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Sample records for providing practical advice

  1. Examining the content of weight, nutrition and physical activity advices provided by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: analysis of videotaped consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dillen, S M E; Noordman, J; van Dulmen, S; Hiddink, G J

    2014-01-01

    To examine the content of Dutch practice nurses' (PNs') advices about weight, nutrition and physical activity to overweight and obese patients. A 100 videotaped real-life PN consultations (The Netherlands, 2010/2011) with overweight or obese patients were selected. An observational checklist was developed to assess frequency and content. Personalization of advices was scored, as also the guidelines on which PNs based their advices. Content analysis was used to identify different categories of advices. About one quarter of advices concerned weight, over two-thirds nutrition and one-third physical activity. Lose weight, eat less fat and be more physically active in general were the main categories for each type of advice. Despite high clarity of advices, lower scores were found for specificity and personalization. Very few nutrition advices were provided in combination with physical activity advices. Weight advices often related to the patient's complaint. PNs seldom set a concrete weight goal. Although benefits of physical activity were discussed, often no practical advices were provided about how to achieve this. Integrated lifestyle advice was not common: advices about nutrition and physical activity were fragmented throughout the consultation. Obesity prevention needs more emphasis in PNs' educational programs.

  2. Changing current practice in urological cancer care: Providing better information, advice and related support on work engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, S J; Murdoch, S E; Cox, T

    2017-09-01

    There is a growing body of evidence on the importance of work following a diagnosis of cancer and the need to provide better information, advice and related support to patients on work engagement. The aim of this study was to better understand the nature of those needs and to identify better ways to meet these for those with a urological cancer. The focus was on the issues that were common to three key stakeholder groups. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with stakeholders in North East Scotland: 12 individuals with kidney, bladder or prostate cancer, 10 healthcare providers and 10 managers from large organisations. Five key themes emerged from the Framework Analysis: perceived importance of work engagement; decision-making: treatment, work and cancer; roles and responsibilities; education and training; information, advice and support resources. The data confirmed that work engagement is important to those with urological cancer. It also made clear that the current provision of information and advice could be improved. Any such interventions should involve all three key stakeholder groups with greater clarity on their respective roles and responsibilities. Finally, any new system would be best integrated with existing care provision and supported by adequate education and training of those involved. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Examining the content of weight, nutrition and physical activity advices provided by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: analysis of videotaped consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: To examine the content of Dutch practice nurses' (PNs') advices about weight, nutrition and physical activity to overweight and obese patients. SUBJECTS/METHODS: A 100 videotaped real-life PN consultations (The Netherlands, 2010/2011) with overweight or obese patients were

  4. Examining the content of weight, nutrition and physical activity advices provided by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: analysis of videotaped consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M.E. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objective: To examine the content of Dutch practice nurses’ (PNs’) advices about weight, nutrition and physical activity to overweight and obese patients. Subjects/Methods: A 100 videotaped real-life PN consultations (The Netherlands, 2010/2011) with overweight or obese patients were

  5. Extensive IT outsourcing: advice from providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mike; Whiting, Stacilee

    2007-01-01

    In summary, providers are reporting some benefits related to resources and knowledge, improved service levels/performance and stronger IT staff/leadership. Also, on average, providers are reporting satisfactory experiences with application support and CIO outsourcing. However, not all of their expectations are being met, and some providers have discontinued outsourcing due to unmet expectations. Clearly, outsourcing is an option one must research in depth--it is not for everyone. When one evaluates the results of extensive IT outsourcing, it becomes easier to see what outsourcing mix and firm may be a good match for your organization's needs and expected outcomes. As you decide upon the outsourcing mix and firm that is right for you, providers advise you to pay special attention to contractual arrangements. With adequate research and contractual provisions, organizations can find the outsourcing mix that is right for them.

  6. Weight management including dietary and physical activity advice provided by Australian physiotherapists: a pilot cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Carter, Amy E; Guest, Maya; Collins, Clare E; James, Carole; Kable, Ashley K; Ashby, Samantha E; Plotnikoff, Ronald C

    2014-08-01

    Physiotherapists may have an impact on obesity prevention and treatment by providing nutrition and physical activity advice to overweight or obese clients; yet little is known about physiotherapists' beliefs and practices related to client weight management. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the practices, beliefs, attitudes and knowledge of physiotherapists regarding the provision of weight management advice to overweight or obese clients. Physiotherapists (n = 65) working in multiple practice settings completed a self-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression determined factors associated with the provision of dietary and physical activity advice for weight management. The majority of physiotherapists (n = 53 [81.5%]) believed providing weight management advice was within their scope of practice, yet only a minority had received training during their professional entry level education (n = 13 [20%]) or through professional development (n = 7 [11%]). Most physiotherapists (n = 55 [84.6%]) provided physical activity advice for weight management, but a minority (n = 27 [41.5%]) provided dietary advice. Having received training in weight management during their professional entry level education was associated with providing dietary advice (Odds ratio 8.8, 95% confidence interval 2.0-38.9, p = 0.004). Training in weight management may increase the likelihood of physiotherapists providing dietary advice, improving physiotherapists' management of obesity.

  7. Reinforcement learning agents providing advice in complex video games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Matthew E.; Carboni, Nicholas; Fachantidis, Anestis; Vlahavas, Ioannis; Torrey, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a teacher-student framework for reinforcement learning, synthesising and extending material that appeared in conference proceedings [Torrey, L., & Taylor, M. E. (2013)]. Teaching on a budget: Agents advising agents in reinforcement learning. {Proceedings of the international conference on autonomous agents and multiagent systems}] and in a non-archival workshop paper [Carboni, N., &Taylor, M. E. (2013, May)]. Preliminary results for 1 vs. 1 tactics in StarCraft. {Proceedings of the adaptive and learning agents workshop (at AAMAS-13)}]. In this framework, a teacher agent instructs a student agent by suggesting actions the student should take as it learns. However, the teacher may only give such advice a limited number of times. We present several novel algorithms that teachers can use to budget their advice effectively, and we evaluate them in two complex video games: StarCraft and Pac-Man. Our results show that the same amount of advice, given at different moments, can have different effects on student learning, and that teachers can significantly affect student learning even when students use different learning methods and state representations.

  8. 12 CFR 9.101 - Providing investment advice for a fee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (including acting as investment adviser to a mutual fund). Additionally, the qualifying phrase “if the bank... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Providing investment advice for a fee. 9.101... ACTIVITIES OF NATIONAL BANKS Interpretations § 9.101 Providing investment advice for a fee. (a) In general...

  9. "There's rural, and then there's rural": advice from nurses providing primary healthcare in northern remote communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Misener, Ruth; MacLeod, Martha L P; Banks, Kathy; Morton, A Michel; Vogt, Carolyn; Bentham, Donna

    2008-01-01

    Nursing practice in remote northern communities is highly complex, with unique challenges created by isolation, geography and cultural dynamics. This paper, the second of two focusing on the advice offered by nurses interviewed in the national study, The Nature of Nursing Practice in Rural and Remote Canada, considers suggestions from outpost nurses. Their advice to new nurses was: know what you are getting into; consider whether your personal qualities are suited for northern practice; learn to listen and listen to learn; expect a steep learning curve, even if you are experienced; and take action to prevent burnout. Recommendations for educators were to offer programs that prepare nurses for the realities of outpost nursing and provide opportunities for accessible, flexible, relevant continuing education. The outpost nurses in this study counselled administrators to stay in contact with and listen to the perspectives of nurses at the "grassroots," and not merely to fill positions but instead to recruit outpost nurses effectively and remunerate them fairly. The study findings highlighted the multiple interrelated strategies that nurses, educators and administrators can use to optimize practice in remote northern communities.

  10. More about software requirements thorny issues and practical advice

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegers, Karl E

    2006-01-01

    No matter how much instruction you've had on managing software requirements, there's no substitute for experience. Too often, lessons about requirements engineering processes lack the no-nonsense guidance that supports real-world solutions. Complementing the best practices presented in his book, Software Requirements, Second Edition, requirements engineering authority Karl Wiegers tackles even more of the real issues head-on in this book. With straightforward, professional advice and practical solutions based on actual project experiences, this book answers many of the tough questions rais

  11. Inequalities in advice provided by public health workers to women during antenatal sessions in rural India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Singh

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Studies have widely documented the socioeconomic inequalities in maternal and child health related outcomes in developing countries including India. However, there is limited research on the inequalities in advice provided by public health workers on maternal and child health during antenatal visits. This paper investigates the inequalities in advice provided by public health workers to women during antenatal visits in rural India. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The District Level Household Survey (2007-08 was used to compute rich-poor ratios and concentration indices. Binary logistic regressions were used to investigate inequalities in advice provided by public health workers. The dependent variables comprised the advice provided on seven essential components of maternal and child health care. A significant proportion of pregnant women who attended at least four ANC sessions were not advised on these components during their antenatal sessions. Only 51%-72% of the pregnant women were advised on at least one of the components. Moreover, socioeconomic inequalities in providing advice were significant and the provision of advice concentrated disproportionately among the rich. Inequalities were highest in the case of advice on family planning methods. Advice on breastfeeding was least unequal. Public health workers working in lower level health facilities were significantly less likely than their counterparts in the higher level health facilities to provide specific advice. CONCLUSION: A significant proportion of women were not advised on recommended components of maternal and child health in rural India. Moreover, there were enormous socioeconomic inequalities. The findings of this study raise questions about the capacity of the public health care system in providing equitable services in India. The Government of India must focus on training and capacity building of the public health workers in communication skills so that they can deliver

  12. Midwives' Role in Providing Nutrition Advice during Pregnancy: Meeting the Challenges? A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Arrish, Jamila; Yeatman, Heather; Williamson, Moira

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the Australian midwives' role in the provision of nutrition advice. Little is known about their perceptions of this role, the influence of the model of care, and the barriers and facilitators that may influence them providing quality nutrition advice to pregnant women. Semistructured telephone interviews were undertaken with a subsample (n = 16) of the members of the Australian College of Midwives who participated in an online survey about midwives' nutrition knowledge, at...

  13. Making LibrariesAccessible for Visually Impaired Users: Practical Advice For Librarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devney Hamilton

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an introduction to making university libraries accessible to visually impaired users. It includes a summary of how visually impaired students access information and how libraries can provide access to materials, devices and software, and staff support to ensure visually impaired students ’ equal opportunity to use the library. The practical advice for librarians are based on interviews with 18 visually impaired university students and professionals who specialize in media, library services and information retrieval.

  14. What do patients think about the role of optometrists in providing advice about smoking and nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, Laura E; Douglass, Amanda; Guest, Daryl; Keller, Peter R

    2017-03-01

    Tobacco smoking and nutrition are key lifestyle factors with long-term effects on eye health. However, little is known about patients' perceptions and experiences in these areas in relation to the care received from optometrists. The main aim was to survey patients' perceptions and prior experience regarding the role of optometrists in enquiring and providing advice about tobacco smoking and nutrition. An anonymous, paper-based survey was distributed to a convenience sample of 225 adults attending the University of Melbourne eye care clinic. Respondents provided demographic and other information (age, sex, length of time since last eye examination, country of most recent eye examination, smoking status and intake of nutritional supplements) and indicated their level of agreement (using a five-step Likert scale) with a series of statements relating to the care provided by optometrists in the areas of health, smoking and nutrition. The statements were designed to assess the perceived scope of practice of optometrists and the extent to which patients expect, and feel comfortable, discussing these issues with their optometrist. 220 completed surveys were returned. Most respondents (>80%) agreed that they visit their optometrist to quantify their refractive error and to examine their eye health. About two-thirds of respondents indicated that they expect their optometrist to ask about their general health, with almost half expecting their optometrist to communicate with their general medical practitioner. Approximately one-third of respondents indicated having been routinely questioned about their smoking status, diet and nutritional supplement intake by their optometrist. This was despite about half expecting their optometrist to question them about these factors and almost three out of four respondents indicating that they felt comfortable talking with their optometrist about these lifestyle behaviours. This study provides novel insight into patients' perceptions and

  15. Role of community pharmacists in providing oral health advice in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia

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    Hamad Al-Saleh

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: Community pharmacists are approached frequently for oral healthcare advices. Majority of them had no oral health training. Almost all of them were willing to provide oral health information in the community. It is essential to provide continuous oral health education to the pharmacists to better serve oral health needs of the community.

  16. Transfer of Knowledge on Agroforestry Management Practices: the Structure of Farmer Advice Networks

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    Marney E. Isaac

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Access to knowledge on farm management practices is essential for the maintenance of productive agroforestry systems. Farmers who lack the means to acquire farming knowledge from formal sources often rely on information within their informal social networks. However, little research has explored the explicit structure of farmer communication patterns. We examined advice network structures by using farmer attributes, i.e., kin relationships, community involvement, and imitation, to characterize structural positions and investigated the consequences of such structure on farming practices in cocoa agroforestry systems in Ghana, West Africa. Furthermore, we used a multicommunity approach; we constructed networks for four communities to increase replication and enhance the generality of our conclusions. A high density of advice ties occurred among a small group of farmers, indicating a core-periphery structure. Settler farmers composed 73% of core position members, suggesting that social proximity did not control the formation of informal advice structures. Because core farmers were highly participative in community activities, the promotion of community involvement may facilitate the movement of knowledge and social exchange to strengthen informal networks. Farmers in both core and peripheral structural positions indicated that they observed fellow farmers and subsequently adopted their practices. Of highly sought farmers, 84% used external information, predominately from government institutions, thus functioning as bridging links between formal and informal networks. Both external and farmer-derived sources of knowledge of agroforestry practices were transferred through informal advice networks, providing available information throughout the farming community, as well as a foundation for community-based adaptive management.

  17. Health care provider advice for adolescent tobacco use: results from the 2011 National Youth Tobacco Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Gillian L; Agaku, Israel T; King, Brian A; Malarcher, Ann M

    2014-09-01

    Health care providers play an important role in promoting tobacco use abstinence among adolescents. This study aimed to provide nationally representative data on the prevalence of provider tobacco use screening and advice delivered to adolescents. Cessation behaviors and correlates of past year quit attempts among current smokers are also explored. Data came from the 2011 National Youth Tobacco Survey, a nationally representative school-based survey of adolescents in grades 6 through 12 (n = 18385). Provider screening and advice were assessed by smoking status and demographic characteristics. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between advice and past year quit attempt. The overall prevalence of current tobacco use was 16.6%; 10.8% were current cigarette smokers (3.6% were established smokers, 7.2% were nonestablished smokers); 17.3% were former smokers; and 71.9% were never smokers (22.6% high susceptibility, 77.4% low susceptibility). Among all respondents, the prevalence of being asked about tobacco use by a health care provider was 32.2%; the prevalence of being advised to quit or avoid tobacco was 31.4%. Established smokers were more likely than other groups to report provider assessment of tobacco use and advice. Receipt of advice was associated with a higher adjusted odds of having made a past year quit attempt (odds ratio: 1.47, 95% confidence interval: 1.18-1.82). Less than one-third of adolescents report being asked about tobacco use or being advised not to use tobacco. Increased tobacco use intervention by health care providers is needed to prevent initiation and increase cessation. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Advice on malaria and yellow fever prevention provided at travel agencies in Cuzco, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Meyer, Pablo G; Garcia-Jasso, Carlos A; Springer, Chelsea A; Lane, Jenna K; Su, Bonny S; Hidalgo, Idania S; Goodrich, Mary R; Deichsel, Emily L; White, A C; Cabada, Miguel M

    2015-01-01

    Travelers receive medical advice from a variety of sources, including travel agencies. The aim of this study is to describe the quality of pre-travel advice provided by travel agencies in Cuzco to travelers interested in visiting malaria and yellow fever endemic areas. Trained medical students posed as tourists and visited travel agencies in Cuzco requesting travel advice for a trip to the southern Amazon of Peru, recording advice regarding risk and prevention of malaria and yellow fever. A total of 163 registered travel agencies were included in the study. The mean proposed tour duration was 6.8 days (±1.4 days) with a median time to departure of 3 days and a median tour cost of 805 US dollars (USD) [interquartile range (IQR) 580-1,095]. Overall, 45% employees failed to mention the risk for any illness. Eighteen percent of the employees acknowledged risk of malaria and 53% risk of yellow fever. However, 36% denied malaria risk and 2% denied risk of yellow fever in the region. The price of tours from travel agencies that did not mention any health risk was significantly lower [1,009.6 ± 500.5 vs 783.9 ± 402 USD, t (152) = 3, p yellow fever (100%) were able to provide at least one recommendation for prevention. However, advice was not always accurate or spontaneously volunteered. Only 7% of the employees provided both correct scheduling and location information for administration of the yellow fever vaccine. The majority of registered travel agencies in Cuzco did not provide sufficient and accurate information regarding risk and prevention of malaria and yellow fever to travelers inquiring about trips to the southern Amazon of Peru. © 2014 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  19. "Delivering knowledge and advice": Healthcare providers' experiences of their interaction with patients' management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsten, Ulrika; Bergman, Stefan; Fridlund, Bengt; Arvidsson, Barbro

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases are often chronic and involve a lifetime of suffering. The focus of rheumatology care is to support patients to manage their lives and master their disease. Healthcare providers and patients have different views on the consequences of living with rheumatic diseases and patients are reporting unmet healthcare needs. There is a need to integrate providers' perspective to develop the quality of rheumatology care. The aim was to explore healthcare providers' experiences of their interaction with patients in their management of RA. Interviews with 18 providers from different clinical settings were analysed in accordance with the grounded theory method. A core category; Delivering knowledge and advice was found to be the most important task and involved providing the patient with information about the disease and appropriate forms of treatment. Healthcare providers' attitudes and patients' responses influenced the outcome of the delivery of knowledge and advice and three dimensions emerged; completed delivery, adjusted delivery and failed delivery. There were differences in the providers' experiences in their interaction with patients as well as in reflections on their role as the delivering part. There could be difficulties in the interaction when patients' expectations and preferences were not taken into account when giving advice. These findings highlight the importance of developing rheumatology care, as no provider or patient benefits if the delivery of knowledge and advice becomes a failed delivery. The healthcare organization must acknowledge the difficulties involved in the interaction with patients in their management of RA and find methods to develop a more person-centred approach to care.

  20. Productive ward 2: practical advice to facilitators implementing the programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsopp, Pete; Faruqi, Joe; Gascoigne, Laura; Tennyson, Rachel

    This is the second in a two-part series looking at the implementation of Productive Ward. Part one looked at roll-out of the initiative across a hospital This part offers advice to facilitators involved in implementing the programme.

  1. Web accessibility practical advice for the library and information professional

    CERN Document Server

    Craven, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    Offers an introduction to web accessibility and usability for information professionals, offering advice on the concerns relevant to library and information organizations. This book can be used as a resource for developing staff training and awareness activities. It will also be of value to website managers involved in web design and development.

  2. The ICMJE and URM: Providing Independent Advice for the Conduct of Biomedical Research and Publication

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Weyden, Martin B

    2007-01-01

    The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) is a working group of editors of selected medical journals that meets annually. Founded in Vancouver, Canada, in 1978, it currently consists of 11 member journals and a representative of the US National Library of Medicine. The major purpose of the Committee is to address and provide guidance for the conduct and publishing of biomedical research and the ethical tenets underpinning these activities. This advice is detailed in the C...

  3. Immunisation errors reported to a vaccine advice service: intelligence to improve practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Sarah; Ford, Karen J; John, Tessa; Pollard, Andrew J; McCarthy, Noel D

    2014-01-01

    The success of immunisation programmes depends on the quality with which they are administered. The Vaccine Advice for CliniCians Service (VACCSline) is an advice service to support immunisers and promote excellence in immunisation practice, through specialist guidance and local education, covering a catchment population of two million people. All enquiries are recorded onto a database and categorised. Vaccine error is selected when a vaccine has not been prepared or administered according to national recommendations or relevant expert guidance. All enquiries from 2009 to 2011, categorised on the VACCSline database as 'vaccine error' were analysed and subjected to a detailed free-text review. Of 4301 enquiries, 158 (3.7%) concerned vaccine errors. The greatest frequency of errors, 145 (92.9%) concerned immunisations delivered in primary care services; 92% of all errors occurred during either vaccine selection and preparation or history checking and scheduling. Administration of the wrong vaccine was the most frequent error recorded in 33.3% of reports. A shared first letter of the vaccine name was noted to occur in 13 error reports in which the incorrect vaccine was inadvertently administered. Consultations involving pairs of siblings were associated with various errors in seven enquiries. Failure to revaccinate after spillage (seven reports) showed a widespread knowledge gap in this area. Advice line enquiries provide intelligence to alert immunisers to the errors that are commonly reported and may serve to highlight processes that predispose to errors, thus informing immuniser training and updating.

  4. Smoking cessation advice: Knowledge, attitude, and practice among clinical dental students'

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    Allama Prabhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Smoking is the single most important public health challenge facing the National Health Service. The detrimental effects on the general health of tobacco smoking are well documented. Smoking is a primary risk factor for oral cancer and many oral diseases. Dental professional scan plays an important role in preventing adverse health effects by promoting smoking cessation. Objective: To assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice among clinical dental students in giving smoking cessation advice and to explore the barriers to this activity. Materials and Methods: A total of 262 clinical dental trainee of two dental colleges (College of Dental Sciences and Bapuji Dental College of Davangere city were included in the survey. A self-administered questionnaire was administered to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice toward Tobacco Cessation Advise. Results: Among the 262 participants in the study, around 51% said they know about Nicotine Replacement Therapy, and among them, only 4.6% were aware of the options available in the market. When asked about 5A's of tobacco cessation, only 35.5% were aware of it. Similarly, when asked about 5R's of tobacco cessation, 48.5% were unaware of it. Conclusions: The respondents did not have sufficient knowledge regarding tobacco cessation advice. With patient's disinterest and lack of time being quoted as the important barriers in providing tobacco cessation advice, it is highly recommended that there is need to incorporate few chapters on tobacco, its effect and cessation of habit in the undergraduate dental curriculum with simultaneous application of the same in clinical practice.

  5. Nutrition myths and healthy dietary advice in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Lenard I; Mazza, Mary Carol; Lucan, Sean C

    2015-05-01

    Healthy dietary intake is important for the maintenance of general health and wellness, the prevention of chronic illness, the optimization of life expectancy, and the clinical management of virtually all disease states. Dietary myths (i.e., concepts about nutrition that are poorly supported or contradicted by scientific evidence) may stand in the way of healthy dietary intake. Dietary myths exist about micronutrients, macronutrients, non-nutrients, and food energy. Representative myths of each type include that patients need to focus on consuming enough calcium to ensure bone health, dietary fat leads to obesity and is detrimental to vascular health, all fiber (whether naturally occurring or artificially added) is beneficial, and food calories translate to pounds of body weight through a linear relationship and simple arithmetic. A common theme for dietary myths is a reductionist view of diet that emphasizes selected food constituents as opposed to whole foods. Healthy dietary advice takes a more holistic view; consistent evidence supports recommendations to limit the consumption of ultraprocessed foods and to eat whole or minimally processed foods, generally in a form that is as close to what occurs in nature as possible. Family physicians can help dispel myths for patients and give sound nutritional advice by focusing on actual foods and broader dietary patterns.

  6. Evaluating Provider Advice and Women's Beliefs on Total Weight Gain During Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinze, Nkiruka V; Karp, Sharon M; Gesell, Sabina B

    2016-02-01

    Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with complications for both mother and child. Minority women are at increased risk for excessive GWG, yet are underrepresented in published weight control interventions. To inform future interventions, we examined the prevalence and accuracy of provider advice and its association with personal beliefs about necessary maternal weight gain among predominantly Latina pregnant women. Secondary analysis examining baseline data (N = 123) from a healthy lifestyle randomized controlled trial conducted in and urban area of the South East. Only 23.6 % of women reported being told how much weight to gain during pregnancy; although 58.6 % received advice that met Institute of Medicine recommendations. Concordance of mothers' personal weight gain target with clinical recommendations varied by mothers' pre-pregnancy weight status [χ (4) (2)  = 9.781, p = 0.044]. Findings suggest the need for prenatal providers of low-income, minority women to engage patients in shaping healthy weight gain targets as a precursor to preventing excessive GWG and its complications.

  7. Practical Advice for Emergency IUD Contraception in Young Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstuck, Norman D; Wildemeersch, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Too few women are aware of the very high efficacy of intrauterine copper devices (IUDs) to prevent pregnancy after unprotected intercourse. Women who frequently engage in unprotected intercourse or seek emergency contraception (EC) are at high risk of unplanned pregnancy and possible abortion. It is therefore important that these women receive precise and accurate information about intrauterine devices as they may benefit from using an IUD for EC as continuing contraception. Copper IUDs should be used as first choice options given their rapid onset of action and their long-term contraceptive action which require minimal thought or intervention on the part of the user. In the United States, there is only one copper IUD presently available which limits treatment options. There are numerous copper IUDs available for use in EC, however, their designs and size are not always optimal for use in nulliparous women or women with smaller or narrower uteruses. Utilization of frameless IUDs which do not require a larger transverse arm for uterine retention may have distinct advantages, particularly in young women, as they will be suitable for use in all women irrespective of uterine size. This paper provides practical information on EC use with emphasis on the use of the frameless IUD.

