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Sample records for providing prophylactic antibiotics

  1. Improvement in Timing of Antibiotic Administration by Using a Prophylactic Antibiotic Record Form

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    Sung-Ching Pan

    2008-03-01

    Conclusion: The prophylactic antibiotic form effectively decreased the inappropriate use of prophylactic antibiotics. Due to its high degree of reliability, this infection control measure can be used as a continuous monitoring system for prophylactic antibiotic use.

  2. Prophylactic antibiotics versus post- operative antibiotics in herniorraphy

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    Abedulla Khan Kayamkani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative surgical site infections are a major source of illness.  Infection results in longer hospital stay and higher costs.  Uses of preoperative antibiotics have been standardized and are being used routinely in most clinical surgeries and include controversial areas like breast surgery and herniorraphy. Objective of the study is to find out the benefit of prophylactic use of antibiotics in the management of herniorraphy.This project was carried out in a multispeciality tertiary care teaching hospital from 1st-30th April in 2002. Group 1 patients were treated prophylactically half an hour before surgery with single dose of I.V. antibiotics (injection.  Ampicillin 1gm + injection.  Gentamicin 80mg. Group 2 patients were treated post surgery with capsule. Ampicillin 500mg 4 times a day for 7 days and injection. Gentamicin twice a day for first 4 days. In case of group 1 patients only one out of 20 patients (5% was infected.  Whereas in-group 2 patients 5 out of 20 patients (25% were infected. The cost of prophylactic antibiotic treatment was Rs. 25.56 per patient.  The postoperative antibiotic treatment cost was Rs. 220.4 per patient.  That means postoperative treatment is around 8.62 times costlier than prophylactic treatment.             From this study it is evident that prophylactic (preoperative treatment is better than postoperative treatment with antibiotics.

  3. Prophylactic antibiotic use in pediatric burn units.

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    Ergün, O; Celik, A; Ergün, G; Ozok, G

    2004-12-01

    Prophylactic antibiotic use in childhood burns is controversial. The efficiency of antibiotic prophylaxis in 77 pediatric burn patients was evaluated. Forty-seven patients received prophylactic antibiotics (Group AP), while 30 patients received no prophylaxis (Group NP). Age, wound depth, day of admission, mechanism of burn injury, type of dressings were similar for both groups (p > 0.05). Wound infection rates were 21.3 % in Group AP and 16.7 % in Group NP (p > 0.05). S. aureus, Enterobacter spp., P. aeruginosa, and E. coli were the most common microorganisms. Patients with wound colonization and infection had a larger burned total body surface area (BTBSA) in both groups (p beneficial and cost-effective results in the treatment of childhood burns is recommended.

  4. Prophylactic antibiotics in acute pancreatitis: endless debate.

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    Mourad, M M; Evans, Rpt; Kalidindi, V; Navaratnam, R; Dvorkin, L; Bramhall, S R

    2017-02-01

    INTRODUCTION The development of pancreatic infection is associated with the development of a deteriorating disease with subsequent high morbidity and mortality. There is agreement that in mild pancreatitis there is no need to use antibiotics; in severe pancreatitis it would appear to be a logical choice to use antibiotics to prevent secondary pancreatic infection and decrease associated mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS A non-systematic review of current evidence, meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials was conducted to assess the role of prophylactic antibiotics in acute pancreatitis and whether it might improve morbidity and mortality in pancreatitis. RESULTS Mixed evidence was found to support and refute the role of prophylactic antibiotics in acute pancreatitis. Most studies have failed to demonstrate much benefit from its routine use. Data from our unit suggested little benefit of their routine use, and showed that the mortality of those treated with antibiotics was significantly higher compared with those not treated with antibiotics (9% vs 0%, respectively, P = 0.043). In addition, the antibiotic group had significantly higher morbidity (36% vs 5%, respectively, P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS Antibiotics should be used in patients who develop sepsis, infected necrosis-related systemic inflammatory response syndrome, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome or pancreatic and extra-pancreatic infection. Despite the many other factors that should be considered, prompt antibiotic therapy is recommended once inflammatory markers are raised, to prevent secondary pancreatic infection. Unfortunately, there remain many unanswered questions regarding the indications for antibiotic administration and the patients who benefit from antibiotic treatment in acute pancreatitis.

  5. Audit of prophylactic antibiotic use in orthopaedic surgery in Mulago ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prophylactic antibiotics are entrenched in implant orthopaedic surgery. We conducted a study to determine the use of prophylactic antibiotics in clean implant orthopaedic surgery in Mulago hospital. Methods: We prospectively recruited patients undergoing ORIF, Athroplasty and Foot and Ankle surgery.

  6. Prophylactic antibiotic regimens in tumor surgery (PARITY survey

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    Hasan Khaled

    2012-06-01

    clear benefit of an antibiotic drug regimen different from what they are currently using. Further support for a clinical trial was observed by an overwhelming surgeon interest (87%; 95% CI: 77, 93% in participating in a multi-center randomized controlled study. Conclusion The current lack of guidelines for the prescription of prophylactic antibiotics in Musculoskeletal Tumor Surgery has left Orthopaedic Oncologists with varying opinions and practices. The lack of current evidence and strong surgeon support for participating in a definitive study provides strong rationale for clinical trials.

  7. Vesicoureteral reflux and continuous prophylactic antibiotics

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    Ted Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR management must be tailored based on the risk for further infections and renal scarring, gender, likelihood of spontaneous resolution, and parental preferences. Because we now understand that sterile VUR is benign and most reflux spontaneously resolves over time, the initial approach in majority of children is non-surgical with continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP and correction of bladder and bowel dysfunction. Despite increasing utilization of CAP over the past four decades, the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis has been questioned due to conflicting results of studies plagued with design flaws and inadequate subject sample size. The Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR trial, which was designed to address many of the limitations from previous studies, provided much needed answers. In this review, we sought to describe the controversy surrounding VUR management, highlight the results of RIVUR trial, and discuss how the RIVUR findings impact our understanding of CAP in the management of VUR.

  8. Impact of pharmacist interventions on rational prophylactic antibiotic use and cost saving in elective cesarean section.

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    Wang, Jingwen; Dong, Mohan; Lu, Yang; Zhao, Xian; Li, Xin; Wen, Aidong

    2015-08-01

    To assess the impact of pharmacist interventions on rational use of prophylactic antibiotics and cost saving in elective cesarean section and the economic outcomes of implementing pharmacist interventions. A pre-to-post intervention design was applied to the practices of prophylactic antibiotic use in the department of gynecology and obstetrics in a Chinese tertiary hospital. Patients admitted during a 3-month period from June to August 2012 and during that from October to December 2012 undergoing elective cesarean section were assigned to the pre-intervention and the post-intervention group, respectively. Pharmacist interventions were performed in the post-intervention group, including obstetrician education, realtime monitoring of clinical records and making recommendations to obstetricians on prophylactic antibiotic prescription based on the criteria set at the beginning of the study. Data from the two groups were then compared to evaluate the outcomes of pharmacist interventions. Cost-outcome analysis was performed to determine the economic effect of implementing pharmacist interventions in preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Pharmacist interventions led to significant reductions in antibiotic usage cost/patient-day (p antibiotic cost (p antibiotics (p antibiotic use to the cost of pharmacist time was 27.23 : 1 and the net cost benefit was $65,255.84. This study provides evidence that pharmacist interventions promoted rational use of prophylactic antibiotics and substantial cost saving in elective cesarean section.

  9. Prophylactic antibiotics in otolaryngologic surgeries: from knowledge to practice.

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    Khatami-Moghadam, Minoo; Khorsandi-Ashtiani, Mohammad-Taghi; Mohagheghi, Mohammad-Ali; Hasibi, Mehrdad; Kouhi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The management and use of antimicrobial drugs has clinical, economic, and environmental implications. In many countries, antimicrobial drugs are the most frequently prescribed therapeutic agents. Therefore, health-care policy should focus on how to establish a rational attitude toward antibiotics. This study was performed to investigate antibiotic usage as a prophylactic regimen in head and neck surgeries. This study was a retrospective case series. Patients undergoing otolaryngology surgeries in a tertiary referral otolaryngology center were included. Members of operating room staff that were unaware of the study objectives collected patients' data using a questionnaire that contained information regarding general medical condition, disease, surgical procedure, and prophylaxis regimen and duration. Excluding infected patients, we studied 1349 patients during a four-month period who needed prophylactic antibiotics. A total of 34 different types of surgical procedures were performed. Out of the total number of patients, 503 (37.0%) received a parenteral antibiotic directly before surgery. The main antibiotics used before surgery were cephalosporins (94.9%). All of the 1349 patients were administered antibiotics after the procedure. These antibiotics where given with a mean number of doses of 4.81 (range: 1-68), and also consisted of mostly cephalosporins. Our results indicate that prophylactic antibiotics were being significantly misused in a tertiary referral center of a university hospital. Although teaching the principles of prophylaxis to physicians is important, we think that finding a way to bring this knowledge to practice is more important.

  10. [Prophylactic and therapeutic use of antibiotics in dental medicine].

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    Mutzbauer, Till S; Imfeld, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    In dentistry antibiotics are used as a prophylactic measure as well as for therapeutic reasons. For the general practitioner, antibiotic prophylaxis of infectious diseases of dental or oral origin is more prevalent than the antibiotic treatment of such infections. Patients suffering from bacterial infections of oral origin should be referred to a dentist or to an oral surgeon. This review aims to precisely describe the indications for antibiotic preventive measures before dental or oral surgical treatments. Theses measures should be commonly planned by the general practitioner and the dentist. The actual treatment of the infection should, however, be left to the dentist, oral or maxillofacial surgeon.

  11. Prophylactic antibiotic regimens in tumour surgery (PARITY)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Michael Mørk; Hettwer, Werner H; Grum-Schwensen, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    -day regimen of post-operative antibiotics, in comparison to a 24-hour regimen, decreases surgical site infections in patients undergoing endoprosthetic reconstruction for lower extremity primary bone tumours. METHODS: We performed a pilot international multi-centre RCT. We used central randomisation...... to conceal treatment allocation and sham antibiotics to blind participants, surgeons, and data collectors. We determined feasibility by measuring patient enrolment, completeness of follow-up, and protocol deviations for the antibiotic regimens. RESULTS: We screened 96 patients and enrolled 60 participants......% at one year (the remainder with partial data or pending queries). In total, 18 participants missed at least one dose of antibiotics or placebo post-operatively, but 93% of all post-operative doses were administered per protocol. CONCLUSIONS: It is feasible to conduct a definitive multi-centre RCT of post...

  12. Prophylactic Antibiotics in Otolaryngologic Surgeries: From Knowledge to Practice

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    Minoo Khatami-Moghadam

    2011-01-01

    Our results indicate that prophylactic antibiotics were being significantly misused in a tertiary referral center of a university hospital. Although teaching the principles of prophylaxis to physicians is important, we think that finding a way to bring this knowledge to practice is more important.

  13. Prophylactic Antibiotics in Otolaryngologic Surgeries: From Knowledge to Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Khatami-Moghadam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The management and use of antimicrobial drugs has clinical, economic, and environmental implications. In many countries, antimicrobial drugs are the most frequently prescribed therapeutic agents. Therefore, health-care policy should focus on how to establish a rational attitude toward antibiotics. This study was performed to investigate antibiotic usage as a prophylactic regimen in head and neck surgeries.  Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective case series. Patients undergoing otolaryngology surgeries in a tertiary referral otolaryngology center were included. Members of operating room staff that were unaware of the study objectives collected patients’ data using a questionnaire that contained information regarding general medical condition, disease, surgical procedure, and prophylaxis regimen and duration.   Results: Excluding infected patients, we studied 1349 patients during a four-month period who needed prophylactic antibiotics. A total of 34 different types of surgical procedures were performed. Out of the total number of patients, 503 (37.0% received a parenteral antibiotic directly before surgery. The main antibiotics used before surgery were cephalosporins (94.9%. All of the 1349 patients were administered antibiotics after the procedure. These antibiotics where given with a mean number of doses of 4.81 (range: 1–68, and also consisted of mostly cephalosporins. Conclusion: Our results indicate that prophylactic antibiotics were being significantly misused in a tertiary referral center of a university hospital. Although teaching the principles of prophylaxis to physicians is important, we think that finding a way to bring this knowledge to practice is more important.

  14. Present and future of prophylactic antibiotics for severe acute pancreatitis

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    Jiang, Kun; Huang, Wei; Yang, Xiao-Nan; Xia, Qing

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of prophylactic antibiotics in the reduction of mortality of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) patients, which is highly questioned by more and more randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses. METHODS: An updated meta-analysis was performed. RCTs comparing prophylactic antibiotics for SAP with control or placebo were included for meta-analysis. The mortality outcomes were pooled for estimation, and re-pooled estimation was performed by the sensitivity analysis of an ideal large-scale RCT. RESULTS: Currently available 11 RCTs were included. Subgroup analysis showed that there was significant reduction of mortality rate in the period before 2000, while no significant reduction in the period from 2000 [Risk Ratio, (RR) = 1.01, P = 0.98]. Funnel plot indicated that there might be apparent publication bias in the period before 2000. Sensitivity analysis showed that the RR of mortality rate ranged from 0.77 to 1.00 with a relatively narrow confidence interval (P antibiotic prophylaxis. CONCLUSION: Current evidences do not support prophylactic antibiotics as a routine treatment for SAP, but the potentially benefited sub-population requires further investigations. PMID:22294832

  15. Prophylactic antibiotics in vesicoureteric reflux: Evidence-based analysis

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    M S Ansari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this review was to systematically examine the available evidence for the effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotics in cases of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR. Materials and Methods: We searched the relevant data on medical management of VUR and the date of last search was June 2008. The search included both randomized controlled trials as well as the nonrandomized trials and the data sources were; MEDLINE, online peer reviewed journals, Cochrane database and abstracts from conference proceedings. Results: Barring few most of the studies published on medical management were nonrandomized. Besides being small in number many of these studies were of poor-quality and poorly designed eventually failing in giving a reliable answer in this regard. Few of the studies suggest that the children with low grade VUR might do well even without antibiotic prophylaxis. Conclusions : In the absence of properly designed, randomized controlled trials and long-term follow-up the question of antibiotic prophylaxis in cases of VUR remains unanswered in large part of it. Whether to give prophylactic antibiotics or not would ultimately need a shared decision-making involving both the treating physician and the parents assessing both the risks and the benefits.

  16. Postoperative prophylactic antibiotics and surgical site infection rates in breast surgery patients.

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    Throckmorton, Alyssa D; Boughey, Judy C; Boostrom, Sarah Y; Holifield, Andrea C; Stobbs, Melissa M; Hoskin, Tanya; Baddour, Larry M; Degnim, Amy C

    2009-09-01

    A single preoperative prophylactic dose of an intravenous antibiotic with antistaphylococcal activity is standard of care for breast and axillary surgical procedures. Some surgeons also prescribe postoperative prophylaxis for all patients with drains to prevent infection despite its lack of proven efficacy. A retrospective chart review of patients with breast and/or axillary surgical procedures between July 2004 and June 2006 were included. Data were collected on patient demographics, procedure types, and use of prophylactic antibiotics. Surgical site infection (SSI) was defined by means of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria, including patients meeting the physician diagnosis criterion if an antibiotic was prescribed for a clinical diagnosis of cellulitis. chi(2) and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare SSI rates. Three hundred fifty-three patients with 436 surgical sites who received either preoperative or both pre- and postoperative antibiotic were analyzed. Overall, the SSI rate was 7.8% (34 of 436 surgical sites). Eighty-five patients (24%) with 127 surgical sites were provided both preoperative and postoperative prophylactic antibiotics. The SSI rates did not differ statistically (P = .67) for the groups that did (95% confidence interval, 4.8-15.0; 11 of 127 surgical sites, 8.7%) and did not receive postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis (95% confidence interval, 5.0-11.0; 23 of 309, 7.4%). Although the overall number of patients who developed SSI was relatively small, there was no reduction in the SSI rate among those who received postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Because of the potential adverse events associated with antibiotic use, further evaluation of this practice is required.

  17. Prophylactic anti-staphylococcal antibiotics for cystic fibrosis.

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    Smyth, Alan R; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2017-04-18

    Staphylococcus aureus causes pulmonary infection in young children with cystic fibrosis. Prophylactic antibiotics are prescribed hoping to prevent such infection and lung damage. Antibiotics have adverse effects and long-term use might lead to infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This is an update of a previously published review. To assess continuous oral antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent the acquisition of Staphylococcus aureus versus no prophylaxis in people with cystic fibrosis, we tested these hypotheses. Prophylaxis:1. improves clinical status, lung function and survival;2. causes adverse effects (e.g. diarrhoea, skin rash, candidiasis);3. leads to fewer isolates of common pathogens from respiratory secretions;4. leads to the emergence of antibiotic resistance and colonisation of the respiratory tract with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register, comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Companies manufacturing anti-staphylococcal antibiotics were contacted.Most recent search of the Group's Register: 29 September 2016. Randomised trials of continuous oral prophylactic antibiotics (given for at least one year) compared to intermittent antibiotics given 'as required', in people with cystic fibrosis of any disease severity. The authors assessed studies for eligibility and methodological quality and extracted data. We included four studies, with a total of 401 randomised participants aged zero to seven years on enrolment; one study is ongoing. The two older included studies generally had a higher risk of bias across all domains, but in particular due to a lack of blinding and incomplete outcome data, than the two more recent studies. We only regarded the most recent study as being generally free of bias, although even here we were not certain of the effect of the per protocol

  18. Pharmacist interventions for prophylactic antibiotic use in urological inpatients undergoing clean or clean-contaminated operations in a Chinese hospital.

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    Hai-Xia Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact and cost-benefit value of pharmacist interventions for prophylactic antibiotic use in surgical patients undergoing clean or clean-contaminated operations. METHODS: A pre-to-post intervention study was performed in the Department of Urological Surgery of a tertiary hospital. Patients admitted from January through June 2011, undergoing clean or clean-contaminated surgery, served as the pre-intervention group; patients admitted from January through June 2012 formed the post-intervention group. Pharmacist interventions were performed for the surgeries in the post-intervention group. The criteria for the rational use of antibiotic prophylaxis were established by the hospital administration. The pharmacist interventions included real-time monitoring of medical records and controlling of the prescriptions of prophylactic antibiotics against the criteria. The pre- and post-intervention groups were then compared to evaluate the outcomes of the pharmacist interventions. A cost-benefit analysis was performed to determine the economic effects of implementing the pharmacist intervention on preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis. RESULTS: After the pharmacist intervention, a significant decrease was found in the rate of no indications for prophylactic antibiotic use (p = 0.004, the rate of broad-spectrum antibiotic use (p<0.001, the rate of drug replacement (p<0.001 and the rate of prolonged duration of prophylaxis (p<0.001. Significant reductions were observed in the mean antibiotic cost (p<0.001, the mean duration of antibiotic prophylaxis (p<0.001 and the mean number of antibiotics used (p<0.001. A significant increase was observed in the rate of correct choice of antibiotics (p<0.001. The ratio of the net mean cost savings for antibiotics to the mean cost of pharmacist time was approximately 18.79:1. CONCLUSION: Real-time interventions provided by a clinical pharmacist promoted rational use of prophylactic antibiotics, with

  19. Prophylactic Antibiotic Therapy in Contaminated Traumatic Wounds: Two Days versus Five Days Treatment

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    Ghafouri, Hamed-Basir; Bagheri-Behzad, Barzin; Yasinzadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Modirian, Ehsan; Divsalar, Dorsa; Farahmand, Shervin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Emergency department manages several kinds of wounds including simple, non-bite traumatic wounds and lacerations. Prophylactic antibiotic therapy is one of pre-scribed treatment in these conditions. We aimed to compare the clinical efficacy of the two day regimen of prophylactic antimicrobial agents with the five day regimen in simple traumatic but highly contaminated wounds. Methods Between January 2010 and May 2010, patients presenting with simple traumatic wounds or lacerations in different parts of the body, highly contaminated with soil, debris or feces in emergency department of a referral educational hospital in Tehran (Rasul-Akram hospital), Iran, went for primary closure. All of the patients were provided prophylactic antibiotic, however, prescribed for one group (A) of patients for 2 days and other group (B) received for 5 days, according to the physician concerned. As these treatments were routine, we selected 70 patients from each group using table of random numbers. The patients were warned about the signs of infection including long-lasting erythema, purulent discharge and inflammation and were supposed to inform the concerned physician in any of such alarming situations. Oral Cephalexin 500 mg qid was prescribed for all patients enrolled for prophylaxis treatment. Results On follow-up 11 (8.2%) patients were found to develop sutured site infection (6 out of 70 (8.57%) in group A, and five out of 70 (7.14%) in group B (P=0.31)). There was no statistical difference between infection rates between men (8.6%) in comparison to women (6.25%) (P>0.05; CI=95%). Conclusion Our study showed that 2-day prophylactic antibiotic therapy using Cephalexin is at least as effective as a 5-day regimen in relation to development of surgical site infection in patients with simple traumatic contaminated wounds or lacerations. PMID:23678439

  20. Is there a role for prophylactic antibiotics after stented hypospadias repair?

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    Kanaroglou, Niki; Wehbi, Elias; Alotay, Abdulhakim; Bagli, Darius J; Koyle, Martin A; Lorenzo, Armando J; Farhat, Walid A

    2013-10-01

    Data are lacking on prophylactic oral antibiotic use in stented hypospadias repair cases. We evaluated the role of prophylactic oral antibiotics for preventing symptomatic urinary tract infections in this population. We reviewed consecutive patients treated with stented primary/redo hypospadias repair by a single surgeon from September 2009 to January 2012. All patients received antibiotics upon induction. Before April 1, 2011, patients also received prophylactic oral antibiotics while stented. They were compared to those who underwent surgery after April 1, who received no prophylactic oral antibiotics. The primary outcome was symptomatic urinary tract infections, as captured from patient records and verified by an electronic cross-check of ICD-10 codes. Secondary outcomes included cellulitis, fistula, dehiscence and meatal stenosis. Of the 161 patients reviewed 11 were unstented and 1 underwent followup elsewhere. Of the remaining 149 patients 78 received prophylactic oral antibiotics and 71 did not. The groups were well matched for age, hypospadias characteristics, surgical technique and stent duration. Median followup was 17 months (range 0.2 to 33). No culture proven, symptomatic urinary tract infections developed in either group. One patient in the prophylactic group was treated for cellulitis by the pediatrician. The complication rate, including redo cases, was 18.2% in the prophylactic group and 15.3% in the nonprophylactic group (p = 0.8). When postoperative prophylactic oral antibiotics were not administered, we identified no increased incidence of symptomatic urinary tract infections or complications. Our data suggest that prophylactic oral antibiotics may not be needed in cases of stented hypospadias repair. This study contributes to the growing body of evidence supporting the rational use of antimicrobials. It can potentially serve as a basis for a prospective, multicenter, randomized study. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education

  1. Variation in Use of Prophylactic Antibiotics in Gynecologic Procedures Before and After an Educational Intervention.

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    Wu, Emily; Langsjoen, Jessica; Pruszynski, Jessica; Kuehl, Thomas J; Larsen, Wilma I

    2017-12-01

    Guidelines for use of prophylactic antibiotics in gynecologic procedures are outlined by the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. There remains, however, a high rate of unindicated administration of antibiotics for surgeries. A retrospective study performed at our institution in 2012-2013 demonstrated that unindicated prophylactic antibiotics were administered over half the time. This study aimed to examine variations in the use of prophylactic antibiotics in patients undergoing gynecologic surgery at Scott and White Memorial Hospital and determine whether an educational intervention to gynecology physicians was associated with a significant decrease in unindicated prophylactic antibiotics. A retrospective chart review was performed for all women undergoing gynecologic surgery at Scott and White Memorial Hospital in Temple, Texas for 1 year. An educational intervention regarding prophylactic antibiotic usage was held for obstetricians and gynecologists in the middle of that year. Subjects were included if they had procedures with a Current Procedural Terminology code corresponding to a procedure that does not require prophylactic antibiotics. Subjects were excluded if they had concurrent procedures for which antibiotics are recommended. A total of 500 subjects met inclusion and exclusion criteria, with 243 before the educational intervention and 257 after the intervention. In our study, a significant decrease (P educational intervention, both the gynecology oncology and reproductive endocrinology and infertility divisions had the highest rates of unindicated antibiotic use-91.7% (44/48) and 91.7% (33/36), respectively. The generalist and urogynecology divisions had the lowest rates for specialists before the intervention: 20.6% (30/146) and 30.8% (4/13), respectively. After the intervention, all of the divisions demonstrated an improvement in their rates of unindicated prophylactic antibiotic use. The urogynecology division demonstrated an

  2. The Efficacy of Postoperative Prophylactic Antibiotics in Orthognathic Surgery: A Prospective Study in Le Fort I Osteotomy and Bilateral Intraoral Vertical Ramus Osteotomy

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    Kang, Sang-Hoon; Yoo, Jae-Ha

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the efficacy of the postoperative prophylactic antibiotics used in orthognathic surgery. The prevalence of surgical site infections (SSIs) was determined according to the use of postoperative prophylactic antibiotics. Patients and Methods Fifty-six patients were divided into 2 groups. Each patient intravenously received 1.0 g of a third-generation cephalosporin (Cefpiramide) 30 minutes before surgery. Among them, 28 patients in the control group received 1.0 g Cefpiramide twice daily until the third day after surgery. The postoperative wounds were examined regularly for the presence of infectious signs. Results There was no significant difference in the incidence of postoperative wound infections between patients who had received postoperative prophylactic antibiotic administration and those who had not (p = 0.639). Conclusion Prolonged prophylactic antibiotic use after orthognathic surgery may not be necessary, provided that there are no other significant factors for wound infections. PMID:19259349

  3. Practice patterns in the use of prophylactic antibiotics following nonoperative orbital fractures

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    Wang, Jijo Jizhou; Koterwas, Jennifer M; Bedrossian, Edward H; Foster, William J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to analyze the practice management patterns of the current members of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS) and to determine the use of oral prophylactic antibiotics in an attempt to prevent orbital cellulitis following nonoperative orbital fractures. Patients and methods A cross-sectional web-based survey was emailed to all the members of ASOPRS regarding their current management of nonsurgical orbital fractures and their experience with orbital cellulitis following nonoperative orbital fractures. Results The majority of practicing oculoplastic surgeon members of ASOPRS do not routinely prescribe prophylactic antibiotics for patients with nonoperative orbital fractures or patients with orbital fractures whom the physicians are observing and who might potentially need surgical intervention. Among the reported cases of orbital cellulitis following a nonoperative orbital fracture in this survey, more than a quarter of the patients had received prophylactic antibiotics. Furthermore, among physicians who have managed orbital cellulitis following nonoperative fracture, 75% (33 out of 44 physicians) report that orbital cellulitis. Conclusion Despite frequent recommendation for the use of prophylactic antibiotics after orbital fractures in commonly cited ophthalmic references, the majority of oculoplastic surgeons do not use prophylactic antibiotics for orbital fractures, including both nonoperative orbital fractures and orbital fractures that may potentially need surgery. PMID:27822009

  4. Prophylactic Antibiotics for Endoscopy-Associated Peritonitis in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

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    Wu, Hsin-Hsu; Li, I-Jung; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chang, Ming-Yang; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chih-Wei; Tian, Ya-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) peritonitis may develop after endoscopic procedures, and the benefit of prophylactic antibiotics is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether prophylactic antibiotics reduce the incidence of peritonitis in these patients. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed all endoscopic procedures, including esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, cystoscopy, hysteroscopy, and hysteroscopy-assisted intrauterine device (IUD) implantation/removal, performed in CAPD patients at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan, between February 2001 and February 2012. Results Four hundred and thirty-three patients were enrolled, and 125 endoscopies were performed in 45 patients. Eight (6.4%) peritonitis episodes developed after the examination. Antibiotics were used in 26 procedures, and none of the patients had peritonitis (0% vs. 8.1% without antibiotic use; p = 0.20). The peritonitis rate was significantly higher in the non-EGD group than in the EGD group (15.9% [7/44] vs. 1.2% [1/81]; pperitonitis rate compared to that without antibiotic use (0% [0/16] vs. 25% [7/28]; pPeritonitis only occurred if invasive procedures were performed, such as biopsy, polypectomy, or IUD implantation, (noninvasive procedures, 0% [0/20] vs. invasive procedures, 30.4% [7/23]; pperitonitis was noted if antibiotics were used prior to examination with invasive procedures (0% [0/10] vs. 53.8% [7/13] without antibiotic use; pperitonitis (antibiotics, 0% [0/4] vs. no antibiotics, 55.6% [5/9]; p = 0.10). Conclusion Antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced endoscopy-associated PD peritonitis in the non-EGD group. Endoscopically assisted invasive procedures, such as biopsy, polypectomy, IUD implantation/removal, and dilatation and curettage (D&C), pose a high risk for peritonitis. Prophylactic antibiotics for peritonitis prevention may be required in colonoscopic procedures and gynecologic procedures

  5. Practice patterns in the use of prophylactic antibiotics following nonoperative orbital fractures

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    Wang JJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Jijo Jizhou Wang,1 Jennifer M Koterwas,2 Edward H Bedrossian Jr,2 William J Foster2,3 1Lewis Katz School of Medicine, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, 3Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the practice management patterns of the current members of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS and to determine the use of oral prophylactic antibiotics in an attempt to prevent orbital cellulitis following nonoperative orbital fractures.Patients and methods: A cross-sectional web-based survey was emailed to all the members of ASOPRS regarding their current management of nonsurgical orbital fractures and their experience with orbital cellulitis following nonoperative orbital fractures.Results: The majority of practicing oculoplastic surgeon members of ASOPRS do not routinely prescribe prophylactic antibiotics for patients with nonoperative orbital fractures or patients with orbital fractures whom the physicians are observing and who might potentially need surgical intervention. Among the reported cases of orbital cellulitis following a nonoperative orbital fracture in this survey, more than a quarter of the patients had received prophylactic antibiotics. Furthermore, among physicians who have managed orbital cellulitis following nonoperative fracture, 75% (33 out of 44 physicians report that <1% of patients develop orbital cellulitis.Conclusion: Despite frequent recommendation for the use of prophylactic antibiotics after orbital fractures in commonly cited ophthalmic references, the majority of oculoplastic surgeons do not use prophylactic antibiotics for orbital fractures, including both nonoperative orbital fractures and orbital fractures that may potentially need surgery. Keywords: orbital blowout fracture, orbital fracture, antibiotic use, practice patterns, survey

  6. Real-World Use of Prophylactic Antibiotics in Insertable Cardiac Monitor Procedures.

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    Beinart, Sean C; Natale, Andrea; Verma, Atul; Amin, Alpesh; Kasner, Scott; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Pouliot, Erika; Franco, Noreli; Mittal, Suneet

    2016-08-01

    The use of prophylactic antibiotics during insertable cardiac monitor (ICM) procedures is a carryover of the common practice used with therapeutic cardiac implantable electronic devices. We sought to characterize the current practice of ICM insertion procedures to evaluate the influence of prophylactic antibiotic administration on the occurrence of infections. We characterized insertion procedures and procedure-related infections from an ongoing multicenter registry (Reveal LINQ(TM) Registry). In order to accurately capture infections, only patients enrolled before or the day of insertion who also had a record of whether or not preoperative antibiotics were used were included in this analysis. Infections were defined based on the physician's assessment and reported upon occurrence. Patients were categorized into two analysis cohorts based on prophylactic antibiotic use. We analyzed 375 patients from 14 U.S. centers (age 63.1 ± 15.6 years; male 54.1%). Approximately two-thirds of patients (66.4%) did not receive any preprocedural antibiotics. The overall infection rate was 1.1% (0.3-2.7% confidence interval [CI]) and corresponded to four events. In the group that did not receive preprocedural antibiotics, there were two minor infections (0.8%, [0.1-2.9% CI]), whereas in the group receiving preprocedural antibiotics a serious and a minor infection occurred (1.6%, [0.2-5.6% CI]); this serious infection resulted in an explant. Current real-world practice shows that ICM insertions are increasingly performed without the use of prophylactic antibiotics, which is associated with a very low infection rate. © 2016 The Authors. Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Prophylactic antibiotics at the time of tracheotomy lowers the incidence of pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Nicklas Järvelä; Hahn, Christoffer Holst

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Nosocomial pneumonia in relation to tracheotomy is a well-known complication. The aim of the present study was to study prophylactic antibiotics at the time of tracheotomy as a protective factor against nosocomial pneumonia. METHODS: A retrospective follow-up study was conducted...

  8. Adherence to guidelines of antibiotic prophylactic use in surgery: a prospective cohort study in North West Bank, Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musmar, Samar M J; Ba'ba, Hiba; Owais, Ala'

    2014-09-09

    Surgical site infection is a major contributor to increased mortality and health care costs globally which can be reduced by appropriate antibiotic prophylactic use. In Palestine, there is no published data about preoperative antibiotic use. This study aims to find the pattern of antimicrobial prophylaxis use by evaluating time of the first dose, antibiotic selection and duration after surgery in three governmental hospitals in North West Bank/ Palestine during 2011. After approval of Institutional Review Board, a prospective cohort study included a total of 400 abdominal, orthopedic, and gynecological operations which were performed during study period. Trained clinical pharmacists observed selected 301 operations and followed the patient's files for the three intended study parameters. Compliance of prophylactic antibiotic administration was evaluated according to published guidelines of the American Society for Hospital Pharmacist. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 applying descriptive methods. Relationship between guideline compliance and selected operation factors such as type of surgery, patient care unit, and hospital shift, in addition to provider's age, gender, experience, and specialization were examined applying chi square test. The statistically significant factors with p Palestine, with high rate of broad spectrum antibiotic use, long duration and inappropriate time of first dose .We recommend adopting guidelines for prophylaxis and training all health care providers accordingly.

  9. Prophylactic Antibiotics Use at IUCD Insertion and Pelvic Infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Mirena Intrauterine system was not used. The antibiotic used was oral Azithromycin. (Zithromax, Pfizer). In their Sexual history, the users did not report any change in sexual partners or habits after insertion of the device. They were followed up for three months after insertion. Results: Thirty-one clients were seen during ...

  10. Prophylactic antibiotics for endoscopy-associated peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients.

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    Hsin-Hsu Wu

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD peritonitis may develop after endoscopic procedures, and the benefit of prophylactic antibiotics is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether prophylactic antibiotics reduce the incidence of peritonitis in these patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all endoscopic procedures, including esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD, colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, cystoscopy, hysteroscopy, and hysteroscopy-assisted intrauterine device (IUD implantation/removal, performed in CAPD patients at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan, between February 2001 and February 2012. RESULTS: Four hundred and thirty-three patients were enrolled, and 125 endoscopies were performed in 45 patients. Eight (6.4% peritonitis episodes developed after the examination. Antibiotics were used in 26 procedures, and none of the patients had peritonitis (0% vs. 8.1% without antibiotic use; p=0.20. The peritonitis rate was significantly higher in the non-EGD group than in the EGD group (15.9% [7/44] vs. 1.2% [1/81]; p<0.005. Antibiotic use prior to non-EGD examinations significantly reduced the endoscopy-associated peritonitis rate compared to that without antibiotic use (0% [0/16] vs. 25% [7/28]; p<0.05. Peritonitis only occurred if invasive procedures were performed, such as biopsy, polypectomy, or IUD implantation, (noninvasive procedures, 0% [0/20] vs. invasive procedures, 30.4% [7/23]; p<0.05. No peritonitis was noted if antibiotics were used prior to examination with invasive procedures (0% [0/10] vs. 53.8% [7/13] without antibiotic use; p<0.05. Although not statistically significant, antibiotics may play a role in preventing gynecologic procedure-related peritonitis (antibiotics, 0% [0/4] vs. no antibiotics, 55.6% [5/9]; p=0.10. CONCLUSION: Antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced endoscopy-associated PD peritonitis in the non-EGD group. Endoscopically assisted invasive procedures, such

  11. EFFECT OF PROPHYLACTIC ANTIBIOTIC ON SURGICAL SITE INFECTION AFTER TENSION-FREE HERNIOPLASTY

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    Y Saskia-Javi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: prophylactic antibiotics were remains applied for hernioplasty treatment at Sanglah General Hospital Bali-Indonesia. On the other hand, there were no comprehensive infection incidence data gathered. This research aims to determine incidence differences of post operative infection inpatients underwent tension-free hernioplasty and received prophylactic antibiotics compared to thosewho received placebo. The general purpose of this research is to determine the necessity of prophylactic antibiotics in the hope of setting new procedural standards in elective hernia procedures thus reducing cost and bacteria resistance.Patients and Method: This was an open label randomizedclinical trial conducted at Sanglah General Hospital Department of General Surgery from October 2011. The target population was all patients who underwent tension-free hernioplasty procedure, in Sanglah General Hospital. The acquired data was analyzed after an independent t test was performed. a Mann-Whitney U test, Fisher’s exact test, and Two-Sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test were used todetermine the correlations between variables, where p < 0.05 was regardless of significant.Results: From 54 subjects 3 (5.6% of them were found to have a slight erythema around the operation wound,on the 7th,14th,21th, and 28th day no signs of erythema were found. From the three subjects two (7.4% were from the placebo group and one (3.7% from the antibiotic group. All clinical assessment of post operative wound was made using Southampton Wound Assessment Scale, where erythema is a grade 1C, all subjects healed primarily.Conclusion: An Open Label Randomized Clinical Trial comparing SSI in post tension-free hernioplasty patients who were given prophylactic antibiotics and placebo.No significant difference were found.

  12. Effect of Prophylactic Antibiotic Use in the Development of Antibiotic Resistance in Children with Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections

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    Mehmet Karacı

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Although prophylactic antibiotic treatment is still debatable, it is currently in use in recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs. In the present study, we aimed to observe if prophylactic antibiotic use had any effect on the development of antibiotic resistance in patients with recurrent UTIs who we followed up in our clinic. Methods: The present study was performed on patients aged between one month and 16 years, who had recurrent UTIs, and were followed up by the Department of Pediatrics at Bülent Ecevit University Medical School. Patient files were retrospectively reviewed, and 50 patients who received antibiotic prophylaxis and 100 patients without prophylaxis were enrolled in the study. Urinary tests, subsequent urinary culture results, and antibiotic resistances were compared between the groups. Results: The mean age was 42.7±44.2 months. The most frequently cultured isolated bacterium was Escherichia coli (E. coli (58.4%. No difference was determined in bacteria in cultures between prophylaxis receivers and non-receivers. Isolation rate of E. coli was higher in urinary cultures in females than in males (p<0.001. When antibiotic resistance of all urinary culture-isolated bacteria was compared between the two groups, there was no statistically significant difference. However, an increased resistance against amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftriaxone, and piperacillin was determined in prophylaxis group in whom E. coli was grown. In this study, general antibiotic resistance was most frequently observed against ampicillin (71.9%. Conclusion: In the present study, we observed that prophylaxis did not contribute so much to resistance other than E. coli. We recommend not preferring antibiotics which have increased resistance in our institution especially in children receiving prophylaxis for empirical treatment.

  13. Role of prophylactic antibiotics in low risk elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy: is there a need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Muhammad Ali; Mehraj, Adnan; Ejaz, Raja; Mian, Amer

    2013-01-01

    Elective cholecystectomy for symptomatic gall stone disease carries low risk of postoperative infective complications. Yet the routine use of prophylactic antibiotic is in vogue in many centres. The aim of this study was to find out the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing postoperative infective complications in low risk elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy patients. Randomised controlled trial was carried out in our hospital from 1st Nov 2009 to 15th Oct 2011. A total of 350 patients were included in the study and were divided into Group A (n = 177). and Group B (n = 173). Group A was given single dose of injection Celfuroxime 1.5 gm as prophylactic antibiotic at the time of induction of anaesthesia, and Group B was not given any antibiotic. In both groups, age, sex, duration of surgery, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, duration of surgery and length of hospital stay were recorded. Patients were followed-up weekly for 4 weeks and rates of superficial surgical site infections as well as intra-abdominal infections were recorded. There were no significant differences in both groups in terms of age, sex, duration of surgery, length of hospital stay. Eight (4.5%) cases of superficial surgical site infection were noted in Group A and 7 (4.0%) in Group B which was insignificant statistically (p > 0.05). In low risk patients antibiotic prophylaxis does not seem to affect the incidence of postoperative infective complications in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The use of prophylactic antibiotics should be reserved for high risk patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  14. Postoperative bacteremia in periodontal flap surgery, with and without prophylactic antibiotic administration: A comparative study

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    Asi Kanwarjit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Many a times in clinical periodontology, the decision whether to prescribe prophylactic antibiotics or not , is perplexing.The present study was conducted to compare the bacteremias induced after periodontal flap surgeries with and without prophylactic antibiotics. Materials and Methods: The occurrence of postoperative bacteremia following periodontal flap surgery was studied in 30 patients. On these patients, 30 quadrant wise flap surgeries were carried out without any preoperative prophylactic antibiotics and 30 surgeries carried out after prophylactic administration of amoxycillin preoperatively. A blood sample was taken from each patient at the time of maximum surgical trauma and was cultured for micro-organisms and antibiotic sensitivity. Results: 18 out of 60 blood samples were positive for micro-organisms. There was a significant reduction in post operative bacteremia after amoxycillin prophylaxis (x - 7.96 with P< 0.01 as post operative bacteremia was found in 14 of the non medicated patients as compared to only 4 of the pre medicated patients. The micro-organisms encountered in the study are as follows:- 1 Staphylococcus albus coagulase negative, 2 Klebsiella, 3 Psedomonas aerugenosa, 4 Streptococcus viridans, 5 Alpha hemolytic streptococcus, 6 Neisseria catarrhalis Conclusion: On the basis of the study, it is concluded that the incidence of postoperative bacteremia following periodontal flap surgery is not as high as previously reported. The clinical results show that Amoxicillin is highly effective in reducing postoperative bacteremia in periodontal flap surgery and thus in preventing the possible sequelae (Infective Endocarditis and other systemic maladies in susceptible patients. However, cefotaxime and cephalexin may prove to be more effective in preventing the same.

  15. Prophylactic antibiotics and evaluation scheme following febrile urinary tract infection in children: a nationwide Israeli survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, Naama; Ashkenazi, Shai; Davidovits, Miriam

    2009-11-01

    Although febrile urinary tract infections are very common in young children, the need for antimicrobial prophylaxis and evaluation following a first event is controversial. To assess the approach of leading pediatric specialists throughout israel to antimicrobial prophylaxis. A questionnaire regarding the approach to antibiotic prophylaxis and diagnostic evaluation following a first event of febrile UTI, according to age and underlying renal abnormality, was sent to all 58 directors of departments of pediatrics, units of pediatric infectious diseases and pediatric nephrology in Israel. Fifty-six directors (96%) responded. Most prescribed prophylactic antibiotics after UTI. Heads of infectious disease departments prescribed less prophylaxis following UTI at the age of 18 months than heads of pediatrics or heads of pediatric nephrology units (34% vs. 72-75%, P = 0.018), but more often in cases of severe vesico-ureteral reflux without UTI. Cephalosporins were used prophylactically more often by directors of pediatrics compared to heads of pediatric nephrology units (71% vs. 38%, P = 0.048); the latter used non-beta-lactam prophylaxis (61% vs. 23%, P = 0.013) more often. Most pediatricians used renal sonography for evaluation; renal scan was used more commonly by pediatric nephrologists. The administration of prophylactic antibiotics after UTI is still common practice among pediatric opinion leaders, although the specific approach differs by subspecialty. According to the latest evidence-based data, educational efforts are needed to formulate and implement judicious guidelines.

  16. Prophylactic Antibiotic Choice and Risk of Surgical Site Infection After Hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Shitanshu; Harris, John; Al-Niaimi, Ahmed; Swenson, Carolyn W; Pearlman, Mark D; Reynolds, R Kevin; Kamdar, Neil; Bazzi, Ali; Campbell, Darrell A; Morgan, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate associations between prophylactic preoperative antibiotic choice and surgical site infection rates after hysterectomy. A retrospective cohort study was performed of patients in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative undergoing hysterectomy from July 2012 to February 2015. The primary outcome was a composite outcome of any surgical site infection (superficial surgical site infections or combined deep organ space surgical site infections). Preoperative antibiotics were categorized based on the recommendations set forth by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Surgical Care Improvement Project. Patients receiving a recommended antibiotic regimen were categorized into those receiving β-lactam antibiotics and those receiving alternatives to β-lactam antibiotics. Patients receiving nonrecommended antibiotics were categorized into those receiving overtreatment (excluded from further analysis) and those receiving nonstandard antibiotics. Multivariable logistic regression models were developed to estimate the independent effect of antibiotic choice. Propensity score matching analysis was performed to validate the results. The study included 21,358 hysterectomies. The overall rate of any surgical site infection was 2.06% (n=441). Unadjusted rates of "any surgical site infection" were 1.8%, 3.1%, and 3.7% for β-lactam, β-lactam alternatives, and nonstandard groups, respectively. After adjusting for patient and operative factors within clusters of hospitals, compared with the β-lactam antibiotics (reference group), the risk of "any surgical site infection" was higher for the group receiving β-lactam alternatives (odds ratio [OR] 1.7, confidence interval [CI] 1.27-2.07) or the nonstandard antibiotics (OR 2.0, CI 1.31-3.1). Compared with women receiving β-lactam antibiotic regimens, there is a higher risk of surgical site infection after hysterectomy among those receiving a recommended β-lactam alternative or nonstandard regimen.

  17. Prophylactic antibiotics at the time of tracheotomy lowers the incidence of pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Nicklas Järvelä; Hahn, Christoffer Holst

    2015-07-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia in relation to tracheotomy is a well-known complication. The aim of the present study was to study prophylactic antibiotics at the time of tracheotomy as a protective factor against nosocomial pneumonia. A retrospective follow-up study was conducted on otorhinolaryngeal cancer patients requiring a surgical tracheotomy over a four-year period. Data were extracted from a digital record system. The inclusion criteria included a cancer diagnosis in the otorhinolaryngeal area; and the tracheotomy had to be the primary operation. A total of 88 patients were eligible for inclusion, forming a group without antibiotics (n = 53) treatment and a group with antibiotics (n = 35) treatment. In the group without antibiotics, 67% (n = 34) developed pneumonia (not including aspirational) versus 44% (n = 14) in the group with antibiotics (p = 0.04). The 30-day mortality was 10% (n = 9), and the one-year mortality was 58% (n = 42) for the total population, with no statistically significant differences between the groups. Pneumonia after tracheotomy prolonged the hospitalisation time regardless of grouping. In the group without antibiotics, the median was seven days for patients without pneumonia compared with 12.5 days for patients with pneumonia (p tracheotomy lowers the incidence of pneumonia in otorhinolaryngeal cancer patients. not relevant. not relevant.

  18. Risk of surgical site infection in paediatric herniotomies without any prophylactic antibiotics: A preliminary experience

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    Dhananjay Vaze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different studies underline the use of pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis in clean surgeries like herniotomy and inguinal orchiopexy. But, the meta-analyses do not recommend nor discard the use of prophylactic pre-operative antibiotics. The scarcity of controlled clinical trials in paediatric population further vitiates the matter. This study assessed the difference in the rate of early post-operative wound infection cases in children who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and children who did not receive antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. Materials and Methods: This randomised prospective study was conducted in Paediatric Surgery department of PGIMER Chandigarh. Out of 251 patients, 112 patients were randomised to the case group and 139 were ascribed to the control group. The patients in control group were given a standard regimen of single dose of intravenous antibiotic at the time of induction followed by 3-4 days of oral antibiotic. Case group patients underwent the surgical procedure in similar manner with no antibiotic either at the time of induction or post-operatively. Results: The incidence of surgical site infection in case group was 3.73 % and that in control group was 2.22%. The observed difference in the incidence of surgical site infection was statistically insignificant (P value = 0.7027. The overall infection rate in case and control group was 2.89%. Conclusions: Our preliminary experience suggests that there is no statistically significant difference in the proportion of early post-operative wound infection between the patients who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and the patients who received no antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. The risk of surgical site infection in paediatric heriotomies does not increase even if the child′s weight is less than his/her expected weight for age.

  19. Prophylactic antibiotics to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections after urodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foon, Richard; Toozs-Hobson, Philip; Latthe, Pallavi

    2012-10-17

    There is a risk that people who have invasive urodynamic studies (cystometry) will develop urinary tract infections or bacteria in the urine or blood. However, the use of prophylactic antibiotics before or immediately after invasive cystometry or urodynamic studies is not without risks of adverse effects and emergence of resistant microbes. To assess the effectiveness and safety of administering prophylactic antibiotics in reducing the risk of urinary tract infections after urodynamic studies. The hypothesis was that administering prophylactic antibiotics reduces urinary tract infections after urodynamic studies. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trial Register, MEDLINE (January 1966 to January 2009), CINAHL (January 1982 to January 2009), EMBASE (January 1966 to January 2009), PubMed (1 January 1980 to January 2009), LILACS (up to January 2009), TRIP database (up to January 2009), and the UK NHS Evidence Health Information Resources (searched 10 December 2009). We searched the reference lists of relevant articles, the primary trials and the proceedings of the International Urogynaecological Association International Continence Society and the American Urological Association for the years 1999 to 2009 to identify articles not captured by electronic searches. There were no language restrictions. All randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials comparing the use of prophylactic antibiotics versus a placebo or no treatment in patients having urodynamic studies were selected. Two authors (PL and RF) independently performed the selection of trials for inclusion and any disagreements were resolved by discussion. All assessments of the quality of trials and data extraction were performed independently by two authors of the review (PL and RF) using forms designed according to Cochrane guidelines. We attempted to contact authors of the included trials for any missing data. Data were extracted on characteristics of the study participants

  20. Prophylactic Antibiotic Management of Surgical Patients Noted as "Allergic" to Penicillin at Two Academic Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard H; Jacques, Paul St; Wanderer, Jonathan P; Bombulie, Mark R; Agarwalla, Niraj

    2016-05-01

    We studied prophylactic antibiotics administered at 2 academic medical centers during a 6-year period where a cephalosporin was indicated but an "allergy" to penicillin was noted. Another drug (typically vancomycin or clindamycin) was substituted approximately 80% of the time; this occurred frequently even when symptoms unrelated to acute hypersensitivity were listed. In >50% of cases, the reaction was either omitted or vague (e.g., simply "rash"). Given the estimated 1% cross-reactivity between penicillins and cephalosporins with similar R1 side chains, many of these patients could have received either the prescribed cephalosporin or another cephalosporin with a different R1 side chain.

  1. Prophylactic antibiotics at the time of tracheotomy lowers the incidence of pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Nicklas Järvelä; Hahn, Christoffer Holst

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Nosocomial pneumonia in relation to tracheotomy is a well-known complication. The aim of the present study was to study prophylactic antibiotics at the time of tracheotomy as a protective factor against nosocomial pneumonia. METHODS: A retrospective follow-up study was conducted...... on otorhinolaryngeal cancer patients requiring a surgical tracheotomy over a four-year period. Data were extracted from a digital record system. The inclusion criteria included a cancer diagnosis in the otorhinolaryngeal area; and the tracheotomy had to be the primary operation. A total of 88 patients were eligible...... was 10% (n = 9), and the one-year mortality was 58% (n = 42) for the total population, with no statistically significant differences between the groups. Pneumonia after tracheotomy prolonged the hospitalisation time regardless of grouping. In the group without antibiotics, the median was seven days...

  2. A study comparing preoperative intra-incisional antibiotic infiltration and prophylactic intravenous antibiotic administration for reducing surgical site infection

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    Bharat Bhushan Dogra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical site infection (SSI continues to be a distressing problem since time immemorial, as it happens to be one of the major causes of post-operative morbidity and mortality. Many methods have been evolved to combat wound infection, but the rate of wound infection has been more or less static over the past few decades. The search for alternative modes of management is going on and one of the methods is intra-incisional infiltration of antibiotics. Aims and Objectives: To study the comparative efficacy of pre-operative intra-incisional antibiotic infiltration and prophylactic parenteral antibiotic therapy in reducing surgical site infection. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled study comprising of 120 patients divided in to three groups i.e. 40 in each group. Group A comprising 40 patients were subjected to local infiltration of 1 gram of Cefotaxime around the site of incision, 20 min before the induction of anesthesia. Group B comprising of 40 patients were administered a single dose of 1 gram of Cefotaxime intravenously 20 minutes before the surgical incision and Group C comprising of 40 patients were administered local infiltration of 1 gram of Cefotaxime as well as intravenous administration of 1 gram of Cefotaxime, 20 minutes before surgical incision. Inclusion criteria were patients in age group of 20-60 yrs, procedures that lasted for less than 2 hours, clean and clean contaminated surgical procedures. The exclusion criteria were patients with diabetes mellitus and those on steroid therapy. Incidence of SSI, type of organisms cultured in case of infection were studied. Results: Overall incidence of SSI in Group A was 10%, in Group B 18%, and Group C 2.5%. Frequency of infection due to gram positive bacteria was more as compared to gram negative in the cases that developed SSI. The commonest organism isolated was Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA. Conclusion: The incidence of SSI

  3. Determining the use of prophylactic antibiotics in breast cancer surgeries: a survey of practice

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    Acuna Sergio A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prophylactic antibiotics (PAs are beneficial to breast cancer patients undergoing surgery because they prevent surgical site infection (SSI, but limited information regarding their use has been published. This study aims to determine the use of PAs prior to breast cancer surgery amongst breast surgeons in Colombia. Methods An online survey was distributed amongst the breast surgeon members of the Colombian Association of Mastology, the only breast surgery society of Colombia. The scope of the questions included demographics, clinical practice characteristics, PA prescription characteristics, and the use of PAs in common breast surgical procedures. Results The survey was distributed amongst eighty-eight breast surgeons of whom forty-seven responded (response rate: 53.4%. Forty surgeons (85.1% reported using PAs prior to surgery of which >60% used PAs during mastectomy, axillary lymph node dissection, and/or breast reconstruction. Surgeons reported they targeted the use of PAs in cases in which patients had any of the following SSI risk factors: diabetes mellitus, drains in situ, obesity, and neoadjuvant therapy. The distribution of the self-reported PA dosing regimens was as follows: single pre-operative fixed-dose (27.7%, single preoperative dose followed by a second dose if the surgery was prolonged (44.7%, single preoperative dose followed by one or more postoperative doses for >24 hours (10.6%, and single preoperative weight-adjusted dose (2.1%. Conclusion Although this group of breast surgeons is aware of the importance of PAs in breast cancer surgery there is a discrepancy in how they use it, specifically with regards to prescription and timeliness of drug administration. Our findings call for targeted quality-improvement initiatives, such as standardized national guidelines, which can provide sufficient evidence for all stakeholders and therefore facilitate best practice medicine for breast cancer surgery.

  4. Value of Prophylactic Postoperative Antibiotic Therapy after Bimaxillary Orthognathic Surgery: A Clinical Trial

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    Majid Eshghpour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antibiotic therapy before or after orthognathic surgery is commonly recommended by surgeons to minimize the risk of wound infection. This article evaluates the value of Prophylactic antibiotic therapy in order to diminish the incidence of postoperative wound infection after orthognathic surgery.   Materials and Methods: Fifty candidates for bimaxillary orthognathic surgery were divided into cases and controls. Cefazolin (1g was administered intravenously to all participants 30 mins prior to surgery followed by a similar dose 4 hours later. Case-group patients ingested amoxicillin (500 mg orally for 7 days after surgery. Postoperative wound infection was assessed using clinical features, and the P-value significance was set at P  Results: Both groups were similar according to gender, age, and operating time. During the follow-up period no infection was observed in either the case or control group.   Conclusion:  The results of this study suggest that long-term postoperative antibiotic therapy is not essential for the prevention of postoperative infection, and that application of aseptic surgical technique and hygiene instruction after surgery are sufficient.

  5. Evaluation of prophylactic antibiotic administration in general surgery division of a teaching hospital in north of Iran

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    Paniz Yousefi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections are one of the most important post-surgery complications. Antimicrobial prophylaxis has been used routinely in surgeries to reduce infection incidence. However, inappropriate selection of antimicrobial agents or dosing can develop antimicrobial resistance, serious adverse reactions and prolong hospitalization. Current study aimed to examine prophylactic antibiotic prescription in surgeries in a teaching hospital in Sari, Mazandaran and evaluate level of adherence to the international guidelines. Between January 2015 to May 2015, 104 patients in general surgery ward were selected and enrolled in the study. The prophylactic antibiotics, dosage, timing and duration of administration were collected by reviewing patients’ records and compared to the existing guidelines. Prophylactic antibiotic was given to 85.5% of patients. Prescribed antibiotics were cefazolin (46.1%, metronidazole (24%, ceftriaxone (12.5%, ciprofloxacin (1.9% and vancomycin (0.96%. Most of the patients (62.9% received an inappropriate and delayed timing. Proper antibiotic dosage was seen in 45.2% of patients. All patients received post-operative prophylactic antibiotic. Main antibiotics include cefazolin (41.3%, metronidazole (33.7%, ceftriaxone (31.7% and clindamycin (20.2%. Only 10 (21.9% patients received cefazolin or vancomycin for a total duration of 48 hours or less. Surgical wound infection occurred in 17 (16.3% patients during hospital stay. Adherence to antimicrobial prophylaxis guidelines was completely achieved in 14.4% of cases. Results of this study signified that adherence to existing guidelines was poor and the most common mistakes were over usage, inappropriate dosage and choosing of antibiotics.

  6. Optimizing prophylactic antibiotic regimen in patients admitted for transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies: A prospective randomized study

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    Ahmed Fahmy

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Determining the prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance in rectal flora has important implications in the selection of targeted prophylactic antibiotic regimens. Antimicrobial profiles guided by rectal swabs may prove useful to optimize prophylaxis prior to TRUSBx; this strategy is effective at reducing the rates of infectious complications, including sepsis, especially in men at higher risk of infectious complications.

  7. Prospective randomized evaluation of prophylactic antibiotic usage in patients undergoing tension free inguinal hernioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, I

    2011-06-01

    Assessment of the usefulness of antibiotic prophylaxis in inguinal hernioplasty. This prospective randomized double blind study was conducted on 98 patients. Group A (50 patients) received a single dose of intravenous amoxicillin and clavulanic acid, and Group P (48 patients) received an equal volume of normal saline placebo by intravenous bolus 30 min before the induction of anesthesia. Hernioplasty was performed with polypropylene mesh. Skin was closed using skin staples that were removed after complete wound healing. The surgical site infection was diagnosed according to APIC, CDC criteria ( http://www.apic.org ). The mean operative time was 38.8  ± 10.8 min in group A versus 40.9 ± 11.1 min in group P (P  = 0.34). The mean hospitalization time was 1.3 ± 0.463 days in group A versus 1.25 ± 0.438 days in group P (P = 0.58). Four patients (2%) in group A and 6 patients (2.88%) in group P had wound infections (P = 0.47). Group A had 3 superficial infections and 1 deep infection while group P had 5 superficial infections and 1 deep infection. Antibiotic treatment of the wound infection was successful in all patients. Wound culture showed Staphylococcus aureus infection in 1 patient each group, Streptococcus pyogenes in 1 group A patient and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 1 group P patient. Cultures in other patients in both groups were reported to be sterile. Prophylactic antibiotic usage in patients undergoing tension free inguinal hernioplasty did not show any statistically significant beneficial effects in reduction of surgical site infection.

  8. Prophylactic antibiotics for preventing pneumococcal infection in children with sickle cell disease.

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    Rankine-Mullings, Angela E; Owusu-Ofori, Shirley

    2017-10-10

    Persons with sickle cell disease (SCD) are particularly susceptible to infection. Infants and very young children are especially vulnerable. The 'Co-operative Study of Sickle Cell Disease' observed an incidence rate for pneumococcal septicaemia of 10 per 100 person years in children under the age of three years. Vaccines, including customary pneumococcal vaccines, may be of limited use in this age group. Therefore, prophylactic penicillin regimens may be advisable for this population. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2002, and previously updated, most recently in 2014. To assess the effects of antibiotic prophylaxis against pneumococcus in children with SCD in relation to:1. incidence of infection;2. mortality;3. drug-related adverse events (as reported in the included studies) to the individual and the community;4. the impact of discontinuing at various ages on incidence of infection and mortality. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, which is comprised of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and also two clinical trials registries: ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO International Registry Platform. Additionally, we carried out handsearching of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search: 19 December 2016. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing prophylactic antibiotics to prevent pneumococcal infection in children with SCD with placebo, no treatment or a comparator drug. Both authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. The authors used the GRADE criteria to assess the quality of the evidence. Five trials were identified by the searches, of which three trials (880 children randomised) met the inclusion criteria. All of the included trials showed a reduced incidence of infection in children with SCD (SS or Sβ0Thal) receiving prophylactic penicillin

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Use of a Prophylactic Antibiotic for Patients Undergoing Lower Limb Amputation due to Diabetes or Vascular Illness in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Mateo; Orozco, Luis Esteban; Valderrama, Carlos Oliver; Londoño, Diana Isabel; Lugo, Luz Helena

    2017-04-01

    The use of a prophylactic antibiotic in an amputation surgery is a key element for the successful recovery of the patient. We aim to determine, from the perspective of the Colombian health system, the cost-effectiveness of administering a prophylactic antibiotic among patients undergoing lower limb amputation due to diabetes or vascular illness in Colombia. A decision tree was constructed to compare the use and nonuse of a prophylactic antibiotic. The probabilities of transition were obtained from studies identified from a systematic review of the clinical literature. The chosen health outcome was reduction in mortality due to prevention of infection. The costs were measured by expert consensus using the standard case methodology, and the resource valuation was carried out using national-level pricing manuals. Deterministic sensitivity, scenarios, and probabilistic analyses were conducted. In the base case, the use of a prophylactic antibiotic compared with nonuse was a dominant strategy. This result was consistent when considering different types of medications and when modifying most of the variables in the model. The use of a prophylactic antibiotic ceases to be dominant when the probability of infection is greater than 48%. The administration of a prophylactic antibiotic was a dominant strategy, which is a conclusion that holds in most cases examined; therefore, it is unlikely that the uncertainty around the estimation of costs and benefits change the results. We recommend creating policies oriented toward promoting the use of a prophylactic antibiotic during amputation surgery in Colombia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Unblinded randomized control trial on prophylactic antibiotic use in gustilo II open tibia fractures at Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondari, Joshua Nyaribari; Masika, Moses Muia; Ombachi, Richard Bwana; Ating'a, John Ernest

    2016-10-01

    To determine the difference in infection rate between 24h versus five days of prophylactic antibiotic use in management of Gustilo II open tibia fractures. Unblinded randomized control trial. Accident and Emergency, orthopedic wards and outpatient clinics at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH). The study involved patients aged 18-80 years admitted through accident and emergency department with Gustilo II traumatic open tibia fractures. Patients were randomized into either 24hour or five day group and antibiotics started for 24hours or five days after surgical debridement. The wounds were exposed and scored using ASEPSIS wound scoring system for infection after 48h, 5days and at 14days. The main outcomes of interest were presence of infection at days 2, 5 and 14 and effect of duration to antibiotic administration on infection rate. There was no significant difference in infection rates between 24-hour and 5-day groups with infection rates of 23% (9/40) vs. 19% (7/37) respectively (p=0.699). The infection rate was significantly associated with time lapsed before administration of antibiotics (p=0.004). In the use of prophylactic antibiotics for the management of Gustilo II traumatic open tibia fractures, there is no difference in infection rate between 24hours and five days regimen but time to antibiotic administration correlates with infection rate. Antibiotic use for 24hours only has proven adequate prophylaxis against infection. This is underlined in our study which we hope shall inform practice in our setting. A larger, more appropriately controlled study would be useful. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Short communication: Drug residues in goat milk after prophylactic use of antibiotics in intravaginal sponges for estrus synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, T; Balado, J; Althaus, R L; Beltrán, M C; Molina, M P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the prophylactic use of antibiotics in intravaginal sponges used for estrus synchronization in goats may result in the presence of inhibitors in milk and, therefore, of positive results by microbial screening tests. Ninety-eight Murciano-Granadina goats were used, divided into 7 groups of 14 animals. Intravaginal sponges were placed in 6 groups using 2 concentrations of 3 different antibiotics: doxycycline, oxytetracycline, and sulfathiazole-framycetin. The sponges of the control group were placed without antibiotics. Milk samples were collected daily until 7 d posttreatment and analyzed using 3 microbial tests. Positive samples were retested by specific receptor-binding assays to confirm the positive results. Vaginal status was evaluated by visual assessment of the external aspect of the sponges after removal. The microbial test response was not affected by either day posttreatment or dose of antibiotic used, except for oxytetracycline at the higher concentration. Moreover, no positive results were obtained using receptor-binding assays, suggesting that residues, if present in milk, did not exceed the regulatory (safety) levels established for these drugs. The occurrence of soiled sponges was higher in the control group. With respect to the dose of antibiotics used, no significant differences were found for the lower dose administered. However, a significant increase in the percentage of clean sponges was observed for the higher dose of doxycycline. We conclude that the prophylactic use of low doses of doxycycline, oxytetracycline, or sulfathiazole in intravaginal sponges used for synchronization of estrus helps to reduce clinical vaginitis in dairy goats and does not seem to be the cause of positive results in microbial inhibitor tests used to detect antibiotics in goat milk. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Periinterventional prophylactic antibiotics in radiological port catheter implantation; Periinterventionelle prophylaktische Antibiotikagabe bei der radiologischen Portkatheterimplantation

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    Gebauer, B.; Teichgraeber, U.; Werk, M. [Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Wagner, H.J. [Vivantes Klinikum im Friedrichshain und am Urban (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2007-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether catheter-related infections after radiologically placed port catheters can be reduced by single-shot periinterventional antibiosis. Materials and Method: Between January and September 2002, 164 consecutive patients with indication for central venous port catheter implantation were included in the present study. During implantation the interventional radiologist was responsible for deciding whether to administer a prophylactic single-shot antibiosis. The prophylactic antibiosis entailed intravenous administration of ampicillin and sulbactam (3 g Unacid, Pfizer) or 100 mg ciprofloxacine (Ciprobay, Bayer) in the case of an allergy history to penicillins. Catheter-related infection was defined as a local or systemic infection necessitating port catheter extraction. Results: Indication for port catheter implantation was a malignant disease requiring chemotherapy in 158 cases. The port catheter (Chemosite [Tyco Healthcare] [n = 123], low-profile [Arrow International] [n = 35], other port system [n = 6]) was implanted via sonographically guided puncture of the right jugular vein in 139 patients, via the left jugular vein in 24 cases and via the right subclavian vein in one patient. 75 patients received periinterventional prophylactic antibiosis (Unacid [n = 63] Ciprobay [n = 12]) and 89 patients did not receive antibiosis. The prophylactic antibiosis caused a minor allergic reaction in one patient that improved with antihistamic and corticoid medication. A total of 7 ports, 6 without prophylactic antibiosis versus one with periinterventional prophylaxis, were extracted due to infectious complications. Conclusion: Single-shot periinterventional prophylactic antibiosis can reduce early and late infectious complications after radiological-interventional placement of central venous port catheters. (orig.)

