, and varsity student-athletes. This chapter provides guidance to implement the model in these settings and to create environments that support development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  15. Informal Opportunity among SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rezaei, Shahamak; Dana, Leo-Paul; Goli, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Based on interviews with (legal and illegal) immigrants to Denmark, meetings with stakeholders and with experts in the field, this article addresses issues regarding the underground economy. Our findings show that, in Denmark, the existence of an underground economy makes it possible for semi......-compliant and non-compliant immigrants to make a living. We suggest that the underground economy in Denmark will continue to provide networks of illegal residents with opportunities for informal economic activities as trust allows entrepreneurs to function below the radar, by owning enterprises registered using...

  16. Psychological demands experienced by recreational endurance athletes

    OpenAIRE

    McCormick, Alister; Meijen, Carla; Marcora, Samuele

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify psychological demands that are commonly experienced by endurance athletes so that these demands could inform the design of performance-enhancement psychological interventions for endurance athletes. Focus group interviews were conducted with 30 recreational endurance athletes of various sports (running, cycling, and triathlon), distances, and competitive levels to explore the psychological demands of training, competition preparation, and competition participation...

  17. From recreational to regular drug use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järvinen, Margaretha; Ravn, Signe

    2011-01-01

    to extricate themselves from this pattern. Hence, when regular drug users talk about their future, it is not a future characterised by total abstinence from illegal drugs but a future where they have rolled back their drug use career to the recreational drug use pattern they started out with. Empirically...

  18. Star Trek as Recreational Reading for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeland, Mecedes

    A study investigated the appropriateness of the "Star Trek" book series for use as recreational reading material for elementary school children. The 12 books were adapted from the television series by James Blish. Appropriateness was determined by evaluating the quality and the readability levels of the books. Quality was ascertained by examining…

  19. THE IMPACT OF RECREATIONAL IN HUMAN HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enver Tahiraj

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Of Recreation knows no gender or age, knows no season or time of day. Health is a state of complete, physical, mental and social well-being and not merely absence of disease. The movement is an important feature of life. Therefore, the muscle activity of the best physiological way to stimulate the body's various systems

  20. THE IMPACT OF RECREATIONAL IN HUMAN HEALTH

    OpenAIRE

    Enver Tahiraj; Admira Koničanin; Afrim Shabani; Fikret Shatri; Bahri Gjinovci; Malësor Gjonbalaj

    2012-01-01

    Of Recreation knows no gender or age, knows no season or time of day. Health is a state of complete, physical, mental and social well-being and not merely absence of disease. The movement is an important feature of life. Therefore, the muscle activity of the best physiological way to stimulate the body's various systems

  1. Re-Creating Pablo Picasso's "Guernica"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daseler, Jack C.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the teachers at the author's school completed a group project with their eighth-graders in which they recreated a mural version of the famous painting by Pablo Picasso, "Guernica." This activity was aimed at: (1) studying the rise of Fascism in Spain and Germany during the Spanish Civil War prior to World War II; (2) learning…

  2. Perspectives on law enforcement in recreation areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence C. Hadley

    1971-01-01

    The nature and scope of law-enforcement problems in the National Park System are of increasing concern to park and recreation area managers. A positive response by management in terms of formulating and executing a fully professional and effective enforcement program is vital for sustaining public confidence that Parks are safe for individual and family use. Law...

  3. Public attitudes about financing municipal recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney R. Zwick; Thomas A. More; Tad Nunez

    2008-01-01

    Communities constantly seek creative financing for public services like recreation. Property tax remains central for financing, but user fees, grants, sales taxes, sponsorship, and bond issues have increased. This paper examines preferences for alternative funding mechanisms in a survey of Hartford, VT residents. Public support for municipal facilities and programs...

  4. Creating and Recreating. Microcomputing Working Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arms, Valarie

    This document describes a software program, CREATE, which was developed at Drexel University to guide students in creating English compositions. A second program, ReCREATE, guides students in reading their finished papers and making global revisions. CREATE asks 20 questions that a teacher might ask a student in a pre-writing conference. Unlike…

  5. Converging social trends - emerging outdoor recreation issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl H. Reidel

    1980-01-01

    I can't recall when I have attended a national conference with a more clearly defined objective than this one. We are here to document outdoor recreation trends and explore their meaning for the future. The word "trend" appears no less than 45 times in the conference brochure, and the symposium organizers are determined that the proceedings will be...

  6. Outdoor Recreation in the Northern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; Carter J. Betz; Shela H. Mou; Dale D. Gormanson

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, the North's population grew at a considerably slower rate than the Nation as a whole. Nevertheless, this region's population is large and in all likelihood will continue to grow. This means greater development of land and water resources at the same time that there is growth in demand for outdoor recreation. This report looks at...