  8. Practical Advice for Emergency IUD Contraception in Young Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman D. Goldstuck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Too few women are aware of the very high efficacy of intrauterine copper devices (IUDs to prevent pregnancy after unprotected intercourse. Women who frequently engage in unprotected intercourse or seek emergency contraception (EC are at high risk of unplanned pregnancy and possible abortion. It is therefore important that these women receive precise and accurate information about intrauterine devices as they may benefit from using an IUD for EC as continuing contraception. Copper IUDs should be used as first choice options given their rapid onset of action and their long-term contraceptive action which require minimal thought or intervention on the part of the user. In the United States, there is only one copper IUD presently available which limits treatment options. There are numerous copper IUDs available for use in EC, however, their designs and size are not always optimal for use in nulliparous women or women with smaller or narrower uteruses. Utilization of frameless IUDs which do not require a larger transverse arm for uterine retention may have distinct advantages, particularly in young women, as they will be suitable for use in all women irrespective of uterine size. This paper provides practical information on EC use with emphasis on the use of the frameless IUD.

  9. Working with interpreters: practical advice for use of an interpreter in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadziabdic, Emina; Hjelm, Katarina

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this descriptive commentary is to improve communication in healthcare when an interpreter is used by providing practical advice to healthcare staff when they consider using interpreters. This descriptive commentary considered the issues of preparation and implementation of interpretation sessions to reveal the complexities and dilemmas of an effective healthcare encounter with interpreters. Using the design of a discursive paper, this article seeks to explore and position of what is published in the literature on the topic studied and on the basis of previous studies to provide practical advice on the use of interpreters. The descriptive commentary showed that the interpreter should be used not only as a communication aid but also as a practical and informative guide in the healthcare system. In preparing the interpretation session, it is important to consider the type (trained professional interpreter, family member or bilingual healthcare staff as interpreters) and mode (face to face and telephone) of interpreting. Furthermore, it is important to consider the interpreter's ethnic origin, religious background, gender, language or dialect, social group, clothes, appearance and attitude. During the healthcare encounter, the interpreter should follow the recommendations given in guidelines for interpreters. Healthcare staff should choose an appropriate room and be aware of their own behaviour, appearance and attitude during the healthcare encounter. Good planning is needed, with carefully considered choices concerning the right kind of interpreter, mode of interpretation and individual preferences for the interpretation in order to deliver high-quality and cost-effective healthcare. Depending on the nature of the healthcare encounter, healthcare staff need to plan interpreting carefully and in accordance with the individuals' desires and choose the type of interpreter and mode of interpreting that best suits the need in the actual healthcare situation in

  10. THE VITAL IMPORTANCE OF PROVIDING SOUND SCIENTIFIC ADVICE TO POLICY MAKERS IN GOVERNMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Pearson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The article gives an idea of the scope of professional activity of scientists working in the field of biosafety in terms of providing timely and effective advice for politicians and diplomats in the government. It should be acknowledged that politicians and diplomats are also involved in a varying degree with biosafety issues such as toxicological and biological weapons, formulated in the relevant Convention: Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention. However taking into account their professional interests, they mightn’t have appropriate information on relevant events in these and other activities. The value of these activities of qualified scientists knowing the latest information in the field of biosafety is difficult to overestimate, as they have the possibility to analyze any situation on the range of relevant activities and use their knowledge to make informed proposals which could be acceptable for their co-worker scientists in other areas of biological science. For highly qualified scientists such activities appeared to be effective, it is a vital aspect of their professional activity, because such scientists are able to provide scientific advice, analyze and summarize relevant scientific aspects on a specific topic of interest for politicians and diplomats. Such an analysis should include identification of key elements that are relevant to a given scientific problem and should be formulated so as the consequences of the various elements of the Convention were clearly appreciated and understood by politicians and diplomats. In other words, the rele vant scientific aspects should be analyzed, summarized and presented in the context of the Convention, together with suggestions on what steps in this direction should be taken by politicians and diplomats.

  11. To Boldly Go: Practical Career Advice for Young Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, P.

    1998-05-01

    Young scientists in nearly every field are finding the job market of the 1990's a confusing and frustrating place. Ph.D. supply is far larger than that needed to fill entry-level positions in "traditional" research careers. More new Ph.D. and Master's degree holders are considering a wider range of careers in and out of science, but feel ill-prepared and uninformed about their options. Some feel their Ph.D. training has led them to a dead-end. I present a thorough and practical overview to the process of career planning and job hunting in the 1990's, from the perspective of a young scientist. I cover specific steps that young scientists can take to broaden their horizons, strengthen their skills, and present their best face to potential employers. An important part of this is the realization that most young scientists possess a range of valuable "transferable skills" that are highly sought after by employers in and out of science. I will summarize the specifics of job hunting in the 90's, including informational interviewing, building your network, developing a compelling CV and resume, cover letters, interviewing, based on my book "To Boldly Go: A Practical Career Guide for Scientists". I will also identify other resources available for young scientists. Finally, I will highlight individual stories of Ph.D.-trained scientists who have found exciting and fulfilling careers outside the "traditional" world of academia.

  12. Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose : Professional Advice and Daily Practice of Patients With Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortensius, Johanna; van der Bijl, Jaap J.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Houweling, Sebastiaan T.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the advice given by diabetes educators in Europe, and the daily practice of Dutch patients with diabetes regarding the use of the first or second drop of blood and other aspects concerning self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). Method During a diabetes conference in

  13. Vegan diets: practical advice for athletes and exercisers

    OpenAIRE

    Rogerson, David

    2017-01-01

    With the growth of social media as a platform to share information, veganism is becoming more visible, and could be becoming more accepted in sports and in the health and fitness industry. However, to date, there appears to be a lack of literature that discusses how to manage vegan diets for athletic purposes. This article attempted to review literature in order to provide recommendations for how to construct a vegan diet for athletes and exercisers. While little data could be found in the sp...

  14. Vegan diets: practical advice for athletes and exercisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogerson, David

    2017-01-01

    With the growth of social media as a platform to share information, veganism is becoming more visible, and could be becoming more accepted in sports and in the health and fitness industry. However, to date, there appears to be a lack of literature that discusses how to manage vegan diets for athletic purposes. This article attempted to review literature in order to provide recommendations for how to construct a vegan diet for athletes and exercisers. While little data could be found in the sports nutrition literature specifically, it was revealed elsewhere that veganism creates challenges that need to be accounted for when designing a nutritious diet. This included the sufficiency of energy and protein; the adequacy of vitamin B12, iron, zinc, calcium, iodine and vitamin D; and the lack of the long-chain n -3 fatty acids EPA and DHA in most plant-based sources. However, via the strategic management of food and appropriate supplementation, it is the contention of this article that a nutritive vegan diet can be designed to achieve the dietary needs of most athletes satisfactorily. Further, it was suggested here that creatine and β-alanine supplementation might be of particular use to vegan athletes, owing to vegetarian diets promoting lower muscle creatine and lower muscle carnosine levels in consumers. Empirical research is needed to examine the effects of vegan diets in athletic populations however, especially if this movement grows in popularity, to ensure that the health and performance of athletic vegans is optimised in accordance with developments in sports nutrition knowledge.

  15. Bereaved Parents and Siblings Offer Advice to Healthcare Providers and Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Amii Corbisiero; Kaal, Julia; Thompson, Amanda L.; Barrera, Maru; Compas, Bruce E.; Davies, Betty; Fairclough, Diane L.; Foster, Terrah L.; Gilmer, Mary Jo; Hogan, Nancy; Vannatta, Kathryn; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine how to improve care for families by obtaining their advice to healthcare providers and researchers after a child’s death from cancer. Design Families with a surviving sibling (ages 8-17) were recruited from cancer registries at three hospitals in the United States and Canada 3-12 months (M = 10.4, SD = 3.5) after the child’s death. Setting Data were collected in the home. Participants Participants (N = 99) included 36 mothers, 24 fathers, and 39 siblings from 40 families. Outcome Measures Each participant completed a qualitative interview that was audio recorded, transcribed, and coded for thematic content. Findings Five major themes included the need for: (a) improved communication with the medical team, (b) more compassionate care, (c) increased access to resources, (d) ongoing research, as well as (e) offering praise. Interwoven within the five themes was a subtheme of continuity of care. Conclusions Many participants were pleased with the care the child with cancer received, but others noted areas in need of improvement, particularly medical communication and continuity of care. Additional research is needed to inform interventions to improve services for families of children with life-limiting conditions. PMID:23612375

  16. Primary health care providers' advice for a dental checkup and dental use in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil, Heather A; Rozier, R Gary

    2010-08-01

    In this study we estimated factors associated with children being advised to see the dentist by a doctor or other health provider; tested for an association between the advisement on the likelihood that the child would visit the dentist; and estimated the effect of the advisement on dental costs. We identified a sample of 5268 children aged 2 to 11 years in the 2004 Medical Expenditures Panel Survey. A cross-sectional analysis with logistic regression models was conducted to estimate the likelihood of the child receiving a recommendation for a dental checkup, and to determine its effect on the likelihood of having a dental visit. Differences in cost for children who received a recommendation were assessed by using a linear regression model. All analyses were conducted separately on children aged 2 to 5 (n = 2031) and aged 6 to 11 (n = 3237) years. Forty-seven percent of 2- to 5-year-olds and 37% of 6- to 11-year-olds had been advised to see the dentist. Children aged 2 to 5 who received a recommendation were more likely to have a dental visit (odds ratio: 2.89 [95% confidence interval: 2.16-3.87]), but no difference was observed among older children. Advice had no effect on dental costs in either age group. Health providers' recommendation that pediatric patients visit the dentist was associated with an increase in dental visits among young children. Providers have the potential to play an important role in establishing a dental home for children at an early age. Future research should examine potential interventions to increase effective dental referrals by health providers.

  17. Steve Jobs provides lessons for any medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornstein, Hal; Baum, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Steve Jobs is inarguably the greatest inventor and creative genius since Thomas Edison. He provided technology that enhances communication on a global level. Jobs also provided ideas and suggestions that could work in any medical practice regardless of the size of the practice, the location of the practice, or the employment model. His advice can be transferred from a high-tech business that employs thousands to a high-touch medical practice that has only a few employees. This article will list a few of Jobs leadership characteristics and how they might apply to physicians, their teams, and their practices. Wouldn't you like to be the Steve Jobs of healthcare? If so, read on!

  18. Nutrition advice during pregnancy: do women receive it and can health professionals provide it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Catherine; Charlton, Karen E; Yeatman, Heather

    2014-12-01

    A healthy diet during pregnancy is essential for normal growth and development of the foetus. Pregnant women may obtain nutrition information from a number of sources but evidence regarding the adequacy and extent of this information is sparse. A systematic literature review was conducted to identify sources of nutrition information accessed by pregnant women, their perceived needs for nutrition education, the perceptions of healthcare providers about nutrition education in pregnancy, and to assess the effectiveness of public health programs that aim to improve nutritional practices. The Scopus data base was searched during January, 2013 and in February 2014 to access both qualitative and quantitative studies published between 2002 and 2014 which focused on healthy pregnant women and their healthcare providers in developed countries. Articles were excluded if they focused on the needs of women with medical conditions, including obesity, gestational diabetes or malnutrition. Of 506 articles identified by the search terms, 25 articles were deemed to be eligible for inclusion. Generally, women were not receiving adequate nutrition education during pregnancy. Although healthcare practitioners perceived nutrition education to be important, barriers to providing education to clients included lack of time, lack of resources and lack of relevant training. Further well designed studies are needed to identify the most effective nutrition education strategies to improve nutrition knowledge and dietary behaviours for women during antenatal care.

  19. Recruiting Fathers to Parenting Programs: Advice from Dads and Fatherhood Program Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlschmidt, Mary Jo; Threlfall, Jennifer; Seay, Kristen D.; Lewis, Ericka M.; Kohl, Patricia L.

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of high-quality father-child relationships for fathers and children alike are well documented. While evidence suggests parenting programs can improve the quality of father-child relationships, few fathers participate in such programs. This qualitative study aims to fill the gap in knowledge on best practices for recruiting urban African American fathers, a group of fathers with unique parenting challenges, to parenting programs. Focus groups were conducted with 29 fathers to gain their perspectives on recruitment strategies. Semi-structured interviews were also conducted with a nationwide sample of 19 fatherhood program providers to learn about their most successful recruitment strategies. Recruitment strategies based on emergent themes from the focus groups and interviews are presented here. Themes included using word-of-mouth recruitment, increasing advertising, targeting advertising specifically to urban African American fathers, providing transportation and incentives, recruiting through the courts, collaborating with other community agencies, and offering parenting programming along with other programming valued by fathers such as employment assistance. Implications for developing strategies for recruiting urban African American fathers to parenting programs are discussed. PMID:24791035

  20. The effects on saturated fat purchases of providing internet shoppers with purchase- specific dietary advice: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Amy; Barzi, Federica; Huxley, Rachel; Denyer, Gareth; Rohrlach, Beth; Jayne, Kathy; Neal, Bruce

    2006-09-22

    The supermarket industry now services many customers through online food shopping over the Internet. The Internet shopping process offers a novel opportunity for the modification of dietary patterns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects on consumers' purchases of saturated fat of a fully automated computerised system that provided real-time advice tailored to the consumers' specific purchases recommending foods lower in saturated fat. This study was a blinded, randomised controlled trial. The study was conducted in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The participants were consumers using a commercial online Internet shopping site between February and June 2004. Individuals assigned to intervention received fully automated advice that recommended specific switches from selected products higher in saturated fat to alternate similar products lower in saturated fat. Participants assigned to control received general non-specific advice about how to eat a diet lower in saturated fat. The outcome measure was the difference in saturated fat (grams per 100 g of food) in shopping baskets between the intervention and control groups. There were 497 randomised participants, mean age 40 y, each shopping for an average of about three people. The amount of saturated fat in the foods purchased by the intervention group was 0.66% lower (95% confidence interval 0.48-0.84, p effects of the intervention were sustained over consecutive shopping episodes, and there was no difference in the average cost of the food bought by each group. Fully automated, purchase-specific dietary advice offered to customers during Internet shopping can bring about changes in food purchasing habits that are likely to have significant public health implications. Because implementation is simple to initiate and maintain, this strategy would likely be highly cost-effective.

  1. The Effects on Saturated Fat Purchases of Providing Internet Shoppers with Purchase- Specific Dietary Advice: A Randomised Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Amy; Barzi, Federica; Huxley, Rachel; Denyer, Gareth; Rohrlach, Beth; Jayne, Kathy; Neal, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The supermarket industry now services many customers through online food shopping over the Internet. The Internet shopping process offers a novel opportunity for the modification of dietary patterns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects on consumers' purchases of saturated fat of a fully automated computerised system that provided real-time advice tailored to the consumers' specific purchases recommending foods lower in saturated fat. Design: This study was a blinded, randomised controlled trial. Setting: The study was conducted in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Participants: The participants were consumers using a commercial online Internet shopping site between February and June 2004. Interventions: Individuals assigned to intervention received fully automated advice that recommended specific switches from selected products higher in saturated fat to alternate similar products lower in saturated fat. Participants assigned to control received general non-specific advice about how to eat a diet lower in saturated fat. Outcome Measures: The outcome measure was the difference in saturated fat (grams per 100 g of food) in shopping baskets between the intervention and control groups. Results: There were 497 randomised participants, mean age 40 y, each shopping for an average of about three people. The amount of saturated fat in the foods purchased by the intervention group was 0.66% lower (95% confidence interval 0.48–0.84, p < 0.001) than in the control group. The effects of the intervention were sustained over consecutive shopping episodes, and there was no difference in the average cost of the food bought by each group. Conclusions: Fully automated, purchase-specific dietary advice offered to customers during Internet shopping can bring about changes in food purchasing habits that are likely to have significant public health implications. Because implementation is simple to initiate and maintain, this strategy would likely be highly

  2. Nutrition Advice and Recipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sign-Up Home Patient Information Nutrition Advice & Recipes Nutrition Advice & Recipes This is a very important section ... information on all aspects of daily life, including nutrition, medical treatments, pain management, and practical tips. For ...

  3. Are Canadian clinicians providing consistent sport-related concussion management advice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, James D; Rendely, Alexandra; Garel, Alisha; Meaney, Christopher; Stoller, Jacqueline; Kaicker, Jatin; Hayden, Leigh; Moineddin, Rahim; Frémont, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    To compare the knowledge and use of recommendations for the management of sport-related concussion (SRC) among sport and exercise medicine physicians (SEMPs) and emergency department physicians (EDPs) to assess the success of SRC knowledge transfer across Canada. A self-administered, multiple-choice survey accessed via e-mail by SEMPs and EDPs. The survey had been assessed for content validity. Canada. The survey was completed between May and July 2012 by SEMPs who had passed the diploma examination of the Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine and by EDPs who did not hold this diploma. Knowledge and identification of sources of concussion management information, use of concussion diagnosis strategies, and whether physicians use common and consistent terminology when explaining cognitive rest strategies to patients after an SRC. There was a response rate of 28% (305 of 1085). The SEMP and EDP response rates were 41% (147 of 360) and 22% (158 of 725), respectively. Of the responses, 41% of EDPs and 3% of SEMPs were unaware of any consensus statements on concussion in sport; 74% of SEMPs used the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool, version 2 (SCAT2), "usually or always," whereas 88% of EDPs never used the SCAT2. When queried about how cognitive rest could best be achieved after an SRC, no consistent answer was documented. Differences and a lack of consistency in the implementation of recommendations for SRC patients were identified for SEMPs and EDPs. It appears that the SCAT2 is used more in the SEMP setting than in the emergency context. Further knowledge transfer efforts and research should address the barriers to achieving more consistent advice given by physicians who attend SRC patients. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  4. Regorafenib-associated hand-foot skin reaction: practical advice on diagnosis, prevention, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, B; Ciardiello, F; Lacouture, M E; Segaert, S; Van Cutsem, E

    2015-10-01

    Regorafenib is an orally available, small-molecule multikinase inhibitor with international marketing authorizations for use in colorectal cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. In clinical trials, regorafenib showed a consistent and predictable adverse-event profile, with hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) among the most clinically significant toxicities. This review summarizes the clinical characteristics of regorafenib-related HFSR and provides practical advice on HFSR management to enable health care professionals to recognize, pre-empt, and effectively manage the symptoms, thereby allowing patients to remain on active therapy for as long as possible. This review is based on a systematic literature search of the PubMed database (using synonyms of HFSR, regorafenib, and skin toxicities associated with targeted therapies or cytotoxic chemotherapy). However, as this search identified very few articles, the authors also use their clinical experience as oncologists and dermatologists managing patients with treatment-related HFSR to provide recommendations on recognition and management of HFSR in regorafenib-treated patients. Regorafenib-related HFSR is similar to that seen with other multikinase inhibitors (e.g. sorafenib, sunitinib, cabozantinib, axitinib, and pazopanib) but differs from the hand-foot syndrome seen with cytotoxic chemotherapies (e.g. fluoropyrimidines, anthracyclines, and taxanes). There have been no controlled trials of symptomatic management of regorafenib-related HFSR, and limited good-quality evidence from randomized clinical trials of effective interventions for HFSR associated with other targeted therapies. Recommendations on prevention and management of regorafenib-related HFSR in this review are therefore based on the expert opinion of the authors (dermatologists and oncologists with expertise in the management of treatment-related skin toxicities and oncologists involved in clinical trials of regorafenib) and tried-and-tested empirical

  5. The stage of change approach for implementing ergonomics advice - Translating research into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothmore, Paul; Aylward, Paul; Oakman, Jodi; Tappin, David; Gray, Jodi; Karnon, Jonathan

    2017-03-01

    The Stage of Change (SOC) approach has been proposed as a method to improve the implementation of ergonomics advice. However, despite evidence for its efficacy there is little evidence to suggest it has been adopted by ergonomics consultants. This paper investigates barriers and facilitators to the implementation, monitoring and effectiveness of ergonomics advice and the adoption of the SOC approach in a series of focus groups and a subsequent survey of members of the Human Factors Societies of Australia and New Zealand. A proposed SOC assessment tool developed for use by ergonomics practitioners is presented. Findings from this study suggest the limited application of a SOC based approach to work-related musculoskeletal injury prevention by ergonomics practitioners is due to the absence of a suitable tool in the ergonomists' repertoire, the need for training in this approach, and their limited access to relevant research findings. The final translation of the SOC assessment tool into professional ergonomics practice will require accessible demonstration of its real-world usability to practitioners and the training of ergonomics practitioners in its application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pregnant women's secondhand smoke exposure and receipt of screening and brief advice by prenatal care providers in Argentina and Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Van T; Morello, Paola; Alemán, Alicia; Johnson, Carolyn; Dietz, Patricia M; Farr, Sherry L; Mazzoni, Agustina; Berrueta, Mabel; Colomar, Mercedes; Ciganda, Alvaro; Becú, Ana; Bittar Gonzalez, Maria G; Llambi, Laura; Gibbons, Luz; Smith, Ruben A; Buekens, Pierre; Belizán, José M; Althabe, Fernando

    2015-06-01

    Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure has negative effects on maternal and infant health. SHS exposure among pregnant women in Argentina and Uruguay has not been previously described, nor has the proportion of those who have received screening and advice to avoid SHS during prenatal care. Women who attended one of 21 clusters of publicly-funded prenatal care clinics were interviewed regarding SHS exposure during pregnancy at their delivery hospitalization during 2011-2012. Analyses were conducted using SURVEYFREQ procedure in SAS version 9.3 to account for prenatal clinic clusters. Of 3,427 pregnant women, 43.4 % had a partner who smoked, 52.3 % lived with household members who smoked cigarettes, and 34.4 % had no or partial smoke-free home rule. Of 528 pregnant women who worked outside of the home, 21.6 % reported past month SHS exposure at work and 38.1 % reported no or partial smoke-free work policy. Overall, 35.9 % of women were exposed to SHS at home or work. In at least one prenatal care visit, 67.2 % of women were screened for SHS exposure, and 56.6 % received advice to avoid SHS. Also, 52.6 % of women always avoided SHS for their unborn baby's health. In summary, a third of pregnant women attending publicly-funded prenatal clinics were exposed to SHS, and only half of pregnant women always avoided SHS for their unborn baby's health. Provider screening and advice rates can be improved in these prenatal care settings, as all pregnant women should be screened and advised of the harms of SHS and how to avoid it.

  7. Practical advice on how to prevent and manage poorly performing doctors under postgraduate training - acceptance of a one day training course in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kodal, Troels

    2009-01-01

    "SHORT COMMUNICATION" - ABSTRACTS Practical advice on how to prevent and manage poorly performing doctors under postgraduate training - acceptance of a one day training course in Denmark Troels Kodal*, Allan R ohold, Kirsten Bested, Jonna Skov Madsen, Steen Tinning, Claus Østergaard, Frederik Mørk......, Tine R osengreen Pallisgaard (The Postgraduate Deanery of U niversity of Southern Denmark, HR - Postgraduate Medical Education, R egion of Southern Denmark, Damhaven 1 2, Vejle DK-7100, Denmark) Background: Postgraduate training was reformed in Denmark in 2004 requiring assessment of specific clinical...... skills. This increased the attention on how to manage poorly performing doctors under postgraduate training (PPDUPT). In January 2008 "Managing trainees in difficulty" was published from "National Association of Clinical Tutors UK" providing practical advice for educational and clinical supervisors...

  8. Associations of trust and healthcare provider advice with HPV vaccine acceptance among African American parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Linda Y; Zimet, Gregory D; Latkin, Carl A; Joseph, Jill G

    2017-02-01

    Healthcare providers (HCPs) are advised to give all parents a strong recommendation for HPV vaccination. However, it is possible that strong recommendations could be less effective at promoting vaccination among African Americans who on average have greater mistrust in the healthcare system. This study examines the associations of parental trust in HCPs and strength of HCP vaccination recommendation on HPV vaccine acceptance among African American parents. Participants were recruited from an urban, academic medical center between July 2012 and July 2014. We surveyed 400 African American parents of children ages 10-12years who were offered HPV vaccine by their HCPs to assess sociodemographic factors, vaccine beliefs, trust in HCPs, and the HPV vaccine recommendation received. Medical records were reviewed to determine vaccination receipt. In multivariable analysis, children whose parents were "very strongly" recommended the HPV vaccine had over four times higher odds of vaccine receipt compared with those whose parents were "not very strongly" recommended the vaccine. Having a parent with "a lot of" versus "none" or only "some" trust in HCPs was associated with over twice the odds of receiving HPV vaccine. Very strong HCP recommendations were associated with higher odds of vaccination among all subgroups, including those with more negative baseline attitudes toward HPV vaccine and those with lower levels of trust. Adding the variables strength of HCP recommendation and parental trust in HCPs to a multivariable model already adjusted for sociodemographic factors and parental vaccine beliefs improved the pseudo R2 from 0.52 to 0.55. Among participants, receiving a strong vaccine recommendation and having a higher level of trust in HCPs were associated with higher odds of HPV vaccination, but did not add much to the predictive value of a model that already adjusted for baseline personal beliefs and sociodemographic factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  9. Keeping morality out and the GP in. Consultations in Danish general practice as a context for smoking cessation advice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guassora, Ann Dorrit; Tulinius, Anne Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe consultations in Danish general practice as a context for a mass strategy of smoking cessation advice. METHODS: The focus of the study was on consultations for health problems that were not related to smoking. Interviews with eleven patients and their six GPs were grounded...... in observation of their own consultations. RESULTS: Patients and GPs agreed that the GP should adopt an attitude of moral acceptance towards patients. Ideals of moral acceptance of patients in general practice consultations were challenged by the prevailing negative moral values associated with smoking...... challenged by smoking cessation advice to patients without smoking-related illness: the ideal of moral acceptance of patients in general practice consultations held by GPs and patients and the wish for mutuality in the conversation during consultations. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: A conversation about smoking...