  13. Prophylactic antibiotic for prevention of posttraumatic meningitis after traumatic pneumocephalus: design and rationale of a placebo-controlled randomized multicenter trial [ISRCTN71132784

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeeli Babak

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of prophylactic antibiotic for prevention of meningitis in acute traumatic pneumocephalus patients. Methods In this prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial, 200 selected head injury patients with traumatic pneumocephalus are randomly assigned to receive intravenous antibiotics (2 grams Ceftriaxone twice a day, oral antibiotics (Azithromycin or placebo for at least 7 days after trauma. The patients will be followed for one month posttrauma. Conclusion The authors hope that this study helps clarifying the effectiveness and indications of antibiotics in prevention of meningitis in traumatic pneumocephalus after head injury and in specific subgroup of these patients.

  14. Prophylactic antibiotic for prevention of posttraumatic meningitis after traumatic pneumocephalus: design and rationale of a placebo-controlled randomized multicenter trial [ISRCTN71132784].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhar, Behzad; Ghodsi, Mohammad; Hadadi, Azar; Taghipoor, Mousa; Sigarchi, Samira Zabihyan; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Kazemzadeh, Ehsan Sherafat; Esmaeeli, Babak; Nejat, Farideh; Yalda, Alireza; Ketabchi, Ebrahim

    2006-01-18

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of prophylactic antibiotic for prevention of meningitis in acute traumatic pneumocephalus patients. In this prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial, 200 selected head injury patients with traumatic pneumocephalus are randomly assigned to receive intravenous antibiotics (2 grams Ceftriaxone twice a day), oral antibiotics (Azithromycin) or placebo for at least 7 days after trauma. The patients will be followed for one month posttrauma. The authors hope that this study helps clarifying the effectiveness and indications of antibiotics in prevention of meningitis in traumatic pneumocephalus after head injury and in specific subgroup of these patients.

  15. Maternal and institutional characteristics associated with the administration of prophylactic antibiotics for caesarean section: a secondary analysis of the World Health Organization Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, N; Ganchimeg, T; Ota, E; Vogel, J P; Souza, J P; Mori, R; Gülmezoglu, A M

    2014-03-01

    To illustrate the variability in the use of antibiotic prophylaxis for caesarean section, and its effect on the prevention of postoperative infections. Secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study. Twenty-nine countries participating in the World Health Organization Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health. Three hundred and fifty-nine health facilities with the capacity to perform caesarean section. Descriptive analysis and effect estimates using multilevel logistic regression. Coverage of antibiotic prophylaxis for caesarean section. A total of 89 121 caesarean sections were performed in 332 of the 359 facilities included in the survey; 87% under prophylactic antibiotic coverage. Thirty five facilities provided 0-49% coverage and 77 facilities provided 50-89% coverage. Institutional coverage of prophylactic antibiotics varied greatly within most countries, and was related to guideline use and the practice of clinical audits, but not to the size, location of the institution or development index of the country. Mothers with complications, such as HIV infection, anaemia, or pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, were more likely to receive antibiotic prophylaxis. At the same time, mothers undergoing caesarean birth prior to labour and those with indication for scheduled deliveries were also more likely to receive antibiotic prophylaxis, despite their lower risk of infection, compared with mothers undergoing emergency caesarean section. Coverage of antibiotic prophylaxis for caesarean birth may be related to the perception of the importance of guidelines and clinical audits in the facility. There may also be a tendency to use antibiotics when caesarean section has been scheduled and antibiotic prophylaxis is already included in the routine clinical protocol. This study may act as a signal to re-evaluate institutional practices as a way to identify areas where improvement is possible. © 2014 RCOG The World Health Organization retains copyright and all other rights in

  16. Randomised controlled trial of prophylactic antibiotic treatment for the prevention of endophthalmitis after open globe injury at Groote Schuur Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Toit, N; Mustak, S; Cook, C

    2017-07-01

    Most post-traumatic acute infectious endophthalmitis occur within a week of open globe trauma, necessitating early antibiotic prophylaxis. There are few randomised studies that demonstrate the benefits of prophylactic antibiotics. This randomised controlled non-inferiority trial was aimed at determining the incidence of post-traumatic endophthalmitis using established intravenous/oral prophylaxis and comparing this to the incidence using oral antibiotics only. All adult patients admitted with open globe injury were included. Those with proven endophthalmitis, high-risk features, who underwent primary evisceration and those allergic to the trial antibiotics were excluded. Patients were randomised to receive either intravenous cefazolin and oral ciprofloxacin or oral ciprofloxacin and oral cefuroxime for 3 days from admission. Acute endophthalmitis was the primary outcome. Patients completed the study if they were followed up for 6 weeks post injury. Three hundred patients were enrolled, with 150 in each arm. There were 99 exclusions. Seven patients developed endophthalmitis despite prophylaxis-2.0% (three cases) in the intravenous and oral arm, compared with 2.7% (four cases) in the oral-only arm-this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.703). The incidence of endophthalmitis with prophylaxis was 2-3%. Selected patients with open globe injuries (without high-risk features) may receive either intravenous cefazolin and oral ciprofloxacin, or oral cefuroxime and oral ciprofloxacin as prophylaxis against acute endophthalmitis-the latter regimen has the advantage of shortening patients' hospital stays and reducing costs. Non-inferiority study-design limitations should be taken into account, however. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Adherence to European Association of Urology Guidelines on Prophylactic Antibiotics: An Important Step in Antimicrobial Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Tommaso; Verze, Paolo; Brugnolli, Anna; Tiscione, Daniele; Luciani, Lorenzo Giuseppe; Eccher, Cristina; Lanzafame, Paolo; Malossini, Gianni; Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Mirone, Vincenzo; Bjerklund Johansen, Truls E; Pickard, Robert; Bartoletti, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of resistant pathogens is a worldwide health crisis and adherence to European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on antibiotic prophylaxis may be an important way to improve antibiotic stewardship and reduce patient harm and costs. To evaluate the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains and health care costs during a period of adherence to EAU guidelines in a tertiary referral urologic institution. A protocol for adherence to EAU guidelines for antibiotic prophylaxis for all urologic procedures was introduced in January 2011. Data for 3529 urologic procedures performed between January 2011 and December 2013 after protocol introduction were compared with data for 2619 procedures performed between January 2008 and December 2010 before protocol implementation. The prevalence of bacterial resistance and health care costs were compared between the two periods. The outcome measures were the proportion of resistant uropathogens and costs related to antibiotic consumption and symptomatic postoperative infection. We used χ2 and Fisher's exact tests to test the significance of differences. The proportion of patients with symptomatic postoperative infection did not differ (180/3529 [5.1%] vs. 117/2619 [4.5%]; p=0.27). A total of 342 isolates from all patients with symptomatic postoperative infections were analysed. The rate of resistance of Escherichia coli to piperacillin/tazobactam (9.1% vs. 5.4%; p=0.03), gentamicin (18.3% vs. 11.2%; p=0.02), and ciprofloxacin (32.3% vs. 19.1%; p=0.03) decreased significantly after protocol introduction. The defined daily dose (DDD) use of ciprofloxacin fell from 4.2 to 0.2 DDD per 100 patient-days after implementation (pguidelines on antibiotic prophylaxis reduced antibiotic usage without increasing post-operative infection rate and lowered the prevalence of resistant uropathogens. We analysed the impact of adherence to European Association of Urology guidelines on antibiotic prophylaxis for all surgical

  18. The economics of using prophylactic antibiotic-loaded bone cement in total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowski, C J; Zmistowski, B M; Clyde, C T; Parvizi, J

    2014-01-01

    The rate of peri-prosthetic infection following total joint replacement continues to rise, and attempts to curb this trend have included the use of antibiotic-loaded bone cement at the time of primary surgery. We have investigated the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of the use of antibiotic-loaded cement for primary total knee replacement (TKR) by comparing the rate of infection in 3048 TKRs performed without loaded cement over a three-year period versus the incidence of infection after 4830 TKRs performed with tobramycin-loaded cement over a later period of time of a similar duration. In order to adjust for confounding factors, the rate of infection in 3347 and 4702 uncemented total hip replacements (THR) performed during the same time periods, respectively, was also examined. There were no significant differences in the characteristics of the patients in the different cohorts. The absolute rate of infection increased when antibiotic-loaded cement was used in TKR. However, this rate of increase was less than the rate of increase in infection following uncemented THR during the same period. If the rise in the rate of infection observed in THR were extrapolated to the TKR cohort, 18 additional cases of infection would have been expected to occur in the cohort receiving antibiotic-loaded cement, compared with the number observed. Depending on the type of antibiotic-loaded cement that is used, its cost in all primary TKRs ranges between USD $2112.72 and USD $112 606.67 per case of infection that is prevented.

  19. A "Shark Encounter": Delayed Primary Closure and Prophylactic Antibiotic Treatment of a Great White Shark Bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Daniel; Van Hoesen, Karen

    2016-11-01

    Shark bites are rare but sensational injuries that are covered in the lay press but are not well described in the medical literature. We present the case of a 50-year-old man who sustained two deep puncture wounds to his thigh from a great white shark in the waters surrounding Isla de Guadalupe off the coast of Baja California, Mexico, during a caged SCUBA dive. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: We discuss our strategy of closing the wounds in a delayed primary fashion 24 hours after injury, our antibiotic choices, and the patient's course and review marine pathogens and appropriate antibiotic coverage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Recurrent urinary tract infections in children: Preventive interventions other than prophylactic antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Tewary, Kishor; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common childhood infections. Permanent renal cortical scarring may occur in affected children, especially with recurrent UTIs, leading to long-term complications such as hypertension and chronic renal failure. To prevent such damage, several interventions to prevent UTI recurrences have been tried. The most established and accepted prevention at present is low dose long-term antibiotic prophylaxis. However it has a risk of break through infecti...

  1. Role of Prophylactic Antibiotics in the Management of Postoperative Endodontic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsomadi, Leena; Al Habahbeh, Riyad

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the efficacy of using antibiotics in post endodontic treatment as a method to alleviate post-treatment pain. After completion of endodontic treatment 129 patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A (65 patients) received Ibuprofen 400 mg one tablet before procedure and one tablet every 8 hours for the first day, then one tablet once indicated by pain. Group B (64 patients) received the same regimen as group A in addition to amoxicillin, clavulanic acid tablets (one tablet before the procedure, and then one tablet twice daily for a total of 3 days). Intensity of pain at 8 hours interval using visual analog scale (VAS) and total number of Ibuprofen tablets used was recorded by patients. Peak postoperative pain occurred at 16 hours post-treatment in both groups, there was a significant difference in the pain scale between the two groups in favor for group B over group A (3.8 vs 2.1 respectively). Pain scale was significantly lower in group B at 24, 32, 40, and 48 hours post-treatment with a p-value of post endodontic treatment pain results in less pain with less consumption of Ibuprofens. Pain management in endodontics is a real challenge, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are used effectively in many patients to alleviate post endodontic pain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may have adverse reactions or may be contraindicated. Short-term use of antibiotics to alleviate pain can be of clinical benefits in these patients.

  2. Prophylactic versus clinically-driven antibiotics in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest-A randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaric, Suada Filekovic; Turel, Matjaz; Knafelj, Rihard; Gorjup, Vojka; Stanic, Rade; Gradisek, Primoz; Cerovic, Ognjen; Mirkovic, Tomislav; Noc, Marko

    2017-02-01

    To investigate benefits of prophylactic antibiotics in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Patients without evidence of tracheobronchial aspiration on admission bronchoscopy were randomized to prophylactic Amoxicillin-Clavulanic acid 1.2g every 8h (P) or clinically-driven antibiotics (C) administered if signs of infection developed during initial 7days of intensive care unit (ICU) stay. Among 83 patients enrolled between September 2013 and February 2015, tracheobronchial aspiration was documented in 23 (28%). Accordingly, 60 patients were randomized. Percentage of patients on antibiotics between days 1-5 was significantly greater in P group. White blood count, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin (PCT) and CD 64 significantly increased during the postresuscitation phase. Except for lower CRP and PCT in group P on day 6 (p<0.05), there was no significant differences. Mini BAL on day 3 was less often positive in group P (7% vs. 42%; p<0.01). There was no significant difference in other microbiological samples and X-ray signs of pneumonia cumulatively documented in 50% in both groups. Use of vasopressors/inotropes (93% in both groups), duration of mechanical ventilation (5.4±3.7 vs. 5.2±3.1 days), tracheal intubation (6.5±4.6 vs. 5.9±4.3 days), ICU stay (7.7±5.2 vs. 6.9±4.5 days), survival (73% vs. 73%) and survival with good neurological outcome (50% vs. 40%) were also comparable between P and C groups. Bronchoscopy on admission documented tracheobronchial aspiration in 28% of comatose survivors of OHCA. In the absence of aspiration, prophylactic antibiotics did not significantly alter systemic inflammatory response, postresuscitation pneumonia, ICU treatment and outcome (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02899507). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The influence of prophylactic antibiotic administration on post-operative morbidity in dental implant surgery. A prospective double blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Rory; Kemmoona, Maher; Polyzois, Ioannis; Claffey, Noel

    2014-02-01

    A prospective double-blind randomised controlled trial was conducted to test the effect of prophylactic antibiotics on post-operative morbidity and osseointegration of dental implants. Fifty-five subjects scheduled for implant surgery were enrolled. The patients were randomly assigned to the antibiotic (test group) and placebo (control group). Twenty-seven patients (test group) received 3 g amoxicillin one hour pre-operatively, and 28 patients (control group) received placebo capsules 1 h pre-operatively. No post-operative antibiotics were prescribed. Pain diaries and interference with daily activities diaries were kept by the patients for 1 week post-operatively. Signs of post-operative morbidity (swelling, bruising, suppuration and wound dehiscence) were recorded by the principal investigators at day 2 and day 7 following the operation. Osseointegration was assessed at 2nd stage surgery or 3-4 months post-operatively. The results of this study suggest that the use of prophylactic pre-operative antibiotics may result in higher dental implant survival rates (100% vs. 82%). Five implant failures, one in each of five patients, were reported in the placebo group and none in the antibiotic group (P = 0.0515). No significant differences were found for most of the signs of post-operative morbidity 2 and 7 days post-operatively. Only bruising at 2 days following the operation appeared to be higher in the placebo group (P = 0.0511). Post-operative pain (P = 0.01) and interference with daily activities (P = 0.01) appeared to be significantly lower for the antibiotic group after 7 days. Those patients with implant failure reported higher pain (based on the VAS scores) after 2 days (P = 0.003) and after 7 days (P = 0.0005), higher pain (based on the amount of analgesics used) after 7 days (P = 0.001) and higher interference with daily activities (based on the VAS scores) after 2 days (P = 0.005). The use of for dental implant surgery may be justified, as it appears to improve

  4. Effects of prophylactic antibiotic therapy with mezlocillin plus sulbactam on the incidence and height of fever after severe acute ischemic stroke: the Mannheim infection in stroke study (MISS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Stefan; Al-Shajlawi, Frank; Sick, Christian; Meairs, Stephen; Hennerici, Michael G

    2008-04-01

    Fever after stroke is a strong predictor for a negative outcome with infections as the most common cause. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effects of prophylactic antibiotic therapy on the incidence and height of fever after acute ischemic stroke. This is a randomized, controlled study of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with ischemic stroke enrolled within 24 hours from clinical onset who presented bedridden (modified Rankin score >3) with no significant infection. Interventions included prophylactic mezlocillin plus sulbactam (3 x 2 g/1 g for 4 days) or conventional management. Over 10 days, body temperature was continuously monitored, and the presence of infection was daily assessed. Primary end points were incidence and height of fever; secondary end points included rate of infection and clinical outcome. Sixty patients were included (mean, 75 years; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, 16). Over the first 3 days, patients in the intervention group showed lower mean body temperatures as well as lower daily peak temperatures (P<0.05). Throughout the observation period, 15 of 30 patients in the intervention group but 27 of 30 patients in the conventionally treated group developed an infection (P<0.05). Mean interval until the diagnosis of infection was 5.1 days in the intervention group and 3.3 days in the control group (P<0.05). Clinical outcome was more favorable in patients with prophylactic therapy (P=0.01). In patients with acute severe stroke, prophylactic administration of mezlocillin plus sulbactam over 4 days decreases body temperature, lowers the rate of infection, and may be associated with a better clinical outcome.

  5. The early use of appropriate prophylactic antibiotics in susceptible women for the prevention of preterm birth of infectious etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Jan Stener; Weile, Louise Katrine Kjær; Lamont, Ronald F

    2014-01-01

    of preterm birth so it is logical to consider the use of antibiotics for the prevention of preterm birth. AREAS COVERED: Infection and antibiotics in the etiology, prediction and prevention of preterm birth. EXPERT OPINION: Antibiotics for the prevention of preterm birth have addressed different risk groups...

  6. Knowledge and Antibiotics Prescription Pattern among Ugandan Oral Health Care Providers: A Cross-sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriane Kamulegeya

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Irrational prescription of antibiotics by clinicians might lead to drug resistance. Clinicians do prescribe antibiotics for either prophylactic or therapeutic reasons. The decision of when and what to prescribe leaves room for misuse and therefore it is imperative to continuously monitor knowledge and pattern of prescription. The aim of the present study was to determine the knowledge of antibiotic use and the prescription pattern among dental health care practitioners in Uganda. Materials and methods. A structured and pretested questionnaire was sent to 350 dental health care practitioners by post or physical delivery. All the questionnaires were sent with self-addressed and prepaid postage envelopes to enable respondents to mail back the filled questionnaires. Chi-squared test was used to test for any significant differences between groups of respondents based on qualitative variables. Results. The response rate was 40.3% (n=140. Of these 52.9 % were public health dental officers (PHDOs and 47.1% were dental surgeons. The males constituted 74.3% of the respondents. There were statistically significant differences between dental surgeons and (PHDOs in knowledge on prophylactic antibiotic use (P = 0.001 and patient influence on prescription (P = 0.001. Amoxicillin, in combination with metronidazole, was the most common combination of antibiotics used followed by co-trimoxazole with metronidazole. Conclusion. The knowledge of dental health care practitioners in antibiotic use in this study was generally low. A combination of amoxicillin with metronidazole was the most commonly prescribed antibiotics subsequent to different dental procedures.

  7. Health care provider education as a tool to enhance antibiotic stewardship practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Christopher A; Luther, Vera P

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic stewardship education for health care providers provides a foundation of knowledge and an environment that facilitates and supports optimal antibiotic prescribing. There is a need to extend this education to medical students and health care trainees. Education using passive techniques is modestly effective for increasing prescriber knowledge, whereas education using active techniques is more effective for changing prescribing behavior. Such education has been shown to enhance other antibiotic stewardship interventions. In this review, the need and suggested audience for antibiotic stewardship education are highlighted, and effective education techniques are recommended for increasing knowledge of antibiotics and improving their use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prophylactic antibiotics for preventing early Gram-positive central venous catheter infections in oncology patients, a Cochrane systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wetering, M. D.; van Woensel, J. B. M.; Kremer, L. C. M.; Caron, H. N.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Long-term tunnelled central venous catheters (TCVC) are increasingly used in oncology patients. Infections are a frequent complication of TCVC, mostly caused by Gram-positive bacteria. The objective of this review is to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotics in the prevention of early

  9. US outpatient antibiotic prescribing variation according to geography, patient population, and provider specialty in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Lauri A; Bartoces, Monina G; Roberts, Rebecca M; Suda, Katie J; Hunkler, Robert J; Taylor, Thomas H; Schrag, Stephanie J

    2015-05-01

    Appropriate antibiotic prescribing is an essential strategy to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance. US prescribing practices have not been thoroughly characterized. We analyzed outpatient antibiotic prescribing data to identify where appropriate antibiotic prescribing interventions could have the most impact. Oral antibiotic prescriptions dispensed during 2011 were extracted from the IMS Health Xponent database. The number of prescriptions and census denominators were used to calculate prescribing rates. Prescription totals were calculated for each provider specialty. Regression modeling was used to examine the association between socioeconomic and population health factors and prescribing rates. Healthcare providers prescribed 262.5 million courses of antibiotics in 2011(842 prescriptions per 1000 persons). Penicillins and macrolides were the most common antibiotic categories prescribed. The most commonly prescribed individual antibiotic agent was azithromycin. Family practitioners prescribed the most antibiotic courses (24%). The prescribing rate was higher in the South census region (931 prescriptions per 1000 persons) than in the West (647 prescriptions per 1000 persons; P 1.0). Efforts to characterize antibiotic prescribing practices should focus on the South census region and family practitioners. Further understanding of the factors leading to high prescribing among key target populations will inform appropriate prescribing interventions. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. Understanding and changing human behaviour—antibiotic mainstreaming as an approach to facilitate modification of provider and consumer behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia; Tamhankar, Ashok J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses: 1) Situations where human behaviour is involved in relation to antibiotics, focusing on providers and consumers; 2) Theories about human behaviour and factors influencing behaviour in relation to antibiotics; 3) How behaviour in relation to antibiotics can change; and, 4) Antibiotic mainstreaming as an approach to facilitate changes in human behaviour as regards antibiotics. Influencing human behaviour in relation to antibiotics is a complex process which includes factor...

  11. Antibioticoterapia profilática em obstetrícia: comparação entre esquemas Prophylactic antibiotic treatment in obstetrics: comparison of regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heraldo Francisco Costa

    1998-10-01

    group where all patients received three doses of 1 g EV cefalotin at six-hour intervals. In the medium risk group, the incidence of puerperal infection was 5.3% for the patients who used three doses of 1 g EV cefoxitin; 5.1% for those who used three doses of 1 g EV cefalotin; 4.0% when a single cefoxitin dose was used and 3.4% when a single cefalotin dose was used. Conclusions: it is not necessary to use prophylactic antibiotic therapy in low risk patients and the first generation cephalosporins (cefalotin are as efficacious as the second generation cephalosporins (cefoxitin to prevent puerperal infection, independent of the applied dosage. Cefalotin seems to be effective in preventing puerperal infection in patients at high risk.

  12. Prophylactic antibiotics in transurethral prostatectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Christiansen, H.M.; Ehlers, D

    1984-01-01

    The study included 88 patients with sterile urine prior to transurethral prostatectomy. Forty-five received a preoperative dose of 2 g of cefotaxime (Claforan) and the remaining 43 were given 10 ml of 0.9% NaCl. The two groups did not differ in frequency of postoperative urinary infection (greater....... They were all fully sensitive to cefotaxime except one, who was infected with enterococci. There was no growth of bacteria from either venous blood or bladder irrigating fluid taken during the operations. Nor were any serious complications observed in any of the patients. In view of the relatively low risk...... than 10(5) colonies per ml urine); 6 patients (13.3%) in the cefotaxime group had postoperative infections during hospital stay as compared to 8 patients (18.6%) in the control group (0.5 greater than p greater than 0.3). Those in the cefotaxime group who had infections were tested for resistance...

  13. A Cyclic Altered Peptide Analogue Based on Myelin Basic Protein 87–99 Provides Lasting Prophylactic and Therapeutic Protection Against Acute Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Emmanouil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, amide-linked cyclic peptide analogues of the 87–99 myelin basic protein (MBP epitope, a candidate autoantigen in multiple sclerosis (MS, are tested for therapeutic efficacy in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Cyclic altered peptide analogues of MBP87–99 with substitutions at positions 91 and/or 96 were tested for protective effects when administered using prophylactic or early therapeutic protocols in MBP72–85-induced EAE in Lewis rats. The Lys91 and Pro96 of MBP87–99 are crucial T-cell receptor (TCR anchors and participate in the formation of trimolecular complex between the TCR-antigen (peptide-MHC (major histocompability complex for the stimulation of encephalitogenic T cells that are necessary for EAE induction and are implicated in MS. The cyclic peptides were synthesized using Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis (SPPS applied on the 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarboxyl/tert-butyl Fmoc/tBu methodology and combined with the 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin (CLTR-Cl. Cyclo(91–99[Ala96]MBP87–99, cyclo(87–99[Ala91,96]MBP87–99 and cyclo(87–99[Arg91, Ala96]MBP87–99, but not wild-type linear MBP87–99, strongly inhibited MBP72–85-induced EAE in Lewis rats when administered using prophylactic and early therapeutic vaccination protocols. In particular, cyclo(87–99[Arg91, Ala96]MBP87–99 was highly effective in preventing the onset and development of clinical symptoms and spinal cord pathology and providing lasting protection against EAE induction.

  14. The Extracellular Matrix Component Psl Provides Fast-Acting Antibiotic Defense in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Nicole; Ramirez Millan, Maria; Caldara, Marina; Rusconi, Roberto; Tarasova, Yekaterina; Stocker, Roman; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria within biofilms secrete and surround themselves with an extracellular matrix, which serves as a first line of defense against antibiotic attack. Polysaccharides constitute major elements of the biofilm matrix and are implied in surface adhesion and biofilm organization, but their contributions to the resistance properties of biofilms remain largely elusive. Using a combination of static and continuous-flow biofilm experiments we show that Psl, one major polysaccharide in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix, provides a generic first line of defense toward antibiotics with diverse biochemical properties during the initial stages of biofilm development. Furthermore, we show with mixed-strain experiments that antibiotic-sensitive “non-producing” cells lacking Psl can gain tolerance by integrating into Psl-containing biofilms. However, non-producers dilute the protective capacity of the matrix and hence, excessive incorporation can result in the collapse of resistance of the entire community. Our data also reveal that Psl mediated protection is extendible to E. coli and S. aureus in co-culture biofilms. Together, our study shows that Psl represents a critical first bottleneck to the antibiotic attack of a biofilm community early in biofilm development. PMID:23950711

  15. Usefulness of food chain information provided by Dutch finishing pig producers to control antibiotic residues in pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wagenberg, Coen P A; Backus, Gé B C; van der Vorst, Jack G A J; Urlings, Bert A P

    2012-11-01

    The EU prescribes that food business operators must use food chain information to assist in food safety control. This study analyses usefulness of food chain information about antibiotic usage covering the 60-day period prior to delivery of pigs to slaughter in the control of antibiotic residues in pork. A dataset with 479 test results for antibiotic residues in tissue samples of finishing pigs delivered to a Dutch slaughter company was linked to information provided by pig producers about antibiotic usage in these finishing pigs. Results show that twice as many producers reported using antibiotics in the group of 82 producers with antibiotic residues (11.0%) compared to the group without antibiotic residues (5.5%) (p=0.0686). For 89% of consignments with a finishing pig with antibiotic residues, the producer reported 'did not use antibiotics'. Food chain information about antibiotic usage provided by Dutch pig producers was no guarantee for absence of antibiotic residues in delivered finishing pigs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of a drug allergy educational program and antibiotic prescribing guideline on inpatient clinical providers' antibiotic prescribing knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Shenoy, Erica S; Hurwitz, Shelley; Varughese, Christy A; Hooper, David C; Banerji, Aleena

    2014-01-01

    Inpatient providers have varying levels of knowledge in managing patients with drug and/or penicillin (PCN) allergy. Our objectives were (1) to survey inpatient providers to ascertain their baseline drug allergy knowledge and preparedness in caring for patients with PCN allergy, and (2) to assess the impact of an educational program paired with the implementation of a hospital-based clinical guideline. We electronically surveyed 521 inpatient providers at a tertiary care medical center at baseline and again 6 weeks after an educational initiative paired with clinical guideline implementation. The guideline informed providers on drug allergy history taking and antibiotic prescribing for inpatients with PCN or cephalosporin allergy. Of 323 unique responders, 42% (95% CI, 37-48%) reported no prior education in drug allergy. When considering those who responded to both surveys (n = 213), we observed a significant increase in knowledge about PCN skin testing (35% vs 54%; P allergy over time (54% vs 80%; P allergy was severe significantly improved (77% vs 92%; P = .03). Other areas, including understanding absolute contraindications to receiving a drug again and PCN cross-reactivity with other antimicrobials, did not improve significantly. Inpatient providers have drug allergy knowledge deficits but are interested in tools to help them care for inpatients with drug allergies. Our educational initiative and hospital guideline implementation were associated with increased PCN allergy knowledge in several crucial areas. To improve care of inpatients with drug allergy, more research is needed to evaluate hospital policies and sustainable educational tools. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Next step in antibiotic stewardship: Pharmacist-provided penicillin allergy testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugkaeva, Z; Crago, J S; Yasnogorodsky, M

    2017-08-01

    Penicillin allergy limits therapeutic options for patients but often disappears over time, leaving patients erroneously labelled allergic and leading to the utilization of broad-spectrum and more expensive antibiotics. Penicillin allergy can be effectively assessed via skin testing. To improve patient access to penicillin allergy testing by implementing a pharmacist-provided service in a hospital setting. Beta-lactams remain a mainstream therapy for many infections due to their effectiveness, low side effects and affordability. Typically, patient access to penicillin allergy testing is limited by the availability of allergy specialists, who traditionally perform such testing. A pharmacist-provided penicillin allergy testing service was implemented at our hospital in 2015 and became a powerful antibiotic stewardship tool. Removing penicillin allergy from patient profiles significantly expanded therapeutic options, expedited discharges and reduced costs of care. Pharmacists can expand patient access to penicillin allergy testing. Pharmacist-provided penicillin allergy testing permitted optimized antibiotic treatment and expedited discharges. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Can pay-for-performance to primary care providers stimulate appropriate use of antibiotics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrichson, Jens; Maria Ellegård, Lina; Anell, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to public health worldwide. As the health care sector's use of antibiotics is an important contributor to the development of resistance, it is crucial that physicians only prescribe antibiotics when needed and that they choose narrow-spectrum antibiotics, w...

  19. SERVICE EVALUATION OF A CYSTIC FIBROSIS HOME INTRAVENOUS ANTIBIOTIC SERVICE PROVIDED BY A NHS FOUNDATION TRUST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, Lynn

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate carers' satisfaction with the current service for home reconstitution and administration of intravenous (IV) antibiotics to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and identify ways of improving this service to reduce treatment burden. A formative evaluation was conducted of all 17 carers who reconstituted and administered the IV antibiotics at home. This was carried out using a cross-sectional survey. A questionnaire of open and closed questions was sent first class with a pre-paid return envelope to the carers. This was followed by a reminder letter after the set return date. Thirteen carers responded giving a response rate of 76.5%. The carers had a mean of 2 children in the household with all having 1 child under the care of the paediatric CF team. They had been receiving IV antibiotics for a mean of 8 years and 7 months and had been administering them at home for a mean of 6 years and 1 month. The majority had administered the antibiotics in the last 3 months.Over half received their drugs from the hospital pharmacy, but one carer highlighted that they did not always receive a full supply of the treatment.Removing the reconstitution step by providing pre-prepared syringes could reduce treatment time by around 18 minutes. Overall this could mean a daily reduction in treatment time of almost two hours for a patient who is on two antibiotics three times a day. The majority of respondents stated that they would prefer pre-filled syringes.The carers felt that they received enough training and felt confident in reconstituting and administering the antibiotics. The majority felt that they should receive regular updates to their training and it was highlighted that they are reassessed at the start of each course. Most of the carers felt that they had an opportunity to discuss the IV antibiotics in the out-patient clinic with the doctors and the nurses but none of them would contact the pharmacist. They felt that they were appropriately contacted in advance to

  20. Multifunctional implant coatings providing possibilities for fast antibiotics loading with subsequent slow release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brohede, Ulrika; Forsgren, Johan; Roos, Stefan; Mihranyan, Albert; Engqvist, Håkan; Strømme, Maria

    2009-09-01

    , the present study provides an outline for the development of a fast-loading slow-release surgical implant kit where the implant and the drug are separated when delivered to the surgeon, thus constituting a flexible solution for the surgeon by offering the choice of quick addition of antibiotics to the implant coating based on the patient need.

  1. Prophylactic Probiotics Reduce Cow's Milk Protein Intolerance in Neonates after Small Intestine Surgery and Antibiotic Treatment Presenting Symptoms That Mimics Postoperative Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichi Ezaki

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: CMPI was induced in newborns after surgery on their small intestines and antibiotics treatment with presentation of symptoms that mimic postoperative infection. Development of CMPI in this population possibly involves disruption of intestinal flora. Administration of probiotics can reduce the incidence of CMPI after small intestine surgery. The elevated CRP level may be useful in the diagnosis of CMPI.

  2. Perceptions of Prophylactic Mastectomy in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Han Young; Lee, Jong Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasingly, prophylactic mastectomy has been evaluated as a treatment of breast cancer. Hereditary breast cancer now accounts for approximately 5%–10% of all cases of breast cancer, meaning that the widespread implementation of prophylactic mastectomy may significantly reduce the occurrence of breast cancer. However, prophylactic mastectomy is rarely performed in Korea. Therefore, in this study, we assessed Koreans' attitudes toward and awareness of preventive mastectomy. Methods This was a prospective study of a cohort of patients attending outpatient clinics and their relatives. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires assessing sex, age, educational level, knowledge of breast cancer, understanding of prophylactic mastectomy, attitudes toward prophylactic mastectomy, and reasons for choosing prophylactic mastectomy. Results Sixty-five patients were included. Most patients (36.9%) were between 40 and 49 years of age and 58.4% were college graduates. Only six respondents (9%) understood prophylactic mastectomy, and 17 respondents (27%) stated that they would agree to undergo prophylactic mastectomy if necessary. Reasons given for refusing prophylactic mastectomy included aesthetic concerns (38%), the perception that it would not cure the disease (26%), possible surgical complications (24%), and financial cost (6%). Conclusions In this study, most of the respondents showed a poor knowledge of prophylactic mastectomy. Ultimately, it will be necessary to establish medical guidelines for patients with a high risk of breast cancer, with the objective of providing accurate information and proper treatment at hospitals. PMID:26848446

  3. Understanding and changing human behaviour--antibiotic mainstreaming as an approach to facilitate modification of provider and consumer behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia; Tamhankar, Ashok J

    2014-05-01

    This paper addresses: 1) Situations where human behaviour is involved in relation to antibiotics, focusing on providers and consumers; 2) Theories about human behaviour and factors influencing behaviour in relation to antibiotics; 3) How behaviour in relation to antibiotics can change; and, 4) Antibiotic mainstreaming as an approach to facilitate changes in human behaviour as regards antibiotics. Influencing human behaviour in relation to antibiotics is a complex process which includes factors like knowledge, attitudes, social norms, socio-economic conditions, peer pressure, experiences, and bio-physical and socio-behavioural environment. Further, key concepts are often perceived in different ways by different individuals. While designing and implementing projects or programmes for behavioural change with respect to antibiotics for professionals or consumers it is helpful to consider theories or models of behaviour change, e.g. the 'stages of change model', including pre-contemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance. People in different stages of change are susceptible to different behaviour modification strategies. Application of marketing principles to 'global good', so-called 'social marketing', to improve 'welfare of the individual and society' is gaining increased attention in public health. In conclusion, just providing correct knowledge is not sufficient although it is a pre-requisite for behaviour modification in the desired direction. We can never change the behaviour of any other human, but we can facilitate for others to change their own behaviour. One possibility is to implement 'antibiotic mainstreaming' as a potentially effective way for behaviour modification, i.e. to address consequences for maintaining effective antibiotics in all activities and decisions in society.

  4. A Prophylactic Multivalent Vaccine Against Different Filovirus Species is Immunogenic and Provides Protection from Lethal Infections of Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus Species in Non-Human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    1985;54(1): 30-37. Coltart CE, Johnson AM, Whitty CJ. Role of healthcare workers in early epidemic spread of Ebola: policy implications of...Lethal Infections of Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus Species in Non-human Primates Short title 70 characters Immunogenicity and Protection of a...filovirus species has been prompted by sporadic but large outbreaks of Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus infections . A good prophylactic vaccine should be able

  5. Ancient antimicrobial peptides kill antibiotic-resistant pathogens: Australian mammals provide new options.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghui Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To overcome the increasing resistance of pathogens to existing antibiotics the 10×'20 Initiative declared the urgent need for a global commitment to develop 10 new antimicrobial drugs by the year 2020. Naturally occurring animal antibiotics are an obvious place to start. The recently sequenced genomes of mammals that are divergent from human and mouse, including the tammar wallaby and the platypus, provide an opportunity to discover novel antimicrobials. Marsupials and monotremes are ideal potential sources of new antimicrobials because they give birth to underdeveloped immunologically naïve young that develop outside the sterile confines of a uterus in harsh pathogen-laden environments. While their adaptive immune system develops innate immune factors produced either by the mother or by the young must play a key role in protecting the immune-compromised young. In this study we focus on the cathelicidins, a key family of antimicrobial peptide genes. PRINCIPAL FINDING: We identified 14 cathelicidin genes in the tammar wallaby genome and 8 in the platypus genome. The tammar genes were expressed in the mammary gland during early lactation before the adaptive immune system of the young develops, as well as in the skin of the pouch young. Both platypus and tammar peptides were effective in killing a broad range of bacterial pathogens. One potent peptide, expressed in the early stages of tammar lactation, effectively killed multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Marsupial and monotreme young are protected by antimicrobial peptides that are potent, broad spectrum and salt resistant. The genomes of our distant relatives may hold the key for the development of novel drugs to combat multidrug-resistant pathogens.

  6. Ancient antimicrobial peptides kill antibiotic-resistant pathogens: Australian mammals provide new options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianghui; Wong, Emily S W; Whitley, Jane C; Li, Jian; Stringer, Jessica M; Short, Kirsty R; Renfree, Marilyn B; Belov, Katherine; Cocks, Benjamin G

    2011-01-01

    To overcome the increasing resistance of pathogens to existing antibiotics the 10×'20 Initiative declared the urgent need for a global commitment to develop 10 new antimicrobial drugs by the year 2020. Naturally occurring animal antibiotics are an obvious place to start. The recently sequenced genomes of mammals that are divergent from human and mouse, including the tammar wallaby and the platypus, provide an opportunity to discover novel antimicrobials. Marsupials and monotremes are ideal potential sources of new antimicrobials because they give birth to underdeveloped immunologically naïve young that develop outside the sterile confines of a uterus in harsh pathogen-laden environments. While their adaptive immune system develops innate immune factors produced either by the mother or by the young must play a key role in protecting the immune-compromised young. In this study we focus on the cathelicidins, a key family of antimicrobial peptide genes. We identified 14 cathelicidin genes in the tammar wallaby genome and 8 in the platypus genome. The tammar genes were expressed in the mammary gland during early lactation before the adaptive immune system of the young develops, as well as in the skin of the pouch young. Both platypus and tammar peptides were effective in killing a broad range of bacterial pathogens. One potent peptide, expressed in the early stages of tammar lactation, effectively killed multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. Marsupial and monotreme young are protected by antimicrobial peptides that are potent, broad spectrum and salt resistant. The genomes of our distant relatives may hold the key for the development of novel drugs to combat multidrug-resistant pathogens.

  7. Impact on postpartum hemorrhage of prophylactic administration of oxytocin 10 IU via UnijectTM by peripheral health care providers at home births: design of a community-based cluster-randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanton Cynthia K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemorrhage is the leading direct cause of maternal death globally. While oxytocin is the drug of choice for postpartum hemorrhage prevention, its use has generally been limited to health facilities. This trial assesses the effectiveness, safety, and feasibility of expanding the use of prophylactic intramuscular oxytocin to peripheral health care providers at home births in four predominantly rural districts in central Ghana. Methods This study is designed as a community-based cluster-randomized trial in which Community Health Officers are randomized to provide (or not provide an injection of oxytocin 10 IU via the UnijectTM injection system within one minute of delivery of the baby to women who request their presence at home at the onset of labor. The primary aim is to determine if administration of prophylactic oxytocin via Uniject™ by this cadre will reduce the risk of postpartum hemorrhage by 50 % relative to deliveries which do not receive the prophylactic intervention. Postpartum hemorrhage is examined under three sequential definitions: 1 blood loss ≥500 ml (BL; 2 treatment for bleeding (TX and/or BL; 3 hospital referral for bleeding and/or TX and/or BL. Secondary outcomes address safety and feasibility of the intervention and include adverse maternal and fetal outcomes and logistical concerns regarding assistance at home births and the storage and handling of oxytocin, respectively. Discussion Results from this trial will build evidence for the effectiveness of expanding the delivery of this established prophylactic intervention to peripheral settings. Complementary data on safety and logistical issues related to this intervention will assist policymakers in low-income countries in selecting both the best uterotonic and service delivery strategy for postpartum hemorrhage prevention. Results of this trial are expected in mid-2013. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01108289.

  8. Impact on postpartum hemorrhage of prophylactic administration of oxytocin 10 IU via Uniject™ by peripheral health care providers at home births: design of a community-based cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Cynthia K; Newton, Samuel; Mullany, Luke C; Cofie, Patience; Agyemang, Charlotte Tawiah; Adiibokah, Edward; Darcy, Niamh; Khan, Sadaf; Levisay, Alice; Gyapong, John; Armbruster, Deborah; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2012-06-07

    Hemorrhage is the leading direct cause of maternal death globally. While oxytocin is the drug of choice for postpartum hemorrhage prevention, its use has generally been limited to health facilities. This trial assesses the effectiveness, safety, and feasibility of expanding the use of prophylactic intramuscular oxytocin to peripheral health care providers at home births in four predominantly rural districts in central Ghana. This study is designed as a community-based cluster-randomized trial in which Community Health Officers are randomized to provide (or not provide) an injection of oxytocin 10 IU via the Uniject™ injection system within one minute of delivery of the baby to women who request their presence at home at the onset of labor. The primary aim is to determine if administration of prophylactic oxytocin via Uniject™ by this cadre will reduce the risk of postpartum hemorrhage by 50 % relative to deliveries which do not receive the prophylactic intervention. Postpartum hemorrhage is examined under three sequential definitions: 1) blood loss ≥500 ml (BL); 2) treatment for bleeding (TX) and/or BL; 3) hospital referral for bleeding and/or TX and/or BL. Secondary outcomes address safety and feasibility of the intervention and include adverse maternal and fetal outcomes and logistical concerns regarding assistance at home births and the storage and handling of oxytocin, respectively. Results from this trial will build evidence for the effectiveness of expanding the delivery of this established prophylactic intervention to peripheral settings. Complementary data on safety and logistical issues related to this intervention will assist policymakers in low-income countries in selecting both the best uterotonic and service delivery strategy for postpartum hemorrhage prevention. Results of this trial are expected in mid-2013. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01108289.

  9. Prophylactic mastectomy: an appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagouri, Flora; Chrysikos, Dimosthenis T; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Giannakopoulou, Georgia; Zografos, Constantine G; Papadimitriou, Christos A; Zografos, George C

    2013-02-01

    The main indication of prophylactic mastectomy pertains to BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. Prophylactic mastectomy includes the simple method and the subcutaneous method. Both methods can be followed by breast plastic reconstruction either at the same time or later. This review examines key issues regarding prophylactic mastectomy: the selection of patients, its effectiveness, its limitations, convergence/divergence in existing guidelines, and future perspectives.

  10. Cathelicidins from the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana provides novel template for peptide antibiotic design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiying Ling

    Full Text Available Cathelicidins, a class of gene-encoded effector molecules of vertebrate innate immunity, provide a first line of defense against microbial invasions. Although cathelicidins from mammals, birds, reptiles and fishes have been extensively studied, little is known about cathelicidins from amphibians. Here we report the identification and characterization of two cathelicidins (cathelicidin-RC1 and cathelicidin-RC2 from the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana. The cDNA sequences (677 and 700 bp, respectively encoding the two peptides were successfully cloned from the constructed lung cDNA library of R. catesbeiana. And the deduced mature peptides are composed of 28 and 33 residues, respectively. Structural analysis indicated that cathelicidin-RC1 mainly assumes an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation, while cathelicidin-RC2 could not form stable amphipathic structure. Antimicrobial and bacterial killing kinetic analysis indicated that the synthetic cathelicidin-RC1 possesses potent, broad-spectrum and rapid antimicrobial potency, while cathelicidin-RC2 exhibited very weak antimicrobial activity. Besides, the antimicrobial activity of cathelicidin-RC1 is salt-independent and highly stable. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis indicated that cathelicidin-RC1 kills microorganisms through the disruption of microbial membrane. Moreover, cathelicidin-RC1 exhibited low cytotoxic activity against mammalian normal or tumor cell lines, and low hemolytic activity against human erythrocytes. The potent, broad-spectrum and rapid antimicrobial activity combined with the salt-independence, high stability, low cytotoxic and hemolytic activities make cathelicidin-RC1 an ideal template for the development of novel peptide antibiotics.

  11. Antibióticos em tonsilectomias: terapêutico ou profilático? Necessário ou abusivo? Antibiotic use in tonsillectomies: therapeutic or prophylactic? Required or excessive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otávio Bejzman Piltcher

    2005-10-01

    minimize the local inflammation, stimulate the healing process and hasten recovery triggered a considerable number of studies addressing the relation between the use of perioperative antibiotics and postoperative morbidity of adenotonsillectomy. In spite of the fact that those studies claim to perform an assessment of the surgical prophylactic use of antibiotics, their outline is not in compliance with the worldwide-accepted principles of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis. By performing a critical review of the literature, the authors discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using antibiotics in tonsillectomies or adenotonsillectomies, as well as the most appropriate definition for its utilization.

  12. Effects of computer-aided clinical decision support systems in improving antibiotic prescribing by primary care providers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstiege, Jakob; Mathes, Tim; Pieper, Dawid

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of computer-aided clinical decision support systems (CDSS) in improving antibiotic prescribing in primary care. A literature search utilizing Medline (via PubMed) and Embase (via Embase) was conducted up to November 2013. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster randomized trials (CRTs) that evaluated the effects of CDSS aiming at improving antibiotic prescribing practice in an ambulatory primary care setting were included for review. Two investigators independently extracted data about study design and quality, participant characteristics, interventions, and outcomes. Seven studies (4 CRTs, 3 RCTs) met our inclusion criteria. All studies were performed in the USA. Proportions of eligible patient visits that triggered CDSS use varied substantially between intervention arms of studies (range 2.8-62.8%). Five out of seven trials showed marginal to moderate statistically significant effects of CDSS in improving antibiotic prescribing behavior. CDSS that automatically provided decision support were more likely to improve prescribing practice in contrast to systems that had to be actively initiated by healthcare providers. CDSS show promising effectiveness in improving antibiotic prescribing behavior in primary care. Magnitude of effects compared to no intervention, appeared to be similar to other moderately effective single interventions directed at primary care providers. Additional research is warranted to determine CDSS characteristics crucial to triggering high adoption by providers as a perquisite of clinically relevant improvement of antibiotic prescribing. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comFor numbered affiliations see end of article.

  13. [Human papillomavirus prophylactic vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawana, Kei

    2012-06-01

    Human papillomavirus causes viral-dependent cancers, including cervical, anal, vulvar, penile, vaginal, and oropharyngeal, and condyloma acuminata. In the last decade, HPV prophylactic vaccine has been developed and spread worldwide after many large-scale clinical studies. These studies demonstrate significant clinical efficacy for prevention of HPV16/18/6/11-related diseases. In particular, prevention of cervical cancer should be the most important role in the world. In Japan, incidence of cervical cancer does not increase, but the peak of age of the patients at 2005 is 25-45 years old and became 20 years younger than that at 1985. The current two HPV vaccines can prevent the infection of HPV16/18 among high-risk HPVs and will provide a significant impact especially on young-age onset cervical cancer. Furthermore, quadrivalent HPV vaccine, Gardasil, has shown population impact that is decrease of patients with condyloma acuminate in several countries. The clinical efficacy seems to be convincing. Here HPV vaccine will be reviewed based on the literatures.

  14. Migraine - Prophylactic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhury Debashish

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Preventive therapy in migraine constitutes an important aspect of migraine management especially in patients who are not controlled or have significant disability despite taking drugs for acute management. In spite of te recent advances in understanding of the pathophysiology of migraine, the mechanisms of action of many preventive drugs are largely unknown. Further, these provide only about 50% reduction in frequency in about 2/3rds of migraine sufferers. Hence, risk-benefit ratio must be considered while prescribing these agents. Recent efforts to undertake large-scale meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of these agents have been rewarding and consensus guidelines have evolved. Propanolol, metoprolol, amitriptyline, sodium valproate, flunarizine and lisuride have emerged as first line drugs. The role of newer anti-convulsants and botox injections in refractory cases are being investigated. Availability, co-morbidities, medical contraindications, concomitant acute therapy and costs are important determinants for choosing a particular agent. This article reviews the guidelines to be followed in choosing the prophylactic treatment options for migraine.

  15. Simulated Conversations With Virtual Humans to Improve Patient-Provider Communication and Reduce Unnecessary Prescriptions for Antibiotics: A Repeated Measure Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenthaler, Antoinette; Albright, Glenn; Hibbard, Judith; Goldman, Ron

    2017-04-19

    Despite clear evidence that antibiotics do not cure viral infections, the problem of unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics in ambulatory care persists, and in some cases, prescribing patterns have increased. The overuse of antibiotics for treating viral infections has created numerous economic and clinical consequences including increased medical costs due to unnecessary hospitalizations, antibiotic resistance, disruption of gut bacteria, and obesity. Recent research has underscored the importance of collaborative patient-provider communication as a means to reduce the high rates of unnecessary prescriptions for antibiotics. However, most patients and providers do not feel prepared to engage in such challenging conversations. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the ability of a brief 15-min simulated role-play conversation with virtual humans to serve as a preliminary step to help health care providers and patients practice, and learn how to engage in effective conversations about antibiotics overuse. A total of 69 participants (35 providers and 34 patients) completed the simulation once in one sitting. A pre-post repeated measures design was used to assess changes in patients' and providers' self-reported communication behaviors, activation, and preparedness, intention, and confidence to effectively communicate in the patient-provider encounter. Changes in patients' knowledge and beliefs regarding antibiotic use were also evaluated. Patients experienced a short-term positive improvement in beliefs about appropriate antibiotic use for infection (F1,30=14.10, P=.001). Knowledge scores regarding the correct uses of antibiotics improved immediately postsimulation, but decreased at the 1-month follow-up (F1,30=31.16, Pchange in patient activation and shared decision-making (SDM) scores in the total sample of patients (P>.10) Patients with lower levels of activation exhibited positive, short-term benefits in increased intent and confidence to discuss their needs

  16. Prophylactic mastectomy: is it worth it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña-Salcedo, Jose Abel; Soto-Miranda, Miguel Angel; Lopez-Salguero, Jose Fernando

    2012-02-01

    high-risk population in at least 95%. Our experience with prophylactic mastectomy is extremely satisfactory, with an overall patient satisfaction rate of 94%, no mortality, and an oncologic long-term outcome of 0% of ulterior development of breast cancer. Our series, although relatively small, should provide some insight into the power of this technique and we think all plastic surgeons should have it in their surgical armamentarium and should share their experiences so that this procedure may become more widely accepted. We also think that plastic surgeons should strive for perfecting the technique to reduce the complication rate and therefore help the procedure gain acceptance by the medical community.

  17. Usefulness of food chain information provided by Dutch finishing pig producers to control antibiotic residues in pork

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenberg, van C.P.A.; Backus, G.B.C.; Vorst, van der J.G.A.J.; Urlings, H.A.P.

    2012-01-01

    The EU prescribes that food business operators must use food chain information to assist in food safety control. This study analyses usefulness of food chain information about antibiotic usage covering the 60-day period prior to delivery of pigs to slaughter in the control of antibiotic residues in

  18. Ly6Chi Monocytes Provide a Link between Antibiotic-Induced Changes in Gut Microbiota and Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Möhle

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics, though remarkably useful, can also cause certain adverse effects. We detected that treatment of adult mice with antibiotics decreases hippocampal neurogenesis and memory retention. Reconstitution with normal gut flora (SPF did not completely reverse the deficits in neurogenesis unless the mice also had access to a running wheel or received probiotics. In parallel to an increase in neurogenesis and memory retention, both SPF-reconstituted mice that ran and mice supplemented with probiotics exhibited higher numbers of Ly6Chi monocytes in the brain than antibiotic-treated mice. Elimination of Ly6Chi monocytes by antibody depletion or the use of knockout mice resulted in decreased neurogenesis, whereas adoptive transfer of Ly6Chi monocytes rescued neurogenesis after antibiotic treatment. We propose that the rescue of neurogenesis and behavior deficits in antibiotic-treated mice by exercise and probiotics is partially mediated by Ly6Chi monocytes.

  19. Antibiotics: Use and misuse in pediatric dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F C Peedikayil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are commonly used in dentistry for prophylactic as well as for therapeutic purposes. Most often antibiotics are used in unwarranted situations, which may give rise to resistant bacterial strains. Dentists want to make their patients well and to prevent unpleasant complications. These desires, coupled with the belief that many oral problems are infectious, stimulate the prescribing of antibiotics. Good knowledge about the indications of antibiotics is the need of the hour in prescribing antibiotics for dental conditions.

  20. Trends and patterns in antibiotic prescribing among out-of-hours primary care providers in England, 2010-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Michael; Agbebiyi, Adeola; Ashiru-Oredope, Diane; Hopkins, Susan

    2017-12-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat, increasing morbidity and mortality. In England, publicly funded clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) commission out-of-hours (OOH) primary care services outside daytime hours. OOH consultations represent 1% of in-hours general practice (GP) consultations. Antibiotic prescriptions increased 32% in non-GP community services between 2010 and 2013. We describe OOH antibiotic prescribing patterns and trends between 2010 and 2014. We: estimated the proportion of CCGs with OOH data available; described and compared antibiotic prescribing by volume of prescribed items, seasonality and trends in GP and OOH, using linear regression; and compared the proportion of broad-spectrum to total antibiotic prescriptions in OOHs with their respective CCGs in terms of seasonality and trends, using binomial regression. Data were available for 143 of 211 (68%) CCGs. OOH antibiotic prescription volume represented 4.5%-5.4% of GP prescription volume and was stable over time (P = 0.37). The proportion of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescriptions increased in OOH when it increased in the CCG they operated in (regression coefficient 0.98; 95% CI 0.96-0.99). Compared with GP, the proportion of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescriptions in OOH was higher but decreased both in GP and OOH (-0.57%, 95% CI - 0.54% to - 0.6% and -0.76%, 95% CI - 0.59% to - 0.93% per year, respectively). OOH proportionally prescribed more antibiotics than GPs although we could not comment on prescribing appropriateness. OOH prescribing volume was stable over time, and followed GP seasonal patterns. OOH antibiotic prescribing reflected the CCGs they operated in but with relatively more broad-spectrum antibiotics than in-hours GP. Understanding factors influencing prescribing in OOH will enable the development of tailored interventions promoting optimal prescribing in this setting.

  1. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Periprosthetic Joint Infection (PJI: Literature Review and World Consensus (Part Six

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Parvizi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Context There is a need to find the recommended perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis for current MRSA carriers and to determine if patients with prior history of MRSA should be re-screened and what should the choice of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics be in these patients. There is also a need to determine the recommended prophylaxis in patients undergoing major orthopaedic reconstructions for either tumor or non-neoplastic conditions using megaprosthesis or allograft. Evidence Acquisition Delegates in workgroup 3 of the consensus meeting on PJI reviewed English literature for relevant articles. 30 of 221 articles were relevant to the 4 following questions regarding perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent PJI. Results For current MRSA carriers, vancomycin or teicoplanin is the recommended perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Patients with prior history of MRSA should be re-screened preoperatively. If patients are found to be negative for MRSA, we recommend routine perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Until the emergence of further evidence, we recommend the use of routine antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing major reconstructions such as allograft or megaprostheses. Conclusions Based on evidences in the literature and consensus of expert delegates from consensus meeting recommendations for type of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients who are current MRSA carriers, the protocol for screening and type of prophylactic antibiotics for patients with prior history of MRSA and antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing major reconstructions such as megaprosthesis and allograft were provided.

  2. Fatal pneumococcal meningitis in a 7-year-old girl with interleukin-1 receptor activated kinase deficiency (IRAK-4) despite prophylactic antibiotic and IgG responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvie, Brianna; Top, Karina; McCusker, Christine; Letenyi, Duncan; Issekutz, Thomas B; Issekutz, Andrew C

    2014-04-01

    IRAK-4 deficiency causes IL-1R and TLR signaling failure, resulting in minimal clinical features despite invasive bacterial infection. We report the course of a 7-year-old IRAK-4-deficient girl presenting in the first year with multiple occult Staphylococcus aureus lymphadenitis. She was managed with antibiotic prophylaxis (sulfa/trimethoprim/PenV, then - due to neutropenia - Cefprozil), pneumococcal vaccination (PCV-7, Pneumovax23, PCV-13) and vigilance. Pneumococcal-specific IgG levels were monitored. No bacterial infections occurred on prophylaxis for 6 years after initial presentation. IgG response to pneumococcal polysaccharide was satisfactory but short-lived, requiring frequent boosting. At age 7, patient developed a morning headache and vomited once. Cefprozil was administered and re-dosed. Over 12 h, she was fatigued without other symptoms. Low fever accompanied another emesis. A few hours later she was confused, and purpuric rash appeared. Emergency physicians diagnosed sepsis/meningitis and started vancomycin-ceftriaxone. Respiratory failure and cerebellar herniation occurred IgG4 was increased (3.4 g/L). IgG response to vaccine antigens was satisfactory. IgG to 6A is reported to cross-react with 6C, but this was not the case here. Despite antibiotic prophylaxis and repeated vaccination, even older IRAK-4-deficient patients are at high risk of rapidly fatal infection due to emergence of antibiotic resistance. These patients need early assessment at any age, bacterial culturing, alternative empiric antibiotic therapy and close observation when even vaguely unwell. Based on increasingly recognized immunological and/or clinical impairments in B cell function, and possibly other defects, long-term IgG prophylaxis in addition to antibiotics is recommended.

  3. [The use of antibiotics in dental implantology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Y; Lin, M N; He, F M

    2017-05-09

    The use of antibiotics in dental implantology is very common and the abuse of antibiotics is increasingly obvious. The rational use of antibiotics in the process of oral implantology needs the support of evidence based medicine. The prophylactic use of antibiotics in dental implantology is reviewed in this article, including the summary of different infection risks, such as peri-implantitis and maxillary sinusitis after maxillary sinus floor lifting.

  4. Are we eliminating cures with antibiotic abuse? A study among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amoxicillin emerged as the most preferred antibiotic for dental procedures both as a therapeutic and a prophylactic drug. 50% of the endodontists and 40% of the general dentists opted to prescribe antibiotics during root canal therapy where ideally operative intervention would have sufficed. Overuse of antibiotics for routine ...

  5. Antibiotic prevention of postcataract endophthalmitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Flesner, Per; Andresen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Endophthalmitis is one of the most feared complications after cataract surgery. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the effect of intracameral and topical antibiotics on the prevention of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. A systematic literature review in the MEDLINE, CINAHL......, Cochrane Library and EMBASE databases revealed one randomized trial and 17 observational studies concerning the prophylactic effect of intracameral antibiotic administration on the rate of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. The effect of topical antibiotics on endophthalmitis rate was reported by one...... with the use of intracameral antibiotic administration of cefazolin, cefuroxime and moxifloxacin, whereas no effect was found with the use of topical antibiotics or intracameral vancomycin. Endophthalmitis occurred on average in one of 2855 surgeries when intracameral antibiotics were used compared to one...

  6. Prophylactic Bacteriophage Administration More Effective than Post-Infection Administration in Reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Shedding in Quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosab Ahmadi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Salmonella bacteria, often through poultry products, are a serious public health issue. Because of drawbacks associated with antibiotic prophylaxis, alternative treatments are sought. Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages may provide an effective alternative, but concerns remain with respect to bacteriophage stability and effectiveness. To this end, we assessed the stability of a novel bacteriophage isolated from poultry excreta, siphovirus PSE, and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we sought to determine how the timing (prophylactic or therapeutic and route (oral gavage or vent lip of PSE administration impacted its effectiveness. Here we report that significant quantities of viable PSE bacteriophages were recovered following exposure to high and low pH, high temperatures, and bile salts, testifying to its ability to survive extreme conditions. In addition, we found that ileal lactic acid bacteria and Streptococcus spp. counts increased, but colibacilli and total aerobe counts decreased, in quail receiving phage PSE through both oral gavage and vent lip routes. In other experiments, we assessed the efficiency of PSE administration, in both prophylactic and therapeutic contexts, via either oral gavage or vent lip administration, on S. Enteritidis colonization of quail cecal tonsils. Our results demonstrate that administration of PSE as a preventive agent could reduce the S. Enteritidis colonization more effectively than post-challenge administration. Furthermore, oral administration of PSE phage is a more effective prophylactic tool for reduction of S. Enteritidis shedding in poultry than is vent lip administration.

