WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing preferential excitation

  1. Kinetic model of Nav1.5 channel provides a subtle insight into slow inactivation associated excitability in cardiac cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.5 has been linked to the cardiac cell excitability and a variety of arrhythmic syndromes including long QT, Brugada, and conduction abnormalities. Nav1.5 exhibits a slow inactivation, corresponding to a duration-dependent bi-exponential recovery, which is often associated with various arrhythmia syndromes. However, the gating mechanism of Nav1.5 and the physiological role of slow inactivation in cardiac cells remain elusive. Here a 12-state two-step inactivation Markov model was successfully developed to depict the gating kinetics of Nav1.5. This model can simulate the Nav1.5 channel in not only steady state processes, but also various transient processes. Compared with the simpler 8-state model, this 12-state model is well-behaved in simulating and explaining the processes of slow inactivation and slow recovery. This model provides a good framework for further studying the gating mechanism and physiological role of sodium channel in excitable cells.

  2. Information filtering via preferential diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Linyuan

    2011-01-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential to address information overload problem, namely to help users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlook the significance of diversity and novelty which indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark datasets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  3. Information filtering via preferential diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  4. Coexistence in preferential attachment networks

    CERN Document Server

    Antunović, Tonći; Racz, Miklos Z

    2013-01-01

    Competition in markets is ubiquitous: cell-phone providers, computer manufacturers, and sport gear brands all vie for customers. Though several coexisting competitors are often observed in empirical data, many current theoretical models of competition on small-world networks predict a single winner taking over the majority of the network. We introduce a new model of product adoption that focuses on word-of-mouth recommendations to provide an explanation for this coexistence of competitors. The key property of our model is that customer choices evolve simultaneously with the network of customers. When a new node joins the network, it chooses neighbors according to preferential attachment, and then chooses its type based on the number of initial neighbors of each type. This can model a new cell-phone user choosing a cell-phone provider, a new student choosing a laptop, or a new athletic team member choosing a gear provider. We provide a detailed analysis of the new model; in particular, we determine the possibl...

  5. Predicting the growth of new links by new preferential attachment ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    By revisiting the preferential attachment (PA) mechanism for generating a classical scale-free network, we propose a class of novel preferential attachment similarity indices for predicting future links in evolving networks. Extensive experiments on 14 real-life networks show that these new indices can provide more accurate ...

  6. A preferential flow leaching index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGrath, G.S.; Hinz, C.; Sivapalan, M.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental evidence suggests that for many chemicals surface runoff and rapid preferential flow through the shallow unsaturated zone are significant pathways for transport to streams and groundwater. The signature of this is the episodic and pulsed leaching of these chemicals. The driver for

  7. Excited Delirium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeuchi, Asia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Excited (or agitated delirium is characterized by agitation, aggression, acute distress and sudden death, often in the pre-hospital care setting. It is typically associated with the use of drugs that alter dopamine processing, hyperthermia, and, most notably, sometimes with death of the affected person in the custody of law enforcement. Subjects typically die from cardiopulmonary arrest, although the cause is debated. Unfortunately an adequate treatment plan has yet to be established, in part due to the fact that most patients die before hospital arrival. While there is still much to be discovered about the pathophysiology and treatment, it is hoped that this extensive review will provide both police and medical personnel with the information necessary to recognize and respond appropriately to excited delirium. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1:77-83.

  8. Non-preferential Trading Clubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raimondos-Møller, Pascalis; Woodland, Alan D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the welfare implications of non-discriminatory tariff reforms by a subset of countries, which we term a non-preferential trading club. We show that there exist coordinated tariff reforms, accompanied by appropriate income transfers between the member countries, that unambiguou......, that unambiguously increase the welfare of these countries while leaving the welfare of non-members unaltered. In terms of economic policy implications, our results show that there exist regional, MFN-consistent arrangements that lead to Pareto improvements in world welfare....

  9. Infants preferentially approach and explore the unexpected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Zi L; Xu, Fei

    2017-11-01

    Looking time experiments based on the violation-of-expectation (VOE) method have consistently demonstrated that infants look longer when their expectations are violated. However, it remains an open question whether similar effects will be observed in infants' approach behaviours. Specifically, do infants selectively approach and explore sources that violate their expectations? In this study, we address this question by examining how infants' looking times are related to their approach and exploration behaviours. Using a traditional VOE method and a crawling paradigm, we demonstrate a strong correspondence between looking time and approach behaviours, which indicates that 13-month-old infants preferentially explore sources of unexpected events. Such spontaneous exploration may provide learning opportunities and allow infants to play an active role in driving their own development. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Infants look longer when their expectations are violated. There is some evidence that infants also preferentially explore objects that violate their 'core' physical expectations. What the present study adds? There is a clear correspondence between infants' looking behaviour and their approach behaviour. Expectancy violations involving non-core knowledge can similarly influence infants' exploration. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  10. 15 CFR 700.14 - Preferential scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preferential scheduling. 700.14...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Industrial Priorities § 700.14 Preferential scheduling. (a) A...

  11. Preferential Voting in Denmark: How, Why, and to What Effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elklit, Jørgen

    is then briefly compared to the Swedish and the Finnish systems before a few empirical results from Danish impact studies are presented. Finally, a model attempts to illustrate how the various explanatory factors interact to produce the parties’ votes in the Danish multi-member constituencies.......The paper provides an overview of (1) the Danish system for casting a preferential – or personal – vote in a proportional list system and (2) how seats are subsequently allocated. Denmark differs from most (all?) preferential list PR systems by letting the parties themselves (actually the parties......’ multi-member constituency branches) decide which one of four possible preferential list options they want to employ in an upcoming election. The two dominant options are explained in some detail, to allow a full understanding of how they function. The paper then goes on to discuss how this system can...

  12. Deep mRNA sequencing of the Tritonia diomedea brain transcriptome provides access to gene homologues for neuronal excitability, synaptic transmission and peptidergic signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Senatore

    Full Text Available The sea slug Tritonia diomedea (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Nudibranchia, has a simple and highly accessible nervous system, making it useful for studying neuronal and synaptic mechanisms underlying behavior. Although many important contributions have been made using Tritonia, until now, a lack of genetic information has impeded exploration at the molecular level.We performed Illumina sequencing of central nervous system mRNAs from Tritonia, generating 133.1 million 100 base pair, paired-end reads. De novo reconstruction of the RNA-Seq data yielded a total of 185,546 contigs, which partitioned into 123,154 non-redundant gene clusters (unigenes. BLAST comparison with RefSeq and Swiss-Prot protein databases, as well as mRNA data from other invertebrates (gastropod molluscs: Aplysia californica, Lymnaea stagnalis and Biomphalaria glabrata; cnidarian: Nematostella vectensis revealed that up to 76,292 unigenes in the Tritonia transcriptome have putative homologues in other databases, 18,246 of which are below a more stringent E-value cut-off of 1x10-6. In silico prediction of secreted proteins from the Tritonia transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA produced a database of 579 unique sequences of secreted proteins, which also exhibited markedly higher expression levels compared to other genes in the TSA.Our efforts greatly expand the availability of gene sequences available for Tritonia diomedea. We were able to extract full length protein sequences for most queried genes, including those involved in electrical excitability, synaptic vesicle release and neurotransmission, thus confirming that the transcriptome will serve as a useful tool for probing the molecular correlates of behavior in this species. We also generated a neurosecretome database that will serve as a useful tool for probing peptidergic signalling systems in the Tritonia brain.

  13. Excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    1974-01-01

    Excited States, Volume I reviews radiationless transitions, phosphorescence microwave double resonance through optical spectra in molecular solids, dipole moments in excited states, luminescence of polar molecules, and the problem of interstate interaction in aromatic carbonyl compounds. The book discusses the molecular electronic radiationless transitions; the double resonance techniques and the relaxation mechanisms involving the lowest triplet state of aromatic compounds; as well as the optical spectra and relaxation in molecular solids. The text also describes dipole moments and polarizab

  14. Semantic foundation for preferential description logics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Britz, K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Description logics are a well-established family of knowledge representation formalisms in Artificial Intelligence. Enriching description logics with non-monotonic reasoning capabilities, especially preferential reasoning as developed by Lehmann...

  15. Optimal Design in Geostatistics under Preferential Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Gustavo da Silva; Gamerman, Dani

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the effect of preferential sampling in Geostatistics when the choice of new sampling locations is the main interest of the researcher. A Bayesian criterion based on maximizing utility functions is used. Simulated studies are presented and highlight the strong influence of preferential sampling in the decisions. The computational complexity is faced by treating the new local sampling locations as a model parameter and the optimal choice is then made by analysing its posteri...

  16. Preferential tax regimes with asymmetric countries

    OpenAIRE

    Bucovetsky, Sam; Haufler, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Current policy initiatives taken by the EU and the OECD aim at abolishing preferential corporate tax regimes. This note extends Keen's (2001) analysis of symmetric capital tax competition under preferential (or discriminatory) and non-discriminatory tax regimes to allow for countries of different size. Even though size asymmetries imply a redistribution of tax revenue from the larger to the smaller country, a non-discrimination policy is found to have similar effects as in the symmetric model...

  17. Life, Death, and Preferential Attachment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sune Lehman; Jackson, A. D.; Lautrup, B.

    2005-01-01

    model which allows for the death of nodes. This model provides an excellent description of the citation distributions for live and dead papers in the SPIRES database. Further, this model suggests a novel and general mechanism for the generation of power law distributions in networks whenever...

  18. Discovering Preferential Patterns in Sectoral Trade Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Cingolani

    Full Text Available We analyze the patterns of import/export bilateral relations, with the aim of assessing the relevance and shape of "preferentiality" in countries' trade decisions. Preferentiality here is defined as the tendency to concentrate trade on one or few partners. With this purpose, we adopt a systemic approach through the use of the tools of complex network analysis. In particular, we apply a pattern detection approach based on community and pseudocommunity analysis, in order to highlight the groups of countries within which most of members' trade occur. The method is applied to two intra-industry trade networks consisting of 221 countries, relative to the low-tech "Textiles and Textile Articles" and the high-tech "Electronics" sectors for the year 2006, to look at the structure of world trade before the start of the international financial crisis. It turns out that the two networks display some similarities and some differences in preferential trade patterns: they both include few significant communities that define narrow sets of countries trading with each other as preferential destinations markets or supply sources, and they are characterized by the presence of similar hierarchical structures, led by the largest economies. But there are also distinctive features due to the characteristics of the industries examined, in which the organization of production and the destination markets are different. Overall, the extent of preferentiality and partner selection at the sector level confirm the relevance of international trade costs still today, inducing countries to seek the highest efficiency in their trade patterns.

  19. The Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP) - building the STEM workforce by providing exciting, multi-disciplinary, student-led suborbital flight projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingwall, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) recognizes that suborbital carriers play a vital role in training our country's future science and technology leaders. SMD created the Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP) to offer students the opportunity to design, build, and fly instruments on NASA's unique suborbital research platforms. This paper explores the projects, the impact, and the lessons learned of USIP. USIP required undergraduate teams to design, build, and fly a scientific instrument in 18 months or less. Students were required to form collaborative multidisciplinary teams to design, develop and build their instrument. Teams quickly learned that success required skills often overlooked in an academic environment. Teams quickly learned to share technical information in a clear and concise manner that could be understood by other disciplines. The aggressive schedule required team members to hold each other accountable for progress while maintaining team unity. Unanticipated problems and technical issues led students to a deeper understanding of the need for schedule and cost reserves. Students exited the program with a far deeper understanding of project management and team dynamics. Through the process of designing and building an instrument that will enable new research transforms students from textbook learners to developers of new knowledge. The initial USIP project funded 10 undergraduate teams that flew a broad range of scientific instruments on scientific balloons, sounding rockets, commercial rockets and aircraft. Students were required to prepare for and conduct the major reviews that are an integral part of systems development. Each project conducted a Preliminary Design Review, Critical Design Review and Mission Readiness review for NASA officials and flight platform providers. By preparing and presenting their designs to technical experts, the students developed a deeper understanding of the technical and programmatic project pieces that

  20. Reverse preferential spread in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoizumi, Hiroshi; Tani, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Naoto; Okamoto, Yoshio

    2012-08-01

    Large-degree nodes may have a larger influence on the network, but they can be bottlenecks for spreading information since spreading attempts tend to concentrate on these nodes and become redundant. We discuss that the reverse preferential spread (distributing information inversely proportional to the degree of the receiving node) has an advantage over other spread mechanisms. In large uncorrelated networks, we show that the mean number of nodes that receive information under the reverse preferential spread is an upper bound among any other weight-based spread mechanisms, and this upper bound is indeed a logistic growth independent of the degree distribution.

  1. Attention and attribute overlap in preferential choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sudeep

    2017-07-01

    Attributes that are common, or overlapping, across alternatives in two-alternative forced preferential choice tasks are often non-diagnostic. In many settings, attending to and evaluating these attributes does not help the decision maker determine which of the available alternatives is the most desirable. For this reason, many existing behavioural theories propose that decision makers ignore common attributes while deliberating. Across six experiments, we find that decision makers do direct their attention selectively and ignore attributes that are not present in or associated with either of the available alternatives. However, they are as likely to attend to common attributes as they are to attend to attributes that are unique to a single alternative. These results suggest the need for novel theories of attention in preferential choice.

  2. Axonal Excitability in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis : Axonal Excitability in ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Susanna B; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Axonal excitability testing provides in vivo assessment of axonal ion channel function and membrane potential. Excitability techniques have provided insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of neurodegeneration and clinical features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and related neuromuscular disorders. Specifically, abnormalities of Na+ and K+ conductances contribute to development of membrane hyperexcitability in ALS, thereby leading to symptom generation of muscle cramps and fasciculations, in addition to promoting a neurodegenerative cascade via Ca2+-mediated processes. Modulation of axonal ion channel function in ALS has resulted in significant symptomatic improvement that has been accompanied by stabilization of axonal excitability parameters. Separately, axonal ion channel dysfunction evolves with disease progression and correlates with survival, thereby serving as a potential therapeutic biomarker in ALS. The present review provides an overview of axonal excitability techniques and the physiological mechanisms underlying membrane excitability, with a focus on the role of axonal ion channel dysfunction in motor neuron disease and related neuromuscular diseases.

  3. Concept model semantics for DL preferential reasoning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Britz, K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available ; where BM abbreviates the concept BacterialMeningitis, M stands for Menin- gitis, VM for viralMeningitis, and F abbreviates FatalDisease. One should be able to conclude that viral meningitis is usually non-fatal (VM @ :F ). On the other hand, we should... not conclude that fatal versions of meningitis are usually bacterial (F uM @ BM), nor, for that matter, that fatal versions of meningitis are usually not bacterial ones (F uM @ :BM). Armed with the notion of a preferential model (cf. Section 3) we de ne pref...

  4. A framework for estimating the occurrence frequency and dominant controls of preferential flow across diverse soil-landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H.; Guo, L.

    2016-12-01

    Preferential flow can occur in practically all soils and landscapes and has significant impacts on water quantity and quality, stream discharge, groundwater recharge, contaminant transport, biogeochemical dynamics, and many other environmental and ecological processes. However, due to limited methods available to quantify and monitor preferential flow in the field, the frequency and controls of preferential flow occurrence remain poorly understood. This study examines various methods for identifying and quantifying preferential flow occurrence across space and time and its dominant controls under various field conditions. Based on data collected from a forest catchment and a farm land, we discuss soil moisture sensor networks that provide new opportunities to characterize preferential flow occurrence in real time. We summarize spatial factors that influence preferential flow occurrence, including landscape features (such as landform, hillslope type/shape, slope, and underlying bedrock), soil properties (such as soil type, texture, layering, and structure), and land use/land cover (such as vegetation type and management practices). Temporal factors influencing preferential flow occurrence include precipitation characteristics (such as amount, intensity, duration, and timing), initial soil moisture condition (such as dry, moist, and wet), and vegetation dynamics (such as canopy cover and root growth). We organize these six key categories of factors into an overarching framework for estimating the occurrence frequency and dominant controls of preferential flow across diverse soil-landscapes. Finally, we address optimal experimental design for preferential flow investigation in the field and provide a future outlook on new research opportunities.

  5. Modeling Preferential Admissions at Elite Liberal Arts Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Sally; Hewitt, Gordon; Kelly, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a model that simulates the effects of varying preferential admissions policies on the academic profile of a set of 35 small liberal arts colleges. An underlying assumption is that all schools in the set use the same ratio of preferential to non-preferential admissions. The model predicts that even drastic changes…

  6. Reduced Heat Flux Through Preferential Surface Reactions Leading to Vibrationally and Electronically Excited Product States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-04

    environment, it would be a significant technological step forward if the TPS could be engineered to alter the hypersonic flight environment itself...be a significant technological step forward if the TPS could be engineered to alter the hypersonic flight environment itself (i.e. the boundary layer...release. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Instead of characterizing a hypersonic flight environment and then selecting an appropriate thermal

  7. Exotic nuclear excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Pancholi, S C

    2011-01-01

    By providing the reader with a foundational background in high spin nuclear structure physics and exploring exciting current discoveries in the field, this book presents new phenomena in a clear and compelling way. The quest for achieving the highest spin states has resulted in some remarkable successes which this monograph will address in comprehensive detail. The text covers an array of pertinent subject matter, including the rotational alignment and bandcrossings, magnetic rotation, triaxial strong deformation and wobbling motion and chirality in nuclei. Dr. Pancholi offers his readers a clearly-written and up-to-date treatment of the topics covered. The prerequisites for a proper appreciation are courses in nuclear physics and nuclear models and measurement techniques of observables like gamma-ray energies, intensities, multi-fold coincidences, angular correlations or distributions, linear polarization, internal conversion coefficients, short lifetime (pico-second range) of excited states etc. and instrum...

  8. Preferential Entailments, Extensions and Reductions of The Vocabulary

    OpenAIRE

    Moinard, Yves; Rolland, Raymond

    1999-01-01

    A preferential entailment is defined by a binary relation, or «preference relation», either among interpretations (or models) or among «states» which are «copies of interpretations». Firstly, we show how an extension of the vocabulary allows to express any preferential entailment as a preferent- ial entailment without state. Secondly, by reducing the vocabulary, we show how to express some preferential entailments in a smaller language. This second method works only for particular preferentia...

  9. Introduction to the Special Issue: Precarious Solidarity-Preferential Access in Canadian Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Lynette

    2017-06-01

    Systems of universal health coverage may aspire to provide care based on need and not ability to pay; the complexities of this aspiration (conceptual, practical, and ethical) call for normative analysis. This special issue arises in the wake of a judicial inquiry into preferential access in the Canadian province of Alberta, the Vertes Commission. I describe this inquiry and set out a taxonomy of forms of differential and preferential access. Papers in this special issue focus on the conceptual specification of health system boundaries (the concept of medical need) and on the normative questions raised by complex models of funding and delivery of care, where patients, providers, and services cross system boundaries.

  10. Personalized recommendation based on preferential bidirectional mass diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guilin; Gao, Tianrun; Zhu, Xuzhen; Tian, Hui; Yang, Zhao

    2017-03-01

    Recommendation system provides a promising way to alleviate the dilemma of information overload. In physical dynamics, mass diffusion has been used to design effective recommendation algorithms on bipartite network. However, most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on unidirectional mass diffusion from collected objects to uncollected objects, while overlooking the opposite direction, leading to the risk of similarity estimation deviation and performance degradation. In addition, they are biased towards recommending popular objects which will not necessarily promote the accuracy but make the recommendation lack diversity and novelty that indeed contribute to the vitality of the system. To overcome the aforementioned disadvantages, we propose a preferential bidirectional mass diffusion (PBMD) algorithm by penalizing the weight of popular objects in bidirectional diffusion. Experiments are evaluated on three benchmark datasets (Movielens, Netflix and Amazon) by 10-fold cross validation, and results indicate that PBMD remarkably outperforms the mainstream methods in accuracy, diversity and novelty.

  11. From Idealism to Realism? EU Preferential Trade Agreement Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Garcia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how the EU’s ‘conflicted power’ in trade has played out within its preferential trade agreement (PTA strategies with third parties. It does this by providing an overview of how approaches to the EU’s external trade policies have evolved over time, especially since the end of the Cold War. Tracing changes in discourse in the EU’s consolidated trade policy demonstrates how the policy objectives have evolved from what could be characterised as a soft and even normative power to a much more realist one, attempting to safeguard its position in the international economic order. Notwithstanding these changes, explained by a combination of international context and ideational preferences, an underlying overall continuity has remained in terms of the main economic interests to be realised through trade policy, which presents a portrait of the EU as a rational and realist (if sometimes conflicted actor in the global economy.

  12. Seeking a preferential option for the rural poor in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Dew

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available From colonial times well into the twentieth century (and, unfortunately, even beyond the man/land relationship in Latin America has been markedly unjust. Small numbers of families have owned large tracts of the best land, while large numbers of poor families have struggled with tiny plots of marginal land or labored on the estates of the rich. Chile was no exception to this pattern. Thus, its experiment with land reform in the 1960s and 1970s, the setback of reform under the military in the 1970s and 1980s, and the resumption of reform under democrats in the 1990s, may provide lessons for the rest of Latin America. Is a preferential option for the rural poor still possible in a neoliberal economic system? In Chile, the answer is a qualified “yes”

  13. Modelling capillary hysteresis effects on preferential flow through melting and cold layered snowpacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Nicolas R.; Pomeroy, John W.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate estimation of the amount and timing of water flux through melting snowpacks is important for runoff prediction in cold regions. Most existing snowmelt models only account for one-dimensional matrix flow and neglect to simulate the formation of preferential flow paths. Consideration of lateral and preferential flows has proven critical to improve the performance of soil and groundwater porous media flow models. A two-dimensional physically-based snowpack model that simulates snowmelt, refreezing of meltwater, heat and water flows, and preferential flow paths is presented. The model assumes thermal equilibrium between solid and liquid phases and uses recent snow physics advances to estimate snowpack hydraulic and thermal properties. For the first time, capillary hysteresis is accounted in a snowmelt model. A finite volume method is applied to solve for the 2D coupled heat and mass transfer equations. The model with capillary hysteresis provided better simulations of water suction at the wet to dry snow interface in a wetting snow sample than did a model that only accounted for the boundary drying curve. Capillary hysteresis also improved simulations of preferential flow path dynamics and the snowpack discharge hydrograph. Simulating preferential flow in a subfreezing snowpack allowed the model to generate ice layers, and increased the vertical exchange of energy, thus modelling a faster warming of the snowpack than would be possible without preferential flow. The model is thus capable of simulating many attributes of heterogeneous natural melting snowpacks. These features not only qualitatively improve water flow simulations, but improve the understanding of snowmelt flow processes for both level and sloping terrain, and illuminate how uncertainty in snowmelt-derived runoff calculations might be reduced through the inclusion of more realistic preferential flow through snowpacks.

  14. IMPROVING THE MECHANISM OF PREFERENTIAL LENDING TO AGRICULTURAL ENTERPRISES OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Lemishko

    2016-11-01

    institutions to solve mutual interests, ordering a credit quality for agricultural enterprises and through improving the legal component of the preferential lending mechanism is provided. It is stated in conclusions that there is need for further research of these problems.

  15. CMP substitutions preferentially inhibit polysialic acid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Angata, Kiyohiko; Seeberger, Peter H; Hindsgaul, Ole; Fukuda, Minoru

    2008-02-01

    It is widely reported that derivatives of sugar moieties can be used to metabolically label cell surface carbohydrates or inhibit a particular glycosylation. However, few studies address the effect of substitution of the cytidylmonophosphate (CMP) portion on sialyltransferase activities. Here we first synthesized 2'-O-methyl CMP and 5-methyl CMP and then asked if these CMP derivatives are recognized by alpha2,3-sialyltransferases (ST3Gal-III and ST3Gal-IV), alpha2,6-sialyltransferase (ST6Gal-I), and alpha2,8-sialyltransferase (ST8Sia-II, ST8Sia-III, and ST8Sia-IV). We found that ST3Gal-III and ST3Gal-IV but not ST6Gal-I was inhibited by 2'-O-methyl CMP as potently as by CMP, while ST3Gal-III, ST3Gal-IV, and ST6Gal-I were moderately inhibited by 5-methyl CMP. Previously, it was reported that polysialyltransferase ST8Sia-II but not ST8Sia-IV was inhibited by CMP N-butylneuraminic acid. We found that ST8Sia-IV as well as ST8Sia-II and ST8Sia-III are inhibited by 2'-O-methyl CMP as robustly as by CMP and moderately by 5-methyl CMP. Moreover, the addition of CMP, 2'-O-methyl CMP, and 5-methyl CMP to the culture medium resulted in the decrease of polysialic acid expression on the cell surface and NCAM of Chinese hamster ovary cells. These results suggest that 2'-O-methyl CMP and 5-methyl CMP can be used to preferentially inhibit sialyltransferases, in particular, polysialyltransferases in vitro and in vivo. Such inhibition may be useful to determine the function of a carbohydrate synthesized by a specific sialyltransferase such as polysialyltransferase.

  16. Conditional and preferential logics proof methods and theorem proving

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzato, GL

    2010-01-01

    Contains a version of the author's PhD dissertation and focuses on proof methods and theorem proving for conditional and preferential logics. This book introduces proof methods (sequent and tableau calculi) for conditional and preferential logics, as well as theorem provers obtained by implementing the proposed calculi.

  17. Distributed network generation based on preferential attachment in ABS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Azadbakht (Keyvan); N. Bezirgiannis (Nikolaos); F.S. de Boer (Frank)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractGeneration of social networks using Preferential Attachment (PA) mechanism is proposed in the Barabasi-Albert model. In this mechanism, new nodes are introduced to the network sequentially and they attach to the existing nodes preferentially where the preference can be based on the

  18. 19 CFR 10.213 - Articles eligible for preferential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Articles eligible for preferential treatment. 10...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Textile and Apparel Articles Under the African Growth and Opportunity Act § 10.213 Articles eligible for preferential treatment...

  19. The evolution of Tibetan representation and preferentiality in public employment during the Post-fenpei period in China: Insights from new data sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Fischer (Andrew Martín); A. Zenz (Adrian)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper exploits a new and exciting source of data on public employment recruitment in order to analyse the evolution of Tibetan representation and preferential hiring practices in public employment in all Tibetan areas from 2007 to 2015. Despite the limitations of these data, they

  20. From Free to Fee: Neoliberalising Preferential Policy Measures for Minority Education in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Naomi C. F.

    2015-01-01

    In both China and in the United States, policies of "positive discrimination" were originally intended to lessen educational and economic inequalities, and to provide equal opportunities. As with affirmative action in the American context, China's "preferential policies" are broad-reaching, but are best known for taking ethnic…

  1. Preferential Interactions and the Effect of Protein PEGylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Stenstrup Holm

    Full Text Available PEGylation is a strategy used by the pharmaceutical industry to prolong systemic circulation of protein drugs, whereas formulation excipients are used for stabilization of proteins during storage. Here we investigate the role of PEGylation in protein stabilization by formulation excipients that preferentially interact with the protein.The model protein hen egg white lysozyme was doubly PEGylated on two lysines with 5 kDa linear PEGs (mPEG-succinimidyl valerate, MW 5000 and studied in the absence and presence of preferentially excluded sucrose and preferentially bound guanine hydrochloride. Structural characterization by far- and near-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy was supplemented by investigation of protein thermal stability with the use of differential scanning calorimetry, far and near-UV circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that PEGylated lysozyme was stabilized by the preferentially excluded excipient and destabilized by the preferentially bound excipient in a similar manner as lysozyme. However, compared to lysozyme in all cases the melting transition was lower by up to a few degrees and the calorimetric melting enthalpy was decreased to half the value for PEGylated lysozyme. The ratio between calorimetric and van't Hoff enthalpy suggests that our PEGylated lysozyme is a dimer.The PEGylated model protein displayed similar stability responses to the addition of preferentially active excipients. This suggests that formulation principles using preferentially interacting excipients are similar for PEGylated and non-PEGylated proteins.

  2. Isovector monopole excitation energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, J.D.; Lipparini, E.; Stringary, S.

    1987-11-05

    Using a hydrodynamical model whose parameters have been adjusted to fit the polarizability and excitation energy of the giant dipole nuclear resonance we predict excitation energies of the isovector monopole resonance. The predicted values are in good agreement with experimental data. The mass dependence of the excitation energy is strongly influenced by nuclear geometry.

  3. Preferential interactions and the effect of protein PEGylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Louise Stenstrup; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Kasimova, Marina Robertovna

    2015-01-01

    excipients that preferentially interact with the protein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The model protein hen egg white lysozyme was doubly PEGylated on two lysines with 5 kDa linear PEGs (mPEG-succinimidyl valerate, MW 5000) and studied in the absence and presence of preferentially excluded sucrose...... excipients. This suggests that formulation principles using preferentially interacting excipients are similar for PEGylated and non-PEGylated proteins.......BACKGROUND: PEGylation is a strategy used by the pharmaceutical industry to prolong systemic circulation of protein drugs, whereas formulation excipients are used for stabilization of proteins during storage. Here we investigate the role of PEGylation in protein stabilization by formulation...

  4. A large electrically excited synchronous generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    This invention relates to a large electrically excited synchronous generator (100), comprising a stator (101), and a rotor or rotor coreback (102) comprising an excitation coil (103) generating a magnetic field during use, wherein the rotor or rotor coreback (102) further comprises a plurality...... adjacent neighbouring poles. In this way, a large electrically excited synchronous generator (EESG) is provided that readily enables a relatively large number of poles, compared to a traditional EESG, since the excitation coil in this design provides MMF for all the poles, whereas in a traditional EESG...

  5. Multi-frequency excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-03-10

    Embodiments of multi-frequency excitation are described. In various embodiments, a natural frequency of a device may be determined. In turn, a first voltage amplitude and first fixed frequency of a first source of excitation can be selected for the device based on the natural frequency. Additionally, a second voltage amplitude of a second source of excitation can be selected for the device, and the first and second sources of excitation can be applied to the device. After applying the first and second sources of excitation, a frequency of the second source of excitation can be swept. Using the methods of multi- frequency excitation described herein, new operating frequencies, operating frequency ranges, resonance frequencies, resonance frequency ranges, and/or resonance responses can be achieved for devices and systems.

  6. The role of heterogeneous lithology in a glaciofluvial deposit on unsaturated preferential flow – a numerical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Slimene Erij

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of preferential flow in the vadose zone is crucial for the prediction of the fate of pollutants. Infiltration basins, developed to mitigate the adverse effects of impervious surfaces in urban areas, are established above strongly heterogeneous and highly permeable deposits and thus are prone to preferential flow and enhanced pollutant transport. This study numerically investigates the establishment of preferential flow in an infiltration basin in the Lyon suburbs (France established over a highly heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit covering much of the Lyon region. An investigation of the soil transect (13.5 m long and 2.5 m deep provided full characterization of lithology and hydraulic properties of present lithofacies. Numerical modeling with the HYDRUS-2D model of water flow in the transect was used to identify the effects of individual lithofacies that constitute the deposit. Multiple scenarios that considered different levels of heterogeneity were evaluated. Preferential flow was studied for several values of infiltration rates applied after a long dry period. The numerical study shows that the high contrast in hydraulic properties of different lithofacies triggers the establishment of preferential flow (capillary barriers and funneled flow. Preferential flow develops mainly for low water fluxes imposed at the surface. The role of individual lithofacies in triggering preferential flow depends on their shapes (layering versus inclusions and their sizes. While lenses and inclusions produce preferential flow pathways, the presence of the surface layer has no effect on the development of preferential flow and it only affects the effective hydraulic conductivity of the heterogeneous transect.

  7. Growth of preferential attachment random graphs via continuous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Some growth asymptotics of a version of `preferential attachment' random graphs are studied through an embedding into a continuous-time branching scheme. These results complement and extend previous work in the literature.

  8. Preferential pairing estimates from multivalent frequencies in tetraploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybenga, J

    1994-12-01

    Mathematical models are presented for estimating preferential pairing and chiasma parameters in amphidiploids and autotetraploids on the basis of diakinesis or metaphase I configuration frequencies and are compared with other approaches of estimating affinity. With a preferential pairing factor p, estimated from quadrivalent and trivalent frequencies, and estimated chiasmate association factors for the two arms in quadrivalents (a(qu) and b(qu) for arms A and B, respectively) and in bivalents (a(bi) and b(bi)) a perfect fit between observed and predicted configuration frequencies can often be obtained in amphidiploids of several plant species, including Solanaceae and Gramineae. Since several proven autotetraploids give very similar apparent preferential pairing estimates, the biological significance of such parameters as preferential pairing and affinity factors is considered limited. The same is true for pairing parameters estimated by optimizing fit of configuration frequencies expected on the basis of theoretical models to observed data.

  9. Preferential attachment in the evolution of metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elofsson Arne

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many biological networks show some characteristics of scale-free networks. Scale-free networks can evolve through preferential attachment where new nodes are preferentially attached to well connected nodes. In networks which have evolved through preferential attachment older nodes should have a higher average connectivity than younger nodes. Here we have investigated preferential attachment in the context of metabolic networks. Results The connectivities of the enzymes in the metabolic network of Escherichia coli were determined and representatives for these enzymes were located in 11 eukaryotes, 17 archaea and 46 bacteria. E. coli enzymes which have representatives in eukaryotes have a higher average connectivity while enzymes which are represented only in the prokaryotes, and especially the enzymes only present in βγ-proteobacteria, have lower connectivities than expected by chance. Interestingly, the enzymes which have been proposed as candidates for horizontal gene transfer have a higher average connectivity than the other enzymes. Furthermore, It was found that new edges are added to the highly connected enzymes at a faster rate than to enzymes with low connectivities which is consistent with preferential attachment. Conclusion Here, we have found indications of preferential attachment in the metabolic network of E. coli. A possible biological explanation for preferential attachment growth of metabolic networks is that novel enzymes created through gene duplication maintain some of the compounds involved in the original reaction, throughout its future evolution. In addition, we found that enzymes which are candidates for horizontal gene transfer have a higher average connectivity than other enzymes. This indicates that while new enzymes are attached preferentially to highly connected enzymes, these highly connected enzymes have sometimes been introduced into the E. coli genome by horizontal gene transfer. We speculate

  10. Preferential Regimes Can Make Tax Competition Less Harmful

    OpenAIRE

    Keen, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A key feature of the recent EU and OECD standards for good behavior in international taxation is a presumption against preferential tax regimes (such as those offering advantageous treatment to non-residents or enterprises not active in the domestic market), which are seen as especially corrosive forms of tax competition. This paper shows that, on the contrary, preferential regimes may serve a useful strategic purpose in enabling countries to confine their most aggressive tax competition to p...

  11. Dye staining and excavation of a lateral preferential flow network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Anderson

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Preferential flow paths have been found to be important for runoff generation, solute transport, and slope stability in many areas around the world. Although many studies have identified the particular characteristics of individual features and measured the runoff generation and solute transport within hillslopes, very few studies have determined how individual features are hydraulically connected at a hillslope scale. In this study, we used dye staining and excavation to determine the morphology and spatial pattern of a preferential flow network over a large scale (30 m. We explore the feasibility of extending small-scale dye staining techniques to the hillslope scale. We determine the lateral preferential flow paths that are active during the steady-state flow conditions and their interaction with the surrounding soil matrix. We also calculate the velocities of the flow through each cross-section of the hillslope and compare them to hillslope scale applied tracer measurements. Finally, we investigate the relationship between the contributing area and the characteristics of the preferential flow paths. The experiment revealed that larger contributing areas coincided with highly developed and hydraulically connected preferential flow paths that had flow with little interaction with the surrounding soil matrix. We found evidence of subsurface erosion and deposition of soil and organic material laterally and vertically within the soil. These results are important because they add to the understanding of the runoff generation, solute transport, and slope stability of preferential flow-dominated hillslopes.

  12. Anomalous osmosis resulting from preferential absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staverman, A.J.; Kruissink, C.A.; Pals, D.T.F.

    1965-01-01

    An explanation of the anomalous osmosis described in the preceding paper is given in terms of friction coefficients in the glass membrane. It is shown that anomalous osmosis may be expected when the friction coefficients are constant and positive provided that the membrane absorbs solute strongly

  13. Excitation optimization for damage detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bement, Matthew T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bewley, Thomas R [UCSD

    2009-01-01

    A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

  14. Excited states 2

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 2 is a collection of papers that deals with molecules in the excited states. The book describes the geometries of molecules in the excited electronic states. One paper describes the geometries of a diatomic molecule and of polyatomic molecules; it also discusses the determination of the many excited state geometries of molecules with two, three, or four atoms by techniques similar to diatomic spectroscopy. Another paper introduces an ordered theory related to excitons in pure and mixed molecular crystals. This paper also presents some experimental data such as those invo

  15. Determination of the excitation migration time in Photosystem II - Consequences for the membrane organization and charge separation parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broess, Koen; Trinkunas, Gediminas; van Hoek, Arie; Croce, Roberta; van Amerongen, Herbert

    The fluorescence decay kinetics of Photosystem II (PSII) membranes from spinach with open reaction centers (RCs), were compared after exciting at 420 and 484 nm. These wavelengths lead to preferential excitation of chlorophyll (Chl) a and Chl b, respectively, which causes different initial

  16. Unilamellar DMPC Vesicles in Aqueous Glycerol: Preferential Interactions and Thermochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westh, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Glycerol is accumulated in response to environmental stresses in a diverse range of organisms. Understanding of favorable in vivo effects of this solute requires insight into its interactions with biological macromolecules, and one access to this information is the quantification of so-called preferential interactions in glycerol-biopolymer solutions. For model membrane systems, preferential interactions have been discussed, but not directly measured. Hence, we have applied a new differential vapor pressure equipment to quantify the isoosmotic preferential binding parameter, Γμ1, for systems of unilamellar vesicles of DMPC in aqueous glycerol. It is found that Γμ1 decreases linearly with the glycerol concentration with a slope of −0.14 ± 0.014 per molal. This implies that glycerol is preferentially excluded from the membrane-solvent interface. Calorimetric investigations of the same systems showed that the glycerol-DMPC interactions are weakly endothermic, and the temperature of the main phase transition increases slightly (0.16°C per molal) with the glycerol concentration. The results are discussed with respect to a molecular picture which takes into account both the partitioning of glycerol into the membrane and the preferential exclusion from the hydration layer, and it is concluded that the latter effect contributes about four times stronger than the former to the net interaction. PMID:12524287

  17. Converging hydrostatic and hydromechanic concepts of preferential flow definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutilek, M; Germann, P F

    2009-02-16

    The boundary between preferential flow and Richards-type flow is a priori set at a volumetric soil water content theta* at which soil water diffusivity D (theta*) = eta (= 10(-6) m(2) s(-1)), where eta is the kinematic viscosity. First we estimated with a hydrostatic approach from soil water retention curves the boundary, theta(K), between the structural pore domain, in which preferential flow occurs, and the matrix pore domain, in which Richards-type flow occurs. We then compared theta(K) with theta* that was derived from the respective soil hydrological property functions of same soil sample. Second, from in situ investigations we determined 96 values of theta(G) as the terminal soil water contents that established themselves when the corresponding water-content waves of preferential flow have practically ceased. We compared the frequency distribution of theta(G) with the one of theta* that was calculated from the respective soil hydrological property functions of 32 soil samples that were determined with pressure plate apparatuses in the laboratory. There is support of the notion that theta(K) approximately = theta(G) approximately = theta*, thus indicating the potential of theta* to explain more generally what constitutes preferential flow. However, the support is assessed as working hypothesis on which to base further research rather than a procedure to a clear-cut identification of preferential flow and associated flow paths.

  18. Preferential Solvation of an Asymmetric Redox Molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kee Sung; Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Vijayakumar, M.; Wei, Xiaoliang; Wang, Wei; Hu, Jian Z.; Persson, Kristin A.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2016-12-15

    The fundamental correlations between inter-molecular interactions, solvation structure and functionality of electrolytes are in many cases unknown, particularly for multi-component liquid systems. In this work, we explore such correlations by investigating the complex interplay between solubility and solvation structure for the electrolyte system comprising N-(ferrocenylmethyl)-N,N-dimethyl-N-ethylammonium bistrifluoromethylsulfonimide (Fc1N112-TFSI) dissolved in a ternary carbonate solvent mixture using combined NMR relaxation and computational analyses. Probing the evolution of the solvent-solvent, ion-solvent and ion-ion interactions with an increase in solute concentration provides a molecular level understanding of the solubility limit of the Fc1N112-TFSI system. An increase in solute con-centration leads to pronounced Fc1N112-TFSI contact-ion pair formation by diminishing solvent-solvent and ion-solvent type interactions. At the solubility limit, the precipitation of solute is initiated through agglomeration of contact-ion pairs due to overlapping solvation shells.

  19. The Stable Equilibrium of Preferential Trade Agreements under Technology Asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Han Kim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the optimal policy for trade negotiation in the current multilateral and preferential trade regime. Using a four country oligopoly model with asymmetric technology, we examine the implication of preferential trade agreement on tariff and welfare. We find any preferential trade agreement has a tariff complementarity effect. Social welfare of the more efficient country is also higher with more cooperative trade negotiation regime. However, for technically inefficient country, the cooperative trade policy does not always guarantee to improve the social welfare when the technology difference is large or the global free trade is not feasible. Under large technology difference, we show that South-South FTAs is an optimal alternative policy for the inefficient countries and is more sustainable.

  20. Current challenges in quantifying preferential flow through the vadose zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koestel, John; Larsbo, Mats; Jarvis, Nick

    2017-04-01

    In this presentation, we give an overview of current challenges in quantifying preferential flow through the vadose zone. A review of the literature suggests that current generation models do not fully reflect the present state of process understanding and empirical knowledge of preferential flow. We believe that the development of improved models will be stimulated by the increasingly widespread application of novel imaging technologies as well as future advances in computational power and numerical techniques. One of the main challenges in this respect is to bridge the large gap between the scales at which preferential flow occurs (pore to Darcy scales) and the scale of interest for management (fields, catchments, regions). Studies at the pore scale are being supported by the development of 3-D non-invasive imaging and numerical simulation techniques. These studies are leading to a better understanding of how macropore network topology and initial/boundary conditions control key state variables like matric potential and thus the strength of preferential flow. Extrapolation of this knowledge to larger scales would require support from theoretical frameworks such as key concepts from percolation and network theory, since we lack measurement technologies to quantify macropore networks at these large scales. Linked hydro-geophysical measurement techniques that produce highly spatially and temporally resolved data enable investigation of the larger-scale heterogeneities that can generate preferential flow patterns at pedon, hillslope and field scales. At larger regional and global scales, improved methods of data-mining and analyses of large datasets (machine learning) may help in parameterizing models as well as lead to new insights into the relationships between soil susceptibility to preferential flow and site attributes (climate, land uses, soil types).

  1. Preferential positron annihilation in Fe-Al system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriplach, J.; Dauve, C. [Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Sob, M. [Akademie Ved Ceske Republiky, Brno (Czech Republic). Ustav Fyzikalni Metalurgie

    1997-10-01

    The effect of preferential positron annihilation in binary Fe-Al system is studied by means of LMTO electron and positron structure method. The study covers the whole concentration range from Fe to Al. The supercell approach is utilized to model the structure of alloys. We conclude that positron preferential occupation of Fe sites is negligible for small Al concentrations and increases with Al content. The nonlinear dependence of positron annihilation rate on Al concentration can be almost fully explained as a volume effect. (author). 16 refs, 5 figs.

  2. Afferents originating from the dorsal penile nerve excite oxytocin cells in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagimoto, M; Honda, K; Goto, Y; Negoro, H

    1996-09-16

    Electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile nerve (DPN) produced orthodromic excitation in about half of oxytocin cells in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). In contrast, less than 10% of vasopressin cells were excited. Tactile stimulation of the glans penis by a paintbrush produced excitation in 40% of oxytocin cells. Castration did not prevent activation of oxytocin cells. These results suggest that somatosensory information from the penis is transmitted to the PVN through the DPN and that such afferent input preferentially innervates oxytocin cells.

  3. Adult motor axons preferentially reinnervate predegenerated muscle nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, M; O'Daly, A; Vyas, A; Rohde, C; Brushart, T M

    2013-11-01

    Preferential motor reinnervation (PMR) is the tendency for motor axons regenerating after repair of mixed nerve to reinnervate muscle nerve and/or muscle rather than cutaneous nerve or skin. PMR may occur in response to the peripheral nerve pathway alone in juvenile rats (Brushart, 1993; Redett et al., 2005), yet the ability to identify and respond to specific pathway markers is reportedly lost in adults (Uschold et al., 2007). The experiments reported here evaluate the relative roles of pathway and end organ in the genesis of PMR in adult rats. Fresh and 2-week predegenerated femoral nerve grafts were transferred in correct or reversed alignment to replace the femoral nerves of previously unoperated Lewis rats. After 8 weeks of regeneration the motoneurons projecting through the grafts to recipient femoral cutaneous and muscle branches and their adjacent end organs were identified by retrograde labeling. Motoneuron counts were subjected to Poisson regression analysis to determine the relative roles of pathway and end organ identity in generating PMR. Transfer of fresh grafts did not result in PMR, whereas substantial PMR was observed when predegenerated grafts were used. Similarly, the pathway through which motoneurons reached the muscle had a significant impact on PMR when grafts were predegenerated, but not when they were fresh. Comparison of the relative roles of pathway and end organ in generating PMR revealed that neither could be shown to be more important than the other. These experiments demonstrate unequivocally that adult muscle nerve and cutaneous nerve differ in qualities that can be detected by regenerating adult motoneurons and that can modify their subsequent behavior. They also reveal that two weeks of Wallerian degeneration modify the environment in the graft from one that provides no modality-specific cues for motor neurons to one that actively promotes PMR. © 2013.

  4. Caffeine preferentially protects against oxygen-induced retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuya; Zhou, Rong; Li, Bo; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Yanyan; Gu, Xuejiao; Tang, Lingyun; Wang, Cun; Zhong, Dingjuan; Ge, Yuanyuan; Huo, Yuqing; Lin, Jing; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2017-08-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is the leading cause of childhood blindness, but current anti-VEGF therapy is concerned with delayed retinal vasculature, eye, and brain development of preterm infants. The clinical observation of reduced ROP severity in premature infants after caffeine treatment for apnea suggests that caffeine may protect against ROP. Here, we demonstrate that caffeine did not interfere with normal retinal vascularization development but selectively protected against oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) in mice. Moreover, caffeine attenuated not only hypoxia-induced pathologic angiogenesis, but also hyperoxia-induced vaso-obliteration, which suggests a novel protection window by caffeine. At the hyperoxic phase, caffeine reduced oxygen-induced neural apoptosis by adenosine A 2A receptor (A 2A R)-dependent mechanism, as revealed by combined caffeine and A 2A R-knockout treatment. At the hypoxic phase, caffeine reduced microglial activation and enhanced tip cell formation by A 2A R-dependent and -independent mechanisms, as combined caffeine and A 2A R knockout produced additive and nearly full protection against OIR. Together with clinical use of caffeine in neonates, our demonstration of the selective protection against OIR, effective therapeutic window, adenosine receptor mechanisms, and neuroglial involvement provide the direct evidence of the novel effects of caffeine therapy in the prevention and treatment of ROP.-Zhang, S., Zhou, R., Li, B., Li, H., Wang, Y., Gu, X., Tang, L., Wang, C., Zhong, D., Ge, Y., Huo, Y., Lin, J., Liu, X.-L., Chen, J.-F. Caffeine preferentially protects against oxygen-induced retinopathy. © FASEB.

  5. Partial preferential chromosome pairing is genotype dependent in tetraploid rose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Peter M; Arens, Paul; Voorrips, Roeland E; Esselink, G Danny; Koning-Boucoiran, Carole F S; Van't Westende, Wendy P C; Santos Leonardo, Tiago; Wissink, Patrick; Zheng, Chaozhi; van Geest, Geert; Visser, Richard G F; Krens, Frans A; Smulders, Marinus J M; Maliepaard, Chris

    2017-04-01

    It has long been recognised that polyploid species do not always neatly fall into the categories of auto- or allopolyploid, leading to the term 'segmental allopolyploid' to describe everything in between. The meiotic behaviour of such intermediate species is not fully understood, nor is there consensus as to how to model their inheritance patterns. In this study we used a tetraploid cut rose (Rosa hybrida) population, genotyped using the 68K WagRhSNP array, to construct an ultra-high-density linkage map of all homologous chromosomes using methods previously developed for autotetraploids. Using the predicted bivalent configurations in this population we quantified differences in pairing behaviour among and along homologous chromosomes, leading us to correct our estimates of recombination frequency to account for this behaviour. This resulted in the re-mapping of 25 695 SNP markers across all homologues of the seven rose chromosomes, tailored to the pairing behaviour of each chromosome in each parent. We confirmed the inferred differences in pairing behaviour among chromosomes by examining repulsion-phase linkage estimates, which also carry information about preferential pairing and recombination. Currently, the closest sequenced relative to rose is Fragaria vesca. Aligning the integrated ultra-dense rose map with the strawberry genome sequence provided a detailed picture of the synteny, confirming overall co-linearity but also revealing new genomic rearrangements. Our results suggest that pairing affinities may vary along chromosome arms, which broadens our current understanding of segmental allopolyploidy. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Experimental Biology.

  6. Excited states 4

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 4 is a collection of papers that deals with the excited states of molecular activity. One paper investigates the resonance Raman spectroscopy as the key to vibrational-electronic coupling. This paper reviews the basic theory of Raman scattering; it also explains the derivation of the Raman spectra, excitation profiles, and depolarization ratios for simple resonance systems. Another paper reviews the magnetic properties of triplet states, including the zero-field resonance techniques, the high-field experiments, and the spin Hamiltonian. This paper focuses on the magnetic

  7. Nuclear expansion with excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, J.N. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Samaddar, S.K. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Vinas, X. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Centelles, M. [Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: mario@ecm.ub.es

    2006-07-06

    The expansion of an isolated hot spherical nucleus with excitation energy and its caloric curve are studied in a thermodynamic model with the SkM{sup *} force as the nuclear effective two-body interaction. The calted results are shown to compare well with the recent experimental data from energetic nuclear collisions. The fluctuations in temperature and density are also studied. They are seen to build up very rapidly beyond an excitation energy of {approx}9 MeV/u. Volume-conserving quadrupole deformation in addition to expansion indicates, however, nuclear disassembly above an excitation energy of {approx}4 MeV/u.

  8. Preferential utilization of pans by springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferential utilization of pans by springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis). Milton S.J., Dean W.R.J., Marincowitz C.P.. Abstract. Forage utilization by springbok in pans and surrounding habitats was compared at one karroid shrubland site and two desert grassland sites and was found to be greater in pans than on adjacent plains ...

  9. Fitness networks for real world systems via modified preferential attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Ke-ke; Small, Michael; Yan, Wei-sheng

    2017-05-01

    Complex networks are virtually ubiquitous, and the Barabási and Albert model (BA model) has became an acknowledged standard for the modelling of these systems. The so-called BA model is a kind of preferential attachment growth model based on the intuitive premise that popularity is attractive. However, preferential attachment alone is insufficient to describe the diversity of complex networks observed in the real world. In this paper we first use the accuracy of a link prediction method, as a metric for network fitness. The link prediction method predicts the occurrence of links consistent with preferential attachment, the performance of this link prediction scheme is then a natural measure of the ;preferential-attachment-likeness; of a given network. We then propose several modification methods and modified BA models to construct networks which more accurately describe the fitness properties of real networks. We find that all features assortativity, degree distribution and rich-club formation can play significant roles for the network construction and eventual structure. Moreover, link sparsity and the size of a network are key factors for network reconstruction. In addition, we find that the structure of the network which is limited by geographic location (nodes are embedded in a Euclidean space and connectivity is correlated with distances) differs from other typical networks. In social networks, we observe that the high school contact network has similar structure as the friends network and so we speculate that the contact behaviours can reflect real friendships.

  10. Preferential procurement in the public sector: The case of Amathole ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    5 of 2000: Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act (PPPFA), 2000 at government departments, with particular focus on the Amathole region of the Eastern Cape Province. The assessment was undertaken in a qualitative and quantitative research study conducted among key construction industry stakeholders such ...

  11. Predicting Alcohol, Cigarette, and Marijuana Use from Preferential Music Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Crystal D.; Garcia, Javier A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether use of alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana may be predicted from preferential consumption of particular music genres. Undergraduates (257 women and 78 men) completed a questionnaire assessing these variables. Partial correlation analyses, controlling for sensation-seeking tendencies and behaviors, revealed that…

  12. Soil properties and preferential solute transport at the field scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koestel, J K; Minh, Luong Nhat; Nørgaard, Trine

    An important fraction of water flow and solute transport through soil takes place through preferential flow paths. Although this had been already observed in the nineteenth century, it had been forgotten by the scientific community until it was rediscovered during the 1970s. The awareness...

  13. Growth of preferential attachment random graphs via continuous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Departments of Mathematics and Statistics, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011,. USA. 2Department of Statistics, Iowa State ... Introduction and results. Preferential attachment processes have ... rential attachment', that is by attaching new vertices to existing nodes with probabilities proportional to their 'weight'. When the ...

  14. Preferential Market Access, Foreign Aid and Economic Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afesorgbor, Sylvanus Kwaku; Abreha, Kaleb Girma

    contributed to the economic development of the beneficiary countries. Focusing on the ACP countries over the period 1970-2009, we show that only the EU preferential scheme is effective in promoting exports and that market access plays a significant and economically large role in the development of beneficiary...

  15. Preferential treatment of women and psychological reactance theory: An experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrugt, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    187 male academic staff members read a low- or high-threat (freedom restricting) description of measures for the preferential treatment of women in job selection for academic staff functions. The high-threat condition evoked more psychological reactance than the low-threat condition. Ss with high

  16. Preferential procurement in the public sector: The case of Amathole

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    clients, architects, engineers, and quantity surveyors based within the Amathole region. Selected findings include that there is a perceived low level of awareness of preferential procurement in the public sector as the majority of the institutions investigated have not completely implemented procurement responsibilities.

  17. 19 CFR 10.253 - Articles eligible for preferential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Articles eligible for preferential treatment. 10...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Andean Trade Promotion and Drug Eradication Act Extension of Atpa Benefits to Tuna and Certain Other Non-Textile Articles...

  18. 19 CFR 10.223 - Articles eligible for preferential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Articles eligible for preferential treatment. 10...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act Textile and Apparel Articles Under the United States-Caribbean Basin...

  19. 19 CFR 10.243 - Articles eligible for preferential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Articles eligible for preferential treatment. 10...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Andean Trade Promotion and Drug Eradication Act Apparel and Other Textile Articles Under the Andean Trade Promotion and...

  20. Infants' Preferential Attention to Sung and Spoken Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Giomi, Eugenia; Ilari, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Caregivers and early childhood teachers all over the world use singing and speech to elicit and maintain infants' attention. Research comparing infants' preferential attention to music and speech is inconclusive regarding their responses to these two types of auditory stimuli, with one study showing a music bias and another one…

  1. Predicting the growth of new links by new preferential attachment ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-03-07

    Mar 7, 2014 ... 4School of Management Science and Engineering, Central University of Finance and Economics, ... cal scale-free network, we propose a class of novel preferential attachment similarity indices for predicting ... unknown links and new insights to understand the underlying mechanisms that drive the network.

  2. A preferential attachment strategy for connectivity link addition strategy in improving the robustness of interdependent networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingyuan; Cao, Jianye; Li, Rui; Zhao, Tianfang

    2017-10-01

    Given the same two networks and only one-to-one interlinks are allowed, apparently interdependent networks coupled by these two networks has the optimal robustness when we connect every pair of the same nodes in these two networks. According to the structure of this interdependent network with the optimal robustness, we propose a preferential attachment strategy. And by applying this preferential attachment strategy to three existing connectivity link addition strategies RA (random addition strategy), LD (low degree addition strategy) and LIDD (low inter degree-degree difference addition strategy), we find that each improved strategy is obviously better than before in improving the robustness of interdependent networks. Our findings can provide guidance on connectivity link addition strategy to improve robustness of interdependent networks against cascading failures.