  7. Outdoor Recreation in Two European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, James M.

    1987-01-01

    Questionnaires completed by older adults in Luxembourg (N=138) and in France (N=100) revealed a high extent of participation in outdoor recreation (a demonstrated predictor of successful aging) in the two countries. Identified similarities and differences in socioeconomic characteristics, attitudes, and environmental factors associated with…

  8. Improving our understanding of recreation and tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda E. Kruger; Susan J. Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Over the past century, American society has hanged in many ways that affect the management of natural resources for recreation and tourism. The nation's population is more racially and ethnically diverse. Baby boomers are reaching retirement age and many have money to travel. The nation's population has more than tripled, causing our once rural country to...

  9. Recreation intervention with adolescent offenders: Prospects and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In dealing with the dysfunctional family life and depriving environments of participants, mechanisms of the strategy amount to physical and mental challenges in order to create mastery ... Child offenders with well-established defence mechanisms and resistance to change appear less amenable to recreation intervention.

  10. Lake Holloman Recreational Area Development Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    1-4 1.4 Summary of Key Environmental Requirements ......................................................1-5 1.4.1 National...and Need for Development of Holloman Lake Recreational Area 1.4 Summary of Key Environmental Requirements 1.4.1 National Environmental Policy Act...Sylvilagus audubonii), kangaroo rats ( Dipodomys spp.), White sands woodrat (Neotomamicropus leaucophaea), house mouse (Mus musculus), long-tailed

  11. International Fisheries Management and Recreational Benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oinonen, Soile; Grønbæk, Lone; Laukkanen, Marita

    2016-01-01

    scenarios. In the first scenario, countries take their participation decision for the IFA based only on the net present value of profits from commercial fisheries. In the second scenario, the net present value of the recreational benefits from angling is also considered. The results show that accounting...

  12. Urban Densification and Recreational Quality of Public Urban Green Spaces—A Viennese Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Arnberger

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Public urban green spaces play an important role in urban sustainability. These places should provide high-quality recreation experiences for the urban residents. However, they are often overused. The Wienerberg area in the south of Vienna, Austria, was transformed from a waste disposal site into a natural recreation area. During the past years, intensive settlement densification processes have taken place, resulting in a doubling of the local population living within a few minutes walking distance. An on-site survey among green space visitors (N = 231 revealed that the majority of them considered the area to be overcrowded on Sundays/holidays and reported a perceived increase in visitor numbers during the past years. Visitors with more past experience, as well as those who have perceived an increase in visitor numbers during recent years, reported higher crowding perceptions. A significant proportion of them try to avoid these crowds, relying on behavioral coping strategies, such as inter-area displacement. While urban regeneration has provided an attractive recreation area, urban densification around the green space appears to have reduced its recreational quality. Monitoring recreation quality indicators, such as crowding perceptions, seems to be useful for sustainable urban green space management and city planning.

  13. Clinical toxicology of newer recreational drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Simon L; Thomas, Simon H L

    2011-10-01

    Novel synthetic 'designer' drugs with stimulant, ecstasy-like (entactogenic) and/or hallucinogenic properties have become increasingly popular among recreational drug users in recent years. The substances used change frequently in response to market trends and legislative controls and it is an important challenge for poisons centres and clinical toxicologists to remain updated on the pharmacological and toxicological effects of these emerging agents. To review the available information on newer synthetic stimulant, entactogenic and hallucinogenic drugs, provide a framework for classification of these drugs based on chemical structure and describe their pharmacology and clinical toxicology. A comprehensive review of the published literature was performed using PUBMED and Medline databases, together with additional non-peer reviewed information sources, including books, media reports, government publications and internet resources, including drug user web forums. Novel synthetic stimulant, entactogenic or hallucinogenic designer drugs are increasingly available to users as demonstrated by user surveys, poisons centre calls, activity on internet drug forums, hospital attendance data and mortality data. Some population sub groups such as younger adults who attend dance music clubs are more likely to use these substances. The internet plays an important role in determining the awareness of and availability of these newer drugs of abuse. Most novel synthetic stimulant, entactogenic or hallucinogenic drugs of abuse can be classified according to chemical structure as piperazines (e.g. benzylpiperazine (BZP), trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine), phenethylamines (e.g. 2C or D-series of ring-substituted amfetamines, benzodifurans, cathinones, aminoindans), tryptamines (e.g. dimethyltryptamine, alpha-methyltryptamine, ethyltryptamine, 5-methoxy-alphamethyltryptamine) or piperidines and related substances (e.g. desoxypipradrol, diphenylprolinol). Alternatively classification may

  14. Recreational activities performed with neoplasia carrier Inpatients in a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline de Castro Moura

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at apprehending the contribution of recreational activities in the treatment of hospitalized cancer patients and identifying the most stimulating resources for them. This is a qualitative research of phenomenological nature, it was approved by the Ethics in Research Committee, Protocol 139/2010. It was conducted with patients with cancer in a general hospital, located in Alfenas, in March and April, 2011.The research began from these guiding questions: What are your thoughts on the recreational team work and the activities they do? What do you suggest for this group to be developed? It was perceived that ludic activities help patients to face the disease, that they eased the interaction between the recreational group and the multiprofessional team, besides providing a happy and welcoming environment. The most well accepted activities were music and games the clowns provided. We suggest implementing the humanization by using ludic resources.