  7. BlmB and TlmB provide resistance to the bleomycin family of antitumor antibiotics by N-acetylating metal-free bleomycin, tallysomycin, phleomycin, and zorbamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Jane M; Rudolf, Jeffrey D; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Wang, Liyan; Unsin, Claudia; Galm, Ute; Yang, Dong; Tao, Meifeng; Shen, Ben

    2014-11-11

    The bleomycin (BLM) family of glycopeptide-derived antitumor antibiotics consists of BLMs, tallysomycins (TLMs), phleomycins (PLMs), and zorbamycin (ZBM). The self-resistant elements BlmB and TlmB, discovered from the BLM- and TLM-producing organisms Streptomyces verticillus ATCC15003 and Streptoalloteichus hindustanus E465-94 ATCC31158, respectively, are N-acetyltransferases that provide resistance to the producers by disrupting the metal-binding domain of the antibiotics required for activity. Although each member of the BLM family of antibiotics possesses a conserved metal-binding domain, the structural differences between each member, namely, the bithiazole moiety and C-terminal amine of BLMs, have been suggested to instill substrate specificity within BlmB. Here we report that BlmB and TlmB readily accept and acetylate BLMs, TLMs, PLMs, and ZBM in vitro but only in the metal-free forms. Kinetic analysis of BlmB and TlmB reveals there is no strong preference or rate enhancement for specific substrates, indicating that the structural differences between each member of the BLM family play a negligible role in substrate recognition, binding, or catalysis. Intriguingly, the zbm gene cluster from Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892 does not contain an N-acetyltransferase, yet ZBM is readily acetylated by BlmB and TlmB. We subsequently established that S. flavoviridis lacks the homologue of BlmB and TlmB, and ZbmA, the ZBM-binding protein, alone is sufficient to provide ZBM resistance. We further confirmed that BlmB can indeed confer resistance to ZBM in vivo in S. flavoviridis, introduction of which into wild-type S. flavoviridis further increases the level of resistance.

  8. Prophylactic immunoglobulin therapy in secondary immune deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agostini, Carlo; Blau, Igor-Wolfgang; Kimby, Eva

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In primary immunodeficiency (PID), immunoglobulin replacement therapy (IgRT) for infection prevention is well-established and supported by a wealth of clinical data. On the contrary, very little evidence-based data is available on the challenges surrounding the use of Ig......RT in secondary immune deficiencies (SID), and most published guidelines are mere extrapolations from the experience in PID. AREAS COVERED: In this article, four European experts provide their consolidated opinion on open questions surrounding the prophylactic use of IgRT in SID, based on their clinical...

  9. Antibiotic use among medical specialties in a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogerst, G J; Dippe, S E

    1981-02-27

    Antibiotic use in a community hospital was evaluated to demonstrate specialty variations. A chart review was performed using the Veterans Administration's "Guidelines for Peer Review" to determine appropriate antibiotic use. Of the 1,054 patients discharged in August 1977, three hundred ten (29.4%) received 479 courses of antibiotics of which two hundred eighty-seven (60%) were considered appropriate. Seventy-two percent of the therapeutic courses and 36% of the prophylactic courses were appropriate. Prophylactic antibiotics were used in 12% of the hospitalized patients and accounted for 33% of the total antibiotics. No notable difference in appropriate antibiotic use was found among general surgeons (73%), internists (72%), orthopedists (71%), and family practitioners (67%). Substantially lower levels were found among urologists (54%), otolaryngologists (44%), and obstetricians (36%). Continued education in proper antibiotic use is needed especially for prophylaxis. Educational programs directed at specific specialties may be the most fruitful way to effect improved overall antibiotic use.

  10. Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... of an antibiotic. Using antibiotics can lead to resistance. Each time you take antibiotics, sensitive bacteria are ...

  11. Travellers' diarrhoea - pros and cons of different prophylactic measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Angelika; Wiedermann, Ursula

    2009-10-01

    Travellers' diarrhoea is the most likely cause for disturbing travel arrangements. At an average, 30-40% of tourists are concerned, depending on the travel destination. Due to the high impact on the travellers' health this topic is still of utmost importance in travel medicine. A wide spectrum of enteropathogens can be accountable, with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli being the major causing pathogen among other bacteria, parasites and viruses. Here we discuss advantages and disadvantages of different prophylactic measures against travellers' diarrhoea. The effectiveness but also the relevance of hygiene education, vaccination and antibiotic or probiotic application will be discussed in the context of the travellers' different risk profiles.

  12. Bacteriocins ? Exploring Alternatives to Antibiotics in Mastitis Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Pieterse, Rene?; Todorov, Svetoslav D.

    2010-01-01

    Mastitis is considered to be the most costly disease affecting the dairy industry. Management strategies involve the extensive use of antibiotics to treat and prevent this disease. Prophylactic dosages of antibiotics used in mastitis control programmes could select for strains with resistance to antibiotics. In addition, a strong drive towards reducing antibiotic residues in animal food products has lead to research in finding alternative antimicrobial agents. In this review we have focus on ...

  13. South African medical students’ perceptions and knowledge about antibiotic resistance and appropriate prescribing: Are we providing adequate training to future prescribers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Wasserman,

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Education of medical students has been identified by the World Health Organization as an important aspect of antibiotic resistance (ABR containment. Surveys from high-income countries consistently reveal that medical students recognise the importance of antibiotic prescribing knowledge, but feel inadequately prepared and require more education on how to make antibiotic choices. The attitudes and knowledge of South African (SA medical students regarding ABR and antibiotic prescribing have never been evaluated. Objective. To evaluate SA medical students’ perceptions, attitudes and knowledge about antibiotic use and resistance, and the perceived quality of education relating to antibiotics and infection. Methods. This was a cross-sectional survey of final-year students at three medical schools, using a 26-item self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaires recorded basic demographic information, perceptions about antibiotic use and ABR, sources, quality, and usefulness of current education about antibiotic use, and questions to evaluate knowledge. Hard-copy surveys were administered during whole-class lectures. Results. A total of 289 of 567 (51% students completed the survey. Ninety-two percent agreed that antibiotics are overused and 87% agreed that resistance is a significant problem in SA – higher proportions than those who thought that antibiotic overuse (63% and resistance (61% are problems in the hospitals where they had worked (p<0.001. Most reported that they would appreciate more education on appropriate use of antibiotics (95%. Only 33% felt confident to prescribe antibiotics, with similar proportions across institutions. Overall, prescribing confidence was associated with the use of antibiotic prescribing guidelines (p=0.003, familiarity with antibiotic stewardship (p=0.012, and more frequent contact with infectious diseases specialists (p<0.001. There was an overall mean correct score of 50% on the knowledge

  14. Prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine

    OpenAIRE

    Salmito, Márcio Cavalcante; Duarte, Juliana Antoniolli; Morganti, Lígia Oliveira Golçalves; Brandão, Priscila Valéria Caus; Nakao, Bruno Higa; Villa, Thais Rodrigues; Ganança,Fernando Freitas

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Vestibular migraine (VM) is now accepted as a common cause of episodic vertigo. Treatment of VM involves two situations: the vestibular symptom attacks and the period between attacks. For the latter, some prophylaxis methods can be used. The current recommendation is to use the same prophylactic drugs used for migraines, including β-blockers, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. The recent diagnostic definition of vestibular migraine makes the number of studies on its ...

  15. [Prophylactic Appendectomy: Yes or No?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersting, Sabine; Dimasis, Periklis; Wiesmann, Siri; Mittelkötter, Ulrich

    2017-10-06

    Background At more than 50%, appendicitis is the leading cause of acute intra-abdominal disease requiring surgery. In the course of various other operations, prophylactic appendectomy (PA) is frequently performed. Objectives This study examines to what extent PA is justified. Patients and Methods A prospective study was performed in all patients (n = 173) undergoing prophylactic appendectomy in Katharinen Hospital Unna between January 2010 and October 2013. The following variables were analysed: age, gender, type of primary surgery, emergency or elective surgery, complications, lethality, intraoperative and histopathological evaluation of the appendix. In addition, patients were contacted postoperatively with the request to complete a questionnaire. Results Prophylactic appendectomy was carried out without any specific complications. 117 patients (68%) participated in the survey. 15% of these patients had suffered symptoms that could be attributable to irritation of the appendix. With only one exception, all appendectomy specimens revealed pathological findings in the histopathological examination. PA allowed the early diagnosis of 4 adenomas, one neuroendocrine tumour and 6 metastases or manifestations of peritoneal carcinomatosis. Conclusion PA is ethically justifiable, as there are few complications. Moreover, it can help to avoid future appendicitis and allows early detection of malignancies. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Prophylactic ankle bracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E A; Hergenroeder, A C

    1990-10-01

    Many choices are available to athletes seeking an ankle support. The time-honored tradition of ankle taping with adhesive tape does offer protection against ankle sprains during activity. Laced stabilizers offer an equal or possibly greater amount of support, are less costly and easier to apply, and can be retightened frequently during activity. The physician should become familiar with one of these two methods and choose one based on availability and feasibility in the community. The air stirrup may be indicated for patients with a history of ankle injury who are undergoing a graduated rehabilitation program. Nevertheless, the air stirrup has not been shown to provide significantly greater inversion restriction than taping or lace-on braces and is not recommended as a first-line method of support for individuals with no history of recent ankle sprain. High-top shoes are better when the ankle is taped, although low-top shoes are better when a laced stabilizer is worn. Elastic guards help reduce ankle edema but do not provide ankle stability.

  17. Prescribing pattern of antibiotics in pedodontics OPD of tertiary care dental hospital in Dhule district

    OpenAIRE

    Swapnil Balkrishna Kaikade; Nitin Dnyaneshwar Pise

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antibiotics are prescribed in dental practice for prophylactic and therapeutic reasons. Prophylactic antibiotics are prescribed to prevent diseases caused by members of the oral flora introduced to distant sites in a host at risk or introduced to a local compromised site in a host at risk. Although a number of studies on antibiotic use have been carried out, controversies still exist in areas such as prophylaxis, interactions and their use after both minor and intermediate oral su...

  18. Timing, choice and duration of perioperative prophylactic antibiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    : A teaching hospital based experience from Eritrea, in 2009. Dr.Yosief Yohannes1, Yordanos Mengesha2, Dr.Yosief Tewelde 3. Institutional Affiliation. 1Orotta National Referral Medical Surgical Hospital, Asmara,. 2Orotta School of Medicine, ...

  19. Know When Antibiotics Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-15

    This podcast provides a brief background about antibiotics and quick tips to help prevent antibiotic resistance.  Created: 4/15/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  20. AICRG, Part III: The influence of antibiotic use on the survival of a new implant design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Harold F; Ochi, Shigeru; Plezia, Richard; Gilbert, Harry; Dent, C Daniel; Pikulski, James; Lambert, Paul M

    2004-01-01

    The American College of Surgeons guidelines suggest that complex oral surgery may benefit from prophylactic antibiotic coverage. The use of preoperative antibiotics, postoperative antibiotics, or both during implant placement is a widely accepted practice in the United States, whereas dentists in other countries rarely use antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to determine if antibiotic coverage at the time of implant placement improves the survival of the Ankylos implant. As part of a comprehensive, multicentered, multidisciplinary, prospective, independent, international clinical study, designed and coordinated in the United States by the Ankylos Implant Clinical Research Group (AICRG), the use of preoperative (several regimens) and postoperative antibiotics (yes/no) were carefully documented to assess their influence on improving survival. A total of 1500 Ankylos implants were placed and followed for a period of 3 to 5 years. The decision to use antibiotics and the regimen to be employed was made by the treating surgeon. Failure was defined as removal of the implant for any reason. All data were entered into a computerized database for analysis. The use of preoperative antibiotics produced no significant improvement (P = .21, Fisher's exact test) in survival compared with those placed without antibiotic coverage. There was no significant difference between the regimens defined as AHA-1990, AHA-1997, and Peterson's recommendations. The results of this study suggest that there was little or no advantage to providing antibiotic coverage when placing this implant. These findings also suggest that the use of antibiotics for implant placement may not be as beneficial as once believed. If validated by other studies, the elimination of this practice for routine implant placement would represent a small but significant step forward in the reduction of unnecessary antibiotic use.

  1. Prophylactic Probiotics for Preterm Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rie; Greisen, Gorm; Schrøder, Morten

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major morbidity and cause of mortality in preterm neonates. Probiotics seem to have a beneficial role in preventing NEC, which is confirmed in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We therefore aimed to review and confirm the efficacy...... of probiotics in preterm neonates obtained in observational studies. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of prophylactic probiotics in preterm infants. METHODS: A meta-analysis was performed searching PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL (the Cochrane Library) and www.clinicaltrials.gov. Reference lists of reviews of RCTs were...... also searched. Included studies were observational studies that enrolled preterm infants

  2. Prophylactic treatment of retinal breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blindbæk, Søren Leer; Grauslund, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Prophylactic treatment of retinal breaks has been examined in several studies and reviews, but so far, no studies have successfully applied a systematic approach. In the present systematic review, we examined the need of follow-up after posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) - diagnosed by slit...... breaks. Additional retinal breaks were only revealed at follow-up in patients where a full retinal examination was compromised at presentation by, for example, vitreous haemorrhage. Asymptomatic and symptomatic retinal breaks progressed to rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) in 0-13.8% and 35...

  3. Evidence of increased antibiotic resistance in phylogenetically-diverse Aeromonas isolates from semi-intensive fish ponds treated with antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant J Patil

    2016-11-01

    identified, including an A. salmonicida cluster that harbored all characterized fish skin ulcer samples. Subsequent to stocking diversity was much lower and most water column isolates in both facilities segregated into an A. veronii-associated cluster. This study demonstrated a strong correlation between aquaculture, Aeromonas diversity and antibiotic resistance. It provides strong evidence for linkage between prophylactic and systemic use of antibiotics in aquaculture and the propagation of antibiotic resistance.

  4. Effect of prophylactic phenobarbital on seizures, encephalopathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Seizures after an asphyxial insult may result in brain damage in neonates. Prophylactic phenobarbital may reduce seizures. Objective. To determine the e€ect of prophylactic phenobarbital on seizures, death and neurological outcome at hospital discharge. Methods. Neonates with base de.cit >16 mmol/l and ...

  5. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  6. An alternative for antibiotic se in poultry: probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    FW Edens

    2003-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, there has been increasing amounts of antibiotics used prophylactically and as growth promoters. Today, there is a consumer and governmental outcry to eliminate that practice from poultry and livestock production. Evidence has been accumulated to show that there is a link between risk of zoonotic disease and growth promoting antibiotic usage in livestock and poultry. Therefore, alternatives to the use of growth promoting antibiotics must be found to promote growth or pr...

  7. Analysis of preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in stented, distal hypospadias repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jacob; Patel, Ashay; Zamilpa, Ismael; Bai, Shasha; Alliston, Jeffrey; Canon, Stephen

    2017-04-01

    Surgical site infection [SSI] is a risk for any surgical procedure, including hypospadias repair. Prophylactic antibiotic therapy for patients having surgery is often effective in preventing SSIs, but with increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, this practice has been questioned. The objectives of this study are 1) to assess the incidence of SSIs in patients following stented, distal hypospadias repair and 2) to observe for any potential difference in the incidence of SSIs for patients with and without preoperative antibiotic utilization in this setting. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive patients treated with stented, distal hypospadias repair from 2011 to 2014 by three surgeons and compared two groups: patients who received preoperative antibiotics and patients who did not. Patients with a history of previous hypospadias repair were excluded from the study. Two hundred twenty-four subjects were identified. Group 1 (135) received preoperative antibiotic and Group 2 (89) did not receive preoperative antibiotics. There was no statistically significant difference in SSI prevalence with 0 patients in Group 1 and 1 patient in Group 2 having a SSI. Although prophylactic antibiotics prior to hypospadias repair are most often used by pediatric urologists, this study demonstrates further evidence that antibiotics prior to this procedure do not appear to lower the rate of SSI. This study is limited by its retrospective nature and disparate mean follow up in the two cohorts. Surgical site infection does not appear to be decreased by prophylactic antibiotic therapy before distal hypospadias repair.

  8. Bacteriocins: exploring alternatives to antibiotics in mastitis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reneé Pieterse

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Mastitis is considered to be the most costly disease affecting the dairy industry. Management strategies involve the extensive use of antibiotics to treat and prevent this disease. Prophylactic dosages of antibiotics used in mastitis control programmes could select for strains with resistance to antibiotics. In addition, a strong drive towards reducing antibiotic residues in animal food products has lead to research in finding alternative antimicrobial agents. In this review we have focus on the pathogenesis of the mastitis in dairy cows, existing antibiotic treatments and possible alternative for application of bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of this disease.

  9. Antibiotics and Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Del Fiol, Fernando; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; de Cássia Bergamaschi, Cristiane; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Gauthier, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    During the breastfeeding period, bacterial infections can occur in the nursing mother, requiring the use of antibiotics. A lack of accurate information may lead health care professionals and mothers to suspend breastfeeding, which may be unnecessary. This article provides information on the main antibiotics that are appropriate for clinical use and the interference of these antibiotics with the infant to support medical decisions regarding the discontinuation of breastfeeding. We aim to provide information on the pharmacokinetic factors that interfere with the passage of antibiotics into breast milk and the toxicological implications of absorption by the infant. Publications related to the 20 most frequently employed antibiotics and their transfer into breast milk were evaluated. The results demonstrate that most antibiotics in clinical use are considered suitable during breastfeeding; however, the pharmacokinetic profile of each drug must be observed to ensure the resolution of the maternal infection and the safety of the infant. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Antibiotic Application and Emergence of Multiple Antibiotic Resistance (MAR) in Global Catfish Aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuah, Li-Oon; Effarizah, M E; Goni, Abatcha Mustapha; Rusul, Gulam

    2016-06-01

    Catfish is one of the most cultivated species worldwide. Antibiotics are usually used in catfish farming as therapeutic and prophylactic agents. In the USA, only oxytetracycline, a combination of sulfadimethoxine and ormetoprim, and florfenicol are approved by the Food Drug Administration for specific fish species (e.g., catfish and salmonids) and their specific diseases. Misuse of antibiotics as prophylactic agents in disease prevention, however, is common and contributes in the development of antibiotic resistance. Various studies had reported on antibiotic residues and/or resistance in farmed species, feral fish, water column, sediments, and, in a lesser content, among farm workers. Ninety percent of the world aquaculture production is carried out in developing countries, which lack regulations and enforcement on the use of antibiotics. Hence, efforts are needed to promote the development and enforcement of such a regulatory structure. Alternatives to antibiotics such as antibacterial vaccines, bacteriophages and their lysins, and probiotics have been applied to curtail the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the imprudent application of antibiotics in aquaculture.

  11. Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit Button Past Emails Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Can you ... spp. So, what can we do to prevent antibiotic resistance in healthcare settings? Patients, healthcare providers, healthcare facility ...

  12. Antibiotic prophylaxis in organophosphorus poisoning: A study of health and economic outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Priyendu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Organophosphorus poisoning (OPP is a major concern for developing countries. There are no guidelines for the prophylactic use of antibiotics in the management of OPP which in such critical cases might add to the economic burden of the patients as well as antibiotic resistance. We compared the health and economic outcomes in patients prescribed with prophylactic antibiotics with respect to the patients not prescribed with any antibiotics. Methods: A retrospective observational study was carried out for two years for patients admitted to ICU with OPP. Patients were graded for severity of OPP, and divided into two groups based on prophylactic prescription and no prescription of antibiotics. The length of stay (LOS, hospitalization cost and outcomes were measured and compared between the two groups using statistical tests. Results: Out of the 254 patients observed, 108 were prescribed with prophylactic antibiotics and 94 were not prescribed with any antibiotic. There was a significant difference between LOS, cost of treatment and outcomes in the two groups (p < 0.001. When antibiotics were not prescribed, the odds of improvement was 1.854 times higher compared to those who received prophylactic antibiotics although after adjusting for severity of poisoning, significance was lost. On an average, 2–3 antibiotics were prescribed to every patient in the first group. Conclusion: OPP is an important health concern where issues of antibiotic misuse and overuse are practiced. Our study suggested that systemic antibiotic prophylaxis did not offer any advantage over non-use of any antibiotics in patients with OPP.

  13. Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao K

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Katharine Yao,1 Mark Sisco,2 Isabelle Bedrosian3 1Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, 2Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, 3Department of Surgery, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: There has been an increasing trend in the use of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM in the United States among women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer, particularly young women. Approximately one-third of women ,40 years old are undergoing CPM in the US. Most studies have shown that the CPM trend is mainly patient-driven, which reflects a changing environment for newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. The most common reason that women choose CPM is based on misperceptions about CPM’s effect on survival and overestimation of their contralateral breast cancer (CBC risk. No prospective studies have shown survival benefit to CPM, and the CBC rate for most women is low at 10 years. Fear of recurrence is also a big driver of CPM decisions. Nonetheless, studies have shown that women are mostly satisfied with undergoing CPM, but complications and subsequent surgeries with reconstruction have been associated with dissatisfaction with CPM. Studies on surgeon’s perspectives on CPM are sparse but show that the most common reasons surgeons discuss CPM with patients is because of a suspicious family history or for a patient who is a confirmed BRCA mutation carrier. Studies on the cost–effectiveness of CPM have been conflicting and are highly dependent on patient’s quality of life after CPM. Most recent guidelines for CPM are contradictory. Future areas of research include the development of interventions to better inform patients about CPM, modification of the guidelines to form a more consistent statement, longer term studies on CBC risk and CPM’s effect on survival, and prospective studies that track the psychosocial effects of CPM on body image and

  14. A randomized prospective study of prophylactic cloxacillin in breast reduction surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Richard; Elander, Anna; Thorarinsson, Andri; Kölby, Lars; Sahlin, Per-Erik; Lundberg, Jonas; Panczel, Alexander; Lidén, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative infection after breast reduction surgery is a common complication, with the most commonly involved pathogen being Staphylococcus aureus. Previous studies of antibiotic prophylaxis in breast reduction surgery have been inconclusive. The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of prophylactic antibiotics in breast reduction surgery. In total, 325 women were randomized to antibiotic prophylaxis [with 2 g of cloxacillin intravenously (IV) or 600 mg of clindamycin IV] (intervention group) or no antibiotic prophylaxis (control group). Follow-up was conducted at 1 and 2 weeks postoperatively. Patients with signs of infections or other complications were followed up until resolution. Patients who received antibiotic treatment within 30 days from surgery (cloxacillin 750 mg or clindamycin 300 mg orally) were considered having an infection and this was the main outcome variable. All postoperative infections were also judged according to a graded scale. In the intervention group, 26 (16.0%) patients were treated with antibiotic; and in the control group, 32 (19.6%) patients were treated with antibiotics. No difference was found between the groups (relative risk, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-1.31; P = 0.49). Twenty-two (14%) patients in the intervention group were classified to have a possible infection according to the scale compared to 27 (17%) in the control group. No statistical difference was found (relative risk, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.48-1.37; P = 0.54). Prophylactic cloxacillin as a single-dose IV in breast reduction surgery does not reduce the incidence of postoperative infections.

  15. Emergence of antibiotic resistant Streptococcus sanguis in dental plaque of children after frequent antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, P R; Herzberg, M C

    1999-01-01

    In the pediatric population, several different antibiotic regimens are currently recommended for the treatment of otitis media. This study investigated whether therapy for otitis media was associated with the emergence of antibiotic-resistant oral bacteria. Streptococcus sanguis (S. sanguis) was isolated from supragingival dental plaque of children after a recent course of antibiotic. The isolated strains were tested for resistance to penicillin, amoxicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and erythromycin and compared to isolated strains from age- and sex-matched control subjects, who had received no antibiotics within two years before sampling. While control subjects harbored no resistant strains of S. sanguis, about 60% of children who had received antibiotics harbored S. sanguis which were resistant to at least one of the tested antibiotics. Nearly half of these strains were resistant to two or more antibiotics. Resistance to penicillin and amoxicillin decreased with the age of the child and with the length of time since exposure to the antibiotic. However, resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or erythromycin showed no relationship to the age of the child or the length of time since exposure to the antibiotic. The data show that children who had been treated for otitis media with common antibiotic protocols do harbor antibiotic-resistant oral streptococci which may complicate prophylactic and therapeutic regimens for bacterial endocarditis.

  16. Controlled trial of cycled antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent initial Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tramper-Stranders, G.A.; Wolfs, T.F.W.; van Haren Noman, S.; van Aalderen, W.M.C.; Nagelkerke, A.F.; Nuijsink, M.; Kimpen, J.L.L.; van der Ent, C.K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Initial pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is currently treated with intensive antibiotic therapy. At this stage, inflammation and tissue injury might have already occurred. Moreover, bacterial eradication is not always achieved. Prophylactic

  17. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswati eSengupta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic-resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic-resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in subinhibitory concentrations acting as signalling molecules supporting quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host-parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell and so on. The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behaviour of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and genes that confer resistance to antibiotics in

  18. Description of a multidisciplinary initiative to improve SCIP measures related to pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis compliance: a single-center success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Tori; Beloff, Jennifer; Lightowler, Marie; Liu, Xiaoxia; Nascimben, Luigino; Kaye, Alan D; Urman, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    The Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) was launched in 2005. The core prophylactic perioperative antibiotic guidelines were created due to recognition of the impact of proper perioperative prophylaxis on an estimated annual one million inpatient days and $1.6 billion in excess health care costs secondary to preventable surgical site infections (SSIs). An internal study was conducted to create low cost, standardized processes on an institutional level to improve compliance with prophylactic antibiotic administration. We assessed the impact of auditing and notifying providers of SCIP errors on overall compliance with inpatient antibiotic guidelines and on net financial gain or loss to a large tertiary center between March 1st 2010 and September 31st 2013. We hypothesized that direct physician-to-physician feedback would result in significant compliance improvements. Through physician notification, our hospital was able to significantly improve SCIP compliance and emphasis on patient safety within a year of intervention implementation. The hospital earned an additional $290,612 in 2011 and $209,096 in 2012 for re-investment in patient care initiatives. Provider education and direct notification of SCIP prophylactic antibiotic dosing errors resulted in improved compliance with national patient improvement guidelines. There were differences between the anesthesiology and surgery department feedback responses, the latter likely attributed to diverse surgical department sub-divisions, frequent changes in resident trainees and supervising attending staff, and the comparative ability. Provider notification of guideline non-compliance should be encouraged as standard practice to improve patient safety. Also, the hospital experienced increased revenue for re-investment in patient care as a secondary result of provider notification.

  19. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  20. Subtle Microbiome Manipulation Using Probiotics Reduces Antibiotic-Associated Mortality in Fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, V.; Gomez-Chiarri, M.; Roy, C.; Smith, K.; Amaral-Zettler, L.

    2017-01-01

    Prophylactic antibiotics in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry are intended to prevent the negative impacts of disease outbreaks. Research in mice and humans suggests that antibiotics may disturb microbiome communities and decrease microbiome-mediated disease resistance, also known as

  1. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antibiotic resistance? When and how to take antibiotics Antibacterial agents Bioterrorism & stockpiling antibiotics The Cost of Resistance Science of Resistance Ecology Antibiotics in Agriculture Antibacterial ...

  2. A Comparison of Prophylactic Intravenous Glycopyrrolate and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Spinal anaesthesia is complicated by hypotension and bradycardia. There are many risk factors for bradycardia in parturients who present for caesarean section. Due to the different pathophysiology of bradycardia, prophylactic administration of a vagolytic (glycopyrrolate) may however counter bradycardia ...

  3. Prophylactic Ketamine Reduces Incidence of Postanaesthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    General anesthesia influences the thermoregulatory process. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of low-dose prophylactic ketamine with that ofplacebo in preventing postoperative shivering. A prospective randomized double-blind study involved 76 ASA I and II patients undergoing general anesthesia that was ...

  4. Prescribing Antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Jepsen, Kim Sune

    2018-01-01

    The medical professions will lose an indispensable tool in clinical practice if even simple infections cannot be cured because antibiotics have lost effectiveness. This article presents results from an exploratory enquiry into “good doctoring” in the case of antibiotic prescribing at a time when...

  5. Compliance in Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Orthopaedics and Trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To audit the compliance of prophylactic Antibiotic practice amongst orthopaedic and trauma surgeons, with popular international guidelines. Materials and Method: This is a retrospective observational study. The case notes of all patients who had elective surgery for open reduction and internal fixation for closed ...

  6. Antibiotic prophylaxis and complications following prostate biopsies - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemann, Nina; Helgstrand, John Thomas; Brasso, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    drug strategy. We reviewed the current evidence supporting use of prophylactic antibiotics and the risk of complications following prostate biopsies. METHODS: This review was drafted in accordance with the Prisma Guidelines. The PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched. RESULTS: A total...

  7. Healthcare providers' attitudes and perceptions in infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Healthcare providers demonstrated attitudes and perceptions in antibiotic prescribing or use of laboratory derived information in infection diagnosis that could have negative impacts on antibiotic prescribing. Key words: Healthcare providers, Lesotho, antibiotic prescribing, laboratory derived information ...

  8. Prophylactic Vancomycin Drops Reduce the Severity of Early Bacterial Keratitis in Keratoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantopoulos, Aris; Tan, Xiao Wei; Goh, Gwendoline Tze Wei; Saraswathi, Padmanabhan; Chen, Liyan; Nyein, Chan Lwin; Zhou, Lei; Beuerman, Roger; Tan, Donald Tiang Hwee; Mehta, Jod S; Mehta, Jod

    2015-01-01

    Artificial cornea transplantation, keratoprosthesis, improves vision for patients at high risk of failure with human cadaveric cornea. However, post-operative infection can cause visual loss and implant extrusion in 3.2-17% of eyes. Long-term vancomycin drops are recommended following keratoprosthesis to prevent bacterial keratitis. Evidence, though, in support of this practice is poor. We investigated whether prophylactic vancomycin drops prevented bacterial keratitis in an animal keratoprosthesis model. Twenty-three rabbits were assigned either to a prophylactic group (n = 13) that received vancomycin 1.4% drops 5 times/day from keratoprosthesis implantation to sacrifice, or a non-prophylactic group (n = 10) that received no drops. All rabbits had Staphylococcus aureus inoculation into the cornea at 7-12 days post-implantation and were sacrificed at predetermined time-points. Prophylactic and non-prophylactic groups were compared with slit-lamp photography (SLP), anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT), and histology, immunohistochemistry and bacterial quantification of excised corneas. Corneal vancomycin pharmacokinetics were studied in 8 additional rabbits. On day 1 post-inoculation, the median SLP score and mean±SEM AS-OCT corneal thickness (CT) were greater in the non-prophylactic than the prophylactic group (11 vs. 1, p = 0.049 and 486.9±61.2 vs. 327.4±37.1 μm, p = 0.029 respectively). On days 2 and 4, SLP scores and CT were not significantly different. Immunohistochemistry showed a greater CD11b+ve/non-CD11b+ve cell ratio in the non-prophylactic group (1.45 vs. 0.71) on day 2. Bacterial counts were not significantly different between the two groups. Corneal vancomycin concentration (2.835±0.383 μg/ml) exceeded minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Staphylococcus aureus only after 16 days of vancomycin drops. Two of 3 rabbits still developed infection despite bacterial inoculation after 16 days of prophylactic drops. Prophylactic

  9. Prophylactic Vancomycin Drops Reduce the Severity of Early Bacterial Keratitis in Keratoprosthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Konstantopoulos

    Full Text Available Artificial cornea transplantation, keratoprosthesis, improves vision for patients at high risk of failure with human cadaveric cornea. However, post-operative infection can cause visual loss and implant extrusion in 3.2-17% of eyes. Long-term vancomycin drops are recommended following keratoprosthesis to prevent bacterial keratitis. Evidence, though, in support of this practice is poor. We investigated whether prophylactic vancomycin drops prevented bacterial keratitis in an animal keratoprosthesis model.Twenty-three rabbits were assigned either to a prophylactic group (n = 13 that received vancomycin 1.4% drops 5 times/day from keratoprosthesis implantation to sacrifice, or a non-prophylactic group (n = 10 that received no drops. All rabbits had Staphylococcus aureus inoculation into the cornea at 7-12 days post-implantation and were sacrificed at predetermined time-points. Prophylactic and non-prophylactic groups were compared with slit-lamp photography (SLP, anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT, and histology, immunohistochemistry and bacterial quantification of excised corneas. Corneal vancomycin pharmacokinetics were studied in 8 additional rabbits.On day 1 post-inoculation, the median SLP score and mean±SEM AS-OCT corneal thickness (CT were greater in the non-prophylactic than the prophylactic group (11 vs. 1, p = 0.049 and 486.9±61.2 vs. 327.4±37.1 μm, p = 0.029 respectively. On days 2 and 4, SLP scores and CT were not significantly different. Immunohistochemistry showed a greater CD11b+ve/non-CD11b+ve cell ratio in the non-prophylactic group (1.45 vs. 0.71 on day 2. Bacterial counts were not significantly different between the two groups. Corneal vancomycin concentration (2.835±0.383 μg/ml exceeded minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC for Staphylococcus aureus only after 16 days of vancomycin drops. Two of 3 rabbits still developed infection despite bacterial inoculation after 16 days of prophylactic drops.Prophylactic

  10. Rate of infection after carpal tunnel release surgery and effect of antibiotic prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harness, Neil G; Inacio, Maria C; Pfeil, Faith F; Paxton, Liz W

    2010-02-01

    To determine the rate of postoperative wound infection and the association with prophylactic antibiotic use in uncomplicated carpal tunnel release surgery. We performed a multicenter, retrospective review of all the carpal tunnel release procedures performed between January 1, 2005, and August 30, 2007. Data reviewed included the use of prophylactic antibiotics, diabetic status, and the occurrence of postoperative wound infection. We determined the overall antibiotic usage rate and analyzed the correlation between antibiotic use and the development of postoperative wound infection. The rate of surgical site infections in the 3003 patients who underwent carpal tunnel release surgery (group A) was 11. Antibiotic usage data were available for 2336 patients (group B). Six patients without prophylactic antibiotics had infection, as did 5 patients with prophylactic antibiotics. This difference was not statistically significant. Of the 11 surgical site infections, 4 were deep (organ/space) and 7 superficial (incisional). The number of patients with diabetes in the overall study population was 546, 3 of whom had infections. This was not statistically different from the nondiabetic population infection rate (8 patients). The overall infection rate after carpal tunnel release surgery is low. In addition, the deep (organ/space) infection rate is much lower than previously reported. Antibiotic use did not decrease the risk of infection in this study population, including patients with diabetes. The routine use of antibiotic prophylaxis in carpal tunnel release surgery is not indicated. Surgeons should carefully consider the risks and benefits of routinely using prophylactic antibiotics in carpal tunnel release surgery. Therapeutic III. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Handling Time-dependent Variables: Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Price, L Silvia; Frencken, Jos F; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc

    2016-06-15

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods, antibiotics constitute time-dependent exposures. Cox regression models are suited for determining such associations. After explaining the concepts of hazard, hazard ratio, and proportional hazards, the effects of treating antibiotic exposure as fixed or time-dependent variables are illustrated and discussed. Wider acceptance of these techniques will improve quantification of the effects of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance development and provide better evidence for guideline recommendations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Forgotten antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulcini, Céline; Bush, Karen; Craig, William A

    2012-01-01

    available in fewer than 20 of 38 countries. Economic motives were the major cause for discontinuation of marketing of these antibiotics. Fourteen of 33 antibiotics are potentially active against either resistant Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria. Urgent measures are then needed to ensure better...... disease specialists in Europe, the United States, Canada, and Australia. An international expert panel selected systemic antibacterial drugs for their potential to treat infections caused by resistant bacteria or their unique value for specific criteria. Twenty-two of the 33 selected antibiotics were...

  13. Butterbur extract: prophylactic treatment for childhood migraines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utterback, Gretchann; Zacharias, Rayna; Timraz, Shahrazad; Mershman, Denay

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of migraine headaches in childhood is increasing. Migraines are often difficult to diagnose in pediatrics and even more difficult to treat and prevent. In order to decrease the impact of the condition on the child and the family, prophylactic treatment is recommended if the child is experiencing disabling migraines. The medications currently prescribed for the prevention of pediatric migraines often have significant side effects and are of questionable therapeutic value. For those patients and parents who are interested in alternative therapies and natural remedies for preventive treatment of pediatric migraines, butterbur extract derived from the butterbur plant, Petasites hybridus, has emerged as a promising treatment. This paper discusses the impact of migraines among pediatric patients, the rationale for the preventative treatment of pediatric migraines, the current therapies and the relevance of butterbur extract as a prophylactic treatment for migraines in this patient population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Antibiotics in dentistry--an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Robin A

    2013-05-01

    This review article considers the changes in antibiotic usage over the past 40 years. Perhaps the most significant advance is in the prophylactic use of these drugs to reduce the effect of dentally induced bacteraemia. A greater understanding of various dental infections and, in particular, the role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, has led to further interest in the indications for these drugs as adjunctive measures. Whilst new indications for the use of antibiotics become more widespread, all members of the healthcare professions need to be aware that these drugs have significant adverse effects and their misuse can lead to life-threatening infection. Antibiotics have revolutionized the control of infectious diseases and have a significant role in dental practice. Dentists should be fully appraised of the benefits of these drugs and when they should be prescribed. Antibiotics usage should not be a substitute for interventional procedures, such as drainage of pus or removal of sources of infection. Indications for the use of these drugs as prophylactic measures are now reducing.

  15. Antibiotic usage and appropriateness for a university hospital in Turkey: comparison of the results of the point prevalence in 2012-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanefi Cem Gul

    2015-04-01

    <0.008 and carbepem usage soared (from 14.9% to 29.4%; p<0.017. CONCLUSiON: Especially, increased inappropriate prophylactic antibiotic usage rates in surgical wards has been decreased by reinforming the surgeons regarding prophylactic antibiotic usage and providing with obeying the surgical prophylaxis guidelines. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(2.000: 113-120

  16. Pressure ulcer prevention and treatment: use of prophylactic dressings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid K

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen Reid,1 Elizabeth A Ayello,2 Afsaneh Alavi,3 1Department of Nursing Practice and Education, Bridgepoint Active Healthcare, Toronto, Canada; 2School of Nursing, Excelsior College, Albany, NY, USA; 3Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Abstract: The management of pressure ulcers is challenging for health care providers across disciplines. Pressure ulcers have significant impact on emotional and physical wellbeing, quality of life, and health care costs. The use of wound dressings could be an important and cost-effective strategy in preventing pressure ulcers. The main types of dressings that are examined for this purpose in the literature are foam, hydrocolloid, and films. Some small studies have shown a preventative role for sacral dressings with low-shear backings, though they raise concerns about over-hydration of the skin. Further research demonstrates the application of barrier films over bony prominences to have a prophylactic effect; however, adhesive dressings can also contribute to shearing forces on the skin. There is a vast body of research that examines the use of dressings to prevent pressure ulcers; however, there is limited high-level evidence, such as randomized control trials. A 2013 Cochrane review indicated that there is a paucity of high-level evidence to support the prophylactic use of dressings to prevent pressure ulcers; this paper will examine the emerging literature and consider its relevance to pressure ulcer prevention protocols. Keywords: quality of life, hydrocolloid dressing, topical agent

  17. Prophylactic digitalization preoperatively of patients with arteriosclerotic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bille-Brahe, N E; Engell, H C; Sørensen, M B

    1981-02-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the hemodynamic effect of prophylactic digitalization before major surgical procedures. Sixteen patients, all admitted for an elective vascular operation for arteriosclerotic disease and all with impaired left ventricular function, were investigated. In half of the patients, digitalis was given before the operation, the other half of the patients served as the control study. The measured parameters were pulmonary artery mean pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, central venous pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, blood volume and arterial, as well as venous, oxygen content. Preoperatively, before digitalization, no significant differences were noted between the two groups at rest and during exercise. Before anesthesia and postoperatively, those given digitalis had improved cardiac function. Those in both groups, however, had a normal hemodynamic response to the surgical trauma. In this study, a definite answer is not provided concerning the usefulness of prophylactic digitalization but an increase in the ability of the digitalized heart to withstand the imposition of a pressure load postoperatively is suggested.

  18. Prophylactic Riluzole Attenuates Oxidative Stress Damage in Spinal Cord Distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Eileen Nicole; Seifert, Jennifer L; Johnson, Kevin J; Romero-Ortega, Mario

    2018-01-02

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) without radiographic abnormalities (SCIWORA) presents a significant challenge due the loss of function despite an apparent normal anatomy. The cause of dysfunction is not understood and specific treatment options are lacking. Some scoliosis corrective surgeries result in SCIWORA, where stretching of the spinal cord can lead to vascular compromise and hypoxia. This procedure allows for the implantation of neuroprotective strategies designed to prevent iatrogenic SCI. We utilized a model of atraumatic SCI to evaluate the efficacy of the sodium channel blocker Riluzole, as a prophylactic neuroprotectant. As expected, the stretch injury caused a significant reduction in intraparenchymal oxygen in distraction (-53.09 ± 22.23 %) and Riluzole pre-treated distraction animals (-43.04 ±22.86%). However, in contrast to the oxidative stress and metabolic impairments observed in distraction animals, in which protein carbonylation increased significantly (5.88 ± 1.3 nmol/ml), Riluzole kept these levels within normal range (1.8 ± 1.0nmol/ml). This neurprotection also prevented ventral motor neuron hypoplasia and pyknosis, characteristic features of this atraumatic SCI model, and maintained normal gait function (e.g., stride length and stance time), otherwise observed as a result of distraction injury. This study provides evidence for the use of prophylactic neuroprotective strategies in which thoracic or spine surgeries present the risk of causing atraumatic SCI.

  19. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Hoffmann, Tammy C; McCullough, Amanda R

    2015-01-01

    Numerous opportunities are available in primary care for alleviating the crisis of increasing antibiotic resistance. Preventing patients from developing an acute respiratory infection (ARI) will obviate any need for antibiotic use downstream. Hygiene measures such as physical barriers and hand...... hygiene, and possibly vaccination and exercise, may be effective. Also, a large range of complementary and alternative medicines (e.g. zinc, vitamin C and probiotics) are proposed for preventing and treating ARIs, but evidence for efficacy is scarce. General practitioners' (GPs) attitudes towards...

  20. Is there an improvement of antibiotic use in China? Evidence from the usage analysis of combination antibiotic therapy for type I incisions in 244 hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Juan; Luo, Zhen-Ni; Tang, Chang-Min; Zou, Xiao-Xu; Zhao, Lu; Fang, Peng-Qian

    2016-10-01

    The improvement of antibiotic rational use in China was studied by usage analysis of combination antibiotic therapy for type I incisions in 244 hospitals. Five kinds of hospitals, including general hospital, maternity hospital, children's hospital, stomatological hospital and cancer hospital, from 30 provinces were surveyed. A systematic random sampling strategy was employed to select outpatient prescriptions and inpatient cases in 2011 and 2012. A total of 29 280 outpatient prescriptions and 73 200 inpatient cases from 244 hospitals in each year were analyzed. Data were collected with regards to the implementation of the national antibiotic stewardship program (NASP), the overall usage and the prophylactic use of antibiotic for type I incisions. Univariate analysis was used for microbiological diagnosis rate before antimicrobial therapy, prophylactic use of antibiotics for type I incision operation, and so on. For multivariate analysis, the use of antibiotics was dichotomized according to the guidelines, and entered as binary values into logistic regression analysis. The results were compared with the corresponding criteria given by the guidelines of this campaign. The antibiotic stewardship in China was effective in that more than 80% of each kind of hospitals achieved the criteria of recommended antibiotics varieties. Hospital type appeared to be a factor statistically associated with stewardship outcome. The prophylactic use of antibiotics on type I incision operations decreased by 16.22% (Pantibiotic therapy for type I incisions was also decreased. Region and bed size were the main determinants on surgical prophylaxis for type I incision. This national analysis of hospitals on antibiotic use and stewardship allows relevant comparisons for bench marking. More efforts addressing the root cause of antibiotics abuse would continue to improve the rational use of antibiotics in China.

  1. Antibiotics Prophylaxis for Operative Hysteroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzii, Ludovico; Di Donato, Violante; Boni, Terenzio; Gaglione, Raffaele; Marana, Riccardo; Mazzon, Ivan; Imperiale, Ludovica; De Medici, Caterina; Ruggiero, Alfonso; Panici, Pierluigi Benedetti

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the incidence of infectious complications and effect of prophylactic antibiotic administration during operative hysteroscopic procedures. A multicentric randomized controlled trial was conducted between January 2012 and December 2013. Women (n = 180) affected by endometrial hyperplasia, myomas, or endometrial polyps undergoing operative hysteroscopy were randomized to receive cefazolin 2 g intravenously 30 minutes prior to the procedure (n = 91) and no treatment (n = 89). No statistical difference in terms of postoperative fever (2.4% vs 2.3%, P = .99), endometritis (0% vs 0%), pain (6.0% vs 10.4%, P = .40), cervicitis-vaginitis (0% vs 0%), pelvic abscess (0% vs 0%), pelvic inflammatory disease (0% vs 0%), and bleeding (0% vs 0%) was noticed. No statistical difference in terms of side effects attributable to antibiotic prophylaxis such as allergy (0% vs 4.8%, P = .12), nausea (10.7% vs 17.4%, P = .27), vomiting (3.6% vs 4.6%, P = .99), diarrhea (4.8% vs 5.4%, P = .99), cephalea (9.5% vs 3.5%, P = .13), dizziness (4.8% vs 2.3%, P = .44), and meteorism (5.4% vs 3.4%, P = .99) was noticed. The results of the current study support the recommendation not to prescribe routine antibiotic prophylaxis prior to operative hysteroscopy.

  2. Next generation prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, John T; Müller, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The two licensed bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 (the major papillomavirus virion protein) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines are regarded as safe, effective, and well established prophylactic vaccines. However, they have some inherent limitations, including a fairly high production and delivery cost, virus-type restricted protection, and no reported therapeutic activity, which might be addressed with the development of alternative dosing schedules and vaccine products. A change from a three-dose to a two-dose protocol for the licensed HPV vaccines, especially in younger adolescents (aged 9-13 years), is underway in several countries and is likely to become the future norm. Preliminary evidence suggests that recipients of HPV vaccines might derive prophylactic benefits from one dose of the bivalent vaccine. Substantial interest exists in both the academic and industrial sectors in the development of second-generation L1 VLP vaccines in terms of cost reduction-eg, by production in Escherichia coli or alternative types of yeast. However, Merck's nonavalent vaccine, produced via the Saccharomyces cerevisiae production system that is also used for their quadrivalent vaccine, is the first second-generation HPV VLP vaccine to be available on the market. By contrast, other pharmaceutical companies are developing microbial vectors that deliver L1 genes. These two approaches would add an HPV component to existing live attenuated vaccines for measles and typhoid fever. Prophylactic vaccines that are based on induction of broadly cross-neutralising antibodies to L2, the minor HPV capsid protein, are also being developed both as simple monomeric fusion proteins and as virus-like display vaccines. The strong interest in developing the next generation of vaccines, particularly by manufacturers in middle-to-high income countries, increases the likelihood that vaccine production will become decentralised with the hope that effective HPV vaccines will be

  3. Dental antibiotic prescription in Fijian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murti, Aachal; Morse, Zac

    2007-04-01

    To identify and evaluate dentists' knowledge of and prescription patterns of antimicrobial drugs. All 80 registered general dental practitioners in the Republic of The Fiji Islands, excluding academic staff at Fiji School of Medicine. Sixty five (81%) usable replies were received and analysed. Daily prescription of antibiotics increased with years in practice. There was a moderate level of knowledge regarding specific indications for antibiotic prescription both therapeutically and prophylactically. There was a tendency towards over-prescription with lower dosage, broad spectrum antibiotics with amoxycillin being the overwhelming choice. Some under prescription was noted in certain surgical scenarios. There was a lack of knowledge of the incidence of adverse reactions and very poor medical history record taking. Approximately one third of respondents felt antibacterial resistance is a problem in Fiji and 40% reported experiencing some form of antibiotic resistance in clinical practice. Overall there was a moderate level of correct knowledge for antibiotic prescribing of dentists in Fiji. An improved section on oral and dental infections including guidelines for children should be included in the Fiji Antibiotic Guidelines which could be distributed to all dentists.

  4. Prophylactic knee bracing alters lower-limb muscle forces during a double-leg drop landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Katie A; Fernandez, Justin W; Begg, Rezaul K; Galea, Mary P; Lee, Peter V S

    2016-10-03

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury can be a painful, debilitating and costly consequence of participating in sporting activities. Prophylactic knee bracing aims to reduce the number and severity of ACL injury, which commonly occurs during landing maneuvers and is more prevalent in female athletes, but a consensus on the effectiveness of prophylactic knee braces has not been established. The lower-limb muscles are believed to play an important role in stabilizing the knee joint. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in lower-limb muscle function with prophylactic knee bracing in male and female athletes during landing. Fifteen recreational athletes performed double-leg drop landing tasks from 0.30m and 0.60m with and without a prophylactic knee brace. Motion analysis data were used to create subject-specific musculoskeletal models in OpenSim. Static optimization was performed to calculate the lower-limb muscle forces. A linear mixed model determined that the hamstrings and vasti muscles produced significantly greater flexion and extension torques, respectively, and greater peak muscle forces with bracing. No differences in the timings of peak muscle forces were observed. These findings suggest that prophylactic knee bracing may help to provide stability to the knee joint by increasing the active stiffness of the hamstrings and vasti muscles later in the landing phase rather than by altering the timing of muscle forces. Further studies are necessary to quantify whether prophylactic knee bracing can reduce the load placed on the ACL during intense dynamic movements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prophylactic ankle taping: elastic versus inelastic taping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abián-Vicén, Javier; Alegre, Luis M; Fernández-Rodríguez, Jose M; Aguado, Xavier

    2009-03-01

    The ankle is frequently injured in sporting activities, and therefore it is frequently protected with prophylactic ankle taping. This study aimed first, to compare the mechanical fatigue of two types of prophylactic ankle taping after 30 minutes of intense exercise, one made with elastic tape (ET) and the other with inelastic tape (IT), and second, to investigate the subjects' perception on the tape restriction and comfort. Twenty-seven active women (mean age, 20.6 +/- 4.1 years), without previous ankle injuries volunteered for the study. The participants were tested on three different conditions: with elastic ankle taping, with inelastic taping, and without taping, before and after 30 minutes of intense exercise. The ankle passive ranges of movement (ROMs) were measured before and after exercise, and a subjective scale on taping comfort and restriction was completed by the subjects. Both types of ankle taping showed less ROM restriction after 30 minutes of exercise in inversion (IT = 27% and ET = 21%), and plantarflexion (IT = 8% and ET = 6%). The IT showed more loss of restriction than the ET, with significant differences in inversion (p taping because it produces the same restriction in the ROM as the IT with less taping fatigue, and is perceived as more comfortable and less restrictive by the users.

  6. Compliance of Austrian tourists with prophylactic measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollaritsch, H; Wiedermann, G

    1992-03-01

    Physicians dealing with prophylactic measures for tourists going to developing countries will often not be able to foresee the outcome of their recommendations. Therefore an open study with 2,627 Austrian tourists on their flight home from a tropical destination was carried out to evaluate the behaviour of typical short-term travellers with respect to different kinds of precautionary measures. 94.1% of all tourists informed themselves before travelling abroad, but a high proportion of travellers tends to contact only their travel agency or their personal friends, this leading to inadequate information. Regarding the individual performance of precautionary measures the results indicate a few principal conclusions: Among the recommended inoculations the vaccinations against typhoid fever, poliomyelitis and tetanus are widely underestimated, the latter two in particular for adults, while compliance with the passive immunization against Hepatitis A is generally good (more than 80% of all travellers receive Hepatitis A immunoglobulins prophylactically). The most crucial point seems to be the chemoprophylaxis against malaria in as much as a) there seems to be a considerable lack of information about malaria endemic areas among physicians, b) tourists tend to use the most simple applicable drug unaware of epidemiological considerations and c) the regular intake of chemoprophylaxis declines significantly with the complexity of the intake procedure. In addition, tourists are in general well informed about nutritional risks, but only half of them will receive adequate information on the risk of sexually transmitted diseases and a basic medical travel kit.

  7. [Influence of personal attitude of the manager on antibiotic use in pig production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, J; Kaufmann, G; Hirsiger, P; Kümmerlen, D; Arnold, C; Spring, P; Sidler, X

    2015-12-01

    The attitude as well as the expertise of a person affect the behavior and actions in daily life. To investigate the influence of attitude and knowledge of pig producers on the use of antibiotics in farms, 220 Swiss pig producers were questioned on health awareness, attitude towards sustainable production, risk behavior, intrinsic motivation and knowledge about antibiotics and resistance development. In addition, the strategy of antibiotic use (therapeutic or prophylactic) and the business practice (single or group therapy) for the amount of antibiotics on one hand and for the risk of antibiotic resistance development on the other hand, were determined in a personal interview. Farmers using antibiotics only therapeutically had a better business practice. A direct link between the personal attitude and the antibiotic use or a higher risk of development of antibiotic resistance was not found in this investigation.

  8. [Prospective randomized study regarding the effect of the preoperative antibiotic and chlorhexidine rinse on wound healing after mandibular third molar surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaposvári, István; Körmöczi, Kinga; László, Zsuzsa Beáta; Oberna, Ferenc; Horváth, Ferenc; Joób-Fancsaly, Árpád

    2017-01-01

    The study compares the antibiotic prophylaxis combined with postoperative antibiotic therapy to preoperative chlorhexidine rinse combined with postoperative antibiotic therapy in preventing complications after surgical removal of a mandibular third molar. 71 healthy patients in four groups were enrolled in the study: I. prophylactic dose of 2000 mg of amoxicillin clavulanate, continued with amoxicillin clavulanate postoperatively; II. prophylactic dose of 600 mg of clindamycin, continued with clindamycin postoperatively; III. prophylactic chlorhexidin rinsing, continued randomized amoxicillin clavulanate or clindamycin postoperatively; IV. control, with clindamycin postoperatively. The pain was smaller in the prophylaxis groups. Alveolitis occurred only in the control group: 2 patients. Wound opening occurred in 22,2 % in group IV., 14,2 % in group II, 10 % in group I., 5 % in group III. We consider completing the indicated postoperative antibiotic prescription with antibiotic or antiseptic prophylaxis. Chlorhexidin prophylaxis could have the same positive effect. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(1), 13-19.

  9. Nucleoside antibiotics: biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2015-02-01

    The alarming rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens has coincided with a decline in the supply of new antibiotics. It is therefore of great importance to find and create new antibiotics. Nucleoside antibiotics are a large family of natural products with diverse biological functions. Their biosynthesis is a complex process through multistep enzymatic reactions and is subject to hierarchical regulation. Genetic and biochemical studies of the biosynthetic machinery have provided the basis for pathway engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis to create new or hybrid nucleoside antibiotics. Dissection of regulatory mechanisms is leading to strategies to increase the titer of bioactive nucleoside antibiotics. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Antibiotics during childhood and inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Four epidemiological studies, including two large cohort studies in children aged 17 years or under, have studied the link between antibiotic therapy and inflammatory bowel disease. The risk of inflammatory bowel disease appeared to be twice as high in children exposed to an antibiotic as in unexposed children. The risk appeared higher following exposure during the first year of life, with beta-lactam antibiotics, and with repeated antibiotic courses. One postulated mechanism is through destruction of the anaerobic intestinal flora by antibiotics. In practice, these data provide yet another reason to avoid unnecessarily exposing children to antibiotics.

  11. A survey of antibiotic use in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, J B; Chong, S; Le, N D

    2000-11-01

    Antibiotics are important in the management and prophylaxis of infection in patients at risk of experiencing microbial disease. As a result of the increase in antimicrobial resistance, the authors conducted a survey to assess current antibiotic use in dental practice. The authors mailed a two-page, pretested survey to all licensed dental practitioners in British Columbia, Canada. A total of 2,542 surveys were mailed; 19.9 percent were returned by fax or mail. The authors examined an association between factors analyzed using a chi 2 test. Respondents were demographically consistent with all registered dentists in British Columbia. They reported writing an average of 4.45 prescriptions per week. Antibiotics prescribed after treatment primarily were penicillin and its derivatives. Recommended adult doses of penicillin were prescribed by 59.2 percent of respondents; recommended daily doses of amoxicillin were prescribed by 72.2 percent of respondents. The average prescription duration was 6.92 days. Respondents prescribed prophylactic antibiotics an average of 1.15 times per week for prophylaxis of bacterial endocarditis; 17.5 percent reported postoperative dosing for prophylaxis, ranging from a one- to seven-day prescription with an average of 6.91 postoperative doses. Preoperative antibiotics were prescribed for patients with a history of rheumatic fever or any heart murmur or prosthetic hip. Antibiotics were prescribed more frequently for surgical procedures and patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome than for other circumstances. More than 80 percent of respondents reported that they followed current American Heart Association prophylaxis guidelines. The authors, however, noted discrepancies in prophylactic use of antibiotics for bacterial endocarditis and for patients with large joint prostheses, as well as in prescribing antibiotics in the presence of clinical infection. In therapeutic use, approximately 85 percent of respondents followed appropriate

  12. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian

    of antimicrobial resistance: (1) adaptive mutations and (2) horizontal acquisition of resistance genes from antibiotic gene reservoirs. By studying the geno- and phenotypic changes of E. coli in response to single and drug-pair exposures, I uncover the evolutionary trajectories leading to adaptive resistance. I......Bacteria can avoid extinction during antimicrobial exposure by becoming resistant. They achieve this either via adaptive mutations or horizontally acquired resistance genes. If resistance emerges in clinical relevant species, it can lead to treatment failure and ultimately result in increasing...... morbidity and mortality as well as an increase in the cost of treatment. Understanding how bacteria respond to antibiotic exposure gives the foundations for a rational approach to counteract antimicrobial resistance. In the work presented in this thesis, I explore the two fundamental sources...

  13. Systemic antibiotics in periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitz-Mayfield, L J A

    2009-09-01

    Periodontitis is a biofilm infection with a mixed microbial aetiology. Periodontitis is generally treated by non-surgical mechanical debridement and regular periodontal maintenance care. Periodontal surgery may be indicated for some patients to improve access to the root surface for mechanical debridement. A range of systemic antibiotics for treatment of periodontitis has been documented, with some studies showing superior clinical outcomes following adjunctive antibiotics while others do not. This has resulted in controversy as to the role of systemic antibiotics in the treatment of periodontal diseases. Recent systematic reviews have provided an evidence-based assessment of the possible benefits of adjunctive antibiotics in periodontal therapy. This review aims to provide an update on clinical issues of when and how to prescribe systemic antibiotics in periodontal therapy.

  14. Delayed antibiotic prescriptions for respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurling, Geoffrey Kp; Del Mar, Chris B; Dooley, Liz; Foxlee, Ruth; Farley, Rebecca

    2017-09-07

    Concerns exist regarding antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections (RTIs) owing to adverse reactions, cost, and antibacterial resistance. One proposed strategy to reduce antibiotic prescribing is to provide prescriptions, but to advise delay in antibiotic use with the expectation that symptoms will resolve first. This is an update of a Cochrane Review originally published in 2007, and updated in 2010 and 2013. To evaluate the effects on clinical outcomes, antibiotic use, antibiotic resistance, and patient satisfaction of advising a delayed prescription of antibiotics in respiratory tract infections. For this 2017 update we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2017), which includes the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infection Group's Specialised Register; Ovid MEDLINE (2013 to 25 May 2017); Ovid Embase (2013 to 2017 Week 21); EBSCO CINAHL Plus (1984 to 25 May 2017); Web of Science (2013 to 25 May 2017); WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (1 September 2017); and ClinicalTrials.gov (1 September 2017). Randomised controlled trials involving participants of all ages defined as having an RTI, where delayed antibiotics were compared to immediate antibiotics or no antibiotics. We defined a delayed antibiotic as advice to delay the filling of an antibiotic prescription by at least 48 hours. We considered all RTIs regardless of whether antibiotics were recommended or not. We used standard Cochrane methodological procedures. Three review authors independently extracted and collated data. We assessed the risk of bias of all included trials. We contacted trial authors to obtain missing information. For this 2017 update we added one new trial involving 405 participants with uncomplicated acute respiratory infection. Overall, this review included 11 studies with a total of 3555 participants. These 11 studies involved acute respiratory infections including acute otitis media (three studies

  15. Prophylactic antidepressant treatment following acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ole G; Madsen, Michael T; Simonsen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is significantly increased in patients following acute coronary syndrome resulting in twofold increased mortality compared with patients without depression. The depression diagnosis is often missed leading to considerable undertreatment. This systematic review assesses...... the current evidence of primary prophylactic treatment of depression in patients after acute coronary syndrome. The study protocol was prospectively registered at PROSPERO (registration number CRD42015025587). A systematic review were conducted and reported according to Preferred Reporting Items...... with an antidepressant intervention of any kind. A validated assessment tool should measure depression and depressive symptoms. Languages were limited to articles written in English. Six articles were included. Four studies utilized different components of case and disease management, health coaching, or relaxational...