  3. Linking soil moisture balance and source-responsive models to estimate diffuse and preferential components of groundwater recharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Cuthbert

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented of a detailed study into the vadose zone and shallow water table hydrodynamics of a field site in Shropshire, UK. A conceptual model is presented and tested using a range of numerical models, including a modified soil moisture balance model (SMBM for estimating groundwater recharge in the presence of both diffuse and preferential flow components. Tensiometry reveals that the loamy sand topsoil wets up via preferential flow and subsequent redistribution of moisture into the soil matrix. Recharge does not occur until near-positive pressures are achieved at the top of the sandy glaciofluvial outwash material that underlies the topsoil, about 1 m above the water table. Once this occurs, very rapid water table rises follow. This threshold behaviour is attributed to the vertical discontinuity in preferential flow pathways due to seasonal ploughing of the topsoil and to a lower permeability plough/iron pan restricting matrix flow between the topsoil and the lower outwash deposits. Although the wetting process in the topsoil is complex, a SMBM is shown to be effective in predicting the initiation of preferential flow from the base of the topsoil into the lower outwash horizon. The rapidity of the response at the water table and a water table rise during the summer period while flow gradients in the unsaturated profile were upward suggest that preferential flow is also occurring within the outwash deposits below the topsoil. A variation of the source-responsive model proposed by Nimmo (2010 is shown to reproduce the observed water table dynamics well in the lower outwash horizon when linked to a SMBM that quantifies the potential recharge from the topsoil. The results reveal new insights into preferential flow processes in cultivated soils and provide a useful and practical approach to accounting for preferential flow in studies of groundwater recharge estimation.

  4. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K+ levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are “channelopathies” caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1) and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. PMID:25880512

  5. Excitation of oxytocin cells in the hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus by electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile nerve and tactile stimulation of the penis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, K; Yanagimoto, M; Negoro, H; Narita, K; Murata, T; Higuchi, T

    1999-02-01

    In urethane-anaesthetized male rats, electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile nerve (DPN) excited 29 of 48 (60%) oxytocin cells in the contralateral supraoptic nucleus, whereas only 5 of 28 (18%) vasopressin cells were excited by the stimulation. The stimulus applied to the ipsilateral DPN to the recorded neurone also excited a similar proportion of oxytocin cells (25 of 43; 58%). Tactile stimulation of the glans penis excited 7 of 12 (58%) oxytocin cells, whereas the same stimulation excited only 3 of 16 (19%) vasopressin cells. The results suggest that sensory information arising from the penis preferentially excites oxytocin cells in the supraoptic nucleus.

  6. Beneficial Effect of Preferential Music on Exercise Induced Changes in Heart Rate Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archana, R; Mukilan, R

    2016-05-01

    Music is known to reduce pain, anxiety and fear in several stressful conditions in both males and females. Further, listening to preferred music enhances the endurance during running performance of women rather than listening to non-preferred music. In recent years Heart Rate Variability (HRV) has been used as an indicator of autonomic nervous activity. This study was aimed to assess the effectiveness of preferential music on HRV after moderate exercise. This was an experimental study done in 30 healthy students aged between 20-25 years, of either sex. HRV was measured at rest, 15 minutes of exercise only and 15 minutes of exercise with listening preferential music in same participants. Data was analysed by One-Way ANOVA and Tukey HSD Post-hoc Test. Statistical significance was taken to be a p-value of less than 0.05. Low frequency and high frequency component was significantly increased followed by only exercise. Music minimized increase in both high and low frequency component followed by exercise. However, only high frequency change was statistically significant. LF/HF ratio was significantly increased followed by only exercise. Music significantly minimized increase in LF/HF ratio. This study provides the preliminary evidence that listening to preferential music could be an effective method of relaxation, as indicated by a shift of the autonomic balance towards the parasympathetic activity among medical students.

  7. Nerve excitability in the rat forelimb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnold, Ria; Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer

    2017-01-01

    a novel setup to explore the ulnar nerve excitability in rodents. We provide normative ulnar data in 11 adult female Long Evans rats under anaesthesia by comparison with tibial and caudal nerves. Additionally, these measures were repeated weekly on 3 occasions to determine the repeatability of these tests....... Results Nerve excitability assessment of ulnar nerve proved to be a longitudinally repeatable measure of axonal function mature in rats, as were measures in tibial and caudal nerves. Comparison with existing method: Ulnar nerve motor excitability measures were different from the caudal and tibial...

  8. Endothelial-dependent vasodilators preferentially increase subendocardial blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelc, L.R.; Gross, G.J.; Warltier, D.C.

    1986-03-05

    Interference with arachidonic acid metabolism on the effect of acetylcholine (Ach) or arachidonic acid (AA) to preferentially increase subendocardial perfusion was investigated in anesthetized dogs. Hemodynamics, regional myocardial blood flow (MBF (ml/min/g):radioactive microspheres) and the left ventricular transmural distribution of flow (endo/epi) were measured. Intracoronary infusion of Ach (10 ..mu..g/min) and AA (585 ..mu..g/min) significantly (P < .05*) increased myocardial perfusion and selectively redistributed flow to the subendocardium (increased endo/epi) without changes in systemic hemodynamics. Inhibition of phospholipase A/sub 2/ by quinacrine (Q; 600 ..mu..g/min, ic) attenuated the increase in myocardial perfusion produced by Ach but not by AA and inhibited the redistribution of flow to the subendocardium. The present results suggest that endothelium-dependent vasodilators produce a preferential increase in subendocardial perfusion via a product of AA metabolism.

  9. Bioclogging in Porous Media: Preferential Flow Paths and Anomalous Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzner, M.; Carrel, M.; Morales, V.; Derlon, N.; Beltran, M. A.; Morgenroth, E.; Kaufmann, R.

    2016-12-01

    Biofilms are sessile communities of microorganisms held together by an extracellular polymeric substance that enables surface colonization. In porous media (e.g. soils, trickling filters etc.) biofilm growth has been shown to affect the hydrodynamics in a complex fashion at the pore-scale by clogging individual pores and enhancing preferential flow pathways and anomalous transport. These phenomena are a direct consequence of microbial growth and metabolism, mass transfer processes and complex flow velocity fields possibly exhibiting pronounced three-dimensional features. Despite considerable past work, however, it is not fully understood how bioclogging interacts with flow and mass transport processes in porous media. In this work we use imaging techniques to determine the flow velocities and the distribution of biofilm in a porous medium. Three-dimensional millimodels are packed with a transparent porous medium and a glucose solution to match the optical refractive index. The models are inoculated with planktonic wildtype bacteria and biofilm cultivated for 60 h under a constant flow and nutrient conditions. The pore flow velocities in the increasingly bioclogged medium are measured using 3D particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). The three-dimensional spatial distribution of the biofilm within the pore space is assessed by imaging the model with X-Ray microtomography. We find that biofilm growth increases the complexity of the pore space, leading to the formation of preferential flow pathways and "dead" pore zones. The probability of persistent high and low velocity regions (within preferential paths resp. stagnant flow regions) thus increases upon biofilm growth, leading to an enhancement of anomalous transport. The structural data seems to indicate that the largest pores are not getting clogged and carry the preferential flow, whereas intricated structures develop in the smallest pores, where the flow becomes almost stagnant. These findings may be relevant for

  10. Preferential growth in FeCoV/Ti:N multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemens, D.; Senthil Kumar, M.; Boeni, P.; Horisberger, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The preferential growth in Fe{sub 0.50}Co{sub 0.48}V{sub 0.02}/Ti:N multilayers was studied by X-ray diffraction. X-ray specular reflectometry and subsequent simulation of the spectra was used to extract information about the thickness and interface roughness of individual layers. The investigation gives structural information about the material combination and its potential for the use of neutron polarizers. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 2 refs.

  11. Excitations in organic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Agranovich, Vladimir M

    2009-01-01

    During the last decade our expertise in nanotechnology has advanced considerably. The possibility of incorporating in the same nanostructure different organic and inorganic materials has opened up a promising field of research, and has greatly increased the interest in the study of properties of excitations in organic materials. In this book not only the fundamentals of Frenkel exciton and polariton theory are described, but also the electronic excitations and electronic energytransfers in quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots, at surfaces, at interfaces, in thin films, in multilayers,

  12. Excitation Methods for Bridge Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffy, T.A.; Cornwell, P.J.; Doebling, S.W.

    1999-02-08

    This paper summarizes the various methods that have been used to excited bridge structures during dynamic testing. The excitation methods fall into the general categories of ambient excitation methods and measured-input excitation methods. During ambient excitation the input to the bridge is not directly measured. In contrast, as the category label implies, measured-input excitations are usually applied at a single location where the force input to the structure can be monitored. Issues associated with using these various types of measurements are discussed along with a general description of the various excitation methods.

  13. Positron excitation of neon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  14. Hardness and excitation energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is shown that the first excitation energy can be given by the Kohn-Sham hardness (i.e. the energy difference of the ground-state lowest unoccupied and highest occupied levels) plus an extra term coming from the partial derivative of the ensemble exchange-correlation energy with respect to the weighting factor in the ...

  15. Excitation of Stellar Pulsations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houdek, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this review I present an overview of our current understanding of the physical mechanisms that are responsible for the excitation of pulsations in stars with surface convection zones. These are typically cooler stars such as the δ Scuti stars, and stars supporting solar-like oscillations....

  16. Generalized derivation of an exact relationship linking different coefficients that characterize thermodynamic effects of preferential interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Charles F; Felitsky, Daniel J; Hong, Jiang; Record, M Thomas

    2002-12-10

    In solutions consisting of solvent water (component '1') and two solute components ('2' and '3'), various thermodynamic effects of differences between solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions are quantitatively characterized by state functions commonly called 'preferential interaction coefficients': gamma(mu(1),mu(3)) triple bond (delta(m3)/delta(m2))(T,mu(1),mu(3)) and gamma(mu(k)) triple bond (delta(m3)/delta(m2))(T,P,mu(k)), where k = 1,2 or 3. These different derivatives are not all directly accessible to experimental determination, nor are they entirely equivalent for analyses and interpretations of thermodynamic and molecular effects of preferential interactions. Consequently, various practical and theoretical considerations arise when, for a given system, different kinds of preferential interaction coefficients have significantly different numerical values. Previously we derived the exact relationship linking all three coefficients of the type gamma(mu(k), and hence identified the physical origins of the differences between gamma(mu(1)) and gamma(mu(3)) that have been experimentally determined for each of various common biochemical solutes interacting with a protein [J. Phys. Chem. B, 106 (2002) 418-433]. Continuing our investigation of exact thermodynamic linkages among different types of preferential interaction coefficients, we present here a generalized derivation of the relationship linking gamma(mu(1),mu(3)), gamma(mu(3)) and gamma(mu(1)), with no restrictions on m(2), m(3) or any physical characteristic of either solute component (such as partial molar volume). Hence, we show that (gamma(mu(1),mu(3)) - gamma(mu(3))) is related directly to (gamma(mu(3)) - gamma(mu(1))), for which the physical determinants have been considered in detail previously, and to a factor dependent on the ratio of the partial molar volumes V3/V1. Our generalized expression also provides a basis for calculating gamma(mu(1),mu(3)), even in situations where preferential

  17. Assessing preferential flow by simultaneously injecting nanoparticle and chemical tracers

    KAUST Repository

    Subramanian, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    The exact manner in which preferential (e.g., much faster than average) flow occurs in the subsurface through small fractures or permeable connected pathways of other kinds is important to many processes but is difficult to determine, because most chemical tracers diffuse quickly enough from small flow channels that they appear to move more uniformly through the rock than they actually do. We show how preferential flow can be assessed by injecting 2 to 5 nm carbon particles (C-Dots) and an inert KBr chemical tracer at different flow rates into a permeable core channel that is surrounded by a less permeable matrix in laboratory apparatus of three different designs. When the KBr tracer has a long enough transit through the system to diffuse into the matrix, but the C-Dot tracer does not, the C-Dot tracer arrives first and the KBr tracer later, and the separation measures the degree of preferential flow. Tracer sequestration in the matrix can be estimated with a Peclet number, and this is useful for experiment design. A model is used to determine the best fitting core and matrix dispersion parameters and refine estimates of the core and matrix porosities. Almost the same parameter values explain all experiments. The methods demonstrated in the laboratory can be applied to field tests. If nanoparticles can be designed that do not stick while flowing through the subsurface, the methods presented here could be used to determine the degree of fracture control in natural environments, and this capability would have very wide ranging value and applicability.

  18. Using DC electrical resistivity tomography to quantify preferential flow in fractured rock environments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    May, F

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available . This investigation aims to identify preferential flow paths in fractured rock environments. Time-lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography (TLERT, Lund Imaging System), is regarded as a suitable method for identifying preferential water flow....

  19. A Nonmonotonic Extension of KLM Preferential Logic P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Laura; Gliozzi, Valentina; Olivetti, Nicola; Pozzato, Gian Luca

    In this paper, we propose the logic P min , which is a nonmonotonic extension of Preferential logic P defined by Kraus, Lehmann and Magidor (KLM). In order to perform nonmonotonic inferences, we define a "minimal model" semantics. Given a modal interpretation of a minimal A-world as A ∧ □¬A, the intuition is that preferred, or minimal models are those that minimize the number of worlds where ¬□¬A holds, that is of A-worlds which are not minimal. We also present a tableau calculus for deciding entailment in P min .

  20. Magnetic preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Donald W.; Dunlap, Bobby D.; Veal, Boyd W.

    1990-01-01

    A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0material permits the use of an applied magnetic field to orient the individual crystals when in the superconducting state to substantially increase current transport between adjacent grains. In another embodiment, the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility of rare-earth ions substituted into the oxide material is made use of as an applied magnetic field orients the particles in a preferential direction. This latter operation can be performed with the material in the normal (non-superconducting) state.

  1. Excitable scale free networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copelli, M.; Campos, P. R. A.

    2007-04-01

    When a simple excitable system is continuously stimulated by a Poissonian external source, the response function (mean activity versus stimulus rate) generally shows a linear saturating shape. This is experimentally verified in some classes of sensory neurons, which accordingly present a small dynamic range (defined as the interval of stimulus intensity which can be appropriately coded by the mean activity of the excitable element), usually about one or two decades only. The brain, on the other hand, can handle a significantly broader range of stimulus intensity, and a collective phenomenon involving the interaction among excitable neurons has been suggested to account for the enhancement of the dynamic range. Since the role of the pattern of such interactions is still unclear, here we investigate the performance of a scale-free (SF) network topology in this dynamic range problem. Specifically, we study the transfer function of disordered SF networks of excitable Greenberg-Hastings cellular automata. We observe that the dynamic range is maximum when the coupling among the elements is critical, corroborating a general reasoning recently proposed. Although the maximum dynamic range yielded by general SF networks is slightly worse than that of random networks, for special SF networks which lack loops the enhancement of the dynamic range can be dramatic, reaching nearly five decades. In order to understand the role of loops on the transfer function we propose a simple model in which the density of loops in the network can be gradually increased, and show that this is accompanied by a gradual decrease of dynamic range.

  2. Grandparental child care in Europe: evidence for preferential investment in more certain kin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsbacka, Mirkka; Tanskanen, Antti O; Jokela, Markus; Rotkirch, Anna

    2011-01-24

    Theories of kin selection and parental investment predict stronger investment in children and grandchildren by women and maternal kin. Due to paternity uncertainty, parental and grandparental investments along paternal lineages are based on less certain genetic relatedness with the children and grandchildren. Additionally, the hypothesis of preferential investment (Laham, Gonsalkorale, and von Hippel, 2005) predicts investment to vary according to available investment options. Two previous studies have tested this hypothesis with small samples and conflicting results. Using the second wave of the large and multinational Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE), collected in 2006-07, we study the preferential investment hypothesis in contemporary Europe based on self-reported grandparental provision of child care. We predict that 1) maternal grandmothers provide most care for their grandchildren, followed by maternal grandfathers, paternal grandmothers and last by paternal grandfathers; 2) maternal grandfathers and paternal grandmothers provide equal amounts of care when the latter do not have grandchildren via a daughter; 3) women who have grandchildren via both a daughter and a son will look after the children of the daughter more; and 4) men who have grandchildren via both a daughter and a son will look after the children of the daughter more. Results support all four hypotheses and provide evidence for the continuing effects of paternity uncertainty in contemporary kin behavior.

  3. Grandparental Child Care in Europe: Evidence for Preferential Investment in More Certain Kin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirkka Danielsbacka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Theories of kin selection and parental investment predict stronger investment in children and grandchildren by women and maternal kin. Due to paternity uncertainty, parental and grandparental investments along paternal lineages are based on less certain genetic relatedness with the children and grandchildren. Additionally, the hypothesis of preferential investment (Laham, Gonsalkorale, and von Hippel, 2005 predicts investment to vary according to available investment options. Two previous studies have tested this hypothesis with small samples and conflicting results. Using the second wave of the large and multinational Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE, collected in 2006–07, we study the preferential investment hypothesis in contemporary Europe based on self-reported grandparental provision of child care. We predict that 1 maternal grandmothers provide most care for their grandchildren, followed by maternal grandfathers, paternal grandmothers and last by paternal grandfathers; 2 maternal grandfathers and paternal grandmothers provide equal amounts of care when the latter do not have grandchildren via a daughter; 3 women who have grandchildren via both a daughter and a son will look after the children of the daughter more; and 4 men who have grandchildren via both a daughter and a son will look after the children of the daughter more. Results support all four hypotheses and provide evidence for the continuing effects of paternity uncertainty in contemporary kin behavior.

  4. Solute transport along preferential flow paths in unsaturated fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, G.W.; Geller, J.T.; Pruess, K.; Hunt, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to study solute transport along preferential flow paths in unsaturated, inclined fractures. Qualitative aspects of solute transport were identified in a miscible dye tracer experiment conducted in a transparent replica of a natural granite fracture. Additional experiments were conducted to measure the breakthrough curves of a conservative tracer introduced into an established preferential flow path in two different fracture replicas and a rock-replica combination. The influence of gravity was investigated by varying fracture inclination. The relationship between the travel times of the solute and the relative influence of gravity was substantially affected by two modes of intermittent flow that occurred: the snapping rivulet and the pulsating blob modes. The measured travel times of the solute were evaluated with three transfer function models: the axial dispersion, the reactors-in-series, and the lognormal models. The three models described the solute travel times nearly equally well. A mechanistic model was also formulated to describe transport when the pulsating blob mode occurred which assumed blobs of water containing solute mixed with residual pools of water along the flow path.

  5. Drosophila TRF2 is a preferential core promoter regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedmi, Adi; Zehavi, Yonathan; Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Ideses, Diana; Wachtel, Chaim; Doniger, Tirza; Waldman Ben-Asher, Hiba; Muster, Nemone; Thompson, James; Anderson, Scott; Avrahami, Dorit; Yates, John R; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2014-10-01

    Transcription of protein-coding genes is highly dependent on the RNA polymerase II core promoter. Core promoters, generally defined as the regions that direct transcription initiation, consist of functional core promoter motifs (such as the TATA-box, initiator [Inr], and downstream core promoter element [DPE]) that confer specific properties to the core promoter. The known basal transcription factors that support TATA-dependent transcription are insufficient for in vitro transcription of DPE-dependent promoters. In search of a transcription factor that supports DPE-dependent transcription, we used a biochemical complementation approach and identified the Drosophila TBP (TATA-box-binding protein)-related factor 2 (TRF2) as an enriched factor in the fractions that support DPE-dependent transcription. We demonstrate that the short TRF2 isoform preferentially activates DPE-dependent promoters. DNA microarray analysis reveals the enrichment of DPE promoters among short TRF2 up-regulated genes. Using primer extension analysis and reporter assays, we show the importance of the DPE in transcriptional regulation of TRF2 target genes. It was previously shown that, unlike TBP, TRF2 fails to bind DNA containing TATA-boxes. Using microfluidic affinity analysis, we discovered that short TRF2-bound DNA oligos are enriched for Inr and DPE motifs. Taken together, our findings highlight the role of short TRF2 as a preferential core promoter regulator. © 2014 Kedmi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. Magnetic excitations in rare earth systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jens

    1982-10-01

    The observation of magnetic excitations, by means of inelastic neutron scattering, provides valuable information on the magnetic forces acting in rare-earth systems. The RPA (random-phase approximation) theory, developed into its final form in the early seventies, is now a widely used tool for analyzing the excitation spectra in systems with well-defined local moments. These excitations reflect both the dynamics of the single moments and the interactions of these moments with their surroundings. A discussion of the information which has been obtained from studies of the magnetic excitations in the rare-earth metal is presented. The emphasis is laid on Pr-metal which has attracted much interest in recent years. Recent progress in the investigation of rare-earth intermetallic compounds, like the Laves-phase and the CsCl-type-compounds and the rare-earth pnictides, is also condidered. Some aspects of the magnetic properties of the actinides can be understood in terms of a model of localized moments, and we include a discussion of USb, where the spin-wave spectrum contains direct evidence that the spins are ordered in a triple- q structure. The magnetic excitations may be coupled to the phonons and in the metallic systems they interact with the electron- hole excitations of the conduction electrons. Therefore the sound velocities and the effective mass of the conduction electrons can be strongly affected by the spin system. Recent developments within these areas are also reviewed.

  7. Preferential attention towards the eye-region amongst individuals with insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Umair; Ellis, Jason G; Myachykov, Andriy; Barclay, Nicola L

    2017-02-01

    People with insomnia often perceive their own facial appearance as more tired compared with the appearance of others. Evidence also highlights the eye-region in projecting tiredness cues to perceivers, and tiredness judgements often rely on preferential attention towards this region. Using a novel eye-tracking paradigm, this study examined: (i) whether individuals with insomnia display preferential attention towards the eye-region, relative to nose and mouth regions, whilst observing faces compared with normal-sleepers; and (ii) whether an attentional bias towards the eye-region amongst individuals with insomnia is self-specific or general in nature. Twenty individuals with DSM-5 Insomnia Disorder and 20 normal-sleepers viewed 48 neutral facial photographs (24 of themselves, 24 of other people) for periods of 4000 ms. Eye movements were recorded using eye-tracking, and first fixation onset, first fixation duration and total gaze duration were examined for three interest-regions (eyes, nose, mouth). Significant group × interest-region interactions indicated that, regardless of the face presented, participants with insomnia were quicker to attend to, and spent more time observing, the eye-region relative to the nose and mouth regions compared with normal-sleepers. However, no group × face × interest-region interactions were established. Thus, whilst individuals with insomnia displayed preferential attention towards the eye-region in general, this effect was not accentuated during self-perception. Insomnia appears to be characterized by a general, rather than self-specific, attentional bias towards the eye-region. These findings contribute to our understanding of face perception in insomnia, and provide tentative support for cognitive models of insomnia demonstrating that individuals with insomnia monitor faces in general, with a specific focus around the eye-region, for cues associated with tiredness. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  8. Connecting ecohydrology and hydropedology in desert shrubs: stemflow as a source of preferential flow in soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Lin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Ecohydrology and hydropedology are two emerging fields that are interconnected. In this study, we demonstrate stemflow hydrology and preferential water flow along roots in two desert shrubs (H. scoparium and S. psammophila in the south fringe of Mu Us sandy land in North China. Stemflow generation and subsequent movement within soil-root system were investigated during the growing seasons from 2006 to 2008. The results indicated that the amount of stemflow in H. scoparium averaged 3.4% of incident gross rainfall with a range of 2.3–7.0%, while in S. psammophila stemflow averaged 6.3% with a range of 0.2–14.2%. Stemflow was produced from rainfall events with total amount more than 1 mm for both shrubs. The average funneling ratio (the ratio of rainfall amount delivered to the base of the tree to the rainfall that would have reached the ground should the tree were not present was 77.8 and 48.7 for H. scoparium and S. psammophila, respectively, indicating that branches and stems were fully contributing to stemflow generation and thereby provided sources of water for possible preferential flow into deeper soil layer. Analysis of Rhodamine-B dye distribution under the shrubs showed that root channels were preferential pathways for the movement of most stemflow water into the soil. Distribution of soil water content under the shrubs with and without stemflow ascertained that stemflow was conducive to concentrate and store water in deeper layers in the soil profiles, which may create favorable soil water conditions for plant growth under arid conditions. Accordingly, a clear linkage between aboveground ecohydrology and belowground hydropedology in the desert shrubs is worth noticing, whereby an increase in stemflow would result in an increase in soil hydrologic heterogeneity.

  9. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  10. Preferential partner selection in an evolutionary study of prisoner's dilemma

    CERN Document Server

    Ashlock, D; Stanley, E A; Tesfatsion, L; Ashlock, Dan; Smucker, Mark D; Stanley, E Ann; Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1994-01-01

    Partner selection is an important process in many social interactions, permitting individuals to decrease the risks associated with cooperation. In large populations, defectors may escape punishment by roving from partner to partner, but defectors in smaller populations risk social isolation. We investigate these possibilities for an evolutionary prisoner's dilemma in which agents use expected payoffs to choose and refuse partners. In comparison to random or round-robin partner matching, we find that the average payoffs attained with preferential partner selection tend to be more narrowly confined to a few isolated payoff regions. Most ecologies evolve to essentially full cooperative behavior, but when agents are intolerant of defections, or when the costs of refusal and social isolation are small, we also see the emergence of wallflower ecologies in which all agents are socially isolated. In between these two extremes, we see the emergence of ecologies whose agents tend to engage in a small number of defecti...

  11. Megacity pumping and preferential flow threaten groundwater quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mahfuzur R; Koneshloo, Mohammad; Knappett, Peter S K; Ahmed, Kazi M; Bostick, Benjamin C; Mailloux, Brian J; Mozumder, Rajib H; Zahid, Anwar; Harvey, Charles F; van Geen, Alexander; Michael, Holly A

    2016-09-27

    Many of the world's megacities depend on groundwater from geologically complex aquifers that are over-exploited and threatened by contamination. Here, using the example of Dhaka, Bangladesh, we illustrate how interactions between aquifer heterogeneity and groundwater exploitation jeopardize groundwater resources regionally. Groundwater pumping in Dhaka has caused large-scale drawdown that extends into outlying areas where arsenic-contaminated shallow groundwater is pervasive and has potential to migrate downward. We evaluate the vulnerability of deep, low-arsenic groundwater with groundwater models that incorporate geostatistical simulations of aquifer heterogeneity. Simulations show that preferential flow through stratigraphy typical of fluvio-deltaic aquifers could contaminate deep (>150 m) groundwater within a decade, nearly a century faster than predicted through homogeneous models calibrated to the same data. The most critical fast flowpaths cannot be predicted by simplified models or identified by standard measurements. Such complex vulnerability beyond city limits could become a limiting factor for megacity groundwater supplies in aquifers worldwide.

  12. DNA mismatch repair preferentially protects genes from mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Eric J; Ding, Zhong Jie; Jamieson, Fiona J C; Visscher, Anne M; Zheng, Shao Jian; Mithani, Aziz; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2017-12-12

    Mutation is the source of genetic variation and fuels biological evolution. Many mutations first arise as DNA replication errors. These errors subsequently evade correction by cellular DNA repair, for example, by the well-known DNA mismatch repair (MMR) mechanism. Here, we determine the genome-wide effects of MMR on mutation. We first identify almost 9000 mutations accumulated over five generations in eight MMR-deficient mutation accumulation (MA) lines of the model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana We then show that MMR deficiency greatly increases the frequency of both smaller-scale insertions and deletions (indels) and of single-nucleotide variant (SNV) mutations. Most indels involve A or T nucleotides and occur preferentially in homopolymeric (poly A or poly T) genomic stretches. In addition, we find that the likelihood of occurrence of indels in homopolymeric stretches is strongly related to stretch length, and that this relationship causes ultrahigh localized mutation rates in specific homopolymeric stretch regions. For SNVs, we show that MMR deficiency both increases their frequency and changes their molecular mutational spectrum, causing further enhancement of the GC to AT bias characteristic of organisms with normal MMR function. Our final genome-wide analyses show that MMR deficiency disproportionately increases the numbers of SNVs in genes, rather than in nongenic regions of the genome. This latter observation indicates that MMR preferentially protects genes from mutation and has important consequences for understanding the evolution of genomes during both natural selection and human tumor growth. © 2018 Belfield et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. Cyclosporin A preferentially attenuates skeletal slow-twitch muscle regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyabara E.H.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, is associated with muscle regeneration via NFATc1/GATA2-dependent pathways. However, it is not clear whether calcineurin preferentially affects the regeneration of slow- or fast-twitch muscles. We investigated the effect of a calcineurin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, on the morphology and fiber diameter of regenerating slow- and fast-twitch muscles. Adult Wistar rats (259.5 ± 9 g maintained under standard conditions were treated with CsA (20 mg/kg body weight, ip for 5 days, submitted to cryolesion of soleus and tibialis anterior (TA muscles on the 6th day, and then treated with CsA for an additional 21 days. The muscles were removed, weighed, frozen, and stored in liquid nitrogen. Cryolesion did not alter the body weight gain of the animals after 21 days of regeneration (P = 0.001 and CsA significantly reduced the body weight gain (15.5%; P = 0.01 during the same period. All treated TA and soleus muscles showed decreased weights (17 and 29%, respectively, P < 0.05. CsA treatment decreased the cross-sectional area of both soleus and TA muscles of cryoinjured animals (TA: 2108 ± 930 vs 792 ± 640 µm²; soleus: 2209 ± 322 vs 764 ± 439 m²; P < 0.001. Histological sections of both muscles stained with Toluidine blue revealed similar regenerative responses after cryolesion. In addition, CsA was able to minimize these responses, i.e., centralized nuclei and split fibers, more efficiently so in TA muscle. These results indicate that calcineurin preferentially plays a role in regeneration of slow-twitch muscle.

  14. Linking soil moisture balance and source-responsive models to estimate diffuse and preferential components of groundwater recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, M.O.; Mackay, R.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Results are presented of a detailed study into the vadose zone and shallow water table hydrodynamics of a field site in Shropshire, UK. A conceptual model is developed and tested using a range of numerical models, including a modified soil moisture balance model (SMBM) for estimating groundwater recharge in the presence of both diffuse and preferential flow components. Tensiometry reveals that the loamy sand topsoil wets up via macropore flow and subsequent redistribution of moisture into the soil matrix. Recharge does not occur until near-positive pressures are achieved at the top of the sandy glaciofluvial outwash material that underlies the topsoil, about 1 m above the water table. Once this occurs, very rapid water table rises follow. This threshold behaviour is attributed to the vertical discontinuity in the macropore system due to seasonal ploughing of the topsoil, and a lower permeability plough/iron pan restricting matrix flow between the topsoil and the lower outwash deposits. Although the wetting process in the topsoil is complex, a SMBM is shown to be effective in predicting the initiation of preferential flow from the base of the topsoil into the lower outwash horizon. The rapidity of the response at the water table and a water table rise during the summer period while flow gradients in the unsaturated profile were upward suggest that preferential flow is also occurring within the outwash deposits below the topsoil. A variation of the source-responsive model proposed by Nimmo (2010) is shown to reproduce the observed water table dynamics well in the lower outwash horizon when linked to a SMBM that quantifies the potential recharge from the topsoil. The results reveal new insights into preferential flow processes in cultivated soils and provide a useful and practical approach to accounting for preferential flow in studies of groundwater recharge estimation.

  15. Pre-encoding administration of amphetamine or THC preferentially modulates emotional memory in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Michael E.; Gallo, David A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Many addictive drugs are known to have effects on learning and memory, and these effects could motivate future drug use. Specifically, addictive drugs may affect memory of emotional events and experiences in ways that are attractive to some users. However, few studies have investigated the effects of addictive drugs on emotional memory in humans. Objectives This study examined the effects of the memory-enhancing drug dextroamphetamine (AMP) and the memory-impairing drug Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on emotional memory in healthy volunteers. Methods Participants completed three experimental sessions across which they received capsules containing placebo and two doses of either AMP (10 and 20 mg; N=25) or THC (7.5 and 15 mg; N=25) before viewing pictures of positive (pleasant), neutral, and negative (unpleasant) scenes. Memory for the pictures was assessed two days later, under drug-free conditions. Results Relative to placebo, memory for emotional pictures was improved by AMP and impaired by THC, but neither drug significantly affected memory for unemotional pictures. Positive memory biases were not observed with either drug, and there was no indication that the drugs’ memory effects were directly related to their subjective or physiological effects alone. Conclusions This study provides the first clear evidence that stimulant drugs can preferentially strengthen, and cannabinoids can preferentially impair, memory for emotional events in humans. Although addictive drugs do not appear to positively bias memory, the possibility remains that these drugs’ effects on emotional memory could influence drug use among certain individuals. PMID:23224510

  16. Pre-encoding administration of amphetamine or THC preferentially modulates emotional memory in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Michael E; Gallo, David A; de Wit, Harriet

    2013-04-01

    Many addictive drugs are known to have effects on learning and memory, and these effects could motivate future drug use. Specifically, addictive drugs may affect memory of emotional events and experiences in ways that are attractive to some users. However, few studies have investigated the effects of addictive drugs on emotional memory in humans. This study examined the effects of the memory-enhancing drug dextroamphetamine (AMP) and the memory-impairing drug Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on emotional memory in healthy volunteers. Participants completed three experimental sessions across which they received capsules containing placebo and two doses of either AMP (10 and 20 mg; N = 25) or THC (7.5 and 15 mg; N = 25) before viewing pictures of positive (pleasant), neutral, and negative (unpleasant) scenes. Memory for the pictures was assessed 2 days later, under drug-free conditions. Relative to placebo, memory for emotional pictures was improved by AMP and impaired by THC, but neither drug significantly affected memory for unemotional pictures. Positive memory biases were not observed with either drug, and there was no indication that the drugs' memory effects were directly related to their subjective or physiological effects alone. This study provides the first clear evidence that stimulant drugs can preferentially strengthen, and cannabinoids can preferentially impair, memory for emotional events in humans. Although addictive drugs do not appear to positively bias memory, the possibility remains that these drugs' effects on emotional memory could influence drug use among certain individuals.

  17. Magnetic Excitations and Magnetic Ordering in Praseodymium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden; Chapellier, M.; Mackintosh, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    The dispersion relations for magnetic excitons propagating on the hexagonal sites of double-hcp Pr provide clear evidence for a pronounced anisotropy in the exchange. The energy of the excitations decreases rapidly as the temperature is lowered, but becomes almost constant below about 7 K, in agr...

  18. CINE: Comet INfrared Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-08-01

    CINE calculates infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. One of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets is the fluorescence by the solar radiation followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state. This command-line tool calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Fluorescence coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  19. Charge-displacement analysis for excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronca, Enrico, E-mail: enrico@thch.unipg.it; Tarantelli, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.tarantelli@unipg.it [Istituto CNR di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, via Elce di Sotto 8, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Chimica, Biologia e Biotecnologie, Università degli Studi di Perugia, via Elce di Sotto 8, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Pastore, Mariachiara, E-mail: chiara@thch.unipg.it; Belpassi, Leonardo; De Angelis, Filippo [Istituto CNR di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari, via Elce di Sotto 8, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Ferrara, via Borsari 46, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2014-02-07

    We extend the Charge-Displacement (CD) analysis, already successfully employed to describe the nature of intermolecular interactions [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 13046 (2010)] and various types of controversial chemical bonds [L. Belpassi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 1048 (2008); N. Salvi et al., Chem. Eur. J. 16, 7231 (2010)], to study the charge fluxes accompanying electron excitations, and in particular the all-important charge-transfer (CT) phenomena. We demonstrate the usefulness of the new approach through applications to exemplary excitations in a series of molecules, encompassing various typical situations from valence, to Rydberg, to CT excitations. The CD functions defined along various spatial directions provide a detailed and insightful quantitative picture of the electron displacements taking place.

  20. Sigma-1 Receptor and Neuronal Excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourrich, Saïd

    2017-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), via interaction with various proteins, including voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channels (VGICs and LGICs), is involved in a plethora of neuronal functions. This capability to regulate a variety of ion channel targets endows the Sig-1R with a powerful capability to fine tune neuronal excitability, and thereby the transmission of information within brain circuits. This versatility may also explain why the Sig-1R is associated to numerous diseases at both peripheral and central levels. To date, how the Sig-1R chooses its targets and how the combinations of target modulations alter overall neuronal excitability is one of the challenges in the field of Sig-1R-dependent regulation of neuronal activity. Here, we will describe and discuss the latest findings on Sig-1R-dependent modulation of VGICs and LGICs, and provide hypotheses that may explain the diverse excitability outcomes that have been reported so far.

  1. Quantifying Preferential Flow and Seasonal Storage in an Unsaturated Fracture-Facial Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, J. R.; Malek-Mohammadi, S.

    2012-12-01

    Preferential flow through deep unsaturated zones of fractured rock is hydrologically important to a variety of contaminant transport and water-resource issues. The unsaturated zone of the English Chalk Aquifer provides an important opportunity for a case study of unsaturated preferential flow in isolation from other flow modes. The chalk matrix has low hydraulic conductivity and stays saturated, owing to its fine uniform pores and the wet climate of the region. Therefore the substantial fluxes observed in the unsaturated chalk must be within fractures and interact minimally with matrix material. Price et al. [2000] showed that irregularities on fracture surfaces provide a significant storage capacity in the chalk unsaturated zone, likely accounting for volumes of water required to explain unexpected dry-season water-table stability during substantial continuing streamflow observed by Lewis et al. [1993] In this presentation we discuss and quantify the dynamics of replenishment and drainage of this unsaturated zone fracture-face storage domain using a modification of the source-responsive model of Nimmo [2010]. This model explains the processes in terms of two interacting flow regimes: a film or rivulet preferential flow regime on rough fracture faces, active on an individual-storm timescale, and a regime of adsorptive and surface-tension influences, resembling traditional diffuse formulations of unsaturated flow, effective mainly on a seasonal timescale. The modified model identifies hydraulic parameters for an unsaturated fracture-facial domain lining the fractures. Besides helping to quantify the unsaturated zone storage described by Price et al., these results highlight the importance of research on the topic of unsaturated-flow relations within a near-fracture-surface domain. This model can also facilitate understanding of mechanisms for reinitiation of preferential flow after temporary cessation, which is important in multi-year preferential flow through deep

  2. Excited State Spectra and Dynamics of Phenyl-Substituted Butadienes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallace-Williams, Stacie E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.; Møller, Søren

    1994-01-01

    A combination of steady-state and dynamic spectral measurements are used to provide new insights into the nature of the excited-state processes of all-trans-1,4-diphenyl-1,3-butadiene and several analogs: 1,4-diphenyl- 1,3-cyclopentadiene, 1,1,4,4-tetraphenylbutadiene, 1,2,3,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-cyc...... indicate that phenyl torsional motion is not important to the excited-state dynamics and reveal alternative excited-state reaction pathways. The results demonstrate how molecular systems that are structually similar can exhibit different electronic properties and excited-state dynamics....

  3. Coherent two-photon excitation of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, L.; Huber, T.; Prilmüller, M.; Solomon, G. S.; Ritsch, H.; Weihs, G.; Predojević, A.

    2016-04-01

    Single semiconductor quantum dots, due to their discrete energy structure, form single photon and twin photon sources that are characterized by a well-defined frequency of the emitted photons and inherently sub-Poissonian statistics. The single photons are generated through a recombination of an electron-hole pair formed by an electron from the conduction band and a hole from the valence band. When excited to the biexciton state quantum dots can provide pairs of photons emitted in a cascade. It has been shown that this biexciton-exciton cascade can deliver entangled pairs of photons. To achieve a deterministic generation of photon pairs from a quantum dot system one requires exciting it using a two-photon resonant excitation of the biexciton. Particularly, an efficient and coherent excitation of the biexciton requires the elimination of the single exciton probability amplitude in the excitation pulse and reaching the lowest possible degree of dephasing caused by the laser excitation. These two conditions impose contradictory demands on the excitation pulse-length and its intensity. We addressed this problem from a point of view that does not include interaction of the quantum dot with the semiconductor environment. We found an optimized operation regime for the system under consideration and provide guidelines on how to extend this study to other similar systems. In particular, our study shows that an optimal excitation process requires a trade-off between the biexciton binding energy and the excitation laser pulse length.

  4. Subsurface excitations in a metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ray, M. P.; Lake, R. E.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate internal hot carrier excitations in a Au thin film bombarded by hyperthermal and low energy alkali and noble gas ions. Excitations within the thin film of a metal-oxide-semiconductor device are measured revealing that ions whose velocities fall below the classical threshold given...... by the free-electron model of a metal still excite hot carriers. Excellent agreement between these results and a nonadiabatic model that accounts for the time-varying ion-surface interaction indicates that the measured excitations are due to semilocalized electrons near the metal surface....

  5. Multimodality imaging demonstrates trafficking of liposomes preferentially to ischemic myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinski, Michael J; Albelda, M Teresa; Frias, Juan C; Anderson, Stasia A; Luger, Dror; Westman, Peter C; Escarcega, Ricardo O; Hellinga, David G; Waksman, Ron; Arai, Andrew E; Epstein, Stephen E

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles may serve as a promising means to deliver novel therapeutics to the myocardium following myocardial infarction. We sought to determine whether lipid-based liposomal nanoparticles can be shown through different imaging modalities to specifically target injured myocardium following intravenous injection in an ischemia-reperfusion murine myocardial infarction model. Mice underwent ischemia-reperfusion surgery and then either received tail-vein injection with gadolinium- and fluorescent-labeled liposomes or no injection (control). The hearts were harvested 24h later and underwent T1 and T2-weighted ex vivo imaging using a 7 Tesla Bruker magnet. The hearts were then sectioned for immunohistochemistry and optical fluorescent imaging. The mean size of the liposomes was 100nm. T1-weighted signal intensity was significantly increased in the ischemic vs. the non-ischemic myocardium for mice that received liposomes compared with control. Optical imaging demonstrated significant fluorescence within the infarct area for the liposome group compared with control (163±31% vs. 13±14%, p=0.001) and fluorescent microscopy confirmed the presence of liposomes within the ischemic myocardium. Liposomes traffic to the heart and preferentially home to regions of myocardial injury, enabling improved diagnosis of myocardial injury and could serve as a vehicle for drug delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Preferential isolation of Megasphaera elsdenii from pig feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Yu; Yoshikawa, Shota; Cho, Yuichiro; Ito, Toshiyuki; Miyamoto, Hirokuni; Kodama, Hiroaki

    2017-08-28

    Lactic acid produced by intestinal bacteria is fermented by lactate-utilizing bacteria. In this study, we developed a selective culture medium (KMI medium) for Megasphaera elsdenii, a lactate-utilizing bacterium that is abundant in pig intestines. Supplementation of the medium with lactate and beef extract powder was necessary for the preferential growth of M. elsdenii. In addition, we designed a species-specific primer set to detect M. elsdenii. When pig fecal samples were plated on KMI agar medium, approximately 60-100% of the resulting colonies tested positive using the M. elsdenii-specific PCR primers. In fact, nearly all of the large, yellow-white colonies that grew on the KMI agar medium tested positive by PCR with this primer set. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of three representative PCR-positive strains showed strong similarities to that of M. elsdenii ATCC 25940(T) (98.9-99.2% identity). These three strains were approximately 1.5 μm sized cocci that were primarily arranged in pairs, as was observed for M. elsdenii JCM 1772(T). The selective KMI medium and species-specific primer set developed in this study are useful for the isolation and detection of M. elsdenii and will be useful in research aimed at increasing our understanding of intestinal short-chain fatty acid metabolism in pigs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. GPCR genes are preferentially retained after whole genome duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenia Semyonov

    Full Text Available One of the most interesting questions in biology is whether certain pathways have been favored during evolution, and if so, what properties could cause such a preference. Due to the lack of experimental evidence, whether select gene families have been preferentially retained over time after duplication in metazoan organisms remains unclear. Here, by syntenic mapping of nonchemosensory G protein-coupled receptor genes (nGPCRs which represent half the receptome for transmembrane signaling in the vertebrate genomes, we found that, as opposed to the 8-15% retention rate for whole genome duplication (WGD-derived gene duplicates in the entire genome of pufferfish, greater than 27.8% of WGD-derived nGPCRs which interact with a nonpeptide ligand were retained after WGD in pufferfish Tetraodon nigroviridis. In addition, we show that concurrent duplication of cognate ligand genes by WGD could impose selection of nGPCRs that interact with a polypeptide ligand. Against less than 2.25% probability for parallel retention of a pair of WGD-derived ligands and a pair of cognate receptor duplicates, we found a more than 8.9% retention of WGD-derived ligand-nGPCR pairs--threefold greater than one would surmise. These results demonstrate that gene retention is not uniform after WGD in vertebrates, and suggest a Darwinian selection of GPCR-mediated intercellular communication in metazoan organisms.

  8. Preferential sequestration of terrestrial organic matter in boreal lake sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemette, François; von Wachenfeldt, Eddie; Kothawala, Dolly N.; Bastviken, David; Tranvik, Lars J.

    2017-04-01

    The molecular composition and origin has recently been demonstrated to play a critical role in the persistence of organic matter in lake water, but it is unclear to what degree chemical attributes and sources may also control settling and burial of organic matter in lake sediments. Here we compared the annual contribution of allochthonous and autochthonous sources to the organic matter settling in the water column and present in the sediments of 12 boreal lakes. We used the fluorescence properties and elemental composition of the organic matter to trace its origin and found a consistent pattern of increasing contribution of terrestrial compounds in the sediments as compared to the settling matter, with an annual average allochthony of 87% and 57%, respectively. Seasonal data revealed a predominance of in-lake-produced compounds sinking in the water column in summer. Yet only a slight concurrent decrease in the contribution of terrestrial C to lake sediments was observed during the same period, and sediment allochthony increased again to high levels in autumn. Our results reveal a preferential preservation of allochthonous matter in the sediments and highlight the role of lakes as sequesters of organic carbon primarily originating from the surrounding landscape.

  9. Multimodality imaging demonstrates trafficking of liposomes preferentially to ischemic myocardium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipinski, Michael J., E-mail: mjlipinski12@gmail.com [MedStar Heart and Vascular Institute, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC (United States); Albelda, M. Teresa [GIBI2" 3" 0, Grupo de Investigación Biomédica en Imagen, IIS La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Frias, Juan C. [Departamento de Ciencias Biomédicas, Universidad CEU Cardenal Herrera, Valencia (Spain); Anderson, Stasia A. [Advanced Cardiovascular Imaging Laboratory, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Luger, Dror; Westman, Peter C.; Escarcega, Ricardo O.; Hellinga, David G.; Waksman, Ron [MedStar Heart and Vascular Institute, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC (United States); Arai, Andrew E. [Advanced Cardiovascular Imaging Laboratory, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Epstein, Stephen E. [MedStar Heart and Vascular Institute, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Introduction: Nanoparticles may serve as a promising means to deliver novel therapeutics to the myocardium following myocardial infarction. We sought to determine whether lipid-based liposomal nanoparticles can be shown through different imaging modalities to specifically target injured myocardium following intravenous injection in an ischemia–reperfusion murine myocardial infarction model. Methods: Mice underwent ischemia–reperfusion surgery and then either received tail-vein injection with gadolinium- and fluorescent-labeled liposomes or no injection (control). The hearts were harvested 24 h later and underwent T1 and T2-weighted ex vivo imaging using a 7 Tesla Bruker magnet. The hearts were then sectioned for immunohistochemistry and optical fluorescent imaging. Results: The mean size of the liposomes was 100 nm. T1-weighted signal intensity was significantly increased in the ischemic vs. the non-ischemic myocardium for mice that received liposomes compared with control. Optical imaging demonstrated significant fluorescence within the infarct area for the liposome group compared with control (163 ± 31% vs. 13 ± 14%, p = 0.001) and fluorescent microscopy confirmed the presence of liposomes within the ischemic myocardium. Conclusions: Liposomes traffic to the heart and preferentially home to regions of myocardial injury, enabling improved diagnosis of myocardial injury and could serve as a vehicle for drug delivery.

  10. Fine Structure Zonal Flow Excitation by Beta-induced Alfven Eigenmode

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Zonca, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear excitation of low frequency zonal structure (LFZS) by beta-induced Alfven eigenmode (BAE) is investigated using nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. It is found that electrostatic zonal flow (ZF), rather than zonal current, is preferentially excited by finite amplitude BAE. In addition to the well-known meso-scale radial envelope structure, ZF is also found to exhibit fine radial structure due to the localization of BAE with respect to mode rational surfaces. Specifically, the zonal electric field has an even mode structure at the rational surface where radial envelope peaks.

  11. Preferential HLA Usage in the Influenza Virus-Specific CTL Response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boon, Adrianus C. M; de Mutsert, Gerrie; Fouchier, Ron A. M; Sintnicolaas, Kees; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2004-01-01

    ...; and Sanquin Bloodbank Rotterdam, Laboratory for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics, Dordrecht, The Netherlands To study whether individual HLA class I alleles are used preferentially or equally...

  12. Preferential Solvation/Hydration of α-Chymotrypsin in Water-Acetonitrile Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, Vladimir A; Kuchierskaya, Alexandra A

    2017-05-04

    The aim of our study is to monitor the preferential hydration/solvation of the protein macromolecules at low and high water content in water-organic mixtures. Our approach is based on the analysis of the absolute values of the water/organic solvent sorption. We applied this approach to estimate the protein stabilization/destabilization due to the preferential interactions of α-chymotrypsin with water-acetonitrile mixtures. At high water content, α-chymotrypsin is preferentially hydrated. At the intermediate water content, the preferential interaction changed from preferential hydration to preferential binding of acetonitrile. From infrared spectra, changes in the structure of α-chymotrypsin were determined through an analysis of the structure of the amide I band. Acetonitrile augments the intensity of the 1626 cm(-1) band assigned to the intermolecular β-sheet aggregates. At low water content, the protein is in a glassy (rigid) state. The H-bond accepting acetonitrile molecules are not effective in solvating the dehydrated protein molecules alone. Therefore, the acetonitrile molecules are preferentially excluded from the protein surface, resulting in the preferential hydration. Advantages of our approach: (i) The preferential interaction parameters can be determined in the entire range of water content in water-organic mixtures. (ii) Our approach facilitates the individual evaluation of the Gibbs energies of water, protein, and organic solvent.

  13. Femtosecond photoelectron imaging of transient electronic states and Rydberg atom emission from electronically excited he droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilov, Oleg; Bünermann, Oliver; Haxton, Daniel J; Leone, Stephen R; Neumark, Daniel M; Gessner, Oliver

    2011-07-14

    Ultrafast relaxation of electronically excited pure He droplets is investigated by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging. Droplets are excited by extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulses with photon energies below 24 eV. Excited states and relaxation products are probed by ionization with an infrared (IR) pulse with 1.6 eV photon energy. An initially excited droplet state decays on a time scale of 220 fs, leading predominantly to the emission of unaligned 1s3d Rydberg atoms. In a second relaxation channel, electronically aligned 1s4p Rydberg atoms are emitted from the droplet within less than 120 fs. The experimental results are described within a model that approximates electronically excited droplet states by localized, atomic Rydberg states perturbed by the local droplet environment in which the atom is embedded. The model suggests that, below 24 eV, EUV excitation preferentially leads to states that are localized in the surface region of the droplet. Electronically aligned 1s4p Rydberg atoms are expected to originate from excitations in the outermost surface regions, while nonaligned 1s3d Rydberg atoms emerge from a deeper surface region with higher local densities. The model is used to simulate the He droplet EUV absorption spectrum in good agreement with previously reported fluorescence excitation measurements.

  14. Two-Photon Excitation of Conjugated Molecules in Solution: Spectroscopy and Excited-State Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elles, Christopher G.; Houk, Amanda L.; de Wergifosse, Marc; Krylov, Anna

    2017-06-01

    We examine the two-photon absorption (2PA) spectroscopy and ultrafast excited-state dynamics of several conjugated molecules in solution. By controlling the relative wavelength and polarization of the two photons, the 2PA measurements provide a more sensitive means of probing the electronic structure of a molecule compared with traditional linear absorption spectra. We compare experimental spectra of trans-stilbene, cis-stilbene, and phenanthrene in solution with the calculated spectra of the isolated molecules using EOM-EE-CCSD. The calculated spectra show good agreement with the low-energy region of the experimental spectra (below 6 eV) after suppressing transitions with strong Rydberg character and accounting for solvent and method-dependent shifts of the valence transitions. We also monitor the excited state dynamics following two-photon excitation to high-lying valence states of trans-stilbene up to 6.5 eV. The initially excited states rapidly relax to the lowest singlet excited state and then follow the same reaction path as observed following direct one-photon excitation to the lowest absorption band at 4.0 eV.

  15. Strain-induced preferential dissolution at the dislocation emergences in MnS: an atomic scale study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y. T.; Wang, Y. J.; Zheng, S. J.; Zhang, B.; Ma, X. L.

    2015-08-01

    The long-standing problem of dislocation-preferential dissolution in a crystal has been generally ascribed to the distortion energy stored in the vicinity of the dislocation core. However, due to lack of experimental means, the relationship between the local distortion state and the electrochemical behaviour of a single dislocation has not been established so far. via in situ ex-environment transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we demonstrate that the emergences of both edge and screw dislocations on MnS surfaces are the preferential sites for dissolution of the MnS inclusions within a stainless steel. In addition, we map the strain-induced variation of the standard electrode potential around the edge dislocation by a combination of the aberration-corrected high-resolution TEM and strain-analysis-based mechanochemistry theory. Significantly, our report provides a new approach to investigate the strain-corrosion correlation at an atomic scale.

  16. Thrombin preferentially induces autophagy in glia cells in the rat central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shukun; Wu, Gang; Ding, Xin; Zhang, Yi

    2016-09-06

    Autophagy widely occurs after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). In our previous study, we demonstrated that thrombin, a serine protease produced after hematoma, contributes to ICH-induced autophagy. However, whether thrombin plays a neuronal and/or astrocytic role in autophagy induction is largely unknown. Here, we examined the autophagic role of thrombin on neurons and glia cells, respectively. In vivo, we found that intracaudate injection of thrombin specifically elevated the astrocytic expression of beclin-1 and LC3, two autophagic markers, and promoted the formation of autophagic vacuoles within astrocytes rather than neurons in the ipsilateral basal ganglia. Consistent with this, thrombin enhanced the LC3-II level and increased the number of MDC-labeled autophagic vacuoles in cultured astrocytes. These results indicated that thrombin preferentially activated astrocytic autophagy after ICH, and therefore provided novel insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms and therapeutic targets for hemorrhage stroke and brain trauma. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Topological excitations in magnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D., E-mail: bazeia@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-970 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Doria, M.M. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Rodrigues, E.I.B. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-970 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2016-05-20

    In this work we propose a new route to describe topological excitations in magnetic systems through a single real scalar field. We show here that spherically symmetric structures in two spatial dimensions, which map helical excitations in magnetic materials, admit this formulation and can be used to model skyrmion-like structures in magnetic materials.