  15. Medical and recreational marijuana: commentary and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Samuel T

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have seen substantial shifts in cultural attitudes towards marijuana for medical and recreational use. Potential problems with the approval, production, dispensation, route of administration, and negative health effects of medical and recreational marijuana are reviewed. Medical marijuana should be subject to the same rigorous approval process as other medications prescribed by physicians. Legalizing recreational marijuana may have negative public health effects.

  16. RPA Assessment of Outdoor Recreation: Past, Current, and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    John C. Bergstrom; H. Ken Cordell; Linda Langner

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the outdoor recreation sections of the Renewable Resource Planning Act (RPA) Assessments conducted to date are reviewed. Current policy and mangement applications of the outsdoor recreation results published in 1989 Assessment are discussed also. The paper concludes with suggestions for the assemssment of outdoor recreation in future RPA Assessements...

  17. 77 FR 71191 - 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    ... AGENCY 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability of the 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 304... availability of the 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria (RWQC). The document contains the EPA's...

  18. 36 CFR 7.79 - Amistad Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amistad Recreation Area. 7.79... REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.79 Amistad Recreation Area. (a) Hunting. (1) Hunting is... (PWC). (1) PWCs are allowed within Amistad National Recreation Area with the following exceptions: (i...

  19. Sports and recreation participation in three communities in Botswana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A questionnaire was used to gather information about sports and recreation participation, participation in sports and recreation activities, using the integrated sports facilities and reasons for low participation in sports and recreation activities. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. The results showed that soccer ...

  20. Physical Recreation of Blind Adults: Present Practices and Childhood Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Claudine; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of tape-recorded responses of 30 blind adults to a 22-question interview showed that most respondents had positive attitudes toward physical education and recreation, but felt that little encouragement had been offered them. Leisure education and counseling for blind persons and recreation personnel can improve physical recreation and…

  1. The Future of Outdoor Recreation. What the Trends Tell Us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Gina

    1986-01-01

    The author looked at trend data presented at the 1985 National Outdoor Recreation Trends Symposium and synthesized the results to offer insights into the future of outdoor recreation. Discussed are social, activity, private sector recreational, economic, tourism, and policy trends. (MT)

  2. America's Outdoor Recreation Areas--Playgrounds for the Affluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, John D.

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the societal benefits of outdoor recreation and to determine the relationship of social stratification to utilization of outdoor recreation facilities. Conclusions are that many of America's outdoor recreation sites are located at considerable distances from population concentrations and require substantial…

  3. Outdoor Recreation Participation: Blacks, Whites, Hispanics, and Asians in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Dwyer

    1992-01-01

    Blacks, Whites, Hispanics, and Asians in Illinois attach a high level of significance to outdoor recreation. However, there are important differences in the outdoor recreation participation patterns of these four groups, including the activities participated in and where they participate, that have important implications for recreation resource planning and research....

  4. 36 CFR 327.23 - Recreation use fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreation use fees. 327.23... § 327.23 Recreation use fees. (a) In accordance with the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965... Engineers collects day use fees, special recreation use fees and/or special permit fees for the use of...

  5. 36 CFR 7.62 - Lake Chelan National Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Recreation Area. 7.62 Section 7.62 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Recreation Area. (a) Snowmobiles. After consideration of existing special situations, i.e., depth of snow... snowmobiles the following locations within the Lake Chelan National Recreation Area: (1) All open areas...

  6. 36 CFR 7.69 - Ross Lake National Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ross Lake National Recreation... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.69 Ross Lake National Recreation Area... snowmobiles the following locations within the Ross Lake National Recreation Area: (1) State Highway 20, that...

  7. 36 CFR 7.55 - Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Recreation Area. 7.55 Section 7.55 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Recreation Area. (a) Hunting. Hunting is allowed at times and locations designated as open for hunting. (b... Recreation Area except in the following areas: (i) Crescent Bay Lake. (ii) Kettle River above the Hedlund...

  8. 76 FR 58403 - Prohibitions-Developed Recreation Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... Forest Service 36 CFR Part 261 RIN 0596-AC98 Prohibitions--Developed Recreation Sites AGENCY: Forest.... Section-by-Section Analysis 36 CFR Part 261, Subpart A Section 261.16 Developed Recreation Sites.... 261.16 Developed recreation sites. * * * * * (j) Bringing in or possessing an animal, other than a...