  16. Antibiotic adjuvants - A strategy to unlock bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Bello, Concepción

    2017-09-15

    Resistance to available antibiotics in pathogenic bacteria is currently a global challenge since the number of strains that are resistant to multiple types of antibiotics has increased dramatically each year and has spread worldwide. To unlock this problem, the use of an 'antibiotic adjuvant' in combination with an antibiotic is now being exploited. This approach enables us to prolong the lifespan of these life-saving drugs. This digests review provides an overview of the main types of antibiotic adjuvants, the basis of their operation and the remaining issues to be tackled in this field. Particular emphasis is placed on those compounds that are already in clinical development, namely β-lactamase inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Single dose Intraoperative Antibiotics versus Postoperative Antibiotics for Patient Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Symptomatic Cholelithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagun Bahadur Thapa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical site infection is a common complication shown in literature following cholecystectomies. Smaller incision and use of trocars in laparoscopic cholecystectomy lessen the contamination resulting in less chances of surgical site infection. However, in fear of postoperative infection, many opt for the prolonged postoperative use of antibiotic and there is growing consensus against it. Antibiotics not only increases the cost and hospital stay duration but it aids in emergence of multidrug resistance. Because of the controversies, we conducted this clinical trial to see whether a single prophylactic dose of antibiotic at the time of induction of anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy was equally effective in controlling post-operative infection as multi-dose antibiotics during and post-operative period. Methods: The study was conducted at the department of general surgery, Lumbini Medical College Teaching Hospital, from November  2015 to October 2016. All cases with symptomatic cholelithiasis subjected for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were enrolled. Patients were randomized into two groups; Group SD received single dose of an intravenous dose of amikacin 500 mg, at induction of anesthesia and Group MD received multiple intravenous dose of amikacin, during and postoperatively for two days. Complications, hospital stay, and treatment cost in two groups were compared and analyzed. Results: There were a total of 240 patients in the study, 118 in Group SD and 122 in Group MD. Post-operative infection rate was 4.2% (n= 5, N=118 in Group SD and 3.3% (n=4, N=122 in Group MD; the difference was not significant (p=0.75. Hospital stay was prolonged and cost was higher significantly in Group MD. Conclusion: Single dose of prophylactic antibiotic, administered at induction of anesthesia, is equally effective as multiple doses of post surgical antibiotics to prevent post-operative infection in patients undergoing elective laparoscopic

  18. Dissemination of health information through social networks: twitter and antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanfeld, Daniel; Scanfeld, Vanessa; Larson, Elaine L

    2010-04-01

    This study reviewed Twitter status updates mentioning "antibiotic(s)" to determine overarching categories and explore evidence of misunderstanding or misuse of antibiotics. One thousand Twitter status updates mentioning antibiotic(s) were randomly selected for content analysis and categorization. To explore cases of potential misunderstanding or misuse, these status updates were mined for co-occurrence of the following terms: "cold + antibiotic(s)," "extra + antibiotic(s)," "flu + antibiotic(s)," "leftover + antibiotic(s)," and "share + antibiotic(s)" and reviewed to confirm evidence of misuse or misunderstanding. Of the 1000 status updates, 971 were categorized into 11 groups: general use (n = 289), advice/information (n = 157), side effects/negative reactions (n = 113), diagnosis (n = 102), resistance (n = 92), misunderstanding and/or misuse (n = 55), positive reactions (n = 48), animals (n = 46), other (n = 42), wanting/needing (n = 19), and cost (n = 8). Cases of misunderstanding or abuse were identified for the following combinations: "flu + antibiotic(s)" (n = 345), "cold + antibiotic(s)" (n = 302), "leftover + antibiotic(s)" (n = 23), "share + antibiotic(s)" (n = 10), and "extra + antibiotic(s)" (n = 7). Social media sites offer means of health information sharing. Further study is warranted to explore how such networks may provide a venue to identify misuse or misunderstanding of antibiotics, promote positive behavior change, disseminate valid information, and explore how such tools can be used to gather real-time health data. 2010 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of the antibiotic prophylaxis prescribed by Spanish Oral Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho-Puchades, Manuel; Herráez-Vilas, José-María; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduardo; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2009-10-01

    To identify prophylactic antibiotic prescription practices among Spanish dentists with preferential dedication to Oral Surgery in different types of tooth extraction surgeries. Members of the Spanish Oral Surgery Society were surveyed on antibiotic prophylaxis use in 4 different tooth extraction modalities scaled according to their surgical invasiveness. Sixty-nine of the 105 distributed questionnaires were returned completed. Thirteen percent of the surveyed surgeons would prescribe antibiotics to prevent postoperative wound infection when confronted with conventional tooth extraction lasting less than 5 minutes. In the case of surgery lasting more than 5 minutes, the percentage of participants that would prescribe antibiotics increased to 39%. When a mucoperiosteal flap was elevated or an ostectomy was performed, 87% and 100%, respectively, would prescribe antibiotic prophylaxis. Amoxicillin and its combination with clavulanic acid were the most commonly prescribed antibiotics. All participants would prescribe the antibiotic orally, starting after surgery and with a duration that ranged from 2-8 days. The results obtained suggest that antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing local odontogenic infection is not being correctly implemented in Spain. This can generate new bacterial resistances, facilitate adverse drug reactions and favor opportunistic infections. Better designed studies are needed in order to clarify the role of antibiotics in the prevention of postsurgical wound infection.

  20. Current practice of antibiotic prophylaxis during elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macano, Caw; Griffiths, E A; Vohra, R S

    2017-03-01

    INTRODUCTION Current guidelines do not recommend antibiotic prophylaxis in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Despite this, there is wide variation in antibiotic prophylaxis during cholecystectomy in population-based studies. The aim of this survey was to establish the current rationale for antibiotic prophylaxis in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. METHODS A short questionnaire was designed and disseminated across collaborators for a population-based study investigating outcomes following cholecystectomy and via the Association of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeons, Researchgate and Surginet membership. RESULTS Responses were received from 234 people; 50.9% had no written policy for the use of prophylactic antibiotics in elective cholecystectomy; 5.6% never used antibiotics, while 30.8% always did and 63.7% selectively used antibiotics. Contamination with bile, stones and pus were scenarios in which antibiotics were most commonly used in selective practices to reduce infective complications. Interestingly, 87% of respondents would be happy to participate in a trial investigating the effectiveness of antibiotics in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy where contamination has occurred. CONCLUSIONS The disparity between current practice and guidelines appears to arise because of a lack of evidence to show that antibiotics reduce surgical site infection following elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy where contamination has occurred. This question needs to addressed before practice will change.

  1. Beyond Antibiotics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LE Nicolle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The AMMI Canada meeting in March 2006 hosted a symposium exploring the potential alternatives to antibiotics for the prevention and treatment of infection. Four papers summarizing talks from that session are published in this issue of the Journal (1-4. These reviews address the scientific underpinnings for a number of proposed concepts, and summarize the current status of clinical use. The approaches - probiotics, bacteriophage therapy, and manipulation of innate immunity - are all intriguing but are still removed from immediate practical applications.

  2. Probiotic approach to prevent antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwehand, Arthur C; Forssten, Sofia; Hibberd, Ashley A; Lyra, Anna; Stahl, Buffy

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, mainly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although also strain of other species are commercialized, that have a beneficial effect on the host. From the perspective of antibiotic use, probiotics have been observed to reduce the risk of certain infectious disease such as certain types of diarrhea and respiratory tract infection. This may be accompanied with a reduced need of antibiotics for secondary infections. Antibiotics tend to be effective against most common diseases, but increasingly resistance is being observed among pathogens. Probiotics are specifically selected to not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and not carry transferable antibiotic resistance. Concomitant use of probiotics with antibiotics has been observed to reduce the incidence, duration and/or severity of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. This contributes to better adherence to the antibiotic prescription and thereby reduces the evolution of resistance. To what extent probiotics directly reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance is still much under investigation; but maintaining a balanced microbiota during antibiotic use may certainly provide opportunities for reducing the spread of resistances. Key messages Probiotics may reduce the risk for certain infectious diseases and thereby reduce the need for antibiotics. Probiotics may reduce the risk for antibiotic-associated diarrhea Probiotics do not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and may even reduce it.

  3. Antibiotics, pediatric dysbiosis, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangay, Pajau; Ward, Tonya; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Knights, Dan

    2015-05-13

    Antibiotics are by far the most common medications prescribed for children. Recent epidemiological data suggests an association between early antibiotic use and disease phenotypes in adulthood. Antibiotic use during infancy induces imbalances in gut microbiota, called dysbiosis. The gut microbiome's responses to antibiotics and its potential link to disease development are especially complex to study in the changing infant gut. Here, we synthesize current knowledge linking antibiotics, dysbiosis, and disease and propose a framework for studying antibiotic-related dysbiosis in children. We recommend future studies into the microbiome-mediated effects of antibiotics focused on four types of dysbiosis: loss of keystone taxa, loss of diversity, shifts in metabolic capacity, and blooms of pathogens. Establishment of a large and diverse baseline cohort to define healthy infant microbiome development is essential to advancing diagnosis, interpretation, and eventual treatment of pediatric dysbiosis. This approach will also help provide evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic usage in infancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Collective antibiotic tolerance: mechanisms, dynamics and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Hannah R; Srimani, Jaydeep K; Lee, Anna J; Lopatkin, Allison J; You, Lingchong

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria have developed resistance against every antibiotic at a rate that is alarming considering the timescale at which new antibiotics are developed. Thus, there is a critical need to use antibiotics more effectively, extend the shelf life of existing antibiotics and minimize their side effects. This requires understanding the mechanisms underlying bacterial drug responses. Past studies have focused on survival in the presence of antibiotics by individual cells, as genetic mutants or persisters. Also important, however, is the fact that a population of bacterial cells can collectively survive antibiotic treatments lethal to individual cells. This tolerance can arise by diverse mechanisms, including resistance-conferring enzyme production, titration-mediated bistable growth inhibition, swarming and interpopulation interactions. These strategies can enable rapid population recovery after antibiotic treatment and provide a time window during which otherwise susceptible bacteria can acquire inheritable genetic resistance. Here, we emphasize the potential for targeting collective antibiotic tolerance behaviors as an antibacterial treatment strategy.

  5. COMPARISON OF SUBLINGUAL THERAPEUTIC VACCINE WITH ANTIBIOTICS FOR THE PROPHYLAXIS OF RECURRENT URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    María Fernanda Lorenzo-Gómez; María Fernanda Lorenzo-Gómez; María Fernanda Lorenzo-Gómez; Bárbara ePadilla-Fernández; María Begoña García-Cenador; Álvaro Julio Virseda Rodríguez; Álvaro Julio Virseda Rodríguez; Isidoro eMartín-García; Alfonso eSánchez-Escudero; Manuel José Vicente-Arroyo; José Antonio Mirón-Canelo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical impact of the prophylactic treatment with sublingual immunostimulation in the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTIs) compared with the use of antibiotics.Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study evaluating the clinical records of 669 women with rUTIs; 339 had a 6-month prophylaxis with antibiotics and 360 had a 3-month prophylaxis with a sublingual bacterial preparation (MV 140-Uromune®). The time after the prophylaxis-period until...

  6. Comparison of sublingual therapeutic vaccine with antibiotics for the prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzo-G?mez, Mar?a F.; Padilla-Fern?ndez, B?rbara; Garc?a-Cenador, Mar?a B.; Virseda-Rodr?guez, ?lvaro J.; Mart?n-Garc?a, Isidoro; S?nchez-Escudero, Alfonso; Vicente-Arroyo, Manuel J.; Mir?n-Canelo, Jos? A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical impact of a prophylactic treatment with sublingual immunostimulation in the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTIs) with the use of antibiotics. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study evaluating the medical records of 669 women with rUTIs; 339 had a 6-month prophylaxis with antibiotics and 360 a 3-month prophylaxis with a sublingual bacterial preparation (MV 140-Uromune®). The time frame after the prophylaxis-period until the ap...

  7. Perceived influence of psychological consultation on psychological well-being, body image, and intimacy following bilateral prophylactic mastectomy: A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassey, Rachael; Hardcastle, Sarah J; O'Connor, Moira; Ives, Angela; Saunders, Christobel

    2018-02-01

    This study explored whether psychological consultation offered to women prior to bilateral prophylactic mastectomy (BPM) appeared to provide psychosocial benefit to younger women (35 years) considering BPM. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of resistance among the most important bacterial pathogens is recognized as a major public health threat affecting humans worldwide. Multidrug-resistant organisms have emerged not only in the hospital environment but are now often identified in community settings, suggesting that reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present outside the hospital. The bacterial response to the antibiotic “attack” is the prime example of bacterial adaptation and the pinnacle of evolution. “Survival of the fittest” is a consequence of an immense genetic plasticity of bacterial pathogens that trigger specific responses that result in mutational adaptations, acquisition of genetic material or alteration of gene expression producing resistance to virtually all antibiotics currently available in clinical practice. Therefore, understanding the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance is of paramount importance to design strategies to curtail the emergence and spread of resistance and devise innovative therapeutic approaches against multidrug-resistant organisms. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the major mechanisms of antibiotic resistance encountered in clinical practice providing specific examples in relevant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27227291

  9. Prophylactic effects of two selective dry cow strategies accounting for interdependence of quarter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, E A; Johnston, W T; Hillerton, J E

    2003-12-01

    Infusion of a long-acting antibiotic preparation at drying off in dairy cows as a prophylactic therapy is usually recommended for all quarters where it is in use. Studying the effectiveness of such treatment using quarter as the unit of analysis assumes that each quarter within a cow has a risk of being infected independent of the other quarters of the cow. Failure to account for interdependence of quarters within a cow may lead to inaccurate variance estimates and errors in assessing treatment effects. Data from two trials assessing different dry-cow strategies were examined for interdependence of infection between quarters. Logistic regression with a variance inflation factor or a multilevel analysis was used to assess the effect of antibiotic and internal teat-sealant dry cow strategies. Parity and infection status at drying off were covariates in the analysis. Interdependence of the risk of quarter infections within control-group cows was demonstrated in both dry-cow antibiotic and teat-seal trials. However, cows that received either of these treatments did not demonstrate interdependence. Treated quarters in both trials were 3.0 times less likely to acquire a new infection at calving compared with the untreated controls. Quarters in cows of parity 3 or greater were also at an increased risk in the antibiotic treatment trial. In both trials, quarters with either Corynebacterium spp. or coagulase-negative staphylococci infections at drying off had an increased risk of a new intramammary infection at calving. This study has demonstrated the beneficial and comparable effects of antibiotic and teat seal dry cow strategies; both decreased the risk of intramammary infection at calving. The application of dry-cow strategies at the cow level and not the quarter level is also supported.

  10. Adjuvant Docetaxel and Cyclophosphamide (DC with prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF on days 8 &12 in breast cancer patients: a retrospective analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Yerushalmi

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Four cycles of docetaxel/cyclophosphamide (DC resulted in superior survival than doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide in the treatment of early breast cancer. The original study reported a 5% incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN recommending prophylactic antibiotics with no granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF support. The worldwide adoption of this protocol yielded several reports on substantially higher rates of FN events. We explored the use of growth factor (GF support on days 8 and 12 of the cycle with the original DC protocol. METHODS: Our study included all consecutive patients with stages I-II breast cancer who were treated with the DC protocol at the Institute of Oncology, Davidoff Center (Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel from April, 2007 to March, 2012. Patient, tumor characteristics, and toxicity were reported. RESULTS: In total, 123 patients received the DC regimen. Median age was 60 years, (range, 25-81 years. Thirty-three patients (26.8% were aged 65 years and older. Most of the women (87% adhered to the planned G-CSF protocol (days 8 &12. 96% of the patients completed the 4 planned cycles of chemotherapy. Six patients (5% had dose reductions, 6 (5% had treatment delays due to non-medical reasons. Thirteen patients (10.6% experienced at least one event of FN (3 patients had 2 events, all requiring hospitalization. Eight patients (6.5% required additional support with G-CSF after the first chemotherapy cycle, 7 because of FN and one due to neutropenia and diarrhea. IN CONCLUSION: Primary prophylactic G-CSF support on days 8 and 12 of the cycle provides a tolerable option to deliver the DC protocol. Our results are in line with other retrospective protocols using longer schedules of GF support.

  11. A dose-response study with the feed enzyme beta-mannanase in broilers provided with corn-soybean meal based diets in the absence of antibiotic growth promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M E; Geronian, K; Knox, A; McNab, J; McCartney, E

    2004-12-01

    An experiment was designed to assess the effects of graded levels of beta-mannanase on performance and body weight uniformity of male broilers provided with diets based on corn and soybean meal and devoid of antibiotic growth promoters or coccidiostats. Four dietary treatments contained 0, 50, 80, and 110 MU of Hemicell/ ton (where 1 MU = 10(6) enzyme activity units, 100 MU/ton is manufacturer's recommendation). Each treatment contained 15 pens with 40 birds/pen. Individual bird weights were determined on d 0, 21, and 42. From 21 to 42 d of age, feed intake for the 80 MU/ton treatment was significantly greater than the 50 MU/ton treatment. beta-Mannanase inclusion at 80 or 110 MU/ton induced improvements (P < 0.05) in weight gain (3.9 to 4.8%) and feed efficiency (3.5 to 3.8%) over the control, whereas inclusion of 50 MU/ton resulted in no significant benefit. There were no significant differences between 80 or 110 MU/ton. The experiment demonstrated that dietary inclusion of beta-mannanase at approximately 50 MU/ton is not sufficient for maximum response. Inclusion at 80 MU/ ton improved broiler gains and feed conversion and increasing to 110 MU/ton resulted in no significant additional response.

  12. Probiotics: delineation of prophylactic and therapeutic benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Indu Pal; Kuhad, Anurag; Garg, Amita; Chopra, Kanwaljit

    2009-04-01

    Probiotics produce a beneficial impact on the host by improving the endogenous flora. It has been advocated that nonpathogenic bacteria like Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium may undergo antagonistic interactions with other bacterial strains and can be used to control pathogenic bacteria. Novel modes of therapeutic and prophylactic interventions are based on their consumption either alone or in combination with prebiotics. Usefulness of probiotics has been implicated in allergies, cancer, AIDS, and respiratory and urinary tract infections. In this review we have listed various findings suggesting their benefits in alleviating symptoms associated with aging, fatigue, and autism. Newer claims indicating their role in reducing the risks of osteoporosis, obesity, and possibly type 2 diabetes are also discussed. Considering the wide array of such activities, the present review comprehensively elaborates upon the proposed benefits of probiotics. The concept of synbiotics, a combination of probiotics and prebiotics beneficially affecting the survival and implantation of such live organisms, is also discussed. Available probiotic strains, their commercial preparations, and newer approaches to improve the efficacy and overcome limitations of the therapy are also discussed in relation to the future of probiotic therapy. Considering that the purported claims about disease risk reduction are tentative, the review also encompasses various aspects regarding the safety of probiotics and their possible future role in disease prevention.

  13. Resistance to Antibiotics Mediated by Target Alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Brian G.

    1994-04-01

    The development of resistance to antibiotics by reductions in the affinities of their enzymatic targets occurs most rapidly for antibiotics that inactivate a single target and that are not analogs of substrate. In these cases of resistance (for example, resistance to rifampicin), numerous single amino acid substitutions may provide large decreases in the affinity of the target for the antibiotic, leading to clinically significant levels of resistance. Resistance due to target alterations should occur much more slowly for those antibiotics (penicillin, for example) that inactivate multiple targets irreversibly by acting as close analogs of substrate. Resistance to penicillin because of target changes has emerged, by unexpected mechanisms, only in a limited number of species. However, inactivating enzymes commonly provide resistance to antibiotics that, like penicillin, are derived from natural products, although such enzymes have not been found for synthetic antibiotics. Thus, the ideal antibiotic would be produced by rational design, rather than by the modification of a natural product.

  14. New business models for antibiotic innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Anthony D; Shah, Tejen A

    2014-05-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistance and the dearth of novel antibiotics have become a growing concern among policy-makers. A combination of financial, scientific, and regulatory challenges poses barriers to antibiotic innovation. However, each of these three challenges provides an opportunity to develop pathways for new business models to bring novel antibiotics to market. Pull-incentives that pay for the outputs of research and development (R&D) and push-incentives that pay for the inputs of R&D can be used to increase innovation for antibiotics. Financial incentives might be structured to promote delinkage of a company's return on investment from revenues of antibiotics. This delinkage strategy might not only increase innovation, but also reinforce rational use of antibiotics. Regulatory approval, however, should not and need not compromise safety and efficacy standards to bring antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action to market. Instead regulatory agencies could encourage development of companion diagnostics, test antibiotic combinations in parallel, and pool and make transparent clinical trial data to lower R&D costs. A tax on non-human use of antibiotics might also create a disincentive for non-therapeutic use of these drugs. Finally, the new business model for antibiotic innovation should apply the 3Rs strategy for encouraging collaborative approaches to R&D in innovating novel antibiotics: sharing resources, risks, and rewards.

  15. Elective Bowel Surgery with or without Prophylactic Nasogastric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nasogastric tube (NT) decompression after routine gastrointestinal procedures has long been considered the standard of care as a prophylactic measure to prevent nausea, vomiting, and abdominal distension, to decrease postoperative ileus and wound complications. Routinely, postoperative nasogastric decompression ...

  16. Combating Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that could be performed to evaluate how an antibacterial drug works for the treatment of different types of infections. Updated: ... More Information Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance Antimicrobial ...

  17. Antibiotic Resistance in Children with Bloody Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamedi Abdolkarim

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Shigellosis is an important public health problem, especially in developing countries. Antibiotic treatment of bacterial dysentery, aimed at resolving diarrhea or reducing its duration is especially indicated whenever malnutrition is present. First-line drugs include ampicillin and trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole(TMP-SMX; however multidrug-resistance has occurred and careful antibiotic selection must be considered in prescribing .When epidemiologic data indicate a rise in resistancy, fluoroquinolones may be used in adults and oral third-generation cephalosporins and nalidixic acid in children. All children (n=2400 with acute diarrhea who were admitted to the Pediatric department of Dr.sheykh Hospital Mashhad, Iran from March 2004 to March 2005 were selected and their stool culture were obtained, then positive cultures (312 cases,13% were evaluated by antibiogram. This study showed that in heavily populated areas of IRAN like Mashhad, 97% shigella strain isolated from children with bloody diarrhea were sensitive to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and cefixime and rarely susceptible to ampicillin and cotrimoxazole. There is increasing resistance of Shigella to most of the antibiotics in use, and for this reason, careful selection of antibiotics must use considered in each area. Development and use of new drugs are expensive and have severe limitations in the third world. Simple prophylactic alternatives are therefore, required, such as awareness of hygienic child care practices and early promotion of breast feeding. For treatment of shigellosis in infants Ceftriaxon, and in children Nalidixic Acid is recommended.

  18. Effect of antibiotics administered via the respiratory tract in the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Póvoa, Frederico Castro Costa; Cardinal-Fernandez, Pablo; Maia, Israel Silva; Reboredo, Maycon Moura; Pinheiro, Bruno Valle

    2018-02-01

    We evaluated the effect of antibiotics administered via the respiratory tract to prevent the ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients. We searched relevant articles for trials that evaluated the impact of prophylactic antibiotics administered through the respiratory tract on the occurrence of VAP. The end-point was the occurrence of VAP in MV patients. We included 6 comparative trials involving 1158 patients (632 received prophylactic antibiotic). Our meta-analysis revealed that prophylactic antibiotics administered through the respiratory tract reduced the occurrence of VAP when compared to placebo or no treatment (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.34-0.84). This effect was seen when the antibiotics were given by nebulization (OR 0.46; 95% CI 0.22-0.97), but not when they were administered by intratracheal instillation (OR 0.57; 95% CI 0.28-1.15). We did not find a significant difference between the compared groups in the intensive care unit (ICU) mortality (OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.64-1.25). Antibiotic prophylaxis did not impact occurrence of VAP due to multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogens (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.17-2.62). Prophylactic antibiotics administered through the respiratory tract by nebulization reduce the occurrence of VAP, without a significant effect on either the ICU mortality or occurrence of VAP due to MDR pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Are we eliminating cures with antibiotic abuse? A study among dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goud, S R; Nagesh, L; Fernandes, S

    2012-01-01

    The theme of "World Health Day 2011" is "combat drug resistance- No action today, No cure tomorrow" which is very pertinent. The present study emphatically demonstrates the current issues related to the overwhelming concerns regarding indiscriminate use of antibiotics, leading to a bleak tomorrow where cures may be few. To know the prescription pattern of antibiotics for various dental procedures by dental practitioners. A pretested questionnaire was used which contained two sections pertaining to prescription of antibiotics for healthy and medically compromised patients during various dental procedures, with therapeutic and prophylactic considerations. Questionnaire response rate of 66.6% was observed. Amoxicillin emerged as the most preferred antibiotic for dental procedures both as a therapeutic and a prophylactic drug. 50% of the endodontists and 40% of the general dentists opted to prescribe antibiotics during root canal therapy where ideally operative intervention would have sufficed. Overuse of antibiotics for routine scaling and extraction was observed. The dental profession as a whole needs to acquire a deeper understanding of the global effects of superfluous antibiotic prescription. Antibiotics when judiciously used are precise life-saving drugs.

  20. Alternatives to antibiotics for the control of bacterial disease in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defoirdt, Tom; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter

    2011-06-01

    The wide and frequent use of antibiotics in aquaculture has resulted in the development and spread of antibiotic resistance. Because of the health risks associated with the use of antibiotics in animal production, there is a growing awareness that antibiotics should be used with more care. This is reflected in the recent implementation of more strict regulations on the prophylactic use of antibiotics and the presence of antibiotic residues in aquaculture products. For a sustainable further development of the aquaculture industry, novel strategies to control bacterial infections are needed. This review evaluates several alternative biocontrol measures that have emerged recently. Most of these methods are still in research phase; few have been tested in real aquaculture settings. It is important to further develop different strategies that could be combined or used in rotation in order to maximise the chance of successfully protecting the animals and to prevent resistance development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Living With Prophylactic ICD Therapy and the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grew, Julie Christina

    2017-01-01

    Prophylactic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy treats potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmias in patients who have not previously experienced such but are at considerable risk due to underlying heart disease. Most patients are unaware of their risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD......) until the ICD is introduced to them. Thus, the problem of risk of death and the solution of ICD therapy are presented simultaneously. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in Danish hospitals, this article illustrates how clinicians narrate prophylactic ICD therapy as a benign therapy preventing risk of death...... and providing the good life. However, risk of SCD is not the most pressing problem for the patients. The article argues that the solution of ICD therapy ignores patients' experience of living with severe heart disease and introduces the risk of shock therapy. For patients, a good life does not equal absence...

  2. Demographics of antibiotic persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollerova, Silvia; Jouvet, Lionel; Steiner, Ulrich

    Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch...... even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed....

  3. Antibiotics in periodontal surgeries: A prospective randomised cross over clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswal, Sheetal; Ravindra, Shivamurthy; Sinha, Aditya; Manjunath, Shaurya

    2014-09-01

    (1) To evaluate the need of antibiotics in periodontal surgeries in reducing postsurgical infections and explore if antibiotics have any key role in reducing or eliminating inflammatory complications. (2) To establish the incidence of postoperative infections in relation to type of surgery and determine those factors, which may affect infection rates. A prospective randomized double-blind cross over clinical study was carried out for a period of 1-year with predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. All the patients included in the study for any periodontal surgery were randomly divided into three categories: Group A (prophylactic), Group B (therapeutic), and Group C (no antibiotics). Patients were followed up for 1-week after surgery on the day of suture removal and were evaluated for pain, swelling, fever, infection, delayed wound healing and any other significant findings. Appropriate statistical analysis was carried out to evaluate the objectives and P infection was reported in any of 90 sites. Patients reported less pain and postoperative discomfort when prophylactic antibiotics were given. However, there were no statistical significant differences between the three groups. There was no postoperative infection reported in all the 90 sites operated in this study. The prevalence of postoperative infections following periodontal surgery is infections. Use of prophylactic antibiotics may have role in prevention of inflammatory complication, but again not infection.

  4. Evaluation of the appropriate perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Napolitano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The appropriate use of antibiotics prophylaxis in the prevention and reduction in the incidence of surgical site infection is widespread. This study evaluates the appropriateness of the prescription of antibiotics prophylaxis prior to surgery amongst hospitalized patients in the geographic area of Avellino, Caserta, and Naples (Italy and the factors associated with a poor adherence. METHODS: A sample of 382 patients admitted to 23 surgical wards and undergoing surgery in five hospitals were randomly selected. RESULTS: Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was appropriate in 18.1% of cases. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that patients with hypoalbuminemia, with a clinical infection, with a wound clean were more likely to receive an appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis. Compared with patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA score ≥4, those with a score of 2 were correlated with a 64% reduction in the odds of having an appropriate prophylaxis. The appropriateness of the timing of prophylactic antibiotic administration was observed in 53.4% of the procedures. Multivariate logistic regression model showed that such appropriateness was more frequent in older patients, in those admitted in general surgery wards, in those not having been underwent an endoscopic surgery, in those with a higher length of surgery, and in patients with ASA score 1 when a score ≥4 was chosen as the reference category. The most common antibiotics used inappropriately were ceftazidime, sultamicillin, levofloxacin, and teicoplanin. CONCLUSIONS: Educational interventions are needed to improve perioperative appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis.

  5. A wire-flooring model for inducing lameness in broilers: evaluation of probiotics as a prophylactic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wideman, R F; Hamal, K R; Stark, J M; Blankenship, J; Lester, H; Mitchell, K N; Lorenzoni, G; Pevzner, I

    2012-04-01

    Bacterial chondronecrosis with osteomyelitis (BCO) is the most common cause of lameness in commercial broilers. Bacteria entering the blood via translocation from the respiratory system or gastrointestinal tract spread hematogenously to the proximal epiphyseal-physeal cartilage of rapidly growing femora and tibiae, causing BCO. We tested the hypothesis that rearing broilers on wire flooring should increase the incidence of BCO by persistently imposing additional torque and shear stress on susceptible leg joints. We also tested the hypothesis that probiotics might attenuate bacterial translocation and thereby reduce the incidence of BCO. In 5 independent experiments using 4 commercial lines, broilers grown on wire flooring developed lameness attributable predominately to BCO. The fastest-growing birds were not necessarily the most susceptible to lameness on wire flooring, nor did the genders differ in susceptibility in the 2 experiments that included both male and female broilers. The pathogenesis of BCO is not instantaneous, and accordingly, many broilers that did not exhibit lameness, nevertheless, did possess early pathognomonic lesions. These subclinical lesions were equally likely to develop in the right or left leg. The lesion status of the proximal femoral head did not determine the lesion status of the ipsilateral or contralateral proximal tibial head and vice versa. Broilers reared on wire flooring consistently had higher incidences of lameness than hatch-mates reared on wood-shavings litter. Adding probiotics to the diet beginning at 1 d of age consistently reduced the incidence of lameness for broilers reared on wire flooring. These experiments indicate that probiotics administered prophylactically may constitute an alternative to antibiotics for reducing lameness attributable to BCO. Rearing broilers on wire flooring provides an important new research model for investigating the etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment strategies for BCO.

  6. Adherence to prophylactic asthma medication: habit strength and cognitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, Catherine; Arwert, Titia G; Völlink, Trijntje

    2011-01-01

    To explain adherence to prophylactic asthma medication (PAM, inhaled corticosteroids) by the attitude, social influence, and self-efficacy (ASE) model added with the concept of habit strength and to study whether habit moderates or mediates relationships between ASE factors and adherence. A mail-out survey was conducted among 139 asthmatic adults. Multiple regression analysis was conducted, with self-reported adherence as the outcome and ASE factors and habit as the independent variables. Simple slope analyses and bootstrapping mediation analyses were also conducted. Having more severe asthma, taking PAM habitually, and perceiving few negative consequences of taking PAM were associated with better adherence. Self-efficacy influenced adherence indirectly through habit. The relationship between social norms and adherence was moderated by habit: In the case of weak habits, a supportive norm in a patient's environment toward taking PAM was positively related to PAM adherence; in the case of strong habits, a supportive norm led to less adherence. Interventions to increase adherence should enhance the formation of habits by stimulating patients to perform the behavior frequently in similar situations by increasing self-efficacy and providing environmental cues, such as reminder devices and pill organizers. In addition, the disadvantages of PAM use should be negated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prophylactic antibiotics for preventing early central venous catheter Gram positive infections in oncology patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wetering, M. D.; van Woensel, J. B. M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term tunnelled central venous catheters (TCVCs) are increasingly used when treating oncology patients. Despite international guidelines on sterile insertion, appropriate catheter maintenance and use, infections still a complication of TCVC. These infections are mainly caused by

  8. Prophylactic antibiotics for preventing early central venous catheter Gram positive infections in oncology patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wetering, M. D.; van Woensel, J. B. M.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term tunnelled central venous catheters (TCVC) are increasingly used in oncology patients. Despite guidelines on insertion, maintenance and use, infections remain an important complication. Most infections are caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Therefore antimicrobial prevention

  9. Antibiotics for preterm rupture of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Sara; Boulvain, Michel; Neilson, James P

    2013-12-02

    Premature birth carries substantial neonatal morbidity and mortality. Subclinical infection is associated with preterm rupture of membranes (PROM). Prophylactic maternal antibiotic therapy might lessen infectious morbidity and delay labour, but could suppress labour without treating underlying infection. To evaluate the immediate and long-term effects of administering antibiotics to women with PROM before 37 weeks, on maternal infectious morbidity, neonatal morbidity and mortality, and longer-term childhood development. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 September 2013). Randomised controlled trials comparing antibiotic administration with placebo that reported clinically relevant outcomes were included as were trials of different antibiotics. Trials in which no placebo was used were included for the outcome of perinatal death alone. We extracted data from each report without blinding of either the results or the treatments that women received. We sought unpublished data from a number of authors. We included 22 trials, involving 6872 women and babies.The use of antibiotics following PROM is associated with statistically significant reductions in chorioamnionitis (average risk ratio (RR) 0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.46 to 0.96, and a reduction in the numbers of babies born within 48 hours (average RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.87) and seven days of randomisation (average RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.89). The following markers of neonatal morbidity were reduced: neonatal infection (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.85), use of surfactant (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.72 to 0.96), oxygen therapy (RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.81 to 0.96), and abnormal cerebral ultrasound scan prior to discharge from hospital (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.98). Co-amoxiclav was associated with an increased risk of neonatal necrotising enterocolitis (RR 4.72, 95% CI 1.57 to 14.23).One study evaluated the children's health at seven years of age (ORACLE Children Study) and found

  10. Is Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Primary Liver Tumors Necessary? Results From a Single-Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, Shivank S., E-mail: sbhatia1@med.miami.edu [University of Miami, Vascular/Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Miller School of Medicine (United States); Spector, Seth, E-mail: sspector@med.miami.edu [University of Miami, Department of Surgery, VA Hospital (Veterans Affairs Medical Center) (United States); Echenique, Ana, E-mail: aechenique@med.miami.edu; Froud, Tatiana, E-mail: tfroud@med.miami.edu; Suthar, Rekha, E-mail: rsuthar@med.miami.edu; Lawson, Ivy, E-mail: i.lawson1@med.miami.edu; Dalal, Ravi, E-mail: rdalal@med.miami.edu [University of Miami, Vascular/Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Miller School of Medicine (United States); Dinh, Vy, E-mail: vdinh@med.miami.edu [VA Hospital (Veterans Affairs Medical Center), Department of Medicine (United States); Yrizarry, Jose, E-mail: jyrizarr@med.miami.edu; Narayanan, Govindarajan, E-mail: gnarayanan@med.miami.edu [University of Miami, Vascular/Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Miller School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate need for antibiotic prophylaxis for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver tumors in patients with no significant co-existing risk factors for infection.Materials and MethodsFrom January 2004 to September 2013, 83 patients underwent 123 percutaneous RFA procedures for total of 152 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions. None of the patients had pre-existing biliary enteric anastomosis (BEA) or any biliary tract abnormality predisposing to ascending biliary infection or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. No pre- or post-procedure antibiotic prophylaxis was provided for 121 procedures. Data for potential risk factors were reviewed retrospectively and analyzed for the frequency of infectious complications, including abscess formation.ResultsOne patient (1/121 (0.8 %) RFA sessions) developed a large segment 5 liver abscess/infected biloma communicating with the gallbladder 7 weeks after the procedure, successfully treated over 10 weeks with IV and PO antibiotic therapy and percutaneous catheter drainage. This patient did not receive any antibiotics prior to RFA. During the procedure, there was inadvertent placement of RFA probe tines into the gallbladder. No other infectious complications were documented.ConclusionThese data suggest that the routine use of prophylactic antibiotics for liver RFA is not necessary in majority of the patients undergoing liver ablation for HCC and could be limited to patients with high-risk factors such as the presence of BEA or other biliary abnormalities, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, and large centrally located tumors in close proximity to central bile ducts. Larger randomized studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  11. A Quantitative Risk-Benefit Analysis of Prophylactic Surgery Prior to Extended-Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Danielle; Reyes, David; Kerstman, Eric; Walton, Marlei; Antonsen, Erik

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Among otherwise healthy astronauts undertaking deep space missions, the risks for acute appendicitis (AA) and cholecystitis (AC) are not zero. If these conditions were to occur during spaceflight they may require surgery for definitive care. The proposed study quantifies and compares the risks of developing de novo AA and AC in-flight to the surgical risks of prophylactic laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) and cholecystectomy (LC) using NASA's Integrated Medical Model (IMM). METHODS: The IMM is a Monte Carlo simulation that forecasts medical events during spaceflight missions and estimates the impact of these medical events on crew health. In this study, four Design Reference Missions (DRMs) were created to assess the probability of an astronaut developing in-flight small-bowel obstruction (SBO) following prophylactic 1) LA, 2) LC, 3) LA and LC, or 4) neither surgery (SR# S-20160407-351). Model inputs were drawn from a large, population-based 2011 Swedish study that examined the incidence and risks of post-operative SBO over a 5-year follow-up period. The study group included 1,152 patients who underwent LA, and 16,371 who underwent LC. RESULTS: Preliminary results indicate that prophylactic LA may yield higher mission risks than the control DRM. Complete analyses are pending and will be subsequently available. DISCUSSION: The risk versus benefits of prophylactic surgery in astronauts to decrease the probability of acute surgical events during spaceflight has only been qualitatively examined in prior studies. Within the assumptions and limitations of the IMM, this work provides the first quantitative guidance that has previously been lacking to this important question for future deep space exploration missions.

  12. Sensory and vascular changes in a rat monoarthritis model: prophylactic and therapeutic effects of meloxicam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Javeria Ali; Yashpal, Kiran; Holdsworth, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective and design The objective of this study was to determine the ability of meloxicam prophylaxis and therapy to blunt the effect of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) induced monoarthritis. Materials and methods First the validity of this animal model was established by examining joint changes at multiple levels after injecting CFA into the tibio-tarsal joint. Next, meloxicam (5 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered on days 0–7 (prophylactic) and on days 7–16 (therapeutic) in separate groups of animals. Results The CFA-injected joint demonstrated hallmark histological and structural changes such as pannus formation, bone remodeling, cartilage erosion and immune cell infiltration. Both prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with meloxicam effectively reduced swelling (ankle circumference), oedema and extravasation of Evans blue dye in the affected joint. Moreover, meloxicam reduced loss in range of motion and also reduced mechanical stimulus evoked pain scores. Notably, these effects persisted after discontinuing drug treatment. Conclusion The present study provides a unique comparison of prophylactic versus therapeutic effects of meloxicam in the CFA-induced model of monoarthritis. PMID:20349327

  13. [Assessment of antibiotic use and impact of an intervention intended to modify the prescribing behavior in surgical prophylaxis in 6hospitals in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Saucedo, Gerardo Del Carmen; de la Garza-Camargo, Mauricio; Briones-Lara, Evangelina; Carmona-González, Sandra; García-Cabello, Ricardo; Islas-Esparza, Luis Arturo; Saldaña-Flores, Gustavo; González-Cano, Juan Roberto; González-Ruvalcaba, Román; Valadez-Botello, Francisco Javier; Muñoz-Maldonado, Gerardo Enrique; Montero-Cantú, Carlos Alberto; Díaz-Ramos, Rita Delia; Solórzano-Santos, Fortino

    Improper use of antibiotics increases antimicrobial resistance. Evaluate the use of antibiotics and the impact of an intervention designed to improve antibiotic prescription for surgical prophylaxis in 6 hospitals of Monterrey, Mexico. Design: A prospective multicenter survey and a pretest-postest experimental study. Phase 1: Survey to evaluate the use of antibiotics through an especially designed guide. Phase 2: Intervention designed to improve antibiotic prescription for surgical prophylaxis by the medical staff by using printed, audiovisual and electronic messages. Phase 3: Survey to evaluate the impact of the intervention. Frequencies, percentages, medians, ranges and X2 test. Phase 1: We evaluated 358 surgical patients, 274 prophylactic antibiotic regimens. A total of 96% of antibiotics regimens began with inappropriate timing (290/302), 82.8% were inappropriate regimens (274/331), 77.7% were in inappropriate dosage (230/296), 86% of inadequate length (241/280), and in 17.4% restricted antibiotics were used (52/299). Phase 2: 9 sessions including 189 physicians (14 department chairs, 58 general practitioners and 117 residents). Phase 3: We evaluated 303 surgical patients, 218 prophylactic antibiotics regimens. Inappropriate treatment commencement was reduced to 84.1% (180/214) (P<0.001), inappropriate regimens to 75.3% (162/215) (P=0.03), inappropriate dosages to 51.2% (110/215) (P<0.001), and use of restricted antibiotics to 8.3% (18/215) (P=0.003). Inappropriate use of prophylactic antibiotics in surgery is a frequent problem in Monterrey. The intervention improved the antibiotic prescription for surgical prophylaxis by reducing inappropriate treatment commencement, regimens, dosages, and overuse of restricted antibiotics. It is necessary to strengthen strategies to improve the prescription of antibiotics in surgical prophylaxis. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Prophylactic oxytocin for the third stage of labour to prevent postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhoff, Gina; Cotter, Amanda M; Tolosa, Jorge E

    2013-10-30

    outcomes, to achieve maximal benefit providers may opt to implement a practice of giving prophylactic oxytocin as part of the active management of the third stage of labour at a dose of 10 IU given as an IV bolus. If IV delivery is not possible, IM delivery may be used as this route of delivery did show a benefit to prevent PPH greater than 500 mL and there was a trend to decrease the need for therapeutic uterotonics, albeit not statistically significant.Prophylactic oxytocin was superior to ergot alkaloids in preventing PPH greater than 500 mL; however, in subgroup analysis this benefit did not persist when only randomised trials with low risk of methodologic bias were analysed. Based on this, there is limited high-quality evidence supporting a benefit of prophylactic oxytocin over ergot alkaloids. However, the use of prophylactic oxytocin was associated with fewer side effects, specifically nausea and vomiting, making oxytocin the more desirable option for routine use to prevent PPH.There is no evidence of benefit when adding oxytocin to ergometrine compared to ergot alkaloids alone, and there may even be increased harm as one study showed evidence that using the combination was associated with increased mean blood loss compared to ergot alkaloids alone.Importantly, there is no evidence to suggest that prophylactic oxytocin increases the risk of retained placenta when compared to placebo or ergot alkaloids.More placebo-controlled, randomised, and double-blinded trials are needed to improve the quality of data used to evaluate the effective dose, timing, and route of administration of prophylactic oxytocin to prevent PPH. In addition, more trials are needed especially, but not only, in low- and middle-income countries to evaluate these interventions in the birth centres that shoulder the majority of the burden of PPH in order to improve maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide.

  15. Antibiotics to prevent complications following tooth extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, Giovanni; Figini, Lara; Sardella, Andrea; Carrassi, Antonio; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Furness, Susan

    2012-11-14

    the risk of dry socket by 38% (RR 0.62 (95% CI 0.41 to 0.95) P = 0.03, 1429 participants, moderate quality evidence) which means that 38 people (range 24-250) need to take antibiotics to prevent one case of dry socket following extraction of impacted wisdom teeth. There is also some evidence that patients who have prophylactic antibiotics may have less pain (MD -8.17 (95% CI -11.90 to -4.45) P infection. There is no evidence of a difference between antibiotics and placebo in the outcomes of fever (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.06 to 1.99), swelling (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.30) or trismus (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.42 to 1.71) 7 days after tooth extraction.Antibiotics are associated with an increase in generally mild and transient adverse effects compared to placebo (RR 1.98 (95% CI 1.10 to 3.59) P = 0.02) which means that for every 21 people (range 8-200) who receive antibiotics, an adverse effect is likely. Although general dentists perform dental extractions because of severe dental caries or periodontal infection, there were no trials identified which evaluated the role of antibiotic prophylaxis in this group of patients in this setting. All of the trials included in this review included healthy patients undergoing extraction of impacted third molars, often performed by oral surgeons. There is evidence that prophylactic antibiotics reduce the risk of infection, dry socket and pain following third molar extraction and result in an increase in mild and transient adverse effects. It is unclear whether the evidence in this review is generalisable to those with concomitant illnesses or immunodeficiency, or those undergoing the extraction of teeth due to severe caries or periodontitis. However, patients at a higher risk of infection are more likely to benefit from prophylactic antibiotics, because infections in this group are likely to be more frequent, associated with complications and be more difficult to treat. Due to the increasing prevalence of bacteria which are resistant to

  16. Cardiac disturbances after pneumonectomy--the value of prophylactic digitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, A; Mattila, T; Appelqvist, P; Meurala, H; Mattila, S

    1978-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative cardiac disturbances and the value of prophylactic digitalization were studied retrospectively in 143 patients undergoing pneumonectomy for carcinoma of the lung. Cardiac arrhythmias occurred in 29% and tachycardia episodes in 30% of the patients. The incidence of myocardial infarction was 2%. Operative mortality was 4%. The cardiac disturbances developed more often after left than after right pneumonectomy. The age of the patients, a history of angina pectoris or hypertension did not markedly increase the incidence of cardiac disturbances, neither did operative factors, such as pericardiotomy, left atrial resection, major bleeding nor postoperative empyema. Prophylactic digitalization significantly reduced postoperative cardiac disorders, their frequency being 33% in the group of patients who received prophylactic digitalis compared with 65% in the group that did not.

  17. Prophylactic use of octreotide for asparaginase-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Sachi; Higa, Takeshi; Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Fujimura, Junya; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, we sought to evaluate the prophylactic use of octreotide for asparaginase-induced acute pancreatitis. We reviewed the medical records of seven patients in two institutions who received prophylactic octreotide for re-administration of asparaginase after asparaginase-induced acute pancreatitis. Three patients completed asparaginase treatment without developing pancreatitis, and four experienced recurrence of pancreatitis. A literature search using PubMed identified four additional patients in whom asparaginase was successfully re-administered with octreotide. Prophylactic use of octreotide may, thus, be warranted for patients who would benefit from re-administration of asparaginase for cancer treatment; however, careful observation is needed to monitor for breakthrough recurrence of pancreatitis.

  18. Adjunctive use of antibiotics in periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barca, Ece; Cifcibasi, Emine; Cintan, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are infectious diseases with a mixed microbial aetiology and marked inflammatory response leading to destruction of underlying tissue. Periodontal therapy aims to eliminate pathogens associated with the disease and attain periodontal health. Periodontitis is generally treated by nonsurgical mechanical debridement and regular periodontal maintenance care. Periodontal surgery may be indicated for some patients to improve access to the root surface; however, mechanical debridement alone may not be helpful in all cases. In such cases, adjunctive systemic antibiotic therapy remains the treatment of choice. It can reach microorganisms at the base of the deep periodontal pockets and furcation areas via serum, and also affects organisms residing within gingival epithelium and connective tissue. This review aims to provide an update on clinical issues regarding when and how to prescribe systemic antibiotics in periodontal therapy. The points discussed are the mode of antibiotic action, susceptible periodontal pathogens, antibiotic dosage, antibiotic use in treatment of periodontal disease, and mechanism of bacterial resistance to each antibiotic.

  19. Antibiotic use and resistance in long term care facilities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buul, L.W. van; Steen, J.T. van der; Veenhuizen, R.B.; Achterberg, W.P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Essink, R.T.G.M.; Benthem, B.H.B. van; Natsch, S.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The common occurrence of infectious diseases in nursing homes and residential care facilities may result in substantial antibiotic use, and consequently antibiotic resistance. Focusing on these settings, this article aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature available

  20. Environmental impacts of antibiotic use in the animal production industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics are routinely used in the livestock industry to treat and prevent disease. At subtherapeutic concentrations, antibiotics can select for resistant bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract of production animals, providing a potential reservoir for dissemination of drug resistant bacteria int...

  1. Antibiotic use and resistance in long term care facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buul, L.W.; van der Steen, J.T.; Veenhuizen, R.B.; Achterberg, W.P.; Schellevis, F.G.; Essink, R.T.G.M.; Benthem, B.H. van; Natsch, S.S.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The common occurrence of infectious diseases in nursing homes and residential care facilities may result in substantial antibiotic use, and consequently antibiotic resistance. Focusing on these settings, this article aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature available

  2. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in water environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquero, Fernando; Martínez, José-Luis; Cantón, Rafael

    2008-06-01

    Antibiotic-resistant organisms enter into water environments from human and animal sources. These bacteria are able to spread their genes into water-indigenous microbes, which also contain resistance genes. On the contrary, many antibiotics from industrial origin circulate in water environments, potentially altering microbial ecosystems. Risk assessment protocols for antibiotics and resistant bacteria in water, based on better systems for antibiotics detection and antibiotic-resistance microbial source tracking, are starting to be discussed. Methods to reduce resistant bacterial load in wastewaters, and the amount of antimicrobial agents, in most cases originated in hospitals and farms, include optimization of disinfection procedures and management of wastewater and manure. A policy for preventing mixing human-originated and animal-originated bacteria with environmental organisms seems advisable.

  3. Interventions for replacing missing teeth: antibiotics at dental implant placement to prevent complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Worthington, Helen V; Loli, Vassiliki; Coulthard, Paul; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella

    2010-07-07

    Some dental implant failures may be due to bacterial contamination at implant insertion. Infections around biomaterials are difficult to treat and almost all infected implants have to be removed. In general, antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery is only indicated for patients at risk of infectious endocarditis, for patients with reduced host-response, when surgery is performed in infected sites, in cases of extensive and prolonged surgical interventions and when large foreign materials are implanted. To minimise infections after dental implant placement various prophylactic systemic antibiotic regimens have been suggested. More recent protocols recommended short term prophylaxis, if antibiotics have to be used. With the administration of antibiotics adverse events may occur, ranging from diarrhoea to life-threatening allergic reactions. Another major concern associated with the widespread use of antibiotics is the selection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The use of prophylactic antibiotics in implant dentistry is controversial. To assess the beneficial or harmful effects of systemic prophylactic antibiotics at dental implant placement versus no antibiotic/placebo administration and, if antibiotics are of benefit, to find which type, dosage and duration is the most effective. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched up to 2nd June 2010. Several dental journals were handsearched. There were no language restrictions. Randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) with a follow up of at least 3 months comparing the administration of various prophylactic antibiotic regimens versus no antibiotics to patients undergoing dental implant placement. Outcome measures were prosthesis failures, implant failures, postoperative infections and adverse events (gastrointestinal, hypersensitivity, etc). Screening of eligible studies, assessment of the methodological quality of the

  4. Klebsiella pneumoniae antibiotic resistance identified by atomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In particular, we studied Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria provided by the Lavagna Hospital ASL4Liguria (Italy), where there are cases linked with antibiotics resistance of the Klebsiella pneumoniae. By comparing AFMimages of bacteria strains treated with different antibiotics is possible to identify unambiguously the ...

  5. Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes from antibiotic producers to pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Xinglin; Ellabaan, Mostafa M Hashim; Charusanti, Pep

    2017-01-01

    , that appear to be closely related to actinobacterial ARGs known to confer resistance against clinically important antibiotics. Furthermore, we identify two potential examples of recent horizontal transfer of actinobacterial ARGs to proteobacterial pathogens. Based on this bioinformatic evidence, we propose......It has been hypothesized that some antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) found in pathogenic bacteria derive from antibiotic-producing actinobacteria. Here we provide bioinformatic and experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis. We identify genes in proteobacteria, including some pathogens...... and experimentally test a 'carry-back' mechanism for the transfer, involving conjugative transfer of a carrier sequence from proteobacteria to actinobacteria, recombination of the carrier sequence with the actinobacterial ARG, followed by natural transformation of proteobacteria with the carrier-sandwiched ARG. Our...

  6. Magnet‑retained Prophylactic Appliance for Post‑excisional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magnet‑retained Prophylactic Appliance for Post‑excisional. Pressure Therapy and Custom‑made Acrylic Therapeutic. Pressure Appliance for Auricular Keloid: A Clinical Report. Manu Rathee, Renu Kundu. INTRODUCTION. Keloid is a cutaneous fibrous scar that represents disequilibrium in the dermal wound healing.

  7. The effect of colloid preload versus prophylactic ephedrine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: We aimed to investigate the effect of colloid infusion immediately before the spinal anesthesia, and the prophylactic intravenous (IV) infusion of ephedrine after injection of intrathecal bupivacaine on hemodynamic parameters, QT, The QT interval corrected for heart rate (QTc), and dispersion of QTc (QTcDisp) intervals ...

  8. Iranian women's attitude toward prophylactic mastectomy for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Majidzadeh-A

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Preventive mastectomy has a higher rate of acceptability among women who have had a family history of breast cancer. Therefore, it may be concluded that raising public awareness about the advantages of prophylactic mastectomy could help better address breast cancer in Iran.

  9. RIBOMUNYL IN PROPHYLACTICS OF RELAPSE OF STENOSING LARYNGOTRACHEITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Orlova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The activity of ribomunyl in treatment and rehabilitation of 40 pediatric patients with relapsing stenosing laryngotracheitis, developed on the basis of acute respiratory viral infection was investigated. Treatment with ribomunyl recovers microbiocenose of nasopharynx and fauces, normalizes pulmonary ventilation and decreases liminal sensitivity of respiratory tract to the histamine.Key words: relapsing stenosing laryngotracheitis, ribomunyl, prophylactics, children.

  10. Modelling formulae of strawberry whey drinks of prophylactic application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tkachenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Expediency of the development of formulae and innovative technologies for production of prophylactic application drinks possessing antioxidant, probiotic and hepatoprotective properties with the use of the secondary dairy product – whey, as well as the domestic vegetable raw materials having a high content of bioactive substances has been substantiated.Formulation composition of the prophylactic drinks based on cheese whey, extract of Tagetes patula flowers and the berry filler “Strawberry” with the use of the response surface method has been developed. Bioactivity of the drinks and the complex quality indicator which accounts for the total influence of the bioactivity, organoleptic assessment and weight coefficients of the specified unit indicators were taken as the optimization criteria; as the independent factors that were varied in the course of the experiment, the mass fractions of the marigold flowers extract and the strawberries filler were selected. It is recommended that the mass fractions of the berry filler “Strawberry” and the extract of Tagetes patula flowers in the prophylactic drinks are set as 7 and 20 % of the finished product, accordingly. The practical mass fraction of the citric acid of 0.2 % was determined as it ensures high organoleptic characteristics of the finished drinks. Recommendations are given concerning development of innovative technologies of unfermented and fermented strawberry whey drinks of prophylactic application enriched with the extract of Tagetes patula flowers.

  11. The effect of prophylactic knee bracing on proprioception ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... knee brace (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Prophylactic knee bracing improved proprioception performance of playing (uninjured) rugby players, and therefore may be responsible for the improvement in knee injury statistics reported in some studies on knee bracing. South African Journal of Sports Medicine Vol.16(1) 2004: 33- ...

  12. The Prophylactics Debate: Is Unhu/Ubuntu an Alternative for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In view of the high prevalence of HIV and AIDS infection among Zimbabwean school children, liberals have been calling for the distribution of prophylactics, commonly known as condoms/sheath, to pupils. This, however, has sparked a great deal of controversy as the conservatives, guided by the religio-cultural and moral ...

  13. Prophylactic Swallowing Exercises in Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, H R; Jensen, Kenneth; Aksglæde, K

    2015-01-01

    Many head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors experience reduced quality of life due to radiotherapy (RT)-related dysphagia. The aim of this prospective randomized trial was to evaluate the impact of prophylactic swallowing exercises on swallowing-related outcomes in HNC patients treated with curativ...

  14. Prophylactic antioxidants and phenolics of seagrass and seaweed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prophylactic antioxidants and phenolics of seagrass and seaweed species: A seasonal variation study in a Southern Indian Ocean Island, Mauritius. ... The collective data are indicative of the potential of Mauritian seaweeds and seagrasses as possible sources of secondary metabolites for pharmaceuticals. Further analysis ...

  15. The effect of prophylactic knee bracing on proprioception ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    prioception in osteoarthritic and replaced knees. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE. The effect of prophylactic knee bracing on proprioception performance in first division rugby union players. T H Kruger (BSc Hons Biokinetics, MSc Sports Injuries). M F Coetsee (BSc Hons Biokinetics, MSc, PhD). S Davies (BA Hons, MA ...

  16. The effect of Prophylactic knee bracing on selected performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine if the wearing of a prophylactic knee brace by uninjured rugby players affected the following performance based parameters: speed, agility, strength, proprioception and economy of running. Thirty rugby players were subjected to a selected number of carefully monitored ...

  17. Prophylactic Oophorectomy: Preventing Cancer by Surgically Removing Your Ovaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... much lower than the lifetime risk of ovarian cancer if the ovaries remain intact. Prophylactic oophorectomy might relieve much of ... cancer. Screening usually includes a blood test for cancer antigen CA 125 and an ultrasound exam of your ovaries. In theory, increased screening should be able to ...

  18. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Tietze, Anna; Khalil, Azza Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prophylactic cerebral irradiation (PCI) is a standard treatment for all small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients with response to chemotherapy. The aims of this study were: to evaluate patients undergoing PCI with regard to cerebral recurrence rate, site of recurrence, and overall...

  19. Modelling lifelong effects of different prophylactic treatment strategies for severe haemophilia A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, K.; Lewandowski, D.; Janssen, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lifelong prophylactic replacement therapy with clotting factor concentrates is recommended for severe haemophilia. The prophylactic dose determines both clinical outcome and treatment cost. In the absence of clinical studies, computer simulation was used to explore lifelong effects and

  20. Prophylactic vertebroplasty can decrease the fracture risk of adjacent vertebrae: An in vitro cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aquarius, R.; Homminga, Jasper Johan; Hosman, A.J.F.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; Tanck, E.

    2014-01-01

    Adjacent level vertebral fractures are common in patients with osteoporotic wedge fractures, but can theoretically be prevented with prophylactic vertebroplasty. Previous tests on prophylactic vertebroplasties have been performed under axial loading, while in vivo changes in spinal alignment likely

  1. Prophylactic vertebroplasty can decrease the fracture risk of adjacent vertebrae: an in vitro cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aquarius, R.; Homminga, J.; Hosman, A.J.F.; Verdonschot, N.J.; Tanck, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Adjacent level vertebral fractures are common in patients with osteoporotic wedge fractures, but can theoretically be prevented with prophylactic vertebroplasty. Previous tests on prophylactic vertebroplasties have been performed under axial loading, while in vivo changes in spinal alignment likely

  2. Midline abdominal wall closure: a new prophylactic mesh concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellón, Juan M; López-Hervás, Pedro; Rodríguez, Marta; García-Honduvilla, Natalio; Pascual, Gemma; Buján, Julia

    2006-10-01

    Despite intense research efforts, incisional hernias continue to be a problem in patients who undergo laparotomy. This study was designed to reinforce the midline laparotomy closure by including a new prosthetic design between the edges of the surgical wound. A midline incision was made in New Zealand white rabbits and closed by inserting a polypropylene strip, T-shaped in cross-section, between the incisional borders. The T was placed upside down such that the horizontal arm of the T, whose surface is coated with extra-low pore size expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, made contact with the visceral peritoneum. The mesh was secured by a mass polypropylene 3/0 running suture. Surgery outcomes in these animals were compared with those in which the surgical wound was closed by simple suture and with control, nonoperated animals. The T-mesh induced an increased amount of scar tissue at the midline, where neoformed recipient tissue appeared around the polypropylene mesh filaments. The expanded polytetrafluoroethylene lamina became appropriately mesothelialized. Compared with the simple suture, the T-mesh provided a significant gain in biomechanical strength at postoperative week 6 (43.99+/-4.17 Newtons and 56.96+/-10.94 Newtons, respectively, p abdominal wall (82.25+/-7.60 Newtons versus 79.55+/-11.46 Newtons). Data were expressed as mean +/- standard deviation. The use of a nonabsorbable biomaterial for midline laparotomy closure significantly improves its biomechanical resistance. Used in high-risk patients or even prophylactically, this technique could reduce the incidence of incisional hernia.

  3. The impact of prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy on quality of life and psychological distress in women with a BRCA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Amy; Metcalfe, Kelly A; Chiang, Jaclyn; Elit, Lorraine; McLaughlin, John; Springate, Caitlin; Esplen, Mary Jane; Demsky, Rochelle; Murphy, Joan; Rosen, Barry; Narod, Steven A

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the impact of prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy on health-related quality of life and psychological distress in women. Women who underwent prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy between August 20, 2003 and June 26, 2008 because of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation were invited to participate. Participants completed three questionnaires (SF-12(®) Health Survey, Brief Symptom Inventory and the Impact of Events Scale) before prophylactic surgery and again 1 year after surgery. Measures of health-related quality of life, of general psychological distress and of ovarian cancer worry before and after surgery were compared. Few women who underwent salpingo-oophorectomy experienced a worsening in physical or mental health functioning after salpingo-oophorectomy. On average, women experienced less ovarian cancer-specific worry after surgery; 34.3% experienced moderate to severe ovarian cancer-specific distress before surgery, compared with 18.6% after surgery. For most women, physical and mental health-related quality of life did not deteriorate after prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy, and they were less worried about ovarian cancer. A subset of women continued to experience moderate to severe cancer-specific distress. Identification of these women is important in order to provide continued counseling and support. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Muscular and Functional Performance Characteristics of Individuals Wearing Prophylactic Knee Braces

    OpenAIRE

    Borsa, Paul A.; Lephart, Scott M.; Fu, Freddie H.

    1993-01-01

    The efficacy of prophylactic knee bracing has been refuted with regard to reducing the incidence and/or severity of injuries to the knee joint. This is thought to be a result of the prophylactic knee brace's ineffectiveness in protecting the knee joint from valgus loads. Furthermore, discrepancies exist regarding the prophylactic knee brace's detrimental effect on functional performance. The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of the prophylactic knee brace on selected isokinetic ...

  5. Prophylactic treatment of migraine; the patient's view, a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dekker Frans

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prophylactic treatment is an important but under-utilised option for the management of migraine. Patients and physicians appear to have reservations about initiating this treatment option. This paper explores the opinions, motives and expectations of patients regarding prophylactic migraine therapy. Methods A qualitative focus group study in general practice in the Netherlands with twenty patients recruited from urban and rural general practices. Three focus group meetings were held with 6-7 migraine patients per group (2 female and 1 male group. All participants were migraine patients according to the IHS (International Headache Society; 9 had experience with prophylactic medication. The focus group meetings were analysed using a general thematic analysis. Results For patients several distinguished factors count when making a decision on prophylactic treatment. The decision of a patient on prophylactic medication is depending on experience and perspectives, grouped into five categories, namely the context of being active or passive in taking the initiative to start prophylaxis; assessing the advantages and disadvantages of prophylaxis; satisfaction with current migraine treatment; the relationship with the physician and the feeling to be heard; and previous steps taken to prevent migraine. Conclusion In addition to the functional impact of migraine, the decision to start prophylaxis is based on a complex of considerations from the patient's perspective (e.g. perceived burden of migraine, expected benefits or disadvantages, interaction with relatives, colleagues and physician. Therefore, when advising migraine patients about prophylaxis, their opinions should be taken into account. Patients need to be open to advice and information and intervention have to be offered at an appropriate moment in the course of migraine.

  6. Approach to osteomyelitis treatment with antibiotic loaded PMMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentao, Zhang; Lei, Guangyu; Liu, Yang; Wang, Wei; Song, Tao; Fan, Jinzhu

    2017-01-01

    To reduce the incidence of osteomyelitis infection, local antibiotic impregnated delivery systems are commonly used as a promising and effective approach to deliver high antibiotic concentrations at the infection site. The objective of this review was to provide a literature review regarding approach to osteomyelitis treatment with antibiotic loaded PMMA. Literature study regarding osteomyelitis treatment with antibiotic loaded carriers using key terms Antibiotic, osteomyelitis, biodegradable PMMA through published articles. Hands searching of bibliographies of identified articles were also undertaken. We concluded that Antibiotic-impregnated PMMA beads are useful options for the treatment of osteomyelitis for prolonged drug therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Antibiotic Resistance in Modern World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla S. Namazova-Baranova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article brings up the topic not only vital and urgent for further development of modern medical science, but also affecting the interests of mankind as a whole and of every inhabitant of the Earth in particular: that is the irrational use of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance which rate is growing rapidly. We investigate the reasons for the epidemic of antibiotic resistance and discuss in detail all the necessary measures in order to cope with this problem. The shocking data on the almost universal irrational use of antibiotics by both medical workers and parents is provided. We demonstrate the microbiome changes that follow antibacterial drugs application resulting in the development of severe chronic pediatric diseases which cause severe disability or life-threatening conditions in children with long-term results in adult age. In conclusion, we summarize the evidence-based research in phytomedicine that present the phytopreparations as a serious alternative to antibiotics in a number of clinical settings. 