  18. Frac Sand Mines Are Preferentially Sited in Unzoned Rural Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Shifting markets can cause unexpected, stochastic changes in rural landscapes that may take local communities by surprise. Preferential siting of new industrial facilities in poor areas or in areas with few regulatory restrictions can have implications for environmental sustainability, human health, and social justice. This study focuses on frac sand mining-the mining of high-quality silica sand used in hydraulic fracturing processes for gas and oil extraction. Frac sand mining gained prominence in the 2000s in the upper midwestern United States where nonmetallic mining is regulated primarily by local zoning. I asked whether frac sand mines were more commonly sited in rural townships without formal zoning regulations or planning processes than in those that undertook zoning and planning before the frac sand boom. I also asked if mine prevalence was correlated with socioeconomic differences across townships. After creating a probability surface to map areas most suitable for frac sand mine occurrence, I developed neutral landscape models from which to compare actual mine distributions in zoned and unzoned areas at three different spatial extents. Mines were significantly clustered in unzoned jurisdictions at the statewide level and in 7 of the 8 counties with at least three frac sand mines and some unzoned land. Subsequent regression analyses showed mine prevalence to be uncorrelated with land value, tax rate, or per capita income, but correlated with remoteness and zoning. The predicted mine count in unzoned townships was over two times higher than that in zoned townships. However, the county with the most mines by far was under a county zoning ordinance, perhaps indicating industry preferences for locations with clear, homogenous rules over patchwork regulation. Rural communities can use the case of frac sand mining as motivation to discuss and plan for sudden land-use predicaments, rather than wait to grapple with unfamiliar legal processes during a period of

  19. Frac Sand Mines Are Preferentially Sited in Unzoned Rural Areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Locke

    Full Text Available Shifting markets can cause unexpected, stochastic changes in rural landscapes that may take local communities by surprise. Preferential siting of new industrial facilities in poor areas or in areas with few regulatory restrictions can have implications for environmental sustainability, human health, and social justice. This study focuses on frac sand mining-the mining of high-quality silica sand used in hydraulic fracturing processes for gas and oil extraction. Frac sand mining gained prominence in the 2000s in the upper midwestern United States where nonmetallic mining is regulated primarily by local zoning. I asked whether frac sand mines were more commonly sited in rural townships without formal zoning regulations or planning processes than in those that undertook zoning and planning before the frac sand boom. I also asked if mine prevalence was correlated with socioeconomic differences across townships. After creating a probability surface to map areas most suitable for frac sand mine occurrence, I developed neutral landscape models from which to compare actual mine distributions in zoned and unzoned areas at three different spatial extents. Mines were significantly clustered in unzoned jurisdictions at the statewide level and in 7 of the 8 counties with at least three frac sand mines and some unzoned land. Subsequent regression analyses showed mine prevalence to be uncorrelated with land value, tax rate, or per capita income, but correlated with remoteness and zoning. The predicted mine count in unzoned townships was over two times higher than that in zoned townships. However, the county with the most mines by far was under a county zoning ordinance, perhaps indicating industry preferences for locations with clear, homogenous rules over patchwork regulation. Rural communities can use the case of frac sand mining as motivation to discuss and plan for sudden land-use predicaments, rather than wait to grapple with unfamiliar legal processes

  20. Probabilistic solutions of nonlinear oscillators excited by combined colored and white noise excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu-Siu, Guo; Qingxuan, Shi

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) systems combined to Gaussian white noise and Gaussian/non-Gaussian colored noise excitations are investigated. By expressing colored noise excitation as a second-order filtered white noise process and introducing colored noise as an additional state variable, the equation of motion for SDOF system under colored noise is then transferred artificially to multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) system under white noise excitations with four-coupled first-order differential equations. As a consequence, corresponding Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation governing the joint probabilistic density function (PDF) of state variables increases to 4-dimension (4-D). Solution procedure and computer programme become much more sophisticated. The exponential-polynomial closure (EPC) method, widely applied for cases of SDOF systems under white noise excitations, is developed and improved for cases of systems under colored noise excitations and for solving the complex 4-D FPK equation. On the other hand, Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) method is performed to test the approximate EPC solutions. Two examples associated with Gaussian and non-Gaussian colored noise excitations are considered. Corresponding band-limited power spectral densities (PSDs) for colored noise excitations are separately given. Numerical studies show that the developed EPC method provides relatively accurate estimates of the stationary probabilistic solutions, especially the ones in the tail regions of the PDFs. Moreover, statistical parameter of mean-up crossing rate (MCR) is taken into account, which is important for reliability and failure analysis. Hopefully, our present work could provide insights into the investigation of structures under random loadings.

  1. Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Do Not Preferentially Attend to Biological Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Campbell, Ruth; Coleman, Mike; Milne, Elizabeth; Swettenham, John

    2012-01-01

    Preferential attention to biological motion can be seen in typically developing infants in the first few days of life and is thought to be an important precursor in the development of social communication. We examined whether children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) aged 3-7 years preferentially attend to point-light displays depicting…

  2. Preferential Production and Transport of Grass-Derived Pyrogenic Carbon in NE-Australian Savanna Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Saiz

    2018-01-01

    large trees, leading to a bias toward the finer C4-derived PyC in the sedimentary record. This in turn, provides further evidence for the preferential production and transport of C4-derived PyC in mixed ecosystems where grass and woody vegetation coexist. Moreover, our isotopic approach provides independent validation of findings derived from conventional charcoal counting techniques concerning the appropriateness of adopting a relatively small particle size threshold (i.e., ~50 μm to reconstruct savanna fire regimes using sedimentary records. This work allows for a more nuanced understanding of the savanna isotope disequilibrium effect, which has significant implications for global 13C isotopic disequilibria calculations and for the interpretation of δ13C values of PyC preserved in sedimentary records.

  3. Does intrinsic motivation enhance motor cortex excitability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radel, Rémi; Pjevac, Dusan; Davranche, Karen; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne; Colson, Serge S; Lapole, Thomas; Gruet, Mathieu

    2016-11-01

    Intrinsic motivation (IM) is often viewed as a spontaneous tendency for action. Recent behavioral and neuroimaging evidence indicate that IM, in comparison to extrinsic motivation (EM), solicits the motor system. Accordingly, we tested whether IM leads to greater excitability of the motor cortex than EM. To test this hypothesis, we used two different tasks to induce the motivational orientation using either words representing each motivational orientation or pictures previously linked to each motivational orientation through associative learning. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex was applied when viewing the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded on the contracted first dorsal interosseous muscle. Two indexes of corticospinal excitability (the amplitude of motor-evoked potential and the length of cortical silent period) were obtained through unbiased automatic detection and analyzed using a mixed model that provided both statistical power and a high level of control over all important individual, task, and stimuli characteristics. Across the two tasks and the two indices of corticospinal excitability, the exposure to IM-related stimuli did not lead to a greater corticospinal excitability than EM-related stimuli or than stimuli with no motivational valence (ps > .20). While these results tend to dismiss the advantage of IM at activating the motor cortex, we suggest alternative hypotheses to explain this lack of effect, which deserves further research. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  4. Water partitioning and storage via preferential pathways on the hillslope scale observed using time-lapse ERT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotikian, M.; Parsekian, A.; Paige, G. B.; Carey, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Water in the west is primarily sourced from snowmelt in the mountainous alpine zone providing freshwater for rivers and recharge for groundwater aquifers. Subsurface water flow often moves through the soil and fractured rock although its storage, residence time, and partitioning have not been well documented at the hillslope scale. In this study we investigate water partitioning and preferential flow pathways using geophysical methods to complete the water balance. We hypothesize that preferential flow paths will indicate where water is partitioning into groundwater stores and will differ based on the vegetation cover and soil depth. We use daily time-lapse electric resistivity tomography (TL-ERT) to estimate moisture content on seasonal and annual time-scales. Water content is assumed to be the only variable to change over the duration of the measurement after temperature corrections. The ERT measurement is combined with other geophysical measurements including seismic refraction tomography for locating the weathering front, time-lapse borehole nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to directly measure changes in water content over the season, and 3D ERT as a control for out-of-plane effects of the 2D TL-ERT measurement. The results show that during snowmelt, the wetting front is heterogeneous and moves down at a rate up to 25 mm/day within the top 5m. A preferential flow path is observed to be moving water to at least 5m depth in one area. This preferential flow anomaly only occurred during snowmelt and was not observed during rainfall-driven infiltration. Heterogeneities in vegetation cover and soil depth result in different water flow behaviors. These results indicate that water storage increases during the snowmelt season and partitioning pathways differ seasonally and with precipitation type.

  5. Connectivity of preferential pathways for flow and transport in soils (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieber, J. L.; Sidle, R. C.; Wilson, G. V.; Fox, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    Although it has been recognized for more than 150 years that preferential flow pathways through macrostructures in soils are potentially important to the movement of water and transport of mass and energy within soils, it has only been in the last few decades that research has quantified the significance of the phenomenon. Types of macrostructures known to facilitate such transport include features such as soil cracks, worm channels, decayed and live root channels, and soil pipes. Dozens of detailed laboratory and field studies have been conducted employing pressure and moisture sensing tools, chemical tracers, stable isotopes, and staining agents to detect the pathways of flow, determine when such pathways become active, and quantify directly or indirectly the magnitudes of flows along these pathways. General observations from this experimental work have shown that these structural features become active only after some specific water status threshold has been exceeded. For instance, surface connected structural features can be activated only when ponded water exists at the land surface. In contrast, features not connected to the land surface will not become active unless the soil water pressure exceeds the water entry pressure of the feature. These structural features generally form a latent network of flow pathways, with the network increasing in hydrologic connectivity as soil moisture increases. Both field and modeling studies have shown that disconnected macropores can contribute to the expanding preferential network as soil wetness increases. These results have led hydrologists to characterize the observed dynamic network connection phenomenon as a self-organization process. Several researchers have developed and applied modeling tools to simulate the effects of these structural features on hillslope discharge, subsurface erosion, and hillslope stability. Here we provide an overview of the experimental and modeling research that has led to the conceptual

  6. Spreading dynamics of an e-commerce preferential information model on scale-free networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chen; Li, Tao; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Yuanmei; Liu, Xiongding

    2017-02-01

    In order to study the influence of the preferential degree and the heterogeneity of underlying networks on the spread of preferential e-commerce information, we propose a novel susceptible-infected-beneficial model based on scale-free networks. The spreading dynamics of the preferential information are analyzed in detail using the mean-field theory. We determine the basic reproductive number and equilibria. The theoretical analysis indicates that the basic reproductive number depends mainly on the preferential degree and the topology of the underlying networks. We prove the global stability of the information-elimination equilibrium. The permanence of preferential information and the global attractivity of the information-prevailing equilibrium are also studied in detail. Some numerical simulations are presented to verify the theoretical results.

  7. Excited cooper pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Arrietea, M. G.; Solis, M. A.; De Llano, M. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F (Mexico)

    2001-02-01

    Excited cooper pairs formed in a many-fermion system are those with nonzero total center-of mass momentum (CMM). They are normally neglected in the standard Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity for being too few compared with zero CMM pairs. However, a Bose-Einstein condensation picture requires both zero and nonzero CMM pairs. Assuming a BCS model interaction between fermions we determine the populations for all CMM values of Cooper pairs by actually calculating the number of nonzero-CMM pairs relative to that of zero-CMM ones in both 2D and 3D. Although this ratio decreases rapidly with CMM, the number of Cooper pairs for any specific CMM less than the maximum (or breakup of the pair) momentum turns out to be typically larger than about 95% of those with zero-CMM at zero temperature T. Even at T {approx}100 K this fraction en 2D is still as large as about 70% for typical quasi-2D cuprate superconductor parameters. [Spanish] Los pares de cooper excitados formados en un sistema de muchos electrones, son aquellos con momentos de centro de masa (CMM) diferente de cero. Normalmente estos no son tomados en cuenta en la teoria estandar de la superconductividad de Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) al suponer que su numero es muy pequeno comparados con los pares de centro de masa igual a cero. Sin embargo, un esquema de condensacion Bose-Einstein requiere de ambos pares, con CMM cero y diferente de cero. Asumiendo una interaccion modelo BCS entre los fermiones, determinamos la poblacion de pares cooper con cada uno de todos los posibles valores del CMM calculando el numero de pares con momentos de centro de masa diferente de cero relativo a los pares de CMM igual a cero, en 2D y 3D. Aunque esta razon decrece rapidamente con el CMM, el numero de pares de cooper para cualquier CMM especifico menor que el momento maximo (o rompimiento de par) es tipicamente mas grande que el 95% de aquellos con CMM cero. Aun a T {approx}100 K esta fraccion en 2D es

  8. Uniform excitations in magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steen Mørup

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a short review of the magnetic excitations in nanoparticles below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature. In this temperature regime, the magnetic dynamics in nanoparticles is dominated by uniform excitations, and this leads to a linear temperature dependence of the magnetization and the magnetic hyperfine field, in contrast to the Bloch T3/2 law in bulk materials. The temperature dependence of the average magnetization is conveniently studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The energy of the uniform excitations of magnetic nanoparticles can be studied by inelastic neutron scattering.

  9. Uniform excitations in magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Frandsen, Cathrine; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    2010-01-01

    We present a short review of the magnetic excitations in nanoparticles below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature. In this temperature regime, the magnetic dynamics in nanoparticles is dominated by uniform excitations, and this leads to a linear temperature dependence of the magnetization...... and the magnetic hyperfine field, in contrast to the Bloch T3/2 law in bulk materials. The temperature dependence of the average magnetization is conveniently studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The energy of the uniform excitations of magnetic nanoparticles can be studied by inelastic neutron scattering....

  10. A Platinum(IV) Pro-drug Preferentially Targets IDO Providing Enhanced Ovarian Cancer Immuno-Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Awuah, Samuel G.; Zheng, Yao-Rong; Bruno, Peter M.; Hemann, Michael T.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an immunosuppressive enzyme in human tumors, leads to immune evasion and tumor tolerance. IDO is therefore a tumor immunotherapeutic target, and several IDO inhibitors are currently undergoing clinical trials. IDO inhibitors can enhance the efficacy of common cancer chemotherapeutics. Here we investigated Pt(IV) – (D)-1-methyltryptophan conjugates 1 and 2 for combined immunomodulation and DNA cross-link-triggered apoptosis for cancer ‘immuno-ch...

  11. Scaling preferential flow processes in agricultural soils affected by tillage and trafficking at the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipović, Vilim; Coquet, Yves

    2016-04-01

    There is an accumulation of experimental evidences that agricultural soils, at least the top horizons affected by tillage practices, are not homogeneous and present a structure that is strongly dependent on farming practices like tillage and trafficking. Soil tillage and trafficking can create compacted zones in the soil with hydraulic properties and porosity which are different from those of the non-compacted zones. This spatial variability can strongly influence transport processes and initiate preferential flow. Two or three dimensional models can be used to account for spatial variability created by agricultural practices, but such models need a detailed assessment of spatial heterogeneity which can be rather impractical to provide. This logically raises the question whether and how one dimensional model may be designed and used to account for the within-field spatial variability in soil structure created by agricultural practices. Preferential flow (dual-permeability) modelling performed with HYDRUS-1D will be confronted to classical modelling based on the Richards and convection-dispersion equations using HYDRUS-2D taking into account the various soil heterogeneities created by agricultural practices. Our goal is to derive one set of equivalent 1D soil hydraulic parameters from 2D simulations which accounts for soil heterogeneities created by agricultural operations. A field experiment was carried out in two phases: infiltration and redistribution on a plot by uniform sprinkle irrigation with water or bromide solution. Prior to the field experiment the soil structure of the tilled layer was determined along the face of a large trench perpendicular to the tillage direction (0.7 m depth and 3.1 m wide). Thirty TDR probes and tensiometers were installed in different soil structural zones (Δ compacted soil and Γ macroporous soil) which ensured soil water monitoring throughout the experiment. A map of bromide was constructed from small core samples (4 cm diam

  12. LS1: exciting times ahead

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Duc

    2013-01-01

    As the first and last proton-lead run of 2013 draws to a close, the extensive upgrade and maintenance programme of the LHC's first long shutdown (LS1) is about to get under way.   The LHC has provided physicists with a huge quantity of data to analyse since the first physics run in 2009. Now it's time for the machine, along with CERN's other accelerators, to get a facelift. LS1 will start on 13 February 2013, but this doesn’t mean that life at the Laboratory will be any less rich and exciting. Although there will be no collisions for a period of almost two years, the whole CERN site will be a hive of activity, with large-scale work under way to modernise the infrastructure and prepare the LHC for operation at higher energy. "A whole series of renovation work will be carried out around the LHC during LS1,” explains Simon Baird, deputy head of the EN Department. "The key driver is of course the consolidation of the 10,170 high-curren...

  13. Excitability of motor cortices as a function of emotional sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeilipoor, Naeem; Pizzolato, Fabio; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Cesari, Paola

    2013-01-01

    We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to clarify how non-verbal emotionally-characterized sounds modulate the excitability of the corticospinal motor tract (CST). While subjects were listening to sounds (monaurally and binaurally), single TMS pulses were delivered to either left or right primary motor cortex (M1), and electromyographic activities were recorded from the contralateral abductor pollicis brevis muscle. We found a significant increase in CST excitability in response to unpleasant as compared to neutral sounds. The increased excitability was lateralized as a function of stimulus valence: Unpleasant stimuli resulted in a significantly higher facilitation of motor potentials evoked in the left hemisphere, while pleasant stimuli yielded a greater CST excitability in the right one. Furthermore, TMS induced higher motor evoked potentials when listening to unpleasant sounds with the left than with the right ear. Taken together, our findings provide compelling evidence for an asymmetric modulation of CST excitability as a function of emotional sounds along with ear laterality.

  14. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vodungbo, B; Tudu, B; Perron, J; Delaunay, R; Müller, L; Berntsen, M.H; Grübel, G; Malinowski, G; Weier, C; Gautier, J; Lambert, G; Zeitoun, P; Gutt, C; Jal, E; Reid, A.H; Granitzka, P.W; Jaouen, N; Dakovski, G.L; Moeller, S; Minitti, M.P; Mitra, A; Carron, S; Pfau, B; von Korff Schmising, C; Schneider, M; Eisebitt, S; Lüning, J

    2016-01-01

    .... Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer...

  15. Transport waves as crystal excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepellotti, Andrea; Marzari, Nicola

    2017-09-01

    We introduce the concept of transport waves by showing that the linearized Boltzmann transport equation admits excitations in the form of waves that have well-defined dispersion relations and decay times. Crucially, these waves do not represent single-particle excitations, but are collective excitations of the equilibrium distribution functions. We study in detail the case of thermal transport, where relaxons are found in the long-wavelength limit, and second sound is reinterpreted as the excitation of one or several temperature waves at finite frequencies. Graphene is studied numerically, finding decay times of the order of microseconds. The derivation, obtained by a spectral representation of the Boltzmann equation, holds in principle for any crystal or semiclassical transport theory and is particularly relevant when transport takes place in the hydrodynamic regime.

  16. Excitation power quantities in phase resonance testing of nonlinear systems with phase-locked-loop excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Simon; Leine, Remco I.

    2017-11-01

    Phase resonance testing is one method for the experimental extraction of nonlinear normal modes. This paper proposes a novel method for nonlinear phase resonance testing. Firstly, the issue of appropriate excitation is approached on the basis of excitation power considerations. Therefore, power quantities known from nonlinear systems theory in electrical engineering are transferred to nonlinear structural dynamics applications. A new power-based nonlinear mode indicator function is derived, which is generally applicable, reliable and easy to implement in experiments. Secondly, the tuning of the excitation phase is automated by the use of a Phase-Locked-Loop controller. This method provides a very user-friendly and fast way for obtaining the backbone curve. Furthermore, the method allows to exploit specific advantages of phase control such as the robustness for lightly damped systems and the stabilization of unstable branches of the frequency response. The reduced tuning time for the excitation makes the commonly used free-decay measurements for the extraction of backbone curves unnecessary. Instead, steady-state measurements for every point of the curve are obtained. In conjunction with the new mode indicator function, the correlation of every measured point with the associated nonlinear normal mode of the underlying conservative system can be evaluated. Moreover, it is shown that the analysis of the excitation power helps to locate sources of inaccuracies in the force appropriation process. The method is illustrated by a numerical example and its functionality in experiments is demonstrated on a benchmark beam structure.

  17. Properties, Propagation, and Excitation of EMIC Waves Properties, Propagation, and Excitation of EMIC Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jichun; Coffey, Victoria N.; Chandler, Michael O.; Boardsen, Scott A.; Saikin, Anthony A.; Mello, Emily M.; Russell, Christopher T.; Torbert, Roy B.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Giles, Barbara L.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves (0.1-5 Hz) play an important role in particle dynamics in the Earth's magnetosphere. EMIC waves are preferentially excited in regions where hot anisotropic ions and cold dense plasma populations spatially overlap. While the generation region of EMIC waves is usually on or near the magnetic equatorial plane in the inner magnetosphere, EMIC waves have both equatorial and off-equator source regions on the dayside in the compressed outer magnetosphere. Using field and plasma measurements from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, we perform a case study of EMIC waves and associated local plasma conditions observed on 19 October 2015. From 0315 to 0810 UT, before crossing the magnetopause into the magnetosheath, all four MMS spacecraft detected long-lasting He(exp +)-band EMIC wave emissions around local noon (MLT = 12.7 - 14.0) at high L-shells (L = 8.8 - 15.2) and low magnetic latitudes (MLAT = -21.8deg - -30.3deg). Energetic (greater than 1 keV) and anisotropic ions were present throughout this event that was in the recovery phase of a weak geomagnetic storm (min. Dst = -48 nT at 1000 UT on 18 October 2015). The testing of linear theory suggests that the EMIC waves were excited locally. Although the wave event is dominated by small normal angles, its polarization is mixed with right- and left-handedness and its propagation is bi-directional with regard to the background magnetic field. The short inter-spacecraft distances (as low as 15 km) of the MMS mission make it possible to accurately determine the k vector of the waves using the phase difference technique. Preliminary analysis finds that the k vector magnitude, phase speed, and wavelength of the 0.3-Hz wave packet at 0453:55 UT are 0.005 km(exp -1), 372.9 km/s, and 1242.9 km, respectively.

  18. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    OpenAIRE

    Boris Vodungbo; Bahrati Tudu; Jonathan Perron; Renaud Delaunay; Leonard Müller; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Gerhard Grübel; Grégory Malinowski; Christian Weier; Julien Gautier; Guillaume Lambert; Philippe Zeitoun; Christian Gutt; Emmanuelle Jal; Reid, Alexander H.

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a ne...

  19. Stochastic Hierarchical Systems: Excitable Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhardt, Helmar; Zaks, Michael A.; Falcke, Martin; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    We present a discrete model of stochastic excitability by a low-dimensional set of delayed integral equations governing the probability in the rest state, the excited state, and the refractory state. The process is a random walk with discrete states and nonexponential waiting time distributions, which lead to the incorporation of memory kernels in the integral equations. We extend the equations of a single unit to the system of equations for an ensemble of globally coupled oscillators, derive...

  20. Autowaves in moving excitable media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A.Davydov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of kinematic theory of autowaves we suggest a method for analytic description of stationary autowave structures appearing at the boundary between the moving and fixed excitable media. The front breakdown phenomenon is predicted for such structures. Autowave refraction and, particulary, one-side "total reflection" at the boundary is considered. The obtained analytical results are confirmed by computer simulations. Prospects of the proposed method for further studies of autowave dynamics in the moving excitable media are discussed.

  1. Have Gluonic Excitations Been Found?

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Philip R.

    1996-01-01

    New experimental information on the non-exotic J^PC = 0^-+ isovector seen at 1.8 GeV by VES yields convincing evidence of its excited gluonic (hybrid) nature when a critical study of alternative quarkonium assignments is made in the context of ^3 P_0 decay by flux-tube breaking. Production of this gluonic excitation via meson exchange is promising, although its two photon production vanishes.

  2. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christophorou, L.G. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA) Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs.

  3. Study on Excitation-triggered Damage Mechanism in Perilous Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongkai; Wang, Shengjuan

    2017-12-01

    Chain collapse is easy to happen for perilous rock aggregate locating on steep high slope, and one of the key scientific problems is the damage mechanism of perilous rock under excitation action at perilous rock rupture. This paper studies excitation-triggered damage mechanism in perilous rock by wave mechanics, which gives three conclusions. Firstly, when only the normal incidence attenuation spread of excitation wave is considered, while the energy loss is ignored for excitation wave to spread in perilous rock aggregate, the paper establishes one method to calculate peak velocity when excitation wave passes through boundary between any two perilous rock blocks in perilous rock aggregate. Secondly, following by Sweden and Canmet criteria, the paper provides one wave velocity criterion for excitation-triggered damage in the aggregate. Thirdly, assuming double parameters of volume strain of cracks or fissures in rock meet the Weibull distribution, one method to estimate micro-fissure in excitation-triggered damage zone in perilous rock aggregate is established. The studies solve the mechanical description problem for excitation-triggered damage in perilous rock, which is valuable in studies on profoundly rupture mechanism.

  4. Benefits and Challenges of Over-Actuated Excitation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Fitz-Coy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a comprehensive discussion on the benefits and technical challenges of controlling over-determined and over-actuated excitation systems ranging from 1-DOF to 6-DOF. The primary challenges of over-actuated systems result from the physical constraints imposed when the number of exciters exceeds the number of mechanical degree-of-freedom. This issue is less critical for electro-dynamic exciters which tend to be more compliant than servo-hydraulic exciters. To facilitate the technical challenges discussion, generalized methods for determining the drive output commands and the actuator input transform is presented. To further provide insights into the problem, over-actuated 1-DOF and 6-DOF examples are provided. Results are presented to support the discussions.

  5. Group excitation control of generators in state regional electric power plant transformer station automatic control systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumin, M.I.; Rosman, L.V.; Tarnavskii, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    Group excitation control of electric generators according to standard methods is essential for the management of power plant conditions according to voltage and reactive power. A system is described that provides coordinated changes in the automatic excitation controller set point for generators that operate on common buses. The advantages of the excitation control system are discussed.

  6. The excitement of discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    I had the good luck to start research at the dawn of molecular biology when it was possible to ask fundamental questions about the nature of the nucleic acids and how information is transferred in living systems. The search for answers led me into many different areas, often with the question of how molecular structure leads to biological function. Early work in this period provided some of the roots supporting the current explosive developments in life sciences. Here I give a brief account of my development, describe some contributions, and provide a hint of the exhilaration in discovering new things. Most of all, I had the good fortune to have inspiring teachers, stimulating colleagues, and excellent students.

  7. Livermore experience: contributions of J. H. Eberly to laser excitation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, B W; Kulander, K; Davis, J I

    2000-10-12

    This article summarizes the developing understanding of coherent atomic excitation, as gained through a collaboration of J. H. Eberly with the Laser Isotope Separation Program of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, particularly aspects of coherence, population trapping, multilevel multiphoton excitation sequences, analytic solutions to multistate excitation chains, the quasicontinuum, pulse propagation, and noise. In addition to the discovery of several curious and unexpected properties of coherent excitation, mentioned here, the collaboration provided an excellent example of unexpected benefits from investment into basic research.

  8. Ultrashort-pulse laser excitation and damage of dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse; Balling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Ultrashort-pulse laser excitation of dielectrics is an intricate problem due to the strong coupling between the rapidly changing material properties and the light. In the present paper, details of a model based on a multiple-rate-equation description of the conduction band are provided. The model...... is verified by comparison with recent experimental measurements of the transient optical properties in combination with ablation-depth determinations. The excitation process from the first creation of conduction-band electrons at low intensities to the formation of a highly-excited plasma and associated...

  9. Network growth with arbitrary initial conditions: Degree dynamics for uniform and preferential attachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotouhi, Babak; Rabbat, Michael G.

    2013-12-01

    This paper provides time-dependent expressions for the expected degree distribution of a given network that is subject to growth. We consider both uniform attachment, where incoming nodes form links to existing nodes selected uniformly at random, and preferential attachment, where probabilities are assigned proportional to the degrees of the existing nodes. We consider the cases of single and multiple links being formed by each newly introduced node. The initial conditions are arbitrary, that is, the solution depends on the degree distribution of the initial graph which is the substrate of the growth. Previous work in the literature focuses on the asymptotic state, that is, when the number of nodes added to the initial graph tends to infinity, rendering the effect of the initial graph negligible. Our contribution provides a solution for the expected degree distribution as a function of time, for arbitrary initial condition. Previous results match our results in the asymptotic limit. The results are discrete in the degree domain and continuous in the time domain, where the addition of new nodes to the graph are approximated by a continuous arrival rate.

  10. Sadomasochism, sexual excitement, and perversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernberg, O F

    1991-01-01

    Sadomasochism, an ingredient of infantile sexuality, is an essential part of normal sexual functioning and love relations, and of the very nature of sexual excitement. Sadomasochistic elements are also present in all sexual perversions. Sadomasochism starts out as the potential for erotic masochism in both sexes, and represents a very early capacity to link aggression with the libidinal elements of sexual excitement. Sexual excitement may be considered a basic affect that overcomes primitive splitting of love and hatred. Erotic desire is a more mature form of sexual excitement. Psychoanalytic exploration makes it possible to uncover the unconscious components of sexual excitement: wishes for symbiotic fusion and for aggressive penetration and intermingling; bisexual identifications; the desire to transgress oedipal prohibitions and the secretiveness of the primal scene, and to violate the boundaries of a teasing and withholding object. The relation between these wishes and the development of erotic idealization processes in both sexes is explored in the context of a critical review of the pertinent psychoanalytic literature.

  11. Coulomb excitation of (31)Mg

    CERN Document Server

    Seidlitz, M; Reiter, P; Bildstein, V; Blazhev, A; Bree, N; Bruyneel, B; Cederkall, J; Clement, E; Davinson, T; van Duppen, P; Ekstrom, A; Finke, F; Fraile, L M; Geibel, K; Gernhauser, R; Hess, H; Holler, A; Huyse, M; Ivanov, O; Jolie, J; Kalkuhler, M; Kotthaus, T; Krucken, R; Lutter, R; Piselli, E; Scheit, H; Stefanescu, I; van de Walle, J; Voulot, D; Warr, N; Wenander, F; Wiens, A

    2011-01-01

    The ground state properties of ^3^1Mg indicate a change of nuclear shape at N=19 with a deformed J^@p=1/2^+ intruder state as a ground state, implying that ^3^1Mg is part of the ''island of inversion''. The collective properties of excited states were the subject of a Coulomb excitation experiment at REX-ISOLDE, CERN, employing a radioactive ^3^1Mg beam. De-excitation @c-rays were detected by the MINIBALL @c-spectrometer in coincidence with scattered particles in a segmented Si-detector. The level scheme of ^3^1Mg was extended. Spin and parity assignment of the 945 keV state yielded 5/2^+ and its de-excitation is dominated by a strong collective M1 transition. Comparison of the transition probabilities of ^3^0^,^3^1^,^3^2Mg establishes that for th e N=19 magnesium isotope not only the ground state but also excited states are largely dominated by a deformed pf intruder configuration.

  12. Preferential Interaction of Na+ over K+ to Carboxylate-functionalized Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elucidating mechanistic interactions between specific ions (Na+/ K+) and nanoparticle surfaces to alter particle stability in polar media has received little attention. We investigated relative preferential binding of Na+ and K+ to carboxylate-functionalized silver nanoparticles ...

  13. A macroscopic relationship for preferential flow in the vadose zone: Theory and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.H.; Zhang, R.D.

    2010-02-15

    Preferential flow commonly observed in unsaturated soils allows rapid movement of solute from the ground surface or vadose zone to the groundwater, bypassing a significant volume of unsaturated soil and increasing the risk of groundwater contamination. A variety of evidence indicates that complex preferential flow patterns observed from fields are fractals. This paper discusses a macroscopic rela-tionship for modeling preferential flow in the vadose zone. Conceptually, the flow domain can be di-vided into active and inactive regions. Flow occurs preferentially in the active region (characterized by fractals), and inactive region is simply bypassed. The portion of the active region was found to be a power function of saturation. The validity of this macroscopic relationship is demonstrated by its consistency with field observations and the related numerical experiments.

  14. Collective excitations in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular, the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of this collective motions is a very good tool to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article is to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. We have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. Understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actuality in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular, the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure of nuclei close to their ground states. Moreover, some collective states appear to be very robust against the onset of chaos. This is the case of the hot giant dipole built on top of a hot nucleus which seems to survive up to rather high temperatures. Their sudden disappearance is still a subject of controversy. It may be that the mean-field and the associated collective states are playing a crucial role also in catastrophic processes such as the phase-transitions. Indeed, when the system is diluted the collective vibrations may become unstable and it seems that these unstable modes provide a natural explanation to the self organization of the system in drops. Finally, considering the diversity of the different structures of exotic nuclei one may expect new vibration types. All these studies are showing the diversity of the collective motions of strongly correlated quantum systems such as the nucleus but many open questions remain to be solved. (authors) 304 refs., 53 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Producing coherent excitations in pumped Mott antiferromagnetic insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Claassen, Martin; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2017-12-01

    Nonequilibrium dynamics in correlated materials has attracted attention due to the possibility of characterizing, tuning, and creating complex ordered states. To understand the photoinduced microscopic dynamics, especially the linkage under realistic pump conditions between transient states and remnant elementary excitations, we performed nonperturbative simulations of various time-resolved spectroscopies. We used the Mott antiferromagnetic insulator as a model platform. The transient dynamics of multiparticle excitations can be attributed to the interplay between Floquet virtual states and a modification of the density of states, in which interactions induce a spectral weight transfer. Using an autocorrelation of the time-dependent spectral function, we show that resonance of the virtual states with the upper Hubbard band in the Mott insulator provides the route towards manipulating the electronic distribution and modifying charge and spin excitations. Our results link transient dynamics to the nature of many-body excitations and provide an opportunity to design nonequilibrium states of matter via tuned laser pulses.

  16. Excited State Dynamics of DNA and RNA bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudock, Hanneli; Levine, Benjamin; Martinez, Todd

    2007-03-01

    Recent ultrafast spectroscopic experiments have reported excited state lifetimes for DNA and RNA bases and assigned these lifetimes to various electronic states. We have used theoretical and simulation methods to describe the excited state dynamics of these bases in an effort to provide a mechanistic explanation for the observed lifetimes. Our simulations are based on ab initio molecular dynamics, where the electronic and nuclear Schrodinger equations are solved simultaneously. The results are further verified by comparison to high-level ab initio electronic structure methods, including dynamic electron correlation effects through multireference perturbation theory, at important points along the dynamical pathways. Our results provide an explanation of the photochemical mechanism leading to nonradiative decay of the electronic excited states and some suggestions as to the origin of the different lifetimes. Comparisons between pyrimidines illustrate how chemical differences impact excited state dynamics and may play a role in explaining the propensity for dimer formation in thymine.

  17. TWO MEASURES OF THE DEPENDENCE OF PREFERENTIAL RANKINGS ON CATEGORICAL VARIABLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lissowski Grzegorz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to apply a general methodology for constructing statistical methods, which is based on decision theory, to give a statistical description of preferential rankings, with a focus on the rankings’ dependence on categorical variables. In the paper, I use functions of description errors that are based on the Kemeny and Hamming distances between preferential orderings, but the proposed methodology can also be applied to other methods of estimating description errors.

  18. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H.; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.

  19. Magnetic excitations in deformed nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nojarov, R. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    1995-08-01

    Cross sections for inelastic electron scattering and energy distributions of M1 and E2 strengths of K{sup {pi}} - 1{sup +} excitations in titanium, rare-earth, and actinide nuclei are studied microscopically within QRPA. The spin M1 strength has two peaks, isoscalar and isovector, residing between the low-and high-energy orbital M1 strength. The latter is strongly fragmented and lies in the region of the IVGQR, where the (e,e`) cross sections are almost one order of magnitude larger for E2 than for M1 excitations. Comparison with the quantized isovector rotor allows the interpretation of all the orbital M1 excitations at both low and high energies as manifestation of the collective scissors mode. (author).

  20. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bharati; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H; Granitzka, Patrick W; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.

  1. Collective excitations in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chomaz, Ph

    1997-12-31

    The properties of the nucleus cannot be reduced to the properties of its constituents: it is a complex system. The fact that many properties of the nucleus are consequences of the existence of mean-field potential is a manifestation of this complexity. In particular the nucleons can thus self-organize in collective motions such as giant resonances. Therefore the study of these collective motions is a very good to understand the properties of the nucleus itself. The purpose of this article was to stress some aspects of these collective vibrations. In particular we have studied how an ensemble of fermions as the nucleus can self-organize in collective vibrations which are behaving like a gas of bosons in weak interaction. The understanding of these phenomena remains one of the important subjects of actually in the context of quantal systems in strong interaction. In particular the study of the states with one or two vibration quanta provides a direct information on the structure if nuclei close to their ground states. (author) 270 refs.

  2. Thermal Excitation System for Shearography (TESS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansing, Matthew D.; Bullock, Michael W.

    1996-01-01

    One of the most convenient and effective methods of stressing a part or structure for shearographic evaluation is thermal excitation. This technique involves heating the part, often convectively with a heat gun, and then monitoring with a shearography device the deformation during cooling. For a composite specimen, unbonds, delaminations, inclusions, or matrix cracking will deform during cooling differently than other more structurally sound regions and thus will appear as anomalies in the deformation field. However, one of the difficulties that cause this inspection to be dependent on the operator experience is the conventional heating process. Fanning the part with a heat gun by hand introduces a wide range of variability from person to person and from one inspection to the next. The goal of this research effort was to conduct research in the methods of thermal excitation for shearography inspection. A computerized heating system was developed for inspection of 0.61 m (24 in.) square panels. The Thermal Excitation System for Shearography (TESS) provides radiant heating with continuous digital measurement of the surface temperature profile to ensure repeatability. The TESS device functions as an accessory to any electronic shearography device.

  3. Autoresonant Excitation of Antiproton Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, Gorm B; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D; Butler, Eoin; Carpenter, P T; Cesar, Claudio L; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C; Gill, David R; Hangst, Jeffrey S; Hardy, Walter N; Hayden, Michael E; Humphries, Andrew J; Hurt, J L; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olchanski, Konstantin; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Silveira, Daniel M; So, Chukman; Storey, James W; Thompson, Robert I; van der Werf, Dirk P; Wurtele, Jonathan S; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate controllable excitation of the center-of-mass longitudinal motion of a thermal antiproton plasma using a swept-frequency autoresonant drive. When the plasma is cold, dense, and highly collective in nature, we observe that the entire system behaves as a single-particle nonlinear oscillator, as predicted by a recent theory. In contrast, only a fraction of the antiprotons in a warm plasma can be similarly excited. Antihydrogen was produced and trapped by using this technique to drive antiprotons into a positron plasma, thereby initiating atomic recombination.

  4. Arctigenin preferentially induces tumor cell death under glucose deprivation by inhibiting cellular energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Qi, Chunting; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Ma, Xiuquan; Zhang, Haohao; Hu, Lihong; Yuan, Junying; Yu, Qiang

    2012-08-15

    Selectively eradicating cancer cells with minimum adverse effects on normal cells is a major challenge in the development of anticancer therapy. We hypothesize that nutrient-limiting conditions frequently encountered by cancer cells in poorly vascularized solid tumors might provide an opportunity for developing selective therapy. In this study, we investigated the function and molecular mechanisms of a natural compound, arctigenin, in regulating tumor cell growth. We demonstrated that arctigenin selectively promoted glucose-starved A549 tumor cells to undergo necrosis by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. In doing so, arctigenin elevated cellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocked cellular energy metabolism in the glucose-starved tumor cells. We also demonstrated that cellular ROS generation was caused by intracellular ATP depletion and played an essential role in the arctigenin-induced tumor cell death under the glucose-limiting condition. Furthermore, we combined arctigenin with the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) and examined their effects on tumor cell growth. Interestingly, this combination displayed preferential cell-death inducing activity against tumor cells compared to normal cells. Hence, we propose that the combination of arctigenin and 2DG may represent a promising new cancer therapy with minimal normal tissue toxicity. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Chiglitazar Preferentially Regulates Gene Expression via Configuration-Restricted Binding and Phosphorylation Inhibition of PPARγ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Si Pan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is often treated with insulin-sensitizing drugs called thiazolidinediones (TZD, which improve insulin resistance and glycemic control. Despite their effectiveness in treating diabetes, these drugs provide little protection from eminent cardiovascular disease associated with diabetes. Here we demonstrate how chiglitazar, a configuration-restricted non-TZD peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR pan agonist with moderate transcription activity, preferentially regulates ANGPTL4 and PDK4, which are involved in glucose and lipid metabolism. CDK5-mediated phosphorylation at serine 273 (S273 is a unique regulatory mechanism reserved for PPARγ, and this event is linked to insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Our data demonstrates that chiglitazar modulates gene expression differently from two TZDs, rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, via its configuration-restricted binding and phosphorylation inhibition of PPARγ. Chiglitazar induced significantly greater expression of ANGPTL4 and PDK4 than rosiglitazone and pioglitazone in different cell models. These increased expressions were dependent on the phosphorylation status of PPARγ at S273. Furthermore, ChIP and AlphaScreen assays showed that phosphorylation at S273 inhibited promoter binding and cofactor recruitment by PPARγ. Based on these results, activities from pan agonist chiglitazar can be an effective part of a long-term therapeutic strategy for treating type 2 diabetes in a more balanced action among its targeted organs.

  6. Mean First Passage Time of Preferential Random Walks on Complex Networks with Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongtuan Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates, both theoretically and numerically, preferential random walks (PRW on weighted complex networks. By using two different analytical methods, two exact expressions are derived for the mean first passage time (MFPT between two nodes. On one hand, the MFPT is got explicitly in terms of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a matrix associated with the transition matrix of PRW. On the other hand, the center-product-degree (CPD is introduced as one measure of node strength and it plays a main role in determining the scaling of the MFPT for the PRW. Comparative studies are also performed on PRW and simple random walks (SRW. Numerical simulations of random walks on paradigmatic network models confirm analytical predictions and deepen discussions in different aspects. The work may provide a comprehensive approach for exploring random walks on complex networks, especially biased random walks, which may also help to better understand and tackle some practical problems such as search and routing on networks.

  7. Counter-regulating on the Internet: Threat elicits preferential processing of positive information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greving, Hannah; Sassenberg, Kai; Fetterman, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The Internet is a central source of information. It is increasingly used for information search in self-relevant domains (e.g., health). Self-relevant topics are also associated with specific emotions and motivational states. For example, individuals may fear serious illness and feel threatened. Thus far, the impact of threat has received little attention in Internet-based research. The current studies investigated how threat influences Internet search. Threat is known to elicit the preferential processing of positive information. The self-directed nature of Internet search should particularly provide opportunities for such processing behavior. We predicted that during Internet search, more positive information would be processed (i.e., allocated more attention to) and more positive knowledge would be acquired under threat than in a control condition. Three experiments supported this prediction: Under threat, attention is directed more to positive web pages (Study 1) and positive links (Study 2), and more positive information is acquired (Studies 1 and 3) than in a control condition. Notably, the effect on knowledge acquisition was mediated by the effect on attention allocation during an actual Internet search (Study 1). Thus, Internet search under threat leads to selective processing of positive information and dampens threatened individuals' negative affect. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Excitation of a biconical line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshin, G. G.

    1985-01-01

    The Kontorovich-Lebedev integral transformation is used to obtain in an analytic form a rigorous solution to the quasi-three-dimensional problem involving the excitation of a biconical surface with ideally conducting boundaries by slotted ring sources that are phased according to the traveling-wave law. The results can be used in the design of elliptical-polarization biconical antennas.

  9. Performance of thermally excited resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; van Ouwerkerk, R.H.; Bouwstra, S.; Bouwstra, S.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    A study of electrothermal excitation of micro-machined silicon beams is reported. The temperature distribution is calculated as a function of the position of the transducer, resulting in stress in the structure which reduces the resonance frequency. Test samples are realized and measurements or

  10. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vodungbo, B.; Tudu, B.; Perron, J.; Delaunay, R.; Müller, L.; Berntsen, M.H.; Grübel, G.; Malinowski, G.; Weier, C.; Gautier, J.; Lambert, G.; Zeitoun, P.; Gutt, C.; Jal, E.; Reid, A.H.; Granitzka, P.W.; Jaouen, N,; Dakovski, G.L.; Moeller, S.; Minitti, M.P.; Mitra, A.; Carron, S.; Pfau, B.; von Korff Schmising, C.; Schneider, M.; Eisebitt, S.; Lüning, J.

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium

  11. Predictions for Excited Strange Baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernando, Ishara P.; Goity, Jose L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    An assessment is made of predictions for excited hyperon masses which follow from flavor symmetry and consistency with a 1/N c expansion of QCD. Such predictions are based on presently established baryonic resonances. Low lying hyperon resonances which do not seem to fit into the proposed scheme are discussed.

  12. The application of in situ analytical transmission electron microscopy to the study of preferential intergranular oxidation in Alloy 600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M.G., E-mail: m.g.burke@manchester.ac.uk; Bertali, G.; Prestat, E.; Scenini, F.; Haigh, S.J.

    2017-05-15

    In situ analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can provide a unique perspective on dynamic reactions in a variety of environments, including liquids and gases. In this study, in situ analytical TEM techniques have been applied to examine the localised oxidation reactions that occur in a Ni-Cr-Fe alloy, Alloy 600, using a gas environmental cell at elevated temperatures. The initial stages of preferential intergranular oxidation, shown to be an important precursor phenomenon for intergranular stress corrosion cracking in pressurized water reactors (PWRs), have been successfully identified using the in situ approach. Furthermore, the detailed observations correspond to the ex situ results obtained from bulk specimens tested in hydrogenated steam and in high temperature PWR primary water. The excellent agreement between the in situ and ex situ oxidation studies demonstrates that this approach can be used to investigate the initial stages of preferential intergranular oxidation relevant to nuclear power systems. - Highlights: • In situ analytical TEM has been performed in 1 bar H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O vapor at 360–480 °C. • Nanoscale GB migration and solute partitioning correlate with ex situ data for Alloy 600 in H{sub 2}-steam. • This technique can provide new insights into localised reactions associated with localised oxidation.

  13. Lysozyme in water-acetonitrile mixtures: Preferential solvation at the inner edge of excess hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, Vladimir A.; Kuchierskaya, Alexandra A.

    2017-06-01

    Preferential solvation/hydration is an effective way for regulating the mechanism of the protein destabilization/stabilization. Organic solvent/water sorption and residual enzyme activity measurements were performed to monitor the preferential solvation/hydration of hen egg-white lysozyme at high and low water content in acetonitrile at 25 °C. The obtained results show that the protein destabilization/stabilization depends essentially on the initial hydration level of lysozyme and the water content in acetonitrile. There are three composition regimes for the dried lysozyme. At high water content, the lysozyme has a higher affinity for water than for acetonitrile. The residual enzyme activity values are close to 100%. At the intermediate water content, the dehydrated lysozyme has a higher affinity for acetonitrile than for water. A minimum on the residual enzyme activity curve was observed in this concentration range. At the lowest water content, the organic solvent molecules are preferentially excluded from the dried lysozyme, resulting in the preferential hydration. The residual catalytic activity is ˜80%, compared with that observed after incubation in pure water. Two distinct schemes are operative for the hydrated lysozyme. At high and intermediate water content, lysozyme is preferentially hydrated. However, in contrast to the dried protein, at the intermediate water content, the initially hydrated lysozyme has the increased preferential hydration parameters. At low water content, the preferential binding of the acetonitrile molecules to the initially hydrated lysozyme was detected. No residual enzyme activity was observed in the water-poor acetonitrile. Our data clearly show that the initial hydration level of the protein macromolecules is one of the key factors that govern the stability of the protein-water-organic solvent systems.

  14. Preferential Attachment in an Internet-mediated Human Network

    OpenAIRE

    Arevalo, Chezka Camille P.; Pabico, Jaderick P.

    2015-01-01

    In the advent of the Internet, web-mediated social networking has become of great influence to Filipinos. Networking sites such as Friendster, YouTube, FaceBook and MySpace are among the most well known sites on the Internet. These sites provide a wide range of services to users from different parts of the world, such as connecting and finding people, as well as, sharing and organizing contents. The popularity and accessibility of these sites enable information to be available. These allow pe...

  15. The exciting star of HH 57

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M.; Dopita, M. A.; Schwartz, R.

    1986-01-01

    The first spectral classification for the exciting star of HH 57 is provided. The star is an F8 III and suffers about 5 mag of visual extinction, far greater than that toward the HH 57A knot, only a few arcseconds away. This difference supports the previous identification of a flattened geometry for the circumstellar dust around this star. Using IRAS photometry, a distance of 940 pc to HH 57 is determined by bolometrically matching the observed luminosity of the star to those of FU Ori and V1057 Cyg.

  16. Statistics of Fractionalized Excitations through Threshold Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morampudi, Siddhardh C.; Turner, Ari M.; Pollmann, Frank; Wilczek, Frank

    2017-06-01

    We show that neutral anyonic excitations have a signature in spectroscopic measurements of materials: The low-energy onset of spectral functions near the threshold follows universal power laws with an exponent that depends only on the statistics of the anyons. This provides a route, using experimental techniques such as neutron scattering and tunneling spectroscopy, for detecting anyonic statistics in topologically ordered states such as gapped quantum spin liquids and hypothesized fractional Chern insulators. Our calculations also explain some recent theoretical results in spin systems.

  17. Electromagnetic toroidal excitations in matter and free space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasimakis, N.; Fedotov, V. A.; Savinov, V.; Raybould, T. A.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2016-03-01

    The toroidal dipole is a localized electromagnetic excitation, distinct from the magnetic and electric dipoles. While the electric dipole can be understood as a pair of opposite charges and the magnetic dipole as a current loop, the toroidal dipole corresponds to currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Toroidal dipoles provide physically significant contributions to the basic characteristics of matter including absorption, dispersion and optical activity. Toroidal excitations also exist in free space as spatially and temporally localized electromagnetic pulses propagating at the speed of light and interacting with matter. We review recent experimental observations of resonant toroidal dipole excitations in metamaterials and the discovery of anapoles, non-radiating charge-current configurations involving toroidal dipoles. While certain fundamental and practical aspects of toroidal electrodynamics remain open for the moment, we envision that exploitation of toroidal excitations can have important implications for the fields of photonics, sensing, energy and information.

  18. Percolation of optical excitation mediated by near-field interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruse, Makoto; Kim, Song-Ju; Takahashi, Taiki; Aono, Masashi; Akahane, Kouichi; D'Acunto, Mario; Hori, Hirokazu; Thylén, Lars; Katori, Makoto; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2017-04-01

    Optical excitation transfer in nanostructured matter has been intensively studied in various material systems for versatile applications. Herein, we theoretically and numerically discuss the percolation of optical excitations in randomly organized nanostructures caused by optical near-field interactions governed by Yukawa potential in a two-dimensional stochastic model. The model results demonstrate the appearance of two phases of percolation of optical excitation as a function of the localization degree of near-field interaction. Moreover, it indicates sublinear scaling with percolation distances when the light localization is strong. Furthermore, such a character is maximized at a particular size of environments. The results provide fundamental insights into optical excitation transfer and will facilitate the design and analysis of nanoscale signal-transfer characteristics.

  19. Excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorner, B. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1996-12-31

    A short introduction to instrumental resolution is followed by a discussion of visibilities of phonon modes due to their eigenvectors. High precision phonon dispersion curves in GaAs are presented together with `ab initio` calculations. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is taken as an example of selected visibility due to group theory. By careful determination of phonon intensities eigenvectors can be determined, such as in Silicon and Diamond. The investigation of magnon modes is shown for the garnet Fe{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3}, where also a quantum gap due to zero point spin fluctuations was observed. The study of the splitting of excitons in CsFeCl{sub 3} in an applied magnetic field demonstrates the possibilities of neutron polarisation analysis, which made it possible to observe a mode crossing. An outlook to inelastic X-ray scattering with very high energy resolution of synchrotron radiation is given with the examples of phonons in Beryllium and in water. (author) 19 figs., 36 refs.

  20. Changes in Membrane Cholesterol Differentially Influence Preferential and Non-preferential Signaling of the M1 and M3 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michal, Pavel; El-Fakahany, Esam E; Doležal, Vladimír

    2015-10-01

    We have found earlier that changes in membrane cholesterol content have distinct impact on signaling via the M1, M2, or M3 receptors expressed in CHO cells (CHO-M1 through CHO-M3). Now we investigated whether gradual changes in membrane cholesterol exerts differential effects on coupling of the M1 and M3 muscarinic receptors to preferential signaling pathways through Gq/11 and non-preferential Gs G-proteins signaling. Changes in membrane cholesterol resulted in only marginal alterations of antagonist and agonist affinity of the M1 and M3 receptors, and did not influence precoupling of either subtype. Changes in membrane cholesterol did not influence parameters of carbachol-stimulated GTP-γ(35)S binding in CHO-M1 membranes while reduction as well as augmentation of membrane cholesterol lowered the efficacy but increased the potency of carbachol in CHO-M3 membranes. Gradual increase or decrease in membrane cholesterol concentration dependently attenuated agonist-induced inositolphosphates release while only cholesterol depletion increased basal values in both cell lines. Similarly, membrane cholesterol manipulation modified basal and agonist-stimulated cAMP synthesis via Gs in the same way in both cell lines. These results demonstrate that changes in membrane cholesterol concentration differentially impact preferential and non-preferential M1 and M3 receptor signaling. They point to the activated G-protein/effector protein interaction as the main site of action in alterations of M1 receptor-mediated stimulation of second messenger pathways. On the other hand, modifications in agonist-stimulated GTP-γ(35)S binding in CHO-M3 membranes indicate that in this case changes in ligand-activated receptor/G-protein interaction may also play a role.

  1. Mean excitation energies for molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Phillip W. K.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Oddershede, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The essential material constant that determines the bulk of the stopping power of high energy projectiles, the mean excitation energy, is calculated for a range of smaller molecular ions using the RPA method. It is demonstrated that the mean excitation energy of both molecules and atoms increase...... with ionic charge. However, while the mean excitation energies of atoms also increase with atomic number, the opposite is the case for mean excitation energies for molecules and molecular ions. The origin of these effects is explained by considering the spectral representation of the excited state...... contributing to the mean excitation energy....

  2. Mean excitation energies for molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Phillip W.K.; Sauer, Stephan P.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Oddershede, Jens [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Quantum Theory Project, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sabin, John R., E-mail: sabin@qtp.ufl.edu [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Quantum Theory Project, Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The essential material constant that determines the bulk of the stopping power of high energy projectiles, the mean excitation energy, is calculated for a range of smaller molecular ions using the RPA method. It is demonstrated that the mean excitation energy of both molecules and atoms increase with ionic charge. However, while the mean excitation energies of atoms also increase with atomic number, the opposite is the case for mean excitation energies for molecules and molecular ions. The origin of these effects is explained by considering the spectral representation of the excited state contributing to the mean excitation energy.

  3. ASEAN’s Preferential Trade Agreements (PTA Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanyi Leu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a diversification explanation in order understand the development of PTAs in Southeast Asia. I argue that an important reason why ASEAN states participate in PTAs has been to diversify existing trade ties and to reduce overdependence on a narrow range of export markets. Southeast Asian countries have formed PTAs with markets with which they had weak or unexplored economic relations, as demonstrated by three case analyses: the ASEAN Free Trade Area (AFTA, the ASEAN-China Free Trade Agreement (ACFTA and the ASEAN-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (AJCEP. To maximise the economic gains and the diversification effects of PTA participation, ASEAN countries have pursued a strategy of strengthening economic unity while keeping external economic linkages as diversified as possible. Although East Asia, and especially China, was an important alternative market to reduce ASEAN’s dependence on trade with America, ASEAN countries have also pursued PTAs with a number of other trading partners. This paper explains how PTAs have helped ASEAN states to develop more policy autonomy in their trading environment.