  10. Health-care provider screening for tobacco smoking and advice to quit - 17 countries, 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable mortality in the world. Article 14 of the World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) states that countries should promote cessation of tobacco use and adequate treatment for tobacco dependence. Health-care providers asking all patients about their tobacco use and advising tobacco users to quit are evidence-based strategies that increase tobacco abstinence. This report examines the proportion of tobacco smokers in 17 countries responding to the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) who saw a health-care provider in the past year and who reported that a health-care provider asked them about smoking and advised them to quit. Respondents were tobacco smokers aged ≥15 years surveyed during 2008-2011 in Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Russia, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, and Vietnam. The proportion of smokers who had visited a health-care provider during the previous 12 months ranged from 21.6% in Egypt to 62.3% in Poland. Among these, the proportion reporting that a health-care provider asked if they smoked ranged from 34.9% in Vietnam to 82.1% in Romania. Among those screened for tobacco use, those who reported their health-care providers advised them to quit ranged from 17.3% in Mexico to 67.3% in Romania. In most countries, persons aged ≥45 years were more likely to report being screened and advised to quit than were persons aged ≤24 years. Health-care providers should identify smokers and provide advice and assistance in quitting at each visit as an adjunct to effective community interventions (e.g., increased price of tobacco products; smoke-free policies, mass media campaigns, and tobacco quitlines).

  11. Training and Regulating those providing Publicly Funded Legal Advice Services\\ud \\ud A Case Study of Civil Provision

    OpenAIRE

    Sanderson, Pete; Sommerlad, Hilary

    2008-01-01

    This report summarises the results of a two year project funded by the Ministry of Justice, evaluating the impact of regulatory and training regimes on the front line experiences of solicitors and advice agency staff involved in the delivery of publicly funded legal advice. The findings shed light on the impact of contractual regulation on the organization and objectives of private firms and voluntary organizations, and rpovide insight into the nature of work-based learning.

  12. Provider practice characteristics that promote interpersonal continuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelstaedt, Tyler S; Mori, Motomi; Lambert, William E; Saultz, John W

    2013-01-01

    Becoming certified as a patient-centered medical home now requires practices to measure how effectively they provide continuity of care. To understand how continuity can be improved, we studied the association between provider practice characteristics and interpersonal continuity using the Usual Provider Continuity Index (UPC). We conducted a mixed-methods study of the relationship between provider practice characteristics and UPC in 4 university-based family medicine clinics. For the quantitative part of the study, we analyzed data extracted from monthly provider performance reports for 63 primary care providers (PCPs) between July 2009 and June 2010. We tested the association of 5 practice parameters on UPC: (1) clinic frequency; (2) panel size; (3) patient load (ratio of panel size to clinic frequency); (4) attendance ratio; and (5) duration in practice (number of years working in the current practice). Clinic, care team, provider sex, and provider type (physicians versus nonphysician providers) were analyzed as covariates. Simple and multiple linear regressions were used for statistical modeling. Findings from the quantitative part of the study were validated using qualitative data from provider focus groups that were analyzed using sequential thematic coding. There were strong linear associations between UPC and both clinic frequency (β = 0.94; 95% CI, 0.62-1.27) and patient load (β = -0.37; 95% CI, -0.48 to -0.26). A multiple linear regression including clinic frequency, patient load, duration in practice, and provider type explained more than 60% of the variation in UPC (adjusted R(2) = 0.629). UPC for nurse practitioners and physician assistants was more strongly dependent on clinic frequency and was at least as high as it was for physicians. Focus groups identified 6 themes as other potential sources of variability in UPC. Variability in UPC between providers is strongly correlated with variables that can be modified by practice managers. Our study

  13. Midwives' perceptions of providing stop-smoking advice and pregnant smokers' perceptions of stop-smoking services within the same deprived area of London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberts, Carolina; Sykes, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To identify and juxtapose midwives' perceptions of providing stop-smoking advice and pregnant smokers' perceptions of stop-smoking services. A qualitative design was used in an attempt to expose and compare in-depth perceptions of midwives and pregnant smokers. Three focus groups lasting approximately 1 hour and involving 15 midwives were carried out, and 10 pregnant smokers participated in semistructured interviews. The qualitative data were analyzed by using the full version of grounded theory. The perceptions of midwives regarding provision of advice were related to outcome of advice, the relationship with patients, personal experiences, attributes, perception of role, the impact of external factors, and aspects related to pregnant smokers and pregnancy. Pregnant smokers' perceived barriers and facilitators to approaching stop-smoking services were categorized into areas of smoking behavior, advice from health professionals, stop-smoking services, and negative perceptions of pregnant women who smoke. In theory, many of the perceived barriers to providing advice could be overcome by implementing effective mandatory training for midwives. However, real issues, such as lack of time, have a major impact on the provision of advice. Pregnant smokers expect and appreciate receiving stop-smoking advice from midwives. Yet, they tend to have negative expectations of stop-smoking services, although the experiences of those who have attended these services are positive. Raising awareness of stop-smoking support for pregnant women is crucial in empowering women to make informed choices about their health and the health of their children. © 2011 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  14. Turn off or Tune In? What Advice Can SLTs, Educational Psychologists and Teachers Provide about Uses of New Media and Children with Language Impairments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Kevin; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

    2014-01-01

    New media are commonplace in children's lives. Speech and language therapists (SLTs), educational psychologists and teachers are sometimes called upon by caregivers to provide advice on whether or how children and young people with language impairments should be encouraged to use these media. This article aims to illuminate some of the key…

  15. Long-Term Effect of Interactive Online Dietician Weight Loss Advice in General Practice (LIVA Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl J. Brandt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Internet-based complex interventions aiming to promote weight loss and optimize healthy behaviors have attracted much attention. However, evidence for effect is lacking. Obesity is a growing problem, resulting in an increasing demand for cost efficient weight loss programs suitable for use on a large scale, for example, as part of standard primary care. In a previous pilot project by Brandt et al. (2011 without a control group, we examined the effects of online dietician counseling and found an average weight loss of 7.0 kg (95% CI: 4.6 to 9.3 kg after 20 months. Aims and Methods. To analyze the effects of a complex intervention using trained dieticians in a general practice setting combined with internet-based interactive and personalized weight management support compared with conventional advice with a noninteractive internet support as placebo treatment in 340 overweight patients during a 2-year period. Primary endpoints are weight loss and lowering of cholesterol (LDL. We will also explore patients’ sociodemographics and use of the intervention as well as the health professionals’ views and perceptions of the intervention (their role and the advice and support that they provide. Perspective. The project will generate knowledge on the cost-effectiveness of a complex internet-based intervention in a general practice setting and on barriers and acceptability among professionals and patients.

  16. Search and seizure law; practical advice and interpretation for nuclear protective force persons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwell, J.J.

    1983-07-06

    Recent Supreme Court decisions, which interpret the 200-year-old Fourth Amendment of the US Constitution, are used to provide a brief overview of some search and seizure subjects important to management and officers responsible for physical protection of nuclear facilities. The overview is framed in practical terms in order to make the comments applicable to the everyday activity of nuclear-protective-force persons. The Supreme Court has described several exceptions where searches and seizures (arrests) are permitted without a warrant, despite the Fourth Amendment which states that warrants are always required. The seven exceptions briefly discussed are search incidents to a lawful arrest, the automobile-search exception, the suitcase or container exception, the hot-pursuit or emergency exception, the stop-and-frisk exception, the plain-view exception, and consent to be searched.

  17. Actions and advice in coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoche, Hendrik; Jamadagni, HS; Rao, PR Sheshagiri

    2015-01-01

    To improve their agricultural output, farmers require timely and contextualized information and advice. Relevant information and advice provided by trusted peers represents a promising approach. We present the considerations for the design of coli, an agricultural information network on touch...

  18. Effectiveness of intensive practice nurse counselling versus brief general practitioner advice, both combined with varenicline, for smoking cessation: a randomized pragmatic trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rossem, Carolien; Spigt, Mark; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Lucas, Annelies E M; van Schayck, Onno C P; Kotz, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    To study the effectiveness of intensive counselling by a practice nurse (PN) versus brief advice by a general practitioner (GP), each combined with pharmacotherapy, for 6 months' tobacco abstinence (primary outcome). Secondary outcomes included 12-month abstinence, medication adherence and incremental costs per life-year gained. A multi-site (n = 10), two-group, parallel, pragmatic randomized controlled trial. A network of primary health-care centres in the Netherlands. A total of 295 adult daily smokers (mean age = 48 years; mean cigarettes/day = 19). Patients were randomized to receive individual counselling by a practice nurse (PN) (n = 149) or brief advice by a general practitioner (GP) (146). All patients received 12 weeks of open-label varenicline. The primary outcome was prolonged biochemically validated abstinence from weeks 9 to 26 after treatment initiation. Secondary outcomes included abstinence from weeks 9 to 52, good dosing adherence (> 80% days taken) and incremental costs per life-year gained. Abstinence rates in the PN versus GP groups were 32.2% (n = 48) versus 39.0% [n = 57; odds ratio (OR) = 0.71; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.44-1.16] from weeks 9 to 26 and 25.5% (n = 38) versus 28.8% (n = 42; OR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.50-1.43) from weeks 9 to 52, respectively. Values of the Bayes factor indicated that the PN and GP were equally effective. Good dosing adherence was significantly lower in the PN (45.5%, n = 56/123) than in the GP group (62.0%, n = 75/121; OR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.26-0.77), and the incremental costs per life-year gained were -€416.10. Among people seeking help to stop smoking from their general practice, one-off brief advice from a general practitioner appears to be as effective as several sessions of behavioural support from a practice nurse when smoking cessation medication is provided. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  19. An assessment of the quality of advice provided by patent medicine vendors to users of oral contraceptive pills in urban Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujuju, Chinazo; Adebayo, Samson B; Anyanti, Jennifer; Oluigbo, Obi; Muhammad, Fatima; Ankomah, Augustine

    2014-01-01

    In Nigeria about 50% of oral contraceptive pill users obtain their products from proprietary patent medicine vendors (PPMVs). This group of service providers are poorly trained and have very limited knowledge about contraception. This paper investigated the nature of the advice offered to simulated current and potential users of oral contraceptive pills. The main objective was to assess the nature and quality of advice provided by PPMVs to pill users. This study is based on findings from a 'mystery client' approach in which three scenarios related to contraceptive pill use were simulated. Each of the 12 mystery clients simulated one of the following three scenarios: new pill users (new to family planning or switching from condom to pills); user seeking a resupply of pills; and dissatisfied pill users intending to discontinue use. Simple random sampling was used to select 410 PPMVs from a total of 1,826 in four states in Nigeria. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews was also conducted. A majority of the PPMVs had pills in stock on the day of the survey and resupplied pills to the clients. PPMVs also understood the reason and importance of referring clients who were new adopters of oral contraceptive methods to a health facility; 30% of the PPMVs referred new adopters to a health facility. However, demand from clients who do not want to go to health care facilities (for various reasons) necessitated the provision of oral contraceptive pills to 41% of the first time users. Some PPMVs prescribed treatment to mystery clients who presented with perceived complications arising from the use of pills, while 49% were referred to a health facility. The advice given by PPMVs often falls short of safety guidelines related to the use of oral contraceptive pills. There is a need to continuously update knowledge among the PPMVs to ensure that they provide quality oral contraceptive services as PPMVs bridge the gap between medical experts and users in rural communities.

  20. Regulating household financial advice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin F. Cummings

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews economic theory related to investment advice. This theory explains 1 why financial advisors need to be carefully regulated for the benefit of both the investment advice industry and for consumers, 2 why principles-based regulation (e.g., a fiduciary standard is more efficient than rules-based regulation, 3 why dual regulation of financial professionals providing investment or insurance advice is inefficient and inequitable policy, and 4 why the application of a universal and uniform fiduciary standard will be difficult to implement.

  1. Dietary advice in family medicine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the conceptual basis of dietary advice in family medicine. Given the large number of illnesses and diseases encountered in family practice for which diet and nutrition are relevant interventions, food-related advice is an important part of daily practice. To enhance the

  2. Institutional wide implementation of key advice for socially inclusive teaching in higher education. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Government policy and institutional initiatives have influenced increases in enrolment of non-traditional students to Australian universities. For these students, university culture is often incongruent with their own, making it difficult to understand the tacit requirements for participation and success. Academic teaching staff are important in creating socially inclusive learning experiences, particularly in first year subjects. This paper presents an institution-wide approach to enhancing socially inclusive teaching at one Australian university. Underpinned by a framework of ”bridging social-incongruity” the initiative was guided by six principles of socially inclusive teaching to support practice as proposed in the 2012 “Effective support of students from low socioeconomic backgrounds in higher education” report commissioned by the Australian Office of Learning and Teaching. Feedback from 150 academic teaching staff from various disciplines and campus locations, suggests this initiative was effective in increasing understanding of socially inclusive teaching practices with many participants indicating the teaching enhancements were applicable for their teaching context.

  3. [Consensus paper treatment of acute traveler's diarrhea. Practice recommendation for travel advice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Tomas; Nothdurft, Hans-Dieter; Haditsch, Martin; Weinke, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    In times of mass tourism, traveler's diarrhea is one of the most common health problems of long-distance travel. Globally, some 40 million cases occur annually. Travellers to risk areas should therefore be comprehensively advised beforehand, as to what action to take in case of an acute traveler's diarrhea and what drugs to add to their first-aid kit. To date none, or hardly any specific studies or valid specific guidelines for the treatment of traveler's diarrhea are available for Germany. Drafting a consensus paper based on results of a specialists' meeting to evaluate therapeutic options in the treatment of acute uncomplicated travelers' diarrhea. The foundation for the present consensus recommendations is current evidence on antidiarrheals available in Germany for symptomatic treatment of gastrointestinal infections, summarized in the S2k guideline for gastrointestinal infections and Whipple's disease. Further taken into account for the present consensus recommendations were Pubmed-listed publications on symptomatic treatment of traveler's diarrhea, practical aspects, and the experts' experience in travel medicine. For the treatment of acute uncomplicated traveler's diarrhea - more than 90 % of all cases - the secretion inhibitor racecadotril is considered first choice, based on our evaluation criteria. The previously usual practice of recommending the antimotility drug loperamide as first choice should be reconsidered, in favor of the recent active ingredient racecadotril. Antibiotics should be used only in complicated cases. A large number of travelers who generally demand antibiotic therapy should be disabused of their expectations. Other therapeutic measures that are currently available for the treatment of acute diarrhea while traveling play a subordinate role.

  4. An assessment of the quality of advice provided by patent medicine vendors to users of oral contraceptive pills in urban Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujuju C

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chinazo Ujuju,1 Samson B Adebayo,2 Jennifer Anyanti,3 Obi Oluigbo,3 Fatima Muhammad,4 Augustine Ankomah5 1Research and Evaluation Division, Society for Family Health, Abuja, Nigeria; 2Planning, Research and Statistics Directorate, National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control, Abuja, Nigeria; 3Technical Services Directorate, Society for Family Health, Abuja, Nigeria; 4Family Planning Directorate, Society for Family Health, Abuja, Nigeria; 5Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra, Ghana Introduction: In Nigeria about 50% of oral contraceptive pill users obtain their products from proprietary patent medicine vendors (PPMVs. This group of service providers are poorly trained and have very limited knowledge about contraception. This paper investigated the nature of the advice offered to simulated current and potential users of oral contraceptive pills. The main objective was to assess the nature and quality of advice provided by PPMVs to pill users. Method: This study is based on findings from a 'mystery client' approach in which three scenarios related to contraceptive pill use were simulated. Each of the 12 mystery clients simulated one of the following three scenarios: new pill users (new to family planning or switching from condom to pills; user seeking a resupply of pills; and dissatisfied pill users intending to discontinue use. Simple random sampling was used to select 410 PPMVs from a total of 1,826 in four states in Nigeria. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews was also conducted. Results: A majority of the PPMVs had pills in stock on the day of the survey and resupplied pills to the clients. PPMVs also understood the reason and importance of referring clients who were new adopters of oral contraceptive methods to a health facility; 30% of the PPMVs referred new adopters to a health facility. However, demand from clients who do not want to go

  5. Providing Feedback: Practical Skills and Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkany, David; Deitte, Lori

    2017-06-01

    Feedback is an essential component of education. It is designed to influence, reinforce, and change behaviors, concepts, and attitudes in learners. Although providing constructive feedback can be challenging, it is a learnable skill. The negative consequences of destructive feedback or lack of feedback all together are far-reaching. This article summarizes the components of constructive feedback and provides readers with tangible skills to enhance their ability to give effective feedback to learners and peers. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [How to handle the dilemma of driving for patients with Alzheimer's disease? A survey of advices provided by French caregivers guides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mietkiewicz, Marie-Claude; Ostrowski, Madeleine

    2015-09-01

    For many old people, driving takes an important place in the daily living activities and contributes to carry on their autonomy and self-esteem. However, many studies showed a link between car accidents and Alzheimer's disease, even in the early stages of dementia, and people caring for these patients inevitably ask the question: "Is my patient with Alzheimer's disease still able to drive his car?" Guides devoted to caregivers can play an important role to improve the knowledge of Alzheimer's disease and to afford advices for patients managing. To assess how these guides handle the question of patients driving, we made a survey of the 46 French caregiver guides (re)published between 1988 and 2013. The question of driving is raised with more or less details in 31 guides. All state that driving should be discontinued but that the consequences of this decision on the patient autonomy should be taken into account. A few guides provide clues to assess driving competence for the patients, and many propose advices to support the implementation of the driving discontinuity decision, such as to discuss with the patient to persuade him to stop driving, to ask for assistance by the family physician, to hide the car's keys or to disconnect its battery... In France, physicians are not allowed to prohibit driving or to report dangerous driving to authorities. Ultimately, the caregivers remain faced with the ethical dilemma to choose between safety and the patient's autonomy preservation. Therefore the responsibility for the patient to persist or give up driving only falls to them.

  7. Improving diet, physical activity and other lifestyle behaviours using computer-tailored advice in general practice: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parekh Sanjoti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adoption and maintenance of healthy behaviours is essential in the primary prevention of chronic non-communicable diseases. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a minimal intervention on multiple lifestyle factors such as diet, physical activity, smoking and alcohol, delivered through general practice, using computer-tailored feedback. Methods Adult patients visiting 21 general practitioners in Brisbane, Australia, were surveyed about ten health behaviours that are risk factors for chronic, non-communicable diseases. Those who completed the self-administered baseline questionnaire entered a randomised controlled trial, with the intervention group receiving computer-tailored printed advice, targeting those health behaviours for which respondents were not meeting current recommendations. The primary outcome was change in summary lifestyle score (Prudence Score and individual health behaviours at three months. A repeated measures analysis compared change in these outcomes in intervention and control groups after adjusting for age and education. Results 2306 patients were randomised into the trial. 1711 (76% returned the follow-up questionnaire at 3 months. The Prudence Score (10 items in the intervention group at baseline was 5.88, improving to 6.25 at 3 months (improvement = 0.37, compared with 5.84 to 5.96 (improvement = 0.12 in the control group (F = 13.3, p = 0.01. The intervention group showed improvement in meeting recommendations for all individual health behaviours compared with the control group. However, these differences were significant only for fish intake (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.11-1.68, salt intake (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.05-1.38, and type of spread used (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.06-1.51. Conclusion A minimal intervention using computer-tailored feedback to address multiple lifestyle behaviours can facilitate change and improve unhealthy behaviours. Although individual behaviour changes were modest

  8. Improving diet, physical activity and other lifestyle behaviours using computer-tailored advice in general practice: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Sanjoti; Vandelanotte, Corneel; King, David; Boyle, Frances M

    2012-09-11

    The adoption and maintenance of healthy behaviours is essential in the primary prevention of chronic non-communicable diseases. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a minimal intervention on multiple lifestyle factors such as diet, physical activity, smoking and alcohol, delivered through general practice, using computer-tailored feedback. Adult patients visiting 21 general practitioners in Brisbane, Australia, were surveyed about ten health behaviours that are risk factors for chronic, non-communicable diseases. Those who completed the self-administered baseline questionnaire entered a randomised controlled trial, with the intervention group receiving computer-tailored printed advice, targeting those health behaviours for which respondents were not meeting current recommendations. The primary outcome was change in summary lifestyle score (Prudence Score) and individual health behaviours at three months. A repeated measures analysis compared change in these outcomes in intervention and control groups after adjusting for age and education. 2306 patients were randomised into the trial. 1711 (76%) returned the follow-up questionnaire at 3 months. The Prudence Score (10 items) in the intervention group at baseline was 5.88, improving to 6.25 at 3 months (improvement = 0.37), compared with 5.84 to 5.96 (improvement = 0.12) in the control group (F = 13.3, p = 0.01). The intervention group showed improvement in meeting recommendations for all individual health behaviours compared with the control group. However, these differences were significant only for fish intake (OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.11-1.68), salt intake (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.05-1.38), and type of spread used (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.06-1.51). A minimal intervention using computer-tailored feedback to address multiple lifestyle behaviours can facilitate change and improve unhealthy behaviours. Although individual behaviour changes were modest, when implemented on a large scale through general practice

  9. Professional advice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottaviani, Marco; Sørensen, Peter Norman

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies strategic communication by an expert who is concerned about appearing to be well informed. The expert is assumed to observe a private signal with a simple and particularly tractable (multiplicative linear) structure. The quality of the expert's information is evaluated on the b......This paper studies strategic communication by an expert who is concerned about appearing to be well informed. The expert is assumed to observe a private signal with a simple and particularly tractable (multiplicative linear) structure. The quality of the expert's information is evaluated...... on the basis of the advice given and the realized state of the world. In equilibrium of this reputational cheap-talk game, no more than two messages are effectively reported. The model is extended to consider sequential communication by experts with conditionally independent signals. In the long run, learning...

  10. Integrity of Evidence-Based Practice: Are Providers Modifying Practice Content or Practice Sequencing?

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Alayna L.; Chorpita, Bruce F.; Regan, Jennifer; Weisz, John R

    2014-01-01

    This study examined patterns of evidence-based treatment (EBT) implementation within community settings by evaluating integrity along separate dimensions of practice content (PC; a session included the prescribed procedure) and practice sequencing (a session occurred in the prescribed sequence) within a recent randomized effectiveness trial. We measured whether sessions showed integrity to PC and to flexible or linear practice sequences. Findings revealed that providers tended to incorporate ...

  11. “Prescribing sunshine”: a national, cross-sectional survey of 1,089 New Zealand general practitioners regarding their sun exposure and vitamin D perceptions, and advice provided to patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeder Anthony

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The health effects of ultraviolet radiation vary according to wavelength, timing and pattern of exposure, personal characteristics and practices. Negative effects include skin cancers, eye diseases and immune suppression; positive effects primarily relate to endogenous vitamin D production which protects against bone disease. Drafting comprehensive guidelines regarding appropriate sun protective behaviours and vitamin D sufficiency is challenging. Advice given by general practitioners is potentially influential because they are widely respected. Methods A survey instrument was developed, pre-tested and provided to practising GP’s, either by on-line link or mailed, reply paid hard-copy. Odds ratios, differences in means, or ratios of geometric means from regression models are reported for potential predictor variables with 95% confidence intervals. Results Data (demographic, training, practicing, information accessing, confidence in vitamin D knowledge suitable for analysis were obtained from 1,089 GPs (32% participation. Many (43% were ‘not at all confident’ about their vitamin D knowledge. Recent information led 29% to recommend less sun protection during winter months and 10% less all year. Confidence was positively associated with non-‘Western’ medical training, information sources read and practising in a metropolitan centre with a medical school. Reading the Melanoma Clinical Practice Guidelines was associated with lower estimates of the amount of summer sun exposure required to obtain adequate vitamin D. Increasing years in practice was negatively associated with provision of recommended advice about summer and winter sun protection. Greater concern about vitamin D than skin cancer was expressed by females and those in practice longer. Conclusions Concern about the potentially negative impact of skin cancer prevention on vitamin D status may undermine appropriate sun protective recommendations. Reading some

  12. Leyendo con tu hijo: Consejos practicos para los padres... (Reading with Your Child: Practical Advice for Parents...).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    This brochure (in Spanish) offers some practical tips for Spanish-speaking parents who wish to read to their young children. The brochure first provides general tips, such as "Lea a su hijo en voz alto por lo menos unos 15 minutos todos los dias" (Read to your child aloud for at least 15 minutes daily), and "Estabeleza una rotina y…

  13. Long-Term Effect of Interactive Online Dietician Weight Loss Advice in General Practice (LIVA) Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Carl J; Brandt, Vibeke; Pedersen, Mathilde

    2014-01-01

    . To analyze the effects of a complex intervention using trained dieticians in a general practice setting combined with internet-based interactive and personalized weight management support compared with conventional advice with a noninteractive internet support as placebo treatment in 340 overweight patients......Background. Internet-based complex interventions aiming to promote weight loss and optimize healthy behaviors have attracted much attention. However, evidence for effect is lacking. Obesity is a growing problem, resulting in an increasing demand for cost efficient weight loss programs suitable...