  8. Antibiotic prescribing in ambulatory pediatrics in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Adam L; Shapiro, Daniel J; Pavia, Andrew T; Shah, Samir S

    2011-12-01

    Antibiotics are commonly prescribed for children with conditions for which they provide no benefit, including viral respiratory infections. Broad-spectrum antibiotic use is increasing, which adds unnecessary cost and promotes the development of antibiotic resistance. To provide a nationally representative analysis of antibiotic prescribing in ambulatory pediatrics according to antibiotic classes and diagnostic categories and identify factors associated with broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing. We used the National Ambulatory and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care surveys from 2006 to 2008, which are nationally representative samples of ambulatory care visits in the United States. We estimated the percentage of visits for patients younger than 18 years for whom antibiotics were prescribed according to antibiotic classes, those considered broad-spectrum, and diagnostic categories. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify demographic and clinical factors that were independently associated with broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing. Antibiotics were prescribed during 21% of pediatric ambulatory visits; 50% were broad-spectrum, most commonly macrolides. Respiratory conditions accounted for >70% of visits in which both antibiotics and broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed. Twenty-three percent of the visits in which antibiotics were prescribed were for respiratory conditions for which antibiotics are not clearly indicated, which accounts for >10 million visits annually. Factors independently associated with broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing included respiratory conditions for which antibiotics are not indicated, younger patients, visits in the South, and private insurance. Broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing in ambulatory pediatrics is extremely common and frequently inappropriate. These findings can inform the development and implementation of antibiotic stewardship efforts in ambulatory care toward the most important geographic regions

  9. Are there clinical variables determining antibiotic prophylaxis-susceptible versus resistant infection in open fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Amanda; Suvà, Domizio; Dunkel, Nathalie; Nicodème, Jean-Damien; Lomessy, Antoine; Lauper, Nicolas; Rohner, Peter; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Uçkay, Ilker

    2014-11-01

    In Gustilo grade III open fractures, it remains unknown which demographic or clinical features may be associated with an infection resistant to the administered prophylactic agent, compared to one that is susceptible. This was a retrospective case-control study on patients hospitalized from 2004 to 2009. We identified 310 patients with Gustilo-III open fractures, 36 (12%) of which became infected after a median of ten days. In 26 (72%) of the episodes the pathogen was susceptible to the prophylactic antibiotic agent prescribed upon admission, while in the other ten it was resistant. All antibiotic prophylaxis was intravenous; the median duration of treatment was three days and the median delay between trauma and surgery was one day. In multivariate analysis adjusting for case-mix, only Gustilo-grade-IIIc fractures (vascular lesions) showed tendency to be infected with resistant pathogens (odds ratio 10; 95% confidence interval 1.0-10; p = 0.058). There were no significant differences between cases caused by antibiotic resistant and susceptible pathogen cases in patient's sex, presence of immune suppression, duration and choice of antibiotic prophylaxis, choice of surgical technique or materials, time delay until surgery, use of bone reaming, fracture localization, or presence of compartment syndrome. We were unable to identify any specific clinical parameters associated with infection with antibiotic resistant pathogens in Gustilo-grade III open fractures, other than the severity of the fracture itself. More research is needed to identify patients who might benefit from a broader-spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis.

  10. The Angelina Jolie Effect in Jewish Law: Prophylactic Mastectomy and Oophorectomy in BRCA Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Galper Grossman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Following the announcement of actress Angelina Jolie’s prophylactic bilateral mastectomies and subsequent prophylactic oophorectomy, there has been a dramatic increase in interest in BRCA testing and prophylactic surgery. Objective: To review current medical literature on the benefits of prophylactic mastectomy and oophorectomy among BRCA-positive women and its permissibility under Jewish law. Results: Recent literature suggests that in BRCA-positive women who undergo prophylactic oophorectomy the risk of dying of breast cancer is reduced by 90%, the risk of dying of ovarian cancer is reduced by 95%, and the risk of dying of any cause is reduced by 77%. The risk of breast cancer is further reduced by prophylactic mastectomy. Prophylactic oophorectomy and prophylactic mastectomy pose several challenges within Jewish law that call into question the permissibility of surgery, including mutilation of a healthy organ, termination of fertility, self-wounding, and castration. A growing number of Jewish legal scholars have found grounds to permit prophylactic surgery among BRCA carriers, with some even obligating prophylactic mastectomy and oophorectomy. Conclusion: Current data suggest a significant reduction in mortality from prophylactic mastectomy and oophorectomy in BRCA carriers. While mutilation of healthy organs is intrinsically forbidden in Jewish law, the ability to preserve human life may contravene and even mandate prophylactic surgery.

  11. Finding alternatives to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Heather K; Trachsel, Julian; Looft, Torey; Casey, Thomas A

    2014-09-01

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens requires new treatments. As the rate of development of new antibiotics has severely declined, alternatives to antibiotics must be considered in both animal agriculture and human medicine. Products for disease prevention are different from those for disease treatment, and examples of both are discussed here. For example, modulating the gut microbial community, either through feed additives or fecal transplantation, could be a promising way to prevent certain diseases; for disease treatment, non-antibiotic approaches include phage therapy, phage lysins, bacteriocins, and predatory bacteria. Interestingly, several of these methods augment antibiotic efficacy by improving bacterial killing and decreasing antibiotic resistance selection. Because bacteria can ultimately evolve resistance to almost any therapeutic agent, it is important to continue to use both antibiotics and their alternatives judiciously. © 2014 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of The New York Academy of Sciences.

  12. Recommendations for the Prophylactic Management of Skin Reactions Induced by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors in Patients With Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Deplanque, Gaël; Komatsu, Yoshito; Kobayashi, Yoshimitsu; Ocvirk, Janja; Racca, Patrizia; Guenther, Silke; Zhang, Jun; Lacouture, Mario E; Jatoi, Aminah

    2016-12-01

    : Inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an established treatment that extends patient survival across a variety of tumor types. EGFR inhibitors fall into two main categories: anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab and panitumumab, and first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as afatinib, gefitinib, and erlotinib. Skin reactions are the most common EGFR inhibitor-attributable adverse event, resulting in papulopustular (acneiform) eruptions that can be painful and debilitating, and which may potentially have a negative impact on patients' quality of life and social functioning, as well as a negative impact on treatment duration. Shortened treatment duration can, in turn, compromise antineoplastic efficacy. Similarly, appropriate management of skin reactions is dependent on their accurate grading; however, conventional means for grading skin reactions are inadequate, particularly within the context of clinical trials. Treating a skin reaction only once it occurs (reactive treatment strategies) may not be the most effective management approach; instead, prophylactic approaches may be preferable. Indeed, we support the viewpoint that prophylactic management of skin reactions should be recommended for all patients treated with EGFR inhibitors. Appropriate prophylactic management could effectively reduce the severity of skin reactions in patients treated with EGFR inhibitors and therefore has the potential to directly benefit patients and improve drug adherence. Accordingly, here we review published and still-emerging data, and provide practical and evidence-based recommendations and algorithms regarding the optimal prophylactic management of EGFR inhibitor-attributable skin reactions. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors extend patient survival across a variety of tumor types. The most common EGFR inhibitor-attributable adverse events are skin reactions. Prophylactic-rather than reactive-management of skin

  13. Genetic architecture of intrinsic antibiotic susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany S Girgis

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic exposure rapidly selects for more resistant bacterial strains, and both a drug's chemical structure and a bacterium's cellular network affect the types of mutations acquired.To better characterize the genetic determinants of antibiotic susceptibility, we exposed a transposon-mutagenized library of Escherichia coli to each of 17 antibiotics that encompass a wide range of drug classes and mechanisms of action. Propagating the library for multiple generations with drug concentrations that moderately inhibited the growth of the isogenic parental strain caused the abundance of strains with even minor fitness advantages or disadvantages to change measurably and reproducibly. Using a microarray-based genetic footprinting strategy, we then determined the quantitative contribution of each gene to E. coli's intrinsic antibiotic susceptibility. We found both loci whose removal increased general antibiotic tolerance as well as pathways whose down-regulation increased tolerance to specific drugs and drug classes. The beneficial mutations identified span multiple pathways, and we identified pairs of mutations that individually provide only minor decreases in antibiotic susceptibility but that combine to provide higher tolerance.Our results illustrate that a wide-range of mutations can modulate the activity of many cellular resistance processes and demonstrate that E. coli has a large mutational target size for increasing antibiotic tolerance. Furthermore, the work suggests that clinical levels of antibiotic resistance might develop through the sequential accumulation of chromosomal mutations of small individual effect.

  14. Evaluation of Post-Operative Antibiotic Administration on Phenotypic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    But baseline data to judge effects of long-term post-operative antibiotic administration in clinical and surgical canine health conditions are currently lacking in Nigeria. This study aimed at providing vital baseline antibiotic profiles of canine bacteria of veterinary and public health importance. Phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility ...

  15. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Auerbach-Nevo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of “pathogen-specific antibiotics,” in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification.

  16. Rational use of antibiotics--a quality improvement initiative in hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nausheen, Sidrah; Hammad, Rabia; Khan, Ambreen

    2013-01-01

    To minimise irrational use of antibiotics by implementing guidelines for antibiotic usage in obstetrics and Gynaeocology. The observational study was conducted from January to December 2010 at the maternity unit of Aga Khan Hospital for Women and children, Kharadar, a secondary care facility in Karachi, Pakistan. Data was collected from medical records related to the study period. Prophylactic antibiotics were given according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists recommendation 2009. Surveillance was done by surgical site infection rates and infectious morbidity. Data was analysed on SPSS 13. Therapeutic antibiotic use was rationalized, reducing the use of therapeutic antibiotics from 97% (n = 160/165) in January 2010 to 8% (n = 10/125) in December 2010. Surgical site infection rates were less than 5%. Cost of antibiotics per patient decreased by 90%. Decrease in the length of stay and workload on nursing staff was also observed. Implementing guidelines for antibiotic use in obstetrics and gynaecology and translating it into our protocols was effective in decreasing the irrational antibiotic consumption and increasing the rational use of antibiotics in the hospital.

  17. Knowledge regarding antibiotic drug action and prescription practices among dentist in Jaipur city, Rajasthan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushyant Pal Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dentists prescribe antibiotics routinely to manage oral and dental infections. Unscrupulous antibiotic prescriptions can be associated with unfavorable side effects and the development of resistance. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the level of knowledge regarding antibiotic prescription use among dentists in Jaipur City, Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted among 300 dentists in Jaipur city. A validated, self-designed, 21-item, closed-ended questionnaire was used to collect data on knowledge regarding antibiotic prescription. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results: A total of 300 dental practitioners were included in the study. The majority of the respondents seem to prescribe antibiotics that are broad spectrum or the ones that are commonly used. A considerable percentage of the respondents were not aware of the pregnancy drug risk categories by Food and Drug Administration. The most of the respondents said that they prescribe antibiotics on the basis of the diagnosis, whereas more than two-thirds of the respondents said that they never advise culture sensitivity test before prescribing the antibiotics. Conclusion: Our findings suggest the knowledge of dentists regarding antibiotic prescription is inadequate and more focus should be given to the ongoing training regarding the pharmacological aspects, pertinent medical conditions, and prophylactic use of antibiotics in dentistry.

  18. The Use of Intravenous Antibiotics at the Onset of Neutropenia in Patients Receiving Outpatient-Based Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadah, Aziz; Schreiber, Yoko; Toye, Baldwin; McDiarmid, Sheryl; Huebsch, Lothar; Bredeson, Christopher; Tay, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Empirical antibiotics at the onset of febrile neutropenia are one of several strategies for management of bacterial infections in patients undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT) (empiric strategy). Our HSCT program aims to perform HSCT in an outpatient setting, where an empiric antibiotic strategy was employed. HSCT recipients began receiving intravenous antibiotics at the onset of neutropenia in the absence of fever as part of our institutional policy from 01 Jan 2009; intravenous Prophylactic strategy. A prospective study was conducted to compare two consecutive cohorts [Year 2008 (Empiric strategy) vs. Year 2009 (Prophylactic strategy)] of patients receiving HSCT. There were 238 HSCTs performed between 01 Jan 2008 and 31 Dec 2009 with 127 and 111 in the earlier and later cohorts respectively. Infection-related mortality pre- engraftment was similar with a prophylactic compared to an empiric strategy (3.6% vs. 7.1%; p = 0.24), but reduced among recipients of autologous HSCT (0% vs. 6.8%; p = 0.03). Microbiologically documented, blood stream infections and clinically documented infections pre-engraftment were reduced in those receiving a prophylactic compared to an empiric strategy, (11.7% vs. 28.3%; p = 0.001), (9.9% vs. 24.4%; p = 0.003) and (18.2% vs. 33.9% p = 0.007) respectively. The prophylactic use of intravenous once-daily ceftriaxone in patients receiving outpatient based HSCT is safe and may be particularly effective in patients receiving autologous HSCT. Further studies are warranted to study the impact of this Prophylactic strategy in an outpatient based HSCT program. PMID:23029441

  19. The prophylactic effect of valproate on glyceryltrinitrate induced migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedskov, Jesper Filtenborg; Thomsen, L L; Iversen, H K

    2004-01-01

    In this study the human glyceryltrinitrate (GTN) model of migraine was for the first time used to test the effect of a prophylactic drug. We chose to test valproate due to its well documented effect as a migraine prophylactic drug. Efficacy of this compound would support the usefulness of the model....../kg/min) was given. Headache was registered for 12 h after the infusion and headache intensity was scored on a scale from 0 to 10. Fulfillment of IHS criteria was recorded for 24 h. The middle cerebral arteries were evaluated by transcranial Doppler and the diameter of the superficial temporal and radial arteries...... were measured with high frequency ultrasound. GTN evoked migraine fulfilling IHS criteria 1.1 in 6 patients after placebo and in 2 patients after valproate (P = 0.125). Including additionally 3 patients on placebo and 1 patient on valproate who felt they had suffered a migraine attack, but who had...

  20. [Rational use of antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walger, P

    2016-06-01

    International and national campaigns draw attention worldwide to the rational use of the available antibiotics. This has been stimulated by the high prevalence rates of drug-resistant pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), a threatening spread of development of resistance in Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria and the selection of Clostridium difficile with a simultaneous clear reduction in the development of new antibiotics. The implementation of antibiotic stewardship programs aims to maintain their effectiveness by a rational use of the available antibiotics. The essential target of therapy with antibiotics is successful treatment of individual patients with bacterial infections. The optimal clinical treatment results can only be achieved when the toxicity, selection of pathogens and development of resistance are minimized. This article presents the principles of a rational antibiotic therapy.

  1. High Antibiotic Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; José Rabanaque, María; Feja, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Heavy antibiotic users are those individuals with the highest exposure to antibiotics. They play an important role as contributors to the increasing risk of antimicrobial resistance. We applied different methods to identify and characterize the group of heavy antibiotic users in Spain as well...... as their exposure to antibiotics. Data on outpatient prescribing of antimicrobials (ATC J01) in 2010 were obtained from a prescription database covering Aragón (northeastern Spain). The antimicrobial consumption at the individual level was analysed both according to the volume of DDD and the number of packages...... purchased per year. Heavy antibiotic users were identified according to Lorenz curves and characterized by age, gender, and their antimicrobial prescription profile. Lorenz curves demonstrated substantial differences in the individual use of antimicrobials. Heavy antibiotic users (5% of individuals...

  2. [Prophylactic requirements for sanitary and epidemiological surveillance in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, B M; Maksimenko, L V; Fedotova, N N; Gololobova, T V; Konovalov, O E

    2009-01-01

    The paper outlines the requirements for sanitary-and-epidemiological surveillance to prevent dental diseases. The investigations pose tasks to medical prevention centers to solve the problems in tooth prophylaxis, such as organizational-and-methodological, sanitary-and-educational, health-improving, and others. The sanitary-and-hygienic requirements for therapeutic-and-prophylactic dental facilities are defined. A procedure for keeping a management protocol for the prevention of tooth diseases is described.

  3. Prophylactic treatment of jellyfish stings--a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønseth, Kim Alexander; Andersen, Torgrim Salvesen; Andresen, Torgrim Salvesen; Pripp, Are Hugo; Karlsen, Hans Erik

    2012-06-26

    Contact with jellyfish can cause skin irritation and manifestations. We wanted to investigate the prophylactic effect of a sun cream containing an inhibitor against jellyfish stings. We recruited 38 persons who were randomised such that each received two of three possible treatments, one on each underarm. Prophylactic treatment with sun cream containing jellyfish sting inhibitor, ordinary sun cream, and no cream. Their underarms were exposed to wet jellyfish tentacles in a watchglass. The following were recorded: time before pain, skin changes after four minutes, and pain intensity after 10 minutes, registered on a VAS scale. Thirteen of 25 subjects who had the sun cream with jellyfish sting inhibitor did not register any pain after 4 minutes' exposure, compared with two of 25 and two of 26 who had received pre-treatment with ordinary sun cream (p = 0.32) and no pre-treatment (p jellyfish sting inhibitor recorded a lower VAS score for pain/discomfort after 10 minutes. The difference was 10.6 mm (95 % CI 3.1-17.9) compared with ordinary sun cream and 14.2 mm (95 % CI 6.9-21.5) compared with no pre-treatment. A smaller number of subjects were found to have underarms with inflamed skin when prophylactic cream containing jellyfish sting inhibitor was used (6 of 25) than when ordinary sun cream was used (11 of 25) or no pre-treatment (12 of 26). There were no statistically significant differences between ordinary sun cream and no pre-treatment for any of the three outcomes. Prophylactic treatment with jellyfish sting inhibitor reduces the risk of subjects developing symptoms after exposure to jellyfish tentacles.

  4. Tackling Ebola: new insights into prophylactic and therapeutic intervention strategies

    OpenAIRE

    De Wit, Emmie,; Feldmann, Heinz; Munster, Vincent J.

    2011-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1976, Ebolavirus has caused periodic outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever associated with severe and often fatal disease. Ebolavirus is endemic in Central Africa and the Philippines. Although there is currently no approved treatment available, the past 10 years has seen remarkable progress in our understanding of the pathogenicity of Ebolavirus and the development of prophylactic and post-exposure therapies against it. In vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that Eb...

  5. Predictors for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy in breast cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Yun; Zhuang, Zhigang; Dewing, Michelle; Apple, Sophia; Chang, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Background: In recent years, radical breast cancer surgery has been largely replaced by breast conservation treatment, due to early diagnosis and more effective adjuvant treatment. While breast conservation is mostly preferred, the trend of bilateral mastectomy has risen in the United States. The aim of this study is to determine factors influencing patients’ choice for having contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). Methods: This is a retrospective study of 373 patients diagnosed with pr...

  6. Encephalitic Sarcocystosis and its Prophylactic Treatment in Sheep

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZMEN, Özlem; ŞAHİNDURAN, Şima; HALIGÜR, Mehmet; YUKARI, Bayram Ali; Dorrestein, Gerry M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the clinical and pathological findings in sheep naturally infected with severe encephalitic sarcocystosis and to evaluate the prophylactic effect of amprolium on the disease. From a flock of approximately 350 animals, 10 sheep were referred to the Veterinary Faculty Clinic with neurological symptoms that developed during the previous 2 weeks. These 10 sheep were clinically and pathologically examined, and the remaining animals in the flock without neurolog...

  7. Effect of Prophylactic Antifungal Protocols on the Prognosis of Liver Transplantation: A Propensity Score Matching and Multistate Model Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Whether routine antifungal prophylaxis decreases posttransplantation fungal infections in patients receiving orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of antifungal prophylaxis for patients receiving OLT. Patients and Methods. This is a retrospective analysis of a database at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. We have been administering routine antibiotic and prophylactic antifungal regimens to recipients with high model for end-stage liver disease scores (>20 since 2009. After propensity score matching, 402 patients were enrolled. We conducted a multistate model to analyze the cumulative hazards, probability of fungal infections, and risk factors. Results. The cumulative hazards and transition probability of “transplantation to fungal infection” were lower in the prophylaxis group. The incidence rate of fungal infection after OLT decreased from 18.9% to 11.4% (p=0.052; overall mortality improved from 40.8% to 23.4% (p<0.001. In the “transplantation to fungal infection” transition, prophylaxis was significantly associated with reduced hazards for fungal infection (hazard ratio: 0.57, 95% confidence interval: 0.34–0.96, p=0.033. Massive ascites, cadaver transplantation, and older age were significantly associated with higher risks for mortality. Conclusion. Prophylactic antifungal regimens in high-risk recipients might decrease the incidence of posttransplant fungal infections.

  8. Antibiotics or probiotics as preventive measures against ventilator-associated pneumonia: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Marcus J; Haas, Lenneke E

    2011-01-01

    Mechanically ventilated critically ill patients frequently develop ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), a life-threatening complication. Proposed preventive measures against VAP include, but are not restricted to, selective decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD), selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD) and the use of probiotics. Probiotics are live bacteria that could have beneficial effects on the host by altering gastrointestinal flora. Similar to SDD and SOD, a prescription of probiotics aims at the prevention of secondary colonization of the upper and/or lower digestive tract. We performed a literature review to describe the differences and similarities between SDD/SOD and probiotic preventive strategies, focusing on (a) efficacy, (b) risks, and (c) the routing of these strategies. Reductions in the incidence of VAP have been achieved with SDD and SOD. Two large randomized controlled trials even showed reduced mortality with these preventive strategies. Randomized controlled trials of probiotic strategies also showed a reduction of the incidence of VAP, but trials were too small to draw firm conclusions. Preventive strategies with antibiotics and probiotics may be limited due to the risk of emerging resistance to the locally applied antibiotics and the risk of probiotic-related infections, respectively. The majority of trials of SDD and SOD did not exhaustively address the issue of emerging resistance. Likewise, trials of probiotic strategies did not adequately address the risk of colonization with probiotics and probiotic-related infection. In studies of SDD and SOD the preventive strategy aimed at decontamination of the oral cavity, throat, stomach and intestines, and the oral cavity and throat, respectively. In the vast majority of studies of probiotic therapy the preventive strategy aimed at decontamination of the stomach and intestines. Prophylactic use of antibiotics in critically ill patients is effective in reducing the incidence of VAP

  9. Functional MRI in medulloblastoma survivors supports prophylactic reading intervention during tumor treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ping; Conklin, Heather M; Scoggins, Matthew A; Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu; Jones, Melissa M; Palmer, Shawna L; Gajjar, Amar; Ogg, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Development of reading skills is vulnerable to disruption in children treated for brain tumors. Interventions, remedial and prophylactic, are needed to mitigate reading and other learning difficulties faced by survivors. A functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was conducted to investigate long-term effects of a prophylactic reading intervention administered during radiation therapy in children treated for medulloblastoma. The fMRI study included 19 reading-intervention (age 11.7 ± 0.6 years) and 21 standard-of-care (age 12.1 ± 0.6 years) medulloblastoma survivors, and 21 typically developing children (age 12.3 ± 0.6 years). The survivors were 2.5 [1.2, 5.4] years after completion of tumor therapies and reading-intervention survivors were 2.9 [1.6, 5.9] years after intervention. Five fMRI tasks (Rapid Automatized Naming, Continuous Performance Test using faces and letters, orthographic and phonological processing of letter pairs, implicit word reading, and story reading) were used to probe reading-related neural activation. Woodcock-Johnson Reading Fluency, Word Attack, and Sound Awareness subtests were used to evaluate reading abilities. At the time of fMRI, Sound Awareness scores were significantly higher in the reading-intervention group than in the standard-of-care group (p = 0.046). Brain activation during the fMRI tasks was detected in left inferior frontal, temporal, ventral occipitotemporal, and subcortical regions, and differed among the groups (p reading-intervention group. Standardized reading scores and patterns of brain activation provide evidence of long-term effects of prophylactic reading intervention in children treated for medulloblastoma.

  10. Inhibition of Granulomatous Inflammation and Prophylactic Treatment of Schistosomiasis with a Combination of Edelfosine and Praziquantel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Yepes

    cytokine patterns, and may provide a promising and effective strategy for a prophylactic treatment of schistosomiasis.

  11. Cost and effectiveness evaluation of prophylactic HPV vaccine in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termrungruanglert, Wichai; Havanond, Piyalamporn; Khemapech, Nipon; Lertmaharit, Somrat; Pongpanich, Sathirakorn; Khorprasert, Chonlakiet; Taneepanichskul, Surasak

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 80% of cervical cancer cases occur in developing countries. In Thailand, cervical cancer has been the leading cancer in females, with an incidence of 24.7 cases per 100,000 individuals per year. We constructed a decision model to simulate the lifetime economic impact for women in the context of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection prevention. HPV-related diseases were of interest: cervical cancer, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, and genital warts. The two strategies used were 1) current practice and 2) prophylactic quadrivalent vaccine against HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18. We developed a Markov simulation model to evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of prophylactic HPV vaccine. Women transition through a model either healthy or developing HPV or its related diseases, or die from cervical cancer or from other causes according to transitional probabilities under the Thai health-care context. Costs from a provider perspective were obtained from King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital. Costs and benefits were discounted at 3% annually. Compared with no prophylactic HPV vaccine, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was 160,649.50 baht per quality-adjusted life-year. The mortality rate was reduced by 54.8%. The incidence of cervical cancer, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3, and genital warts was reduced by up to 55.1%. Compared with commonly accepted standard thresholds recommended by the World Health Organization Commission on Macroeconomics and Health, the nationwide coverage of HPV vaccination in girls is likely to be cost-effective in Thailand. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Is Routine Prophylactic Cholecystectomy Necessary During Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Jun; Kunisaki, Chikara; Takagawa, Ryo; Makino, Hirochika; Ueda, Michio; Ota, Mitsuyoshi; Oba, Mari; Kosaka, Takashi; Akiyama, Hirotoshi; Endo, Itaru

    2017-04-01

    Performing routine prophylactic cholecystectomy during gastrectomy in gastric cancer patients has been controversial. The frequency of cholelithiasis, cholecystitis, and cholangitis after gastrectomy has not been reported for large patient populations, so we carried out this retrospective study to aid the assessment of the necessity for prophylactic cholecystectomy. This retrospective study reviewed 969 patients with gastric cancer who underwent distal gastrectomies with Billroth I reconstructions (DG) or total gastrectomies with Roux-en-Y reconstructions (TG), preserving the gallbladder, between January 2000 and May 2012. Risk factors for cholelithiasis, cholecystitis, and cholangitis after gastrectomy were evaluated using logistic regression analysis. The median follow-up period after gastrectomy was 48 months (range 12-159 months). After gastrectomy, cholelithiasis occurred in 6.1% (59/969) patients and cholecystitis and/or cholangitis occurred in 1.2% (12/969) patients. The method used for gastrectomy was an independent risk factor for both cholelithiasis (TG/DG: OR (95%CI): 1.900 (1.114-3.240), p = 0.018) and cholecystitis and/or cholangitis (TG/DG: OR (95%CI): 8.325 (1.814-38.197), p = 0.006). In patients who developed cholelithiasis, the incidence of cholecystitis and/or cholangitis was 31.3% (10/32) after TG, but only 7.4% after DG. Prophylactic cholecystectomy may be unnecessary in distal gastrectomy with Billroth I reconstruction.

  13. Antibiotics: Miracle Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-16

    The overuse of antibiotics has led to the development of resistance among bacteria, making antibiotics ineffective in treating certain conditions. This podcast discusses the importance of talking to your healthcare professional about whether or not antibiotics will be beneficial if you’ve been diagnosed with an infectious disease.  Created: 4/16/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  14. Prophylactic Effect of Ondansetron for Intrathecal Fentanyl-Induced Pruritus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Fathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Using opioids along with local analgesic increase anesthesia duration and provide appropriate postoperative analgesia. However, intrathecal injection of opioids is associated with upsetting side effects including pruritus. Ondansetron (5-HT3 receptor agonist has anti-pruritus effects. Therefore, we conducted a double blind randomized case-control study to evaluate prophylactic effects of ondansetron for preventing intrathecal fentanyl-induced pruritus. Materials and Methods: Two hundred seven patients with ASA status I, II or III, who were candidate for pelvic or lower extremity surgery with spinal anesthesia (SA using bupivacaine hyperbaric (10-15 mg and fentanyl (25 μg were included in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups of case (ondansetron 8 mg IV and control (4 ml normal saline IV. Patients’ hemodynamic indexes and side effects were evaluated at 5, 10, 30, 60 minutes and then hourly up to 6 hours after SA. Pruritus presence, degree, and site were evaluated after two and six hours. Data were analyzed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, student t-test, Mann–Whitney U, χP2P, Fisher exact test, and Spearman linear correlation coefficient. Results: The pruritus incidence was 60% in control and 34% in case group. Severe pruritus was observed in 18% of control group and 6% of case group. Ninety four percent of patients with pruritus in control group expressed it in above TR6R dermatomes and 74% of patients with pruritus in case group had pruritus in TR6R-LR1R dermatomes. The incidence of pruritus in LR1R-lower dermatomes was similar in two groups. Headache and nausea after anesthesia were more common in control group (p=0.035. Conclusion: Ondansetron decrease incidence and degree of intrathecal fentanyl-induced pruritus. This reduction was more significant around injection area TR6R-LR1R dermatomes. Ondansetron injection does not influence systolic blood pressure, duration of anesthesia and analgesia, and does not

  15. Effects of prophylactic administration of bacteriophages to immunosuppressed mice infected with Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borysowski Jan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteriophages can be successfully applied to treat infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Until now no attempts have been undertaken to treat infections in immunosuppressed patients with phages. In this work we investigated the prophylactic efficacy of specific bacteriophages in CBA mice treated with cyclophosphamide (CP and infected with Staphylococcus aureus. Results High numbers of bacterial colony-forming units in the organs as well as elevated tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6 serum concentrations in CP-treated and S. aureus-infected mice were significantly lowered upon application of phages. The phages markedly increased the percentage of circulating neutrophils and immature cells from the myelocytic and lymphocytic lineages in CP-treated, S. aureus-infected mice as well as of myelocytes and immature neutrophils in the bone marrow. In addition, phages stimulated in such mice generation of specific agglutinins against S. aureus. Conclusion Application of specific phages to immunosuppressed mice prior to infection with S. aureus proved very effective, suggesting a potential benefit of phage therapy in immunocompromised patients experiencing bacterial infections.

  16. Effects of prophylactic administration of bacteriophages to immunosuppressed mice infected with Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimecki, Michał; Artym, Jolanta; Kocieba, Maja; Weber-Dabrowska, Beata; Borysowski, Jan; Górski, Andrzej

    2009-08-17

    Bacteriophages can be successfully applied to treat infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Until now no attempts have been undertaken to treat infections in immunosuppressed patients with phages. In this work we investigated the prophylactic efficacy of specific bacteriophages in CBA mice treated with cyclophosphamide (CP) and infected with Staphylococcus aureus. High numbers of bacterial colony-forming units in the organs as well as elevated tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6 serum concentrations in CP-treated and S. aureus-infected mice were significantly lowered upon application of phages. The phages markedly increased the percentage of circulating neutrophils and immature cells from the myelocytic and lymphocytic lineages in CP-treated, S. aureus-infected mice as well as of myelocytes and immature neutrophils in the bone marrow. In addition, phages stimulated in such mice generation of specific agglutinins against S. aureus. Application of specific phages to immunosuppressed mice prior to infection with S. aureus proved very effective, suggesting a potential benefit of phage therapy in immunocompromised patients experiencing bacterial infections.

  17. Pharmacotherapy as prophylactic treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Autumn Pearl

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder has a lifetime prevalence of almost 9% in the United States. The diagnosis is associated with increased rates of comorbid substance abuse and increased rates of depression. Providers are taught how to diagnose and treat PTSD, but little discussion is devoted to how to prevent the disorder. Behavioral research in animal studies has provided some evidence for the use of medications in decreasing the fear response and the reconsolidation of memories. A heightened fear response and the re-experience of traumatic memory are key components for diagnosis. The purpose of this literature review is to examine the evidence for pharmacotherapy as prophylactic treatment in acute stress/trauma in order to prevent the development of post-traumatic stress disorder. The body of the review includes discussions on medications, medications as adjunct to script-driven imagery, and special considerations for military, first responders, and women. This article concludes with implications for practice and recommendations for future research. The key words used for the literature search were "prophylactic treatment of PTSD," "pharmacotherapy and trauma," "pharmacological prevention of PTSD," "beta blockers and the prevention of PTSD," "acute stress and prevention of PTSD," "propranolol and PTSD," "secondary prevention of PTSD," and "medications used to prevent PTSD." Findings were categorized by medications and medications as adjunct to script-driven imagery. The literature suggests that hydrocortisone, propranolol, and morphine may decrease symptoms and diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder.

  18. Psychotic disorder after contact with a potentially rabid animal and post-exposure prophylactic anti-rabies treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojani, Shabnamzehra; Aldana-Bernier, Lilian; Sikder, Mobaswera; Pawelzik, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old who developed psychotic symptoms after exposure to a potentially rabid animal and post-exposure prophylactic treatment. This case serves to remind physicians to fully explore the possibility of a nonpsychiatric origin of de novo psychotic symptoms and provides indirect evidence in favor of the possible involvement of the immune system in the development of psychotic disorders.

  19. Prophylactic Ankle Braces and Knee Varus-Valgus and Internal-External Rotation Torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venesky, Kandy; Docherty, Carrie L; Dapena, Jesus; Schrader, John

    2006-01-01

    Context: Although prophylactic ankle bracing has been shown to be effective in reducing the incidence of ankle sprains, how these ankle braces might affect the other joints of the lower extremity is not clearly understood. Objective: To determine the effects of a prophylactic ankle brace on knee joint varus-valgus and internal-external rotation torque during a drop landing onto a slanted surface. Design: A repeated-measures design. Setting: Biomechanics research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-four physically active college students. Intervention(s): Participants were tested in a brace and no-brace condition. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured 3 dependent variables: (1) peak ankle inversion-eversion torque, (2) peak knee varus-valgus torque, and (3) peak knee internal-external rotation torque. A forceplate was used to collect ground reaction force data, and 6 motion analysis cameras collected kinematic data during the unilateral drop landing. An adjustable bar was hung from the ceiling, and a slant board was positioned over the center of the forceplate, so that the ankle of the participant's dominant leg would invert upon landing. Peak torque was measured in both the brace and no-brace conditions. The average of the peak values in 3 trials for both conditions was used for the statistical analysis. Results: Ankle eversion torque was significantly greater in the brace condition (F1,23 = 19.75, P Knee external rotation torque was significantly greater in the brace condition (F1,23 = 4.33,P knee torque was smaller in the brace condition, but the difference was not statistically significant (F1,23 = 3.45,P = .08). Conclusions: This study provides an important first step in understanding the effects of prophylactic ankle bracing on other joints of the lower extremity. We found that prophylactic ankle bracing did have an effect on knee torque when the subject was landing on a slanted surface. Specifically, knee external rotation torque increased when

  20. When and How to Take Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antibiotic resistance? When and how to take antibiotics Antibacterial agents Bioterrorism & stockpiling antibiotics The Cost of Resistance Science of Resistance Ecology Antibiotics in Agriculture Antibacterial ...

  1. Handling Time-dependent Variables : Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Price, L. Silvia; Frencken, Jos F.; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods,

  2. Antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance in dental practice

    OpenAIRE

    Ytreland, Kristian J.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is an increasing problem in health care settings worldwide. After approximately 70 years of antibiotic use, the bacteria have developed mechanisms that let them survive antibiotic treatment. The use of antibiotics is an important factor in resistance development. Norwegian dentists prescribe approximately 5.3% of the total antibiotics consumed in the country. Dentists tend to use mostly β-Lactam antibiotics, metronidazoles, macrolides, lincosamides and te...

  3. Antibiotic resistance in bacteria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antibiotic in the body and its concentration at the site of infec- tion, and the immune ... Several pathogens” are increasingly developing resistance, particularly to first-line ... and spread of antimicrobial resistance due to exposure of heavy antibiotic use in a ..... cephalosporins South Korea, Portugal, Croatia 19. France, USA ...

  4. The future of antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to spread even as society is experiencing a market failure of new antibiotic research and development (R&D). Scientific, economic, and regulatory barriers all contribute to the antibiotic market failure. Scientific solutions to rekindle R&D include finding new screening strategies to identify novel antibiotic scaffolds and transforming the way we think about treating infections, such that the goal is to disarm the pathogen without killing it or modulate the host response to the organism without targeting the organism for destruction. Future economic strategies are likely to focus on ‘push’ incentives offered by public-private partnerships as well as increasing pricing by focusing development on areas of high unmet need. Such strategies can also help protect new antibiotics from overuse after marketing. Regulatory reform is needed to re-establish feasible and meaningful traditional antibiotic pathways, to create novel limited-use pathways that focus on highly resistant infections, and to harmonize regulatory standards across nations. We need new antibiotics with which to treat our patients. But we also need to protect those new antibiotics from misuse when they become available. If we want to break the cycle of resistance and change the current landscape, disruptive approaches that challenge long-standing dogma will be needed. PMID:25043962

  5. History of Antibiotics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Kathrin I

    2016-01-01

    For thousands of years people were delivered helplessly to various kinds of infections, which often reached epidemic proportions and have cost the lives of millions of people. This is precisely the age since mankind has been thinking of infectious diseases and the question of their causes. However, due to a lack of knowledge, the search for strategies to fight, heal, and prevent the spread of communicable diseases was unsuccessful for a long time. It was not until the discovery of the healing effects of (antibiotic producing) molds, the first microscopic observations of microorganisms in the seventeenth century, the refutation of the abiogenesis theory, and the dissolution of the question "What is the nature of infectious diseases?" that the first milestones within the history of antibiotics research were set. Then new discoveries accelerated rapidly: Bacteria could be isolated and cultured and were identified as possible agents of diseases as well as producers of bioactive metabolites. At the same time the first synthetic antibiotics were developed and shortly thereafter, thousands of synthetic substances as well as millions of soil borne bacteria and fungi were screened for bioactivity within numerous microbial laboratories of pharmaceutical companies. New antibiotic classes with different targets were discovered as on assembly line production. With the beginning of the twentieth century, many of the diseases which reached epidemic proportions at the time-e.g., cholera, syphilis, plague, tuberculosis, or typhoid fever, just to name a few, could be combatted with new discovered antibiotics. It should be considered that hundred years ago the market launch of new antibiotics was significantly faster and less complicated than today (where it takes 10-12 years in average between the discovery of a new antibiotic until the launch). After the first euphoria it was quickly realized that bacteria are able to develop, acquire, and spread numerous resistance mechanisms

  6. Living With Prophylactic ICD Therapy and the Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death: How Patients Negotiate Solutions and Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grew, Julie Christina

    2017-12-01

    Prophylactic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy treats potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmias in patients who have not previously experienced such but are at considerable risk due to underlying heart disease. Most patients are unaware of their risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) until the ICD is introduced to them. Thus, the problem of risk of death and the solution of ICD therapy are presented simultaneously. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in Danish hospitals, this article illustrates how clinicians narrate prophylactic ICD therapy as a benign therapy preventing risk of death and providing the good life. However, risk of SCD is not the most pressing problem for the patients. The article argues that the solution of ICD therapy ignores patients' experience of living with severe heart disease and introduces the risk of shock therapy. For patients, a good life does not equal absence of risk of death but a life without heart disease.

  7. antibiotic susceptibility pattern and multiple antibiotic resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pg, gentamicin 10 pg, streptomycin 30 pg, erythromycin 30 ug and chloramphenicol 20 tlg. Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCTC 10662 served as control. Determination of MAR index. The MAR index was determined for each isolate by dividing the number of antibiotics to which the isolate is resistant by the total number of ...

  8. Prophylactic and postexposure efficacy of a potent human monoclonal antibody against MERS coronavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Davide; Zhao, Jincun; Pedotti, Mattia; Simonelli, Luca; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Fett, Craig; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Foglierini, Mathilde; Agatic, Gloria; Vanzetta, Fabrizia; Gopal, Robin; Langrish, Christopher J.; Barrett, Nicholas A; Sallusto, Federica; Baric, Ralph S.; Varani, Luca; Zambon, Maria; Perlman, Stanley; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a highly lethal pulmonary infection caused by a previously unidentified coronavirus (CoV), likely transmitted to humans by infected camels. There is no licensed vaccine or antiviral for MERS, therefore new prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to combat human infections are needed. In this study, we describe, for the first time, to our knowledge, the isolation of a potent MERS-CoV–neutralizing antibody from memory B cells of an infected individual. The antibody, named LCA60, binds to a novel site on the spike protein and potently neutralizes infection of multiple MERS-CoV isolates by interfering with the binding to the cellular receptor CD26. Importantly, using mice transduced with adenovirus expressing human CD26 and infected with MERS-CoV, we show that LCA60 can effectively protect in both prophylactic and postexposure settings. This antibody can be used for prophylaxis, for postexposure prophylaxis of individuals at risk, or for the treatment of human cases of MERS-CoV infection. The fact that it took only 4 mo from the initial screening of B cells derived from a convalescent patient for the development of a stable chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line producing neutralizing antibodies at more than 5 g/L provides an example of a rapid pathway toward the generation of effective antiviral therapies against emerging viruses. PMID:26216974

  9. Prophylactic radiotherapy of the breast in patients with prostatic carcinoma before application of contrasexual hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arndt, D.; Heibel, J.H.

    1983-08-01

    Symptoms and objective parameters of gynecomastia are analysed in 113 patients, who received prophylactic irradiation of the breast (12 Gy in 3 fractions) prior to estrogen therapy of prostatic carcinoma. Another 10 patients were treated equally after estrogens had caused severe complaints. Symptoms increased from 10% to 100% in relation to 4 classes of gynecomastia. They were mild in 27.5%, moderate in 23.9% and severe in 8.8%. A correlation between metric classification and graded symptoms became more evident when only 2 groups were distinguished. With a maximum diameter of 3.5 cm only 17% of the patients had mostly slight discomfort in contrast to 70% of the patients with a gland of more than 3.5 cm in diameter; they revealed moderate or serious complaints. These results indicate that prophylactic radiotherapy may reduce severe complications to less than 10% as compared to 70-80% without irradiation. If gynecomastia has developed, regression by subsequent radiotherapy seems to be impossible; but the intensity of complaints could be reduced in our ten patients. Provided that irradiation precedes estrogen application, this sequence may be considered as a reasonable alternative to expensive antiandrogen therapy.

  10. A review of prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines: recommendations and monitoring in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Eileen F; Datta, S Deblina; E Markowitz, Lauri

    2008-11-15

    It has been estimated that genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the US. Nononcogenic types, such as HPV type 6 (HPV-6) and HPV-11, can cause benign or low-grade cervical cell changes, genital warts, and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. Oncogenic types can cause cervical and other anogenital cancers; oncogenic HPV types are detected in 99% of cervical cancers worldwide. A quadrivalent HPV vaccine to prevent HPV-6, HPV-11, HPV-16, and HPV-18 was licensed for use in the US in June 2006 and an application for Food and Drug Administration licensure was submitted for a bivalent HPV vaccine to prevent HPV-16 and HPV-18 in March 2007. Currently in the US, the quadrivalent HPV vaccine is recommended for routine immunization of girls aged 11 and 12 years, and catch-up immunization is recommended through age 26 years. Monitoring the impact of prophylactic HPV vaccines will be useful for understanding the population level impact of vaccination. In this report, the authors provide a brief review of the epidemiology of HPV infection and an overview of prophylactic HPV vaccines and postvaccine licensure monitoring.

  11. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Sang Hee Lee; Ill Hwan Cho; Byeong Chul Jeong; Chang-Ro Lee

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic r...

  12. Towards rational use of antibiotics for suspected secondary infections in Buruli ulcer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barogui, Yves T; Klis, Sandor; Bankolé, Honoré Sourou; Sopoh, Ghislain E; Mamo, Solomon; Baba-Moussa, Lamine; Manson, Willem L; Johnson, Roch Christian; van der Werf, Tjip S; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2013-01-01

    The emerging disease Buruli ulcer is treated with streptomycin and rifampicin and surgery if necessary. Frequently other antibiotics are used during treatment. Information on prescribing behavior of antibiotics for suspected secondary infections and for prophylactic use was collected retrospectively. Of 185 patients that started treatment for Buruli ulcer in different centers in Ghana and Bénin 51 were admitted. Forty of these 51 admitted patients (78%) received at least one course of antibiotics other than streptomycin and rifampicin during their hospital stay. The median number (IQR) of antibiotic courses for admitted patients was 2 (1, 5). Only twelve patients received antibiotics for a suspected secondary infection, all other courses were prescribed as prophylaxis of secondary infections extended till 10 days on average after excision, debridement or skin grafting. Antibiotic regimens varied considerably per indication. In another group of BU patients in two centers in Bénin, superficial wound cultures were performed. These cultures from superficial swabs represented bacteria to be expected from a chronic wound, but 13 of the 34 (38%) S. aureus were MRSA. A guide for rational antibiotic treatment for suspected secondary infections or prophylaxis is needed. Adherence to the guideline proposed in this article may reduce and tailor antibiotic use other than streptomycin and rifampicin in Buruli ulcer patients. It may save costs, reduce toxicity and limit development of further antimicrobial resistance. This topic should be included in general protocols on the management of Buruli ulcer.

  13. Antibiotics in periodontal surgeries: A prospective randomised cross over clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Oswal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: (1 To evaluate the need of antibiotics in periodontal surgeries in reducing postsurgical infections and explore if antibiotics have any key role in reducing or eliminating inflammatory complications. (2 To establish the incidence of postoperative infections in relation to type of surgery and determine those factors, which may affect infection rates. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized double-blind cross over clinical study was carried out for a period of 1-year with predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. All the patients included in the study for any periodontal surgery were randomly divided into three categories: Group A (prophylactic, Group B (therapeutic, and Group C (no antibiotics. Patients were followed up for 1-week after surgery on the day of suture removal and were evaluated for pain, swelling, fever, infection, delayed wound healing and any other significant findings. Appropriate statistical analysis was carried out to evaluate the objectives and P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: No infection was reported in any of 90 sites. Patients reported less pain and postoperative discomfort when prophylactic antibiotics were given. However, there were no statistical significant differences between the three groups. Summary and Conclusion: There was no postoperative infection reported in all the 90 sites operated in this study. The prevalence of postoperative infections following periodontal surgery is <1% and this low risk does not justify the routine use of systemic antimicrobials just to prevent infections. Use of prophylactic antibiotics may have role in prevention of inflammatory complication, but again not infection.

  14. Pervasive antibiotic misuse in the Cambodian community: antibiotic-seeking behaviour with unrestricted access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhorvoin Om

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic misuse is widespread in resource-limited countries such as Cambodia where the burden of infectious diseases is high and access to antibiotics is unrestricted. We explored healthcare seeking behaviour related to obtaining antibiotics and drivers of antibiotic misuse in the Cambodian community. Methods In-depth interviews were held with family members of patients being admitted in hospitals and private pharmacies termed pharmacy attendants in the catchment areas of the hospitals. Nurses who run community primary healthcare centres located within the hospital catchment areas were invited to attend focus group discussions. Nvivo version 10 was used to code and manage thematic data analysis. Results We conducted individual interviews with 35 family members, 7 untrained pharmacy attendants and 3 trained pharmacists and 6 focus group discussions with 30 nurses. Self-medication with a drug-cocktail was widespread and included broad-spectrum antibiotics for mild illness. Unrestricted access to antibiotics was facilitated by various community enablers including pharmacies or drug outlets, nurse suppliers and unofficial village medical providers referred to as “village Pett” whose healthcare training has historically been in the field and not at university. These enablers supplied the community with various types of antibiotics including broad spectrum fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins. When treatment was perceived to be ineffective patients would prescriber-shop various suppliers who would unfailingly provide them with antibiotics. The main driver of the community’s demand for antibiotics was a mistaken belief in the benefits of antibiotics for a common cold, high temperature, pain, malaria and ‘Roleak’ which includes a broad catch-all for perceived inflammatory conditions. For severe illnesses, patients would attend a community healthcare centre, hospital, or when their finances permitted, a private prescriber

  15. Prophylactic intravenous nimodipine treatment in skull base surgery: pharmacokinetic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, C; Vogel, A-S; Simmermacher, S; Rachinger, J C; Prell, J; Strauss, C; Reinsch, M; Kunter, U; Wienke, A; Neumann, J; Scheller, K

    2012-05-01

    Nimodipine is primarily used in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Clinical trials revealed also a beneficial effect of prophylactic nimodipine treatment on cranial nerve functions following vestibular schwannoma surgery. The unknown pharmacokinetics of prophylactically administered nimodipine were investigated. Samples were taken from 27 patients with skull base lesions. Prophylactic intravenous nimodipine infusion was started 5.8-25.8 h (mean 17.9 h) before surgery. Nimodipine concentrations were determined in serum (intra- and postoperatively), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (intraoperatively), and tissue samples. Wide interindividual differences were observed. Mean concentrations for nimodipine were 46.9 ng/ml (SD: 6.4; min. 4.1 and max. 92.7 ng/ml) in intraoperative serum, 73.2 ng/ml (SD: 16.7; min. 6.6 and max. 253 ng/ml) in postoperative serum and 8.3 ng/ml (SD: 1.5; min. 1.0 und max. 29.7 ng/ml) in intraoperative CSF. The correlation between intra- and postoperative serum (p=0.004, r=0.560) and between intra-operative serum and CSF concentration (p=0.003, r=0.567) were statistically significant. Furthermore the correlation between intraoperative serum concentration and concentrations collected from vestibular nerves was high (r=0.711), but not statistically significant (p=0.178). Interindividually, continously administered intravenous nimodipine produces considerably variable serum levels. Controls of nimodipine serum concentrations may be useful to optimize nimodipine medication in skull base surgery and in the management of SAH. The serum nimodipine level is a useful marker for CSF and intracranial nerve tissue concentrations of nimodipine. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Prophylactic efficiency of glass-ionomer fissure sealant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Bojan B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most efficient prophylactic measures in caries prevention is sealing pits and fissures. After improvements of physical and mechanical properties, glass-ionomers are frequently used as sealing materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prophylactic efficiency of Fuji VII, a glass-ionomer fissure sealant, through adaptation ability and fluoride reeasing potential assessment using scanning electron microscopic and energy dispersive spectroscopic techniques. The sample consisted of 20 extracted intact human teeth, 10 premolars and 10 molars. Six sections of each tooth were analyzed using SEM. EDS analysis was conducted one week and three months after material placement. The parameters used for the evaluation included: adaptation ability, penetration depth, material structure, integrity of the interfacial zone and ion exchange extent. The sealant penetration depth was observed at 30 X magnification, and the interfacial zone between the material and the enamel at 500-10000 X. EDS was used for quantitative analysis of the material structure, interfacial zone and the enamel surface. The results were statistically analyzed the using chisquare test and descriptive statistical methods. SEM analysis revealed the zone of interaction between the enamel surface and the glass-ionomer with predominant cohesive failures within the sealant material, and satisfactory adaptation ability of the sealing material. The mean value of the penetration was 83% of the total fissure depth, without a statistically significant difference between the tested teeth groups. A lower penetration ability was observed in deep pits and fissures with a larger diameter of unfilled space (p<0.05. EDS analysis revealed the potential of the glass-ionomer for ion exchange with dental tissues. The presence of fluoride ions was detected in 2 sections 3 months after material placement. Glass-ionomers, chemically cured, biocompatible materials demonstrate satisfactory

  17. Solving the Antibiotic Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Gerard D

    2015-02-13

    Antibiotics are essential for both treating and preventing infectious diseases. Paradoxically, despite their importance as pillars of modern medicine, we are in danger of losing antibiotics because of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms throughout all pathogenic microbes. This fact, coupled with an inability to bring new drugs to market at a pace that matches resistance, has resulted in a crisis of global proportion. Solving this crisis requires the actions of many stakeholders, but chemists, chemical biologists, and microbiologists must drive the scientific innovation that is required to maintain our antibiotic arsenal. This innovation requires (1) a deep understanding of the evolution and reservoirs of resistance; (2) full knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic action and resistance; (3) the discovery of chemical and genetic probes of antibiotic action and resistance; (4) the integration of systems biology into antibiotic discovery; and (5) the discovery of new antimicrobial chemical matter. Addressing these pressing scientific gaps will ensure that we can meet the antibiotic crisis with creativity and purpose.

  18. Biosensors, antibiotics and food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virolainen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics are medicine's leading asset for fighting microbial infection, which is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. However, the misuse of antibiotics has led to the rapid spread of antibiotic resistance among bacteria and the development of multiple resistant pathogens. Therefore, antibiotics are rapidly losing their antimicrobial value. The use of antibiotics in food production animals is strictly controlled by the European Union (EU). Veterinary use is regulated to prevent the spread of resistance. EU legislation establishes maximum residue limits for veterinary medicinal products in foodstuffs of animal origin and enforces the establishment and execution of national monitoring plans. Among samples selected for monitoring, suspected noncompliant samples are screened and then subjected to confirmatory analysis to establish the identity and concentration of the contaminant. Screening methods for antibiotic residues are typically based on microbiological growth inhibition, whereas physico-chemical methods are used for confirmatory analysis. This chapter discusses biosensors, especially whole-cell based biosensors, as emerging screening methods for antibiotic residues. Whole-cell biosensors can offer highly sensitive and specific detection of residues. Applications demonstrating quantitative analysis and specific analyte identification further improve their potential as screening methods.

  19. Antibiotic prescribing practices by dentists: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najla Saeed Dar-Odeh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Najla Saeed Dar-Odeh1, Osama Abdalla Abu-Hammad1, Mahmoud Khaled Al-Omiri1, Ameen Sameh Khraisat1, Asem Ata Shehabi21Faculty of Dentistry, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan; 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Jordan, Amman, JordanAbstract: Antibiotics are prescribed by dentists for treatment as well as prevention of infection. Indications for the use of systemic antibiotics in dentistry are limited, since most dental and periodontal diseases are best managed by operative intervention and oral hygiene measures. However, the literature provides evidence of inadequate prescribing practices by dentists, due to a number of factors ranging from inadequate knowledge to social factors. Here we review studies that investigated the pattern of antibiotic use by dentists worldwide. The main defects in the knowledge of antibiotic prescribing are outlined. The main conclusion is that, unfortunately, the prescribing practices of dentists are inadequate and this is manifested by over-prescribing. Recommendations to improve antibiotic prescribing practices are presented in an attempt to curb the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance and other side effects of antibiotic abuse.Keywords: over-prescribing, antimicrobial resistance, recommended practice, penicillin

  20. The role of prophylactic surgery in cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Y Nancy; Lakhani, Vipul T; Wells, Samuel A

    2007-03-01

    Since the human genome has been sequenced many mysteries of cell biology have been unravelled, thereby clarifying the pathogenesis of several diseases, particularly cancer. In members of kindreds with certain hereditary diseases, it is now possible early in life to predict with great certainty whether or not a family member has inherited the mutated allele causing the disease. In hereditary malignancies this has been particularly important, because in affected family members there is the possibility of removing the organ destined to develop cancer before malignancy develops or while it is in situ. At first consideration, it would appear that "prophylactic surgery" would have a place in many hereditary malignancies; however, the procedure has applicability only if certain criteria are met: (1) the genetic mutation causing the hereditary malignancy must have a very high penetrance and be expressed regardless of environmental factors; (2) there must be a highly reliable test to identify patients who have inherited the mutated gene; (3) the organ must be removed with minimal morbidity and virtually no mortality; (4) there must be a suitable replacement for the function of the removed organ; and (5) there must be a reliable method of determining over time that the patient has been cured by "prophylactic surgery." In this monograph we review several hereditary malignancies and consider those where prophylactic surgery might be useful. As we learn, there are various barriers to performing the procedure in many common hereditary cancer syndromes. The archetype disease syndromes, which meet each of the five criteria mentioned above and where prophylactic surgery is most useful, are the type 2 multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) syndromes: MEN2A, MEN2B, and the related familial medullary thyroid carcinoma. An additional benefit of the Human Genome Project, has been the development of pharmacologic and biologic compounds that block the metabolic pathway(s) activated by

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies as Prophylactic and Therapeutic Agents Against Chikungunya Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, April M

    2016-12-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that is responsible for considerable epidemics worldwide and recently emerged in the Americas in 2013. CHIKV may cause long-lasting arthralgia after acute infection. With currently no licensed vaccines or antivirals, the design of effective therapies to prevent or treat CHIKV infection is of utmost importance and will be facilitated by increased understanding of the dynamics of chikungunya. In this article, monoclonal antibodies against CHIKV as viable prophylactic and therapeutic agents will be discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Knowledge, attitude and practice of prophylactic mastectomy among patients and relations attending a surgical outpatient clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Oguntola, Adetunji Saliu; Olaitan, Peter Babatunde; Omotoso, Olutayo; Oseni, Ganiyu Oyediran

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Prophylactic mastectomy (PM) is uncommon in our practice. This study documents the knowledge and attitude of patients and relation to prophylactic mastectomy. Methods Adults attending surgical outpatient unit were interviewed. Biodata, awareness of breast cancer, and attitude towards prophylactic mastectomy were inquired about and documented. Results Two hundred and forty eight (99 men and 149 women) were involved. Most, 75.6%, were age bracket 20-29 years and 77.2% had tertiary ...

  3. Antibiotics for acute maxillary sinusitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahovuo-Saloranta, Anneli; Rautakorpi, Ulla-Maija; Borisenko, Oleg V; Liira, Helena; Williams, John W; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2014-02-11

    ). Five studies at low risk of bias comparing penicillin or amoxicillin to placebo provided information on the main outcome: clinical failure rate at 7 to 15 days follow-up, defined as a lack of full recovery or improvement, for participants with symptoms lasting at least seven days. In these studies antibiotics decreased the risk of clinical failure (pooled RR of 0.66, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.94, 1084 participants randomised, 1058 evaluated, moderate quality evidence). However, the clinical benefit was small. Cure or improvement rates were high in both the placebo group (86%) and the antibiotic group (91%) in these five studies. When clinical failure was defined as a lack of full recovery (n = five studies), results were similar: antibiotics decreased the risk of failure (pooled RR of 0.73, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.85, high quality evidence) at 7 to 15 days follow-up.Adverse effects in seven of the nine placebo-controlled studies (comparing penicillin, amoxicillin, azithromycin or moxicillin to placebo) were more common in antibiotic than in placebo groups (median of difference between groups 10.5%, range 2% to 23%). However, drop-outs due to adverse effects were rare in both groups: 1.5% in antibiotic groups and 1% in control groups.In the 10 head-to-head comparisons, none of the antibiotic preparations were superior to another. However, amoxicillin-clavulanate had significantly more drop-outs due to adverse effects than cephalosporins and macrolides. There is moderate evidence that antibiotics provide a small benefit for clinical outcomes in immunocompetent primary care patients with uncomplicated acute sinusitis. However, about 80% of participants treated without antibiotics improved within two weeks. Clinicians need to weigh the small benefits of antibiotic treatment against the potential for adverse effects at both the individual and general population levels.

  4. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This

  5. ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS IN BARIATRIC SURGERY: a continuous infusion of cefazolin versus ampicillin/sulbactam and ertapenem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Antônio Bandeira FERRAZ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The incidence of surgical site infection in bariatric patients is significant and the current recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis are sometimes inadequate. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of three prophylactic antibiotic regimens on the incidence of surgical site infection. Methods A prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted between January 2009 and January 2013 in which 896 Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses were performed to treat obesity. The study compared three groups of patients according to the perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis administered intravenously and beginning at anesthesia induction: Group I consisting of 194 patients treated with two 3-g doses of ampicillin/sulbactam; Group II with 303 patients treated with a single 1-g dose of ertapenem; and Group III with 399 patients treated with a 2-g dose of cefazolin at anesthesia induction followed by a continuous infusion of cefazolin 1g throughout the surgical procedure. The rate of surgical site infection was analyzed, as well as its association with age, sex, preoperative weight, body mass index and comorbidities. Results The rates of surgical site infection were 4.16% in the group treated prophylactically with ampicillin/sulbactam, 1.98% in the ertapenem group and 1.55% in the continuous cefazolin group. Conclusion The prophylactic use of continuous cefazolin in surgeries for morbid obesity shows very promising results. These findings suggest that some prophylactic regimens need to be reconsidered and even substituted by more effective therapies for the prevention of surgical site infections in bariatric patients.

  6. Generic antibiotic industries: Challenges and implied strategies with regulatory perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Venkatesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the discovery of antibiotics, the quality of human life greatly improved in the 20 th century. The discovery of penicillin transformed the medicine industry and initiated a search for a better antibiotic every time resulting in several synthetic and semi-synthetic antibiotics. Beginning with the 1937 sulfa drug tragedy, the drug regulations had a parallel growth along with the antibiotics and the antibiotic-based generic Pharma industries. This review article is focused on the scenario depicting current global Pharma industries based on generic antibiotics. Several regulatory aspects involved with these industries have been discussed along with the complexity of the market, issues that could affect their growth, their struggle for quality, and their compliance with the tightened regulations. With the skyrocketing commercialization of antibiotics through generics and the leveraging technologic renaissance, generic industries are involved in providing maximum safer benefits for the welfare of the people, highlighting its need today.

  7. Botanical alternatives to antibiotics for use in organic poultry production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra; D'Souza, Doris; Biswas, Debrabrata; Hanning, Irene

    2015-06-01

    The development of antibiotic resistant pathogens has resulted from the use of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics delivered in poultry feed. Furthermore, there are a number of consumer concerns regarding the use of antibiotics in food animals including residue contamination of poultry products and antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. These issues have resulted in recommendations to reduce the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in livestock in the United States. Unlike conventional production, organic systems are not permitted to use antibiotics. Thus, both conventional and organic poultry production need alternative methods to improve growth and performance of poultry. Herbs, spices, and various other plant extracts are being evaluated as alternatives to antibiotics and some do have growth promoting effects, antimicrobial properties, and other health-related benefits. This review aims to provide an overview of herbs, spices, and plant extracts, currently defined as phytobiotics as potential feed additives. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  8. Nonmedical Uses of Antibiotics: Time to Restrict Their Use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard William Meek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The global crisis of antibiotic resistance has reached a point where, if action is not taken, human medicine will enter a postantibiotic world and simple injuries could once again be life threatening. New antibiotics are needed urgently, but better use of existing agents is just as important. More appropriate use of antibiotics in medicine is vital, but the extensive use of antibiotics outside medical settings is often overlooked. Antibiotics are commonly used in animal husbandry, bee-keeping, fish farming and other forms of aquaculture, ethanol production, horticulture, antifouling paints, food preservation, and domestically. This provides multiple opportunities for the selection and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Given the current crisis, it is vital that the nonmedical use of antibiotics is critically examined and that any nonessential use halted.

  9. Nonmedical Uses of Antibiotics: Time to Restrict Their Use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Richard William; Vyas, Hrushi; Piddock, Laura Jane Violet

    2015-10-01

    The global crisis of antibiotic resistance has reached a point where, if action is not taken, human medicine will enter a postantibiotic world and simple injuries could once again be life threatening. New antibiotics are needed urgently, but better use of existing agents is just as important. More appropriate use of antibiotics in medicine is vital, but the extensive use of antibiotics outside medical settings is often overlooked. Antibiotics are commonly used in animal husbandry, bee-keeping, fish farming and other forms of aquaculture, ethanol production, horticulture, antifouling paints, food preservation, and domestically. This provides multiple opportunities for the selection and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Given the current crisis, it is vital that the nonmedical use of antibiotics is critically examined and that any nonessential use halted.

