WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing quantitative input

  1. 40 CFR 60.4176 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... input data. 60.4176 Section 60.4176 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of a Hg Budget unit that monitors and reports Hg... monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the procedures set forth in part 75 of this...

  2. 40 CFR 97.76 - Additional requirements to provide heat input data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... heat input data. 97.76 Section 97.76 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Monitoring and Reporting § 97.76 Additional requirements to provide heat input data. The owner or operator of... a flow system shall also monitor and report heat input rate at the unit level using the procedures...

  3. Quantitative system drift compensates for altered maternal inputs to the gap gene network of the scuttle fly Megaselia abdita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotton, Karl R; Jiménez-Guri, Eva; Crombach, Anton; Janssens, Hilde; Alcaine-Colet, Anna; Lemke, Steffen; Schmidt-Ott, Urs; Jaeger, Johannes

    2015-01-05

    The segmentation gene network in insects can produce equivalent phenotypic outputs despite differences in upstream regulatory inputs between species. We investigate the mechanistic basis of this phenomenon through a systems-level analysis of the gap gene network in the scuttle fly Megaselia abdita (Phoridae). It combines quantification of gene expression at high spatio-temporal resolution with systematic knock-downs by RNA interference (RNAi). Initiation and dynamics of gap gene expression differ markedly between M. abdita and Drosophila melanogaster, while the output of the system converges to equivalent patterns at the end of the blastoderm stage. Although the qualitative structure of the gap gene network is conserved, there are differences in the strength of regulatory interactions between species. We term such network rewiring 'quantitative system drift'. It provides a mechanistic explanation for the developmental hourglass model in the dipteran lineage. Quantitative system drift is likely to be a widespread mechanism for developmental evolution.

  4. Using reinforcement learning to provide stable brain-machine interface control despite neural input reorganization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Pohlmeyer

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interface (BMI systems give users direct neural control of robotic, communication, or functional electrical stimulation systems. As BMI systems begin transitioning from laboratory settings into activities of daily living, an important goal is to develop neural decoding algorithms that can be calibrated with a minimal burden on the user, provide stable control for long periods of time, and can be responsive to fluctuations in the decoder's neural input space (e.g. neurons appearing or being lost amongst electrode recordings. These are significant challenges for static neural decoding algorithms that assume stationary input/output relationships. Here we use an actor-critic reinforcement learning architecture to provide an adaptive BMI controller that can successfully adapt to dramatic neural reorganizations, can maintain its performance over long time periods, and which does not require the user to produce specific kinetic or kinematic activities to calibrate the BMI. Two marmoset monkeys used the Reinforcement Learning BMI (RLBMI to successfully control a robotic arm during a two-target reaching task. The RLBMI was initialized using random initial conditions, and it quickly learned to control the robot from brain states using only a binary evaluative feedback regarding whether previously chosen robot actions were good or bad. The RLBMI was able to maintain control over the system throughout sessions spanning multiple weeks. Furthermore, the RLBMI was able to quickly adapt and maintain control of the robot despite dramatic perturbations to the neural inputs, including a series of tests in which the neuron input space was deliberately halved or doubled.

  5. Using reinforcement learning to provide stable brain-machine interface control despite neural input reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeyer, Eric A; Mahmoudi, Babak; Geng, Shijia; Prins, Noeline W; Sanchez, Justin C

    2014-01-01

    Brain-machine interface (BMI) systems give users direct neural control of robotic, communication, or functional electrical stimulation systems. As BMI systems begin transitioning from laboratory settings into activities of daily living, an important goal is to develop neural decoding algorithms that can be calibrated with a minimal burden on the user, provide stable control for long periods of time, and can be responsive to fluctuations in the decoder's neural input space (e.g. neurons appearing or being lost amongst electrode recordings). These are significant challenges for static neural decoding algorithms that assume stationary input/output relationships. Here we use an actor-critic reinforcement learning architecture to provide an adaptive BMI controller that can successfully adapt to dramatic neural reorganizations, can maintain its performance over long time periods, and which does not require the user to produce specific kinetic or kinematic activities to calibrate the BMI. Two marmoset monkeys used the Reinforcement Learning BMI (RLBMI) to successfully control a robotic arm during a two-target reaching task. The RLBMI was initialized using random initial conditions, and it quickly learned to control the robot from brain states using only a binary evaluative feedback regarding whether previously chosen robot actions were good or bad. The RLBMI was able to maintain control over the system throughout sessions spanning multiple weeks. Furthermore, the RLBMI was able to quickly adapt and maintain control of the robot despite dramatic perturbations to the neural inputs, including a series of tests in which the neuron input space was deliberately halved or doubled.

  6. How citizen advisory boards provide input into major waste policy decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, E.; Murakami, L.; Hanson, L. [Rocky Flats Citizen Advisory Board, Westminster, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Volunteer citizen boards, such as Site Specific Advisory Boards, can be a very important key to success for the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Waste Management program. These boards can provide informed, independent recommendations reflecting the diversity of the community and its values. A successful volunteer process requires collaboration among regulators, DOE and other Boards; knowing how and when to interface with the broader public; understanding the diversity and representational issues of a citizens group; knowing the {open_quotes}ins and outs{close_quotes} of working with volunteers; education and training and most importantly, planning. Volunteers on a citizens board were created to tackle the big picture, policy decisions. The chair of the Rocky Flats Citizens Advisory Board will describe her Board`s successes, including the challenges in reaching consensus agreements, as well as the need for integration with other boards and the sites` on-going public involvement programs to provide the input the department is seeking. Finally, one of the greatest challenges for the boards is interfacing with the greater public-at-large, seeing how the CAB has overcome this challenge and integrating broader public input into its decisions.

  7. Prolonged Walking with a Wearable System Providing Intelligent Auditory Input in People with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginis, Pieter; Heremans, Elke; Ferrari, Alberto; Dockx, Kim; Canning, Colleen G; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2017-01-01

    Rhythmic auditory cueing is a well-accepted tool for gait rehabilitation in Parkinson's disease (PD), which can now be applied in a performance-adapted fashion due to technological advance. This study investigated the immediate differences on gait during a prolonged, 30 min, walk with performance-adapted (intelligent) auditory cueing and verbal feedback provided by a wearable sensor-based system as alternatives for traditional cueing. Additionally, potential effects on self-perceived fatigue were assessed. Twenty-eight people with PD and 13 age-matched healthy elderly (HE) performed four 30 min walks with a wearable cue and feedback system. In randomized order, participants received: (1) continuous auditory cueing; (2) intelligent cueing (10 metronome beats triggered by a deviating walking rhythm); (3) intelligent feedback (verbal instructions triggered by a deviating walking rhythm); and (4) no external input. Fatigue was self-scored at rest and after walking during each session. The results showed that while HE were able to maintain cadence for 30 min during all conditions, cadence in PD significantly declined without input. With continuous cueing and intelligent feedback people with PD were able to maintain cadence (p = 0.04), although they were more physically fatigued than HE. Furthermore, cadence deviated significantly more in people with PD than in HE without input and particularly with intelligent feedback (both: p = 0.04). In PD, continuous and intelligent cueing induced significantly less deviations of cadence (p = 0.006). Altogether, this suggests that intelligent cueing is a suitable alternative for the continuous mode during prolonged walking in PD, as it induced similar effects on gait without generating levels of fatigue beyond that of HE.

  8. Do quantitative decadal forecasts from GCMs provide decision relevant skill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckling, E. B.; Smith, L. A.

    2012-04-01

    It is widely held that only physics-based simulation models can capture the dynamics required to provide decision-relevant probabilistic climate predictions. This fact in itself provides no evidence that predictions from today's GCMs are fit for purpose. Empirical (data-based) models are employed to make probability forecasts on decadal timescales, where it is argued that these 'physics free' forecasts provide a quantitative 'zero skill' target for the evaluation of forecasts based on more complicated models. It is demonstrated that these zero skill models are competitive with GCMs on decadal scales for probability forecasts evaluated over the last 50 years. Complications of statistical interpretation due to the 'hindcast' nature of this experiment, and the likely relevance of arguments that the lack of hindcast skill is irrelevant as the signal will soon 'come out of the noise' are discussed. A lack of decision relevant quantiative skill does not bring the science-based insights of anthropogenic warming into doubt, but it does call for a clear quantification of limits, as a function of lead time, for spatial and temporal scales on which decisions based on such model output are expected to prove maladaptive. Failing to do so may risk the credibility of science in support of policy in the long term. The performance amongst a collection of simulation models is evaluated, having transformed ensembles of point forecasts into probability distributions through the kernel dressing procedure [1], according to a selection of proper skill scores [2] and contrasted with purely data-based empirical models. Data-based models are unlikely to yield realistic forecasts for future climate change if the Earth system moves away from the conditions observed in the past, upon which the models are constructed; in this sense the empirical model defines zero skill. When should a decision relevant simulation model be expected to significantly outperform such empirical models? Probability

  9. WetLab-2: Providing Quantitative PCR Capabilities on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Macarena; Jung, Jimmy Kar Chuen; Almeida, Eduardo; Boone, Travis David; Schonfeld, Julie; Tran, Luan Hoang

    2015-01-01

    The objective of NASA Ames Research Centers WetLab-2 Project is to place on the ISS a system capable of conducting gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of biological specimens sampled or cultured on orbit. The WetLab-2 system is capable of processing sample types ranging from microbial cultures to animal tissues dissected on-orbit. The project has developed a RNA preparation module that can lyse cells and extract RNA of sufficient quality and quantity for use as templates in qRT-PCR reactions. Our protocol has the advantage that it uses non-toxic chemicals, alcohols or other organics. The resulting RNA is transferred into a pipette and then dispensed into reaction tubes that contain all lyophilized reagents needed to perform qRT-PCR reactions. These reaction tubes are mounted on rotors to centrifuge the liquid to the reaction window of the tube using a cordless drill. System operations require simple and limited crew actions including syringe pushes, valve turns and pipette dispenses. The resulting process takes less than 30 min to have tubes ready for loading into the qRT-PCR unit.The project has selected a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) qRT-PCR unit, the Cepheid SmartCycler, that will fly in its COTS configuration. The SmartCycler has a number of advantages including modular design (16 independent PCR modules), low power consumption, rapid thermal ramp times and four-color detection. The ability to detect up to four fluorescent channels will enable multiplex assays that can be used to normalize for RNA concentration and integrity, and to study multiple genes of interest in each module. The WetLab-2 system will have the capability to downlink data from the ISS to the ground after a completed run and to uplink new programs. The ability to conduct qRT-PCR on-orbit eliminates the confounding effects on gene expression of reentry stresses and shock acting on live cells and organisms or the concern of RNA degradation of fixed samples. The

  10. The influence of the input function on quantitative rCBF by the Xe/CT method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Oettingen, G; Bergholt, B; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    gas exchange; high or low levels of rCBF; tissue type; and xenon inhalation protocols. In part 2 the mean rCBF underestimation was 18.8 +/- 8.3%. In conclusion, non-invasive estimate of the input function should be considered as a source of error when defining quantitative blood flow values e...

  11. Performing Repeated Quantitative Small-Animal PET with an Arterial Input Function Is Routinely Feasible in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Cheng; Wu, Chun-Hu; Huang, Ya-Yao; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Chen, Szu-Fu; Tsai, Miao-Ling; Wu, Hsiao-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Performing quantitative small-animal PET with an arterial input function has been considered technically challenging. Here, we introduce a catheterization procedure that keeps a rat physiologically stable for 1.5 mo. We demonstrated the feasibility of quantitative small-animal 18 F-FDG PET in rats by performing it repeatedly to monitor the time course of variations in the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMR glc ). Methods: Aseptic surgery was performed on 2 rats. Each rat underwent catheterization of the right femoral artery and left femoral vein. The catheters were sealed with microinjection ports and then implanted subcutaneously. Over the next 3 wk, each rat underwent 18 F-FDG quantitative small-animal PET 6 times. The CMR glc of each brain region was calculated using a 3-compartment model and an operational equation that included a k* 4 Results: On 6 mornings, we completed 12 18 F-FDG quantitative small-animal PET studies on 2 rats. The rats grew steadily before and after the 6 quantitative small-animal PET studies. The CMR glc of the conscious brain (e.g., right parietal region, 99.6 ± 10.2 μmol/100 g/min; n = 6) was comparable to that for 14 C-deoxyglucose autoradiographic methods. Conclusion: Maintaining good blood patency in catheterized rats is not difficult. Longitudinal quantitative small-animal PET imaging with an arterial input function can be performed routinely. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  12. Preliminary evaluation of MRI-derived input function for quantitative measurement of glucose metabolism in an integrated PET-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anazodo, Udunna; Kewin, Matthew [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Finger, Elizabeth [Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Thiessen, Jonathan; Hadway, Jennifer; Butler, John [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Pavlosky, William [Diagnostic Imaging, St Joseph' s Health Care, London, Ontario (Canada); Prato, Frank; Thompson, Terry; St Lawrence, Keith [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-05-18

    PET semi-quantitative methods such as relative uptake value can be robust but offer no biological information and do not account for intra-subject variability in tracer administration or clearance. Simultaneous multimodal measurements that combine PET and MRI not only permit crucial multiparametric measurements, it provides means of applying tracer kinetic modelling without the need for serial arterial blood sampling. In this study we adapted an image-derived input function (IDIF) method to improve characterization of glucose metabolism in an ongoing dementia study. Here we present preliminary results in a small group of frontotemporal dementia patients and controls. IDIF was obtained directly from dynamic PET data guided by regions of interest drawn on carotid vessels on high resolution T1-weighted MR Images. IDIF was corrected for contamination of non-arterial voxels. A validation of the method was performed in a porcine model in a PET-CT scanner comparing IDIF to direct arterial blood samples. Metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) was measured voxel-by-voxel in gray matter producing maps that were compared between groups. Net influx rate (Ki) and global mean CMRglc are reported. A good correlation (r = 0.9 p<0.0001) was found between corrected IDIF and input function measured from direct arterial blood sampling in the validation study. In 3 FTD and 3 controls, a trend towards hypometabolism was found in frontal, temporal and parietal lobes similar to significant differences previously reported by other groups. The global mean CMRglc and Ki observed in control subjects are in line with previous reports. In general, kinetic modelling of PET-FDG using an MR-IDIF can improve characterization of glucose metabolism in dementia. This method is feasible in multimodal studies that aim to combine PET molecular imaging with MRI as dynamic PET can be acquired along with multiple MRI measurements.

  13. Computationally efficient vascular input function models for quantitative kinetic modelling using DCE-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, Matthew R; D' Arcy, James A; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Collins, David J; Leach, Martin O [Cancer Research UK Clinical MR Research Group, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); Hawkes, David J; Atkinson, David [Centre for Medical Image Computing, University College London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2008-03-07

    A description of the vascular input function is needed to obtain tissue kinetic parameter estimates from dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data. This paper describes a general modelling framework for defining compact functional forms to describe vascular input functions. By appropriately specifying the components of this model it is possible to generate models that are realistic, and that ensure that the tissue concentration curves can be analytically calculated. This means that the computations necessary to estimate parameters from measured data are relatively efficient, which is important if such methods are to become of use in clinical practice. Three models defined by four parameters, using exponential, gamma-variate and cosine descriptions of the bolus, are described and their properties investigated using simulations. The results indicate that if there is no plasma fraction, then the proposed models are indistinguishable. When a small plasma fraction is present the exponential model gives parameter estimates that are biassed by up to 50%, while the other two models give very little bias; up to 10% but less than 5% in most cases. With a larger plasma fraction the exponential model is again biassed, the gamma-variate model has a small bias, but the cosine model has a very little bias and is indistinguishable from the model used to generate the data. The computational speed of the analytic approaches is compared with a fast-Fourier-transform-based numerical convolution approach. The analytic methods are nearly 10 times faster than the numerical methods for the isolated computation of the convolution, and around 4-5 times faster when used in an optimization routine to obtain parameter estimates. These results were obtained from five example data sets, one of which was examined in more detail to compare the estimates obtained using the different models, and with literature values.

  14. Can 28-Month-Old Children Learn Spatial Prepositions Robustly from Pictures? Yes, When Narrative Input Is Provided.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfing, Katharina J; Nachtigäller, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    The learning of spatial prepositions is assumed to be based on experience in space. In a slow mapping study, we investigated whether 31 German 28-month-old children could robustly learn the German spatial prepositions hinter [behind] and neben [next to] from pictures, and whether a narrative input can compensate for a lack of immediate experience in space. One group of children received pictures with a narrative input as a training to understand spatial prepositions. In two further groups, we controlled (a) for the narrative input by providing unconnected speech during the training and (b) for the learning material by training the children on toys rather than pictures. We assessed children's understanding of spatial prepositions at three different time points: pretest, immediate test, and delayed posttest. Results showed improved word retention in children from the narrative but not the control group receiving unconnected speech. Neither of the trained groups succeeded in generalization to novel referents. Finally, all groups were instructed to deal with untrained material in the test to investigate the robustness of learning across tasks. None of the groups succeeded in this task transfer.

  15. Image-derived and arterial blood sampled input functions for quantitative PET imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tao; Tsui, Benjamin M W; Li, Xin; Vranesic, Melin; Lodge, Martin A; Gulaldi, Nedim C M; Szabo, Zsolt

    2015-11-01

    The radioligand 11C-KR31173 has been introduced for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney in vivo. To study the biokinetics of 11C-KR31173 with a compartmental model, the input function is needed. Collection and analysis of arterial blood samples are the established approach to obtain the input function but they are not feasible in patients with renal diseases. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative technique that can provide an accurate image-derived input function (ID-IF) to replace the conventional invasive arterial sampling and test the method in pigs with the goal of translation into human studies. The experimental animals were injected with [11C]KR31173 and scanned up to 90 min with dynamic PET. Arterial blood samples were collected for the artery derived input function (AD-IF) and used as a gold standard for ID-IF. Before PET, magnetic resonance angiography of the kidneys was obtained to provide the anatomical information required for derivation of the recovery coefficients in the abdominal aorta, a requirement for partial volume correction of the ID-IF. Different image reconstruction methods, filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM), were investigated for the best trade-off between bias and variance of the ID-IF. The effects of kidney uptakes on the quantitative accuracy of ID-IF were also studied. Biological variables such as red blood cell binding and radioligand metabolism were also taken into consideration. A single blood sample was used for calibration in the later phase of the input function. In the first 2 min after injection, the OS-EM based ID-IF was found to be biased, and the bias was found to be induced by the kidney uptake. No such bias was found with the FBP based image reconstruction method. However, the OS-EM based image reconstruction was found to reduce variance in the subsequent phase of the ID-IF. The combined use of FBP

  16. Image-derived and arterial blood sampled input functions for quantitative PET imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Tao; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Li, Xin; Vranesic, Melin; Lodge, Martin A.; Gulaldi, Nedim C. M.; Szabo, Zsolt, E-mail: zszabo@jhmi.edu [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The radioligand {sup 11}C-KR31173 has been introduced for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney in vivo. To study the biokinetics of {sup 11}C-KR31173 with a compartmental model, the input function is needed. Collection and analysis of arterial blood samples are the established approach to obtain the input function but they are not feasible in patients with renal diseases. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative technique that can provide an accurate image-derived input function (ID-IF) to replace the conventional invasive arterial sampling and test the method in pigs with the goal of translation into human studies. Methods: The experimental animals were injected with [{sup 11}C]KR31173 and scanned up to 90 min with dynamic PET. Arterial blood samples were collected for the artery derived input function (AD-IF) and used as a gold standard for ID-IF. Before PET, magnetic resonance angiography of the kidneys was obtained to provide the anatomical information required for derivation of the recovery coefficients in the abdominal aorta, a requirement for partial volume correction of the ID-IF. Different image reconstruction methods, filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM), were investigated for the best trade-off between bias and variance of the ID-IF. The effects of kidney uptakes on the quantitative accuracy of ID-IF were also studied. Biological variables such as red blood cell binding and radioligand metabolism were also taken into consideration. A single blood sample was used for calibration in the later phase of the input function. Results: In the first 2 min after injection, the OS-EM based ID-IF was found to be biased, and the bias was found to be induced by the kidney uptake. No such bias was found with the FBP based image reconstruction method. However, the OS-EM based image reconstruction was found to reduce variance in the subsequent

  17. Quantitative measures of walking and strength provide insight into brain corticospinal tract pathology in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora E Fritz

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative measures of strength and walking are associated with brain corticospinal tract pathology. The addition of these quantitative measures to basic clinical information explains more of the variance in corticospinal tract fractional anisotropy and magnetization transfer ratio than the basic clinical information alone. Outcome measurement for multiple sclerosis clinical trials has been notoriously challenging; the use of quantitative measures of strength and walking along with tract-specific imaging methods may improve our ability to monitor disease change over time, with intervention, and provide needed guidelines for developing more effective targeted rehabilitation strategies.

  18. Peptide-Centric Approaches Provide an Alternative Perspective To Re-Examine Quantitative Proteomic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Zhibin; Zhang, Xu; Mayne, Janice; Figeys, Daniel

    2016-02-16

    Quantitative proteomics can provide rich information on changes in biological functions and processes. However, its accuracy is affected by the inherent information degeneration found in bottom-up proteomics. Therefore, the precise protein inference from identified peptides can be mistaken since an ad hoc rule is used for generating a list of protein groups that depends on both the sample type and the sampling depth. Herein, we propose an alternative approach for examining quantitative proteomic data which is peptide-centric instead of protein-centric. We discuss the feasibility of the peptide-centric approach which was tested on several quantitative proteomic data sets. We show that peptide-centric quantification has several advantages over protein level analysis: (1) it is more sensitive for sample segregation, (2) it avoids the issues associated with protein inference, and (3) it can retrieve significant peptides lost in protein-centric quantification for further downstream analysis.

  19. Providing Open-Access Know How for Directors of Quantitative and Mathematics Support Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schuckers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this editorial is to introduce the quantitative literacy community to the newly published A Handbook for Directors of Quantitative and Mathematics Centers. QMaSCs (pronounced “Q-masks” can be broadly defined as centers that have supporting students in quantitative fields of study as part of their mission. Some focus only on calculus or mathematics; others concentrate on numeracy or quantitative literacy, and some do all of that. A QMaSC may be embedded in a mathematics department, or part of a learning commons, or a stand-alone center. There are hundreds of these centers in the U.S. The new handbook, which is the outgrowth of a 2013 NSF-sponsored, national workshop attended by 23 QMaSC directors from all quarters of the U.S., is available open access on the USF Scholar Commons and in hard copy from Amazon.com. This editorial by the handbook’s editors provides background and overview of the 20 detailed chapters on center leadership and management; community interactions; staffing, hiring and training; center assessment; and starting a center; and then a collection of ten case studies from research universities, four-year state colleges, liberal arts colleges, and a community college. The editorial ends by pointing out the need and potential benefits of a professional organization for QMaSC directors.

  20. Review of inputs provided to Jason Associates Corporation in support of RWEV-REP-001, the Analysis of Postclosure Groundwater Impacts report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R.; Weck, Philippe F.; Vaughn, Palmer; Arnold, Bill Walter

    2014-04-01

    Report RWEV-REP-001, Analysis of Postclosure Groundwater Impacts for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada was issued by the DOE in 2009 and is currently being updated. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) provided support for the original document, performing calculations and extracting data from the Yucca Mountain Performance Assessment Model that were used as inputs to the contaminant transport and dose calculations by Jason Associates Corporation, the primary developers of the DOE report. The inputs from SNL were documented in LSA-AR-037, Inputs to Jason Associates Corporation in Support of the Postclosure Repository Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement. To support the updating of the original Groundwater Impacts document, SNL has reviewed the inputs provided in LSA-AR-037 to verify that they are current and appropriate for use. The results of that assessment are documented here.

  1. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Provides Novel Insights into Cold Stress Responses in Petunia Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Huilin; Ning, Luyun; Li, Bei; Bao, Manzhu

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature is a major adverse environmental factor that impairs petunia growth and development. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of cold stress adaptation of petunia plants, a quantitative proteomic analysis using iTRAQ technology was performed to detect the effects of cold stress on protein expression profiles in petunia seedlings which had been subjected to 2°C for 5 days. Of the 2430 proteins whose levels were quantitated, a total of 117 proteins were discovered to be differentially expressed under low temperature stress in comparison to unstressed controls. As an initial study, 44 proteins including well known and novel cold-responsive proteins were successfully annotated. By integrating the results of two independent Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analyses, seven common GO terms were found of which "oxidation-reduction process" was the most notable for the cold-responsive proteins. By using the subcellular localization tool Plant-mPLoc predictor, as much as 40.2% of the cold-responsive protein group was found to be located within chloroplasts, suggesting that the chloroplast proteome is particularly affected by cold stress. Gene expression analyses of 11 cold-responsive proteins by real time PCR demonstrated that the mRNA levels were not strongly correlated with the respective protein levels. Further activity assay of anti-oxidative enzymes showed different alterations in cold treated petunia seedlings. Our investigation has highlighted the role of antioxidation mechanisms and also epigenetic factors in the regulation of cold stress responses. Our work has provided novel insights into the plant response to cold stress and should facilitate further studies regarding the molecular mechanisms which determine how plant cells cope with environmental perturbation. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002189.

  2. Providing Open-Access Know How for Directors of Quantitative and Mathematics Support Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Schuckers; Mary B. O'Neill; Grace Coulombe

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this editorial is to introduce the quantitative literacy community to the newly published A Handbook for Directors of Quantitative and Mathematics Centers. QMaSCs (pronounced “Q-masks”) can be broadly defined as centers that have supporting students in quantitative fields of study as part of their mission. Some focus only on calculus or mathematics; others concentrate on numeracy or quantitative literacy, and some do all of that. A QMaSC may be embedded in a mathematics departm...

  3. Quantitative evaluation of fiber fuse initiation with exposure to arc discharge provided by a fusion splicer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoroki, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-03

    The optical communication industry and power-over-fiber applications face a dilemma as a result of the expanding demand of light power delivery and the potential risks of high-power light manipulation including the fiber fuse phenomenon, a continuous destruction of the fiber core pumped by the propagating light and triggered by a heat-induced strong absorption of silica glass. However, we have limited knowledge on its initiation process in the viewpoint of energy flow in the reactive area. Therefore, the conditions required for a fiber fuse initiation in standard single-mode fibers were determined quantitatively, namely the power of a 1480 nm fiber laser and the arc discharge intensity provided by a fusion splicer for one second as an outer heat source. Systematic investigation on the energy flow balance between these energy sources revealed that the initiation process consists of two steps; the generation of a precursor at the heated spot and the transition to a stable fiber fuse. The latter step needs a certain degree of heat accumulation at the core where waveguide deformation is ongoing competitively. This method is useful for comparing the tolerance to fiber fuse initiation among various fibers with a fixed energy amount that was not noticed before.

  4. Evaluation of input and process components of quality of child health services provided at 24 × 7 primary health centers of a district in Central Gujarat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavda, Paragkumar; Misra, Shobha

    2015-01-01

    With the critical Indian challenge on child survival and health, time is ripe to initiate focus on quality of services apart from measuring coverage, to bring about improvements. To assess the quality of child health services provided at 24 × 7 Primary Health Centers of Vadodara District in Gujarat in terms of Input and Process Indicators. The study was carried out in 12 randomly chosen 24 × 7 Primary Health Centers (PHCs) of Vadodara district using a modified quality assessment checklist of the Program on District Quality Assurance for Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) services with use of scores from May 2010 to June 2011. Inputs assessment was done by facility survey. Process assessment for the four child health service components used actual observation of service, review of records and interview of service providers and clients. The mean obtained score for facilities in Input section was 65%. Highest score was obtained for Drugs and Consumables (86%) followed by Equipments and Supplies (74%). The score obtained for Infrastructure facility was 65%, Personnel and training was 56% and Essential protocols and guidelines scored 43%. The mean obtained score in the process section was 55%. Highest scores were obtained for immunization at 76%. This was followed by newborn care (52%), growth monitoring (52%). management of sick child (41%). Quality improvement efforts should focus not only on resource-intensive structural improvements, but also on cost-effective measures at improving service delivery process, especially adherence to service guidelines by providers.

  5. A method for quantitative analysis of standard and high-throughput qPCR expression data based on input sample quantity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz G Adamski

    Full Text Available Over the past decade rapid advances have occurred in the understanding of RNA expression and its regulation. Quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR have become the gold standard for quantifying gene expression. Microfluidic next generation, high throughput qPCR now permits the detection of transcript copy number in thousands of reactions simultaneously, dramatically increasing the sensitivity over standard qPCR. Here we present a gene expression analysis method applicable to both standard polymerase chain reactions (qPCR and high throughput qPCR. This technique is adjusted to the input sample quantity (e.g., the number of cells and is independent of control gene expression. It is efficiency-corrected and with the use of a universal reference sample (commercial complementary DNA (cDNA permits the normalization of results between different batches and between different instruments--regardless of potential differences in transcript amplification efficiency. Modifications of the input quantity method include (1 the achievement of absolute quantification and (2 a non-efficiency corrected analysis. When compared to other commonly used algorithms the input quantity method proved to be valid. This method is of particular value for clinical studies of whole blood and circulating leukocytes where cell counts are readily available.

  6. Quantitative magnetization transfer provides information complementary to grey matter atrophy in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulietti, Giovanni; Bozzali, Marco; Figura, Viviana; Spanò, Barbara; Perri, Roberta; Marra, Camillo; Lacidogna, Giordano; Giubilei, Franco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Cercignani, Mara

    2012-01-16

    Preliminary studies, based on a region-of-interest approach, suggest that quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT), an extension of magnetization transfer imaging, provides complementary information to conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the characterisation of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aim of this study was to extend these findings to the whole brain, using a voxel-wise approach. We recruited 19AD patients and 11 healthy subjects (HS). All subjects had an MRI acquisition at 3.0T including a T(1)-weighted volume, 12 MT-weighted volumes for qMT, and data for computing T(1) and B(1) maps. The T(1)-weighted volumes were processed to yield grey matter (GM) volumetric maps, while the other sequences were used to compute qMT parametric maps of the whole brain. qMT maps were warped to standard space and smoothed, and subsequently compared between groups. Of all the qMT parameters considered, only the forward exchange rate, RM(0)(B), showed significant group differences. These images were therefore retained for the multimodal statistical analysis, designed to locate brain regions of RM(0)(B) differences between AD and HS groups, adjusting for local GM atrophy. Widespread areas of reduced RM(0)(B) were found in AD patients, mainly located in the hippocampus, in the temporal lobe, in the posterior cingulate and in the parietal cortex. These results indicate that, among qMT parameters, RM(0)(B) is the most sensitive to AD pathology. This quantity is altered in the hippocampus of patients with AD (as found by previous works) but also in other brain areas, that PET studies have highlighted as involved with both, reduced glucose metabolism and amyloid β deposition. RM(0)(B) might reflect, through the measurement of the efficiency of MT exchange, some information with a specific pathological counterpart. Given previous evidence of a strict relationship between RM(0)(B) and intracellular pH, an intriguing speculation is that our findings might reflect metabolic

  7. Providing effective trauma care: the potential for service provider views to enhance the quality of care (qualitative study nested within a multicentre longitudinal quantitative study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Kate; Earthy, Sarah; Sleney, Jude; Barnes, Jo; Kellezi, Blerina; Barker, Marcus; Clarkson, Julie; Coffey, Frank; Elder, Georgina; Kendrick, Denise

    2014-07-08

    To explore views of service providers caring for injured people on: the extent to which services meet patients' needs and their perspectives on factors contributing to any identified gaps in service provision. Qualitative study nested within a quantitative multicentre longitudinal study assessing longer term impact of unintentional injuries in working age adults. Sampling frame for service providers was based on patient-reported service use in the quantitative study, patient interviews and advice of previously injured lay research advisers. Service providers' views were elicited through semistructured interviews. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Participants were recruited from a range of settings and services in acute hospital trusts in four study centres (Bristol, Leicester, Nottingham and Surrey) and surrounding areas. 40 service providers from a range of disciplines. Service providers described two distinct models of trauma care: an 'ideal' model, informed by professional knowledge of the impact of injury and awareness of best models of care, and a 'real' model based on the realities of National Health Service (NHS) practice. Participants' 'ideal' model was consistent with standards of high-quality effective trauma care and while there were examples of services meeting the ideal model, 'real' care could also be fragmented and inequitable with major gaps in provision. Service provider accounts provide evidence of comprehensive understanding of patients' needs, awareness of best practice, compassion and research but reveal significant organisational and resource barriers limiting implementation of knowledge in practice. Service providers envisage an 'ideal' model of trauma care which is timely, equitable, effective and holistic, but this can differ from the care currently provided. Their experiences provide many suggestions for service improvements to bridge the gap between 'real' and 'ideal' care. Using service provider views to inform service design

  8. Quantitative estimates of Asian dust input to the western Philippine Sea in the mid-late Quaternary and its potential significance for paleoenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaokai; Li, Tiegang; Clift, Peter D.; Lim, Dhongil; Wan, Shiming; Chen, Hongjin; Tang, Zheng; Jiang, Fuqing; Xiong, Zhifang

    2015-09-01

    We present a new high-resolution multiproxy data set of Sr-Nd isotopes, rare earth element, soluble iron, and total organic carbon data from International Marine Global Change Study Core MD06-3047 located in the western Philippine Sea. We integrate our new data with published clay mineralogy, rare earth element chemistry, thermocline depth, and δ13C differences between benthic and planktonic foraminifera, in order to quantitatively constrain Asian dust input to the basin. We explore the relationship between Philippine Sea and high-latitude Pacific eolian fluxes, as well as its significance for marine productivity and atmospheric CO2 during the mid-late Quaternary. Three different indices indicate that Asian dust contributes between ˜15% and ˜50% to the detrital fraction of the sediments. Eolian dust flux in Core MD06-3047 is similar to that in the polar southern Pacific sediment. Coherent changes for most dust flux maximum/minimum indicate that dust generation in interhemispheric source areas might have a common response to climatic variation over the mid-late Quaternary. Furthermore, we note relatively good coherence between Asian dust input, soluble iron concentration, local marine productivity, and even global atmospheric CO2 concentration over the entire study interval. This suggests that dust-borne iron fertilization of marine phytoplankton might have been a periodic process operating at glacial/interglacial time scales over the past 700 ka. We suggest that strengthening of the biological pump in the Philippine Sea, and elsewhere in the tropical western Pacific during the mid-late Quaternary glacial periods may contribute to the lowering of atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ice ages.

  9. Comparison of quantitative flow cytometric data provided by panels with lower and increased color number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocsi, József; Mittag, Anja; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Baumgartner, Adolf; Dähnert, Ingo; Tárnok, Attila

    2012-03-01

    To date the flow cytometry (FCM) industry is booming with new generations of commercial clinical instruments. Long-term clinical studies have the dilemma that moving to new instruments being capable of more complex cell-analysis makes it difficult to compare new data with those obtained on older instruments with less complex analysis panels. Since 15 years we conduct follow-up studies on children with congenital heart diseases. In this period we moved from 2- to 3- and now to 10-color FCM immunophenotyping panels. Questions arise how to compare and transfer data from lower to higher level of complexity. Two comparable antibody panels for leukocyte immunophenotyping (12-tube 2-colors, and 9-tube 4-colors) were measured on a BD FACScalibur FCM (calibration: Spherotech beads) in 19 blood samples from children with congenital heart disease. This increase of colors was accompanied by moving antibodies that were in the 2-color panel either FITC or PE labeled to red dyes such as PerCP or APC. Algorithms were developed for bridging data for quantitative characterization of antigen expression (mean fluorescence intensity) and frequency of different cell subpopulations in combination with rainbow bead standard data. This approach worked for the most relevant antibodies (CD3, CD4, CD8 etc.) well, but rendered substantial uncertainty for activation markers (CD69 etc.). Our techniques are particularly well suited to the analysis in long-term studies and have the potential to compare older and recent results in a standardized way.

  10. Speech graphs provide a quantitative measure of thought disorder in psychosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia B Mota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psychosis has various causes, including mania and schizophrenia. Since the differential diagnosis of psychosis is exclusively based on subjective assessments of oral interviews with patients, an objective quantification of the speech disturbances that characterize mania and schizophrenia is in order. In principle, such quantification could be achieved by the analysis of speech graphs. A graph represents a network with nodes connected by edges; in speech graphs, nodes correspond to words and edges correspond to semantic and grammatical relationships. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To quantify speech differences related to psychosis, interviews with schizophrenics, manics and normal subjects were recorded and represented as graphs. Manics scored significantly higher than schizophrenics in ten graph measures. Psychopathological symptoms such as logorrhea, poor speech, and flight of thoughts were grasped by the analysis even when verbosity differences were discounted. Binary classifiers based on speech graph measures sorted schizophrenics from manics with up to 93.8% of sensitivity and 93.7% of specificity. In contrast, sorting based on the scores of two standard psychiatric scales (BPRS and PANSS reached only 62.5% of sensitivity and specificity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrate that alterations of the thought process manifested in the speech of psychotic patients can be objectively measured using graph-theoretical tools, developed to capture specific features of the normal and dysfunctional flow of thought, such as divergence and recurrence. The quantitative analysis of speech graphs is not redundant with standard psychometric scales but rather complementary, as it yields a very accurate sorting of schizophrenics and manics. Overall, the results point to automated psychiatric diagnosis based not on what is said, but on how it is said.

  11. The Fidelity Index provides a systematic quantitation of star activity of DNA restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hua; Therrien, Caitlin; Blanchard, Aine; Guan, Shengxi; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2008-05-01

    Restriction endonucleases are the basic tools of molecular biology. Many restriction endonucleases show relaxed sequence recognition, called star activity, as an inherent property under various digestion conditions including the optimal ones. To quantify this property we propose the concept of the Fidelity Index (FI), which is defined as the ratio of the maximum enzyme amount showing no star activity to the minimum amount needed for complete digestion at the cognate recognition site for any particular restriction endonuclease. Fidelity indices for a large number of restriction endonucleases are reported here. The effects of reaction vessel, reaction volume, incubation mode, substrate differences, reaction time, reaction temperature and additional glycerol, DMSO, ethanol and Mn(2+) on the FI are also investigated. The FI provides a practical guideline for the use of restriction endonucleases and defines a fundamental property by which restriction endonucleases can be characterized.

  12. Using a 3-Component Age Model for the Seaward Portions of an Abandoned Delta to Quantitatively Assess Sedimentary Input Pre- and Post-Abandonment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C.; Bentley, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding how deltaic landscapes naturally build and degrade is essential to conservation of deltaic coasts that are retreating worldwide. In the Mississippi Delta, the Lafourche delta complex holds the greatest potential for evaluating these processes under natural conditions. The last major avulsion in the Mississippi River delta occurred 700 years ago, when the Lafourche delta was abandoned for the distributary network that led to the modern birds-foot (Balize) delta. Subaerial portions of the abandoned Lafourche delta exist along Bayou Lafourche, but the youngest seaward deposits are disappearing quickly. Annual overbank flooding, organic production, changes in porosity and water content, and storm processes are all important to deltaic wetlands, for maintaining vertical equilibrium with sea-level. Quantifying their relative importance is problematic, especially considering that high-resolution sedimentological studies that cover the complete timescales relevant to this system (1 to 102 years) are lacking. To capture this time window for the Lafourche delta, 15 co-located vibracores (4-5 m, susceptible to compaction) and piston cores (0.5-1.5 m, negligible compaction) have been collected within the Lafourche delta west of Port Fourchon, LA, USA. Sediment composition via X-ray fluorescence (elements) and loss-on-ignition (organics), bulk-density, and grain size analysis have been applied to develop a stratigraphic model. 210Pb and 137Cs gamma decay, radiocarbon of bulk sediments, and optically-stimulated-luminescence of prodelta quartz (which can differ with radiocarbon by an order of magnitude) have been applied here to create an age model for the studied portion of the delta, and allow for quantitative interpretations of sedimentary controls over time. Total mineral sediment input to the delta decreased by an order of magnitude following abandonment, from about 16 kg m-2y-1 to 1.5 kg m-2y-1. Identified discrete storm events represent about 5% of these

  13. The perspective of healthcare providers and patients on health literacy: a systematic review of the quantitative and qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajah, Retha; Ahmad Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Jou, Lim Ching; Murugiah, Muthu Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Health literacy (HL) is a multifaceted concept, thus understanding the perspective of healthcare providers, patients, and the system is vital. This systematic review examines and synthesises the available studies on HL-related knowledge, attitude, practice, and perceived barriers. CINAHL and Medline (via EBSCOhost), Google Scholar, PubMed, ProQuest, Sage Journals, and Science Direct were searched. Both quantitative and/or qualitative studies in the English language were included. Intervention studies and studies focusing on HL assessment tools and prevalence of low HL were excluded. The risk of biasness reduced with the involvement of two reviewers independently assessing study eligibility and quality. A total of 30 studies were included, which consist of 19 quantitative, 9 qualitative, and 2 mixed-method studies. Out of 17 studies, 13 reported deficiency of HL-related knowledge among healthcare providers and 1 among patients. Three studies showed a positive attitude of healthcare providers towards learning about HL. Another three studies demonstrated patients feel shame exposing their literacy and undergoing HL assessment. Common HL communication techniques reported practiced by healthcare providers were the use of everyday language, teach-back method, and providing patients with reading materials and aids, while time constraint was the most reported HL perceived barriers by both healthcare providers and patients. Significant gaps exists in HL knowledge among healthcare providers and patients that needs immediate intervention. Such as, greater effort placed in creating a health system that provides an opportunity for healthcare providers to learn about HL and patients to access health information with taking consideration of their perceived barriers.

  14. Cancer and the LGBTQ Population: Quantitative and Qualitative Results from an Oncology Providers' Survey on Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamargo, Christina L; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Sanchez, Julian A; Schabath, Matthew B

    2017-10-07

    Despite growing social acceptance, the LGBTQ population continues to face barriers to healthcare including fear of stigmatization by healthcare providers, and providers' lack of knowledge about LGBTQ-specific health issues. This analysis focuses on the assessment of quantitative and qualitative responses from a subset of providers who identified as specialists that treat one or more of the seven cancers that may be disproportionate in LGBTQ patients. A 32-item web-based survey was emailed to 388 oncology providers at a single institution. The survey assessed: demographics, knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors. Oncology providers specializing in seven cancer types had poor knowledge of LGBTQ-specific health needs, with fewer than half of the surveyed providers (49.5%) correctly answering knowledge questions. Most providers had overall positive attitudes toward LGBTQ patients, with 91.7% agreeing they would be comfortable treating this population, and would support education and/or training on LGBTQ-related cancer health issues. Results suggest that despite generally positive attitudes toward the LGBTQ population, oncology providers who treat cancer types most prevalent among the population, lack knowledge of their unique health issues. Knowledge and practice behaviors may improve with enhanced education and training on this population's specific needs.

  15. Methods, Devices and Computer Program Products Providing for Establishing a Model for Emulating a Physical Quantity Which Depends on at Least One Input Parameter, and Use Thereof

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention proposes methods, devices and computer program products. To this extent, there is defined a set X including N distinct parameter values x_i for at least one input parameter x, N being an integer greater than or equal to 1, first measured the physical quantity Pm1 for each...... of the N distinct parameter values x_i of the at least one input parameter x, while keeping all other input parameters fixed, constructed a Vandermonde matrix VM using the set of N parameter values x_i of the at least one input parameter x, and computed the model W for emulating the physical quantity P...... based on the Vandermonde matrix and the first measured physical quantity according to the equation W=(VMT*VM)-1*VMT*Pm1. The model is iteratively refined so as to obtained a desired emulation precision.; The model can later be used to emulate the physical quantity based on input parameters or logs taken...

  16. Is life cycle assessment (LCA) a suitable method for quantitative CO{sub 2} saving estimations? the impact of field input on the LCA results for a pure vegetable oil chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaramonti, David [University of Florence, Mech. Eng. Faculty, CREAR and Department of Energetics ' ' Sergio Stecco' ' , Via S. Marta, 3 - 50139 Florence (Italy); Recchia, Lucia [University of Florence, Agriculture Faculty, CREAR and Department of Agricultural and Forestry Engineering, Piazzale delle Cascine, 15 - 50144 Florence (Italy)

    2010-05-15

    The environmental and social sustainability of biofuel production and use is today the most critical issue for the development of support policies in this sector.The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology is commonly agreed as the main tool for the estimation of the impact of biofuel chains, even in quantitative terms. This is also reflected in the recently issued EU Directive (Renewable Energy Directive, RED) on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources. However, the results of Life Cycle Assessment works largely depend on the quality of the information given as input to the study, as also very recent research works started to investigate: in addition, the comparison of a large number of very different (technically, geographically, agronomically) biofuel chains, as some Life Cycle Assessments and reviews tried to do, is a very difficult task due to the extremely large number of variable conditions and parameters. This paper, by considering a very specific biofuel chain (production and use of Pure/Straight Sunflower Oil in North-Central Italy), discuss some limits and constraints of the application of the LCA method. The work investigated within which boundaries Life Cycle Assessment could be implemented to perform quantitative assessments, as requested by the current supporting policies in the biofuel area. Results showed very large variations in the calculation of the CO{sub 2} equivalent emissions, thus illustrating how achievable results depends on the local agricultural practices and performances, even for such a small and well defined biofuel chain. The adoption of the present standardized Life Cycle Assessment approach for generalized evaluations in the bioenergy sector and, in particular, for quantitative assessments should therefore be reconsidered. Concluding, LCA studies, even while addressing very specific and well defined chains, should always provide the bias of the calculations, as this range of variation of Life Cycle Assessment

  17. Effect of simultaneous application of mycorrhiza with compost, vermicompost and sulfural geranole on some quantitative and qualitative characteristics of sesame (Sesamum indicum L. in a low input cropping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P rezvani moghaddam

    2016-03-01

    quantitative and qualitative characteristics of sesame (Sesamum indicum L. in a low input cropping system was investigated. Materials and methods In order to evaluate the effects of simultaneous application of mycorrhiza and organic fertilizers on some quantitative and qualitative characteristics of sesame (Sesamum indicum L., an experiment was conducted based on randomized complete block design with three replications at Agricultural Research Farm, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran during growing season 2009-2010 growing season. Treatments were mycorrhiza (Glomus mosseae, mycorrhiza+compost, mycorrhiza+vermicompost, mycorrhiza+organic sulfural geranole, compost, vermicompost, Organic sulfural geranole and control (no fertilizer. Finally, data analysis was done using SAS 9.1 and means were compared by duncan’s multiple range test at 5% level of probability. Results and discussion The results showed that the effect of different organic and biological fertilizers were significant on seed yield. Seed yield significantly increased by using mycorrhiza in both condition of single and mixed with organic sulfural geranole and vermicompost compared to control treatment. Biological yield, in simultaneous application of vermicompost and organic sulfural geranole with mycorrhiza increased significantly compared to separate use of these fertilizers. All study organic fertilizers with mycorrhiza had significant effect on increasing oil content of sesame. Seed oil increased in simultaneous application of mycorrhiza and each of compost, vermicompost and organic sulfural geranole compared to separate application of mycorrhiza 12, 13 and 10 percentages, respectively. It seems that mycorrhiza and organic fertilizers improved quantitative and qualitative characteristics of sesame due to provide better conditions to absorption and transportation of nutrient to the plant (Hawkes et al., 2008. Conclusion In general, the results showed that the simultaneous use of ecological inputs can improve

  18. An approach to quantitative assessment of crew well-being for providing safety of long-term space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsev, S. I.; Mezhevikin, V. V.; Okhonin, V. A.

    The main destination of Life Support Systems - to support life and provide crew safety - put the problem of the most effective providing this function. In the scope of the whole mission the safety of crew depends on many interrelating features of space ship, LSS, and scenario of given mission itself. Effective risk mitigation needs optimal minimizing of all risk factors. Effective minimization presumes quantitative presentation of these factors. In the paper an approach to quantitative assessment of quality of life in the scope of previously introduced integrated coefficient of maximum reliability. One of the most significant risk factors is crew fatal mistake. There is always other-than-zero probability of a fatal human mistake in controlling the vehicle, landing module, nuclear reactor or other vital device. It is difficult to estimate the probability of such a mistake, but it is apparent that this probability increases with impaired human health. Under closed air cycling such a condition is highly probable as demonstrated by the Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) in highly sealed, so-called "energy efficient" buildings. Seemingly, the cause of SBS is a set of not completely identified factors, yet, it should be noted that in spite of complete pressurization the crew of Bios-3 did not have complaints typical for SBS. It cannot be ruled out that the higher plants may be the most realistic remedy to reduce the probability of the crew's fatal mistakes. All this gives the way to convert so difficultly formalizable parameter as quality of life into probability of accident. A simple monotonous dependence of deterioration of crew health and probability of a fatal mistake on mission time is discussed. Possible medical-biological experiments for more detailed estimations of this dependency are considered.

  19. Characterization of the image-derived carotid artery input function using independent component analysis for the quantitation of [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, K [Banner Alzheimer Institute and Banner Good Samaritan Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Center, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Chen, X [Div Computer Stud, Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ (United States); Renaut, R [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Alexander, G E [Arizona Alzheimer' s Consortium, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Bandy, D [Banner Alzheimer Institute and Banner Good Samaritan Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Center, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Guo, H [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Reiman, E M [Banner Alzheimer Institute and Banner Good Samaritan Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Center, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2007-12-07

    We previously developed a noninvasive technique for the quantification of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images using an image-derived input function obtained from a manually drawn carotid artery region. Here, we investigate the use of independent component analysis (ICA) for more objective identification of the carotid artery and surrounding tissue regions. Using FDG PET data from 22 subjects, ICA was applied to an easily defined cubical region including the carotid artery and neighboring tissue. Carotid artery and tissue time activity curves and three venous samples were used to generate spillover and partial volume-corrected input functions and to calculate the parametric images of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRgl). Different from a blood-sampling-free ICA approach, the results from our ICA approach are numerically well matched to those based on the arterial blood sampled input function. In fact, the ICA-derived input functions and CMRgl measurements were not only highly correlated (correlation coefficients >0.99) to, but also highly comparable (regression slopes between 0.92 and 1.09), with those generated using arterial blood sampling. Moreover, the reliability of the ICA-derived input function remained high despite variations in the location and size of the cubical region. The ICA procedure makes it possible to quantify FDG PET images in an objective and reproducible manner.

  20. Ecosystem Services Provided by Agroecosystems: A Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of this Relationship in the Pampa Region, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rositano, Florencia; Ferraro, Diego Omar

    2014-03-01

    The development of an analytical framework relating agricultural conditions and ecosystem services (ES) provision could be very useful for developing land-use systems which sustain natural resources for future use. According to this, a conceptual network was developed, based on literature review and expert knowledge, about the functional relationships between agricultural management and ES provision in the Pampa region (Argentina). We selected eight ES to develop this conceptual network: (1) carbon (C) balance, (2) nitrogen (N) balance, (3) groundwater contamination control, (4) soil water balance, (5) soil structural maintenance, (6) N2O emission control, (7) regulation of biotic adversities, and (8) biodiversity maintenance. This conceptual network revealed a high degree of interdependence among ES provided by Pampean agroecosystems, finding two trade-offs, and two synergies among them. Then, we analyzed the conceptual network structure, and found that both environmental and management variables influenced ES provision. Finally, we selected four ES to parameterize and quantify along 10 growing seasons (2000/2001-2009/2010) through a probabilistic methodology called Bayesian Networks. Only N balance was negatively impacted by agricultural management; while C balance, groundwater contamination control, and N2O emission control were not. Outcomes of our work emphasize the idea that qualitative and quantitative methodologies should be implemented together to assess ES provision in Pampean agroecosystems, as well as in other agricultural systems.

  1. Regadenoson provides perfusion results comparable to adenosine in heterogeneous patient populations: a quantitative analysis from the ADVANCE MPI trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmarian, John J; Peterson, Leif E; Xu, Jiaqiong; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Iskandrian, Ami E; Bateman, Timothy M; Thomas, Gregory S; Nabi, Faisal

    2015-04-01

    Total and reversible left ventricular (LV) perfusion defect size (PDS) predict patient outcome. Limited data exist as to whether regadenoson induces similar perfusion abnormalities as observed with adenosine. We sought to determine whether regadenoson induces a similar LV PDS as seen with adenosine across varying patient populations. ADVANCE MPI were prospective, double-blind randomized trials comparing regadenoson to standard adenosine myocardial perfusion tomography (SPECT). Following an initial adenosine SPECT, patients were randomized to either regadenoson (N = 1284) or a second adenosine study (N = 660). SPECT quantification was performed blinded to randomization and image sequence. Propensity analysis was used to define comparability of regadenoson and adenosine perfusion results. Baseline clinical and SPECT results were similar in the two randomized groups. There was a close correlation between adenosine and regadenoson-induced total (r (2) = 0.98, P regadenoson vs adenosine, respectively, and irrespective of age, gender, diabetic status, body mass index, or prior cardiovascular history. By propensity analysis, regadenoson-induced total PDS was significantly larger than observed with adenosine. This is the first study to show that regadenoson induces similar, if not larger, perfusion defects than those observed with adenosine across different patient populations and demonstrates the value of quantitative analysis for defining serial changes in SPECT perfusion results. Regadenoson should provide comparable diagnostic and prognostic SPECT information to that obtained with adenosine.