  14. Social support in the practices of informal providers: The case of patent and proprietary medicine vendors in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieverding, Maia; Liu, Jenny; Beyeler, Naomi

    2015-10-01

    The social and institutional environments in which informal healthcare providers operate shape their health and business practices, particularly in contexts where regulatory enforcement is weak. In this study, we adopt a social capital perspective to understanding the social networks on which proprietary and patent medicine vendors (PPMVs) in Nigeria rely for support in the operation of their shops. Data are drawn from 70 in-depth interviews with PPMVs in three states, including interviews with local leaders of the PPMV professional association. We find that PPMVs primarily relied on more senior colleagues and formal healthcare professionals for informational support, including information about new medicines and advice on how to treat specific cases of illness. For instrumental support, including finance, start-up assistance, and intervention with regulatory agencies, PPMVs relied on extended family, the PPMVs with whom they apprenticed, and the leaders of their professional association. PPMVs' networks also provided continual reinforcement of what constitutes good PPMV practice through admonishments to follow scope of practice limitations. These informal reminders, as well as monitoring activities conducted by the professional association, served to reinforce PPMVs' concern with avoiding negative customer health outcomes, which were perceived to be detrimental to their business reputations. That PPMVs' networks both encouraged practices to reduce the likelihood of poor health outcomes, and provided advice regarding customers' health conditions, highlights the potential impact of informal providers' access to different forms of social capital on their delivery of health services, as well as their success as microenterprises. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Veterinary advice for entrepreneurial Dutch dairy farmers: from curative practice to coach-consultant: what needs to be changed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordhuizen, J P T M; van Egmond, M J; Jorritsma, R; Hogeveen, H; van Werven, T; Vos, P L A M; Lievaart, J J

    2008-01-01

    Dairy farms are tending to become larger, with a milk quota of more than 8 tons a year, and are managed by entrepreneurial dairy farmers with their own specific characteristics and farming style. Some Dutch veterinary practices appear unable to respond to this different style and often do not serve such farms or lose them as client. Moreover, the veterinary curriculum often focuses on traditional, family-run, smaller dairy operations and not on larger farms, which raises the question whether newly qualified veterinary practitioners are adequately trained to provide these entrepreneurial farmers with the services they require. This article addresses the characteristics of entrepreneurial dairy farmers and those of cattle practitioners, to determine whether cattle practitioners need to acquire other skills to better prepare them for their coaching-consultant tasks on larger dairy farms.

  16. Knowledge and Practices of PMTCT among Health Care Providers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adequate knowledge by health care providers of antiretroviral use and other PMTCT strategies will be required to ensure control of vertical transmission of the virus. Objective: To assess the knowledge and practice of PMTCT among health care providers in private health facilities in Ilorin, Nigeria. Method: This is a review of ...

  17. Sleep Deprivation and Advice Taking

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Alexander Häusser; Johannes Leder; Charlene Ketturat; Martin Dresler; Nadira Sophie Faber

    2016-01-01

    Judgements and decisions in many political, economic or medical contexts are often made while sleep deprived. Furthermore, in such contexts individuals are required to integrate information provided by - more or less qualified - advisors. We asked if sleep deprivation affects advice taking. We conducted a 2 (sleep deprivation: yes vs. no) x 2 (competency of advisor: medium vs. high) experimental study to examine the effects of sleep deprivation on advice taking in an estimation task. We compa...

  18. Providing services to trafficking survivors: Understanding practices across the globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Jordan J; Kynn, Jamie; Stylianou, Amanda M; Postmus, Judy L

    2018-01-01

    Human trafficking is a global issue, with survivors representing all genders, ages, races, ethnicities, religions, and countries. However, little research exists that identifies effective practices in supporting survivors of human trafficking. The research that does exist is Western-centric. To fill this gap in the literature, the goal of this research was to understand practices used throughout the globe with adult human trafficking survivors. A qualitative approach was utilized. Providers from 26 countries, across six different continents, were interviewed to allow for a comprehensive and multi-faceted understanding of practices in working with survivors. Participants identified utilizing an empowerment-based, survivor, and human life-centered approach to working with survivors, emphasized the importance of engaging in community level interventions, and highlighted the importance of government recognition of human trafficking. Findings provide information from the perspective of advocates on best practices in the field that can be used by agencies to enhance human trafficking programming.

  19. A review of the provision of appropriate advice by pharmacy staff for self-medication in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brata, Cecilia; Gudka, Sajni; Schneider, Carl R; Clifford, Rhonda M

    2015-01-01

    Patients in developing countries often prefer to self-medicate via community pharmacies. Pharmacy staff are therefore in a strategic position to optimize the health of the public by providing appropriate advice to patients who self-medicate. To determine the proportion of pharmacy staff who provide appropriate advice when handling self-medication requests in developing countries. A literature search was undertaken via MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus, Web of Science and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts. Studies that reported on the proportion of pharmacy staff providing appropriate advice when handling self-medication requests in developing countries were included. The appropriateness of advice was determined by each author's definition in the original studies. Twenty-eight studies met the inclusion criteria. There were variations in methods, scenarios, how the authors reported and defined appropriate advice, and study populations. The proportion of pharmacy staff providing appropriate advice varied widely from 0% to 96%, with a minority providing appropriate advice in 83% of the scenarios performed. There was considerable variation in results, with the majority of studies reporting that inappropriate advice was provided by pharmacy staff when handling self-medication requests in developing countries. Consistent and robust methods are required to provide comparisons across practice settings. There is also a need to identify contributing factors to poor provision of advice for developing intervention strategies for practice improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Buprenorphine prescribing practice trends and attitudes among New York providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermack, Andrea; Flannery, Mara; Tofighi, Babak; McNeely, Jennifer; Lee, Joshua D

    2017-03-01

    Buprenorphine office-based opioid maintenance is an increasingly common form of treatment for opioid use disorders. However, total prescribing has not kept pace with the current opioid and overdose epidemic and access remains scarce among the underserved. This study sought to assess current provider attitudes and clinical practices among a targeted sample of primarily New York City public sector buprenorphine prescribers. A cross-sectional online survey purposefully sampled buprenorphine prescribers in NYC with a focus on those serving Medicaid and uninsured patient populations. Expert review of local provider networks, snowball referrals, and in-person networking generated an email list, which received a survey link. A brief 25-question instrument queried provider and practice demographics, prescribing practices including induction approaches and attitudes regarding common hot topics (e.g., buprenorphine diversion, prescriber patient limits, insurance issues, ancillary treatments). Of 132 email invitations, N=72 respondents completed (n=64) or partially completed (n=8) the survey between January and April 2016. Most (79%) were Medicaid providers in non-psychiatric specialties (72%), working in a hospital-based or community general practice (51%), and board-certified in addiction medicine or psychiatry (58%). Practice sizes were generally 100 patients or fewer (71%); many providers (64%) individually prescribed buprenorphine Buprenorphine diversion was not rated as an important practice barrier. In conclusion, this targeted survey of buprenorphine prescribers in NYC treating primarily underserved populations showed a consistent pattern of part-time prescribing to modest volumes of patients, routine use of unobserved buprenorphine induction, and primarily elective referrals to psychosocial counseling. Barriers to prescribing included prior authorization requirements, lack of clinical resources (space, staff) and psychiatric services. Federal and local efforts to

  1. Advice dilemmas: Managing advice against the competing public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key to resolving this issue is an acknowledgement that, whether as counsellor or health adviser, persuasion and influence are central features of the VCT interaction. Clear practice guidelines and tools are required to assist counsellors to distinguish between advice, suggestion or mere confirmation of an intended client ...

  2. Organization of primary care practice for providing energy balance care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabunde, Carrie N; Clauser, Steven B; Liu, Benmei; Pronk, Nicolaas P; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Huang, Terry T-K; Smith, Ashley Wilder

    2014-01-01

    Primary care physicians (PCPs) may not adequately counsel or monitor patients regarding diet, physical activity, and weight control (i.e., provide energy balance care). We assessed the organization of PCPs' practices for providing this care. The study design was a nationally representative survey conducted in 2008. The study setting was U.S. primary care practices. A total of 1740 PCPs completed two sequential questionnaires (response rate, 55.5%). The study measured PCPs' reports of practice resources, and the frequency of body mass index assessment, counseling, referral for further evaluation/management, and monitoring of patients for energy balance care. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression modeling were used. More than 80% of PCPs reported having information resources on diet, physical activity, or weight control available in waiting/exam rooms, but fewer billed (45%), used reminder systems (energy balance care. A total of 26% reported regularly assessing body mass index and always/often providing counseling as well as tracking patients for progress related to energy balance. In multivariate analyses, PCPs in practices with full electronic health records or those that bill for energy balance care provided this care more often and more comprehensively. There were strong specialty differences, with pediatricians more likely (odds ratio, 1.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-2.51) and obstetrician/gynecologists less likely (odds ratio, 0.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.44) than others to provide energy balance care. PCPs' practices are not well organized for providing energy balance care. Further research is needed to understand PCP care-related specialty differences.

  3. Weight Management Advice for Clients with Overweight or Obesity: Allied Health Professional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne J. Snodgrass

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity is increasing. The potential for allied health professionals to intervene through the provision of lifestyle advice is unknown. This study aimed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of health professionals in the provision of dietary and physical activity advice for clients with overweight or obesity. Dietitians, exercise physiologists, nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and psychologists (n = 296 working in New South Wales were surveyed using paper-based and online methods. The majority of health professionals (71% believed that providing weight management advice was within their scope of practice; 81% provided physical activity advice but only 57% provided dietary advice. Other than dietitians, few had received training in client weight management during their professional qualification (14% or continuing education (16%. Providing dietary advice was associated with: believing it was within their scope of practice (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.9–7.9, p < 0.01, training during their entry-level qualification (OR 7.2, 3.2–16.4, p < 0.01 and having departmental guidelines (OR 4.7, 2.1–10.9, p < 0.01. Most health professionals are willing to provide lifestyle advice to clients with overweight or obesity but few have received required training. Developing guidelines and training for in client weight management may potentially impact on rising obesity levels.

  4. Develop a Prototype Personal Health Record Application (PHR-A) that Captures Information About Daily Living Important for Diabetes and Provides Decision Support with Actionable Advice for Diabetes Self Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    testing your blood sugar or taking your medications.There are also surveys that ask what you believe about diabetes and how your mood has been. When you...Diary, Activity Diary, and Medications Log to see how those components of diabetes self-care affect your blood sugar . As with the other tabs, the Blood...Living Important for Diabetes and Provides Decision Support with Actionable Advice for Diabetes Self Care”. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Stephanie Fonda

  5. Theory in Practice: Helping Providers Address Depression in Diabetes Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Kozak, Cindy; Wagner, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: A continuing education (CE) program based on the theory of planned behavior was designed to understand and improve health care providers' practice patterns in screening, assessing, and treating and/or referring patients with diabetes for depression treatment. Methods: Participants completed assessments of attitudes, confidence,…

  6. VET Providers Planning to Deliver Degrees: Good Practice Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2015

    2015-01-01

    This good practice guide is intended to assist public and private registered training organisations (RTOs) planning to commence higher education (HE) delivery. The guide is based on research undertaken by Victor Callan and Kaye Bowman, who completed case studies with six providers currently delivering higher education qualifications in addition to…

  7. Health care providers' knowledge and practice of focused antenatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential of antenatal care for reducing maternal morbidity and mortality and improving newborn survival and health is widely acknowledged. The study sought to investigate Health Care Providers knowledge and practice of focused antenatal care in a cottage Hospital Okpatu. Qualitative ethnographical research design ...

  8. Nurse telephone triage in out-of-hours GP practice: determinants of independent advice and return consultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klazinga Niek S

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays, nurses play a central role in telephone triage in Dutch out-of-hours primary care. The percentage of calls that is handled through nurse telephone advice alone (NTAA appears to vary substantially between GP cooperatives. This study aims to explore which determinants are associated with NTAA and with subsequent return consultations to the GP. Methods For the ten most frequently presented problems, a two-week follow-up cohort study took place in one cooperative run by 25 GPs and 8 nurses, serving a population of 62,291 people. Random effects logistic regression analysis was used to study the determinants of NTAA and return consultation rates. The effect of NTAA on hospital referral rates was also studied as a proxy for severity of illness. Results The mean NTAA rate was 27.5% – ranging from 15.5% to 39.4% for the eight nurses. It was higher during the night (RR 1.63, CI 1.48–1.76 and lower with increasing age (RR 0.96, CI 0.93–0.99, per ten years or when the patient presented >2 problems (RR 0.65; CI 0.51–0.83. Using cough as reference category, NTAA was highest for earache (RR 1.49; CI 1.18–1.78 and lowest for chest pain (RR 0.18; CI 0.06–0.47. After correction for differences in case mix, significant variation in NTAA between nurses remained (p Conclusion Important inter-nurse variability may indicate differences in perception on tasks and/or differences in skill to handle telephone calls alone. Future research should focus more on modifiable determinants of NTAA rates.

  9. Best Practice? Advice Provided to Teachers about the Use of Brain Gym[R] in Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Perceptual motor programs continue to be used in Australian schools despite evidence showing they do not influence academic learning. Brain Gym[R] is one perceptual motor program that is used in schools in Australia and overseas. There is little evidence to support the claims made about the benefits of Brain Gym[R]; its theoretical underpinning…

  10. Brief Mindfulness Practices for Healthcare Providers - A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmartin, Heather; Goyal, Anupama; Hamati, Mary C; Mann, Jason; Saint, Sanjay; Chopra, Vineet

    2017-10-01

    Mindfulness practice, where an individual maintains openness, patience, and acceptance while focusing attention on a situation in a nonjudgmental way, can improve symptoms of anxiety, burnout, and depression. The practice is relevant for health care providers; however, the time commitment is a barrier to practice. For this reason, brief mindfulness interventions (eg, ≤ 4 hours) are being introduced. We systematically reviewed the literature from inception to January 2017 about the effects of brief mindfulness interventions on provider well-being and behavior. Studies that tested a brief mindfulness intervention with hospital providers and measured change in well-being (eg, stress) or behavior (eg, tasks of attention or reduction of clinical or diagnostic errors) were selected for narrative synthesis. Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria; 7 were randomized controlled trials. Nine of 14 studies reported positive changes in levels of stress, anxiety, mindfulness, resiliency, and burnout symptoms. No studies found an effect on provider behavior. Brief mindfulness interventions may be effective in improving provider well-being; however, larger studies are needed to assess an impact on clinical care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Stepwise Advice Negotiation in Writing Center Peer Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Innhwa

    2014-01-01

    While the delivery and reception of advice is a practice integral to a wide range of settings, little attention has been given to the detailed practices of advice resistance and how it leads to advice negotiation. Based on 7 hours of videotaped tutoring interactions among 6 tutors and 11 tutees, this conversation analytic study examines the…

  12. [Practical advices in choosing local anesthesia tools in dentistry. Management of carpule's quality in local anesthesia in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, A V

    2014-01-01

    The equipment for local anesthesia is described in this article. Practical recommendations for the selection of the injection needle length, size, bevel type is given. Using dental needle for local anesthesia should be guided by the "one injection - one needle" rule, as a needle tends to deform by even the slightest contact with jawbone. Some of the shortcomings of carpule quality may be detected before use: signs of cup corrosion, the presence of sediment, air bubbles, rubber plunger disposition. In the case of such defects being identified all the package should not be used. The use of such carpule in clinical practice is unsafe.

  13. Veterinary advice for entrepreneurial Dutch dairy farmers : From curative practice to coach-consultant: what needs to be changed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordhuizen, J.P.T.M.; Egmond, van M.J.; Jorritsma, R.; Hogeveen, H.; Lievaart, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Dairy farms are tending to become larger, with a milk quota of more than 8 tons a year, and are managed by entrepreneurial dairy farmers with their own specific characteristics and farming style. Some Dutch veterinary practices appear unable to respond to this different style and often do not serve

  14. Abortion practice in Mexico: a survey of health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayananda, Ila; Walker, Dilys; Atienzo, Erika E; Haider, Sadia

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about abortion practice in Mexico postlegalization of abortion in Mexico City in 2007. In 2009, we anonymously surveyed 418 Mexican health care providers at the Colegio Mexicano de Especialistas en Ginecologia y Obstetricia meeting using audio computer-assisted self-interview technology. The majority of respondents were obstetrician gynecologists (376, 90%), Catholic (341, 82%), 35-60 years old (332, 79%) and male (222, 53%) and worked with trainees (307, 74%). Prior to 2007, 11% (46) and 17% (71) provided medical and surgical abortions; now, 15% (62) and 21% (86) provide these services, respectively. Practitioners from Mexico City were more likely to provide services than those from other areas. Most medical abortion providers (50, 81%) used ineffective protocols. Surgical abortion providers mainly used either manual vacuum aspiration (39, 45%) or sharp curettage (27, 32%). Most abortion providers were trained in residency and wanted more training in medical (54, 87%) and surgical (59, 69%) abortion. Among nonproviders, 49% (175) and 27% (89) expressed interest in learning to perform medical and surgical abortion, respectively. Given the interest in learning to provide safe abortion services and the prevalent use of ineffective medical abortion regimens and sharp curettage, abortion training in Mexico should be strengthened. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hand Washing Practices Among Emergency Medical Services Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Joshua; Donovan, Colleen; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; McCoy, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    Hand hygiene is an important component of infection control efforts. Our primary and secondary goals were to determine the reported rates of hand washing and stethoscope cleaning in emergency medical services (EMS) workers, respectively. We designed a survey about hand hygiene practices. The survey was distributed to various national EMS organizations through e-mail. Descriptive statistics were calculated for survey items (responses on a Likert scale) and subpopulations of survey respondents to identify relationships between variables. We used analysis of variance to test differences in means between the subgroups. There were 1,494 responses. Overall, reported hand hygiene practices were poor among pre-hospital providers in all clinical situations. Women reported that they washed their hands more frequently than men overall, although the differences were unlikely to be clinically significant. Hygiene after invasive procedures was reported to be poor. The presence of available hand sanitizer in the ambulance did not improve reported hygiene rates but improved reported rates of cleaning the stethoscope (absolute difference 0.4, p=0.0003). Providers who brought their own sanitizer were more likely to clean their hands. Reported hand hygiene is poor amongst pre-hospital providers. There is a need for future intervention to improve reported performance in pre-hospital provider hand washing.

  16. Obesity management in gynecologic cancer survivors: provider practices and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Amelia M; Tergas, Ana I; Satin, Andrew J; Fader, Amanda N

    2013-05-01

    Obesity is associated with the development and risk of death from several women's cancers. The study objective was to describe and compare oncologic providers' attitudes and practices as they relate to obesity counseling and management in cancer survivors. Society of Gynecologic Oncology members (n = 924) were surveyed with the use of a web-based, electronic questionnaire. χ(2) and Fisher exact tests were used to analyze responses. Of the 240 respondents (30%), 92.9% were practicing gynecologic oncologists or fellows, and 5.1% were allied health professionals. Median age was 42 years; 50.8% of the respondents were female. Of the respondents, 42.7% reported that they themselves were overweight/obese and that ≥50% of their survivor patients were overweight/obese. Additionaly, 82% of the respondents believed that discussing weight would not harm the doctor-patient relationship. Most of the respondents (95%) agreed that addressing lifestyle modifications with survivors is important. Respondents believed that gynecologic oncologists (85.1%) and primary care providers (84.5%) were responsible for addressing obesity. More providers who were ≤42 years old reported undergoing obesity management training (P 42 years old (P = .017). After initial counseling, 81.5% of the respondents referred survivors to other providers for obesity interventions. Oncology provider respondents believe that addressing obesity with cancer survivors is important. Providers believed themselves to be responsible for initial counseling but believed that obesity interventions should be directed by other specialists. Further research is needed to identify barriers to care for obese cancer survivors and to improve physician engagement with obesity counseling in the "teachable moment" that is provided by a new cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Does social marketing provide a framework for changing healthcare practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Zoë Slote; Clarkson, Peter John

    2009-07-01

    We argue that social marketing can be used as a generic framework for analysing barriers to the take-up of clinical guidelines, and planning interventions which seek to enable this change. We reviewed the literature on take-up of clinical guidelines, in particular barriers and enablers to change; social marketing principles and social marketing applied to healthcare. We then applied the social marketing framework to analyse the literature and to consider implications for future guideline policy to assess its feasibility and accessibility. There is sizeable extant literature on healthcare practitioners' non-compliance with clinical guidelines. This is an international problem common to a number of settings. The reasons for poor levels of take up appear to be well understood, but not addressed adequately in practice. Applying a social marketing framework brings new insights to the problem." We show that a social marketing framework provides a useful solution-focused framework for systematically understanding barriers to individual behaviour change and designing interventions accordingly. Whether the social marketing framework provides an effective means of bringing about behaviour change remains an empirical question which has still to be tested in practice. The analysis presented here provides strong motivation to begin such testing.

  18. What is a good health check? An interview study of health check providers' views and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stol, Yrrah H; Asscher, Eva C A; Schermer, Maartje H N

    2017-10-02

    Health checks identify (risk factors for) disease in people without symptoms. They may be offered by the government through population screenings and by other providers to individual users as 'personal health checks'. Health check providers' perspective of 'good' health checks may further the debate on the ethical evaluation and possible regulation of these personal health checks. In 2015, we interviewed twenty Dutch health check providers on criteria for 'good' health checks, and the role these criteria play in their practices. Providers unanimously formulate a number of minimal criteria: Checks must focus on (risk factors for) treatable/preventable disease; Tests must be reliable and clinically valid; Participation must be informed and voluntary; Checks should provide more benefits than harms; Governmental screenings should be cost-effective. Aspirational criteria mentioned were: Follow-up care should be provided; Providers should be skilled and experienced professionals that put the benefit of (potential) users first; Providers should take time and attention. Some criteria were contested: People should be free to test on any (risk factor for) disease; Health checks should only be performed in people at high risk for disease that are likely to implement health advice; Follow up care of privately funded tests should not drain on collective resources. Providers do not always fulfil their own criteria. Their reasons reveal conflicts between criteria, conflicts between criteria and other ethical values, and point to components in the (Dutch) organisation of health care that hinder an ethical provision of health checks. Moreover, providers consider informed consent a criterion that is hard to establish in practice. According to providers, personal health checks should meet the same criteria as population screenings, with the exception of cost-effectiveness. Providers do not always fulfil their own criteria. Results indicate that in thinking about the ethics of health

  19. Adoption of Sustainable Practices And Certification ISO 14001: A Case Study in a Law and Legal Advice Firm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Eugênia Arenhart

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to analyze how the company X Advocacy and Legal Consultancy can implant sustainable and quality practices to obtain the environmental certification ISO 14001. To achieve the objective, a qualitative and quantitative approach study was conducted. Regarding procedures, it consisted in a case study with a descriptive focus. From observation of the reality of X Advocacy and Legal Consultancy and its claims in relation to obtaining ISO 14001 certification, it is possible to propose as solution the implementation of a number of initiatives and sustainability actions in three pillars – social, environmental and economic. Suggestions were also developed about the dimensions of quality in order to formulate the basis for X Advocacy and Legal Consultancy environmental policy and possible implementation of ISO 14,001. 

  20. Understanding U.S. healthcare providers' practices and experiences with molluscum contagiosum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Hughes

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Molluscum contagiosum is a common superficial skin infection caused by the poxvirus, Molluscum Contagiosum virus. The study objective is to obtain a better understanding of physician practices and experiences with molluscum contagiosum in order to focus informational and guidance material. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey to assess medical practitioners' knowledge and practices with molluscum contagiosum was conducted using the 2009 DocStyles survey. Questions regarding category and number of molluscum contagiosum patients seen, treatments used and advice given to patients were included in the survey. RESULTS: Dermatologists saw the most cases, with the majority seeing 51-100 molluscum contagiosum cases/year. The most common cases seen were children with multiple lesions and adults with genital lesions. Respondents were most likely to recommend treatment to immunocompromised individuals, HIV patients, adults with genital lesions and children with multiple lesions. Cryotherapy was the top choice for all specialties with the exception of OB/GYNs, whose top choice was curettage. "Avoid intimate contact until lesions resolve", "Avoid touching lesions to reduce further spread", and "Don't be concerned, this will go away" were the top advice choices. DISCUSSION: Most survey respondents have dealt with molluscum contagiosum in their practice during the previous year. Overall, respondents picked appropriate choices for treatment and advice given; however some ineffective or unnecessary treatments were chosen and recommendations to prevent spread were chosen infrequently. Knowledge gaps for appropriate transmission precaution advice might cause unnecessary spread or autoinoculation. This survey has demonstrated that molluscum contagiosum is a common infection seen by many types of practitioners and therefore guidance on treatment considerations and infection control is valuable.

  1. Sleep Deprivation and Advice Taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausser, J.A.; Leder, J.; Ketturat, C.; Dresler, M.; Faber, N.S.

    2016-01-01

    Judgements and decisions in many political, economic or medical contexts are often made while sleep deprived. Furthermore, in such contexts individuals are required to integrate information provided by - more or less qualified - advisors. We asked if sleep deprivation affects advice taking. We

  2. Provider attitudes and practice patterns of obesity management with pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granara, Brittany; Laurent, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    More than one third of American adults are obese. Extreme obesity is rapidly rising. Nine medications are approved for weight loss yet they remain underutilized with the focus primarily on lifestyle modifications. The objective was to determine current prescribing patterns and attitudes of weight loss medications in the management of obesity among primary care providers (PCPs). PCPs were surveyed to determine practice patterns, attitudes, barriers, and facilitators for prescribing weight loss medications. Ninety-four surveys were analyzed. Seventy-six percent of all PCPs did not prescribe weight loss medications for long-term weight loss and 58% of PCPs had negative perceptions of pharmacotherapy. Differences existed between prescribing patterns and attitudes of advanced practice clinicians and physicians. Safety concerns were the greatest barrier. Having 2+ comorbidities and severe obesity were facilitators for prescribing weight loss medications. Underutilization of pharmacotherapy suggests that PCPs may not have sufficient knowledge about medication safety profiles and efficacy. Delaying treatment until patients have reached a high level of morbidity may be less efficacious than earlier treatment. Education regarding effectiveness and risks of weight loss medications for obesity management is needed and earlier interventions with pharmacotherapy may prevent significant morbidity and mortality. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  3. Nurse provision of healthy lifestyle advice to people who are overweight or obese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kable, Ashley; James, Carole; Snodgrass, Suzanne; Plotnikoff, Ronald; Guest, Maya; Ashby, Samantha; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Collins, Clare

    2015-12-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a regional area in Australia to measure nurses' perceptions, practices, and knowledge in regard to providing healthy lifestyle advice to people who are overweight or obese. Responses were compared between geographic regions. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Of the 79 nurse participants, 68% considered that provision of healthy lifestyle advice was within their scope of practice. Only 28% reported frequently estimating body mass index in the practice setting. Nurses often recommended increasing activity levels (44%), but recommended reducing daily caloric intake less often (25%). Nurses' knowledge about weight management was variable and the proportion of correct answers to knowledge items ranged from 33-99%. Nurses have many opportunities to deliver healthy lifestyle advice in a range of practice settings. The variation in practices and knowledge of nurses indicates a need for improved healthy lifestyle education for undergraduate and practicing nurses. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Young tertiary students and help-seeking for health advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, Lesley; Dutton, Jane

    2011-11-01

    Help-seeking is an active process used by people of all ages to obtain assistance to solve problems. This research sought to investigate a component of help-seeking related to health concerns. A health related help-seeking model, was adapted to frame questions for an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire. Seventy-five students aged between 16 and 24 years responded and data were analysed using content and descriptive statistical techniques. Findings indicated that young people perceived the need to seek advice when unwell, needing support or information, are resourceful, and were motivated to seek help from a variety of sources. Parents and whānau formed one usual source of advice, but young people reported one of the best sources of advice as General Practice nurses and doctors. Barriers to seeking advice included distrusting sources, and concerns about confidentiality. Unsurprisingly, many respondents used the Internet for health information, although some mistrusted that information. Nurses need to be aware of the sources of health advice and support that young people choose to use. Motivations for selecting services, providers, or sources clearly replicated what young people hold as important--sources with which they feel comfortable, have a relationship, trust, and which they perceived as maintaining confidentiality.