  4. Preferential targeting of apoptosis in tumor versus normal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woynarowska, Barbara A; Woynarowski, Jan M

    2002-07-18

    Elimination of cancer cells by early apoptosis is preferred over other forms of cell growth inhibition. Apoptosis directly leads to tumor regression and reduces risks of selecting more aggressive and/or drug-resistant phenotypes that are often responsible for tumor regrowth and treatment failure. Although DNA damage by anticancer drugs is commonly recognized as an apoptotic stimulus, there is enormous variability in the magnitude and timing of such effects. Especially potent and rapid apoptosis seems to be a hallmark of various alkylating anticancer drugs that are regarded as DNA-reactive agents but are observed to react mainly with cellular proteins. Our studies with such dual-action drugs (irofulven, oxaliplatin) suggest that not only DNA damage, but also protein damage, contributes to apoptosis induction. DNA damage is well known to initiate death-signaling pathways leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Protein damage, in turn, can distort cell redox homeostasis, which facilitates apoptosis execution. Such dual effects can be particularly lethal to tumor cells, which tend to function under pro-oxidative conditions. In contrast to tumor cells that are highly susceptible, normal cells show marginal apoptotic responses to the dual action drugs. This protection of normal cells might reflect their greater ability to buffer pro-oxidative changes and quickly restore redox homeostasis, despite substantial drug uptake and macromolecular binding. Importantly, by targeting the death process at multiple points, DNA- and protein-damaging drugs can be less vulnerable to various bypass mechanisms possible with single targets. The reviewed studies provide a proof of concept that differential apoptosis targeting in cancer versus normal cells can be a basis for tumor selectivity of anticancer drugs.

  5. Characteristics of Excitable Dog Behavior Based on Owners’ Report from a Self-Selected Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Shabelansky

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Past research has found that excitable dog behavior is prevalent among sheltered and owned dogs and many times is a reason for canine relinquishment. In spite of its prevalence in the canine population, excitable behavior is relatively unstudied in the scientific literature. The intent of this research was to understand the experience of owners of excitable dogs through the analysis of self-administered online questionnaires completed by owners as part of another study. We found that certain daily scenarios tended to prompt excitable behavior, with excitability most common when the owner or other people came to the dog’s home. All owners experienced some level of frustration with their dog’s excitable behavior, with the majority being very frustrated. Many dogs in the sample had other behavior problems, with disobedient, destructive, chasing and barking behaviors being the most commonly reported. Other characteristics of excitable dogs also are discussed. Although the ability to generalize from these results is likely limited, due to targeted recruitment and selection of owners of more excitable dogs, this research provides valuable insights into the owner’s experience of excitable behavior. We hope this study prompts more research into canine excitable behavior which would expand our understanding of this behavior and help behaviorists, veterinarians, and shelters develop tools for managing it, as well as provide better education to owners of excitable dogs.

  6. Excited B states at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kluit, Peter M

    2005-01-01

    The first orbitally excited B states were discovered at LEP in 1995. In subsequent years evidence was put forward for the existence of several excited B hadron states. Now, ten years later it is time to review the situation. New analyses have been performed in DELPHI using the full LEP data set with improved and high performance analysis tools. Measurements for the production rate and masses of narrow and broad B/sub u, d//sup **/ mesons will be presented as well as results for the search for B/sub s//sup **/ mesons and Sigma /sub b//sup (*)/ baryons. The results will be compared to earlier measurements, predictions from HQET and measurements in the charm sector.

  7. International Meeting: Excited QCD 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Giacosa, Francesco; Malek, Magdalena; Marinkovic, Marina; Parganlija, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Excited QCD 2014 will take place on the beautiful Bjelasnica mountain located in the vicinity of the Bosnian capital Sarajevo. Bjelasnica was a venue of the XIV Winter Olympic Games and it is situated only 30 kilometers from Sarajevo International Airport. The workshop program will start on February 2 and finish on February 8, 2014, with scientific lectures taking place from February 3 to 7. Workshop participants will be accomodated in Hotel Marsal, only couple of minutes by foot from the Olympic ski slopes. ABOUT THE WORKSHOP This edition is the sixth in a series of workshops that were previously organised in Poland, Slovakia, France and Portugal. Following the succesful meeting in 2013, the Workshop is returning to Sarajevo Olympic mountains in 2014, exactly thirty years after the Games. The workshop covers diverse aspects of QCD: (i) QCD at low energies: excited hadrons, glueballs, multiquarks. (ii) QCD at high temperatures and large densities: heavy-ion collisions, jets, diffraction, hadronisation, quark-...

  8. Stochastic hierarchical systems: excitable dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Helmar; Zaks, Michael A; Falcke, Martin; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2008-10-01

    We present a discrete model of stochastic excitability by a low-dimensional set of delayed integral equations governing the probability in the rest state, the excited state, and the refractory state. The process is a random walk with discrete states and nonexponential waiting time distributions, which lead to the incorporation of memory kernels in the integral equations. We extend the equations of a single unit to the system of equations for an ensemble of globally coupled oscillators, derive the mean field equations, and investigate bifurcations of steady states. Conditions of destabilization are found, which imply oscillations of the mean fields in the stochastic ensemble. The relation between the mean field equations and the paradigmatic Kuramoto model is shown.

  9. Uniform magnetic excitations in nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Hansen, Britt Rosendahl

    2005-01-01

    We have used a spin-wave model to calculate the temperature dependence of the (sublattice) magnetization of magnetic nanoparticles. The uniform precession mode, corresponding to a spin wave with wave vector q=0, is predominant in nanoparticles and gives rise to an approximately linear temperature...... dependence of the (sublattice) magnetization well below the superparamagnetic blocking temperature for both ferro-, ferri-, and antiferromagnetic particles. This is in accordance with the results of a classical model for collective magnetic excitations in nanoparticles. In nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic...... materials, quantum effects give rise to a small deviation from the linear temperature dependence of the (sublattice) magnetization at very low temperatures. The complex nature of the excited precession states of nanoparticles of antiferromagnetic materials, with deviations from antiparallel orientation...

  10. Your Health Buddies Matter: Preferential Selection and Social Influence on Weight Management in an Online Health Social Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jingbo

    2016-12-01

    A growing number of online social networks are designed with the intention to promote health by providing virtual space wherein individuals can seek and share information and support with similar others. Research has shown that real-world social networks have a significant influence on one's health behavior and outcomes. However, there is a dearth of studies on how individuals form social networks in virtual space and whether such online social networks exert any impact on individuals' health outcomes. Built on the Multi-Theoretical Multilevel (MTML) framework and drawing from literature on social influence, this study examined the mechanisms underlying the formation of an online health social network and empirically tested social influence on individual health outcomes through the network. Situated in a weight management social networking site, the study tracked a health buddy network of 709 users and their weight management activities and outcomes for 4 months. Actor-based modeling was used to test the joint dynamics of preferential selection and social influence among health buddies. The results showed that baseline, inbreeding, and health status homophily significantly predicted preferential selection of health buddies in the weight management social networking site, whereas self-interest in seeking experiential health information did not. The study also found peer influence of online health buddy networks on individual weight outcomes, such that an individual's odds of losing weight increased if, on average, the individual's health buddies were losing weight.

  11. Integrated Geophysical Investigation of Preferential Flow Paths at the Former Tyson Valley Powder Farm near Eureka, Missouri, May 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Bethany L.; Ball, Lyndsay B.; Stanton, Gregory P.; Hobza, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    In May 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, conducted surface and borehole geophysical surveys at the former Tyson Valley Powder Farm near Eureka, Mo., to identify preferential pathways for potential contaminant transport along the bedrock surface and into dissolution-enhanced fractures. The Tyson Valley Powder Farm was formerly used as a munitions storage and disposal facility in the 1940s and 1950s, and the site at which the surveys were performed was a disposal area for munitions and waste solvents such as trichloroethylene and dichloroethylene. Direct-current resistivity and seismic refraction data were acquired on the surface; gamma, electromagnetic induction, and full waveform sonic logs were acquired in accessible boreholes. Through the combined interpretation of the seismic refraction tomographic and resistivity inversion results and borehole logs, inconsistencies in the bedrock surface were identified that may provide horizontal preferential flow paths for dense nonaqueous phase liquid contaminants. These results, interpreted and displayed in georeferenced three-dimensional space, should help to establish more effective monitoring and remediation strategies.

  12. Gravitational wave sources from Pop III stars are preferentially located within the cores of their host Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacucci, Fabio; Loeb, Abraham; Salvadori, Stefania

    2017-10-01

    The detection of gravitational waves (GWs) generated by merging black holes has recently opened up a new observational window into the Universe. The mass of the black holes in the first and third Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) detections (36-29 M⊙ and 32-19 M⊙) suggests low-metallicity stars as their most likely progenitors. Based on high-resolution N-body simulations, coupled with state-of-the-art metal enrichment models, we find that the remnants of Pop III stars are preferentially located within the cores of galaxies. The probability of a GW signal to be generated by Pop III stars reaches ∼90 per cent at ∼0.5 kpc from the galaxy centre, compared to a benchmark value of ∼5 per cent outside the core. The predicted merger rates inside bulges is ∼60 × βIII Gpc-3 yr-1 (βIII is the Pop III binarity fraction). To match the 90 per cent credible range of LIGO merger rates, we obtain: 0.03 < βIII < 0.88. Future advances in GW observatories and the discovery of possible electromagnetic counterparts could allow the localization of such sources within their host galaxies. The preferential concentration of GW events within the bulge of galaxies would then provide an indirect proof for the existence of Pop III stars.

  13. Selenium Preferentially Accumulates in the Eye Lens Following Embryonic Exposure: A Confocal X-ray Fluorescence Imaging Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Sanjukta; Thomas, Jith; Sylvain, Nicole J.; Ponomarenko, Olena; Gordon, Robert A.; Heald, Steve M.; Janz, David M.; Krone, Patrick H.; Coulthard, Ian; George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.

    2015-02-17

    Maternal transfer of elevated selenium (Se) to offspring is an important route of Se exposure for fish in the natural environment. However, there is a lack of information on the tissue specific spatial distribution and speciation of Se in the early developmental stages of fish, which provide important information about Se toxicokinetics. The effect of maternal transfer of Se was studied by feeding adult zebrafish a Se-elevated or a control diet followed by collection of larvae from both groups. Novel confocal synchrotron-based techniques were used to investigate Se within intact preserved larvae. Confocal X-ray fluorescence imaging was used to compare Se distributions within specific planes of an intact larva from each of the two groups. The elevated Se treatment showed substantially higher Se levels than the control; Se preferentially accumulated to highest levels in the eye lens, with lower levels in the retina, yolk and other tissues. Confocal X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to determine that the speciation of Se within the eye lens of the intact larva was a selenomethionine-like species. Preferential accumulation of Se in the eye lens may suggest a direct cause-and-effect relationship between exposure to elevated Se and Se-induced ocular impairments reported previously. This study illustrates the effectiveness of confocal X-ray fluorescence methods for investigating trace element distribution and speciation in intact biological specimens

  14. Gravitational wave sources from Pop III stars are preferentially located within the cores of their host Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacucci, Fabio; Loeb, Abraham; Salvadori, Stefania

    2017-10-01

    The detection of gravitational waves (GWs) generated by merging black holes has recently opened up a new observational window into the Universe. The mass of the black holes in the first and third LIGO detections, ($36-29 \\, \\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$ and $32-19 \\, \\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$), suggests low-metallicity stars as their most likely progenitors. Based on high-resolution N-body simulations, coupled with state-of-the-art metal enrichment models, we find that the remnants of Pop III stars are preferentially located within the cores of galaxies. The probability of a GW signal to be generated by Pop III stars reaches $\\sim 90\\%$ at $\\sim 0.5 \\, \\mathrm{kpc}$ from the galaxy center, compared to a benchmark value of $\\sim 5\\%$ outside the core. The predicted merger rates inside bulges is $\\sim 60 \\times \\beta_{III} \\, \\mathrm{Gpc^{-3} \\, yr^{-1}}$ ($\\beta_{III}$ is the Pop III binarity fraction). To match the $90\\%$ credible range of LIGO merger rates, we obtain: $0.03 < \\beta_{III} < 0.88$. Future advances in GW observatories and the discovery of possible electromagnetic counterparts could allow the localization of such sources within their host galaxies. The preferential concentration of GW events within the bulge of galaxies would then provide an indirect proof for the existence of Pop III stars.

  15. Can Internal Conversion BE Controlled by Mode-Specific Vibrational Excitation in Polyatomic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnov, Alexander; Epshtein, Michael; Bar, Ilana

    2017-06-01

    Nonadiabatic processes, dominated by dynamic passage of reactive fluxes through conical intersections (CIs) are considered to be appealing means for manipulating reaction paths. One approach that is considered to be effective in controlling the course of dissociation processes is the selective excitation of vibrational modes containing a considerable component of motion. Here, we have chosen to study the predissociation of the model test molecule, methylamine and its deuterated isotopologues, excited to well-characterized quantum states on the first excited electronic state, S_{1}, by following the N-H(D) bond fission dynamics through sensitive H(D) photofragment probing. The branching ratios between slow and fast H(D) photofragments, the internal energies of their counter radical photofragments and the anisotropy parameters for fast H photofragments, confirm correlated anomalies for predissociation initiated from specific rovibronic states, reflecting the existence of a dynamic resonance in each molecule. This resonance strongly depends on the energy of the initially excited rovibronic states, the evolving vibrational mode on the repulsive S_{1} part during N-H(D) bond elongation, and the manipulated passage through the CI that leads to radicals excited with C-N-H(D) bending and preferential perpendicular bond breaking, relative to the photolyzing laser polarization, in molecules containing the NH_{2} group. The indicated resonance plays an important role in the bifurcation dynamics at the CI and can be foreseen to exist in other photoinitiated processes and to control their outcome.

  16. Characteristics of Excitable Dog Behavior Based on Owners’ Report from a Self-Selected Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabelansky, Anastasia; Dowling-Guyer, Seana

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary This study provides information about owners’ experiences with their dogs’ excitable behavior. We found that certain daily scenarios tended to prompt excitable behavior. The majority of owners in this self-selected sample were very frustrated with their excitable dog. Many dogs in the sample had other behavior problems. Abstract Past research has found that excitable dog behavior is prevalent among sheltered and owned dogs and many times is a reason for canine relinquishment. In spite of its prevalence in the canine population, excitable behavior is relatively unstudied in the scientific literature. The intent of this research was to understand the experience of owners of excitable dogs through the analysis of self-administered online questionnaires completed by owners as part of another study. We found that certain daily scenarios tended to prompt excitable behavior, with excitability most common when the owner or other people came to the dog’s home. All owners experienced some level of frustration with their dog’s excitable behavior, with the majority being very frustrated. Many dogs in the sample had other behavior problems, with disobedient, destructive, chasing and barking behaviors being the most commonly reported. Other characteristics of excitable dogs also are discussed. Although the ability to generalize from these results is likely limited, due to targeted recruitment and selection of owners of more excitable dogs, this research provides valuable insights into the owner’s experience of excitable behavior. We hope this study prompts more research into canine excitable behavior which would expand our understanding of this behavior and help behaviorists, veterinarians, and shelters develop tools for managing it, as well as provide better education to owners of excitable dogs. PMID:26999222

  17. Inert Carbon Nanoparticles for the Assessment of Preferential Flow in Saturated Dual-Permeability Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Chuanjin

    2017-06-07

    Knowledge of preferential flow in heterogeneous environments is essential for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery, geothermal energy extraction, and successful sequestration of chemical waste and carbon dioxide. Dual tracer tests using nanoparticles with a chemical tracer could indicate the preferential flow. A dual-permeability model with a high permeable core channel surrounded by a low permeable annulus was constructed and used to determine the viability of an inert carbon nanoparticle tracer for this application. A series of column experiments were conducted to demonstrate how this nanoparticle tracer can be used to implement the dual tracer tests in heterogeneous environments. The results indicate that, with the injection rate selected and controlled appropriately, nanoparticles together with a chemical tracer can assess the preferential flow in heterogeneous environments. The results also implement the dual tracer tests in heterogeneous environments by simultaneously injecting chemical and nanoparticle tracers.

  18. How Medical Tourism Enables Preferential Access to Care: Four Patterns from the Canadian Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jeremy; Johnston, Rory; Crooks, Valorie A; Morgan, Jeff; Adams, Krystyna

    2017-06-01

    Medical tourism is the practice of traveling across international borders with the intention of accessing medical care, paid for out-of-pocket. This practice has implications for preferential access to medical care for Canadians both through inbound and outbound medical tourism. In this paper, we identify four patterns of medical tourism with implications for preferential access to care by Canadians: (1) Inbound medical tourism to Canada's public hospitals; (2) Inbound medical tourism to a First Nations reserve; (3) Canadian patients opting to go abroad for medical tourism; and (4) Canadian patients traveling abroad with a Canadian surgeon. These patterns of medical tourism affect preferential access to health care by Canadians by circumventing domestic regulation of care, creating jurisdictional tensions over the provision of health care, and undermining solidarity with the Canadian health system.

  19. Automatic attention does not equal automatic fear: preferential attention without implicit valence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkis, Helena M; Lipp, Ottmar V

    2007-05-01

    Theories of nonassociative fear acquisition hold that humans have an innate predisposition for some fears, such as fear of snakes and spiders. This predisposition may be mediated by an evolved fear module (Ohman & Mineka, 2001) that responds to basic perceptual features of threat stimuli by directing attention preferentially and generating an automatic fear response. Visual search and affective priming tasks were used to examine attentional processing and implicit evaluation of snake and spider pictures in participants with different explicit attitudes; controls (n = 25) and snake and spider experts (n = 23). Attentional processing and explicit evaluation were found to diverge; snakes and spiders were preferentially attended to by all participants; however, they were negative only for controls. Implicit evaluations of dangerous and nondangerous snakes and spiders, which have similar perceptual features, differed for expert participants, but not for controls. The authors suggest that although snakes and spiders are preferentially attended to, negative evaluations are not automatically elicited during this processing.

  20. Kinds and meaning of preferential credits for development of agriculture and rural areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Mickiewicz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The theme of the paper was of preferential credits granted in two periods, that means after Poland’s accession to the European Union (2004-2006 and in the period after introduction of new legal regulations (2007-2010. The institution responsible for realisation of preferential credits was Agency of Restructuring and Modernisation of Agriculture which delegated its rights to banks. The credit policy in first period of our functioning in the European Union relied on gradual ending old legal regulations, not compliant with EU standards and undertaking activities in adaptation of Polish agriculture to standards obeyed in EU-15 Member States. Directions of preferential credits granting were changed in 2007. There were introduced 7 credit lines which aim was improvement of production efficiency, better use of production base in agricultural farms and acceleration of agrarian changes. The biggest beneficiaries of structural pensions were young farmers and farmers who wanted to increase the size of their farms.

  1. A Zone of Preferential Ion Heating Extends Tens of Solar Radii from the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, J. C.; Klein, K. G.; Weber, T.; Maksimovic, M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Bale, S. D.; Maruca, B. A.; Stevens, M. L.; Case, A. W.

    2017-11-01

    The extreme temperatures and nonthermal nature of the solar corona and solar wind arise from an unidentified physical mechanism that preferentially heats certain ion species relative to others. Spectroscopic indicators of unequal temperatures commence within a fraction of a solar radius above the surface of the Sun, but the outer reach of this mechanism has yet to be determined. Here we present an empirical procedure for combining interplanetary solar wind measurements and a modeled energy equation including Coulomb relaxation to solve for the typical outer boundary of this zone of preferential heating. Applied to two decades of observations by the Wind spacecraft, our results are consistent with preferential heating being active in a zone extending from the transition region in the lower corona to an outer boundary 20–40 solar radii from the Sun, producing a steady-state super-mass-proportional α-to-proton temperature ratio of 5.2–5.3. Preferential ion heating continues far beyond the transition region and is important for the evolution of both the outer corona and the solar wind. The outer boundary of this zone is well below the orbits of spacecraft at 1 au and even closer missions such as Helios and MESSENGER, meaning it is likely that no existing mission has directly observed intense preferential heating, just residual signatures. We predict that the Parker Solar Probe will be the first spacecraft with a perihelion sufficiently close to the Sun to pass through the outer boundary, enter the zone of preferential heating, and directly observe the physical mechanism in action.

  2. Broad-Band Analysis of Polar Motion Excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.

    2016-12-01

    Earth rotational changes, i.e. polar motion and length-of-day (LOD), are driven by two types of geophysical excitations: 1) mass redistribution within the Earth system, and 2) angular momentum exchange between the solid Earth (more precisely the crust) and other components of the Earth system. Accurate quantification of Earth rotational excitations has been difficult, due to the lack of global-scale observations of mass redistribution and angular momentum exchange. The over 14-years time-variable gravity measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) have provided a unique means for quantifying Earth rotational excitations from mass redistribution in different components of the climate system. Comparisons between observed Earth rotational changes and geophysical excitations estimated from GRACE, satellite laser ranging (SLR) and climate models show that GRACE-derived excitations agree remarkably well with polar motion observations over a broad-band of frequencies. GRACE estimates also suggest that accelerated polar region ice melting in recent years and corresponding sea level rise have played an important role in driving long-term polar motion as well. With several estimates of polar motion excitations, it is possible to estimate broad-band noise variance and noise power spectra in each, given reasonable assumptions about noise independence. Results based on GRACE CSR RL05 solutions clearly outperform other estimates with the lowest noise levels over a broad band of frequencies.

  3. When and where does preferential flow matter - from observation to large scale modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Markus; Leistert, Hannes; Steinbrich, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Preferential flow can be of relevance in a wide range of soils and the interaction of different processes and factors are still difficult to assess. As most studies (including our own studies) focusing on the effect of preferential flow are based on relatively high precipitation rates, there is always the question how relevant preferential flow is under natural conditions, considering the site specific precipitation characteristics, the effect of the drying and wetting cycle on the initial soil water condition and shrinkage cracks, the site specific soil properties, soil structure and rock fragments, and the effect of plant roots and soil fauna (e.g. earthworm channels). In order to assess this question, we developed the distributed, process-based model RoGeR (Runoff Generation Research) to include a large number relevant features and processes of preferential flow in soils. The model was developed from a large number of process based research and experiments and includes preferential flow in roots, earthworm channels, along rock fragments and shrinkage cracks. We parameterized the uncalibrated model at a high spatial resolution of 5x5m for the whole state of Baden-Württemberg in Germany using LiDAR data, degree of sealing, landuse, soil properties and geology. As the model is an event based model, we derived typical event based precipitation characteristics based on rainfall duration, mean intensity and amount. Using the site-specific variability of initial soil moisture derived from a water balance model based on the same dataset, we simulated the infiltration and recharge amounts of all event classes derived from the event precipitation characteristics and initial soil moisture conditions. The analysis of the simulation results allowed us to extracts the relevance of preferential flow for infiltration and recharge considering all factors above. We could clearly see a strong effect of the soil properties and land-use, but also, particular for clay rich soils a

  4. Excitation system testing in HPP 'Uvac'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milojčić Nemanja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The excitation system of hydro unit in HPP 'Uvac' and results of testings of excitation system performed for achieving of unit's mathematical model are presented in this paper. Description of excitation system equipment, parameters of regulators and results obtained after testings are presented. The presented results showed that the regulators are properly adjusted and that the excitation system is completely functional and reliable.

  5. First 3- excited state of Fe56

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiades, N.; Nelson, R. O.; Devlin, M.

    2010-03-01

    There is no reliable evidence for the existence of the 3.076 MeV (3-) level adopted in the ENSDF evaluation for Fe56 although it has been reported in a few experiments. Previous reports of the observation of this level appear to be based on an incorrect assignment in early (e,e') work. Recent neutron inelastic scattering measurements by Demidov [Phys. At. Nucl. 67, 1884, (2004)] show that the assigned γ-ray decay of this state does not occur at a level consistent with known properties of inelastic scattering. In the present work the Fe56(n,n'γ) reaction was used to populate excited states in Fe56. Neutrons in the energy range from 1 to 250 MeV were provided by the pulsed neutron source of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center’s WNR facility. Deexciting γ rays were detected with the GEANIE spectrometer, a Compton suppressed array of 26 Ge detectors. The γ-γ data obtained with GEANIE were used to establish coincidence relations between transitions. All previously reported levels up to Ex=3.6 MeV excitation energy were observed except for the 3.076 MeV (3-) level. The 991- and 2229-keV transitions, previously reported to deexcite this level, were not observed in the γ-γ coincidence data obtained in the present experiment. The present work supports the assignment of the 4509.6 keV level as the first 3- excited state in Fe56 by observation of two previously known transitions deexciting this state.

  6. Femtosecond laser excitation of dielectric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Balling, Peter; Frislev, Martin Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We report an approach to modeling the interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and dielectric materials. The model includes the excitation of carriers by the laser through strongfield excitation, collisional excitation, and absorption in the plasma consisting of conduction-band electrons formed...

  7. IFI16 Preferentially Binds to DNA with Quadruplex Structure and Enhances DNA Quadruplex Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hároníková, Lucia; Coufal, Jan; Kejnovská, Iva; Jagelská, Eva B; Fojta, Miroslav; Dvořáková, Petra; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Brázda, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) is a member of the HIN-200 protein family, containing two HIN domains and one PYRIN domain. IFI16 acts as a sensor of viral and bacterial DNA and is important for innate immune responses. IFI16 binds DNA and binding has been described to be DNA length-dependent, but a preference for supercoiled DNA has also been demonstrated. Here we report a specific preference of IFI16 for binding to quadruplex DNA compared to other DNA structures. IFI16 binds to quadruplex DNA with significantly higher affinity than to the same sequence in double stranded DNA. By circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy we also demonstrated the ability of IFI16 to stabilize quadruplex structures with quadruplex-forming oligonucleotides derived from human telomere (HTEL) sequences and the MYC promotor. A novel H/D exchange mass spectrometry approach was developed to assess protein interactions with quadruplex DNA. Quadruplex DNA changed the IFI16 deuteration profile in parts of the PYRIN domain (aa 0-80) and in structurally identical parts of both HIN domains (aa 271-302 and aa 586-617) compared to single stranded or double stranded DNAs, supporting the preferential affinity of IFI16 for structured DNA. Our results reveal the importance of quadruplex DNA structure in IFI16 binding and improve our understanding of how IFI16 senses DNA. IFI16 selectivity for quadruplex structure provides a mechanistic framework for IFI16 in immunity and cellular processes including DNA damage responses and cell proliferation.

  8. Nicotinamide preferentially protects glycolysis in dermal fibroblasts under oxidative stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovito, H A; Oblong, J E

    2013-07-01

    Daily exposure of human skin to environmental insults such as solar radiation, pollution and smoke can lead to an elevation of oxidative stress, causing premature acceleration of skin ageing. Oxidative stress is known to disrupt cellular metabolism, which negatively impacts the skin's functionality at the cellular and tissue level. To examine the changes in cellular metabolism due to oxidative stress. Glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation rates in human dermal fibroblasts were monitored in real time under controlled nonlethal oxidative stress conditions. Hydrogen peroxide was utilized as a surrogate stressor because numerous environmental stressors as well as intrinsic ageing trigger its production. Hydrogen peroxide ranging between 0.5 and 3 mmol L(-1) caused a significant decrease in glycolytic and oxidative phosphorylation rates along with cellular ATP levels. Nicotinamide (NAM) was found to protect dose dependently as well as restore glycolytic rates concurrent with restoring ATP to control levels. NAM had an effective dose-response range between 0.1 and 1.0 mmol L(-1) , with maximal effects attained at 0.5 mmol L(-1) . Relative to oxidative phosphorylation, NAM was able to provide a diminished level of protection. FK866, a known NAM phosphoribosyltransferase inhibitor, was found to inhibit the protective effects of NAM significantly, suggesting part of the NAM mechanism of action involves nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+) ) synthesis. These results support previous findings that NAM protects cellular metabolism from oxidative stress by preferentially affecting glycolysis. Additionally, part of its mechanism of action appears to include NAD(+) synthesis. © 2013 The Authors BJD © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  9. Alu elements in primates are preferentially lost from areas of high GC content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookfield, John FY

    2013-01-01

    The currently-accepted dogma when analysing human Alu transposable elements is that ‘young’ Alu elements are found in low GC regions and ‘old’ Alus in high GC regions. The correlation between high GC regions and high gene frequency regions make this observation particularly difficult to explain. Although a number of studies have tackled the problem, no analysis has definitively explained the reason for this trend. These observations have been made by relying on the subfamily as a proxy for age of an element. In this study, we suggest that this is a misleading assumption and instead analyse the relationship between the taxonomic distribution of an individual element and its surrounding GC environment. An analysis of 103906 Alu elements across 6 human chromosomes was carried out, using the presence of orthologous Alu elements in other primate species as a proxy for age. We show that the previously-reported effect of GC content correlating with subfamily age is not reflected by the ages of the individual elements. Instead, elements are preferentially lost from areas of high GC content over time. The correlation between GC content and subfamily may be due to a change in insertion bias in the young subfamilies. The link between Alu subfamily age and GC region was made due to an over-simplification of the data and is incorrect. We suggest that use of subfamilies as a proxy for age is inappropriate and that the analysis of ortholog presence in other primate species provides a deeper insight into the data. PMID:23717800

  10. Points mean prizes: priority points, preferential status and directed organ donation in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Antonia J

    2014-02-24

    The introduction of Israel's new Organ Transplantation Act in 2010 has enabled the development of a unique priority point system aimed at motivating individual's to donate their organ. The priority point system rewards those who are willing to donate an organ with preferential status and an increased chance of receiving a donor organ, should they come to be in need of one. Preliminary evidence suggests it has considerable public support among Israelis, who appear willing to redress the challenge posed by those who are willing to accept an organ but not willing to donate. Since the Act's introduction Israel has witnessed record numbers signing donor cards and there has been a significant increase in the actual numbers of transplants.One aspect of the new Israeli system that has hitherto not much been considered is its tendency towards a communitarian model of organ donation and the implications this change in emphasis may have for the existing 'opt-in' model based upon autonomy and consent. Gil Siegel draws our attention to this aspect when he sets out his defence of a proposal he refers to as 'directed organ donation to other registered donors', which encourages community responsibility without affecting the established commitment to consent and individual freedom.This commentary provides a brief overview of the new Act and its priority point system. It also examines Siegel's proposal and considers the implications it may have for equity and justice, personal choice and dispositional authority. It is argued that although the proposal brings with it several inevitable hurdles for policy makers these are not insurmountable. Rather, its extraordinary potential to save life and avoid suffering should prompt urgent action at policy level. If such a scheme was successfully implemented in Israel it would represent a landmark change in organ donation and allocation policy, and set an example from which we all could learn.

  11. Turbulent swirling jets with excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, Rahmat; Farokhi, Saeed

    1988-01-01

    An existing cold-jet facility at NASA Lewis Research Center was modified to produce swirling flows with controllable initial tangential velocity distribution. Two extreme swirl profiles, i.e., one with solid-body rotation and the other predominated by a free-vortex distribution, were produced at identical swirl number of 0.48. Mean centerline velocity decay characteristics of the solid-body rotation jet flow exhibited classical decay features of a swirling jet with S - 0.48 reported in the literature. However, the predominantly free-vortex distribution case was on the verge of vortex breakdown, a phenomenon associated with the rotating flows of significantly higher swirl numbers, i.e., S sub crit greater than or equal to 0.06. This remarkable result leads to the conclusion that the integrated swirl effect, reflected in the swirl number, is inadequate in describing the mean swirling jet behavior in the near field. The relative size (i.e., diameter) of the vortex core emerging from the nozzle and the corresponding tangential velocity distribution are also controlling factors. Excitability of swirling jets is also investigated by exciting a flow with a swirl number of 0.35 by plane acoustic waves at a constant sound pressure level and at various frequencies. It is observed that the cold swirling jet is excitable by plane waves, and that the instability waves grow about 50 percent less in peak r.m.s. amplitude and saturate further upstream compared to corresponding waves in a jet without swirl having the same axial mass flux. The preferred Strouhal number based on the mass-averaged axial velocity and nozzle exit diameter for both swirling and nonswirling flows is 0.4.

  12. Combined effects of dissolution kinetics, secondary mineral precipitation, and preferential flow on copper leaching from mining waste rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Nils; Destouni, Georgia

    A probabilistic Lagrangian approach to reactive subsurface transport is used to investigate possible processes that may explain reported discrepancies between modelled and observed copper concentrations at the Aitik waste rock heaps in northern Sweden and to quantify the implications of these processes for the long-term dynamics of copper leaching. The presented Lagrangian transport system couples two different types of primary dissolution kinetics with flow heterogeneity and pH-dependent equilibrium precipitation/dissolution of secondary copper-bearing minerals. Of the investigated processes, which we chose to study based on previous geochemical studies of the site, only flow heterogeneity in the form of preferential flow paths can provide a possible explanation for the low drainage water concentrations of copper currently measured in the field. The investigated pH-dependent precipitation-dissolution of secondary copper bearing minerals provides an explanation for even lower copper concentrations observed in laboratory column experiments in fresh waste rock; these experiments correspond to the initial part of the weathering phase in the field. If both preferential flow and secondary copper precipitation/dissolution occur at the Aitik site, the assumed prevailing type of primary dissolution kinetics does not influence the modelled expected long-term copper leaching nearly as much as it does under homogeneous flow conditions without formation of secondary minerals. The present sensitivity analysis does not provide a comprehensive prediction model for the Aitik site, since not all possible hydrological and chemical processes have been included in the investigation. This study rather exemplifies the application of the probabilistic Lagrangian approach as an investigation methodology for field-scale geochemical problems by using and extending results of detailed geochemical modelling.

  13. Hypoxia preferentially destroys GABAergic neurons in developing rat neocortex explants in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romijn, H. J.; Ruijter, J. M.; Wolters, P. S.

    1988-01-01

    The hypothesis that hypoxic ischemia before or during the human birth process preferentially destroys GABAergic nerve cells, particularly in the neocortex, was tested in a tissue culture model system. To that end, rat neocortex explants dissected from 6-day-old rat pups and cultured to a

  14. Quantification of the influence of preferential flow on slope stability using a numerical modeling approach (discussions)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shao, W.; Bogaard, T.A.; Bakker, M.; Greco, R.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of preferential flow on the stability of landslides is studied through numerical simulation of two types of rainfall events on a hypothetical hillslope. A model is developed that consists of two parts. The first part is a model for combined saturated/unsaturated subsurface flow and is

  15. Preferential aerosolization of bacteria in bioaerosols generated in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrott, P; Turgeon, N; Gauthier-Levesque, L; Duchaine, C

    2017-09-01

    Little is known about how bacteria are aerosolized in terms of whether some bacteria will be found in the air more readily than others that are present in the source. This report describes in vitro experiments to compare aerosolization rates (also known as preferential aerosolization) of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as rod- and coccus-shaped bacteria, using two nebulization conditions. A consortium of five bacterial species was aerosolized in a homemade chamber. Aerosols generated with a commercial nebulizer and a homemade bubble-burst aerosol generator were compared. Data suggest that Pseudomonas aeruginosa was preferentially aerosolized in comparison to Moraxella catarrhalis, Lactobacillus paracasei, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus suis, independently of the method of aerosolization. Bacterial integrity of Strep. suis was more preserved compared to other bacteria studied as revealed with PMA-qPCR. We reported the design of an aerosol chamber and bubble-burst generator for the in vitro study of preferential aerosolization. In our setting, preferential aerosolization was influenced by bacterial properties instead of aerosolization mechanism. These findings could have important implications for predicting the composition of bioaerosols in various locations such as wastewater treatment plants, agricultural settings and health care settings. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. An elaboration of theory about preventing outbreaks in homogeneous populations to include heterogeneity or preferential mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhilan; Hill, Andrew N.; Smith, Philip J.; Glasser, John W.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of many vaccination programs is to attain the population immunity above which pathogens introduced by infectious people (e.g., travelers from endemic areas) will not cause outbreaks. Using a simple meta-population model, we demonstrate that, if sub-populations either differ in characteristics affecting their basic reproduction numbers or if their members mix preferentially, weighted average sub-population immunities cannot be compared with the proportionally-mixing homogeneous population-immunity threshold, as public health practitioners are wont to do. Then we review the effect of heterogeneity in average per capita contact rates on the basic meta-population reproduction number. To the extent that population density affects contacts, for example, rates might differ in urban and rural sub-populations. Other differences among sub-populations in characteristics affecting their basic reproduction numbers would contribute similarly. In agreement with more recent results, we show that heterogeneous preferential mixing among sub-populations increases the basic meta-population reproduction number more than homogeneous preferential mixing does. Next we refine earlier results on the effects of heterogeneity in sub-population immunities and preferential mixing on the effective meta-population reproduction number. Finally, we propose the vector of partial derivatives of the reproduction number with respect to the sub-population immunities as a fundamentally new tool for targeting vaccination efforts. PMID:26375548

  17. Influence of sampling strategy on detecting preferential flow paths in water-repellent sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.

    1996-01-01

    A sample spacing up to 22 cm over a distance of several metres is just sufficient to collect information about preferential flow paths in a water-repellent sandy soil. When larger sample spacings were used, the water content distributions became more horizontally stratified. Increasing the sample

  18. Unsteady behavior of locally strained diffusion flames affected by curvature and preferential diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Kenji; Takagi, Toshimi

    1999-07-01

    Experimental and numerical studies are made of transient H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}--air counterflow diffusion flames unsteadily strained by an impinging micro jet. Two-dimensional temperature measurements by laser Rayleigh scattering method and numerical computations taking into account detailed chemical kinetics are conducted paying attention to transient local extinction and reignition in relation to the unsteadiness, flame curvature and preferential diffusion effects. The results are as follows. (1) Transient local flame extinction is observed where the micro jet impinges. But, the transient flame can survive instantaneously in spite of quite high stretch rate where the steady flame cannot exist. (2) Reignition is observed after the local extinction due to the micro air jet impingement. The temperature after reignition becomes significantly higher than that of the original flame. This high temperature is induced by the concentration of H{sub 2} species due to the preferential diffusion in relation to the concave curvature. The predicted behaviors of the local transient extinction and reignition are well confirmed by the experiments. (3) The reignition is induced after the formation of combustible premixed gas mixture and the consequent flame propagation. (4) The reignition is hardly observed after the extinction by micro fuel jet impingement. This is due to the dilution of H{sub 2} species induced by the preferential diffusion in relation to the convex curvature. (5) The maximum flame temperature cannot be rationalized by the stretch rate but changes widely depending on the unsteadiness and the flame curvature in relation with preferential diffusion.

  19. Is there a preferential interaction between cholesterol and tryptophan residues in membrane proteins?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holt, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837423; de Almeida, R.F.M.; Nyholm, T.K.M.; Loura, L.M.S.; Daily, A.E.; Staffhorst, R.W.H.M.; Rijkers, D.T.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126713758; Koeppe II, R.E.; Prieto, M.; Killian, J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071792317

    2008-01-01

    Recently, several indications have been found that suggest a preferential interaction between cholesterol and tryptophan residues located near the membrane-water interface. The aim of this study was to investigate by direct methods how tryptophan and cholesterol interact with each other and what the

  20. 19 CFR 10.233 - Articles eligible for preferential tariff treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the territory of any country that is not a CBTPA beneficiary country, the articles in the shipment do... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Articles eligible for preferential tariff... SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United...

  1. Preferential flow of bromide, bentazon, and imidacloprid in a Dutch clay soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scorza Júnior, R.P.; Smelt, J.H.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Hendriks, R.F.A.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2004-01-01

    Leaching to ground water and tile drains are important parts of the environmental assessment of pesticides. The aims of the present study were to (i) assess the significance of preferential flow for pesticide leaching under realistic worst-case conditions for Dutch agriculture (soil profile with

  2. Preferential Trade Arrangements, Induced Investment, and National Income in a Heckscher-Ohlin-Ramsey Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. François (Joseph); M. Rombout

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe develop a Heckscher-Ohlin-Ramsey model, combining dual techniques with classic geometric techniques from trade theory. This framework is used to explore the long-run general equilibrium effects of regional integration (preferential trade agreements). Emphasis is placed on positive

  3. 19 CFR 10.470 - Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment. 10.470 Section 10.470 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF... identification of the types of machinery used in production, and the number of workers employed in production...

  4. Preferential processing of visual trauma-film reminders predicts subsequent intrusive memories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwoerd, J.R.L.; Wessel, I.; De Jong, P.J.; Nieuwenhuis, Maurice

    2009-01-01

    This study used an analogue design to test the hypothesis that preferential processing of visual trauma reminders in the aftermath of a stressful or traumatic event gives rise to subsequent intrusive memories. Shortly after the presentation of a stressful film fragment, participants (n=36) were

  5. Preferential Trade Agreements and the Law and Politics of GATT Article XXIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alavi, Amin

    2010-01-01

    The tasks Preferential Trade Agreements (PTAs) perform are expressed in their scope and covered issues, thus in order to be WTO compatible these aspects of PTAs should comply with the relevant WTO rules. This paper examines which aspects of PTAs can violate these rules and therefore can be challe...

  6. Preferential HLA usage in the influenza virus-specific CTL response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.M. Boon (Adrianus); G. de Mutsert (Gerrie); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); K. Sintnicolaas (Krijn); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractTo study whether individual HLA class I alleles are used preferentially or equally in human virus-specific CTL responses, the contribution of individual HLA-A and -B alleles to the human influenza virus-specific CTL response was investigated. To this end, PBMC were obtained from three

  7. Exploring the antecedents of preferential customer treatment by suppliers: a mixed methods approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huttinger, Lisa; Schiele, Holger; Schröer, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to understand the factors that influence a supplier’s choice to treat selected customers more preferentially than others. Suppliers often lack the resources to treat all their customers equally, instead having to make choices to treat some customers as preferred. Empirical

  8. Relativistic Coulomb excitation of {sup 88}Kr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moschner, Kevin; Blazhev, Andrey; Jolie, Jan; Warr, Nigel; Wendt, Andreas [IKP, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Collaboration: PreSPEC-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Within the scope of the PreSPEC campaign we performed a Coulomb-excitation experiment to determine absolute E2 transition strengths to 2{sup +} states in the radioactive nucleus {sup 88}Kr. The aim of our studies was to identify the one quadruple-phonon mixed-symmetry 2{sub MS}{sup +} state in order to extend our knowledge on these states to lighter N = 52 isotones and to track their evolution over different proton shells. The investigated ions were provided through projectile fission of a 650 MeV {sup 238}U beam on a primary target consisting of 0.6 g/cm{sup 2} {sup 9}Be and subsequent separation and identification of the reaction products via the FRS at GSI. The secondary target consisted of 0.4 g/cm{sup 2} {sup 197}Au. De-exciting γ radiation was detected by the PreSPEC array, consisting of 15 EUROBALL Cluster detectors. The Lund-York-Cologne-CAlorimeter LYCCA was used for particle identification after the secondary target. Absolute transition strengths of the transitions depopulating the 2{sup +}{sub 3} state in {sup 88}Kr which suggest the mixed symmetric character of this state are presented and discussed within the systematics of the N = 52 isotones.

  9. Excited state Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Anthralin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Andersen, Kristine B.; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results in an unus......Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results......, associated with an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process....

  10. Excitation of surface electromagnetic waves on water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A K; Goben, C A; Davarpanah, M; Boone, J L

    1978-11-01

    Excitation of surface electromagnetic waves (SEW) on water was studied using optical coupling techniques at microwave frequencies. Excitation of SEW was also achieved using direct horn antenna coupling. The transmitted SEW power was increased by adding acid and salt to water. The horn antenna gave the maximum excitation efficiency 70%. It was increased to 75% by collimating the electromagnetic beam in the vertical direction. Excitation efficiency for the prism (0 degrees pitch angle) and grating couplers were 15.2% and 10.5% respectively. By changing the prism coupler pitch angle to +36 degrees , its excitation efficiency was increased to 82%.

  11. Higher Order Parametric Excitation Modes for Spaceborne Quadrupole Mass Spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, D. J.; Block, B. P.; Rubin, M.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to significantly improve upon the mass peak shape and mass resolution of spaceborne quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMSs) through higher order auxiliary excitation of the quadrupole field. Using a novel multiresonant tank circuit, additional frequency components can be used to drive modulating voltages on the quadrupole rods in a practical manner, suitable for both improved commercial applications and spaceflight instruments. Auxiliary excitation at frequencies near twice that of the fundamental quadrupole RF frequency provides the advantages of previously studied parametric excitation techniques, but with the added benefit of increased sensed excitation amplitude dynamic range and the ability to operate voltage scan lines through the center of upper stability islands. Using a field programmable gate array, the amplitudes and frequencies of all QMS signals are digitally generated and managed, providing a robust and stable voltage control system. These techniques are experimentally verified through an interface with a commercial Pfeiffer QMG422 quadrupole rod system.When operating through the center of a stability island formed from higher order auxiliary excitation, approximately 50% and 400% improvements in 1% mass resolution and peak stability were measured, respectively, when compared with traditional QMS operation. Although tested with a circular rod system, the presented techniques have the potential to improve the performance of both circular and hyperbolic rod geometry QMS sensors.

  12. Students Excited by Stellar Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    In the constellation of Ophiuchus, above the disk of our Milky Way Galaxy, there lurks a stellar corpse spinning 30 times per second -- an exotic star known as a radio pulsar. This object was unknown until it was discovered last week by three high school students. These students are part of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) project, run by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, WV, and West Virginia University (WVU). The pulsar, which may be a rare kind of neutron star called a recycled pulsar, was discovered independently by Virginia students Alexander Snider and Casey Thompson, on January 20, and a day later by Kentucky student Hannah Mabry. "Every day, I told myself, 'I have to find a pulsar. I better find a pulsar before this class ends,'" said Mabry. When she actually made the discovery, she could barely contain her excitement. "I started screaming and jumping up and down." Thompson was similarly expressive. "After three years of searching, I hadn't found a single thing," he said, "but when I did, I threw my hands up in the air and said, 'Yes!'." Snider said, "It actually feels really neat to be the first person to ever see something like that. It's an uplifting feeling." As part of the PSC, the students analyze real data from NRAO's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to find pulsars. The students' teachers -- Debra Edwards of Sherando High School, Leah Lorton of James River High School, and Jennifer Carter of Rowan County Senior High School -- all introduced the PSC in their classes, and interested students formed teams to continue the work. Even before the discovery, Mabry simply enjoyed the search. "It just feels like you're actually doing something," she said. "It's a good feeling." Once the pulsar candidate was reported to NRAO, Project Director Rachel Rosen took a look and agreed with the young scientists. A followup observing session was scheduled on the GBT. Snider and Mabry traveled to West Virginia to assist in the

  13. Modeling preferential flow and its consequences on solute transfer in a strongly heterogeneous deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Slimene, Erij; Lassabatere, Laurent; Winiarski, Thierry; Gourdon, Remy

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of the fate of pollutants in the vadose zone is a prerequisite to manage soil and groundwater quality. Water infiltrates into the soil and carries a large amount of pollutants (heavy metals, organic compounds, etc.). The quality of groundwater depends on the capability of soils to remove pollutants while water infiltrates. The capability of soils to remove pollutants depends not only on their geochemical properties and affinity with pollutants but also on the quality of the contact between the reactive particles of the soil and pollutants. In such a context, preferential flows are the worst scenario since they prevent pollutants from reaching large parts of the soil including reactive zones that could serve for pollutant removal. The negative effects of preferential flow have already been pointed out by several studies. In this paper, we investigate numerically the effect of the establishment of preferential flow in a numerical section (13.5m long and 2.5m deep) that mimics a strongly heterogeneous deposit. The modelled deposit is made of several lithofacies with contrasting hydraulic properties. The numerical study proves that this strong contrast in hydraulic properties triggers the establishment of preferential flow (capillary barriers and funneled flow). Preferential flow develops mainly for low initial water contents and low fluxes imposed at the soil surface. The impact of these flows on solute transfer is also investigated as a function of solute reactivity and affinity to soil sorption sites. Modeled results clearly show that solute transport is greatly impacted by flow heterogeneity. Funneled flows have the same impacts as water fractionation into mobile and immobile transfer with a fast transport of solutes by preferential flow and solute diffusion to zones where the flow is slower. Such a pattern greatly impacts retention and reduces the access of pollutants into large parts of the soil. Retention is thus greatly reduced at the section

  14. Land cover effects on infiltration and preferential flow pathways in the high rainfall zone of Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwartendijk, Bob; van Meerveld, Ilja; Ravelona, Maafaka; Razakamanarivo, Herintsitohaina; Ghimire, Chandra; Bruijnzeel, Sampurno; Jones, Julia

    2015-04-01

    Shortened slash-and-burn cycles exhaust agricultural land and have resulted in extensive tracts of highly degraded land across the tropics. Land degradation typically results in decreased rainfall infiltration due to a reduced field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of the topsoil because of a progressive decline in soil organic matter, exposure to raindrop impact, surface sealing and compaction. This results, in turn, in enhanced surface runoff and erosion, and consequently less subsurface flow and groundwater recharge. On the other hand, natural vegetation regrowth or active reforestation can lead to a renewed accumulation of soil organic matter, macropore development and increased infiltration rates. As part of the P4GES project (Can Paying 4 Global Ecosystem Services values reduce poverty?; www.p4ges.org), we study the effects of land use change and reforestation on water resources in the Corridor Ankeniheny-Zahamena (CAZ) in eastern Madagascar. In this poster, we present the results of infiltration and preferential flow measurements in four different land uses in the southern part of the CAZ: (i) closed canopy forest, (ii) 3-14 year-old regrowth on fallow land (savokas), (iii) exhausted and severely degraded land (tany maty), and (iv) recently reforested sites (6-8 years old). The results show that infiltrability increases significantly after several years of forest regrowth after land abandonment, but it remains unclear whether active replanting decreases the time required for restoration of soil hydrological functioning. Preferential flow pathways differed strikingly between the respective land cover types: infiltration in mature forests was predominantly characterized by macropore flow (preferential flow pathways), whereas infiltration in exhausted agricultural land was dominated by matrix flow (few preferential flow pathways). Occurrence of preferential flow pathways in reforestation and fallow sites varied considerably. These results suggest that land

  15. Coulomb excitation of 73Ga

    CERN Document Server

    Diriken, J; Balabanski, D; Blasi, N; Blazhev, A; Bree, N; Cederkäll, J; Cocolios, T E; Davinson, T; Eberth, J; Ekström, A; Fedorov, D V; Fedosseev, V N; Fraille, L M; Franchoo, S; Georgiev, G; Gladnishki, K; Huyse, M; Ivanov, O V; Ivanov, V S; Iwanicki, V; Jolie, J; Konstantinopoulos, T; Kröll, Th; Krücken, R; Köster, U; Lagoyannis, A; Bianco, G Lo; Maierbeck, P; March, B A; Napiarkowski, P; Patronis, N; Pauwels, D; Reiter, P; Seliverstov, M; Sletten, G; Van de Walle, J; Van Duppen, P; Voulot, D; Walters, W B; Warr, N; Wenander, F; Wrzosek, K

    2010-01-01

    The B(E2; Ii ! If ) values for transitions in 71Ga and 73Ga were deduced from a Coulomb excitation experiment at the safe energy of 2.95 MeV/nucleon using post-accelerated beams of 71,73Ga at the REX-ISOLDE on-line isotope mass separator facility. The emitted gamma rays were detected by the MINIBALL-detector array and B(E2; Ii->If ) values were obtained from the yields normalized to the known strength of the 2+ -> 0+ transition in the 120Sn target. The comparison of these new results with the data of less neutron-rich gallium isotopes shows a shift of the E2 collectivity towards lower excitation energy when adding neutrons beyond N = 40. This supports conclusions from previous studies of the gallium isotopes which indicated a structural change in this isotopical chain between N = 40 and N = 42. Combined with recent measurements from collinear laser spectroscopy showing a 1/2- spin and parity for the ground state, the extracted results revealed evidence for a 1/2-; 3/2- doublet near the ground state in 73 31Ga...

  16. Estimation of Unsaturated Zone Traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Using a Source-Responsive Preferential-Flow Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebel, Brian A.; Nimmo, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Traveltimes for contaminant transport by water from a point in the unsaturated zone to the saturated zone are a concern at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Where nuclear tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone, contaminants must traverse hundreds of meters of variably saturated rock before they enter the saturated zone in the carbonate rock, where the regional groundwater system has the potential to carry them substantial distances to a location of concern. The unsaturated-zone portion of the contaminant transport path may cause a significant delay, in addition to the time required to travel within the saturated zone, and thus may be important in the overall evaluation of the potential hazard from contamination. Downward contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone occurs through various processes and pathways; this can lead to a broad distribution of contaminant traveltimes, including exceedingly slow and unexpectedly fast extremes. Though the bulk of mobile contaminant arrives between the time-scale end members, the fastest contaminant transport speed, in other words the speed determined by the combination of possible processes and pathways that would bring a measureable quantity of contaminant to the aquifer in the shortest time, carries particular regulatory significance because of its relevance in formulating the most conservative hazard-prevention scenarios. Unsaturated-zone flow is usually modeled as a diffusive process responding to gravity and pressure gradients as mediated by the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the materials traversed. The mathematical formulation of the diffuse-flow concept is known as Richards' equation, which when coupled to a solute transport equation, such as the advection-dispersion equation, provides a framework to simulate contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone. In recent decades awareness has increased that much fluid flow and contaminant transport within the unsaturated

  17. Estimation of unsaturated zone traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, using a source-responsive preferential-flow model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian A. Ebel; John R. Nimmo

    2009-09-11

    Traveltimes for contaminant transport by water from a point in the unsaturated zone to the saturated zone are a concern at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Where nuclear tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone, contaminants must traverse hundreds of meters of variably saturated rock before they enter the saturated zone in the carbonate rock, where the regional groundwater system has the potential to carry them substantial distances to a location of concern. The unsaturated-zone portion of the contaminant transport path may cause a significant delay, in addition to the time required to travel within the saturated zone, and thus may be important in the overall evaluation of the potential hazard from contamination. Downward contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone occurs through various processes and pathways; this can lead to a broad distribution of contaminant traveltimes, including exceedingly slow and unexpectedly fast extremes. Though the bulk of mobile contaminant arrives between the time-scale end members, the fastest contaminant transport speed, in other words the speed determined by the combination of possible processes and pathways that would bring a measureable quantity of contaminant to the aquifer in the shortest time, carries particular regulatory significance because of its relevance in formulating the most conservative hazard-prevention scenarios. Unsaturated-zone flow is usually modeled as a diffusive process responding to gravity and pressure gradients as mediated by the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the materials traversed. The mathematical formulation of the diffuse-flow concept is known as Richards' equation, which when coupled to a solute transport equation, such as the advection-dispersion equation, provides a framework to simulate contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone. In recent decades awareness has increased that much fluid flow and contaminant transport within the

  18. A computational search for lipases that can preferentially hydrolyze long-chain omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil triacylglycerols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Md Zahid; Barrow, Colin J; Rao, Nalam Madhusudhana

    2015-04-15

    Consumption of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids is known to decrease the risk of major cardiovascular events. Lipases, a class of triacylglycerol hydrolases, have been extensively tested to concentrate omega-3 fatty acids from fish oils, under mild enzymatic conditions. However, no lipases with preference for omega-3 fatty acids selectivity have yet been discovered or developed. In this study we performed an exhaustive computational study of substrate-lipase interactions by docking, both covalent and non-covalent, for 38 lipases with a large number of structured triacylglycerols containing omega-3 fatty acids. We identified some lipases that have potential to preferentially hydrolyze omega-3 fatty acids from structured triacylglycerols. However omega-3 fatty acid preferences were found to be modest. Our study provides an explanation for absence of reports of lipases with omega-3 fatty acid hydrolyzing ability and suggests methods for developing these selective lipases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Improved Underwater Excitation-Emission Matrix Fluorometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Casey; daCunha, John; Rhoades, Bruce; Twardowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution, two-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorometer (EEMF) has been designed and built specifically for use in identifying and measuring the concentrations of organic compounds, including polluting hydrocarbons, in natural underwater settings. Heretofore, most EEMFs have been designed and built for installation in laboratories, where they are used to analyze the contents of samples collected in the field and brought to the laboratories. Because the present EEMF can be operated in the field, it is better suited to measurement of spatially and temporally varying concentrations of substances of interest. In excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorometry, fluorescence is excited by irradiating a sample at one or more wavelengths, and the fluorescent emission from the sample is measured at multiple wavelengths. When excitation is provided at only one wavelength, the technique is termed one-dimensional (1D) EEM fluorometry because the resulting matrix of fluorescence emission data (the EEM) contains only one row or column. When excitation is provided at multiple wavelengths, the technique is termed two-dimensional (2D) EEM fluorometry because the resulting EEM contains multiple rows and columns. EEM fluorometry - especially the 2D variety - is well established as a means of simultaneously detecting numerous dissolved and particulate compounds in water. Each compound or pool of compounds has a unique spectral fluorescence signature, and each EEM is rich in information content, in that it can contain multiple fluorescence signatures. By use of deconvolution and/or other mixture-analyses techniques, it is often possible to isolate the spectral signature of compounds of interest, even when their fluorescence spectra overlap. What distinguishes the present 2D EEMF over prior laboratory-type 2D EEMFs are several improvements in packaging (including a sealed housing) and other aspects of design that render it suitable for use in natural underwater

  20. Near-ultraviolet laser diodes for brilliant ultraviolet fluorophore excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William G

    2015-12-01

    Although multiple lasers are now standard equipment on most modern flow cytometers, ultraviolet (UV) lasers (325-365 nm) remain an uncommon excitation source for cytometry. Nd:YVO4 frequency-tripled diode pumped solid-state lasers emitting at 355 nm are now the primary means of providing UV excitation on multilaser flow cytometers. Although a number of UV excited fluorochromes are available for flow cytometry, the cost of solid-state UV lasers remains prohibitively high, limiting their use to all but the most sophisticated multilaser instruments. The recent introduction of the brilliant ultraviolet (BUV) series of fluorochromes for cell surface marker detection and their importance in increasing the number of simultaneous parameters for high-dimensional analysis has increased the urgency of including UV sources in cytometer designs; however, these lasers remain expensive. Near-UV laser diodes (NUVLDs), a direct diode laser source emitting in the 370-380 nm range, have been previously validated for flow cytometric analysis of most UV-excited probes, including quantum nanocrystals, the Hoechst dyes, and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. However, they remain a little-used laser source for cytometry, despite their significantly lower cost. In this study, the ability of NUVLDs to excite the BUV dyes was assessed, along with their compatibility with simultaneous brilliant violet (BV) labeling. A NUVLD emitting at 375 nm was found to excite most of the available BUV dyes at least as well as a UV 355 nm source. This slightly longer wavelength did produce some unwanted excitation of BV dyes, but at sufficiently low levels to require minimal additional compensation. NUVLDs are compact, relatively inexpensive lasers that have higher power levels than the newest generation of small 355 nm lasers. They can, therefore, make a useful, cost-effective substitute for traditional UV lasers in multicolor analysis involving the BUV and BV dyes. Published 2015 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on

  1. An excitation-pattern model for the starling (Sturnus vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buus, S; Klump, G M; Gleich, O; Langemann, U

    1995-07-01

    This paper develops and tests an excitation-pattern model for the starling. Like excitation-pattern models for humans [e.g., Zwicker, Acustica 6, 365-381 (1956); Florentine and Buus, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 70, 1646-1654 (1981)], the model for starlings provides a unified account of a large body of data. The foundation of the model is a critical-band scale, which is derived as an equal-distance scale according to a cochlear-map function. The cochlear-map function is determined as a best-fitting function to physiological data relating characteristic frequency (CF) of auditory-nerve fibers to their place of innervation on the basilar papilla. Excitation patterns are derived from auditory-nerve measurements of levels at CF necessary to produce firing rates equal to those evoked by a test tone. The shape of these excitation patterns is independent of level and frequency when plotted on a cochlear-distance scale. The resulting model indicates that 10-dB bandwidths of auditory-nerve tuning curves and frequency DLs can be approximated as equal distances along the basilar papilla. Predictions of level discrimination are in good agreement with the data, except below 20 dB SL. Overall, the present work indicates that excitation-pattern models account for a wide range of auditory phenomena in both humans and starlings, when the models take into account differences in critical-band scales, absolute thresholds, excitation-pattern slopes, and growth of excitation, which is linear in starlings, but nonlinear in humans.