  9. 36 CFR 7.57 - Lake Meredith National Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Meredith National Recreation Area. 7.57 Section 7.57 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Recreation Area. (a) The operation of motor vehicles within the Lake Meredith Recreation Area is prohibited...

  10. 20 CFR 638.515 - Recreation/avocational program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recreation/avocational program. 638.515... PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.515 Recreation/avocational program. The center operator shall develop a recreation/avocational program in accordance with...

  11. 78 FR 48136 - Notice of New Recreation Fee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... Doc No: 2013-19047] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Notice of New Recreation Fee AGENCY: Prescott National Forest, Southwestern Region, USDA Forest Service. ACTION: Notice of New Recreation Fee... following proposed fees: (1) Osprey recreation fee is proposed at $75/night for up to 50 persons or $125...

  12. A role for first-person science in recreation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert Schroeder

    2008-01-01

    Most if not all recreation researchers are also recreationists. This paper explores the possibility that recreation researchers could use their own recreation experiences as a source of insight into the phenomena they are trying to understand. Such a strategy of "first-person science" is embraced by practitioners of phenomenological psychology, experiential...

  13. Diffusion of Innovation: A Roadmap for Inclusive Community Recreation Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleien, Stuart J.; Miller, Kimberly D.

    2010-01-01

    Inclusive community recreation is an optimal environment for the development of recreation and sports skills and social relationships between people with and without disabilities. Although we know much about best practices for inclusion, little systemic change in recreation agencies has transpired. Diffusion of Innovation Theory is proposed as a…

  14. Econonmic effects of river recreation on local economies

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; John C. Bergstrom; Gregory A. Ashley; John Karish

    1990-01-01

    Outdoor recreation is a major, growing use of water resources in the United States. The economic effects of expenditures by visitors to three recreational river sites on local economies surrounding the sites were estimated using an input-output model (IMPLAN). Expenditure data were from the Public Area Recreation Visitors Study (PARVS). Results indicate that visitor...

  15. 40 CFR 230.51 - Recreational and commercial fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recreational and commercial fisheries... Potential Effects on Human Use Characteristics § 230.51 Recreational and commercial fisheries. (a) Recreational and commercial fisheries consist of harvestable fish, crustaceans, shellfish, and other aquatic...

  16. MDCT findings in sports and recreational accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensch, Frank V; Koivikko, Mika P; Koskinen, Seppo K (Dept. of Radiology, Toeoeloe Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)), email: frank.bensch@hus.fi

    2011-12-15

    Background. Sports and recreational accidents involving critical areas of the body occur commonly in the general population. Reports on their demographics and recommendations for screening procedures are, however, few. Purpose. To assess injuries of the craniofacial area, spine, and torso resulting from sports and recreational accidents with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as primary imaging method in a Level I trauma center. Material and Methods. All emergency room CT requests over a time span of 105 months were reviewed retrospectively for trauma mechanism and injury. Patients were identified using an electronic picture archiving and communications system (PACS), and MDCT studies interpreted by two radiologists independently. Results. Of a total of 5898 patients, 492 patients (301 boys/men, 191 girls/women, age range 2-76 years, mean 33.5 years, median 29.5 years) with sports or recreational accidents emerged. A total of 102 traumatic findings were diagnosed, thereof 72 (71%) serious. The three most commonly encountered serious injuries were intracranial injury, fractures of facial bones, and vertebral injuries. The three most common injury mechanisms were bicycling, horseback riding, and team ball sports. Patients from recreational activities were on average significantly younger (29.2 years) than those from sports accidents (36.9 years; P < 0.001). Only age groups <21 years and 41-50 years differed in injury severity from the other age groups (P = 0.004 and P = 0.063, respectively). Of all trauma mechanisms, only bicycling had a significantly increased risk of injury (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Injuries in sports and recreational accidents presented with an overall incidence of 21%, of which 71% are serious. The most common mechanisms of injury were bicycling, horseback riding, and team ball sports. The largest incidence of serious injury involved bicycling. Because of the high probability of a serious injury and the high energies that are often involved

  17. Recreational Water Quality Criteria Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    This set of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) provides an overview of NPDES permitting applicable to continuous dischargers (such as POTWs) based on water quality standards for pathogens and pathogen indicators associated with fecal contamination.

  18. Energy conservation: policy issues and end-use scenarios of savings potential. Part IV. Energy-efficient recreational travel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, P.; Codina, R.; Cornwall, B.