  10. Comparison of brain mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity with cyanide LD(50) yields insight into the efficacy of prophylactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziaz, Mandy L; Frazier, Kathryn; Guidry, Paul B; Ruiz, Robyn A; Petrikovics, Ilona; Haines, Donovan C

    2013-01-01

    Cyanide inhibits cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal oxidase of the mitochondrial respiratory pathway, therefore inhibiting the cell oxygen utilization and resulting in the condition of histotoxic anoxia. The enzyme rhodanese detoxifies cyanide by utilizing sulfur donors to convert cyanide to thiocyanate, and new and improved sulfur donors are actively sought as researchers seek to improve cyanide prophylactics. We have determined brain cytochrome c oxidase activity as a marker for cyanide exposure for mice pre-treated with various cyanide poisoning prophylactics, including sulfur donors thiosulfate (TS) and thiotaurine (TT3). Brain mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation, the outer mitochondrial membrane was disrupted by a maltoside detergent, and the decrease in absorbance at 550 nm as horse heart ferrocytochrome c (generated by the dithiothreitol reduction of ferricytochrome c) was oxidized was monitored. Overall, the TS control prophylactic treatment provided significant protection of the cytochrome c oxidase activity. The TT3-treated mice showed reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity even in the absence of cyanide. In both treatment series, addition of exogenous Rh did not significantly enhance the prevention of cytochrome c oxidase inhibition, but the addition of sodium nitrite did. These findings can lead to a better understanding of the protection mechanism by various cyanide antidotal systems. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Antibiotic prophylaxis for premature rupture of membranes and perinatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barišić, Tatjana; Mandić, Vjekoslav; Tomić, Vajdana; Zovko, Ana; Novaković, Gorjana

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the perinatal outcomes of newborns after premature rupture of membranes (PROM) at the term according to the timing of initial antibiotic administration. This is a retrospective, cohort study investigating perinatal outcomes of newborns in pregnant women with PROM at the term who were treated with ampicillin within or after 6 h from the PROM. Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test for continuous variables test and chi-square or for categorical data. The study involved 144 pregnant women with PROM and their newborns, a lower number received antibiotics after birth were in the group who received antibiotics within 6 h of PROM (26.4% versus 73.6%), the mediane values of C-reactive protein were lower (3.0 ± 2.9 mg/l versus 6.1 ± 7.3 mg/l; p < 0.001), their newborns remained shorter in hospital after birth (4.13 versus 4.94; p =0.023) and time between PROM and delivery was shorter (p < 0.001). In group who received prophylactic antibiotics after 6 h of the PROM had significantly higher frequency of infection in newborns (45.3% versus 15.4%), and higher number of chorioamnionitis (9.72% versus 3,47%) compared to group who received antibiotics within 6h. Timely usage of antibiotic prophylaxis and shorter time between PROM and delivery improve perinatal outcomes.

  12. Antibiotics for uncomplicated diverticulitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel M; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    Diverticulitis is an inflammatory complication to the very common condition diverticulosis. Uncomplicated diverticulitis has traditionally been treated with antibiotics with reference to the microbiology, extrapolation from trials on complicated intra-abdominal infections and clinical experience....

  13. The prophylactic effect of valproate on glyceryltrinitrate induced migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedskov, Jesper Filtenborg; Thomsen, L L; Iversen, H K

    2004-01-01

    In this study the human glyceryltrinitrate (GTN) model of migraine was for the first time used to test the effect of a prophylactic drug. We chose to test valproate due to its well documented effect as a migraine prophylactic drug. Efficacy of this compound would support the usefulness of the model....../kg/min) was given. Headache was registered for 12 h after the infusion and headache intensity was scored on a scale from 0 to 10. Fulfillment of IHS criteria was recorded for 24 h. The middle cerebral arteries were evaluated by transcranial Doppler and the diameter of the superficial temporal and radial arteries...... with valproate as compared to placebo reduced the velocity in both middle cerebral arteries after GTN (left P = 0.021, right P = 0.031). No effect of valproate was seen in the diameter of the superficial temporal artery (P = 0.781) or the radial artery (P = 0.367) before or after GTN. The study indicates...

  14. Prophylactic kinesio taping enhances balance for healthy collegiate players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsiao-Yun; Huang, Yu-Hui; Cheng, Shih-Chung; Yeh, Chun-Yu; Wang, Chun-Hou

    2017-04-28

    This study was to investigate the effects of prophylactic Kinesio taping and athletic taping on the functional performance of the lower extremities in healthy collegiate players with tapes applied to the dominant leg. The study design was a prospective, randomized, clinical trial with comparison of groups. The 32 healthy collegiate players who participated in this study were randomly assigned to 2 groups, an athletic taping group and a Kinesio taping group. Active range of motion of ankle joint, ankle plantar-flexor strength, endurance, vertical jump performance, and dynamic balance were used to measure the player's functional performance of the lower extremities. These tests were conducted 2 times at 4-hour intervals before and after different tapes were applied. The repeated measures analysis of variance was used to examine the interaction in functional performance between the groups before and after the tapes applied. The results found less limitation of range of motion in active ankle dorsiflexion and significant improvement in dynamic balance in the Kinesio taping group (F = 5.150, P = 0.031, F = 18.766, P taping group. The prophylactic Kinesio taping could enhance dynamic balance and result in less restriction of range of motion of ankle dorsiflexion in healthy collegiate players.

  15. Predictors for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yun; Zhuang, Zhigang; Dewing, Michelle; Apple, Sophia; Chang, Helena

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, radical breast cancer surgery has been largely replaced by breast conservation treatment, due to early diagnosis and more effective adjuvant treatment. While breast conservation is mostly preferred, the trend of bilateral mastectomy has risen in the United States. The aim of this study is to determine factors influencing patients' choice for having contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM). This is a retrospective study of 373 patients diagnosed with primary invasive breast cancer who were treated by bilateral or unilateral mastectomy (BM or UM) at the Revlon/UCLA Breast Center between Jan. 2002 and Dec. 2010. In the BM group, only those with unilateral breast cancer who chose CPM were included in the analysis. When compared with the UM group, the following factors were found to be associated with BM: younger age, pre-menopausal, a family history of breast/ovarian cancer, BRCA mutation, more breast biopsies, history of breast augmentation, having MRI study within 6 months before the surgery, more likely to have reconstruction and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) and fewer had neoadjuvant/adjuvant chemotherapy/radiation. When patients with bilateral breast cancer were excluded, multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated younger patients with negative nodes, SLNB as the only nodal surgery and positive family history were significant factors predicting CPM and immediate reconstruction using tissue expanders or implants. Younger age, lower TN stage, requiring only SLNB and high risk family history predict contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. Tissue expander/implant-based reconstructions were more frequently chosen by patients with BM.

  16. Prophylactic Antiviral Treatment in Recurrent Herpes Zoster: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Gamze Bayram

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster (HZ occurs in older ages with activation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV which persists in a dormant phase within the dorsal root ganglia. The incidence of HZ in immunosuppressed patients is 20-100 times higher and the clinical progress is more severe than in immunocompetent individuals. A 48-year-old man who had been diagnosed with acute myelocytic leukemia type M3 and had been treated with immunosuppressive agents was admitted to our clinic. The patient was clinically diagnosed as having HZ. He was treated with acyclovir 800 mg five times daily for 7 days. In the consecutive three months, he attended our clinic again with similar complaints. The left cervical (C5, C6 dermatomes were involved at the fourth attack of HZ. Multinucleated giant cells were determined on the Tzanck smear. VZV DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Treatment with valacyclovir 1 g three times daily for 14 days was prescribed and then, prophylactic treatment with valacyclovir 500 mg two times a day was administered. Although immunosuppressive treatment was continued, no new attacks of herpes zoster occurred. We think that prophylactic antiviral therapy should be initiated in immunosuppressive individuals who have recurrent herpes zoster attacks.

  17. [Antibiotics in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steciwko, Andrzej; Lubieniecka, Małgorzata; Muszyńska, Agnieszka

    2011-05-01

    Discovered in the forties of the twentieth century antimicrobial agents have changed the world. Currently, due to their overuse, we are threatened by the increasing resistance of bacteria to antibiotics, and soon we may face a threat of inability to fight these pathogens. For that reason, the world, European and national organizations introduce antibiotics protection programs. In Poland since 2004, the National Program of Protection of Antibiotics is being held. The concept of rational antibiotic therapy is associated not only with the appropriate choice of therapy or antimicrobial dosage but also with a reduction in costs associated with a refund of medicines. Antibiotics are prescribed mostly by primary care physicians (GP), and about one fifth of visits to family doctor's office ends with prescribing antimicrobial drug. These trends are probably related to both the difficulty in applying the differential diagnosis of viral and bacterial infection in a primary care doctor's office, as well as patient's conviction about the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in viral infections. However, although patients often want to influence the therapeutic decisions and ask their doctor for prescribing antimicrobial drug, the right conversation with a doctor alone is the critical component in satisfaction with medical care. Many countries have established standards to clarify the indications for use of antibiotics and thereby reduce their consumption. The next step is to monitor the prescribing and use of these drugs and to assess the rise of drug resistance in the area. In Poland, the recommendations regarding outpatient respiratory tract infections treatment were published and usage of antimicrobial agents monitoring has begun. However, lack of publications covering a broad analysis of antibiotic therapy and drug resistance on Polish territory is still a problem. Modem medicine has yet another tool in the fight against bacteria--they are bacteriophages. Phage therapy is

  18. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really ...

  19. Aerosolized antibiotics in cystic fibrosis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiel, Stanley B

    2014-06-01

    Inhaled antibiotic therapy, targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is a fundamental component of cystic fibrosis (CF) management. Tobramycin inhalation solution (TIS) was approved in the United States (US) in 1998. Subsequent research efforts focused on developing products with a reduced treatment time burden. Aztreonam for inhalation solution (AZLI), administered via a more efficient nebulizer than TIS, was approved in the US in 2010. Dry powder for inhalation (DPI) formulations provide alternatives to nebulized therapy: tobramycin powder for inhalation (also known as TIP™) was approved in the US in 2013, and colistimethate sodium DPI received European approval in 2012. Other aerosolized antibiotics and regimens combining inhaled antibiotics are in development. Inhaled antibiotic rotation (e.g., TIS alternating with AZLI) is an important concept being actively tested in CF.

  20. Chemical Genetic Analysis and Functional Characterization of Staphylococcal Wall Teichoic Acid 2-Epimerases Reveals Unconventional Antibiotic Drug Targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Mann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe a chemical biology strategy performed in Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to identify MnaA, a 2-epimerase that we demonstrate interconverts UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-ManNAc to modulate substrate levels of TarO and TarA wall teichoic acid (WTA biosynthesis enzymes. Genetic inactivation of mnaA results in complete loss of WTA and dramatic in vitro β-lactam hypersensitivity in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA and S. epidermidis (MRSE. Likewise, the β-lactam antibiotic imipenem exhibits restored bactericidal activity against mnaA mutants in vitro and concomitant efficacy against 2-epimerase defective strains in a mouse thigh model of MRSA and MRSE infection. Interestingly, whereas MnaA serves as the sole 2-epimerase required for WTA biosynthesis in S. epidermidis, MnaA and Cap5P provide compensatory WTA functional roles in S. aureus. We also demonstrate that MnaA and other enzymes of WTA biosynthesis are required for biofilm formation in MRSA and MRSE. We further determine the 1.9Å crystal structure of S. aureus MnaA and identify critical residues for enzymatic dimerization, stability, and substrate binding. Finally, the natural product antibiotic tunicamycin is shown to physically bind MnaA and Cap5P and inhibit 2-epimerase activity, demonstrating that it inhibits a previously unanticipated step in WTA biosynthesis. In summary, MnaA serves as a new Staphylococcal antibiotic target with cognate inhibitors predicted to possess dual therapeutic benefit: as combination agents to restore β-lactam efficacy against MRSA and MRSE and as non-bioactive prophylactic agents to prevent Staphylococcal biofilm formation.

  1. Chemical Genetic Analysis and Functional Characterization of Staphylococcal Wall Teichoic Acid 2-Epimerases Reveals Unconventional Antibiotic Drug Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Paul A.; Müller, Anna; Wolff, Kerstin A.; Fischmann, Thierry; Wang, Hao; Reed, Patricia; Hou, Yan; Li, Wenjin; Müller, Christa E.; Xiao, Jianying; Murgolo, Nicholas; Sher, Xinwei; Mayhood, Todd; Sheth, Payal R.; Mirza, Asra; Labroli, Marc; Xiao, Li; McCoy, Mark; Gill, Charles J.; Pinho, Mariana G.; Schneider, Tanja; Roemer, Terry (Merck); (Bonn); (FCT/UNL)

    2016-05-04

    Here we describe a chemical biology strategy performed in Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to identify MnaA, a 2-epimerase that we demonstrate interconverts UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-ManNAc to modulate substrate levels of TarO and TarA wall teichoic acid (WTA) biosynthesis enzymes. Genetic inactivation of mnaA results in complete loss of WTA and dramatic in vitro β-lactam hypersensitivity in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and S. epidermidis (MRSE). Likewise, the β-lactam antibiotic imipenem exhibits restored bactericidal activity against mnaA mutants in vitro and concomitant efficacy against 2-epimerase defective strains in a mouse thigh model of MRSA and MRSE infection. Interestingly, whereas MnaA serves as the sole 2-epimerase required for WTA biosynthesis in S. epidermidis, MnaA and Cap5P provide compensatory WTA functional roles in S. aureus. We also demonstrate that MnaA and other enzymes of WTA biosynthesis are required for biofilm formation in MRSA and MRSE. We further determine the 1.9Å crystal structure of S. aureus MnaA and identify critical residues for enzymatic dimerization, stability, and substrate binding. Finally, the natural product antibiotic tunicamycin is shown to physically bind MnaA and Cap5P and inhibit 2-epimerase activity, demonstrating that it inhibits a previously unanticipated step in WTA biosynthesis. In summary, MnaA serves as a new Staphylococcal antibiotic target with cognate inhibitors predicted to possess dual therapeutic benefit: as combination agents to restore β-lactam efficacy against MRSA and MRSE and as non-bioactive prophylactic agents to prevent Staphylococcal biofilm formation.

  2. [The history of antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdankhah, Siamak; Lassen, Jørgen; Midtvedt, Tore; Solberg, Claus Ola

    2013-12-10

    The development of chemical compounds for the treatment of infectious diseases may be divided into three phases: a) the discovery in the 1600s in South America of alkaloid extracts from the bark of the cinchona tree and from the dried root of the ipecacuanha bush, which proved effective against, respectively, malaria (quinine) and amoebic dysentery (emetine); b) the development of synthetic drugs, which mostly took place in Germany, starting with Paul Ehrlich's (1854-1915) discovery of salvarsan (1909), and crowned with Gerhard Domagk's (1895-1964) discovery of the sulfonamides (1930s); and c) the discovery of antibiotics. The prime example of the latter is the development of penicillin in the late 1920s following a discovery by a solitary research scientist who never worked in a team and never as part of a research programme. It took another ten years or so before drug-quality penicillin was produced, with research now dependent on being conducted in large collaborative teams, frequently between universities and wealthy industrial companies. The search for new antibiotics began in earnest in the latter half of the 1940s and was mostly based on soil microorganisms. Many new antibiotics were discovered in this period, which may be termed «the golden age of antibiotics». Over the past three decades, the development of new antibiotics has largely stalled, while antibiotic resistance has increased. This situation may require new strategies for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  3. Antibiotic susceptibility testing in less than 30 min using direct single-cell imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Baltekin, Özden; Boucharin, Alexis; Tano, Eva; Andersson, Dan I.; Elf, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global threat to human health. The problem is aggravated by unnecessary and incorrect use of broad spectrum antibiotics. One way to provide correct treatment and slow down the development of antibiotic resistance is to assay the susceptibility profile of the infecting bacteria before treatment is initiated and let this information guide the choice of antibiotic. Here, we present an antibiotic susceptibility test that is sufficiently fast to be used at the point of c...

  4. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hee Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST, clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care, the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing. The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.

  5. Strategies to minimize antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Cho, Ill Hwan; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2013-09-12

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care), the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students) regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing). The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.

  6. Potential burden of antibiotic resistance on surgery and cancer chemotherapy antibiotic prophylaxis in the USA: a literature review and modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teillant, Aude; Gandra, Sumanth; Barter, Devra; Morgan, Daniel J; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2015-12-01

    The declining efficacy of existing antibiotics potentially jeopardises outcomes in patients undergoing medical procedures. We investigated the potential consequences of increases in antibiotic resistance on the ten most common surgical procedures and immunosuppressing cancer chemotherapies that rely on antibiotic prophylaxis in the USA. We searched the published scientific literature and identified meta-analyses and reviews of randomised controlled trials or quasi-randomised controlled trials (allocation done on the basis of a pseudo-random sequence-eg, odd/even hospital number or date of birth, alternation) to estimate the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing infections and infection-related deaths after surgical procedures and immunosuppressing cancer chemotherapy. We varied the identified effect sizes under different scenarios of reduction in the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis (10%, 30%, 70%, and 100% reductions) and estimated the additional number of infections and infection-related deaths per year in the USA for each scenario. We estimated the percentage of pathogens causing infections after these procedures that are resistant to standard prophylactic antibiotics in the USA. We estimate that between 38·7% and 50·9% of pathogens causing surgical site infections and 26·8% of pathogens causing infections after chemotherapy are resistant to standard prophylactic antibiotics in the USA. A 30% reduction in the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis for these procedures would result in 120,000 additional surgical site infections and infections after chemotherapy per year in the USA (ranging from 40,000 for a 10% reduction in efficacy to 280,000 for a 70% reduction in efficacy), and 6300 infection-related deaths (range: 2100 for a 10% reduction in efficacy, to 15,000 for a 70% reduction). We estimated that every year, 13,120 infections (42%) after prostate biopsy are attributable to resistance to fluoroquinolones in the USA. Increasing antibiotic

  7. Are systemic antibiotics indicated in aesthetic breast surgery? A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwicke, Joseph T; Bechar, Janak; Skillman, Joanna M

    2013-06-01

    The use of systemic prophylactic antibiotics to reduce surgical-site infection in aesthetic breast surgery remains controversial. The aim of this review is to weigh the available evidence with respect to reducing surgical-site infection. Two literature searches were performed to analyze the available data for studies involving either reduction or augmentation mammaplasty and the results of different antibiotics regimens. Outcome measures included surgical-site infection and capsular contracture. A total of 2971 patients (5891 breasts) were included. A meta-analysis of surgical-site infection incidence after aesthetic breast surgery revealed a significant reduction in infections overall with antibiotic prophylaxis compared with controls (p=0.02). This was most significant with a single preoperative antibiotic dose (p=0.02). In cases of reduction mammaplasty, when antibiotics are administered as a single preoperative dose, the risk of developing surgical-site infection is halved. With augmentation mammaplasty, there was no effect on infection rates with any antibiotic regimen. Data concerning the incidence of capsular contracture were insufficient for meta-analysis. For cases of reduction mammaplasty, the authors recommend a single intravenous perioperative dose of antibiotic with action against Staphylococcus species. For augmentation mammaplasty, there is no evidence to refute current guidelines, based on recommendations obtained from other forms of implant surgery. Therapeutic, II.

  8. Probiotics and antibiotics in IBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Harry

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of the gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of IBD is supported by many findings and is thus now commonly acknowledged. The imbalance in the composition of the microbiota (dysbiosis) observed in IBD patients is one of the strongest arguments and provides the rationale for a therapeutic manipulation of the gut microbiota. The tools available to achieve this goal include fecal microbiota transplantation, but antibiotics and probiotics have been the most used one until now. Although antibiotics have shown some efficacy in inducing remission in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), as well as preventing postoperative relapse in CD, they are not currently recommended for the treatment of IBD except for septic complications, notably because of long-term tolerance and ecological issues. Some probiotics have been shown to be as good as 5-aminosalicylic acid to maintain remission in mild-to-moderate UC, but have been disappointing until now in CD in all tested indications. In pouchitis, antibiotics and probiotics have shown efficacy for inducing and maintaining remission, respectively. Targeting the gut microbiota in IBD is an attractive strategy. Current efforts to better understand the host-microbiota interactions in physiological as well as disease settings might lead to the development of rational-based treatments. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Antibiotic usage in surgical prophylaxis: a prospective surveillance of surgical wards at a tertiary hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ai Ling; Goh, Leh Min; Nik Azim, Nik Abdullah; Tee, Chee Sian; Shehab Phung, Chee Wei

    2014-02-13

    The widespread and inappropriate use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in surgical prophylaxis has led to reduced treatment efficacy, increased healthcare costs, and antibiotic resistance. This study aimed to explore the adherence of antibiotic usage in surgical prophylaxis to the national antibiotic guideline and the incidences of surgical site infection (SSI). A three-month prospective observational study has been conducted in the surgical wards of Sarawak General Hospital (SGH) using a standardized surveillance form. Each patient was reviewed for up to 30 days post-operatively to determine the occurrence of SSI. A total of 87 patients were included within the study period. The majority of the cases were clean-contaminated wounds (60.9%). Most were hepatobiliary cases (37.9%), followed by colorectal cases (19.5%). The most preferred antibiotic used was cefoperazone (63.2%). The choices of antibiotics in 78.2% of the cases were consistent with the guideline. Around 80% of prophylactic antibiotics were given within one hour before operation and 27.6% were omitted from intraoperative re-dosing. Prophylactic antibiotics were discontinued within 24 hours post-operatively in 77% of the cases. Of those continued for > 24 hours, the majority (60%) were administered for unknown reasons. SSI was documented in 13.8% of the total cases studied. However, there was no significant association between choices of antibiotics and timing of surgical prophylaxis with SSI (p = 0.299 and p = 0.258 respectively). Overall guideline adherence rate was more than 70%. Areas of non-concordance to the guideline require further investigation.

  10. Severe Neuropsychiatric Reaction in a Deployed Military Member after Prophylactic Mefloquine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan L. Peterson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of military personnel who have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan have reported a number of combat-related psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and traumatic brain injury. This case report involves a 27-year-old male active-duty US military service member who developed severe depression, psychotic hallucinations, and neuropsychological sequelae following the prophylactic use of the antimalarial medication mefloquine hydrochloride. The patient had a recent history of depression and was taking antidepressant medications at the time of his deployment to the Middle East. Psychiatrists and other health care providers should be aware of the possible neuropsychiatric side effects of mefloquine in deployed military personnel and should consider the use of other medications for malaria prophylaxis in those individuals who may be at increased risk for side effects.

  11. BIOADEQUATE APPROACH IS IN PROPHYLACTIC MEDICINE. PROJECT “SMILE OF HEALTH”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Zakharov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Importance of forming of thinking of personality is shown as a risk of morbidity factor. Methodology of realization of social initiative is described on development of the new stomatological thinking for doctors-specialists and teachers, and also children and teenagers. The integral going is offered near organization of prophylactic work of doctor, providing success of inlightening with the areas of stomatological knowledge and subsequent forming of stomatological culture and healthy kind of being. Methodology of “residence” of material of employment is offered on the basis of the personal experience, allowing to save interest in a hygiene and prophylaxis with outgrowing of him in the internal necessity of developing personality of child. 

  12. Prophylactic treatment of migraine in children. Part 1. A systematic review of non-pharmacological trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, L; Bruijn, J; Koes, BW; Berger, MY; Passchier, J; Verhagen, AP

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of non-pharmacological prophylactic treatments of migraine in children. Databases were searched from inception to June 2004 and references were checked. We selected controlled trials reporting the effects of non-pharmacological prophylactic treatments

  13. Prophylactic treatment of migraine in children. Part 2. A systematic review of pharmacological trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, L; Bruijn, J; Verhagen, AP; Berger, MY; Passchier, J; Koes, BW

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of pharmacological prophylactic treatments of migraine in children. Databases were searched from inception to June 2004 and references were checked. We selected controlled trials on the effects of pharmacological prophylactic treatments in children

  14. A Modified Prophylactic Regimen for the Prevention of Otitis Externa in Saturation Divers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Prophylactic Regimen for the Prevention of Otitis Externa in Saturation Divers Authors: DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Paul C. Algra, LT, MC...May 2012 – May 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Modified Prophylactic Regimen for the Prevention of Otitis Externa in Saturation Divers...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT To prevent acute otitis externa (AOE) in the saturation setting and to decrease the side effects

  15. Comparison of antibiotic resistance patterns between laboratories in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic resistance is increasing rapidly and developing countries are the worse affected since they provide conditions and practices that support the development and spread of resistant microbes. For better health policy on antibiotic use a national surveillance program is needed to provide baseline data from different ...

  16. Biofilm processes in treating mariculture wastewater may be a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Zhang, Shenghua; Ye, Chengsong; Lin, Wenfang; Zhang, Menglu; Chen, Lihua; Li, Jinmei; Yu, Xin

    2017-05-15

    Antibiotics are heavily used in Chinese mariculture, but only a small portion of the added antibiotics are absorbed by living creatures. Biofilm processes are universally used in mariculture wastewater treatment. In this study, removal of antibiotics (norfloxacin, rifampicin, and oxytetracycline) from wastewater by moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) and the influence of antibiotics on reactor biofilm were investigated. The results demonstrated that there was no significant effect of sub-μg/L-sub-mg/L concentrations of antibiotics on TOC removal. Moreover, the relative abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and antibiotic resistance bacteria (ARB) in MBBR biofilm increased because of selective pressure of antibiotics. In addition, antibiotics decreased the diversity of the biofilm bacterial community and altered bacterial community structure. These findings provide an empirical basis for the development of appropriate practices for mariculture, and suggest that disinfection and advanced oxidation should be applied to eliminate antibiotics, ARGs, and ARB from mariculture wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Antibiotics for acute bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom; Smucny, John; Becker, Lorne A

    2017-06-19

    The benefits and risks of antibiotics for acute bronchitis remain unclear despite it being one of the most common illnesses seen in primary care. To assess the effects of antibiotics in improving outcomes and to assess adverse effects of antibiotic therapy for people with a clinical diagnosis of acute bronchitis. We searched CENTRAL 2016, Issue 11 (accessed 13 January 2017), MEDLINE (1966 to January week 1, 2017), Embase (1974 to 13 January 2017), and LILACS (1982 to 13 January 2017). We searched the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov on 5 April 2017. Randomised controlled trials comparing any antibiotic therapy with placebo or no treatment in acute bronchitis or acute productive cough, in people without underlying pulmonary disease. At least two review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality. We did not identify any new trials for inclusion in this 2017 update. We included 17 trials with 5099 participants in the primary analysis. The quality of trials was generally good. At follow-up there was no difference in participants described as being clinically improved between the antibiotic and placebo groups (11 studies with 3841 participants, risk ratio (RR) 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99 to 1.15). Participants given antibiotics were less likely to have a cough (4 studies with 275 participants, RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.85; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 6) and a night cough (4 studies with 538 participants, RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.83; NNTB 7). Participants given antibiotics had a shorter mean cough duration (7 studies with 2776 participants, mean difference (MD) -0.46 days, 95% CI -0.87 to -0.04). The differences in presence of a productive cough at follow-up and MD of productive cough did not reach statistical significance.Antibiotic-treated participants were more likely to be improved according to clinician's global assessment (6 studies

  18. ADJUNCTIVE USE OF ANTIBIOTICS IN PERIODONTAL THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece Barça

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal diseases are infectious diseases with a mixed microbial aetiology and marked inflammatory response leading to destruction of underlying tissue. Periodontal therapy aims to eliminate pathogens associated with the disease and attain periodontal health. Periodontitis is generally treated by nonsurgical mechanical debridement and regular periodontal maintenance care. Periodontal surgery may be indicated for some patients to improve access to the root surface; however, mechanical debridement alone may not be helpful in all cases. In such cases, adjunctive systemic antibiotic therapy remains the treatment of choice. It can reach microorganisms at the base of the deep periodontal pockets and furcation areas via serum, and also affects organisms residing within gingival epithelium and connective tissue. This review aims to provide an update on clinical issues regarding when and how to prescribe systemic antibiotics in periodontal therapy. The points discussed are the mode of antibiotic action, susceptible periodontal pathogens, antibiotic dosage, antibiotic use in treatment of periodontal disease, and mechanism of bacterial resistance to each antibiotic.

  19. Microfluidics for Antibiotic Susceptibility and Toxicity Testing

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    Jing Dai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recent emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a major concern for worldwide policy makers as very few new antibiotics have been developed in the last twenty-five years. To prevent the death of millions of people worldwide, there is an urgent need for a cheap, fast and accurate set of tools and techniques that can help to discover and develop new antimicrobial drugs. In the past decade, microfluidic platforms have emerged as potential systems for conducting pharmacological studies. Recent studies have demonstrated that microfluidic platforms can perform rapid antibiotic susceptibility tests to evaluate antimicrobial drugs’ efficacy. In addition, the development of cell-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip platforms have enabled the early drug testing, providing more accurate insights into conventional cell cultures on the drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity, at the early and cheaper stage of drug development, i.e., prior to animal and human testing. In this review, we focus on the recent developments of microfluidic platforms for rapid antibiotics susceptibility testing, investigating bacterial persistence and non-growing but metabolically active (NGMA bacteria, evaluating antibiotic effectiveness on biofilms and combinatorial effect of antibiotics, as well as microfluidic platforms that can be used for in vitro antibiotic toxicity testing.

  20. Risk-reducing strategies for women carrying brca1/2 mutations with a focus on prophylactic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokbel Kefah

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women who have inherited mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have substantially elevated risks of breast and ovarian cancer. Mutation carriers have various options, including extensive and regular surveillance, chemoprevention and risk-reducing surgery. The aim of this review is to provide an up-to-date analysis and to subsequently summarise the available literature in relation to risk-reducing strategies, with a keen focus on prophylactic surgery. Methods The literature review is facilitated by Medline and PubMed databases. The cross-referencing of the obtained articles was used to identify other relevant studies. Results Prophylactic surgery (bilateral mastectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy or a combination of both procedures has proved to be the most effective risk-reducing strategy. There are no randomised controlled trials able to demonstrate the potential benefits or harms of prophylactic surgery; therefore, the evidence has been derived from retrospective and short follow-up prospective studies, in addition to hypothetical mathematical models. Based on the current knowledge, it is reasonable to recommend prophylactic oophorectomy for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers when childbearing is completed in order to reduce the risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. In addition, women should be offered the options of rigorous breast surveillance, chemoprevention with anti-oestrogens--especially for carriers of BRCA2--or bilateral prophylactic mastectomy. Conclusion The selection of the most appropriate risk-reducing strategy is not a straightforward task. The impact of risk-reducing strategies on cancer risk, survival, and overall quality of life are the key criteria considered for decision-making. Notably, various other factors should be taken into consideration when evaluating individual mutation carriers' individual circumstances, namely woman's age, morbidity, type of mutation, and individual preferences and

  1. Current and future prophylactic vaccines for hepatitis C virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunlop JI

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available James I Dunlop, Anna M Owsianka, Vanessa M Cowton, Arvind H Patel MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Glasgow, Scotland, UK Abstract: The development of a vaccine is necessary to combat the global hepatitis C virus (HCV epidemic. The key to the development of a prophylactic vaccine is understanding the immune response in those who spontaneously resolve HCV infections versus those who develop chronic disease. Several promising vaccine candidates based on the use of viral vectors are currently in Phase I and Phase II clinical trials. The recently solved structures of the E2 glycoprotein have greatly aided epitope- and antibody-based vaccine design. Keywords: antibody, E1E2 glycoproteins, epitope, HCV, neutralizing antibody, viral vector

  2. Status of prophylactic and therapeutic genital herpes vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Sita; Friedman, Harvey M

    2014-06-01

    A half billion people have genital herpes infections worldwide. Approximately one-fifth of American women between ages 14 and 49 are HSV-2 seropositive. The development of an effective genital herpes vaccine is a global health necessity based on the mental anguish genital herpes causes for some individuals, the fact that pregnant women with genital herpes risk transmitting infection to their newborn children, and the observation that HSV-2 infection is associated with a 3-fold to 4-fold increased probability of HIV acquisition. We review the strengths and limitations of preclinical animal models used to assess genital herpes vaccine candidates and the goals of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. We also discuss the current pipeline of vaccine candidates and lessons learned from past clinical trials that serve as a stimulus for new strategies, study designs and endpoint determinations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Skin Lesions after Prophylactic Mastectomy and Immediate Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Baulies, MD

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Metastatic breast carcinoma can mimic benign cutaneous lesions. Breast surgeons should be aware of skin manifestations to be able to distinguish them and set a proper therapeutic strategy. A clinical case of cutaneous lesion after breast cancer is presented. A 41-year-old woman with a history of left breast cancer underwent a prophylactic right nipple-sparing mastectomy with immediate breast implant reconstruction. After surgery, she attended our service due to a right periareolar rash resistant to medical treatment, accompanied by cutaneous induration and fixed axillary adenopathy. A differential diagnosis of skin metastases was considered. Cutaneous metastases should be the first diagnosis of skin lesions in oncological patients due to the implications in terms of treatment and prognosis. However, differential diagnoses have to be discussed.

  4. Prophylactic total gastrectomy in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Linda; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in the CDH1 (E-cadherin) gene are the predisposing cause of gastric cancer in most families with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). The lifetime risk of cancer in mutation positive members is more than 80 % and prophylactic total gastrectomy is recommended. Not all...... mutations in the CDH1 gene are however pathogenic and it is important to classify mutations before this major operation is performed. Probands from two Danish families with gastric cancer and a history suggesting HDGC were screened for CDH1 gene mutations. Two novel CDH1 gene mutations were identified....... Hospital stay was 6-8 days and there were no complications. Small foci of diffuse gastric cancer were found in all patients-intramucosal in six and advanced in one. Preoperative endoscopic biopsies had revealed a microscopic cancer focus in two of the patients. Our data confirmed the pathogenic nature...

  5. Chitosan Films: A Potential Local Drug Delivery System for Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Noel, Scott P.; Courtney, Harry; Bumgardner, Joel D.; Warren O. Haggard

    2008-01-01

    Local antibiotic delivery is an emerging area of study designed to provide alternative methods of treatment to clinicians for compromised wound sites where avascular zones can prevent the delivery of antibiotics to the infected tissue. Antibiotic-loaded bone cement is the gold standard for drug-eluting local delivery devices but is not ideal because it requires a removal surgery. Chitosan is a biocompatible, biodegradable polymer that has been used in several different drug delivery applicati...

  6. Tackling Ebola: new insights into prophylactic and therapeutic intervention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Emmie; Feldmann, Heinz; Munster, Vincent J

    2011-01-27

    Since its discovery in 1976, Ebolavirus has caused periodic outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever associated with severe and often fatal disease. Ebolavirus is endemic in Central Africa and the Philippines. Although there is currently no approved treatment available, the past 10 years has seen remarkable progress in our understanding of the pathogenicity of Ebolavirus and the development of prophylactic and post-exposure therapies against it. In vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that Ebolavirus pathogenicity is multifactorial, including viral and host determinants. Besides their function in the virus replication cycle, the viral glycoprotein, nucleoprotein, minor matrix protein and polymerase cofactor are viral determinants of pathogenicity, with evasion of the host innate and adaptive immune responses as the main mechanism. Although no licensed Ebolavirus vaccines are currently available, vaccine research in non-human primates, the 'gold standard' animal model for Ebolavirus, has produced several promising candidates. A combination of DNA vaccination and a recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 boost resulted in cross-protective immunity in non-human primates. A recombinant vesicular stomatitis vaccine vector protected non-human primates in pre- and post-exposure challenge studies. Several antiviral therapies are currently under investigation, but only a few of these have been tested in non-human primate models. Antisense therapies, in which oligonucleotides inhibit viral replication, have shown promising results in non-human primates following post-exposure treatment. In light of the severity of Ebolavirus disease and the observed increase in Ebolavirus outbreaks over the past decade, the expedited translation of potential candidate therapeutics and vaccines from bench to bedside is currently the most challenging task for the field. Here, we review the current state of Ebolavirus research, with emphasis on prophylactic and therapeutic intervention strategies.

  7. Tetracycline Antibiotics and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Trudy H

    2016-04-01

    Tetracyclines possess many properties considered ideal for antibiotic drugs, including activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens, proven clinical safety, acceptable tolerability, and the availability of intravenous (IV) and oral formulations for most members of the class. As with all antibiotic classes, the antimicrobial activities of tetracyclines are subject to both class-specific and intrinsic antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Since the discovery of the first tetracyclines more than 60 years ago, ongoing optimization of the core scaffold has produced tetracyclines in clinical use and development that are capable of thwarting many of these resistance mechanisms. New chemistry approaches have enabled the creation of synthetic derivatives with improved in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy, ensuring that the full potential of the class can be explored for use against current and emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  8. Dosing antibiotic prophylaxis during cardiopulmonary bypass-a higher level of complexity? A structured review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruk, Fathima; Sime, Fekade B; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2017-04-01

    In highly invasive procedures such as open heart surgery, the risk of post-operative infection is particularly high due to exposure of the surgical field to multiple foreign devices. Adequate antibiotic prophylaxis is an essential intervention to minimise post-operative morbidity and mortality. However, there is a lack of clear understanding on the adequacy of traditional prophylactic dosing regimens, which are rarely supported by data. The aim of this structured review is to describe the relevant pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) considerations for optimal antibiotic prophylaxis for major cardiac surgery including cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). A structured review of the relevant published literature was performed and 45 relevant studies describing antibiotic pharmacokinetics in patients receiving extracorporeal CPB as part of major cardiac surgery were identified. Some of the studies suggested marked PK alterations in the peri-operative period with increases in volume of distribution (V d ) by up to 58% and altered drug clearances of up to 20%. Mechanisms proposed as causing the PK changes included haemodilution, hypothermia, retention of the antibiotic within the extracorporeal circuit, altered physiology related to a systemic inflammatory response, and maldistribution of blood flow. Of note, some studies reported no or minimal impact of the CPB procedure on antibiotic pharmacokinetics. Given the inconsistent data, ongoing research should focus on clarifying the influence of CPB procedure and related clinical covariates on the pharmacokinetics of different antibiotics during cardiac surgery. Traditional prophylactic dosing regimens may need to be re-assessed to ensure sufficient drug exposures that will minimise the risk of surgical site infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  9. Should intentional endovascular stent-graft coverage of the left subclavian artery be preceded by prophylactic revascularisation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weigang, Ernst; Parker, Jack A T C; Czerny, Martin

    2011-01-01

    and analysed three basic treatment concepts for LSA revascularisation in TEVAR patients (prophylactic, conditional prophylactic and no prophylactic LSA revascularisation). The available evidence supports prophylactic revascularisation of the LSA before ESG LSA coverage when preoperative imaging reveals......, covering, endovascular, revascularisation and thoracic aorta. We have gathered the most complete scientific evidence available used to support the various concepts to deal with this issue. After a review of the current available literature, 23 relevant articles were found, where we have identified...

  10. Public knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding antibiotic use in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajmi, Drita; Berisha, Merita; Begolli, Ilir; Hoxha, Rina; Mehmeti, Rukije; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Kurti, Arsim; Loku, Afrim; Raka, Lul

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is becoming a major public health challenge worldwide, caused primarily by the misuse of antibiotics. Antibiotic use is closely related to the knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of a population. The objective of this study was to assess the level of knowledge, attitudes and practices about antibiotic use among the general public in Kosovo. A cross-sectional face-to-face survey was carried out with a sample of 811 randomly selected Kosovo residents. The methodology used for this survey was based on the European Commission Eurobarometer survey on antimicrobial resistance. More than half of respondents (58.7%) have used antibiotics during the past year. A quarter of respondents consumed antibiotics without a medical prescription. The most common reasons for usage were flu (23.8%), followed by sore throat (20.2%), cold (13%) and common cold (7.6%). 42.5% of respondents think that antibiotics are effective against viral infections. Almost half of respondents (46.7%) received information about the unnecessary use of antibiotics and 32.5% of them report having changed their views and behaviours after receiving this information. Health care workers were identified as the most trustworthy source of information on antibiotic use (67.2%). These results provide quantitative baseline data on Kosovar knowledge, attitudes and practice regarding the use of antibiotic. These findings have potential to empower educational campaigns to promote the prudent use of antibiotics in both community and health care settings.

  11. Public knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding antibiotic use in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zajmi D

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antimicrobial resistance is becoming a major public health challenge worldwide, caused primarily by the misuse of antibiotics. Antibiotic use is closely related to the knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of a population. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the level of knowledge, attitudes and practices about antibiotic use among the general public in Kosovo. Methods: A cross-sectional face-to-face survey was carried out with a sample of 811 randomly selected Kosovo residents. The methodology used for this survey was based on the European Commission Eurobarometer survey on antimicrobial resistance. Results: More than half of respondents (58.7% have used antibiotics during the past year. A quarter of respondents consumed antibiotics without a medical prescription. The most common reasons for usage were flu (23.8%, followed by sore throat (20.2%, cold (13% and common cold (7.6%. 42.5% of respondents think that antibiotics are effective against viral infections. Almost half of respondents (46.7% received information about the unnecessary use of antibiotics and 32.5% of them report having changed their views and behaviours after receiving this information. Health care workers were identified as the most trustworthy source of information on antibiotic use (67.2%. Conclusion: These results provide quantitative baseline data on Kosovar knowledge, attitudes and practice regarding the use of antibiotic. These findings have potential to empower educational campaigns to promote the prudent use of antibiotics in both community and health care settings.

  12. Emerging Insights into Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea and Clostridium difficile Infection through the Lens of Microbial Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth T. Walk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are the main, and often only, clinical intervention for prophylactic and active treatment of bacterial infections in humans. Perhaps it is not surprising that these drugs also shift the composition of commensal bacteria inside our bodies, especially those within the gut microbial community (microbiota. How these dynamics ultimately affect the function of the gut microbiota, however, is not fully appreciated. Likewise, how antibiotic induced changes facilitate the outgrowth and pathogenicity of certain bacterial strains remains largely enigmatic. Here, we discuss the merits of a microbial ecology approach toward understanding a common side effect of antibiotic use, antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD, and the opportunistic bacterial infections that sometimes underlie it. As an example, we discuss how this approach is being used to address complex disease dynamics during Clostridium difficile infection.

  13. Antibiotics in Animal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Amílcar C.

    The administration of antibiotics to animals to prevent or treat diseases led us to be concerned about the impact of these antibiotics on human health. In fact, animal products could be a potential vehicle to transfer drugs to humans. Using appropri ated mathematical and statistical models, one can predict the kinetic profile of drugs and their metabolites and, consequently, develop preventive procedures regarding drug transmission (i.e., determination of appropriate withdrawal periods). Nevertheless, in the present chapter the mathematical and statistical concepts for data interpretation are strictly given to allow understanding of some basic pharma-cokinetic principles and to illustrate the determination of withdrawal periods

  14. Estimates of benefits and harms of prophylactic use of aspirin in the general population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzick, J.; Thorat, M. A.; Bosetti, C.; Brown, P. H.; Burn, J.; Cook, N. R.; Ford, L. G.; Jacobs, E. J.; Jankowski, J. A.; La Vecchia, C.; Law, M.; Meyskens, F.; Rothwell, P. M.; Senn, H. J.; Umar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence supports an effect of aspirin in reducing overall cancer incidence and mortality in the general population. We reviewed current data and assessed the benefits and harms of prophylactic use of aspirin in the general population. Methods The effect of aspirin for site-specific cancer incidence and mortality, cardiovascular events was collated from the most recent systematic reviews. Studies identified through systematic Medline search provided data regarding harmful effects of aspirin and baseline rates of harms like gastrointestinal bleeding and peptic ulcer. Results The effects of aspirin on cancer are not apparent until at least 3 years after the start of use, and some benefits are sustained for several years after cessation in long-term users. No differences between low and standard doses of aspirin are observed, but there were no direct comparisons. Higher doses do not appear to confer additional benefit but increase toxicities. Excess bleeding is the most important harm associated with aspirin use, and its risk and fatality rate increases with age. For average-risk individuals aged 50–65 years taking aspirin for 10 years, there would be a relative reduction of between 7% (women) and 9% (men) in the number of cancer, myocardial infarction or stroke events over a 15-year period and an overall 4% relative reduction in all deaths over a 20-year period. Conclusions Prophylactic aspirin use for a minimum of 5 years at doses between 75 and 325 mg/day appears to have favourable benefit–harm profile; longer use is likely to have greater benefits. Further research is needed to determine the optimum dose and duration of use, to identify individuals at increased risk of bleeding, and to test effectiveness of Helicobacter pylori screening–eradication before starting aspirin prophylaxis. PMID:25096604

  15. Prophylactic supplementation of caprylic acid in feed reduces Salmonella enteritidis colonization in commercial broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johny, Anup Kollanoor; Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Charles, Anu Susan; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Darre, Michael J; Khan, Mazhar I; Hoagland, Thomas A; Schreiber, David T; Donoghue, Annie M; Donoghue, Dan J; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2009-04-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis is a major foodborne pathogen for which chickens serve as reservoir hosts. Reducing Salmonella Enteritidis carriage in chickens would reduce contamination of poultry meat and eggs with this pathogen. We investigated the prophylactic efficacy of feed supplemented with caprylic acid (CA), a natural, generally recognized as safe eight-carbon fatty acid, for reducing Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in chicks. One hundred commercial day-old chicks were randomly divided into five groups of 20 birds each: CA control (no Salmonella Enteritidis, CA), positive control (Salmonella Enteritidis, no CA), negative control (no Salmonella Enteritidis, no CA), and 0.7 or 1% CA. Water and feed were provided ad libitum. On day 8, birds were inoculated with 5.0 log CFU of Salmonella Enteritidis by crop gavage. Six birds from each group were euthanized on days 1, 7, and 10 after challenge, and Salmonella Enteritidis populations in the cecum, small intestine, cloaca, crop, liver, and spleen were enumerated. The study was replicated three times. CA supplementation at 0.7 and 1% consistently decreased Salmonella Enteritidis populations recovered from the treated birds. Salmonella Enteritidis counts in the tissue samples of CA-treated chicks were significantly lower (P Feed intake and body weight did not differ between the groups. Histological examination revealed no pathological changes in the cecum and liver of CA-supplemented birds. The results suggest that prophylactic CA supplementation through feed can reduce Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in day-old chicks and may be a useful treatment for reducing Salmonella Enteritidis carriage in chickens.

  16. An alternative for antibiotic se in poultry: probiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edens FW

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 50 years, there has been increasing amounts of antibiotics used prophylactically and as growth promoters. Today, there is a consumer and governmental outcry to eliminate that practice from poultry and livestock production. Evidence has been accumulated to show that there is a link between risk of zoonotic disease and growth promoting antibiotic usage in livestock and poultry. Therefore, alternatives to the use of growth promoting antibiotics must be found to promote growth or production at or near the genetic potential of the modern day broiler, turkey, and egg producer. The use of probiotics has many potential benefits and include modified host metabolism, immuno-stimulation, anti-inflammatory reactions, exclusion and killing of pathogens in the intestinal tract, reduced bacterial contamination on processed broiler carcasses, enhanced nutrient absorption and performance, and ultimately decreased human health risk. The development of these factors generally can be ascribed to the ability of most probiotic products to balance and maintain the intestinal microflora in poultry species.

  17. Antibiotic use and cost in a teaching hospital in İstanbul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Dağlı

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine the usage patterns and the cost of antibiotics, along with theevaluation of the effects of infectious diseases (ID specialists on appropriate antimicrobial use in hospitalized patients.Materials and methods: A one-day, cross-sectional study was conducted in a major tertiary hospital and data on theuse of antibiotics were collected by using a standard form. The appropriateness of the antibiotic usage was evaluatedusing the Council for Appropriate and Rational Antibiotic Therapy (CARAT criteria; and the consumption and daily costof antibiotics were determined.Results: On the study day, antibiotics were prescribed in 199 (35.6% of 553 hospitalized patients, in 109 (32.9% onthe surgical and 90 patients (40.5% on the medical wards. The total empirical antibiotic use was more frequent (49.7%than prophylactic (29.1% and culture-based therapy (21.2%. In 44 patients (22.1% the antibiotics were used inappropriately;any of these antibiotics needed the approval of ID specialist. The inappropriate usage was more common inprophylactic therapy (46.5% than empirical (16.1% and specific antibiotic administration (2.3%. ID consultation rateswere significantly higher in the appropriate antibiotic administrations (69.6% than in the inappropriate group [(6.8%,p<0.0001, odds ratio (OR 10.2, confidence intervals (CI =3.0–3.7]. The total one-day cost of antibiotic therapy in ourhospital was US $3350.6, and the total daily cost for hospital infection was $2137.1. The mean daily cost per patientwas $2.1 for prophylaxis, $10.7 for community-acquired infections and $54.7 for hospital infections (p<0.001, OR 9.8,CI 4.7–20.7.Conclusion: This study showed that antibiotic prescription rates are high, surgical prophylaxis is still a major problemin our hospital, ID approval is effective for appropriate use of antibiotics, and the antibiotic cost of hospital infections isan important part of extra costs. J Microbiol Infect

  18. ANTIBIOTIC-ASSOCIATED DIARRHEA AND ANTIBIOTIC-ASSOCIATED COLITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Belousova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents most recent data on antibiotic-associated intestinal disorders. The author reviews epidemiology and causative microorganisms in antibiotic-induced diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis as well as clinical variants of antibiotic-associated disorders. Diagnosis methods are decribed at length with special attention to most sensitive and informative tests. Treatment of different clinical variants of antibiotic-induced disorders is discussed in detail.

  19. Antibiotic prescribing in Danish general practice 2004-13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Siersma, Volkert; Plejdrup Hansen, Malene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Antibiotic consumption in the primary care sector is often perceived as synonymous with consumption in general practice despite the fact that few countries stratify the primary care sector by providers' medical specialty. We aimed to characterize and quantify antibiotic use in Danish...... general practice relative to the entire primary care sector. Methods: This was a registry-based study including all patients who redeemed an antibiotic prescription between July 2004 and June 2013 at a Danish community pharmacy. Antibiotic use was expressed as DDDs and treatments/1000 inhabitants....../day (DIDs and TIDs, respectively) and assessed according to antibiotic spectrum (narrow versus broad) and their anatomical therapeutic classification codes in total as well as in six age groups. Results: The contribution of general practice to the entire antibiotic use in the primary care sector declined...

  20. Influence of a Shorter Duration of Post-Operative Antibiotic Prophylaxis on Infectious Complications in Patients Undergoing Elective Liver Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoda, Masahiko; Iino, Satoshi; Mataki, Yuko; Kawasaki, Yota; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Maemura, Kosei; Ueno, Shinichi; Natsugoe, Shoji

    Antibiotic prophylaxis has been recommended to reduce post-operative infectious complications. Discontinuation of post-operative antibiotic administration within 24 hours of operation is currently recommended. Many surgeons, however, conventionally tend to extend the duration of prophylactic antibiotic use. In this study, we performed a retrospective analysis to assess the efficacy of extended post-operative antibiotic use in patients who underwent elective liver resection. A total of 208 consecutive patients who underwent liver resection without biliary reconstruction were investigated. Patients were divided into two groups according to the duration of post-operative antibiotic use: Only once after the operation (the post-operative day [POD] 0 group) and until three days after the operation (the POD 3 group). Post-operative complications in the two groups were analyzed and compared. Incisional surgical site infections (SSIs) were observed in 5% of the POD 0 group and 3% of the POD 3 group (p = 0.517). Organ/space SSIs were observed in 2% of the POD 0 group and 3% of the POD 3 group (p = 0.694). Overall infectious complications including SSIs and remote site infections were observed in 12% of the POD 0 group and 11% of the POD 3 group. Multi-variable analyses revealed that the short-term post-operative antibiotic regimen did not confer additional risk for infectious complications. In elective liver resection, the administration of prophylactic antibiotics on the operative day alone appears to be sufficient, because no additional benefit in the incidence of post-operative infectious complications was conferred on patients given antibiotic agents for three days.

  1. Improving antibiotic use in daily hospital practice : The antibiotic checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Daalen, F.V.

    2018-01-01

    Better use of current antibiotic agents is necessary to help control antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Antibiotic stewardship programs (ASPs) are introduced to coordinate activities to measure and improve appropriate antibiotic use in daily hospital practice. This thesis shows how the introduction of

  2. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibiotic resistance in Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vo, A.T.T.

    2007-01-01

    Immediately after their introduction in the beginning of the fourties of the previous century, the agents used to combat infectious diseases caused by bacteria were regarded with suspicion, but not long thereafter antibiotics had the status of miracle drugs. For decades mankind has lived under the

  4. Antibiotics in laboratory medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lorian, Victor

    2005-01-01

    ... in critical articles and reviews. Materials appearing in this book prepared by individuals as part of their official duties as U.S. government employees are not covered by the above-mentioned copyright. Printed in the USA Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Antibiotics in laboratory medicine / [edited by] Victor Lorian. - 5th ed...

  5. Antibiotic resistance reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    One of the major threats to human health in the 21st century is the emergence of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, thereby limiting treatment options. An important route through which pathogens become resistant is via acquisition of resistance genes from environmental

  6. Prophylactic Antiepileptics and Seizure Incidence Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Propensity Score-Matched Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panczykowski, David; Pease, Matthew; Zhao, Yin; Weiner, Gregory; Ares, William; Crago, Elizabeth; Jankowitz, Brian; Ducruet, Andrew F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The utility of prophylactic antiepileptic drug (AED) administration following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains controversial. AEDs have not clearly been associated with a reduction in seizure incidence and have been associated with both neurologic worsening and delayed functional recovery in this setting. Methods We retrospectively analyzed a prospectively collected database of SAH patients admitted to our institution between 2005 and 2010. Between 2005 and 2007, all patients received prophylactic AEDs upon admission. After 2007 no patients received prophylactic AEDs or had AEDs immediately discontinued if initiated at an outside hospital. A propensity score-matched analysis was then performed to compare the development of clinical and/or electrographic seizures in these two populations. Results 353 patients with spontaneous SAH were analyzed, 43% of whom were treated with prophylactic AEDs upon admission. Overall, 10% of patients suffered clinical and/or electrographic seizures, most frequently occurring within 24-hrs of ictus (47%). The incidence of seizures did not vary significantly based on the use of prophylactic AEDs (11 vs. 8%, p=0.33). Propensity score-matched analyses suggest that patients receiving prophylactic AEDs had a similar likelihood of suffering seizures as those who did not (p=0.49). Conclusions Propensity score-matched analysis suggests that prophylactic AEDs do not significantly reduce the risk of seizure occurrence in patients with spontaneous SAH. PMID:27301932

  7. Historic perspective: prebiotics, probiotics, and other alternatives to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, M E

    2011-11-01

    Applications of antimicrobials in food production and human health have found favor throughout human history. Antibiotic applications in agricultural and human medical arenas have resulted in tremendous increases in food animal production and historically unprecedented gains in human health protection. Successes attributed to widespread antibiotic use have been accompanied by the inadvertent emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A major problem associated with this emerging resistance is the crossover use of some antibiotics in agricultural settings as well as in the prevention and treatment of human disease. This outcome led to calls to restrict the use of human health-related antibiotics in food animal production. Calls for restricted antibiotic use have heightened existing searches for alternatives to antibiotics that give similar or enhanced production qualities as highly reliable as the antibiotics currently provided to food animals. Agricultural and scientific advances, mainly within the last 100 yr, have given us insights into sources, structures, and actions of materials that have found widespread application in our modern world. The purpose of this presentation is to provide a historic perspective on the search for what are generally known as antibiotics and alternative antimicrobials, probiotics, prebiotics, bacteriophages, bacteriocins, and phytotherapeutics.

  8. Administration of antibiotic agents before intraoperative sampling in orthopedic infections alters culture results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mayahi, Mohamed; Cian, Anais; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Suvà, Domizio; Müller, Camillo; Landelle, Caroline; Miozzari, Hermès H; Uçkay, Ilker

    2015-11-01

    Many physicians and surgeons think that prescribing antibiotics before intraoperative sampling does not alter the microbiological results. Case-control study of adult patients hospitalized with orthopedic infections. Among 2740 episodes of orthopedic infections, 1167 (43%) had received antibiotic therapy before surgical sampling. Among these, 220 (19%) grew no pathogens while the proportion of culture-negative results in the 2573 who had no preoperative antibiotic therapy was only 6%. By multivariate analyses, pre-operative antibiotic exposure was associated with significantly more culture-negative results (odds ratio 2.8, 95% confidence interval 2.1-3.7), more non-fermenting rods and skin commensals (odds ratio 2.8 and 3.0, respectively). Even a single pre-operative dose of antibiotic was significantly associated with subsequent culture-negative results (19/93 vs. 297/2350; χ²-test, p = 0.01) and skin commensals (17/74 vs. 274/2350; p = 0.01) compared to episodes without preceding prophylaxis. Prior antibiotic use, including single-dose prophylactic administrations, is three-fold associated with culture-negative results, non-fermenting rods and resistant skin commensals. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Antibiotic Resistant Target Seeker (ARTS), an exploration engine for antibiotic cluster prioritization and novel drug target discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanjary, Mohammad; Kronmiller, Brent; Adamek, Martina

    2017-01-01

    With the rise of multi-drug resistant pathogens and the decline in number of potential new antibiotics in development there is a fervent need to reinvigorate the natural products discovery pipeline. Most antibiotics are derived from secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms and plants....... To avoid suicide, an antibiotic producer harbors resistance genes often found within the same biosynthetic gene cluster (BGC) responsible for manufacturing the antibiotic. Existing mining tools are excellent at detecting BGCs or resistant genes in general, but provide little help in prioritizing...... and identifying gene clusters for compounds active against specific and novel targets. Here we introduce the 'Antibiotic Resistant Target Seeker' (ARTS) available at https://arts.ziemertlab.com. ARTS allows for specific and efficient genome mining for antibiotics with interesting and novel targets. The aim...

  10. Enabling techniques in the search for new antibiotics: Combinatorial biosynthesis of sugar-containing antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Je Won; Nam, Sang-Jip; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2017-06-15

    Nature has a talent for inventing a vast number of natural products, including hybrids generated by blending different scaffolds, resulting in a myriad of bioactive chemical entities. Herein, we review the highlights and recent trends (2010-2016) in the combinatorial biosynthesis of sugar-containing antibiotics where nature's structural diversification capabilities are exploited to enable the creation of new anti-infective and anti-proliferative drugs. In this review, we describe the modern combinatorial biosynthetic approaches for polyketide synthase-derived complex and aromatic polyketides, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-directed lipo-/glycopeptides, aminoglycosides, nucleoside antibiotics, and alkaloids, along with their therapeutic potential. Finally, we present the feasible nexus between combinatorial biosynthesis, systems biology, and synthetic biology as a toolbox to provide new antibiotics that will be indispensable in the post-antibiotic era. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of antibiotic resistance among isolated pathogenic bacteria from shrimp hatcheries in Bushehr province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Moghimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Rapid development of shrimp aquaculture has resulted in widespread use of antibiotics for preventing and curing diseases. In aquaculture, particularly shrimp hatcheries antibiotics are routinely used at therapeutic levels to treat disease and at sub-therapeutic levels as prophylactic agents to increase feed efficiency. Antibiotic residues in the environment are likely to lead to the development and maintenance of antibiotic resistance in microbial populations. The aim of this study was determine of antibiotic resistance to two shrimp pathogens Vibrio harveyi, V.alginolyticus, that they are agents of mortality in shrimp hatcheries. Material and Methods: After isolation and detection(by biochemical tests of two species of bacterial pathogens from three hatcheries of Bushehr province, bacterial strains were tested for sensitivity to antibiotics including erythromycin, streptomycin, oxytetracyclin, and trimetoprim by disk diffusion method. Results: Results showed that all isolated bacteria Vibrio harveyi from three hatcheries were sensitive to oxytetracyclin and trimetoprim, but to streptomycin were resistant, and to erythromycin in hatcheries A, B, C was intermediate, resistance, sensitive respectively. Bacteria Vibrio alginolyticus isolated from three hatcheries were resistant to streptomycin. But they isolated from a hatchery to the other antibiotics erythromycin, oxytetracyclin and trimetoprim were resistant, intermediate and intermediate, respectively. Also they isolated from B hatchery were resistant, sensitive and sensitive to erythromycin, oxytetracyclin and trimetoprim, respectively And from C hatchery were intermediate, sensitive and sensitive to antibiotics, respectively. Conclusion: Isolated bacteria showed the most resistance to streptomycin and erythromycin respectively. These antibiotics is used frequently in medicine and veterinary, with entrance of human and animal's bacteria resistance via waste and fluid water

  12. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies....... This omission creates a skewed view, which emphasizes short-term efficacy and ignores the long-term consequences to the patient and other people. We offer a framework for addressing antibiotic resistance in systematic reviews. We suggest that the data on background resistance in the original trials should...... controlled trials or systematic reviews....

  13. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in the Management of Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Cendron

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic prophylaxis has been, since 1960s, one of the management options in treating vesicoureteral reflux. The purpose of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the rational for antiobiotic prophylaxis and to discuss the various agents used. Some of the current controversies regarding use of antibiotics for reflux will also be presented.

  14. Antibiotic resistance plasmids in wastewater treatment plants and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic resistance plasmids found in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) may represent a threat to public health if they are readily disseminated into the environment and ultimately into pathogenic bacteria. The wastewater environments provide an ideal ecosystem for development and evolution of antibiotic resistance ...

  15. Environmental pollution by antibiotics and by antibiotic resistance determinants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jose Luis, E-mail: jlmtnez@cnb.csic.e [Departamento de Biotecnologia Microbiana, Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Darwin 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, and CIBERESP (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    Antibiotics are among the most successful drugs used for human therapy. However, since they can challenge microbial populations, they must be considered as important pollutants as well. Besides being used for human therapy, antibiotics are extensively used for animal farming and for agricultural purposes. Residues from human environments and from farms may contain antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes that can contaminate natural environments. The clearest consequence of antibiotic release in natural environments is the selection of resistant bacteria. The same resistance genes found at clinical settings are currently disseminated among pristine ecosystems without any record of antibiotic contamination. Nevertheless, the effect of antibiotics on the biosphere is wider than this and can impact the structure and activity of environmental microbiota. Along the article, we review the impact that pollution by antibiotics or by antibiotic resistance genes may have for both human health and for the evolution of environmental microbial populations. - The article reviews the current knowledge on the effects that pollution by antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes may have for the microbiosphere.

  16. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really replace antibiotics remains a controversial issue. This review summarizes recent development and perspectives of alternatives to antibiotics. The mechanism of actions, applications, and prospectives of the alternatives such as immunity modulating agents, bacteriophages and their lysins, antimicrobial peptides, pro-, pre-, and synbiotics, plant extracts, inhibitors targeting pathogenicity (bacterial quorum sensing, biofilm, and virulence), and feeding enzymes are thoroughly discussed. Lastly, the feasibility of alternatives to antibiotics is deeply analyzed. It is hard to conclude that the alternatives might substitute antibiotics in veterinary medicine in the foreseeable future. At the present time, prudent use of antibiotics and the establishment of scientific monitoring systems are the best and fastest way to limit the adverse effects of the abuse of antibiotics and to ensure the safety of animal-derived food and environment.

  17. Antibiotic Alternatives: The Substitution of Antibiotics in Animal Husbandry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyue eCheng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could relly replace antibiotics remains a controversial issue. This review summarizes recent development and perspectives of alternatives to antibiotics. The mechanism of actions, applications, and prospectives of the alternatives such as immunity modulating agents, bacteriophages and their lysins, antimicrobial peptides, pro-, pre- and synbiotics, plant extracts, inhibitors targeting pathogenicity (bacterial quorum sensing, biofilm and virulence, and feeding enzymes are thoroughly discussed. Lastly, the feasibility of alternatives to antibiotics is deeply analyzed. It is hard to conclude that the alternatives might substitute antibiotics in veterinary medicine in the foreseeable future. At the present time, prudent use of antibiotics and the establishment of scientific monitoring systems are the best and fastest way to limit the adverse effects of the abuse of antibiotics and to ensure the safety of animal-derived food and environment.