  2. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis Provides Insight into the Response to Short-Term Drought Stress in Ammopiptanthus mongolicus Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huigai Sun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses that negatively affects plant growth and development. Ammopiptanthus mongolicus is an ecologically important shrub in the mid-Asia desert region and used as a model for abiotic tolerance research in trees. Protein phosphorylation participates in the regulation of various biological processes, however, phosphorylation events associated with drought stress signaling and response in plants is still limited. Here, we conducted a quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of the response of A. mongolicus roots to short-term drought stress. Data are available via the iProx database with project ID IPX0000971000. In total, 7841 phosphorylation sites were found from the 2019 identified phosphopeptides, corresponding to 1060 phosphoproteins. Drought stress results in significant changes in the abundance of 103 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 90 differentially-phosphorylated phosphoproteins (DPPs. Motif-x analysis identified two motifs, including [pSP] and [RXXpS], from these DPPs. Functional enrichment and protein-protein interaction analysis showed that the DPPs were mainly involved in signal transduction and transcriptional regulation, osmotic adjustment, stress response and defense, RNA splicing and transport, protein synthesis, folding and degradation, and epigenetic regulation. These drought-corresponsive phosphoproteins, and the related signaling and metabolic pathways probably play important roles in drought stress signaling and response in A. mongolicus roots. Our results provide new information for understanding the molecular mechanism of the abiotic stress response in plants at the posttranslational level.

  3. Mechanistic implications for the formation of the diiron cluster in ribonucleotide reductase provided by quantitative EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Brad S; Elgren, Timothy E; Hendrich, Michael P

    2003-07-23

    -peptide (beta(II)) approximately 25 A away. Furthermore, we show that metal incorporation into beta(II) occurs only during the O(2) activation chemistry of the beta(I)-peptide. This is the first direct evidence of an allosteric interaction between the two beta-peptides of R2. Furthermore, this model can explain the generally observed low Fe occupancy of R2. We also demonstrate that metal uptake and this newly observed allosteric effect are buffer dependent. Higher levels of glycerol cause loss of the allosteric effect. Reductive cycling of samples in the presence of Mn(II) produced a novel mixed metal Fe(III)Mn(III)R2 species within the active site of R2. The magnitude of the exchange coupling (J) determined for both the Mn(2)(II)R2 and Fe(III)Mn(III)R2 species was determined to be -1.8 +/- 0.3 and -18 +/- 3 cm(-)(1), respectively. Quantitative spectral simulations for the Fe(III)Mn(III)R2 and mononuclear Mn(II)R2 species are provided. This work represents the first instance where both X- and Q-band simulations of perpendicular and parallel mode spectra were used to quantitatively predict the concentration of a protein bound mononuclear Mn(II) species.

  4. MDS MIC Catalog Inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Vowell, C. W.; Smith, Byron; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the inputs to the MDS Medical Information Communique (MIC) catalog. The purpose of the group is to provide input for updating the MDS MIC Catalog and to request that MMOP assign Action Item to other working groups and FSs to support the MITWG Process for developing MIC-DDs.

  5. In the Piriform Cortex, the Primary Impetus for Information Encoding through Synaptic Plasticity Is Provided by Descending Rather than Ascending Olfactory Inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Christina; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2018-02-01

    Information encoding by means of persistent changes in synaptic strength supports long-term information storage and memory in structures such as the hippocampus. In the piriform cortex (PC), that engages in the processing of associative memory, only short-term synaptic plasticity has been described to date, both in vitro and in anesthetized rodents in vivo. Whether the PC maintains changes in synaptic strength for longer periods of time is unknown: Such a property would indicate that it can serve as a repository for long-term memories. Here, we report that in freely behaving animals, frequency-dependent synaptic plasticity does not occur in the anterior PC (aPC) following patterned stimulation of the olfactory bulb (OB). Naris closure changed action potential properties of aPC neurons and enabled expression of long-term potentiation (LTP) by OB stimulation, indicating that an intrinsic ability to express synaptic plasticity is present. Odor discrimination and categorization in the aPC is supported by descending inputs from the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Here, OFC stimulation resulted in LTP (>4 h), suggesting that this structure plays an important role in promoting information encoding through synaptic plasticity in the aPC. These persistent changes in synaptic strength are likely to comprise a means through which long-term memories are encoded and/or retained in the PC. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. A high en-face resolution AS-OCT providing quantitative ability to measure layered corneal opacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yu-Kuang; Chen, Wei-Li; Tsai, Cheng-Tsung; Yang, Chang-Hao; Huang, Sheng-Lung

    2017-07-01

    An in-vivo anterior-segment optical coherence tomography with sub-micron isotropic resolutions is demonstrated on rat cornea. The opacity of the layered cornea was quantitatively analyzed. The morphology of corneal layers was well-depicted by the en-face image.

  7. Providing Quantitative Information and a Nudge to Undergo Stool Testing in a Colorectal Cancer Screening Decision Aid: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Peter H; Perkins, Susan M; Schmidt, Karen K; Muriello, Paul F; Althouse, Sandra; Rawl, Susan M

    2017-08-01

    Guidelines recommend that patient decision aids should provide quantitative information about probabilities of potential outcomes, but the impact of this information is unknown. Behavioral economics suggests that patients confused by quantitative information could benefit from a "nudge" towards one option. We conducted a pilot randomized trial to estimate the effect sizes of presenting quantitative information and a nudge. Primary care patients (n = 213) eligible for colorectal cancer screening viewed basic screening information and were randomized to view (a) quantitative information (quantitative module), (b) a nudge towards stool testing with the fecal immunochemical test (FIT) (nudge module), (c) neither a nor b, or (d) both a and b. Outcome measures were perceived colorectal cancer risk, screening intent, preferred test, and decision conflict, measured before and after viewing the decision aid, and screening behavior at 6 months. Patients viewing the quantitative module were more likely to be screened than those who did not ( P = 0.012). Patients viewing the nudge module had a greater increase in perceived colorectal cancer risk than those who did not ( P = 0.041). Those viewing the quantitative module had a smaller increase in perceived risk than those who did not ( P = 0.046), and the effect was moderated by numeracy. Among patients with high numeracy who did not view the nudge module, those who viewed the quantitative module had a greater increase in intent to undergo FIT ( P = 0.028) than did those who did not. The limitations of this study were the limited sample size and single healthcare system. Adding quantitative information to a decision aid increased uptake of colorectal cancer screening, while adding a nudge to undergo FIT did not increase uptake. Further research on quantitative information in decision aids is warranted.

  8. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of murine Fmr1-KO cell lines provides new insights into FMRP-dependent signal transduction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matic, Katarina; Eninger, Timo; Bardoni, Barbara; Davidovic, Laetitia; Macek, Boris

    2014-10-03

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein that has a major effect on neuronal protein synthesis. Transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to loss of FMRP and development of Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common known hereditary cause of intellectual impairment and autism. Here we utilize SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to analyze murine FMR1(-) and FMR1(+) fibroblastic cell lines derived from FMR1-KO embryos to identify proteins and phosphorylation sites dysregulated as a consequence of FMRP loss. We quantify FMRP-related changes in the levels of 5,023 proteins and 6,133 phosphorylation events and map them onto major signal transduction pathways. Our study confirms global downregulation of the MAPK/ERK pathway and decrease in phosphorylation level of ERK1/2 in the absence of FMRP, which is connected to attenuation of long-term potentiation. We detect differential expression of several key proteins from the p53 pathway, pointing to the involvement of p53 signaling in dysregulated cell cycle control in FXS. Finally, we detect differential expression and phosphorylation of proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing and nuclear transport, as well as Wnt and calcium signaling, such as PLC, PKC, NFAT, and cPLA2. We postulate that calcium homeostasis is likely affected in molecular pathogenesis of FXS.

  9. Quantitative analysis of oyster larval proteome provides new insights into the effects of multiple climate change stressors

    KAUST Repository

    Dineshram, Ramadoss

    2016-03-19

    The metamorphosis of planktonic larvae of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) underpins their complex life-history strategy by switching on the molecular machinery required for sessile life and building calcite shells. Metamorphosis becomes a survival bottleneck, which will be pressured by different anthropogenically induced climate change-related variables. Therefore, it is important to understand how metamorphosing larvae interact with emerging climate change stressors. To predict how larvae might be affected in a future ocean, we examined changes in the proteome of metamorphosing larvae under multiple stressors: decreased pH (pH 7.4), increased temperature (30 °C), and reduced salinity (15 psu). Quantitative protein expression profiling using iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS identified more than 1300 proteins. Decreased pH had a negative effect on metamorphosis by down-regulating several proteins involved in energy production, metabolism, and protein synthesis. However, warming switched on these down-regulated pathways at pH 7.4. Under multiple stressors, cell signaling, energy production, growth, and developmental pathways were up-regulated, although metamorphosis was still reduced. Despite the lack of lethal effects, significant physiological responses to both individual and interacting climate change related stressors were observed at proteome level. The metamorphosing larvae of the C. gigas population in the Yellow Sea appear to have adequate phenotypic plasticity at the proteome level to survive in future coastal oceans, but with developmental and physiological costs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Provider report of the existence of detection and care of perinatal depression: quantitative evidence from public obstetric units in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa de Castro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To provide evidence on perinatal mental healthcare in Mexico. Materials and methods. Descriptive and bivariate analyses of data from a cross-sectional probabilistic survey of 211 public obstetric units. Results. Over half (64.0% of units offer mental healthcare; fewer offer perinatal depression (PND detection (37.1% and care (40.3%. More units had protocols/guidelines for PND detection and for care, respectively, in Mexico City-Mexico state (76.7%; 78.1% than in Southern (26.5%; 36.4%, Northern (27.3%; 28.1% and Central Mexico (50.0%; 52.7%. Conclusion. Protocols and provider training in PND, implementation of brief screening tools and psychosocial interventions delivered by non-clinical personnel are needed.      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21149/spm.v58i4.8028

  11. Spiritual care competence for contemporary nursing practice: A quantitative exploration of the guidance provided by fundamental nursing textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Fiona; Neill, Freda; Murphy, Maryanne; Begley, Thelma; Sheaf, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Spirituality is receiving unprecedented attention in the nursing literature. Both the volume and scope of literature on the topic is expanding, and it is clear that this topic is of interest to nurses. There is consensus that the spiritual required by clients receiving health ought to be an integrated effort across the health care team. Although undergraduate nurses receive some education on the topic, this is ad hoc and inconsistent across universities. Textbooks are clearly a key resource in this area however the extent to which they form a comprehensive guide for nursing students and nurses is unclear. This study provides a hitherto unperformed analysis of core nursing textbooks to ascertain spirituality related content. 543 books were examined and this provides a range of useful information about inclusions and omissions in this field. Findings revealed that spirituality is not strongly portrayed as a component of holistic care and specific direction for the provision of spiritual care is lacking. Fundamental textbooks used by nurses and nursing students ought to inform and guide integrated spiritual care and reflect a more holistic approach to nursing care. The religious and/or spiritual needs of an increasingly diverse community need to be taken seriously within scholarly texts so that this commitment to individual clients' needs can be mirrored in practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. HistoFlex-a microfluidic device providing uniform flow conditions enabling highly sensitive, reproducible and quantitative in situ hybridizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Martin Jensen; Okkels, Fridolin; Sabourin, David

    2011-01-01

    were not visually damaged during assaying, which enabled adapting a complete ISH assay for detection of microRNAs (miRNA). The effects of flow based incubations on hybridization, antibody incubation and Tyramide Signal Amplification (TSA) steps were investigated upon adapting the ISH assay...... for performing in the HistoFlex. The hybridization step was significantly enhanced using flow based incubations due to improved hybridization efficiency. The HistoFlex device enabled a fast miRNA ISH assay (3 hours) which provided higher hybridization signal intensity compared to using conventional techniques (5......A microfluidic device (the HistoFlex) designed to perform and monitor molecular biological assays under dynamic flow conditions on microscope slide-substrates, with special emphasis on analyzing histological tissue sections, is presented. Microscope slides were reversibly sealed onto a cast...

  13. Patient and healthcare provider barriers to hypertension awareness, treatment and follow up: a systematic review and meta-analysis of qualitative and quantitative studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Khatib

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the importance of detecting, treating, and controlling hypertension has been recognized for decades, the majority of patients with hypertension remain uncontrolled. The path from evidence to practice contains many potential barriers, but their role has not been reviewed systematically. This review aimed to synthesize and identify important barriers to hypertension control as reported by patients and healthcare providers. METHODS: Electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and Global Health were searched systematically up to February 2013. Two reviewers independently selected eligible studies. Two reviewers categorized barriers based on a theoretical framework of behavior change. The theoretical framework suggests that a change in behavior requires a strong commitment to change [intention], the necessary skills and abilities to adopt the behavior [capability], and an absence of health system and support constraints. FINDINGS: Twenty-five qualitative studies and 44 quantitative studies met the inclusion criteria. In qualitative studies, health system barriers were most commonly discussed in studies of patients and health care providers. Quantitative studies identified disagreement with clinical recommendations as the most common barrier among health care providers. Quantitative studies of patients yielded different results: lack of knowledge was the most common barrier to hypertension awareness. Stress, anxiety and depression were most commonly reported as barriers that hindered or delayed adoption of a healthier lifestyle. In terms of hypertension treatment adherence, patients mostly reported forgetting to take their medication. Finally, priority setting barriers were most commonly reported by patients in terms of following up with their health care providers. CONCLUSIONS: This review identified a wide range of barriers facing patients and health care providers pursuing hypertension control, indicating the need for targeted multi

  14. SDR Input Power Estimation Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappier, Jennifer M.; Briones, Janette C.

    2013-01-01

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  15. SDR input power estimation algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, J. C.; Nappier, J. M.

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  16. Health care providers' perceptions of and attitudes towards induced abortions in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia: a systematic literature review of qualitative and quantitative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehnström Loi, Ulrika; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Faxelid, Elisabeth; Klingberg-Allvin, Marie

    2015-02-12

    Unsafe abortions are a serious public health problem and a major human rights issue. In low-income countries, where restrictive abortion laws are common, safe abortion care is not always available to women in need. Health care providers have an important role in the provision of abortion services. However, the shortage of health care providers in low-income countries is critical and exacerbated by the unwillingness of some health care providers to provide abortion services. The aim of this study was to identify, summarise and synthesise available research addressing health care providers' perceptions of and attitudes towards induced abortions in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. A systematic literature search of three databases was conducted in November 2014, as well as a manual search of reference lists. The selection criteria included quantitative and qualitative research studies written in English, regardless of the year of publication, exploring health care providers' perceptions of and attitudes towards induced abortions in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. The quality of all articles that met the inclusion criteria was assessed. The studies were critically appraised, and thematic analysis was used to synthesise the data. Thirty-six studies, published during 1977 and 2014, including data from 15 different countries, met the inclusion criteria. Nine key themes were identified as influencing the health care providers' attitudes towards induced abortions: 1) human rights, 2) gender, 3) religion, 4) access, 5) unpreparedness, 6) quality of life, 7) ambivalence 8) quality of care and 9) stigma and victimisation. Health care providers in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia have moral-, social- and gender-based reservations about induced abortion. These reservations influence attitudes towards induced abortions and subsequently affect the relationship between the health care provider and the pregnant woman who wishes to have an abortion. A values

  17. Quantitative fluorescence kinetic analysis of NADH and FAD in human plasma using three- and four-way calibration methods capable of providing the second-order advantage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chao [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Wu, Hai-Long, E-mail: hlwu@hnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhou, Chang; Xiang, Shou-Xia; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Yu, Yong-Jie; Yu, Ru-Qin [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2016-03-03

    The metabolic coenzymes reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are the primary electron donor and acceptor respectively, participate in almost all biological metabolic pathways. This study develops a novel method for the quantitative kinetic analysis of the degradation reaction of NADH and the formation reaction of FAD in human plasma containing an uncalibrated interferent, by using three-way calibration based on multi-way fluorescence technique. In the three-way analysis, by using the calibration set in a static manner, we directly predicted the concentrations of both analytes in the mixture at any time after the start of their reactions, even in the presence of an uncalibrated spectral interferent and a varying background interferent. The satisfactory quantitative results indicate that the proposed method allows one to directly monitor the concentration of each analyte in the mixture as the function of time in real-time and nondestructively, instead of determining the concentration after the analytical separation. Thereafter, we fitted the first-order rate law to their concentration data throughout their reactions. Additionally, a four-way calibration procedure is developed as an alternative for highly collinear systems. The results of the four-way analysis confirmed the results of the three-way analysis and revealed that both the degradation reaction of NADH and the formation reaction of FAD in human plasma fit the first-order rate law. The proposed methods could be expected to provide promising tools for simultaneous kinetic analysis of multiple reactions in complex systems in real-time and nondestructively. - Highlights: • A novel three-way calibration method for the quantitative kinetic analysis of NADH and FAD in human plasma is proposed. • The method can directly monitor the concentration of each analyte in the reaction in real-time and nondestructively. • The method has the second-order advantage. • A

  18. A quantitative X-ray diffraction inventory of the tephra and volcanic glass inputs into the Holocene marine sediment archives off Iceland: A contribution to V.A.S.T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, John T.; Kristjansdottir, Greta B.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Jennings, Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper re-evaluates how well quantitative x-ray diffraction (qXRD) can be used as an exploratory method of the weight percentage (wt%) of volcaniclastic sediment, and to identify tephra events in marine cores. In the widely used RockJock v6 software programme, qXRD tephra and glass standards include the rhyodacite White River tephra (Alaska), a rhyolitic tephra (Hekla-4) and the basaltic Saksunarvatn tephra. Experiments of adding known wt% of tephra to felsic bedrock samples indicated that additions ≥10 wt% are accurately detected, but reliable estimates of lesser amounts are masked by amorphous material produced by milling. Volcaniclastic inputs range between 20 and 50 wt%. Primary tephra events are identified as peaks in residual qXRD glass wt% from fourth-order polynomial fits. In cores where tephras have been identified by shard counts in the > 150 µm fraction, there is a positive correlation (validation) with peaks in the wt% glass estimated by qXRD. Geochemistry of tephra shards confirms the presence of several Hekla-sourced tephras in cores B997-317PC1 and -319PC2 on the northern Iceland shelf. In core B997-338 (north-west Iceland), there are two rhyolitic tephras separated by ca. 100 cm with uncorrected radiocarbon dates on articulated shells of around 13 000 yr B.P. These tephras may be correlatives of the Borrobol and Penifiler tephras found in Scotland. The number of Holocene tephra events per 1000 yr was estimated from qXRD on 16 cores and showed a bimodal distribution with an increased number of events in both the late and early Holocene.

  19. Quantitative investigation of the edge enhancement in in-line phase contrast projections and tomosynthesis provided by distributing microbubbles on the interface between two tissues: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Donovan Wong, Molly; Li, Yuhua; Fajardo, Laurie; Zheng, Bin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively investigate the ability to distribute microbubbles along the interface between two tissues, in an effort to improve the edge and/or boundary features in phase contrast imaging. The experiments were conducted by employing a custom designed tissue simulating phantom, which also simulated a clinical condition where the ligand-targeted microbubbles are self-aggregated on the endothelium of blood vessels surrounding malignant cells. Four different concentrations of microbubble suspensions were injected into the phantom: 0%, 0.1%, 0.2%, and 0.4%. A time delay of 5 min was implemented before image acquisition to allow the microbubbles to become distributed at the interface between the acrylic and the cavity simulating a blood vessel segment. For comparison purposes, images were acquired using three system configurations for both projection and tomosynthesis imaging with a fixed radiation dose delivery: conventional low-energy contact mode, low-energy in-line phase contrast and high-energy in-line phase contrast. The resultant images illustrate the edge feature enhancements in the in-line phase contrast imaging mode when the microbubble concentration is extremely low. The quantitative edge-enhancement-to-noise ratio calculations not only agree with the direct image observations, but also indicate that the edge feature enhancement can be improved by increasing the microbubble concentration. In addition, high-energy in-line phase contrast imaging provided better performance in detecting low-concentration microbubble distributions.

  20. The Impact of Quantitative Data Provided by a Multi-spectral Digital Skin Lesion Analysis Device on Dermatologists'Decisions to Biopsy Pigmented Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farberg, Aaron S; Winkelmann, Richard R; Tucker, Natalie; White, Richard; Rigel, Darrell S

    2017-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Early diagnosis of melanoma is critical to survival. New technologies, such as a multi-spectral digital skin lesion analysis (MSDSLA) device [MelaFind, STRATA Skin Sciences, Horsham, Pennsylvania] may be useful to enhance clinician evaluation of concerning pigmented skin lesions. Previous studies evaluated the effect of only the binary output. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to determine how decisions dermatologists make regarding pigmented lesion biopsies are impacted by providing both the underlying classifier score (CS) and associated probability risk provided by multi-spectral digital skin lesion analysis. This outcome was also compared against the improvement reported with the provision of only the binary output. METHODS: Dermatologists attending an educational conference evaluated 50 pigmented lesions (25 melanomas and 25 benign lesions). Participants were asked if they would biopsy the lesion based on clinical images, and were asked this question again after being shown multi-spectral digital skin lesion analysis data that included the probability graphs and classifier score. RESULTS: Data were analyzed from a total of 160 United States board-certified dermatologists. Biopsy sensitivity for melanoma improved from 76 percent following clinical evaluation to 92 percent after quantitative multi-spectral digital skin lesion analysis information was provided ( p lesion analysis (64% vs. 86%, p lesions led to both increased sensitivity and specificity, thereby resulting in more accurate biopsy decisions.

  1. Input or intimacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Navracsics

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the critical period hypothesis, the earlier the acquisition of a second language starts, the better. Owing to the plasticity of the brain, up until a certain age a second language can be acquired successfully according to this view. Early second language learners are commonly said to have an advantage over later ones especially in phonetic/phonological acquisition. Native-like pronunciation is said to be most likely to be achieved by young learners. However, there is evidence of accentfree speech in second languages learnt after puberty as well. Occasionally, on the other hand, a nonnative accent may appear even in early second (or third language acquisition. Cross-linguistic influences are natural in multilingual development, and we would expect the dominant language to have an impact on the weaker one(s. The dominant language is usually the one that provides the largest amount of input for the child. But is it always the amount that counts? Perhaps sometimes other factors, such as emotions, ome into play? In this paper, data obtained from an EnglishPersian-Hungarian trilingual pair of siblings (under age 4 and 3 respectively is analyzed, with a special focus on cross-linguistic influences at the phonetic/phonological levels. It will be shown that beyond the amount of input there are more important factors that trigger interference in multilingual development.

  2. Input parameters and scenarios, including economic inputs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boklund, Anette; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq

    2012-01-01

    to day 8 after the herd was infected, and increased to 1 after day 8. The outputs from the epidemiological models were used as inputs in an economic model to calculate costs and losses for each epidemic. The costs of an epidemic were divided into direct and indirect costs. The direct costs consisted...

  3. Quantitative Electroencephalographic Analysis Provides an Early-Stage Indicator of Disease Onset and Progression in the zQ175 Knock-In Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Simon P.; Schwartz, Michael D.; Wurts-Black, Sarah; Thomas, Alexia M.; Chen, Tsui-Ming; Miller, Michael A.; Palmerston, Jeremiah B.; Kilduff, Thomas S.; Morairty, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    intervention and improve outcomes for patients with HD. Citation: Fisher SP, Schwartz MD, Wurts-Black S, Thomas AM, Chen TM, Miller MA, Palmerston JB, Kilduff TS, Morairty SR. Quantitative electroencephalographic analysis provides an early-stage indicator of disease onset and progression in the zQ175 knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease. SLEEP 2016;39(2):379–391. PMID:26446107

  4. an assessment in the use of agricultural inputs with particylar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    analysis of the data. The targeted variables such as input supply, age and education of farmers, extension contact, credit availability and marketing conditions, price of inputs and outputs among sampled farmers with various degrees of application of agricultural inputs have been discussed quantitatively and qualitatively.

  5. Lab Inputs for Common Micros.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Robert

    1984-01-01

    The game paddle inputs of Apple microcomputers provide a simple way to get laboratory measurements into the computer. Discusses these game paddles and the necessary interface software. Includes schematics for Apple built-in paddle electronics, TRS-80 game paddle I/O, Commodore circuit for user port, and bus interface for Sinclair/Timex, Commodore,…

  6. Input characterization of a shock test strructure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hylok, J. E. (Jeffrey E.); Groethe, M. A.; Maupin, R. D. (Ryan D.)

    2004-01-01

    Often in experimental work, measuring input forces and pressures is a difficult and sometimes impossible task. For one particular shock test article, its input sensitivity required a detailed measurement of the pressure input. This paper discusses the use of a surrogate mass mock test article to measure spatial and temporal variations of the shock input within and between experiments. Also discussed will be the challenges and solutions in making some of the high speed transient measurements. The current input characterization work appears as part of the second phase in an extensive model validation project. During the first phase, the system under analysis displayed sensitivities to the shock input's qualitative and quantitative (magnitude) characteristics. However, multiple shortcomings existed in the characterization of the input. First, the experimental measurements of the input were made on a significantly simplified structure only, and the spatial fidelity of the measurements was minimal. Second, the sensors used for the pressure measurement contained known errors that could not be fully quantified. Finally, the measurements examined only one input pressure path (from contact with the energetic material). Airblast levels from the energetic materials were unknown. The result was a large discrepancy between the energy content in the analysis and experiments.

  7. PLEXOS Input Data Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-02-01

    The PLEXOS Input Data Generator (PIDG) is a tool that enables PLEXOS users to better version their data, automate data processing, collaborate in developing inputs, and transfer data between different production cost modeling and other power systems analysis software. PIDG can process data that is in a generalized format from multiple input sources, including CSV files, PostgreSQL databases, and PSS/E .raw files and write it to an Excel file that can be imported into PLEXOS with only limited manual intervention.

  8. Bilinearity in spatiotemporal integration of synaptic inputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songting Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons process information via integration of synaptic inputs from dendrites. Many experimental results demonstrate dendritic integration could be highly nonlinear, yet few theoretical analyses have been performed to obtain a precise quantitative characterization analytically. Based on asymptotic analysis of a two-compartment passive cable model, given a pair of time-dependent synaptic conductance inputs, we derive a bilinear spatiotemporal dendritic integration rule. The summed somatic potential can be well approximated by the linear summation of the two postsynaptic potentials elicited separately, plus a third additional bilinear term proportional to their product with a proportionality coefficient [Formula: see text]. The rule is valid for a pair of synaptic inputs of all types, including excitation-inhibition, excitation-excitation, and inhibition-inhibition. In addition, the rule is valid during the whole dendritic integration process for a pair of synaptic inputs with arbitrary input time differences and input locations. The coefficient [Formula: see text] is demonstrated to be nearly independent of the input strengths but is dependent on input times and input locations. This rule is then verified through simulation of a realistic pyramidal neuron model and in electrophysiological experiments of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons. The rule is further generalized to describe the spatiotemporal dendritic integration of multiple excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. The integration of multiple inputs can be decomposed into the sum of all possible pairwise integration, where each paired integration obeys the bilinear rule. This decomposition leads to a graph representation of dendritic integration, which can be viewed as functionally sparse.

  9. Health care providers' perceptions of and attitudes towards induced abortions in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia : a systematic literature review of qualitative and quantitative data.

    OpenAIRE

    Rehnstr?m Loi, Ulrika; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Faxelid, Elisabeth; Klingberg-Allvin, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background Unsafe abortions are a serious public health problem and a major human rights issue. In low-income countries, where restrictive abortion laws are common, safe abortion care is not always available to women in need. Health care providers have an important role in the provision of abortion services. However, the shortage of health care providers in low-income countries is critical and exacerbated by the unwillingness of some health care providers to provide abortion services. The aim...

  10. Serial Input Output

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each

  11. Quantitative Analysis of the Usage of a Pedagogical Tool Combining Questions Listed as Learning Objectives and Answers Provided as Online Videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odette Laneuville

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To improve the learning of basic concepts in molecular biology of an undergraduate science class, a pedagogical tool was developed, consisting of learning objectives listed at the end of each lecture and answers to those objectives made available as videos online. The aim of this study was to determine if the pedagogical tool was used by students as instructed, and to explore students’ perception of its usefulness. A combination of quantitative survey data and measures of online viewing was used to evaluate the usage of the pedagogical practice. A total of 77 short videos linked to 11 lectures were made available to 71 students, and 64 completed the survey. Using online tracking tools, a total of 7046 views were recorded. Survey data indicated that most students (73.4% accessed all videos, and the majority (98.4% found the videos to be useful in assisting their learning. Interestingly, approximately half of the students (53.1% always or most of the time used the pedagogical tool as recommended, and consistently answered the learning objectives before watching the videos. While the proposed pedagogical tool was used by the majority of students outside the classroom, only half used it as recommended limiting the impact on students’ involvement in the learning of the material presented in class.

  12. Quantitative relationships between huntingtin levels, polyglutamine length, inclusion body formation, and neuronal death provide novel insight into Huntington’s disease molecular pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jason; Arrasate, Montserrat; Shaby, Benjamin A.; Mitra, Siddhartha; Masliah, Eliezer; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2010-01-01

    An expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) stretch in the protein huntingtin (htt) induces self-aggregation into inclusion bodies (IBs) and causes Huntington’s disease (HD). Defining precise relationships between early observable variables and neuronal death at the molecular and cellular levels should improve our understanding of HD pathogenesis. Here, we utilized an automated microscope that can track thousands of neurons individually over their entire lifetime to quantify interconnected relationships between early variables, such as htt levels, polyQ length, and IB formation, and neuronal death in a primary striatal model of HD. The resulting model revealed that: mutant htt increases the risk of death by tonically interfering with homeostatic coping mechanisms rather than producing accumulated damage to the neuron; htt toxicity is saturable; the rate limiting steps for inclusion body formation and death can be traced to different conformational changes in monomeric htt; and IB formation reduces the impact of a neuron’s starting levels of htt on its risk of death. Finally, the model that emerges from our quantitative measurements places critical limits on the potential mechanisms by which mutant htt might induce neurodegeneration, which should help direct future research. PMID:20685997

  13. Rich input i engelskundervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melgaard, Bente; Guttesen, Maria Josephine; Jacobsen, Susanne Karen

    2017-01-01

    Der er mange gode grunde til at bruge autentiske tekster i engelskundervisningen på alle niveauer. Eleverne skal i engelskundervisningen stifte bekendtskab med et varieret input på fremmedsproget, og det at læse autentiske tekster er et møde med sprog som målrettet målsprogsbrugere, og giver...

  14. Access to Research Inputs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Grimpe, Christoph; Pellens, Maikel

    sciences, natural sciences, engineering, and social sciences, that scientists who receive industry funding are twice as likely to deny requests for research inputs as those who do not. Receiving external funding in general does not affect denying others access. Scientists who receive external funding...

  15. Access to Research Inputs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Grimpe, Christoph; Pellens, Maikel

    2015-01-01

    sciences, natural sciences, engineering, and social sciences, that scientists who receive industry funding are twice as likely to deny requests for research inputs as those who do not. Receiving external funding in general does not affect denying others access. Scientists who receive external funding...

  16. ColloInputGenerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    This is a very simple program to help you put together input files for use in Gries' (2007) R-based collostruction analysis program. It basically puts together a text file with a frequency list of lexemes in the construction and inserts a column where you can add the corpus frequencies. It requir...

  17. Pain in patients with multiple sclerosis: a complex assessment including quantitative and qualitative measurements provides for a disease-related biopsychosocial pain model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dominik Michalski1,*, Stefanie Liebig1,*, Eva Thomae1,2, Andreas Hinz3, Florian Then Bergh1,21Department of Neurology, 2Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine (TRM, 3Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany *These authors contributed equallyBackground: Pain of various causes is a common phenomenon in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS. A biopsychosocial perspective has proven a useful theoretical construct in other chronic pain conditions and was also started in MS. To support such an approach, we aimed to investigate pain in MS with special emphasis on separating quantitative and qualitative aspects, and its interrelation to behavioral and physical aspects.Materials and methods: Pain intensity (NRS and quality (SES were measured in 38 consecutive outpatients with MS (mean age, 42.0 ± 11.5 years, 82% women. Pain-related behavior (FSR, health care utilization, bodily complaints (GBB-24 and fatigue (WEIMuS were assessed by questionnaires, and MS-related neurological impairment by a standardized neurological examination (EDSS.Results: Mean pain intensity was 4.0 (range, 0–10 and mean EDSS 3.7 (range, 0–8 in the overall sample. Currently present pain was reported by 81.6% of all patients. Disease duration and EDSS did not differ between patients with and without pain and were not correlated to quality or intensity of pain. Patients with pain had significantly higher scores of musculoskeletal complaints, but equal scores of exhaustion, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular complaints. Pain intensity correlated only with physical aspects, whereas quality of pain was additionally associated with increased avoidance, resignation and cognitive fatigue.Conclusion: As in other conditions, pain in MS must be assessed in a multidimensional way. Further research should be devoted to adapt existing models to a MS-specific model of pain.Keywords: pain intensity, quality of pain, pain

  18. 42 CFR 460.138 - Committees with community input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Committees with community input. 460.138 Section... community input. A PACE organization must establish one or more committees, with community input, to do the... implementation of, and results from, the quality assessment and performance improvement plan. (c) Provide input...

  19. A notion of sufficient input

    OpenAIRE

    Bertrand Crettez; Philippe Michel

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we study a notion of sufficient input, i.e. input that allows to produce at least one unit of output when the other inputs are fixed at any positive level. We show that such an input allows to produce any positive amount of production. The main property of sufficient inputs is as follows. A input is sufficient if and only if the unit cost goes to zero when its price goes to zero.

  20. Comprehensible input and learning outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar Campillo, Patricia

    1996-01-01

    Segones Jornades de Foment de la Investigació de la FCHS (Any 1996-1997) In Krashen’s terms, optimal input has to be comprehensible to the learner if we want acquisition to take place. An overview of the literature on input indicates two ways of making input comprehensible: the first one is to premodify input before it is offered to the learner, (premodified input), and the second one is to negotiate the input through interaction (interactionally modified input). The aim of the...

  1. Extending Quantitative Easing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallett, Andrew Hughes; Fiedler, Salomon; Kooths, Stefan

    The notes in this compilation address the pros and cons associated with the extension of ECB quantitative easing programme of asset purchases. The notes have been requested by the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs as an input for the February 2017 session of the Monetary Dialogue....

  2. Quantitative analysis of oyster larval proteome provides new insights into the effects of multiple climate change stressors, supplement to: Dineshram, R; Chandramouli, K; Ko, W K Ginger; Zhang, Huoming; Qian, Pei Yuan; Ravasi, Timothy; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen (2016): Quantitative analysis of oyster larval proteome provides new insights into the effects of multiple climate change stressors. Global Change Biology, 22(6), 2054-2068

    KAUST Repository

    Dineshram, R

    2016-01-01

    The metamorphosis of planktonic larvae of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) underpins their complex life-history strategy by switching on the molecular machinery required for sessile life and building calcite shells. Metamorphosis becomes a survival bottleneck, which will be pressured by different anthropogenically induced climate change-related variables. Therefore, it is important to understand how metamorphosing larvae interact with emerging climate change stressors. To predict how larvae might be affected in a future ocean, we examined changes in the proteome of metamorphosing larvae under multiple stressors: decreased pH (pH 7.4), increased temperature (30 °C), and reduced salinity (15 psu). Quantitative protein expression profiling using iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS identified more than 1300 proteins. Decreased pH had a negative effect on metamorphosis by down-regulating several proteins involved in energy production, metabolism, and protein synthesis. However, warming switched on these down-regulated pathways at pH 7.4. Under multiple stressors, cell signaling, energy production, growth, and developmental pathways were up-regulated, although metamorphosis was still reduced. Despite the lack of lethal effects, significant physiological responses to both individual and interacting climate change related stressors were observed at proteome level. The metamorphosing larvae of the C. gigas population in the Yellow Sea appear to have adequate phenotypic plasticity at the proteome level to survive in future coastal oceans, but with developmental and physiological costs.

  3. 78 FR 65960 - Enhancing Agricultural Coexistence; Request for Public Input

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... Office of the Secretary Enhancing Agricultural Coexistence; Request for Public Input ACTION: Request for... (5) seed quality. In the area of education and outreach, we are seeking public input regarding the.... Following the comment period, USDA intends to hold a public forum to discuss input provided by commenters...

  4. Microsatellite CONVERT Input File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Microsatellite data formatted for the software CONVERT, which includes dataset numerical IDs, sampling site names, and locus identifiers. Rows 291-294 provides...

  5. Rigour in quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, Leica Sarah

    2015-07-22

    This article which forms part of the research series addresses scientific rigour in quantitative research. It explores the basis and use of quantitative research and the nature of scientific rigour. It examines how the reader may determine whether quantitative research results are accurate, the questions that should be asked to determine accuracy and the checklists that may be used in this process. Quantitative research has advantages in nursing, since it can provide numerical data to help answer questions encountered in everyday practice.

  6. Prioritizing Interdependent Production Processes using Leontief Input-Output Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masbad Jesah Grace

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a methodology in identifying key production processes in an interdependent production system. Previous approaches on this domain have drawbacks that may potentially affect the reliability of decision-making. The proposed approach adopts the Leontief input-output model (L-IOM which was proven successful in analyzing interdependent economic systems. The motivation behind such adoption lies in the strength of L-IOM in providing a rigorous quantitative framework in identifying key components of interdependent systems. In this proposed approach, the consumption and production flows of each process are represented respectively by the material inventory produced by the prior process and the material inventory produced by the current process, both in monetary values. A case study in a furniture production system located in central Philippines was carried out to elucidate the proposed approach. Results of the case were reported in this work

  7. Significance of Input Correlations in Striatal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Man Yi; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    The striatum is the main input station of the basal ganglia and is strongly associated with motor and cognitive functions. Anatomical evidence suggests that individual striatal neurons are unlikely to share their inputs from the cortex. Using a biologically realistic large-scale network model of striatum and cortico-striatal projections, we provide a functional interpretation of the special anatomical structure of these projections. Specifically, we show that weak pairwise correlation within the pool of inputs to individual striatal neurons enhances the saliency of signal representation in the striatum. By contrast, correlations among the input pools of different striatal neurons render the signal representation less distinct from background activity. We suggest that for the network architecture of the striatum, there is a preferred cortico-striatal input configuration for optimal signal representation. It is further enhanced by the low-rate asynchronous background activity in striatum, supported by the balance between feedforward and feedback inhibitions in the striatal network. Thus, an appropriate combination of rates and correlations in the striatal input sets the stage for action selection presumably implemented in the basal ganglia. PMID:22125480

  8. Regional Hospital Input Price Indexes

    OpenAIRE

    Freeland, Mark S.; Schendler, Carol Ellen; Anderson, Gerard

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development of regional hospital input price indexes that is consistent with the general methodology used for the National Hospital Input Price Index. The feasibility of developing regional indexes was investigated because individuals inquired whether different regions experienced different rates of increase in hospital input prices. The regional indexes incorporate variations in cost-share weights (the amount an expense category contributes to total spending) associa...

  9. Mobile gaze input system for pervasive interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    feedback to the user in response to the received command input. The unit provides feedback to the user on how to position the mobile unit in front of his eyes. The gaze tracking unit interacts with one or more controlled devices via wireless or wired communications. Example devices include a lock...

  10. Critical Quantitative Inquiry in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Frances K.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter briefly traces the development of the concept of critical quantitative inquiry, provides an expanded conceptualization of the tasks of critical quantitative research, offers theoretical explanation and justification for critical research using quantitative methods, and previews the work of quantitative criticalists presented in this…

  11. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Frank (Bud) Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to real-world materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  12. The Contrast Theory of negative input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, M

    1997-02-01

    Beliefs about whether or not children receive corrective input for grammatical errors depend crucially on how one defines the concept of correction. Arguably, previous conceptualizations do not provide a viable basis for empirical research (Gold, 1967; Brown & Hanlon, 1970; Hirsh-Pasek, Treiman & Schneiderman, 1984). Within the Contrast Theory of negative input, an alternative definition of negative evidence is offered, based on the idea that the unique discourse structure created in the juxtaposition of child error and adult correct form can reveal to the child the contrast, or conflict, between the two forms, and hence provide a basis for rejecting the erroneous form. A within-subjects experimental design was implemented for 36 children (mean age 5;0), in order to compare the immediate effects of negative evidence with those of positive input, on the acquisition of six novel irregular past tense forms. Children reproduced the correct irregular model more often, and persisted with fewer errors, following negative evidence rather than positive input.

  13. The Multi-Q web server for multiplexed protein quantitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuan-Yih; Tsui, Yin-Hao; Yian, Yi-Hwa; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2007-01-01

    The Multi-Q web server provides an automated data analysis tool for multiplexed protein quantitation based on the iTRAQ labeling method. The web server is designed as a platform that can accommodate various input data formats from search engines and mass spectrometer manufacturers. Compared to the previous stand-alone version, the new web server version provides many enhanced features and flexible options for quantitation. The workflow of the web server is represented by a quantitation wizard so that the tool is easy to use. It also provides a friendly interface that helps users configure their parameter settings before running the program. The web server generates a standard report for quantitation results. In addition, it allows users to customize their output reports and information of interest can be easily highlighted. The output also provides visualization of mass spectral data so that users can conveniently validate the results. The Multi-Q web server is a fully automated and easy to use quantitation tool that is suitable for large-scale multiplexed protein quantitation. Users can download the Multi-Q Web Server from http://ms.iis.sinica.edu.tw/Multi-Q-Web. PMID:17553828

  14. World Input-Output Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Cerina

    Full Text Available Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries.

  15. Analog Input Data Acquisition Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DAQ Master Software allows users to easily set up a system to monitor up to five analog input channels and save the data after acquisition. This program was written in LabVIEW 8.0, and requires the LabVIEW runtime engine 8.0 to run the executable.

  16. World Input-Output Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries.

  17. Remote input/output station

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    A general view of the remote input/output station installed in building 112 (ISR) and used for submitting jobs to the CDC 6500 and 6600. The card reader on the left and the line printer on the right are operated by programmers on a self-service basis.

  18. Leaders' achievement goals and their reactions to subordinates' creative input

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbom, R.B.L.; Janssen, O.; van Yperen, N.W.

    2010-01-01

    The present experimental research examined the impact of leaders' achievement goals on their reactions to creative input provided by their subordinates. In Experiment 1, performance goal leaders were found to be less receptive to subordinates' creative input than mastery goal leaders. In Experiment

  19. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  20. 40 CFR 75.36 - Missing data procedures for heat input rate determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....36 Missing data procedures for heat input rate determinations. (a) When hourly heat input rate is... the heat input rate calculation shall be provided according to § 75.31 or § 75.33, as applicable. When... heat input rate calculations in accordance with paragraphs (b) and (d) of this section. (b) During the...

  1. Systems and methods for reconfiguring input devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Jeff (Inventor); De Mers, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes an input device having first and second input members configured to be activated by a user. The input device is configured to generate activation signals associated with activation of the first and second input members, and each of the first and second input members are associated with an input function. A processor is coupled to the input device and configured to receive the activation signals. A memory coupled to the processor, and includes a reconfiguration module configured to store the input functions assigned to the first and second input members and, upon execution of the processor, to reconfigure the input functions assigned to the input members when the first input member is inoperable.

  2. Sensory Synergy as Environmental Input Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fady eAlnajjar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a method to feed proper environmental inputs back to the central nervous system (CNS remains one of the challenges in achieving natural movement when part of the body is replaced with an artificial device. Muscle synergies are widely accepted as a biologically plausible interpretation of the neural dynamics between the CNS and the muscular system. Yet the sensorineural dynamics of environmental feedback to the CNS has not been investigated in detail. In this study, we address this issue by exploring the concept of sensory synergy. In contrast to muscle synergy, we hypothesize that sensory synergy plays an essential role in integrating the overall environmental inputs to provide low-dimensional information to the CNS. We assume that sensor synergy and muscle synergy communicate using these low-dimensional signals. To examine our hypothesis, we conducted posture control experiments involving lateral disturbance with 9 healthy participants. Proprioceptive information represented by the changes on muscle lengths were estimated by using the musculoskeletal model analysis software SIMM. Changes on muscles lengths were then used to compute sensory synergies. The experimental results indicate that the environmental inputs were translated into the two dimensional signals and used to move the upper limb to the desired position immediately after the lateral disturbance. Participants who showed high skill in posture control were found to be likely to have a strong correlation between sensory and muscle signaling as well as high coordination between the utilized sensory synergies. These results suggest the importance of integrating environmental inputs into suitable low-dimensional signals before providing them to the CNS. This mechanism should be essential when designing the prosthesis’ sensory system to make the controller simpler

  3. Quantitative easing

    OpenAIRE

    Faustino, Rui Alexandre Rodrigues Veloso

    2012-01-01

    A Work Project, presented as part of the requirements for the Award of a Masters Degree in Economics from the NOVA – School of Business and Economics Since November 2008, the Federal Reserve of the United States pursued a series of large-scale asset purchases, known as Quantitative Easing. In this Work Project, I describe the context, the objectives and the implementation of the Quantitative Easing. Additionally, I discuss its expected effects. Finally, I present empirical evidence of the ...

  4. Input graph: the hidden geometry in controlling complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xizhe; Lv, Tianyang; Pu, Yuanyuan

    2016-11-01

    The ability to control a complex network towards a desired behavior relies on our understanding of the complex nature of these social and technological networks. The existence of numerous control schemes in a network promotes us to wonder: what is the underlying relationship of all possible input nodes? Here we introduce input graph, a simple geometry that reveals the complex relationship between all control schemes and input nodes. We prove that the node adjacent to an input node in the input graph will appear in another control scheme, and the connected nodes in input graph have the same type in control, which they are either all possible input nodes or not. Furthermore, we find that the giant components emerge in the input graphs of many real networks, which provides a clear topological explanation of bifurcation phenomenon emerging in dense networks and promotes us to design an efficient method to alter the node type in control. The findings provide an insight into control principles of complex networks and offer a general mechanism to design a suitable control scheme for different purposes.

  5. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607... § 3430.607 Stakeholder input. CSREES shall seek and obtain stakeholder input through a variety of forums (e.g., public meetings, request for input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the...

  6. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907... Program § 3430.907 Stakeholder input. CSREES shall seek and obtain stakeholder input through a variety of forums (e.g., public meetings, requests for input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the...

  7. Quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Roger

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the basic tenets of quantitative research. The concepts of dependent and independent variables are addressed and the concept of measurement and its associated issues, such as error, reliability and validity, are explored. Experiments and surveys – the principal research designs in quantitative research – are described and key features explained. The importance of the double-blind randomised controlled trial is emphasised, alongside the importance of longitudinal surveys, as opposed to cross-sectional surveys. Essential features of data storage are covered, with an emphasis on safe, anonymous storage. Finally, the article explores the analysis of quantitative data, considering what may be analysed and the main uses of statistics in analysis.

  8. On Optimal Input Design and Model Selection for Communication Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanyan [ORNL; Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL; Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the optimal model (structure) selection and input design which minimize the worst case identification error for communication systems are provided. The problem is formulated using metric complexity theory in a Hilbert space setting. It is pointed out that model selection and input design can be handled independently. Kolmogorov n-width is used to characterize the representation error introduced by model selection, while Gel fand and Time n-widths are used to represent the inherent error introduced by input design. After the model is selected, an optimal input which minimizes the worst case identification error is shown to exist. In particular, it is proven that the optimal model for reducing the representation error is a Finite Impulse Response (FIR) model, and the optimal input is an impulse at the start of the observation interval. FIR models are widely popular in communication systems, such as, in Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) systems.

  9. The Effect of Overt Prepositional Input on Students’ Written Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Morgan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available I believe that there should be a focus on problematic language issues such as prepositions in the language classroom in order to provide continuous exposure to such features. Consequently I provided my students with supplementary activities on prepositions, and also promoted learner autonomy by highlighting urls which deal with collocation. Analysis of the students written output shows the input to have been successful in focussing students’ attention on this problematic language aspect. While a pre-input writing task generated 83 prepositional errors, at the rate of 1 in every 48 words, longer post-input tasks only generated 76 prepositional errors at the rate of 1 in every 215 words. Consequently, I plan to continue providing students with input on this often neglected language feature, in order to increase students’ written accuracy.

  10. Quantitative Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Vincent A.

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative literacy for students with deafness is addressed, noting work by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics to establish curriculum standards for grades K-12. The standards stress problem solving, communication, reasoning, making mathematical connections, and the need for educators of the deaf to pursue mathematics literacy with…

  11. MERRA-2 Input Observations: Summary and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal D. (Editor); McCarty, Will; Coy, Lawrence; Gelaro, Ronald; Huang, Albert; Merkova, Dagmar; Smith, Edmond B.; Sienkiewicz, Meta; Wargan, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2) is an atmospheric reanalysis, spanning 1980 through near-realtime, that uses state-of-the-art processing of observations from the continually evolving global observing system. The effectiveness of any reanalysis is a function not only of the input observations themselves, but also of how the observations are handled in the assimilation procedure. Relevant issues to consider include, but are not limited to, data selection, data preprocessing, quality control, bias correction procedures, and blacklisting. As the assimilation algorithm and earth system models are fundamentally fixed in a reanalysis, it is often a change in the character of the observations, and their feedbacks on the system, that cause changes in the character of the reanalysis. It is therefore important to provide documentation of the observing system so that its discontinuities and transitions can be readily linked to discontinuities seen in the gridded atmospheric fields of the reanalysis. With this in mind, this document provides an exhaustive list of the input observations, the context under which they are assimilated, and an initial assessment of selected core observations fundamental to the reanalysis.

  12. Substitutions between Water and other Agricultural Inputs - An Empirical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X.; You, J.

    2005-12-01

    Increasing concerns about water availability, environmental water requirement and water quality have led to an increased importance of quantitative assessments of the substitution between water and other agricultural inputs at the margin for agricultural and environmental policy analysis. This paper explores the potential substitutions between water and other agricultural inputs in irrigated agriculture through an empirical study. The study include (1) an analysis based on a crop production function for net substitution at the crop field and farm levels; and (2) a numerical study for gross substitution in the context of water allocation in river basins thorough an integrated hydrologic-economic river basin model. Along with the empirical analysis and numerical illustrations, we discuss several theoretical issues relevant to substitutions between water and other inputs, such as (1) selection of indicators of elasticity of substitution, depending on farmers' concerns on yield, production, or profit; (2) appropriateness of net or gross substitution analysis, which is relevant to the spatial scale of the analysis (field, district or region), as well as farmers' concerns; and (3) output impact of substitutions. Water is both a natural resource and an economic input, and the constraints on water include those from both physical and socio-economic aspects. Therefore, the output impact of the substitution between water and other inputs should be extended from a pure economic concept to the context of integrated hydrologic-economic systems.

  13. Smart mobility solution with multiple input Output interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Aartika; Deb, Sujay; Ranjan, Prabhat; Sardar, Arghya

    2017-07-01

    Smart wheelchairs are commonly used to provide solution for mobility impairment. However their usage is limited primarily due to high cost owing from sensors required for giving input, lack of adaptability for different categories of input and limited functionality. In this paper we propose a smart mobility solution using smartphone with inbuilt sensors (accelerometer, camera and speaker) as an input interface. An Emotiv EPOC+ is also used for motor imagery based input control synced with facial expressions in cases of extreme disability. Apart from traction, additional functions like home security and automation are provided using Internet of Things (IoT) and web interfaces. Although preliminary, our results suggest that this system can be used as an integrated and efficient solution for people suffering from mobility impairment. The results also indicate a decent accuracy is obtained for the overall system.

  14. Sound effects: Multimodal input helps infants find displaced objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinskey, Jeanne L

    2017-09-01

    Before 9 months, infants use sound to retrieve a stationary object hidden by darkness but not one hidden by occlusion, suggesting auditory input is more salient in the absence of visual input. This article addresses how audiovisual input affects 10-month-olds' search for displaced objects. In AB tasks, infants who previously retrieved an object at A subsequently fail to find it after it is displaced to B, especially following a delay between hiding and retrieval. Experiment 1 manipulated auditory input by keeping the hidden object audible versus silent, and visual input by presenting the delay in the light versus dark. Infants succeeded more at B with audible than silent objects and, unexpectedly, more after delays in the light than dark. Experiment 2 presented both the delay and search phases in darkness. The unexpected light-dark difference disappeared. Across experiments, the presence of auditory input helped infants find displaced objects, whereas the absence of visual input did not. Sound might help by strengthening object representation, reducing memory load, or focusing attention. This work provides new evidence on when bimodal input aids object processing, corroborates claims that audiovisual processing improves over the first year of life, and contributes to multisensory approaches to studying cognition. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject Before 9 months, infants use sound to retrieve a stationary object hidden by darkness but not one hidden by occlusion. This suggests they find auditory input more salient in the absence of visual input in simple search tasks. After 9 months, infants' object processing appears more sensitive to multimodal (e.g., audiovisual) input. What does this study add? This study tested how audiovisual input affects 10-month-olds' search for an object displaced in an AB task. Sound helped infants find displaced objects in both the presence and absence of visual input. Object processing becomes more

  15. Storm-impact scenario XBeach model inputs and tesults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Rangley; Long, Joseph W.; Thompson, David M.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Dalyander, P. Soupy

    2017-01-01

    The XBeach model input and output of topography and bathymetry resulting from simulation of storm-impact scenarios at the Chandeleur Islands, LA, as described in USGS Open-File Report 2017–1009 (https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20171009), are provided here. For further information regarding model input generation and visualization of model output topography and bathymetry refer to USGS Open-File Report 2017–1009 (https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20171009).