  5. Impact of quality assurance program: providing practice assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saporito, R A; Feldman, C A; Stewart, D C; Echoldt, H; Buchanan, R N

    1994-05-01

    Participation in a self-administered quality assessment (SAQA) program led to changes in New Jersey dentists' perceptions of practice quality. Ninety-four percent indicated they discovered practice deficiencies. This study suggests that using a self-administered quality assessment program, such as the SAQA program, can lead to a better understanding of a practice's strengths and weaknesses.

  6. What's worrying young Australians and where do they go for advice and support? Policy and practice implications for their well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampshire, Anne; Di Nicola, Kathryn

    2011-02-01

    The Mission Australia annual National Survey of Young Australians aims to generate insights into what young people think on a range of issues, including what they value, what issues are of concern to them, and where they go for advice and support. A two-page opt-in questionnaire was distributed to a very broad range of organisations across Australia, and was available in both an online and paper-based format. Responses to the survey were anonymous. Respondents were asked to rank items from the lists provided, and results are reported on the basis of items ranked one, two or three by respondents. Responses were disaggregated by age, gender, cultural background and living arrangements. Close to 48,000 young people participated in the 2009 survey, and the data confirms the importance of relationships to young people, as well as the diversity of concerns they may have, including drugs, suicide, mental health and body image. While concerns tended to vary with age and to some extent gender, what is valued by young people tends to be consistent across age and genders, namely family and friends. Implications for policy making and service delivery are drawn with a focus on the issues of relationships, drugs and mental health. In particular, the need for early intervention, evidence-based drug education programs, and initiatives that support those closest to young people, to assist them when they have concerns, are highlighted. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Understanding infant feeding beliefs, practices and preferred nutrition education and health provider approaches: an exploratory study with Somali mothers in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Lesley; Doescher, Mark; Keppel, Gina A.; Pak-Gorstein, Suzinne; Graham, Elinor; Haq, Aliya; Johnson, Donna B.; Spicer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore Somali mothers’ beliefs and practices around infant feeding and education, towards developing a culturally informed infant nutrition curriculum for health providers. Four focus groups were conducted to explore: (1) beliefs about infant feeding, hunger and ideal weight; (2) feeding practices; (3) nutrition education approaches; and (4) provider/mother interactions. Thirty-seven Somali mother participants identified the following themes within these topics: (1) strategies for assessing hunger, satiety and when to feed; shared beliefs that plump babies are healthy, leading to worry about infant weight; (2) context of breast milk adequacy, difficulties breastfeeding and environmental and cultural barriers to breastfeeding, leading to nearly universal early supplementation with formula; (3) preferred education approaches include provider visits with interpreters, Somali language educational materials and advice from older, experienced family members; and (4) desired health provider skills include: listening, explaining, empathy, addressing specific concerns, repeating important information, offering preventive advice and sufficient visit time. This study presents knowledge about Somali beliefs and practices that can directly guide discussions with these families. Given that these infants appear on a trajectory towards obesity, influencing infant feeding practices in the Somali community is a good upstream approach to preventing obesity. These findings will underpin a new infant nutrition curriculum for health providers. PMID:20055931

  8. Nursing students' practice in providing oral hygiene for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Ann

    To explore and identify precedent factors that may influence nursing students' oral hygiene practice in hospitalised patients, by using an adaptation of the Precede Model. A quantitative approach with a descriptive design was adopted in this pilot study. A questionnaire was designed and implemented as a self-report method of data collection. A convenience sample of 37 second-year diploma nursing students in an Irish teaching hospital participated in the study. The clinical area and the practices within it are influential factors in the provision of oral hygiene. Students are exposed to and influenced by outdated and non-research-based practices. Role modelling is an effective means of motivating and reinforcing student practices. However, qualified nurses' practices need to be critically reviewed before assuming that they can act as role models in assisting students to implement research-based oral hygiene. Formal education, current practices, socialisation and role modelling may influence students' behaviour in relation to oral hygiene. The results should be tentatively reviewed by clinical staff as an indication of current practices.

  9. Utilization of nondentist providers and attitudes toward new provider models: findings from the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Christine M; Funkhouser, D Ellen; Riggs, Sheila; Rindal, D Brad; Worley, Donald; Pihlstrom, Daniel J; Benjamin, Paul; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify, within the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network, current utilization of dental hygienists and assistants with expanded functions and quantify network dentists' attitudes toward a new nondentist provider model - the dental therapist. National Dental Practice-Based Research Network practitioner-investigators participated in a single, cross-sectional administration of a questionnaire. Current nondentist providers are not being utilized by network practitioner-investigators to the fullest extent allowed by law. Minnesota practitioners, practitioners in large group practices, and those with prior experience with expanded-function nondentist providers delegate at a higher rate and had more-positive perceptions of the new dental therapist model. Expanding scopes of practice for dental hygienists and assistants has not translated to the maximal delegation allowed by law among network practices. This finding may provide insight into dentists' acceptance of newer nondentist provider models. © 2013 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  10. 75 FR 9360 - Investment Advice-Participants and Beneficiaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... Benefits Security Administration 29 CFR 2550 RIN 1210-AB35 Investment Advice--Participants and... provisions of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, relating to the provision of investment advice to... account plans, as well as providers of investment and investment advice related services to such plans...

  11. Efficacy of paracetamol, diclofenac and advice for acute low back pain in general practice: design of a randomized controlled trial (PACE Plus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schreijenberg; P.A.J. Luijsterburg (Pim); Y. van Trier (Yvonne); D. Rizopoulos (Dimitris); M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); L. Voogt; C. Maher (Chris); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Low back pain is common and associated with a considerable burden to patients and society. There is uncertainty regarding the relative benefit of paracetamol and diclofenac and regarding the additional effect of pain medication compared with advice only in patients with acute

  12. Study protocol for the 10 Top Tips (10TT Trial: Randomised controlled trial of habit-based advice for weight control in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beeken Rebecca J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care is the first port of call for advice about weight control. There is hence a need for simple, effective interventions that can be delivered without specialist skills. We have developed such an intervention; the 10 Top Tips (10TT. This intervention was effective with respect to weight loss in a volunteer population, but has yet to be tested in primary care. The aim of this trial is therefore to test the effectiveness of the 10TT intervention in primary care, incorporating clinical outcomes and health economic analyses. Methods/Design The trial is a two-arm, individually-randomised, controlled trial in obese (BMI ≥ 30 adults (n = 520 in primary care, comparing weight loss in patients receiving the 10TT intervention with weight loss in a control group of patients receiving usual care. The intervention is based on habit formation theory, using written materials to take people through a set of simple weight control behaviours with strategies to make them habitual; an approach that could make it more successful than others in establishing long-term behaviour change. Patients will be recruited from 14 General Practices across England. Randomisation will be through telephoning a central randomisation service using a computer-generated list of random numbers. Patients are followed up at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. The primary outcome is weight loss at 3 months, with assessment by a health professional who is blind to group allocation. Other follow-ups will be un-blinded. We will examine whether weight loss is maintained up to 24 months. We will also assess changes in the automaticity of the 10TT target behaviours and improvement in clinical markers for potential co-morbidities. Finally, we will undertake a full economic evaluation to establish cost-effectiveness in the NHS context. Discussion If proven to be effective when delivered through primary care, 10TT could make a highly cost-effective contribution

  13. Chlamydia and HIV testing, contraception advice, and free condoms offered in general practice: a qualitative interview study of young adults' perceptions of this initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Leah Ffion; Ricketts, Ellie; Town, Katy; Rugman, Claire; Lecky, Donna; Folkard, Kate; Nardone, Anthony; Hartney, Thomas Nathan; McNulty, Cliodna

    2017-07-01

    Opportunistic chlamydia screening is actively encouraged in English general practices. Based on recent policy changes, Public Health England piloted 3Cs and HIV in 2013-2014, integrating the offer of chlamydia testing with providing condoms, contraceptive information, and HIV testing (referred to as 3Cs and HIV) according to national guidelines. To determine young adults' opinions of receiving a broader sexual health offer of 3Cs and HIV at their GP practice. Qualitative interviews were conducted in a general practice setting in England between March and June 2013. Thirty interviews were conducted with nine male and 21 female patients aged 16-24 years, immediately before or after a routine practice attendance. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic framework. Participants indicated that the method of testing, timing, and the way the staff member approached the topic were important aspects to patients being offered 3Cs and HIV. Participants displayed a clear preference for 3Cs and HIV to be offered at the GP practice over other sexual health service providers. Participants highlighted convenience of the practice, assurance of confidentiality, and that the sexual health discussion was appropriate and routine. Barriers identified for patients were embarrassment, unease, lack of time, religion, and patients believing that certain patients could take offence. Suggested facilitators include raising awareness, reassuring confidentiality, and ensuring the offer is made in a professional and non-judgemental way at the end of the consultation. General practice staff should facilitate patients' preferences by ensuring that 3Cs and HIV testing services are made available at their surgery and offered to appropriate patients in a non-judgemental way. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  14. Educating advanced practice nurses for collaborative practice in the multidisciplinary provider team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Margaret P; DeCristofaro, Claire; Smith, Carol A

    2004-12-01

    To describe the use of a clinical decision-making work sheet as a tool to teach communication skills to advanced practice nurse (APN) students. Achievement of competencies in communication and documentation that utilize language and communication strategies that are shared with other health professionals promotes effective collaborative practice among members of the multidisciplinary provider team. Review of the recent Institute of Medicine report on health professions education and other health professional literature. The Clinical Decision-Making Work Sheet helps APN students effectively communicate in real-world clinical settings. The clinical work sheet allows nurse practitioner students to communicate more effectively and efficiently, using a vocabulary that is shared with other members of the multidisciplinary health care provider team. Use of the tool in students' clinical-rotation settings facilitates effective application and refinement of the clinical decision-making skills that students learned in the advanced health assessment course. Faculty have the responsibility to assist nurses as they transition from traditional nursing to APN roles. The work sheet facilitates learning the common language for data collection, clinical decision making, documentation, and reporting that is shared with other health professionals. Using the tool, students learn to efficiently organize information that supports communication and documentation that enhances their clinical problem-solving skills. Case presentation and documentation using the work sheet provide a basis for preceptor and student interaction and for student evaluation.

  15. An investigation into e-learning practices: Implications for providers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The last decade has seen a considerable growth in the application of e-learning courses in most higher education institutions and in companies that provide inhouse training for employees. Hereby recognition is given that modern information and telecommunication technologies can help educators to meet the dual

  16. Safety advice sheets

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    You never know when you might be faced with questions such as: when/how should I dispose of a gas canister? Where can I find an inspection report? How should I handle/store/dispose of a chemical substance…?   The SI section of the DGS/SEE Group is primarily responsible for safety inspections, evaluating the safety conditions of equipment items, premises and facilities. On top of this core task, it also regularly issues “Safety Advice Sheets” on various topics, designed to be of assistance to users but also to recall and reinforce safety rules and procedures. These clear and concise sheets, complete with illustrations, are easy to display in the appropriate areas. The following safety advice sheets have been issued so far: Other sheets will be published shortly. Suggestions are welcome and should be sent to the SI section of the DGS/SEE Group. Please send enquiries to general-safety-visits.service@cern.ch.

  17. The neural basis of following advice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Biele

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Learning by following explicit advice is fundamental for human cultural evolution, yet the neurobiology of adaptive social learning is largely unknown. Here, we used simulations to analyze the adaptive value of social learning mechanisms, computational modeling of behavioral data to describe cognitive mechanisms involved in social learning, and model-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to identify the neurobiological basis of following advice. One-time advice received before learning had a sustained influence on people's learning processes. This was best explained by social learning mechanisms implementing a more positive evaluation of the outcomes from recommended options. Computer simulations showed that this "outcome-bonus" accumulates more rewards than an alternative mechanism implementing higher initial reward expectation for recommended options. fMRI results revealed a neural outcome-bonus signal in the septal area and the left caudate. This neural signal coded rewards in the absence of advice, and crucially, it signaled greater positive rewards for positive and negative feedback after recommended rather than after non-recommended choices. Hence, our results indicate that following advice is intrinsically rewarding. A positive correlation between the model's outcome-bonus parameter and amygdala activity after positive feedback directly relates the computational model to brain activity. These results advance the understanding of social learning by providing a neurobiological account for adaptive learning from advice.

  18. Investment research and investment advice: real differences?

    OpenAIRE

    Ruggi Manuela; Settanni Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The article examines the investment research - a service introduced by MIFID - in order to describe the major application problems. In particular, the paper will an- alyse similarities and differences between investment research and investment advice, highlighting the potential problems in practice, and outlining possible solutions from an operational point of view.

  19. Implicit normativity in scientific advice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folker, Anna Paldam; Andersen, Hanne; Sandøe, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on implicit normative considerations underlying scientific advice-those normative questions, decisions, or issues that scientific advisers and the general public are not fully aware of but that nevertheless have implications for the character of the advice given. Using...... nutritional science as an example, we identify three such implicit normative issues. The first concerns the aim of scientific advice: whether it is about avoiding harm or promoting good. The second concerns the intended beneficiaries of the advice: whether advice should be framed to benefit the society...

  20. Health professionals' perceptions of the barriers and facilitators to providing smoking cessation advice to women in pregnancy and during the post-partum period: a systematic review of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Kate; Graham, Hilary; McCaughan, Dorothy; Angus, Kathryn; Sinclair, Lesley; Bauld, Linda

    2016-03-31

    Reducing smoking in pregnancy is a policy priority in many countries and as a result there has been a rise in the development of services to help pregnant women to quit. A wide range of professionals are involved in providing these services, with midwives playing a particularly pivotal role. Understanding professionals' experiences of providing smoking cessation support in pregnancy can help to inform the design of interventions as well as to improve routine care. A synthesis of qualitative research of health professionals' perceptions of the barriers and facilitators to providing smoking cessation advice to women in pregnancy and the post-partum period was conducted using meta-ethnography. Searches were undertaken from 1990 to January 2015 using terms for maternity health professionals and smoking cessation advisors, pregnancy, post-partum, smoking, and qualitative in seven electronic databases. The review was reported in accordance with the 'Enhancing transparency in reporting the synthesis of qualitative research' (ENTREQ) statement. Eight studies reported in nine papers were included, reporting on the views of 190 health professionals/key informants, including 85 midwives and health visitors. The synthesis identified that both the professional role of participants and the organisational context in which they worked could act as either barriers or facilitators to an individual's ability to provide smoking cessation support to pregnant or post-partum women. Underpinning these factors was an acknowledgment that the association between maternal smoking and social disadvantage was a considerable barrier to addressing and supporting smoking cessation The review identifies a role for professional education, both pre-qualification and in continuing professional development that will enable individuals to provide smoking cessation support to pregnant women. Key to the success of this education is recognising the centrality of the professional-client/patient relationship

  1. Health professionals’ perceptions of the barriers and facilitators to providing smoking cessation advice to women in pregnancy and during the post-partum period: a systematic review of qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Flemming

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reducing smoking in pregnancy is a policy priority in many countries and as a result there has been a rise in the development of services to help pregnant women to quit. A wide range of professionals are involved in providing these services, with midwives playing a particularly pivotal role. Understanding professionals’ experiences of providing smoking cessation support in pregnancy can help to inform the design of interventions as well as to improve routine care. Methods A synthesis of qualitative research of health professionals’ perceptions of the barriers and facilitators to providing smoking cessation advice to women in pregnancy and the post-partum period was conducted using meta-ethnography. Searches were undertaken from 1990 to January 2015 using terms for maternity health professionals and smoking cessation advisors, pregnancy, post-partum, smoking, and qualitative in seven electronic databases. The review was reported in accordance with the ‘Enhancing transparency in reporting the synthesis of qualitative research’ (ENTREQ statement. Results Eight studies reported in nine papers were included, reporting on the views of 190 health professionals/key informants, including 85 midwives and health visitors. The synthesis identified that both the professional role of participants and the organisational context in which they worked could act as either barriers or facilitators to an individual’s ability to provide smoking cessation support to pregnant or post-partum women. Underpinning these factors was an acknowledgment that the association between maternal smoking and social disadvantage was a considerable barrier to addressing and supporting smoking cessation Conclusions The review identifies a role for professional education, both pre-qualification and in continuing professional development that will enable individuals to provide smoking cessation support to pregnant women. Key to the success of this education

  2. 'I only give advice if I am asked': examining the grandmother's potential to influence infant feeding decisions and parenting practices of new mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Judy; Schmied, Virginia; Beale, Barbara

    2010-06-01

    Australia has high breastfeeding initiation rates however, at 3 and 6 months exclusive breastfeeding rates fall below global recommendations. Research suggests significant others in a woman's life can influence infant feeding decisions and practices but how and why they do so needs investigation. This study explored grandmothers' perceptions of their role in supporting new families and examined the potential for grandmothers to influence infant feeding decisions and parenting practices of new mothers in an area of Sydney, Australia, with low breastfeeding maintenance rates. A qualitative, descriptive study was conducted in South Western Sydney, Australia. Eleven grandmothers participated in one to one interviews and three of these also participated in a group discussion. Analysis revealed three themes: 'Presence'; 'Position'; and 'Power versus Preservation' which provide insight into the complexity of the grandmother-new mother relationship and describe the potential influence that grandmothers may have on infant feeding and parenting. The findings highlight challenges and dilemmas faced by grandmothers in their supportive role for the new mother in her breastfeeding and early parenting experience and the difficulties grandmothers face in balancing potential risks and rewards in their interactions with the new family. 2009 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Health-care providers' perceptions, attitudes towards and recommendation practice of cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hweissa, N Ab; Lim, J N W; Su, T T

    2016-09-01

    In Libya, cervical cancer is ranked third as the most frequent cancer among women with early diagnosis being shown to reduce morbidity and mortality. Health-care providers can influence women's screening behaviours, and their lack of recommendations for screening can be one of the barriers that affect women's participation in screening programmes. This study aims to assess the health-care provider's perception around cervical cancer screening. In-depth, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 16 health-care providers, from both public and private sectors in Az-Zawiya city, Libya, between February and July of 2014. The interviews were recorded and transcribed, then analysed using thematic analysis. Our findings suggest that health-care providers did not provide sufficient information regarding cervical cancer screening for women who attend health-care facilities. The results highlight the role played by health-care professionals in motivating women to attend cervical cancer screening programs, and the need for health education of health-care providers to offer a precious advice regarding the screening. On the other hand, health-care providers highlighted that implementation of reminding system of cervical cancer screening will support them to improve screening attendance. In addition, health-care providers stressed the necessity for educational and awareness campaigns of cervical cancer screening among Libyan women. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Making sense of energy advice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darby, Sarah [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Environmental Change Inst.

    2003-07-01

    This paper analyses the ways in which householders, advisers and evaluators make sense of domestic energy advice: how they interpret the process and how they assess its usefulness. Using constructivist learning theory as a guide, it emphasises the contribution made by personal experience and tacit knowledge (procedural knowledge) in developing householders' ability to understand and manage their energy use, and advisers' ability to interpret and respond to a situation. Energy advice programmes in the UK were chosen as subjects for study because they link householders, advisers, suppliers and installers in order to achieve objectives such as a reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions, a more energy-efficient housing stock, and improved health and comfort. Material from interviews with householders and advisers in contrasting programmes is analysed, to show some of the processes by which they learn and increase their understanding and abilities. It raises the issue of how householders become capable of teaching themselves and adapting to changing conditions. Careful use of qualitative research can provide valuable information on what and how householders learn, whether they have been formally advised or not. This information is worthwhile in its own right and can also be used to supplement quantitative data on installation of efficiency measures or behavioural change. It allows advisers and policy makers to reflect on their work more productively, to develop their programmes in the most suitable way for a given set of circumstances and to choose the most suitable criteria for reviewing programme effectiveness.

  5. Implicit normativity in scientific advice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folker, Anna Paldam; Andersen, Hanne; Sandøe, Peter

    2008-01-01

    nutritional science as an example, we identify three such implicit normative issues. The first concerns the aim of scientific advice: whether it is about avoiding harm or promoting good. The second concerns the intended beneficiaries of the advice: whether advice should be framed to benefit the society......This paper focuses on implicit normative considerations underlying scientific advice-those normative questions, decisions, or issues that scientific advisers and the general public are not fully aware of but that nevertheless have implications for the character of the advice given. Using...... as a whole or with special concern for the most vulnerable members of the population. The third consideration involves scientific advisers' attempts to balance the strengths of the scientific evidence with the expected consequences of scientific advice. We hope to promote more explicit discussion...

  6. Advice for the Newly Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the System Books & Resources Employment Issues Finding the Right Doctor Benefits and Insurance Relationships Advice for Loved Ones Sexual & Reproductive Health Sharing Your Diagnosis Support Groups For Clinicians ...

  7. Dentist-Perceived Barriers and Attractors to Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment Provided by Mental Health Providers in Dental Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, R E; Wojda, A K; Eddy, J M; Haydt, N C; Geiger, J F; Slep, A M Smith

    2018-02-01

    Over 1 in 5 dental patients report moderate to severe dental fear. Although the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for dental fear has been examined in over 20 randomized controlled trials-with 2 meta-analyses finding strong average effect sizes ( d > 1)-CBT has received almost no dissemination beyond the specialty clinics that tested it. The challenge, then, is not how to treat dental fear but how to disseminate and implement such an evidence-based treatment in a way that recognizes the rewards and barriers in the US health care system. This mixed-method study investigated the potential of disseminating CBT through care from a mental health provider from within the dental home, a practice known as evidence-based collaborative care (EBCC). Two preadoption studies were conducted with practicing dentists drawn from a self-organized Practice-Based Research Network in the New York City metropolitan area. The first comprised 3 focus groups ( N = 17), and the second involved the administration of a survey ( N = 46). Focus group participants agreed that CBT for dental fear is worthy of consideration but identified several concerns regarding its appeal, feasibility, and application in community dental practices. Survey participants indicated endorsement of factors promoting the use of EBCC as a mechanism for CBT dissemination, with no factors receiving less than 50% support. Taken together, these findings indicate that EBCC may be a useful framework through which an evidence-based treatment for dental fear treatment can be delivered.

  8. Giving advice to agents with hidden goals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rosman, Benjamin S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available estimates the performance of the user by comparing behaviour to the common sense model, and then based on this, provides advice in states where it is estimated to be needed. In this way, we regard advice as a data-driven policy selection mechanism.... Although the mechanism of action priors is defined as learning from policies Π, we consider trajectories as samples thereof, and use these to update the action prior model. We define Π as a set of expert policies, where an expert is considered...

  9. Dietary advice in HFE-hemochromatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van G.M.; Gosselink, I.M.G.

    2012-01-01

    This report aims to provide dietary advice which is based on what is known so far about the effect of a diet, particularly on iron overload in HFE-hemochromatosis. The reason that the recommendations in principle apply only to the group of individuals with HFE-gene mutations and are focused on the

  10. Best Practices for Cloud Provider Connectivity for R&E Users

    CERN Document Server

    Bos, Erik-Jan; Kleist, Josva; Foster, David; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2016-01-01

    R&E Networks have been in the business of serving the needs of research and education for decades. A recent development is that more and more R&E Networks are required to support the overall business of research and education for their customers. As R&E institutes have felt the pressure from governments to become more efficient and cost-effective, their interest has turned to cloud solutions for scientific applications as well as back-end office systems. The use of clouds, both commercial and private, is increasing rapidly. Large scale connectivity with cloud providers is a rather new but important area, in which R&E Networks are trying to find their way to add value. Connectivity with commercial cloud providers nowadays is an important topic, and it is becoming crucial that advice to policy makers, decision makers and procurers is given so that over time it will lead to a coherent, scalable and increasingly cost-effective solution for connecting to cloud service providers.