  18. Prophylactic antibiotics are associated with a lower incidence of pneumonia in cardiac arrest survivors treated with targeted temperature management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagnon, David J; Nielsen, Niklas; Fraser, Gilles L

    2015-01-01

    of a good functional outcome (41.1 vs. 36.6%, p = 0.19) were similar between groups. Backwards stepwise logistic regression demonstrated PRO were independently associated with a lower incidence of pneumonia (OR 0.09, 95% 0.06-0.14, p

  19. Prophylactic antibiotics for preventing Gram positive infections associated with long-term central venous catheters in oncology patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wetering, Marianne D.; van Woensel, Job B. M.; Lawrie, Theresa A.

    2013-01-01

    This is an updated version of the review which was first published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in 2006. Long-term central venous catheters (CVCs), including tunnelled CVCs (TCVCs) and totally implanted devices or ports (TIDs), are increasingly used when treating oncology patients.

  20. Excretion of antibiotic resistance genes by dairy calves fed milk replacers with varying doses of antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callie H. Thames

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Elevated levels of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs in soil and water have been linked to livestock farms and in some cases feed antibiotics may select for antibiotic resistant gut microbiota. The purpose of this study was to examine the establishment of ARGs in the feces of calves receiving milk replacer containing no antibiotics versus subtherapeutic or therapeutic doses of tetracycline and neomycin. The effect of antibiotics on calf health was also of interest. Twenty-eight male and female dairy calves were assigned to one of the three antibiotic treatment groups at birth and fecal samples were collected at weeks 6, 7 (prior to weaning, and 12 (5 weeks after weaning. ARGs corresponding to the tetracycline (tetC, tetG, tetO, tetW, and tetX, macrolide (ermB, ermF, and sulfonamide (sul1, sul2 classes of antibiotics along with the class I integron gene, intI1, were monitored by quantitative polymerase chain reaction as potential indicators of direct selection, co-selection, or horizontal gene transfer of ARGs. Surprisingly, there was no significant effect of antibiotic treatment on the absolute abundance (gene copies/ g wet manure of any of the ARGs except ermF, which was lower in the antibiotic-treated calf manure, presumably because a significant portion of host bacterial cells carrying ermF were not resistant to tetracycline or neomycin. However, relative abundance (gene copies normalized to 16S rRNA genes of tetO was higher in calves fed the highest dose of antibiotic than in the other treatments. All genes, except tetC and intI1, were detectable in feces from 6 weeks onwards, and tetW and tetG significantly increased (P<0.10, even in control calves. Overall, the results provide new insight into the colonization of calf gut flora with ARGs in the early weeks. Although feed antibiotics exerted little effect on the ARGs monitored in this study, the fact that they also provided no health benefit suggests that the greater than conventional

  1. Prophylactic Appendectomy during Laparoscopic Surgery for Other Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Occhionorelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis remains the most common surgical emergency. Laparoscopy has gained increasing favor as a method of both investigating right iliac fossa pain and treating the finding of appendicitis. A question arises: what to do with an apparent healthy appendix discovered during laparoscopic surgery for other pathology. We present a case of unilateral hydroureteronephrosis complicated with rupture of the renal pelvis, due to gangrenous appendicitis with abscess of the right iliopsoas muscle and periappendicular inflammation in a 67-year-old woman, who underwent laparoscopic right annessiectomy for right ovarian cyst few years earlier, in which a healthy appendix was left inside. There is a lack of consensus in the literature about what to do with a normal appendix. The main argument for removing an apparently normal appendix is that endoluminal appendicitis may not be recognized during surgery, leading to concern that an abnormal appendix is left in place. Because of a lack of evidence from randomized trials, it remains unclear whether the benefits of routine elective coincidental appendectomy outweigh the costs and risks of morbidity associated with this prophylactic procedure. Nevertheless, it appears, from limited data, that women aged 35 years and under benefit most from elective coincidental appendectomy.

  2. Therapeutic and Prophylactic Potential of Morama (Tylosema esculentum): A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chingwaru, Walter; Vidmar, Jerneja; Kapewangolo, Petrina T; Mazimba, Ofentse; Jackson, Jose

    2015-10-01

    Tylosema esculentum (morama) is a highly valued traditional food and source of medicine for the San and other indigenous populations that inhabit the arid to semi-arid parts of Southern Africa. Morama beans are a rich source of phenolic acids, flavonoids, certain fatty acids, non-essential amino acids, certain phytosterols, tannins and minerals. The plant's tuber contains griffonilide, behenic acid and starch. Concoctions of extracts from morama bean, tuber and other local plants are frequently used to treat diarrhoea and digestive disorders by the San and other indigenous populations. Information on composition and bioactivity of phytochemical components of T. esculentum suggests that the polyphenol-rich extracts of the bean testae and cotyledons have great potential as sources of chemicals that inhibit infectious microorganisms (viral, bacterial and fungal, including drug-resistant strains), offer protection against certain non-communicable diseases and promote wound healing and gut health. The potential antinutritional properties of a few morama components are also highlighted. More research is necessary to reveal the full prophylactic and therapeutic potential of the plant against diseases of the current century. Research on domestication and conservation of the plant offers new hope for sustainable utilisation of the plant. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The influence of prophylactic factor VIII in severe hemophilia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissel, Matthew; Whelihan, Matthew F; Ferris, Lauren A; Mann, Kenneth G; Rivard, Georges E; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hemophilia A individuals displaying a similar genetic defect have heterogeneous clinical phenotypes. Aim To evaluate the underlying effect of exogenous factor (f)VIII on tissue factor (Tf)-initiated blood coagulation in severe hemophilia utilizing both empirical and computational models. Methods We investigated twenty-five clinically severe hemophilia A patients. All individuals were on fVIII prophylaxis and had not received fVIII from 0.25 to 4 days prior to phlebotomy. Coagulation was initiated by the addition of Tf to contact-pathway inhibited whole blood ± an anti-fVIII antibody. Aliquots were quenched over 20 min and analyzed for thrombin generation and fibrin formation. Coagulation factor levels were obtained and used to computationally predict thrombin generation with fVIII set to either zero or its value at the time of the draw. Results Due to prophylactic fVIII, at the time of the blood draw, the individuals had fVIII levels that ranged from hemophilia A. The combination of each individual's coagulation factors (outside of fVIII) determine each individual's baseline thrombin potential and may affect bleeding risk. PMID:21899664

  4. Effect of prophylactic digitalization on the development of myocardial hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutilletta, A F; Rudnik, M; Arcilla, R A; Straube, R

    1977-11-01

    The effect of prophylactic digitalization on the development of left ventricular hypertrophy was studied in adult rats. Digitoxin, 0.1 mg/100 g body wt or solvent was given daily for 1 wk prior to either aortic constriction or sham operation and was continued until the animals were killed, either 1 or 4 wk after surgery. A hemodynamic study was done in those animals killed 1 wk after surgery; hearts of all animals were examined for evidence of myocardial hypertrophy. Constriction of the ascending aorta had no significant effect on cardiac output but did reduce peak flow velocity and flow acceleration. An increase in left ventricular mass, RNA, and hydroxyproline was found in the animals with aortic constriction. Digitoxin treatment did not alter peak flow velocity or flow acceleration, but did significantly increase isovolumic (dP/dt)P-1. Digitoxin had no effect on body weight, heart weight, RNA, or hydroxyproline in either the sham-operated animals or in the animals with aortic constriction. Therefore, despite plasma digitoxin levels sufficient to affect myocardial contractility, left ventricular hypertrophy still developed after aortic constriction.

  5. Recruitment barriers for prophylactic vaccine trials: A study in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Lauriane; Van Damme, Pierre; Vandermeulen, Corinne; Mali, Stéphanie

    2017-12-04

    Recruitment of volunteers is one of the main challenges in clinical trial management, and there is little information about recruitment barriers for preventative vaccine trials. We investigated both the recruitment barriers and recruitment strategies for preventive vaccine trials in Belgium. A 10 min survey was used as well as interviews of staff at all clinical trial sites in Belgium that regularly perform vaccine trials. We observed that there are successful recruitment strategies and few recruitment issues for trials involving healthy adults and those over 65 years old. However, challenges face the recruitment of paediatric populations, pregnant women, patients and the very elderly (over 85 years old). From these results, we identified three priority areas to increase recruitment for prophylactic vaccine trials in Belgium. These are: the lack of public knowledge about infectious diseases; the lack of resources of healthcare professionals to take part in clinical trials; and the burden to potential volunteers to take part in a trial. These were discussed with stakeholders and solutions were proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. PROPHYLACTIC EFFECTIVENESS OF FUSAFUNGINE IN CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC TONSILLITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.I. Garashchenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2008/2009, at the time of influenza epidemic, the study of ambulatory prophylactic treatment of fusafungine (Bioparox in 50 children 7–15 years old with chronic tonsillitis was performed. All these children underwent regular ENT check-up. The control group included 50 schoolchildren the same age without chronic diseases of upper airways. After the treatment with intranasal fusafungine, the amount of patients with Streptococcus pyogenes was decreased 1,6 times low (and after 3 months of treatment it was decreased 3,5 times low. The sanation of palatine tonsils from Candida albicans was detected (eradication of microorganism was achieved in 58% of cases, and the amount of patients with pharyngomycosis was decreased 2,4 times low. Patient’s quality of life significantly increased, and ENT-specialists met less complaints (in 4,5–15 times low. The morbidity with respiratory infections in 3 months after the treatment with fusafungine was 7,5 times low than in control group.Key words: schoolchildren, chronic tonsillitis, acute respiratory infection, fusafungine.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(1:26-31

  7. Prophylactic respiratory physiotherapy after cardiac surgery: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquina, Patrick; Tramèr, Martin R; Walder, Bernhard

    2003-12-13

    To assess whether respiratory physiotherapy prevents pulmonary complications after cardiac surgery. Searches through Medline, Embase, Cinahl, the Cochrane library, and bibliographies, for randomised trials comparing any type of prophylactic respiratory physiotherapy with another type or no intervention after cardiac surgery, with a follow up of at least two days, and reporting on respiratory outcomes. Investigators assessed trial validity independently. Information on study design, population, interventions, and end points was abstracted by one investigator and checked by the others. 18 trials (1457 patients) were identified. Most were of low quality. They tested physical therapy (13 trials), incentive spirometry (eight), continuous positive airway pressure (five), and intermittent positive pressure breathing (three). The maximum follow up was six days. Four trials only had a no intervention control; none showed any significant benefit of physiotherapy. Across all trials and interventions, average values postoperatively were: incidence of atelectasis, 15-98%; incidence of pneumonia, 0-20%; partial pressure of arterial oxygen per inspired oxygen fraction, 212-329 mm Hg; vital capacity, 37-72% of preoperative values; and forced expiratory volume in one second, 34-72%. No intervention showed superiority for any end point. For the most labour intensive intervention, continuous positive airway pressure, the average cost of labour for each patient day was 27 euro (pound 19; 32 dollars). The usefulness of respiratory physiotherapy for the prevention of pulmonary complications after cardiac surgery remains unproved. Large randomised trials are needed with no intervention controls, clinically relevant end points, and reasonable follow up periods.

  8. Naratriptan in the Prophylactic Treatment of Cluster Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yasuo; Mitsufuji, Takashi; Asano, Yoshio; Shimazu, Tomokazu; Kato, Yuji; Tanahashi, Norio; Maruki, Yuichi; Sakai, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Toshimasa; Araki, Nobuo

    2017-10-01

    Objective Naratriptan has been reported to reduce the frequency of cluster headache. The purpose of this study was to determine whether naratriptan is effective as a prophylactic treatment for cluster headache in Japan. Methods We retrospectively reviewed all 43 patients with cluster headache who received preventive treatment with naratriptan from April 2009 to April 2015. The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd Edition (beta version) (ICHD-3 beta) was used to diagnose cluster headache. This study was conducted at 3 centers (Department of Neurology, Saitama Medical University; Saitama Neuropsychiatric Institute; Saitama Medical University International Medical Center). Patients were recruited from these specialized headache outpatient centers. Naratriptan was taken before the patient went to bed. Results The study population included 30 men (69.8%) and 13 women (30.2%). Twenty-two cases received other preventive treatments (51.2%), while 21 cases only received naratriptan (48.8%). Among the 43 cases, 37 patients (86.0%) achieved an improvement of cluster headache on naratriptan. Conclusion Naratriptan has been suggested as a preventive medicine for cluster headache because of the longer the biological half-life in comparison to other triptans. The internal use of naratriptan 2 hours before attacks appears to achieve a good response in patients with cluster headache.

  9. Klebsiella pneumoniae antibiotic resistance identified by atomic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vincenzo Ierardi

    2017-10-03

    Oct 3, 2017 ... Our aims were to use the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate bacteria morphological changes in response to antibiotics treatment and explore the possibility of reducing the time required to obtain information on their resistance. In particular, we studied Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria provided by ...

  10. Antibiotic use for irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotry, Anirudha; Fedorowicz, Zbys; van Zuuren, Esther J; Farman, Allan G; Al-Langawi, Jassim Hasan

    2016-02-17

    study period: 9.2 (standard deviation (SD) 6.02) in the penicillin group versus 9.6 (SD 6.34) in the placebo group; mean difference -0.40 (95% confidence interval (CI) -4.23 to 3.43; P value = 0.84). This applied equally for the mean total number of Tylenol tablets: 6.9 (SD 6.87) used in the penicillin group versus 4.45 (SD 4.82) in the placebo group; mean difference 2.45 (95% CI -1.23 to 6.13; P value = 0.19). Our secondary outcome on reporting of adverse events was not addressed in this study. This systematic review which was based on one low powered small sample trial assessed as at low risk of bias, illustrates that there is insufficient evidence to determine whether antibiotics reduce pain or not compared to not having antibiotics. The results of this review confirm the necessity for further larger sample and methodologically sound trials that can provide additional evidence as to whether antibiotics, prescribed in the preoperative phase, can affect treatment outcomes for irreversible pulpitis.

  11. Fish oils against Burkholderia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: in vitro efficacy and their therapeutic and prophylactic effects on infected Galleria mellonella larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mil-Homens, D; Ferreira-Dias, S; Fialho, A M

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the antimicrobial effects of fish oil-based formulas rich in omega-3 fatty acids (free fatty acids, ethyl esters or triacylglycerols), against cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens (Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), often resistant to multiple antibiotics. The fish oils have shown antibacterial efficacy, although activity was highest for the one containing the fatty acid EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) in their free form (MIC value is 1·87% v/v for both pathogens). To test whether the fish oils could have a therapeutic and prophylactic potential in vivo, we assessed its efficacy using a Galleria mellonella caterpillar model of infection. The treatment of infected larvae with a single dose (7 h post infection) enhances the survival of larvae, being more pronounced with the free fatty acid form (EPAX 6000 FA). Moreover, we observed that the prophylactic food provision of the fish oil EPAX 6000 FA during 12 days prior to bacterial infection extended the life of the infected larvae. The fish oils, particularly in the free fatty acid form, are active in killing Burkholderia and Ps. aeruginosa. The possibility of using fish oils for the treatment of bacterial infections in CF patients. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Antibiotic use and microbiome function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Manuel; Méndez-García, Celia; Rojo, David; Barbas, Coral; Moya, Andrés

    2017-06-15

    Our microbiome should be understood as one of the most complex components of the human body. The use of β-lactam antibiotics is one of the microbiome covariates that influence its composition. The extent to which our microbiota changes after an antibiotic intervention depends not only on the chemical nature of the antibiotic or cocktail of antibiotics used to treat specific infections, but also on the type of administration, duration and dose, as well as the level of resistance that each microbiota develops. We have begun to appreciate that not all bacteria within our microbiota are vulnerable or reactive to different antibiotic interventions, and that their influence on both microbial composition and metabolism may differ. Antibiotics are being used worldwide on a huge scale and the prescription of antibiotics is continuing to rise; however, their effects on our microbiota have been reported for only a limited number of them. This article presents a critical review of the antibiotics or antibiotic cocktails whose use in humans has been linked to changes in the composition of our microbial communities, with a particular focus on the gut, oral, respiratory, skin and vaginal microbiota, and on their molecular agents (genes, proteins and metabolites). We review the state of the art as of June 2016, and cover a total of circa 68 different antibiotics. The data herein are the first to compile information about the bacteria, fungi, archaea and viruses most influenced by the main antibiotic treatments prescribed nowadays. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gut Microbiome and Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizumi, Tadasu; Battaglia, Thomas; Ruiz, Victoria; Perez Perez, Guillermo I

    2017-12-05

    Despite that the human gastrointestinal tract is the most populated ecological niche by bacteria in the human body, much is still unknown about its characteristics. This site is highly susceptible to the effects of many external factors that may affect in the quality and the quantity of the microbiome. Specific factors such as diet, personal hygiene, pharmacological drugs and the use of antibiotics can produce a significant impact on the gut microbiota. The effect of these factors is more relevant early in life, when the gut microbiota has not yet fully established. In this review, we discussed the effect of type and doses of the antibiotics on the gut microbiota and what the major consequences in the use and abuse of these antimicrobial agents. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prophylactic tracheotomy and lung cancer resection in patient with low predictive pulmonary function: a randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filaire, Marc; Tardy, Marie M; Richard, Ruddy; Naamee, Adel; Chadeyras, Jean Baptiste; Da Costa, Valence; Bailly, Patrick; Eisenmann, Nathanaël; Pereira, Bruno; Merle, Patrick; Galvaing, Géraud

    2015-12-01

    Whether prophylactic tracheotomy can shorten the duration of mechanical ventilation (MV) in high risk patients eligible for lung cancer resection. The objective was to compare duration of MV and outcome in 39 patients randomly assigned to prophylactic tracheotomy or control. Prospective randomized controlled, single-center trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01053624). The primary outcome measure was the cumulative number of MV days after operation until discharge. The secondary outcome measures were the 60 days mortality rate, the ICU and the hospital length of stay, the incidence of postoperative respiratory, cardiac and general complications, the reventilation rate, the need of noninvasive ventilation (NIV), the need of a tracheotomy in control group and the tracheal complications. The duration of MV was not significantly different between the tracheotomy group (3.5±6 days) and the control group (4.7±9.3 days) (P=0.54). Among patients needing prolonged MV >4 days, tracheotomy patients had a shortened duration of MV than control patients (respectively 11.4±7.1 and 20.4±9.6 days, P=0.04). The rate of respiratory complications were significantly lower in the tracheotomy group than in the control group (28% vs. 51%, P=0.03). Six patients (15%) needed a postoperative tracheotomy in the control group because of a prolonged MV >7 days. Tracheotomy was associated with a reduced need of NIV (P=0.04). There was no difference in 60-day mortality rate, cardiac complications, intensive care unit and hospital length of stay. No death was related with the tracheotomy. Prophylactic tracheotomy in patients with ppo FEV1 <50% who underwent thoracotomy for lung cancer resection provided benefits in terms of duration of prolonged MV and respiratory complications but was not associated with a decreased mortality rate, ICU and hospital length of stay and non-respiratory complications.

  15. HPV Prophylactic Vaccination in Males Improves the Clearance of Semen Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Foresta

    2015-10-01

    Discussion: Humoral immunity has a major role in healing from HPV infection. Elder ART patients with HPV semen infection may benefit by the union of both specific counselling and available prophylactic vaccination.

  16. Prophylactic Supplementation of Caprylic Acid in Feed Reduces Salmonella Enteritidis Colonization in Commercial Broiler Chicks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johny, Anup Kollanoor; Baskaran, Sangeetha Ananda; Charles, Anu Susan; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Darre, Michael J; Khan, Mazhar I; Hoagland, Thomas A; Schreiber, David T; Donoghue, Annie M; Donoghue, Dan J; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2009-01-01

    .... We investigated the prophylactic efficacy of feed supplemented with caprylic acid (CA), a natural, generally recognized as safe eight-carbon fatty acid, for reducing Salmonella Enteritidis colonization in chicks...

  17. Prophylactic dialysis in non-dialysis-dependent patients with renal failure after CABG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roghayyeh Borji

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: According the results of this study, prophylactic dialysis, before conduct-ing CABG, does not have any significant effect on mortality and other complications. The only exception is lung complications in non-dialysis-dependent patients with renal failure.

  18. Prophylactic treatment response in bipolar disorder: Results of a naturalistic observation study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garnham, Julie; Munro, Alana; Slaney, Claire; MacDougall, Marsha; Passmore, Michael; Duffy, Anne; O'Donovan, Claire; Teehan, Andrew; Alda, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate effectiveness of commonly used prophylactic treatments for bipolar disorder in a naturalistic setting and to explore factors associated with treatment response...

  19. Indications and Outcomes of Prophylactic and Therapeutic Extracranial-to-intracranial Arterial Bypass for Cerebral Revascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Gazyakan, MD, MSc

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: The collaboration of neurosurgeons and plastic surgeons in performing EC-IC bypass can result in excellent outcomes with a high bypass patency rate and few complications, particularly for prophylactic EC-IC bypass.

  20. Prophylactic pinning for slipped capital femoral epiphysis: does it affect proximal femoral morphology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Gerard R; Campbell, Donald M; Wilson, Neil I L; Maclean, Jamie G B

    2016-05-01

    This study was designed to determine whether prophylactic pinning of the unaffected hip in unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis affects the proximal femoral morphology. Twenty-four hips prophylactically pinned were compared with 26 cases observed. The articulotrochanteric distance (ATD) and the trochanteric-trochanteric distance (TTD) were measured. Postoperative radiographs were compared with final follow-up radiographs. The final TTD : ATD ratio was higher (P=0.048) in the pinned group, suggesting relative coxa vara/breva. There was a smaller difference between the two hips in the prophylactically pinned group (0.7) as opposed to those observed (1.47). Prophylactic pinning does not cause growth to stop immediately but alters the proximal femoral morphology.

  1. ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS ON ESTOMATOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Alfaro, Miguel; Responsable de la cátedra de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Burga Sánchez, Jonny; Catedrático de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Chumpitaz Cerrate, Víctor; Catedrático de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Varas Hilario, Roberto; Catedrático de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Guerra Sanguinetti, Jaime; Cirujano Dentista de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; López Bellido, Roger; Bachiller de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Zegarra Cuya, Juan; Interno de la Facultad de OdontoIogia UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical antibiotic prophylaxis consists in the use of an antimicrobial drug in a preventive way, that must be active against microorganisms that in high frequency causes posterior infections of our surgical wounds and maintain effective tissue concentrations along the surgery procedure and the posterior time when appears the bacteremia. To reach a successful treatment is necessary to have the knowledge of the resident bactemial flora and the pathogenous flora that infects our surgical wounds...

  2. Opportunities for synthetic biology in antibiotics: expanding glycopeptide chemical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaker, Maulik N; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-03-20

    Synthetic biology offers a new path for the exploitation and improvement of natural products to address the growing crisis in antibiotic resistance. All antibiotics in clinical use are facing eventual obsolesce as a result of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms, yet there are few new drug leads forthcoming from the pharmaceutical sector. Natural products of microbial origin have proven over the past 70 years to be the wellspring of antimicrobial drugs. Harnessing synthetic biology thinking and strategies can provide new molecules and expand chemical diversity of known antibiotic scaffolds to provide much needed new drug leads. The glycopeptide antibiotics offer paradigmatic scaffolds suitable for such an approach. We review these strategies here using the glycopeptides as an example and demonstrate how synthetic biology can expand antibiotic chemical diversity to help address the growing resistance crisis.

  3. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alan P.

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance involves the collection and analysis of data for the detection and monitoring of threats to public health. Surveillance should also inform as to the epidemiology of the threat and its burden in the population. A further key component of surveillance is the timely feedback of data to stakeholders with a view to generating action aimed at reducing or preventing the public health threat being monitored. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance involves the collection of antibiotic susceptibility test results undertaken by microbiology laboratories on bacteria isolated from clinical samples sent for investigation. Correlation of these data with demographic and clinical data for the patient populations from whom the pathogens were isolated gives insight into the underlying epidemiology and facilitates the formulation of rational interventions aimed at reducing the burden of resistance. This article describes a range of surveillance activities that have been undertaken in the UK over a number of years, together with current interventions being implemented. These activities are not only of national importance but form part of the international response to the global threat posed by antibiotic resistance. PMID:25918439

  4. Perioperative antibiotics for prevention of acute endophthalmitis after cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Emily W; Lindsley, Kristina; Nanji, Afshan A; Leyngold, Ilya; McDonnell, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Background Endophthalmitis is a severe inflammation of the anterior and/or posterior chambers of the eye that may be sterile or associated with infection. It is a potentially vision-threatening complication of cataract surgery. Prophylactic measures for endophthalmitis are targeted against various sources of infection. Objectives The objective of this review was to evaluate the effects of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis for endophthalmitis following cataract surgery. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 10), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, (January 1950 to October 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 25 October 2012. We also searched for additional studies that cited any included trials using the Science Citation Index. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials that enrolled adults undergoing cataract surgery (any method and incision type) for lens opacities due to any origin. Trials that evaluated preoperative antibiotics, intraoperative (intracameral, subconjunctival or systemic) or postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis for acute endophthalmitis were included. We did not include studies that evaluated antiseptic preoperative preparations using agents such as povidone iodine, nor did we include studies that evaluated antibiotics for treating acute endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Data collection and analysis Two

  5. Minocycline: far beyond an antibiotic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Mesa, N; Zarzuelo, A; Gálvez, J

    2013-01-01

    Minocycline is a second-generation, semi-synthetic tetracycline that has been in therapeutic use for over 30 years because of its antibiotic properties against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. It is mainly used in the treatment of acne vulgaris and some sexually transmitted diseases. Recently, it has been reported that tetracyclines can exert a variety of biological actions that are independent of their anti-microbial activity, including anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities, and inhibition of proteolysis, angiogenesis and tumour metastasis. These findings specifically concern to minocycline as it has recently been found to have multiple non-antibiotic biological effects that are beneficial in experimental models of various diseases with an inflammatory basis, including dermatitis, periodontitis, atherosclerosis and autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Of note, minocycline has also emerged as the most effective tetracycline derivative at providing neuroprotection. This effect has been confirmed in experimental models of ischaemia, traumatic brain injury and neuropathic pain, and of several neurodegenerative conditions including Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Moreover, other pre-clinical studies have shown its ability to inhibit malignant cell growth and activation and replication of human immunodeficiency virus, and to prevent bone resorption. Considering the above-mentioned findings, this review will cover the most important topics in the pharmacology of minocycline to date, supporting its evaluation as a new therapeutic approach for many of the diseases described herein. PMID:23441623

  6. National hospital antibiotic timing measures for pneumonia and antibiotic overuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Douglas E; Cohen, Abigail; Cohn, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    The development of drug-resistant bacteria from the overuse of antibiotics is a serious problem, with overutilization threatening to disarm caregivers and their patients even as together they face increasingly virulent strains of microbes. On the other hand, the speedy treatment of pneumonia with antibiotics is a firmly established, evidence-based practice, enshrined in Joint Commission on Accreditation for Healthcare Organizations Core Measures used in hospital accrediting and public reporting, and in Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) public-reporting and pay-for-performance hospital measures. This sets the stage for a potential conflict between (a) not doing the wrong thing by overprescribing antibiotics and (b) prescribing antibiotics on time for pneumonia. In November 2005, pneumonia antibiotic timing results were announced for the 133 top-performing hospitals in the first year of the 3-year CMS Hospital Quality Incentive Demonstration (HQID) pay-for-performance project, conducted in collaboration with Premier Inc, a hospital purchasing and informatics alliance. Premier client hospitals participating in the HQID also submit drug utilization and other comparative data to Premier for client access for benchmarking purposes; this makes it possible to see how the antibiotics specified for pneumonia are used by Premier hospitals for other conditions. In this study we look at where increased success in meeting the HQID pneumonia antibiotic timing measure is tied to an increase in antibiotic use for conditions where antibiotics are unwarranted--with the potential for promoting antibiotic resistance.

  7. Prophylactic central lymph nodes dissection (VI level in papillary thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Olegovich Rumiantsev

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic involvement of central lymph nodes in patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC is very common. However, prophylactic central lymph nodes dissection additionally to thyroidectomy does not significantly affect disease-free and overall survival of PTC patients. Meanwhile its routine conduction is tangibly increase postsurgical complications. From efficacy/safety point of view prophylactic central lymph nodes dissection couldn't be recommended as substantiated in all PTC patients.

  8. Effectiveness of prophylactic intravenous immunoglobulins in preventing infection in pediatric oncology patients: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Amy; Christian, Robin

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this review is to identify the effectiveness of prophylactic intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs) for the prevention of infection in pediatric oncology patients, and to identify which types of patients would benefit from the intervention, such as patients with specific diagnoses or those with previous infections. A further objective of this review is to identify the effectiveness of prophylactic IVIGs on the prevention of diffuse interstitial pneumonitis and mortality in pediatric oncology patients.The review questions are.

  9. Cost analysis of prophylactic intraoperative cystoscopic ureteral stents in gynecologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, James; Fenton, Bradford; Jean, Geraldine Marie; Chae, Clara

    2011-12-01

    Prophylactic intraoperative ureteral stent placement is performed to decrease operative ureteric injury, though few data are available on the effectiveness of this procedure, and no data are available on its cost. To analyze the cost of prophylactic intraoperative cystoscopic ureteral stents in gynecologic surgery. All cases of prophylactic ureteral stent placement performed in gynecologic surgery during a 1-year period were identified and retrospectively reviewed through the electronic medical records database of Summa Health System. Costs were obtained through the Healthcare Cost Accounting System. The principles of cost-effective analysis were used (ie, explicit and detailed descriptions of costs and cost-effectiveness statistics). Importantly, we evaluated cost and not charges or financial model estimates. In addition, we obtained the contribution margins (ie, the hospital's net profit or loss) for prophylactic ureteral stent placement. Other gynecologic procedures were also analyzed. Among 792 major inpatient gynecologic procedures, 18 cases of prophylactic intraoperative ureteral stents were identified. Median costs were as follows: additional cost of prophylactic intraoperative ureteral stenting, $1580; additional cost of surgical resources, $770; cost of ureteral catheters, $427; cost of surgeons, $383. The contribution margins per case for various gynecologic surgical procedures were as follows: oophorectomy, $2804 profit; abdominal hysterectomy, $2649 profit; laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH), $1760 profit. When intraoperative ureteral stenting was added, the contribution margins changed to the following: oophorectomy, $782 profit; abdominal hysterectomy, $627 profit; LAVH, $262 loss. Overall, the contribution margin profit was decreased by about 85%, from $2400 to $380. Prophylactic intraoperative ureteral stenting in gynecologic surgery decreases a hospital's contribution margin. Because of the expense of this procedure, as well as

  10. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Prophylactic Intra-Operative Wound Irrigation for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Stijn W; Boldingh, Quirine J J; Solomkin, Joseph S; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Egger, Matthias; Dellinger, E Patchen; Boermeester, Marja A

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. To reduce SSIs, prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (pIOWI) has been advocated, although the results to date are equivocal. To develop recommendations for the new World Health Organization (WHO) SSI prevention guidelines, a systematic literature review and a meta-analysis were conducted on the effectiveness of pIOWI using different agents as a means of reducing SSI. The PUBMED, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and WHO databases were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing either pIOWI with no pIOWI or with pIOWI using different solutions and techniques were retrieved with SSI as the primary outcome. Meta-analyses were performed, and odds ratios (OR) and the mean difference with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were extracted and pooled with a random effects model. Twenty-one studies were suitable for analysis, and a distinction was made between intra-peritoneal, mediastinal, and incisional wound irrigation. A low quality of evidence demonstrated a statistically significant benefit for incisional wound irrigation with an aqueous povidone-iodine (PVP-I) solution in clean and clean contaminated wounds (OR 0.31; 95% CI 0.13-0.73; p = 0.007); 50 fewer SSIs per 1,000 procedures (from 19 fewer to 64 fewer)). Antibiotic irrigation had no significant effect in reducing SSIs (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.64-2.12; p = 0.63). Low-quality evidence suggests considering the use of prophylactic incisional wound irrigation to prevent SSI with an aqueous povidone-iodine solution. Antibiotic irrigation does not show a benefit and therefore is discouraged.

  11. Chlamydia screening and prophylactic treatment in termination of pregnancy clinics in the Netherlands and Great Britain: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Georgina F; Picavet, Charles; Hoopman, Rianne; Lohr, Patricia A; Op de Coul, Eline L M

    2016-12-01

    Women having a termination of pregnancy (TOP) have higher rates of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) than the general population. In this study, we explored CT treatment and prevention in Dutch TOP clinics in comparison to that provided in Great Britain (GB). A qualitative study including 14 semi-structured interviews with health care professionals (HCPs) in TOP clinics (the Netherlands: 9, GB: 5). Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analysed by thematic content analysis. Prophylactic treatment with azithromycin is routinely prescribed after surgical TOP, but not after medical TOP ('abortion pill'). Sexually transmitted infections (STI) tests are offered to clients who are considered at high risk of having STI. Uptake varies according to health insurance coverage of STI testing. Some Dutch clinics are able to provide free testing for women under 25 years of age. Sexual health counselling is often limited to discussing birth control. The major difference between the Netherlands and GB is that GB TOP clinics more often offer free STI testing and prophylaxis to their clients. HCPs in Dutch TOP clinics consider STI testing an important part of their service, but financial barriers prevent testing on location. Dutch TOP clinics should offer STI tests to all women, and collaboration with public health services could improve STI testing and counselling for young people. Furthermore, clinics should treat all TOP clients with prophylactic azithromycin. This could prevent CT and other upper genital tract post-abortion infections.

  12. Prophylactic Treatment with Adlay Bran Extract Reduces the Risk of Severe Acute Radiation Dermatitis: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Study

    OpenAIRE

    Chih-Jen Huang; Ming-Feng Hou; Jung-Yu Kan; Chiung-Hui Juan; Shyng-Shiou F Yuan; Kuei-Hau Luo; Hung-Yi Chuang; Stephen Chu-Sung Hu

    2015-01-01

    Acute radiation dermatitis is a frequent adverse effect in patients with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy, but there are only a small number of studies providing evidence-based interventions for this clinical condition. Adlay is a cereal crop that has been previously shown to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. In this study, we seek to evaluate the effectiveness of oral prophylactic treatment with adlay bran extract in reducing the risk of severe acute radiation dermatiti...

  13. Cost and usage patterns of antibiotics in a tertiary care neurosurgical unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Singh Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The routine use of prophylactic antibiotics in neurosurgery has been shown to significantly reduce surgical site infection rates. The documentation of non-surgical site, nosocomial infections in neurosurgical patients remains limited, despite this being a stimulus for prolific antibiotic usage. The actual quantum of antibiotic use in neurosurgery and its role in infection control remain both undocumented and controversial. The authors address this issue with a cost-effectiveness study using historical controls. Materials and Methods: Bacteriologically positive body fluid samples were used to quantify infection rates in the year 2006 and compared with those in the year 1997. Itemized drug lists obtained from dedicated neurosurgical intensive care units and wards were used to quantify antibiotic usage and calculate their costs. Results were compared using both historical and internal controls. The monetary conversion factor used was INR 40=US$1. Results: A total of 3114 consecutive elective and emergency neurosurgical procedures were performed during the study period. 329 patients (10.6% were recorded to have bacteriologically positive body fluid samples, and 100,250 units of antibiotics were consumed costing Rs. 14,378,227.5 ($359,455.7. On an average, an operated patient received 32.2 units of antibiotics valued at Rs. 4,617 ($115.4. The crude infection rates were recorded to have reduced significantly in comparison to 1997, but did not differ between mirror intra-departmental units with significantly different antibiotic usage. Conclusions: Antibiotics accounted for 31% of the per capita cost of consumables for performing a craniotomy in the year 2006. This estimate should be factored into projecting future package costs.

  14. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  15. Pharmacological preconditioning with GYKI 52466: a prophylactic approach to neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea S Goulton

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Some toxins and drugs can trigger lasting neuroprotective mechanisms that enable neurons to resist a subsequent severe insult. This ‘pharmacological preconditioning’ has far-reaching implications for conditions in which blood flow to the brain is interrupted. We have previously shown that in vitro preconditioning with the AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 induces tolerance to kainic acid (KA toxicity in hippocampus. This effect persists well after washout of the drug and may be mediated via inverse agonism of G protein linked receptors. Given the amplifying nature of metabotropic modulation, we hypothesised that GYKI 52466 may be effective in reducing seizure severity at doses well below those normally associated with adverse side effects. Here we report that pharmacological preconditioning with low-dose GYKI imparts a significant protection against KA-induced seizures in vivo. GYKI (3 mg/kg, s.c., 90 to 180 min. prior to high-dose KA, markedly reduced seizure scores, virtually abolished all level 3 and level 4 seizures, and completely suppressed KA-induced hippocampal cFOS expression. In addition, preconditioned animals exhibited significant reductions in high frequency/high amplitude spiking and ECoG power in the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands during KA. Adverse behaviours often associated with higher doses of GYKI were not evident during preconditioning. The fact that GYKI is effective at doses well-below, and at pre-administration intervals well-beyond previous studies, suggests that a classical blockade of ionotropic AMPA receptors does not underlie anticonvulsant effects. Low-dose GYKI preconditioning may represent a novel, prophylactic strategy for neuroprotection in a field almost completely devoid of effective pharmaceuticals.

  16. Prophylactic bracing decreases ankle injuries in collegiate female volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedowitz, David I; Reddy, Sudheer; Parekh, Selene G; Huffman, G Russell; Sennett, Brian J

    2008-02-01

    Ankle injuries account for the highest percentage of injuries among female collegiate volleyball players. Since 1998, all female volleyball players at the authors' institution have worn bilateral double-upright padded ankle braces at all times. To review the authors' experience with this brace in preventing ankle injuries that result in a loss of play. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Injury data, preparticipation medical histories, and total exposure data were collected prospectively on all female volleyball players at the authors' institution from 1998 to 2005. Injuries and exposures were defined based on established National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System criteria. Injury rate was calculated as the number of injuries per 1000 exposures. The National Collegiate Athletic Association female volleyball injury data from 1998 to 2005 were used for comparison. During the study period, there were a total of 13,500 exposures and 1 injury in our group yielding an injury rate of 0.07 per 1000 exposures. Nearly half of our athletes had a preparticipation history of ankle sprains, yet only 1 ankle injury occurred during all of our braced exposures. There were 811 710 exposures and 797 injuries in the National Collegiate Athletic Association comparison group with an increased injury rate of 0.98 per 1000 exposures (P = .001). Prophylactic use of a double-upright ankle brace significantly reduced the ankle injury rate compared with that reported by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. From these data, it appears that the use of such a brace is an effective way to decrease the incidence of ankle injuries in this active but vulnerable group of athletes.

  17. Neurochemical Evidence of Potential Neurotoxicity After Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalm, Marie, E-mail: marie.kalm@neuro.gu.se [Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Insitute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Abel, Edvard [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wasling, Pontus [Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Nyman, Jan [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Hietala, Max Albert [Department of Neurology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Bremell, Daniel; Hagberg, Lars [Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Elam, Mikael [Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Insitute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Blennow, Kaj [Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal (Sweden); Björk-Eriksson, Thomas [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Zetterberg, Henrik [Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal (Sweden); UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To examine whether cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for neuroaxonal damage, neuroglial activation, and amyloid β–related processes could characterize the neurochemical response to cranial radiation. Methods and Materials: Before prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) of patients with small cell lung cancer, each patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, lumbar puncture, and Mini-Mental State Examination of cognitive function. These examinations were repeated at approximately 3 and 12 months after radiation. Results: The major findings were as follows. (1) Cerebrospinal fluid markers for neuronal and neuroglial injury were elevated during the subacute phase after PCI. Neurofilament and T-tau increased 120% and 50%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). The same was seen for the neuroglial markers YKL-40 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, which increased 144% and 106%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). (2) The levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein-α and -β were reduced 44% and 46%, respectively, 3 months after PCI, and the levels continued to decrease as long as 1 year after treatment (P<.05). (3) Mini-Mental State Examination did not reveal any cognitive decline, indicating that a more sensitive test should be used in future studies. Conclusion: In conclusion, we were able to detect radiation therapy–induced changes in several markers reflecting neuronal injury, inflammatory/astroglial activation, and altered amyloid precursor protein/amyloid β metabolism, despite the low number of patients and quite moderate radiation doses (20-30 Gy). These changes are hypothesis generating and could potentially be used to assess the individual risk of developing long-term symptoms of chronic encephalopathy after PCI. This has to be evaluated in large studies with extended clinical follow-up and more detailed neurocognitive assessments.

  18. Prophylactic chemotherapy for hydatidiform mole to prevent gestational trophoblastic neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuyi; Fu, Jing; Hu, Lina; Fang, Fang; Xie, Lingxia; Chen, Hengxi; He, Fan; Wu, Taixiang; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2017-09-11

    This is an update of the original Cochrane Review published in Cochrane Library, Issue 10, 2012.Hydatidiform mole (HM), also called a molar pregnancy, is characterised by an overgrowth of foetal chorionic tissue within the uterus. HMs may be partial (PM) or complete (CM) depending on their gross appearance, histopathology and karyotype. PMs usually have a triploid karyotype, derived from maternal and paternal origins, whereas CMs are diploid and have paternal origins only. Most women with HM can be cured by evacuation of retained products of conception (ERPC) and their fertility preserved. However, in some women the growth persists and develops into gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN), a malignant form of the disease that requires treatment with chemotherapy. CMs have a higher rate of malignant transformation than PMs. It may be possible to reduce the risk of GTN in women with HM by administering prophylactic chemotherapy (P-Chem). However, P-Chem given before or after evacuation of HM to prevent malignant sequelae remains controversial, as the risks and benefits of this practice are unclear. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of P-Chem to prevent GTN in women with a molar pregnancy. To investigate whether any subgroup of women with HM may benefit more from P-Chem than others. For the original review we performed electronic searches in the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 2, 2012), MEDLINE (1946 to February week 4, 2012) and Embase (1980 to 2012, week 9). We developed the search strategy using free text and MeSH. For this update we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 5, 2017), MEDLINE (February 2012 to June week 1, 2017) and Embase (February 2012 to 2017, week 23). We also handsearched reference lists of relevant literature to identify additional studies and searched trial registries. We included randomised controlled trials

  19. Suppression of antibiotic resistance acquisition by combined use of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shingo; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Furusawa, Chikara

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed the effect of combinatorial use of antibiotics with a trade-off relationship of resistance, i.e., resistance acquisition to one drug causes susceptibility to the other drug, and vice versa, on the evolution of antibiotic resistance. We demonstrated that this combinatorial use of antibiotics significantly suppressed the acquisition of resistance. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of hydrogel dressings in prophylactic sets used by soldiers involved in Polish military contingents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Radosław

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the available production technology of hydrogel dressings. Their practical application were tested--solid and semi-liquid--in the daily practice of medical emergency. An analysis was made of risk associated with the application of these type of dressings, and of the ability to apply them in individual prophylactic sets. The aim of the study was to compare commercially available hydrogel dressings--to the conditions and the risk of their use. Anti-burn dressings were used of three different companies, provided for the research in original packaging. The study was conducted in the laboratory. The samples of dressings were placed on a thermally insulating surface, and then for a period of 60 h with a thermocouple the temperature was measured under the dressing. The measured values were compared with measurements effected parallel to the ambient temperature. The implementation of the dressing on the surface resulted in the immediate cooling of the surface (about 10 min). Time after application of the dressing to achieve its full cooling capacity is approximately 60 min for each of the tested dressings. The maximum reduction in temperature of cooled surface was analogous for the three tested dressings and was 4.20 degrees C. Maximum cooling times of dressings differed significantly. In conclusion, the dressings in the form of solid hydrogels are characterized by an easier application, they are safe during oxygen therapy and they provide a longer cooling time.

  1. Rapid optical determination of β-lactamase and antibiotic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The absence of rapid tests evaluating antibiotic susceptibility results in the empirical prescription of antibiotics. This can lead to treatment failures due to escalating antibiotic resistance, and also furthers the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria. This study reports a rapid optical method to detect β-lactamase and thereby assess activity of β-lactam antibiotics, which could provide an approach for targeted prescription of antibiotics. The methodology is centred on a fluorescence quenching based probe (β-LEAF – β-Lactamase Enzyme Activated Fluorophore) that mimics the structure of β-lactam antibiotics. Results The β-LEAF assay was performed for rapid determination of β-lactamase production and activity of β-lactam antibiotic (cefazolin) on a panel of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC strains and clinical isolates. Four of the clinical isolates were determined to be lactamase producers, with the capacity to inactivate cefazolin, out of the twenty-five isolates tested. These results were compared against gold standard methods, nitrocefin disk test for β-lactamase detection and disk diffusion for antibiotic susceptibility, showing results to be largely consistent. Furthermore, in the sub-set of β-lactamase producers, it was demonstrated and validated that multiple antibiotics (cefazolin, cefoxitin, cefepime) could be assessed simultaneously to predict the antibiotic that would be most active for a given bacterial isolate. Conclusions The study establishes the rapid β-LEAF assay for β-lactamase detection and prediction of antibiotic activity using S. aureus clinical isolates. Although the focus in the current study is β-lactamase-based resistance, the overall approach represents a broad diagnostic platform. In the long-term, these studies form the basis for the development of assays utilizing a broader variety of targets, pathogens and drugs. PMID:24708478

  2. Dry cow therapy with a non-antibiotic intramammary teat seal - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crispie Fiona

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Dry cow antibiotic therapy is used to eliminate existing intramammary infections and to prevent new infections in the dry period. It is implemented as part of a total management system known as the 'Five-Point Plan' for mastitis control. Recent public concerns over the widespread prophylactic use of antibiotics, coupled with an increasing interest in organic farming, have lead to a re-evaluation of the treatment of cows at drying-off. As a result, attention has focussed on the use of novel alternatives to antibiotic therapy at the end of lactation. One such therapy involves the application of a non-antibiotic bismuth-based intramammary teat seal designed for use in cows with low cell counts at the end of lactation. Like the keratin plug that forms naturally in teats of cows that have been dried-off, teat seal forms a physical barrier to invading pathogens. To date, a number of independent studies have shown that teat seal is as effective as traditional dry cow antibiotic products in preventing the occurrence of new infection during the dry period in cows with somatic cell counts of ≤200,000 cells ml-1 at drying-off. This paper reviews the efficacy of teat seal in preventing dry period mastitis in both conventional and organic dairying systems.

  3. August 2014 Phoenix pulmonary journal club: the use of macrolide antibiotics in chronic respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. This month's journal club reviewed the role of macrolide antibiotics in chronic respiratory disease. Macrolide usage was suggested from observational studies in Japan in diffuse panbroncholitis, a disorder associated with chronic respiratory infection, usually Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1. Clinical improvement was noted despite doses of antibiotics well below the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of the antibiotic. This suggested the antibiotic was likely working by an anti-inflammatory effect. These observations were extended to cystic fibrosis (CF where prophylactic macrolide therapy in CF patients infected with Pseudomonas has become standard therapy (2. More recently, low dose macrolide therapy has been applied to non-CF lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, bronchiectasis and asthma. Time did not permit a review of all studies so a representative sample was discussed. In patients with COPD, the four randomized, placebo-controlled trials reviewed all suggested that chronic therapy with macrolide antibiotics reduced COPD exacerbations (3-5. This ...

  4. The macrolide antibiotic renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinos, George P

    2017-09-01

    Macrolides represent a large family of protein synthesis inhibitors of great clinical interest due to their applicability to human medicine. Macrolides are composed of a macrocyclic lactone of different ring sizes, to which one or more deoxy-sugar or amino sugar residues are attached. Macrolides act as antibiotics by binding to bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit and interfering with protein synthesis. The high affinity of macrolides for bacterial ribosomes, together with the highly conserved structure of ribosomes across virtually all of the bacterial species, is consistent with their broad-spectrum activity. Since the discovery of the progenitor macrolide, erythromycin, in 1950, many derivatives have been synthesised, leading to compounds with better bioavailability and acid stability and improved pharmacokinetics. These efforts led to the second generation of macrolides, including well-known members such as azithromycin and clarithromycin. Subsequently, in order to address increasing antibiotic resistance, a third generation of macrolides displaying improved activity against many macrolide resistant strains was developed. However, these improvements were accompanied with serious side effects, leading to disappointment and causing many researchers to stop working on macrolide derivatives, assuming that this procedure had reached the end. In contrast, a recent published breakthrough introduced a new chemical platform for synthesis and discovery of a wide range of diverse macrolide antibiotics. This chemical synthesis revolution, in combination with reduction in the side effects, namely, 'Ketek effects', has led to a macrolide renaissance, increasing the hope for novel and safe therapeutic agents to combat serious human infectious diseases. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Antibiotics in late clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Martens, Evan

    2017-06-01

    Most pharmaceutical companies have stopped or have severely limited investments to discover and develop new antibiotics to treat the increasing prevalence of infections caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, because the return on investment has been mostly negative for antibiotics that received marketing approved in the last few decades. In contrast, a few small companies have taken on this challenge and are developing new antibiotics. This review describes those antibiotics in late-stage clinical development. Most of them belong to existing antibiotic classes and a few with a narrow spectrum of activity are novel compounds directed against novel targets. The reasons for some of the past failures to find new molecules and a path forward to help attract investments to fund discovery of new antibiotics are described. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Acute bronchitis is a self-limiting infectious disease characterized by acute cough with or without sputum but without signs of pneumonia. About 90% of cases are caused by viruses. Antibiotics for acute bronchitis have been associated with an approximately half-day reduction in duration of cough. However, at follow-up there are no significant differences in overall clinical improvement inpatients treated with antibiotics compared with those receiving placebo. Despite this, antibiotics are administered to approximately two thirds of these patients. This review discusses the reason for this antibiotic overprescription. Other therapies targeted to control symptoms have also demonstrated a marginal or no effect. Expert commentary: Clinicians should be aware of the marginal effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. Some strategies like the use of rapid tests, delayed prescribing of antibiotics and the use of leaflets for patients have been associated with a reduction of their unnecessary utilization.

  7. A study of antibiotic prescribing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, L.; Radzeviciene-Jurgute, R.; Jurgutis, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Globally, general practitioners (GPs) write more than 90% of all antibiotic prescriptions. This study examines the experiences of Lithuanian and Russian GPs in antibiotic prescription for upper respiratory tract infections, including their perceptions of when it is not indicated...... clinically or pharmacologically. Methods. 22 Lithuanian and 29 Russian GPs participated in five focus group discussions. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results. We identified four main thematic categories: patients' faith in antibiotics as medication for upper respiratory tract infections......; patient potential to influence a GP's decision to prescribe antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections; impediments perceived by GPs in advocating clinically grounded antibiotic prescribing with their patients, and strategies applied in physician-patient negotiation about antibiotic prescribing...

  8. Antibiotic Therapy for Crohn’s Disease: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Lal

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that gut bacteria play a pathogenic role in Crohn’s disease (CD, providing a rationale for the use of antibiotics in the primary treatment of the disease. While there are data to suggest that antibiotics may be effective in treating active luminal, particularly colonic, and/or perianal CD, evidence for their use in these settings is hampered by the lack of well-designed, adequately powered, placebo-controlled trials. Furthermore, although nitroimidazole antibiotics have been shown to reduce postoperative recurrence following ileocolonic resection, their use is limited by side effects. There is a current need for rigorous multicentre studies looking into the role of antibiotics in treating perianal and luminal CD, as well as a need for the large-scale assessment of novel antibiotics, with low systemic absorption, which may improve patient tolerance.

  9. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Korp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism.

  10. Gender differences in appropriate shocks and mortality among patients with primary prophylactic implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Conen, David; Röver, Christian; Bergau, Leonard; Muñoz, Pascal; Wijers, Sofieke; Sticherling, Christian; Zabel, Markus; Friede, Tim

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some but not all prior studies have shown that women receiving a primary prophylactic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) have a lower risk of death and appropriate shocks than men. PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of gender on the risk of appropriate shock, all-cause mortality and inappropriate shock in contemporary studies of patients receiving a primary prophylactic ICD. DATA SOURCE: PubMed, LIVIVO, Cochrane CENTRAL between 2010 and 2016. STUDY SELECTION: Studies providing at least 1 gender-specific risk estimate for the outcomes of interest. DATA EXTRACTION: Abstracts were screened independently for potentially eligible studies for inclusion. Thereby each abstract was reviewed by at least two authors. DATA SYNTHESIS: Out of 680 abstracts retained by our search strategy, 20 studies including 46'657 patients had gender-specific information on at least one of the relevant endpoints. Mean age across the individual studies varied between 58 and 69 years. The proportion of women enrolled ran...

  11. Assessment of smoking prevalence and status among students of senior courses of medico-prophylactic and therapeutic faculties of Samara State Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokina N.A.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article provides data on prevalence and smoking status assessment among students of senior courses of medical university, the purpose of the study was to evaluate smoking prevalence and status in students of medical university in order to develop recommendations on healthy life style promotion. 58 senior students, 18 men and 40 women, were under study. Screening survey, spirometry, Fagerstrem test, questionnaires on motivation to stop smoking and test to reveal chronic bronchitis were held. Smoking was highly spread among the students of therapeutic faculty. The longest period of smoking was detected among male students of medico-prophylactic, and the highest intensity was revealed among female students of therapeutic faculty. Nicotine addiction in all groups was described as «very weak» and the highest degree was marked among men of medico-prophylactic faculty in particularly. Unwillingness of students (lack of motivation to stop smoking was determined

  12. Does antibiotic prophylaxis at implant placement decrease early implant failures? A Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Loli, Vasiliki; Coulthard, Paul; Worthington, Helen V

    2010-01-01

    Marco Esposito is the first author of two of the included studies; however, he was not involved in the quality assessment of these trials. This review is based on a Cochrane systematic review entitled 'Interventions for replacing missing teeth: antibiotics at dental implant placement to prevent complications' published in The Cochrane Library (see http://www.cochrane.org for more information). Cochrane systematic reviews are regularly updated to include new research, and in response to comments and criticisms from readers. If you wish to comment on this review, please send your comments to the Cochrane website or to Marco Esposito. The Cochrane Library should be consulted for the most recent version of the review. The results of a Cochrane Review can be interpreted differently, depending on people's perspectives and circumstances. Please consider the conclusions presented carefully. They are the opinions of the review authors, and are not necessarily shared by the Cochrane Collaboration. To assess the beneficial or harmful effects of systemic prophylactic antibiotics at dental implant placement versus no antibiotic/placebo administration and, if antibiotics are of benefit, to find which type, dosage and duration is the most effective. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched up to 2 June 2010 for randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) with a follow-up of at least 3 months comparing the administration of various prophylactic antibiotic regimens versus no antibiotics to patients undergoing dental implant placement. Outcome measures were prosthesis failures, implant failures, postoperative infections and adverse events (gastrointestinal, hypersensitivity, etc.). Screening of eligible studies, assessment of the methodological quality of the trials and data extraction were conducted in duplicate and independently by two review authors. Meta-analyses were

  13. Immunomodulatory Effects of Macrolide Antibiotics - Part 1 : Biological Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altenburg, J.; de Graaff, C. S.; van der Werf, T. S.; Boersma, W. G.

    2011-01-01

    Macrolide antibiotics are well known for their antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. This article provides an overview of the biological mechanisms through which macrolides exert this 'double effect'. Their antibacterial effect consists of the inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis,

  14. Antibiotics in dental practice: how justified are we.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder S; Dhingra, Chandan; Sharma, Gaurav; Sardana, Divesh

    2015-02-01

    Antibiotics are prescribed by dentists in dental practice, during dental treatment as well as for prevention of infection. Indications for the use of systemic antibiotics in dentistry are limited because most dental and periodontal diseases are best managed by operative intervention and oral hygiene measures. The use of antibiotics in dental practice is characterised by empirical prescription based on clinical and bacteriological epidemiological factors, resulting in the use of a very narrow range of broad-spectrum antibiotics for short periods of time. This has led to the development of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in a wide range of microbes and to the consequent inefficacy of commonly used antibiotics. Dentists can make a difference by the judicious use of antimicrobials--prescribing the correct drug, at the standard dosage and appropriate regimen--only when systemic spread of infection is evident. The increasing resistance problems of recent years are probably related to the over- or misuse of broad-spectrum agents. There is a clear need for the development of prescribing guidelines and educational initiatives to encourage the rational and appropriate use of drugs in dentistry. This paper highlights the need for dentists to improve antibiotic prescribing practices in an attempt to curb the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance and other side effects of antibiotic abuse. The literature provides evidence of inadequate prescribing practices by dentists for a number of factors, ranging from inadequate knowledge to social factors. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  15. Messages about Antibiotic Resistance in Different Newspaper Genres

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    Marwa Nasr

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Poorer people are more likely to use antibiotics; inappropriate antibiotic use causes resistance, and health campaigns attempt to change behaviour through education. However, fuelled by the media, the public think antibiotic resistance is outside their control. Differences in the attribution of blame for antibiotic resistance in two genres of UK newspapers, targeting distinct socioeconomic groups, were examined using a mixed methods approach. Firstly, depiction of blame was categorised as either external to the lay public (outside their control or internal (lay person accountable and subjected to a chi-square test. Secondly, using critical discourse analysis, we examined the portrayal of the main agents through newspaper language. Data from 597 articles (307 broadsheets analysed revealed a significant association between newspaper genre and attribution of blame for antibiotic resistance. While both newspaper types blamed antibiotic resistance predominantly on factors external to the lay public, broadsheets were more likely to acknowledge internal factors than tabloids. Tabloids provided a more skewed representation, exposing readers to inaccurate explanations about antibiotic resistance. They highlighted ineptitude in health professionals, victimising patients and blaming others, while broadsheets used less emotive language. Pharmacists should take special care to communicate the importance of appropriate antibiotic use against this backdrop of distortion.

  16. Allergy to antibiotics in children: an overestimated problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Castellazzi, Luca; Tagliabue, Claudia; Principi, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    Antibiotics are the most prescribed drugs for children, and a relevant number of prescriptions are associated with the emergence of adverse events. Allergic reactions are the most frequently reported adverse events, with an incidence of up to 10% of all prescriptions. However, literature analysis has shown that allergy to antibiotics is generally overdiagnosed in children because in most cases the diagnosis is based only on the clinical history without a full allergy work-up. Consequently, children are often improperly deprived of narrow-spectrum antibiotics because of a suspected allergy to these drugs. β-Lactams, mainly penicillins, are more frequently involved as a cause of allergy to antibiotics, although allergic problems are reported for most of the antibiotic classes. Accurate diagnosis is essential for a precise definition of determination of allergy to a given drug. Diagnosis has to be based on history, laboratory tests and, when possible, on in vitro and drug provocation tests. Unfortunately, the allergological work-up is well structured only for β-lactam antibiotics, whereas for non-β-lactams few studies are available, with very limited experience in children. The main aim of this paper is to discuss the real relevance of allergy to antibiotics in children in order to provide physicians with the knowledge needed to establish an appropriate diagnostic allergy work-up and to make better use of antibiotic therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  17. The concentration of antibiotic in fresh-frozen bone graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y; Shih, H-N; Chen, D W; Lee, M S; Ueng, S W; Hsieh, P-H

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the antibiotic concentration in fresh-frozen femoral head allografts harvested from two groups of living donors. Ten samples were collected from patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and ten from those with a fracture of the neck of the femur scheduled for primary arthroplasty. Cefazolin (1 g) was administered as a pre-operative prophylactic antibiotic. After storage at -80 degrees C for two weeks the pattern of release of cefazolin from morsellised femoral heads was evaluated by an in vitro broth elution assay using high-performance liquid chromatography. The bioactivity of the bone was further determined with an agar disc diffusion and standardised tube dilution bioassay. The results indicated that the fresh-frozen femoral heads contained cefazolin. The morsellised bone released cefazolin for up to four days. The concentration of cefazolin was significantly higher in the heads from patients with osteoarthritis of the hip than in those with a fracture.Also, in bioassays the bone showed inhibitory effects against bacteria.We concluded that allografts of morsellised bone from the femoral head harvested from patients undergoing arthroplasty of the hip contained cefazolin, which had been administered pre-operatively and they exhibited inhibitory effects against bacteria in vitro.

  18. Antibiotic Resistance in Nephrological Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Taran

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of antibiotic resistance is a serious threat to the global public health and requires action by both the state and the public. The World Health Organization identified 15 most dangerous and prevalent superbugs, which it ranked based on three levels of threat they present to the public health. At the heart of the fight against antibiotic resistance lies the increased awareness of the health professionals and general public that incorrect and excessive use of antibiotics amid poor practices in infection prevention and control contributes to the acceleration of antibiotic resistance.

  19. [Usage of antibiotics in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternák, G; Almási, I

    1996-12-29

    The authors publish the results of a survey conducted among hospital records of patients discharged from eight inpatient's institutes between 1-31st of January 1995 to gather information on the indications and usage of antibiotics. The institutes were selected from different part of the country to represent the hospital structure as much as possible. Data from the 13,719 documents were recorded and analysed by computer program. It was found that 27.6% of the patients (3749 cases) received antibiotic treatment. 407 different diagnosis and 365 different surgical procedures (as profilaxis) were considered as indications of antibiotic treatment (total: 4450 indications for 5849 antibiotic treatment). The largest group of patients receiving antibiotics was of antibiotic profilaxis (24.56%, 1093 cases), followed by lower respiratory tract infections (19.89%, 849 cases), uroinfections (10.53%, 469 cases) and upper respiratory tract infections. Relatively large group of patients belonged to those who had fever or subfebrility without known reason (7.35%, 327 cases) and to those who did not have any proof in their document indicating the reasons of antibiotic treatment (6.4%, 285 cases). We can not consider the antibiotic indications well founded in those groups of patients (every sixth or every fifth cases). The most frequently used antibiotics were of [2-nd] generation cefalosporins. The rate of nosocomial infections were found as 6.78% average. The results are demonstrated on diagrams and table.

  20. The antibiotic resistome: what's new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Julie Ann; Westman, Erin Louise; Wright, Gerard D

    2014-10-01

    The antibiotic resistome is dynamic and ever expanding, yet its foundations were laid long before the introduction of antibiotics into clinical practice. Here, we revisit our theoretical framework for the resistome concept and consider the many factors that influence the evolution of novel resistance genes, the spread of mobile resistance elements, and the ramifications of these processes for clinical practice. Observing the trends and prevalence of genes within the antibiotic resistome is key to maintaining the efficacy of antibiotics in the clinic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A prospective Korean multicenter study for infectious complications in patients undergoing prostate surgery: risk factors and efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eu Chang; Jung, Seung Il; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Lee, Gilho; Bae, Jae Hyun; Na, Yong Gil; Min, Seung Ki; Son, Hwancheol; Lee, Sun Ju; Chung, Jae Min; Chung, Hong; Cho, In Rae; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Chang, In Ho

    2014-09-01

    This multicenter study was undertaken to determine the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis and identify the risk factors for infectious complications after prostate surgery in Korean patients. A total of 424 patients who underwent surgery of the prostate were reviewed. All patients underwent urinalysis and urine culture preoperatively and postoperatively. Efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis and risk factors for infectious complications were investigated. Infectious complications were observed in 34.9% of all patients. Factors independently associated with infectious complications were diabetes mellitus (adjusted OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.09-3.65, P=0.025) and operation time (adjusted OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.03-1.13, P=0.004). Clinicians should be aware of the high risk of infectious complications in patients with diabetes and those who undergo a prolonged operation time. Neither the type nor duration of prophylactic antibiotics resulted in differences in infectious complications.