  2. Coulomb excitation of radioactive {sup 20,21}Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumaker, M.A.; Svensson, C.E.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Demand, G.A.; Finlay, P.; Green, K.L.; Grinyer, G.F.; Leach, K.G.; Phillips, A.A.; Wong, J. [Univ. of Guelph, Dept. of Physics, Guelph, Ontario (Canada); Cline, D.; Hayes, A.B.; Whitbeck, A. [Univ. of Rochester, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester, NY (United States); Hackman, G.; Pearson, C.; Andreyev, A.; Ball, G.C.; Buchmann, L.; Churchman, R.; Cifarelli, F.; Lee, G.; Maharaj, R.; Morton, A.C.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Ruiz, C.; Williams, S.J. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wu, C.Y.; Becker, J.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Austin, R.A.E.; Gallant, A.T. [Saint Mary' s Univ., Dept. of Astronomy and Physics, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cooper, R.J.; Dimmock, M.R.; Grint, A.N.; Harkness, L.J.; Nelson, L.; Nolan, P.J.; Scraggs, D.P. [Univ. of Liverpool, Dept. of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Cross, D.S.; Ressler, J.J.; Wan, J.M. [Simon Fraser Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada); Dashdorj, D. [North Carolina State Univ., Dept. of Physics, Raleigh, NC (United States); Drake, T.E. [Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Physics, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Garrett, P.E. [Univ. of Guelph, Dept. of Physics, Guelph, Ontario (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Kanungo, R. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Saint Mary' s Univ., Dept. of Astronomy and Physics, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Lisetskiy, A.F. [Univ. of Arizona, Dept. of Physics, Tucson, AZ (United States); Martin, J.P. [Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Moisan, F.; Roy, R. [Universite de Laval, Laval, Quebec (Canada); Mythili, S. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, British Columbia (Canada); Newman, O. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2009-12-15

    The low-energy structures of the radioactive nuclei {sup 20,21}Na have been examined using Coulomb excitation at the TRIUMF-ISAC radioactive ion beam facility. Beams of {proportional_to}5 x 10{sup 6} ions/s were accelerated to 1.7 MeV/A and Coulomb excited in a 0.5 mg/cm {sup 2} {sup nat}Ti target. Two TIGRESS HPGe clover detectors perpendicular to the beam axis were used for {gamma} -ray detection, while scattered nuclei were observed by the Si detector BAMBINO. For {sup 21}Na, Coulomb excitation from the 3/2{sup +} ground state to the first excited 5/2{sup +} state was observed, while for {sup 20}Na, Coulomb excitation was observed from the 2{sup +} ground state to the first excited 3{sup +} and 4{sup +} states. For both beams, B ({lambda} L) values were determined using the 2{sup +} {yields} 0{sup +} de-excitation in {sup 48}Ti as a reference. The resulting B(E2) arrow up and down value for {sup 21}Na is 137{+-}9 e{sup 2}fm{sup 4}, while the resulting B({lambda} L) arrow up and down values for {sup 20}Na are 55{+-}6 e{sup 2}fm{sup 4} for the 3{sup +} {yields} 2{sup +}, 35.7{+-}5.7 e{sup 2} fm{sup 4} for the 4{sup +} {yields} 2{sup +}, and 0.154{+-}0.030 {mu}{sub N}{sup 2} for the 4{sup +}{yields}3{sup +} transitions. This analysis significantly improves the measurement of the {sup 21}Na B(E2) value, and provides the first experimental determination of B({lambda} L) values for the proton dripline nucleus {sup 20}Na. (orig.)

  3. Efficient primary and parametric resonance excitation of bistable resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Ramini, Abdallah

    2016-09-12

    We experimentally demonstrate an efficient approach to excite primary and parametric (up to the 4th) resonance of Microelectromechanical system MEMS arch resonators with large vibrational amplitudes. A single crystal silicon in-plane arch microbeam is fabricated such that it can be excited axially from one of its ends by a parallel-plate electrode. Its micro/nano scale vibrations are transduced using a high speed camera. Through the parallel-plate electrode, a time varying electrostatic force is applied, which is converted into a time varying axial force that modulates dynamically the stiffness of the arch resonator. Due to the initial curvature of the structure, not only parametric excitation is induced, but also primary resonance. Experimental investigation is conducted comparing the response of the arch near primary resonance using the axial excitation to that of a classical parallel-plate actuation where the arch itself forms an electrode. The results show that the axial excitation can be more efficient and requires less power for primary resonance excitation. Moreover, unlike the classical method where the structure is vulnerable to the dynamic pull-in instability, the axial excitation technique can provide large amplitude motion while protecting the structure from pull-in. In addition to primary resonance, parametrical resonances are demonstrated at twice, one-half, and two-thirds the primary resonance frequency. The ability to actuate primary and/or parametric resonances can serve various applications, such as for resonator based logic and memory devices. (C) 2016 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license

  4. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  5. Investigation of excitation control for wind-turbine generator stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebben, V. D.

    1977-01-01

    High speed horizontal axis wind turbine generators with blades on the downwind side of the support tower require special design considerations to handle disturbances introduced by the flow wake behind the tower. Experiments and analytical analyses were made to determine benefits that might be obtained by using the generator exciter to provide system damping for reducing power fluctuations.

  6. Spectroscopic probes of vibrationally excited molecules at chemically significant energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, T.R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the application of multiple-resonance spectroscopic techniques for investigating energy transfer and dissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. Two major goals of this work are: (1) to provide information on potential energy surfaces of combustion related molecules at chemically significant energies, and (2) to test theoretical modes of unimolecular dissociation rates critically via quantum-state resolved measurements.

  7. Holonomic Quantum Control by Coherent Optical Excitation in Diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Brian B.; Jerger, Paul C.; Shkolnikov, V. O.; Heremans, F. Joseph; Burkard, Guido; Awschalom, David D.

    2017-10-01

    Although geometric phases in quantum evolution are historically overlooked, their active control now stimulates strategies for constructing robust quantum technologies. Here, we demonstrate arbitrary singlequbit holonomic gates from a single cycle of nonadiabatic evolution, eliminating the need to concatenate two separate cycles. Our method varies the amplitude, phase, and detuning of a two-tone optical field to control the non-Abelian geometric phase acquired by a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond over a coherent excitation cycle. We demonstrate the enhanced robustness of detuned gates to excited-state decoherence and provide insights for optimizing fast holonomic control in dissipative quantum systems.

  8. Electron impact excitation of highly charged sodium-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, M.; Davis, J.

    1978-01-01

    Optical transition probabilities and electron collision strengths for Ca X, Fe XVI, Zn XX, Kr XXVI and Mo XXXII are calculated for transitions between n equal to 3 and n equal to 4 levels. The calculations neglect relativistic effects on the radial functions. A semi-empirical approach provides wave functions of the excited states; a distorted wave function without exchange is employed to obtain the excitation cross sections. The density dependence of the relative intensities of certain emission lines in the sodium isoelectronic sequence is also discussed.

  9. Holonomic Quantum Control by Coherent Optical Excitation in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Brian B.; Jerger, Paul C.; Shkolnikov, V. O.; Heremans, F. Joseph; Burkard, Guido; Awschalom, David D.

    2017-10-01

    Although geometric phases in quantum evolution are historically overlooked, their active control now stimulates strategies for constructing robust quantum technologies. Here, we demonstrate arbitrary single-qubit holonomic gates from a single cycle of nonadiabatic evolution, eliminating the need to concatenate two separate cycles. Our method varies the amplitude, phase, and detuning of a two-tone optical field to control the non-Abelian geometric phase acquired by a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond over a coherent excitation cycle. We demonstrate the enhanced robustness of detuned gates to excited-state decoherence and provide insights for optimizing fast holonomic control in dissipative quantum systems.

  10. Modulation of motor cortex excitability by physical similarity with an observed hand action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Christine Désy

    Full Text Available The passive observation of hand actions is associated with increased motor cortex excitability, presumably reflecting activity within the human mirror neuron system (MNS. Recent data show that in-group ethnic membership increases motor cortex excitability during observation of culturally relevant hand gestures, suggesting that physical similarity with an observed body part may modulate MNS responses. Here, we ask whether the MNS is preferentially activated by passive observation of hand actions that are similar or dissimilar to self in terms of sex and skin color. Transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced motor evoked potentials were recorded from the first dorsal interosseus muscle while participants viewed videos depicting index finger movements made by female or male participants with black or white skin color. Forty-eight participants equally distributed in terms of sex and skin color participated in the study. Results show an interaction between self-attributes and physical attributes of the observed hand in the right motor cortex of female participants, where corticospinal excitability is increased during observation of hand actions in a different skin color than that of the observer. Our data show that specific physical properties of an observed action modulate motor cortex excitability and we hypothesize that in-group/out-group membership and self-related processes underlie these effects.

  11. Comparison of Excitation Signals in Active Magnetic Bearing System Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouni Vuojolainen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Active magnetic bearings (AMBs offer frictionless suspension, vibration insulation, programmable stiffness, and damping, among other advantages, in levitated rotor applications. However, AMBs are inherently unstable and require accurate system models for the high-performance model-based multi-input multi-output control of rotor position. Control electronics with high calculation capacity and accurate sensors of AMBs provide an opportunity to implement various identification schemes. A variety of artificial excitation signal-based identification methods can thus be achieved with no additional hardware. In this paper, a selection of excitation signals, namely the pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS, chirp signal, multisine, and stepped sine are presented, applied, and compared with the AMB system identification. From the identification experiments, the rotor-bearing system, the inner current control loop, and values of position and current stiffness are identified. Unlike recently published works considering excitation-based identification of AMB rotor systems, it is demonstrated that identification of the rotor system dynamics can be carried out using various well-established excitation signals. Application and feasibility of these excitation signals in AMB rotor systems are analyzed based on experimental results.

  12. Excitability of motor cortices as a function of emotional sounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeem Komeilipoor

    Full Text Available We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS to clarify how non-verbal emotionally-characterized sounds modulate the excitability of the corticospinal motor tract (CST. While subjects were listening to sounds (monaurally and binaurally, single TMS pulses were delivered to either left or right primary motor cortex (M1, and electromyographic activities were recorded from the contralateral abductor pollicis brevis muscle. We found a significant increase in CST excitability in response to unpleasant as compared to neutral sounds. The increased excitability was lateralized as a function of stimulus valence: Unpleasant stimuli resulted in a significantly higher facilitation of motor potentials evoked in the left hemisphere, while pleasant stimuli yielded a greater CST excitability in the right one. Furthermore, TMS induced higher motor evoked potentials when listening to unpleasant sounds with the left than with the right ear. Taken together, our findings provide compelling evidence for an asymmetric modulation of CST excitability as a function of emotional sounds along with ear laterality.

  13. Synaptic control of motoneuronal excitability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Funk, G D; Bayliss, D A

    2000-01-01

    Movement, the fundamental component of behavior and the principal extrinsic action of the brain, is produced when skeletal muscles contract and relax in response to patterns of action potentials generated by motoneurons. The processes that determine the firing behavior of motoneurons are therefore...... important in understanding the transformation of neural activity to motor behavior. Here, we review recent studies on the control of motoneuronal excitability, focusing on synaptic and cellular properties. We first present a background description of motoneurons: their development, anatomical organization...... current, hyperpolarization-activated inward current, Ca(2+) channels, or presynaptic release processes. Together, these numerous inputs mediate and modify incoming motor commands, ultimately generating the coordinated firing patterns that underlie muscle contractions during motor behavior....

  14. Rotational excitation of interstellar molecular ions by electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, A [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique, UMR 5571 CNRS, Universite Joseph-Fourier, B.P. 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 09 (France); Tennyson, J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Kokoouline, V [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Greene, Chris H, E-mail: afaure@obs.ujf-grenoble.f [Department of Physics and JILA, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Electrons are known to be efficient in rotationally exciting molecular ions in cold ionized media. Rotational effects have also been shown to affect the dissociative recombination (DR) process. Electron collisions are thus expected to play a significant role in the thermalization and dissociation dynamics of molecular ions, both in the laboratory and in space. Using the molecular R-matrix method combined with the Adiabatic-Nuclei-Rotation (ANR) approximation corrected for threshold and closed-channel effects, we have computed new rate coefficients for the rotational excitation of H{sup +}{sub 3} and HCO{sup +} by electrons at temperatures from 10 to 1 000K. At temperatures above rotational thresholds, rotational rates are found to compete or even dominate those of dissociative recombination, suggesting that electron collisions provide a possible source of rotational (de)excitation in DR measurements.

  15. Interplay between magnetic and electric excitations for backward electron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nojarov, R.; Faessler, A.; Dingfelder, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    1994-10-01

    It is found that the M1 (e,e`) cross sections of low-lying orbital I{sup {pi}} K = 1{sup +}1 excitations in heavy deformed nuclei contain E2 admixtures from the (predominantly longtitudinal) excitation of the accompanying 2{sup +}1 states. This happens even for backward scattering angles as large as {theta} = 165{sup o}, where the E2 excitation is strongly quenched. For small momentum transfer q the E2 cross section is negligible; however, it provides significant corrections to the theoretical M1 cross section for 0.4 < q < 0.6 fm{sup -1} and substantially improves the agreement with experiment in heavy deformed nuclei. (author).

  16. Multifrequency Excitation of a Clamped-Clamped Microbeam

    KAUST Repository

    Jaber, Nizar R.

    2016-01-20

    We present analytical and experimental investigation of an electrically actuated clamped-clamped microbeam under a twosource harmonic excitation. The first frequency is swept around the first mode of vibration where the second one is fixed. These microbeams are fabricated using polyimide as structural layer coated with nickel form top and chromium and gold layers from bottom. We demonstrate the excitation of additive and subtractive type resonance. We show that by properly tuning the frequency and the amplitude of the excitation force, the frequency bandwidth of the resonator is increased. Theoretically, we solved the eigenvalue problem for different axial forces to find the natural frequencies ratio that match the experimental values. Using Galerkin method, a reduced order model is derived to simulate the static and dynamic response of the device where using three symmetric mode shapes provided a good agreement with experimental data. © Copyright 2015 by ASME.

  17. Excitation of global Alfven Eigenmodes by RF heating in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerner, W.; Borba, D.; Gormezano, C.; Huysmans, G.; Porcelli, F.; Start, D. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Fasoli, A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP); Sharapov, S. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-07-01

    The alpha-particle confinement of future D-T experiments at JET can be severely degraded by Global Alfven Eigenmodes (AE). Scenarios for the excitation of Alfven Eigenmodes in usual (e.g. D-D) plasmas are proposed, which provide a MHD diagnostic and allow the study of the transport of super-Alfvenic ions. Active studies with separate control of TAE amplitude and energetic particle destabilization, measuring the plasma response, give more information than passive studies, in particular concerning the damping mechanisms. The TAE excitation can be achieved by means of the saddle coil and the ICRH antenna. The experimental method is introduced together with a theoretical model for RF excitation. (authors). 6 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Statistical dynamo theory: Mode excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyng, P

    2009-04-01

    We compute statistical properties of the lowest-order multipole coefficients of the magnetic field generated by a dynamo of arbitrary shape. To this end we expand the field in a complete biorthogonal set of base functions, viz. B= summation operator_{k}a;{k}(t)b;{k}(r) . The properties of these biorthogonal function sets are treated in detail. We consider a linear problem and the statistical properties of the fluid flow are supposed to be given. The turbulent convection may have an arbitrary distribution of spatial scales. The time evolution of the expansion coefficients a;{k} is governed by a stochastic differential equation from which we infer their averages a;{k} , autocorrelation functions a;{k}(t)a;{k *}(t+tau) , and an equation for the cross correlations a;{k}a;{l *} . The eigenfunctions of the dynamo equation (with eigenvalues lambda_{k} ) turn out to be a preferred set in terms of which our results assume their simplest form. The magnetic field of the dynamo is shown to consist of transiently excited eigenmodes whose frequency and coherence time is given by Ilambda_{k} and -1/Rlambda_{k} , respectively. The relative rms excitation level of the eigenmodes, and hence the distribution of magnetic energy over spatial scales, is determined by linear theory. An expression is derived for |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} in case the fundamental mode b;{0} has a dominant amplitude, and we outline how this expression may be evaluated. It is estimated that |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} approximately 1/N , where N is the number of convective cells in the dynamo. We show that the old problem of a short correlation time (or first-order smoothing approximation) has been partially eliminated. Finally we prove that for a simple statistically steady dynamo with finite resistivity all eigenvalues obey Rlambda_{k}<0 .

  19. Origin of preferential flow and its controlling factors on emission potential using numerical simulations and lab experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baviskar, S.M.; Heimovaara, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    We believe the unsaturated and heterogeneous nature of landfills leads to the emergence of preferential pathways of water and dissolved compounds through the waste body. In this research we explore the origin of preferential flow in a porous media with a deterministic numerical model. In this model

  20. Analysis of Synchronization Phenomena in Broadband Signals with Nonlinear Excitable Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernihovskyi, Anton; Elger, Christian E.; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2009-12-01

    We apply the method of frequency-selective excitation waves in excitable media to characterize synchronization phenomena in interacting complex dynamical systems by measuring coincidence rates of induced excitations. We relax the frequency-selectivity of excitable media and demonstrate two applications of the method to signals with broadband spectra. Findings obtained from analyzing time series of coupled chaotic oscillators as well as electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from an epilepsy patient indicate that this method can provide an alternative and complementary way to estimate the degree of phase synchronization in noisy signals.

  1. Analysis of Synchronization Phenomena in Broadband Signals with Nonlinear Excitable Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Lehnertz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We apply the method of frequency-selective excitation waves in excitable media to characterize synchronization phenomena in interacting complex dynamical systems by measuring coincidence rates of induced excitations. We relax the frequency-selectivity of excitable media and demonstrate two applications of the method to signals with broadband spectra. Findings obtained from analyzing time series of coupled chaotic oscillators as well as electroencephalographic (EEG recordings from an epilepsy patient indicate that this method can provide an alternative and complementary way to estimate the degree of phase synchronization in noisy signals.

  2. MD 2485: Active halo control using narrowband and colored noise excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Morales, Hector; Kotzian, Gerd; Maclean, Ewen Hamish; Redaelli, Stefano; Valuch, Daniel; Wagner, Joschka; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    This MD note summarizes the actions carried out during the MD 2485 on Active halo control using narrowband and colored noise excitations. The goal of the MD was to repeat some promising cases already tested in the past and introduce a new excitation type based on applying a colored noise. Although we were able to repeat some cases using a narrowband excitation, due to a problem with the waveform generator, the colored noise excitation could not be accomplished as expected. In any case, we provide some results that may be useful for future MDs.

  3. Manipulating charge transfer excited state relaxation and spin crossover in iron coordination complexes with ligand substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenkai; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Alonso-Mori, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    state lifetime of iron based complexes due to spin crossover-the extremely fast intersystem crossing and internal conversion to high spin metal-centered excited states. We revitalize a 30 year old synthetic strategy for extending the MLCT excited state lifetimes of iron complexes by making mixed ligand...... iron complexes with four cyanide (CN-;) ligands and one 2,2′-bipyridine (bpy) ligand. This enables MLCT excited state and metal-centered excited state energies to be manipulated with partial independence and provides a path to suppressing spin crossover. We have combined X-ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL......) Kβ hard X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy with femtosecond time-resolved UV-visible absorption spectroscopy to characterize the electronic excited state dynamics initiated by MLCT excitation of [Fe(CN)4(bpy)]2-. The two experimental techniques are highly complementary; the time-resolved UV...

  4. Effects of Soil Compaction and Organic Carbon Content on Preferential Flow in Loamy Field Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soares, Antonio; Moldrup, Per; Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad

    2015-01-01

    Preferential flow and transport through macropores affects plant water use efficiency and enhances leaching of agrochemicals and the transport of colloids, thereby increasing the risk for contamination of groundwater resources. As part of the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Program this study...... investigated effects of soil compaction and organic carbon content on macroporosity and preferential flow and transport. More than 150 undisturbed soil cores were extracted from two field sites in Denmark. While both sites exhibited loamy soil textures, one site had significantly higher organic carbon contents......, the relationships between bulk density and tritium transport parameters were markedly different for the two soils although the relationship between bulk density and macroporosity was nearly identical. The difference was likely caused by the higher organic carbon content of one soil leading to a more pronounced pipe...

  5. Assortativity and leadership emergence from anti-preferential attachment in heterogeneous networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sendiña-Nadal, I; Wang, Z; Havlin, S; Boccaletti, S

    2015-01-01

    Many real-world networks exhibit degree-assortativity, with nodes of similar degree more likely to link to one another. Particularly in social networks, the contribution to the total assortativity varies with degree, featuring a distinctive peak slightly past the average degree. The way traditional models imprint assortativity on top of pre-defined topologies is via degree-preserving link permutations, which however destroy the particular graph's hierarchical traits of clustering. Here, we propose the first generative model which creates heterogeneous networks with scale-free-like properties and tunable realistic assortativity. In our approach, two distinct populations of nodes are added to an initial network seed: one (the followers) that abides by usual preferential rules, and one (the potential leaders) connecting via anti-preferential attachments, i.e. selecting lower degree nodes for their initial links. The latter nodes come to develop a higher average degree, and convert eventually into the final hubs....

  6. Use of an imaging infiltrometer to understand soil crack sealing and preferential flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    Soil cracks can act as preferential flowpaths, but their effects on non-equilibrium flow and transport are difficult to quantify because of dynamic interactions between water and the crack structure. I have developed a simple method that combines infiltration measurements with digital imaging to simultaneously quantify infiltration and crack closure. Preliminary data collected on soils with moderate shrink-swell potential (possessing surface-connected cracks of 1-5 mm width) reveal that soil cracks begin to close almost immediately after the onset of infiltration, but soon thereafter attain quasi-stable geometries. This suggests that in the context of short-term infiltration tests it may be possible to model soil cracks as having relatively constant contributions to preferential flow.

  7. Modes of Collaboration in Modern Science - Beyond Power Laws and Preferential Attachment

    CERN Document Server

    Milojević, Staša

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the study is to determine the underlying processes leading to the observed collaborator distribution in modern scientific fields, with special attention to non-power law behavior. Nanoscience is used as a case study of a modern interdisciplinary field, and its coauthorship network for 2000-04 period is constructed from NanoBank database. We find three collaboration modes that correspond to three distinct ranges in the distribution of collaborators: (1) for authors with fewer than 20 collaborators (the majority) preferential attachment does not hold and they form a log-normal "hook" instead of a power law, (2) authors with more than 20 collaborators benefit from preferential attachment and form a power law tail, and (3) authors with between 250 and 800 collaborators are more frequent than expected because of the hyperauthorship practices in certain subfields.

  8. Brain Tumor Initiating Cells Adapt to Restricted Nutrition through Preferential Glucose Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavahan, William A.; Wu, Qiulian; Hitomi, Masahiro; Rahim, Nasiha; Kim, Youngmi; Sloan, Andrew E.; Weil, Robert J.; Nakano, Ichiro; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Stringer, Brett W.; Day, Bryan W.; Li, Meizhang; Lathia, Justin D.; Rich, Jeremy N.; Hjelmeland, Anita B.

    2013-01-01

    Like all cancers, brain tumors require a continuous source of energy and molecular resources for new cell production. In normal brain, glucose is an essential neuronal fuel, but the blood-brain barrier limits its delivery. We now report that nutrient restriction contributes to tumor progression by enriching for brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) due to preferential BTIC survival and adaptation of non-BTICs through acquisition of BTIC features. BTICs outcompete for glucose uptake by co-opting the high affinity neuronal glucose transporter, type 3 (Glut3, SLC2A3). BTICs preferentially express Glut3 and targeting Glut3 inhibits BTIC growth and tumorigenic potential. Glut3, but not Glut1, correlates with poor survival in brain tumors and other cancers; thus, TICs may extract nutrients with high affinity. As altered metabolism represents a cancer hallmark, metabolic reprogramming may instruct the tumor hierarchy and portend poor prognosis. PMID:23995067

  9. Ageism at Work: What Happens to Older Workers Who Benefit from Preferential Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Iweins

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase the activity rate of older workers, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD recommends that national governments implement policies promoting the employment of this category of workers. However, policies that favour minority groups have been shown to produce detrimental effects such as devaluing members of these groups. In two studies, we examined whether age-related preferential treatment reinforces ageist attitudes in the workplace. A first study revealed that policies favouring 50 years old workers increased negative perceptions toward them. In a second experimental study, results indicated that, compared to a merit-based treatment, a preferential treatment increased negative perceptions, emotions, and behaviours toward an old target. As a set, our findings shed new light on ageism at work and on the role of context.

  10. The dynamics of power laws: Fitness and aging in preferential attachment trees

    OpenAIRE

    Garavaglia, Alessandro; van der Hofstad, Remco; Woeginger, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    Continuous-time branching processes describe the evolution of a population whose individuals generate a random number of children according to a birth process. Such branching processes can be used to understand preferential attachment models in which the birth rates are linear functions. We are motivated by citation networks, where power-law citation counts are observed as well as aging in the citation patterns. To model this, we introduce fitness and age-dependence in these birth processes. ...

  11. Effects of subsoil compaction on hydraulic properties and preferential flow in a Swedish clay soil

    OpenAIRE

    Mossadeghi-Björklund Mona; Arvidsson Johan; Keller Thomas; Koestel John; Lamandé Mathieu; Larsbo Mats; Jarvis Nick

    2016-01-01

    Soil compaction by vehicular traffic modifies the pore structure and soil hydraulic properties. These changes potentially influence the occurrence of preferential flow which so far has been little studied. Our aim was to study the effect of compaction on soil hydraulic and transport properties in subsoil. A randomized block design trial at two sites on a well structured clay soil in central Sweden was established. Plots with two levels of compaction were created at both sites in the following...

  12. SAT1, a glutamine transporter, is preferentially expressed in GABAergic neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Tom Tallak Solbu; Tom Tallak Solbu; Mona Bjørkmo; Mona Bjørkmo; Paul Berghuis; Tibor Harkany; Tibor Harkany; Farrukh A Chaudhry; Farrukh A Chaudhry

    2010-01-01

    Subsets of GABAergic neurons are able to maintain high frequency discharge patterns, which requires efficient replenishment of the releasable pool of GABA. Although glutamine is considered a preferred precursor of GABA, the identity of transporters involved in glutamine uptake by GABAergic neurons remains elusive. Molecular analyses revealed that SAT1 (Slc38a1) features system A characteristics with a preferential affinity for glutamine, and that SAT1 mRNA expression is associated with GABAe...

  13. SAT1, A Glutamine Transporter, is Preferentially Expressed in GABAergic Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Solbu, Tom Tallak; Bjørkmo, Mona; Berghuis, Paul; Harkany, Tibor; Chaudhry, Farrukh A.

    2010-01-01

    Subsets of GABAergic neurons are able to maintain high frequency discharge patterns, which requires efficient replenishment of the releasable pool of GABA. Although glutamine is considered a preferred precursor of GABA, the identity of transporters involved in glutamine uptake by GABAergic neurons remains elusive. Molecular analyses revealed that SAT1 (Slc38a1) features system A characteristics with a preferential affinity for glutamine, and that SAT1 mRNA expression is associated with GABAer...

  14. The anti-protozoan drug nifurtimox preferentially inhibits clonogenic tumor cells under hypoxic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Quhuan; Lin, Qun; Kim, Hoon; Yun, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is an independent prognostic indicator of tumor malignant progression and poor patient survival. Therefore, eradication of hypoxic tumor cells is of paramount importance for successful disease control. In this study, we have made a new discovery that nifurtimox, a clinically approved drug to treat Chagas disease caused by the parasitic protozoan trypanosomes, can function as a hypoxia-activated cytotoxin. We have found that nifurtimox preferentially kill clonogenic tumor cells e...

  15. Observation of field- scale preferential flow in soil landscapes with kettle holes as internal drainage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Horst H.

    2010-05-01

    Complementary to pedon-scale phenomena (e.g., macropore flow in structured soil), preferential flow may be also defined at larger scales mainly along impeding structures that allow for the development of transient ‘local' non-equilibrium in water potentials depending on characteristic boundary conditions. The phenomenon is then related to a ‘global' system (i.e., field, hillslope, or catchment). Larger scale preferential flow processes have recently been hypothesized although full conceptual understanding for model development remains challenging. The objective of this contribution is to discuss field observations of area-scale preferential water flow for improving the conceptual model. Examples are from a typical post-glacial landscape with kettle holes (i.e., site Grünow, north East Germany) as internal catchment systems where surface runoff and lateral subsurface flow occur. Where soils are developed from the till, and predominately used for agriculture, water moves along the surface as runoff or within highly conductive soil regions before it enters the central depression. From there it may either evaporate or eventually lead to depression-focussed recharge. Observations show lateral flow ‘bypassing' relatively dry subsoil in most of the catchment and re-wetting the subsoil near the depression by lateral infiltration from the pond indicated by reversal of hydraulic gradients. Results suggest that surface runoff is dominating the hydrological regime during the winter when the soil is frozen and in the summer during storm events. The lateral exchange fluxes between pond and surrounding soil suggest that additional geomorphologic and pedologic structures affect the hydrological function of the system. Ponds can trap large volumes of surface runoff and control seepage function. The field-scale lateral preferential flow can strongly control percolation and discharge and may be a possible route for ground water contamination.

  16. Modeling, Analysis and Simulation of Multiscale Preferential Flow - 8/05-8/10 - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralph Showalter; Malgorzata Peszynska

    2012-07-03

    The research agenda of this project are: (1) Modeling of preferential transport from mesoscale to macroscale; (2) Modeling of fast flow in narrow fractures in porous media; (3) Pseudo-parabolic Models of Dynamic Capillary Pressure; (4) Adaptive computational upscaling of flow with inertia from porescale to mesoscale; (5) Adaptive modeling of nonlinear coupled systems; and (6) Adaptive modeling and a-posteriori estimators for coupled systems with heterogeneous data.

  17. The mechanisms of Excited states in enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Frederic Nicolas Rønne; Bohr, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Enzyme catalysis is studied on the basis of excited state processes, which are of electronic, vibrational and thermal nature. The ways of achieving the excited state, such as photo-absorption and ligand binding, are discussed and exemplified by various cases of enzymes.......Enzyme catalysis is studied on the basis of excited state processes, which are of electronic, vibrational and thermal nature. The ways of achieving the excited state, such as photo-absorption and ligand binding, are discussed and exemplified by various cases of enzymes....

  18. Elementary excitations of ferromagnetic metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cehovin, A.; Canali, C.; MacDonald, A.

    2003-07-01

    We present a theory of the elementary spin excitations in transition-metal ferromagnet nanoparticles which achieves a unified and consistent quantum description of both collective and quasiparticle physics. The theory starts by recognizing the essential role played by spin-orbit interactions in determining the energies of ferromagnetic resonances in the collective excitation spectrum and the strength of their coupling to low-energy particle-hole excitations. We argue that a crossover between Landau-damped ferromagnetic resonance and pure-state collective magnetic excitations occurs as the number of atoms in typical transition-metal ferromagnet nanoparticles drops below approximately 104, about where the single-particle level spacing, δ, becomes larger than (α)Eres, where Eres is the ferromagnetic resonance frequency and α is the Gilbert damping parameter. We illustrate our ideas by studying the properties of semirealistic model Hamiltonians, which we solve numerically for nanoparticles containing several hundred atoms. For small nanoparticles, we find one isolated ferromagnetic resonance collective mode below the lowest particle-hole excitation energy, at Eres≈0.1 meV. The spectral weight of this pure excitation nearly exhausts the transverse dynamical susceptibility spectral weight. As δ approaches (α)Eres, the ferromagnetic collective excitation is more likely to couple strongly with discrete particle-hole excitations. In this regime the distinction between the two types of excitations blurs. We discuss the significance of this picture for the interpretation of recent single-electron tunneling experiments.

  19. Preferential transfer of certain plasma membrane proteins onto T and B cells by trogocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Daubeuf

    Full Text Available T and B cells capture antigens via membrane fragments of antigen presenting cells (APC in a process termed trogocytosis. Whether (and how a preferential transfer of some APC components occurs during trogocytosis is still largely unknown. We analyzed the transfer onto murine T and B cells of a large panel of fluorescent proteins with different intra-cellular localizations in the APC or various types of anchors in the plasma membrane (PM. Only the latter were transferred by trogocytosis, albeit with different efficiencies. Unexpectedly, proteins anchored to the PM's cytoplasmic face, or recruited to it via interaction with phosphinositides, were more efficiently transferred than those facing the outside of the cell. For proteins spanning the PM's whole width, transfer efficiency was found to vary quite substantially, with tetraspanins, CD4 and FcRgamma found among the most efficiently transferred proteins. We exploited our findings to set immunodiagnostic assays based on the capture of preferentially transferred components onto T or B cells. The preferential transfer documented here should prove useful in deciphering the cellular structures involved in trogocytosis.

  20. Assortativity and leadership emerge from anti-preferential attachment in heterogeneous networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendiña-Nadal, I.; Danziger, M. M.; Wang, Z.; Havlin, S.; Boccaletti, S.

    2016-02-01

    Real-world networks have distinct topologies, with marked deviations from purely random networks. Many of them exhibit degree-assortativity, with nodes of similar degree more likely to link to one another. Though microscopic mechanisms have been suggested for the emergence of other topological features, assortativity has proven elusive. Assortativity can be artificially implanted in a network via degree-preserving link permutations, however this destroys the graph’s hierarchical clustering and does not correspond to any microscopic mechanism. Here, we propose the first generative model which creates heterogeneous networks with scale-free-like properties in degree and clustering distributions and tunable realistic assortativity. Two distinct populations of nodes are incrementally added to an initial network by selecting a subgraph to connect to at random. One population (the followers) follows preferential attachment, while the other population (the potential leaders) connects via anti-preferential attachment: they link to lower degree nodes when added to the network. By selecting the lower degree nodes, the potential leader nodes maintain high visibility during the growth process, eventually growing into hubs. The evolution of links in Facebook empirically validates the connection between the initial anti-preferential attachment and long term high degree. In this way, our work sheds new light on the structure and evolution of social networks.

  1. Effects of fine root length density and root biomass on soil preferential flow in forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghu Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The study was conducted to characterize the impacts of plant roots systems (e.g., root length density and root biomass on soil preferential flow in forest ecosystems. Area of study: The study was carried out in Jiufeng National Forest Park, Beijing, China. Material and methods: The flow patterns were measured by field dye tracing experiments. Different species (Sophora japonica Linn,Platycladus orientalis Franco, Quercus dentata Thunbwere quantified in two replicates, and 12 soil depth were applied. Plant roots were sampled in the sieving methods. Root length density and root biomass were measured by WinRHIZO. Dye coverage was implied in the image analysis, and maximum depth of dye infiltration by direct measurement. Main results: Root length density and root biomass decreased with the increasing distance from soil surface, and root length density was 81.6% higher in preferential pathways than in soil matrix, and 66.7% for root biomass with respect to all experimental plots. Plant roots were densely distributed in the upper soil layers. Dye coverage was almost 100% in the upper 5-10 cm, but then decreased rapidly with soil depth. Root length density and root biomass were different from species: Platycladus orientalis Franco > Quercus dentata Thunb > Sophora japonica Linn. Research highlights: The results indicated that fine roots systems had strong effects on soil preferential flow, particularly root channels enhancing nutrition transport across soil profiles in forest dynamics.

  2. Dihydroartemisinin induces apoptosis preferentially via a Bim-mediated intrinsic pathway in hepatocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guiqi; Zhao, ChuBiao; Zhang, Lili; Liu, Hongyu; Quan, Yingyao; Chai, Liuying; Wu, Shengnan; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Tongsheng

    2015-08-01

    This report is designed to dissect the detail molecular mechanism by which dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a derivative of artemisinin, induces apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. DHA induced a loss of the mitochondrial transmemberane potential (ΔΨm), release of cytochrome c, activation of caspases, and externalization of phosphatidylserine indicative of apoptosis induction. Compared with the modest inhibitory effects of silencing Bax, silencing Bak largely prevented DHA-induced ΔΨm collapse and apoptosis though DHA induced a commensurable activation of Bax and Bak, demonstrating a key role of the Bak-mediated intrinsic apoptosis pathway. DHA did not induce Bid cleavage and translocation from cytoplasm to mitochondria and had little effects on the expressions of Puma and Noxa, but did increase Bim and Bak expressions and decrease Mcl-1 expression. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of DHA was remarkably reduced by silencing Bim, and modestly but significantly reduced by silencing Puma or Noxa. Silencing Bim or Noxa preferentially reduced DHA-induced Bak activation, while silencing Puma preferentially reduced DHA-induced Bax activation, demonstrating that Bim and to a lesser extent Noxa act as upstream mediators to trigger the Bak-mediated intrinsic apoptosis pathway. In addition, silencing Mcl-1 enhanced DHA-induced Bak activation and apoptosis. Taken together, our data demonstrate a crucial role of Bim in preferentially regulating the Bak/Mcl-1 rheostat to mediate DHA-induced apoptosis in HCC cells.

  3. Minority Achievement Gaps in STEM: Findings of a Longitudinal Study of Project Excite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Steenbergen-Hu, Saiying; Thomson, Dana; Rosen, Rhoda

    2017-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the outcomes of Project Excite on reducing minority students' achievement gaps in STEM over 14 years. Project Excite was designed to provide intensive supplemental enrichment and accelerated programming for high-potential, underrepresented minority students from third through eighth grades to better prepare them…

  4. Preferential flow effects on transport and fate of chemicals and microorganisms in soils irrigated with wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddu, Rita; Corrias, Roberto; Dessena, Maria Antonietta; Ferralis, Marcella; Marras, Gabriele; Pin, Paola; Spanu, Paola

    2010-05-01

    This work is part of a multidisciplinary research properly planned by the ENAS (Cagliari-Sardinia-Italy) to verify the consequences of urban wastewater reuse in irrigation practices on chemical, biological and hydrological behavior of agricultural soils of the Had as Soualem area (Morocco). The area consists of Fluventic Haploxerept soils, according to USDA Soil Taxonomy. Undisturbed large soil columns, 70 cm height and 20 cm diameter, were collected from plots, the locations of which were preliminarily individuated through a prior pedological study. The soils are characterized by an apparent structure, suggesting that preferential flow processes may occur in the study area, which may impact usable groundwater at depth. Wastewater reuse for irrigation simultaneously solves water shortage and wastewater disposal problems. Unfortunately, wastewaters generally contain high concentrations of suspended and dissolved solids, both organic and inorganic, and microbial contaminants (virus and bacteria) added to wastewater during domestic and industrial usage. Most of these contaminants are only partially removed during conventional sewage treatment so they remain in the irrigation water. Although adsorbing ions and microbes are relatively immobile within porous media, preferential flow and adsorption to mobile colloids can enhance their transport. There is limited knowledge regarding the role of preferential flow and colloidal transport on adsorbing contaminants. The main aim of this research is to determine the influence of preferential flow and colloids on wastewater contaminant transport. Leaching rates and arrival time of wastewater contaminants will be determined using field and laboratory measurements at the study sites in combination with preferential flow numerical modeling. To achieve these objectives the soil columns were analyzed for physical, chemical, and microbial characterization. At the laboratory, an experimental facility was set up and sensors for

  5. Ultraviolet 320 nm laser excitation for flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William; Stickland, Lynn; Koschorreck, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Although multiple lasers and high-dimensional analysis capability are now standard on advanced flow cytometers, ultraviolet (UV) lasers (usually 325-365 nm) remain an uncommon excitation source for cytometry. This is primarily due to their cost, and the small number of applications that require this wavelength. The development of the Brilliant Ultraviolet (BUV fluorochromes, however, has increased the importance of this formerly niche excitation wavelength. Historically, UV excitation was usually provided by water-cooled argon- and krypton-ion lasers. Modern flow cytometers primary rely on diode pumped solid state lasers emitting at 355 nm. While useful for all UV-excited applications, DPSS UV lasers are still large by modern solid state laser standards, and remain very expensive. Smaller and cheaper near UV laser diodes (NUVLDs) emitting at 375 nm make adequate substitutes for 355 nm sources in many situations, but do not work as well with very short wavelength probes like the fluorescent calcium chelator indo-1. In this study, we evaluate a newly available UV 320 nm laser for flow cytometry. While shorter in wavelength that conventional UV lasers, 320 is close to the 325 nm helium-cadmium wavelength used in the past on early benchtop cytometers. A UV 320 nm laser was found to excite almost all Brilliant Ultraviolet dyes to nearly the same level as 355 nm sources. Both 320 nm and 355 nm sources worked equally well for Hoechst and DyeCycle Violet side population analysis of stem cells in mouse hematopoetic tissue. The shorter wavelength UV source also showed excellent excitation of indo-1, a probe that is not compatible with NUVLD 375 nm sources. In summary, a 320 nm laser module made a suitable substitute for conventional 355 nm sources. This laser technology is available in a smaller form factor than current 355 nm units, making it useful for small cytometers with space constraints. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International

  6. Excited-state Wigner crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Fergus J. M.; Loos, Pierre-François

    2017-01-01

    Wigner crystals (WCs) are electronic phases peculiar to low-density systems, particularly in the uniform electron gas. Since its introduction in the early twentieth century, this model has remained essential to many aspects of electronic structure theory and condensed-matter physics. Although the (lowest-energy) ground-state WC (GSWC) has been thoroughly studied, the properties of excited-state WCs (ESWCs) are basically unknown. To bridge this gap, we present a well-defined procedure to obtain an entire family of ESWCs in a one-dimensional electron gas using a symmetry-broken mean-field approach. While the GSWC is a commensurate crystal (i.e., the number of density maxima equals the number of electrons), these ESWCs are incommensurate crystals exhibiting more or less maxima. Interestingly, they are lower in energy than the (uniform) Fermi fluid state. For some of these ESWCs, we have found asymmetrical band gaps, which would lead to anisotropic conductivity. These properties are associated with unusual characteristics in their electronic structure.

  7. Evaluation of the interaction between plant roots and preferential flow paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinghu; Niu, Jianzhi; Zhang, Mingxiang; Xiao, Zixing; Zhu, Weili

    2017-04-01

    Introduction Preferential flow causing environmental issues by carrying contaminants to the groundwater resources level, occurs throughout the world. Soil water flow and solute transportation via preferential flow paths with little resistance could bypass soil matrix quickly. It is necessary to characterize preferential flow phenomenon because of its understanding of ecological functions of soil, including the degradation of topsoil, the low activity of soil microorganisms, the loss of soil nutrients, and the serious source of pollution of groundwater resources (Brevik et al., 2015; Singh et al., 2015). Studies on the interaction between plant roots and soil water flow in response to preferential flow is promising increasingly. However, it is complicated to evaluate soil hydrology when plant roots are associated with the mechanisms of soil water flow and solute transportation, especially preferential flow (Ola et al., 2015). Root channels formed by living/decayed plant roots and root-soil interfaces affect soil hydrology (Tracy et al., 2011). For example, Jørgensen et al. (2002) stated that soil water flow was more obvious in soil profiles with plant roots than in soil profiles without plant roots. The present study was conducted to investigate the interaction between plant roots and soil water flow in response to preferential flow in stony soils. Materials and methods Field experiments: field dye tracing experiments centered on experimental plants (S. japonica Linn, P. orientalis (L.) Franco, and Q. dentata Thunb) were conducted to characterize the root length density, preferential flow paths (stained areas), and soil matrix (unstained areas). Brilliant Blue FCF (C.I. Food Blue 2) as dye solution (50 L) was applied to the experimental plots. Laboratory analyses: undisturbed soil columns (7-cm diameter, 10 cm high) obtained from soil depths of 0-20, 20-40, and 40-60 cm, respectively, were conducted with breakthrough curves experiments under different conditions

  8. Using the dye tracer for visualization of preferential flow in macro and micro-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodesova, Radka; Nemecek, Karel; Kodes, Vit; Fer, Miroslav; Jirku, Veronika; Nikodem, Antonin; Zigova, Anna; Jaksik, Ondrej; Kocarek, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Study is focused on the visualization of the preferential flow in different soil types and their horizons using the dye tracer experiment. Study was performed in the Haplic Luvisol in Hněvčeves and the Haplic Cambisol in Humpolec in the Czech Republic. The 100 (Haplic Luvisol) and 50 (Haplic Cambisol) liters of solute of dye Brilliant Blue FCF (5g/litr) was infiltrated on a 1 x 1 m plot (applying an initial ponding depth of 10 and 5 cm, respectively) immediately after the wheat harvest. On the next day, one half of the plot was sliced horizontally and another half vertically to study the dye distribution within the soil profile to the depth of 100 cm (macro-scale). The 3-D image of the dye distribution was created. In addition, the thin soil sections were made and micromorphological images were used to study a soil aggregate structure and dye distribution in micro-scale. The staining patterns within the vertical and horizontal sections documented very different nature of the preferential flow in different soil types and also within the soil profiles. Images of the Haplic Luvisol showed that while dye tracer was partly regularly transported and only some isolated domains were visible in the surface Ap1 horizon, the preferential flow occurred in the subsurface horizons. The preferential flow in the upper subsurface Ap2 horizon (plow pan) was caused by the gravitational biopores in the very compact matrix structure, which considerably slowed down the dye transport. In the case of deeper horizons (Bt1 and Bt2), the preferential flow occurred due to the gravitational biopores and extensively developed prismatic structure (small and very large aggregates in the Bt1 and Bt2 horizon respectively), which was highly affected by clay coatings. Even better characterization of the preferential flow particularly in these two horizons was obtained, when the same ponding dye infiltration experiment was performed directly on the top of the Bt1 horizon. Images of the Haplic

  9. Resonant coherent excitation of channeled ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datz, S.; Moak, C.D.; Crawford, O.H.; Krause, H.F.; Dittner, P.F.; Gomez del Campo, J.; Biggerstaff, J.A.; Miller, P.D.; Hvelplund, P.; Knudsen, H.

    1978-03-27

    We have observed resonant excitation of swift channeled hydrogenlike ions (Z = 5 to Z = 9) and heliumlike F/sup 7 +/ which arises from a coherent periodic perturbation by the atoms in the bounding crystal rows. The resonance excitation was seen through the reduction in the transmission of fixed-charge-state ions through channels in thin crystals of Au and Ag.

  10. Evolution of Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Sugai, H.

    1984-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally by control of the end losses in the 'scrape off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface...

  11. Electromagnetic excitation of ultrasound in electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankovsky, N. S.

    1996-11-01

    An electromagnetic explanation is given in earlier experimental evidence for the possibility of exciting acoustic signals by a transient electric field in an electrolyte. The theory is in agreement with experimental observations of acoustic signals excited by some elementary electric signals. The described mechanism can be applied to the construction of ultrasonic transducers operating in liquids or in living tissues.

  12. Excitations in Topological Superfluids and Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao

    In this thesis I present the theoretical work on Fermionic surface states, and %the bulk Bosonic collective excitations in topological superfluids and superconductors. Broken symmetries %Bulk-edge correspondence in topological condensed matter systems have implications for the spectrum of Fermionic excitations confined on surfaces or topological defects. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  13. Excitations of Neodymium Ions in Praseodymium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, M.; Jensen, J.; Mackintosh, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    The excitations of Nd ions dissolved in Pr have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. A crystal-field level at about 1.2 meV interferes strongly with the host excitations. In the antiferromagnetic phase, another level is observed about 0.5 meV above the ground-state, which is split by the...

  14. New mode of magnetic excitation in praseodymium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, K.N.; McEwen, K.A.; Jensen, J.

    1994-01-01

    A novel propagating mode of magnetic excitation has been observed in Pr. It takes the form of low-energy satellites to the crystal-field excitations on both the hexagonal and cubic sites which are very broad at long wavelengths, rise in energy and rapidly narrow with increasing q, and disappear b...

  15. Excited cosmic strings with superconducting currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Betti; Michel, Florent; Peter, Patrick

    2017-12-01

    We present a detailed analysis of excited cosmic string solutions that possess superconducting currents. These currents can be excited inside the string core, and—if the condensate is large enough—can lead to the excitations of the Higgs field. Next to the case with global unbroken symmetry, we discuss also the effects of the gauging of this symmetry and show that excited condensates persist when coupled to an electromagnetic field. The space-time of such strings is also constructed by solving the Einstein equations numerically and we show how the local scalar curvature is modified by the excitation. We consider the relevance of our results on the cosmic string network evolution as well as observations of primordial gravitational waves and cosmic rays.

  16. Loss of excitation of synchronous generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krištof, Vladimír; Mešter, Marián

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results of study of loss-of-excitation phenomena simulations. Loss of excitation is a very common fault in synchronous machine operating and can be caused by short circuit of the field winding, unexpected field breaker open or loss-of-excitation relay mal-operation. According to the statistic [1], the generator failure due to loss-of-excitation accounts for 69% of all generator failures. There has been concern over possible incorrect operation of the relay when operating the generator in the under-excited region, during stable transient swings and during major system disturbances. This article can serve as inputs for system operators in preparation of operation area or protection relaying area.

  17. Neutral excitations in the Gaffnian state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byungmin; Moore, Joel E.

    2017-06-01

    We study a model fractional quantum Hall (FQH) wave function called the Gaffnian state, which is believed to represent a gapless, strongly correlated state that is very different from conventional metals. To understand this exotic gapless state better, we provide a representation based on work of Halperin in which the pairing structure of the Gaffnian state becomes more explicit. We employ the single-mode approximation introduced by Girvin, MacDonald, and Platzman, here extended to three-body interactions, in order to treat a neutral collective excitation mode in order to clarify the physical origin of the gaplessness of the Gaffnian state. We discuss approaches to extract systematically the relevant physics in the long-distance, large-electron-number limit of FQH states using numerical calculations with relatively few electrons. In Appendices, we provide second-quantized expressions for many-body Haldane pseudopotentials in various geometries including the plane, sphere, cylinder, and torus based on the proper definition of the relative angular momentum.

  18. Acoustically excited encapsulated microbubbles and mitigation of biofouling

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2017-08-31

    Provided herein is a universally applicable biofouling mitigation technology using acoustically excited encapsulated microbubbles that disrupt biofilm or biofilm formation. For example, a method of reducing biofilm formation or removing biofilm in a membrane filtration system is provided in which a feed solution comprising encapsulated microbubbles is provided to the membrane under conditions that allow the encapsulated microbubbles to embed in a biofilm. Sonication of the embedded, encapsulated microbubbles disrupts the biofilm. Thus, provided herein is a membrane filtration system for performing the methods and encapsulated microbubbles specifically selected for binding to extracellular polymeric substances (EFS) in a biofilm.