  11. Young children heed advice selectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakoczy, Hannes; Ehrling, Christoph; Harris, Paul L; Schultze, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    A rational strategy to update and revise one's uncertain beliefs is to take advice by other agents who are better informed. Adults routinely engage in such advice taking in systematic and selective ways depending on relevant characteristics such as reliability of advisors. The current study merged research in social and developmental psychology to examine whether children also adjust their initial judgment to varying degrees depending on the characteristics of their advisors. Participants aged 3 to 6 years played a game in which they made initial judgments, received advice, and subsequently made final judgments. They systematically revised their judgments in light of the advice, and they did so selectively as a function of advisor expertise. They made greater adjustments to their initial judgment when advised by an apparently knowledgeable informant. This suggests that the pattern of advice taking studied in social psychology has its roots in early development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Advising in austerity reflections on challenging times for advice agencies

    CERN Document Server

    Kirwan, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Advising in austerity provides a lively and thought-provoking account of the conditions, consequences and challenges of advice work in the UK. It examines how advisors negotiate the private troubles of those who come to Citizens Advice Bureaux (CAB) and construct ways forward.

  13. Using Advice from Multiple Sources to Revise and Improve Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Ilan; Milyavsky, Maxim

    2007-01-01

    How might people revise their opinions on the basis of multiple pieces of advice? What sort of gains could be obtained from rules for using advice? In the present studies judges first provided their initial estimates for a series of questions; next they were presented with several (2, 4, or 8) opinions from an ecological pool of advisory estimates…

  14. Antimalarial measures - type, sources of advice and compliance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-06-01

    Jun 1, 1994 ... acid supplementation.. Two of the pharmacies whose suggestions include. Maloprim (pyrimethamine + dapsone) made enquiries about sulphone sensitivity. Regimens were adjusted for size/weight. Table I. Prophylactic advice provided by 70 pharmacies. Advice. Adults Pregnant women Children. Daraclor.

  15. Cultural practices and medical beliefs in pre-revolutionary Russia compared to modern textbook advice: did Russian women breastfeed the "wrong" way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbeda-Wilson, Natalie; Powers, Nancy G

    2012-12-01

    Historical accounts of infant feeding practices can inform our understanding of current-day practices and the ways in which cultural traditions are incorporated into infant care. Pre-revolutionary Russian feeding practices have not previously been summarized, to our knowledge. The purpose of this study is to collect information about pre-revolutionary feeding practices. We may then be able to better understand the motivation for suboptimal practices and tailor feeding messages to the specific population. Materials were collected from libraries and from the Internet regarding medical, demographic, and ethnographic literature of the 19(th) century and early 21(st) century, primarily in Russian. Breastfeeding was pervasive in pre-revolutionary Russia, but suboptimal patterns such as withholding colostrum and early introduction of other foods and liquids were common. Breast problems were treated with folk remedies and comfort measures, some of which are similar to modern-day treatments. Around 1906, child rearing and infant feeding recommendations were subsumed by male physicians espousing the "scientific approach." Many of these medical recommendations were detrimental to the previously successful breastfeeding practices that, despite barriers, had allowed Russian women to continue breastfeeding for 2 years or longer.

  16. Women's knowledge of taking oral contraceptive pills correctly and of emergency contraception: effect of providing information leaflets in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, L F; Whitfield, M J

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND. About one third of all pregnancies are unplanned and 20% of all pregnancies end in abortion. More than 170,000 legal abortions are performed in the United Kingdom annually. Nearly all general practitioners provide contraceptive advice; the most commonly used form of reversible contraception is the oral contraceptive pill. AIM. The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with women's knowledge of taking the contraceptive pill correctly and of emergency contraception, ...

  17. Procurement risk management practices and supply chain performance among mobile phone service providers in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Adhiambo Okonjo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between procurement risk management practices and supply chain performance among mobile phone service providers in Kenya. The study specifically set out to establish the extent to which mobile phone service providers have implemented procurement risk management practices and to determine the relationship between procurement risk management practices and supply chain performance. The study adopted a descriptive study design by collecting data from the four (4 mobile telecommunication companies in Kenya using a self-administered questionnaire. Means, standard deviation, and regression analysis were used to analyze the data collected. The study established that most of the mobile phone service providers in Kenya had implemented procurement risk management practices. It was also clear that there was a very significant relationship between procurement risk management practices and supply chain performance.

  18. The interplay between research, research-based advice and the development of the Greenlandic Governmental environmental legislation and practices in respect to EIA and SEA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosbech, Anders

    Government decides to grant licensees for oil exploration the operators have to develop specific EIAs for all major activities. The activities shall be based on BEP (Best Environmental Practice) and BAT (Best Environmental Technology) principles, and operators shall conduct supplementary environmental...

  19. Nurses' attitude and practice in providing tobacco cessation care to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedharan, J; Muttappallymyalil, J; Venkatramana, M

    2010-06-01

    Patients respond very positively with nurses when they talk to them about their health related problems. This cross sectional study was carried out among nurses working in Gulf Medical College hospital and Research centre, Ajman, UAE to assess the their attitude in providing tobacco cessation counselling or advise to their patients and potential barriers they face in providing tobacco cessation care. 108 nurses participated in the study. Among the nurses 87% were females, the majority were aged between 25 and 34 years, and 46.3% had a work experience of less than 5 years. Among the nurses who participated in the survey, 99.1% felt that the hospital stay was a suitable time for nurses to create awareness on tobacco and health to the patients and had a positive attitude towards creating awareness on tobacco and health to the patients. Only 0.9% had a negative attitude towards creating awareness on tobacco and health and they felt that patients might not listen to them. All nurses, irrespective of their socio-demographic characteristics had a positive attitude to motivating patients to quit tobacco use. Currently, 70.4% regularly advise their patients to avoid tobacco products. Potential barriers pointed out by nurses were: lack of time (6.3%) patients may not appreciate it (90.6%) and not part of their job (3.1%). The study concludes that nurses have a positive attitude in providing tobacco cessation care to their patients and they can utilize their unique knowledge and know-how to promote tobacco cessation and prevent the spread of this public health crisis. Providing advice and support for tobacco cessation by nurses would increase the chance of patients stopping tobacco use. This will create an enabling environment and greater potential for public health persons to fight the epidemic with greater vigour

  20. Advice to young behavioral and cognitive scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Ronald G

    2008-02-01

    Modeled on Medawar's Advice to a Young Scientist [Medawar, P.B., 1979. Advice to a Young Scientist. Basic Books, New York], this article provides advice to behavioral and cognitive scientists. An important guiding principle is that the study of comparative cognition and behavior are natural sciences tasked with explaining nature. The author advises young scientists to begin with a natural phenomenon and then bring it into the laboratory, rather than beginning in the laboratory and hoping for an application in nature. He suggests collaboration as a way to include research outside the scientist's normal competence. He then discusses several guides to good science. These guides include Tinbergen's [Tinbergen, N., 1963. On aims and methods of ethology. Zeitschrift für Tierpsychologie, 20, 410-433. This journal was renamed Ethology in 1986. Also reprinted in Anim. Biol. 55, 297-321, 2005] four "why" questions, Platt's [Platt, J.R., 1964. Strong inference. Science 146, 347-353, (http://weber.ucsd.edu/~jmoore/courses/Platt1964.pdf)] notion of strong inference using multiple alternative hypotheses, and the idea that positive controls help scientists to follow Popper's [Popper, K.R., 1959. The Logic of Scientific Discovery. Basic Books, New York, p. 41] advice about disproving hypotheses. The author also recommends Strunk and White's [Strunk, W., White, E.B., 1979. The Elements of Style, third ed. Macmillan, New York] rules for sound writing, and he provides his personal advice on how to use the anticipation of peer review to improve research and how to decode editors' and reviewers' comments about submitted articles.

  1. PERCEPTIONS OF INDONESIAN PRACTICAL NURSES TOWARDS UPDATING CAPABILITY TO PROVIDE CARE: A QUALITATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Arofiati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Capability to provide care can be recognized as the combination of nursing knowledge, skills, and attitude of care which is dynamic. Objective: This study aims to explore the perceptions of practical nurses towards updating capability to provide care. Methods: A descriptive qualitative study was conducted to explore the deep understanding of practical nurses towards updating capability to provide care. Data were gathered using in-depth interview with 25 practical nurses from different areas of practices, three times focus group discussion (FGD and participant-observation. Qualitative content analysis model was applied to anaylze the data. Result: There were two themes emerged from data: 1 Internal perceptions of updating capacity to provide care, with three subthemes: Having great expectation, Being confidence as a professional nurse, and Developing Self-Initiation, 2 External contexts driving perception of practicing nurses, with two subthemes: Giving best care and Acquiring requirement. Conclusions: The findings indicated that updating capacity to provide care supports practical nurses to provide better nursing services to patients and meet the regulation of nursing professionalism.

  2. The role of Advanced Practice Providers in interdisciplinary oncology care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Rae Brana; McCoy, Kimberly

    2016-06-01

    Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) and Physician Assistants (PAs), generally referred to as Advanced Practice Providers (APPs), are fundamental to interdisciplinary oncology care. As the projected demand for oncology services is anticipated to outpace the supply of oncologists, APPs will become increasingly vital in the delivery of oncology care and services. The training, education, and scope of practice for APPs gives the interdisciplinary care team professionals that deliver high-quality clinical services and provide valuable contributions and leadership to health care quality improvement initiatives. Optimizing the integration of APPs in oncology care offers immense advantages towards improvement of clinical outcomes.

  3. The impact of nonphysician providers on diagnostic and interventional radiology practices: regulatory, billing, and compliance perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, C Matthew; Bowen, Michael A; Gilliland, Charles A; Walls, D Gail; Duszak, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The numbers of nurse practitioners and physician assistants are increasing throughout the entire health care enterprise, and a similar expansion continues within radiology. Some practices have instead embraced radiologist assistants. The increased volume of services rendered by this growing nonphysician provider subset of the health care workforce within and outside of radiology departments warrants closer review. The authors evaluate the recent literature and offer recommendations to radiology practices regarding both regulatory and scope-of-practice issues related to these professionals. Additionally, billing and compliance issues for care provided by nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and radiologist assistants are detailed. An analysis of the integration of these professionals into interventional and diagnostic radiology practices, as well as potential implications for medical education, is provided in the second part of this series. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Using Vignettes to Tap Into Moral Reasoning in Public Health Policy: Practical Advice and Design Principles From a Study on Food Advertising to Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Emily; Hoang, Sylvia; Cook, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe a process for designing and applying vignettes in public health policy research and practice. We developed this methodology for a study on moral reasoning underpinning policy debate on food advertising to children. Using vignettes prompted policy actors who were relatively entrenched in particular ways of speaking professionally about a controversial and ethically challenging issue to converse in a more authentic and reflective way. Vignettes hold benefits and complexities. They can focus attention on moral conflicts, draw out different types of evidence to support moral reasoning, and enable simultaneous consideration of real and ideal worlds. We suggest a process and recommendations on design features for crafting vignettes for public health policy. PMID:25121818

  5. Scope of practice review: providers for triage and assessment of spine-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boakye, Omenaa; Birney, Arden; Suter, Esther; Phillips, Leah Adeline; Suen, Victoria Ym

    2016-01-01

    This study explored which health care providers could be involved in centralized intake for patients with nonspecific low back pain to enhance access, continuity, and appropriateness of care. We reviewed the scope of practice regulations for a range of health care providers. We also conducted telephone interviews with 17 individuals representing ten provincial colleges and regulatory bodies to further understand providers' legislated scopes of practice. Activities relevant to triaging and assessing patients with low back pain were mapped against professionals' scope of practice. Family physicians and nurse practitioners have the most comprehensive scopes and can complete all restricted activities for spine assessment and triage, while the scope of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses are progressively narrower. Chiropractors, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, and athletic therapists are considered experts in musculoskeletal assessments and appear best suited for musculoskeletal specific assessment and triage. Other providers may play a complementary role depending on the individual patient needs. These findings indicate that an interprofessional assessment and triage team that includes allied health professionals would be a feasible option to create a centralized intake model. Implementation of such teams would require removing barriers that currently prevent providers from delivering on their full scope of practice.

  6. Neurology advanced practice providers: A position paper of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Heidi B; Fritz, Joseph V; Govindarajan, Raghav; Penfold Murray, Rebecca; Boyle, Kathryn B; Getchius, Thomas S D; Freimer, Miriam

    2015-08-01

    There are many factors driving health care reform, including unsustainable costs, poor outcomes, an aging populace, and physician shortages. These issues are particularly relevant to neurology. New reimbursement models are based on value and facilitated by the use of multidisciplinary teams. Integration of advanced practice providers (APPs) into neurology practice offers many advantages with new models of care. Conversely, there are many and varied challenges financially and logistically with these practice models. The American Academy of Neurology has formed a Work Group to address the needs of both neurologists and neurologic APPs and monitor the effect of APPs on quality and cost of neurologic care.

  7. Scope of practice review: providers for triage and assessment of spine-related disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boakye O

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Omenaa Boakye,1 Arden Birney,1 Esther Suter,1 Leah Adeline Phillips,2 Victoria YM Suen3 1Workforce Research and Evaluation, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, 2College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Alberta, Edmonton, 3Addiction and Mental Health SCN, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, AB, Canada Purpose: This study explored which health care providers could be involved in centralized intake for patients with nonspecific low back pain to enhance access, continuity, and appropriateness of care. Methods: We reviewed the scope of practice regulations for a range of health care providers. We also conducted telephone interviews with 17 individuals representing ten provincial colleges and regulatory bodies to further understand providers' legislated scopes of practice. Activities relevant to triaging and assessing patients with low back pain were mapped against professionals' scope of practice. Results: Family physicians and nurse practitioners have the most comprehensive scopes and can complete all restricted activities for spine assessment and triage, while the scope of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses are progressively narrower. Chiropractors, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, and athletic therapists are considered experts in musculoskeletal assessments and appear best suited for musculoskeletal specific assessment and triage. Other providers may play a complementary role depending on the individual patient needs. Conclusion: These findings indicate that an interprofessional assessment and triage team that includes allied health professionals would be a feasible option to create a centralized intake model. Implementation of such teams would require removing barriers that currently prevent providers from delivering on their full scope of practice. Keywords: scope of practice review, low back pain, integrated service model, centralized intake, interprofessional team

  8. Women's knowledge of taking oral contraceptive pills correctly and of emergency contraception: effect of providing information leaflets in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L F; Whitfield, M J

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND. About one third of all pregnancies are unplanned and 20% of all pregnancies end in abortion. More than 170,000 legal abortions are performed in the United Kingdom annually. Nearly all general practitioners provide contraceptive advice; the most commonly used form of reversible contraception is the oral contraceptive pill. AIM. The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with women's knowledge of taking the contraceptive pill correctly and of emergency contraception, and to investigate if their knowledge could be improved in general practice by providing women with Family Planning Association information leaflets. METHOD. An uncontrolled intervention study was performed in one rural and one urban English general practice, using a self-completion questionnaire that was initially administered to women attending their general practitioner for oral contraception over six months from 1 October 1992. The questionnaire asked for: sociodemographic information; knowledge of how late women can be taking an oral contraceptive pill and still be protected against unplanned pregnancy; for how many days after being late with a pill they need to use other precautions; sources and methods of emergency contraception; and for how long the methods are effective after the primary contraceptive failure. After completing the questionnaire women were given two leaflets: one about how to take their prescribed contraceptive pill correctly and one about emergency contraception. Three to 12 months later the same questionnaire was administered in the same manner. RESULTS. Of 449 women completing the first questionnaire, 233 (52%) completed the second questionnaire. Initially 71% of 406 women taking an oestrogen/progestogen combined pill knew about the '12-hour rule' and 17% knew about the 'seven-day rule'; giving women information about the pill they were taking increased the extent of knowledge about these rules among 212 respondents to 82% (P emergency contraception

  9. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of private sector immunization service providers in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, José E; Gaonkar, Narayan; Doshi, Vikas; Patni, Anas; Vyas, Shailee; Mazumdar, Vihang; Kosambiya, J K; Gupta, Satish; Watkins, Margaret

    2018-01-02

    India is responsible for 30% of the annual global cohort of unvaccinated children worldwide. Private practitioners provide an estimated 21% of vaccinations in urban centers of India, and are important partners in achieving high vaccination coverage. We used an in-person questionnaire and on-site observation to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices of private immunization service providers regarding delivery of immunization services in the urban settings of Surat and Baroda, in Gujarat, India. We constructed a comprehensive sampling frame of all private physician providers of immunization services in Surat and Baroda cities, by consulting vaccine distributors, local branches of physician associations, and published lists of private medical practitioners. All providers were contacted and asked to participate in the study if they provided immunization services. Data were collected using an in-person structured questionnaire and directly observing practices; one provider in each practice setting was interviewed. The response rate was 82% (121/147) in Surat, and 91% (137/151) in Baroda. Of 258 participants 195 (76%) were pediatricians, and 63 (24%) were general practitioners. Practices that were potential missed opportunities for vaccination (MOV) included not strictly following vaccination schedules if there were concerns about ability to pay (45% of practitioners), and not administering more than two injections in the same visit (60%). Only 22% of respondents used a vaccination register to record vaccine doses, and 31% reported vaccine doses administered to the government. Of 237 randomly selected vaccine vials, 18% had expired vaccine vial monitors. Quality of immunization services in Gujarat can be strengthened by providing training and support to private immunization service providers to reduce MOVs and improve quality and safety; other more context specific strategies that should be evaluated may involve giving feedback to providers on quality of services

  10. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding Rocky Mountain spotted fever among healthcare providers, Tennessee, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosites, Emily; Carpenter, L Rand; McElroy, Kristina; Lancaster, Mary J; Ngo, Tue H; McQuiston, Jennifer; Wiedeman, Caleb; Dunn, John R

    2013-01-01

    Tennessee has a high incidence of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), the most severe tick-borne rickettsial illness in the United States. Some regions in Tennessee have reported increased illness severity and death. Healthcare providers in all regions of Tennessee were surveyed to assess knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions regarding RMSF. Providers were sent a questionnaire regarding knowledge of treatment, diagnosis, and public health reporting awareness. Responses were compared by region of practice within the state, specialty, and degree. A high proportion of respondents were unaware that doxycycline is the treatment of choice in children ≤ 8 years of age. Physicians practicing in emergency medicine, internal medicine, and family medicine; and nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and providers practicing for < 20 years demonstrated less knowledge regarding RMSF. The gaps in knowledge identified between specialties, designations, and years of experience can help target education regarding RMSF.

  11. 5 CFR 1304.4607 - Advice to former Government employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... PROCEDURES POST EMPLOYMENT CONFLICT OF INTEREST § 1304.4607 Advice to former Government employees. The Office of General Counsel, OMB, has the responsibility for providing assistance promptly to former...

  12. Comparison of Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) Measure Adherence Between Oncology Fellows, Advanced Practice Providers, and Attending Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jason; Zhang, Tian; Shah, Radhika; Kamal, Arif H; Kelley, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Quality improvement measures are uniformly applied to all oncology providers, regardless of their roles. Little is known about differences in adherence to these measures between oncology fellows, advance practice providers (APP), and attending physicians. We investigated conformance across Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) measures for oncology fellows, advance practice providers, and attending physicians at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (DVAMC). Using data collected from the Spring 2012 and 2013 QOPI cycles, we abstracted charts of patients and separated them based on their primary provider. Descriptive statistics and the chi-square test were calculated for each QOPI measure between fellows, advanced practice providers (APPs), and attending physicians. A total of 169 patients were reviewed. Of these, 31 patients had a fellow, 39 had an APP, and 99 had an attending as their primary oncology provider. Fellows and attending physicians performed similarly on 90 of 94 QOPI metrics. High-performing metrics included several core QOPI measures including documenting consent for chemotherapy, recommending adjuvant chemotherapy when appropriate, and prescribing serotonin antagonists when prescribing emetogenic chemotherapies. Low-performing metrics included documentation of treatment summary and taking action to address problems with emotional well-being by the second office visit. Attendings documented the plan for oral chemotherapy more often (92 vs. 63%, P=0.049). However, after the chart audit, we found that fellows actually documented the plan for oral chemotherapy 88% of the time (p=0.73). APPs and attendings performed similarly on 88 of 90 QOPI measures. The quality of oncology care tends to be similar between attendings and fellows overall; some of the significant differences do not remain significant after a second manual chart review, highlighting that the use of manual data collection for QOPI analysis is an imperfect system, and there may

  13. Provider Attitudes and Practices toward Sexual and Reproductive Health Care for Young Women with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmerski, Traci M; Borrero, Sonya; Sawicki, Gregory S; Abebe, Kaleab Z; Jones, Kelley A; Tuchman, Lisa K; Weiner, Daniel J; Pilewski, Joseph M; Orenstein, David M; Miller, Elizabeth

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the attitudes and practices of cystic fibrosis (CF) providers toward sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care in young women with CF. Adult and pediatric US CF providers were sent an online survey exploring their attitudes toward SRH importance, SRH care practices, and barriers/facilitators to SRH care in adolescent and/or young adult women. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to analyze results. Attitudes toward the importance of SRH care in patients with CF and self-report of practice patterns of SRH discussion. Respondents (n = 196) were 57% pediatric (111/196) and 24% adult physicians (48/196) and 19% nurse practitioners (NPs)/physician assistants (PAs) (37/196). Ninety-four percent of respondents believed SRH was important for female patients with CF (184/196). More than 75% believed SRH care should be standardized within the CF care model (147/196) and 41% believed the CF team should have the primary role in SRH discussion and care (80/196). For many CF-specific SRH topics, discrepancies emerged between how important respondents believed these were to address and how often they reported discussing these topics in practice. Significant differences in SRH attitudes and practices were present between adult and pediatric physicians. The most significant barriers to SRH care identified were lack of time (70%, 137/196) and the presence of family in clinic room (54%, 106/196). Potential facilitators included training materials for providers (68%, 133/196) and written (71%, 139/196) or online (76%, 149/196) educational resources for patients. CF providers perceive SRH topics as important to discuss, but identify barriers to routine discussion in current practice. Providers endorsed provider training and patient educational resources as means to improve SRH delivery. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Providers perspectives on self-regulation impact their use of responsive feeding practices in child care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Dipti A; Speirs, Katherine E; Williams, Natalie A; Ramsay, Samantha; McBride, Brent A; Hatton-Bowers, Holly

    2017-11-01

    Supporting children's self-regulation in eating through caregivers' practice of responsive feeding is paramount to obesity prevention, and while much attention has been given to supporting children's self-regulation in eating through parents' responsive feeding practices in the home setting, little attention has been given to this issue in childcare settings. This qualitative study examines childcare providers' perspectives on using responsive feeding practices with young children (2-5years). Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with providers until saturation was reached. Data was analyzed using thematic analysis. The final sample included 18 providers who were employed full-time in Head Start or state-licensed center-based childcare programs, cared for children (2-5y), and were directly responsible for serving meals and snacks. Providers were primarily (67%) employed in childcare programs that served children from low-income families and received reimbursement for meals and snacks from the US Department of Agriculture's Child and Adult Care Food Program. Three factors emerged that shaped childcare providers' experiences using responsive feeding practices: the providers' perspectives about whether or not young children can self-regulate food intake, their understanding of Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) portion size regulations, and the availability of food at the center where they worked. Future research should examine how childcare providers' understanding of children's ability to self-regulate their food intake, the appropriate use of the CACFP regulations in relationship to serving sizes, and having food available to offer seconds promotes providers' use of responsive feeding practices in center-based childcare programs and children's dietary behaviors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sustained Forced Sale Value Opinion Advice in Nigerian Valuation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sultan

    Sustained Forced Sale Value Opinion Advice in Nigerian. Valuation Practice: The Recurring Face of a Bad Coin. Terzungwe Timothy Dugeri. Department of Estate Management, Kaduna State Univeristy. Abstract. This study, the first in a series testing for standardisation of practice among professional Valuers, explores the ...

  16. Nutritional advice from George Orwell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Hedegaard

    2015-01-01

    challenge the underlying rationalities and assumptions of the rational yet “knowledge deficient” individual consumer implicitly present in much nutritional advice - both past and present. The disregard of social mechanisms, and therefore implicitly issues of class, could indicate a general “de......-socialization” of nutritional advice also in its dispersal through various health-promotion initiatives and campaigns, which raises serious questions about the usefulness of much nutritional advice, already tentatively questioned by some nutritionist (Burr et al., 2007) as well as “food” sociologist (Smith & Holm 2010).......Despite of a general consensus and recognition of the importance of the “social gradient” on nutritional standards and ultimately people's health, (WHO 2013, Marmot & Wilkinson 1999, Marmot et.al 1991, Budrys 2003, Ross & Wu 1995), the body of literature identifying and describing the actual...

  17. Vertical integration of teaching in Australian general practice--a survey of regional training providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, Nigel P; Frank, Oliver; Linn, Andrew M; Anderson, Katrina; Meertens, Sarah

    2011-06-06

    To examine vertical integration of teaching and clinical training in general practice and describe practical examples being undertaken by Australian general practice regional training providers (RTPs). A qualitative study of all RTPs in Australia, mid 2010. All 17 RTPs in Australia responded. Eleven had developed some vertical integration initiatives. Several encouraged registrars to teach junior doctors and medical students, others encouraged general practitioner supervisors to run multilevel educational sessions, a few coordinated placements, linkages and support across their region. Three RTPs provided case studies of vertical integration. Many RTPs in Australia use vertical integration of teaching in their training programs. RTPs with close associations with universities and rural clinical schools seem to be leading these initiatives.