    1978-09-01

    The guidelines laid out for the five subjects investigated in this series are to take a holistic view of energy conservation policies by describing the overall system in which they are implemented; provide analytical tools and sufficiently disaggregated data bases that can be adapted to answer a variety of questions by the users; identify and discuss some of the important issues behind successful energy conservation policy; and develop an energy conservation policy in depth. This report contains the design of a specific policy that addresses energy conservation in recreational travel. The policy is denoted as an ''Information System for the National Park Service.'' This work is based on prior examination of the characteristics of the recreational trip and decision making for the recreational experience. The examination revealed which aspects of the recreational travel system needed to be addressed to encourage energy-efficient modal decisions for recreational travel. This policy is briefly described in Section 1, the ''Summary of Initiative.'' A more detailed discussion of the policy follows. The material which led to the policy's formation is developed in Section 2: Importance and Impact of the Recreational Trip; Weekend Travel; The Flowchart: Decision Making for the Recreational Experience; Policy Development for Phase 1 ''Planning the Trip;'' and Objectives and Strategies for ''Planning the Trip.'' (MCW)

  19. Implementation uncertainty when using recreational hunting to manage carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischof, Richard; Nilsen, Erlend B; Brøseth, Henrik; Männil, Peep; Ozoliņš, Jaānis; Linnell, John D C; Bode, Michael

    2012-08-01

    1. Wildlife managers often rely on resource users, such as recreational or commercial hunters, to achieve management goals. The use of hunters to control wildlife populations is especially common for predators and ungulates, but managers cannot assume that hunters will always fill annual quotas set by the authorities. It has been advocated that resource management models should account for uncertainty in how harvest rules are realized, requiring that this implementation uncertainty be estimated.2. We used a survival analysis framework and long-term harvest data from large carnivore management systems in three countries (Estonia, Latvia and Norway) involving four species (brown bear, grey wolf, Eurasian lynx and wolverine) to estimate the performance of hunters with respect to harvest goals set by managers.3. Variation in hunter quota-filling performance was substantial, ranging from 40% for wolverine in Norway to nearly 100% for lynx in Latvia. Seasonal and regional variation was also high within country-species pairs. We detected a positive relationship between the instantaneous potential to fill a quota slot and the relative availability of the target species for both wolverine and lynx in Norway.4. Survivor curves and hazards - with survival time measured as the time from the start of a season until a quota slot is filled - can indicate the extent to which managers can influence harvest through adjustments of season duration and quota limits.5.Synthesis and applications. We investigated seven systems where authorities use recreational hunting to manage large carnivore populations. The variation and magnitude of deviation from harvest goals was substantial, underlining the need to incorporate implementation uncertainty into resource management models and decisions-making. We illustrate how survival analysis can be used by managers to estimate the performance of resource users with respect to achieving harvest goals set by managers. The findings in this study come

  20. Recent advances in recreation ecology and the implications of different relationships between recreation use and ecological impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher A. Monz; Catherine M. Pickering; Wade L. Hadwen

    2013-01-01

    Recreation ecology - the study of the environmental consequences of outdoor recreation/nature-based tourism activities and their effective management - is an emerging field of global importance. A primary research generalization in this field, the use-impact relationship, is commonly described as curvilinear, with proportionally more impact from initial recreation/...

  1. Outdoor recreation participation of people with mobility disabilities: selected results of the national survey of recreation and the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Williams; Hans Vogelsong; Gary Green; Ken Cordell

    2004-01-01

    Outdoor recreation is an important and meaningful experience that carries numerous benefits for people with and without disabilities. Traditionally, relatively few recreation services and facilities were accessible to people with disabilities. Recent legislation such as the Americans with Disabilities Act has increased the accessibility of many outdoor recreation...

  2. 75 FR 26711 - Notice of New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... No: 2010-11040] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Notice of New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L. 108-447) AGENCY: National Forests in Mississippi, USDA Forest Service. ACTION: Notice of New Recreation Fee Site. SUMMARY: Bethel Motorcycle and Bethel...

  3. 75 FR 26714 - Notice of Proposed New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... No: 2010-11042] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Notice of Proposed New Recreation Fee Site; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act, (Title VIII, Pub. L. 108-447) AGENCY: National Forests in Mississippi, USDA Forest Service. ACTION: Notice of Proposed New Recreation Fee Site. SUMMARY: Rattlesnake Bay...

  4. Decontamination tests in the recreational areas affected by the Chernobyl accident: efficiency of decontamination and long-term stability of the effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramzaev, V.; Barkovsky, A.; Mishine, A.

    2013-01-01

    The paper provides a review of the decontamination tests and the follow up monitoring program conducted by the Russian and Danish researchers in two recreational areas in the period 1995–2003. The recreational areas Novie Bobovichi and Muravinka consisted of sets of wooden and brick summer houses...

  5. Writing Well as an Essential Skill for Professionals in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism: Why Do We Need It and How Do We Do It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Mary Sarah; Piatt, Jennifer A.; Paisley, Karen P.