  16. Repositioning Recitation Input in College English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    This paper tries to discuss how recitation input helps overcome the negative influences on the basis of second language acquisition theory and confirms the important role that recitation input plays in improving college students' oral and written English.

  17. 7 CFR 3430.15 - Stakeholder input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.15 Section 3430.15... Stakeholder input. Section 103(c)(2) of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998 (AREERA) (7 U.S.C. 7613(c)(2)) requires the Secretary to solicit and consider input on each program RFA...

  18. Automatic input selection for hydrological modelling: a comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Greer; Galelli, Stefano; Castelletti, Andrea; Maier, Holger; Dandy, Graham; Gibbs, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Input variable selection is an essential step in the development of statistical models and is particularly relevant in hydrological modelling, where potential model inputs often consist of time lagged values of each different potential input variable. While new methods for identifying important model inputs continue to emerge, each has its own advantages and limitations and no method is best suited to all datasets and purposes. Nevertheless, rigorous evaluation of new and existing input variable selection methods is largely neglected due to the lack of guidelines or precedent to facilitate consistent and standardised assessment. This rigorous evaluation would allow the effectiveness of these algorithms to be properly identified in various circumstances. In this paper, we propose a new framework for the evaluation of input variable selection methods which takes into account a wide range of dataset properties that are relevant to real world data and assessment criteria selected to highlight algorithm suitability in different situations of interest. The framework is supported by a repository of data sets to enable standardised and statistically significant testing. This framework is supposed to help promoting the appropriate application and comparison of input variable selection algorithms and eventually serves to provide guidance as to which algorithm is most suitable in a given situation.

  19. Quantitative Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Grover H.

    The use of quantitative decision making tools provides the decision maker with a range of alternatives among which to decide, permits acceptance and use of the optimal solution, and decreases risk. Training line administrators in the use of these tools can help school business officials obtain reliable information upon which to base district…

  20. How much control is enough? Influence of unreliable input on user experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, B.L.A.; Plass - Oude Bos, D.; Reuderink, B.; Poel, Mannes; Nijholt, Antinus

    2013-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCI) provide a valuable new input modality within human–computer interaction systems. However, like other body-based inputs such as gesture or gaze based systems, the system recognition of input commands is still far from perfect. This raises important questions, such as

  1. A semi-quantitative approach for modelling crop response to soil fertility: Evaluation of the AquaCrop procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Van Gaelen, Hanne; Tsegay, Alemtsehay; Delbecque, Nele; Shrestha, Nirman; Garcia, Magali; Fajardo, Hector; Miranda, Roberto; Vanuytrecht, Eline; Abrha, Berhanu; Diels, Jan; Raes, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Most crop models make use of a nutrient balance approach for modelling crop response to soil fertility. To counter the vast input data requirements that are typical of these models, the crop water productivity model AquaCrop adopts a semi-quantitative approach. Instead of providing nutrient levels, users of the model provide the soil fertility level as a model input. This level is expressed in terms of the expected impact on crop biomass production, which can be observed in the field or obtai...

  2. Prediction uncertainty reflects both data input quality and model software sophistication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvitski, J.

    2011-12-01

    Recently Syvitski et al. (2011, The Sedimentary Record, v. 9) put forth three concepts related to earth surface modeling: 1) Prediction, as opposed to cataloging, is a major step in the evolution of geoscience; 2) Quantitative modeling provides a framework in which researchers express their predictive ideas in a precise, consistent format; and 3) Models are an encyclopedia of what we know, and often reveal what we cannot yet quantify. This burgeoning field of earth surface science has proportioned itself into three loose fields of endeavor: 1) those that provide data for model initialization and model boundary conditions; 2) those that develop the algorithms, the numerical models and even the middle ware that links models and input data; and 3) the observational specialists that provide test case data that can be used to judge the skill of a model or parts of a model. This 'modern' way of conducting geoscience requires a team approach offering diverse expertise. Uncertainties associated with this workflow are not always understood or appreciated or transparent - leading to poor or over interpretation of model results. To avoid this perception, uncertainties associated with input data must be involved in the model runs, model-run uncertainties must also be expressed independent of the input data uncertainties, and finally model skill testing must be appreciated with full knowledge of uncertainties associated with test case data. While methods have been developed to cope with geo-model skill (ensemble model run averaging or intercomparison; data ingestion schemes to deal with model drift), workflow uncertainty studies are seldom carried out (i.e. is the expense worth the effort?). Prediction uncertainty examples will be presented based on experience from the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System 'CSDMS' community.

  3. How northern freshwater input can stabilise thermohaline circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Lambert

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC carries heat and salt towards the Arctic. This circulation is partly sustained by buoyancy loss and is generally believed to be inhibited by northern freshwater input as indicated by the ‘box-model’ of Stommel (1961. The inferred freshwater-sensitivity of the THC, however, varies considerably between studies, both quantitatively and qualitatively. The northernmost branch of the Atlantic THC, which forms a double estuarine circulation in the Arctic Mediterranean, is one example where both buoyancy loss and buoyancy gain facilitate circulation. We have built on Stommel's original concept to examine the freshwater-sensitivity of a double estuarine circulation. The net inflow into the double estuary is found to be more sensitive to a change in the distribution of freshwater than to a change in the total freshwater input. A double estuarine circulation is more stable than a single overturning, requiring a larger amount and more localised freshwater input into regions of buoyancy loss to induce a thermohaline ‘collapse’. For the Arctic Mediterranean, these findings imply that the Atlantic inflow may be relatively insensitive to increased freshwater input. Complementing Stommel's thermal and haline flow regimes, the double estuarine circulation allows for a third: the throughflow regime. In this regime, a THC with warm poleward surface flow can be sustained without production of dense water; a decrease in high-latitude dense water formation does therefore not necessarily affect regional surface conditions as strongly as generally thought.

  4. Residual N effects from livestock manure inputs to soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Jaap; Bechini, Luca; Bittman, Shabtai

    Organic inputs including livestock manures provide nitrogen (N) to crops beyond the year of their application. This so-called residual N effect should be taken into account when making decisions on N rates for individual fields, but also when interpreting N response trials in preparation of recom......Organic inputs including livestock manures provide nitrogen (N) to crops beyond the year of their application. This so-called residual N effect should be taken into account when making decisions on N rates for individual fields, but also when interpreting N response trials in preparation...

  5. Input Method "Five Strokes": Advantages and Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja PETROVČIČ

    2014-03-01

    Since the Five Stroke input method is easily accessible, simple to master and is not pronunciation-based, we would expect that the students will use it to input unknown characters. The survey comprises students of Japanology and Sinology at Department of Asian and African Studies, takes in consideration the grade of the respondent and therefore his/her knowledge of characters. This paper also discusses the impact of typeface to the accuracy of the input.

  6. Regulation of neuronal input transformations by tunable dendritic inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett-Barron, Matthew; Turi, Gergely F; Kaifosh, Patrick; Lee, Peter H; Bolze, Frédéric; Sun, Xiao-Hua; Nicoud, Jean-François; Zemelman, Boris V; Sternson, Scott M; Losonczy, Attila

    2012-01-15

    Transforming synaptic input into action potential output is a fundamental function of neurons. The pattern of action potential output from principal cells of the mammalian hippocampus encodes spatial and nonspatial information, but the cellular and circuit mechanisms by which neurons transform their synaptic input into a given output are unknown. Using a combination of optical activation and cell type-specific pharmacogenetic silencing in vitro, we found that dendritic inhibition is the primary regulator of input-output transformations in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells, and acts by gating the dendritic electrogenesis driving burst spiking. Dendrite-targeting interneurons are themselves modulated by interneurons targeting pyramidal cell somata, providing a synaptic substrate for tuning pyramidal cell output through interactions in the local inhibitory network. These results provide evidence for a division of labor in cortical circuits, where distinct computational functions are implemented by subtypes of local inhibitory neurons.

  7. Quantitative Computertomographie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelke K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Die quantitative Computertomographie (QCT ist neben der Dual X-ray-Absorptiometry (DXA eine Standardmethode in der Osteodensitometrie. Wichtigste Meßorte, für die auch kommerzielle Lösungen existieren, sind die Lendenwirbelsäule (LWS und der distale Unterarm. Untersuchungen des Tibia- oder auch des Femurschaftes haben dagegen untergeordnete Bedeutung. Untersuchungen der LWS werden mit klinischen Ganzkörpertomographen durchgeführt. Dafür existieren spezielle Aufnahme- und Auswerteprotokolle. Für QCT-Messungen an peripheren Meßorten (pQCT, insbesondere am distalen Unterarm, wurden kompakte CT-Scanner entwickelt, die heute als Tischgeräte angeboten werden. Entscheidende Vorteile der QCT im Vergleich mit der DXA sind die exakte dreidimensionale Lokalisation des Meßvolumens, die isolierte Erfassung dieses Volumens ohne Überlagerung des umgebenden Gewebes und die Separation trabekulären und kortikalen Knochens. Mit QCT wird die Konzentration des Knochenmineralgehaltes innerhalb einer definierten Auswerteregion (ROI, region of interest bestimmt. Die Konzentration wird typischerweise als Knochenmineraldichte (BMD, bone mineral density bezeichnet und in g/cm3 angegeben. Dagegen wird mit dem projektiven Verfahren der DXA lediglich eine Flächenkonzentration in g/cm2 bestimmt, die in Analogie zur QCT als Flächendichte bezeichnet wird. Der Unterschied zwischen Dichte (QCT und Flächendichte (DXA wird aber in der Literatur meistens vernachlässigt.

  8. Quantitative Analysen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, Philipp

    Der heilige Gral jeglicher Analytik ist, den wahren Wert bestimmen zu können. Dies bedingt quantitative Messmethoden, welche in der molekularen Analytik nun seit einiger Zeit zur Verfügung stehen. Das generelle Problem bei der Quantifizierung ist, dass wir meistens den wahren Wert weder kennen noch bestimmen können! Aus diesem Grund behelfen wir uns mit Annäherungen an den wahren Wert, indem wir aus Laborvergleichsuntersuchungen den Median oder den (robusten) Mittelwert berechnen oder indem wir einen Erwartungswert (expected value) aufgrund der Herstellung des Probenmaterials berechnen. Bei diesen Versuchen der Annäherung an den wahren Wert findet beabsichtigterweise eine Normierung der Analytik statt, entweder nach dem demokratischen Prinzip, dass die Mehrheit bestimmt oder durch zur Verfügungsstellung von geeignetem zertifiziertem Referenzmaterial. Wir müssen uns folglich bewusst sein, dass durch dieses Vorgehen zwar garantiert wird, dass die Mehrheit der Analysenlaboratorien gleich misst, wir jedoch dabei nicht wissen, ob alle gleich gut oder allenfalls gleich schlecht messen.

  9. A one-model approach based on relaxed combinations of inputs for evaluating input congestion in DEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodabakhshi, Mohammad

    2009-08-01

    This paper provides a one-model approach of input congestion based on input relaxation model developed in data envelopment analysis (e.g. [G.R. Jahanshahloo, M. Khodabakhshi, Suitable combination of inputs for improving outputs in DEA with determining input congestion -- Considering textile industry of China, Applied Mathematics and Computation (1) (2004) 263-273; G.R. Jahanshahloo, M. Khodabakhshi, Determining assurance interval for non-Archimedean ele improving outputs model in DEA, Applied Mathematics and Computation 151 (2) (2004) 501-506; M. Khodabakhshi, A super-efficiency model based on improved outputs in data envelopment analysis, Applied Mathematics and Computation 184 (2) (2007) 695-703; M. Khodabakhshi, M. Asgharian, An input relaxation measure of efficiency in stochastic data analysis, Applied Mathematical Modelling 33 (2009) 2010-2023]. This approach reduces solving three problems with the two-model approach introduced in the first of the above-mentioned reference to two problems which is certainly important from computational point of view. The model is applied to a set of data extracted from ISI database to estimate input congestion of 12 Canadian business schools.

  10. The quantitative Morse theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Loi, Ta Le; Phien, Phan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we give a proof of the quantitative Morse theorem stated by {Y. Yomdin} in \\cite{Y1}. The proof is based on the quantitative Sard theorem, the quantitative inverse function theorem and the quantitative Morse lemma.

  11. Partial volume corrected image derived input functions for dynamic PET brain studies: methodology and validation for [11C]flumazenil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourik, J.E.M.; Lubberink, J.M.; Klumpers, U.M.H.; Comans, E.F.I.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Boellaard, R.

    2008-01-01

    Extraction of arterial input functions from dynamic brain scans may obviate the need for arterial sampling and would increase the clinical applicability of quantitative PET studies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate applicability and accuracy of image derived input functions (IDIFs)

  12. Managing Input during Assistive Technology Product Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Mi

    2011-01-01

    Many different sources of input are available to assistive technology innovators during the course of designing products. However, there is little information on which ones may be most effective or how they may be efficiently utilized within the design process. The aim of this project was to compare how three types of input--from simulation tools,…

  13. 39 CFR 3020.92 - Public input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public input. 3020.92 Section 3020.92 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PRODUCT LISTS Requests Initiated by the Postal Service to Change the Mail Classification Schedule § 3020.92 Public input. The Commission shall publish Postal...

  14. Farmers\\' Perceived Agricultural Input Factors Influencing Adoption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated agricultural input factors influencing adoption and production of food crops in Ondo State, Nigeria. Data from 120 randomly selected farmers were used for the study. Findings show that the major inputs used by the respondents are improved seeds (89.2%), fertilizer (66.7%) and agrochemicals ...

  15. Farmer and input marketer's involvement in researchextension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined the level of involvement of farmers and input marketers in the Research-Extension-Farmer-Input Linkage System (REFILS) continuum of activities in the Southeastern agro-ecological zone of Nigeria. Data were collected with the aid of structured questionnaire administered to 80 randomly selected ...

  16. EDP Applications to Musical Bibliography: Input Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Donald C.

    1972-01-01

    The application of Electronic Data Processing (EDP) has been a boon in the analysis and bibliographic control of music. However, an extra step of encoding must be undertaken for input of music. The best hope to facilitate musical input is the development of an Optical Character Recognition (OCR) music-reading machine. (29 references) (Author/NH)

  17. Income distributions in input-output models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenge, Albert E.; Serrano, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of income distribution (ID) has traditionally been of prime importance for economists and policy-makers. However, the standard input-output (I-O) model is not particularly well equipped for studying current issues such as the consequences of decreasing access to primary inputs or the

  18. Input/output plugin architecture for MDSplus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillerman, Joshua, E-mail: jas@psfc.mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 175 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Fredian, Thomas, E-mail: twf@psfc.mit.edu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 175 Albany Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Manduchi, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.manduchi@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    The first version of MDSplus was released in 1991 for VAX/VMS. Since that time the underlying file formats have remained constant. The software however has evolved, it was ported to unix, linux, Windows, and Macintosh. In 1997 a TCP based protocol, mdsip, was added to provide network access to MDSplus data. In 2011 a mechanism was added to allow protocol plugins to permit the use of other transport mechanisms such as ssh to access data users. This paper describes a similar design which permits the insertion of plugins to handle the reading and writing of MDSplus data at the data storage level. Tree paths become URIs which specify the protocol, host, and protocol specific information. The protocol is provided by a dynamically activated shared library that can provide any consistent subset of the data store access API, treeshr. The existing low level network protocol called mdsip, is activated by defining tree paths like “host::/directory”. Using the new plugin mechanism this is re-implemented as an instance of the general plugin that replaces the low level treeshr input/output routines. It is specified by using a path like “mdsip://host/directory”. This architecture will make it possible to adapt the MDSplus data organization and analysis tools to other underlying data storage. The first new application of this, after the existing network protocol is implemented, will be a plugin based on a key value store. Key value stores, can provide inexpensive scalable, redundant data storage. An example of this might be an Amazon G3 plugin which would let you specify a tree path such as “AG3://container” to access MDSplus data stored in the cloud.

  19. Atmospheric Nitrogen input to the Kattegat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asman, W.A.H.; Hertel, O.; Berkowicz, R.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of the processes involved in the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen compounds. These processes are incorporated in an atmospheric transport model that is used to calculate the nitrogen input to the Kattegat, the sea area between Denmark and Sweden. The model results show...... that the total atmospheric nitrogen input to the Kattegat is approximately 960 kg N km(-2) yr(-1). The nitrogen input to the Kattegat is dominated by the wet depositions of NHx (42%) and NOy (30%). The contribution from the dry deposition of NHx is 17% and that of the dry deposition of NOy is 11......%. The contribution of the atmospheric input of nitrogen to the Kattegat is about 30% of the total input including the net transport from other sea areas, runoff etc....

  20. Statistical identification of effective input variables. [SCREEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaurio, J.K.

    1982-09-01

    A statistical sensitivity analysis procedure has been developed for ranking the input data of large computer codes in the order of sensitivity-importance. The method is economical for large codes with many input variables, since it uses a relatively small number of computer runs. No prior judgemental elimination of input variables is needed. The sceening method is based on stagewise correlation and extensive regression analysis of output values calculated with selected input value combinations. The regression process deals with multivariate nonlinear functions, and statistical tests are also available for identifying input variables that contribute to threshold effects, i.e., discontinuities in the output variables. A computer code SCREEN has been developed for implementing the screening techniques. The efficiency has been demonstrated by several examples and applied to a fast reactor safety analysis code (Venus-II). However, the methods and the coding are general and not limited to such applications.

  1. Residual N effects from livestock manure inputs to soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroder, J.J.; Bechini, L.; Bittman, S.; Brito, M.P.; Delin, S.; Lalor, S.T.J.; Morvan, T.; Chambers, B.J.; Sakrabani, R.; Sørensen, P.B.

    2013-01-01

    Organic inputs including livestock manures provide nitrogen (N) to crops beyond the year of their application. This so-called residual N effect should be taken into account when making decisions on N rates for individual fields, but also when interpreting N response trials in preparation of

  2. Speech intelligibility benefits of hearing AIDS at various input levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuk, Francis; Lau, Chi-Chuen; Korhonen, Petri; Crose, Bryan

    2015-03-01

    performance of the NH listeners was higher than that of the HI listeners. Subjective preference for the unaided sounds versus the aided sounds increased as input level increased, with a crossover intensity at approximately 75 dB SPL for speech and 80 dB SPL for music. The results supported the hypothesis that the study hearing aid can provide aided speech-in-noise benefit at very high noise inputs in a controlled environment. American Academy of Audiology.

  3. Robust transcriptional signatures for low-input RNA samples based on relative expression orderings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaping; Li, Yawei; He, Jun; Guan, Qingzhou; Chen, Rou; Yan, Haidan; Zheng, Weicheng; Song, Kai; Cai, Hao; Guo, You; Wang, Xianlong; Guo, Zheng

    2017-11-28

    It is often difficult to obtain sufficient quantity of RNA molecules for gene expression profiling under many practical situations. Amplification from low-input samples may induce artificial signals. We compared the expression measurements of low-input mRNA samples, from 25 pg to 1000 pg mRNA, which were amplified and profiled by Smart-seq, DP-seq and CEL-seq techniques using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, with those of the paired high-input (50 ng) mRNA samples. Even with 1000 pg mRNA input, we found that thousands of genes had at least 2 folds-change of expression levels in the low-input samples compared with the corresponding paired high-input samples. Consequently, a transcriptional signature based on quantitative expression values and determined from high-input RNA samples cannot be applied to low-input samples, and vice versa. In contrast, the within-sample relative expression orderings (REOs) of approximately 90% of all the gene pairs in the high-input samples were maintained in the paired low-input samples with 1000 pg input mRNA molecules. Similar results were observed in the low-input total RNA samples amplified and profiled by the Whole-Genome DASL technique using the Illumina HumanRef-8 v3.0 platform. As a proof of principle, we developed REOs-based signatures from high-input RNA samples for discriminating cancer tissues and showed that they can be robustly applied to low-input RNA samples. REOs-based signatures determined from the high-input RNA samples can be robustly applied to samples profiled with the low-input RNA samples, as low as the 1000 pg and 250 pg input samples but no longer stable in samples with less than 250 pg RNA input to a certain degree.

  4. Reproducibility of CSF quantitative culture methods for estimating rate of clearance in cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyal, Jonathan; Akampurira, Andrew; Rhein, Joshua; Morawski, Bozena M; Kiggundu, Reuben; Nabeta, Henry W; Musubire, Abdu K; Bahr, Nathan C; Williams, Darlisha A; Bicanic, Tihana; Larsen, Robert A; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures provide a measure of disease severity in cryptococcal meningitis. The fungal clearance rate by quantitative cultures has become a primary endpoint for phase II clinical trials. This study determined the inter-assay accuracy of three different quantitative culture methodologies. Among 91 participants with meningitis symptoms in Kampala, Uganda, during August-November 2013, 305 CSF samples were prospectively collected from patients at multiple time points during treatment. Samples were simultaneously cultured by three methods: (1) St. George's 100 mcl input volume of CSF with five 1:10 serial dilutions, (2) AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) method using 1000, 100, 10 mcl input volumes, and two 1:100 dilutions with 100 and 10 mcl input volume per dilution on seven agar plates; and (3) 10 mcl calibrated loop of undiluted and 1:100 diluted CSF (loop). Quantitative culture values did not statistically differ between St. George-ACTG methods (P= .09) but did for St. George-10 mcl loop (Pmethods was high (r≥0.88). For detecting sterility, the ACTG-method had the highest negative predictive value of 97% (91% St. George, 60% loop), but the ACTG-method had occasional (∼10%) difficulties in quantification due to colony clumping. For CSF clearance rate, St. George-ACTG methods did not differ overall (mean -0.05 ± 0.07 log10CFU/ml/day;P= .14) on a group level; however, individual-level clearance varied. The St. George and ACTG quantitative CSF culture methods produced comparable but not identical results. Quantitative cultures can inform treatment management strategies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Measuring Input Thresholds on an Existing Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Igor; Gutrich, Daniel G.; Berkun, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    A critical PECL (positive emitter-coupled logic) interface to Xilinx interface needed to be changed on an existing flight board. The new Xilinx input interface used a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) type of input, and the driver could meet its thresholds typically, but not in worst-case, according to the data sheet. The previous interface had been based on comparison with an external reference, but the CMOS input is based on comparison with an internal divider from the power supply. A way to measure what the exact input threshold was for this device for 64 inputs on a flight board was needed. The measurement technique allowed an accurate measurement of the voltage required to switch a Xilinx input from high to low for each of the 64 lines, while only probing two of them. Directly driving an external voltage was considered too risky, and tests done on any other unit could not be used to qualify the flight board. The two lines directly probed gave an absolute voltage threshold calibration, while data collected on the remaining 62 lines without probing gave relative measurements that could be used to identify any outliers. The PECL interface was forced to a long-period square wave by driving a saturated square wave into the ADC (analog to digital converter). The active pull-down circuit was turned off, causing each line to rise rapidly and fall slowly according to the input s weak pull-down circuitry. The fall time shows up as a change in the pulse width of the signal ready by the Xilinx. This change in pulse width is a function of capacitance, pulldown current, and input threshold. Capacitance was known from the different trace lengths, plus a gate input capacitance, which is the same for all inputs. The pull-down current is the same for all inputs including the two that are probed directly. The data was combined, and the Excel solver tool was used to find input thresholds for the 62 lines. This was repeated over different supply voltages and

  6. Understanding quantitative research: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoe, Juanita; Hoare, Zoë

    This article, which is the first in a two-part series, provides an introduction to understanding quantitative research, basic statistics and terminology used in research articles. Critical appraisal of research articles is essential to ensure that nurses remain up to date with evidence-based practice to provide consistent and high-quality nursing care. This article focuses on developing critical appraisal skills and understanding the use and implications of different quantitative approaches to research. Part two of this article will focus on explaining common statistical terms and the presentation of statistical data in quantitative research.

  7. Quantitative EPR A Practitioners Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Eaton, Gareth R; Barr, David P; Weber, Ralph T

    2010-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive yet practical guide for people who perform quantitative EPR measurements. No existing book provides this level of practical guidance to ensure the successful use of EPR. There is a growing need in both industrial and academic research to provide meaningful and accurate quantitative EPR results. This text discusses the various sample, instrument and software related aspects required for EPR quantitation. Specific topics include: choosing a reference standard, resonator considerations (Q, B1, Bm), power saturation characteristics, sample positioning, and finally, putting all the factors together to obtain an accurate spin concentration of a sample.

  8. Deliberation: obtaining informed input from a diverse public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Grace; Gold, Marthe; Siegel, Joanna; Sofaer, Shoshanna; Yang, Manshu; Mallery, Coretta; Carman, Kristin L

    2015-02-01

    Health care decision makers require public input to incorporate diverse values into programs and policies. Deliberation, one method for obtaining input, seeks to apply inclusive principles wherein diverse groups provide perspectives to inform decisions. We evaluate whether participants of different racial, ethnic, and educational backgrounds show differences in the effect of deliberation and the value placed on deliberation participation. We surveyed 907 participants before and after deliberation. Regression models examined associations between demographics and change in knowledge and attitudes, and perceived impact. Changes in knowledge about using medical evidence in decision-making were not associated with race, ethnicity, or education. Changes in attitudes were not associated with these characteristics with one exception. African American, Hispanic, and participants with lower educational attainment reported more perceived impact. Similar results across demographic groups suggest deliberation's promise for obtaining input from a diverse public to inform health programs and policies.

  9. Incorporating uncertainty in RADTRAN 6.0 input files.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, Matthew L.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Heames, Terence John (Alion Science and Technology)

    2010-02-01

    Uncertainty may be introduced into RADTRAN analyses by distributing input parameters. The MELCOR Uncertainty Engine (Gauntt and Erickson, 2004) has been adapted for use in RADTRAN to determine the parameter shape and minimum and maximum of the distribution, to sample on the distribution, and to create an appropriate RADTRAN batch file. Coupling input parameters is not possible in this initial application. It is recommended that the analyst be very familiar with RADTRAN and able to edit or create a RADTRAN input file using a text editor before implementing the RADTRAN Uncertainty Analysis Module. Installation of the MELCOR Uncertainty Engine is required for incorporation of uncertainty into RADTRAN. Gauntt and Erickson (2004) provides installation instructions as well as a description and user guide for the uncertainty engine.

  10. Input and language development in bilingually developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Erika; Core, Cynthia

    2013-11-01

    Language skills in young bilingual children are highly varied as a result of the variability in their language experiences, making it difficult for speech-language pathologists to differentiate language disorder from language difference in bilingual children. Understanding the sources of variability in bilingual contexts and the resulting variability in children's skills will help improve language assessment practices by speech-language pathologists. In this article, we review literature on bilingual first language development for children under 5 years of age. We describe the rate of development in single and total language growth, we describe effects of quantity of input and quality of input on growth, and we describe effects of family composition on language input and language growth in bilingual children. We provide recommendations for language assessment of young bilingual children and consider implications for optimizing children's dual language development. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Identifying local and descending inputs for primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shengli; Rodriguez, Erica; Takatoh, Jun; Han, Bao-Xia; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Fan

    2015-10-01

    Primary pain and touch sensory neurons not only detect internal and external sensory stimuli, but also receive inputs from other neurons. However, the neuronal derived inputs for primary neurons have not been systematically identified. Using a monosynaptic rabies viruses-based transneuronal tracing method combined with sensory-specific Cre-drivers, we found that sensory neurons receive intraganglion, intraspinal, and supraspinal inputs, the latter of which are mainly derived from the rostroventral medulla (RVM). The viral-traced central neurons were largely inhibitory but also consisted of some glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord and serotonergic neurons in the RVM. The majority of RVM-derived descending inputs were dual GABAergic and enkephalinergic (opioidergic). These inputs projected through the dorsolateral funiculus and primarily innervated layers I, II, and V of the dorsal horn, where pain-sensory afferents terminate. Silencing or activation of the dual GABA/enkephalinergic RVM neurons in adult animals substantially increased or decreased behavioral sensitivity, respectively, to heat and mechanical stimuli. These results are consistent with the fact that both GABA and enkephalin can exert presynaptic inhibition of the sensory afferents. Taken together, this work provides a systematic view of and a set of tools for examining peri- and extrasynaptic regulations of pain-afferent transmission.

  12. Deterministic quantitative risk assessment development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Jane; Colquhoun, Iain [PII Pipeline Solutions Business of GE Oil and Gas, Cramlington Northumberland (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Current risk assessment practice in pipeline integrity management is to use a semi-quantitative index-based or model based methodology. This approach has been found to be very flexible and provide useful results for identifying high risk areas and for prioritizing physical integrity assessments. However, as pipeline operators progressively adopt an operating strategy of continual risk reduction with a view to minimizing total expenditures within safety, environmental, and reliability constraints, the need for quantitative assessments of risk levels is becoming evident. Whereas reliability based quantitative risk assessments can be and are routinely carried out on a site-specific basis, they require significant amounts of quantitative data for the results to be meaningful. This need for detailed and reliable data tends to make these methods unwieldy for system-wide risk k assessment applications. This paper describes methods for estimating risk quantitatively through the calibration of semi-quantitative estimates to failure rates for peer pipeline systems. The methods involve the analysis of the failure rate distribution, and techniques for mapping the rate to the distribution of likelihoods available from currently available semi-quantitative programs. By applying point value probabilities to the failure rates, deterministic quantitative risk assessment (QRA) provides greater rigor and objectivity than can usually be achieved through the implementation of semi-quantitative risk assessment results. The method permits a fully quantitative approach or a mixture of QRA and semi-QRA to suit the operator's data availability and quality, and analysis needs. For example, consequence analysis can be quantitative or can address qualitative ranges for consequence categories. Likewise, failure likelihoods can be output as classical probabilities or as expected failure frequencies as required. (author)

  13. Keeping community health workers in Uganda motivated: key challenges, facilitators, and preferred program inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunie, Aurélie; Wamala-Mucheri, Patricia; Otterness, Conrad; Akol, Angela; Chen, Mario; Bufumbo, Leonard; Weaver, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the face of global health worker shortages, community health workers (CHWs) are an important health care delivery strategy for underserved populations. In Uganda, community-based programs often use volunteer CHWs to extend services, including family planning, in rural areas. This study examined factors related to CHW motivation and level of activity in 3 family planning programs in Uganda. Methods: Data were collected between July and August 2011, and sources comprised 183 surveys with active CHWs, in-depth interviews (IDIs) with 43 active CHWs and 5 former CHWs, and service statistics records. Surveys included a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to elicit CHW preferences for selected program inputs. Results: Service statistics indicated an average of 56 visits with family planning clients per surveyed CHW over the 3-month period prior to data collection. In the survey, new skills and knowledge, perceived impact on the community, and enhanced status were the main positive aspects of the job reported by CHWs; the main challenges related to transportation. Multivariate analyses identified 2 correlates of CHWs being highly vs. less active (in terms of number of client visits): experiencing problems with supplies and not collaborating with peers. DCE results showed that provision of a package including a T-shirt, badge, and bicycle was the program input CHWs preferred, followed by a mobile phone (without airtime). IDI data reinforced and supplemented these quantitative findings. Social prestige, social responsibility, and aspirations for other opportunities were important motivators, while main challenges related to transportation and commodity stockouts. CHWs had complex motivations for wanting better compensation, including offsetting time and transportation costs, providing for their families, and feeling appreciated for their efforts. Conclusion: Volunteer CHW programs in Uganda and elsewhere need to carefully consider appropriate combinations of

  14. Keeping community health workers in Uganda motivated: key challenges, facilitators, and preferred program inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunie, Aurélie; Wamala-Mucheri, Patricia; Otterness, Conrad; Akol, Angela; Chen, Mario; Bufumbo, Leonard; Weaver, Mark

    2014-02-01

    In the face of global health worker shortages, community health workers (CHWs) are an important health care delivery strategy for underserved populations. In Uganda, community-based programs often use volunteer CHWs to extend services, including family planning, in rural areas. This study examined factors related to CHW motivation and level of activity in 3 family planning programs in Uganda. Data were collected between July and August 2011, and sources comprised 183 surveys with active CHWs, in-depth interviews (IDIs) with 43 active CHWs and 5 former CHWs, and service statistics records. Surveys included a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to elicit CHW preferences for selected program inputs. Service statistics indicated an average of 56 visits with family planning clients per surveyed CHW over the 3-month period prior to data collection. In the survey, new skills and knowledge, perceived impact on the community, and enhanced status were the main positive aspects of the job reported by CHWs; the main challenges related to transportation. Multivariate analyses identified 2 correlates of CHWs being highly vs. less active (in terms of number of client visits): experiencing problems with supplies and not collaborating with peers. DCE results showed that provision of a package including a T-shirt, badge, and bicycle was the program input CHWs preferred, followed by a mobile phone (without airtime). IDI data reinforced and supplemented these quantitative findings. Social prestige, social responsibility, and aspirations for other opportunities were important motivators, while main challenges related to transportation and commodity stockouts. CHWs had complex motivations for wanting better compensation, including offsetting time and transportation costs, providing for their families, and feeling appreciated for their efforts. Volunteer CHW programs in Uganda and elsewhere need to carefully consider appropriate combinations of financial and nonfinancial inputs for optimal

  15. Integrating agronomic principles into production function estimation: A dichotomy of growth inputs and facilitating inputs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhengfei, G.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.; Ittersum, van M.K.; Wossink, G.A.A.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a general conceptual framework for integrating agronomic principles into economic production analysis. We categorize inputs in crop production into growth inputs and facilitating inputs. Based on this dichotomy we specify an asymmetric production function. The robustness of the

  16. Geniculohypothalamic GABAergic projections gate suprachiasmatic nucleus responses to retinal input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Lydia; Walmsley, Lauren; Pienaar, Abigail; Howarth, Michael; Brown, Timothy M

    2017-06-01

    Visual input to the suprachiasmatic nucleus circadian clock is critical for animals to adapt their physiology and behaviour in line with the solar day. In addition to direct retinal projections, the clock receives input from the visual thalamus, although the role of this geniculohypothalamic pathway in circadian photoreception is poorly understood. In the present study, we develop a novel brain slice preparation that preserves the geniculohypothalamic pathway to show that GABAergic thalamic neurons inhibit retinally-driven activity in the central clock in a circadian time-dependent manner. We also show that in vivo manipulation of thalamic signalling adjusts specific features of the hypothalamic light response, indicating that the geniculohypothalamic pathway is primarily activated by crossed retinal inputs. Our data provide a mechanism by which geniculohypothalamic signals can adjust the magnitude of circadian and more acute hypothalamic light responses according to time-of-day and establish an important new model for future investigations of the circadian visual system. Sensory input to the master mammalian circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), is vital in allowing animals to optimize physiology and behaviour alongside daily changes in the environment. Retinal inputs encoding changes in external illumination provide the principle source of such information. The SCN also receives input from other retinorecipient brain regions, primarily via the geniculohypothalamic tract (GHT), although the contribution of these indirect projections to circadian photoreception is currently poorly understood. To address this deficit, in the present study, we established an in vitro mouse brain slice preparation that retains connectivity across the extended circadian system. Using multi-electrode recordings, we first confirm that this preparation retains intact optic projections to the SCN, thalamus and pretectum and a functional GHT. We next show that optogenetic

  17. Advanced information processing system: Input/output network management software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Gail; Alger, Linda; Kemp, Alexander

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the software requirements and specifications for the Input/Output Network Management Services for the Advanced Information Processing System. This introduction and overview section is provided to briefly outline the overall architecture and software requirements of the AIPS system before discussing the details of the design requirements and specifications of the AIPS I/O Network Management software. A brief overview of the AIPS architecture followed by a more detailed description of the network architecture.

  18. Providing driving rain data for hygrothermal calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Mikkel Kristian

    1996-01-01

    Due to a wish for driving rain data as input for hygrothermal calculations, this report deals with utilizing commonly applied empirical relations and standard meteorological data, in an attempt to provide realistic estimates rather than exact correlations.......Due to a wish for driving rain data as input for hygrothermal calculations, this report deals with utilizing commonly applied empirical relations and standard meteorological data, in an attempt to provide realistic estimates rather than exact correlations....

  19. Terrestrial litter inputs as determinants of food quality of organic matter in a forest stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.L. Meyer; C. Hax; J.B. Wallace; S.L. Eggert; J.R. Webster

    2000-01-01

    Inputs of leaf litter and other organic matter from the catchment exceed autochthonous production and provide an important food resource in most streams (WEBSTER & MEYER 1997, ANDERSON & SEDELL 1979). An experimental long-term exclusion of terrestrial litter inputs to a forested headwater stream (WALLACE et al. 1997) provided an opportunity to determine if the...

  20. Input data to run Landis-II

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The data are input data files to run the forest simulation model Landis-II for Isle Royale National Park. Files include: a) Initial_Comm, which includes the location...

  1. Input-output rearrangement of isolated converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mickey Pierre; Kovacevic, Milovan; Mønster, Jakob Døllner

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new way of rearranging the input and output of isolated converters. The new arrangement posses several advantages, as increased voltage range, higher power handling capabilities, reduced voltage stress and improved efficiency, for applications where galvanic isolation...

  2. Applied quantitative finance

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Cathy; Overbeck, Ludger

    2017-01-01

    This volume provides practical solutions and introduces recent theoretical developments in risk management, pricing of credit derivatives, quantification of volatility and copula modeling. This third edition is devoted to modern risk analysis based on quantitative methods and textual analytics to meet the current challenges in banking and finance. It includes 14 new contributions and presents a comprehensive, state-of-the-art treatment of cutting-edge methods and topics, such as collateralized debt obligations, the high-frequency analysis of market liquidity, and realized volatility. The book is divided into three parts: Part 1 revisits important market risk issues, while Part 2 introduces novel concepts in credit risk and its management along with updated quantitative methods. The third part discusses the dynamics of risk management and includes risk analysis of energy markets and for cryptocurrencies. Digital assets, such as blockchain-based currencies, have become popular b ut are theoretically challenging...

  3. Ecological network analysis of an urban metabolic system based on input-output tables: model development and case study for Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Hongmei; Fath, Brian D; Liu, Hong; Yang, Zhifeng; Liu, Gengyuan; Su, Meirong

    2014-01-15

    If cities are considered as "superorganisms", then disorders of their metabolic processes cause something analogous to an "urban disease". It is therefore helpful to identify the causes of such disorders by analyzing the inner mechanisms that control urban metabolic processes. Combining input-output analysis with ecological network analysis lets researchers study the functional relationships and hierarchy of the urban metabolic processes, thereby providing direct support for the analysis of urban disease. In this paper, using Beijing as an example, we develop a model of an urban metabolic system that accounts for the intensity of the embodied ecological elements using monetary input-output tables from 1997, 2000, 2002, 2005, and 2007, and use this data to compile the corresponding physical input-output tables. This approach described the various flows of ecological elements through urban metabolic processes and let us build an ecological network model with 32 components. Then, using two methods from ecological network analysis (flow analysis and utility analysis), we quantitatively analyzed the physical input-output relationships among urban components, determined the ecological hierarchy of the components of the metabolic system, and determined the distribution of advantage-dominated and disadvantage-dominated relationships, thereby providing scientific support to guide restructuring of the urban metabolic system in an effort to prevent or cure urban "diseases". © 2013.

  4. Energy Input Flux in the Global Quiet-Sun Corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Cormack, Cecilia; Vásquez, Alberto M.; López Fuentes, Marcelo; Nuevo, Federico A. [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE), CONICET-UBA, CC 67—Suc 28, (C1428ZAA) Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Landi, Enrico; Frazin, Richard A. [Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering (CLaSP), University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States)

    2017-07-01

    We present first results of a novel technique that provides, for the first time, constraints on the energy input flux at the coronal base ( r ∼ 1.025 R {sub ⊙}) of the quiet Sun at a global scale. By combining differential emission measure tomography of EUV images, with global models of the coronal magnetic field, we estimate the energy input flux at the coronal base that is required to maintain thermodynamically stable structures. The technique is described in detail and first applied to data provided by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager instrument, on board the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory mission, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument, on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, for two solar rotations with different levels of activity. Our analysis indicates that the typical energy input flux at the coronal base of magnetic loops in the quiet Sun is in the range ∼0.5–2.0 × 10{sup 5} (erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}), depending on the structure size and level of activity. A large fraction of this energy input, or even its totality, could be accounted for by Alfvén waves, as shown by recent independent observational estimates derived from determinations of the non-thermal broadening of spectral lines in the coronal base of quiet-Sun regions. This new tomography product will be useful for the validation of coronal heating models in magnetohydrodinamic simulations of the global corona.

  5. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources: a nominal 300 Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28 Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt (kW) discharge power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300 to 500 Volts (V) to the thruster. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall effect thruster. The performance of the unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97%. The unit was also tested with a 12.5kW Hall effect thruster to verify compatibility and output filter specifications. With space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power devices, this would provide a design solution to address the need for high power electric propulsion systems.

  6. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources - a nominal 300-Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28-Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power supplies that provide power to the thruster auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300-Volts to 500-Volts to the thruster discharge supply. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall Effect Thruster. The performance of unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate the exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97. With a space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power device, this design could evolve into a flight design for future missions that require high power electric propulsion systems.

  7. Compact, common path quantitative phase microscopic techniques ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-05

    Jan 5, 2014 ... Quantitative phase contrast techniques, which directly provide informa- tion about the phase of the object wavefront, can be used to quantitatively image the object under investigation. Typically, interferometric techniques are used for quantitative phase imaging. 2. Digital holographic microscopy. Holograms ...

  8. HCG blood test - quantitative

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood test - quantitative; Beta-HCG blood test - quantitative; Pregnancy test - blood - quantitative ... of a screening test for Down syndrome. This test is also done to diagnose abnormal conditions not related to pregnancy that can raise HCG level.

  9. Measuring input synchrony in the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck neuronal model through input parameter estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsou, Achilleas; Kanev, Jacob; Christodoulou, Chris

    2013-11-06

    We present a method of estimating the input parameters and through them, the input synchrony, of a stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire neuronal model based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process when it is driven by time-dependent sinusoidal input signal and noise. By driving the neuron using sinusoidal inputs, we simulate the effects of periodic synchrony on the membrane voltage and the firing of the neuron, where the peaks of the sine wave represent volleys of synchronised input spikes. Our estimation methods allow us to measure the degree of synchrony driving the neuron in terms of the input sine wave parameters, using the output spikes of the model and the membrane potential. In particular, by estimating the frequency of the synchronous input volleys and averaging the estimates of the level of input activity at corresponding intervals of the input signal, we obtain fairly accurate estimates of the baseline and peak activity of the input, which in turn define the degrees of synchrony. The same procedure is also successfully applied in estimating the baseline and peak activity of the noise. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neural Coding 2012. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploring narratives of psychological input in the acute inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghay-Spire, Eloise G; McGowan, John; Griffiths, Kim; Barazzone, Natalie

    2016-12-01

    This research explored what happens when psychological input is offered in the inpatient setting and examined service users' and staff members' understanding and portrayal of these experiences. Narrative analysis, an interview design, was used to examine experiences of inpatient psychological interventions in National Health Service inpatient mental health settings. Ten participants (four service users and six staff members; five males and five females; seven White British, one White Irish, one Black African, and one Black Caribbean) were recruited via clinical psychologists from an inpatient psychology department and participated in 18- to 90-min interviews. Evidence suggested that direct, indirect, and strategic psychological interventions were used in the inpatient setting, with formulation and the therapeutic relationship conceptualized as common features. Connections between inpatient psychology and change, evidenced in the stories, suggested that interventions can help people make sense of a crisis, improve relationships, and contribute to meaningful recovery. Evidence of barriers suggests that psychological input in this setting might not always be compatible with everyone's needs. This paper explored service users' and staff members' experiences of psychological input in the inpatient setting. The analysis revealed that psychological provision in the inpatient mental health setting is varied and encompasses direct and indirect input, valued by service users and clinicians. It also identified that psychological input in the acute inpatient mental health setting is perceived as meaningful and can lead to changes at an interpersonal and intrapersonal level. There is a sense that providing psychological thinking in the inpatient setting can be challenging due to environmental constraints and individual factors. This highlights the need for further research focused on the costs and clinical effectiveness of providing psychological thinking within the acute

  11. Providing disabled persons in developing countries access to computer games through a novel gaming input device

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, Andrew C

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available with the assistance of residents of a home for intellectually and physically handicapped adults (2). Four persons were identified as testees; all over 50 years of age and having had no prior computer exposure. The testees? intellectual ages at the time of testing... application, have been done with able-bodied children (4). Informal tests with disabled children, using the same BodyPingPong gaming application, have shown promising results. Current testing was executed with the aid of mentally handicapped adults...

  12. Replacing Voice Input with Technology that Provided Immediate Visual and Audio Feedback to Reduce Employee Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goomas, David T.

    2010-01-01

    In this report from the field at two auto parts distribution centers, order selectors picked auto accessories (e.g., fuses, oil caps, tool kits) into industrial plastic totes as part of store orders. Accurately identifying all store order totes via the license plate number was a prerequisite for the warehouse management system (WMS) to track each…

  13. 76 FR 11980 - Stakeholder Input: Listening Session to Provide Information and Solicit Suggestions for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... aquatic environments through the discharge of encrusting organisms from boat hulls, boat trailers, fishing..., enhanced turbidity, and introduce pathogenic organisms to the surrounding water. Coatings used to deter organism growth on vessel hulls can release heavy metals and/or other biocides, which can lead to acute or...

  14. Inferring nonlinear neuronal computation based on physiologically plausible inputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M McFarland

    Full Text Available The computation represented by a sensory neuron's response to stimuli is constructed from an array of physiological processes both belonging to that neuron and inherited from its inputs. Although many of these physiological processes are known to be nonlinear, linear approximations are commonly used to describe the stimulus selectivity of sensory neurons (i.e., linear receptive fields. Here we present an approach for modeling sensory processing, termed the Nonlinear Input Model (NIM, which is based on the hypothesis that the dominant nonlinearities imposed by physiological mechanisms arise from rectification of a neuron's inputs. Incorporating such 'upstream nonlinearities' within the standard linear-nonlinear (LN cascade modeling structure implicitly allows for the identification of multiple stimulus features driving a neuron's response, which become directly interpretable as either excitatory or inhibitory. Because its form is analogous to an integrate-and-fire neuron receiving excitatory and inhibitory inputs, model fitting can be guided by prior knowledge about the inputs to a given neuron, and elements of the resulting model can often result in specific physiological predictions. Furthermore, by providing an explicit probabilistic model with a relatively simple nonlinear structure, its parameters can be efficiently optimized and appropriately regularized. Parameter estimation is robust and efficient even with large numbers of model components and in the context of high-dimensional stimuli with complex statistical structure (e.g. natural stimuli. We describe detailed methods for estimating the model parameters, and illustrate the advantages of the NIM using a range of example sensory neurons in the visual and auditory systems. We thus present a modeling framework that can capture a broad range of nonlinear response functions while providing physiologically interpretable descriptions of neural computation.

  15. Reading input flooding versus listening input flooding: Can they boost speaking skill?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashtchi Mojgan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study compared the effects of reading input flooding and listening input flooding techniques on the accuracy and complexity of Iranian EFL learners’ speaking skill. Participants were 66 homogeneous intermediate EFL learners who were randomly divided into three groups of 22: Reading input flooding group, listening input flooding group, and control group. The reading flooded input group was exposed to the numerous examples of the target structures through reading. In the same phase, the listening group was given relatively the same task, through listening. The participants’ monologues in the posttest were separately recorded, and later transcribed and coded in terms of accuracy and complexity through Bygate’s (2001 standard coding system. The results of ANCOVA indicated the outperformance of reading input flooding group. The study also supported the trade-off effects (Skehan, 1998, 2009 between accuracy and complexity.

  16. The human motor neuron pools receive a dominant slow‐varying common synaptic input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro, Francesco; Yavuz, Utku Şükrü

    2016-01-01

    Key points Motor neurons in a pool receive both common and independent synaptic inputs, although the proportion and role of their common synaptic input is debated.Classic correlation techniques between motor unit spike trains do not measure the absolute proportion of common input and have limitations as a result of the non‐linearity of motor neurons.We propose a method that for the first time allows an accurate quantification of the absolute proportion of low frequency common synaptic input (60%) of common input, irrespective of their different functional and control properties.These results increase our knowledge about the role of common and independent input to motor neurons in force control. Abstract Motor neurons receive both common and independent synaptic inputs. This observation is classically based on the presence of a significant correlation between pairs of motor unit spike trains. The functional significance of different relative proportions of common input across muscles, individuals and conditions is still debated. One of the limitations in our understanding of correlated input to motor neurons is that it has not been possible so far to quantify the absolute proportion of common input with respect to the total synaptic input received by the motor neurons. Indeed, correlation measures of pairs of output spike trains only allow for relative comparisons. In the present study, we report for the first time an approach for measuring the proportion of common input in the low frequency bandwidth (60%) proportion of common low frequency oscillations with respect to their total synaptic input. These results suggest that the central nervous system provides a large amount of common input to motor neuron pools, in a similar way to that for muscles with different functional and control properties. PMID:27151459

  17. Thermal Calculations Of Input Coupler For Erl Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Sobenin, N P; Bogdanovich, B Yu; Kaminsky, V I; Krasnov, A A; Lalayan, M V; Veshcherevich, V G; Zavadtsev, A A; Zavadtsev, D A

    2004-01-01

    The thermal calculation results of input coupler for ERL injector cavities are presented [1]. A twin coaxial coupler of TTF-3 type was chosen for 2×75 kW RF power transfer. TTF-3 coupler was intended for high pulse and not high average power transmission, so there were revisings proposed in its design. New coupler configuration provides thermal leakage not more than 0.2 W at temperature 2.0K, 2 W at the temperature 4,0K and 50 W at temperature 80K. Construction revising was made at "cold" and "warm" bellows. In particularly, bellows separating was proposed to install additional heat sink. Coupler configuration with "warm" window of choke type was examined. It provides mechanical uncoupling of input waveguide and ceramic insulator. Electrodynamics simulations were carried out by MicroWaveStudio and HFSS codes, thermal analysis was maid using ANSYS.

  18. Shaped input distributions for structural damage localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulriksen, Martin Dalgaard; Bernal, Dionisio; Damkilde, Lars

    2017-01-01

    localization method is cast, which operates on the premise of shaping inputs—whose spatial distribution is fixed—by use of a theoretical model such that these inputs, in one structural subdomain at the time, suppress certain steady-state vibration quantities (depending on the type of damage one seeks...... to interrogate for). Accordingly, damage is localized when the vibration signature induced by the shaped inputs in the damaged state corresponds to that in the reference state, hereby implying that the approach does not point directly to damage. Instead, it operates with interrogation based on postulated damage...... of two numerical examples, of which the first involves a chain-like system that is included to demonstrate some of the basic principles of the approach. The second example treats a truss structure model, which, besides the inputs to be shaped, is subjected to ambient excitation while the output...

  19. Harmonize input selection for sediment transport prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afan, Haitham Abdulmohsin; Keshtegar, Behrooz; Mohtar, Wan Hanna Melini Wan; El-Shafie, Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, three modeling approaches using a Neural Network (NN), Response Surface Method (RSM) and response surface method basis Global Harmony Search (GHS) are applied to predict the daily time series suspended sediment load. Generally, the input variables for forecasting the suspended sediment load are manually selected based on the maximum correlations of input variables in the modeling approaches based on NN and RSM. The RSM is improved to select the input variables by using the errors terms of training data based on the GHS, namely as response surface method and global harmony search (RSM-GHS) modeling method. The second-order polynomial function with cross terms is applied to calibrate the time series suspended sediment load with three, four and five input variables in the proposed RSM-GHS. The linear, square and cross corrections of twenty input variables of antecedent values of suspended sediment load and water discharge are investigated to achieve the best predictions of the RSM based on the GHS method. The performances of the NN, RSM and proposed RSM-GHS including both accuracy and simplicity are compared through several comparative predicted and error statistics. The results illustrated that the proposed RSM-GHS is as uncomplicated as the RSM but performed better, where fewer errors and better correlation was observed (R = 0.95, MAE = 18.09 (ton/day), RMSE = 25.16 (ton/day)) compared to the ANN (R = 0.91, MAE = 20.17 (ton/day), RMSE = 33.09 (ton/day)) and RSM (R = 0.91, MAE = 20.06 (ton/day), RMSE = 31.92 (ton/day)) for all types of input variables.

  20. On a multi-channel stochastic network with controlled input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livinska, Hanna; Lebedev, Eugene

    2017-06-01

    In this paper stationary properties of queueing network of the type [M|M|∞]r are investigated provided that the input flow is controlled by a Markov chain. We consider two cases. In the one-dimensional case a generating function of the stationary distribution is obtained. The form of the generating function is a matrix version of the well-known Takasc formula. For a multivariate service process the condition of a stationary regime existence and a correlation matrix are found.

  1. An Interface Theory for Input/Output Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Nyman, Ulrik; Wasowski, Andrzej

    Building on the theory of interface automata by de~Alfaro and Henzinger we design an interface language for Lynch's Input/Output Automata, a popular formalism used in the development of distributed asynchronous systems, not addressed by previous interface research. We introduce an explicit....... We also present a method for solving systems of relativized behavioral inequalities as used in our setup and draw a formal correspondence between our work and interface automata. Proofs are provided in an appendix....

  2. A parallel input composite transimpedance amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. J.; Kim, C.

    2018-01-01

    A new approach to high performance current to voltage preamplifier design is presented. The design using multiple operational amplifiers (op-amps) has a parasitic capacitance compensation network and a composite amplifier topology for fast, precision, and low noise performance. The input stage consisting of a parallel linked JFET op-amps and a high-speed bipolar junction transistor (BJT) gain stage driving the output in the composite amplifier topology, cooperating with the capacitance compensation feedback network, ensures wide bandwidth stability in the presence of input capacitance above 40 nF. The design is ideal for any two-probe measurement, including high impedance transport and scanning tunneling microscopy measurements.