  19. Zebularine induces replication-dependent double-strand breaks which are preferentially repaired by homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orta, Manuel Luis; Pastor, Nuria; Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Domínguez, Inmaculada; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Huertas Castaño, Carlos; López-Lázaro, Miguel; Helleday, Thomas; Mateos, Santiago

    2017-09-01

    Zebularine is a second-generation, highly stable hydrophilic inhibitor of DNA methylation with oral bioavailability that preferentially target cancer cells. It acts primarily as a trap for DNA methyl transferases (DNMTs) protein by forming covalent complexes between DNMT protein and zebularine-substrate DNA. It's well documented that replication-blocking DNA lesions can cause replication fork collapse and thereby to the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). DSB are dangerous lesions that can lead to potentially oncogenic genomic rearrangements or cell death. The two major pathways for repair of DSB are non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Recently, multiple functions for the HR machinery have been identified at arrested forks. Here we investigate in more detail the importance of the lesions induced by zebularine in terms of DNA damage and cytotoxicity as well as the role of HR in the repair of these lesions. When we examined the contribution of NHEJ and HR in the repair of DSB induced by zebularine we found that these breaks were preferentially repaired by HR. Also we show that the production of DSB is dependent on active replication. To test this, we determined chromosome damage by zebularine while transiently inhibiting DNA synthesis. Here we report that cells deficient in single-strand break (SSB) repair are hypersensitive to zebularine. We have observed more DSB induced by zebularine in XRCC1 deficient cells, likely to be the result of conversion of SSB into toxic DSB when encountered by a replication fork. Furthermore we demonstrate that HR is required for the repair of these breaks. Overall, our data suggest that zebularine induces replication-dependent DSB which are preferentially repaired by HR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Review on Preferential Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Hydrogen Rich Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mishra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this review, recent works on the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen rich gases for fuel cell applications are summarized. H2 is used as a fuel for polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. It is produced by reforming of natural gas or liquid fuels followed by water gas shift reaction. The produced gas consists of H2, CO, and CO2. In which CO content is around 1%, which is highly poisonous for the Pt anode of the PEMFC so that further removal of CO is needed. Catalytic preferential oxidation of CO (CO-PROX is one of the most suitable methods of purification of H2 because of high CO conversion rate at low temperature range, which is preferable for PEMFC operating conditions. Catalysts used for COPROX are mainly noble metal based; gold based and base metal oxide catalysts among them Copper-Ceria based catalysts are the most appropriate due to its low cost, easy availability and result obtained by these catalysts are comparable with the conventional noble metal catalysts. Copyright © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 22nd October 2010, Revised: 12nd January 2011, Accepted: 19th January 2011[How to Cite: A. Mishra, R. Prasad. (2011. A Review on Preferential Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Hydrogen Rich Gases. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (1: 1-14. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.191.1-14][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.191.1-14 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/191] | View in 

  1. Spatial connectivity in a highly heterogeneous aquifer: From cores to preferential flow paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, M.; Zheng, C.; Wilson, C.; Tick, G.R.; Liu, Gaisheng; Gorelick, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates connectivity in a small portion of the extremely heterogeneous aquifer at the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Columbus, Mississippi. A total of 19 fully penetrating soil cores were collected from a rectangular grid of 4 m by 4 m. Detailed grain size analysis was performed on 5 cm segments of each core, yielding 1740 hydraulic conductivity (K) estimates. Three different geostatistical simulation methods were used to generate 3-D conditional realizations of the K field for the sampled block. Particle tracking calculations showed that the fastest particles, as represented by the first 5% to arrive, converge along preferential flow paths and exit the model domain within preferred areas. These 5% fastest flow paths accounted for about 40% of the flow. The distribution of preferential flow paths and particle exit locations is clearly influenced by the occurrence of clusters formed by interconnected cells with K equal to or greater than the 0.9 decile of the data distribution (10% of the volume). The fraction of particle paths within the high-K clusters ranges from 43% to 69%. In variogram-based K fields, some of the fastest paths are through media with lower K values, suggesting that transport connectivity may not require fully connected zones of relatively homogenous K. The high degree of flow and transport connectivity was confirmed by the values of two groups of connectivity indicators. In particular, the ratio between effective and geometric mean K (on average, about 2) and the ratio between the average arrival time and the arrival time of the fastest particles (on average, about 9) are consistent with flow and advective transport behavior characterized by channeling along preferential flow paths. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Depth resolution and preferential sputtering in depth profiling of sharp interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, S. [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (formerly MPI for Metals Research), Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Han, Y.S. [Department of Physics, Shantou University, 243 Daxue Road, Shantou, 515063 Guangdong (China); Wang, J.Y., E-mail: wangjy@stu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Shantou University, 243 Daxue Road, Shantou, 515063 Guangdong (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Interfacial depth resolution from MRI model depends on sputtering rate differences. • Depth resolution critically depends on the dominance of roughness or atomic mixing. • True (depth scale) and apparent (time scale) depth resolutions are different. • Average sputtering rate approximately yields true from apparent depth resolution. • Profiles by SIMS and XPS are different but similar to surface concentrations. - Abstract: The influence of preferential sputtering on depth resolution of sputter depth profiles is studied for different sputtering rates of the two components at an A/B interface. Surface concentration and intensity depth profiles on both the sputtering time scale (as measured) and the depth scale are obtained by calculations with an extended Mixing-Roughness-Information depth (MRI)-model. The results show a clear difference for the two extreme cases (a) preponderant roughness and (b) preponderant atomic mixing. In case (a), the interface width on the time scale (Δt(16–84%)) increases with preferential sputtering if the faster sputtering component is on top of the slower sputtering component, but the true resolution on the depth scale (Δz(16–84%)) stays constant. In case (b), the interface width on the time scale stays constant but the true resolution on the depth scale varies with preferential sputtering. For similar order of magnitude of the atomic mixing and the roughness parameters, a transition state between the two extremes is obtained. While the normalized intensity profile of SIMS represents that of the surface concentration, an additional broadening effect is encountered in XPS or AES by the influence of the mean electron escape depth which may even cause an additional matrix effect at the interface.

  3. Coherent Excitations Induced by Pumping a Mott System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Claassen, Martin; Moritz, Brian; Devereaux, Thomas

    Time-domain or non-equilibrium dynamics of correlated materials has attracted attention due to the possibility to characterize, tune and create complex ordered states. To understand how single and multi-particle excitations develop in a strongly-correlated systems during a pulsed pump, we perform a time-resolved exact-diagonalization study on a single-band Hubbard model. Starting from the Mott insulator at half-filling, we observe the suppression of antiferromagnetism and development of low-energy charge excitations through a series of Floquet-like sidebands. By correlating with the numerically evaluated single-particle spectra in non-equilibrium, the transient dynamics of multi-particle excitations can be attributed to the interplay between virtual Floquet sidebands and change of density of states due to the existence of strong correlations. The autocorrelation of this time-dependent spectral function reflects that it is the resonance of floquet states and upper Hubbard band that causes the remnant change of charge and spin excitations. This nonperturbative, nonequilibrium and nonstatic study reveals the underlying physical process while correlated electrons are pumped in experiment and provide the opportunity of designing nonequilibrium state of matter by a short pulsed laser.

  4. Inertia-driven resonant excitation of a magnetic skyrmion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiino, Takayuki; Kim, Kab-Jin; Lee, Ki-Suk; Park, Byong-Guk

    2017-10-25

    Topological spin structures such as magnetic domain walls, vortices, and skyrmions, have been receiving great interest because of their high potential application in various spintronic devices. To utilize them in the future spintronic devices, it is first necessary to understand the dynamics of the topological spin structures. Since inertial effect plays a crucial role in the dynamics of a particle, understanding the inertial effect of topological spin structures is an important task. Here, we report that a strong inertial effect appears steadily when a skyrmion is driven by an oscillating spin-Hall-spin-torque (SHST). We find that the skyrmion exhibits an inertia-driven hypocycloid-type trajectory when it is excited by the oscillating SHST. This motion has not been achieved by an oscillating magnetic field, which only excites the breathing mode without the inertial effect. The distinct inertial effect can be explained in terms of a spin wave excitation in the skyrmion boundary which is induced by the non-uniform SHST. Furthermore, the inertia-driven resonant excitation provides a way of experimentally estimating the inertial mass of the skyrmion. Our results therefore pave the way for the development of skyrmion-based device applications.

  5. A coevolving model based on preferential triadic closure for social media networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Menghui; Zou, Hailin; Guan, Shuguang; Gong, Xiaofeng; Li, Kun; Di, Zengru; Lai, Choy-Heng

    2013-01-01

    The dynamical origin of complex networks, i.e., the underlying principles governing network evolution, is a crucial issue in network study. In this paper, by carrying out analysis to the temporal data of Flickr and Epinions-two typical social media networks, we found that the dynamical pattern in neighborhood, especially the formation of triadic links, plays a dominant role in the evolution of networks. We thus proposed a coevolving dynamical model for such networks, in which the evolution is only driven by the local dynamics-the preferential triadic closure. Numerical experiments verified that the model can reproduce global properties which are qualitatively consistent with the empirical observations.

  6. The TPP and its Relation with Regional and Preferential Agreements in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Polanco, Rodrigo Javier

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the impact that the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP) may have on regional and preferential trade agreements (PTAs) in Latin America. If we understand TPP as an ordering project operating both on a mega-regional scale and at a regional dimension, this research examine the influence of TPP wording and commitments on TPP negotiating countries in Latin America (Chile, Mexico and Peru), and on other countries that are not part of the TPP negotiation, inc...

  7. Preferential attachment of communities: The same principle, but a higher level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollner, P.; Palla, G.; Vicsek, T.

    2006-02-01

    The graph of communities is a network emerging above the level of individual nodes in the hierarchical organisation of a complex system. In this graph the nodes correspond to communities (highly interconnected subgraphs, also called modules or clusters), and the links refer to members shared by two communities. Our analysis indicates that the development of this modular structure is driven by preferential attachment, in complete analogy with the growth of the underlying network of nodes. We study how the links between communities are born in a growing co-authorship network, and introduce a simple model for the dynamics of overlapping communities.

  8. Identification of Preferential Groundwater Flow Pathways from Local Tracer Breakthrough Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinaki, A.; Sleep, B. E.; Dearden, R.; Wealthall, G.

    2009-12-01

    Characterizing preferential groundwater flow paths in the subsurface is a key factor in the design of in situ remediation technologies. When applying reaction-based remediation methods, such as enhanced bioremediation, preferential flow paths result in fast solute migration and potentially ineffective delivery of reactants, thereby adversely affecting treatment efficiency. The presence of such subsurface conduits was observed at the SABRe (Source Area Bioremediation) research site. Non-uniform migration of contaminants and electron donor during the field trials of enhanced bioremediation supported this observation. To better determine the spatial flow field of the heterogeneous aquifer, a conservative tracer test was conducted. Breakthrough curves were obtained at a reference plane perpendicular to the principal groundwater flow direction. The resulting dataset was analyzed using three different methods: peak arrival times, analytical solution fitting and moment analysis. Interpretation using the peak arrival time method indicated areas of fast plume migration. However, some of the high velocities are supported by single data points, thus adding considerable uncertainty to the estimated velocity distribution. Observation of complete breakthrough curves indicated different types of solute breakthrough, corresponding to different transport mechanisms. Sharp peaks corresponded to high conductivity preferential flow pathways, whereas more dispersed breakthrough curves with long tails were characteristic of significant dispersive mixing and dilution. While analytical solutions adequately quantified flow characteristics for the first type of curves, they failed to do so for the second type, in which case they gave unrealistic results. Therefore, a temporal moment analysis was performed to obtain complete spatial distributions of mass recovery, velocity and dispersivity. Though the results of moment analysis qualitatively agreed with the results of previous methods, more

  9. Nonlinear preferential rewiring in fixed-size networks as a diffusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel; Torres, Joaquín J; Marro, Joaquín

    2009-05-01

    We present an evolving network model in which the total numbers of nodes and edges are conserved, but in which edges are continuously rewired according to nonlinear preferential detachment and reattachment. Assuming power-law kernels with exponents alpha and beta , the stationary states which the degree distributions evolve toward exhibit a second-order phase transition-from relatively homogeneous to highly heterogeneous (with the emergence of starlike structures) at alpha=beta . Temporal evolution of the distribution in this critical regime is shown to follow a nonlinear diffusion equation, arriving at either pure or mixed power laws of exponents -alpha and 1-alpha .

  10. Rapid dissolution of ZnO nanocrystals in acidic cancer microenvironment leading to preferential apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharan, Abhilash; Chandran, Parwathy; Menon, Deepthy; Raman, Sreerekha; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2011-09-01

    The microenvironment of cancer plays a very critical role in the survival, proliferation and drug resistance of solid tumors. Here, we report an interesting, acidic cancer microenvironment-mediated dissolution-induced preferential toxicity of ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) against cancer cells while leaving primary cells unaffected. Irrespective of the size-scale (5 and 200 nm) and surface chemistry differences (silica, starch or polyethylene glycol coating), ZnO NCs exhibited multiple stress mechanisms against cancer cell lines (IC50 ~150 μM) while normal human primary cells (human dermal fibroblast, lymphocytes, human umbilical vein endothelial cells) remain less affected. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that ZnO NCs undergo rapid preferential dissolution in acidic (pH ~5-6) cancer microenvironment causing elevated ROS stress, mitochondrial superoxide formation, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane, and cell cycle arrest at S/G2 phase leading to apoptosis. In effect, by elucidating the unique toxicity mechanism of ZnO NCs, we show that ZnO NCs can destabilize cancer cells by utilizing its own hostile acidic microenvironment, which is otherwise critical for its survival.The microenvironment of cancer plays a very critical role in the survival, proliferation and drug resistance of solid tumors. Here, we report an interesting, acidic cancer microenvironment-mediated dissolution-induced preferential toxicity of ZnO nanocrystals (NCs) against cancer cells while leaving primary cells unaffected. Irrespective of the size-scale (5 and 200 nm) and surface chemistry differences (silica, starch or polyethylene glycol coating), ZnO NCs exhibited multiple stress mechanisms against cancer cell lines (IC50 ~150 μM) while normal human primary cells (human dermal fibroblast, lymphocytes, human umbilical vein endothelial cells) remain less affected. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that ZnO NCs undergo rapid preferential dissolution in

  11. Preferential Solvation of Lithium Cations and Impacts on Oxygen Reduction in Lithium-Air Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dong; Qu, Deyu; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Lee, Hung-Sui; Qu, Deyang

    2015-09-16

    The solvation of Li+ with 11 nonaqueous solvents commonly used as electrolytes for lithium batteries was studied. The solvation preferences of different solvents were compared by means of electrospray mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation. The relative strength of the solvent for the solvation of Li+ was determined. The Lewis acidity of the solvated Li+ cations was determined by the preferential solvation of the solvent in the solvation shell. The kinetics of the catalytic disproportionation of the O2•- depends on the relative Lewis acidity of the solvated Li+ ion. The impact of the solvated Li+ cation on the O2 redox reaction was also investigated.

  12. Effects of CT Number-Derived Matrix Density on Preferential Flow 1 and Transport in a Macroporous Agricultural Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katuwal, Sheela; Moldrup, Per; Lamandé, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Preferential flow and transport in structured soils can be intimately linked to numerous environmental problems. Surface-applied chemicals are susceptible to rapid transport in structural soil pores to deeper depths, thereby potentially contaminating valuable environmental resources and posing ri...

  13. Mesoscopic segregation of excitation and inhibition in a brain network model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Malagarriga

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the brain are known to operate under a careful balance of excitation and inhibition, which maintains neural microcircuits within the proper operational range. How this balance is played out at the mesoscopic level of neuronal populations is, however, less clear. In order to address this issue, here we use a coupled neural mass model to study computationally the dynamics of a network of cortical macrocolumns operating in a partially synchronized, irregular regime. The topology of the network is heterogeneous, with a few of the nodes acting as connector hubs while the rest are relatively poorly connected. Our results show that in this type of mesoscopic network excitation and inhibition spontaneously segregate, with some columns acting mainly in an excitatory manner while some others have predominantly an inhibitory effect on their neighbors. We characterize the conditions under which this segregation arises, and relate the character of the different columns with their topological role within the network. In particular, we show that the connector hubs are preferentially inhibitory, the more so the larger the node's connectivity. These results suggest a potential mesoscale organization of the excitation-inhibition balance in brain networks.

  14. Nerve conduction and excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2009-01-01

    counterparts in the peripheral nervous system, in some instances without peripheral nervous system symptoms. Both hereditary and acquired demyelinating neuropathies have been studied and the effects on nerve pathophysiology have been compared with degeneration and regeneration of axons. SUMMARY: Excitability....... Studies of different metabolic neuropathies have assessed the influence of uremia, diabetes and ischemia, and the use of these methods in toxic neuropathies has allowed pinpointing damaging factors. Various mutations in ion channels associated with central nervous system disorders have been shown to have......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review is aimed at providing information about the role of nerve excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders. It has been known for many years that the insight into peripheral nerve pathophysiology provided by conventional nerve conduction studies is limited. Nerve...

  15. Symmetry characterization of electrons and lattice excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schober H.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Symmetry concerns all aspects of a physical system from the electronic orbitals to structural and magnetic excitations. In this article we will try to elaborate the fundamental connection between symmetry and excitations. As excitations are manyfold in physical systems it is impossible to treat them exhaustively. We thus concentrate on the two topics of Bloch electrons and phonons. These two examples are complementary in the sense that Bloch electrons describe single particles in an external periodic potential while phonons exemplify a decoupled system of interacting particles. The way we develop the argument gives as by-product a short account of molecular orbitals and molecular vibrations.

  16. Studies of HeH: Dissociative Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertan E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used structure and scattering calculations to determine the potential energy curves, non-adiabatic couplings and autoionization widths for the HeH system. These will be used to study a variety of processes ranging from dissociative recombination to mutual neutralization. As an example, we present our results on the direct dissociative excitation of HeH+ by electron impact via excitation to the two lowest excited states of the ion. The results are found to be in good agreement with experiment.

  17. Relativistic dynamical spin excitations of magnetic adatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Dias, M.; Schweflinghaus, B.; Blügel, S.; Lounis, S.

    2015-02-01

    We present a first-principles theory of dynamical spin excitations in the presence of spin-orbit coupling. The broken global spin rotational invariance leads to a new sum rule. We explore the competition between the magnetic anisotropy energy and the external magnetic field, as well as the role of electron-hole excitations, through calculations for 3 d -metal adatoms on the Cu(111) surface. The spin excitation resonance energy and lifetime display nontrivial behavior, establishing the strong impact of relativistic effects. We legitimate the use of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation down to the atomic limit, but with parameters that differ from a stationary theory.

  18. α-chymotrypsin in water-acetone and water-dimethyl sulfoxide mixtures: Effect of preferential solvation and hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, Vladimir A; Kuchierskaya, Alexandra A

    2017-10-01

    We investigated water/organic solvent sorption and residual enzyme activity to simultaneously monitor preferential solvation/hydration of protein macromolecules in the entire range of water content at 25°C. We applied this approach to estimate protein destabilization/stabilization due to the preferential interactions of bovine pancreatic α-chymotrypsin with water-acetone (moderate-strength H-bond acceptor) and water-DMSO (strong H-bond acceptor) mixtures. There are three concentration regimes for the dried α-chymotrypsin. α-Chymotrypsin is preferentially hydrated at high water content. The residual enzyme activity values are close to 100%. At intermediate water content, the dehydrated α-chymotrypsin has a higher affinity for acetone/DMSO than for water. Residual enzyme activity is minimal in this concentration range. The acetone/DMSO molecules are preferentially excluded from the protein surface at the lowest water content, resulting in preferential hydration. The residual catalytic activity in the water-poor acetone is ∼80%, compared with that observed after incubation in pure water. This effect is very small for the water-poor DMSO. Two different schemes are operative for the hydrated enzyme. At high and intermediate water content, α-chymotrypsin exhibits preferential hydration. However, at intermediate water content, in contrast to the dried enzyme, the initially hydrated α-chymotrypsin possesses increased preferential hydration parameters. At low water content, no residual enzyme activity was observed. Preferential binding of DMSO/acetone to α-chymotrypsin was detected. Our data clearly demonstrate that the hydrogen bond accepting ability of organic solvents and the protein hydration level constitute key factors in determining the stability of protein-water-organic solvent systems. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. High Amplitude Non Contact Acoustic Source for Defect Detection and 3-component Excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bas, Pierre-Yves [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-03

    This report provides motivation, time reversal basics, non-contact source basics and first results, three component excitation, and a path forward for high amplitude, non-contact acoustic source for defect detection.

  20. Controlled excitation of resonance self-oscillations in one-dimensional distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izrailovich, M. Ya.

    2004-03-01

    On the basis of the method of equivalent linearization combined with the method of moments, laws of self-oscillation excitation are obtained that provide the modes with maximum intensity of resonance (or quasi-resonance) oscillations in one-dimensional systems with distributed parameters. A restriction of a general type is imposed on the law of excitation. In the particular case of an integral quadratic restriction, the law of excitation leads to the generation of purely harmonic self-oscillations. The use of an extended (multiplicatively stabilizing) control provides the uniqueness and stability of the quasi-optimal mode of self-oscillation.

  1. Stimulated emission of dark matter axion from condensed matter excitations

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoi, Naoto; Saitoh, Eiji

    2018-01-01

    We discuss a possible principle for detecting dark matter axions in galactic halos. If axions constitute a condensate in the Milky Way, stimulated emissions of the axions from a type of excitation in condensed matter can be detectable. We provide general mechanism for the dark matter emission, and, as a concrete example, an emission of dark matter axions from magnetic vortex strings in a type II superconductor is investigated along with possible experimental signatures.

  2. Isotope low-dimensional structures elementary excitations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Plekhanov, Vladimir G

    2012-01-01

    This Briefs volume describes the properties and structure of  elementary excitations in isotope low-dimensional structures. Without assuming prior knowledge of quantum physics, the present book provides the basic knowledge needed to understand the recent developments in the sub-disciplines of nanoscience isotopetronics, novel device concepts and materials for nanotechnology. It is the first and comprehensive interdisciplinary account of the newly developed scientific discipline isotopetronics.

  3. Probing excited electronic states and ionisation mechanisms of fullerenes

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Olof; Campbell, Eleanor E. B.

    2013-01-01

    Fullerenes are interesting model systems for probing the complex, fundamental electron dynamics and ionisation mechanisms of large molecules and nanoparticles. In this Tutorial Review we explain how recent experimental and theoretical advances are providing insight into the interesting phenomenon of thermal electron emission from molecular systems and the properties of hydrogenic, diffuse, excited electronic states, known as superatom molecular orbitals, which are responsible for relatively s...

  4. Probing clustering in excited alpha-conjugate nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Borderie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The fragmentation of quasi-projectiles from the nuclear reaction 40Ca+12C at 25 MeV per nucleon bombarding energy was used to produce α-emission sources. From a careful selection of these sources provided by a complete detection and from comparisons with models of sequential and simultaneous decays, evidence in favor of α-particle clustering from excited 16O, 20Ne and 24Mg is reported.

  5. Probing clustering in excited alpha-conjugate nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borderie, B., E-mail: borderie@ipno.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); Raduta, Ad.R. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Ademard, G.; Rivet, M.F. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); De Filippo, E. [INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Geraci, E. [INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bologna and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Bologna (Italy); Le Neindre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay (France); LPC, CNRS/IN2P3, Ensicaen, Université de Caen, Caen (France); Alba, R.; Amorini, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Cardella, G. [INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Chatterjee, M. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India); Guinet, D.; Lautesse, P. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, CNRS/IN2P3, Univ. Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, Villeurbanne (France); La Guidara, E. [INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Facoltá di Ingegneria e Architettura, Università Kore, Enna (Italy); Lanzano, G. [INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); and others

    2016-04-10

    The fragmentation of quasi-projectiles from the nuclear reaction {sup 40}Ca+{sup 12}C at 25 MeV per nucleon bombarding energy was used to produce α-emission sources. From a careful selection of these sources provided by a complete detection and from comparisons with models of sequential and simultaneous decays, evidence in favor of α-particle clustering from excited {sup 16}O, {sup 20}Ne and {sup 24}Mg is reported.

  6. Corticospinal Excitability in Children with Congenital Hemiparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Ying Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS can be used as an assessment or intervention to evaluate or influence brain activity in children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP commonly caused by perinatal stroke. This communication report analyzed data from two clinical trials using TMS to assess corticospinal excitability in children and young adults with hemiparetic CP. The results of this communication revealed a higher probability of finding a motor evoked potential (MEP on the non-lesioned hemisphere compared to the lesioned hemisphere (p = 0.005. The resting motor threshold (RMT was lower on the non-lesioned hemisphere than the lesioned hemisphere (p = 0.013. There was a significantly negative correlation between age and RMT (rs = −0.65, p = 0.003. This communication provides information regarding MEP responses, motor thresholds (MTs and the association with age during TMS assessment in children with hemiparetic CP. Such findings contribute to the development of future pediatric studies in neuroplasticity and neuromodulation to influence motor function and recovery after perinatal stroke.

  7. Susceptibility to enhanced chemical migration from depression-focused preferential flow, High Plains aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurdak, J.J.; Walvoord, Michelle Ann; McMahon, P.B.

    2008-01-01

    Aquifer susceptibility to contamination is controlled in part by the inherent hydrogeologic properties of the vadose zone, which includes preferential-flow pathways. The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of seasonal ponding near leaky irrigation wells as a mechanism for depression-focused preferential flow and enhanced chemical migration through the vadose zone of the High Plains aquifer. Such a mechanism may help explain the widespread presence of agrichemicals in recently recharged groundwater despite estimates of advective chemical transit times through the vadose zone from diffuse recharge that exceed the historical period of agriculture. Using a combination of field observations, vadose zone flow and transport simulations, and probabilistic neural network modeling, we demonstrated that vadose zone transit times near irrigation wells range from 7 to 50 yr, which are one to two orders of magnitude faster than previous estimates based on diffuse recharge. These findings support the concept of fast and slow transport zones and help to explain the previous discordant findings of long vadose zone transit times and the presence of agrichemicals at the water table. Using predictions of aquifer susceptibility from probabilistic neural network models, we delineated approximately 20% of the areal extent of the aquifer to have conditions that may promote advective chemical transit times to the water table of practices.

  8. Nucleus accumbens core acetylcholine is preferentially activated during acquisition of drug- vs food-reinforced behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Jose A; Stöckl, Petra; Zorn, Katja; Saria, Alois; Zernig, Gerald

    2008-12-01

    Acquisition of drug-reinforced behavior is accompanied by a systematic increase of release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) rather than dopamine, the expected prime reward neurotransmitter candidate, in the nucleus accumbens core (AcbC), with activation of both muscarinic and nicotinic ACh receptors in the AcbC by ACh volume transmission being necessary for the drug conditioning. The present findings suggest that the AcbC ACh system is preferentially activated by drug reinforcers, because (1) acquisition of food-reinforced behavior was not paralleled by activation of ACh release in the AcbC whereas acquisition of morphine-reinforced behavior, like that of cocaine or remifentanil (tested previously), was, and because (2) local intra-AcbC administration of muscarinic or nicotinic ACh receptor antagonists (atropine or mecamylamine, respectively) did not block the acquisition of food-reinforced behavior whereas acquisition of drug-reinforced behavior had been blocked. Interestingly, the speed with which a drug of abuse distributed into the AcbC and was eliminated from the AcbC determined the size of the AcbC ACh signal, with the temporally more sharply delineated drug stimulus producing a more pronounced AcbC ACh signal. The present findings suggest that muscarinic and nicotinic ACh receptors in the AcbC are preferentially involved during reward conditioning for drugs of abuse vs sweetened condensed milk as a food reinforcer.

  9. Role of dimensionality in preferential attachment growth in the Bianconi-Barabási model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Thiago C.; Brito, Samurai; da Silva, Luciano R.; Tsallis, Constantino

    2017-09-01

    Scale-free networks are quite popular nowadays since many systems are well represented by such structures. In order to study these systems, several models were proposed. However, most of them do not take into account the node-to-node Euclidean distance, i.e. the geographical distance. In real networks, the distance between sites can be very relevant, e.g. those cases where it is intended to minimize costs. Within this scenario we studied the role of dimensionality d in the Bianconi-Barabási model with a preferential attachment growth involving Euclidean distances. The preferential attachment in this model follows the rule \\Pii \\propto ηi k_i/rijα_A (1 ≤slant i distribution P(k) for dimensions d=1, 2, 3, 4 are well fitted by P(k) \\propto e_q-k/κ , where e_q-k/κ is the q-exponential function naturally emerging within nonextensive statistical mechanics. We determine the index q and κ as functions of the quantities αA and d, and numerically verify that both present a universal behavior with respect to the scaled variable α_A/d . The same behavior also has been displayed by the dynamical β exponent which characterizes the steadily growing number of links of a given site.

  10. Dependence of crystallite formation and preferential backbone orientations on the side chain pattern in PBDTTPD polymers

    KAUST Repository

    El Labban, Abdulrahman

    2014-11-26

    (Figure Presented) Alkyl substituents appended to the π-conjugated main chain account for the solution-processability and film-forming properties of most π-conjugated polymers for organic electronic device applications, including field-effect transistors (FETs) and bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Beyond film-forming properties, recent work has emphasized the determining role that side-chain substituents play on polymer self-assembly and thin-film nanostructural order, and, in turn, on device performance. However, the factors that determine polymer crystallite orientation in thin-films, implying preferential backbone orientation relative to the device substrate, are a matter of some debate, and these structural changes remain difficult to anticipate. In this report, we show how systematic changes in the side-chain pattern of poly(benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene-alt-thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione) (PBDTTPD) polymers can (i) influence the propensity of the polymer to order in the π-stacking direction, and (ii) direct the preferential orientation of the polymer crystallites in thin films (e.g., "face-on" vs "edge-on"). Oriented crystallites, specifically crystallites that are well-ordered in the π-stacking direction, are believed to be a key contributor to improved thin-film device performance in both FETs and BHJ solar cells.

  11. On the relationship between the non-local clustering mechanism and preferential concentration

    CERN Document Server

    Bragg, Andrew D; Collins, Lance R

    2015-01-01

    `Preferential concentration' (\\emph{Phys. Fluids} \\textbf{A3}:1169--78, 1991) refers to the clustering of inertial particles in the high-strain, low-rotation regions of turbulence. The `centrifuge mechanism' of Maxey (\\emph{J. Fluid Mech.} \\textbf{174}:441--65, 1987) appears to explain this phenomenon. In a recent paper, Bragg \\& Collins (\\emph{New J. Phys.} \\textbf{16}:055013, 2014) showed that the centrifuge mechanism is dominant only in the regime ${St\\ll1}$, where $St$ is the Stokes number based on the Kolmogorov time scale. Outside this regime, the centrifuge mechanism gives way to a non-local, path-history symmetry breaking mechanism. However, despite the change in the clustering mechanism, the instantaneous particle positions continue to correlate with high-strain, low-rotation regions of the turbulence. In this paper, we analyze the exact equation governing the radial distribution function and show how the non-local clustering mechanism is influenced by, but not dependent upon, the preferential sa...

  12. Antibiotic ivermectin preferentially targets renal cancer through inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Li, Youkong; Zhou, Zhifang

    2017-10-21

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most aggressive type of genitourinary cancer and highly resistant to current available therapies. In this work, we investigated the effects and mechanism of anti-parasitic agent ivermectin in RCC. We show that ivermectin significantly inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in multiple RCC cell lines that represent different histological subtypes and various mutation status. Importantly, ivermectin is significantly less or ineffective in normal kidney cells compared with RCC cells, demonstrating the preferential toxicity of ivermectin to RCC. Ivermectin also significantly inhibits RCC tumor growth in vivo. Mechanistically, ivermectin induces mitochondrial dysfunction via decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial respiration and ATP production. As a consequence of mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and damage is detected in ivermectin treated RCC cells and xenograft mouse model. The rescue of ivermectin's effect by acetyl-l-Carnitine (ALCAR, a mitochondrial fuel) or antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) confirms mitochondria as the target of ivermectin in RCC cells. Compared to normal kidney cells, RCC cells have higher mitochondrial mass and respiration, and ATP production, which might explain the preferential toxicity of ivermectin to RCC. Our work suggest that ivermectin is a promising candidate for RCC treatment and targeting mitochondrial metabolism is an alternative therapeutic strategy for RCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhanced dielectric characteristics of preferential (1 1 1)-oriented BZT thin films by manganese doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie, W J [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zhu, J [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Qin, W F [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Wei, X H [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Xiong, J [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Zhang, Y [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Bhalla, A [Materials Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Li, Y R [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2007-05-07

    Ba(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3} (BZT) and 2 mol% Mn additional doped BZT (Mn-BZT) thin films were deposited on Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique under the same growth conditions. X-ray diffraction scans showed that both films were polycrystalline and preferentially (1 1 1)-oriented, and an enhanced crystallization effect was obtained after Mn doping. The parallel-plate capacitors of Au/BZT/Pt and Au/Mn-BZT/Pt were prepared to investigate the electric properties, respectively. The remanent polarization and the coercive electric field for Mn-doped BZT film were both smaller than those of undoped BZT film. Furthermore, Mn-doped BZT film exhibited a higher dielectric constant of 460 at zero bias, larger dielectric tunability of 69.0% and lower dielectric loss of 5.0 per mille under an applied electric field of 615 kV cm{sup -1} than those of undoped BZT film. The figure of merit for preferentially (1 1 1)-oriented BZT thin film was greatly enhanced from 94 to 138 by Mn doping. The enhanced dielectric behaviour by Mn doping could be mainly attributed to the decrease in electron concentration and oxygen vacancies and the reorientation of the defect complex.

  14. Preferential Heating of Oxygen 5+ Ions by Finite-Amplitude Oblique Alfven Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneva, Yana G.; Vinas, Adolfo; Araneda, Jamie; Poedts, Stefaan

    2016-01-01

    Minor ions in the fast solar wind are known to have higher temperatures and to flow faster than protons in the interplanetary space. In this study we combine previous research on parametric instability theory and 2.5D hybrid simulations to study the onset of preferential heating of Oxygen 5+ ions by large-scale finite-amplitude Alfven waves in the collisionless fast solar wind. We consider initially non-drifting isotropic multi-species plasma, consisting of isothermal massless fluid electrons, kinetic protons and kinetic Oxygen 5+ ions. The external energy source for the plasma heating and energization are oblique monochromatic Alfven-cyclotron waves. The waves have been created by rotating the direction of initial parallel pump, which is a solution of the multi-fluid plasma dispersion relation. We consider propagation angles theta less than or equal to 30 deg. The obliquely propagating Alfven pump waves lead to strong diffusion in the ion phase space, resulting in highly anisotropic heavy ion velocity distribution functions and proton beams. We discuss the application of the model to the problems of preferential heating of minor ions in the solar corona and the fast solar wind.

  15. Preferential Arc transcription at rest in the active ensemble during associative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashikawa, Koichi; Matsuki, Norio; Nomura, Hiroshi

    2011-05-01

    Information processing in the central nervous system (CNS) during periods of rest is crucial for lasting memories but the precise off-line neuronal population activity that contributes to long-term memory formation remains unclear. This pattern of neuronal activity during rest triggers transcription of immediate early genes such as activity regulated cytoskeletal gene (Arc). We compared the active neuronal population in the lateral amygdala of C57BL/6J mice during fear conditioning and rest periods using a large scale imaging technique, Arc cellular compartment analysis of temporal activity by fluorescence in situ hybridization (catFISH). We found that the neuronal population transcribing Arc during fear conditioning was more similar to that the population transcribing Arc after fear conditioning than before fear conditioning. The overlapping population was larger in conditioned mice that acquired associative memory than in unshocked mice and in latent inhibited mice that received shocks but did not form associative memory. Moreover, these results were confirmed using Arc/Homer 1a catFISH. Our findings indicate that Arc is preferentially transcribed in neurons that are active during fear conditioning after associative learning. This preferential transcription may contribute to the formation of long-lasting memory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ligand Fluorination to Optimize Preferential Oxidation (PROX) of Carbon Monoxide by Water-Soluble Rhodium Porphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffinger, Justin C.; Uppaluri, ShriHarsha; Sun, Haoran

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic, low temperature preferential oxidation (PROX) of carbon monoxide by aqueous [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octafluoroporphyrinato]rhodium(III) tetrasodium salt, (1[Rh(III)]) and [5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-sulfonato-2,6-difluorophenyl)-2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octafluoroporphyrinato]rhodium(III) tetrasodium salt, (2[Rh(III)]) is reported. The PROX reaction occurs at ambient temperature in buffered (4 ≤ pH ≤ 13) aqueous solutions. Fluorination on the porphyrin periphery is shown to increase the CO PROX reaction rate, shift the metal centered redox potentials, and acidify ligated water molecules. Most importantly, β-fluorination increases the acidity of the rhodium hydride complex (pKa = 2.2 ± 0.2 for 2[Rh-D]); the dramatically increased acidity of the Rh(III) hydride complex precludes proton reduction and hydrogen activation near neutral pH, thereby permitting oxidation of CO to be unaffected by the presence of H2. This new fluorinated water-soluble rhodium porphyrin-based homogenous catalyst system permits preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen gas streams at 308 °K using dioxygen or a sacrificial electron acceptor (indigo carmine) as the terminal oxidant. PMID:21949596

  17. The anti-protozoan drug nifurtimox preferentially inhibits clonogenic tumor cells under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quhuan; Lin, Qun; Kim, Hoon; Yun, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is an independent prognostic indicator of tumor malignant progression and poor patient survival. Therefore, eradication of hypoxic tumor cells is of paramount importance for successful disease control. In this study, we have made a new discovery that nifurtimox, a clinically approved drug to treat Chagas disease caused by the parasitic protozoan trypanosomes, can function as a hypoxia-activated cytotoxin. We have found that nifurtimox preferentially kill clonogenic tumor cells especially under the hypoxic conditions of ≤0.1% O2. Mechanistically, nifurtimox becomes activated after tumor cells enter into a fully hypoxic state, as shown by the stabilization of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α (HIF-1α). Nifurtimox specifically induces the formation of 53BP1 foci, a hallmark of DNA double-stranded breaks, in hypoxic tumor cells. Hypoxia-dependent activation of nifurtimox involves P450 (cytochrome) oxidoreductase. The anti-protozoan drug nifurtimox holds promise as a new hypoxia-activated cytotoxin with the potential to preferentially eliminates severely hypoxic tumor cells.

  18. Organic carbon composition and thermodynamics indicate preferential carbon sequestration at a terrestrial-aquatic interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, E.; Crump, A.; Kennedy, D.; Tfaily, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial carbon (C) inputs into aquatic systems have increased by up to 1 PgC yr-1 in the anthropogenic era, yet considerable uncertainty remains in the flux of organic matter across terrestrial-aquatic linkages. Previous research has demonstrated impacts of organic matter composition on C burial efficiency and stabilization within sediments. Here, we investigated preferential sediment C sequestration along two elevation transects in the hyporheic zone of the Columbia River in eastern Washington State. We sampled depth profiles at 10 cm intervals from 0-60 cm using liquid nitrogen freeze cores to maintain spatial integrity. At each depth, we used Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) to yield the elemental composition and Gibbs free energy of C oxidation (dGCox) in C profiles. We expected dGCox to increase with depth, reflecting declines in labile C and in redox conditions. Instead, we observed the opposite trend in freeze cores with high rates of aerobic activity, while those sampled locations with low aerobic activity did not show thermodynamic trends. Preliminary analysis of C composition profiles supports this relationship, with enhanced labile C pools at lower depths in high-activity freeze cores. We also found spatial variation in C processing within depth profiles across environment under which subsequent biogeochemical cycling operates. Our results generate new insights into preferential C burial rates, microbially-mediated transformations of organic matter, and thermodynamic constraints on C sequestration at terrestrial-aquatic interfaces.

  19. Formic acid electrooxidation on Bi-modified polyoriented and preferential (111) Pt nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cudero, Ana; Vidal-Iglesias, Francisco J; Solla-Gullón, José; Herrero, Enrique; Aldaz, Antonio; Feliu, Juan M

    2009-01-14

    Formic acid electrooxidation was studied on Bi modified polyoriented and preferential (111) Pt nanoparticles. For both types of nanoparticles, Bi coverage was progressively increased and its effect on formic acid electrooxidation was evaluated using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric measurements. In both experiments, significant and progressive enhancements on the electrooxidation current densities were obtained in comparison to the bare Pt nanoparticles. In voltammetry, at maximum Bi coverage, higher current densities at peak potential were obtained with the preferential (111) Pt nanoparticles (approximately 42 mA cm(-2)) as compared to the polyoriented Pt nanoparticles (approximately 32 mA cm(-2)) in agreement with previous single crystal studies. Nevertheless, this tendency was not observed in chronoamperometry at 0.4 V where currents obtained at maximum Bi coverage were similar. On the other hand, CO poison formation was also evaluated at open circuit potential. The resulting electrochemical activity has been rationalized using different parameters, such as surface structure, size domains, particle size and Bi coverage.

  20. The epidemiological advantage of preferential targeting of tuberculosis control at the poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, J R; Basu, S; Dowdy, D W; Murray, M B

    2015-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains disproportionately concentrated among the poor, yet known determinants of TB reactivation may fail to explain observed disparities in disease rates according to wealth. Reviewing data on TB disparities in India and the wealth distribution of known TB risk factors, we describe how social mixing patterns could be contributing to TB disparities. Wealth-assortative mixing, whereby individuals are more likely to be in contact with others from similar socio-economic backgrounds, amplifies smaller differences in risk of TB, resulting in large population-level disparities. As disparities and assortativeness increase, TB becomes more difficult to control, an effect that is obscured by looking at population averages of epidemiological parameters, such as case detection rates. We illustrate how TB control efforts may benefit from preferential targeting toward the poor. In India, an equivalent-scale intervention could have a substantially greater impact if targeted at those living below the poverty line than with a population-wide strategy. In addition to potential efficiencies in targeting higher-risk populations, TB control efforts would lead to a greater reduction in secondary TB cases per primary case diagnosed if they were preferentially targeted at the poor. We highlight the need to collect programmatic data on TB disparities and explicitly incorporate equity considerations into TB control plans.

  1. MHC I-associated peptides preferentially derive from transcripts bearing miRNA response elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Diana Paola; Yahyaoui, Wafaa; Laumont, Céline M; Daouda, Tariq; Muratore-Schroeder, Tara L; Côté, Caroline; Laverdure, Jean-Philippe; Lemieux, Sébastien; Thibault, Pierre; Perreault, Claude

    2012-06-28

    MHC I-associated peptides (MIPs) play an essential role in normal homeostasis and diverse pathologic conditions. MIPs derive mainly from defective ribosomal products (DRiPs), a subset of nascent proteins that fail to achieve a proper conformation and the physical nature of which remains elusive. In the present study, we used high-throughput proteomic and transcriptomic methods to unravel the structure and biogenesis of MIPs presented by HLA-A and HLA-B molecules on human EBV-infected B lymphocytes from 4 patients. We found that although HLA-different subjects present distinctive MIPs derived from different proteins, these MIPs originate from proteins that are functionally interconnected and implicated in similar biologic pathways. Secondly, the MIP repertoire of human B cells showed no bias toward conserved versus polymorphic genomic sequences, were derived preferentially from abundant transcripts, and conveyed to the cell surface a cell-type-specific signature. Finally, we discovered that MIPs derive preferentially from transcripts bearing miRNA response elements. Furthermore, whereas MIPs of HLA-disparate subjects are coded by different sets of transcripts, these transcripts are regulated by mostly similar miRNAs. Our data support an emerging model in which the generation of MIPs by a transcript depends on its abundance and DRiP rate, which is regulated to a large extent by miRNAs.

  2. The Dynamics of Power laws: Fitness and Aging in Preferential Attachment Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavaglia, Alessandro; van der Hofstad, Remco; Woeginger, Gerhard

    2017-09-01

    Continuous-time branching processes describe the evolution of a population whose individuals generate a random number of children according to a birth process. Such branching processes can be used to understand preferential attachment models in which the birth rates are linear functions. We are motivated by citation networks, where power-law citation counts are observed as well as aging in the citation patterns. To model this, we introduce fitness and age-dependence in these birth processes. The multiplicative fitness moderates the rate at which children are born, while the aging is integrable, so that individuals receives a finite number of children in their lifetime. We show the existence of a limiting degree distribution for such processes. In the preferential attachment case, where fitness and aging are absent, this limiting degree distribution is known to have power-law tails. We show that the limiting degree distribution has exponential tails for bounded fitnesses in the presence of integrable aging, while the power-law tail is restored when integrable aging is combined with fitness with unbounded support with at most exponential tails. In the absence of integrable aging, such processes are explosive.

  3. Dopamine D2 receptors preferentially regulate the development of light responses of the inner retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ning; Xu, Hong-ping; Wang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Retinal light responsiveness measured via electroretinography undergoes developmental modulation and is thought to be critically regulated by both visual experience and dopamine. The primary goal of this study is to determine whether the dopamine D2 receptor regulates the visual experience-dependent functional development of the retina. Accordingly, we recorded electroretinograms from wild type mice and mice with a genetic deletion of the gene that encodes the dopamine D2 receptor raised under normal cyclic light conditions and constant darkness. Our results demonstrate that mutation of the dopamine D2 receptors preferentially increases the amplitude of the inner retinal light responses evoked by high intensity light measured as oscillatory potentials in adult mice. During postnatal development, all three major components of electroretinograms, the a-wave, b-wave and oscillatory potentials, increase with age. Comparatively, mutation of the dopamine D2 receptors preferentially reduces the age-dependent increase of b-waves evoked by low intensity light. Light deprivation from birth reduces the amplitude of b-waves and completely diminishes the increased amplitude of oscillatory potentials. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the dopamine D2 receptor plays an important role in the activity-dependent functional development of the mouse retina. PMID:25393815

  4. Preferential flow, diffuse flow, and perching in an interbedded fractured-rock unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, John R.; Creasey, Kaitlyn M; Perkins, Kimberlie; Mirus, Benjamin B.

    2017-01-01

    Layers of strong geologic contrast within the unsaturated zone can control recharge and contaminant transport to underlying aquifers. Slow diffuse flow in certain geologic layers, and rapid preferential flow in others, complicates the prediction of vertical and lateral fluxes. A simple model is presented, designed to use limited geological site information to predict these critical subsurface processes in response to a sustained infiltration source. The model is developed and tested using site-specific information from the Idaho National Laboratory in the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), USA, where there are natural and anthropogenic sources of high-volume infiltration from floods, spills, leaks, wastewater disposal, retention ponds, and hydrologic field experiments. The thick unsaturated zone overlying the ESRP aquifer is a good example of a sharply stratified unsaturated zone. Sedimentary interbeds are interspersed between massive and fractured basalt units. The combination of surficial sediments, basalts, and interbeds determines the water fluxes through the variably saturated subsurface. Interbeds are generally less conductive, sometimes causing perched water to collect above them. The model successfully predicts the volume and extent of perching and approximates vertical travel times during events that generate high fluxes from the land surface. These developments are applicable to sites having a thick, geologically complex unsaturated zone of substantial thickness in which preferential and diffuse flow, and perching of percolated water, are important to contaminant transport or aquifer recharge.

  5. Probing an Excited-State Atomic Transition Using Hyperfine Quantum Beat Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, Christopher G; Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to observe the dynamics of an excited-state transition in a room temperature atomic vapor using hyperfine quantum beats. Our experiment using cesium atoms consists of a pulsed excitation of the D2 transition, and continuous-wave driving of an excited-state transition from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state to the 7S$_{1/2}$ state. We observe quantum beats in the fluorescence from the 6P$_{3/2}$ state which are modified by the driving of the excited-state transition. The Fourier spectrum of the beat signal yields evidence of Autler-Townes splitting of the 6P$_{3/2}$, F = 5 hyperfine level and Rabi oscillations on the excited-state transition. A detailed model provides qualitative agreement with the data, giving insight to the physical processes involved.

  6. Minimal-excitation states for electron quantum optics using levitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, J; Jullien, T; Portier, F; Roche, P; Cavanna, A; Jin, Y; Wegscheider, W; Roulleau, P; Glattli, D C

    2013-10-31

    The on-demand generation of pure quantum excitations is important for the operation of quantum systems, but it is particularly difficult for a system of fermions. This is because any perturbation affects all states below the Fermi energy, resulting in a complex superposition of particle and hole excitations. However, it was predicted nearly 20 years ago that a Lorentzian time-dependent potential with quantized flux generates a minimal excitation with only one particle and no hole. Here we report that such quasiparticles (hereafter termed levitons) can be generated on demand in a conductor by applying voltage pulses to a contact. Partitioning the excitations with an electronic beam splitter generates a current noise that we use to measure their number. Minimal-excitation states are observed for Lorentzian pulses, whereas for other pulse shapes there are significant contributions from holes. Further identification of levitons is provided in the energy domain with shot-noise spectroscopy, and in the time domain with electronic Hong-Ou-Mandel noise correlations. The latter, obtained by colliding synchronized levitons on a beam splitter, exemplifies the potential use of levitons for quantum information: using linear electron quantum optics in ballistic conductors, it is possible to imagine flying-qubit operation in which the Fermi statistics are exploited to entangle synchronized electrons emitted by distinct sources. Compared with electron sources based on quantum dots, the generation of levitons does not require delicate nanolithography, considerably simplifying the circuitry for scalability. Levitons are not limited to carrying a single charge, and so in a broader context n-particle levitons could find application in the study of full electron counting statistics. But they can also carry a fraction of charge if they are implemented in Luttinger liquids or in fractional quantum Hall edge channels; this allows the study of Abelian and non-Abelian quasiparticles in the

  7. Wideband MEMS Resonator Using Multifrequency Excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Jaber, Nizar

    2016-03-09

    We demonstrate the excitation of combination resonances of additive and subtractive types and their exploitations to realize a large bandwidth micro-machined resonator of large amplitude even at higher harmonic modes of vibrations. The investigation is conducted on a Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) clamped-clamped microbeam fabricated using polyimide as a structural layer coated with nickel from top and chromium and gold layers from bottom. The microbeam is excited by a two-source harmonic excitation, where the first frequency source is swept around the targeted resonance (first or third mode of vibration) while the second source frequency is kept fixed. We report for the first time a large bandwidth and large amplitude response near the higher order modes of vibration. Also, we show that by properly tuning the frequency and amplitude of the excitation force, the frequency bandwidth of the resonator is controlled.

  8. "Safe" Coulomb Excitation of $^{30}$Mg

    CERN Document Server

    Niedermaier, O; Bildstein, V; Boie, H; Fitting, J; Von Hahn, R; Köck, F; Lauer, M; Pal, U K; Podlech, H; Repnow, R; Schwalm, D; Alvarez, C; Ames, F; Bollen, G; Emhofer, S; Habs, D; Kester, O; Lutter, R; Rudolph, K; Pasini, M; Thirolf, P G; Wolf, B H; Eberth, J; Gersch, G; Hess, H; Reiter, P; Thelen, O; Warr, N; Weisshaar, D; Aksouh, F; Van den Bergh, P; Van Duppen, P; Huyse, M; Ivanov, O; Mayet, P; Van de Walle, J; Äystö, J; Butler, P A; Cederkäll, J; Delahaye, P; Fynbo, H O U; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Forstner, O; Franchoo, S; Köster, U; Nilsson, T; Oinonen, M; Sieber, T; Wenander, F; Pantea, M; Richter, A; Schrieder, G; Simon, H; Behrens, T; Gernhäuser, R; Kröll, T; Krücken, R; Münch, M M; Davinson, T; Gerl, J; Huber, G; Hurst, A; Iwanicki, J; Jonson, B; Lieb, P; Liljeby, L; Schempp, A; Scherillo, A; Schmidt, P; Walter, G

    2005-01-01

    We report on the first radioactive beam experiment performed at the recently commissioned REX-ISOLDE facility at CERN in conjunction with the highly efficient $\\gamma$ -spectrometer MINIBALL. Using $^{30}$Mg ions accelerated to an energy of 2.25MeV/u together with a thin $^{nat}$Ni target, Coulomb excitation of the first excited 2+ states of the projectile and target nuclei well below the Coulomb barrier was observed. From the measured relative de-excitation $\\gamma$ -ray yields the B(E2; 0$^{+}_{gs} \\rightarrow 2^{+}_{1}$) value of $^{30}$Mg was determined to be 241(31)$e^{2}$fm$^{4}$. Our result is lower than values obtained at projectile fragmenttion facilities using the intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation method and confirms that the theoretical conjecture that the neutron-rich magnesium isotope $^{30}$Mg lies still outside the "island of inversion".

  9. Parametric excitation of a linear oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butikov, Eugene I.

    2004-07-01

    The phenomenon of parametric resonance is explained and investigated both analytically and with the help of a computer simulation. Parametric excitation is studied for the example of the rotary oscillations of a simple linear system—mechanical torsion spring pendulum excited by periodic variations of its moment of inertia. Conditions and characteristics of parametric resonance and regeneration are found and discussed in detail. Ranges of frequencies within which parametric excitation is possible are determined. Stationary oscillations at the boundaries of these ranges are investigated. The simulation experiments aid greatly an understanding of basic principles and peculiarities of parametric excitation and complement the analytical study of the subject in a manner that is mutually reinforcing.

  10. Parametric excitation of a linear oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butikov, Eugene I [St Petersburg State University, St Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-16

    The phenomenon of parametric resonance is explained and investigated both analytically and with the help of a computer simulation. Parametric excitation is studied for the example of the rotary oscillations of a simple linear system-mechanical torsion spring pendulum excited by periodic variations of its moment of inertia. Conditions and characteristics of parametric resonance and regeneration are found and discussed in detail. Ranges of frequencies within which parametric excitation is possible are determined. Stationary oscillations at the boundaries of these ranges are investigated. The simulation experiments aid greatly an understanding of basic principles and peculiarities of parametric excitation and complement the analytical study of the subject in a manner that is mutually reinforcing.

  11. Faraday waves under time-reversed excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietschmann, Dirk; Stannarius, Ralf; Wagner, Christian; John, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Do parametrically driven systems distinguish periodic excitations that are time mirrors of each other? Faraday waves in a Newtonian fluid are studied under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. We demonstrate that the threshold parameters for the stability of the ground state are insensitive to a time inversion of the driving function. This is a peculiarity of some dynamic systems. The Faraday system shares this property with standard electroconvection in nematic liquid crystals [J. Heuer et al., Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)]. In general, time inversion of the excitation affects the asymptotic stability of a parametrically driven system, even when it is described by linear ordinary differential equations. Obviously, the observed symmetry has to be attributed to the particular structure of the underlying differential equation system. The pattern selection of the Faraday waves above threshold, on the other hand, discriminates between time-mirrored excitation functions.

  12. Search for Excited Leptons at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hakobyan, R.S.; Hansen, J.M.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2003-01-01

    A search for charged and neutral excited leptons is performed in 217 pb-1 of data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV. The pair- and single-production mechanisms are investigated and no signals are detected. Combining with L3 results from searches at lower centre-of-mass energies, gives improved limits on the masses and couplings of excited leptons.

  13. Propagation and excitation of graphene plasmon polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Jeppesen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the propagation of graphene plasmon polaritons in graphene nanoribbon waveguides and experimentally observe the excitation of the graphene plasmon polaritons in a continuous graphene monolayer. We show that graphene nanoribbon bends do not induce any additional loss...... and nanofocusing occurs in a tapered graphene nanoriboon, and we experimentally demonstrate the excitation of graphene plasmon polaritonss in a continuous graphene monolayer assisted by a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating....

  14. Two-photon excited hemoglobin fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Dong; Zeng, Yan; Luo, Yi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2010-01-01

    We discovered that hemoglobin emits high energy Soret fluorescence when two-photon excited by the visible femtosecond light sources. The unique spectral and temporal characteristics of hemoglobin fluorescence were measured by using a time-resolved spectroscopic detection system. The high energy Soret fluorescence of hemoglobin shows the spectral peak at 438 nm with extremely short lifetime. This discovery enables two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy to become a potentially powerful t...

  15. Rearrangements in ground and excited states

    CERN Document Server

    de Mayo, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Rearrangements in Ground and Excited States, Volume 3 presents essays on the chemical generation of excited states; the cis-trans isomerization of olefins; and the photochemical rearrangements in trienes. The book also includes essays on the zimmerman rearrangements; the photochemical rearrangements of enones; the photochemical rearrangements of conjugated cyclic dienones; and the rearrangements of the benzene ring. Essays on the photo rearrangements via biradicals of simple carbonyl compounds; the photochemical rearrangements involving three-membered rings or five-membered ring heterocycles;

  16. Excited quark production at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    1987-06-01

    Composite models generally predict the existence of excited quark and lepton states. We consider the production and experimental signatures of excited quarks Q* of spin and isospin 1/2 at hadron colliders and estimate the background for those channels which are most promising for Q* identification. Multi-TeV pp-colliders will give access to such particles with masses up to several TeV.

  17. 3D Groundwater flow model at the Upper Rhine Graben scale to delineate preferential target areas for geothermal projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armandine Les Landes, Antoine; Guillon, Théophile; Peter-Borie, Mariane; Rachez, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    (DFN) and 3D elements to simulate groundwater flow in the 3D regional fault network and in sedimentary deposits, respectively. Firstly, the geometry of the 3D fracture network and its hydraulic connections with 3D elements (sedimentary cover) is built in accordance with the tectonic history and based on geological and geophysical evidences. Secondly, data from previous studies and site-specific geological knowledge provide information on the fault zones family sets and on respective hydraulic properties. Then, from the simulated 3D groundwater flow model and based on a particle tracking methodology, groundwater flow paths are constructed. The regional groundwater flow paths results are extracted and analysed to delineate preferential zones to explore at finer scale and so to define the potential positions of the exploration wells. This work is conducted in the framework of the IMAGE project (Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration, grant agreement No. 608553), which aims to develop new methods for better siting of exploitation wells.