  18. Palliative Care Providers' Practices Surrounding Psychological Distress Screening and Treatment: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Elissa; Eghan, Claude; Moran, Sheila; Herr, Keela; Reid, M Carrington

    2017-01-01

    To investigate how inpatient palliative care teams nationwide currently screen for and treat psychological distress. A web-based survey was sent to inpatient palliative care providers of all disciplines nationwide asking about their practice patterns regarding psychological assessment and treatment. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and responses, and analysis of variance was conducted to determine whether certain disciplines were more likely to utilize specific treatment modalities. A total of N = 236 respondents were included in the final analyses. Providers reported that they encounter psychological distress regularly in their practice and that they screen for distress using multiple methods. When psychological distress is detected, providers reported referring patients to an average of 3 different providers (standard deviation = 1.46), most frequently a social worker (69.6%) or chaplain (65.3%) on the palliative care team. A total of 84.6% of physicians and 54.5% of nurse practitioners reported that they prescribe anxiolytics or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors to patients experiencing psychological distress. This study revealed significant variability and redundancy in how palliative care teams currently manage psychological distress. The lack of consistency potentially stems from the variability in the composition of palliative care teams across care settings and the lack of scientific evidence for best practices in psychological care in palliative care. Future research is needed to establish best practices in the screening and treatment of psychological distress for patients receiving palliative care.

  19. Student-selected components in surgery: providing practical experience and increasing student confidence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Falk, G A

    2009-09-01

    Reviews of the medical school curriculum in the UK and Ireland have recommended the introduction of student-selected components (SSCs). The Department of Surgery in The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) has introduced a 6-week surgical SSC, which aims to develop practical clinical skills, provide mentorship and prepare students for internship.

  20. Provider Strategies and the Greening of Consumption Practices: Exploring the Role of Companies in Sustainable Consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaargaren, G.; Koppen, van C.S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Making consumption practices more sustainable means incorporating new ideas, information and products into existing consumption routines of citizen-consumers. For a successful incorporation process it is crucial that companies, as main providers of new products and services, develop an active

  1. United States Air Force Health Care Provider Practices: Skin Testing for Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-03

    Infection Control Manager Nurse Manager, Family Practice Clinic Infection Control Assistant Manager Clinical Nurse, Obstetrical Ward Clinical...172 Air Force health care providers at a mid- level medical treatment facility including: medical doctors (MD), doctors of osteopathy (DO...of osteopathy , physician assistants, nurse practitioners and independent duty medical technicians. Knowledge of tuberculosis skin testing: shall be

  2. The Relationship between Practices and Child Care Providers' Beliefs Related to Child Feeding and Obesity Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanigan, Jane D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between child care practices and child care provider knowledge and beliefs about their role in supporting children's healthful eating. Design: Longitudinal design using survey and observation data from baseline and year 1 of the Encouraging Healthy Activity and Eating in Childcare Environments (ENHANCE) pilot…

  3. Delivering effective science communication: advice from a professional science communicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Sam

    2017-10-01

    Science communication is becoming ever more prevalent, with more and more scientists expected to not only communicate their research to a wider public, but to do so in an innovative and engaging manner. Given the other commitments that researchers and academics are required to fulfil as part of their workload models, it is unfair to be expect them to also instantly produce effective science communication events and activities. However, by thinking carefully about what it is that needs to be communicated, and why this is being done, it is possible to develop high-quality activities that are of benefit to both the audience and the communicator(s). In this paper, I present some practical advice for developing, delivering and evaluating effective science communication initiatives, based on over a decade of experience as being a professional science communicator. I provide advice regarding event logistics, suggestions on how to successfully market and advertise your science communication initiatives, and recommendations for establishing effective branding and legacy. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In-Center Nutrition Practices of Clinics within a Large Hemodialysis Provider in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Debbie; Burgess, Mary; Stasios, Maria; Brosch, Becky; Wilund, Ken; Shen, Sa; Kistler, Brandon

    2016-05-06

    Eating during hemodialysis treatment remains a controversial topic. It is perceived that more restrictive practices in the United States contribute to poorer nutritional status and elevated mortality compared with some other parts of the world. However, in-center food practices in the United States have not been previously described. In 2011, we conducted a survey of clinic practices and clinician (dietitian, facility administrator, and medical director) opinions related to in-center food consumption within a large dialysis organization. After the initial survey, we provided clinicians with educational materials about eating during treatment. In 2014, we performed a follow-up survey. Differences in practices and opinions were analyzed using chi-squared tests and logistic regression. In 2011, 343 of 1199 clinics (28.6%) did not allow eating during treatment, 222 clinics (18.2%) did not allow drinking during treatment, and 19 clinics (1.6%) did not allow eating at the facility before or after treatment. In 2014, the proportion of clinics that did not allow eating during treatment had declined to 22.6% (321 of 1422 clinics), a significant shift in practice (Pnutritional status. Among clinicians, a higher percentage encouraged eating during treatment (53.1% versus 37.4%; P<0.05), and facility administrators and medical directors were less concerned about the seven reasons commonly cited for restricting eating during treatment in 2014 compared with 2011 (P<0.05 for all). We found that 28.6% and 22.6% of hemodialysis clinics within the United States restricted eating during treatment in 2011 and 2014, respectively, a rate more than double that found in an international cohort on which we previously published. However, practices and clinician opinions are shifting toward allowing patients to eat. Additional research is warranted to understand the effect that these practices have on patient outcomes and outline best practices. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of

  5. Moodle: Practical Advices for University Teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Kuran, Mehmet Şükrü

    2017-01-01

    for students to solve after the lectures, and that the fully potential of the platform is not exploited. In this paper we demonstrate some of the functionalities that university teachers can make use of to increase the learning experience of the students. For each of the features we demonstrate, we both show...... how it can be used, and give some didactic considerations. We have tested all of the presented features ourself in a blended learning course carried out as part of an Erasmus+ Strategic Partnership.......Moodle is a widely used Learning Management System, with a market share of 20% in the US/Canada and 65% in Europe. However, it is our experience that the system is too often used just as a website or repository for classical teaching material such as literature references, slides and problems...

  6. Moodle: Practical Advices for University Teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Kuran, Mehmet Şükrü

    2017-01-01

    Moodle is a widely used Learning Management System, with a market share of 20% in the US/Canada and 65% in Europe. However, it is our experience that the system is too often used just as a website or repository for classical teaching material such as literature references, slides and problems...

  7. Advice in the Abortion Decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscutoff, Sidney A.; Elms, Alan C.

    1975-01-01

    Subjects in this study were asked to report the number of contacts-for-advice they had made when forming decisions to have a therapeutic abortion, or to carry a pregnancy to term. As predicted, the abortion group differed strongly from both other groups on most questions. (Author)

  8. Discharge communication practices and healthcare provider and patient preferences, satisfaction and comprehension: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, Harvey; Barker, Anna; Ritchie, Edward; Hitchcock, Karen; Gibbs, Harry; Holton, Sara

    2017-09-07

    To systematically review the available evidence about hospital discharge communication practices and identify which practices were preferred by patients and healthcare providers, improved patient and provider satisfaction, and increased patients' understanding of their medical condition. OVID Medline, Web of Science, ProQuest, PubMed and CINAHL plus. Databases were searched for peer-reviewed, English-language papers, published to August 2016, of empirical research using quantitative or qualitative methods. Reference lists in the papers meeting inclusion criteria were searched to identify further papers. Of the 3489 articles identified, 30 met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Much research to date has focused on the use of printed material and person-based discharge communication methods including verbal instructions (either in person or via telephone calls). Several studies have examined the use of information technology (IT) such as computer-generated and video-based discharge communication practices. Utilizing technology to deliver discharge information is preferred by healthcare providers and patients, and improves patients' understanding of their medical condition and discharge instructions. Well-designed IT solutions may improve communication, coordination and retention of information, and lead to improved outcomes for patients, their families, caregivers and primary healthcare providers as well as expediting the task for hospital staff.

  9. EMS providers' perceptions of safety climate and adherence to safe work practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseo, Laura J; Murray, Kate A; White, Laura F; Dyer, Sophia; Mitchell, Patricia A; Fernandez, William G

    2012-01-01

    Occupational injuries are an important source of morbidity for emergency medical services (EMS) providers. Previous work has shown that employee perceptions of an organization's commitment to safety (i.e., safety climate) correlate with adherence to safe practices. To assess the association between perceived safety climate and compliance with safety procedures in an urban EMS system with >100,000 calls/year. EMS providers were issued a self-administered survey that included questions on demographics, years of experience, perceived safety climate, and adherence to safety procedures. Safety climate was assessed with a 20-item validated instrument. Adherence to safety procedures was assessed with a nine-item list of safety behaviors. Strict adherence to safety procedures was defined as endorsing "agree" or "strongly agree" on 80% of items. The effect of safety climate on compliance with safe practices was estimated using multiple logistic regression. One hundred ninety-six of 221 providers (89%) completed surveys; 74% were male; the median age was 36-40 years; and the median amount of experience was 8 years. One hundred twenty-seven of 196 respondents (65%) reported strict adherence to safe work practice. Factor analysis confirmed the original six-factor grouping of questions; frequent safety-related feedback/training was significantly associated with safe practices (odds ratio [OR] = 2.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-4.51). EMS workers perceiving a high degree of perceived safety climate was associated with twofold greater odds of self-reported level of strict adherence to safe work practices. Frequent safety-related feedback/training was the one dimension of safety climate that had the strongest association with adherence to safe workplace behaviors.

  10. Current Knowledge and Practice of Pediatric Providers in Umbilical Cord Blood Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Amy E; Fonstad, Rachel; Spellman, Stephen; Tullius, Zoe; Chaudhury, Sonali

    2018-02-01

    More than 35 000 umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplants have been performed worldwide, prompting the development of private and public banks to collect and store UCB cells. We hypothesized that pediatricians, who are uniquely poised to discuss UCB banking (UCBB) during prenatal or sibling visits, rarely do so. Through distribution of a 26-question electronic survey to general and subspecialty pediatric providers, we assessed baseline knowledge and conversations about UCBB. A total of 473 providers completed the survey; only 22% of physicians ever discussed UCBB with expectant parents. The majority responded that autologous UCB transplants were indicated in malignant (73%) and nonmalignant (61%) conditions; however, these are rare indications. Providers practicing >10 years were more likely to address UCBB ( P ≤ .001), whereas younger and female general pediatric providers were significantly less likely ( P < .001). Overall, pediatric providers rarely speak to families about UCBB, and we believe that they can be better informed to its current clinical utility.

  11. Ways of Doing: Restorative Practices, Governmentality, and Provider Conduct in Post-Apartheid Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Bronwyn; Eyles, John; Goudge, Jane

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we consider the conduct of post-apartheid health care in a policy context directed toward entrenching democracy, ensuring treatment-adherent patients, and creating a healthy populace actively responsible for their own health. We ask how tuberculosis treatment, antiretroviral therapy, and maternal services are delivered within South Africa's health system, an institutional site of colonial and apartheid injustice, and democratic reform. Using Foucauldian and post-Foucauldian notions of governmentality, we explore provider ways of doing to, for, and with patients in three health subdistricts. Although restorative provider engagements are expected in policy, older authoritarian and paternalistic norms persist in practice. These challenge and reshape, even 'undo' democratic assertions of citizenship, while producing compliant, self-responsible patients. Alongside the need to address pervasive structural barriers to health care, a restorative approach requires community participation, provider accountability, and a health system that does with providers as much as providers who do with patients.

  12. Oncology healthcare providers' knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors regarding LGBT health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Gina; Sanchez, Julian A; Lancaster, Johnathan M; Wilson, Lauren E; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Schabath, Matthew B

    2016-10-01

    There are limited data on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) healthcare experiences and interactions with the providers. This study assessed knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors of oncology providers regarding LGBT health. A 32-item web-based survey was emailed to 388 oncology providers at a single institution. The survey assessed: demographics, knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors. 108 providers participated in the survey (28% response rate). LGBT cultural competency at the institution. Results from the open comments section identified multiple misconceptions. This study revealed knowledge gaps about LGBT health risks. Cultural competency training may aid oncology providers to understand the need to inquire about patients' gender identity and sexual orientation. Health care providers who incorporate the routine collection of gender identity and sexual orientation (SOGI) in their patient history taking may improve patient care by offering tailored education and referrals. While identifying as LGBT does not in itself increase risk for adverse health outcomes, this population tends to have increased risk behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Opioid-prescribing practices and provider confidence recognizing opioid analgesic abuse in HIV primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Paula J; Little, Sherri; Botsko, Michael; Hersh, David; Thawley, Robert E; Egan, James E; Mitty, Jennifer; Boverman, Joshua; Fiellin, David A

    2011-03-01

    Pain syndromes are common in HIV-infected patients, who also are commonly affected by opioid-use disorders. Although opioids can treat pain, prescribers must consider the consequences of iatrogenic or missed addiction diagnoses. In an anonymous online survey, we asked a national sample of HIV providers about their demographics, experience, and patients, and their practices and attitudes about chronic opioid therapy, addiction, and confidence recognizing opioid analgesic abuse. One hundred six providers reported 28% of their patients had chronic pain; 21% received opioid analgesics; 37% were HIV infected by injecting drug use; and 12% were addicted to prescription opioids. Few providers followed recommended guidelines for chronic opioid therapy in nonmalignant pain. Mean provider confidence was 6.3 on a scale of 10. Higher confidence was associated with provider sex (P opioids (P = 0.005), and prescribing buprenorphine (P = 0.009). HIV providers seldom follow recommended guidelines for opioid prescribing and have limited confidence in their ability to recognize opioid analgesic abuse. Clinical practices developed to reduce misuse and increase early detection and treatment of opioid dependence are associated with higher confidence. The implementation of guidelines to improve the quality of opioid prescribing in HIV clinics may aid in the diagnosis of addictive disorders and prevent their adverse outcomes.

  14. Provider practices impact adequate diagnosis of sleep disorders in children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sejal V; Simakajornboon, Narong; Glauser, Tracy A

    2013-05-01

    Sleep disorders significantly affect the lives of children with epilepsy. Limited data exist about provider practices concerning detection and correct diagnosis of sleep problems in epilepsy. The authors conducted this study to identify and correlate sleep screening methods, referral practices, referral reasons and final sleep diagnoses. They identified that 94% of the providers who had referred patients to the sleep center of a major children's hospital used routine screening and 70% of them used 2 to 3 screening questions. This method, however, underidentified the patients at risk for sleep disorders. Moreover, in 40% of the children, sleep disorder was incorrectly anticipated, based on the initial symptoms. Of these children, 10% had no sleep disorder and 30% had unexpected sleep disorder. The authors conclude that better screening methods should be used for sleep disorders. Once identified, these patients should have formal sleep evaluation and management. Further studies are needed to develop screening questionnaires.

  15. A quantitative analysis of the quality and content of the health advice in popular Australian magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Amanda; Smith, David; Peel, Roseanne; Robertson, Jane; Kypri, Kypros

    2017-06-01

    To examine how health advice is provided in popular magazines and the quality of that advice. A prospective quantitative analysis of the quality of health advice provided in Australian magazines between July and December 2011 was conducted. A rating instrument was adapted from the Media Doctor Australia rating tool used to assess quality of health news reporting. Criteria included: recommends seeing a doctor; advice based on reliable evidence; advice clear and easily applied; benefits presented meaningfully; potential harms mentioned; evidence of disease mongering; availability and cost of treatments; obvious advertising; vested interest, and anecdotal evidence. 163 health advice articles were rated showing a wide variation in the quality of advice presented between magazines. Magazines with 'health' in the title, rated most poorly with only 36% (26/73) of these articles presenting clear and meaningful advice and 52% (38/73) giving advice based on reliable evidence. Australian magazines, especially those with health in the title, generally presented poor quality, unreliable health advice. Teen magazine Dolly provided the highest quality advice. Consumers need to be aware of this when making health choices. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  16. Informal allopathic provider knowledge and practice regarding control and prevention of TB in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Qazi S; Ahmed, Syed M; Islam, Mohammad A; Chowdhury, Anita S; Siddiquea, Bodrun N; Husain, Mohammad A

    2014-09-01

    BRAC (formerly Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee), in collaboration with the National Tuberculosis Control Programme, provides one full-day training on TB to make informal allopathic providers knowledgeable for managing TB in rural Bangladesh. This study explored the knowledge and practices of the providers receiving the above training in the control and prevention of TB. The study was conducted in 30 subdistricts, with 30 trained and 30 untrained providers randomly selected from each subdistrict. Approximately 3% (49/1800) did not provide complete information. Pre-tested structured and semi-structured questionnaires were used. TB was commonly perceived as a disease of only males (66.1%, 1157/1751). Only one-quarter knew about the bacterial cause of TB. Very few providers (2.1%, 36) had adequate knowledge regarding prevention of TB. They also lacked knowledge about TB treatment duration (71.6%, 1253), the meaning of DOTS (directly observed treatment, short course) (26.0%, 455) and multidrug resistance (20.6%, 360). Antibiotics (79.7%, 1396) and cough syrup (75.0%, 1313) were commonly prescribed by providers despite symptoms suggestive of TB. However, 70.2% (613) and 74.5% (650) of trained providers' knowledge and practice scores were equal to or more than the mean scores (≥6.97 and ≥6.6, respectively), whereas they were only 49.5% (435) and 64.2% (563), respectively, among untrained providers (ppreventing TB efficiently. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Healthcare Provider Views on Transitioning From Task Shifting to Advanced Practice Nursing in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mboineki, Joanes Faustine; Zhang, Weihong

    The Tanzanian health sector suffers from shortages of healthcare workers as well as uneven distribution of healthcare workers in urban and rural areas. Task shifting-delegation of tasks from professionals to other healthcare team members with less training, such as medical attendants-is practiced, compromising quality of care. Advanced practice nursing is underutilized. The purpose of this study was to explore the views of nurses and physicians on current responses to shortages of healthcare workers and the potential for utilization of advanced practice nurses. A descriptive, qualitative design was used. Purposeful sampling was used to select 20 participants. An in-depth interview guide was used to obtain information. Interviews were conducted in Swahili or English. Content analysis was used to identify themes. Shortage of human resources in rural primary healthcare facilities was identified as a major rationale for implementation of the advanced practice nurse practitioner role because the current health providers in rural health facilities are less trained and doctors are not ready to work in these settings. Opposition from physicians is expected during the course of implementing the nurse practitioner role. Professional bodies and government should reach consensus before the implementation of this role in such a way that they should agree on scope and standards of practice of nurse practitioners in Tanzania. Shortage of human resources for health is greater in rural primary healthcare facilities. Task shifting in Tanzania is neither effective nor legally recognized. Transition to advanced practice nursing roles-particularly the nurse practitioner role-can facilitate provision of optimal care. Nurse practitioners should be prepared to work in rural primary healthcare facilities.

  18. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of private sector providers of tuberculosis care: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, C A; Duncan, G; Saini, B

    2011-08-01

    The past decade has seen a significant increase in private sector provision of tuberculosis (TB)care. While patients often seek and select treatment from private providers at significant out-of-pocket expense,treatment outcomes remain largely unknown. To investigate the knowledge, attitudes and practices of private sector TB care providers in high burden countries. Medline, PubMed, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases were searched using Medical Subject Headings terms,Emtree terms and key words. Searches were limited to the English language and published between 1998 and week 2 of November 2009. Studies were included if they reported the knowledge, attitudes or practice behaviours of private health care providers working in one of 22 high-TB-burden countries. Each included study was critically assessed using a structured data extraction tool. Data extracted included the study setting, objective, design, sample, response rate, outcomes and limitations. The 34 studies that met review inclusion criteriaen compassed diverse study methods and designs.All categories of TB care providers lacked comprehensive knowledge of national treatment guidelines. Procedures for referral, treatment monitoring, record keeping and case holding were not systematically implemented.However, there was a high degree of willingness to collaborate with national TB programmes. Research using standardised data collection methods may assist in identifying gaps in knowledge and practice among all providers of TB care. Further studies in developing and evaluating needs-based interventions should be undertaken; systematic reviews of such studies may then assist in strategic decision making in public-private mix DOTS expansion.

  19. Patients, evidence and genes: an exploration of GPs' perspectives on gene-based personalized nutrition advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, Laura; Te Molder, Hedwig; Hiddink, Gerrit

    2008-12-01

    Nutrigenomics science examines the response of individuals to food compounds using post-genomics technology. It is expected that in the future, personalized nutrition advice can be provided based on information about genetic make-up. Gene-based personalized nutrition advice emerges at the junction of different disciplines and technologies and may directly influence people's lives. Therefore, public concern is to be expected. Because GPs are gatekeepers of health care, their involvement in early stages of the development process is desirable. In 2006, 15 GPs were interviewed to collect their perceived barriers and opportunities towards involvement in gene-based nutrition advice. The interviews were qualitatively analysed with use of Atlas.ti, a qualitative analysis programme. The participants held a mostly critical view towards such personalized nutrition advice. They argued that findings of nutritional studies lacked robustness, were not based on patients' needs and were often equivocal. And that a patient central perspective urges them to question consequences for patients. Participants argued that GPs should be involved in selecting and monitoring patients in nutrigenomics studies. Early involvement of GPs in the development process is needed to allow for the integration of their practical, social and ethical considerations in the technical and scientific agendas. However, the background of their critical attitude towards nutrigenomics-based personalized nutrition, and nutrition advice more generally, has to be explored further. To facilitate a joint learning process and to improve socio-technical decision making with respect to this innovation, initiatives that allow different stakeholders to exchange their perspectives should be organized.

  20. Primary Care Providers' Knowledge and Practices of Diabetes Management During Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mujtaba; Adams, Alexandra; Hossain, Md Anwar; Sutin, David; Han, Benjamin Hyun

    2016-01-01

    There are an estimated 3.5 million Muslims in North America. During the holy month of Ramadan, healthy adult Muslims are to fast from predawn to after sunset. While there are exemptions for older and sick adults, many adults with diabetes fast during Ramadan. However, there are risks associated with fasting and specific management considerations for patients with diabetes. We evaluated provider practices and knowledge regarding the management of patients with diabetes who fast during Ramadan. A 15-question quality improvement survey based on a literature review and the American Diabetes Association guidelines was developed and offered to providers at the outpatient primary care and geriatric clinics at an inner-city hospital in New York City. Forty-five providers completed the survey. Most respondents did not ask their Muslim patients with diabetes if they were fasting during the previous Ramadan. Knowledge of fasting practices during Ramadan was variable, and most felt uncomfortable managing patients with diabetes during Ramadan. There is room for improvement in educating providers about specific cultural and medical issues regarding fasting for patients with diabetes during Ramadan. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Advice Giving: A Subtle Pathway to Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaerer, Michael; Tost, Leigh P; Huang, Li; Gino, Francesca; Larrick, Rick

    2018-01-01

    We propose that interpersonal behaviors can activate feelings of power, and we examine this idea in the context of advice giving. Specifically, we show (a) that advice giving is an interpersonal behavior that enhances individuals' sense of power and (b) that those who seek power are motivated to engage in advice giving. Four studies, including two experiments ( N = 290, N = 188), an organization-based field study ( N = 94), and a negotiation simulation ( N = 124), demonstrate that giving advice enhances the adviser's sense of power because it gives the adviser perceived influence over others' actions. Two of our studies further demonstrate that people with a high tendency to seek power are more likely to give advice than those with a low tendency. This research establishes advice giving as a subtle route to a sense of power, shows that the desire to feel powerful motivates advice giving, and highlights the dynamic interplay between power and advice.

  2. [Elements of comprehensiveness in the professional health practices provided to rural women victims of violence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Marta Cocco; Lopes, Marta Julia Marques

    2012-10-01

    The present article refers to a qualitative study that was performed with the objective to identify and analyze the practice of healthcare professionals regarding rural women victims of violence, under the perspective of comprehensive care, in cities located in southern Rio Grande do Sul state. Participants were healthcare professionals and workers from health services who work in rural areas. The information was generated through interviews and analyzed using the thematic mode. In regards to care elements provided to rural women who are victims of violence, the study pointed out not only the relational strategies - welcoming, attachment and dialogue - but also the construction of collective actions through group activities, recognized as supporting health promotion, as well as individual and collective empowerment in the dimension of violent events. It was found that the professionals' care practices are aimed at focusing care on the rural women, establishing a relationship between the worker and client to produce comprehensiveness of care.

  3. Frequent attenders in general practice: problem solving treatment provided by nurses [ISRCTN51021015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Oppen P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need for assistance from primary care mental health workers in general practice in the Netherlands. General practitioners (GPs experience an overload of frequent attenders suffering from psychological problems. Problem Solving Treatment (PST is a brief psychological treatment tailored for use in a primary care setting. PST is provided by nurses, and earlier research has shown that it is a treatment at least as effective as usual care. However, research outcomes are not totally satisfying. This protocol describes a randomized clinical trial on the effectiveness of PST provided by nurses for patients in general practice. The results of this study, which currently being carried out, will be presented as soon as they are available. Methods/design This study protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of PST and usual care compared to usual care only. Patients, 18 years and older, who present psychological problems and are frequent attenders in general practice are recruited by the research assistant. The participants receive questionnaires at baseline, after the intervention, and again after 3 months and 9 months. Primary outcome is the reduction of symptoms, and other outcomes measured are improvement in problem solving skills, psychological and physical well being, daily functioning, social support, coping styles, problem evaluation and health care utilization. Discussion Our results may either confirm that PST in primary care is an effective way of dealing with emotional disorders and a promising addition to the primary care in the UK and USA, or may question this assumption. This trial will allow an evaluation of the effects of PST in practical circumstances and in a rather heterogeneous group of primary care patients. This study delivers scientific support for this use and therefore indications for optimal treatment and referral.

  4. Bedside resource stewardship in disasters: a provider's dilemma practicing in an ethical gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    During disasters, clinicians may be forced to play dual roles, as both a provider and an allocator of scarce resources. At present, a clear framework to govern resource stewardship at the bedside is lacking. Clinicians who find themselves practicing in this ethical gap between clinical and public health ethics can experience significant moral distress. One provider describes her experience allocating an oxygen tank in the intensive care unit at a hospital in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, immediately following the 2010 earthquake. Using a clinical vignette and reflective narrative she attempts to identify the factors that influenced her allocation decision, opening up the factors for commentary and debate by an ethicist. A better paradigm for the ethical care of patients during disasters is needed to better guide provider choices in the future.