  3. Do efficiency scores depend on input mix?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Mette; Hougaard, Jens Leth; Kronborg, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we examine the possibility of using the standard Kruskal-Wallis (KW) rank test in order to evaluate whether the distribution of efficiency scores resulting from Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) is independent of the input (or output) mix of the observations. Since the DEA frontier...... is estimated, many standard assumptions for evaluating the KW test statistic are violated. Therefore, we propose to explore its statistical properties by the use of simulation studies. The simulations are performed conditional on the observed input mixes. The method, unlike existing approaches...

  4. Load Estimation from Natural input Modal Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aenlle, Manuel López; Brincker, Rune; Canteli, Alfonso Fernández

    2005-01-01

    One application of Natural Input Modal Analysis consists in estimating the unknown load acting on structures such as wind loads, wave loads, traffic loads, etc. In this paper, a procedure to determine loading from a truncated modal model, as well as the results of an experimental testing programme...... estimation. In the experimental program a small structure subjected to vibration was used to estimate the loading from the measurements and the experimental modal space. The modal parameters were estimated by Natural Input Modal Analysis and the scaling factors of the mode shapes obtained by the mass change...

  5. Nuclear reaction inputs based on effective interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilaire, S.; Peru, S.; Dubray, N.; Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Goriely, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, CP-226, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-11-15

    Extensive nuclear structure studies have been performed for decades using effective interactions as sole input. They have shown a remarkable ability to describe rather accurately many types of nuclear properties. In the early 2000 s, a major effort has been engaged to produce nuclear reaction input data out of the Gogny interaction, in order to challenge its quality also with respect to nuclear reaction observables. The status of this project, well advanced today thanks to the use of modern computers as well as modern nuclear reaction codes, is reviewed and future developments are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Three-input majority logic gate and multiple input logic circuit based on DNA strand displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yang, Yang; Yan, Hao; Liu, Yan

    2013-06-12

    In biomolecular programming, the properties of biomolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids are harnessed for computational purposes. The field has gained considerable attention due to the possibility of exploiting the massive parallelism that is inherent in natural systems to solve computational problems. DNA has already been used to build complex molecular circuits, where the basic building blocks are logic gates that produce single outputs from one or more logical inputs. We designed and experimentally realized a three-input majority gate based on DNA strand displacement. One of the key features of a three-input majority gate is that the three inputs have equal priority, and the output will be true if any of the two inputs are true. Our design consists of a central, circular DNA strand with three unique domains between which are identical joint sequences. Before inputs are introduced to the system, each domain and half of each joint is protected by one complementary ssDNA that displays a toehold for subsequent displacement by the corresponding input. With this design the relationship between any two domains is analogous to the relationship between inputs in a majority gate. Displacing two or more of the protection strands will expose at least one complete joint and return a true output; displacing none or only one of the protection strands will not expose a complete joint and will return a false output. Further, we designed and realized a complex five-input logic gate based on the majority gate described here. By controlling two of the five inputs the complex gate can realize every combination of OR and AND gates of the other three inputs.

  7. Quantitative Decision Support Requires Quantitative User Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Is it conceivable that models run on 2007 computer hardware could provide robust and credible probabilistic information for decision support and user guidance at the ZIP code level for sub-daily meteorological events in 2060? In 2090? Retrospectively, how informative would output from today’s models have proven in 2003? or the 1930’s? Consultancies in the United Kingdom, including the Met Office, are offering services to “future-proof” their customers from climate change. How is a US or European based user or policy maker to determine the extent to which exciting new Bayesian methods are relevant here? or when a commercial supplier is vastly overselling the insights of today’s climate science? How are policy makers and academic economists to make the closely related decisions facing them? How can we communicate deep uncertainty in the future at small length-scales without undermining the firm foundation established by climate science regarding global trends? Three distinct aspects of the communication of the uses of climate model output targeting users and policy makers, as well as other specialist adaptation scientists, are discussed. First, a brief scientific evaluation of the length and time scales at which climate model output is likely to become uninformative is provided, including a note on the applicability the latest Bayesian methodology to current state-of-the-art general circulation models output. Second, a critical evaluation of the language often employed in communication of climate model output, a language which accurately states that models are “better”, have “improved” and now “include” and “simulate” relevant meteorological processed, without clearly identifying where the current information is thought to be uninformative and misleads, both for the current climate and as a function of the state of the (each) climate simulation. And thirdly, a general approach for evaluating the relevance of quantitative climate model output

  8. Afferent Inputs to Neurotransmitter-Defined Cell Types in the Ventral Tegmental Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Faget

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ventral tegmental area (VTA plays a central role in the neural circuit control of behavioral reinforcement. Though considered a dopaminergic nucleus, the VTA contains substantial heterogeneity in neurotransmitter type, containing also GABA and glutamate neurons. Here, we used a combinatorial viral approach to transsynaptically label afferents to defined VTA dopamine, GABA, or glutamate neurons. Surprisingly, we find that these populations received qualitatively similar inputs, with dominant and comparable projections from the lateral hypothalamus, raphe, and ventral pallidum. However, notable differences were observed, with striatal regions and globus pallidus providing a greater share of input to VTA dopamine neurons, cortical input preferentially on to glutamate neurons, and GABA neurons receiving proportionally more input from the lateral habenula and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus. By comparing inputs to each of the transmitter-defined VTA cell types, this study sheds important light on the systems-level organization of diverse inputs to VTA.

  9. Organization of Monosynaptic Inputs to the Serotonin and Dopamine Neuromodulatory Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachie K. Ogawa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin and dopamine are major neuromodulators. Here, we used a modified rabies virus to identify monosynaptic inputs to serotonin neurons in the dorsal and median raphe (DR and MR. We found that inputs to DR and MR serotonin neurons are spatially shifted in the forebrain, and MR serotonin neurons receive inputs from more medial structures. Then, we compared these data with inputs to dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc. We found that DR serotonin neurons receive inputs from a remarkably similar set of areas as VTA dopamine neurons apart from the striatum, which preferentially targets dopamine neurons. Our results suggest three major input streams: a medial stream regulates MR serotonin neurons, an intermediate stream regulates DR serotonin and VTA dopamine neurons, and a lateral stream regulates SNc dopamine neurons. These results provide fundamental organizational principles of afferent control for serotonin and dopamine.

  10. Input and state estimation for linear systems with a rank-deficient direct feedthrough matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haokun; Zhao, Jun; Xu, Zuhua; Shao, Zhijiang

    2015-07-01

    The problem of joint input and state estimation for linear stochastic systems with a rank-deficient direct feedthrough matrix is discussed in this paper. Results from previous studies only solve the state estimation problem; globally optimal estimation of the unknown input is not provided. Based on linear minimum-variance unbiased estimation, a five-step recursive filter with global optimality is proposed to estimate both the unknown input and the state. The relationship between the proposed filter and the existing results is addressed. We show that the unbiased input estimation does not require any new information or additional constraints. Both the state and the unknown input can be estimated under the same unbiasedness condition. Global optimalities of both the state estimator and the unknown input estimator are proven in the minimum-variance unbiased sense. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. CBM First-level Event Selector Input Interface Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Dirk; de Cuveland, Jan; Lindenstruth, Volker

    2017-10-01

    CBM is a heavy-ion experiment at the future FAIR facility in Darmstadt, Germany. Featuring self-triggered front-end electronics and free-streaming read-out, event selection will exclusively be done by the First Level Event Selector (FLES). Designed as an HPC cluster with several hundred nodes its task is an online analysis and selection of the physics data at a total input data rate exceeding 1 TByte/s. To allow efficient event selection, the FLES performs timeslice building, which combines the data from all given input links to self-contained, potentially overlapping processing intervals and distributes them to compute nodes. Partitioning the input data streams into specialized containers allows performing this task very efficiently. The FLES Input Interface defines the linkage between the FEE and the FLES data transport framework. A custom FPGA PCIe board, the FLES Interface Board (FLIB), is used to receive data via optical links and transfer them via DMA to the host’s memory. The current prototype of the FLIB features a Kintex-7 FPGA and provides up to eight 10 GBit/s optical links. A custom FPGA design has been developed for this board. DMA transfers and data structures are optimized for subsequent timeslice building. Index tables generated by the FPGA enable fast random access to the written data containers. In addition the DMA target buffers can directly serve as InfiniBand RDMA source buffers without copying the data. The usage of POSIX shared memory for these buffers allows data access from multiple processes. An accompanying HDL module has been developed to integrate the FLES link into the front-end FPGA designs. It implements the front-end logic interface as well as the link protocol. Prototypes of all Input Interface components have been implemented and integrated into the FLES test framework. This allows the implementation and evaluation of the foreseen CBM read-out chain.

  12. Drawings as Input for Handheld Game Computers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, Mannes; Zwiers, Jakob; Nijholt, Antinus; de Jong, R.; Krooman, E.; Maybury, Mark; Stock, Oliveiro; Wahlster, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    The Nintendo DS (TM) is a hand held game computer that includes a small sketch pad as one of it input modalities. We discuss the possibilities for recognition of simple line drawing on this device, with focus of attention on robustness and real-time behavior. The results of our experiments show that

  13. Hydrogen Generation Rate Model Calculation Input Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KUFAHL, M.A.

    2000-04-27

    This report documents the procedures and techniques utilized in the collection and analysis of analyte input data values in support of the flammable gas hazard safety analyses. This document represents the analyses of data current at the time of its writing and does not account for data available since then.

  14. Representations of space based on haptic input

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidhoek, S.

    2005-01-01

    The present thesis focused on the representations of grasping space based on haptic input. We aimed at identifying their characteristics, and the underlying neurocognitive processes and mechanisms. To this end, we studied the systematic distortions in performance on several orientation perception

  15. Input and Intake in Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Ann C.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation presents an approach for a productive way forward in the study of language acquisition, sealing the rift between claims of an innate linguistic hypothesis space and powerful domain general statistical inference. This approach breaks language acquisition into its component parts, distinguishing the input in the environment from…

  16. Programmable Input for Nanomagnetic Logic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt-Landsiedel D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A programmable magnetic input, based on the magnetic interaction of a soft and hard magnetic layer is presented for the first time. Therefore, a single-domain Co/Pt nanomagnet is placed on top of one end of a permalloy bar, separated by a thin dielectric layer. The permalloy bar of the introduced input structure is magnetized by weak easy-axis in-plane fields. Acting like a ’magnetic amplifier’, the generated fringing fields of the permalloy pole are strong enough to control the magnetization of the superimposed Co/Pt nanomagnets, which have high crystalline perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. This magnetostatic interaction results in a shift of the hysteresis curve of the Co/Pt nanomagnet, measured by magneto-optical Kerr microscopy. The Co/Pt nanomagnet is fixed by the fringing field of the permalloy and thereby not affected by the magnetic power clock of the Nanomagnetic Logic system. MFM measurements verify the functionality of the programmable magnetic input structure. The fringing fields are extracted from micromagnetic simulations and are in good agreement with experimental results. The introduced input structure enables switching the logic functionality of the majority gate from NAND to NOR during runtime, offering programmable Nanomagnetic Logic.

  17. Facilitating agricultural input distribution in Uganda - Experiences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    2004 National Agricultural Research Organisation. Facilitating agricultural input distribution in ... guarantee fund, a retail oriented business training, farmer training, promotion, and efforts to develop the rural markets. Such interventions help .... Working in solidarity groups benefits the rural retailers in that they have stronger ...

  18. Evaluation of 2D and 3D glove input applied to medical image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zudilova-Seinstra, E.V.; de Koning, P.J.H.; Suinesiaputra, A.; van Schooten, B.W.; van der Geest, R.J.; Reiber, J.H.C.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a series of experiments that compared 2D/3D input methods for selection and positioning tasks related to medical image analysis. For our study, we chose a switchable P5 Glove Controller, which can be used to provide both 2DOF and 6DOF input control. Our results suggest that for both

  19. Exploring 2D/3D input techniques for medical image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zudilova-Seinstra, E.V.; Sloot, P.M.A.; de Koning, P.J.H.; Suinesiaputra, A.; van der Geest, R.J.; Reiber, J.H.C.; Banissi, E.; Sarfraz, M.; Khosrowshahi, F.; Counsell, J.; Laing, R.; Moore, C.; Cowell, A.J.; Hou, M.; Tian, G.Y.; Dastbaz, M.; Bannatyne, M.; Zhang, J.J.; Scarano, V.; De Chiara, R.; Erra, U.; Ursyn, A.; Levkowitz, H.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a series of experiments that compared the 2D and 3D input methods for selection and positioning tasks related to medical image analysis. For this study, we chose a switchable P5 glove controller, which can be used to provide both 2DOF and 6DOF input control. Our results suggest that for

  20. Evaluation of 2D and 3D glove input applied to medical image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zudilova-Seinstra, E.V.; de Koning, P.J.H.; Suinesiaputra, A.; van Schooten, B.W.; van der Geest, R.J.; Reiber, J.H.C.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    We describe a series of experiments that compared 2D/3D input methods for selection and positioning tasks related to medical image analysis. For our study, we chose a switchable P5 Glove Controller, which can be used to provide both 2DOF and 6DOF input control. Our results suggest that for both

  1. Comment on "Carbon-negative biofuels from low-input high-diversity grassland biomass".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russelle, Michael P; Morey, R Vance; Baker, John M; Porter, Paul M; Jung, Hans-Joachim G

    2007-06-15

    Tilman et al. (Reports, 8 December 2006, p. 1598) argued that low-input high-diversity grasslands can provide a substantial proportion of global energy needs. We contend that their conclusions are not substantiated by their experimental protocol. The authors understated the management inputs required to establish prairies, extrapolated globally from site-specific results, and presented potentially misleading energy accounting.

  2. NIH Seeks Input on Prioritizing Renewable Affinity Reagents | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is seeking community input on a priority list for renewable affinity reagents for human transcription factors. For more information or to provide input, please visit, http://commonfund.nih.gov/proteincapture/reagents/index.aspx.

  3. Leaders’ receptivity to subordinates’ creative input: the role of achievement goals and composition of creative input

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbom, R.B.L.; Janssen, O.; van Yperen, N.W.

    2015-01-01

    We identified leaders’ achievement goals and composition of creative input as important factors that can clarify when and why leaders are receptive to, and supportive of, subordinates’ creative input. As hypothesized, in two experimental studies, we found that relative to mastery goal leaders,

  4. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  5. Input-form data for the U.S. Geological Survey assessment of the Mississippian Barnett Shale of the Bend Arch–Fort Worth Basin Province, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Kristen R.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Lewan, Michael D.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Klett, Timothy R.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Le, Phuong A.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Pitman, Janet K.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2016-07-15

    In 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) released an updated assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable shale gas and shale oil resources of the Mississippian Barnett Shale in north-central Texas (Marra and others, 2015). The Barnett Shale was assessed using the standard continuous (unconventional) methodology established by the USGS for two assessment units (AUs): (1) Barnett Continuous Gas AU, and (2) Barnett Mixed Continuous Gas and Oil AU. A third assessment unit, the Western Barnett Continuous Oil AU, was also defined but was not quantitatively assessed because of limited data within the extent of the AU. The purpose of this report is to provide supplemental documentation of the quantitative input parameters applied in the Barnett Shale assessment.

  6. The input-output relationship approach to structural identifiability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearup, Daniel J; Evans, Neil D; Chappell, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    Analysis of the identifiability of a given model system is an essential prerequisite to the determination of model parameters from physical data. However, the tools available for the analysis of non-linear systems can be limited both in applicability and by computational intractability for any but the simplest of models. The input-output relation of a model summarises the input-output structure of the whole system and as such provides the potential for an alternative approach to this analysis. However for this approach to be valid it is necessary to determine whether the monomials of a differential polynomial are linearly independent. A simple test for this property is presented in this work. The derivation and analysis of this relation can be implemented symbolically within Maple. These techniques are applied to analyse classical models from biomedical systems modelling and those of enzyme catalysed reaction schemes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reconstruction of Input Excitation Acting on Vibration Isolation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration isolation systems are widely employed in automotive, marine, aerospace, and other engineering fields. Accurate input forces are of great significance for mechanical design, vibration prediction, and structure modification and optimization. One-stage vibration isolation system including engine, vibration isolators, and flexible supporting structure is modeled theoretically in this paper. Input excitation acting on the vibration isolation system is reconstructed using dynamic responses measured on engine and supporting structure under in-suit condition. The reconstructed forces reveal that dynamic responses on rigid body are likely to provide more accurate estimation results. Moreover, in order to improve the accuracy of excitation reconstructed by dynamic responses on flexible supporting structure, auto/cross-power spectral density function is utilized to reduce measurement noise.

  8. Contributing Input-Output Tables to the GTAP Data Base

    OpenAIRE

    Huff, Karen; McDougall, Robert; Walmsley, Terrie L.

    2000-01-01

    This document is written for those who wish to contribute to the GTAP data base, whether by providing an input-output table for a country not separately represented in the data base, or by updating the table for a region that is already represented. It provides specifications and advice on the structure of the table, sectoral classification, treatment of imports, and other key points. It also describes what we at the Center for Global Trade Analysis do once we receive your table. This vers...

  9. Robustness of Input features from Noisy Silhouettes in Human Pose Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Wenjuan; Fihl, Preben; Gonzàlez, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    . In this paper, we explore this problem. First, We compare performances of several image features widely used for human pose estimation and explore their performances against each other and select one with best performance. Second, iterative closest point algorithm is introduced for a new quantitative...... measurement of noisy inputs. The proposed measurement is able to automatically discard noise, like camouflage from the background or shadows. With the proposed measurement, we split inputs into different noise levels and assess their pose estimation accuracies. Furthermore, we explore performances...

  10. Quantitative analysis of trade-offs and model input sensitivities in public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duintjer Tebbens, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    With the global eradication of poliomyelitis approaching, global and national policy makers need to develop policies for the post-eradication era. While the disappearance of the naturally circulating wild poliovirus will substantially decrease the risk of poliomyelitis disease, risks of

  11. Quantitative analysis of trade-offs and model input sensitivities in public health

    OpenAIRE

    Duintjer Tebbens, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    With the global eradication of poliomyelitis approaching, global and national policy makers need to develop policies for the post-eradication era. While the disappearance of the naturally circulating wild poliovirus will substantially decrease the risk of poliomyelitis disease, risks of reintroduction of the virus through circulation of vaccine-derived poliovirus, unintentional release from a vaccine manufacturing site or laboratory, and intentional virus release continue to exist. Therefore,...

  12. Identification of penile inputs to the rat gracile nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cothron, Kyle J; Massey, James M; Onifer, Stephen M; Hubscher, Charles H

    2008-03-01

    Neurons in the medullary reticular formation (MRF) of the rat receive a vast array of urogenital inputs. Using select acute and chronic spinal cord lesions to identify the location of the ascending neural circuitries providing either direct or indirect inputs to MRF from the penis, our previous studies demonstrated that the dorsal columns and dorsal half of the lateral funiculus convey low- and high-threshold inputs, respectively. In the present study, the gracile nucleus was targeted as one of the likely sources of low-threshold information from the penis to MRF. Both electrophysiological recordings and neuroanatomical tracing [injection of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) into a dorsal nerve of the penis] were used. After discrimination of a single neuron responding to penile stimulation, testing for somatovisceral convergence was done (mechanical stimulation of the distal colon and the skin over the entire hindquarters). In 12 rats, a limited number of neurons (43 in total) responded to penile stimulation. Many of these neurons also responded to scrotal stimulation (53.5%, dorsal and/or ventral scrotum) and/or prepuce stimulation (46.5%). Histological reconstruction of the electrode tracks showed that the majority of neurons responding to penile stimulation were located ventrally within the medial one-third of the gracile nucleus surrounding obex. This location corresponded to sparse innervation by CTB-immunoreactive primary afferent terminals. These results indicate that neurons in the gracile nucleus are likely part of the pathway that provides low-threshold penile inputs to MRF, a region known to play an important role in mating processes.

  13. Quantitative Robust Control Engineering: Theory and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data...the D tank as a dashed line [mg/l] and the control input IR(t) is shown as a solid line [ per unit of the influent flow rate] with the G22(z...1992). Discrete quantitative feedback technique, Capítulo 16 en el libro : Digital Control Systems: theory, hardware, software, 2ª edicion. McGraw

  14. Load Estimation from Natural input Modal Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Aenlle, Manuel López; Brincker, Rune; Canteli, Alfonso Fernández

    2005-01-01

    One application of Natural Input Modal Analysis consists in estimating the unknown load acting on structures such as wind loads, wave loads, traffic loads, etc. In this paper, a procedure to determine loading from a truncated modal model, as well as the results of an experimental testing programme, are presented. The method involves the inversion of the FRF matrix partly solving the numerical problems that appear because of the truncation of the modal space. However, the error in the load est...

  15. Input Impedance of the Microstrip SQUID Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinion, Darin; Clarke, John

    2008-03-01

    We present measurements of the complex scattering parameters of microstrip SQUID amplifiers (MSA) cooled to 4.2 K. The input of the MSA is a microstrip transmission line in the shape of a square spiral coil surrounding the hole in the SQUID washer that serves as the ground plane. The input impedance is found by measuring the reverse scattering parameter (S11) and is described well by a low-loss transmission line model. We map the low-loss transmission line model into an equivalent parallel RLC circuit in which a resistance R, inductance L, and capacitance C are calculated from the resonant frequency, characteristic impedance and attenuation factor. Using this equivalent RLC circuit, we model the MSA and input network with a lumped circuit model that accurately predicts the observed gain given by the forward scattering parameter (S21). We will summarize results for different coil geometries and terminations as well as SQUID bias conditions. A portion of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in part under Contract W-7405-Eng-48 and in part under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  16. Molecular structure input on the web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertl Peter

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A molecule editor, that is program for input and editing of molecules, is an indispensable part of every cheminformatics or molecular processing system. This review focuses on a special type of molecule editors, namely those that are used for molecule structure input on the web. Scientific computing is now moving more and more in the direction of web services and cloud computing, with servers scattered all around the Internet. Thus a web browser has become the universal scientific user interface, and a tool to edit molecules directly within the web browser is essential. The review covers a history of web-based structure input, starting with simple text entry boxes and early molecule editors based on clickable maps, before moving to the current situation dominated by Java applets. One typical example - the popular JME Molecule Editor - will be described in more detail. Modern Ajax server-side molecule editors are also presented. And finally, the possible future direction of web-based molecule editing, based on technologies like JavaScript and Flash, is discussed.

  17. Emowars: Interactive Game Input Menggunakan Ekspresi Wajah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andry Chowanda

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Research in the affective game has received attention from the research communities over this lustrum. As a crucial aspect of a game, emotions play an important role in user experience as well as to emphasize the user’s emotions state on game design. This will improve the user’s interactivity while they playing the game. This research aims to discuss and analyze whether emotions can replace traditional user game inputs (keyboard, mouse, and others. The methodology used in this research is divided into two main phases: game design and facial expression recognition. The results of this research indicate that users preferred to use a traditional input such as mouse. Moreover, user’s interactivities with game are still slightly low. However, this is a great opportunity for researchers in affective game with a more interactive game play as well as rich and complex story. Hopefully this will improve the user affective state and emotions in game. The results of this research imply that happy emotion obtains 78% of detection, meanwhile the anger emotion has the lowest detection of44.4%. Moreover, users prefer mouse and FER (face expression recognition as the best input for this game.

  18. Comparing Jupiter and Saturn: dimensionless input rates from plasma sources within the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Vasyliūnas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative significance for a planetary magnetosphere of plasma sources associated with a moon of the planet can be assessed only by expressing the plasma mass input rate in dimensionless form, as the ratio of the actual mass input to some reference value. Traditionally, the solar wind mass flux through an area equal to the cross-section of the magnetosphere has been used. Here I identify another reference value of mass input, independent of the solar wind and constructed from planetary parameters alone, which can be shown to represent a mass input sufficiently large to prevent corotation already at the source location. The source rate from Enceladus at Saturn has been reported to be an order of magnitude smaller (in absolute numbers than that from Io at Jupiter. Both reference values, however, are also smaller at Saturn than at Jupiter, by factors ~40 to 60; expressed in dimensionless form, the estimated mass input from Enceladus may be larger than that from Io by factors ~4 to 6. The magnetosphere of Saturn may thus, despite a lower mass input in kg s−1, intrinsically be more heavily mass-loaded than the magnetosphere of Jupiter.

  19. Comparing Jupiter and Saturn: dimensionless input rates from plasma sources within the magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Vasyliūnas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative significance for a planetary magnetosphere of plasma sources associated with a moon of the planet can be assessed only by expressing the plasma mass input rate in dimensionless form, as the ratio of the actual mass input to some reference value. Traditionally, the solar wind mass flux through an area equal to the cross-section of the magnetosphere has been used. Here I identify another reference value of mass input, independent of the solar wind and constructed from planetary parameters alone, which can be shown to represent a mass input sufficiently large to prevent corotation already at the source location. The source rate from Enceladus at Saturn has been reported to be an order of magnitude smaller (in absolute numbers than that from Io at Jupiter. Both reference values, however, are also smaller at Saturn than at Jupiter, by factors ~40 to 60; expressed in dimensionless form, the estimated mass input from Enceladus may be larger than that from Io by factors ~4 to 6. The magnetosphere of Saturn may thus, despite a lower mass input in kg s−1, intrinsically be more heavily mass-loaded than the magnetosphere of Jupiter.

  20. A Quantitative Version of a Theorem due to Borwein-Reich-Shafrir

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlenbach, Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    We give a quantitative analysis of a result due to Borwein, Reich and Shafrir on the asymptotic behaviour of the general Krasnoselski-Mann iteration for nonexpansive self-mappings of convex sets in arbitrary normed spaces. Besides providing explicit bounds we also get new qualitative results...... concerning the independence of the rate of asymptotic regularity of that iteration from various input data. In the special case of bounded convex sets, where by well-known results of Ishikawa, Edelstein/O'Brien and Goebel/Kirk the norm of the iteration converges to zero, we obtain uniform bounds which do...

  1. Can Simulation Credibility Be Improved Using Sensitivity Analysis to Understand Input Data Effects on Model Outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jerry G.; Young, M.; Goodenow, Debra A.; Keenan, A.; Walton, M.; Boley, L.

    2015-01-01

    Model and simulation (MS) credibility is defined as, the quality to elicit belief or trust in MS results. NASA-STD-7009 [1] delineates eight components (Verification, Validation, Input Pedigree, Results Uncertainty, Results Robustness, Use History, MS Management, People Qualifications) that address quantifying model credibility, and provides guidance to the model developers, analysts, and end users for assessing the MS credibility. Of the eight characteristics, input pedigree, or the quality of the data used to develop model input parameters, governing functions, or initial conditions, can vary significantly. These data quality differences have varying consequences across the range of MS application. NASA-STD-7009 requires that the lowest input data quality be used to represent the entire set of input data when scoring the input pedigree credibility of the model. This requirement provides a conservative assessment of model inputs, and maximizes the communication of the potential level of risk of using model outputs. Unfortunately, in practice, this may result in overly pessimistic communication of the MS output, undermining the credibility of simulation predictions to decision makers. This presentation proposes an alternative assessment mechanism, utilizing results parameter robustness, also known as model input sensitivity, to improve the credibility scoring process for specific simulations.

  2. Dopaminergic Input to the Inferior Colliculus in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A Nevue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of sensory neurons to stimuli can be modulated by a variety of factors including attention, emotion, behavioral context, and disorders involving neuromodulatory systems. For example, patients with Parkinson’s disease have disordered speech processing, suggesting that dopamine alters normal representation of these salient sounds. Understanding the mechanisms by which dopamine modulates auditory processing is thus an important goal. The principal auditory midbrain nucleus, the inferior colliculus (IC, is a likely location for dopaminergic modulation of auditory processing because it contains dopamine receptors and nerve terminals immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. However, the sources of dopaminergic input to the IC are unknown. In this study, we iontophoretically injected a retrograde tracer into the IC of mice and then stained the tissue for TH. We also immunostained for dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH, an enzyme critical for the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, to differentiate between dopaminergic and noradrenergic inputs. Retrogradely labeled neurons that were positive for TH were seen bilaterally, with strong ipsilateral dominance, in the subparafascicular thalamic nucleus (SPF. All retrogradely labeled neurons that we observed in other brain regions were TH-negative. Projections from the SPF were confirmed using an anterograde tracer, revealing TH-positive and DBH-negative anterogradely labeled fibers and terminals in the IC. While the functional role of this dopaminergic input to the IC is not yet known, it provides a potential mechanism for context dependent modulation of auditory processing.

  3. Environmental Transport Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Wasiolek

    2004-09-10

    This analysis report is one of the technical reports documenting the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the reports developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for the TSPA-LA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) (TWP). This figure provides an understanding of how this report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application (LA). This report is one of the five reports that develop input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the conceptual model and the mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters. The output of this report is used as direct input in the ''Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' and in the ''Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' that calculate the values of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios, respectively. The purpose of this analysis was to develop biosphere model parameter values related to radionuclide transport and accumulation in the environment. These parameters support calculations of radionuclide concentrations in the environmental media (e.g., soil, crops, animal products, and air) resulting from a given radionuclide concentration at the source of contamination (i.e., either in groundwater or in volcanic ash). The analysis

  4. Agricultural and Environmental Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaylie Rasmuson; Kurt Rautenstrauch

    2003-06-20

    This analysis is one of nine technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN) biosphere model. It documents input parameters for the biosphere model, and supports the use of the model to develop Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCF). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the repository at Yucca Mountain. The ERMYN provides the TSPA with the capability to perform dose assessments. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships between the major activities and their products (the analysis and model reports) that were planned in the biosphere Technical Work Plan (TWP, BSC 2003a). It should be noted that some documents identified in Figure 1-1 may be under development and therefore not available at the time this document is issued. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003b) describes the ERMYN and its input parameters. This analysis report, ANL-MGR-MD-000006, ''Agricultural and Environmental Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. This report defines and justifies values for twelve parameters required in the biosphere model. These parameters are related to use of contaminated groundwater to grow crops. The parameter values recommended in this report are used in the soil, plant, and carbon-14 submodels of the ERMYN.

  5. Quantitation of transgenic Bt event-176 maize using double quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction and capillary gel electrophoresis laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cañas, Virginia; Cifuentes, Alejandro; González, Ramón

    2004-04-15

    In this work, a new procedure useful to quantitatively analyze genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in foods is described and applied to analyze transgenic Bt Event-176 maize. The method developed consists of coamplifications of specific DNA maize sequences with internal standards using quantitative competitive PCR (QC-PCR). The QC-PCR products are quantitatively analyzed using a capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) with laser-induced fluorescence detection (LIF) method developed at our laboratory that utilizes a physically adsorbed coating. The CGE-LIF procedure allows the use of internal standards differing by only 10 bp from the original target fragments, to our knowledge, the smallest size difference that can be found in the bibliography for QC-PCR of GMOs. A spectrofluorometric procedure using ROX reference dye is proposed to solve calibration problems of input DNA concentration. It is demonstrated that the use of ROX drastically enhances the accuracy of the quantitative analysis by QC-PCR. Reproducibility of analysis times and corrected peak areas (measured as target/competitor PCR products ratio) for the CGE-LIF separations are determined to be better than 0.91 and 1.93% (RSD, n = 15) respectively, for three different days. It is shown that CGE-LIF provides better resolution and a signal/noise ratio improvement of approximately 700-fold compared to slab gel electrophoresis. The good possibilities in terms of quantitative analysis of GMOs provided by this new method are confirmed by determining the Bt Event-176 maize content in certified reference maize powder and food samples of known composition. This procedure opens the possibility for accurate quantitation of multiple GMOs in a single run.

  6. Undergraduate medical education programme renewal: a longitudinal context, input, process and product evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzazadeh, Azim; Gandomkar, Roghayeh; Hejri, Sara Mortaz; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Koochak, Hamid Emadi; Golestani, Abolfazl; Jafarian, Ali; Jalili, Mohammad; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Saleh, Narges; Shahi, Farhad; Razavi, Seyed Hasan Emami

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize the Context, Input, Process and Product (CIPP) evaluation model as a comprehensive framework to guide initiating, planning, implementing and evaluating a revised undergraduate medical education programme. The eight-year longitudinal evaluation study consisted of four phases compatible with the four components of the CIPP model. In the first phase, we explored the strengths and weaknesses of the traditional programme as well as contextual needs, assets, and resources. For the second phase, we proposed a model for the programme considering contextual features. During the process phase, we provided formative information for revisions and adjustments. Finally, in the fourth phase, we evaluated the outcomes of the new undergraduate medical education programme in the basic sciences phase. Information was collected from different sources such as medical students, faculty members, administrators, and graduates, using various qualitative and quantitative methods including focus groups, questionnaires, and performance measures. The CIPP model has the potential to guide policy makers to systematically collect evaluation data and to manage stakeholders' reactions at each stage of the reform in order to make informed decisions. However, the model may result in evaluation burden and fail to address some unplanned evaluation questions.

  7. Statistical prediction of energy input to buildings subjected to wind force

    OpenAIRE

    洪, 起; Koh, Ki

    2011-01-01

    It is necessary to access quantitatively the statistics of wind force to cotrol the damage of buildings due to wind force predicted in future. The purpose of this paper is to develop in the frequency domain a mathematical formula making the statistical prediction of energy input to buildings subjected to wind force, which will bocome the fundamental formula to establish the rational wind-resistance design method.

  8. Sensitivity Analysis of Selected DIVOPS Input Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-12-01

    v40. .............. o..... ....... H-3 viii CAA- TD -77-9 SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF SELECTED DIVOPS INPUT FACTORS CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION 1-1. BACKGROUND...freedom squares A 5 l,149 15,j74 7.93** S.33U, 1jj lb5,Ubb bl.17-* - 2 47,411 23,7U5 7.35**- L) Z 48,9b5 124,493 38.59** E b5b,423 1b7,711 79.2:*** F 2

  9. Input data to run Landis-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJager, Nathan R.

    2017-01-01

    The data are input data files to run the forest simulation model Landis-II for Isle Royale National Park. Files include: a) Initial_Comm, which includes the location of each mapcode, b) Cohort_ages, which includes the ages for each tree species-cohort within each mapcode, c) Ecoregions, which consist of different regions of soils and climate, d) Ecoregion_codes, which define the ecoregions, and e) Species_Params, which link the potential establishment and growth rates for each species with each ecoregion.

  10. ADAPTIVE SUBOPTIMAL CONTROL OF INPUT CONSTRAINED PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerii Azarskov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This paper deals with adaptive regulation of a discrete-time linear time-invariant plant witharbitrary bounded disturbances whose control input is constrained to lie within certain limits. The adaptivecontrol algorithm exploits the one-step-ahead control strategy and the gradient projection type estimationprocedure using the modified dead zone. The convergence property of the estimation algorithm is shown tobe ensured. The sufficient conditions guaranteeing the global asymptotical stability and simultaneously thesuboptimality of the closed-loop systems are derived. Numerical examples and simulations are presented tosupport the theoretical results.

  11. Flexible input, dazzling output with IBM i

    CERN Document Server

    Victória-Pereira, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Link your IBM i system to the modern business server world! This book presents easier and more flexible ways to get data into your IBM i system, along with rather surprising methods to export and present the vital business data it contains. You'll learn how to automate file transfers, seamlessly connect PC applications with your RPG programs, and much more. Input operations will become more flexible and user-proof, with self-correcting import processes and direct file transfers that require a minimum of user intervention. Also learn novel ways to present information: your DB2 data will look gr

  12. Agricultural management affects below ground carbon input estimations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirte, Juliane; Leifeld, Jens; Abiven, Samuel; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Mayer, Jochen

    2017-04-01

    and wheat were 1.4 and 0.7 tha 1, respectively, in DOK and 0.5 and 0.6 tha 1, respectively, in ZOFE. Both root biomass and C rhizodeposition were similar among treatments on both sites but were significantly higher for silage maize (DOK) than for grain maize (ZOFE) and winter wheat (DOK and ZOFE). (ii) With increasing fertilization intensities, below/above ground C ratios of both maize and wheat significantly decreased from 0.43 to 0.16 for maize and 0.57 to 0.15 for wheat. Vertical distribution of below ground C inputs into soil was not affected by agricultural management but differed significantly between crops: In the subsoil (0.5 - 0.75m), below ground C inputs of wheat were twice as high as those of maize on both sites. Increasing fertilization intensity leads to a considerable increase in above ground biomass but does not affect below ground C inputs of maize and wheat on two Swiss agricultural sites. This finding shows that below ground C inputs cannot be estimated from above ground biomass in order to provide soil C models with input data. A differentiation according to the management system is strongly needed.

  13. Faculty input in book selection: a comparison of alternative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J A; Bredderman, P J; Stangohr, M K; O'Brien, K F

    1987-07-01

    In an era of tight funding, academic medical center libraries need to determine their users' needs in order to provide cost-effective resource collections. Although faculty input is valuable, it is impractical to impose such ongoing responsibility on faculty members. This study tested an alternative method by comparing faculty preferences in discipline-specific subjects with faculty choices on corresponding discipline-specific, new-book approval slips from a vendor. Collection development librarian selections, based on formal selection criteria, were evaluated against both measures of faculty preferences. It was found that faculty members' subject ratings did not accurately predict their book choices. Implications of this and the other findings are discussed.

  14. Frequency and Spatial Shaping of Inputs for Multiaxis Shaker Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig C. Smith

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled amplitude and phase relationships between multiaxial shaker inputs (i.e., spatial shaping provides for more realistic simulation of a service environment than does conventional frequency shaping alone. Spatial shaping is described in terms of a basic mathematical model relating test article response (absolute and relative motions to excitation by the shaker. Advantages and objectives are viewed through spectral relationships. The objective of simulating dynamic responses as in service is shown to be the duplication of the resultant cross-modal response for all important modes, even if the sources of excitation in service are unknown.

  15. Framework for Modelling Multiple Input Complex Aggregations for Interactive Installations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padfield, Nicolas; Andreasen, Troels

    2012-01-01

    We describe a generalized framework as a method and design tool for creating interactive installations with a demand for exploratory meaning creation, not limited to the design stage, but extending into the stage where the installation meets participants and audience. The proposed solution is based...... on fuzzy logic and provides a method for variably balancing interaction and user input with the intention of the artist or director. An experimental design is presented, demonstrating an intuitive interface for parametric modelling of a complex aggregation function. The aggregation function unifies...

  16. A High Input Impedance Low Noise Integrated Front-End Amplifier for Neural Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhijun; Warr, Paul A

    2016-12-01

    Within neural monitoring systems, the front-end amplifier forms the critical element for signal detection and pre-processing, which determines not only the fidelity of the biosignal, but also impacts power consumption and detector size. In this paper, a novel combined feedback loop-controlled approach is proposed to compensate for input leakage currents generated by low noise amplifiers when in integrated circuit form alongside signal leakage into the input bias network. This loop topology ensures the Front-End Amplifier (FEA) maintains a high input impedance across all manufacturing and operational variations. Measured results from a prototype manufactured on the AMS 0.35 [Formula: see text] CMOS technology is provided. This FEA consumes 3.1 [Formula: see text] in 0.042 [Formula: see text], achieves input impedance of 42 [Formula: see text], and 18.2 [Formula: see text] input-referred noise.

  17. Assessment of debris inputs from land into the river in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jing; Wang, Yonggui; Cheng, Meiling; Engel, Bernard A; Zhang, Wanshun; Peng, Hong

    2017-12-07

    Riverine debris in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area (TGRA) poses a threat to electricity generation, ship navigation, and water environment. Quantifying riverine debris inputs from land into the river is a foundation for modeling of the transport and accumulation of floating debris on the water surface in the TGRA. However, this has not been researched to date. In this study, debris inputs from land into the river in the TGRA were assessed according to the response relationship between debris inputs and surface runoff. The land-based debris inputs in the TGRA were estimated using simulated surface runoff which was simulated by the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. Results showed that 15.32 × 106 kg of land-based debris was inputted into the main channel of the TGRA in 2015 which accounted for 9.74% of total debris inputs (the monitoring data of river-sourced and land-sourced debris inputs was 157.27 × 106 kg). Debris inputs varied seasonally and peaked in the summer season (July to September). Compared with monthly measured data, the average relative errors in 2015 were below 30%. In addition, areas with higher debris pollution inputs were mainly located in the upper section of the TGRA, between the Tang River Basin and the Long River Basin. The proposed method was tested and determined to be reliable; thus, it can be used to quickly estimate debris inputs from land into the river by surface runoff of the outlets in a river basin. Moreover, this method provides new insight into the estimation of land-based debris inputs into rivers.

  18. Arterial input function in a dedicated slice for cerebral perfusion measurements in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Elias; Mader, Irina; Reisert, Marco; Urbach, Horst; Kiselev, Valerij Gennadevic

    2017-12-09

    We aimed to modify our previously published method for arterial input function measurements for evaluation of cerebral perfusion (dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI) such that it can be applied in humans in a clinical setting. Similarly to our previous work, a conventional measurement sequence for dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI is extended with an additional measurement slice at the neck. Measurement parameters at this slice were optimized for the blood signal (short echo time, background suppression, magnitude and phase images). Phase-based evaluation of the signal in the carotid arteries is used to obtain quantitative arterial input functions. In all pilot measurements, quantitative arterial input functions were obtained. The resulting absolute perfusion parameters agree well with literature values (gray and white matter mean values of 46 and 24 mL/100 g/min, respectively, for cerebral blood flow and 3.0% and 1.6%, respectively, for cerebral blood volume). The proposed method has the potential to quantify arterial input functions in the carotid arteries from a direct measurement without any additional normalization.

  19. The Effects of Pre Modified Input, Interactionally Modified Input, and Modified Output on EFL Learners' Comprehension of New Vocabularies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Zinat; Pazhakh, AbdolReza

    2012-01-01

    The present study was an attempt to investigate the effects of premodified input, interactionally modified input and modified output on 80 EFL learners' comprehension of new words. The subjects were randomly assigned into four groups of pre modified input, interactionally modified input, modified output and unmodified (control) groups. Each group…

  20. Modality of Input and Vocabulary Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetyana Sydorenko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the effect of input modality (video, audio, and captions, i.e., on-screen text in the same language as audio on (a the learning of written and aural word forms, (b overall vocabulary gains, (c attention to input, and (d vocabulary learning strategies of beginning L2 learners. Twenty-six second-semester learners of Russian participated in this study. Group one (N = 8 saw video with audio and captions (VAC; group two (N = 9 saw video with audio (VA; group three (N = 9 saw video with captions (VC. All participants completed written and aural vocabulary tests and a final questionnaire.The results indicate that groups with captions (VAC and VC scored higher on written than on aural recognition of word forms, while the reverse applied to the VA group. The VAC group learned more word meanings than the VA group. Results from the questionnaire suggest that learners paid most attention to captions, followed by video and audio, and acquired most words by associating them with visual images. Pedagogical implications of this study are that captioned video tends to aid recognition of written word forms and the learning of word meaning, while non-captioned video tends to improve listening comprehension as it facilitates recognition of aural word forms.

  1. Cometary micrometeorites and input of prebiotic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engrand C.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The apparition of life on the early Earth was probably favored by inputs of extraterrestrial matter brought by carbonaceous chondrite-like objects or cometary material. Interplanetary dust collected nowadays on Earth is related to carbonaceous chondrites and to cometary material. They contain in particular at least a few percent of organic matter, organic compounds (amino-acids, PAHs,…, hydrous silicates, and could have largely contributed to the budget of prebiotic matter on Earth, about 4 Ga ago. A new population of cometary dust was recently discovered in the Concordia Antarctic micrometeorite collection. These “Ultracarbonaceous Antarctic Micrometeorites” (UCAMMs are dominated by deuterium-rich and nitrogen-rich organic matter. They seem related to the “CHON” grains identified in the comet Halley in 1986. Although rare in the micrometeorites flux (<5% of the micrometeorites, UCAMMs could have significantly contributed to the input of prebiotic matter. Their content in soluble organic matter is currently under study.

  2. [Prosody, speech input and language acquisition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungheim, M; Miller, S; Kühn, D; Ptok, M

    2014-04-01

    In order to acquire language, children require speech input. The prosody of the speech input plays an important role. In most cultures adults modify their code when communicating with children. Compared to normal speech this code differs especially with regard to prosody. For this review a selective literature search in PubMed and Scopus was performed. Prosodic characteristics are a key feature of spoken language. By analysing prosodic features, children gain knowledge about underlying grammatical structures. Child-directed speech (CDS) is modified in a way that meaningful sequences are highlighted acoustically so that important information can be extracted from the continuous speech flow more easily. CDS is said to enhance the representation of linguistic signs. Taking into consideration what has previously been described in the literature regarding the perception of suprasegmentals, CDS seems to be able to support language acquisition due to the correspondence of prosodic and syntactic units. However, no findings have been reported, stating that the linguistically reduced CDS could hinder first language acquisition.

  3. Neuroprosthetics and the science of patient input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Heather L; Civillico, Eugene F

    2017-01-01

    Safe and effective neuroprosthetic systems are of great interest to both DARPA and CDRH, due to their innovative nature and their potential to aid severely disabled populations. By expanding what is possible in human-device interaction, these devices introduce new potential benefits and risks. Therefore patient input, which is increasingly important in weighing benefits and risks, is particularly relevant for this class of devices. FDA has been a significant contributor to an ongoing stakeholder conversation about the inclusion of the patient voice, working collaboratively to create a new framework for a patient-centered approach to medical device development. This framework is evolving through open dialogue with researcher and patient communities, investment in the science of patient input, and policymaking that is responsive to patient-centered data throughout the total product life cycle. In this commentary, we will discuss recent developments in patient-centered benefit-risk assessment and their relevance to the development of neural prosthetic systems. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Quantitative imaging methods in osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, Ling; Koromani, Fjorda; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Zillikens, M Carola; Oei, Edwin H G

    2016-12-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by a decreased bone mass and quality resulting in an increased fracture risk. Quantitative imaging methods are critical in the diagnosis and follow-up of treatment effects in osteoporosis. Prior radiographic vertebral fractures and bone mineral density (BMD) as a quantitative parameter derived from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) are among the strongest known predictors of future osteoporotic fractures. Therefore, current clinical decision making relies heavily on accurate assessment of these imaging features. Further, novel quantitative techniques are being developed to appraise additional characteristics of osteoporosis including three-dimensional bone architecture with quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Dedicated high-resolution (HR) CT equipment is available to enhance image quality. At the other end of the spectrum, by utilizing post-processing techniques such as the trabecular bone score (TBS) information on three-dimensional architecture can be derived from DXA images. Further developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) seem promising to not only capture bone micro-architecture but also characterize processes at the molecular level. This review provides an overview of various quantitative imaging techniques based on different radiological modalities utilized in clinical osteoporosis care and research.

  5. Sensory-evoked perturbations of locomotor activity by sparse sensory input: a computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstone, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory inputs from muscle, cutaneous, and joint afferents project to the spinal cord, where they are able to affect ongoing locomotor activity. Activation of sensory input can initiate or prolong bouts of locomotor activity depending on the identity of the sensory afferent activated and the timing of the activation within the locomotor cycle. However, the mechanisms by which afferent activity modifies locomotor rhythm and the distribution of sensory afferents to the spinal locomotor networks have not been determined. Considering the many sources of sensory inputs to the spinal cord, determining this distribution would provide insights into how sensory inputs are integrated to adjust ongoing locomotor activity. We asked whether a sparsely distributed set of sensory inputs could modify ongoing locomotor activity. To address this question, several computational models of locomotor central pattern generators (CPGs) that were mechanistically diverse and generated locomotor-like rhythmic activity were developed. We show that sensory inputs restricted to a small subset of the network neurons can perturb locomotor activity in the same manner as seen experimentally. Furthermore, we show that an architecture with sparse sensory input improves the capacity to gate sensory information by selectively modulating sensory channels. These data demonstrate that sensory input to rhythm-generating networks need not be extensively distributed. PMID:25673740

  6. Sensory-evoked perturbations of locomotor activity by sparse sensory input: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Tuan V; Brownstone, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    Sensory inputs from muscle, cutaneous, and joint afferents project to the spinal cord, where they are able to affect ongoing locomotor activity. Activation of sensory input can initiate or prolong bouts of locomotor activity depending on the identity of the sensory afferent activated and the timing of the activation within the locomotor cycle. However, the mechanisms by which afferent activity modifies locomotor rhythm and the distribution of sensory afferents to the spinal locomotor networks have not been determined. Considering the many sources of sensory inputs to the spinal cord, determining this distribution would provide insights into how sensory inputs are integrated to adjust ongoing locomotor activity. We asked whether a sparsely distributed set of sensory inputs could modify ongoing locomotor activity. To address this question, several computational models of locomotor central pattern generators (CPGs) that were mechanistically diverse and generated locomotor-like rhythmic activity were developed. We show that sensory inputs restricted to a small subset of the network neurons can perturb locomotor activity in the same manner as seen experimentally. Furthermore, we show that an architecture with sparse sensory input improves the capacity to gate sensory information by selectively modulating sensory channels. These data demonstrate that sensory input to rhythm-generating networks need not be extensively distributed. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Control Board Digital Interface Input Devices – Touchscreen, Trackpad, or Mouse?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Ronald L. Boring; Roger Lew

    2015-08-01

    The authors collaborated with a power utility to evaluate input devices for use in the human system interface (HSI) for a new digital Turbine Control System (TCS) at a nuclear power plant (NPP) undergoing a TCS upgrade. A standalone dynamic software simulation of the new digital TCS and a mobile kiosk were developed to conduct an input device study to evaluate operator preference and input device effectiveness. The TCS software presented the anticipated HSI for the TCS and mimicked (i.e., simulated) the turbine systems’ responses to operator commands. Twenty-four licensed operators from the two nuclear power units participated in the study. Three input devices were tested: a trackpad, mouse, and touchscreen. The subjective feedback from the survey indicates the operators preferred the touchscreen interface. The operators subjectively rated the touchscreen as the fastest and most comfortable input device given the range of tasks they performed during the study, but also noted a lack of accuracy for selecting small targets. The empirical data suggest the mouse input device provides the most consistent performance for screen navigation and manipulating on screen controls. The trackpad input device was both empirically and subjectively found to be the least effective and least desired input device.

  8. Calibration of a Hydrological Model using Ensemble Satellite Rainfall Inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Christopher; Bellerby, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    A combination of satellite rainfall estimates (SRFE) and hydrological models can provide useful information for many remote areas of the planet. However, each component contains its own uncertainties and these uncertainties will interact when SRFE are used as inputs for hydrological models. For any assessment of a coupled system such as this there is a requirement for a comprehensive analysis of all sources of uncertainty, with full consideration of both facets. SRFE have been shown to be useful in many areas that lack the infrastructure to make timely and accurate estimations of rainfall from the ground. Sub-Saharan Africa is typical of this, where a paucity of rain recording radar and sparse gauging networks combine with a highly variable climate and a reliance on rain-fed agriculture. When operating at higher spatial and temporal resolutions, SRFE contain large uncertainties which will propagate through a hydrological model if used as a driving input. This study used a sequential method to produce ensemble SRFE based around the full conditional distribution of recorded rainfall from a sparse, historic raingauge network. The TAMSIM method (introduced by Teo, 2006) was used to produce 200 unique yet equiprobable SRFE, each used as a driver to a downstream hydrological model. Traditional hydrological modelling uses the adjustment of variable parameters within the model to reduce the error between a recorded record of discharge and the modelled one, and many automatic procedures have been produced to refine this calibration process. When SRFE have been used as a driver, little consideration has been paid to this process and often a calibration using the raingauge data has been used, without any consideration to the resulting uncertainty within the hydrological model and its calibration. A similar issue arises when ensemble inputs are used to a hydrological model that has been calibrated using a deterministic estimate of rainfall. This study has shown that such

  9. Plasma to blood ratio derived parent fractions for robust plasma input based kinetic analysis of dynamic 18F-FLT PET studies in NSCLC cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avendano Estrada, Arturo; Kramer, G.; Frings, V.; Vállez García, David; Smit, E; Lammertsma, A. A.; Hoekstra, O; Boellaard, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Introduction: Full quantitative analysis of dynamic 18F-FLT PET studies is important to validate the use of simplified methods and metrics, such as SUVs, for early response assessment (1). However, full quantitative kinetic analysis requires the use of a metabolite corrected plasma input

  10. Quantitative determination of Auramine O by terahertz spectroscopy with 2DCOS-PLSR model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huo; Li, Zhi; Chen, Tao; Qin, Binyi

    2017-09-01

    Residues of harmful dyes such as Auramine O (AO) in herb and food products threaten the health of people. So, fast and sensitive detection techniques of the residues are needed. As a powerful tool for substance detection, terahertz (THz) spectroscopy was used for the quantitative determination of AO by combining with an improved partial least-squares regression (PLSR) model in this paper. Absorbance of herbal samples with different concentrations was obtained by THz-TDS in the band between 0.2THz and 1.6THz. We applied two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) to improve the PLSR model. This method highlighted the spectral differences of different concentrations, provided a clear criterion of the input interval selection, and improved the accuracy of detection result. The experimental result indicated that the combination of the THz spectroscopy and 2DCOS-PLSR is an excellent quantitative analysis method.