  18. Connectivity, excitability and activity patterns in neuronal networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Feber, Jakob; Stoyanova, Irina; Chiappalone, Michela

    2014-01-01

    Extremely synchronized firing patterns such as those observed in brain diseases like epilepsy may result from excessive network excitability. Although network excitability is closely related to (excitatory) connectivity, a direct measure for network excitability remains unavailable. Several methods

  19. Non-stationary random vibration analysis of structures under multiple correlated normal random excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanbin; Mulani, Sameer B.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Fei, Qingguo; Wu, Shaoqing

    2017-07-01

    An algorithm that integrates Karhunen-Loeve expansion (KLE) and the finite element method (FEM) is proposed to perform non-stationary random vibration analysis of structures under excitations, represented by multiple random processes that are correlated in both time and spatial domains. In KLE, the auto-covariance functions of random excitations are discretized using orthogonal basis functions. The KLE for multiple correlated random excitations relies on expansions in terms of correlated sets of random variables reflecting the cross-covariance of the random processes. During the response calculations, the eigenfunctions of KLE used to represent excitations are applied as forcing functions to the structure. The proposed algorithm is applied to a 2DOF system, a 2D cantilever beam and a 3D aircraft wing under both stationary and non-stationary correlated random excitations. Two methods are adopted to obtain the structural responses: a) the modal method and b) the direct method. Both the methods provide the statistics of the dynamic response with sufficient accuracy. The structural responses under the same type of correlated random excitations are bounded by the response obtained by perfectly correlated and uncorrelated random excitations. The structural response increases with a decrease in the correlation length and with an increase in the correlation magnitude. The proposed methodology can be applied for the analysis of any complex structure under any type of random excitation.

  20. A methodological investigation of the Intermodal Preferential Looking paradigm: Methods of analyses, picture selection and data rejection criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Luche, Claire; Durrant, Samantha; Poltrock, Silvana; Floccia, Caroline

    2015-08-01

    The Intermodal Preferential Looking paradigm provides a sensitive measure of a child's online word comprehension. To complement existing recommendations (Fernald, Zangl, Portillo, & Marchman, 2008), the present study evaluates the impact of experimental noise generated by two aspects of the visual stimuli on the robustness of familiar word recognition with and without mispronunciations: the presence of a central fixation point and the level of visual noise in the pictures (as measured by luminance saliency). Twenty-month-old infants were presented with a classic word recognition IPL procedure in 3 conditions: without a fixation stimulus (No Fixation - noisiest condition), with a fixation stimulus before trial onset (Fixation, intermediate), and with a fixation stimulus, a neutral background and equally salient images (Fixation Plus - least noisy). Data were systematically analyzed considering a range of data selection criteria and dependent variables (proportion of looking time towards the target, longest look, and time-course analysis). Critically, the expected pronunciation and naming interaction was only found in the Fixation Plus condition. We discuss the impact of data selection criteria and the dependent variable choice on the modulation of these effects across the different conditions. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhancing thermoelectric properties of Sb2Te3 flexible thin film through microstructure control and crystal preferential orientation engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shengfei; Zhu, Wei; Deng, Yuan; Zhao, Huaizhou; Peng, Yuncheng; Wang, Chuanjun

    2017-08-01

    Preparation of high performance flexible thermoelectric thin films would promote applications of flexible thermoelectric device. In this work, antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) thin films were directly deposited on polyimide substrate. The crystalline structures and morphologies of the thin films were analyzed, and the mechanism of crystal growth influenced by sputtering pressure was discussed. We also investigated the effects of microstructure on their thermoelectric properties, where Hall effect measurement was conducted to provide further insight into the enhancement of thermoelectric properties. The mean free path of the carrier was calculated on the basis of carrier concentration and mobility. Our results showed that with (015) crystal preferential orientation, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of Sb2Te3 thin films were simultaneously increased, and a maximum power factor of 6.0 μW cm-1 K-2 was achieved, which was increased by 75% compared with the ordinary thin film. Meanwhile, due to the reduced lattice thermal conductivity and increased power factor, the estimated figure of merit (ZT) value was largely enhanced to 0.42.

  2. MicroRNA genes preferentially expressed in dendritic cells contain sites for conserved transcription factor binding motifs in their promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huynen Martijn A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs play a fundamental role in the regulation of gene expression by translational repression or target mRNA degradation. Regulatory elements in miRNA promoters are less well studied, but may reveal a link between their expression and a specific cell type. Results To explore this link in myeloid cells, miRNA expression profiles were generated from monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs. Differences in miRNA expression among monocytes, DCs and their stimulated progeny were observed. Furthermore, putative promoter regions of miRNAs that are significantly up-regulated in DCs were screened for Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBSs based on TFBS motif matching score, the degree to which those TFBSs are over-represented in the promoters of the up-regulated miRNAs, and the extent of conservation of the TFBSs in mammals. Conclusions Analysis of evolutionarily conserved TFBSs in DC promoters revealed preferential clustering of sites within 500 bp upstream of the precursor miRNAs and that many mRNAs of cognate TFs of the conserved TFBSs were indeed expressed in the DCs. Taken together, our data provide evidence that selected miRNAs expressed in DCs have evolutionarily conserved TFBSs relevant to DC biology in their promoters.

  3. Stick-Slip Analysis of a Drill String Subjected to Deterministic Excitation and Stochastic Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyuan Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a finite element model, this paper investigates the torsional vibration of a drill string under combined deterministic excitation and random excitation. The random excitation is caused by the random friction coefficients between the drill bit and the bottom of the hole and assumed as white noise. Simulation shows that the responses under random excitation become random too, and the probabilistic distribution of the responses at each discretized time instant is obtained. The two points, entering and leaving the stick stage, are examined with special attention. The results indicate that the two points become random under random excitation, and the distributions are not normal even when the excitation is assumed as Gaussian white noise.

  4. The effect of trees on preferential flow and soil infiltrability in an agroforestry parkland in semiarid Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargués Tobella, A; Reese, H; Almaw, A; Bayala, J; Malmer, A; Laudon, H; Ilstedt, U

    2014-04-01

    Water scarcity constrains the livelihoods of millions of people in tropical drylands. Tree planting in these environments is generally discouraged due to the large water consumption by trees, but this view may neglect their potential positive impacts on water availability. The effect of trees on soil hydraulic properties linked to groundwater recharge is poorly understood. In this study, we performed 18 rainfall simulations and tracer experiments in an agroforestry parkland in Burkina Faso to investigate the effect of trees and associated termite mounds on soil infiltrability and preferential flow. The sampling points were distributed in transects each consisting of three positions: (i) under a single tree, (ii) in the middle of an open area, and (iii) under a tree associated with a termite mound. The degree of preferential flow was quantified through parameters based on the dye infiltration patterns, which were analyzed using image analysis of photographs. Our results show that the degree of preferential flow was highest under trees associated with termite mounds, intermediate under single trees, and minimal in the open areas. Tree density also had an influence on the degree of preferential flow, with small open areas having more preferential flow than large ones. Soil infiltrability was higher under single trees than in the open areas or under trees associated with a termite mound. The findings from this study demonstrate that trees have a positive impact on soil hydraulic properties influencing groundwater recharge, and thus such effects must be considered when evaluating the impact of trees on water resources in drylands. Trees in dryland landscapes increase soil infiltrability and preferential flow Termite mounds in association with trees further enhance preferential flow.

  5. Preferential flow in municipal solid waste and implications for long-term leachate quality: valuation of laboratory-scale experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosqvist, N H; Dollar, L H; Fourie, A B

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, we study and quantify pollutant concentrations after long-term leaching at relatively low flow rates and residual concentrations after heavy flushing of a 0.14 m3 municipal solid waste sample. Moreover, water flow and solute transport through preferential flow paths are studied by model interpretation of experimental break-through curves (BTCs), generated by tracer tests. In the study it was found that high concentrations of chloride remain after several pore volumes of water have percolated through the waste sample. The residual concentration was found to be considerably higher than can be predicted by degradation models. For model interpretations of the experimental BTCs, two probabilistic model approaches were applied, the transfer function model and the Lagrangian transport formulation. The experimental BTCs indicated the presence of preferential flow through the waste mass and the model interpretation of the BTCs suggested that between 19 and 41% of the total water content participated in the transport of solute through preferential flow paths. In the study, the occurrence of preferential flow was found to be dependent on the flow rate in the sense that a high flow rate enhances the preferential flow. However, to fully quantify the possible dependence between flow rate and preferential flow, experiments on a broader range of experimental conditions are suggested. The chloride washout curve obtained over the 4-year study period shows that as a consequence of the water flow in favoured flow paths, bypassing other parts of the solid waste body, the leachate quality may reflect only the flow paths and their surroundings. The results in this study thus show that in order to improve long-term prediction of the leachate quality and quantity the magnitude of the preferential water flow through a landfill must be taken into account.

  6. Predicting DNA-mediated drug delivery in interior carcinoma using electromagnetically excited nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soham; Das, Tamal; Chakraborty, Suman; Das, Sarit K

    2011-09-01

    Tumor-site-specific delivery of anti-cancer drugs remains one of the most prevailing problems in cancer treatment. While conventional means of chemo-delivery invariably leave different degrees of side-effects on healthy tissues, in recent times, intelligent chemical designs have been exploited to reduce the cross-consequences. In particular, the strategies involving superparamaganetic nanoparticles with surface assembled oligonucleotides as therapeutic carrier have raised affirmative promises. Process is designed in such a way that the therapeutic molecules are released preferentially at target site as the complementary oligonucleotide chains dissociate over the heat generated by the nanoparticles under the excitation of low frequency electromagnetic energy. In spite of the preliminary demonstrations, analytical comprehension of the entire process especially on the purview of non-trivial interactions between stochastic phase-transition phenomena of oligonucleotide chains and hierarchical organization of in vivo transport processes remains unknown. Here, we propose an integrated computational predictive model to interpret the efficacy of drug delivery in the aforementioned process. The basic physics of heat generation by superparamagnetic nanoparticles in presence of external electromagnetic field has been coupled with transient biological heat transfer model and the statistical mechanics based oligonucleotide denaturation dynamics. Conjunctionally, we have introduced a set of hierarchically appropriate transport processes to mimic the in vivo drug delivery system. The subsequent interstitial diffusion and convection of the various species involved in the process over time was simulated assuming a porous media model of the carcinoma. As a result, the model predictions exhibit excellent congruence with available experimental results. To delineate a broader spectrum of a priori speculations, we have investigated the effects of different tunable parameters such as

  7. Speech recognition using articulatory and excitation source features

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, K Sreenivasa

    2017-01-01

    This book discusses the contribution of articulatory and excitation source information in discriminating sound units. The authors focus on excitation source component of speech -- and the dynamics of various articulators during speech production -- for enhancement of speech recognition (SR) performance. Speech recognition is analyzed for read, extempore, and conversation modes of speech. Five groups of articulatory features (AFs) are explored for speech recognition, in addition to conventional spectral features. Each chapter provides the motivation for exploring the specific feature for SR task, discusses the methods to extract those features, and finally suggests appropriate models to capture the sound unit specific knowledge from the proposed features. The authors close by discussing various combinations of spectral, articulatory and source features, and the desired models to enhance the performance of SR systems.

  8. Modal Parameter Extraction Using Natural Excitation Response Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barney, P.; Carne, T.

    1998-10-21

    The use of natural excitation response data for the extraction of modal parameters has been an alluring idea for many years, The primary reason is that it offers the real world inputs (both spatial and temporal) and the associated responses of the system without the cost of a complex excitation system. The use of NExT allows for a linear representation of the system at operating levels, which is ideal for predictive linear simulation. The NExT parameter estimation methods have relied on using standard modal parameter extraction routines that do not exploit the special model form of NExT data. A parameter estimation method is developed here that is consistent with the form, thereby providing a more robust estimator in the presence of noise. This paper presents the basic methods used in NExT as well as some of the critical issues when using NExT.

  9. Lattice QCD determination of patterns of excited baryon states

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, Subhasish; Fleming, G T; Juge, K J; Lichtl, A; Morningstar, C; Richards, D G; Sato, I; Wallace, S J

    2007-01-01

    Energies for excited isospin I=1/2 and I=3/2 states that include the nucleon and Delta families of baryons are computed using quenched, anisotropic lattices. Baryon interpolating field operators that are used include nonlocal operators that provide G_2 irreducible representations of the octahedral group. The decomposition of spin 5/2 or higher spin states is realized for the first time in a lattice QCD calculation. We observe patterns of degenerate energies in the irreducible representations of the octahedral group that correspond to the subduction of the continuum spin 5/2 or higher. The overall pattern of low-lying excited states corresponds well to the pattern of physical states subduced to the irreducible representations of the octahedral group.

  10. Probing the neutron skin thickness in collective modes of excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paar N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear collective motion provides valuable constraint on the size of neutron-skin thickness and the properties of nuclear matter symmetry energy. By employing relativistic nuclear energy density functional (RNEDF and covariance analysis related to χ2 fitting of the model parameters, relevant observables are identified for dipole excitations, which strongly correlate with the neutron-skin thickness (rnp, symmetry energy at saturation density (J and slope of the symmetry energy (L. Using the RNEDF framework and experimental data on pygmy dipole strength (68Ni, 132Sn, 208Pb and dipole polarizability (208Pb, it is shown how the values of J, and L, and rnp are constrained. The isotopic dependence of moments associated to dipole excitations in 116–136Sn shows that the low-energy dipole strength and polarizability in neutron-rich nuclei display strong sensitivity to the symmetry energy parameter J, more pronounced than in isotopes with moderate neutron-to-proton number ratios.

  11. Reconstruction of Input Excitation Acting on Vibration Isolation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration isolation systems are widely employed in automotive, marine, aerospace, and other engineering fields. Accurate input forces are of great significance for mechanical design, vibration prediction, and structure modification and optimization. One-stage vibration isolation system including engine, vibration isolators, and flexible supporting structure is modeled theoretically in this paper. Input excitation acting on the vibration isolation system is reconstructed using dynamic responses measured on engine and supporting structure under in-suit condition. The reconstructed forces reveal that dynamic responses on rigid body are likely to provide more accurate estimation results. Moreover, in order to improve the accuracy of excitation reconstructed by dynamic responses on flexible supporting structure, auto/cross-power spectral density function is utilized to reduce measurement noise.

  12. Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering Excitation Functions at Intermediate Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, D.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bollmann, R.; Büßer, K.; Cloth, P.; Daniel, R.; Diehl, O.; Dohrmann, F.; Engelhardt, H. P.; Ernst, J.; Eversheim, P. D.; Gasthuber, M.; Gebel, R.; Greiff, J.; Groß, A.; Groß-Hardt, R.; Heider, S.; Heine, A.; Hinterberger, F.; Igelbrink, M.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Lahr, U.; Langkau, R.; Lindlein, J.; Maier, R.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Mosel, F.; Müller, M.; Münstermann, M.; Prasuhn, D.; Rohdjeß, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Roß, U.; von Rossen, P.; Scheid, H.; Schirm, N.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwandt, F.; Schwarz, V.; Scobel, W.; Sterzenbach, G.; Trelle, H. J.; Wellinghausen, A.; Wiedmann, W.; Woller, K.; Ziegler, R.

    1997-03-01

    Excitation functions of proton-proton elastic scattering cross sections have been measured in narrow steps for projectile momenta pp (energies Tp) from 1100 to 3300 MeV/c (500 to 2500 MeV) in the angular range 35°<=Θc.m.<=90° with a detector providing ΔΘc.m.~1.4° resolution. Measurements have been performed continuously during projectile acceleration in the cooler synchrotron COSY with an internal CH2 fiber target, taking particular care to monitor luminosity as a function of Tp. The advantages of this experimental technique are demonstrated, and the excitation functions obtained are compared to existing cross section data. No evidence for narrow structures was found.

  13. Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering Excitation Functions at Intermediate Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisplinghoff, J.; Daniel, R.; Diehl, O.; Engelhardt, H.; Ernst, J.; Eversheim, P.; Gro-Hardt, R.; Heider, S.; Heine, A.; Hinterberger, F.; Jahn, R.; Jeske, M.; Lahr, U.; Maschuw, R.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Mosel, F.; Rohdje, H.; Rosendaal, D.; Ro, U.; Scheid, H.; Schulz-Rojahn, M.; Schwandt, F.; Schwarz, V.; Trelle, H.; Wiedmann, W.; Ziegler, R. [Inst.fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Albers, D.; Bollmann, R.; Bueer, K.; Dohrmann, F.; Gasthuber, M.; Greiff, J.; Gro, A.; Igelbrink, M.; Langkau, R.; Lindlein, J.; Mueller, M.; Muenstermann, M.; Schirm, N.; Scobel, W.; Wellinghausen, A.; Woller, K. [I. Inst.fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Cloth, P.; Gebel, R.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; von Rossen, P.; Sterzenbach, G. [Inst.fuer Kernphysik, KFA Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Excitation functions of proton-proton elastic scattering cross sections have been measured in narrow steps for projectile momenta p{sub p} (energies T{sub p}) from 1100 to 3300MeV/c (500 to 2500MeV) in the angular range 35{degree}{le}{Theta}{sub c.m.}{le}90{degree} with a detector providing {Delta}{Theta}{sub c.m.}{approx}1.4{degree} resolution. Measurements have been performed continuously during projectile acceleration in the cooler synchrotron COSY with an internal CH{sub 2} fiber target, taking particular care to monitor luminosity as a function of T{sub p}. The advantages of this experimental technique are demonstrated, and the excitation functions obtained are compared to existing cross section data. No evidence for narrow structures was found. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Enhanced Electromagnetic Chirality by Locally Excited Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    CERN Document Server

    Alizadeh, M H

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to enhance chiral light-matter interactions through plasmonic nanostructures provides entirely new opportunities for greatly improving the detection limits of chiroptical spectroscopies down to the single molecule level. The most pronounced of these chiral interactions occur in the ultraviolet (UV) range of the electromagnetic spectrum, which is difficult to access with conventional localized plasmon resonance based sensors. Although Surface Plasmon Polaritons (SPPs) on noble metal films can sustain resonances in the desired spectral range, their transverse magnetic nature has been an obstacle for enhancing chiroptical effects. Here we demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that SPPs excited by near-field sources can exhibit rich and non-trivial chiral characteristics. In particular, we show that the excitation of SPPs by a chiral source not only results in a locally enhanced optical chirality but also achieves manifold enhancement of net optical chirality. Our finding that SPPs facil...

  15. Wind turbine blade testing system using base excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotrell, Jason; Thresher, Robert; Lambert, Scott; Hughes, Scott; Johnson, Jay

    2014-03-25

    An apparatus (500) for fatigue testing elongate test articles (404) including wind turbine blades through forced or resonant excitation of the base (406) of the test articles (404). The apparatus (500) includes a testing platform or foundation (402). A blade support (410) is provided for retaining or supporting a base (406) of an elongate test article (404), and the blade support (410) is pivotally mounted on the testing platform (402) with at least two degrees of freedom of motion relative to the testing platform (402). An excitation input assembly (540) is interconnected with the blade support (410) and includes first and second actuators (444, 446, 541) that act to concurrently apply forces or loads to the blade support (410). The actuator forces are cyclically applied in first and second transverse directions. The test article (404) responds to shaking of its base (406) by oscillating in two, transverse directions (505, 507).

  16. Therapy Provider Phase Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Therapy Provider Phase Information dataset is a tool for providers to search by their National Provider Identifier (NPI) number to determine their phase for...

  17. Electron Excitation of High Dipole Moment Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Paul; Kauffmann, Jens

    2018-01-01

    Emission from high-dipole moment molecules such as HCN allows determination of the density in molecular clouds, and is often considered to trace the “dense” gas available for star formation. We assess the importance of electron excitation in various environments. The ratio of the rate coefficients for electrons and H2 molecules, ~10^5 for HCN, yields the requirements for electron excitation to be of practical importance if n(H2) 10^{-5}, where the numerical factors reflect critical values n_c(H2) and X^*(e-). This indicates that in regions where a large fraction of carbon is ionized, X(e-) will be large enough to make electron excitation significant. The situation is in general similar for other “high density tracers”, including HCO+, CN, and CS. But there are significant differences in the critical electron fractional abundance, X^*(e-), defined by the value required for equal effect from collisions with H2 and e-. Electron excitation is, for example, unimportant for CO and C+. Electron excitation may be responsible for the surprisingly large spatial extent of the emission from dense gas tracers in some molecular clouds (Pety et al. 2017, Kauffmann, Goldsmith et al. 2017, A&A, submitted). The enhanced estimates for HCN abundances and HCN/CO and HCN/HCO+ ratios observed in the nuclear regions of luminous galaxies may be in part a result of electron excitation of high dipole moment tracers. The importance of electron excitation will depend on detailed models of the chemistry, which may well be non-steady state and non--static.

  18. SAT1, a glutamine transporter, is preferentially expressed in GABAergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Tallak Solbu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Subsets of GABAergic neurons are able to maintain high frequency discharge patterns, which requires efficient replenishment of the releasable pool of GABA. Although glutamine is considered a preferred precursor of GABA, the identity of transporters involved in glutamine uptake by GABAergic neurons remains elusive. Molecular analyses revealed that SAT1 (Slc38a1 features system A characteristics with a preferential affinity for glutamine, and that SAT1 mRNA expression is associated with GABAergic neurons. By generating specific antibodies against SAT1 we show that this glutamine carrier is particularly enriched in GABAergic neurons. Cellular SAT1 distribution resembles that of GAD67, an essential GABA synthesis enzyme, suggesting that SAT1 can be involved in translocating glutamine into GABAergic neurons to facilitate inhibitory neurotransmitter generation.

  19. SAT1, A Glutamine Transporter, is Preferentially Expressed in GABAergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbu, Tom Tallak; Bjørkmo, Mona; Berghuis, Paul; Harkany, Tibor; Chaudhry, Farrukh A.

    2009-01-01

    Subsets of GABAergic neurons are able to maintain high frequency discharge patterns, which requires efficient replenishment of the releasable pool of GABA. Although glutamine is considered a preferred precursor of GABA, the identity of transporters involved in glutamine uptake by GABAergic neurons remains elusive. Molecular analyses revealed that SAT1 (Slc38a1) features system A characteristics with a preferential affinity for glutamine, and that SAT1 mRNA expression is associated with GABAergic neurons. By generating specific antibodies against SAT1 we show that this glutamine carrier is particularly enriched in GABAergic neurons. Cellular SAT1 distribution resembles that of GAD67, an essential GABA synthesis enzyme, suggesting that SAT1 can be involved in translocating glutamine into GABAergic neurons to facilitate inhibitory neurotransmitter generation. PMID:20161990

  20. Preferential Quadriceps Activation in Female Athletes With Incremental Increases in Landing Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kevin R.; Myer, Gregory D.; Schmitt, Laura C.; Uhl, Timothy L.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify alterations in preparatory muscle activation patterns across different drop heights in female athletes. Sixteen female high school volleyball players performed the drop vertical jump from three different drop heights. Surface electromyography of the quadriceps and hamstrings were collected during the movement trials. As the drop height increased, muscle activation of the quadriceps during preparatory phase also increased (p < .05). However, the hamstrings activation showed no similar increases relative to drop height. Female athletes appear to preferentially rely on increased quadriceps activation, without an increase in hamstrings activation, with increased plyometric intensity. The resultant decreased activation ratio of the hamstrings relative to quadriceps before landing may represent altered dynamic knee stability and may contribute to the increased risk of ACL injury in female athletes. PMID:21844610

  1. Receptor-isoform-selective insulin analogues give tissue-preferential effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vienberg, Sara Gry; Bouman, Stephan D; Sørensen, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    The relative expression patterns of the two IR (insulin receptor) isoforms, +/- exon 11 (IR-B/IR-A respectively), are tissue-dependent. Therefore we have developed insulin analogues with different binding affinities for the two isoforms to test whether tissue-preferential biological effects can...... be attained. In rats and mice, IR-B is the most prominent isoform in the liver (> 95%) and fat (> 90%), whereas in muscles IR-A is the dominant isoform (> 95%). As a consequence, the insulin analogue INS-A, which has a higher relative affinity for human IR-A, had a higher relative potency [compared with HI...... (human insulin)] for glycogen synthesis in rat muscle strips (26%) than for glycogen accumulation in rat hepatocytes (5%) and for lipogenesis in rat adipocytes (4%). In contrast, the INS-B analogue, which has an increased affinity for human IR-B, had higher relative potencies (compared with HI...

  2. Lichen Planus Pemphigoides Presenting Preferentially Over Preexisting Scars: A Rare Instance of Isotopic Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Piyush; Savant, Sushil S; Das, Anupam; Hassan, Shahid; Barman, Panchami Deb

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old girl presented with multiple itchy hyperpigmented papules and plaques, along with tense blisters over the lower limbs and buttocks for last 3 months. These papules, plaques, and bullae were mostly localized to preexisting scars. The histopathological findings from papule and bulla were consistent with lichen planus (LP) and bullous pemphigoid, respectively. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) of perilesional skin around bulla showed linear deposition of IgG and C3. Considering clinical, histopathological and DIF findings, diagnosis of LP pemphigoides (LPP) was made. The preferential localization of LPP lesions over preexisting scars was a very interesting finding in our case an extremely rare instance of the isotopic phenomenon. PMID:26677275

  3. Effect of nimesulide-a preferential COX-2 inhibitor on arterial blood pressure, compared to ketoprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saran, Tomasz; Sodolski, Wojciech; Sodolska, Katarzyna; Danilkiewicz, Wit Cezary; Schabowski, Janusz

    2004-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies have shown that renal and cardiovascular effects of most selective COX-2 inhibitors (rofecoxib, celecoxib) are similar to other traditional NSAIDs (dual COX inhibitors). In these study the effect of nimesulide--preferential COX-2 inhibitor, administration on 24-hour blood pressure profile was investigated in 40 adult individuals on antihypertensive therapy with pain states caused by osteoartritis. Nimesulide was administered orally, twice a day at the conventional dose of 0.1 g for five days. In the next (or previous) 5 days the same patients were administered with ketoprofen at the dose of 0.05 g three times a day. On the last day of the NSAID administration period, 24-hour blood pressure monitoring was performed. Our results indicate no difference between nimesulide and ketoprofen effects on mean blood pressure values during antihypertensive therapy.

  4. Shape-dependent electrocatalysis: methanol and formic acid electrooxidation on preferentially oriented Pt nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solla-Gullón, J; Vidal-Iglesias, F J; López-Cudero, A; Garnier, E; Feliu, J M; Aldaz, A

    2008-07-07

    Reactivity towards methanol and formic acid electrooxidation on Pt nanoparticles with well characterised surfaces were studied and compared with the behaviour of single crystal electrodes with basal orientations. Polyoriented and preferential (100), (111) and (100)-(111) Pt nanoparticles were synthesised, cleaned preserving its surface structure, characterised and employed to evaluate the influence of the surface structure/shape of the Pt nanoparticles on these two relevant electrochemical reactions. The results pointed out that, in agreement with fundamental studies with Pt single crystal electrodes, the surface structure of the electrodes plays an important role on the reactivity of both oxidation processes, and thus the electrocatalytic properties strongly depend on the surface structure/shape of the nanoparticles, in particular on the presence of sites with (111) symmetry. These findings open the possibility of designing new and better electrocatalytic materials using decorated shape-controlled Pt nanoparticles as previously described with Pt single crystal electrodes.

  5. Separation of Enantiomers by Preferential Crystallization: Mathematical Modeling of a Coupled Crystallizer Configuration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaaban, Joussef Hussein; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Skovby, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    A mathematical model describing the separation of enantiomers by simultaneous preferential crystallization in a coupled crystallizer configuration is developed. The model was validated against experimental data for a chemical model compound, the conglomerate forming system of asparagine monohydrate...... in water. The kinetic parameters required were taken from available literature sources and simulations compared to experimental data. Simulations were found to be in good agreement with experimental data. Additional model simulations suggest that the separation process can be improved by increasing...... the mean residence time of the liquid phase in the crystallizers, and the mass of seeds supplied. Reducing the size of seed crystals will also lead to an improved separation. The model can also be used to simulate the performance of the crystallization process for a racemic compound forming system...

  6. Preferential changes of skeletal muscle echogenicity in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, N; Sogawa, K; Nodera, H; Hashiguchi, S; Osaki, Y; Saito, M; Mori, A; Izumi, Y; Kaji, R

    2017-02-01

    In myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), weakness of distal limb muscles affects quality of life. Non-invasive evaluation of muscular involvement by muscle sonography could be useful for characterizing muscle-specific involvement. Sonography of the lower leg and forearm was performed in 19 patients with DM1 and 10 control subjects. The mean echo intensities (EIs) of seven limb muscles were obtained by computer-assisted histogram analysis and compared within DM1 according to the overall clinical severity. The EIs of the muscles were significantly higher in DM1 than in the controls (P muscles showed the following: (i) greater EIs in flexor digitorum profundus than flexor carpi ulnaris (P muscles. Preferential high echogenicity in the medial gastrocnemius and deep finger flexors is suggestive of DM1. Muscle echogenicity is not generally related to functional dysfunction in DM1. © 2016 EAN.

  7. A unified perspective on preferential solvation and adsorption based on inhomogeneous solvation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Seishi; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2018-02-01

    How cosolvents affects solvation has been revealed through the independent determination of solute-solvent and solute-cosolvent interactions guaranteed by the phase rule. Based on the first principles of inhomogeneous solvation theory, we present here a general matrix theory encompassing both preferential solvation and surface adsorption. The central role of the stability conditions, that govern how many excess numbers (surface excesses) are independently determinable, have been clarified from the first principles. The advantage of the inhomogeneous approach has been demonstrated to be in its ease in treating solvation and adsorption in a unified manner, while its disadvantage, for example in membrane dialysis experiments, can be overcome by the inhomogeneous-homogeneous conversion.

  8. Preferential adsorption of extracellular polymeric substances from bacteria on clay minerals and iron oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuanyuan; Wei, Xing; Cai, Peng; Huang, Qiaoyun; Rong, Xinming; Liang, Wei

    2011-03-01

    The adsorption of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from Bacillus subtilis on montmorillonite, kaolinite and goethite was investigated as a function of pH and ionic strength using batch studies coupled with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The adsorption isotherms of EPS on minerals conformed to the Langmuir equation. The amount of EPS-C and -N adsorbed followed the sequence of montmorillonite>goethite>kaolinite. However, EPS-P adsorption was in the order of goethite>montmorillonite>kaolinite. A marked decrease in the mass fraction of EPS adsorption on minerals was observed with the increase of final pH from 3.1 to 8.3. Calcium ion was more efficient than sodium ion in promoting EPS adsorption on minerals. At various pH values and ionic strength, the mass fraction of EPS-N was higher than those of EPS-C and -P on montmorillonite and kaolinite, while the mass fraction of EPS-P was the highest on goethite. These results suggest that proteinaceous constituents were adsorbed preferentially on montmorillonite and kaolinite, and phosphorylated macromolecules were absorbed preferentially on goethite. Adsorption of EPS on clay minerals resulted in obvious shifts of infrared absorption bands of adsorbed water molecules, showing the importance of hydrogen bonding in EPS adsorption. The highest K values in equilibrium adsorption and FTIR are consistent with ligand exchange of EPS phosphate groups for goethite surface. The information obtained is of fundamental significance for understanding interfacial reactions between microorganisms and minerals. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Observations of capillary barriers and preferential flow in layered snow during cold laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzi, Francesco; Hirashima, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Katsushima, Takafumi; De Michele, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Data of liquid water flow around a capillary barrier in snow are still limited. To gain insight into this process, we carried out observations of dyed water infiltration in layered snow at 0 °C during cold laboratory experiments. We considered three different finer-over-coarser textures and three different water input rates. By means of visual inspection, horizontal sectioning, and measurements of liquid water content (LWC), capillary barriers and associated preferential flow were characterized. The flow dynamics of each sample were also simulated solving the Richards equation within the 1-D multi-layer physically based snow cover model SNOWPACK. Results revealed that capillary barriers and preferential flow are relevant processes ruling the speed of water infiltration in stratified snow. Both are marked by a high degree of spatial variability at centimeter scale and complex 3-D patterns. During unsteady percolation of water, observed peaks in bulk volumetric LWC at the interface reached ˜ 33-36 vol % when the upper layer was composed by fine snow (grain size smaller than 0.5 mm). However, LWC might locally be greater due to the observed heterogeneity in the process. Spatial variability in water transmission increases with grain size, whereas we did not observe a systematic dependency on water input rate for samples containing fine snow. The comparison between observed and simulated LWC profiles revealed that the implementation of the Richards equation reproduces the existence of a capillary barrier for all observed cases and yields a good agreement with observed peaks in LWC at the interface between layers.

  10. Inclusion of cow records in genomic evaluations and impact on bias due to preferential treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dassonneville Romain

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today, genomic evaluations are an essential feature of dairy cattle breeding. Initially, genomic evaluation targeted young bulls but recently, a rapidly increasing number of females (both heifers and cows are being genotyped. A rising issue is whether and how own performance of genotyped cows should be included in genomic evaluations. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of including yield deviations, i.e. own performance of cows, in genomic evaluations. Methods Two different genomic evaluations were performed: one including only reliable daughter yield deviations of proven bulls based on their non-genotyped daughters, and one including both daughter yield deviations for males and own yield deviations for genotyped females. Milk yield, the trait most prone to preferential treatment, and somatic cell count, for which such a bias is very unlikely, were studied. Data consisted of two groups of animals from the three main dairy breeds in France: 11 884 elite females genotyped by breeding companies and 7032 cows genotyped for a research project (and considered as randomly selected from the commercial population. Results For several measures that could be related to preferential treatment bias, the elite group presented a different pattern of estimated breeding values for milk yield compared to the other combinations of trait and group: for instance, for milk yield, the average difference between estimated breeding values with or without own yield deviations was significantly different from 0 for this group. Correlations between estimated breeding values with or without yield deviations were lower for elite females than for randomly selected cows for milk yield but were very similar for somatic cell count. Conclusions This study demonstrated that including own milk performance of elite females leads to biased (over-estimated genomic evaluations. Thus, milk production records of elite cows require specific treatment in

  11. Neurocircuitry Underlying the Preferential Sensitivity of Prefrontal Catecholamines to Low-Dose Psychostimulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeichel, Brooke E; Berridge, Craig W

    2013-01-01

    Low doses of psychostimulants, including methylphenidate (MPH), are highly effective in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). At these doses, psychostimulants improve prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent function. Recent evidence indicates that low and clinically relevant doses of psychostimulants target norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) signaling preferentially in the PFC. To better understand the neural mechanisms responsible for the regional selectivity of low-dose psychostimulant action, it is important to first identify the underlying neurocircuitry. The current study used reverse microdialysis to test the hypothesis that the preferential targeting of PFC catecholamines by low-dose psychostimulants involves direct action within the PFC, reflecting an intrinsic property of this region. For these studies, the effects of varying concentrations of MPH (0.25, 1.0, and 4.0 μM) on NE and DA efflux were examined within the PFC and select subcortical fields in unanesthetized rats. Low concentrations of MPH elicited significantly larger increases in extracellular levels of NE and DA in the PFC than in subcortical regions linked to motor-activating and arousal-promoting actions of psychostimulants (nucleus accumbens and medial septal area, respectively). The differential action of MPH across regions disappeared at higher concentrations. The enhanced sensitivity of PFC catecholamines to low and clinically relevant doses of psychostimulants, at least in part, reflects a unique sensitivity of this region to NE/DA transporter blockade. Available evidence suggests that the increased sensitivity of PFC catecholamines likely involves DA clearance through the NE transporter within the PFC. PMID:23303075

  12. Evaluation of diffuse and preferential flow pathways of infiltratedprecipitation and irrigation using oxygen and hydrogen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bin; Liang, Xing; Liu, Shaohua; Jin, Menggui; Nimmo, John R.; Li, Jingxin

    2017-01-01

    Subsurface-water flow pathways in three different land-use areas (non-irrigated grassland, poplar forest, and irrigated arable land) in the central North China Plain were investigated using oxygen (18O) and hydrogen (2H) isotopes in samples of precipitation, soils, and groundwater. Soil water in the top 10 cm was significantly affected by both evaporation and infiltration. Water at 10–40 cm depth in the grassland and arable land, and 10–60 cm in poplar forest, showed a relatively short residence time, as a substantial proportion of antecedent soil water was mixed with a 92-mm storm infiltration event, whereas below those depths (down to 150 cm), depleted δ18O spikes suggested that some storm water bypassed the shallow soil layers. Significant differences, in soil-water content and δ18O values, within a small area, suggested that the proportion of immobile soil water and water flowing in subsurface pathways varies depending on local vegetation cover, soil characteristics and irrigation applications. Soil-water δ18O values revealed that preferential flow and diffuse flow coexist. Preferential flow was active within the root zone, independent of antecedent soil-water content, in both poplar forest and arable land, whereas diffuse flow was observed in grassland. The depleted δ18O spikes at 20–50 cm depth in the arable land suggested the infiltration of irrigation water during the dry season. Temporal isotopic variations in precipitation were subdued in the shallow groundwater, suggesting more complete mixing of different input waters in the unsaturated zone before reaching the shallow groundwater.

  13. Binding of VEGF-A to canine cancer cells with preferential expression of VEGFR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Borgatti,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Despite encouraging results in syngeneic and xenografts cancer models with various inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or its receptors (VEGFRs, beneficial effects have not been consistently translated to the clinic, underscoring the need to develop strategies that go beyond the inhibition of these targets. The purpose of this study was to generate data to support the hypothesis that VEGF may be used as “bait” to selectively deliver therapeutics to VEGFR-expressing cancer cells. Materials and Methods: VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 expression was characterized using real time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR in canine hemangiosarcoma (Grace-HSA, Emma-HSA, melanoma (TLM-1, and thyroid adenocarcinoma (CTAC cell lines. TLM-1 and Grace-HSA were identified as representative cell lines that selectively expressed high levels of VEGFR1. Flow cytometry was performed to examine binding of a single VEGF molecule (biotinylated VEGFA and avidin conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC by these chemoresistant cell lines. Results: RT-qPCR showed that canine tumor cells can preferentially express VEGFR1 over VEGFR2. Both TLM-1 and Grace-HSA cell lines, which represent VEGFR1-expressing tumors, showed specific binding to VEGF-A and this binding was competitively inhibited by anti-VEGF antibody. Conclusions: Cells preferentially expressing VEGFR1 can be targeted with a single VEGF molecule and these ligand-receptor pairs are well suited for targeting cytotoxic molecules in various canine tumor cells. Further studies are needed to develop strategies to selectively deliver therapeutics through VEGF-VEGFRs binding into VEGFR-expressing tumors.

  14. Transferred T cells preferentially adhere in the BALT of CD26-deficient recipient lungs during asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Jutta; Schmiedl, Andreas; Stephan, Michael; Pabst, Reinhard; von Hörsten, Stephan

    2010-04-01

    The multifunctional glycoprotein CD26/dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DP4) has a DP activity, plays a role during T-cell activation, and interacts with several proteins, including extracellular matrix (ECM)-proteins. The latter have been studied mainly in the context of experimental metastasis. The potential role of CD26 for T-cell adhesion could be of major interest. Here, a coisogenic transfer of CFSE-labelled T cells was performed after isolation from CD26-expressing or CD26-deficient F344 rat donors and subsequent cross-transfer to recipients of the other substrain. Their recovery in the lungs was quantified using flow cytometry, a histochemical activity assay, as well as immunohistochemistry and morphometry. Under naïve conditions there were neither differences in the numbers of recovered T cells nor in their preferential anatomical sites of adhesion. The induction of an asthma-like inflammation, however, led to a site-preferential adhesion of T cells in the bronchus-associated lymphatic tissue (BALT). In this compartment of the lungs, surprisingly, significantly more T cells were found in CD26-deficient recipient lungs, regardless of the origin of the transferred T cells. These findings demonstrate a negative regulatory role of the BALT-specific expression of CD26 in T-cell adhesion during an asthma-like inflammation. Considering the pattern of cellular re-distribution it is not very likely that CD26 expressed on T cells and/or endothelial cells represents a significant factor in T-cell adhesion in vivo. Instead, the present findings suggest that the lack of the CD26 peptidase function in BALT might cause an overflow of a T-cell chemoattractant, which yet remains to be identified. 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Some general effects of strong high-frequency excitation: stiffening, biasing, and smoothening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2002-01-01

    that can be modeled by a finite number of second order ordinary differential equations, generally nonlinear, with periodically oscillating excitation terms of high frequency and small amplitude. The results should be useful for understanding the effects in question in a broader perspective than is possible......Mechanical high-frequency (HF) excitation provides a working principle behind many industrial and natural applications and phenomena. This paper concerns three particular effects of HF excitation, that may change the apparent characteristics of mechanical systems: 1) stiffening, by which...

  16. The dependence of ZnO photoluminescence efficiency on excitation conditions and defect densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Jay G.; Liu, Jie [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Foreman, John V. [U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Everitt, Henry O., E-mail: everitt@phy.duke.edu [U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama 35898 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2013-11-11

    The quantum efficiencies of both the band edge and deep-level defect emission from annealed ZnO powders were measured as a function of excitation fluence and wavelength from a tunable sub-picosecond source. A simple model of excitonic decay reproduces the observed excitation dependence of rate constants and associated trap densities for all radiative and nonradiative processes. The analysis explores how phosphor performance deteriorates as excitation fluence and energy increase, provides an all-optical approach for estimating the number density of defects responsible for deep-level emission, and yields new insights for designing efficient ZnO-based phosphors.

  17. Non-orthogonal configuration interaction for the calculation of multielectron excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundstrom, Eric J., E-mail: eric.jon.sundstrom@berkeley.edu; Head-Gordon, Martin [Department of Chemistry, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-03-21

    We apply Non-orthogonal Configuration Interaction (NOCI) to molecular systems where multielectron excitations, in this case double excitations, play a substantial role: the linear polyenes and β-carotene. We demonstrate that NOCI when applied to systems with extended conjugation, provides a qualitatively correct wavefunction at a fraction of the cost of many other multireference treatments. We also present a new extension to this method allowing for purification of higher-order spin states by utilizing Generalized Hartree-Fock Slater determinants and the details for computing 〈S{sup 2}〉 for the ground and excited states.

  18. Surface Plasmon Excitation and Localization by Metal-Coated Axicon Prism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Ono

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Collimated Gaussian beams are efficiently localized at the apex of a metal-coated axicon prism by surface plasmon excitations. We observed the light scattered at the apex and the light reflected by the prism. Intense scattered light was observed with the radial polarization incidence. Further, each incidence of the radial, azimuthal, and linear polarizations provided field distributions of bright and dark intensities in the reflected images according to the surface plasmon excitation. We have demonstrated that surface plasmon waves are excited at the sides of the prism in the Kretschmann configuration and that they converge to its apex.

  19. Doppler- and recoil-free laser excitation of Rydberg states via three-photon transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Ryabtsev, I. I.; Beterov, I. I.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Entin, V. M.; Yakshina, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    Three-photon laser excitation of Rydberg states by three different laser beams can be arranged in a star-like geometry that simultaneously eliminates the recoil effect and Doppler broadening. Our analytical and numerical calculations for a particular laser excitation scheme 5S_{1/2}->5P_{3/2}->6S_{1/2}->nP in Rb atoms have shown that compared to the one- and two-photon laser excitation this approach provides much narrower line width and longer coherence time for both cold atom samples and hot...

  20. Balancing practicality and hydrologic realism: a parsimonious approach for simulating rapid groundwater recharge via unsaturated-zone preferential flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Nimmo, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of preferential flow on recharge and contaminant transport poses a considerable challenge to water-resources management. Typical hydrologic models require extensive site characterization, but can underestimate fluxes when preferential flow is significant. A recently developed source-responsive model incorporates film-flow theory with conservation of mass to estimate unsaturated-zone preferential fluxes with readily available data. The term source-responsive describes the sensitivity of preferential flow in response to water availability at the source of input. We present the first rigorous tests of a parsimonious formulation for simulating water table fluctuations using two case studies, both in arid regions with thick unsaturated zones of fractured volcanic rock. Diffuse flow theory cannot adequately capture the observed water table responses at both sites; the source-responsive model is a viable alternative. We treat the active area fraction of preferential flow paths as a scaled function of water inputs at the land surface then calibrate the macropore density to fit observed water table rises. Unlike previous applications, we allow the characteristic film-flow velocity to vary, reflecting the lag time between source and deep water table responses. Analysis of model performance and parameter sensitivity for the two case studies underscores the importance of identifying thresholds for initiation of film flow in unsaturated rocks, and suggests that this parsimonious approach is potentially of great practical value.

  1. The effect of trees on preferential flow and soil infiltrability in an agroforestry parkland in semiarid Burkina Faso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargués Tobella, A.; Reese, H.; Almaw, A.; Bayala, J.; Malmer, A.; Laudon, H.; Ilstedt, U.

    2014-04-01

    Water scarcity constrains the livelihoods of millions of people in tropical drylands. Tree planting in these environments is generally discouraged due to the large water consumption by trees, but this view may neglect their potential positive impacts on water availability. The effect of trees on soil hydraulic properties linked to groundwater recharge is poorly understood. In this study, we performed 18 rainfall simulations and tracer experiments in an agroforestry parkland in Burkina Faso to investigate the effect of trees and associated termite mounds on soil infiltrability and preferential flow. The sampling points were distributed in transects each consisting of three positions: (i) under a single tree, (ii) in the middle of an open area, and (iii) under a tree associated with a termite mound. The degree of preferential flow was quantified through parameters based on the dye infiltration patterns, which were analyzed using image analysis of photographs. Our results show that the degree of preferential flow was highest under trees associated with termite mounds, intermediate under single trees, and minimal in the open areas. Tree density also had an influence on the degree of preferential flow, with small open areas having more preferential flow than large ones. Soil infiltrability was higher under single trees than in the open areas or under trees associated with a termite mound. The findings from this study demonstrate that trees have a positive impact on soil hydraulic properties influencing groundwater recharge, and thus such effects must be considered when evaluating the impact of trees on water resources in drylands.

  2. Theory of elementary excitations in quasiperiodic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, E.L.; Cottam, M.G

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the main physical properties (such as energy profiles, localization, scale laws, multifractal analysis, transmission spectra, transmission fingerprints, electronic structures, magnetization curves and thermodynamic properties) of the elementary excitations that can propagate in multilayered structures with constituents arranged in a quasiperiodic fashion. These excitations include plasmon-polaritons, spin waves, light waves and electrons, among others. A complex fractal or multifractal profile of the energy spectra is the common feature among these excitations. The quasiperiodic property is formed by the incommensurate arrangement of periodic unit cells and can be of the type referred to as deterministic (or controlled) disorder. The resulting excitations are characterized by the nature of their Fourier spectrum, which can be dense pure point (as for the Fibonacci sequence) or singular continuous (as for the Thue-Morse and double-period sequences). These sequences are described in terms of a series of generations that obey particular recursion relations, and they can be considered as intermediate systems between a periodic crystal and the random amorphous solids, thus defining a novel description of disorder. A discussion is also included of some spectroscopic techniques used to probe the excitations, emphasizing Raman and Brillouin light scattering.

  3. Excitation of seismic waves by a tornado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovcin, A.; Tanimoto, T.; Twardzik, C.

    2016-12-01

    Tornadoes are among the most common natural disasters to occur in the United States. Various methods are currently used in tornado forecasting, including surface weather stations, weather balloons and satellite and Doppler radar. These methods work for detecting possible locations of tornadoes and funnel clouds, but knowing when a tornado has touched down still strongly relies on reports from spotters. Studying tornadoes seismically offers an opportunity to know when a tornado has touched down without requiring an eyewitness report. With the installation of Earthscope's Transportable Array (TA), there have been an increased number of tornadoes that have come within close range of seismometers. We have identified seismic signals corresponding to three tornadoes that occurred in 2011 in the central US. These signals were recorded by the TA station closest to each of the tornado tracks. For each tornado, the amplitudes of the seismic signals increase when the storm is in contact with the ground, and continue until the tornado lifts off some time later. This occurs at both high and low frequencies. In this study we will model the seismic signal generated by a tornado at low frequencies (below 0.1 Hz). We will begin by modeling the signal from the Joplin tornado, an EF5 rated tornado which occurred in Missouri on May 22, 2011. By approximating the tornado as a vertical force, we model the generated signal as the tornado moves along its track and changes in strength. By modeling the seismic waveform generated by a tornado, we can better understand the seismic-excitation process. It could also provide a way to quantitatively compare tornadoes. Additional tornadoes to model include the Calumet-El Reno-Piedmont-Guthrie (CEPG) and Chickasa-Blanchard-Newcastle (CBN) tornadoes, both of which occurred on May 24, 2011 in Oklahoma.

  4. Formation of non-excited and excited hydrogen in proton–lithium inelastic scattering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elkilany, S.A; Al-Dhawi, A.A

    The collisions of a proton with a lithium atom are treated for the first time as a three-channel problem under the assumption that the elastic and hydrogen formation in non-excited, H(1s), and excited, H(2s), channels are open...

  5. Dark excitations in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deilmann, Thorsten; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2017-01-01

    Monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) possess unique optoelectronic properties, including strongly bound excitons and trions. To date, most studies have focused on optically active excitations, but recent experiments have highlighted the existence of dark states, which are equally...... important in many respects. Here, we use ab initio many-body calculations to unravel the nature of the dark excitations in monolayer MoSe2, MoS2, WSe2, andWS(2). Our results show that all these monolayer TMDCs host dark states as their lowest neutral and charged excitations. We further show that dark...... excitons possess larger binding energies than their bright counterparts while the opposite holds for trions....

  6. Springing response due to bidirectional wave excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidic-Perunovic, Jelena

    2005-01-01

    Springing is a two-node high frequency resonant vibration of the hull induced by unsteady wave pressure field on the hull. The excitation force may be rather complex - any wave activity (or their combination) in the Ocean matching the two-node natural hull vibration frequency. With some ship...... designs the hull natural frequency may get low enough that the corresponding level of excitation energy becomes large. Springing vibration negatively influences the fatigue life of the ship but, paradoxically, it still doesn't get much attention of the technical society. Usually, non-linear hydroelastic...... theories deal with the unidirectional wave excitation. This is quite standard. The problem is how to include more than one directional wave systems described by a wave spectrum with arbitrary heading. The main objective of the present work has been to account for the additional second-order springing...

  7. Nanoscale control of phonon excitations in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo Won; Ko, Wonhee; Ku, Jiyeon; Ryu, Seunghwa; Hwang, Sung Woo

    Phonons, which are collective excitations in a lattice of atoms or molecules, play a major role in determining various physical properties of condensed matter, such as thermal and electrical conductivities. In particular, phonons in graphene interact strongly with electrons; however, unlike in usual metals, these interactions between phonons and massless Dirac fermions appear to mirror the rather complicated physics of those between light and relativistic electrons. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the underlying physics through systematic studies of phonon interactions and excitations in graphene is crucial for realizing graphene-based devices. In this study, we demonstrate that the local phonon properties of graphene can be controlled at the nanoscale by tuning the interaction strength between graphene and an underlying Pt substrate. Using scanning probe methods, we determine that the reduced interaction due to embedded Ar atoms facilitates electron-phonon excitations, further influencing phonon-assisted inelastic electron tunneling.

  8. Exciting dynamic anapoles with electromagnetic doughnut pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Tim; Fedotov, Vassili A.; Papasimakis, Nikitas; Youngs, Ian; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2017-08-01

    As was predicted in 1995 by Afanasiev and Stepanovsky, a superposition of electric and toroidal dipoles can lead to a non-trivial non-radiating charge current-configuration, the dynamic anapole. The dynamic anapoles were recently observed first in microwave metamaterials and then in dielectric nanodisks. However, spectroscopic studies of toroidal dipole and anapole excitations are challenging owing to their diminishing coupling to transverse electromagnetic waves. Here, we show that anapoles can be excited by electromagnetic Flying Doughnut (FD) pulses. First described by Helwarth and Nouchi in 1996, FD pulses (also known as "Flying Toroids") are space-time inseparable exact solutions to Maxwell's equations that have toroidal topology and propagate in free-space at the speed of light. We argue that FD pulses can be used as a diagnostic and spectroscopic tool for the dynamic anapole excitations in matter.

  9. Encryption in Chaotic Systems with Sinusoidal Excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Obregón-Pulido

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution an encryption method using a chaotic oscillator, excited by “n” sinusoidal signals, is presented. The chaotic oscillator is excited by a sum of “n” sinusoidal signals and a message. The objective is to encrypt such a message using the chaotic behavior and transmit it, and, as the chaotic system is perturbed by the sinusoidal signal, the transmission security could be increased due to the effect of such a perturbation. The procedure is based on the regulation theory and consider that the receiver knows the frequencies of the perturbing signal, with this considerations the algorithm estimates the excitation in such a way that the receiver can cancel out the perturbation and all the undesirable dynamics in order to produce only the message. In this way we consider that the security level is increased.

  10. Testing the excitability of human motoneurones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris J Mcneil

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The responsiveness of the human central nervous system can change profoundly with exercise, injury, disuse or disease. Changes occur at both cortical and spinal levels but in most cases excitability of the motoneurone pool must be assessed to localize accurately the site of adaptation. Hence, it is critical to understand, and employ correctly, the methods to test motoneurone excitability in humans. Several techniques exist and each has its advantages and disadvantages. This review examines the most common techniques that use evoked compound muscle action potentials to test the excitability of the motoneurone pool and describes the merits and limitations of each. The techniques discussed are the H-reflex, F-wave, tendon jerk, V-wave, cervicomedullary motor evoked potential, and motor evoked potential. A number of limitations with these techniques are presented.

  11. Extracellular vesicles secreted by highly metastatic clonal variants of osteosarcoma preferentially localize to the lungs and induce metastatic behaviour in poorly metastatic clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macklin, Rebecca; Wang, Haolu; Loo, Dorothy; Martin, Sally; Cumming, Andrew; Cai, Na; Lane, Rebecca; Ponce, Natalia Saenz; Topkas, Eleni; Inder, Kerry; Saunders, Nicholas A; Endo-Munoz, Liliana

    2016-07-12

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common pediatric bone tumor and is associated with the emergence of pulmonary metastasis. Unfortunately, the mechanistic basis for metastasis remains unclear. Tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been shown to play critical roles in cell-to-cell communication and metastatic progression in other cancers, but their role in OS has not been explored. We show that EVs secreted by cells derived from a highly metastatic clonal variant of the KHOS cell line can be internalized by a poorly metastatic clonal variant of the same cell line and induce a migratory and invasive phenotype. This horizontal phenotypic transfer is unidirectional and provides evidence that metastatic potential may arise via interclonal co-operation. Proteomic analysis of the EVs secreted by highly metastatic OS clonal variants results in the identification of a number of proteins and G-protein coupled receptor signaling events as potential drivers of OS metastasis and novel therapeutic targets. Finally, multiphoton microscopy with fluorescence lifetime imaging in vivo, demonstrated a preferential seeding of lung tissue by EVs derived from highly metastatic OS clonal variants. Thus, we show that EVs derived from highly metastatic clonal variants of OS may drive metastatic behaviour via interclonal co-operation and preferential colonization of the lungs.

  12. Search for excited states in 25O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. D.; Fossez, K.; Baumann, T.; DeYoung, P. A.; Finck, J. E.; Frank, N.; Kuchera, A. N.; Michel, N.; Nazarewicz, W.; Rotureau, J.; Smith, J. K.; Stephenson, S. L.; Stiefel, K.; Thoennessen, M.; Zegers, R. G. T.