    2012-01-01

    Although writing is an important skill for all professionals, many students in parks, recreation, and tourism do not see the relevance of learning and applying the skills of writing well in parks, recreation, and tourism courses. This article outlines the reasons good writing is beneficial for students and provides concrete guidelines for how they…

  6. The Problems and Prospects of Sustainable Recreational Nature Management in the Small Bend of the Don River on the Example of the Basin of the Bolshaya Golubaya River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnyakov Nikolay Vladimirovich

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the opportunities of tourist-recreational events organization in the basin of the Bolshaya Golubaya river located in the small bend of the Don river. This area is characterized by rich natural, cultural, historical and recreational potential. The article contains the data on the expeditions to the studied areas during the field seasons of 2013-2014. The author also cites the data of statistical research performed using the method of expert assessment with the assistance of specialists in sports tourism and recreation – directors and employees of touristic companies of the city of Volgograd, who are tour operators for domestic tourism, and professional tourists. Using these data the author made numerous maps of the recreational activities forms, which are possible to implement on this territory. The generalized map of the recreational use of nature in the basin of Bolshaya Golubaya river was created on the basis of these materials. There are also hydrological and road networks of the region on this map. The studied area is suitable for organizing and conducting different recreational events: sports and health tourism, horse riding, cycling tourism, agrotourism, ethnographic tourism. Managers of tourism enterprises, sports and tour groups can use the results of this research at the stage of creation, organization and conduction of recreational events on this territory.

  7. Recreating the Cardiac Microenvironment in Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Human Physiology and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmanli, Ayhan; Domian, Ibrahim John

    2017-05-01

    The advent of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) biology has opened unprecedented opportunities for the use of tissue engineering to generate human cardiac tissue for in vitro study. Engineering cardiac constructs that recapitulate human development and disease requires faithful recreation of the cardiac niche in vitro. Here we discuss recent progress in translating the in vivo cardiac microenvironment into PSC models of the human heart. We review three key physiologic features required to recreate the cardiac niche and facilitate normal cardiac differentiation and maturation: the biochemical, biophysical, and bioelectrical signaling cues. Finally, we discuss key barriers that must be overcome to fulfill the promise of stem cell biology in preclinical applications and ultimately in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Near miss experiences of transport and recreational cyclists in New South Wales, Australia. Findings from a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, R G; Hatfield, J; Rissel, C; Flack, L K; Shaw, L; Grzebieta, R; McIntosh, A S

    2017-04-01

    This paper investigates events in which cyclists perceive a cycling crash is narrowly avoided (henceforth, a near miss). A cohort of 2038 adult transport and recreational cyclists from New South Wales (Australia) provided self-reported prospectively collected data from cycling diaries to allow the calculation of an exposure-based rate of near misses and investigation of near miss circumstances. During 25,971days of cycling, 3437 near misses were reported. For a given time cycling, cyclists who rode mainly for transport (compared with those who rode mainly for recreation), and cyclists with less experience (compared to those with more experience) were more likely to report a near miss; older cyclists (60+ years) were less likely to report a near miss than younger cyclists (25-59 years). Where type of near miss was recorded, 72.0% involved motor vehicles, 10.9% involved pedestrians and 6.9% involved other cyclists. Results indicate some similarities between near misses and crashes reported by this cohort during the same reporting period. A bias toward reporting near misses with motor vehicles was suggested, which likely reflects cyclists' perceptions that crashes involving motor vehicles are particularly serious, and highlights their impact on perceived safety. Given the relative rarity of crashes, and the limited breadth and depth of administrative data, collection of near miss data may contribute to our understanding of cycling safety by increasing the volume and detail of information available for analysis. Addressing the causes of near misses may offer an opportunity to improve both perceived and actual safety for cyclists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A quantitative analysis of biodiversity and the recreational value of potential national parks in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Frank Wugt; Petersen, Anders Højgård; Strange, Niels; Lund, Mette Palitzsch; Rahbek, Carsten

    2008-05-01

    Denmark has committed itself to the European 2010 target to halt the loss of biodiversity. Currently, Denmark is in the process of designating larger areas as national parks, and 7 areas (of a possible 32 larger nature areas) have been selected for pilot projects to test the feasibility of establishing national parks. In this article, we first evaluate the effectiveness of the a priori network of national parks proposed through expert and political consensus versus a network chosen specifically for biodiversity through quantitative analysis. Second, we analyze the potential synergy between preserving biodiversity in terms of species representation and recreational values in selecting a network of national parks. We use the actual distribution of 973 species within these 32 areas and 4 quantitative measures of recreational value. Our results show that the 7 pilot project areas are not significantly more effective in representing species than expected by chance and that considerably more efficient networks can be selected. Moreover, it is possible to select more-effective networks of areas that combine high representation of species with high ranking in terms of recreational values. Therefore, our findings suggest possible synergies between outdoor recreation and biodiversity conservation when selecting networks of national parks. Overall, this Danish case illustrates that data-driven analysis can not only provide valuable information to guide the decision-making process of designating national parks, but it can also be a means to identify solutions that simultaneously fulfill several goals (biodiversity preservation and recreational values).