  11. Using Popular Culture to Teach Quantitative Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyard, Cinnamon

    2007-01-01

    Popular culture provides many opportunities to develop quantitative reasoning. This article describes a junior-level, interdisciplinary, quantitative reasoning course that uses examples from movies, cartoons, television, magazine advertisements, and children's literature. Some benefits from and cautions to using popular culture to teach…

  12. Patient participation in patient safety and nursing input - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jordan, Sue; Kangasniemi, Mari

    2015-03-01

    This systematic review aims to synthesise the existing research on how patients participate in patient safety initiatives. Ambiguities remain about how patients participate in routine measures designed to promote patient safety. Systematic review using integrative methods. Electronic databases were searched using keywords describing patient involvement, nursing input and patient safety initiatives to retrieve empirical research published between 2007 and 2013. Findings were synthesized using the theoretical domains of Vincent's framework for analysing risk and safety in clinical practice: "patient", "healthcare provider", "task", "work environment", "organisation & management". We identified 17 empirical research papers: four qualitative, one mixed-method and 12 quantitative designs. All 17 papers indicated that patients can participate in safety initiatives. Improving patient participation in patient safety necessitates considering the patient as a person, the nurse as healthcare provider, the task of participation and the clinical environment. Patients' knowledge, health conditions, beliefs and experiences influence their decisions to engage in patient safety initiatives. An important component of the management of long-term conditions is to ensure that patients have sufficient knowledge to participate. Healthcare providers may need further professional development in patient education and patient care management to promote patient involvement in patient safety, and ensure that patients understand that they are 'allowed' to inform nurses of adverse events or errors. A healthcare system characterised by patient-centredness and mutual acknowledgement will support patient participation in safety practices. Further research is required to improve international knowledge of patient participation in patient safety in different disciplines, contexts and cultures. Patients have a significant role to play in enhancing their own safety while receiving hospital care. This

  13. Quantitative dispersion microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Dan; Choi, Wonshik; Sung, Yongjin; Yaqoob, Zahid; Ramachandra R Dasari; Feld, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Refractive index dispersion is an intrinsic optical property and a useful source of contrast in biological imaging studies. In this report, we present the first dispersion phase imaging of living eukaryotic cells. We have developed quantitative dispersion microscopy based on the principle of quantitative phase microscopy. The dual-wavelength quantitative phase microscope makes phase measurements at 310 nm and 400 nm wavelengths to quantify dispersion (refractive index increment ratio) of live...

  14. The Ineffectiveness of the Provision of Input on the Problematic Grammatical Feature of Articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Morgan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the value of giving specific input on the use of articles on an undergraduate English for Academic Purposes (EAP course. This topic was chosen as previous cohorts had generated a noticeable amount of errors in their use of articles, and developing written grammatical accuracy was one of the course’s aims. Participants were provided with input on the definite, indefinite and zero articles. This involved providing images of authentic article errors, and catering for the interpersonal learner, with emphasis on student: student interaction. Also, a newspaper article was incorporated to illustrate how grammar works at a textual level, and because research has shown that accuracy in the use of the definite article increases during contextualized tasks exploiting authentic materials learners can relate to. However, the lack of effectiveness of highlighting this grammatical feature is illustrated by the students’ post-input writing, which generated more errors than the pre-input task, pro rata. In the post-input essay, there was one error for every 25 of the noun phrases, the equivalent of an error every 131 words. In comparison, the rate of errors in the pre-input work was one in every 28 of the noun phrases, or an error every 153 words. Therefore, due to the 16.7% increase in post-input errors, in future, I will not focus on this grammatical feature when attempting to improve written accuracy.

  15. Quantitative Algebraic Reasoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardare, Radu Iulian; Panangaden, Prakash; Plotkin, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantitative analogue of equational reasoning which we call quantitative algebra. We define an equality relation indexed by rationals: a =ε b which we think of as saying that “a is approximately equal to b up to an error of ε”. We have 4 interesting examples where we have a quantitative...... equational theory whose free algebras correspond to well known structures. In each case we have finitary and continuous versions. The four cases are: Hausdorff metrics from quantitive semilattices; pWasserstein metrics (hence also the Kantorovich metric) from barycentric algebras and also from pointed...

  16. Field tests-low input, side-wall vented boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litzke, W.L.; Butcher, T.A.; Celebi, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-07-01

    The Fan Atomized Burner (FAB) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory as part of the Oil Heat Combustion Equipment Technology Program to provide a practical low-firing rate technology leading to new, high efficiency oil-fired appliances. The development of the burner design and results of application testing have been presented in prior oil heat conferences over the past several years. This information is also summarized in a more comprehensive BNL report. The first field trial of a prototype unit was initiated during the 1994-95 heating season. This paper presents the results of the second year of testing, during the 1995-96 heating season. The field tests enable the demonstration of the reliability and performance of the FAB under practical, typical operating conditions. Another important objective of the field test was to demonstrate that the low input is adequate to satisfy the heating and hot water demands of the household. During the first field trial it was shown that at a maximum input rate of 0.4 gph (55,000 Btu/hr) the burner was able to heat a home with over 2,000 square feet of conditioned living space and provide adequate supply of domestic hot water for a family of six. The test is located in Long Island, NY.

  17. Auto Draw from Excel Input Files

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Karl F.; Goullioud, Renaud; Cox, Brian; Grimes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    The design process often involves the use of Excel files during project development. To facilitate communications of the information in the Excel files, drawings are often generated. During the design process, the Excel files are updated often to reflect new input. The problem is that the drawings often lag the updates, often leading to confusion of the current state of the design. The use of this program allows visualization of complex data in a format that is more easily understandable than pages of numbers. Because the graphical output can be updated automatically, the manual labor of diagram drawing can be eliminated. The more frequent update of system diagrams can reduce confusion and reduce errors and is likely to uncover symmetric problems earlier in the design cycle, thus reducing rework and redesign.

  18. Achromatic waveguide input/output coupler design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, K E; Morris, G M

    1991-03-20

    An investigation into methods for achromatizing the coupling angle characteristics of waveguide input/output couplers is described. The basic approach involves correcting the inherent angular dispersion of conventional waveguide couplers with a diffraction grating. Two configurations are analyzed in detail: a hybrid prism/grating coupler and a double grating coupler. Expressions are derived for values of the grating parameters that produce achromatic coupling. A method is also presented to predict the achromatic wavelength range and maximize it with the available degrees of freedom. For a coupling angle tolerance of 0.005 degrees , it is found that with double grating couplers achromatic wavelength ranges of the order of 10 nm can be obtained, and that with prism/grating couplers this range can be as large as 200 nm.

  19. Automatic parsing of parental verbal input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagae, Kenji; MacWhinney, Brian; Lavie, Alon

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate theoretical proposals regarding the course of child language acquisition, researchers often need to rely on the processing of large numbers of syntactically parsed utterances, both from children and from their parents. Because it is so difficult to do this by hand, there are currently no parsed corpora of child language input data. To automate this process, we developed a system that combined the MOR tagger, a rule-based parser, and statistical disambiguation techniques. The resultant system obtained nearly 80% correct parses for the sentences spoken to children. To achieve this level, we had to construct a particular processing sequence that minimizes problems caused by the coverage/ambiguity tradeoff in parser design. These procedures are particularly appropriate for use with the CHILDES database, an international corpus of transcripts. The data and programs are now freely available over the Internet.

  20. The UK waste input-output table: Linking waste generation to the UK economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemdeeb, Ramy; Al-Tabbaa, Abir; Reynolds, Christian

    2016-10-01

    In order to achieve a circular economy, there must be a greater understanding of the links between economic activity and waste generation. This study introduces the first version of the UK waste input-output table that could be used to quantify both direct and indirect waste arisings across the supply chain. The proposed waste input-output table features 21 industrial sectors and 34 waste types and is for the 2010 time-period. Using the waste input-output table, the study results quantitatively confirm that sectors with a long supply chain (i.e. manufacturing and services sectors) have higher indirect waste generation rates compared with industrial primary sectors (e.g. mining and quarrying) and sectors with a shorter supply chain (e.g. construction). Results also reveal that the construction, mining and quarrying sectors have the highest waste generation rates, 742 and 694 tonne per £1m of final demand, respectively. Owing to the aggregated format of the first version of the waste input-output, the model does not address the relationship between waste generation and recycling activities. Therefore, an updated version of the waste input-output table is expected be developed considering this issue. Consequently, the expanded model would lead to a better understanding of waste and resource flows in the supply chain. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Input and output constraints affecting irrigation development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, G.

    1981-05-01

    In many of the developing countries the expansion of irrigated agriculture is used as a major development tool for bringing about increases in agricultural output, rural economic growth and income distribution. Apart from constraints imposed by water availability, the major limitations considered to any acceleration of such programs are usually thought to be those of costs and financial resources. However, as is shown on the basis of empirical data drawn from Mexico, in reality the feasibility and effectiveness of such development programs is even more constrained by the lack of specialized physical and human factors on the input and market limitations on the output side. On the input side, the limited availability of complementary factors such as, for example, truly functioning credit systems for small-scale farmers or effective agricultural extension services impose long-term constraints on development. On the output side the limited availability, high risk, and relatively slow growth of markets for high-value crops sharply reduce the usually hoped-for and projected profitable crop mix that would warrant the frequently high costs of irrigation investments. Three conclusions are drawn: (1) Factors in limited supply have to be shadow-priced to reflect their high opportunity costs in alternative uses. (2) Re-allocation of financial resources from immediate construction of projects to longer-term increase in the supply of scarce, highly-trained manpower resources are necessary in order to optimize development over time. (3) Inclusion of high-value, high-income producing crops in the benefit-cost analysis of new projects is inappropriate if these crops could potentially be grown in already existing projects.

  2. Distribution Development for STORM Ingestion Input Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulton, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The Sandia-developed Transport of Radioactive Materials (STORM) code suite is used as part of the Radioisotope Power System Launch Safety (RPSLS) program to perform statistical modeling of the consequences due to release of radioactive material given a launch accident. As part of this modeling, STORM samples input parameters from probability distributions with some parameters treated as constants. This report described the work done to convert four of these constant inputs (Consumption Rate, Average Crop Yield, Cropland to Landuse Database Ratio, and Crop Uptake Factor) to sampled values. Consumption rate changed from a constant value of 557.68 kg / yr to a normal distribution with a mean of 102.96 kg / yr and a standard deviation of 2.65 kg / yr. Meanwhile, Average Crop Yield changed from a constant value of 3.783 kg edible / m 2 to a normal distribution with a mean of 3.23 kg edible / m 2 and a standard deviation of 0.442 kg edible / m 2 . The Cropland to Landuse Database ratio changed from a constant value of 0.0996 (9.96%) to a normal distribution with a mean value of 0.0312 (3.12%) and a standard deviation of 0.00292 (0.29%). Finally the crop uptake factor changed from a constant value of 6.37e-4 (Bq crop /kg)/(Bq soil /kg) to a lognormal distribution with a geometric mean value of 3.38e-4 (Bq crop /kg)/(Bq soil /kg) and a standard deviation value of 3.33 (Bq crop /kg)/(Bq soil /kg)

  3. Reduced basis ANOVA methods for partial differential equations with high-dimensional random inputs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Qifeng, E-mail: liaoqf@shanghaitech.edu.cn [School of Information Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Lin, Guang, E-mail: guanglin@purdue.edu [Department of Mathematics & School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    In this paper we present a reduced basis ANOVA approach for partial deferential equations (PDEs) with random inputs. The ANOVA method combined with stochastic collocation methods provides model reduction in high-dimensional parameter space through decomposing high-dimensional inputs into unions of low-dimensional inputs. In this work, to further reduce the computational cost, we investigate spatial low-rank structures in the ANOVA-collocation method, and develop efficient spatial model reduction techniques using hierarchically generated reduced bases. We present a general mathematical framework of the methodology, validate its accuracy and demonstrate its efficiency with numerical experiments.

  4. Soil organic carbon dynamics jointly controlled by climate, carbon inputs, soil properties and soil carbon fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhongkui; Feng, Wenting; Luo, Yiqi; Baldock, Jeff; Wang, Enli

    2017-10-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics are regulated by the complex interplay of climatic, edaphic and biotic conditions. However, the interrelation of SOC and these drivers and their potential connection networks are rarely assessed quantitatively. Using observations of SOC dynamics with detailed soil properties from 90 field trials at 28 sites under different agroecosystems across the Australian cropping regions, we investigated the direct and indirect effects of climate, soil properties, carbon (C) inputs and soil C pools (a total of 17 variables) on SOC change rate (r C , Mg C ha -1  yr -1 ). Among these variables, we found that the most influential variables on r C were the average C input amount and annual precipitation, and the total SOC stock at the beginning of the trials. Overall, C inputs (including C input amount and pasture frequency in the crop rotation system) accounted for 27% of the relative influence on r C , followed by climate 25% (including precipitation and temperature), soil C pools 24% (including pool size and composition) and soil properties (such as cation exchange capacity, clay content, bulk density) 24%. Path analysis identified a network of intercorrelations of climate, soil properties, C inputs and soil C pools in determining r C . The direct correlation of r C with climate was significantly weakened if removing the effects of soil properties and C pools, and vice versa. These results reveal the relative importance of climate, soil properties, C inputs and C pools and their complex interconnections in regulating SOC dynamics. Ignorance of the impact of changes in soil properties, C pool composition and C input (quantity and quality) on SOC dynamics is likely one of the main sources of uncertainty in SOC predictions from the process-based SOC models. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Provider Opinions Regarding the Development of a Stigma-Reduction Intervention Tailored for Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Dinesh; Corrigan, Patrick; Drummond, Karen L.; Porchia, Sylvia; Sullivan, Greer

    2016-01-01

    Interventions involving contact with a person who has recovered from mental illness are most effective at reducing stigma. This study sought input from health care providers to inform the design of a contact intervention intended to reduce provider stigma toward persons with serious mental illness. Using a purposive sampling strategy, data were…

  6. Facilitating mathematics learning for students with upper extremity disabilities using touch-input system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kup-Sze; Chan, Tak-Yin

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using tablet device as user interface for students with upper extremity disabilities to input mathematics efficiently into computer. A touch-input system using tablet device as user interface was proposed to assist these students to write mathematics. User-switchable and context-specific keyboard layouts were designed to streamline the input process. The system could be integrated with conventional computer systems only with minor software setup. A two-week pre-post test study involving five participants was conducted to evaluate the performance of the system and collect user feedback. The mathematics input efficiency of the participants was found to improve during the experiment sessions. In particular, their performance in entering trigonometric expressions by using the touch-input system was significantly better than that by using conventional mathematics editing software with keyboard and mouse. The participants rated the touch-input system positively and were confident that they could operate at ease with more practice. The proposed touch-input system provides a convenient way for the students with hand impairment to write mathematics and has the potential to facilitate their mathematics learning. Implications for Rehabilitation Students with upper extremity disabilities often face barriers to learning mathematics which is largely based on handwriting. Conventional computer user interfaces are inefficient for them to input mathematics into computer. A touch-input system with context-specific and user-switchable keyboard layouts was designed to improve the efficiency of mathematics input. Experimental results and user feedback suggested that the system has the potential to facilitate mathematics learning for the students.

  7. Robust input design for nonlinear dynamic modeling of AUV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Nowrouz Mohammad; Valadi, Mehrdad

    2017-09-01

    Input design has a dominant role in developing the dynamic model of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) through system identification. Optimal input design is the process of generating informative inputs that can be used to generate the good quality dynamic model of AUVs. In a problem with optimal input design, the desired input signal depends on the unknown system which is intended to be identified. In this paper, the input design approach which is robust to uncertainties in model parameters is used. The Bayesian robust design strategy is applied to design input signals for dynamic modeling of AUVs. The employed approach can design multiple inputs and apply constraints on an AUV system's inputs and outputs. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is employed to solve the constraint robust optimization problem. The presented algorithm is used for designing the input signals for an AUV, and the estimate obtained by robust input design is compared with that of the optimal input design. According to the results, proposed input design can satisfy both robustness of constraints and optimality. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of input compression and input frequency response on music perception in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, Emily R; Jones, Linor L; Fraser, Matthew; Lockley, Morag; Hill-Feltham, Penelope; McKay, Colette M

    2015-06-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether modifications to input compression and input frequency response characteristics can improve music-listening satisfaction in cochlear implant users. Experiment 1 compared three pre-processed versions of music and speech stimuli in a laboratory setting: original, compressed, and flattened frequency response. Music excerpts comprised three music genres (classical, country, and jazz), and a running speech excerpt was compared. Experiment 2 implemented a flattened input frequency response in the speech processor program. In a take-home trial, participants compared unaltered and flattened frequency responses. Ten and twelve adult Nucleus Freedom cochlear implant users participated in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively. Experiment 1 revealed a significant preference for music stimuli with a flattened frequency response compared to both original and compressed stimuli, whereas there was a significant preference for the original (rising) frequency response for speech stimuli. Experiment 2 revealed no significant mean preference for the flattened frequency response, with 9 of 11 subjects preferring the rising frequency response. Input compression did not alter music enjoyment. Comparison of the two experiments indicated that individual frequency response preferences may depend on the genre or familiarity, and particularly whether the music contained lyrics.

  9. Input Quality Matters: Some Comments on Input Type and Age-Effects in Adult SLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Jason; Guijarro-Fuentes, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    In accord with the general program of researching factors relating to ultimate attainment and maturational constraints in adult language acquisition, this commentary highlights the importance of input differences in amount, type, and setting between naturalistic and classroom learners of an L2. It is suggested that these variables are often…

  10. Fluidized-bed steam methane reforming with oxygen input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, S.; Pruden, B.B. [University of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroluem Engineering; Adris, A.M. [SABIC R and D, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Research and Technology Support; Grace, J.R.; Lim, C.J. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-07-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether oxygen could be added directly to a fluidized bed of catalyst to provide all of the endothermic heat for the reforming reaction. It is shown that oxygen can be successfully introduced onto a reforming reactor to provide for the endothermic heat of reforming reactions. The methane conversion increased with increasing reactor temperature, oxygen input flow rate and steam-methane ratio and decreased with increasing reactor pressure as expected. Methane conversion and hydrogen yield are compared to those expected at equilibrium. There was 100% conversion of oxygen under all conditions. Most experimental runs reached and maintained autothermal conditions. The hydrogen yield increased with increasing temperature and steam-methane ratio. The hydrogen yield decreased minimally with increasing reactor pressure and oxygen flowrate. (author)

  11. Prototype van een Dynamisch Input Advies Systeem voor biogasinstallaties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, M.; Riel, van J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Het Dynamisch Input Advies Systeem (Dynamisch Vergisten) voor biogasinstallaties maakt gebruik van bedrijfsspecifieke procesgegevens voor de dagelijkse bijsturing van de input naar een biogasinstallatie. Het adviessysteem bestaat uit een methodiek die dagelijks de actuele invloed bepaalt van de

  12. Quantitative Methods for Molecular Diagnostic and Therapeutic Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Quanzheng

    2013-01-01

    This theme issue provides an overview on the basic quantitative methods, an in-depth discussion on the cutting-edge quantitative analysis approaches as well as their applications for both static and dynamic molecular diagnostic and therapeutic imaging.

  13. The Vestibular Implant Input Interacts with Residual Natural Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond van de Berg

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivePatients with bilateral vestibulopathy (BV can still have residual “natural” function. This might interact with “artificial” vestibular implant input (VI-input. When fluctuating, it could lead to vertigo attacks. Main objective was to investigate how “artificial” VI-input is integrated with residual “natural” input by the central vestibular system. This, to explore (1 whether misalignment in the response of “artificial” VI-input is sufficiently counteracted by well-aligned residual “natural” input and (2 whether “artificial” VI-input is able to influence and counteract the response to residual “natural” input, to show feasibility of a “vestibular pacemaker.”Materials and methodsFive vestibular electrodes in four BV patients implanted with a VI were available. This involved electrodes with a predominantly horizontal response and electrodes with a predominantly vertical response. Responses to predominantly horizontal residual “natural” input and predominantly horizontal and vertical “artificial” VI-input were separately measured first. Then, inputs were combined in conditions where both would hypothetically collaborate or counteract. In each condition, subjects were subjected to 60 cycles of sinusoidal stimulation presented at 1 Hz. Gain, asymmetry, phase and angle of eye responses were calculated. Signal averaging was performed.ResultsCombining residual “natural” input and “artificial” VI-input resulted in an interaction in which characteristics of the resulting eye movement responses could significantly differ from those observed when responses were measured for each input separately (p < 0.0013. In the total eye response, inputs with a stronger vector magnitude seemed to have stronger weights than inputs with a lower vector magnitude, in a non-linear combination. Misalignment in the response of “artificial” VI-input was not sufficiently counteracted by well-aligned residual

  14. The Vestibular Implant Input Interacts with Residual Natural Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Berg, Raymond; Guinand, Nils; Ranieri, Maurizio; Cavuscens, Samuel; Khoa Nguyen, T A; Guyot, Jean-Philippe; Lucieer, Florence; Starkov, Dmitrii; Kingma, Herman; van Hoof, Marc; Perez-Fornos, Angelica

    2017-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibulopathy (BV) can still have residual "natural" function. This might interact with "artificial" vestibular implant input (VI-input). When fluctuating, it could lead to vertigo attacks. Main objective was to investigate how "artificial" VI-input is integrated with residual "natural" input by the central vestibular system. This, to explore (1) whether misalignment in the response of "artificial" VI-input is sufficiently counteracted by well-aligned residual "natural" input and (2) whether "artificial" VI-input is able to influence and counteract the response to residual "natural" input, to show feasibility of a "vestibular pacemaker." Five vestibular electrodes in four BV patients implanted with a VI were available. This involved electrodes with a predominantly horizontal response and electrodes with a predominantly vertical response. Responses to predominantly horizontal residual "natural" input and predominantly horizontal and vertical "artificial" VI-input were separately measured first. Then, inputs were combined in conditions where both would hypothetically collaborate or counteract. In each condition, subjects were subjected to 60 cycles of sinusoidal stimulation presented at 1 Hz. Gain, asymmetry, phase and angle of eye responses were calculated. Signal averaging was performed. Combining residual "natural" input and "artificial" VI-input resulted in an interaction in which characteristics of the resulting eye movement responses could significantly differ from those observed when responses were measured for each input separately (p < 0.0013). In the total eye response, inputs with a stronger vector magnitude seemed to have stronger weights than inputs with a lower vector magnitude, in a non-linear combination. Misalignment in the response of "artificial" VI-input was not sufficiently counteracted by well-aligned residual "natural" input. "Artificial" VI-input was able to significantly influence and counteract the response to

  15. Modal Parameter Identification from Responses of General Unknown Random Inputs

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, S. R.; Asmussen, J. C.; Brincker, Rune

    1995-01-01

    Modal parameter identification from ambient responses due to a general unknown random inputs is investigated. Existing identification techniques which are based on assumptions of white noise and or stationary random inputs are utilized even though the inputs conditions are not satisfied. This is accomplished via adding. In cascade. A force cascade conversion to the structures system under consideration. The input to the force conversion system is white noise and the output of which is the act...

  16. Summary of Quantitative Interpretation of Image Far Ultraviolet Auroral Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, H. U.; Immel, T. J.; Mende, S. B.; Gerard, J.-C.; Hubert, B.; Habraken, S.; Span, J.; Gladstone, G. R.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Shematovich, V. I.; hide

    2002-01-01

    Direct imaging of the magnetosphere by instruments on the IMAGE spacecraft is supplemented by simultaneous observations of the global aurora in three far ultraviolet (FUV) wavelength bands. The purpose of the multi-wavelength imaging is to study the global auroral particle and energy input from thc magnetosphere into the atmosphere. This paper describes provides the method for quantitative interpretation of FUV measurements. The Wide-Band Imaging Camera (WIC) provides broad band ultraviolet images of the aurora with maximum spatial and temporal resolution by imaging the nitrogen lines and bands between 140 and 180 nm wavelength. The Spectrographic Imager (SI), a dual wavelength monochromatic instrument, images both Doppler-shifted Lyman alpha emissions produced by precipitating protons, in the SI-12 channel and OI 135.6 nm emissions in the SI-13 channel. From the SI-12 Doppler shifted Lyman alpha images it is possible to obtain the precipitating proton flux provided assumptions are made regarding the mean energy of the protons. Knowledge of the proton (flux and energy) component allows the calculation of the contribution produced by protons in the WIC and SI-13 instruments. Comparison of the corrected WIC and SI-13 signals provides a measure of the electron mean energy, which can then be used to determine the electron energy fluxun-. To accomplish this reliable modeling emission modeling and instrument calibrations are required. In-flight calibration using early-type stars was used to validate the pre-flight laboratory calibrations and determine long-term trends in sensitivity. In general, very reasonable agreement is found between in-situ measurements and remote quantitative determinations.

  17. The Quantitative Linear-Time–Branching-Time Spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Claus; Fahrenberg, Uli; Legay, Axel

    2011-01-01

    We present a distance-agnostic approach to quantitative verification. Taking as input an unspecified distance on system traces, or executions, we develop a game-based framework which allows us to define a spectrum of different interesting system distances corresponding to the given trace distance....... Thus we extend the classic linear-time–branching-time spectrum to a quantitative setting, parametrized by trace distance. We also prove a general transfer principle which allows us to transfer counterexamples from the qualitative to the quantitative setting, showing that all system distances...

  18. Input Manipulation, Enhancement and Processing: Theoretical Views and Empirical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benati, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Researchers in the field of instructed second language acquisition have been examining the issue of how learners interact with input by conducting research measuring particular kinds of instructional interventions (input-oriented and meaning-based). These interventions include such things as input flood, textual enhancement and processing…

  19. 7 CFR 3431.4 - Solicitation of stakeholder input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Solicitation of stakeholder input. 3431.4 Section... Designation of Veterinarian Shortage Situations § 3431.4 Solicitation of stakeholder input. The Secretary will solicit stakeholder input on the process and procedures used to designate veterinarian shortage situations...

  20. Probit Analysis of Women's Access to Agricultural Inputs in Bosso ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The title of the study is Probit analysis of women's access to agricultural inputs in Bosso Local Government Area of Niger State, Nigeria. The specific objectives are to identify the socio-economic characteristics of the women farmers and examine their sources of agricultural inputs as well as their accessibility to these inputs, ...

  1. Waste treatment in physical input-output analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietzenbacher, E

    2005-01-01

    When compared to monetary input-output tables (MIOTs), a distinctive feature of physical input-output tables (PIOTs) is that they include the generation of waste as part of a consistent accounting framework. As a consequence, however, physical input-output analysis thus requires that the treatment

  2. Input Frequency and the Acquisition of Syllable Structure in Polish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Gaja; Calamaro, Shira; Zentz, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This article examines phonological development and its relationship to input statistics. Using novel data from a longitudinal corpus of spontaneous child speech in Polish, we evaluate and compare the predictions of a variety of input-based phonotactic models for syllable structure acquisition. We find that many commonly examined input statistics…

  3. A novel high input impedance front-end for capacitive biopotential measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rongrong; Tang, Yue; Li, Zhiyu; Zhang, Limin; Yan, Feng

    2018-01-08

    For capacitive biopotential measurement, a novel high input impedance front-end is proposed. The input impedance of the front-end can achieve more than 100 GΩ by matching the peripheral parameters. The front-end's noise model is provided, and noise optimization is given further. The analysis shows the proposed front-end can achieve at least two orders of input impedance more than the non-inverting amplifier circuit with the same peripheral parameters at the cost of only increasing twice input-referred noise. The final experimental results verify the analysis and show the front-end's feasibility of capacitive sensing electrocardiogram signal. Graphical abstract A novel high input impedance front-end is proposed, which impedance can achieve more than 100 GΩ by matching the peripheral parameters. The analysis and noise optimization results show the proposed front-end can achieve at least two orders of input impedance more than the non-inverting amplifier circuit with the same peripheral parameters at the cost of only increasing twice input-referred noise. The final experimental results verify the analysis and show its feasibility of capacitive sensing electrocardiogram signal.

  4. Quantitative assessment of securitisation deals

    CERN Document Server

    Campolongo, Francesca; Schoutens, Wim

    2013-01-01

    The book draws on current research on model risk and parameter sensitivity of securitisation ratings. It provides practical ideas and tools that can facilitate a more informed usage of securitisation ratings. We show how global sensitivity analysis techniques can be used to better analyse and to enhance the understanding of the uncertainties inherent in ratings due to uncertainty in the input parameters. The text introduces a novel global rating approach that takes the uncertainty in the ratings into account when assigning ratings to securitisation products. The book also covers new prepayment and default models that overcome flaws in current models.

  5. Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. A. Wasiolek

    2003-09-24

    This analysis is one of the nine reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN) biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003a) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents a set of input parameters for the biosphere model, and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. This report, ''Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2003b). It should be noted that some documents identified in Figure 1-1 may be under development at the time this report is issued and therefore not available at that time. This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this analysis report. This analysis report defines and justifies values of mass loading, which is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Measurements of mass loading are used in the air submodel of ERMYN to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air surrounding crops and concentrations in air

  6. Voxel-specific brain arterial input functions from dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI and blind deconvolution in a group of healthy males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordli, Håkon; Taxt, Torfinn; Moen, Gunnar; Grüner, Renate

    2010-04-01

    Arterial input functions may differ between brain regions due to delay and dispersion effects in the vascular supply network. Unless corrected for, these differences may degrade quantitative estimations of cerebral blood flow in dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance perfusion imaging (DSC-MRI). To investigate in a healthy population (n=44) the properties of voxel-specific arterial input functions that were obtained using a recently published blind estimation approach. The voxel-specific arterial input functions were qualitatively and quantitatively assessed, through visual inspection or by comparing time-to-peak (delays) and peak amplitude (dispersion) values between eight regions of the brain. Furthermore, they were compared to arterial input functions selected manually in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), where normally no delay or dispersion of the contrast agent was expected. The estimated voxel-specific arterial input functions varied between brain regions. Differences in delays and dispersion were larger within one brain region among all participants than between regions in one participant. A good correlation was typically found between the estimated voxel-specific arterial input functions and the manually selected arterial input functions in the MCA region. Given knowledge of neurovascular anatomy, the current blind approach seemingly produced reasonable estimates of voxel-specific arterial input functions. In addition to potentially reducing quantification errors in DSC-MRI, these user-independent voxel-specific arterial input functions could be useful for visualizing abnormal blood supply patterns in patients.

  7. Large-scale stabilization control of input-constrained quadrotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The quadrotor has been the most popular aircraft in the last decade due to its excellent dynamics and continues to attract ever-increasing research interest. Delivering a quadrotor from a large fixed-wing aircraft is a promising application of quadrotors. In such an application, the quadrotor needs to switch from a highly unstable status, featured as large initial states, to a safe and stable flight status. This is the so-called large-scale stability control problem. In such an extreme scenario, the quadrotor is at risk of actuator saturation. This can cause the controller to update incorrectly and lead the quadrotor to spiral and crash. In this article, to safely control the quadrotor in such scenarios, the control input constraint is analyzed. The key states of a quadrotor dynamic model are selected, and a two-dimensional dynamic model is extracted based on a symmetrical body configuration. A generalized point-wise min-norm nonlinear control method is proposed based on the Lyapunov function, and large-scale stability control is hence achieved. An enhanced point-wise, min-norm control is further provided to improve the attitude control performance, with altitude performance degenerating slightly. Simulation results showed that the proposed control methods can stabilize the input-constrained quadrotor and the enhanced method can improve the performance of the quadrotor in critical states.

  8. Benefits of syllabic input compression for users of cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Hugh J; Henshall, Katherine R; McKay, Colette M

    2002-01-01

    Ten users of multielectrode cochlear implants participated in an evaluation of the perceptual effects of input-signal compression. A syllabic compressor was introduced into the microphone circuit of Spectra-22 or SPrint sound processors. The post-compression gain was adjusted to provide similar loudness for speech at an average level of 65 dBA with compression either enabled or disabled. Sentence recognition was measured at three levels. Averaged across all listeners, statistically significant score increases were obtained at each level with compression enabled (45 dBA: 19.6 percentage points, p < .0001; 55 dBA: 16.6 percentage points, p < .0001; 70 dBA: 3.1 percentage points, p = .031). A test of speech intelligibility in noise showed no significant effect of compression. Generally, participants in the trial reported improved perception of low-level sounds with compression, although a few disliked the increased loudness of some background noises. Some participants suggested that the ability to enable or disable compression with a manual switch would be helpful. Overall, the results show that input compression can improve the performance of these sound processors for users of cochlear implants, especially when listening to speech at low levels.

  9. Flight energetics of sphinx moths: power input during hovering flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, T M

    1976-06-01

    The energetic cost of hovering flight was measured in sphinx moths from five species. Mean power input per unit mass (Pi/M) varied from 237-2 W kg-1 in Manduca sexta (Subfamily:Sphinginae), mean body mass 1-2 X 10(-3) kg, to 327-9 W kg-1 in Deilephila elpenor (Subfamily: Macroglossinae) mean body mass 7-3 X 10(-4) kg. Mean Pi/M for the five species was inversely proportional to mean body mass and directly proportional to mean wing loading. For any given body mass, Pi/M was greater in Hyles lineata than in M. sexta. This difference is correlated with higher wing loading at any given mass in H. lineata. Energy expenditure per unit mass of thorax was 1018 W kg-1 in H. lineata and 694 W kg-1 in M. sexta. Within each of these species, Pi per unit mass of thorax does not vary with body mass. Power input data are compared with calculated power requirements based on momentum theory and blade-element theory of helicopter aerodynamics. Absolute efficiency, the ratio between calculated power requirements and measured energy expenditure, appears to vary directly with body mass. These data provide an energetic basis for observed correlates between thoracic temperature and flight effort in flying sphinx moths.

  10. A Clinical Evaluation of the Competing Sources of Input Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Laurence B.; Bredin-Oja, Shelley L.; Deevy, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Our purpose was to test the competing sources of input (CSI) hypothesis by evaluating an intervention based on its principles. This hypothesis proposes that children's use of main verbs without tense is the result of their treating certain sentence types in the input (e.g., Was she laughing ?) as models for declaratives (e.g., She laughing). Method Twenty preschoolers with specific language impairment were randomly assigned to receive either a CSI-based intervention or a more traditional intervention that lacked the novel CSI features. The auxiliary is and the third-person singular suffix –s were directly treated over a 16-week period. Past tense –ed was monitored as a control. Results The CSI-based group exhibited greater improvements in use of is than did the traditional group (d = 1.31), providing strong support for the CSI hypothesis. There were no significant between-groups differences in the production of the third-person singular suffix –s or the control (–ed), however. Conclusions The group differences in the effects on the 2 treated morphemes may be due to differences in their distribution in interrogatives and declaratives (e.g., Is he hiding/He is hiding vs. Does he hide/He hide s). Refinements in the intervention could address this issue and lead to more general effects across morphemes. PMID:28114610

  11. Agricultural and Environmental Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Rasmuson; K. Rautenstrauch

    2004-09-14

    This analysis is one of 10 technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN) (i.e., the biosphere model). It documents development of agricultural and environmental input parameters for the biosphere model, and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the repository at Yucca Mountain. The ERMYN provides the TSPA with the capability to perform dose assessments. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships between the major activities and their products (the analysis and model reports) that were planned in ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the ERMYN and its input parameters.

  12. Authentic Language Input Through Audiovisual Technology and Second Language Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher Bahrani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Second language acquisition cannot take place without having exposure to language input. With regard to this, the present research aimed at providing empirical evidence about the low and the upper-intermediate language learners’ preferred type of audiovisual programs and language proficiency development outside the classroom. To this end, 60 language learners (30 low level and 30 upper-intermediate level were asked to have exposure to their preferred types of audiovisual program(s outside the classroom and keep a diary of the amount and the type of exposure. The obtained data indicated that the low-level participants preferred cartoons and the upper-intermediate participants preferred news more. To find out which language proficiency level could improve its language proficiency significantly, a post-test was administered. The results indicated that only the upper-intermediate language learners gained significant improvement. Based on the findings, the quality of the language input should be given priority over the amount of exposure.

  13. Therapy Provider Phase Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Therapy Provider Phase Information dataset is a tool for providers to search by their National Provider Identifier (NPI) number to determine their phase for...

  14. Comparison Study on Empirical Correlation for Mass Transfer Coefficient with Gas Hold-up and Input Power of Aeration Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Kyoo; Yang, Hei Cheon [Chonnam Nat’l Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    As stricter environmental regulation have led to an increase in the water treatment cost, it is necessary to quantitatively study the input power of the aeration process to improve the energy efficiency of the water treatment processes. The objective of this study is to propose the empirical correlations for the mass transfer coefficient with the gas hold-up and input power in order to investigate the mass transfer characteristics of the aeration process. It was found that as the input power increases, the mass transfer coefficient increases because of the decrease of gas hold-up and increase of Reynolds number, the penetration length, and dispersion of mixed flow. The correlations for the volumetric mass transfer coefficients with gas hold-up and input power were consistent with the experimental data, with the maximum deviation less than approximately ±10.0%.

  15. Use of regional climate model simulations as input for hydrological models for the Hindukush-Karakorum-Himalaya region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ahmad

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The most important climatological inputs required for the calibration and validation of hydrological models are temperature and precipitation that can be derived from observational records or alternatively from regional climate models (RCMs. In this paper, meteorological station observations and results of the PRECIS (Providing REgional Climate for Impact Studies RCM driven by the outputs of reanalysis ERA 40 data and HadAM3P general circulation model (GCM results are used as input in the hydrological model. The objective is to investigate the effect of precipitation and temperature simulated with the PRECIS RCM nested in these two data sets on discharge simulated with the HBV model for three river basins in the Hindukush-Karakorum-Himalaya (HKH region. Six HBV model experiments are designed: HBV-Met, HBV-ERA and HBV-Had, HBV-MetCRU-corrected, HBV-ERABenchmark and HBV-HadBenchmark where HBV is driven by meteorological stations data, data from PRECIS nested in ERA-40 and HadAM3P, meteorological stations CRU corrected data, ERA-40 reanalysis and HadAM3P GCM data, respectively. Present day PRECIS simulations possess strong capacity to simulate spatial patterns of present day climate characteristics. However, also some quantitative biases exist in the HKH region, where PRECIS RCM simulations underestimate temperature and overestimate precipitation with respect to CRU observations. The calibration and validation results of the HBV model experiments show that the performance of HBV-Met is better than the HBV models driven by other data sources. However, using input data series from sources different from the data used in the model calibration shows that HBV-Had is more efficient than other models and HBV-Met has the least absolute relative error with respect to all other models. The uncertainties are higher in least efficient models (i.e. HBV-MetCRU-corrected and HBV-ERABenchmark where the model

  16. iQuant™ Analyser: A rapid quantitative immunoassay reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jayaraj; Vasan, Jayaraman Kiruthi; Shah, Malay; Sivaprakasam, Mohansankar; Mahajan, Lalit

    2017-07-01

    Lateral flow immunoassays (LFIA) used in rapid quantitative point of care testing require an accurate, reliable and easy to operate instrument to read the LFIA kit and calculate the quantitative result value. We present iQuant® Analyser, an immunoassay reader designed for reading the Quanti® range of LFIA test kits for key markers such as HbA1C, Vitamin D, TSH etc. The instrument utilizes a laser based confocal optics system to capture the test and control lines from the LFIA kit, digitizes the fluorescent signal with high spatiotemporal resolution, computes necessary peak area ratios, applies calibration curves and declares the final result in an automated manner with minimal operator input. The instrument uses kit specific calibration information embedded on each LFIA test kit, to compute the final clinical parameter without using any external calibration chip. An intuitive icon based interface enables easy operation with minimal key presses, suited for point of care applications. The technology is designed in a modular manner to enable the instrument to perform tests on various parameters such as HbA1C, TSH, and Vitamin D etc without any hardware changes, using test-specific LFIA kits. The functional performance of the iQuant Analyser was verified over the range of expected area ratio values with standard reference cartridges that provided stable fluorescent lines. Repeatability of the instrument was found to be excellent with coefficient of variation (CoV) of area ratios found to be less than 1%. The inter-instrument reproducibility was also found to be good with CoV less than 4 %. Tests using blood samples with Quanti LFIA kits verified the accuracy of HbA1C results to be acceptable as per international standards with errors <; 4 %. The iQuant Analyser is a portable, easy to use rapid quantitative immunoassay reader best suited for point of care applications.

  17. Quantitative analysis of the publishing landscape in High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mele, S; Vigen, Jens; Yeomans, Joanne

    2006-01-01

    World-wide collaboration in high-energy physics (HEP) is a tradition which dates back several decades, with scientific publications mostly coauthored by scientists from different countries. This coauthorship phenomenon makes it difficult to identify precisely the "share" of each country in HEP scientific production. One year's worth of HEP scientific articles published in peer-reviewed journals is analysed and their authors are uniquely assigned to countries. This method allows the first correct estimation on a pro rata basis of the share of HEP scientific publishing among several countries and institutions. The results provide an interesting insight into the geographical collaborative patterns of the HEP community. The HEP publishing landscape is further analysed to provide information on the journals favoured by the HEP community and on the geographical variation of their author bases. These results provide quantitative input to the ongoing debate on the possible transition of HEP publishing to an Open Acce...

  18. Speaker Input Variability Does Not Explain Why Larger Populations Have Simpler Languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Mark; Kirby, Simon; Smith, Kenny

    2015-01-01

    A learner's linguistic input is more variable if it comes from a greater number of speakers. Higher speaker input variability has been shown to facilitate the acquisition of phonemic boundaries, since data drawn from multiple speakers provides more information about the distribution of phonemes in a speech community. It has also been proposed that speaker input variability may have a systematic influence on individual-level learning of morphology, which can in turn influence the group-level characteristics of a language. Languages spoken by larger groups of people have less complex morphology than those spoken in smaller communities. While a mechanism by which the number of speakers could have such an effect is yet to be convincingly identified, differences in speaker input variability, which is thought to be larger in larger groups, may provide an explanation. By hindering the acquisition, and hence faithful cross-generational transfer, of complex morphology, higher speaker input variability may result in structural simplification. We assess this claim in two experiments which investigate the effect of such variability on language learning, considering its influence on a learner's ability to segment a continuous speech stream and acquire a morphologically complex miniature language. We ultimately find no evidence to support the proposal that speaker input variability influences language learning and so cannot support the hypothesis that it explains how population size determines the structural properties of language.

  19. Speaker Input Variability Does Not Explain Why Larger Populations Have Simpler Languages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Atkinson

    Full Text Available A learner's linguistic input is more variable if it comes from a greater number of speakers. Higher speaker input variability has been shown to facilitate the acquisition of phonemic boundaries, since data drawn from multiple speakers provides more information about the distribution of phonemes in a speech community. It has also been proposed that speaker input variability may have a systematic influence on individual-level learning of morphology, which can in turn influence the group-level characteristics of a language. Languages spoken by larger groups of people have less complex morphology than those spoken in smaller communities. While a mechanism by which the number of speakers could have such an effect is yet to be convincingly identified, differences in speaker input variability, which is thought to be larger in larger groups, may provide an explanation. By hindering the acquisition, and hence faithful cross-generational transfer, of complex morphology, higher speaker input variability may result in structural simplification. We assess this claim in two experiments which investigate the effect of such variability on language learning, considering its influence on a learner's ability to segment a continuous speech stream and acquire a morphologically complex miniature language. We ultimately find no evidence to support the proposal that speaker input variability influences language learning and so cannot support the hypothesis that it explains how population size determines the structural properties of language.

  20. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Joseph Alexander; Balda, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-31

    A device for producing an alternating current output voltage from a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage comprising, high-frequency, square-wave input a matrix converter and a control system. The matrix converter comprises a plurality of electrical switches. The high-frequency input and the matrix converter are electrically connected to each other. The control system is connected to each switch of the matrix converter. The control system is electrically connected to the input of the matrix converter. The control system is configured to operate each electrical switch of the matrix converter converting a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage across the first input port of the matrix converter and the second input port of the matrix converter to an alternating current output voltage at the output of the matrix converter.

  1. Modal Parameter Identification from Responses of General Unknown Random Inputs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, S. R.; Asmussen, J. C.; Brincker, Rune

    1996-01-01

    Modal parameter identification from ambient responses due to a general unknown random inputs is investigated. Existing identification techniques which are based on assumptions of white noise and or stationary random inputs are utilized even though the inputs conditions are not satisfied....... This is accomplished via adding. In cascade. A force cascade conversion to the structures system under consideration. The input to the force conversion system is white noise and the output of which is the actual force(s) applied to the structure. The white noise input(s) and the structures responses are then used...... to identify the compined system. Identification results are then sorted as either structural parameters or input force(s) characteristics....

  2. On the Nature of the Input in Optimality Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heck, Fabian; Müller, Gereon; Vogel, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    The input has two main functions in optimality theory (Prince and Smolensky 1993). First, the input defines the candidate set, in other words it determines which output candidates compete for optimality, and which do not. Second, the input is referred to by faithfulness constraints that prohibit...... output candidates from deviating from specifications in the input. Whereas there is general agreement concerning the relevance of the input in phonology, the nature of the input in syntax is notoriously unclear. In this article, we show that the input should not be taken to define syntactic candidate...... and syntax is due to a basic, irreducible difference between these two components of grammar: Syntax is an information preserving system, phonology is not....

  3. Organization of dopamine and serotonin system: Anatomical and functional mapping of monosynaptic inputs using rabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Sachie K; Watabe-Uchida, Mitsuko

    2017-05-02

    Dopamine and serotonin play critical roles in flexible behaviors and are related to various psychiatric and motor disorders. This paper reviews the global organization of dopamine and serotonin systems through recent findings using a modified rabies virus. We first introduce methods for comprehensive mapping of monosynaptic inputs. We then describe quantitative comparisons across the data regarding monosynaptic inputs to dopamine neurons versus serotonin neurons. There is surprising similarity between the input to dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the input to serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe (DR), suggesting functional interactions between these systems. We next introduce studies of mapping monosynaptic inputs to subpopulations of dopamine neurons specified by their projection targets. It was found that the population of dopamine neurons that project to the tail of the striatum (TS) forms an anatomically distinct outlier, suggesting a unique function. From these series of anatomical studies, we propose that there are three information flows that regulate these neuromodulatory systems: the midline stream to serotonin neurons in median raphe (MR) and B6, the central stream to value-coding dopamine neurons and serotonin neurons in rostral DR, and the lateral stream to TS-projecting dopamine neurons. Finally we introduce a new approach to investigate firing patterns of monosynaptic inputs to dopamine neurons in behaving animals. Combining anatomical and physiological findings, we propose that within the central stream, dopamine neurons broadcast a central teaching signal rather than personal teaching signals to multiple brain areas, which are computed in a redundant way in multi-layered neural circuits. Examination of global organization of the dopamine and serotonin circuits not only revealed the complexity of the systems but also revealed some principles of their organization. We will also discuss limitations, practical issues and the

  4. Transmitter inputs to different motoneuron subgroups in the oculomotor and trochlear nucleus in monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Zeeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In all vertebrates the eyes are moved by six pairs of extraocular muscles enabling horizontal, vertical and rotatory movements. Recent work showed that each extraocular muscle is controlled by two motoneuronal groups: 1. Motoneurons of singly-innervated muscle fibers (SIF that lie within the boundaries of motonuclei mediating a fast muscle contraction and 2. motoneurons of multiply-innervated muscle fibers (MIF in the periphery of motonuclei mediating a tonic muscle contraction. Currently only limited data about the transmitter inputs to the SIF and MIF motoneurons are available. Here we performed a quantitative study on the transmitter inputs to SIF and MIF motoneurons of individual muscles in the oculomotor and trochlear nucleus in monkey. Pre-labeled motoneurons were immunostained for GABA, glutamate decarboxylase, GABA-A receptor, glycine transporter 2, glycine receptor 1, and vesicular glutamate transporters (vGlut 1 and 2. The main findings were: 1. the inhibitory control of SIF motoneurons for horizontal and vertical eye movements differs. Unlike in previous primate studies a considerable GABAergic input was found to all SIF motoneuronal groups, whereas a glycinergic input was confined to motoneurons of the medial rectus muscle mediating horizontal eye movements and to those of the levator palpebrae muscle elevating the upper eyelid. Whereas SIF and MIF motoneurons of individual eye muscles do not differ numerically in their GABAergic, glycinergic and vGlut2 input, vGlut1 containing terminals densely covered the supraoculomotor area targeting medial rectus MIF motoneurons. It is reasonable to assume that the vGlut1 input affects the near response system in the supraoculomotor area, which houses the preganglionic neurons mediating pupillary constriction and accommodation and the medial rectus MIF motoneurones involved in vergence.

  5. Relative numbers of cortical and brainstem inputs to the lateral geniculate nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erişir, Alev; Van Horn, Susan C.; Sherman, S. Murray

    1997-01-01

    Terminals of a morphological type known as RD (for round vesicles and dense mitochondria, which we define here as the aggregate of types formerly known as RSD and RLD, where “S” is small and “L” is large) constitute at least half of the synaptic inputs to the feline lateral geniculate nucleus, which represents the thalamic relay of retinal input to cortex. It had been thought that the vast majority of these RD terminals were of cortical origin, making the corticogeniculate pathway by far the largest source of input to geniculate relay cells. However, another source of RD terminals recently identified derives from cholinergic cells of the brainstem parabrachial region. (These cells also contain NO.) We used techniques of electron microscopy to determine quantitatively the relative contribution of cortex and brainstem to the population of RD terminals. We identified corticogeniculate terminals by orthograde transport of biocytin injected into the visual cortex and identified brainstem terminals by immunocytochemical labeling for choline acetyltransferase or brain NO synthase (the synthesizing enzymes for acetylcholine and NO, respectively). We estimated the relative numbers of corticogeniculate and brainstem terminals with a two-step algorithm: First, we determined the relative probability of sampling each terminal type in our material, and then we calculated what mixture of identified corticogeniculate and brainstem terminals was needed to recreate the size distribution of the parent RD terminal population. We conclude that brainstem terminals comprise roughly one-half of the RD population. Thus, the cortical input is perhaps half as large and the brainstem input is an order of magnitude larger than had been thought. This further suggests that the brainstem inputs might play a surprisingly complex and subtle role in the control of the geniculocortical relay. PMID:9037085

  6. A Note on Stabilization via Communication Channel in the presence of Input Constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persis, Claudio De

    2003-01-01

    The problem of asymptotic stabilization of a process via communication channel under control input constraints is studied. A solution is proposed which provides encoders, decoders and controllers accomplishing global asymptotic stabilization of the closed-loop system provided that a suitable number

  7. Quantitative cardiac ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Rijsterborgh (Hans)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is about the various aspects of quantitative cardiac ultrasound. The first four chapters are mainly devoted to the reproducibility of echocardiographic measurements. These . are focussed on the variation of echocardiographic measurements within patients. An important

  8. On Quantitative Rorschach Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggard, Ernest A.

    1978-01-01

    Two types of quantitative Rorschach scales are discussed: first, those based on the response categories of content, location, and the determinants, and second, global scales based on the subject's responses to all ten stimulus cards. (Author/JKS)

  9. Quantitative physics tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Snětinová, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Title: Quantitative Physics Tasks Author: Mgr. Marie Snětinová Department: Department of Physics Education Supervisor of the doctoral thesis: doc. RNDr. Leoš Dvořák, CSc., Department of Physics Education Abstract: The doctoral thesis concerns with problem solving in physics, especially on students' attitudes to solving of quantitative physics tasks, and various methods how to develop students' problem solving skills in physics. It contains brief overview of the theoretical framework of proble...

  10. Method and System for Physiologically Modulating Videogames and Simulations which Use Gesture and Body Image Sensing Control Input Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Alan T. (Inventor); Stephens, Chad L. (Inventor); Habowski, Tyler (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Method for physiologically modulating videogames and simulations includes utilizing input from a motion-sensing video game system and input from a physiological signal acquisition device. The inputs from the physiological signal sensors are utilized to change the response of a user's avatar to inputs from the motion-sensing sensors. The motion-sensing system comprises a 3D sensor system having full-body 3D motion capture of a user's body. This arrangement encourages health-enhancing physiological self-regulation skills or therapeutic amplification of healthful physiological characteristics. The system provides increased motivation for users to utilize biofeedback as may be desired for treatment of various conditions.

  11. Consumer input into research: the Australian Cancer Trials website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butow Phyllis N

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Australian Cancer Trials website (ACTO was publicly launched in 2010 to help people search for cancer clinical trials recruiting in Australia, provide information about clinical trials and assist with doctor-patient communication about trials. We describe consumer involvement in the design and development of ACTO and report our preliminary patient evaluation of the website. Methods Consumers, led by Cancer Voices NSW, provided the impetus to develop the website. Consumer representative groups were consulted by the research team during the design and development of ACTO which combines a search engine, trial details, general information about trial participation and question prompt lists. Website use was analysed. A patient evaluation questionnaire was completed at one hospital, one week after exposure to the website. Results ACTO's main features and content reflect consumer input. In February 2011, it covered 1, 042 cancer trials. Since ACTO's public launch in November 2010, until the end of February 2011, the website has had 2, 549 new visits and generated 17, 833 page views. In a sub-study of 47 patient users, 89% found the website helpful for learning about clinical trials and all respondents thought patients should have access to ACTO. Conclusions The development of ACTO is an example of consumers working with doctors, researchers and policy makers to improve the information available to people whose lives are affected by cancer and to help them participate in their treatment decisions, including consideration of clinical trial enrolment. Consumer input has ensured that the website is informative, targets consumer priorities and is user-friendly. ACTO serves as a model for other health conditions.