    2017-11-01

    Background: Theoretical calculations suggest the presence of low-lying excited states in 25O. Previous experimental searches by means of proton knockout on 26F produced no evidence for such excitations. Purpose: We search for excited states in 25O using the 24O(d ,p ) 25O reaction. The theoretical analysis of excited states in unbound O,2725 is based on the configuration interaction approach that accounts for couplings to the scattering continuum. Method: We use invariant-mass spectroscopy to measure neutron-unbound states in 25O. For the theoretical approach, we use the complex-energy Gamow Shell Model and Density Matrix Renormalization Group method with a finite-range two-body interaction optimized to the bound states and resonances of O-2623, assuming a core of 22O. We predict energies, decay widths, and asymptotic normalization coefficients. Results: Our calculations in a large s p d f space predict several low-lying excited states in 25O of positive and negative parity, and we obtain an experimental limit on the relative cross section of a possible Jπ=1/2 + state with respect to the ground state of 25O at σ1 /2 +/σg .s .=0 .25-0.25+1.0 . We also discuss how the observation of negative parity states in 25O could guide the search for the low-lying negative parity states in 27O. Conclusion: Previous experiments based on the proton knockout of 26F suffered from the low cross sections for the population of excited states in 25O because of low spectroscopic factors. In this respect, neutron transfer reactions carry more promise.

  13. Microwave-excited ultrasound and thermoacoustic dual imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenzheng; Ji, Zhong; Xing, Da

    2017-05-01

    We designed a microwave-excited ultrasound (MUI) and thermoacoustic dual imaging system. Under the pulsed microwave excitation, the piezoelectric transducer used for thermoacoustic signal detection will also emit a highly directional ultrasonic beam based on the inverse piezoelectric effect. With this beam, the ultrasonic transmitter circuitry of the traditional ultrasound imaging (TUI) system can be replaced by a microwave source. In other words, TUI can be fully integrated into the thermoacoustic imaging system by sharing the microwave excitation source and the transducer. Moreover, the signals of the two imaging modalities do not interfere with each other due to the existence of the sound path difference, so that MUI can be performed simultaneously with microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging. In the study, the performance characteristics and imaging capabilities of this hybrid system are demonstrated. The results indicate that our design provides one easy method for low-cost platform integration and has the potential to offer a clinically useful dual-modality tool for the detection of accurate diseases.

  14. Viewing instructions accompanying action observation modulate corticospinal excitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David James Wright

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Action observation interventions may have the potential to contribute to improved motor function in motor (relearning settings by promoting functional activity and plasticity in the motor regions of the brain. Optimal methods for delivering such interventions, however, have yet to be established. This experiment investigated the effect on corticospinal excitability of manipulating the viewing instructions provided to participants (N = 21 prior to action observation. Specifically, motor evoked potential responses measured from the right hand muscles following single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to the left motor cortex were compared when participants were instructed to observe finger-thumb opposition movement sequences: (i passively; (ii with the intent to imitate the observed movement; or (iii whilst simultaneously and actively imagining that they were performing the movement as they observed it. All three action observation viewing instructions facilitated corticospinal excitability to a greater extent than did observation of a static hand. In addition, the extent to which corticospinal excitability was facilitated was greater during combined observation and imagery, compared to passive observation. These findings have important implications for the design of action observation interventions in motor (relearning settings, where instructions that encourage observers to simultaneously imagine themselves performing the observed movement may offer the current optimal method for improving motor function through action observation.

  15. Dopamine Rebound-Excitation Theory: Putting Brakes on PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason C Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available It is not uncommon for humans or animals to experience traumatic events in their lifetimes. However, the majority of individuals are resilient to long-term detrimental changes turning into anxiety and depression, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. What underlying neural mechanism accounts for individual variability in stress resilience? Hyperactivity in fear circuits, such as the amygdalar system, is well-known to be the major pathophysiological basis for PTSD, much like a stuck accelerator. Interestingly, increasing evidence demonstrates that dopamine (DA – traditionally known for its role in motivation, reward prediction, and addiction– is also crucial in regulating fear learning and anxiety. Yet how DA neurons control stress resilience is unclear, especially given that DA neurons have multiple subtypes with distinct temporal dynamics. Here, we propose the Rebound-Excitation Theory, which posits that DA neurons’ rebound-excitation at the termination of fearful experiences serves as an important brake by providing intrinsic safety-signals to fear-processing neural circuits in a spatially and temporally controlled manner. We discuss how DA neuron rebound-excitation may be regulated by genetics and experiences, and how such physiological properties may be used as a brain-activity biomarker to predict and confer individual resilience to stress and anxiety.

  16. Excitation of dielectric barrier discharges by unipolar submicrosecond square pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuhai; Neiger, Manfred

    2001-06-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) are self-extinguishing discharges due to charge accumulation on dielectric surfaces. In order to take advantage of these surface charges also at a low repetition frequency, high-voltage unipolar square pulses (amplitude up to 15 kV, rise and fall time less than 20 ns) are applied to drive DBDs. For electrical diagnostics of this novel excitation method, a temporally dynamic model for diffuse DBDs is introduced, from which equations were derived which allow the calculation of internal electrical quantities in the discharge gap from measured external electrical quantities. It was found, following a primary discharge at the rising front or at the top of the voltage pulse, that a secondary discharge is induced at the end of the falling voltage flank without simultaneously consuming energy from the external circuit. The energy needed is provided by the accumulated surface and space charges left by the primary discharge, which are totally or partially lost under normal low-frequency sine or square wave excitation. Secondary discharges are observed in a wide range of electrode configurations, gases and gas pressures for both homogeneous and filamentary discharges. In the case of filamentary modes, secondary discharges are found to develop along the remaining channels of the preceding primary discharges. Experiments for ozone synthesis show an improved energy efficiency of 8-9 eV per ozone molecule, which is about 30% better than that achieved with sine wave excitation.

  17. Theory of nuclear excitation by electron capture for heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagyi-Palffy, A.

    2006-07-01

    The resonant process of nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC) in collisions involving highly-charged ions has been investigated theoretically. NEEC is a rare recombination process in which a free electron is captured into a bound shell of an ion with the simultaneous excitation of the nucleus. Total cross sections for NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the excited nucleus are presented for various collision systems. The possibility to observe the NEEC in scattering experiments with trapped or stored ions was discussed focusing on the cases with the largest calculated resonance strength. As the photons emitted in different channels of the electron recombination process are indistinguishable in the total cross section, the interference between NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the nucleus and radiative recombination was investigated. The angular distribution of the emitted photons in the recombination process provides means to discern the two processes. Angular differential cross sections for the emitted photons in the case of E2 nuclear transitions were presented for several heavy elements. (orig.)

  18. Excited State Atom-Ion Charge-Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Makrides, Constantinos; Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2017-04-01

    We theoretically investigate the exothermic charge-exchange reaction between an excited atom and a ground-state positive ion. In particular, we focus on MOT-excited Ca*(4s4p 1P) atoms colliding with ground-state Yb+ ions, which are under active study by the experimental group of E. Hudson at UCLA. Collisions between an excited atom and an ion are guided by two major contributions to the long-range interaction potentials, the induction C4 /R4 and charge-quadrupole C3 /R3 potentials, and their coupling by the electron-exchange interaction. Our model of these forces leads to close-coupling equations for multiple reaction channels. We find several avoided crossings between the potentials that couple to the nearby asymptotic limits of Yb*+Ca+, some of which can possibly provide large charge exchange rate coefficients above 10-10 cm3 / s. We acknowledge support from the US Army Research Office, MURI Grants W911NF-14-1-0378 and the US National Science Foundation, Grant PHY-1619788.

  19. Two-photon excitation STED microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moneron, Gael; Hell, Stefan W

    2009-08-17

    We report sub-diffraction resolution in two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence microscopy achieved by merging this technique with stimulated-emission depletion (STED). We demonstrate an easy-to-implement and promising laser combination based on a short-pulse laser source for two-photon excitation and a continuous-wave (CW) laser source for resolution enhancement. Images of fluorescent nanoparticles and the immunostained transcription regulator NF kappaB in mammalian cell nuclei exhibit resolutions of barrier. (c) 2009 Optical Society of America

  20. Gauge Fields as Composite Boundary Excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Sergio; Ferrara, Sergio; Fronsdal, Christian

    1998-01-01

    We investigate representations of the conformal group that describe "massless" particles in the interior and at the boundary of anti-de Sitter space. It turns out that massless gauge excitations in anti-de Sitter are gauge "current" operators at the boundary. Conversely, massless excitations at the boundary are topological singletons in the interior. These representations lie at the threshold of two "unitary bounds" that apply to any conformally invariant field theory. Gravity and Yang-Mills gauge symmetry in anti-De Sitter is translated to global translational symmetry and continuous R-symmetry of the boundary superconformal field theory.

  1. Exciting Baryons: now and in the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Pennington

    2012-04-01

    This is the final talk of NSTAR2011 conference. It is not a summary talk, but rather a looking forward to what still needs to be done in excited baryon physics. In particular, we need to hone our tools connecting experimental inputs with QCD. At present we rely on models that often have doubtful connections with the underlying theory, and this needs to be dramatically improved, if we are to reach definitive conclusions about the relevant degrees of freedom of excited baryons. Conclusions that we want to have by NSTAR2021.

  2. Laser Excited Fluorescence For Forensic Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Robert E.

    1986-07-01

    The application of laser excited fluorescence to the detection and identification of latent fingerprints was first accomplished ten years ago. The development of the technology has progressed rapidly with the introduction of commercial equipment by several manufacturers. Systems based on Argon-ion, Copper-vapor, and frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers are compared. The theoretical basis of detection by fluorescence is discussed along with the more useful techniques of dye staining. Other applications of the laser excited fluorescence in forensic investigation include gunshot residue analysis, serology, collection of trace evidence, and document examination.

  3. Charmonium excited state spectrum in lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; Nilmani Mathur; David Richards

    2008-02-01

    Working with a large basis of covariant derivative-based meson interpolating fields we demonstrate the feasibility of reliably extracting multiple excited states using a variational method. The study is performed on quenched anisotropic lattices with clover quarks at the charm mass. We demonstrate how a knowledge of the continuum limit of a lattice interpolating field can give additional spin-assignment information, even at a single lattice spacing, via the overlap factors of interpolating field and state. Excited state masses are systematically high with respect to quark potential model predictions and, where they exist, experimental states. We conclude that this is most likely a result of the quenched approximation.

  4. The resonance Raman excitation profile of lutein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, L. C.

    The resonance Raman excitation profiles for the ν 1, ν 2 and ν 3 vibrations of lutein in acetone, toluene and carbon disulfide solvents have been measured. The results are interpreted in terms of a three-mode vibrational theory which includes both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening effects. Excellent agreement between calculated and observed excitation profiles and visible spectra was found in acetone and toluene, but the results in carbon disulfide indicate a possible breakdown in the three-mode model. The major broadening mechanism is homogeneous, with about a 25% contribution from inhomogeneous broadening.

  5. Search for Excited Neutrinos at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bate, P.; Becker, J.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, C.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boehme, J.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Chernyshov, V.; Chetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, M.; Werner, N.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2002-01-01

    We present a search for excited neutrinos using e^-p data taken by the H1 experiment at HERA at a center-of-mass energy of 318 GeV with an integrated luminosity of 15 pb-1. No evidence for excited neutrino production is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits are determined for the ratio of the coupling to the compositeness scale, f/Lambda, independently of the relative couplings to the SU(2) and U(1) gauge bosons. These limits extend the excluded region to higher masses than has been possible in previous searches at other colliders.

  6. A Search for Excited Fermions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bassler, U.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Bernardi, G.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Chabert, E.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Hoprich, W.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Jansen, D.M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Kaufmann, O.; Kausch, M.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Krasny, M.W.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Kutuev, R.; Lachnit, W.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Metlica, F.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Negri, I.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Riess, S.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Siegmon, G.; Sievers, P.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solochenko, V.; Solovev, Y.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Tchernyshov, V.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; von Dombrowski, S.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wengler, T.; Werner, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2000-01-01

    A search for excited fermions f^* of the first generation in e^+p scattering at the collider HERA is presented using H1 data with an integrated luminosity of 37 pb^(-1). All electroweak decays of excited fermions, f^* -> f gamma, f W, f Z are considered and all possible final states resulting from the Z or W hadronic decays or decays into leptons of the first two generations are taken into account. No evidence for f^* production is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits on cross-sections and on the ratio of coupling constants to the compositeness scale are derived.

  7. Narrow-Band Excitation of Hysteretic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.Q. Zhu

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The stationary response of smooth and bilinear hysteretic systems to narrow-band random excitations is investigated by using the quasistatic method and digital simulation. It is shown that the response is qualitatively different in different ranges of values of the ratio of the excitation central frequency to the natural frequency of the system. In the resonant zone, the response is essentially non-Gaussian. For bilinear hysteretic systems with strong yielding, stochastic jumps may occur for a range of values of the ratio between nonresonant and resonant zones.

  8. Computing correct truncated excited state wavefunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacalis, N. C.; Xiong, Z.; Zang, J.; Karaoulanis, D.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate that, if a wave function's truncated expansion is small, then the standard excited states computational method, of optimizing one "root" of a secular equation, may lead to an incorrect wave function - despite the correct energy according to the theorem of Hylleraas, Undheim and McDonald - whereas our proposed method [J. Comput. Meth. Sci. Eng. 8, 277 (2008)] (independent of orthogonality to lower lying approximants) leads to correct reliable small truncated wave functions. The demonstration is done in He excited states, using truncated series expansions in Hylleraas coordinates, as well as standard configuration-interaction truncated expansions.

  9. The Protein Corona of PEGylated PGMA-Based Nanoparticles is Preferentially Enriched with Specific Serum Proteins of Varied Biological Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Priya S R; Norret, Marck; Smith, Nicole M; Dunlop, Sarah A; Taylor, Nicolas L; Fitzgerald, Melinda; Iyer, K Swaminathan

    2017-11-14

    The composition of the protein corona formed on poly(ethylene glycol)-functionalized (PEGylated) poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) nanoparticles (NPs) was qualitatively and quantitatively compared to the protein corona on non-PEGylated PGMA NPs. Despite the reputation of PEGylated NPs for stealth functionality, we demonstrate the preferential enrichment of specific serum proteins of varied biological function in the protein corona on PEGylated NPs when compared to non-PEGylated NPs. Additionally, we suggest that the base material of polymeric NPs plays a role in the preferential enrichment of select serum proteins to the hard corona.

  10. Magnetic equivalent circuit model for unipolar hybrid excitation synchronous machine

    OpenAIRE

    Kupiec Emil; Przyborowski Włodzimierz

    2015-01-01

    Lately, there has been increased interest in hybrid excitation electrical machines. Hybrid excitation is a construction that combines permanent magnet excitation with wound field excitation. Within the general classification, these machines can be classified as modified synchronous machines or inductor machines. These machines may be applied as motors and generators. The complexity of electromagnetic phenomena which occur as a result of coupling of magnetic fluxes of separate excitation syste...

  11. Relaxation channels of multi-photon excited xenon clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdobintsev, P Yu; Rakcheeva, L P; Murashov, S V; Melnikov, A S; Lyubchik, S; Timofeev, N A; Pastor, A A; Khodorkovskii, M A

    2015-09-21

    The relaxation processes of the xenon clusters subjected to multi-photon excitation by laser radiation with quantum energies significantly lower than the thresholds of excitation of atoms and ionization of clusters were studied. Results obtained by means of the photoelectron spectroscopy method showed that desorption processes of excited atoms play a significant role in the decay of two-photon excited xenon clusters. A number of excited states of xenon atoms formed during this process were discovered and identified.

  12. Electron Energy Loss and One- and Two-Photon Excited SERS Probing of “Hot” Plasmonic Silver Nanoaggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Joseph, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    between two- and one-photon excited SERS measured at different excitation wavelengths provides information about local fields in the hottest spots and their dependence on the photon energy. Our data verify experimentally the predicted increase of local optical fields in the hot spots with increasing wave...

  13. Construction of a molecular beacon based on two-photon excited fluorescence resonance energy transfer with quantum dot as donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingzhi; Li, Hui; Qiu, Ting; Zhou, Guohua; Wong, Kwok-Yin; He, Zhike; Liu, Zhihong

    2011-03-07

    A new molecular beacon (MB) driven by two-photon excitation (TPE) using quantum dots as energy donor is constructed, which provides reduced direct excitation of acceptor and is free of interferences from autofluorescence or scattering light in a complicated biological matrix.

  14. Ice crystals growing on K-feldspar (microcline) have preferential orientation dictated by feldspar lattice structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, A. A.; Bachmann, F.; Pedevilla, P.; Cox, S.; Michaelides, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, we have conducted experiments on deposition nucleation and growth of ice on freshly cleaved natural K-feldspar (microcline) crystals exposed to water vapor in the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM, FEI Quanta 650 FEG). Independently adjusting the partial water vapor pressure in the sample chamber and the temperature of the substrate mounted on top of the double-stage Peltier element, deposition ice nucleation, growth, and sublimation can be studied within the temperature range from -5°C to -60°C. By using small crystal size and tilted geometry we have been able to record the video sequences of ice nucleation taking place on both 001 and 010 crystallographic planes simultaneously. Here, we report the following general features of ice nucleation and growth observed in these experiments: Nucleation of ice always starts before the water saturation is reached. Ice was preferentially nucleating on surface defects (steps, cracks, and pits) or on the debris particles scattered over the surface of feldspar crystal. Ice crystals grown via deposition at temperatures above -30°C on any of the feldspar crystal faces have shown the same directional and rotational orientation, with c-axis of ice aligned with the c-axis of microcline unit cell. Below -35°C no preferential orientation has been observed whatsoever. The majority of observed ice crystals exhibit the evaporation groove at the waist of hexagonal prism, indicting the presence of lattice dislocations in the crystal nucleation plane. We discuss a possible mechanism of crystal lattice alignment by considering layer of ordered water on the surface of feldspar crystal forming prior to ice nucleation. Using density functional theory we show how the mineral surface interacts with water, particularly addressing the interaction of surface cations and hydroxyl groups with a water overlayer. We argue that the misalignment of the 001 lattice planes for microcline and ice (inherently following from the

  15. Preferential solvation, ion pairing, and dynamics of concentrated aqueous solutions of divalent metal nitrate salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sushma; Chandra, Amalendu

    2017-12-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of preferential solvation of ions, structure of solvation shells, ion pairing, and dynamics of aqueous solutions of divalent alkaline-earth metal nitrate salts at varying concentration by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Hydration shell structures and the extent of preferential solvation of the metal and nitrate ions in the solutions are investigated through calculations of radial distribution functions, tetrahedral ordering, and also spatial distribution functions. The Mg2+ ions are found to form solvent separated ion-pairs while the Ca2+ and Sr2+ ions form contact ion pairs with the nitrate ions. These findings are further corroborated by excess coordination numbers calculated through Kirkwood-Buff G factors for different ion-ion and ion-water pairs. The ion-pairing propensity is found to be in the order of Mg(NO3) 2 coefficients. It is found that proper modeling of these solutions requires the inclusion of electronic polarization of the ions which is achieved in the current study through electronic continuum correction force fields. A detailed analysis of the effects of ion-pairs on the structure and dynamics of water around the hydrated ions is done through classification of water into different subspecies based on their locations around the cations or anions only or bridged between them. We have looked at the diffusion coefficients, relaxation of orientational correlation functions, and also the residence times of different subspecies of water to explore the dynamics of water in different structural environments in the solutions. The current results show that the water molecules are incorporated into fairly well-structured hydration shells of the ions, thus decreasing the single-particle diffusivities and increasing the orientational relaxation times of water with an increase in salt concentration. The different structural motifs also lead to the presence of substantial dynamical heterogeneity in these solutions

  16. A novel physical eco-hydrological model concept for preferential flow based on experimental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackisch, Conrad; van Schaik, Loes; Graeff, Thomas; Zehe, Erwin

    2014-05-01

    Preferential flow through macropores often determines hydrological characteristics - especially regarding runoff generation and fast transport of solutes. Macropore settings may yet be very different in nature and dynamics, depending on their origin. While biogenic structures follow activity cycles (e.g. earth worms) and population conditions (e.g. roots), pedogenic and geogenic structures may depend on water stress (e.g. cracks) or large events (e.g. flushed voids between skeleton and soil pipes) or simply persist (e.g. bedrock interface). On the one hand, such dynamic site characteristics can be observed in seasonal changes in its reaction to precipitation. On the other hand, sprinkling experiments accompanied by tracers or time-lapse 3D Ground-Penetrating-Radar are suitable tools to determine infiltration patterns and macropore configuration. However, model representation of the macropore-matrix system is still problematic, because models either rely on effective parameters (assuming well-mixed state) or on explicit advection strongly simplifying or neglecting interaction with the diffusive flow domain. Motivated by the dynamic nature of macropores, we present a novel model approach for interacting diffusive and advective water, solutes and energy transport in structured soils. It solely relies on scale- and process-aware observables. A representative set of macropores (data from sprinkling experiments) determines the process model scale through 1D advective domains. These are connected to a 2D matrix domain which is defined by pedo-physical retention properties. Water is represented as particles. Diffusive flow is governed by a 2D random walk of these particles while advection may take place in the macropore domain. Macropore-matrix interaction is computed as dissipation of the advective momentum of a particle by its experienced drag from the matrix domain. Through a representation of matrix and macropores as connected diffusive and advective domains for water

  17. The gsdf gene locus harbors evolutionary conserved and clustered genes preferentially expressed in fish previtellogenic oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Aude; Le Gac, Florence; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques

    2011-02-01

    The gonadal soma-derived factor (GSDF) belongs to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily and is conserved in teleostean fish species. Gsdf is specifically expressed in the gonads, and gene expression is restricted to the granulosa and Sertoli cells in trout and medaka. The gsdf gene expression is correlated to early testis differentiation in medaka and was shown to stimulate primordial germ cell and spermatogonia proliferation in trout. In the present study, we show that the gsdf gene localizes to a syntenic chromosomal fragment conserved among vertebrates although no gsdf-related gene is detected on the corresponding genomic region in tetrapods. We demonstrate using quantitative RT-PCR that most of the genes localized in the synteny are specifically expressed in medaka gonads. Gsdf is the only gene of the synteny with a much higher expression in the testis compared to the ovary. In contrast, gene expression pattern analysis of the gsdf surrounding genes (nup54, aff1, klhl8, sdad1, and ptpn13) indicates that these genes are preferentially expressed in the female gonads. The tissue distribution of these genes is highly similar in medaka and zebrafish, two teleostean species that have diverged more than 110 million years ago. The cellular localization of these genes was determined in medaka gonads using the whole-mount in situ hybridization technique. We confirm that gsdf gene expression is restricted to Sertoli and granulosa cells in contact with the premeiotic and meiotic cells. The nup54 gene is expressed in spermatocytes and previtellogenic oocytes. Transcripts corresponding to the ovary-specific genes (aff1, klhl8, and sdad1) are detected only in previtellogenic oocytes. No expression was detected in the gonocytes in 10 dpf embryos. In conclusion, we show that the gsdf gene localizes to a syntenic chromosomal fragment harboring evolutionary conserved genes in vertebrates. These genes are preferentially expressed in previtelloogenic oocytes, and thus, they

  18. Wind tunnel measurements of the preferential concentration of inertial droplets in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bateson, Colin P.; Aliseda, Alberto [University of Washington, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 4000 15th Ave NE, Box 352600, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We describe an experimental setup aimed at studying turbulent-induced droplet collisions in a laboratory setting. Our goal is to reproduce conditions relevant to warm-rain formation in clouds. In these conditions, the trajectories of small inertial droplets are strongly influenced by the background air turbulence, and collisions can potentially explain the droplet growth rates and spectrum broadening observed in this type of clouds. Warm-rain formation is currently under strong scrutiny because it is an important source of uncertainty in atmospheric models. A grid at the entrance of a horizontal wind tunnel produces homogeneous isotropic turbulence at a Re{sub {lambda}} in the range of 400-500. Water droplets are injected from the nodes of the turbulence-inducing grid at a volume fraction ({phi}) of 2.7 x 10{sup -5} and with sizes of 10-200 {mu}m. A complex manifold-injection system was developed to obtain uniform water droplet seeding, in terms of both water content and size distribution. We characterize the resulting droplet-laden turbulent flow, and the statistics of droplet pairs are measured and analyzed. We found that the radial distribution function (RDF), a measure of preferential concentration of droplets that plays a key role in collision kernel models, has a large peak at distances below the Kolmogorov microscale of the turbulence. At very long separations, comparable with the integral length scale of the turbulence, these RDFs show a slow decay to the average probability given by the mean droplet number density. Consistent with this result, conditional analysis shows an increased local concentration of droplets within the inertial length scale ({approx} 10-100 Kolmogorov lengths). These results are in good agreement with previous experiments that found clustering of inertial droplets with St {approx} 1 at scales on the order of 10{eta}. Ultimately, our results support the hypothesis that turbulence-induced preferential concentration and enhanced

  19. Preferential infection sites of Cysticercus bovis in cattle experimentally infected with Taenia saginata eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Welber D Z; Santos, Thaís R; Soares, Vando E; Nunes, Jorge L N; Mendonça, Rafael P; de Lima, Roberto C A; Sakamoto, Cláudio A M; Costa, Gustavo H N; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Oliveira, Gilson P; Costa, Alvimar J

    2011-02-01

    The preferential sites of infection of Cysticercus bovis were evaluated in the skeletal muscle and entrails of 25 cattle that were experimentally infected with Taenia saginata (2×10(4) eggs). Two other animals were not inoculated (control). Ninety days after inoculation, all the cattle were euthanized. The carcasses were deboned and dissected into 26 anatomical sections (masseter muscles, brain, tongue, esophagus, heart, diaphragm, lungs, liver, kidneys, spleen, top sirloin butt, bottom sirloin butt, outside round, top (inside) round, transversus abdominus, top sirloin cap, strip loin, full tenderloin, eye of round, knuckle, shoulder clod, foreshank, shank, chuck, back ribs, and tail muscles). The dissected tissues were sliced into 5mm sections. From the 25 cattle, 9258 C. bovis (cysticerci) were recovered; 75.02% (6946) of these were recovered from skeletal muscles and 24.98% (2312) from the entrails. A high parasitism level was found in the shoulder clod (12.55%), heart (11.02%), liver (9.48%), masseter muscles (8.51%), chuck (8.25%), strip loin and full tenderloin (7.26%), knuckle (6.63%), and back ribs (5.53%), totaling 69.23% (5738) of all of the detected cysticerci. On the other hand, there was a low C. bovis parasitism level in the brain, spleen, tail muscles, kidneys, esophagus, and diaphragm, representing just 3.9% of the total number of cysticerci. Given these results, we conclude that specific skeletal musculature regions, such as the shoulder blade, chuck, strip loin and full tenderloin, knuckle, back ribs and top round, which are not officially examined in many countries, are effective sites to efficiently screen C. bovis infection. To date, these regions have not been considered as preferential sites of C. bovis infection. Based on our work, however, these regions deserve greater attention from health inspectors because they contained a greater number of Cysticercus than the other regions of carcasses that are parasitized by T. saginata larvae

  20. Resorufin analogs preferentially bind cerebrovascular amyloid: potential use as imaging ligands for cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Byung

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA is characterized by deposition of fibrillar amyloid β (Aβ within cerebral vessels. It is commonly seen in the elderly and almost universally present in patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD. In both patient populations, CAA is an independent risk factor for lobar hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, and dementia. To date, definitive diagnosis of CAA requires obtaining pathological tissues via brain biopsy (which is rarely clinically indicated or at autopsy. Though amyloid tracers labeled with positron-emitting radioligands such as [11C]PIB have shown promise for non-invasive amyloid imaging in AD patients, to date they have been unable to clarify whether the observed amyloid load represents neuritic plaques versus CAA due in large part to the low resolution of PET imaging and the almost equal affinity of these tracers for both vascular and parenchymal amyloid. Therefore, the development of a precise and specific non-invasive technique for diagnosing CAA in live patients is desired. Results We found that the phenoxazine derivative resorufin preferentially bound cerebrovascular amyloid deposits over neuritic plaques in the aged Tg2576 transgenic mouse model of AD/CAA, whereas the congophilic amyloid dye methoxy-X34 bound both cerebrovascular amyloid deposits and neuritic plaques. Similarly, resorufin-positive staining was predominantly noted in fibrillar Aβ-laden vessels in postmortem AD brain tissues. Fluorescent labeling and multi-photon microscopy further revealed that both resorufin- and methoxy-X34-positive staining is colocalized to the vascular smooth muscle (VSMC layer of vessel segments that have severe disruption of VSMC arrangement, a characteristic feature of CAA. Resorufin also selectively visualized vascular amyloid deposits in live Tg2576 mice when administered topically, though not systemically. Resorufin derivatives with chemical modification at the 7-OH position of resorufin also

  1. PARAMETRIC EXCITATION IN A SELF-EXCITED THREE-DEGREES OF FREEDOM PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SITI FATIMAH

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The efect of parametric excitation in self-excited has been investigated in two-degrees of freedom problems. The possibility of suppressing self-excited vibrationsby using parametric excitation and the dynamic behavior of those kind systems were discussed. In the this paper, we consider a system in three-degrees of freedom problem which by using a linear transformation the system becomes an Autoparametric. The system consists of a central mass and two external masses where those masses are conectedby springs with the same constant stiffness. The flow-generated self-excited force is actingon the external masses, it is represented by Rayleigh force. The variable stiffness isperiodically varying in time, represents a parametric excitation. It turns out that forcertain parameter ranges full vibration cancellation is possible. The analysis of linearcase of system shows that there are two conditions in order to obtain an interval ofthe parametric excitation. Using the averaging method the fully non-linear system is investigated producing as non-trivial solutions unstable periodic solutions. The behaviorof this unstable solution is studied in the full system.

  2. Preferential degradation of polyphenols from Sphagnum - 4-Isopropenylphenol as a proxy for past hydrological conditions in Sphagnum-dominated peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Judith; Bindler, Richard; Martínez-Cortizas, Antonio; McClymont, Erin L.; Abbott, Geoffrey D.; Biester, Harald; Pontevedra-Pombal, Xabier; Buurman, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The net accumulation of remains of Sphagnum spp. is fundamental to the development of many peatlands. The effect of polyphenols from Sphagnum on decomposition processes is frequently cited but has barely been studied. The central area of the Rödmossamyran peatland (Sweden) is an open lawn that consists mostly of Sphagnum spp. with a very low contribution from vascular plants. In order to determine the effects of decay on sphagnum phenols, 53 samples of a 2.7 m deep core from this lawn were analysed with pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (pyrolysis-GC-MS) and compared with more traditional decomposition proxies such as C/N ratio, UV light transmission of alkaline peat extracts, and bulk density. Factor analysis of 72 quantified pyrolysis products suggested that the variation in 4-isopropenylphenol was largely determined by aerobic decomposition instead of Sphagnum abundance. In order to evaluate the effects of aerobic decay in Sphagnum peat, down-core records from different climatic regions were compared using molecular markers for plant biopolymers and C/N ratio. These included markers for lignin from vascular plants ((di)methoxyphenols), polyphenols from Sphagnum spp. (4-isopropenylphenol), and cellulose (levoglucosan). Our results indicate that polyphenols from Sphagnum are preferentially degraded over polysaccharides; consequently the variability of the marker for sphagnum acid, 4-isopropenylphenol, was found indicative of decomposition instead of reflecting the abundance of Sphagnum remains. The fact that 4-isopropenylphenol is aerobically degraded in combination with its specificity for Sphagnum spp. makes it a consistent indicator of past hydrological conditions in Sphagnum-dominated peat. In contrast, the variability of C/N records in Sphagnum-dominated peat was influenced by both vegetation shifts and decomposition, and the dominant effect differed between the studied peatlands. Our results provide direction for modelling studies that try to

  3. The excitement of colours and scents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lawrence

    a Creativity Group formed by the ever-enthusiastic Jehangir Mistry, a teacher in the Physics Department. Our small group of sixteen students, drawn from diverse disciplines and interests, bonded immediately, and collaborated on science projects that culminated in an exhibition. The atmosphere of freedom, excitement and ...

  4. Collective excitations in deformed alkali metal clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipparini, E.; Stringari, S. (Trento Univ. (Italy). Dipartimento di Fisica Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Povo (Italy). Gruppo Collegato di Trento)

    1991-02-01

    A theoretical study of collective excitations in deformed metal clusters is presented. Sum rules are used to study the splittings of the dipole surface plasma resonance originating from the cluster deformation. The vibrating potential model is developed and used to predict the occurrence of a low lying collective mode of orbital magnetic nature. (orig.).

  5. Collective excitations in deformed alkali metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipparini, Enrico; Stringari, Sandro

    1991-06-01

    A theoretical study of collective excitations in deformed metal clusters is presented. Sum rules are used to study the splittings of the dipole surface plasma resonance originating from the cluster deformation. The vibrating potential model is developed and used to predict the occurrence of a low lying collective mode of orbital magnetic nature.

  6. Global chaos synchronization of coupled parametrically excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    coupled double-well Duffing oscillators (DDOs) and showed that synchronization was characterized by boundary crisis of the chaotic attractors. In our previous work [23,25], only numerical results were presented. In this paper, we extend our results to parametrically excited systems and in particular obtain sufficient crite-.

  7. Triple mode filters with coaxial excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerini, G.; Bustamante, F.D.; Guglielmi, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe triple mode filters in a square waveguide with integrated coaxial input/output excitation. An important feature of the structure proposed is that it is easily amenable to an accurate full wave analysis. In addition to theory, a practical six pole filter with two

  8. Laser excitation of Antihydrogen in ALPHA

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Animation of how a trapped antihydrogen atom is excited by two photons from the 1S to the 2S state in antihydrogen, and further photo-ionised by a third foton. The first part of the movie shows how antihydrogen is made and captured in a magnetic minimum trap.

  9. Dynamics of excitable nodes on random graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ogy and dynamics of excitable nodes on Erd˝os–Rényi (ER) [16] random graphs. Our focus is on rhythmic dynamics, namely periodic solutions, in this representative model. Since the network topology plays an important role, the question of how different growth rules. DOI: 10.1007/s12043-011-0180-6; ePublication: 31 ...

  10. Lithium. Effects on excitable cell membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeger, Egbert Johan

    1974-01-01

    LITHIUM: Effects on excitable cell membranes. Lithium salts have been used in the treatment of manic-depressive psychosis for many years but their mechanism of action is not well understood. Many workers assume that the action of lithium on catecholamine metabolism and/or on electrolyte distribution

  11. Global chaos synchronization of coupled parametrically excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we study the synchronization behaviour of two linearly coupled parametrically excited chaotic pendula. The stability of the synchronized state is examined using Lyapunov stability theory and linear matrix inequality (LMI); and some sufficient criteria for global asymptotic synchronization are derived from which ...

  12. Excitation of XUV radiation in solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to understand the means by which XUV radiation in solar flares is excited, and to use this radiation as diagnostics of the energy release and transport processes occurring in the flare. Significant progress in both of these areas, as described, was made.

  13. Extracting excited mesons from the finite volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doring, Michael [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    As quark masses come closer to their physical values in lattice simulations, finite volume effects dominate the level spectrum. Methods to extract excited mesons from the finite volume are discussed, like moving frames in the presence of coupled channels. Effective field theory can be used to stabilize the determination of the resonance spectrum.

  14. Collective excitations of harmonically trapped ideal gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Schaeybroeck, B.; Lazarides, A.

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically study the collective excitations of an ideal gas confined in an isotropic harmonic trap. We give an exact solution to the Boltzmann-Vlasov equation; as expected for a single-component system, the associated mode frequencies are integer multiples of the trapping frequency. We show

  15. Collective excitations of sup 3 He clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, Ll.; Garcias, F. (Universidad de las Islas Baleares, Palma de Mallorca (Spain). Dept. de Fisica); Barranco, M. (Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Estructura y Constituyentes de la Materia); Navarro, J. (Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Valencia (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular); Giai, V. (Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Div. de Physique Theorique)

    1991-01-01

    Collective excitations of {sup 3}He clusters are studied by treating the cluster as a quantum liquid drop. We have used the Random-Phase Approximation sum rules technique within a Density Functional Formalism. Results for L=2 to 10 surface modes and the L=0 volume mode are presented. (orig.).

  16. Persistent Histamine Excitation of Glutamatergic Preoptic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarean, Iustin V.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca2+ concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  17. Creation of skyrmion through resonance excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhi-xiong; Chen, Yi-fu; Zhou, Zhen-wei; Nie, Yao-zhuang; Xia, Qing-lin; Wang, Dao-wei; Guo, Guang-hua, E-mail: guogh@mail.csu.edu.cn

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Intrinsic oscillation modes of skyrmion are studied by using micromagnetic simulation. • Creation of skyrmion through resonant excitation is proposed. • The number of generated skyrmions can be effectively controlled by manipulating the driving field. • Skyrmion lattice in extended film is generated via resonant excitation. - Abstract: Controllable creation of magnetic skyrmions in nanostructures is a prerequisite for the application of skyrmions in spintronics. Here, we propose a new method for the creation of skyrmions. We show by using micromagnetic simulations that the skyrmions can be nucleated by resonantly exciting one of the skyrmion intrinsic oscillation modes. We first studied the dynamics of skyrmion in a ferromagnetic nanodisk with perpendicular anisotropy. One breathing mode and two non-degenerate gyrotropic modes are identified. Then we applied a circular-polarized microwave field to excite the uniformly magnetized nanodisk. When the frequency of the driving field is equal to the eigenfrequency of the skyrmion gyrotropic mode, stable skyrmions can be created from the initial uniform state. The number of skyrmions can be effectively controlled by appropriately choosing the duration of the driving field or tuning the field amplitude.

  18. Motor axon excitability during Wallerian degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez, Susana; Krarup, Christian

    2008-01-01

    , action potential propagation and structural integrity of the distal segment are maintained. The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo the changes in membrane function of motor axons during the 'latent' phase of Wallerian degeneration. Multiple indices of axonal excitability of the tibial nerve...

  19. Excited states of muonium in atomic hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Muonium formation in excited states in muon-hydrogen charge-exchange collision is investigated using a method developed in a previous paper. Differential cross-section results are found to resemble positronium formation cross-section results of positron-hydrogen charge-exchange problem. Forward differential and ...

  20. Stabilization of nonlinear excitations by disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Johansson, M.

    1998-01-01

    Using analytical and numerical techniques we analyze the static and dynamical properties of solitonlike excitations in the presence of parametric disorder in the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a homogeneous power nonlinearity. Both the continuum and the discrete problem are i...

  1. Clinical Comparison of Pulse and Chirp Excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Høgholm; Misaridis, T.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    Coded excitation (CE) using frequency modulated signals (chirps) combined with modified matched filtering has earlier been presented showing promising results in simulations and in-vitro. In this study an experimental ultrasound system is evaluated in a clinical setting, where image sequences are...

  2. White noise excitation of road vehicle structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heave and pitch motions of road vehicle structures affect the comfort and the safety of passengers. Excitation of these vertical vibrations is due to road surface roughness. Road vehicle structures are modelled as mechanical systems characterized by their inertia, damping and stiffness, and represented as state equations.

  3. Surface plasmon excitation by a quantum oscillator

    OpenAIRE

    Lidsky, V. V.

    2009-01-01

    Surface waves in a thin uniform metal film are described in terms of quantum electrodynamics.The interaction of surface waves with a quantum oscillator is discussed in the dipole approximation. The increase in the spontaneous emission rate of the excited quantum oscillator, the so called Purcell factor, is evaluated to be as high as by 10 to the five times.

  4. Inner-shell excitation spectroscopy of peroxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harding, K. L.; Kalirai, S.; Hayes, R.; Ju, V.; Cooper, G.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Thompson, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    O 1s inner-shell excitation spectra of a number of vapor phase molecules containing peroxide bonds - hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), di-t-butylperoxide ((BuOBu)-Bu-t-Bu-t), benzoyl peroxide, ((C6H5(CO)O)(2)), luperox-F [1,3(4)-bis(tertbutylperoxyisopropyl)benzene], and analogous, non-peroxide compounds -

  5. The mean excitation energy of atomic ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Oddershede, Jens; Sabin, John R.

    2015-01-01

    A method for calculation of the mean excitation energies of atomic ions is presented, making the calculation of the energy deposition of fast ions to plasmas, warm, dense matter, and complex biological systems possible. Results are reported to all ions of helium, lithium, carbon, neon, aluminum, ...

  6. New Logic Circuit with DC Parametric Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Masanori; Kaneda, Hisayoshi

    1982-12-01

    It is shown that dc parametric excitation is possible in a circuit named JUDO, which is composed of two resistively-connected Josephson junctions. Simulation study proves that the circuit has large gain and properties suitable for the construction of small, high-speed logic circuits.

  7. Preferred provider organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, J D

    1984-05-01

    The 1980s has marked the beginning of a new alternative health care delivery system: the preferred provider organization ( PPO ). This system has developed from the health maintenance organization model and is predominant in California and Colorado. A PPO is a group of providers, usually hospitals and doctors, who agree to provide health care to subscribers for a negotiated fee that is usually discounted. Preferred provider organizations are subject to peer review and strict use controls in exchange for a consistent volume of patients and speedy turnaround on claims payments. This article describes the factors leading to the development of PPOs and the implications for occupational therapy.

  8. Selective serotonergic excitation of callosal projection neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eAvesar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT acting as a neurotransmitter in the cerebral cortex is critical for cognitive function, yet how 5-HT regulates information processing in cortical circuits is not well understood. We tested the serotonergic responsiveness of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5PNs of the mouse medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, and found 3 distinct response types: long-lasting 5-HT1A (1A receptor-dependent inhibitory responses (84% of L5PNs, 5-HT2A (2A receptor-dependent excitatory responses (9%, and biphasic responses in which 2A-dependent excitation followed brief inhibition (5%. Relative to 5-HT-inhibited neurons, those excited by 5-HT had physiological properties characteristic of callosal/commissural (COM neurons that project to the contralateral cortex. We tested whether serotonergic responses in cortical pyramidal neurons are correlated with their axonal projection pattern using retrograde fluorescent labeling of COM and corticopontine-projecting (CPn neurons. 5-HT generated excitatory or biphasic responses in all 5-HT-responsive layer 5 COM neurons. Conversely, CPn neurons were universally inhibited by 5-HT. Serotonergic excitation of COM neurons was blocked by the 2A antagonist MDL 11939, while serotonergic inhibition of CPn neurons was blocked by the 1A antagonist WAY 100635, confirming a role for these two receptor subtypes in regulating pyramidal neuron activity. Selective serotonergic excitation of COM neurons was not layer-specific, as COM neurons in layer 2/3 were also selectively excited by 5-HT relative to their non-labeled pyramidal neuron neighbors. Because neocortical 2A receptors are implicated in the etiology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia, we propose that COM neurons may represent a novel cellular target for intervention in psychiatric disease.

  9. Saturated excitation of Fluorescence to quantify excitation enhancement in aperture antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Aouani, Heykel

    2012-07-23

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is widely used to probe the electromagnetic intensity amplification on optical antennas, yet measuring the excitation intensity amplification is a challenge, as the detected fluorescence signal is an intricate combination of excitation and emission. Here, we describe a novel approach to quantify the electromagnetic amplification in aperture antennas by taking advantage of the intrinsic non linear properties of the fluorescence process. Experimental measurements of the fundamental f and second harmonic 2f amplitudes of the fluorescence signal upon excitation modulation are used to quantify the electromagnetic intensity amplification with plasmonic aperture antennas. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  10. Building Service Provider Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Kristin; Jaura, Manya; Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.

    In this paper we study whether and how the interaction between clients and the service providers contributes to the development of capabilities in service provider firms. In situations where such a contribution occurs, we analyze how different types of activities in the production process...

  11. Providing free autopoweroff plugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Lynge; Hansen, Lars Gårn; Fjordbak, Troels

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidence of the effect of providing households with cheap energy saving technology is sparse. We present results from a field experiment in which autopoweroff plugs were provided free of charge to randomly selected households. We use propensity score matching to find treatment effects...

  12. Effects of long-term use of the preferential COX-2 inhibitor meloxicam on growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorissen, Ben M C; Uilenreef, Joost J; Bergmann, Wilhelmina; Meijer, Ellen; van Rietbergen, Bert; van der Staay, Franz Josef; Weeren, P René van; Wolschrijn, Claudia F

    2017-11-25

    Meloxicam, a preferential COX-2 inhibitor, is a commonly used NSAID in pigs. Besides having potential side effects on the gastrointestinal tract, this type of drug might potentially affect osteogenesis and chondrogenesis, processes relevant to growing pigs. Therefore, the effects of long-term meloxicam treatment on growing pigs were studied. Twelve piglets (n=6 receiving daily meloxicam 0.4 mg/kg orally from 48 until 110 days of age; n=6 receiving only applesauce (vehicle control)) were subjected to visual and objective gait analysis by pressure plate measurements at several time points. Following euthanasia a complete postmortem examination was performed and samples of the talus and distal tibia, including the distal physis, were collected. Trabecular bone microarchitecture was analysed by microCT scanning, bone stiffness by compression testing and growth plate morphology using light microscopy. Animals were not lame and gait patterns did not differ between the groups. Pathological examination revealed no lesions compatible with known side effects of NSAIDs. Trabecular bone microarchitecture and growth plate morphology did not differ between the two groups. The findings of this in vivo study reduce concerns regarding the long-term use of meloxicam in young, growing piglets. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Preferential duplication of intermodular hub genes: an evolutionary signature in eukaryotes genome networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo M Ferreira

    Full Text Available Whole genome protein-protein association networks are not random and their topological properties stem from genome evolution mechanisms. In fact, more connected, but less clustered proteins are related to genes that, in general, present more paralogs as compared to other genes, indicating frequent previous gene duplication episodes. On the other hand, genes related to conserved biological functions present few or no paralogs and yield proteins that are highly connected and clustered. These general network characteristics must have an evolutionary explanation. Considering data from STRING database, we present here experimental evidence that, more than not being scale free, protein degree distributions of organisms present an increased probability for high degree nodes. Furthermore, based on this experimental evidence, we propose a simulation model for genome evolution, where genes in a network are either acquired de novo using a preferential attachment rule, or duplicated with a probability that linearly grows with gene degree and decreases with its clustering coefficient. For the first time a model yields results that simultaneously describe different topological distributions. Also, this model correctly predicts that, to produce protein-protein association networks with number of links and number of nodes in the observed range for Eukaryotes, it is necessary 90% of gene duplication and 10% of de novo gene acquisition. This scenario implies a universal mechanism for genome evolution.

  14. Heterogeneous Ribosomes Preferentially Translate Distinct Subpools of mRNAs Genome-wide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhen; Fujii, Kotaro; Kovary, Kyle M; Genuth, Naomi R; Röst, Hannes L; Teruel, Mary N; Barna, Maria

    2017-07-06

    Emerging studies have linked the ribosome to more selective control of gene regulation. However, an outstanding question is whether ribosome heterogeneity at the level of core ribosomal proteins (RPs) exists and enables ribosomes to preferentially translate specific mRNAs genome-wide. Here, we measured the absolute abundance of RPs in translating ribosomes and profiled transcripts that are enriched or depleted from select subsets of ribosomes within embryonic stem cells. We find that heterogeneity in RP composition endows ribosomes with differential selectivity for translating subpools of transcripts, including those controlling metabolism, cell cycle, and development. As an example, mRNAs enriched in binding to RPL10A/uL1-containing ribosomes are shown to require RPL10A/uL1 for their efficient translation. Within several of these transcripts, this level of regulation is mediated, at least in part, by internal ribosome entry sites. Together, these results reveal a critical functional link between ribosome heterogeneity and the post-transcriptional circuitry of gene expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Preferential pharmacological inhibition of macrophage ACAT increases plaque formation in mouse and rabbit models of atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrey, S; Legendre, C; Matsuura, A; Guffroy, C; Binet, J; Ohbayashi, S; Tanaka, T; Ortuno, J C; Matsukura, T; Laugel, T; Padovani, P; Bellamy, F; Edgar, A D

    2001-04-01

    The cholesteryl ester, foam cell-enriched vulnerable plaque is a principle pharmacological target for reducing athero-thrombosis. Acyl CoA:cholesterol Acyl Transferase (ACAT) catalyzes the esterification of free cholesterol in intestine, liver, adrenal and macrophages, leading in the latter cells to intracellular cholesteryl ester accumulation and foam cell formation in the arterial intima. Previous studies suggested the existence of several isoforms of ACAT with different tissue distribution and this has largely been confirmed by molecular cloning of ACAT-1 and ACAT-2. We developed a series of ACAT inhibitors that preferentially inhibited macrophage ACAT relative to hepatic or intestinal ACAT based on in vitro assays and ex vivo bioavailability studies. Four of these compounds were tested in three models of atherosclerosis at oral doses shown to give sufficient bioavailable monocyte/macrophage ACAT inhibitory activity. In fat-fed C57BL/6 mice, chow fed apo E-/- mice and KHC rabbits, the various ACAT inhibitors had either no effect or increased indices of atherosclerotic foam cell formation. Direct and indirect measurements suggest that the increase in plaque formation may have been related to inhibition of macrophage ACAT possibly leading to cytotoxic effects due to augmented free cholesterol. These results suggest that pharmacological inhibition of macrophage ACAT may not reduce, but actually aggravate, foam cell formation and progression.

  16. Preferential biological processes in the human limbus by differential gene profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin N Nakatsu

    Full Text Available Corneal epithelial stem cells or limbal stem cells (LSCs are responsible for the maintenance of the corneal epithelium in humans. The exact location of LSCs is still under debate, but the increasing need for identifying the biological processes in the limbus, where LSCs are located, is of great importance in the regulation of LSCs. In our current study we identified 146 preferentially expressed genes in the human limbus in direct comparison to that in the cornea and conjunctiva. The expression of newly identified limbal transcripts endomucin, fibromodulin, paired-like homeodomain 2 (PITX2 and axin-2 were validated using qRT-PCR. Further protein analysis on the newly identified limbal transcripts showed protein localization of PITX2 in the basal and suprabasal layer of the limbal epithelium and very low expression in the cornea and conjunctiva. Two other limbal transcripts, frizzled-7 and tenascin-C, were expressed in the basal epithelial layer of the limbus. Gene ontology and network analysis of the overexpressed limbal genes revealed cell-cell adhesion, Wnt and TGF-β/BMP signaling components among other developmental processes in the limbus. These results could aid in a better understanding of the regulatory elements in the LSC microenvironment.

  17. XPO1 Inhibition Preferentially Disrupts the 3D Nuclear Organization of Telomeres in Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor‐Kashton, Cheryl; Lichtensztejn, Daniel; Baloglu, Erkan; Senapedis, William; Shacham, Sharon; Kauffman, Michael G.; Kotb, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the three‐dimensional (3D) nuclear organization of telomeres is altered in cancer cells and the degree of alterations coincides with aggressiveness of disease. Nuclear pores are essential for spatial genome organization and gene regulation and XPO1 (exportin 1/CRM1) is the key nuclear export protein. The Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) compounds developed by Karyopharm Therapeutics (KPT‐185, KPT‐330/selinexor, and KPT‐8602) inhibit XPO1 nuclear export function. In this study, we investigated whether XPO1 inhibition has downstream effects on the 3D nuclear organization of the genome. This was assessed by measuring the 3D telomeric architecture of normal and tumor cells in vitro and ex vivo. Our data demonstrate for the first time a rapid and preferential disruption of the 3D nuclear organization of telomeres in tumor cell lines and in primary cells ex vivo derived from treatment‐naïve newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients. Normal primary cells in culture as well as healthy lymphocyte control cells from the same patients were minimally affected. Using both lymphoid and non‐lymphoid tumor cell lines, we found that the downstream effects on the 3D nuclear telomere structure are independent of tumor type. We conclude that the 3D nuclear organization of telomeres is a sensitive indicator of cellular response when treated with XPO1 inhibitors. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2711–2719, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991404

  18. Preferential control of basal dendritic protrusions by EphB2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Kayser

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The flow of information between neurons in many neural circuits is controlled by a highly specialized site of cell-cell contact known as a synapse. A number of molecules have been identified that are involved in central nervous system synapse development, but knowledge is limited regarding whether these cues direct organization of specific synapse types or on particular regions of individual neurons. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, and the majority of glutamatergic synapses occur on mushroom-shaped protrusions called dendritic spines. Changes in the morphology of these structures are associated with long-lasting modulation of synaptic strength thought to underlie learning and memory, and can be abnormal in neuropsychiatric disease. Here, we use rat cortical slice cultures to examine how a previously-described synaptogenic molecule, the EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase, regulates dendritic protrusion morphology in specific regions of the dendritic arbor in cortical pyramidal neurons. We find that alterations in EphB2 signaling can bidirectionally control protrusion length, and knockdown of EphB2 expression levels reduces the number of dendritic spines and filopodia. Expression of wild-type or dominant negative EphB2 reveals that EphB2 preferentially regulates dendritic protrusion structure in basal dendrites. Our findings suggest that EphB2 may act to specify synapse formation in a particular subcellular region of cortical pyramidal neurons.

  19. XPO1 Inhibition Preferentially Disrupts the 3D Nuclear Organization of Telomeres in Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Kashton, Cheryl; Lichtensztejn, Daniel; Baloglu, Erkan; Senapedis, William; Shacham, Sharon; Kauffman, Michael G; Kotb, Rami; Mai, Sabine

    2016-12-01

    Previous work has shown that the three-dimensional (3D) nuclear organization of telomeres is altered in cancer cells and the degree of alterations coincides with aggressiveness of disease. Nuclear pores are essential for spatial genome organization and gene regulation and XPO1 (exportin 1/CRM1) is the key nuclear export protein. The Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) compounds developed by Karyopharm Therapeutics (KPT-185, KPT-330/selinexor, and KPT-8602) inhibit XPO1 nuclear export function. In this study, we investigated whether XPO1 inhibition has downstream effects on the 3D nuclear organization of the genome. This was assessed by measuring the 3D telomeric architecture of normal and tumor cells in vitro and ex vivo. Our data demonstrate for the first time a rapid and preferential disruption of the 3D nuclear organization of telomeres in tumor cell lines and in primary cells ex vivo derived from treatment-naïve newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients. Normal primary cells in culture as well as healthy lymphocyte control cells from the same patients were minimally affected. Using both lymphoid and non-lymphoid tumor cell lines, we found that the downstream effects on the 3D nuclear telomere structure are independent of tumor type. We conclude that the 3D nuclear organization of telomeres is a sensitive indicator of cellular response when treated with XPO1 inhibitors. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2711-2719, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Is Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis preferentially restricted to the cutaneous lesions of naturally infected dogs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Maria de Fátima; Schubach, Armando de O; Schubach, Tânia M P; Serra, Cathia M B; Pereira, Sandro A; Figueiredo, Fabiano B; Confort, Eliame Mouta; Quintella, Leonardo P; Marzochi, Mauro C A

    2005-08-01

    Nineteen dogs naturally infected with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis were studied in order to determine the presence of the parasite outside cutaneous lesions. Eleven (57.9%) animals showed single cutaneous or mucosal lesions and eight (42.1%) presented two or three lesions. Twenty-eight active lesions were biopsied. Isolation in culture and characterization by enzyme electrophoresis were possible in 100% of cases and amastigote forms were visualized upon histopathological examination in three samples (n=25, 12%). Isolation of the parasite in culture from peripheral blood and intact skin fragments obtained from the scapular region was negative in all animals, as was the histopathological analysis of skin from this region. Serological reactivity determined by an immunofluorescent antibody test and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was demonstrated in 15 animals. The results obtained suggest that L. braziliensis preferentially remains at the site of lesion, in contrast to the systemic distribution of parasites observed in dogs infected with L. (Leishmania) chagasi. A better understanding of this aspect may help direct diagnostic and control strategies applicable to areas characterized by the simultaneous occurrence of the cutaneous and visceral forms of leishmaniasis, as is the case for the Municipality of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.