  10. Crime, physical activity and outdoor recreation among Latino adolescents in Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinew, Kimberly J; Stodolska, Monika; Roman, Caterina G; Yahner, Jennifer

    2013-11-01

    The purpose was to examine how fear of crime, crime victimization, and perceived level of community incivilities are related to physical activity participation and outdoor recreation among Latino adolescents. The study utilized a mixed methods approach that included 25 qualitative interviews and 390 school-based surveys collected from youth across three schools in Little Village, Chicago, Illinois. Results showed that Latino adolescents who expressed greater fear of crime also engaged in less physical activity and outdoor recreation. There was no association between crime victimization and physical activity and outdoor recreation. Those who perceived greater levels of community incivilities also engaged in less outdoor recreation, but perception of incivilities had no significant association with physical activity levels. Interview data revealed most of the children believed crime was a serious problem in their neighborhood and it impacted their ability to be physically active and play outside. Fear of crime was related to lower physical activity and outdoor recreation. It is imperative that communities provide safe environments for children to be active. Increasing police and adult presence in parks and school grounds is recommended. Moreover, efforts must be made to reduce the gang problems in Latino communities. © 2013.

  11. Community size as a factor in health partnerships in community parks and recreation, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Laura L; Zimmermann, Jo An M; Mowen, Andrew J; Orsega-Smith, Elizabeth; Godbey, Geoffrey C

    2013-07-25

    Although partnerships between park and recreation agencies and health agencies are prevalent, little research has examined partnership characteristics and effectiveness among communities of different sizes. The objective of this study was to determine whether park and recreation leaders' perceptions of partnership characteristics, effectiveness, and outcomes vary by community size. A web-based survey was completed in 2007 by 1,217 National Recreation and Park Association members. Community size was divided into 4 categories: very small, small, medium, and large. Questions measured agencies' recognition of the need for partnerships, their level of experience, and the effectiveness and outcomes of partnerships. Larger communities were significantly more likely to recognize the need for and have more experience with partnerships than smaller communities. Very small and large communities partnered significantly more often with senior services, nonprofit health promotion agencies, and public health agencies than did small and medium ones. Large and small communities were significantly more likely than very small and medium communities to agree that their decision making in partnerships is inclusive and that they have clearly defined goals and objectives. Large communities were significantly more likely than very small communities to report that their partnership helped leverage resources, make policy changes, meet their mission statement, and link to funding opportunities. Community size shapes partnership practices, effectiveness, and outcomes. Very small communities are disadvantaged in developing and managing health partnerships. Increasing education, training, and funding opportunities for small and rural park and recreation agencies may enable them to more effectively partner with organizations to address community health concerns.

  12. Study on the Development of Outdoor Recreation Product Considering the Ecology Aspect in Wana Wisata Curug Cilember (WWCC, Kabupaten Bogor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurie Purnamasari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 Recreation development is usually oriented toward on the mass tourism to maximise a number of tourists and rarely put the environmental aspect into consideration.  This created an effect on the sustainability of ecology.  This study’s emphasis is on figuring out an alternative of outdoor recreation product which based on the ecology aspect to support the development of outdoor recreation in the Wana Wisata Curug Cilember (WWCC. This study put the characteristic of tourist and local people into consideration which are describe the product of ecology recreation in order to achieve an ideal product that has not been reached previously and still need more serious effort.  Analysis descriptive with qualitative and quantitative approach is used in this study.  SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats and descriptive statistic are considered for alternative outdoor recreation product while the AHP (Analysis Hierarchy Process has been  used to achieve a priority product for implementation.  The findings suggested a diversification strategy or S-T (Strengths – Threats was chosen to develop the products of recreation in WWCC.  The priority of these products based on the AHP value are as follows: a Water falls (0.2700, b Natural scenery (0.1623, c Camping (0.1405, d Hiking (0.1073, e Theraphy of water fall energy (0.0885,  f Plants viewing (0.0665, g Wildlife viewing (0.0525 and h Outbound (0.0380.   Key words: Outdoor recreation product, ecology, WWCC, Bogor Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

  13. Sewage or Swimming? The Recreational Value of East Lake, Wuhan, China

    OpenAIRE

    Du Yaping

    1998-01-01

    According to this study, demand for swimming, fishing and boating could provide an economic rationale for the clean-up of one of China's most famous lakes. The study looked at how demand for water-based recreation at East Lake, Wuhan, would change if the level of pollution in the lake's waters improved. The study found that cleaning the lake could raise its recreation value by up to 50%, and suggested that the cost of clean-up might be re-couped by charging appropriate fees to the visitors at...