  12. Consumer input into research: the Australian Cancer Trials website

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The Australian Cancer Trials website (ACTO) was publicly launched in 2010 to help people search for cancer clinical trials recruiting in Australia, provide information about clinical trials and assist with doctor-patient communication about trials. We describe consumer involvement in the design and development of ACTO and report our preliminary patient evaluation of the website. Methods Consumers, led by Cancer Voices NSW, provided the impetus to develop the website. Consumer representative groups were consulted by the research team during the design and development of ACTO which combines a search engine, trial details, general information about trial participation and question prompt lists. Website use was analysed. A patient evaluation questionnaire was completed at one hospital, one week after exposure to the website. Results ACTO's main features and content reflect consumer input. In February 2011, it covered 1, 042 cancer trials. Since ACTO's public launch in November 2010, until the end of February 2011, the website has had 2, 549 new visits and generated 17, 833 page views. In a sub-study of 47 patient users, 89% found the website helpful for learning about clinical trials and all respondents thought patients should have access to ACTO. Conclusions The development of ACTO is an example of consumers working with doctors, researchers and policy makers to improve the information available to people whose lives are affected by cancer and to help them participate in their treatment decisions, including consideration of clinical trial enrolment. Consumer input has ensured that the website is informative, targets consumer priorities and is user-friendly. ACTO serves as a model for other health conditions. PMID:21703017

  13. Applications of Microfluidics in Quantitative Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Gao, Meng; Wen, Lingling; He, Caiyun; Chen, Yuan; Liu, Chenli; Fu, Xiongfei; Huang, Shuqiang

    2017-10-04

    Quantitative biology is dedicated to taking advantage of quantitative reasoning and advanced engineering technologies to make biology more predictable. Microfluidics, as an emerging technique, provides new approaches to precisely control fluidic conditions on small scales and collect data in high-throughput and quantitative manners. In this review, the authors present the relevant applications of microfluidics to quantitative biology based on two major categories (channel-based microfluidics and droplet-based microfluidics), and their typical features. We also envision some other microfluidic techniques that may not be employed in quantitative biology right now, but have great potential in the near future. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  14. The Effect of Pinyin Input Experience on the Link between Semantic and Phonology of Chinese Character in Digital Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingjun; Luo, Rong; Liu, Huashan

    2017-01-01

    With the development of ICT, digital writing is becoming much more common in people's life. Differently from keyboarding alphabets directly to input English words, keyboarding Chinese character is always through typing phonetic alphabets and then identify the glyph provided by Pinyin input-method software while in this process which do not need…

  15. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy. PMID:26334858

  16. An operational weather radar-based Quantitative Precipitation Estimation and its application in catchment water resources modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Xin; Vejen, Flemming; Stisen, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The Danish Meteorological Institute operates a radar network consisting of five C-band Doppler radars. Quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) using radar data is performed on a daily basis. Radar QPE is considered to have the potential to signifi cantly improve the spatial representation...... of precipitation compared with rain-gauge-based methods, thus providing the basis for better water resources assessments. The radar QPE algorithm called ARNE is a distance-dependent areal estimation method that merges radar data with ground surface observations. The method was applied to the Skjern River catchment...... in western Denmark where alternative precipitation estimates were also used as input to an integrated hydrologic model. The hydrologic responses from the model were analyzed by comparing radar- and ground-based precipitation input scenarios. Results showed that radar QPE products are able to generate...

  17. Input variable selection for data-driven models of Coriolis flowmeters for two-phase flow measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijuan; Yan, Yong; Wang, Xue; Wang, Tao

    2017-03-01

    Input variable selection is an essential step in the development of data-driven models for environmental, biological and industrial applications. Through input variable selection to eliminate the irrelevant or redundant variables, a suitable subset of variables is identified as the input of a model. Meanwhile, through input variable selection the complexity of the model structure is simplified and the computational efficiency is improved. This paper describes the procedures of the input variable selection for the data-driven models for the measurement of liquid mass flowrate and gas volume fraction under two-phase flow conditions using Coriolis flowmeters. Three advanced input variable selection methods, including partial mutual information (PMI), genetic algorithm-artificial neural network (GA-ANN) and tree-based iterative input selection (IIS) are applied in this study. Typical data-driven models incorporating support vector machine (SVM) are established individually based on the input candidates resulting from the selection methods. The validity of the selection outcomes is assessed through an output performance comparison of the SVM based data-driven models and sensitivity analysis. The validation and analysis results suggest that the input variables selected from the PMI algorithm provide more effective information for the models to measure liquid mass flowrate while the IIS algorithm provides a fewer but more effective variables for the models to predict gas volume fraction.

  18. Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.; Fecht, B.A.

    1992-12-31

    The goal of the MEASUREMENT OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE project is to develop and deliver a suite of imaging radiometric instruments for measuring spatial distributions of chemiluminescence. Envisioned deliverables include instruments working at the microscopic, macroscopic, and life-sized scales. Both laboratory and field portable instruments are envisioned. The project also includes development of phantoms as enclosures for the diazoluminomelanin (DALM) chemiluminescent chemistry. A suite of either phantoms in a variety of typical poses, or phantoms that could be adjusted to a variety of poses, is envisioned. These are to include small mammals (rats), mid-sized mammals (monkeys), and human body parts. A complete human phantom that can be posed is a long-term goal of the development. Taken together, the chemistry and instrumentation provide a means for imaging rf dosimetry based on chemiluminescence induced by the heat resulting from rf energy absorption. The first delivered instrument, the Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System (QLIS), resulted in a patent, and an R&D Magazine 1991 R&D 100 award, recognizing it as one of the 100 most significant technological developments of 1991. The current status of the project is that three systems have been delivered, several related studies have been conducted, two preliminary human hand phantoms have been delivered, system upgrades have been implemented, and calibrations have been maintained. Current development includes sensitivity improvements to the microscope-based system; extension of the large-scale (potentially life-sized targets) system to field portable applications; extension of the 2-D large-scale system to 3-D measurement; imminent delivery of a more refined human hand phantom and a rat phantom; rf, thermal and imaging subsystem integration; and continued calibration and upgrade support.

  19. Bayesian calibration of groundwater models with input data uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tianfang; Valocchi, Albert J.; Ye, Ming; Liang, Feng; Lin, Yu-Feng

    2017-04-01

    Effective water resources management typically relies on numerical models to analyze groundwater flow and solute transport processes. Groundwater models are often subject to input data uncertainty, as some inputs (such as recharge and well pumping rates) are estimated and subject to uncertainty. Current practices of groundwater model calibration often overlook uncertainties in input data; this can lead to biased parameter estimates and compromised predictions. Through a synthetic case study of surface-ground water interaction under changing pumping conditions and land use, we investigate the impacts of uncertain pumping and recharge rates on model calibration and uncertainty analysis. We then present a Bayesian framework of model calibration to handle uncertain input of groundwater models. The framework implements a marginalizing step to account for input data uncertainty when evaluating likelihood. It was found that not accounting for input uncertainty may lead to biased, overconfident parameter estimates because parameters could be over-adjusted to compensate for possible input data errors. Parameter compensation can have deleterious impacts when the calibrated model is used to make forecast under a scenario that is different from calibration conditions. By marginalizing input data uncertainty, the Bayesian calibration approach effectively alleviates parameter compensation and gives more accurate predictions in the synthetic case study. The marginalizing Bayesian method also decomposes prediction uncertainty into uncertainties contributed by parameters, input data, and measurements. The results underscore the need to account for input uncertainty to better inform postmodeling decision making.

  20. A framework for quantitative assessment of impacts related to energy and mineral resource development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Diffendorfer, James; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Berger, Byron R.; Cook, Troy A.; Gautier, Donald L.; Gallegos, Tanya J.; Gerritsen, Margot; Graffy, Elisabeth; Hawkins, Sarah; Johnson, Kathleen; Macknick, Jordan; McMahon, Peter; Modde, Tim; Pierce, Brenda; Schuenemeyer, John H.; Semmens, Darius; Simon, Benjamin; Taylor, Jason; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Natural resource planning at all scales demands methods for assessing the impacts of resource development and use, and in particular it requires standardized methods that yield robust and unbiased results. Building from existing probabilistic methods for assessing the volumes of energy and mineral resources, we provide an algorithm for consistent, reproducible, quantitative assessment of resource development impacts. The approach combines probabilistic input data with Monte Carlo statistical methods to determine probabilistic outputs that convey the uncertainties inherent in the data. For example, one can utilize our algorithm to combine data from a natural gas resource assessment with maps of sage grouse leks and piñon-juniper woodlands in the same area to estimate possible future habitat impacts due to possible future gas development. As another example: one could combine geochemical data and maps of lynx habitat with data from a mineral deposit assessment in the same area to determine possible future mining impacts on water resources and lynx habitat. The approach can be applied to a broad range of positive and negative resource development impacts, such as water quantity or quality, economic benefits, or air quality, limited only by the availability of necessary input data and quantified relationships among geologic resources, development alternatives, and impacts. The framework enables quantitative evaluation of the trade-offs inherent in resource management decision-making, including cumulative impacts, to address societal concerns and policy aspects of resource development.

  1. Enhancing the Quantitative Representation of Socioeconomic Conditions in the Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs) using the International Futures Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, D. S.; Siraj, A.; Hughes, B.

    2013-12-01

    The international research community is currently in the process of developing new scenarios for climate change research. One component of these scenarios are the Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs), which describe a set of possible future socioeconomic conditions. These are presented in narrative storylines with associated quantitative drivers. The core quantitative drivers include total population, average GDP per capita, educational attainment, and urbanization at the global, regional, and national levels. At the same time there have been calls, particularly by the IAV community, for the SSPs to include additional quantitative information on other key social factors, such as income inequality, governance, health, and access to key infrastructures, which are discussed in the narratives. The International Futures system (IFs), based at the Pardee Center at the University of Denver, is able to provide forecasts of many of these indicators. IFs cannot use the SSP drivers as exogenous inputs, but we are able to create development pathways that closely reproduce the core quantitative drivers defined by the different SSPs, as well as incorporating assumptions on other key driving factors described in the qualitative narratives. In this paper, we present forecasts for additional quantitative indicators based upon the implementation of the SSP development pathways in IFs. These results will be of value to many researchers.

  2. Robust fault detection and isolation technique for single-input/single-output closed-loop control systems that exhibit actuator and sensor faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Alavi, S. M. Mahdi; Hayes, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    ) a graphical environment is provided for the design of fault detection (FD) filter, which is intuitively appealing from an engineering perspective. The FD filter can easily be obtained by manually shaping the frequency response into the complex plane. The question of interaction between actuator and sensor......An integrated quantitative feedback design and frequency-based fault detection and isolation (FDI) approach is presented for single-input/single-output systems. A novel design methodology, based on shaping the system frequency response, is proposed to generate an appropriate residual signal...... that is sensitive to actuator and sensor faults in the presence of model uncertainty and exogenous unknown (unmeasured) disturbances. The key features of this technique are: (1) the uncertain phase information is fully addressed by the design equations, resulting in a minimally conservative over-design and (2...

  3. Evaluation of Advanced Stirling Convertor Net Heat Input Correlation Methods Using a Thermal Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two high-efficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower Inc. and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot end and cold end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given net heat input. In an effort to improve net heat input predictions, numerous tasks have been performed which provided a more accurate value for net heat input into the ASCs, including testing validation hardware, known as the Thermal Standard, to provide a direct comparison to numerical and empirical models used to predict convertor net heat input. This validation hardware provided a comparison for scrutinizing and improving empirical correlations and numerical models of ASC-E2 net heat input. This hardware simulated the characteristics of an ASC-E2 convertor in both an operating and non-operating mode. This paper describes the Thermal Standard testing and the conclusions of the validation effort applied to the empirical correlation methods used by the Radioisotope Power System (RPS) team at NASA Glenn.

  4. EEG Frequency-Tagging and Input-Output Comparison in Rhythm Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaradan, Sylvie; Keller, Peter E; Rossion, Bruno; Mouraux, André

    2018-03-01

    The combination of frequency-tagging with electroencephalography (EEG) has recently proved fruitful for understanding the perception of beat and meter in musical rhythm, a common behavior shared by humans of all cultures. EEG frequency-tagging allows the objective measurement of input-output transforms to investigate beat perception, its modulation by exogenous and endogenous factors, development, and neural basis. Recent doubt has been raised about the validity of comparing frequency-domain representations of auditory rhythmic stimuli and corresponding EEG responses, assuming that it implies a one-to-one mapping between the envelope of the rhythmic input and the neural output, and that it neglects the sensitivity of frequency-domain representations to acoustic features making up the rhythms. Here we argue that these elements actually reinforce the strengths of the approach. The obvious fact that acoustic features influence the frequency spectrum of the sound envelope precisely justifies taking into consideration the sounds used to generate a beat percept for interpreting neural responses to auditory rhythms. Most importantly, the many-to-one relationship between rhythmic input and perceived beat actually validates an approach that objectively measures the input-output transforms underlying the perceptual categorization of rhythmic inputs. Hence, provided that a number of potential pitfalls and fallacies are avoided, EEG frequency-tagging to study input-output relationships appears valuable for understanding rhythm perception.

  5. Reconstruction of neuronal input through modeling single-neuron dynamics and computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Qing; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin, E-mail: dengbin@tju.edu.cn; Chan, Wai-lok [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Mathematical models provide a mathematical description of neuron activity, which can better understand and quantify neural computations and corresponding biophysical mechanisms evoked by stimulus. In this paper, based on the output spike train evoked by the acupuncture mechanical stimulus, we present two different levels of models to describe the input-output system to achieve the reconstruction of neuronal input. The reconstruction process is divided into two steps: First, considering the neuronal spiking event as a Gamma stochastic process. The scale parameter and the shape parameter of Gamma process are, respectively, defined as two spiking characteristics, which are estimated by a state-space method. Then, leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model is used to mimic the response system and the estimated spiking characteristics are transformed into two temporal input parameters of LIF model, through two conversion formulas. We test this reconstruction method by three different groups of simulation data. All three groups of estimates reconstruct input parameters with fairly high accuracy. We then use this reconstruction method to estimate the non-measurable acupuncture input parameters. Results show that under three different frequencies of acupuncture stimulus conditions, estimated input parameters have an obvious difference. The higher the frequency of the acupuncture stimulus is, the higher the accuracy of reconstruction is.

  6. Effects of uncertain topographic input data on two-dimensional modeling of flow hydraulics, habitat suitability, and bed mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, C. J.; McDonald, R.; Kyriakidis, P. C.; Nelson, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    spatial pattern of uncertainty in flow model predictions. Maps of ensemble means, standard deviations, and ranges indicated that the impact of topographic uncertainty on model outputs was strongly related to channel morphology, with the greatest variability in predicted velocities and stresses occurring over the point bar. To illustrate the potential effects of this type of uncertainty on various model applications, we used simulated topographic realizations to generate spatially explicit probability distributions of habitat suitability indices and mobile particle sizes. Our results implied that both types of analysis were highly sensitive to uncertain topographic input data. This study thus provided quantitative confirmation that accurate topographic information is an essential prerequisite to reliable flow modeling by highlighting the manner in which topographic uncertainty can propagate through a model to produce uncertain predictions of hydraulic attributes. Future work will use a similar approach to assess the extent to which biases in bed elevations inferred via remote sensing affect the flow model.

  7. Soil-related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Smith

    2003-07-02

    This analysis is one of the technical reports containing documentation of the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the plan for development of the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2003 [163602]). It should be noted that some documents identified in Figure 1-1 may be under development at the time this report is issued and therefore not available. This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this report. This report, ''Soil Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five analysis reports that develop input parameters for use in the ERMYN model. This report is the source documentation for the six biosphere parameters identified in Table 1-1. ''The Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003 [160699]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. The purpose of this analysis was to develop the biosphere model parameters needed to evaluate doses from pathways associated with the accumulation and depletion of radionuclides in the soil. These parameters support the calculation of radionuclide

  8. Input-output relations in biological systems: measurement, information and the Hill equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems produce outputs in response to variable inputs. Input-output relations tend to follow a few regular patterns. For example, many chemical processes follow the S-shaped Hill equation relation between input concentrations and output concentrations. That Hill equation pattern contradicts the fundamental Michaelis-Menten theory of enzyme kinetics. I use the discrepancy between the expected Michaelis-Menten process of enzyme kinetics and the widely observed Hill equation pattern of biological systems to explore the general properties of biological input-output relations. I start with the various processes that could explain the discrepancy between basic chemistry and biological pattern. I then expand the analysis to consider broader aspects that shape biological input-output relations. Key aspects include the input-output processing by component subsystems and how those components combine to determine the system’s overall input-output relations. That aggregate structure often imposes strong regularity on underlying disorder. Aggregation imposes order by dissipating information as it flows through the components of a system. The dissipation of information may be evaluated by the analysis of measurement and precision, explaining why certain common scaling patterns arise so frequently in input-output relations. I discuss how aggregation, measurement and scale provide a framework for understanding the relations between pattern and process. The regularity imposed by those broader structural aspects sets the contours of variation in biology. Thus, biological design will also tend to follow those contours. Natural selection may act primarily to modulate system properties within those broad constraints. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eugene Koonin, Georg Luebeck and Sergei Maslov. PMID:24308849

  9. Biodiversity for multifunctional grasslands: equal productivity in high-diversity low-input and low-diversity high-input systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Weigelt

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Modern grassland management seeks to provide many ecosystem services and experimental studies in resource-poor grasslands have shown a positive relationship between plant species richness and a variety of ecosystem functions. Thus, increasing species richness might help to enhance multifunctionality in managed grasslands if the relationship between species richness and ecosystem functioning is equally valid in high-input grassland systems.

    We tested the relative effects of low-input to high-input management intensities and low to high plant species richness. Using a combination of mowing frequencies (1, 2 or 4 cuts per season and fertilisation levels (0, 100 and 200 kg N ha−1 a−1, we studied the productivity of 78 experimental grassland communities of increasing plant species richness (1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 species with 1 to 4 functional groups in two successive years.

    Our results showed that in both years higher diversity was more effective in increasing productivity than higher management intensity: the 16-species mixtures had a surplus of 449 g m−2 y−1 in 2006 and 492 g m−2 y−1 in 2007 over the monoculture yields whereas the high-input management resulted in only 315 g m−2 y−1 higher productivity in 2006 and 440 g m−2 y−1 in 2007 than the low-input management. In addition, high-diversity low-input grassland communities had similar productivity as low-diversity high-input communities. The slopes of the biodiversity – productivity relationships significantly increased with increasing levels of management intensity in both years.

    We conclude that the biological mechanisms leading to enhanced biomass production in diverse grassland communities are as effective for productivity as a combination of several agricultural measures. Our results demonstrate that high-diversity low-input grassland

  10. Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Smith

    2004-09-09

    This report presents one of the analyses that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN). The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the details of the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and the required input parameters. The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the postclosure Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. A schematic representation of the documentation flow for the Biosphere input to TSPA is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the evolutionary relationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this report. This report, ''Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five analysis reports that develop input parameters for use in the ERMYN model. This report is the source documentation for the six biosphere parameters identified in Table 1-1. The purpose of this analysis was to develop the biosphere model parameters associated with the accumulation and depletion of radionuclides in the soil. These parameters support the calculation of radionuclide concentrations in soil from on-going irrigation or ash deposition and, as a direct consequence, radionuclide concentration in other environmental media that are affected by radionuclide concentrations in soil. The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) where the governing procedure

  11. Preferred provider organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, J D

    1984-05-01

    The 1980s has marked the beginning of a new alternative health care delivery system: the preferred provider organization ( PPO ). This system has developed from the health maintenance organization model and is predominant in California and Colorado. A PPO is a group of providers, usually hospitals and doctors, who agree to provide health care to subscribers for a negotiated fee that is usually discounted. Preferred provider organizations are subject to peer review and strict use controls in exchange for a consistent volume of patients and speedy turnaround on claims payments. This article describes the factors leading to the development of PPOs and the implications for occupational therapy.

  12. Quantitative approaches in climate change ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Christopher J.; Schoeman, David S.; Sydeman, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary impacts of anthropogenic climate change on ecosystems are increasingly being recognized. Documenting the extent of these impacts requires quantitative tools for analyses of ecological observations to distinguish climate impacts in noisy data and to understand interactions between...... climate variability and other drivers of change. To assist the development of reliable statistical approaches, we review the marine climate change literature and provide suggestions for quantitative approaches in climate change ecology. We compiled 267 peer‐reviewed articles that examined relationships...

  13. Orthogonal topography in the parallel input architecture of songbird HVC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kevin C; Wu, Wei; Bertram, Richard; Hyson, Richard L; Johnson, Frank

    2017-06-15

    Neural activity within the cortical premotor nucleus HVC (acronym is name) encodes the learned songs of adult male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). HVC activity is driven and/or modulated by a group of five afferent nuclei (the Medial Magnocellular nucleus of the Anterior Nidopallium, MMAN; Nucleus Interface, NIf; nucleus Avalanche, Av; the Robust nucleus of the Arcopallium, RA; the Uvaeform nucleus, Uva). While earlier evidence suggested that HVC receives a uniformly distributed and nontopographic pattern of afferent input, recent evidence suggests this view is incorrect (Basista et al., ). Here, we used a double-labeling strategy (varying both the distance between and the axial orientation of dual tracer injections into HVC) to reveal a massively parallel and in some cases topographic pattern of afferent input. Afferent neurons target only one rostral or caudal location within medial or lateral HVC, and each HVC location receives convergent input from each afferent nucleus in parallel. Quantifying the distributions of single-labeled cells revealed an orthogonal topography in the organization of afferent input from MMAN and NIf, two cortical nuclei necessary for song learning. MMAN input is organized across the lateral-medial axis whereas NIf input is organized across the rostral-caudal axis. To the extent that HVC activity is influenced by afferent input during the learning, perception, or production of song, functional models of HVC activity may need revision to account for the parallel input architecture of HVC, along with the orthogonal input topography of MMAN and NIf. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Quantitative methods to direct exploration based on hydrogeologic information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graettinger, A.J.; Lee, J.; Reeves, H.W.; Dethan, D.

    2006-01-01

    Quantitatively Directed Exploration (QDE) approaches based on information such as model sensitivity, input data covariance and model output covariance are presented. Seven approaches for directing exploration are developed, applied, and evaluated on a synthetic hydrogeologic site. The QDE approaches evaluate input information uncertainty, subsurface model sensitivity and, most importantly, output covariance to identify the next location to sample. Spatial input parameter values and covariances are calculated with the multivariate conditional probability calculation from a limited number of samples. A variogram structure is used during data extrapolation to describe the spatial continuity, or correlation, of subsurface information. Model sensitivity can be determined by perturbing input data and evaluating output response or, as in this work, sensitivities can be programmed directly into an analysis model. Output covariance is calculated by the First-Order Second Moment (FOSM) method, which combines the covariance of input information with model sensitivity. A groundwater flow example, modeled in MODFLOW-2000, is chosen to demonstrate the seven QDE approaches. MODFLOW-2000 is used to obtain the piezometric head and the model sensitivity simultaneously. The seven QDE approaches are evaluated based on the accuracy of the modeled piezometric head after information from a QDE sample is added. For the synthetic site used in this study, the QDE approach that identifies the location of hydraulic conductivity that contributes the most to the overall piezometric head variance proved to be the best method to quantitatively direct exploration. ?? IWA Publishing 2006.

  15. Kalman Filter Input Processor for Boresight Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalov, Dmitry; Kruizinga, Gerhard; Paik, Meegyeong; Yuan, Dah-Ning; Asmar, Sami W.

    2014-01-01

    Ka-band ranging provides the phase center (PC) to phase center range, which needs to be converted to the center of mass (CM) to center of mass range. Nominally, both PC and CM lie on the line connecting the spacecraft GRAIL A and GRAIL B. In this case, the conversion should be done simply by adding the CM-to-PC distance L to the measured range for both spacecraft. However, due to various technical reasons, such as displacement of the true CM from its nominal position in the SRF, or spacecraft attitude fluctuations, the PC and CM define a unit vector that may be different from the nominal line of sight. The objectives of the software are to determine the actual line of sight direction for each spacecraft and correct the previously recorded range data, and to provide instructions for how to maneuver each spacecraft to make necessary attitude corrections.

  16. Input Validation Framework for Web Services

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Henning

    2007-01-01

    Security is an important aspect for all kinds of software development, but it is especially important for web applications since they usually are exposed to the Internet. Web Services offer application to application connectivity using the SOAP protocol. Web Services are quite often built as an extension to already existing applications to provide business to business communication. Since it is often necessary to expose critical business functions through the Web Services, e.g., ordering an i...

  17. Policy practice in practice: the inputs of social workers in legislative committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss-Gal, Idit

    2013-10-01

    This article presents findings of an empirical study of the involvement of social workers in the policy formulation process. Despite support for policy practice, there has been limited empirical study of social workers' involvement in policy practice, which leaves us with little systematic knowledge of social workers' role in the policy formulation process. This study expands the knowledge of social workers' role in this process by identifying their inputs into Israeli legislative committees. Based on a content analysis of the minutes of 85 parliamentary committee meetings held during the 15th and 16th Knesset sessions (1999 to 2006), the study reveals five main inputs: placing matters on the agenda, providing information, providing explanations, expressing opinions and making suggestions, and commenting on the manner of the discussion, and 23 subinputs. These inputs underscore three main functions that social workers perform, or may perform, with respect to policy: challenging policy, facilitating policy, and enriching policy.

  18. Quantitative Reasoning Learning Progressions for Environmental Science: Developing a Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Mayes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative reasoning is a complex concept with many definitions and a diverse account in the literature. The purpose of this article is to establish a working definition of quantitative reasoning within the context of science, construct a quantitative reasoning framework, and summarize research on key components in that framework. Context underlies all quantitative reasoning; for this review, environmental science serves as the context.In the framework, we identify four components of quantitative reasoning: the quantification act, quantitative literacy, quantitative interpretation of a model, and quantitative modeling. Within each of these components, the framework provides elements that comprise the four components. The quantification act includes the elements of variable identification, communication, context, and variation. Quantitative literacy includes the elements of numeracy, measurement, proportional reasoning, and basic probability/statistics. Quantitative interpretation includes the elements of representations, science diagrams, statistics and probability, and logarithmic scales. Quantitative modeling includes the elements of logic, problem solving, modeling, and inference. A brief comparison of the quantitative reasoning framework with the AAC&U Quantitative Literacy VALUE rubric is presented, demonstrating a mapping of the components and illustrating differences in structure. The framework serves as a precursor for a quantitative reasoning learning progression which is currently under development.

  19. Building Service Provider Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Kristin; Jaura, Manya; Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.

    In this paper we study whether and how the interaction between clients and the service providers contributes to the development of capabilities in service provider firms. In situations where such a contribution occurs, we analyze how different types of activities in the production process...

  20. Providing free autopoweroff plugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Lynge; Hansen, Lars Gårn; Fjordbak, Troels

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidence of the effect of providing households with cheap energy saving technology is sparse. We present results from a field experiment in which autopoweroff plugs were provided free of charge to randomly selected households. We use propensity score matching to find treatment effects...

  1. The role of size of input box, location of input box, input method and display size in Chinese handwriting performance and preference on mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick

    2017-03-01

    This study presented two experiments on Chinese handwriting performance (time, accuracy, the number of protruding strokes and number of rewritings) and subjective ratings (mental workload, satisfaction, and preference) on mobile devices. Experiment 1 evaluated the effects of size of the input box, input method and display size on Chinese handwriting performance and preference. It was indicated that the optimal input sizes were 30.8 × 30.8 mm, 46.6 × 46.6 mm, 58.9 × 58.9 mm and 84.6 × 84.6 mm for devices with 3.5-inch, 5.5-inch, 7.0-inch and 9.7-inch display sizes, respectively. Experiment 2 proved the significant effects of location of the input box, input method and display size on Chinese handwriting performance and subjective ratings. It was suggested that the optimal location was central regardless of display size and input method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Quantitative Profiling Tool for Diverse Genomic Data Types Reveals Potential Associations between Chromatin and Pre-mRNA Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremsky, Isaac; Bellora, Nicolás; Eyras, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing, and genome-based datasets in general, are often represented as profiles centered at reference points to study the association of protein binding and other signals to particular regulatory mechanisms. Although these profiles often provide compelling evidence of these associations, they do not provide a quantitative assessment of the enrichment, which makes the comparison between signals and conditions difficult. In addition, a number of biases can confound profiles, but are rarely accounted for in the tools currently available. We present a novel computational method, ProfileSeq, for the quantitative assessment of biological profiles to provide an exact, nonparametric test that specific regions of the test profile have higher or lower signal densities than a control set. The method is applicable to high-throughput sequencing data (ChIP-Seq, GRO-Seq, CLIP-Seq, etc.) and to genome-based datasets (motifs, etc.). We validate ProfileSeq by recovering and providing a quantitative assessment of several results reported before in the literature using independent datasets. We show that input signal and mappability have confounding effects on the profile results, but that normalizing the signal by input reads can eliminate these biases while preserving the biological signal. Moreover, we apply ProfileSeq to ChIP-Seq data for transcription factors, as well as for motif and CLIP-Seq data for splicing factors. In all examples considered, the profiles were robust to biases in mappability of sequencing reads. Furthermore, analyses performed with ProfileSeq reveal a number of putative relationships between transcription factor binding to DNA and splicing factor binding to pre-mRNA, adding to the growing body of evidence relating chromatin and pre-mRNA processing. ProfileSeq provides a robust way to quantify genome-wide coordinate-based signal. Software and documentation are freely available for academic use at https://bitbucket.org/regulatorygenomicsupf/profileseq/.

  3. Organization of sensory input to the nociceptive-specific cutaneous trunk muscle reflex in rat, an effective experimental system for examining nociception and plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruska, Jeffrey C.; Barker, Darrell F.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Trainer, Robert; Fransen, James W.; Seidman, Peggy A.; Soto, Roy G.; Mendell, Lorne M.; Johnson, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Detailed characterization of neural circuitries furthers our understanding of how nervous systems perform specific functions and enables the use of those systems to test hypotheses. We have characterized the sensory input to the cutaneous trunk muscle (CTM; also cutaneus trunci (rat) or cutaneus maximus (mouse)) reflex (CTMR), which manifests as a puckering of the dorsal thoracolumbar skin and is selectively driven by noxious stimuli. CTM electromyography (EMG) and neurogram recordings in naïve rats revealed that CTMR responses were elicited by natural stimuli and electrical stimulation of all segments from C4 to L6, a much greater extent of segmental drive to the CTMR than previously described. Stimulation of some subcutaneous paraspinal tissue can also elicit this reflex. Using a selective neurotoxin, we also demonstrate differential drive of the CTMR by trkA-expressing and non-expressing small diameter afferents. These observations highlight aspects of the organization of the CTMR system which make it attractive for studies of nociception and anesthesiology and plasticity of primary afferents, motoneurons, and the propriospinal system. We use the CTMR system to qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrate that experimental pharmacological treatments can be compared to controls applied either to the contralateral side or to another segment, with the remaining segments providing controls for systemic or other treatment effects. These data indicate the potential for using the CTMR system as both an invasive and non-invasive quantitative assessment tool providing improved statistical power and reduced animal use. PMID:23983104

  4. Noninvasive quantification of cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in rats using (18)F-FDG PET and standard input function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yuki; Ihara, Naoki; Teramoto, Noboru; Kunimi, Masako; Honda, Manabu; Kato, Koichi; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of arterial input function (AIF) for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) studies is technically challenging. The present study aimed to develop a method based on a standard arterial input function (SIF) to estimate input function without blood sampling. We performed (18)F-fluolodeoxyglucose studies accompanied by continuous blood sampling for measurement of AIF in 11 rats. Standard arterial input function was calculated by averaging AIFs from eight anesthetized rats, after normalization with body mass (BM) and injected dose (ID). Then, the individual input function was estimated using two types of SIF: (1) SIF calibrated by the individual's BM and ID (estimated individual input function, EIF(NS)) and (2) SIF calibrated by a single blood sampling as proposed previously (EIF(1S)). No significant differences in area under the curve (AUC) or cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRGlc) were found across the AIF-, EIF(NS)-, and EIF(1S)-based methods using repeated measures analysis of variance. In the correlation analysis, AUC or CMRGlc derived from EIF(NS) was highly correlated with those derived from AIF and EIF(1S). Preliminary comparison between AIF and EIF(NS) in three awake rats supported an idea that the method might be applicable to behaving animals. The present study suggests that EIF(NS) method might serve as a noninvasive substitute for individual AIF measurement.

  5. Quantitative Management in Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinritz, Fred J.

    1970-01-01

    Based on a position paper orginally presented at the Institute on Quantitative Methods in Librarianship at Ohio State University Libraries in August, 1969, this discusses some of the elements of management: motion, time and cost studies, operations research and other mathematical techniques, and data processing equipment. (Author)

  6. Phylogenetic mixtures and linear invariants for equal input models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanellas, Marta; Steel, Mike

    2017-04-01

    The reconstruction of phylogenetic trees from molecular sequence data relies on modelling site substitutions by a Markov process, or a mixture of such processes. In general, allowing mixed processes can result in different tree topologies becoming indistinguishable from the data, even for infinitely long sequences. However, when the underlying Markov process supports linear phylogenetic invariants, then provided these are sufficiently informative, the identifiability of the tree topology can be restored. In this paper, we investigate a class of processes that support linear invariants once the stationary distribution is fixed, the 'equal input model'. This model generalizes the 'Felsenstein 1981' model (and thereby the Jukes-Cantor model) from four states to an arbitrary number of states (finite or infinite), and it can also be described by a 'random cluster' process. We describe the structure and dimension of the vector spaces of phylogenetic mixtures and of linear invariants for any fixed phylogenetic tree (and for all trees-the so called 'model invariants'), on any number n of leaves. We also provide a precise description of the space of mixtures and linear invariants for the special case of [Formula: see text] leaves. By combining techniques from discrete random processes and (multi-) linear algebra, our results build on a classic result that was first established by James Lake (Mol Biol Evol 4:167-191, 1987).

  7. Artificial spatiotemporal touch inputs reveal complementary decoding in neocortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Calogero M; Mazzoni, Alberto; Spanne, Anton; Enander, Jonas M D; Mogensen, Hannes; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Camboni, Domenico; Micera, Silvestro; Jörntell, Henrik

    2017-04-04

    Investigations of the mechanisms of touch perception and decoding has been hampered by difficulties in achieving invariant patterns of skin sensor activation. To obtain reproducible spatiotemporal patterns of activation of sensory afferents, we used an artificial fingertip equipped with an array of neuromorphic sensors. The artificial fingertip was used to transduce real-world haptic stimuli into spatiotemporal patterns of spikes. These spike patterns were delivered to the skin afferents of the second digit of rats via an array of stimulation electrodes. Combined with low-noise intra- and extracellular recordings from neocortical neurons in vivo, this approach provided a previously inaccessible high resolution analysis of the representation of tactile information in the neocortical neuronal circuitry. The results indicate high information content in individual neurons and reveal multiple novel neuronal tactile coding features such as heterogeneous and complementary spatiotemporal input selectivity also between neighboring neurons. Such neuronal heterogeneity and complementariness can potentially support a very high decoding capacity in a limited population of neurons. Our results also indicate a potential neuroprosthetic approach to communicate with the brain at a very high resolution and provide a potential novel solution for evaluating the degree or state of neurological disease in animal models.

  8. Sensitivity of long-term CTM simulations to meteorological input

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minguzzi, E. [Hydrometeorological Service of Emilia Romagna (SIM), Bologna (Italy); Bedogni, M. [Mobility and Environmental Agency (AMA), Milan (Italy); Carnevale, C. [Electronic Automation Dept. (DEA), Univ. of Brescia (Italy); Pirovano, G. [CESI Research Centre, Milan (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    The City-Delta exercise is an open model intercomparison aimed to explore the effects of changes in urban and regional emissions on urban air quality, with focus on ozone and PM10. The participating modelling groups were asked to run long-term (6 months or 1 year) simulations with 3d Chemical Transport Models (CTM), on regional (300 x 300 km{sup 2}) domains centred on 8 European cities. Common emission inventories and boundary conditions were provided to all groups, for both the base case (present day emissions) and several emission-reduction scenarios, while the meteorological input was prepared independently by each modelling group; a common verification tool was also developed and made available by JRC. After a first stage mainly aimed to ozone analysis, the exercise has then been extended, and a second stage (City-Delta 2) is still in progress. The structure of the exercise is essentially the same as City-Delta, but new emission inventories and boundary conditions have been provided, and participants are required to focus on one-year simulations of PM10. (orig.)

  9. Artificial spatiotemporal touch inputs reveal complementary decoding in neocortical neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Calogero M.; Mazzoni, Alberto; Spanne, Anton; Enander, Jonas M. D.; Mogensen, Hannes; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Camboni, Domenico; Micera, Silvestro; Jörntell, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Investigations of the mechanisms of touch perception and decoding has been hampered by difficulties in achieving invariant patterns of skin sensor activation. To obtain reproducible spatiotemporal patterns of activation of sensory afferents, we used an artificial fingertip equipped with an array of neuromorphic sensors. The artificial fingertip was used to transduce real-world haptic stimuli into spatiotemporal patterns of spikes. These spike patterns were delivered to the skin afferents of the second digit of rats via an array of stimulation electrodes. Combined with low-noise intra- and extracellular recordings from neocortical neurons in vivo, this approach provided a previously inaccessible high resolution analysis of the representation of tactile information in the neocortical neuronal circuitry. The results indicate high information content in individual neurons and reveal multiple novel neuronal tactile coding features such as heterogeneous and complementary spatiotemporal input selectivity also between neighboring neurons. Such neuronal heterogeneity and complementariness can potentially support a very high decoding capacity in a limited population of neurons. Our results also indicate a potential neuroprosthetic approach to communicate with the brain at a very high resolution and provide a potential novel solution for evaluating the degree or state of neurological disease in animal models. PMID:28374841

  10. Democratic Input Legitimacy of IRAs: Proposing an Assessment Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Scholten

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The democratic input legitimacy of independent regulatory agencies (IRAs is often questioned. Their independence creates distance from the main executive bodies, who therefore do not necessarily bear responsibility for them. This in turn may negatively affect the responsiveness of the ‘unelected’ bodies to the electorate’s preferences and hence the acceptance of the authority of IRAs by the public. This article questions whether the democratic input legitimacy of IRAs should be problematic by definition. It examines the essence of the conventional way of ensuring input legitimacy, i.e. elections, and identifies the elements that create a reference level for assessment of input legitimacy, namely authorization, safeguards and accountability. It argues that if the input relationship between the public and IRAs is well organized with respect to these three elements, the input legitimacy of IRAs need not be problematic, even if IRAs are headed by the ‘unelected’. Furthermore, it distinguishes two dimensions of the democratic input legitimacy problem of IRAs: democratic legitimacy of IRAs as public institutions and of IRAs’ operation, and it applies the assessment formula to IRAs in the US and the EU in relation to both dimensions. Distinguishing two dimensions of the input legitimacy issue of IRAs makes it more feasible to determine the exact location of potential problems, which is essential to find appropriate solutions.

  11. Beyond Poverty: Engaging with Input in Generative SLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Tom; Unsworth, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    A generative approach to language acquisition is no different from any other in assuming that target language input is crucial for language acquisition. This discussion note addresses the place of input in generative second language acquisition (SLA) research and the perception in the wider field of SLA research that generative SLA…

  12. Extracting Information from Spoken User Input. A Machine Learning Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lendvai, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a module that performs automatic analysis of user input in spoken dialogue systems using machine learning algorithms. The input to the module is material received from the speech recogniser and the dialogue manager of the spoken dialogue system, the output is a four-level

  13. Language Learning from Inconsistent Input: Bilingual and Monolingual Toddlers Compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bree, Elise; Verhagen, Josje; Kerkhoff, Annemarie; Doedens, Willemijn; Unsworth, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    This study examines novel language learning from inconsistent input in monolingual and bilingual toddlers. We predicted an advantage for the bilingual toddlers on the basis of the structural sensitivity hypothesis. Monolingual and bilingual 24-month-olds performed two novel language learning experiments. The first contained consistent input, and…

  14. Modeling recognition memory using the similarity structure of natural input

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacroix, J.P.W.; Murre, J.M.J.; Postma, E.O.; van den Herik, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    The natural input memory (NIM) model is a new model for recognition memory that operates on natural visual input. A biologically informed perceptual preprocessing method takes local samples (eye fixations) from a natural image and translates these into a feature-vector representation. During

  15. Farm Input Management Strategies In Small Scale Farming In Niger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farm Input Management Strategies In Small Scale Farming In Niger State, Nigeria. ... Tools used for analysis were frequency distribution tables and percentages. The results showed preference for the ... quality of their lives. Keywords: Adoption, effective farm input management, income generation, strategies, Niger State

  16. Putting Resource Dynamics into Continuous Input Ideal Free Distribution Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lessells, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    Continuous input models of the ideal free distribution usually assume that resources are consumed immediately that they enter a patch. This paper presents models of constant continuous input in which this assumption is relaxed, so that predictions can be made about the standing crops of resources

  17. Measuring Equity: Creating a New Standard for Inputs and Outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoeppel, Robert C.; Della Sala, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce a new statistic to capture the ratio of equitable student outcomes given equitable inputs. Given the fact that finance structures should be aligned to outcome standards according to judicial interpretation, a ratio of outputs to inputs, or "equity ratio," is introduced to discern if conclusions can be…

  18. Identifying Inputs to Leadership Development within an Interdisciplinary Leadership Minor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, Aaron J.; Sorensen, Tyson J.; Velez, Jonathan J.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers conducted a qualitative analysis of students' experiences while enrolled in an interdisciplinary leadership minor with the intent to determine programmatic inputs that spur leadership development. Based on students' reflections, three domains of programmatic inputs for leadership development within the minor were identified. These…

  19. VIC (Vector-In-Commander) Input Preprocessor (VIP) Reference Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    ene in this block. 00 Form 1473 Istructions Reverse JUN U6 WA 60M~ OmN .... 1.04.-0."$ ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The primary authors of the VIC Input...the data may be recorded. LOGISTC MENU Transfers from network menu for logistics data. Data input in logistic menu goes to the same file as the

  20. Input Processing and Processing Instruction: Definitions and Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Hashemnezhad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Input Processing (IP proposed by VanPatten (1993, was innovated based on Krashen’s (1982 input hypothesis. In IP model, principles are stated that describe how learners either miss grammatical markers in the input or how they get them wrong (VanPatten, 2002b. Based on this model, learners process input for meaning before form. Processing Instruction (PI, an explicit focus on form that is informed by the model of IP, is a practical solution to IP model. The goal of PI is to help L2 learners derive richer intake from input by having them engage in structured input activities that push them away from the strategies they normally use to make form-meaning connections (Wong, 2004. This article intends to study  the definitions of IP and PI as well the issues of IP and PI, including the principles of IP,  features and goal of PI, and input used in PI (Structured input activities, and then to introduce difference between the terms IP and PI.

  1. 40 CFR 1065.210 - Work input and output sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Work input and output sensors. 1065... Ambient Conditions § 1065.210 Work input and output sensors. (a) Application. Use instruments as specified... sensors, transducers, and meters that meet the specifications in Table 1 of § 1065.205. Note that your...

  2. Assessment of resource inputs and service delivery in school library ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resource inputs into school library media programme have been identified as major determinants of the success of service delivery in School Library Media Centres (SLMCs). The quality of outputs from any system cannot be better than the quality of inputs supplied. Therefore, this study investigated the state of resource ...

  3. Test Generation with Inputs, Outputs and Repetitive Quiescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tretmans, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper studies testing based on labelled transition systems, using the assumption that implementations communicate with their environment via inputs and outputs. Such implementations are formalized by restricting the class of transition systems to those systems that can always accept input

  4. Achievable Information Rates on Linear Interference Channels with Discrete Input

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yankov, Metodi Plamenov; Forchhammer, Søren

    2015-01-01

    In this paper lower bound on the capacity of multi-dimensional linear interference channels is derived, when the input is taken from a finite size alphabet. The bounds are based on the QR decomposition of the channel matrix, and hold for any input distribution that is independent across dimensions...

  5. Diversity Matters: Parent Input Predicts Toddler Verb Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ning; Hadley, Pamela A.; Rispoli, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The contribution of parent input to children's subsequent expressive verb diversity was explored in twenty typically developing toddlers with small verb lexicons. Child developmental factors and parent input measures (i.e. verb quantity, verb diversity, and verb-related structural cues) at age 1;9 were examined as potential predictors of…

  6. Overview of the Agricultural Inputs Sector in the EU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesseler, J.H.H.; Bonanno, A.; Drabik, D.; Materia, V.C.; Malaguti, L.; Meijer, M.; Venus, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the seed, feed, energy, fertilizer, and plant protection agents farm input sectors from two perspectives: the demand side and the supply side. Average input shares in the EU-27 for seeds and fertilizers declined while they increased for feeds. Market concentration is the largest

  7. Does Input Enhancement Work for Learning Politeness Strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, Mohammad; Safari, Mahmood

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of input enhancement on the acquisition of English politeness strategies by intermediate EFL learners. Two groups of freshman English majors were randomly assigned to the experimental (enhanced input) group and the control (mere exposure) group. Initially, a TOEFL test and a discourse completion test (DCT)…

  8. High efficiency input-output prism waveguide coupler: an analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarid, D

    1979-09-01

    The theory and experimental results of the performance of a practical prism waveguide input-output coupler are presented. The coupling scheme, which results in a 94% coupling efficiency, uses a single prism for both input and output coupling, with the light propagating 1 cm in the LiNbO(3) Ti in diffused waveguide.

  9. Energy inputs and outputs in a chickpea production system in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of input used in production were investigated. The aims of this study were to determine the amount of input–output energy used in chickpea production, to investigate the efficiency of energy consumption, to make an economic analysis of chickpea production, and to establish a relation between energy inputs and yield.

  10. ON THE INTERPRETATION OF FIXED INPUT COEFFICIENTS UNDER AGGREGATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMESNARD, L; DIETZENBACHER, E

    A fixed input coefficient is traditionally interpreted as the additional input from one sector that is required for an additional unit of output in another sector. It is shown that this ratio of increments is, in general, not fixed under aggregation. A tight upper and lower bound for its variation

  11. Arterial input functions in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: which model performs best when assessing breast cancer response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, N Jane; Makris, Andreas; Tunariu, Nina; Collins, David J; Li, Sonia P; Ah-See, Mei-Lin; Beresford, Mark; Padhani, Anwar R

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of six models of population arterial input function (AIF) in the setting of primary breast cancer and neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). The ability to fit patient dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data, provide physiological plausible data and detect pathological response was assessed. Methods: Quantitative DCE-MRI parameters were calculated for 27 patients at baseline and after 2 cycles of NAC for 6 AIFs. Pathological complete response detection was compared with change in these parameters from a reproduction cohort of 12 patients using the Bland–Altman approach and receiver-operating characteristic analysis. Results: There were fewer fit failures pre-NAC for all models, with the modified Fritz-Hansen having the fewest pre-NAC (3.6%) and post-NAC (18.8%), contrasting with the femoral artery AIF (19.4% and 43.3%, respectively). Median transfer constant values were greatest for the Weinmann function and also showed greatest reductions with treatment (−68%). Reproducibility (r) was the lowest for the Weinmann function (r = −49.7%), with other AIFs ranging from r = −27.8 to −39.2%. Conclusion: Using the best performing AIF is essential to maximize the utility of quantitative DCE-MRI parameters in predicting response to NAC treatment. Applying our criteria, the modified Fritz-Hansen and cosine bolus approximated Parker AIF models performed best. The Fritz-Hansen and biexponential approximated Parker AIFs performed less well, and the Weinmann and femoral artery AIFs are not recommended. Advances in knowledge: We demonstrate that using the most appropriate AIF can aid successful prediction of response to NAC in breast cancer. PMID:27187599

  12. DNA Memory and Input/Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    There are also Linux downloads for an SBW broker, the Metatool agent, and the NOM agent that handles providing an SBML file to Metatool. It is also...Model ( NOM ) and MetaToolSBW, a network analysis tool. These help to develop a pipeline from genome sequence and annotation to metabolic and genetic...4.8E+005 3.1E+005 4.2E+ 004 2E+005 1.3E+005 5.6E+ 004 49.5 50 50.5 51 51.5 52 52.5 485.5 486 486.5 487 487.5 488 488.5 489 489.5 490 490.5 rt m /z

  13. Input Range Testing for the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    This document contains a test plan for testing input values to the General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT). The plan includes four primary types of information, which rigorously define all tests that should be performed to validate that GMAT will accept allowable inputs and deny disallowed inputs. The first is a complete list of all allowed object fields in GMAT. The second type of information, is test input to be attempted for each field. The third type of information is allowable input values for all objects fields in GMAT. The final piece of information is how GMAT should respond to both valid and invalid information. It is VERY important to note that the tests below must be performed for both the Graphical User Interface and the script!! The examples are illustrated using a scripting perspective, because it is simpler to write up. However, the test must be performed for both interfaces to GMAT.

  14. Effect of plantar cutaneous inputs on center of pressure during quiet stance in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: The findings indicate that mechanical facilitation of sensation on the plantar soles enhanced postural stability in older adults. The results show that plantar cutaneous inputs provide information that leads to reduced postural sway in healthy older adults. This could have implications in clinical and rehabilitative areas.

  15. The Economic Impact of Higher Education Institutions in Ireland: Evidence from Disaggregated Input-Output Tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiantao; Larkin, Charles; Lucey, Brian M.

    2017-01-01

    While there has been a long history of modelling the economic impact of higher education institutions (HEIs), little research has been undertaken in the context of Ireland. This paper provides, for the first time, a disaggregated input-output table for Ireland's higher education sector. The picture painted overall is a higher education sector that…

  16. Regional Capital Inputs in Chinese Industry and Manufacturing, 1978-2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Lili; Szirmai, Adam

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides new estimates of capital inputs in the Chinese economy. Estimates are made for the total economy (1953-2003), for the industrial sector (1978-2003) and for the manufacturing sector (1985-2003). The estimates for industry and manufacturing are broken down by thirty regions. The

  17. Development of a Math Input Interface with Flick Operation for Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Nakahara, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Developing online test environments for e-learning for mobile devices will be useful to increase drill practice opportunities. In order to provide a drill practice environment for calculus using an online math test system, such as STACK, we develop a flickable math input interface that can be easily used on mobile devices. The number of taps…

  18. Comparisons of methods for quantitative analysis of lung lesions using FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joon Young; Choi, Yong; Kim, Sang Eun; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Byung Tae [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    It has been demonstrated that quantitative analysis approaches could improve the accuracy of FDG-PET in identifying malignant lesions. In order to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of various quantitative analysis methods of FDG-PET in differentiating malignant from benign lung masses, 22 patients (malignant: 13, benign: 9) were studied after overnight fasting. Dynamic images were acquired for 56 min after i.v. injection of about 370 MBq (10 mCi) of FDG using a GE Advance tomograph and reconstructed with photon attenuation correction. Standardized uptake values normalized to patient's body weight and plasma glucose concentration (SUVglu) were calculated. The uptake rate constant of FDG and glucose metabolic rates were quantified using Patlak graphical analysis (Kpat and MRpat, respectively), three compartment- five parameter model (K5p, MR5p), and six parameter model taking into account heterogeneity of tumor tissue (K6p, MR6p, Wu et al. 1995). Input functions were derived from a ROI in the left atrium blood pool. The lumped constant of the FDG model was assumed to be a constant value of 1. Areas under receiver operating characteristics curves (ROC) were calculated for each analysis. The six parameter and Patlak graphical analysis approaches are superior to nonkinetic analysis. Plasma glucose concentration needs to be taken into account for quantitative analysis of FDG-PET lung cancer studies. Although quantitative assessment could not differentiate some high metabolic benign lesions such as active inflammation from malignant lesions, it may improve the utility of FDG-PET by providing quantitative values and by reducing interobserver variability.

  19. Targeted quantitation of proteins by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebler, Daniel C; Zimmerman, Lisa J

    2013-06-04

    Quantitative measurement of proteins is one of the most fundamental analytical tasks in a biochemistry laboratory, but widely used immunochemical methods often have limited specificity and high measurement variation. In this review, we discuss applications of multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry, which allows sensitive, precise quantitative analyses of peptides and the proteins from which they are derived. Systematic development of MRM assays is permitted by databases of peptide mass spectra and sequences, software tools for analysis design and data analysis, and rapid evolution of tandem mass spectrometer technology. Key advantages of MRM assays are the ability to target specific peptide sequences, including variants and modified forms, and the capacity for multiplexing that allows analysis of dozens to hundreds of peptides. Different quantitative standardization methods provide options that balance precision, sensitivity, and assay cost. Targeted protein quantitation by MRM and related mass spectrometry methods can advance biochemistry by transforming approaches to protein measurement.