  2. The chemistry of peptidyltransferase center-targeted antibiotics: enzymatic resistance and approaches to countering resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Kevin P; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2012-01-20

    The continued ability to treat bacterial infections requires effective antibiotics. The development of new therapeutics is guided by knowledge of the mechanisms of action of and resistance to these antibiotics. Continued efforts to understand and counteract antibiotic resistance mechanisms at a molecular level have the potential to direct development of new therapeutic strategies in addition to providing insight into the underlying biochemical functions impacted by antibiotics. The interaction of antibiotics with the peptidyltransferase center and adjacent exit tunnel within the bacterial ribosome is the predominant mechanism by which antibiotics impede translation, thus stalling growth. Resistance enzymes catalyze the chemical modification of the RNA that composes these functional regions, leading to diminished binding of antibiotics. This review discusses recent advances in the elucidation of chemical mechanisms underlying resistance and driving the development of new antibiotics.

  3. Pediatric hydrocephalus: systematic literature review and evidence-based guidelines. Part 6: Preoperative antibiotics for shunt surgery in children with hydrocephalus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimo, Paul; Van Poppel, Mark; Thompson, Clinton J; Baird, Lissa C; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Flannery, Ann Marie

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was twofold: to answer the question "What is the evidence for the effectiveness of prophylactic intravenous antibiotics for infection prevention in shunt surgery?" and to make treatment recommendations based on the available evidence. The US National Library of Medicine PubMed/MEDLINE database and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were queried using MeSH headings and key words relevant to prophylactic antibiotic use in children undergoing a shunt operation. Abstracts were reviewed to identify which studies met the inclusion criteria. An evidentiary table was assembled summarizing the studies and the quality of evidence (Classes I-III). A meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effects model to calculate a cumulative estimate of treatment effect using risk ratio (RR). Heterogeneity was assessed using chi-square and I(2) statistics. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted. Based on the quality of the literature and the result of the meta-analysis, a recommendation was rendered (Level I, II, or III). Nine studies (4 Class I, 3 Class II, and 2 Class III) met our inclusion criteria. Of 7 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), 3 were downgraded from Class I to Class II because of significant quality issues, and all RCTs were potentially underpowered. In only 2 Class in retrospective cohort studies were preoperative antibiotic agents found to be protective against shunt infection. When data from the individual studies were pooled together, the infection rate in the prophylactic antibiotics group was 5.9% compared with 10.7% in the control group. Using a random-effects model, the cumulative RR was 0.55 (95% CI 0.38-0.81), indicating a protective benefit of prophylactic preoperative intravenous antibiotics. A sensitivity analysis of RCTs only (n = 7) also demonstrated a statistical benefit, but an analysis of higher-quality RCTs only (n = 4) did not. Conclusions Within the limits of this systematic

  4. Prophylactic drug management for febrile seizures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Offringa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Febrile seizures occurring in a child older than one month during an episode of fever affect 2% to 4% of children in Great Britain and the United States and recur in 30%. Rapid-acting antiepileptics and antipyretics given during subsequent fever episodes have been used to avoid the adverse effects of continuous antiepileptic drugs. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of antiepileptic and antipyretic drugs used prophylactically to treat children with febrile seizures. METHODS Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011. Issue 3; MEDLINE (1966 to May 2011; EMBASE (1966 to May 2011; Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE (May 2011. No language restrictions were imposed. We also contacted researchers in the field to identify continuing or unpublished studies. Selection criteria: Trials using randomized or quasi-randomized patient allocation that compared the use of antiepileptic or antipyretic agents with each other, placebo or no treatment. Data collection and analysis: Two review authors (RN and MO independently applied pre-defined criteria to select trials for inclusion and extracted the pre-defined relevant data, recording methods for randomization, blinding and exclusions. Outcomes assessed were seizure recurrence at 6, 12, 18, 24, 36 months and at age 5 to 6 years in the intervention and non-intervention groups, and adverse medication effects. The presence of publication bias was assessed using funnel plots. MAIN RESULTS Thirty-six articles describing 26 randomized trials with 2740 randomized participants were included. Thirteen interventions of continuous or intermittent prophylaxis and their control treatments were analyzed. Methodological quality was moderate to poor in most studies. We could not do a meta-analysis for 8 of the 13 comparisons due to insufficient numbers of trials. No significant benefit for valproate, pyridoxine

  5. Cost-effectiveness of Prophylactic Moisturization for Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Immaneni, Supriya; Hazen, Gordon B; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Paller, Amy S; Lio, Peter A

    2017-02-06

    Emerging evidence suggests that the use of moisturizers on newborns and infants (ie, from birth to 6 months of age) is potentially helpful in preventing the development of atopic dermatitis. To investigate the cost-effectiveness of using a daily moisturizer as prevention against atopic dermatitis among high-risk newborns. In a cost-effectiveness analysis, the average cost of total-body moisturization using 7 common moisturizers from birth to 6 months of age was determined for male and female infants. We assumed the same unit of weight per moisturizer used for a given body surface area. Based on previously reported data (relative risk reduction of 50%), the incremental gain in quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) was determined using a 6-month time window. The cost-effectiveness of each moisturizer was determined by assuming equal efficacy. A sensitivity analysis was conducted by varying the relative risk from 0.28 to 0.90. Use of prophylactic moisturizing compounds. The primary outcomes were the incremental cost-effectiveness values ($/QALY) for each moisturizer in preventing atopic dermatitis during a 6-month time window. The calculated amount of daily all-body moisturizer needed at birth was 3.6 g (0.12 oz) per application, which increased to 6.6 g (0.22 oz) at 6 months of age. Of the 7 products evaluated, the average price was $1.07/oz (range, $0.13/oz-$2.96/oz). For a 6-month time window, the average incremental QALY benefit was 0.021. The sensitivity analysis showed that the incremental gain of QALY ranged from 0.0041 to 0.030. Petrolatum was the most cost-effective ($353/QALY [95% CI, $244-$1769/QALY) moisturizer in the cohort. Even assuming the lowest incremental QALYs for the most expensive moisturizer, the intervention was still less than $45 000/QALY. Overall, atopic dermatitis represents a major health expenditure and has been associated with multiple comorbidities. Daily moisturization may represent a cost-effective, preventative strategy to reduce the

  6. Functional Repertoire of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Antibiotic Manufacturing Effluents and Receiving Freshwater Sediments.

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    González-Plaza, Juan J; Šimatović, Ana; Milaković, Milena; Bielen, Ana; Wichmann, Fabienne; Udiković-Kolić, Nikolina

    2017-01-01

    Environments polluted by direct discharges of effluents from antibiotic manufacturing are important reservoirs for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), which could potentially be transferred to human pathogens. However, our knowledge about the identity and diversity of ARGs in such polluted environments remains limited. We applied functional metagenomics to explore the resistome of two Croatian antibiotic manufacturing effluents and sediments collected upstream of and at the effluent discharge sites. Metagenomic libraries built from an azithromycin-production site were screened for resistance to macrolide antibiotics, whereas the libraries from a site producing veterinary antibiotics were screened for resistance to sulfonamides, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and beta-lactams. Functional analysis of eight libraries identified a total of 82 unique, often clinically relevant ARGs, which were frequently found in clusters and flanked by mobile genetic elements. The majority of macrolide resistance genes identified from matrices exposed to high levels of macrolides were similar to known genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins, macrolide phosphotransferases, and transporters. Potentially novel macrolide resistance genes included one most similar to a 23S rRNA methyltransferase from Clostridium and another, derived from upstream unpolluted sediment, to a GTPase HflX from Emergencia . In libraries deriving from sediments exposed to lower levels of veterinary antibiotics, we found 8 potentially novel ARGs, including dihydrofolate reductases and beta-lactamases from classes A, B, and D. In addition, we detected 7 potentially novel ARGs in upstream sediment, including thymidylate synthases, dihydrofolate reductases, and class D beta-lactamase. Taken together, in addition to finding known gene types, we report the discovery of novel and diverse ARGs in antibiotic-polluted industrial effluents and sediments, providing a qualitative basis for monitoring the dispersal of ARGs

  7. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Nienke L.; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; Van Duijn, Pleun J.; Bonten, Marc J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to

  8. Media Exposure and Genetic Literacy Skills to Evaluate Angelina Jolie's Decision for Prophylactic Mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Leah R; Koehly, Laura M; Hooker, Gillian W; Paquin, Ryan S; Capella, Joseph N; McBride, Colleen M

    2016-01-01

    To examine public preparedness to evaluate and respond to Angelina Jolie's well-publicized decision to have a prophylactic mastectomy. A consumer panel (n = 1,008) completed an online survey in November 2013, reporting exposure to Jolie's story, confidence applying genomic knowledge to evaluate her decision, and ability to interpret provided genetic risk information (genetic literacy skills). Linear and logistic regressions tested mediating/moderating models of these factors in association with opinions regarding mastectomies. Confidence with genomics was associated with increased genetic literacy skills and increased media exposure, with a significant interaction between the two. Confidence was also associated with favoring mastectomies for women with BRCA mutations, mediating the relationship with media exposure. Respondents were more likely to form opinions about mastectomies if they had high genetic literacy skills. These findings suggest that having higher genetic literacy skills may increase the public's ability to form opinions about clinical applications of genomic discovery. However, repeated media exposure to high-profile stories may artificially inflate confidence among those with low genetic literacy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Motivations for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy as a function of socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptiste, Dadrie F; MacGeorge, Erina L; Venetis, Maria K; Mouton, Ashton; Friley, L Brooke; Pastor, Rebekah; Hatten, Kristen; Lagoo, Janaka; Clare, Susan E; Bowling, Monet W

    2017-02-01

    Despite no demonstrated survival advantage for women at average risk of breast cancer, rates of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) continue to increase. Research reveals women with higher socioeconomic status (SES) are more likely to select CPM. This study examines how indicators of SES, age, and disease severity affect CPM motivations. Patients (N = 113) who underwent CPM at four Indiana University affiliated hospitals completed telephone interviews in 2013. Participants answered questions about 11 CPM motivations and provided demographic information. Responses to motivation items were factor analyzed, resulting in 4 motivational factors: reducing long-term risk, symmetry, avoiding future medical visits, and avoiding treatments. Across demographic differences, reducing long-term risk was the strongest CPM motivation. Lower income predicted stronger motivation to reduce long-term risk and avoid treatment. Older participants were more motivated to avoid treatment; younger and more-educated patients were more concerned about symmetry. Greater severity of diagnosis predicted avoiding treatments. Reducing long-term risk is the primary motivation across groups, but there are also notable differences as a function of age, education, income, and disease severity. To stop the trend of increasing CPM, physicians must tailor patient counseling to address motivations that are consistent across patient populations and those that vary between populations.

  10. Capsular contracture by silicone breast implants: possible causes, biocompatibility, and prophylactic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiert AE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Andreas E Steiert, Maria Boyce, Heiko Sorg Department of Plastic, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany Abstract: The most common implanted material in the human body consists of silicone. Breast augmentation and breast reconstruction using silicone-based implants are procedures frequently performed by reconstructive and aesthetic surgeons. A main complication of this procedure continues to be the development of capsular contracture (CC, displaying the result of a fibrotic foreign body reaction after the implantation of silicone. For many years, experimental and clinical trials have attempted to analyze the problem of its etiology, treatment, and prophylaxis. Different theories of CC formation are known; however, the reason why different individuals develop CC in days or a month, or only after years, is unknown. Therefore, we hypothesize that CC formation, might primarily be induced by immunological mechanisms along with other reasons. This article attempts to review CC formation, with special attention paid to immunological and inflammatory reasons, as well as actual prophylactic strategies. In this context, the word “biocompatibility” has been frequently used to describe the overall biological innocuousness of silicone in the respective studies, although without clear-cut definitions of this important feature. We have therefore developed a new five-point scale with distinct key points of biocompatibility. Hence, this article might provide the basis for ongoing discussion in this field to reduce single-publication definitions as well as increase the understanding of biocompatibility. Keywords: biofilm, foreign body reaction, breast augmentation, biocompatibility, fibrosis

  11. Can Improving Knowledge of Antibiotic-Associated Adverse Drug Events Reduce Parent and Patient Demand for Antibiotics?

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    Rebecca M. Roberts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at least 2 million people are infected and 23,000 die each year in the United States as a result of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. Antibiotic use is the most important factor contributing to antibiotic resistance and overuse is common, especially for upper respiratory tract infections. There is a perception among the public, as well as some health care providers, that antibiotics are harmless. We conducted formative research to explore patient and parent knowledge and attitudes relating to antibiotic use and adverse drug events (ADEs. Methods: Six computer-assisted telephone focus groups were conducted in October and November 2010 with adult patients and mothers of young children. The focus groups were developed to engage participants in discussion about their knowledge and attitudes regarding antibiotic resistance and ADEs associated with antibiotic use. Results: Nearly all mothers were familiar with the possibility of “side effects” with prescription medications, including antibiotics. However, very few mothers were familiar with severe antibiotic-associated ADEs and nearly all felt strongly that this information should be shared with parents at the time a prescription is recommended or written for their child. Adult participants did not believe that the potential for ADEs was a significant issue for adults and most reported never discussing the potential for adverse events with their provider. Conclusions: Parents were receptive to appropriate antibiotic use messaging around ADEs. We learned that ADE messages did not resonate with adults in the same way they did with mothers of young children.

  12. Antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial endocarditis: A study of knowledge of guidelines among dentists participated in the 47th international congress of dentistry

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    Hashemipour M.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Infective endocarditis is a rare disease resulted in mortality and morbidity in 10-80% of patients. The purpose of present study was to investigate the knowledge of guidelines on antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial endocarditis in a group of Iranian dentists. "nMaterials and Methods: This was a descriptive study in which the population under study was 205 who were participated in the 47th international congress of dentistry (Tehran-Spring 2007 and they were chosen by census sampling methods. Nameless questionnaires were designed and were given to the dentists to complete. The t-test, χ² and spearman with the SPSS 13.5 program were used in the data analysis. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance. "nResults: Regarding to the prescribing of prophylactic antibiotic for patients with prosthetic cardiac valves, 94.6% of all answers were correct. Also, the most common procedures in which the prophylaxis antibiotic was distinguished to be necessary were periodontal surgery, scaling, dental extraction and using subgingival cord, respectively. More than half of the dentists (65.8% had chosen amoxicillin as a prophylactic antibiotic. Mean knowledge score was 38.77±12.4. "nConclusion: Results of the present study showed that the knowledge of dentists about prescribing antibiotics for prevention of bacterial endocarditis is relatively low. It was also found that the level of knowledge decreases by passing time from graduation.

  13. Antibiotic prophylaxis in pediatric odontology. An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planells del Pozo, Paloma; Barra Soto, Ma José; Santa Eulalia Troisfontaines, Eva

    2006-07-01

    Most orofacial infections are of odontogenic origin, and are of a self-limiting nature, characterized by spontaneous drainage. The causal bacteria are generally saprophytes. On the other hand, invasive dental interventions give rise to transient bacteremia. When an oral lesion is contaminated by extrinsic bacteria, the required antibiotic treatment should be provided as soon as possible. In the case of pulpitis, such treatment is usually not indicated if the infection only reaches the pulp tissue or the immediately adjacent tissues. In the event of dental avulsion, local antibiotic application is advised, in addition to the provision of systemic antibiotics. The dental professional must know the severity of the infection and the general condition of the child in order to decide referral to a medical center. Prophylaxis is required in all immunocompromised patients, as well as in individuals with cardiac problems associated with endocarditis, vascular catheters or prostheses. Penicillin V associated to clavulanic acid and administered via the oral route is known to be effective against odontogenic infections. In the case of allergies to penicillin, an alternative drug is clindamycin. Most acute infections are resolved within 3-7 days. In recent years, the tendency is to reduce general antibiotic use for preventive or therapeutic purposes.

  14. Does antifouling paint select for antibiotic resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flach, Carl-Fredrik; Pal, Chandan; Svensson, Carl Johan; Kristiansson, Erik; Östman, Marcus; Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Tysklind, Mats; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2017-07-15

    There is concern that heavy metals and biocides contribute to the development of antibiotic resistance via co-selection. Most antifouling paints contain high amounts of such substances, which risks turning painted ship hulls into highly mobile refuges and breeding grounds for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The objectives of this study were to start investigate if heavy-metal based antifouling paints can pose a risk for co-selection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and, if so, identify the underlying genetic basis. Plastic panels with one side painted with copper and zinc-containing antifouling paint were submerged in a Swedish marina and biofilms from both sides of the panels were harvested after 2.5-4weeks. DNA was isolated from the biofilms and subjected to metagenomic sequencing. Biofilm bacteria were cultured on marine agar supplemented with tetracycline, gentamicin, copper sulfate or zinc sulfate. Biofilm communities from painted surfaces displayed lower taxonomic diversity and enrichment of Gammaproteobacteria. Bacteria from these communities showed increased resistance to both heavy metals and tetracycline but not to gentamicin. Significantly higher abundance of metal and biocide resistance genes was observed, whereas mobile antibiotic resistance genes were not enriched in these communities. In contrast, we found an enrichment of chromosomal RND efflux system genes, including such with documented ability to confer decreased susceptibility to both antibiotics and biocides/heavy metals. This was paralleled by increased abundances of integron-associated integrase and ISCR transposase genes. The results show that the heavy metal-based antifouling paint exerts a strong selection pressure on marine bacterial communities and can co-select for certain antibiotic-resistant bacteria, likely by favoring species and strains carrying genes that provide cross-resistance. Although this does not indicate an immediate risk for promotion of mobile antibiotic resistance, the

  15. Efficacy of prophylactic uterine artery embolization before obstetrical procedures with high risk for massive bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Heung Kyu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyung; Han, Ki Chang; Lee, Shin Wha [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of prophylactic uterine artery embolization (UAE) before obstetrical procedures with high risk for massive bleeding. A retrospective review of 29 female patients who underwent prophylactic UAE from June 2009 to February 2014 was performed. Indications for prophylactic UAE were as follows: dilatation and curettage (D and C) associated with ectopic pregnancy (cesarean scar pregnancy, n = 9; cervical pregnancy, n = 6), termination of pregnancy with abnormal placentation (placenta previa, n = 8), D and C for retained placenta with vascularity (n = 5), and D and C for suspected gestational trophoblastic disease (n = 1). Their medical records were reviewed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of UAE. All women received successful bilateral prophylactic UAE followed by D and C with preservation of the uterus. In all patients, UAE followed by obstetrical procedure prevented significant vaginal bleeding on gynecologic examination. There was no major complication related to UAE. Vaginal spotting continued for 3 months in three cases. Although oligomenorrhea continued for six months in one patient, normal menstruation resumed in all patients afterwards. During follow-up, four had subsequent successful natural pregnancies. Spontaneous abortion occurred in one of them during the first trimester. Prophylactic UAE before an obstetrical procedure in patients with high risk of bleeding or symptomatic bleeding may be a safe and effective way to manage or prevent serious bleeding, especially for women who wish to preserve their fertility.

  16. Should intentional endovascular stent-graft coverage of the left subclavian artery be preceded by prophylactic revascularisation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weigang, Ernst; Parker, Jack A T C; Czerny, Martin

    2011-01-01

    subclavian artery (LSA) limiting the proximal landing zone site without proximal vessel coverage. In patients in whom the distance between the LSA and aortic lesion is too short, extension of the landing zone can be obtained by covering the LSA's origin with the endovascular stent graft (ESG). This manoeuvre...... and analysed three basic treatment concepts for LSA revascularisation in TEVAR patients (prophylactic, conditional prophylactic and no prophylactic LSA revascularisation). The available evidence supports prophylactic revascularisation of the LSA before ESG LSA coverage when preoperative imaging reveals...

  17. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Pediatric Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davydova N.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Identify options for the indications for antibiotic prophylaxis in children's dental reception. The analysis of publications shows that the basis of current trends prevention of postoperative wound infection in pediatric surgery should be measures aimed at eliminating or reducing the influence of risk factors, as well as the use of antibiotic prophylaxis

  18. The Antibiotic Resistance Problem Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The term "antibiotic" was first proposed by Vuillemin in 1889 but was first used in the current sense by Walksman in 1941. An antibiotic is defined as a "derivative produced by the metabolism of microorganisms that possess antibacterial activity at low concentrations and is not toxic to the host." In this article, the author describes how…

  19. STREPTOMYCINOID ANTIBIOTICS: SYNERGISM BY PUROMYCIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WHITE, J R; WHITE, H L

    1964-11-06

    Puromycin synergizes the lethal action of streptomycin and related antibiotics. This is interpreted to mean that puromycin action uncovers a sensitive site (or sites) on the 30S ribosome. The streptomycinoid antibiotics can then associate more readily with the ribosome and inhibit further synthesis of valid protein.

  20. Effects of prophylactic and therapeutic teriflunomide in transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced motor-evoked potentials in the dark agouti rat model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Bregna, Deborah; Hanak, Susan; Ji, Zhongqi; Petty, Margaret; Liu, Li; Zhang, Donghui; McMonagle-Strucko, Kathleen

    2013-10-01

    Teriflunomide is a once-daily oral immunomodulatory agent recently approved in the United States for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis (RMS). This study investigated neurophysiological deficits in descending spinal cord motor tracts during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE; a model of multiple sclerosis) and the functional effectiveness of prophylactic or therapeutic teriflunomide treatment in preventing the debilitating paralysis observed in this model. Relapsing-remitting EAE was induced in Dark Agouti rats using rat spinal cord homogenate. Animals were treated with oral teriflunomide (10 mg/kg daily) prophylactically, therapeutically, or with vehicle (control). Transcranial magnetic motor-evoked potentials were measured throughout the disease to provide quantitative assessment of the neurophysiological status of descending motor tracts. Axonal damage was quantified histologically by silver staining. Both prophylactic and therapeutic teriflunomide treatment significantly reduced maximum EAE disease scores (P teriflunomide treatment regimens prevented a delay in wave-form latency and a decrease in wave-form amplitude compared with that observed in vehicle-treated animals. A significant reduction in axonal loss was observed with both teriflunomide treatment regimens compared with vehicle (P teriflunomide can prevent the deficits observed in this animal model in descending spinal cord motor tracts. The mechanism behind reduced axonal loss and improved motor function may be primarily the reduced inflammation and consequent demyelination observed in these animals through the known effects of teriflunomide on impairing proliferation of stimulated T cells. These findings may have significant implications for patients with RMS.

  1. Enteropathogens and antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Torralba, Ana; García-Esteban, Coral; Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2018-01-01

    Infectious gastroenteritis remains a public health problem. The most severe cases are of bacterial origin. In Spain, Campylobacter and Salmonella are the most prevalent bacterial genus, while Yersinia and Shigella are much less frequent. Most cases are usually self-limiting and antibiotic therapy is not generally indicated, unless patients have risk factors for severe infection and shigellosis. Ciprofloxacin, third generation cephalosporins, azithromycin, ampicillin, cotrimoxazole and doxycycline are the most recommended drugs. The susceptibility pattern of the different bacteria determines the choice of the most appropriate treatment. The aim of this review is to analyse the current situation, developments, and evolution of resistance and multidrug resistance in these 4 enteric pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  2. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis for herniorrhaphy and breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, R; Zaleznik, D F; Hopkins, C C; Dellinger, E P; Karchmer, A W; Bryan, C S; Burke, J F; Wikler, M A; Marino, S K; Holbrook, K F

    1990-01-18

    We assessed the efficacy of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis for surgery in a randomized, double-blind trial of 1218 patients undergoing herniorrhaphy or surgery involving the breast, including excision of a breast mass, mastectomy, reduction mammoplasty, and axillary-node dissection. The prophylactic regimen was a single dose of cefonicid (1 g intravenously) administered approximately half an hour before surgery. The patients were followed up for four to six weeks after surgery. Blinding was maintained until the last patient completed the follow-up and all diagnoses of infection had been made. The patients who received prophylaxis had 48 percent fewer probable or definite infections than those who did not (Mantel-Haenszel risk ratio, 0.52; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.32 to 0.84; P = 0.01). For patients undergoing a procedure involving the breast, infection occurred in 6.6 percent of the cefonicid recipients (20 of 303) and 12.2 percent of the placebo recipients (37 of 303); for those undergoing herniorrhaphy, infection occurred in 2.3 percent of the cefonicid recipients (7 of 301) and 4.2 percent of the placebo recipients (13 of 311). There were comparable reductions in the numbers of definite wound infections (Mantel-Haenszel risk ratio, 0.49), wounds that drained pus (risk ratio, 0.43), Staphylococcus aureus wound isolates (risk ratio, 0.49), and urinary tract infections (risk ratio, 0.40). There were also comparable reductions in the need for postoperative antibiotic therapy, non-routine visits to a physician for problems involving wound healing, incision and drainage procedures, and readmission because of problems with wound healing. We conclude that perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis with cefonicid is useful for herniorrhaphy and certain types of breast surgery.

  3. New approaches to antibiotic discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kealey, C; Creaven, C A; Murphy, C D; Brady, C B

    2017-06-01

    New antibiotics are urgently required by human medicine as pathogens emerge with developed resistance to almost all antibiotic classes. Pioneering approaches, methodologies and technologies have facilitated a new era in antimicrobial discovery. Innovative culturing techniques such as iChip and co-culturing methods which use 'helper' strains to produce bioactive molecules have had notable success. Exploiting antibiotic resistance to identify antibacterial producers performed in tandem with diagnostic PCR based identification approaches has identified novel candidates. Employing powerful metagenomic mining and metabolomic tools has identified the antibiotic'ome, highlighting new antibiotics from underexplored environments and silent gene clusters enabling researchers to mine for scaffolds with both a novel mechanism of action and also few clinically established resistance determinants. Modern biotechnological approaches are delivering but will require support from government initiatives together with changes in regulation to pave the way for valuable, efficacious, highly targeted, pathogen specific antimicrobial therapies.

  4. Antibiotics for acute maxillary sinusitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahovuo-Saloranta, Anneli; Borisenko, Oleg V; Kovanen, Niina

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Expert opinions vary on the appropriate role of antibiotics for sinusitis, one of the most commonly diagnosed conditions among adults in ambulatory care. OBJECTIVES: We examined whether antibiotics are effective in treating acute sinusitis, and if so, which antibiotic classes...... are the most effective. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, 2007, Issue 3); MEDLINE (1950 to May 2007) and EMBASE (1974 to June 2007). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing antibiotics with placebo...... or antibiotics from different classes for acute maxillary sinusitis in adults. We included trials with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, whether or not confirmed by radiography or bacterial culture. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: At least two review authors independently screened search results, extracted...

  5. Antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Rojo-Molinero, Estrella; Macià, María D.

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with a wide range of infections, from those related to exogenous devices, such as catheters or prosthetic joints, to chronic tissue infections such as those occurring in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Biofilms are recalcitrant to antibiotic treatment due...... to multiple tolerance mechanisms (phenotypic resistance). This causes persistence of biofilm infections in spite of antibiotic exposure which predisposes to antibiotic resistance development (genetic resistance). Understanding the interplay between phenotypic and genetic resistance mechanisms acting...... on biofilms, as well as appreciating the diversity of environmental conditions of biofilm infections which influence the effect of antibiotics are required in order to optimize the antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections. Here, we review the current knowledge on phenotypic and genetic resistance...

  6. Antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llor, Carl; Bjerrum, Lars

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute bronchitis is a self-limiting infectious disease characterized by acute cough with or without sputum but without signs of pneumonia. About 90% of cases are caused by viruses. AREAS COVERED: Antibiotics for acute bronchitis have been associated with an approximately half......-day reduction in duration of cough. However, at follow-up there are no significant differences in overall clinical improvement inpatients treated with antibiotics compared with those receiving placebo. Despite this, antibiotics are administered to approximately two thirds of these patients. This review...... discusses the reason for this antibiotic overprescription. Other therapies targeted to control symptoms have also demonstrated a marginal or no effect. EXPERT COMMENTARY: Clinicians should be aware of the marginal effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. Some strategies like the use of rapid tests, delayed...

  7. Antibiotic tolerance and microbial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Anders

    Increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents is thought to be an important feature of microbes growing in biofilms. We study the dynamics of antibiotic action within hydrodynamic flow chamber biofilms of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa using isogenic mutants and fluorescent gene...... expression reporters and we address the question of how biofilm organization affects antibiotic susceptibility. The dynamics of microbial killing is monitored by viable count determination, and confocal laser microscopy. Our work shows that the apparent increased antibiotic tolerance is due to the formation...... of antibiotic tolerant subpopulations within the biofilm. The formation of these subpopulations is highly variable and dependent on the antibiotic used, the biofilm structural organization and the induction of specific tolerance mechanisms....

  8. [Is there a rationale for use of antibiotics in hair transplantation surgery?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilosani, A; Gugava, M

    2005-05-01

    Currently hair transplantation is the number one cosmetic surgical procedure in men. American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery (AACS) estimated that there were 177,000 hair transplantation sessions done in the year 2000. As for other cutaneous surgery, various antibiotics are administered during hair transplantation to minimize complications. But the use of prophylactic antibiotics to avoid surgical side infection for clean surgical wounds remains controversial. Although antibiotic prophylaxis can decrease the incidence of surgical side infection, the benefits should be weighed against the risks of toxic and allergic reactions, dysbacteriosis, and the emergence of bacterial resistance. In any case most of surgeons routinely prescribe the use of antibiotics preoperatively (from 1 hour to 2 days before the procedure) and postoperatively (range 5-7 days) for all patients. The objective of this work was the complete clinical observation for surgical side infection risk assessment during large hair transplant sessions which would help us to answer the question: should the antibiotic prophylaxis be used routinely in hair transplant procedures? Three groups of study subjects were defined: first group--100 patients who were operated in our clinic in 2002-2004 years. Number of transplanted FU per session varied between 350-4516 (average 1983+/-4,8). In this group antibiotics were not be administrated. Second group--100 patients who were operated in the same period with 2016+/-47 FU transplantation. In this group all patients received 1,0 gr. ceftriaxone (rocephin, Roche) before surgery and 1,0 gr. ceftriaxone every day after surgery during 5 days. Third group--342 patients who were operated during 1999-2002 years with transplantation of 420-3000 FU (average 1411+/-3,9) per session. In this group all patients received Duracef 500 mg (Bristol Mayers) twice per day after surgery during 1 week. Our observations demonstrated no accidents of surgical side infection or irritation of

  9. Restricted use of antibiotics in organic pig farming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Søren; Jensen, Annette Nygaard

    2013-01-01

    Can the restricted use of antibiotics in organic pig farming be documented to provide a safer, high quality meat product with less antibiotic resistant bacteria? The project SafeOrganic aims to document that the restricted use of antimicrobials in organic pig production leads to lower levels...... of antibiotic resistant bacteria compared with the level in conventional pigs. However, the project will also address the risk of losing this quality parameter, due to a widespread practice of slaughtering organic pigs together with conventional pigs, implying a risk of cross-contamination....

  10. Antimicrobial peptides and bacteriocins: alternatives to traditional antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yongming; Blecha, Frank

    2008-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ubiquitous, gene-encoded natural antibiotics that have gained recent attention in the search for new antimicrobials to combat infectious disease. In multicellular organisms, AMPs, such as defensins and cathelicidins, provide a coordinated protective response against infection and are a principal component of innate immunity in vertebrates. In unicellular organisms, AMPs, such as bacteriocins, function to suppress competitor species. Because many AMPs kill bacteria by disruption of membrane integrity and are thus thought to be less likely to induce resistance, AMPs are being extensively evaluated as novel antimicrobial drugs. This review summarizes and discusses the antibiotic properties of AMPs highlighting their potential as alternatives to conventional antibiotics.

  11. Social Network, Surgeon, and Media Influence on the Decision to Undergo Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venetis, Maria K; MacGeorge, Erina L; Baptiste, Dadrie F; Mouton, Ashton; Friley, Lorin B; Pastor, Rebekah; Hatten, Kristen; Lagoo, Janaka; Bowling, Monet W; Clare, Susan E

    2016-07-26

    The rate of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM) has risen sharply in the past decade. The current study was designed to examine social network, surgeon, and media influence on patients' CPM decision-making, examining not only who influenced the decision, and to what extent, but also the type of influence exerted. Patients (N=113) who underwent CPM at 4 Indiana University-affiliated hospitals between 2008 and 2012 completed structured telephone interviews in 2013. Questions addressed the involvement and influence of the social network (family, friends, and nonsurgeon health professionals), surgeon, and media on the CPM decision. Spouses, children, family, friends, and health professionals were reported as exerting a meaningful degree of influence on patients' decisions, largely in ways that were positive or neutral toward CPM. Most surgeons were regarded as providing options rather than encouraging or discouraging CPM. Media influence was present, but limited. Patients who choose CPM do so with influence and support from members of their social networks. Reversing the increasing choice of CPM will require educating these influential others, which can be accomplished by encouraging patients to include them in clinical consultations, and by providing patients with educational materials that can be shared with their social networks. Surgeons need to be perceived as having an opinion, specifically that CPM should be reserved for those patients for whom it is medically indicated.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  12. HPV as a model for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Raed N; Khleif, Samir N

    2009-08-01

    HPV has been linked to many human malignancies and, as such, represents a major public health crisis. The understanding of HPV biology, however, has helped tremendously in developing prophylactic vaccines, which should help in decreasing mortality due to HPV infections. Understanding HPV biology has allowed researchers to use the virus as a model for the development of not only prophylactic vaccines, but also therapeutic ones. The advantages of HPV as a model stem from the limited number of proteins encoded by the HPV genome that can be targeted by vaccines, and also from the restricted expression of certain viral proteins during different stages of infection. In this review, we discuss how HPV can be used as a model for the development of both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines.

  13. [Cardiovascular effects produced by prophylactic digitalization during introduction of anaesthesia (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köppen, R; Köhne, K; Busse, J; Hosselmann, I; Klaschik, E; Simons, F

    1978-10-01

    The narrow field of non-controversial indications concerning the application of digitalis glycosides is pointed out. Problems of routine digitalization of older patients not suffering from cardiac insuffiency are discussed with special regard to preparing them for operations. Up to now, from the viewpoint of anaesthesiologists no benefits of prophylactic digitalization have been found. In a retrospective computerized study, clinical hemodynamic parameters during introduction of anaesthesia have been investigated by means of anaesthetic data recorded during three years. Nondigitalized patients older than fifty years showed satisfactory cardiac functions, whereas prophylactically digitalized patients--compared with the control group--have been treated with plasma expanders earlier and at a double rate. Furthermore, higher heart frequencies and greater tendency to arrythmias were observed. Consequently, prophylactic digitalization cannot be recommended in general.

  14. Prevalence of Antibiotic-Resistant Fecal Escherichia coli Isolates from Penned Broiler and Scavenging Local Chickens in Arusha, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugumisa, Bernadether T; Call, Douglas R; Mwanyika, Gaspary O; Mrutu, Rehema I; Luanda, Catherine M; Lyimo, Beatus M; Subbiah, Murugan; Buza, Joram J

    2016-08-01

    We compared the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from household-level producers of broiler (commercial source breeds) and local chickens in the Arusha District of Tanzania. Households were composed of a single dwelling or residence with independent, penned broiler flocks. Free-range, scavenging chickens were mixed breed and loosely associated with individual households. A total of 1,800 E. coli isolates (1,200 from broiler and 600 from scavenging local chickens) from 75 chickens were tested for their susceptibility against 11 antibiotics by using breakpoint assays. Isolates from broiler chickens harbored a higher prevalence of antibiotic-resistant E. coli relative to scavenging local chickens, including sulfamethoxazole (80.3 versus 34%), followed by trimethoprim (69.3 versus 27.7%), tetracycline (56.8 versus 20%), streptomycin (52.7 versus 24.7%), amoxicillin (49.6 versus 17%), ampicillin (49.1 versus 16.8%), ciprofloxacin (21.9 versus 1.7%), and chloramphenicol (1.5 versus 1.2%). Except for resistance to chloramphenicol, scavenging local chickens harbored fewer resistant E. coli isolates (P chickens harbored more isolates that were resistant to ≥7 antibiotics (P E. coli from broiler chickens correlated with the reported therapeutic and prophylactic use of antibiotics in this poultry population. We suggest that improved biosecurity measures and increased vaccination efforts would reduce reliance on antibiotics by these households.

  15. The distribution of antibiotics in water of a river basin in South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, T.; Cheng, W.; Wang, M.; Wan, T.; Cheng, M.; Zhang, C. C.; Jia, Z. Y.

    2017-08-01

    In water environment field, one of the most attractive research topics is the determination of contamination characteristics of antibiotics in water. In order to investigate the distribution of antibiotics in surface water and drinking water of a certain river basin in southern China, we determined the types and concentrations of antibiotics that contaminated the river by performing HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method. Thus, we detected 17 antibiotics in four surface water samples (B1, B2, B3, and B4). In sampling points B3 and B4, we detected 16 antibiotics separately. The detection rates of norfloxacin, ofloxacin, and erythromycin-H2O were 100%, and the antibiotic erythromycin-H2O had the maximum concentration. In six drinking water samples (A1, A2, A3, A4, A5, and A6), we detected 13 antibiotics. In A5 water samples, we detected all the 13 antibiotics. The detection rate of ofloxacin and erythromycin-H2O was 100%, and erythromycin-H2O was the antibiotic with the highest concentration. We also found that from the upstream to the downstream of the river basin, the types of antibiotics in river increased gradually. In the upstream water samples (B1), we detected three antibiotics. Erythromycin-H2O was the antibiotic with the highest concentration of 6.61 ng/L, and sulfapyridine had the lowest concentration of 2.82 ng/L. In the downstream water samples (B4), we detected 16 antibiotics. Erythromycin-H2O was the antibiotic with the highest concentration of 277.58 ng/L, and the Sulfamonomethoxine was the antibiotic with the second-highest concentration of 242.1 ng/L. In addition, different membrane treatment processes could remove different amounts of antibiotics from the water samples. The study is an important reference for providing environmental protection to river water basin.

  16. Antibiotic prophylaxis in pediatric odontology : an update

    OpenAIRE

    Planells del Pozo, Paloma; Barra Soto, Mª José; Santa Eulalia Troisfontaines, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Most orofacial infections are of odontogenic origin, and are of a self-limiting nature, characterized by spontaneous drainage. The causal bacteria are generally saprophytes. On the other hand, invasive dental interventions give rise to transient bacteremia. When an oral lesion is contaminated by extrinsic bacteria, the required antibiotic treatment should be provided as soon as possible. In the case of pulpitis, such treatment is usually not indicated if the infection only reaches the pul...

  17. Effect of localised antibiotic infusions applied to the teat-canal and teat sinus at drying-off on mastitis in the dry-period and at calving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, M W; Williamson, J H; Day, T M; Lacy-Hulbert, S J; Henderson, H V

    2001-11-01

    An experiment using three New Zealand herds and a total of 632 cows, examined the effect of localised prophylactic treatments with antibiotic at drying-off on the incidence of new intramammary infection during the dry period and at calving. Antibiotic was infused either into the teat canal (0.22 g of dry-cow formulation) or the teat sinus (3.1 g of lactating-cow formulation) of uninfected quarters to eliminate any bacteria present in these locations at the last milking of lactation. These treatments were compared with a negative control (nil treatment) and a positive antibiotic control (infusion of 3.6 g of dry-cow formulation). All antibiotic formulations used the same active ingredient, sodium cloxacillin. No significant reduction in new dry period clinical mastitis was observed for the two localised treatments whereas the positive control treatment achieved 100% reduction in new clinical mastitis compared with untreated control quarters. A 41% reduction (P < 0.05) in new Streptococcus uberis infections at calving was associated with the teat canal antibiotic treatment, compared with an 82% reduction (P < 0.001) for the positive antibiotic control. Both localised treatments showed a reduced incidence of new intramammary infection (P < 0.001) when pooled across periods and pathogens. Teats receiving either the teat canal antibiotic treatment or a full infusion of long acting dry-cow antibiotic had a lower incidence of open teat canals (P < 0.05) at 3 weeks after drying-off.

  18. Reducing antibiotic prescribing in Australian general practice: time for a national strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Mar, Christopher B; Scott, Anna Mae; Glasziou, Paul P; Hoffmann, Tammy; van Driel, Mieke L; Beller, Elaine; Phillips, Susan M; Dartnell, Jonathan

    2017-11-06

    In Australia, the antibiotic resistance crisis may be partly alleviated by reducing antibiotic use in general practice, which has relatively high prescribing rates - antibiotics are mostly prescribed for acute respiratory infections, for which they provide only minor benefits. Current surveillance is inadequate for monitoring community antibiotic resistance rates, prescribing rates by indication, and serious complications of acute respiratory infections (which antibiotic use earlier in the infection may have averted), making target setting difficult. Categories of interventions that may support general practitioners to reduce prescribing antibiotics are: regulatory (eg, changing the default to "no repeats" in electronic prescribing, changing the packaging of antibiotics to facilitate tailored amounts of antibiotics for the right indication and restricting access to prescribing selected antibiotics to conserve them), externally administered (eg, academic detailing and audit and feedback on total antibiotic use for individual GPs), interventions that GPs can individually implement (eg, delayed prescribing, shared decision making, public declarations in the practice about conserving antibiotics, and self-administered audit), supporting GPs' access to near-patient diagnostic testing, and public awareness campaigns. Many unanswered clinical research questions remain, including research into optimal implementation methods. Reducing antibiotic use in Australian general practice will require a range of approaches (with various intervention categories), a sustained effort over many years and a commitment of appropriate resources and support.

  19. Prophylactic mesh use during primary stoma formation to prevent parastomal hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, S; Daniels, IR; Smart, NJ

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Parastomal hernia (PSH) is a common problem following stoma formation. The optimal technique for stoma formation is unknown although recent studies have focused on whether placement of prophylactic mesh at stoma formation can reduce PSH rates. The aim of this study was to systematically review use of prophylactic mesh versus no mesh with regard to occurrence of PSH and peristomal complications. Methods A systematic search was performed using PubMed, Embase™ and the Cochrane Library to identify randomised controlled trials that analysed placement of prophylactic mesh versus no mesh at time of initial surgery. Meta-analysis was performed using random effects methods. Results A total of 506 studies were identified by our search strategy. Of these, 8 studies were included, involving 430 patients (217 mesh vs 213 no mesh). Prophylactic mesh placement resulted in a significantly lower rate of PSH formation (42/217 [19.4%] vs 92/213 [43.2%]) with a combined risk ratio of 0.40 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.21–0.75, p=0.004). Placement of prophylactic mesh did not result in increased peristomal complications (15/218 [6.9%] vs 16/227 [7.0%]) with a combined risk ratio of 1.0 (95% CI: 0.49–2.01, p=0.990). Conclusions Prophylactic placement of mesh at primary stoma formation may reduce the incidence of PSH, without an increase in peristomal complications. However, the overall quality of the randomised controlled trials included in the meta-analysis was poor, and should prompt caution regarding the applicability of the findings of the individual studies and the meta-analysis to everyday practice. PMID:27269439

  20. Prophylactic amiodarone reduces junctional ectopic tachycardia after tetralogy of Fallot repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Michiaki; Dossey, Amy M; Garcia, Xiomara; Shinkawa, Takeshi; Jaquiss, Robert D B

    2012-01-01

    Junctional ectopic tachycardia is common after pediatric heart surgery. After tetralogy of Fallot repair, the incidence of junctional ectopic tachycardia may be as high as 15% to 20%. We introduced prophylactic amiodarone for tetralogy repair. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the prophylactic amiodarone. A continuous infusion of amiodarone was started in the operating room at the time of rewarming during cardiopulmonary bypass at a rate of 2 mg/kg/d and continued for 48 hours. Between November 2005 and November 2009, 63 consecutive patients underwent primary repair of tetralogy, of whom 20 had prophylactic amiodarone (amiodarone group) and 43 did not (control group). Variables studied included demographic and bypass data, surgical procedure details (transannular or nontransannular patch), preoperative and postoperative echocardiography findings, and postoperative inotropic support. Univariate and stepwise multivariate analyses were conducted to determine factors associated with the occurrence of junctional ectopic tachycardia. The incidence of junctional ectopic tachycardia was 37% in the control group and 10% in the amiodarone group. The groups were similar in age, weight, bypass time, rate of transannular patch usage, and preoperative and postoperative gradient through the right ventricular outflow tract. Prophylactic amiodarone was significantly negatively associated with junctional ectopic tachycardia by both univariate (P = .039) and multivariate (P = .027) analyses. There were no adverse events attributable to prophylactic amiodarone use. Prophylactic amiodarone is well tolerated and significantly associated with a decreased incidence of junctional ectopic tachycardia after tetralogy repair. Copyright © 2012 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of antibiotic resistance of udder pathogens in dairy cows kept on organic and on conventional farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, M; Perreten, V; Doherr, M G; Schaeren, W; Schällibaum, M; Blum, J W

    2006-03-01

    There has been a rapid rise in the emergence of multi-drug-resistant pathogens in the past 10 to 15 yr and some bacteria are now resistant to most antimicrobial agents. Antibiotic use is very restricted on Swiss organic dairy farms, and a purely prophylactic use, such as for dry cow mastitis prevention, is forbidden. A low prevalence of antibiotic resistance in organic farms can be expected compared with conventional farms because the bacteria are infrequently or not exposed to antibiotics. The occurrence of antibiotic resistance was compared between mastitis pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, nonaureus staphylococci, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis) from farms with organic and conventional dairy production. Clear differences in the percentage of antibiotic resistance were mainly species-related, but did not differ significantly between isolates from cows kept on organic and conventional farms, except for Streptococcus uberis, which exhibited significantly more single resistances (compared with no resistance) when isolated from cows kept on organic farms (6/10 isolates) than on conventional farms (0/5 isolates). Different percentages were found (albeit not statistically significant) in resistance to ceftiofur, erythromycin, clindamycin, enrofloxacin, chloramphenicol, penicillin, oxacillin, gentamicin, tetracycline, and quinupristin-dalfopristin, but, importantly, none of the strains was resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid or vancomycin. Multidrug resistance was rarely encountered. The frequency of antibiotic resistance in organic farms, in which the use of antibiotics must be very restricted, was not different from conventional farms, and was contrary to expectation. The antibiotic resistance status needs to be monitored in organic farms as well as conventional farms and production factors related to the absence of reduced antibiotic resistance in organic farms need to be evaluated.

  2. Patterns and determinants of inappropriate antibiotic use in injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrels, Joanna L; Barg, Frances K; Metlay, Joshua P

    2009-02-01

    Inappropriate antibiotic use contributes to the emergence and spread of drug resistant infections. Though injection drug users are at increased risk for drug resistant infections, few studies have examined antibiotic use in this population. To understand patterns and determinants of antibiotic use among injection drug users. Five focus groups were conducted with 28 current injection drug users recruited from a syringe exchange program in Philadelphia and analyzed using the constant comparative method to identify emergent themes. Twenty-six participants also completed a written survey instrument. Injection drug users reported frequent antibiotic exposure, with 12 of 26 participants reporting use of antibiotic medications at least once in the previous 30 days. Participants reported several patterns of antibiotic use that were potentially harmful, including delays in seeking medical care, failing to fill prescriptions, obtaining antibiotics from non-provider sources, and poor adherence to prescribed regimens. The major determinants of inappropriate antibiotic use were delayed recognition of severity of illness, reluctance to wait to be seen, previous mistreatment by providers, lack of insurance, prioritizing purchasing drugs of abuse over antibiotics, forgetting to take antibiotics because of distractions that accompany drug use, concerns about interactions between antibiotics and other substances, and an irregular diet. Additionally, injection drug users commonly misunderstood the concept of antibiotic resistance and equated it with tolerance. Injection drug users reported potentially dangerous antibiotic use behaviors and described determinants of these behaviors. Outreach and educational interventions to improve antibiotic use should target high-risk populations, such as injection drug users, and consider their distinct antibiotic use behaviors and determinants.

  3. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2013-07-31

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water.

  4. Antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofu, Oana; Rojo-Molinero, Estrella; Macià, María D; Oliver, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with a wide range of infections, from those related to exogenous devices, such as catheters or prosthetic joints, to chronic tissue infections such as those occurring in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Biofilms are recalcitrant to antibiotic treatment due to multiple tolerance mechanisms (phenotypic resistance). This causes persistence of biofilm infections in spite of antibiotic exposure which predisposes to antibiotic resistance development (genetic resistance). Understanding the interplay between phenotypic and genetic resistance mechanisms acting on biofilms, as well as appreciating the diversity of environmental conditions of biofilm infections which influence the effect of antibiotics are required in order to optimize the antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections. Here, we review the current knowledge on phenotypic and genetic resistance in biofilms and describe the potential strategies for the antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections. Of note is the optimization of PK/PD parameters in biofilms, high-dose topical treatments, combined and sequential/alternate therapies or the use antibiotic adjuvants. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Antibiotic prescription: An oral physician′s point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Patait

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antibiotics are important in the management and prophylaxis of infections in patients at a risk of experiencing microbial disease. Uses of systemic antibiotics in dentistry are limited since management of acute dental conditions is primarily based upon extraction of teeth or extirpation of the pulp. However, the literature provides evidence of inappropriate prescribing practices by practitioners, due to a number of factors from inadequate knowledge to social factors. Aim: The aim was to assess the therapeutic prescription of antibiotics in the dental office. Materials and Methods: In the current study, 42 faculty members of two dental colleges in the same vicinity were included. A questionnaire was drafted and sent to the dentists to collect data pertaining to the conditions in which antibiotics were prescribed and most commonly prescribed antibiotic. Results: During the study period, 42 faculty members from various departments in the institutes were surveyed, of which 41 questionnaires were completely filled. Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic followed by other amoxicillin combinations; Metronidazole was most widely prescribed antibiotic for anaerobic infections. Conclusion: We have entered an era where cures may be few due to increasing microbial resistance. The biggest force for change will be if all practicing dentists looked at their prescribing and made it more rational.

  6. Alternatives to antibiotics-a pipeline portfolio review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplewski, Lloyd; Bax, Richard; Clokie, Martha; Dawson, Mike; Fairhead, Heather; Fischetti, Vincent A; Foster, Simon; Gilmore, Brendan F; Hancock, Robert E W; Harper, David; Henderson, Ian R; Hilpert, Kai; Jones, Brian V; Kadioglu, Aras; Knowles, David; Ólafsdóttir, Sigríður; Payne, David; Projan, Steve; Shaunak, Sunil; Silverman, Jared; Thomas, Christopher M; Trust, Trevor J; Warn, Peter; Rex, John H

    2016-02-01

    Antibiotics have saved countless lives and enabled the development of modern medicine over the past 70 years. However, it is clear that the success of antibiotics might only have been temporary and we now expect a long-term and perhaps never-ending challenge to find new therapies to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A broader approach to address bacterial infection is needed. In this Review, we discuss alternatives to antibiotics, which we defined as non-compound approaches (products other than classic antibacterial agents) that target bacteria or any approaches that target the host. The most advanced approaches are antibodies, probiotics, and vaccines in phase 2 and phase 3 trials. This first wave of alternatives to antibiotics will probably best serve as adjunctive or preventive therapies, which suggests that conventional antibiotics are still needed. Funding of more than £1·5 billion is needed over 10 years to test and develop these alternatives to antibiotics. Investment needs to be partnered with translational expertise and targeted to support the validation of these approaches in phase 2 trials, which would be a catalyst for active engagement and investment by the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry. Only a sustained, concerted, and coordinated international effort will provide the solutions needed for the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [LOCAL ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY OF OSTEOMYELITIS USING NONABSORBABLE IMPLANT (REVIEW)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleubaev, B; Saginova, D; Abiyev, T; Davletbaev, M; Koshanova, A

    2016-06-01

    Despite the variety of treatments available, including surgical procedures and antimicrobial therapy, bone infections is still a medical problem, because they are difficult to treat. Optimal treatment should stabilize the bone, promote the biological recovery of bone defects and destroy bacterial infection. Systemic antibiotics are part of the standard therapy after surgical treatment of infected bone, but their effectiveness is limited due to malnutrition and low absorption at the site of infection. Moreover, long-term treatment and higher doses are associated with serious side effects. In contrast, the antibiotic impregnated bone cements or fillers can act as a local anti-infective drug delivery system, which not only fills the dead space after debridement, but also provide high concentrations of antibiotics in a potential site of infection, no increase levels of antibiotics in serum. The review analyzed the use of antibiotic-impregnated cement as local delivery of antibiotics systems. Gentamycin impregnated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads, for the topical treatment of orthopedic infections clinically used for over 30 years. Application of antibiotic delivery systems using cement in the infected region is common method of treatment that continues to improve. On the downside of PMMA is that the material does not biodegradable requires subsequent invasive procedures necessary to remove the implant.

  8. Antibiotic prescription: An oral physician's point of view

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendra Patait; N Urvashi; M Rajderkar; Kedar, S.; Kinjal Shah; Reeta Patait

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibiotics are important in the management and prophylaxis of infections in patients at a risk of experiencing microbial disease. Uses of systemic antibiotics in dentistry are limited since management of acute dental conditions is primarily based upon extraction of teeth or extirpation of the pulp. However, the literature provides evidence of inappropriate prescribing practices by practitioners, due to a number of factors from inadequate knowledge to social factors. Aim: The aim ...

  9. The Shared Antibiotic Resistome of Soil Bacteria and Human Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Forsberg, K. J.; A. Reyes; Wang, B; Selleck, E. M.; Sommer, M. O. A.; Dantas, G

    2012-01-01

    Soil microbiota represent one of the ancient evolutionary origins of antibiotic resistance and have been proposed as a reservoir of resistance genes available for exchange with clinical pathogens. Using a high-throughput functional metagenomic approach in conjunction with a pipeline for the de-novo assembly of short-read sequence data from functional selections (termed PARFuMS), we provide evidence for recent exchange of antibiotic resistance genes between environmental bacteria and clinical ...

  10. Antibiotic resistance in children with recurrent or complicated urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, N; Quol, K; Al-Momani, T; Al-Awaisheh, F; Al-Kayed, D

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is certainly one of the most common childhood infections. Emerging resistance to the antibiotics is not unusual. Current hospitalization for children with urinary tract infection is reserved for severe or complicated cases. The aim of the present study was to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern among children with recurrent or complicated urinary tract infection. A retrospective study carried out at Prince Hashem hospital, Zarqa city, eastern Jordan and involved 336 episodes of culture proved urinary tract infection obtained from 121 patients with recurrent UTI, who used prophylactic antibiotics during the period from April 1, 2004 to December 31, 2006. The isolated microorganisms and there antibiotics susceptibility were studied. Seventy three patients (60.3%) were found to have some forms of urinary tract anomaly, significantly more prevalent among male children Pcomplicated rather than recurrent urinary tract infection (64.3% vs. 16.6%, Pcomplicated urinary tract infection. Proteus, Pseudomonas and Candida spp. were more prevalent in patients with complicated (Pcomplicated UTI.

  11. Antibiotics and the resistant microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Morten; Dantas, Gautam

    2011-01-01

    Since the discovery and clinical application of antibiotics, pathogens and the human microbiota have faced a near continuous exposure to these selective agents. A well-established consequence of this exposure is the evolution of multidrug-resistant pathogens, which can become virtually untreatable....... Less appreciated are the concomitant changes in the human microbiome in response to these assaults and their contribution to clinical resistance problems. Studies have shown that pervasive changes to the human microbiota result from antibiotic treatment and that resistant strains can persist for years...... expand our understanding of the interplay between antibiotics and the microbiome....

  12. Antibiotic resistance: A current epilogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, David R

    2017-06-15

    The history of the first commercial antibiotics is briefly reviewed, together with data from the US and WHO, showing the decrease in death due to infectious diseases over the 20th century, from just under half of all deaths, to less than 10%. The second half of the 20th century saw the new use of antibiotics as growth promoters for food animals in the human diet, and the end of the 20th century and beginning of the 21st saw the beginning and rapid rise of advanced microbial resistance to antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Antibiotics as CECs: An Overview of the Hazards Posed by Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Ivan Scott

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTMonitoring programs have traditionally monitored legacy contaminants but are shifting focus to Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs. CECs present many challenges for monitoring and assessment, because measurement methods don't always exist nor have toxicological studies been fully conducted to place results in proper context. Also some CECs affect metabolic pathways to produce adverse outcomes that are not assessed through traditional toxicological evaluations. Antibiotics are CECs that pose significant environmental risks including development of both toxic effects at high doses and antibiotic resistance at doses well below the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC which kill bacteria and have been found in nearly half of all sites monitored in the US. Antimicrobial resistance has generally been attributed to the use of antibiotics in medicine for humans and livestock as well as aquaculture operations. The objective of this study was to assess the extent and magnitude of antibiotics in the environment and estimate their potential hazards in the environment. Antibiotics concentrations were measured in a number of monitoring studies which included Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTP effluent, surface waters, sediments and biota. A number of studies reported levels of Antibiotic Resistant Microbes (ARM in surface waters and some studies found specific ARM genes (e.g. the blaM-1 gene in E. coli which may pose additional environmental risk. High levels of this gene were found to survive WWTP disinfection and accumulated in sediment at levels 100-1000 times higher than in the sewerage effluent, posing potential risks for gene transfer to other bacteria.in aquatic and marine ecosystems. Antibiotic risk assessment approaches were developed based on the use of MICs and MIC Ratios [High (Antibiotic Resistant/Low (Antibiotic Sensitive MIC] for each antibiotic indicating the range of bacterial adaptability to each antibiotic to help define the No

  14. Intracranial haemorrhage in children and adolescents with severe haemophilia A or B - the impact of prophylactic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, Nadine G.; Auerswald, Günter; Barnes, Chris; Carcao, Manuel; Dunn, Amy L.; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Hoffmann, Marianne; Kavakli, Kaan; Kenet, Gili; Kobelt, Rainer; Kurnik, Karin; Liesner, Ri; Mäkipernaa, Anne; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J.; Mancuso, Maria E.; Molinari, Angelo C.; Nolan, Beatrice; Perez Garrido, Rosario; Petrini, Pia; Platokouki, Helen E.; Shapiro, Amy D.; Wu, Runhui; Ljung, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    The discussion of prophylactic therapy in haemophilia is largely focused on joint outcomes. The impact of prophylactic therapy on intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is less known. This study aimed to analyse ICH in children with haemophilia, with a focus on different prophylaxis regimens and sequelae of

  15. Dispensing of non-prescribed antibiotics in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almaaytah A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ammar Almaaytah,1 Tareq L Mukattash,2 Julia Hajaj2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan Objective: Current regulations in Jordan state that antibiotics cannot be sold without a medical prescription. This study aimed to assess the percentage of pharmacies that dispense antibiotics without a medical prescription in the Kingdom of Jordan and identify and highlight the extent and seriousness of such practices among Jordanian pharmacies. Methods: A prospective study was performed, and five different clinical scenarios were simulated at pharmacies investigated including sore throat, otitis media, acute sinusitis, diarrhea, and urinary tract infection in childbearing-aged women. Three levels of demand were used to convince the pharmacists to sell an antibiotic. Results: A total of 202 total pharmacies in Jordan were visited in the present study. The majority of pharmacies (74.3% dispensed antibiotics without prescription with three different levels of demand. The percentage of pharmacies dispensing antibiotics without a prescription for the sore throat scenario was 97.6%, followed by urinary tract infection (83.3%, diarrhea (83%, and otitis media (68.4%. The lowest percentage of antibiotic dispensing was for the acute sinusitis simulation at 48.5%. Among the pharmacies that dispensed antibiotics, the pharmacists provided an explanation as the number of times per day the drug should be taken in 95.3% of the cases, explained the duration of treatment in 25.7%, and inquired about allergies prior to the sale of the antibiotic in only 17.3%. Only 52 pharmacies (25.7% refused to dispense any kind of antibiotics, the majority (61.5% of this refusal response came from acute sinusitis cases, while the minority (2.4% came from the sore throat cases. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate that antibiotics continue to be dispensed

  16. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This omission creates a skewed view, which emphasizes short-term efficacy and ignores the long-term consequences to the patient and other people. We offer a framework for addressing antibiotic resistance in systematic reviews. We suggest that the data on background resistance in the original trials should be reported and taken into account when interpreting results. Data on emergence of resistance (whether in the body reservoirs or in the bacteria causing infection) are important outcomes. Emergence of resistance should be taken into account when interpreting the evidence on antibiotic treatment in randomized controlled trials or systematic reviews. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Worldwide pattern of antibiotic prescription in endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Egea, Juan José; Martín-González, Jenifer; Jiménez-Sánchez, María Del Carmen; Crespo-Gallardo, Isabel; Saúco-Márquez, Juan José; Velasco-Ortega, Eugenio

    2017-08-01

    Odontogenic infections, and especially endodontic infections, are polymicrobial, involving a combination of Gram-positive and Gram-negative facultative anaerobes and strictly anaerobic bacteria. Therefore, antibiotics can be used as an adjunct to endodontic treatment. However, most chronic and even acute endodontic infections can be successfully managed by disinfection of the root-canal system, which eliminates the source of infection, followed by abscess drainage or tooth extraction, without the need for antibiotics. The literature provides evidence of inadequate prescribing practices by dentists. The aim of this concise review was to analyse the worldwide pattern of antibiotic prescription in endodontic infections. Comprehensive searches were conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed, Wiley Online Database, Web of Science and Scopus. The databases were searched up to 13 March 2016 for studies in which dentists used systemic antibiotics to treat endodontic lesions and which reported data on the type of antibiotic prescribed and on the diagnosis of the endodontic disease treated. The electronic and hand searches identified 69 titles, of which 25 were included in the final analysis. Amoxicillin was reported as the drug of choice for endodontic infections in most countries, and clindamycin and erythromycin were the choice for patients allergic to penicillin. Dentists worldwide prescribe antibiotics for non-indicated conditions, such as pulpitis. Antibiotics are overprescribed for the management of endodontic infections. It is necessary to improve antibiotic-prescribing habits in the treatment of endodontic infections, as well as to introduce educational initiatives to encourage the coherent and proper use of antibiotics in such conditions. © 2017 FDI World Dental Federation.

  18. Diabetic foot infection: Antibiotic therapy and good practice recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwell, Nicholas D; Devers, Marion C; Kennon, Brian; Hopkinson, Helen E; McDougall, Claire; Young, Matthew J; Robertson, Hannah M A; Stang, Duncan; Dancer, Stephanie J; Seaton, Andrew; Leese, Graham P

    2017-10-01

    Healthcare events related to diabetic foot disease carry a burden of morbidity, mortality and economic cost. Prompt identification of clinical infection with appropriate tissue sampling limits use of broad spectrum empirical antibiotics and improves antibiotic stewardship. Staphylococcus aureus remains the commonest infecting organism and high-dose flucloxacillin remains the empirical antibiotic of choice for antibiotic naïve patients. Barriers to microbe-specific treatment include: adequate tissue sampling, delays in culture results, drug allergies and the emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms which can complicate the choice of targeted antibiotics. Even appropriate antibiotic treatment carries a risk of adverse events including the selection of resistant organisms. Multidisciplinary clinical assessment of a diabetic foot infection is supported by the use of appropriate imaging modalities and deep tissue sampling, both of which are encouraged to enhance sampling accuracy. Narrow-spectrum, high dose, short duration antimicrobial therapy is ideal. Further clarity in these areas would be of benefit to clinicians involved in management of diabetic foot infections. A combination of literature review with expert discussion was used to generate consensus on management of diabetic foot infection, with a specific focus on empirical antimicrobial therapy. Gram positive organisms represent the commonest pathogens in diabetic foot infection. However there are developing challenges in antimicrobial resistance and antibiotic availability. Recommendations for empirical therapy, including the choice of alternative oral agents and use of outpatient antibiotics would be of benefit to those involved in diabetic foot care. This paper provides advice on empirical antibiotic therapy that may be used as a framework for local guideline development to support clinicians in the management o