  14. Environmental auditing: Capabilities and management utility of recreation impact monitoring programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    A recreation impact monitoring system was developed and applied in 1984?1986 and in 1991 to all backcountry river-accessed campsites within Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Results suggest that actions implemented by park managers in response to problems identified by the initial survey were highly effective in reducing resource degradation caused by camping. In particular, the elimination of some designated campsites and installation of anchored firegrates reduced the total area of disturbance by 50%. Firegrate installation provided a focal point that increased the concentration of camping activities, allowing peripheral areas to recover. As suggested by predictive models, additional resource degradation caused by increased camping intensities is more than offset by improvements in the condition of areas where use is eliminated. The capabilities and management utility of recreation impact monitoring programs, illustrated by the Delaware Water Gap monitoring program, are also presented and discussed.

  15. The public health usefulness of the exercise recreation and sport survey (ERASS) surveillance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merom, D; Bauman, A; Ford, I

    2004-03-01

    There is a public health need to monitor habitual participation in physical activity (PA). This report evaluates the usefulness of routine sport and recreation sector collected 'Exercise Recreation and Sport Survey (ERASS)' data from a public health perspective. The ERASS telephone surveys collected information about participation in any PA undertaken for exercise, recreation or sport and the frequency of participation during the previous 12 months from a random sample of 3,400 Australians (aged > or = 15) each quarter. Activities were categorised as Health Enhancing Physical Activities (HEPA) if the activity was of sufficient intensity (METs > or = 3.5). 'Sufficiently active' people reported HEPA > or = 5 days/week and the sedentary group reported HEPA or = 5 days/week). ERASS could supplement informational gaps in current PA surveillance. It provides estimates of long-term PA behavioural habits and informs policy makers about the types of activities that contribute to population health.

  16. Lightning injuries in sports and recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Eric M; Howard, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    The powers of lightning have been worshiped and feared by all known human cultures. While the chance of being struck by lightning is statistically very low, that risk becomes much greater in those who frequently work or play outdoors. Over the past 2 yr, there have been nearly 50 lightning-related deaths reported within the United States, with a majority of them associated with outdoor recreational activities. Recent publications primarily have been case studies, review articles, and a discussion of a sixth method of injury. The challenge in reducing lightning-related injuries in organized sports has been addressed well by both the National Athletic Trainers' Association and the National Collegiate Athletic Association in their guidelines on lightning safety. Challenges remain in educating the general population involved in recreational outdoor activities that do not fall under the guidelines of organized sports.

  17. Hydration for recreational sport and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenefick, Robert W; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2012-11-01

    This review presents recommendations for fluid needs and hydration assessment for recreational activity. Fluid needs are based on sweat losses, dependent on intensity and duration of the activity, and will vary among individuals. Prolonged aerobic activity is adversely influenced by dehydration, and heat exposure will magnify this effect. Fluid needs predicted for running 5-42 km at recreational paces show that fluid losses are sport drinks, gels, bars) can benefit high-intensity (≤ 1 h) and less-intense, long-duration activity (≥ 1 h). Spot measures of urine color or urine-specific gravity to assess hydration status have limitations. First morning urine concentration and body mass with gross thirst perception can be simple ways to assess hydration status. © 2012 International Life Sciences Institute.

  18. Modeling the Demand for Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Robert

    1987-05-01

    This paper critically reviews several of the new methodologies developed in the last 10 years to model the demand for recreation. There are three competing approaches to modeling heterogeneous recreation sites: partitioning, hedonic, and index models. Partitioning involves grouping sites into small homogeneous sets and treating each set as a unique good (multiple-site travel cost models). Hedonic involves disaggregating goods into their component characteristics and modeling the prices and demands for the characteristics (hedonic property value and the hedonic travel cost method). The index models involve measuring choices among limited alternatives using an index of characteristics (generalized travel cost, gravity, and discrete choice models). Although much work has been done on each method, limitations are noted with each approach, and additional research needs are identified.

  19. Impaired inhibitory control in recreational cocaine users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza S Colzato

    Full Text Available Chronic use of cocaine is associated with impairment in response inhibition but it is an open question whether and to which degree findings from chronic users generalize to the upcoming type of recreational users. This study compared the ability to inhibit and execute behavioral responses in adult recreational users and in a cocaine-free-matched sample controlled for age, race, gender distribution, level of intelligence, and alcohol consumption. Response inhibition and response execution were measured by a stop-signal paradigm. Results show that users and non users are comparable in terms of response execution but users need significantly more time to inhibit responses to stop-signals than non users. Interestingly, the magnitude of the inhibitory deficit was positively correlated with the individuals lifetime cocaine exposure suggesting that the magnitude of the impairment is proportional to the degree of cocaine consumed.

  20. Do We Provide Opportunities or Only Value Productivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Iglesia Mayol, Begona

    2006-01-01

    With a view to improving the quality of life of persons living with disabilities without direct intervention but in the context of action at the level of their personal development, and with the institutional support of the University of the Balearic Islands and funding from "SA Nostra" Caixa de Balears, we decided to develop, implement…