  20. A neuromorphic model of motor overflow in focal hand dystonia due to correlated sensory input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Won Joon; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Motor overflow is a common and frustrating symptom of dystonia, manifested as unintentional muscle contraction that occurs during an intended voluntary movement. Although it is suspected that motor overflow is due to cortical disorganization in some types of dystonia (e.g. focal hand dystonia), it remains elusive which mechanisms could initiate and, more importantly, perpetuate motor overflow. We hypothesize that distinct motor elements have low risk of motor overflow if their sensory inputs remain statistically independent. But when provided with correlated sensory inputs, pre-existing crosstalk among sensory projections will grow under spike-timing-dependent-plasticity (STDP) and eventually produce irreversible motor overflow. Approach. We emulated a simplified neuromuscular system comprising two anatomically distinct digital muscles innervated by two layers of spiking neurons with STDP. The synaptic connections between layers included crosstalk connections. The input neurons received either independent or correlated sensory drive during 4 days of continuous excitation. The emulation is critically enabled and accelerated by our neuromorphic hardware created in previous work. Main results. When driven by correlated sensory inputs, the crosstalk synapses gained weight and produced prominent motor overflow; the growth of crosstalk synapses resulted in enlarged sensory representation reflecting cortical reorganization. The overflow failed to recede when the inputs resumed their original uncorrelated statistics. In the control group, no motor overflow was observed. Significance. Although our model is a highly simplified and limited representation of the human sensorimotor system, it allows us to explain how correlated sensory input to anatomically distinct muscles is by itself sufficient to cause persistent and irreversible motor overflow. Further studies are needed to locate the source of correlation in sensory input.

  1. Simultaneous acquisition of dynamic PET-MRI: arterial input function using DSC-MRI and [18F]-FET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldeira, Liliana; Yun, Seong Dae; Silva, Nuno da; Filss, Christian; Scheins, Juergen; Telmann, Lutz; Herzog, Hans; Shah, Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine - 4, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2015-05-18

    This work focuses on the study of simultaneous dynamic MR-PET acquisition in brain tumour patients. MR-based perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and PET [18F]-FET are dynamic methods, which allow to evaluate tumour metabolism in a quantitative way. In both methods, arterial input function (AIF) is necessary for quantification. However, the AIF estimation is a challenging task. In this work, we explore the possibilities to combine dynamic MR and PET AIF.

  2. Control of time-dependent biological processes by temporally patterned input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezina, Vladimir; Orekhova, Irina V.; Weiss, Klaudiusz R.

    1997-01-01

    Temporal patterning of biological variables, in the form of oscillations and rhythms on many time scales, is ubiquitous. Altering the temporal pattern of an input variable greatly affects the output of many biological processes. We develop here a conceptual framework for a quantitative understanding of such pattern dependence, focusing particularly on nonlinear, saturable, time-dependent processes that abound in biophysics, biochemistry, and physiology. We show theoretically that pattern dependence is governed by the nonlinearity of the input–output transformation as well as its time constant. As a result, only patterns on certain time scales permit the expression of pattern dependence, and processes with different time constants can respond preferentially to different patterns. This has implications for temporal coding and decoding, and allows differential control of processes through pattern. We show how pattern dependence can be quantitatively predicted using only information from steady, unpatterned input. To apply our ideas, we analyze, in an experimental example, how muscle contraction depends on the pattern of motorneuron firing. PMID:9294230

  3. Simulation of TunneLadder Traveling-Wave Tube Input/Output Coupler Characteristics Using MAFIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kory, Carol L.; Qureshi, A. Haq

    1996-01-01

    RF input/output coupler characteristics for the TunneLadder traveling-wave tube have been calculated using the three-dimensional computer code, MAFIA and compared to experimental data with good agreement. Theory behind coupling of the TunneLadder interaction circuit to input and output waveguides is presented and VSWR data is calculated for variations on principal coupler dimensions to provide insight into manufacturing tolerances necessary for acceptable performance. Accuracy of results using MAFIA demonstrates how experimental hardware testing of three-dimensional coupler designs can be reduced.

  4. Performance Evaluation of Type-3 PLLs Under Wide Variation in Input Voltage and Frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aravind, C. K.; Rani, B.Indu; Chakkarapani, M.

    2017-01-01

    bandwidth, both the single loop and dual loop Type-3 PLL exhibit similar dynamics provided the supply voltage is balanced. However, under voltage sag conditions, dual loop PLL shows improved dynamic response without affecting its stability. Further, the tracking time is reduced as the feed forward frequency......This paper presents a detailed analysis of Type-3 PLL under wide variation in input voltage and frequency. Using small signal modeling, the performance of both single loop and dual loop type-3 PLL for variation in input voltage and frequency is studied. The analysis shows that for the same...

  5. Performance Analysis of Adaptive Volterra Filters in the Finite-Alphabet Input Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaïdane Mériem

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the analysis of adaptive Volterra filters, driven by the LMS algorithm, in the finite-alphabet inputs case. A tailored approach for the input context is presented and used to analyze the behavior of this nonlinear adaptive filter. Complete and rigorous mean square analysis is provided without any constraining independence assumption. Exact transient and steady-state performances expressed in terms of critical step size, rate of transient decrease, optimal step size, excess mean square error in stationary mode, and tracking nonstationarities are deduced.

  6. Minimum Symbol Error Rate Detection in Single-Input Multiple-Output Channels with Markov Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Minimum symbol error rate detection in Single-Input Multiple- Output(SIMO) channels with Markov noise is presented. The special case of zero-mean Gauss-Markov noise is examined closer as it only requires knowledge of the second-order moments. In this special case, it is shown that optimal detection...... can be achieved by a Multiple-Input Multiple- Output(MIMO) whitening filter followed by a traditional BCJR algorithm. The Gauss-Markov noise model provides a reasonable approximation for co-channel interference, making it an interesting single-user detector for many multiuser communication systems...

  7. On Couple-Group Consensus of Multiagent Networks with Communication and Input Time Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-hao Ji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the couple-group consensus problems of the multiagent networks with the influence of communication and input time delays. Based on the frequency-domain theory, some algebraic criteria are addressed analytically. From the results, it is found that the input time delays and the coupling strengths between agents of the systems play a crucial role in reaching group consensus. The convergence of the system is independent of the communication delays, but it will affect the convergence rate of the system. Finally, several simulated examples are provided to verify the validity and correctness of our theoretical results.

  8. MOOSE2—A toolbox for least-costly application-oriented input design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariette Annergren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MOOSE2 is a MATLAB®-based toolbox for solving least-costly application-oriented input design problems in system identification. MOOSE2 provides the spectrum of the input signal to be used in the identification experiment made to estimate a linear parametric model of the system. The objective is to find a spectrum that minimizes experiment cost while fulfilling constraints imposed in the experiment and on the obtained model. The constraints considered by MOOSE2 are: frequency or power constraints on the signal spectra in the experiment, and application or quality specifications on the obtained model.

  9. Automation of RELAP5 input calibration and code validation using genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phung, Viet-Anh, E-mail: vaphung@kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Kööp, Kaspar, E-mail: kaspar@safety.sci.kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Grishchenko, Dmitry, E-mail: dmitry@safety.sci.kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Vorobyev, Yury, E-mail: yura3510@gmail.com [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov square 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Kudinov, Pavel, E-mail: pavel@safety.sci.kth.se [Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-04-15

    SRQ of primary interest. The ranges of the input parameter were defined based on the experimental data and results of the calibration process. Then GA was used in order to identify combinations of the uncertain input parameters that provide maximum deviation of code prediction results from the experimental data. Such approach provides a conservative estimate of the possible discrepancy between the code result and the experimental data.

  10. Simultaneous external and internal stabilization of linear systems with input saturation and non-input-additive sustained disturbances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xu; Saberi, Ali; Grip, H°avard Fjær; Stoorvogel, Antonie Arij

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study simultaneous external and internal stabilization of the linear system under input saturation and non-input additive sustained disturbances. For systems that are asymptotic null controllable with bounded control, it is shown that a nonlinear dynamic feedback controller can be

  11. Provider of Services File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The POS file consists of two data files, one for CLIA labs and one for 18 other provider types. The file names are CLIA and OTHER. If downloading the file, note it...

  12. The Provident Principal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, John R.

    This monograph offers leadership approaches for school principals. Discussion applies the business leadership theory of Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus to the role of the principal. Each of the booklet's three parts concludes with discussion questions. Part 1, "Visions and Values for the Provident Principal," demonstrates the importance of…

  13. What HERA may provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); De Roeck, Albert [CERN, Genf (Switzerland); Bartles, Jochen [Univ. Hamburg (DE). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II] (and others)

    2008-09-15

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. (orig.)

  14. care Providers in Ibadan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and eighty six respondents (77.7%) were aware of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT). Awareness ... Key Words: malaria in pregnancy, intermittent preventive treatment, malaria control, health care providers. Department of Obstetrics .... Auxiliary nurses do not have formal training prior to employment.

  15. Environmental Transport Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. A. Wasiolek

    2003-06-27

    This analysis report is one of the technical reports documenting the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the reports developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for the TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2003 [163602]). Some documents in Figure 1-1 may be under development and not available when this report is issued. This figure provides an understanding of how this report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application (LA), but access to the listed documents is not required to understand the contents of this report. This report is one of the reports that develops input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003 [160699]) describes the conceptual model, the mathematical model, and the input parameters. The purpose of this analysis is to develop biosphere model parameter values related to radionuclide transport and accumulation in the environment. These parameters support calculations of radionuclide concentrations in the environmental media (e.g., soil, crops, animal products, and air) resulting from a given radionuclide concentration at the source of contamination (i.e., either in groundwater or volcanic ash). The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2003 [163602]). This analysis develops values of parameters associated with many features, events, and processes (FEPs) applicable to the reference biosphere (DTN: M00303SEPFEPS2.000 [162452]), which are addressed in the biosphere model (BSC 2003 [160699]). The treatment of these FEPs is described in BSC (2003 [160699

  16. Integrated genomics and molecular breeding approaches for dissecting the complex quantitative traits in crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujur, Alice; Saxena, Maneesha S; Bajaj, Deepak; Laxmi; Parida, Swarup K

    2013-12-01

    The enormous population growth, climate change and global warming are now considered major threats to agriculture and world's food security. To improve the productivity and sustainability of agriculture, the development of highyielding and durable abiotic and biotic stress-tolerant cultivars and/climate resilient crops is essential. Henceforth, understanding the molecular mechanism and dissection of complex quantitative yield and stress tolerance traits is the prime objective in current agricultural biotechnology research. In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in plant genomics and molecular breeding research pertaining to conventional and next-generation whole genome, transcriptome and epigenome sequencing efforts, generation of huge genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic resources and development of modern genomics-assisted breeding approaches in diverse crop genotypes with contrasting yield and abiotic stress tolerance traits. Unfortunately, the detailed molecular mechanism and gene regulatory networks controlling such complex quantitative traits is not yet well understood in crop plants. Therefore, we propose an integrated strategies involving available enormous and diverse traditional and modern -omics (structural, functional, comparative and epigenomics) approaches/resources and genomics-assisted breeding methods which agricultural biotechnologist can adopt/utilize to dissect and decode the molecular and gene regulatory networks involved in the complex quantitative yield and stress tolerance traits in crop plants. This would provide clues and much needed inputs for rapid selection of novel functionally relevant molecular tags regulating such complex traits to expedite traditional and modern marker-assisted genetic enhancement studies in target crop species for developing high-yielding stress-tolerant varieties.

  17. Liver kinetics of glucose analogs measured in pigs by PET: importance of dual-input blood sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, O L; Bass, L; Roelsgaard, K

    2001-01-01

    -tissue exchange. Furthermore, the arterial input led to absurdly low estimates for the extracellular volume compared with the independently measured hepatic blood volume of 0.25 +/- 0.01 mL/mL (milliliter blood per milliliter liver tissue). In contrast, the use of a dual-input function provided parameter...... parameters, because of ignorance of the dual blood supply from the hepatic artery and the portal vein to the liver. METHODS: Six pigs underwent PET after [15O]carbon monoxide inhalation, 3-O-[11C]methylglucose (MG) injection, and [18F]FDG injection. For the glucose scans, PET data were acquired for 90 min....... Hepatic arterial and portal venous blood samples and flows were measured during the scan. The dual-input function was calculated as the flow-weighted input. RESULTS: For both MG and FDG, the compartmental analysis using arterial input led to systematic underestimation of the rate constants for rapid blood...

  18. Comparison of Text-Based and Visual-Based Programming Input Methods for First-Time Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Saito

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: When learning to program, both text-based and visual-based input methods are common. However, it is unclear which method is more appropriate for first-time learners (first learners. Background: The differences in the learning effect between text-based and visual-based input methods for first learners are compared the using a questionnaire and problems to assess first learners’ understanding of programming. In addition, we study the benefits and feasibility of both methods. Methodology: In this research, we used the sandbox game Minecraft and the extended function ComputerCraftEdu (CCEdu. CCEdu provides a Lua programming environments for the two (text and visual methods inside Minecraft. We conducted a lecture course on both methods for first learners in Japan ranging in age from 6 to about 15 years old. The lecture taught the basics and concepts of programming. Furthermore, we implemented a questionnaire about the attitude of programming before and after the lecture. Contribution: This research is more than a comparison between the visual method and the text method. It compares visual input and text input methods in the same environment. It clearly shows the difference between the programming learning effects of visual input and text input for first learners. In addition, it shows the more suitable input method for introductory education of first learners in programming learning. Findings: The following results are revealed: (1 The visual input method induces a larger change in attitude toward programming; (2 The number of operations and input quantity influence both groups; (3 The overall results suggest that a visual input is advantageous in a programming implementation environment for first learners. Impact on Society: A visual input method is better suited for first learners as it improves the attitude toward programming. Future Research: In the future, we plan to collect and analyze additional data as well as elucidate the

  19. Innovations in Quantitative Risk Management

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Matthias; Zagst, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative models are omnipresent –but often controversially discussed– in todays risk management practice. New regulations, innovative financial products, and advances in valuation techniques provide a continuous flow of challenging problems for financial engineers and risk managers alike. Designing a sound stochastic model requires finding a careful balance between parsimonious model assumptions, mathematical viability, and interpretability of the output. Moreover, data requirements and the end-user training are to be considered as well. The KPMG Center of Excellence in Risk Management conference Risk Management Reloaded and this proceedings volume contribute to bridging the gap between academia –providing methodological advances– and practice –having a firm understanding of the economic conditions in which a given model is used. Discussed fields of application range from asset management, credit risk, and energy to risk management issues in insurance. Methodologically, dependence modeling...

  20. Energy & Climate: Getting Quantitative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Richard

    2011-11-01

    A noted environmentalist claims that buying an SUV instead of a regular car is energetically equivalent to leaving your refrigerator door open for seven years. A fossil-fuel apologist argues that solar energy is a pie-in-the-sky dream promulgated by na"ive environmentalists, because there's nowhere near enough solar energy to meet humankind's energy demand. A group advocating shutdown of the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant claims that 70% of its electrical energy is lost in transmission lines. Around the world, thousands agitate for climate action, under the numerical banner ``350.'' Neither the environmentalist, the fossil-fuel apologist, the antinuclear activists, nor most of those marching under the ``350'' banner can back up their assertions with quantitative arguments. Yet questions about energy and its environmental impacts almost always require quantitative answers. Physics can help! This poster gives some cogent examples, based on the newly published 2^nd edition of the author's textbook Energy, Environment, and Climate.

  1. Internet Medline providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, D L; Coady, T R

    1998-01-01

    Each database in this review has features that will appeal to some users. Each provides a credible interface to information available within the Medline database. The major differences are pricing and interface design. In this context, features that cost more and might seem trivial to the occasional searcher may actually save time and money when used by the professional. Internet Grateful Med is free, but Ms. Coady and I agree the availability of only three ANDable search fields is a major functional limitation. PubMed is also free but much more powerful. The command line interface that permits very sophisticated searches requires a commitment that casual users will find intimidating. Ms. Coady did not believe the feedback currently provided during a search was sufficient for sustained professional use. Paper Chase and Knowledge Finder are mature, modestly priced Medline search services. Paper Chase provides a menu-driven interface that is very easy to use, yet permits the user to search virtually all of Medline's data fields. Knowledge Finder emphasizes the use of natural language queries but fully supports more traditional search strategies. The impact of the tradeoff between fuzzy and Boolean strategies offered by Knowledge Finder is unclear and beyond the scope of this review. Additional software must be downloaded to use all of Knowledge Finders' features. Other providers required no software beyond the basic Internet browser, and this requirement prevented Ms. Coady from evaluating Knowledge Finder. Ovid and Silver Platter offer well-designed interfaces that simplify the construction of complex queries. These are clearly services designed for professional users. While pricing eliminates these for casual use, it should be emphasized that Medline citation access is only a portion of the service provided by these high-end vendors. Finally, we should comment that each of the vendors and government-sponsored services provided prompt and useful feedback to e

  2. Unknown Input Observer Design for Fuzzy Bilinear System: An LMI Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Saoudi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method to design a fuzzy bilinear observer (FBO with unknown inputs is developed for a class of nonlinear systems. The nonlinear system is modeled as a fuzzy bilinear model (FBM. This kind of T-S fuzzy model is especially suitable for a nonlinear system with a bilinear term. The proposed fuzzy bilinear observer subject to unknown inputs is developed to ensure the asymptotic convergence of the error dynamic using the Lyapunov method. The proposed design conditions are given in linear matrix inequality (LMI formulation. The paper studies also the problem of fault detection and isolation. An unknown input fuzzy bilinear fault diagnosis observer design is proposed. This work is given for both continuous and discrete cases of fuzzy bilinear models. Illustrative examples are chosen to provide the effectiveness of the given methodology.

  3. Multilaminar networks of cortical neurons integrate common inputs from sensory thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Nicolás A; Bourg, Jacques; Petreanu, Leopoldo

    2016-08-01

    Neurons in the thalamorecipient layers of sensory cortices integrate thalamic and recurrent cortical input. Cortical neurons form fine-scale, functionally cotuned networks, but whether interconnected cortical neurons within a column process common thalamocortical inputs is unknown. We tested how local and thalamocortical connectivity relate to each other by analyzing cofluctuations of evoked responses in cortical neurons after photostimulation of thalamocortical axons. We found that connected pairs of pyramidal neurons in layer (L) 4 of mouse visual cortex share more inputs from the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus than nonconnected pairs. Vertically aligned connected pairs of L4 and L2/3 neurons were also preferentially contacted by the same thalamocortical axons. Our results provide a circuit mechanism for the observed amplification of sensory responses by L4 circuits. They also show that sensory information is concurrently processed in L4 and L2/3 by columnar networks of interconnected neurons contacted by the same thalamocortical axons.

  4. Input-output model for MACCS nuclear accident impacts estimation¹

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Outkin, Alexander V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bixler, Nathan E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vargas, Vanessa N [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-27

    Since the original economic model for MACCS was developed, better quality economic data (as well as the tools to gather and process it) and better computational capabilities have become available. The update of the economic impacts component of the MACCS legacy model will provide improved estimates of business disruptions through the use of Input-Output based economic impact estimation. This paper presents an updated MACCS model, bases on Input-Output methodology, in which economic impacts are calculated using the Regional Economic Accounting analysis tool (REAcct) created at Sandia National Laboratories. This new GDP-based model allows quick and consistent estimation of gross domestic product (GDP) losses due to nuclear power plant accidents. This paper outlines the steps taken to combine the REAcct Input-Output-based model with the MACCS code, describes the GDP loss calculation, and discusses the parameters and modeling assumptions necessary for the estimation of long-term effects of nuclear power plant accidents.

  5. ATHENA AIDE: An expert system for ATHENA code input model preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, R.K.; Callow, R.A.; Larson, T.K.; Ransom, V.H.

    1987-01-01

    An expert system called the ATHENA AIDE that assists in the preparation of input models for the ATHENA thermal-hydraulics code has been developed by researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The ATHENA AIDE uses a menu driven graphics interface and rule-based and object-oriented programming techniques to assist users of the ATHENA code in performing the tasks involved in preparing the card image input files required to run ATHENA calculations. The ATHENA AIDE was developed and currently runs on single-user Xerox artificial intelligence workstations. Experience has shown that the intelligent modeling environment provided by the ATHENA AIDE expert system helps ease the modeling task by relieving the analyst of many mundane, repetitive, and error prone procedures involved in the construction of an input model. This reduces errors in the resulting models, helps promote standardized modeling practices, and allows models to be constructed more quickly than was previously possible. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Partial state estimation for linear systems with output and input time delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Q P; That, Nguyen D; Nam, Phan T; Trinh, H

    2014-03-01

    This paper deals with the problem of partial state observer design for linear systems that are subject to time delays in the measured output as well as the control input. By choosing a set of appropriate augmented Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals with a triple-integral term and using the information of both the delayed output and input, a novel approach to design a minimal-order observer is proposed to guarantee that the observer error is ε-convergent with an exponential rate. Existence conditions of such an observer are derived in terms of matrix inequalities for the cases with time delays in both the output and input and with output delay only. Constructive design algorithms are introduced. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the design procedure, practicality and effectiveness of the proposed observer. Copyright © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Graphical user interface for input output characterization of single variable and multivariable highly nonlinear systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrukh Adnan Khan M. D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Graphical User Interface (GUI software utility for the input/output characterization of single variable and multivariable nonlinear systems by obtaining the sinusoidal input describing function (SIDF of the plant. The software utility is developed on MATLAB R2011a environment. The developed GUI holds no restriction on the nonlinearity type, arrangement and system order; provided that output(s of the system is obtainable either though simulation or experiments. An insight to the GUI and its features are presented in this paper and example problems from both single variable and multivariable cases are demonstrated. The formulation of input/output behavior of the system is discussed and the nucleus of the MATLAB command underlying the user interface has been outlined. Some of the industries that would benefit from this software utility includes but not limited to aerospace, defense technology, robotics and automotive.

  8. High-order sliding mode observer for fractional commensurate linear systems with unknown input

    KAUST Repository

    Belkhatir, Zehor

    2017-05-20

    In this paper, a high-order sliding mode observer (HOSMO) is proposed for the joint estimation of the pseudo-state and the unknown input of fractional commensurate linear systems with single unknown input and a single output. The convergence of the proposed observer is proved using a Lyapunov-based approach. In addition, an enhanced variant of the proposed fractional-HOSMO is introduced to avoid the peaking phenomenon and thus to improve the estimation results in the transient phase. Simulation results are provided to illustrate the performance of the proposed fractional observer in both noise-free and noisy cases. The effect of the observer’s gains on the estimated pseudo-state and unknown input is also discussed.

  9. MaXIC-Q Web: a fully automated web service using statistical and computational methods for protein quantitation based on stable isotope labeling and LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Chih-Chiang; Tsui, Yin-Hao; Yian, Yi-Hwa; Chen, Yi-Ju; Yang, Han-Yin; Yu, Chuan-Yih; Lynn, Ke-Shiuan; Chen, Yu-Ju; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2009-07-01

    Isotope labeling combined with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) provides a robust platform for analyzing differential protein expression in proteomics research. We present a web service, called MaXIC-Q Web (http://ms.iis.sinica.edu.tw/MaXIC-Q_Web/), for quantitation analysis of large-scale datasets generated from proteomics experiments using various stable isotope-labeling techniques, e.g. SILAC, ICAT and user-developed labeling methods. It accepts spectral files in the standard mzXML format and search results from SEQUEST, Mascot and ProteinProphet as input. Furthermore, MaXIC-Q Web uses statistical and computational methods to construct two kinds of elution profiles for each ion, namely, PIMS (projected ion mass spectrum) and XIC (extracted ion chromatogram) from MS data. Toward accurate quantitation, a stringent validation procedure is performed on PIMSs to filter out peptide ions interfered with co-eluting peptides or noise. The areas of XICs determine ion abundances, which are used to calculate peptide and protein ratios. Since MaXIC-Q Web adopts stringent validation on spectral data, it achieves high accuracy so that manual validation effort can be substantially reduced. Furthermore, it provides various visualization diagrams and comprehensive quantitation reports so that users can conveniently inspect quantitation results. In summary, MaXIC-Q Web is a user-friendly, interactive, robust, generic web service for quantitation based on ICAT and SILAC labeling techniques.

  10. MaXIC-Q Web: a fully automated web service using statistical and computational methods for protein quantitation based on stable isotope labeling and LC–MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Chih-Chiang; Tsui, Yin-Hao; Yian, Yi-Hwa; Chen, Yi-Ju; Yang, Han-Yin; Yu, Chuan-Yih; Lynn, Ke-Shiuan; Chen, Yu-Ju; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2009-01-01

    Isotope labeling combined with liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) provides a robust platform for analyzing differential protein expression in proteomics research. We present a web service, called MaXIC-Q Web (http://ms.iis.sinica.edu.tw/MaXIC-Q_Web/), for quantitation analysis of large-scale datasets generated from proteomics experiments using various stable isotope-labeling techniques, e.g. SILAC, ICAT and user-developed labeling methods. It accepts spectral files in the standard mzXML format and search results from SEQUEST, Mascot and ProteinProphet as input. Furthermore, MaXIC-Q Web uses statistical and computational methods to construct two kinds of elution profiles for each ion, namely, PIMS (projected ion mass spectrum) and XIC (extracted ion chromatogram) from MS data. Toward accurate quantitation, a stringent validation procedure is performed on PIMSs to filter out peptide ions interfered with co-eluting peptides or noise. The areas of XICs determine ion abundances, which are used to calculate peptide and protein ratios. Since MaXIC-Q Web adopts stringent validation on spectral data, it achieves high accuracy so that manual validation effort can be substantially reduced. Furthermore, it provides various visualization diagrams and comprehensive quantitation reports so that users can conveniently inspect quantitation results. In summary, MaXIC-Q Web is a user-friendly, interactive, robust, generic web service for quantitation based on ICAT and SILAC labeling techniques. PMID:19528069

  11. Reciprocal subsidies in ponds: does leaf input increase frog biomass export?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Julia E; Semlitsch, Raymond D

    2012-12-01

    Reciprocal subsidies occur when ecosystems are paired, both importing and exporting resources to each other. The input of subsidies increases reciprocal subsidy export, but it is unclear how this changes with other important factors, such as ambient resources. We provide a conceptual framework for reciprocal subsidies and empirical data testing this framework using a pond-forest system in Missouri, USA. Our experiment used in situ pond mesocosms and three species of anurans: wood frogs, American toads, and southern leopard frogs. We predicted that increases in ambient resources (primary productivity) and detrital subsidy input (deciduous tree leaves) into pond mesocosms would increase reciprocal export (frog biomass) to the surrounding terrestrial ecosystem. In contrast, we found that increases in primary productivity consistently decreased frog biomass, except with leaf litter inputs. With leaf inputs, primary productivity did not affect the export of frogs, indicating that leaf detritus and associated microbial communities may be more important than algae for frog production. We found that subsidy inputs tended to increase reciprocal exports, and thus partial concordance with our conceptual framework.

  12. Garbage In Garbage Out Garbage In : Improving the Inputs and Atmospheric Feedbacks in Seasonal Snowpack Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, E. D.

    2016-12-01

    Without good input data, almost any model will produce bad output; however, alpine environments are extremely difficult places to make measurements of those inputs. Perhaps the least well known input is precipitation, but almost as important are temperature, wind, humidity, and radiation. Recent advances in atmospheric modeling have improved the fidelity of the output such that model output is sometimes better than interpolated observations, particularly for precipitation; however these models come with a tremendous computational cost. We describe the Intermediate Complexity Atmospheric Research model (ICAR) as one path to a computationally efficient method to improve snow pack model inputs over complex terrain. ICAR provides estimates of all inputs at a small fraction of the computational cost of a traditional atmospheric model such as the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF). Importantly, ICAR is able to simulate feedbacks from the land surface that are critical for estimating the air temperature. In addition, we will explore future improvements to the local wind fields including the use of statistics derived from limited duration Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model runs. These wind fields play a critical role in determing the redistribution of snow, and the redistribution of snow changes the surface topography and thus the wind field. We show that a proper depiction of snowpack redistribution can have a large affect on streamflow timing, and an even larger effect on the climate change signal of that streamflow.

  13. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Yu, Zhenzhen

    2017-04-11

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  14. Unsupervised Learning of Overlapping Image Components Using Divisive Input Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratling, M. W.; De Meyer, K.; Kompass, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that nonnegative matrix factorisation is mathematically related to a class of neural networks that employ negative feedback as a mechanism of competition. This observation inspires a novel learning algorithm which we call Divisive Input Modulation (DIM). The proposed algorithm provides a mathematically simple and computationally efficient method for the unsupervised learning of image components, even in conditions where these elementary features overlap considerably. To test the proposed algorithm, a novel artificial task is introduced which is similar to the frequently-used bars problem but employs squares rather than bars to increase the degree of overlap between components. Using this task, we investigate how the proposed method performs on the parsing of artificial images composed of overlapping features, given the correct representation of the individual components; and secondly, we investigate how well it can learn the elementary components from artificial training images. We compare the performance of the proposed algorithm with its predecessors including variations on these algorithms that have produced state-of-the-art performance on the bars problem. The proposed algorithm is more successful than its predecessors in dealing with overlap and occlusion in the artificial task that has been used to assess performance. PMID:19424442

  15. How much control is enough? Influence of unreliable input on user experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Laar, Bram; Plass-Oude Bos, Danny; Reuderink, Boris; Poel, Mannes; Nijholt, Anton

    2013-12-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCI) provide a valuable new input modality within human–computer interaction systems. However, like other body-based inputs such as gesture or gaze based systems, the system recognition of input commands is still far from perfect. This raises important questions, such as what level of control should such an interface be able to provide. What is the relationship between actual and perceived control? And in the case of applications for entertainment in which fun is an important part of user experience, should we even aim for the highest level of control, or is the optimum elsewhere? In this paper, we evaluate whether we can modulate the amount of control and if a game can be fun with less than perfect control. In the experiment users (n = 158) played a simple game in which a hamster has to be guided to the exit of a maze. The amount of control the user has over the hamster is varied. The variation of control through confusion matrices makes it possible to simulate the experience of using a BCI, while using the traditional keyboard for input. After each session the user completed a short questionnaire on user experience and perceived control. Analysis of the data showed that the perceived control of the user could largely be explained by the amount of control in the respective session. As expected, user frustration decreases with increasing control. Moreover, the results indicate that the relation between fun and control is not linear. Although at lower levels of control fun does increase with improved control, the level of fun drops just before perfect control is reached (with an optimum around 96%). This poses new insights for developers of games who want to incorporate some form of BCI or other modality with unreliable input in their game: for creating a fun game, unreliable input can be used to create a challenge for the user.

  16. Input Scanners: A Growing Impact In A Diverse Marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Kevin E.

    1989-08-01

    Just as newly invented photographic processes revolutionized the printing industry at the turn of the century, electronic imaging has affected almost every computer application today. To completely emulate traditionally mechanical means of information handling, computer based systems must be able to capture graphic images. Thus, there is a widespread need for the electronic camera, the digitizer, the input scanner. This paper will review how various types of input scanners are being used in many diverse applications. The following topics will be covered: - Historical overview of input scanners - New applications for scanners - Impact of scanning technology on select markets - Scanning systems issues

  17. Reducing external speedup requirements for input-queued crossbars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Michael Stubert

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a modified architecture for an input queued switch that reduces external speedup. Maximal size scheduling algorithms for input-buffered crossbars requires a speedup between port card and switch card. The speedup is typically in the range of 2, to compensate for the scheduler...... performance degradation. This implies, that the required bandwidth between port card and switch card is 2 times the actual port speed, adding to cost and complexity. To reduce this bandwidth, a modified architecture is proposed that introduces a small amount of input and output memory on the switch card chip...

  18. Management of communication disorders using family member input, group treatment, and telerehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Christine; Hatfield, Brooke; Georgeadis, Amy

    2005-01-01

    Today, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) practice stroke rehabilitation in environments where they have less time to manage the communication impairments of patients who are more medically fragile than ever before. Many SLPs have creatively adapted their practice to maximize functional outcomes for their patients. This article highlights three techniques designed to enhance functional SLP outcomes: maximizing family member input; providing group treatment; and providing treatment in remote, functional settings via telepractice technology.

  19. Guidance manual for the input of biological information to water-intake-structure design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, D.A.; Simmons, M.A.; McKenzie, D.H.

    1981-12-01

    This manual is intended to provide guidance to the biologist who is asked to provide biological input during the construction or subsequent alteration of a water intake structure. Examples of the types of biological information that might be included in intake design are presented. Procedures for quantifying biological information and defining specific tasks that will generate quantifiable data are discussed. Procedures described apply both to new and modified water intake structures.

  20. Whole cell, label free protein quantitation with data independent acquisition: quantitation at the MS2 level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Peter; Spicer, Vic; Schellenberg, John; Krokhin, Oleg; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David; Wilkins, John A

    2015-01-01

    Label free quantitation by measurement of peptide fragment signal intensity (MS2 quantitation) is a technique that has seen limited use due to the stochastic nature of data dependent acquisition (DDA). However, data independent acquisition has the potential to make large scale MS2 quantitation a more viable technique. In this study we used an implementation of data independent acquisition--SWATH--to perform label free protein quantitation in a model bacterium Clostridium stercorarium. Four tryptic digests analyzed by SWATH were probed by an ion library containing information on peptide mass and retention time obtained from DDA experiments. Application of this ion library to SWATH data quantified 1030 proteins with at least two peptides quantified (∼ 40% of predicted proteins in the C. stercorarium genome) in each replicate. Quantitative results obtained were very consistent between biological replicates (R(2) ∼ 0.960). Protein quantitation by summation of peptide fragment signal intensities was also highly consistent between biological replicates (R(2) ∼ 0.930), indicating that this approach may have increased viability compared to recent applications in label free protein quantitation. SWATH based quantitation was able to consistently detect differences in relative protein quantity and it provided coverage for a number of proteins that were missed in some samples by DDA analysis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Providing Compassion through Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Royeen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meg Kral, MS, OTR/L, CLT, is the cover artist for the Summer 2015 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. Her untitled piece of art is an oil painting and is a re-creation of a photograph taken while on vacation. Meg is currently supervisor of outpatient services at Rush University Medical Center. She is lymphedema certified and has a specific interest in breast cancer lymphedema. Art and occupational therapy serve similar purposes for Meg: both provide a sense of flow. She values the outcomes, whether it is a piece of art or improved functional status

  2. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ysla S. Catalina & Providence

    OpenAIRE

    Diazgranados, Carlos Nicolás; Torres Carreño, Guillermo Andrés; Castell, Edmon; Moreno, Santiago; Ramirez, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    Esta Hoja de Mano pertenece a la exposición temporal "Ysla S. Catalina & Providence". Contiene un resumen histórico de las Islas de Santa Catalina y Providencia en los idiomas inglés y español y un mapa del siglo VI que lo hace más didáctico apoyado por figuras recortables. Esta muestra hace parte del proyecto IDA y VUELTA del Sistema de Patrimonio Cultural y Museos SPM que gestiona la descentralización del patrimonio cultural de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia a otras ciudades del pa...

  4. When learners surpass their models: the acquisition of American Sign Language from inconsistent input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Jenny L; Newport, Elissa L

    2004-12-01

    The present study examines the impact of highly inconsistent input on language acquisition. The American deaf community provides a unique opportunity to observe children exposed to nonnative language models as their only linguistic input. This research is a detailed case study of one child acquiring his native language in such circumstances. It asks whether this child is capable of organizing a natural language out of input data that are not representative of certain natural language principles. Simon is a deaf child whose deaf parents both learned American Sign Language (ASL) after age 15. Simon's only ASL input is provided by his late-learner parents. The study examines Simon's performance at age 7 on an ASL morphology task, compared with eight children who have native signing parents, and also compared with Simon's own parents. The results show that Simon's production of ASL substantially surpasses that of his parents. Simon's parents, like other late learners of ASL, perform below adult native signing criteria, with many inconsistencies and errors in their use of ASL morphology. In contrast, Simon's performance is much more regular, and in fact on most ASL morphemes is equal to that of children exposed to a native signing model. The results thus indicate that Simon is capable of acquiring a regular and orderly morphological rule system for which his input provides only highly inconsistent and noisy data. In addition, the results provide some insight into the mechanisms by which such learning may occur. Although the ASL situation is rare, it reveals clues that may contribute to our understanding of the human capacity for language learning.

  5. Visual Working Memory Enhances the Neural Response to Matching Visual Input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayet, Surya; Guggenmos, Matthias; Christophel, Thomas B; Haynes, John-Dylan; Paffen, Chris L E; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Sterzer, Philipp

    2017-07-12

    Visual working memory (VWM) is used to maintain visual information available for subsequent goal-directed behavior. The content of VWM has been shown to affect the behavioral response to concurrent visual input, suggesting that visual representations originating from VWM and from sensory input draw upon a shared neural substrate (i.e., a sensory recruitment stance on VWM storage). Here, we hypothesized that visual information maintained in VWM would enhance the neural response to concurrent visual input that matches the content of VWM. To test this hypothesis, we measured fMRI BOLD responses to task-irrelevant stimuli acquired from 15 human participants (three males) performing a concurrent delayed match-to-sample task. In this task, observers were sequentially presented with two shape stimuli and a retro-cue indicating which of the two shapes should be memorized for subsequent recognition. During the retention interval, a task-irrelevant shape (the probe) was briefly presented in the peripheral visual field, which could either match or mismatch the shape category of the memorized stimulus. We show that this probe stimulus elicited a stronger BOLD response, and allowed for increased shape-classification performance, when it matched rather than mismatched the concurrently memorized content, despite identical visual stimulation. Our results demonstrate that VWM enhances the neural response to concurrent visual input in a content-specific way. This finding is consistent with the view that neural populations involved in sensory processing are recruited for VWM storage, and it provides a common explanation for a plethora of behavioral studies in which VWM-matching visual input elicits a stronger behavioral and perceptual response. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Humans heavily rely on visual information to interact with their environment and frequently must memorize such information for later use. Visual working memory allows for maintaining such visual information in the mind

  6. Linear vection in virtual environments can be strengthened by discordant inertial input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, W Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    Visual and gravitoinertial sensory inputs are integrated by the central nervous system to provide a compelling and veridical sense of spatial orientation and motion. Although it's known that visual input alone can drive this perception, questions remain as to how vestibular/ proprioceptive (i.e. inertial) inputs integrate with visual input to affect this process. This was investigated further by combining sinusoidal vertical linear oscillation (5 amplitudes between 0m and +/-0.8m) with two different virtual visual inputs. Visual scenes were viewed in a large field-of-view head-mounted display (HMD), which depicted an enriched, hi-res, dynamic image of the actual test chamber from the perspective of a subject seated in the linear motion device. The scene either depicted horizontal (+/-0.7m) or vertical (+/-0.8m) linear 0.2Hz sinusoidal translation. Horizontal visual motion with vertical inertial motion represents a 90 degrees spatial shift. Vertical visual motion with vertical inertial motion whereby the highest physical point matches the lowest visual point and vice versa represents a 180 degrees temporal shift, i.e. opposite of what one experiences in reality. Inertial-only stimulation without visual input was identified as vertical linear oscillation with accurate reports of acceleration peaks and troughs, but a slight tendency to underestimate amplitude. Visual-only (stationary) stimulation was less compelling than combined visual+inertial conditions. In visual+inertial conditions, visual input dominated the direction of perceived self-motion, however, increasing the inertial amplitude increased how compelling this non-veridical perception was. That is, perceived vertical self-motion was most compelling when inertial stimulation was maximal, despite perceiving "up" when physically "down" and vice versa. Similarly, perceived horizontal self-motion was most compelling when vertical inertial motion was at maximum amplitude. "Cross-talk" between visual and

  7. Statistical significance of quantitative PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazza Christian

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PCR has the potential to detect and precisely quantify specific DNA sequences, but it is not yet often used as a fully quantitative method. A number of data collection and processing strategies have been described for the implementation of quantitative PCR. However, they can be experimentally cumbersome, their relative performances have not been evaluated systematically, and they often remain poorly validated statistically and/or experimentally. In this study, we evaluated the performance of known methods, and compared them with newly developed data processing strategies in terms of resolution, precision and robustness. Results Our results indicate that simple methods that do not rely on the estimation of the efficiency of the PCR amplification may provide reproducible and sensitive data, but that they do not quantify DNA with precision. Other evaluated methods based on sigmoidal or exponential curve fitting were generally of both poor resolution and precision. A statistical analysis of the parameters that influence efficiency indicated that it depends mostly on the selected amplicon and to a lesser extent on the particular biological sample analyzed. Thus, we devised various strategies based on individual or averaged efficiency values, which were used to assess the regulated expression of several genes in response to a growth factor. Conclusion Overall, qPCR data analysis methods differ significantly in their performance, and this analysis identifies methods that provide DNA quantification estimates of high precision, robustness and reliability. These methods allow reliable estimations of relative expression ratio of two-fold or higher, and our analysis provides an estimation of the number of biological samples that have to be analyzed to achieve a given precision.

  8. De eerste fase van het Input-Outputproject : compost

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonnenberg, A.S.M.; Blok, C.

    2011-01-01

    In het kader van het 'Input-Output' project van WUR tracht men in een experimentele champignonteelt in Wageningen sluitende balansen te generen voor de belangrijkste parameters bij de benutting van compost. Dat levert interessante data op..

  9. Limiting labor input is an overall prerequisite for sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to show by a simple, aggregate, descriptive model, how the importance of labor input to the production sector has to be revised in a future aiming at sustainable development. Despite substantial technological potentials for more eco-efficient utilization of nature...... process the production must comply with a stagnating or declining general consumption to avoid an endless build-up of surplus production. Consequently, it becomes essential to adjust labor input to the production sector accordingly. Temporary there are several outlets for a surplus production......, for instance giving it away to countries more in need, but in the longer term the only solution is to limit the labor input to production, which is here meant as labor’s total contribution to production. This input can be split up into following factors: 1) Population, 2) Labor force fraction, 3) Working time...

  10. TCP congestion control in input-queued crossbar switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongyun; Zhao, Yongxiang; Chen, Changjia

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we consider congestion control in input queued crossbar switch environment where each input port with finite buffer space while TCP protocol is employed for end-to-end congestion control. We find that it is impossible to achieve efficiency and fairness among TCP flows at the same time only by queue management. Then we propose a scheme of hFS&rEDF, which combine heuristic fair switch arbitration (hFS) and queue management policy of early drop front randomly (rEDF). In our proposed scheme, switch arbitration strategy of hFS unevenly allows input ports to transfer packets to output ports while packets at head of any other input ports involved in conflicts have to be dropped by the policy of rEDF with a probability. Simulation results prove that our proposed scheme can achieve better tradeoff between throughput and fairness.

  11. Towards an affordable alternative educational video game input device

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, Adrew C

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the prototype design results of an alternative physical educational video gaming input device. The device elicits increased physical activity from the players as compared to the compact gaming controller. Complicated...

  12. Smart-Guard: Defending User Input from Malware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denzel, Michael; Bruni, Alessandro; Ryan, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Trusted input techniques can profoundly enhance a variety of scenarios like online banking, electronic voting, Virtual Private Networks, and even commands to a server or Industrial Control System. To protect the system from malware of the sender’s computer, input needs to be reliably authenticated....... Previous research in this field is based on fixed assumptions about trustworthy components and is, thus, too rigid for this use case. We present Smart-Guard, a method to protect user input into a system even if the attacker controls – to us unknown – parts of the underlying system. Our approach ensures...... integrity of user input even when up to two of three devices are compromised; confidentiality holds for one malicious device. In this way, Smart-Guard has flexible trust assumptions, and does not require any particular part of the system to be trusted. To prove our claims, we formally verified our protocol...

  13. Input techniques that dynamically change their cursor activation area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Hornbæk, Kasper

    2007-01-01

    Efficient pointing is crucial to graphical user interfaces, and input techniques that dynamically change their activation area may yield improvements over point cursors by making objects selectable at a distance. Input techniques that dynamically change their activation area include the bubble...... for operating the input techniques, in the other a mouse. In both experiments, the bubble cursor is fastest and participants make fewer errors with it. Participants also unanimously prefer this technique. For small targets, the cell cursors are generally more accurate than the point cursor; in the second...... experiment the box cursor is also faster. The cell cursors succeed in letting participants select objects while the cursor is far away from the target, but are relatively slow in the final phase of target acquisition. We discuss limitations and possible enhancements of input techniques with activation areas...

  14. Uncertainty of input data for room acoustic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Marbjerg, Gerd; Brunskog, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Although many room acoustic simulation models have been well established, simulation results will never be accurate with inaccurate and uncertain input data. This study addresses inappropriateness and uncertainty of input data for room acoustic simulations. Firstly, the random incidence absorption......-included input data are proven to produce perceptually noticeable changes in the objective parameters, such as the sound pressure level, and loudness-based reverberation time. Surfaces should not be assumed to be locally reacting, particularly for multi-layered absorbers having air cavities. Secondly......, the current measurement techniques produce uncertain input data. For example, Sabine absorption coefficients according to ISO 354 measured in reverberation chambers have a poor reproducibility. The same happens for sound scattering and transmission, which depend greatly on the test chamber. This study...

  15. An Exploration of Input Conditions for Virtual Teleportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Emil Rosenlund; Ruder, Kevin Vignola; Nilsson, Niels Chr.

    2017-01-01

    This poster describes a within-groups study (n=17) comparing participants' experience of three different input conditions for instigating virtual teleportation (button clicking, physical jumping, and fist clenching). The results indicated that teleportation by clicking a button generally required...

  16. Noise & Input : videost, Portugalist ja muust / Anders Härm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Härm, Anders, 1977-

    2002-01-01

    Videokunstist, suhtumisest videokunsti Eestis, portugali videokunsti näitusest "High Input, Low Noise" Rotermanni soolalaos. Pedro Dinis (?) Reisi, Caterina (?) Campino, Francisco Quierose (?) ja Rui Toscano teostest. Võrdlus eesti videokunstiga.

  17. Guidelines for PCC inputs to AASHTOWare Pavement ME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this research study was to develop guidelines for portland cement concrete (PCC) material inputs to the : AASHTOWare Pavement ME Design program. The AASHTOWare Pavement ME Design is the software program used by the : Mississippi Depa...

  18. Damage localization in offshore structures using shaped inputs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulriksen, Martin Dalgaard; Bernal, Dionisio; Nielsen, Morten Eggert

    2017-01-01

    Input shaping is an active control procedure by which vibrations in a structural subdomain are suppressed. Recently, a scheme based on shaped inputs has been proposed for damage localization purposes; cast on the premise that the vibration signature of a structural domain in a damaged phase...... will be identical to the signature of the healthy, reference counterpart if, for the same loading conditions, the subdomain containing damage is inactive in terms of vibrations. The methodological idea is, thus, to apply controllable inputs that are shaped such that particular vibration quantities (depending...... on the type of damage one seeks to localize) are suppressed in one subdomain at the time, hereby resulting in damage being localized when the vibration signature induced by the shaped inputs in the damaged phase corresponds to that obtained in the reference phase. The present paper treats an application study...

  19. Effect of Mechanism Error on Input Torque of Scroll Compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the fundamental principle of plane four-bar mechanism, the force on the equivalent parallel four-bar mechanism was analyzed for scroll compressor with mini-crank antirotation, and the formula of input torque was proposed. The change of input torque caused by the mechanism size error was analyzed and verified with an example. The calculation results show that the mechanism size error will cause large fluctuation in input torque at the drive rod and connecting rod collinear and the fluctuation extreme value increases with rotational speed. Decreasing of the crankshaft eccentricity errors is helpful for reducing the effects of dimension error on input torque but will increase the friction loss of orbiting and fixed scroll wrap. The influence of size error should be considered in design in order to select suitable machining accuracy and reduce the adverse effect caused by size error.

  20. Metacognitive Instruction: Global and Local Shifts in Considering Listening Input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Bozorgian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A key shift of thinking for effective learning and teaching of listening input has been seen and organized in education locally and globally. This study has probed whether metacognitive instruction through a pedagogical cycle shifts high-intermediate students' English language learning and English as a second language (ESL teacher's teaching focus on listening input. Twenty male Iranian students with an age range of 18 to 24 received a guided methodology including metacognitive strategies (planning, monitoring, and evaluation for a period of three months. This study has used the strategies and probed the importance of metacognitive instruction through interviewing both the teacher and the students. The results have shown that metacognitive instruction helped both the ESL teacher's and the students' shift of thinking about teaching and learning listening input. This key shift of thinking has implications globally and locally for classroom practices of listening input.

  1. Input error versus output error model reference adaptive control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodson, Marc; Sastry, Shankar

    1987-01-01

    Algorithms for model reference adaptive control were developed in recent years, and their stability and convergence properties have been investigated. Typical algorithms in continuous time involve strictly positive real conditions on the reference model, while similar discrete time algorithms do not require such conditions. It is shown how algorithms differ by the use of an input error versus an output error, and present a continuous time input error adaptive control algorithm which does not involve SPR conditions. The connections with other schemes are discussed. The input error scheme has general stability and ocnvergence properties that are similar to the output error scheme. However, analysis using averaging methods reveals some preferable convergence properties of the input error scheme. Several other advantages are also discussed.

  2. SplicePlot: a utility for visualizing splicing quantitative trait loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Eric; Nance, Tracy; Montgomery, Stephen B

    2014-04-01

    RNA sequencing has provided unprecedented resolution of alternative splicing and splicing quantitative trait loci (sQTL). However, there are few tools available for visualizing the genotype-dependent effects of splicing at a population level. SplicePlot is a simple command line utility that produces intuitive visualization of sQTLs and their effects. SplicePlot takes mapped RNA sequencing reads in BAM format and genotype data in VCF format as input and outputs publication-quality Sashimi plots, hive plots and structure plots, enabling better investigation and understanding of the role of genetics on alternative splicing and transcript structure. Source code and detailed documentation are available at http://montgomerylab.stanford.edu/spliceplot/index.html under Resources and at Github. SplicePlot is implemented in Python and is supported on Linux and Mac OS. A VirtualBox virtual machine running Ubuntu with SplicePlot already installed is also available.

  3. In vivo toxicity of nitroaromatics: A comprehensive quantitative structure-activity relationship study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Aminah; Sizochenko, Natalia; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Gorb, Leonid; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2017-08-01

    The toxicity data of 90 nitroaromatic compounds related to their 50% lethal dose concentration for rats (LD50) were analyzed to develop quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models. Quantum-chemically calculated descriptors together with molecular descriptors generated by DRAGON, PaDEL, and HiT-QSAR software were utilized to build QSAR models. Quality and validity of the models were determined by internal and external validation techniques. The results show that the toxicity of nitroaromatic compounds depends on various factors, such as the number of nitro-groups, the topological state, and the presence of certain structural fragments. The developed models based on the largest (to date) dataset of nitroaromatics in vivo toxicity showed a good predictive ability. The results provide important input that could be applied in a preliminary assessment of nitroaromatic compounds' toxicity to mammals. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2227-2233. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  4. Quantitative criticism of literary relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Joseph P.; Katz, Theodore; Tripuraneni, Nilesh; Dasgupta, Tathagata; Kannan, Ajay; Brofos, James A.; Bonilla Lopez, Jorge A.; Schroeder, Lea A.; Casarez, Adriana; Rabinovich, Maxim; Haimson Lushkov, Ayelet; Chaudhuri, Pramit

    2017-01-01

    Authors often convey meaning by referring to or imitating prior works of literature, a process that creates complex networks of literary relationships (“intertextuality”) and contributes to cultural evolution. In this paper, we use techniques from stylometry and machine learning to address subjective literary critical questions about Latin literature, a corpus marked by an extraordinary concentration of intertextuality. Our work, which we term “quantitative criticism,” focuses on case studies involving two influential Roman authors, the playwright Seneca and the historian Livy. We find that four plays related to but distinct from Seneca’s main writings are differentiated from the rest of the corpus by subtle but important stylistic features. We offer literary interpretations of the significance of these anomalies, providing quantitative data in support of hypotheses about the use of unusual formal features and the interplay between sound and meaning. The second part of the paper describes a machine-learning approach to the identification and analysis of citational material that Livy loosely appropriated from earlier sources. We extend our approach to map the stylistic topography of Latin prose, identifying the writings of Caesar and his near-contemporary Livy as an inflection point in the development of Latin prose style. In total, our results reflect the integration of computational and humanistic methods to investigate a diverse range of literary questions. PMID:28373557

  5. Quantitative criticism of literary relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Joseph P; Katz, Theodore; Tripuraneni, Nilesh; Dasgupta, Tathagata; Kannan, Ajay; Brofos, James A; Bonilla Lopez, Jorge A; Schroeder, Lea A; Casarez, Adriana; Rabinovich, Maxim; Haimson Lushkov, Ayelet; Chaudhuri, Pramit

    2017-04-18

    Authors often convey meaning by referring to or imitating prior works of literature, a process that creates complex networks of literary relationships ("intertextuality") and contributes to cultural evolution. In this paper, we use techniques from stylometry and machine learning to address subjective literary critical questions about Latin literature, a corpus marked by an extraordinary concentration of intertextuality. Our work, which we term "quantitative criticism," focuses on case studies involving two influential Roman authors, the playwright Seneca and the historian Livy. We find that four plays related to but distinct from Seneca's main writings are differentiated from the rest of the corpus by subtle but important stylistic features. We offer literary interpretations of the significance of these anomalies, providing quantitative data in support of hypotheses about the use of unusual formal features and the interplay between sound and meaning. The second part of the paper describes a machine-learning approach to the identification and analysis of citational material that Livy loosely appropriated from earlier sources. We extend our approach to map the stylistic topography of Latin prose, identifying the writings of Caesar and his near-contemporary Livy as an inflection point in the development of Latin prose style. In total, our results reflect the integration of computational and humanistic methods to investigate a diverse range of literary questions.

  6. Technology-intensive industries - Input-output analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Olteanu, Dan

    2010-01-01

    By the analyses included in this paper I tried to quantify â using the input-output method â the amplitude of upstream and downstream linkages between manufacturing industries, structured by technological groups, for Romania and other six EU member countries, for comparison. Since intermediate products are the main carrier of knowledge diffused by high-tech industries towards other industries, by processing data from input-output tables we can obtain a measure of the inter-industry effects of...

  7. Input design for linear dynamic systems using maxmin criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Hansen, Lars H.; Madsen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of input design for maximizing the smallest eigenvalue of the information matrix for linear dynamic systems. The optimization of the smallest eigenvalue is of interest in parameter estimation and parameter change detection problems. We describe a simple cutting...... plane algorithm to determine the optimal frequency power weights of the input, using successive solutions to linear programs. We present a case study related to estimation of thermal parameters of a building....

  8. A convex approach to blind deconvolution with diverse inputs

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Ali; Cosse, Augustin M.; Demanet, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    This note considers the problem of blind identification of a linear, time-invariant (LTI) system when the input signals are unknown, but belong to sufficiently diverse, known subspaces. This problem can be recast as the recovery of a rank-1 matrix, and is effectively relaxed using a semidefinite program (SDP). We show that exact recovery of both the unknown impulse response, and the unknown inputs, occurs when the following conditions are met: (1) the impulse response function is spread in th...

  9. Optimal Input Strategy for Plug and Play Process Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Martin Nygaard; Leth, John-Josef; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of optimal operation of a plant, which goal is to maintain production at minimum cost. The system considered in this work consists of a joined plant and redundant input systems. It is assumed that each input system contributes to a flow of goods into the joined pa...... the performance of the plant. The results are applied to a coal fired power plant where an additional new fuel system, gas, becomes available....

  10. Strategies to tackle problematic input in a Spanish dialogue system

    OpenAIRE

    Arranz Corzana, María Victoria; Castell Ariño, Núria; Civit Torruella, Montserrat

    2001-01-01

    This paper focuses on the strategies adopted to tackle problematic input and ease communication between modules in a Spanish railway information dialogue system for spontaneous speech. The paper describes the design and tuning considerations followed by the understanding and dialogue manager modules. The former needs to handle the problematic input received from the speech recogniser, while the latter needs to establish as agile and unambiguous a comunication as possible.

  11. Input multiplicities in an energy integrated distillation column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, T.R.; Koggersboel, A.; Eden, M.R.; Skotte, R.; Loeppenthien, C.; Joergensen, S.B. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, CAPEC, Lyngby (Denmark)

    1999-02-01

    Input multiplicities in energy integrated binary distillation are investigated using both simulation models and experiments on an industrial size pilot plant. Two input multiplicities are shown to occur within the feasible operating window. One multiplicity is related to the energy integrated system the other to the binary distillation properties. Control strategy and configuration selection issues to reduce or possibly avoid performance reducing implications of these phenomena are discussed. (au)

  12. Management Standards Integration in Service Providing Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Anton Persic; Mirko Markic

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to define key leadership models, to recognize advantages and benefits, and define influence factors of business success on leadership systems integration in service providing organizations in Slovenia. We use quantitative research with frequent analysis complex questions to present and analyse some factors of leadership standards and build a new regression leadership model of organization. We have sent the questionnaire to 89 organizations, all with certificate sys...

  13. Sensitivity Analysis for Input Parameters of a Radiological Dose Assessment Model (U. S. NRC Model) for Ingestion Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Suh, Kyung Suk; Kim, Eun Han; Choi, Young Gil; Han, Moon Hee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    The sensitivity analysis of input parameters was performed for an ingestion dose assessment model (U. S. NRC's Regulatory Guide 1.109 model) from routine releases of radionuclides. In this study, three kinds of typical Korea foodstuffs (rice, leafy vegetables, milk) and two kinds of radionuclides ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 131}I) were considered. The values of input parameters were sampled using a Latin hypercube sampling technique based on Monte Carlo approach. Sensitivity indices, which represent the influence or the importance of input parameters for predictive results, were quantitatively expressed by the partial rank correlation coefficients. As the results, the ratio of the interception fraction to the yield of agricultural plants and the human consumption rate were sensitive input parameters for the considered foodstuffs and radionuclides. Additionally, in case of milk, the transfer factor of radionuclides from animal intake to milk and the daily intake rate of feedstuffs were sensitive input parameters. The weathering removal half-life and the delay time from food production to human consumption were relatively sensitive for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 131}I depositions, respectively.

  14. F# for quantitative finance

    CERN Document Server

    Astborg, Johan

    2013-01-01

    To develop your confidence in F#, this tutorial will first introduce you to simpler tasks such as curve fitting. You will then advance to more complex tasks such as implementing algorithms for trading semi-automation in a practical scenario-based format.If you are a data analyst or a practitioner in quantitative finance, economics, or mathematics and wish to learn how to use F# as a functional programming language, this book is for you. You should have a basic conceptual understanding of financial concepts and models. Elementary knowledge of the .NET framework would also be helpful.

  15. The effect of input perturbations on swimming performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Andrea M.; Thornycroft, Patrick J. M.; Lauder, George V.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2014-11-01

    The influence of flexibility and fluid characteristics on the hydrodynamics of swimming has been investigated for a range of experimental systems. One investigative method is to use reduced-order physical models--pitching and heaving hydrofoils. Typically, a smooth, periodic, input signal is used to control foil motion in experiments that explore fundamental factors (aspect ratio, shape, etc.) in swimming performance. However, the significance of non-smooth input signals in undulating swimmers is non-trivial. Instead of varying external properties, we study the impact of perturbed input motions on swimming performance. A smooth sinusoid is overlaid with high frequency, low amplitude perturbations as the input signal for a heaving panel in a closed loop flow tank. Specifically, 1 cm heave amplitude base sinusoids are added to 0.1 cm heave perturbations with frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 13 Hz. Two thin foils with different stiffness are flapped with the combined input signals in addition to the individual high heave and low heave signals that were added to create the combined inputs. Results demonstrate that perturbations can increase thrust and that adding the perturbed signal to a base frequency alters wake structure.

  16. Input coding for neuro-electronic hybrid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jude Baby; Abraham, Grace Mathew; Singh, Katyayani; Ankolekar, Shreya M; Amrutur, Bharadwaj; Sikdar, Sujit Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Liquid State Machines have been proposed as a framework to explore the computational properties of neuro-electronic hybrid systems (Maass et al., 2002). Here the neuronal culture implements a recurrent network and is followed by an array of linear discriminants implemented using perceptrons in electronics/software. Thus in this framework, it is desired that the outputs of the neuronal network, corresponding to different inputs, be linearly separable. Previous studies have demonstrated this by either using only a small set of input stimulus patterns to the culture (Hafizovic et al., 2007), large number of input electrodes (Dockendorf et al., 2009) or by using complex schemes to post-process the outputs of the neuronal culture prior to linear discriminance (Ortman et al., 2011). In this study we explore ways to temporally encode inputs into stimulus patterns using a small set of electrodes such that the neuronal culture's output can be directly decoded by simple linear discriminants based on perceptrons. We demonstrate that network can detect the timing and order of firing of inputs on multiple electrodes. Based on this, we demonstrate that the neuronal culture can be used as a kernel to transform inputs which are not linearly separable in a low dimensional space, into outputs in a high dimension where they are linearly separable. Thus simple linear discriminants can now be directly connected to outputs of the neuronal culture and allow for implementation of any function for such a hybrid system. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Preisach models of hysteresis driven by Markovian input processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Sven; Radons, Günter

    2017-08-01

    We study the response of Preisach models of hysteresis to stochastically fluctuating external fields. We perform numerical simulations, which indicate that analytical expressions derived previously for the autocorrelation functions and power spectral densities of the Preisach model with uncorrelated input, hold asymptotically also if the external field shows exponentially decaying correlations. As a consequence, the mechanisms causing long-term memory and 1 /f noise in Preisach models with uncorrelated inputs still apply in the presence of fast decaying input correlations. We collect additional evidence for the importance of the effective Preisach density previously introduced even for Preisach models with correlated inputs. Additionally, we present some results for the output of the Preisach model with uncorrelated input using analytical methods. It is found, for instance, that in order to produce the same long-time tails in the output, the elementary hysteresis loops of large width need to have a higher weight for the generic Preisach model than for the symmetric Preisach model. Further, we find autocorrelation functions and power spectral densities to be monotonically decreasing independently of the choice of input and Preisach density.

  18. Inhibitory Gating of Input Comparison in the CA1 Microcircuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstein, Aaron D; Bloss, Erik B; Apostolides, Pierre F; Vaidya, Sachin P; Dilly, Geoffrey A; Zemelman, Boris V; Magee, Jeffrey C

    2015-09-23

    Spatial and temporal features of synaptic inputs engage integration mechanisms on multiple scales, including presynaptic release sites, postsynaptic dendrites, and networks of inhibitory interneurons. Here we investigate how these mechanisms cooperate to filter synaptic input in hippocampal area CA1. Dendritic recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons reveal that proximal inputs from CA3 as well as distal inputs from entorhinal cortex layer III (ECIII) sum sublinearly or linearly at low firing rates due to feedforward inhibition, but sum supralinearly at high firing rates due to synaptic facilitation, producing a high-pass filter. However, during ECIII and CA3 input comparison, supralinear dendritic integration is dynamically balanced by feedforward and feedback inhibition, resulting in suppression of dendritic complex spiking. We find that a particular subpopulation of CA1 interneurons expressing neuropeptide Y (NPY) contributes prominently to this dynamic filter by integrating both ECIII and CA3 input pathways and potently inhibiting CA1 pyramidal neuron dendrites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-perturbative inputs for gluon distributions in the hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermolaev, B.I. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Troyan, S.I. [St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics, Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Description of hadronic reactions at high energies is conventionally done in the framework of QCD factorization. All factorization convolutions comprise non-perturbative inputs mimicking non-perturbative contributions and perturbative evolution of those inputs. We construct inputs for the gluon-hadron scattering amplitudes in the forward kinematics and, using the optical theorem, convert them into inputs for gluon distributions in the hadrons, embracing the cases of polarized and unpolarized hadrons. In the first place, we formulate mathematical criteria which any model for the inputs should obey and then suggest a model satisfying those criteria. This model is based on a simple reasoning: after emitting an active parton off the hadron, the remaining set of spectators becomes unstable and therefore it can be described through factors of the resonance type, so we call it the resonance model. We use it to obtain non-perturbative inputs for gluon distributions in unpolarized and polarized hadrons for all available types of QCD factorization: basic, K{sub T}-and collinear factorizations. (orig.)

  20. Terrestrial ecosystem recovery - Modelling the effects of reduced acidic inputs and increased inputs of sea-salts induced by global change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, C.; Moldan, F.; Wright, R.F.

    2003-01-01

    The reduced emissions of acidifying sulfur and nitrogen in Europe since the late 1970s will be further reduced when the Gothenburg protocol is fully implemented by 2010. Here we address the consequences for the recovery of acidified terrestrial ecosystems using the acidification model MAGIC applied...... and base saturation increases less than 5% over the next 30 years. A climate-induced increase in storm severity will increase the sea-salt input to the ecosystems. This will provide additional base cations to the soils and more than double the rate of the recovery, but also lead to strong acid pulses...... following high sea-salt inputs as the deposited base cations exchange with the acidity stored in the soil. Future recovery of soils and runoff at acidified catchments will thus depend on the amount and rate of reduction of acid deposition, and in the case of systems near the coast, the frequency...

  1. User input verification and test driven development in the NJOY21 nuclear data processing code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trainer, Amelia Jo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McCartney, Austin Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-21

    Before physically-meaningful data can be used in nuclear simulation codes, the data must be interpreted and manipulated by a nuclear data processing code so as to extract the relevant quantities (e.g. cross sections and angular distributions). Perhaps the most popular and widely-trusted of these processing codes is NJOY, which has been developed and improved over the course of 10 major releases since its creation at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the mid-1970’s. The current phase of NJOY development is the creation of NJOY21, which will be a vast improvement from its predecessor, NJOY2016. Designed to be fast, intuitive, accessible, and capable of handling both established and modern formats of nuclear data, NJOY21 will address many issues that many NJOY users face, while remaining functional for those who prefer the existing format. Although early in its development, NJOY21 is quickly providing input validation to check user input. By providing rapid and helpful responses to users while writing input files, NJOY21 will prove to be more intuitive and easy to use than any of its predecessors. Furthermore, during its development, NJOY21 is subject to regular testing, such that its test coverage must strictly increase with the addition of any production code. This thorough testing will allow developers and NJOY users to establish confidence in NJOY21 as it gains functionality. This document serves as a discussion regarding the current state input checking and testing practices of NJOY21.

  2. Isolating Graphical Failure-Inducing Input for Privacy Protection in Error Reporting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matos João

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes a new privacy-enhancing system that minimizes the disclosure of information in error reports. Error reporting mechanisms are of the utmost importance to correct software bugs but, unfortunately, the transmission of an error report may reveal users’ private information. Some privacy-enhancing systems for error reporting have been presented in the past years, yet they rely on path condition analysis, which we show in this paper to be ineffective when it comes to graphical-based input. Knowing that numerous applications have graphical user interfaces (GUI, it is very important to overcome such limitation. This work describes a new privacy-enhancing error reporting system, based on a new input minimization algorithm called GUIᴍɪɴ that is geared towards GUI, to remove input that is unnecessary to reproduce the observed failure. Before deciding whether to submit the error report, the user is provided with a step-by-step graphical replay of the minimized input, to evaluate whether it still yields sensitive information. We also provide an open source implementation of the proposed system and evaluate it with well-known applications.

  3. Modeling the effects of pulsed versus chronic sand inputs on salmonid spawning habitat in a low-gradient gravel-bed river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscar Maturana; Daniele Tonina; James A. McKean; John M. Buffington; Charles H. Luce; Diego Caamano

    2013-01-01

    It is widely recognized that high supplies of fine sediment, largely sand, can negatively impact the aquatic habitat quality of gravel-bed rivers, but effects of the style of input (chronic vs. pulsed) have not been examined quantitatively. We hypothesize that a continuous (i.e. chronic) supply of sand will be more detrimental to the quality of aquatic habitat than an...

  4. EPICS Input/Output Controller (IOC) application developer`s guide. APS Release 3.12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraimer, M.R.

    1994-11-01

    This document describes the core software that resides in an Input/Output Controller (IOC), one of the major components of EPICS. The basic components are: (OPI) Operator Interface; this is a UNIX based workstation which can run various EPICS tools; (IOC) Input/Output Controller; this is a VME/VXI based chassis containing a Motorola 68xxx processor, various I/O modules, and VME modules that provide access to other I/O buses such as GPIB, (LAN), Local Area Network; and this is the communication network which allows the IOCs and OPIs to communicate. Epics provides a software component, Channel Access, which provides network transparent communication between a Channel Access client and an arbitrary number of Channel Access servers.

  5. Provider practice characteristics that promote interpersonal continuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstaedt, Tyler S; Mori, Motomi; Lambert, William E; Saultz, John W

    2013-01-01

    Becoming certified as a patient-centered medical home now requires practices to measure how effectively they provide continuity of care. To understand how continuity can be improved, we studied the association between provider practice characteristics and interpersonal continuity using the Usual Provider Continuity Index (UPC). We conducted a mixed-methods study of the relationship between provider practice characteristics and UPC in 4 university-based family medicine clinics. For the quantitative part of the study, we analyzed data extracted from monthly provider performance reports for 63 primary care providers (PCPs) between July 2009 and June 2010. We tested the association of 5 practice parameters on UPC: (1) clinic frequency; (2) panel size; (3) patient load (ratio of panel size to clinic frequency); (4) attendance ratio; and (5) duration in practice (number of years working in the current practice). Clinic, care team, provider sex, and provider type (physicians versus nonphysician providers) were analyzed as covariates. Simple and multiple linear regressions were used for statistical modeling. Findings from the quantitative part of the study were validated using qualitative data from provider focus groups that were analyzed using sequential thematic coding. There were strong linear associations between UPC and both clinic frequency (β = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.62-1.27) and patient load (β = -0.37; 95% CI, -0.48 to -0.26). A multiple linear regression including clinic frequency, patient load, duration in practice, and provider type explained more than 60% of the variation in UPC (adjusted R(2) = 0.629). UPC for nurse practitioners and physician assistants was more strongly dependent on clinic frequency and was at least as high as it was for physicians. Focus groups identified 6 themes as other potential sources of variability in UPC. Variability in UPC between providers is strongly correlated with variables that can be modified by practice managers. Our study

  6. What HERA May Provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes; /DESY; De Roeck, Albert; /CERN; Bartels, Jochen; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II; Behnke, Olaf; Blumlein, Johannes; /DESY; Brodsky, Stanley; /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; /Oxford U.; Deak, Michal; /DESY; Devenish, Robin; /Oxford U.; Diehl, Markus; /DESY; Gehrmann, Thomas; /Zurich U.; Grindhammer, Guenter; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Gustafson, Gosta; /CERN /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Khoze, Valery; /Durham U., IPPP; Knutsson, Albert; /DESY; Klein, Max; /Liverpool U.; Krauss, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Kutak, Krzysztof; /DESY; Laenen, Eric; /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Lonnblad, Leif; /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Motyka, Leszek; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II /Birmingham U. /Southern Methodist U. /DESY /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /CERN /Paris, LPTHE /Hamburg U. /Penn State U.

    2011-11-10

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. The HERA accelerator and the HERA experiments H1, HERMES and ZEUS stopped running in the end of June 2007. This was after 15 years of very successful operation since the first collisions in 1992. A total luminosity of {approx} 500 pb{sup -1} has been accumulated by each of the collider experiments H1 and ZEUS. During the years the increasingly better understood and upgraded detectors and HERA accelerator have contributed significantly to this success. The physics program remains in full swing and plenty of new results were presented at DIS08 which are approaching the anticipated final precision, fulfilling and exceeding the physics plans and the previsions of the upgrade program. Most of the analyses presented at DIS08 were still based on the so called HERA I data sample, i.e. data taken until 2000, before the shutdown for the luminosity upgrade. This sample has an integrated luminosity of {approx} 100 pb{sup -1}, and the four times larger statistics sample from HERA II is still in the process of being analyzed.

  7. Input parameters for LEAP and analysis of the Model 22C data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, L.; Goldstein, M.

    1981-05-01

    The input data for the Long-Term Energy Analysis Program (LEAP) employed by EIA for projections of long-term energy supply and demand in the US were studied and additional documentation provided. Particular emphasis has been placed on the LEAP Model 22C input data base, which was used in obtaining the output projections which appear in the 1978 Annual Report to Congress. Definitions, units, associated model parameters, and translation equations are given in detail. Many parameters were set to null values in Model 22C so as to turn off certain complexities in LEAP; these parameters are listed in Appendix B along with parameters having constant values across all activities. The values of the parameters for each activity are tabulated along with the source upon which each parameter is based - and appropriate comments provided, where available. The structure of the data base is briefly outlined and an attempt made to categorize the parameters according to the methods employed for estimating the numerical values. Due to incomplete documentation and/or lack of specific parameter definitions, few of the input values could be traced and uniquely interpreted using the information provided in the primary and secondary sources. Input parameter choices were noted which led to output projections which are somewhat suspect. Other data problems encountered are summarized. Some of the input data were corrected and a revised base case was constructed. The output projections for this revised case are compared with the Model 22C output for the year 2020, for the Transportation Sector. LEAP could be a very useful tool, especially so in the study of emerging technologies over long-time frames.

  8. Quantitative determination of formaldehyde by spectrophotometry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Formaldehyde is a vastly used material in industry. Nowadays, it is proven that formaldehyde is toxic and carcinogenic. Thus providing a reliable method for its quantitative determination is very important. This study proposes a UV-Vis spectrophotometric based method for determination of formaldehyde. The method is ...

  9. Coherent quantitative measures of agricultural risks

    OpenAIRE

    TARASOV A.O.

    2011-01-01

    Advantages of quantitative risk measurements in agricultural business are grounded. Coherent methods of production and price risk assessment by modeling stochastic risk factor variations are proposed. Instruments for acceptable and critical risk level measurements are presented by providing an example for sunflower seed production.

  10. Values in Qualitative and Quantitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Maureen; Chenail, Ronald J.

    2008-01-01

    The authors identify the philosophical underpinnings and value-ladenness of major research paradigms. They argue that useful and meaningful research findings for counseling can be generated from both qualitative and quantitative research methodologies, provided that the researcher has an appreciation of the importance of philosophical coherence in…

  11. High-Voltage-Input Level Translator Using Standard CMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Jeremy A.; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Vo, Tuan A.; Blalock, Benjamin J.

    2011-01-01

    proposed integrated circuit would translate (1) a pair of input signals having a low differential potential and a possibly high common-mode potential into (2) a pair of output signals having the same low differential potential and a low common-mode potential. As used here, "low" and "high" refer to potentials that are, respectively, below or above the nominal supply potential (3.3 V) at which standard complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits are designed to operate. The input common-mode potential could lie between 0 and 10 V; the output common-mode potential would be 2 V. This translation would make it possible to process the pair of signals by use of standard 3.3-V CMOS analog and/or mixed-signal (analog and digital) circuitry on the same integrated-circuit chip. A schematic of the circuit is shown in the figure. Standard 3.3-V CMOS circuitry cannot withstand input potentials greater than about 4 V. However, there are many applications that involve low-differential-potential, high-common-mode-potential input signal pairs and in which standard 3.3-V CMOS circuitry, which is relatively inexpensive, would be the most appropriate circuitry for performing other functions on the integrated-circuit chip that handles the high-potential input signals. Thus, there is a need to combine high-voltage input circuitry with standard low-voltage CMOS circuitry on the same integrated-circuit chip. The proposed circuit would satisfy this need. In the proposed circuit, the input signals would be coupled into both a level-shifting pair and a common-mode-sensing pair of CMOS transistors. The output of the level-shifting pair would be fed as input to a differential pair of transistors. The resulting differential current output would pass through six standoff transistors to be mirrored into an output branch by four heterojunction bipolar transistors. The mirrored differential current would be converted back to potential by a pair of diode-connected transistors

  12. Experimental input for the design of metallic glass/crystalline composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Nicholas Willis

    Bulk metallic glasses often exhibit exceptional strength and large elastic strains, but the structural applications of bulk metallic glasses are limited by their extremely low tensile ductility. Below the glass transition temperature of the alloy, plastic deformation occurs primarily in narrow shear bands, which propagate unimpeded through the monolithic glass structure, resulting in catastrophic failure under tensile loading. A number of studies have added crystalline reinforcements to the glassy matrix in an effort to block shear band propagation and increase ductility. The reinforcements in these bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMC's) can be added as ex situ particles or fibers infiltrated by the glass-forming liquid [1], or can be formed in situ, either via devitrification of the glass during post-processing [2] or as a second phase that precipitates from the melt during solidification [3]. The size, distribution, and mechanical properties of the reinforcement phase have significant impact on the ductility of the composite. However, surprisingly little quantitative microstructural information is available for BMGMC's, particularly those formed by precipitation from the melt. In this work, we examine two in situ BMGMC's in which a ductile crystalline phase precipitates during solidification of the melt, resulting in a complex dendritic structure embedded in a continuous glass matrix. A 3D serial sectioning process was used to image the microstructure at regular intervals by removing slices of material using a dual beam focused ion-scanning electron microscope (FIB). Due to the complex nature of the microstructure, measurements of key features were conducted using a 3D measurement method that was developed for this purpose. Experiments were also conducted to provide experimental input for the development and tuning of finite element models. Changes in the elastic modulus of the composite were evaluated over a range of stresses that encompassed the yield

  13. Quantitative wood anatomy - practical guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg evon Arx

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative wood anatomy analyzes the variability of xylem anatomical features in trees, shrubs and herbaceous species to address research questions related to plant functioning, growth and environment. Among the more frequently considered anatomical features are lumen dimensions and wall thickness of conducting cells, fibers and several ray properties. The structural properties of each xylem anatomical feature are mostly fixed once they are formed, and define to a large extent its functionality, including transport and storage of water, nutrients, sugars and hormones, and providing mechanical support. The anatomical features can often be localized within an annual growth ring, which allows to establish intra-annual past and present structure-function relationships and its sensitivity to environmental variability. However, there are many methodological obstacles to overcome when aiming at producing (large data sets of xylem anatomical data.Here we describe the different steps from wood sample collection to xylem anatomical data, provide guidance and identify pitfalls, and present different image-analysis tools for the quantification of anatomical features, in particular conducting cells. We show that each data production step from sample collection in the field, microslide preparation in the lab, image capturing through an optical microscope and image analysis with specific tools can readily introduce measurement errors between 5 to 30% and more, whereby the magnitude usually increases the smaller the anatomical features. Such measurement errors – if not avoided or corrected – may make it impossible to extract meaningful xylem anatomical data in light of the rather small range of variability in many anatomical features as observed, for example, within time series of individual plants. Following a rigid protocol and quality control as proposed in this paper is thus mandatory to use quantitative data of xylem anatomical features as a powerful

  14. The proportion of common synaptic input to motor neurons increases with an increase in net excitatory input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castronovo, Anna Margherita; Negro, Francesco; Conforto, Silvia; Farina, Dario

    2015-12-01

    α-Motor neurons receive synaptic inputs from spinal and supraspinal centers that comprise components either common to the motor neuron pool or independent. The input shared by motor neurons--common input--determines force control. The aim of the study was to investigate the changes in the strength of common synaptic input delivered to motor neurons with changes in force and with fatigue, two conditions that underlie an increase in the net excitatory drive to the motor neurons. High-density surface electromyogram (EMG) signals were recorded from the tibialis anterior muscle during contractions at 20, 50, and 75% of the maximal voluntary contraction force (in 3 sessions separated by at least 2 days), all sustained until task failure. EMG signal decomposition identified the activity of a total of 1,245 motor units. The coherence values between cumulative motor unit spike trains increased with increasing force, especially for low frequencies. This increase in coherence was not observed when comparing two subsets of motor units having different recruitment thresholds, but detected at the same force level. Moreover, the coherence values for frequencies input to motor neurons increases with respect to independent input when the net excitatory drive to motor neurons increases as a consequence of a change in force and fatigue. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. A quantitative theory of the functions of the hippocampal CA3 network in memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Edmund T

    2013-01-01

    A quantitative computational theory of the operation of the hippocampal CA3 system as an autoassociation or attractor network used in episodic memory system is described. In this theory, the CA3 system operates as a single attractor or autoassociation network to enable rapid, one-trial, associations between any spatial location (place in rodents, or spatial view in primates) and an object or reward, and to provide for completion of the whole memory during recall from any part. The theory is extended to associations between time and object or reward to implement temporal order memory, also important in episodic memory. The dentate gyrus (DG) performs pattern separation by competitive learning to produce sparse representations suitable for setting up new representations in CA3 during learning, producing for example neurons with place-like fields from entorhinal cortex grid cells. The dentate granule cells produce by the very small number of mossy fiber (MF) connections to CA3 a randomizing pattern separation effect important during learning but not recall that separates out the patterns represented by CA3 firing to be very different from each other, which is optimal for an unstructured episodic memory system in which each memory must be kept distinct from other memories. The direct perforant path (pp) input to CA3 is quantitatively appropriate to provide the cue for recall in CA3, but not for learning. Tests of the theory including hippocampal subregion analyses and hippocampal NMDA receptor knockouts are described, and support the theory.

  16. Quantitative ADF STEM: acquisition, analysis and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative annular dark-field in the scanning transmission electron microscope (ADF STEM), where image intensities are used to provide composition and thickness measurements, has enjoyed a renaissance during the last decade. Now in a post aberration-correction era many aspects of the technique are being revisited. Here the recent progress and emerging best-practice for such aberration corrected quantitative ADF STEM is discussed including issues relating to proper acquisition of experimental data and its calibration, approaches for data analysis, the utility of such data, its interpretation and limitations.

  17. Electric Field Quantitative Measurement System and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and system are provided for making a quantitative measurement of an electric field. A plurality of antennas separated from one another by known distances are arrayed in a region that extends in at least one dimension. A voltage difference between at least one selected pair of antennas is measured. Each voltage difference is divided by the known distance associated with the selected pair of antennas corresponding thereto to generate a resulting quantity. The plurality of resulting quantities defined over the region quantitatively describe an electric field therein.

  18. Understanding and reducing complex systems pharmacology models based on a novel input-response index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöchel, Jane; Kloft, Charlotte; Huisinga, Wilhelm

    2018-02-01

    A growing understanding of complex processes in biology has led to large-scale mechanistic models of pharmacologically relevant processes. These models are increasingly used to study the response of the system to a given input or stimulus, e.g., after drug administration. Understanding the input-response relationship, however, is often a challenging task due to the complexity of the interactions between its constituents as well as the size of the models. An approach that quantifies the importance of the different constituents for a given input-output relationship and allows to reduce the dynamics to its essential features is therefore highly desirable. In this article, we present a novel state- and time-dependent quantity called the input-response index that quantifies the importance of state variables for a given input-response relationship at a particular time. It is based on the concept of time-bounded controllability and observability, and defined with respect to a reference dynamics. In application to the brown snake venom-fibrinogen (Fg) network, the input-response indices give insight into the coordinated action of specific coagulation factors and about those factors that contribute only little to the response. We demonstrate how the indices can be used to reduce large-scale models in a two-step procedure: (i) elimination of states whose dynamics have only minor impact on the input-response relationship, and (ii) proper lumping of the remaining (lower order) model. In application to the brown snake venom-fibrinogen network, this resulted in a reduction from 62 to 8 state variables in the first step, and a further reduction to 5 state variables in the second step. We further illustrate that the sequence, in which a recursive algorithm eliminates and/or lumps state variables, has an impact on the final reduced model. The input-response indices are particularly suited to determine an informed sequence, since they are based on the dynamics of the original system

  19. Modeling approaches for qualitative and semi-quantitative analysis of cellular signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaga, Regina; Klamt, Steffen

    2013-06-26

    A central goal of systems biology is the construction of predictive models of bio-molecular networks. Cellular networks of moderate size have been modeled successfully in a quantitative way based on differential equations. However, in large-scale networks, knowledge of mechanistic details and kinetic parameters is often too limited to allow for the set-up of predictive quantitative models.Here, we review methodologies for qualitative and semi-quantitative modeling of cellular signal transduction networks. In particular, we focus on three different but related formalisms facilitating modeling of signaling processes with different levels of detail: interaction graphs, logical/Boolean networks, and logic-based ordinary differential equations (ODEs). Albeit the simplest models possible, interaction graphs allow the identification of important network properties such as signaling paths, feedback loops, or global interdependencies. Logical or Boolean models can be derived from interaction graphs by constraining the logical combination of edges. Logical models can be used to study the basic input-output behavior of the system under investigation and to analyze its qualitative dynamic properties by discrete simulations. They also provide a suitable framework to identify proper intervention strategies enforcing or repressing certain behaviors. Finally, as a third formalism, Boolean networks can be transformed into logic-based ODEs enabling studies on essential quantitative and dynamic features of a signaling network, where time and states are continuous.We describe and illustrate key methods and applications of the different modeling formalisms and discuss their relationships. In particular, as one important aspect for model reuse, we will show how these three modeling approaches can be combined to a modeling pipeline (or model hierarchy) allowing one to start with the simplest representation of a signaling network (interaction graph), which can later be refined to logical

  20. Quantitative Risk Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helms, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-10

    The US energy sector is vulnerable to multiple hazards including both natural disasters and malicious attacks from an intelligent adversary. The question that utility owners, operators and regulators face is how to prioritize their investments to mitigate the risks from a hazard that can have the most impact on the asset of interest. In order to be able to understand their risk landscape and develop a prioritized mitigation strategy, they must quantify risk in a consistent way across all hazards their asset is facing. Without being able to quantitatively measure risk, it is not possible to defensibly prioritize security investments or evaluate trade-offs between security and functionality. Development of a methodology that will consistently measure and quantify risk across different hazards is needed.

  1. SUS in nuclear medicine in Brazil: analysis and comparison of data provided by Datasus and CNEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzo, Lorena; Coura Filho, George; Osso Júnior, João Alberto; Squair, Peterson Lima

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the outpatient access to nuclear medicine procedures by means of the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS), analyzing the correspondence between data provided by this system and those from Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN) (National Commission of Nuclear Energy). Data provided by Datasus regarding number of scintillation chambers, outpatient procedures performed from 2008 to 2012, administrative responsibility for such procedures, type of service providers and outsourced services were retrieved and evaluated. Also, such data were compared with those from institutions certified by CNEN. The present study demonstrated that the system still lacks maturity in terms of correct data input, particularly regarding equipment available. It was possible to list the most common procedures and check the growth of the specialty along the study period. Private centers are responsible for most of the procedures covered and reimbursed by SUS. However, many healthcare facilities are not certified by CNEN. Datasus provides relevant data for analysis as done in the present study, although some issues still require attention. The present study has quantitatively depicted the Brazilian reality regarding access to nuclear medicine procedures offered by/for SUS.

  2. QTest: Quantitative Testing of Theories of Binary Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Regenwetter, Michel; Davis-Stober, Clintin P.; Lim, Shiau Hong; Guo, Ying; Popova, Anna; Zwilling, Chris; Cha, Yun-Shil; Messner, William

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to make modeling and quantitative testing accessible to behavioral decision researchers interested in substantive questions. We provide a novel, rigorous, yet very general, quantitative diagnostic framework for testing theories of binary choice. This permits the nontechnical scholar to proceed far beyond traditionally rather superficial methods of analysis, and it permits the quantitatively savvy scholar to triage theoretical proposals before investing effort into co...

  3. Quantitative Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted A.G. Steemers

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging is a non-destructive optical analysis technique that can for instance be used to obtain information from cultural heritage objects unavailable with conventional colour or multi-spectral photography. This technique can be used to distinguish and recognize materials, to enhance the visibility of faint or obscured features, to detect signs of degradation and study the effect of environmental conditions on the object. We describe the basic concept, working principles, construction and performance of a laboratory instrument specifically developed for the analysis of historical documents. The instrument measures calibrated spectral reflectance images at 70 wavelengths ranging from 365 to 1100 nm (near-ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared. By using a wavelength tunable narrow-bandwidth light-source, the light energy used to illuminate the measured object is minimal, so that any light-induced degradation can be excluded. Basic analysis of the hyperspectral data includes a qualitative comparison of the spectral images and the extraction of quantitative data such as mean spectral reflectance curves and statistical information from user-defined regions-of-interest. More sophisticated mathematical feature extraction and classification techniques can be used to map areas on the document, where different types of ink had been applied or where one ink shows various degrees of degradation. The developed quantitative hyperspectral imager is currently in use by the Nationaal Archief (National Archives of The Netherlands to study degradation effects of artificial samples and original documents, exposed in their permanent exhibition area or stored in their deposit rooms.

  4. Functional transformations of odor inputs in the mouse olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Yoav; Livneh, Yoav; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Groysman, Maya; Luo, Liqun; Mizrahi, Adi

    2014-01-01

    Sensory inputs from the nasal epithelium to the olfactory bulb (OB) are organized as a discrete map in the glomerular layer (GL). This map is then modulated by distinct types of local neurons and transmitted to higher brain areas via mitral and tufted cells. Little is known about the functional organization of the circuits downstream of glomeruli. We used in vivo two-photon calcium imaging for large scale functional mapping of distinct neuronal populations in the mouse OB, at single cell resolution. Specifically, we imaged odor responses of mitral cells (MCs), tufted cells (TCs) and glomerular interneurons (GL-INs). Mitral cells population activity was heterogeneous and only mildly correlated with the olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) inputs, supporting the view that discrete input maps undergo significant transformations at the output level of the OB. In contrast, population activity profiles of TCs were dense, and highly correlated with the odor inputs in both space and time. Glomerular interneurons were also highly correlated with the ORN inputs, but showed higher activation thresholds suggesting that these neurons are driven by strongly activated glomeruli. Temporally, upon persistent odor exposure, TCs quickly adapted. In contrast, both MCs and GL-INs showed diverse temporal response patterns, suggesting that GL-INs could contribute to the transformations MCs undergo at slow time scales. Our data suggest that sensory odor maps are transformed by TCs and MCs in different ways forming two distinct and parallel information streams.

  5. The Input-Output Relationship of the Cholinergic Basal Forebrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Gielow

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons influence cortical state, plasticity, learning, and attention. They collectively innervate the entire cerebral cortex, differentially controlling acetylcholine efflux across different cortical areas and timescales. Such control might be achieved by differential inputs driving separable cholinergic outputs, although no input-output relationship on a brain-wide level has ever been demonstrated. Here, we identify input neurons to cholinergic cells projecting to specific cortical regions by infecting cholinergic axon terminals with a monosynaptically restricted viral tracer. This approach revealed several circuit motifs, such as central amygdala neurons synapsing onto basolateral amygdala-projecting cholinergic neurons or strong somatosensory cortical input to motor cortex-projecting cholinergic neurons. The presence of input cells in the parasympathetic midbrain nuclei contacting frontally projecting cholinergic neurons suggest that the network regulating the inner eye muscles are additionally regulating cortical state via acetylcholine efflux. This dataset enables future circuit-level experiments to identify drivers of known cortical cholinergic functions.

  6. CBM first-level event selector input interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutter, Dirk [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The CBM First-level Event Selector (FLES) is the central event selection system of the upcoming CBM experiment at FAIR. Designed as a high-performance computing cluster, its task is an online analysis of the physics data at a total data rate exceeding 1 TByte/s. To allow efficient event selection, the FLES performs timeslice building, which combines the data from all given input links to self-contained, overlapping processing intervals and distributes them to compute nodes. Partitioning the input data streams into specialized containers allows to perform this task very efficiently. The FLES Input Interface defines the linkage between FEE and FLES data transport framework. Utilizing a custom FPGA board, it receives data via optical links, prepares them for subsequent timeslice building, and transfers the data via DMA to the PC's memory. An accompanying HDL module implements the front-end logic interface and FLES link protocol in the front-end FPGAs. Prototypes of all Input Interface components have been implemented and integrated into the FLES framework. In contrast to earlier prototypes, which included components to work without a FPGA layer between FLES and FEE, the structure matches the foreseen final setup. This allows the implementation and evaluation of the final CBM read-out chain. An overview of the FLES Input Interface as well as studies on system integration and system start-up are presented.

  7. Identification of single-input-single-output quantum linear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Matthew; GuÅ£ǎ, Mǎdǎlin

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate system identification for single-input-single-output general (active or passive) quantum linear systems. For a given input we address the following questions: (1) Which parameters can be identified by measuring the output? (2) How can we construct a system realization from sufficient input-output data? We show that for time-dependent inputs, the systems which cannot be distinguished are related by symplectic transformations acting on the space of system modes. This complements a previous result of Guţă and Yamamoto [IEEE Trans. Autom. Control 61, 921 (2016), 10.1109/TAC.2015.2448491] for passive linear systems. In the regime of stationary quantum noise input, the output is completely determined by the power spectrum. We define the notion of global minimality for a given power spectrum, and characterize globally minimal systems as those with a fully mixed stationary state. We show that in the case of systems with a cascade realization, the power spectrum completely fixes the transfer function, so the system can be identified up to a symplectic transformation. We give a method for constructing a globally minimal subsystem direct from the power spectrum. Restricting to passive systems the analysis simplifies so that identifiability may be completely understood from the eigenvalues of a particular system matrix.

  8. Multi-Input Convolutional Neural Network for Flower Grading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Flower grading is a significant task because it is extremely convenient for managing the flowers in greenhouse and market. With the development of computer vision, flower grading has become an interdisciplinary focus in both botany and computer vision. A new dataset named BjfuGloxinia contains three quality grades; each grade consists of 107 samples and 321 images. A multi-input convolutional neural network is designed for large scale flower grading. Multi-input CNN achieves a satisfactory accuracy of 89.6% on the BjfuGloxinia after data augmentation. Compared with a single-input CNN, the accuracy of multi-input CNN is increased by 5% on average, demonstrating that multi-input convolutional neural network is a promising model for flower grading. Although data augmentation contributes to the model, the accuracy is still limited by lack of samples diversity. Majority of misclassification is derived from the medium class. The image processing based bud detection is useful for reducing the misclassification, increasing the accuracy of flower grading to approximately 93.9%.

  9. Functional transformations of odor inputs in the mouse olfactory bulb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Yoav; Livneh, Yoav; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Groysman, Maya; Luo, Liqun; Mizrahi, Adi

    2014-01-01

    Sensory inputs from the nasal epithelium to the olfactory bulb (OB) are organized as a discrete map in the glomerular layer (GL). This map is then modulated by distinct types of local neurons and transmitted to higher brain areas via mitral and tufted cells. Little is known about the functional organization of the circuits downstream of glomeruli. We used in vivo two-photon calcium imaging for large scale functional mapping of distinct neuronal populations in the mouse OB, at single cell resolution. Specifically, we imaged odor responses of mitral cells (MCs), tufted cells (TCs) and glomerular interneurons (GL-INs). Mitral cells population activity was heterogeneous and only mildly correlated with the olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) inputs, supporting the view that discrete input maps undergo significant transformations at the output level of the OB. In contrast, population activity profiles of TCs were dense, and highly correlated with the odor inputs in both space and time. Glomerular interneurons were also highly correlated with the ORN inputs, but showed higher activation thresholds suggesting that these neurons are driven by strongly activated glomeruli. Temporally, upon persistent odor exposure, TCs quickly adapted. In contrast, both MCs and GL-INs showed diverse temporal response patterns, suggesting that GL-INs could contribute to the transformations MCs undergo at slow time scales. Our data suggest that sensory odor maps are transformed by TCs and MCs in different ways forming two distinct and parallel information streams. PMID:25408637

  10. Dynamics of networks of excitatory and inhibitory neuronsin response to time-dependent inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwan eLedoux

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamics of recurrent networks of excitatory (E and inhibitory(I neurons in the presence of time-dependent inputs. The dynamics is characterizedby the network dynamical transfer function, i.e. how the population firing rate ismodulated by sinusoidal inputs at arbitrary frequencies. Two types of networks arestudied and compared: (i a Wilson-Cowan type firing rate model; and (ii a fullyconnected network of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, in a strong noise regime. Wefirst characterize the region of stability of the ‘asynchronous state’ (a state in whichpopulation activity is constant in time when external inputs are constant in the spaceof parameters characterizing the connectivity of the network. We then systematicallycharacterize the qualitative behaviors of the dynamical transfer function, as a functionof the connectivity. We find that the transfer function can be either low-pass, or witha single or double resonance, depending on the connection strengths and synaptic timeconstants. Resonances appear when the system is close to Hopf bifurcations, that canbe induced by two separate mechanisms: the I-I connectivity and the E-I connectivity.Double resonances can appear when excitatory delays are larger than inhibitory delays,due to the fact that two distinct instabilities exist with a finite gap between thecorresponding frequencies. In networks of LIF neurons, changes in external inputs andexternal noise are shown to be able to change qualitatively the network transfer function.Firing rate models are shown to exhibit the same diversity of transfer functions asthe LIF network, provided delays are present. They can also exhibit input-dependentchanges of the transfer function, provided a suitable static nonlinearity is incorporated.

  11. White-light Quantitative Phase Imaging Unit

    CERN Document Server

    Baek, YoonSeok; Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the white light quantitative phase imaging unit (WQPIU) as a practical realization of quantitative phase imaging (QPI) on standard microscope platforms. The WQPIU is a compact stand-alone unit which measures sample induced phase delay under white-light illumination. It does not require any modification of the microscope or additional accessories for its use. The principle of the WQPIU based on lateral shearing interferometry and phase shifting interferometry provides a cost-effective and user-friendly use of QPI. The validity and capacity of the presented method are demonstrated by measuring quantitative phase images of polystyrene beads, human red blood cells, HeLa cells and mouse white blood cells. With speckle-free imaging capability due to the use of white-light illumination, the WQPIU is expected to expand the scope of QPI in biological sciences as a powerful but simple imaging tool.

  12. Anthropogenic point-source and non-point-source nitrogen inputs into Huai River basin and their impacts on riverine ammonia-nitrogen flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. S.; Swaney, D. P.; Li, X. Y.; Hong, B.; Howarth, R. W.; Ding, S. H.

    2015-07-01

    This study provides a new approach to estimate both anthropogenic non-point-source and point-source nitrogen (N) inputs to the landscape, and determines their impacts on riverine ammonia-nitrogen (AN) flux, providing a foundation for further exploration of anthropogenic effects on N pollution. Our study site is Huai River basin of China, a water-shed with one of the highest levels of N input in the world. Multi-year average (2003-2010) inputs of N to the watershed are 27 200 ± 1100 kg N km-2 yr-1. Non-point sources comprised about 98 % of total N input, and only 2 % of inputs are directly added to the aquatic ecosystem as point sources. Fertilizer application was the largest non-point source of new N to the Huai River basin (69 % of net anthropogenic N inputs), followed by atmospheric deposition (20 %), N fixation in croplands (7 %), and N content of imported food and feed (2 %). High N inputs showed impacts on riverine AN flux: fertilizer application, point-source N input, and atmospheric N deposition were proved as more direct sources to riverine AN flux. Modes of N delivery and losses associated with biological denitrification in rivers, water consumption, interception by dams may influence the extent of export of riverine AN flux from N sources. Our findings highlight the importance of anthropogenic N inputs from both point sources and non-point sources in heavily polluted watersheds, and provide some implications for AN prediction and management.

  13. Anthropogenic point and non-point nitrogen inputs into Huai River Basin and their impacts on riverine ammonia-nitrogen flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W. S.; Swaney, D. P.; Li, X. Y.; Hong, B.; Howarth, R. W.; Ding, S. H.

    2015-02-01

    This study provides a new approach to estimate both anthropogenic non-point and point nitrogen (N) inputs to the landscape, and determines their impacts on riverine ammonia-nitrogen (AN) flux, providing a foundation for further exploration of anthropogenic effects on N pollution. Our study site is Huai River Basin of China, a watershed with one of the highest levels of N input in the world. Multi-year average (2003-2010) inputs of N to the watershed are 27 200 ± 1100 kg N km-2 yr-1. Non-point sources comprised about 98% of total N input and only 2% of inputs are directly added to the aquatic ecosystem as point sources. Fertilizer application was the largest non-point source of new N to the Huai River Basin (69% of net anthropogenic N inputs), followed by atmospheric deposition (20%), N fixation in croplands (7%), and N content of imported food and feed (2%). High N inputs showed impacts on riverine AN flux: fertilizer application, point N input and atmospheric N deposition were proved as more direct sources to riverine AN flux. Modes of N delivery and losses associated with biological denitrification in rivers, water consumption, interception by dams influenced the extent of export of riverine AN flux from N sources. Our findings highlight the importance of anthropogenic N inputs from point and non-point sources in heavily polluted watersheds, and provide some implications for AN prediction and management.

  14. Distinguishing Representations as Origin and Representations as Input: Roles for Individual Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C.W. Edwards

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available It is widely perceived that there is a problem in giving a naturalistic account of mental representation that deals adequately with meaning, interpretation or significance (semantic content. It is suggested here that this problem may arise partly from the conflation of two vernacular senses of representation: representation-as-origin and representation-as-input. The flash of a neon sign may in one sense represent a popular drink, but to function as representation it must provide an input to a ‘consumer’ in the street. The arguments presented draw on two principles – the neuron doctrine and the need for a venue for ‘presentation’ or ‘reception’ of a representation at a specified site, consistent with the locality principle. It is also argued that domains of representation cannot be defined by signal traffic, since they can be expected to include ‘null’ elements based on non-firing cells. In this analysis, mental representations-as-origin are distributed patterns of cell firing. Each firing cell is given semantic value in its own right - some form of atomic propositional significance – since different axonal branches may contribute to integration with different populations of signals at different downstream sites. Representations-as-input are patterns of local co-arrival of signals in the form of synaptic potentials in dendrites. Meaning then draws on the relationships between active and null inputs, forming ‘scenarios’ comprising a molecular combination of ‘premises’ from which a new output with atomic propositional significance is generated. In both types of representation, meaning, interpretation or significance pivots on events in an individual cell. (This analysis only applies to ‘occurrent’ representations based on current neural activity. The concept of representations-as-input emphasises the need for a ‘consumer’ of a representation and the dependence of meaning on the co-relationships involved in an

  15. Method and apparatus for smart battery charging including a plurality of controllers each monitoring input variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2013-10-15

    A method for managing the charging and discharging of batteries wherein at least one battery is connected to a battery charger, the battery charger is connected to a power supply. A plurality of controllers in communication with one and another are provided, each of the controllers monitoring a subset of input variables. A set of charging constraints may then generated for each controller as a function of the subset of input variables. A set of objectives for each controller may also be generated. A preferred charge rate for each controller is generated as a function of either the set of objectives, the charging constraints, or both, using an algorithm that accounts for each of the preferred charge rates for each of the controllers and/or that does not violate any of the charging constraints. A current flow between the battery and the battery charger is then provided at the actual charge rate.

  16. Intelligent RF-Based Gesture Input Devices Implemented Using e-Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Hughes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an radio-frequency (RF-based approach to gesture detection and recognition, using e-textile versions of common transmission lines used in microwave circuits. This approach allows for easy fabrication of input swatches that can detect a continuum of finger positions and similarly basic gestures, using a single measurement line. We demonstrate that the swatches can perform gesture detection when under thin layers of cloth or when weatherproofed, providing a high level of versatility not present with other types of approaches. Additionally, using small convolutional neural networks, low-level gestures can be identified with a high level of accuracy using a small, inexpensive microcontroller, allowing for an intelligent fabric that reports only gestures of interest, rather than a simple sensor requiring constant surveillance from an external computing device. The resulting e-textile smart composite has applications in controlling wearable devices by providing a simple, eyes-free mechanism to input simple gestures.

  17. Whole-Brain Monosynaptic Afferent Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System

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    Rongfeng Hu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS robustly modulates many important behaviors, such as arousal, attention, learning and memory, through heavy projections to cortex and hippocampus. However, the presynaptic partners governing BFCS activity still remain poorly understood. Here, we utilized a recently developed rabies virus-based cell-type-specific retrograde tracing system to map the whole-brain afferent inputs of the BFCS. We found that the BFCS receives inputs from multiple cortical areas, such as orbital frontal cortex, motor cortex, and insular cortex, and that the BFCS also receives dense inputs from several subcortical nuclei related to motivation and stress, including lateral septum (LS, central amygdala (CeA, paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVH, dorsal raphe (DRN and parabrachial nucleus (PBN. Interestingly, we found that the BFCS receives inputs from the olfactory areas and the entorhinal-hippocampal system. These results greatly expand our knowledge about the connectivity of the mouse BFCS and provided important preliminary indications for future exploration of circuit function.

  18. Ion input via rainwater in the southwestern region of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

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    Francine Neves Calil

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Ion input via rainfall alone and after interception by the forest canopy, constitutes an important path ofbiochemical cycling, although few studies have provided information on the subject so far. The objective of this work is toquantify ion inputs, via rainfall, in the southwestern region of Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. Ten rain gauges were mountedin a field area. The quantification of stored water volume, along with sample collection for determination of nitrate, nitrite,ammonium, phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium contents, was done fortnightly fromSeptember 2006 to August 2008. Local annual average precipitation in the relevant period was 1,588.3 mm. The concentrationof chemical elements in rainwater was found to vary throughout, being inversely correlated with the increase in rainfall, whilepotassium, ammonium, phosphate, sulfate, chloride and sodium were found to have a significant mutual correlation (p <0.01.Based on the annual amount of nutrient input via rainwater, it can be inferred that rainfall is an important source of chemicalelement input into the forest system.

  19. Ghost stochastic resonance with distributed inputs in pulse-coupled electronic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopera, Abel; Buldú, Javier M.; Torrent, M. C.; Chialvo, Dante R.; García-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2006-02-01

    We study experimentally the phenomenon of ghost stochastic resonance in pulse-coupled excitable systems, for input signals distributed among different elements. Specifically, two excitable electronic circuits are driven by different sinusoidal signals that produce periodic spikes at distinct frequencies. Their outputs are sent to a third circuit that processes these spiking signals and is additionally perturbed by noise. When the input signals are harmonics of a certain fundamental (that is not present in the inputs) the processing circuit exhibits, for an optimal amount of noise, a resonant response at the frequency of the missing fundamental (ghost frequency). In contrast with the standard case in which the signals being directly integrated are sinusoidal, this behavior relies here on a coincidence-detection mechanism. When the input signals are homogeneously shifted in frequency, the processing circuit responds with pulse packages composed of spikes at a frequency that depends linearly on the frequency shift. Expressions for the dependence of the package period and duration on the frequency shift and spike width, respectively, are obtained. These results provide an experimental verification of a recently proposed mechanism of binaural pitch perception.

  20. Noise Propagation in Multiple-Input ADC-Based Measurement Systems

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    Bellan Diego

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the complete statistical characterization of the amplitude spectrum at the output of a multiple-input ADC-based measurement system is derived under the assumption of input channels with different noise levels. In practical applications the input channels correspond to the spatial components of a vector field (e.g., magnetic/electric field. Each output spectral line represents the amplitude of the vector field at a specific frequency. Such amplitude is a random variable depending on the noise levels (internal and external noise of the input channels. Closed form analytical solution for the probability density function of the vector field amplitude is not available in the mathematical literature under the hypothesis of different noise levels. Therefore, an analytical expression for the probability density function is derived on the basis of a Laguerre series expansion. The impact of the kind of time window, the sampling frequency, and the number of samples is clearly derived and put into evidence. Approximate analytical expressions for the mean value and the variance of the vector field amplitude are also provided. Analytical results are validated by means of numerical simulations.