  5. Advice on Writing a Scientific Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, C.

    2006-04-01

    What makes one author a good communicator and another a poor one? What turns out one manuscript a swift editorial task, and another an editorial nightmare? Based on direct experience from the manuscripts of the lectures and papers presented during this school, advice is given on what to do and on what to avoid when writing a scientific paper. Some feedback recommendation is also provided on how to prepare manuscripts, handle copyright and permissions to reproduce, how to anticipate plagiarism, how to deal with editors and referees, and how to avoid common errors. A few illustrations of English grammar and style for the foreign author are given.

  6. Strategic Communication During Whole-System Change: Advice and Guidance for School District Leaders and PR Specialists. Leading Systemic School Improvement #9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Francis M.; Chance, Patti L.

    2006-01-01

    Times of great change in school districts require strategic communication with internal and external stakeholders including the use of school public relations tools and techniques. This book provides theoretical and practical advice and guidance to district-based change leaders and school public relations specialists on how they can support their…

  7. Financial Literacy, Confidence and Financial Advice Seeking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, Marc M.

    2016-01-01

    We find that people with higher confidence in their own financial literacy are less likely to seek financial advice, but no relation between objective measures of literacy and advice seeking. The negative association between confidence and advice seeking is more pronounced among wealthy households.

  8. Library Students Are "Breaking Good" with Saul Goodman's Advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkewitz, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Graduate students are taking big steps and stretching themselves, whether returning to school midpoint in their lives, taking classes on unfamiliar topics, or starting internships and trying to put theory into practice. Who better to offer advice to these graduate students than America's favorite hilarious, morally ambiguous, ambulance-chasing,…

  9. Writing from the wards: advice for residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perloff, Michael D; Zuzuárregui, José-Rafael P; Frank, Samuel A

    2012-03-01

    Published articles share information and ideas across fields and can be a part of educational and career development. Academic and personal interests are the typical motivators, but many residents have trouble with the logistics of writing and the simple act of getting started. The following article gives concrete advice, structural recommendations and addresses logistical concerns in writing manuscripts, focusing on case reports. The process of writing a paper results in self-teaching, while striving to teach others. Working on case reports often produces posters and presentations on the way to writing the manuscript. This article reviews different types of case reports: from the classic sentinel case, to case series, and video submissions, to teaching cases. A "how to" strategy is presented in the writing process, from idea, to data, to writing itself. Aspects such as choosing your audience and journal are discussed, as well as employing coauthors and working together to produce a polished manuscript. Residents and fellows are immersed in clinical medicine but may not possess experience in writing journal articles. Presented is advice on and logistics of writing manuscripts that are based on clinical data and clinical experience. Through utilizing a structured approach and understanding the practicalities involved, more physicians in training can write from the wards.

  10. Exploring mental health providers' interest in using web and mobile-based tools in their practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Schueller

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of Internet sites and mobile applications are being developed intended for use in clinical practice. However, during the development process (e.g., creating features and determining use cases, the needs and interests of providers are often overlooked. We explored providers' interests using a mixed-methods approach incorporating both qualitative and quantitative research methods. A first study used an interview approach to identify the challenges providers faced, tools they used, and any use of computers and apps specifically. Fifteen providers from both the United States and Canada completed the interview and recordings were transcribed and analyzed using a constructivist grounded theory approach. Four primary themes were identified including challenges, potential tools, access and usability. A second study used a brief survey completed by 132 providers at a large healthcare system to explore current use of and potential interest in Internet and mobile technologies. Although many providers (80.9% reported recommending some form of technology to patients, these were mostly Internet websites that were predominantly informational/psychoeducational in nature. Overall, these studies combine to suggest a strong interest in websites and apps for use in clinical settings while highlighting potential areas (ease of use, patient security and privacy that should be considered in the design and deployment of these tools.

  11. Dentist preferences for patients: dimensions and associations with provider, practice, and service characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, David S; Spencer, A John

    2006-01-01

    Provider-patient relations may influence the nature of care provided. The aim of this study was to examine dentist preferences for patients, relate these to characteristics of dentists and practices, and to services provided. A random sample of Australian dentists completed mailed questionnaires (response = 60.3%). Four factor-based subscales and an overall scale (Selectivity) were derived from a 37-item battery. The 4 subscales comprised treatment adherence (behavior relevant to the treatment situation), personal adaptability (willingness to cooperate when expected to do so), social interactiveness (positive affect, communicativeness, and appreciativeness), and enabling characteristics (willing and able to pay, and good dental knowledge). Reliability was adequate (Cronbach's alpha = 0.71-0.90). Treatment adherence was associated with higher orthodontic rates, but a lower extraction rate; social interactiveness was associated with higher extraction and denture rates; personal adaptability was associated with higher orthodontic rates, but lower general/miscellaneous service rates; enabling characteristics was associated with higher endodontic and crown and bridge rates; selectivity was associated with higher rates of diagnostic, preventive, and total services per visit. The associations with service rates indicated that provider preferences were related to treatment behavior that could affect the mix of services, indicating that the nature of care provided may be influenced by the provider-patient relation.

  12. Googling Concussion Care: A Critical Appraisal of Online Concussion Healthcare Providers and Practices in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael J; Ritchie, Lesley; Selci, Erin; Chu, Stephanie; McDonald, Patrick; Russell, Kelly

    2017-03-01

    Concussion is an emerging public health concern, but care of patients with a concussion is presently unregulated in Canada. Independent, blinded Google Internet searches were conducted for the terms "concussion" and "concussion clinic" and each of the Canadian provinces and territories. The first 10 to 15 concussion healthcare providers per province were identified. A critical appraisal of healthcare personnel and services offered on the provider's Web site was conducted. Fifty-eight concussion healthcare providers were identified using this search methodology. Only 40% listed the presence of an on-site medical doctor (M.D.) as a member of the clinical team. Forty-seven percent of concussion healthcare providers advertised access to a concussion clinic, program, or center on their Web site. Professionals designated as team leaders, directors, or presidents among concussion clinics, programs, and centers included a neuropsychologist (15%), sports medicine physician (7%), neurologist (4%), and neurosurgeon (4%). Services offered by providers included baseline testing (67%), physiotherapy (50%), and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (2%). This study indicates that there are numerous concussion healthcare providers in Canada offering diverse services with clinics operated by professionals with varying levels of training in traumatic brain injury. In some cases, the practices of these concussion clinics do not conform to current expert consensus guidelines.

  13. Contraception Initiation in the Emergency Department: A Pilot Study on Providers' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liles, Iyanna; Haddad, Lisa B; Lathrop, Eva; Hankin, Abigail

    2016-05-01

    Almost half of all pregnancies in the United States are unintended; these pregnancies are associated with adverse outcomes. Many reproductive-age females seek care in the emergency department (ED), are at risk of pregnancy, and are amenable to contraceptive services in this setting. Through a pilot study, we sought to assess ED providers' current practices; attitudes; and knowledge of emergency contraception (EC) and nonemergency contraception (non-EC), as well as barriers with respect to contraception initiation. ED physicians and associate providers in Georgia were e-mailed a link to an anonymous Internet questionnaire using state professional databases and contacts. The questionnaire included Likert scales with multiple-choice questions to assess study objectives. Descriptive statistics were generated as well as univariate analyses using χ(2) and Fisher exact tests. A total of 1232 providers were e-mailed, with 119 questionnaires completed. Participants were predominantly physicians (80%), men (59%), and individuals younger than 45 years (59%). Common practices were referrals (96%), EC prescriptions (77%), and non-EC prescriptions (40%). Common barriers were perceived as low likelihood for follow-up (63%), risk of complications (58%), and adverse effects (51%). More than 70% of participants correctly identified the highly effective contraceptive methods, 3% identified the correct maximum EC initiation time, and 42% correctly recognized pregnancy as a higher risk than hormonal contraception use for pulmonary embolism. Most ED providers in this pilot study referred patients for contraception; however, there was no universal contraceptive counseling and management. Many ED providers in this study had an incorrect understanding of the efficacy, risks, and eligibility associated with contraceptive methods. This lack of understanding may affect patient access and be a barrier to patient care.

  14. Engineering practice variation through provider agreement: a cluster-randomized feasibility trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarren M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Madeline McCarren,1 Elaine L Twedt,1 Faizmohamed M Mansuri,2 Philip R Nelson,3 Brian T Peek3 1Pharmacy Benefits Management Services, Department of Veterans Affairs, Hines, IL, 2Wilkes-Barre VA Medical Center, Wilkes-Barre, PA, 3Charles George VA Medical Center, Asheville, NC, USA Purpose: Minimal-risk randomized trials that can be embedded in practice could facilitate learning health-care systems. A cluster-randomized design was proposed to compare treatment strategies by assigning clusters (eg, providers to “favor” a particular drug, with providers retaining autonomy for specific patients. Patient informed consent might be waived, broadening inclusion. However, it is not known if providers will adhere to the assignment or whether institutional review boards will waive consent. We evaluated the feasibility of this trial design.Subjects and methods: Agreeable providers were randomized to “favor” either hydrochlorothiazide or chlorthalidone when starting patients on thiazide-type therapy for hypertension. The assignment applied when the provider had already decided to start a thiazide, and providers could deviate from the strategy as needed. Prescriptions were aggregated to produce a provider strategy-adherence rate.Results: All four institutional review boards waived documentation of patient consent. Providers (n=18 followed their assigned strategy for most of their new thiazide prescriptions (n=138 patients. In the “favor hydrochlorothiazide” group, there was 99% adherence to that strategy. In the “favor chlorthalidone” group, chlorthalidone comprised 77% of new thiazide starts, up from 1% in the pre-study period. When the assigned strategy was followed, dosing in the recommended range was 48% for hydrochlorothiazide (25–50 mg/day and 100% for chlorthalidone (12.5–25.0 mg/day. Providers were motivated to participate by a desire to contribute to a comparative effectiveness study. A study promotional mug, provider information

  15. Perception and Practice Among Emergency Medicine Health Care Providers Regarding Discharging Patients After Opioid Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmaitis, Ryan M; Amaducci, Alexandra; Henry, Kathryn; Jong, Michael; Kiernan, Emily A; Kincaid, Hope; Houck, Lindsay J; Sabbatini, Sandra J; Greenberg, Marna Rayl; Katz, Kenneth D

    2018-01-19

    This study aimed to determine the current attitudes, perceptions, and practices of emergency medicine providers and nurses (RNs) regarding the discharge of adult patients from the emergency department (ED) after administration of opioid analgesics. A cross-sectional survey was administered at 3 hospital sites with a combined annual ED census of >180,000 visits per year. All 59 attending emergency physicians (EPs), 233 RNs, and 23 advanced practice clinicians (APCs) who worked at these sites were eligible to participate. Thirty-five EPs (59.3%), 88 RNs (37.8%), and 14 APCs (60.9%) completed the survey for an overall response rate of 51.75%. Most respondents were female (95 [69.9%]). The factor ranked most important to consider when discharging a patient from the ED after administration of opioids was the patient's functional status and vital signs (median, 2.00; interquartile range, 2.00-3.50). More RNs (84 [96.6%]) than EPs (29 [82.9%]) reported that developing an ED policy or guideline for safe discharge after administration of opioids is important to clinical practice (P = 0.02). Only 8 physicians (23.5%) reported that they did not prescribe intramuscular morphine, and 15 (42.9%) reported that they did not prescribe intramuscular hydromorphone. EPs (7 [20.0%]) and RNs (3 [3.4%]) differed in regard to whether they were aware if any patients to whom they administered an opioid had experienced an adverse drug-related event (P = 0.01). Most EPs (24 [68.6%]) and RNs (54 [61.4%]) believed that the decision for patient discharge should be left to both the emergency medicine provider and the RN. Most study participants believed that developing a policy or guideline for safe discharge after administration opioids in the ED is important to clinical practice. Only a few physicians reported that they did not prescribe intramuscular hydromorphone or morphine. Most participants believed the discharge decision after administration of opioids in the ED should be primarily

  16. Taking stock: provider prescribing practices in the presence and absence of ACT stock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Caroline

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, the monitoring of prompt and effective treatment for malaria with artemisinin combination therapy (ACT is conducted largely through household surveys. This measure; however, provides no information on case management processes at the health facility level. The aim of this review was to assess evidence from health facility surveys on malaria prescribing practices using ACT, in the presence and absence of ACT stock, at time and place where treatment was sought. Methods A systematic search of published literature was conducted. Findings were collated and data extracted on proportion of patients prescribed ACT and alternative anti-malarials in the presence and absence of ACT stock. Results Of the 14 studies identified in which ACT prescription for uncomplicated malaria in the public sector was evaluated, just six, from three countries (Kenya, Uganda and Zambia, reported this in the context of ACT stock. Comparing facilities with ACT stock to facilities without stock (i ACT prescribing was significantly higher in all six studies, increasing by a range of 21.3% in children Conclusions Prescriber practices vary based on ACT availability. Although ACT prescriptions increased and alternative anti-malarials prescriptions decreased in the presence of ACT stock, ACT was prescribed in the absence, and alternative anti-malarials were prescribed in the presence of, ACT. Presence of stock alone does not ensure that treatment guidelines are followed. More health facility surveys, together with qualitative research, are needed to understand the role of ACT stock-outs on provider prescribing behaviours and preferences.

  17. Narrative in interprofessional education and practice: implications for professional identity, provider-patient communication and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Phillip G

    2014-01-01

    Health and social care professionals increasingly use narrative approaches to focus on the patient and to communicate with each other. Both effective interprofessional education (IPE) and practice (IPP) require recognizing the various values and voices of different professions, how they relate to the patient's life story, and how they interact with each other at the level of the healthcare team. This article analyzes and integrates the literature on narrative to explore: self-narrative as an expression of one's professional identity; the co-creation of the patient's narrative by the professional and the patient; and the interprofessional multi-vocal narrative discourse as co-constructed by members of the healthcare team. Using a narrative approach to thinking about professional identity, provider-patient communication, and interprofessional teamwork expands our thinking about both IPE and IPP by providing new insights into the nature of professional practice based on relationships to oneself, the patient, and others on the team. How professionals define themselves, gather and present information from the patient, and communicate as members of a clinical team all have important dimensions that can be revealed by a narrative approach. Implications and conclusions for the further development of the narrative approach in IPE and IPP are offered.

  18. Leaping "out of the doubt"--nutrition advice: values at stake in communicating scientific uncertainty to the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folker, Anna Paldam; Sandøe, Peter

    2008-06-01

    This article deals with scientific advice to the public where the relevant science is subject to public attention and uncertainty of knowledge. It focuses on a tension in the management and presentation of scientific uncertainty between the uncertain nature of science and the expectation that scientific advisers will provide clear public guidance. In the first part of the paper the tension is illustrated by the presentation of results from a recent interview study with nutrition scientists in Denmark. According to the study, nutrition scientists feel their roles as ''public advisers'' and ''scientists'' differ in that the former involves an expectation that they will provide unambiguous advice of the kind that might relegate scientific uncertainty to the background. In the second, more general, part of the paper we provide a normative analysis of different strategies of dealing with the tension. The analysis is structured around the extremes of either total concealment or full openness regarding scientific uncertainty. The result of analysis is that scientific advisers should not simply ''feed'' scientific conclusions to the public. They should rather attempt to promote the ability and willingness of the public to assess and scrutinize scientific knowledge by displaying uncertainties in the scientific basis of advice. On the other hand, scientific advisers must accommodate the public's need for guidance. Such guidance should be restricted by careful consideration of what it is relevant for the public to know in order to evaluate scientific advice in practical terms.

  19. Surgery and trauma care providers' perception of the impact of dual-practice employment on quality of care provided in an Andean country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGrone, L N; Isquith-Dicker, L N; Huaman Egoavil, E; Herrera-Matta, J J; Fuhs, A K; Ortega Checa, D; Revoredo, F; Rodriguez Castro, M J A; Mock, C N

    2017-05-01

    Dual-practice, simultaneous employment by healthcare workers in the public and private sectors is pervasive worldwide. Although an estimated 30 per cent of the global burden of disease is surgical, the implications of dual practice on surgical care are not well understood. Anonymous in-depth individual interviews on trauma quality improvement practices were conducted with healthcare providers who participate in the care of the injured at ten large hospitals in Peru's capital city, Lima. A grounded theory approach to qualitative data analysis was employed to identify salient themes. Fifty interviews were conducted. A group of themes that emerged related to the perceived negative and positive impacts of dual practice on the quality of surgical care. Participants asserted that the majority of physicians in Lima working in the public sector also worked in the private sector. Dual practice has negative impacts on physicians' time, quality of care in the public sector, and surgical education. Dual practice positively affects patient care by allowing physicians to acquire management and quality improvement skills, and providing incentives for research and academic productivity. In addition, dual practice provides opportunities for clinical innovations and raises the economic status of the physician. Surgeons in Peru report that dual practice influences patient care negatively by creating time and human resource conflicts. Participants assert that these conflicts widen the gap in quality of care between rich and poor. This practice warrants redirection through national-level regulation of physician schedules and reorganization of public investment in health via physician remuneration. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Increasing Patient / Provider Communications about Colorectal Cancer Screening In Rural Primary Care Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Berta M.; Skelly, Joan M.; Dorwaldt, Anne L.; Howe, Kathleen D.; Dana, Greg S.; Flynn, Brian S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Rural populations as well as less educated people in the U.S. are less likely to receive colorectal cancer (CRC) screening than people living in urban areas and more educated people. Methods We tested a computer tablet, Patient/Provider Communication Assistant (PPCA), which collected data, educated patients, and printed personalized notes to patients and providers encouraging conversation about CRC screening. Mixed model analyses using a pre-post quasi-experimental design compared patient results during the comparison and intervention periods in 5 rural primary care practices on provider discussion about CRC screening, provider recommendation, and patient intention to be screened. Models including age, education and literacy measures as covariates were examined. Results Providers talked with patients about CRC screening in general, and colonoscopy specifically more frequently after the PPCA than with the comparison group (p values =.04 and .01, respectively). Providers recommended CRC screening more often to patients in the intervention group than to the comparison group (p=.02). Patients planned to be screened and specifically with colonoscopy more frequently following the intervention than in the comparison group (p=.003). There were no interactions between group and any of the covariates. Ninety-five percent of the patients regardless of age or education found the PPCA easy to use. Conclusion Results indicated increased provider discussion and recommendation, and patients' intentions to obtain CRC screening, and in particular colonoscopy, for patients exposed to the intervention, regardless of the patients' age or literacy levels. The PPCA is a promising intervention method that is acceptable to rural patients. PMID:18725831

  1. Interprofessional Oral Health Education Improves Knowledge, Confidence, and Practice for Pediatric Healthcare Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Devon; Kim, JungSoo; Duderstadt, Karen; Stewart, Ray; Lin, Brent; Alkon, Abbey

    2017-01-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic childhood disease in the United States. Dental caries affects the health of 60-90% of school-aged children worldwide. The prevalence of untreated early childhood dental caries is 19% for children 2-5 years of age in the U.S. Some factors that contribute to the progression of dental caries include socioeconomic status, access to dental care, and lack of anticipatory guidance. The prevalence of dental caries remains highest for children from specific ethnic or racial groups, especially those living in underserved areas where there may be limited access to a dentist. Although researchers have acknowledged the various links between oral health and overall systemic health, oral health care is not usually a component of pediatric primary health care. To address this public health crisis and oral health disparity in children, new collaborative efforts among health professionals is critical for dental disease prevention and optimal oral health. This evaluation study focused on a 10-week interprofessional practice and education (IPE) course on children's oral health involving dental, osteopathic medical, and nurse practitioner students at the University of California, San Francisco. This study's objective was to evaluate changes in knowledge, confidence, attitude, and clinical practice in children's oral health of the students completed the course. Thirty-one students participated in the IPE and completed demographic questionnaires and four questionnaires before and after the IPE course: (1) course content knowledge, (2) confidence, (3) attitudes, and (4) clinical practice. Results showed a statistically significant improvement in the overall knowledge of children's oral health topics, confidence in their ability to provide oral health services, and clinical practice. There was no statistically significant difference in attitude, but there was an upward trend toward positivity. To conclude, this IPE evaluation showed that

  2. Interprofessional Oral Health Education Improves Knowledge, Confidence, and Practice for Pediatric Healthcare Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon Cooper

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic childhood disease in the United States. Dental caries affects the health of 60–90% of school-aged children worldwide. The prevalence of untreated early childhood dental caries is 19% for children 2–5 years of age in the U.S. Some factors that contribute to the progression of dental caries include socioeconomic status, access to dental care, and lack of anticipatory guidance. The prevalence of dental caries remains highest for children from specific ethnic or racial groups, especially those living in underserved areas where there may be limited access to a dentist. Although researchers have acknowledged the various links between oral health and overall systemic health, oral health care is not usually a component of pediatric primary health care. To address this public health crisis and oral health disparity in children, new collaborative efforts among health professionals is critical for dental disease prevention and optimal oral health. This evaluation study focused on a 10-week interprofessional practice and education (IPE course on children’s oral health involving dental, osteopathic medical, and nurse practitioner students at the University of California, San Francisco. This study’s objective was to evaluate changes in knowledge, confidence, attitude, and clinical practice in children’s oral health of the students completed the course. Thirty-one students participated in the IPE and completed demographic questionnaires and four questionnaires before and after the IPE course: (1 course content knowledge, (2 confidence, (3 attitudes, and (4 clinical practice. Results showed a statistically significant improvement in the overall knowledge of children’s oral health topics, confidence in their ability to provide oral health services, and clinical practice. There was no statistically significant difference in attitude, but there was an upward trend toward positivity. To conclude, this IPE

  3. Providing Students with Foundational Field Instruction within a 50 Minute Class Period: A Practical Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, M.

    2014-12-01

    There is a growing recognition among secondary educators and administrators that students need to have a science education that provides connections between familiar classes like biology, chemistry, and physics. Because of this waxing interest in an integrative approach to the sciences, there is a broader push for school districts to offer classes geared towards the earth sciences, a field that incorporates knowledge and skills gleaned from the three core science subjects. Within the contexts of a regular secondary school day on a traditional schedule (45- to 50-minute long classes), it is challenging to engage students in rigorous field-based learning, critical for students to develop a deeper understanding of geosciences content, without requiring extra time outside of the regular schedule. We suggest instruction using common, manmade features like drainage retention ponds to model good field practices and provide students with the opportunity to calculate basic hydrologic budgets, take pH readings, and, if in an area with seasonal rainfall, make observations regarding soils by way of trenching, and near-surface processes, including mass wasting and the effects of vegetation on geomorphology. Gains in student understanding are discussed by analyzing the difference in test scores between exams provided to the students after they had received only in-class instruction, and after they had received field instruction in addition to the in-class lectures. In an advanced setting, students made measurements regarding ion contents and pollution that allowed the classes to practice lab skills while developing a data set that was analyzed after field work was completed. It is posited that similar fieldwork could be an effective approach at an introductory level in post-secondary institutions.

  4. Specific antismoking advice after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornnes, Nete; Larsen, Klaus; Brink-Kjær, Tove

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many stroke survivors would benefit from modification of their lifestyle in order to reduce their risk of recurrent stroke. We investigated if tailored smoking cessation advice would yield a higher smoking cessation rate and a higher rate with sustained abstinence in ex......-smokers in the intervention group than among controls. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients admitted with an acute stroke or a transient ischaemic attack were included in a randomised controlled trial focusing on control of lifestyle risk factors and hypertension. Here, we report the intervention focused on smoking cessation. We...

  5. The knowledge, efficacy, and practices instrument for oral health providers: a validity study with dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Garvan, Cyndi W; Moore, Thomas E; Catalanotto, Frank A

    2013-08-01

    Valid and reliable instruments to measure and assess cultural competence for oral health care providers are scarce in the literature, and most published scales have been contested due to a lack of item analysis and internal estimates of reliability. The purposes of this study were, first, to develop a standardized instrument to measure dental students' knowledge of diversity, skills in culturally competent patient-centered communication, and use of culture-centered practices in patient care and, second, to provide preliminary validity support for this instrument. The initial instrument used in this study was a thirty-six-item Likert-scale survey entitled the Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument for Oral Health Providers (KEPI-OHP). This instrument is an adaption of an initially thirty-three-item version of the Multicultural Awareness, Knowledge, and Skills Scale-Counselor Edition (MAKSS-CE), a scale that assesses factors related to social justice, cultural differences among clients, and cross-cultural client management. After the authors conducted cognitive and expert interviews, focus groups, pilot testing, and item analysis, their initial instrument was reduced to twenty-eight items. The KEPI-OHP was then distributed to 916 dental students (response rate=48.6 percent) across the United States to measure its reliability and assess its validity. Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to test the scale's validity. The modification of the survey into a sensible instrument with a relatively clear factor structure using factor analysis resulted in twenty items. A scree test suggested three expressive factors, which were retained for rotation. Bentler's comparative fit and Bentler and Bonnett's non-normed indices were 0.95 and 0.92, respectively. A three-factor solution, including efficacy of assessment, knowledge of diversity, and culture-centered practice subscales, comprised of twenty-items was identified. The KEPI-OHP was found to

  6. Brief advice and active referral for smoking cessation services among community smokers: a study protocol for randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Nam Suen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most smokers do not use smoking cessation (SC services although it increases successful quits. Passive referral providing SC information to smokers is commonly used in SC studies. Little was known about active referral in the community setting. This study aims to motivate community smokers to quit by brief SC advice using a validated AWARD model (Ask, Warn, Advise, Refer and Do-it-again that adjunct with active referral of smokers to various SC services in Hong Kong. Methods/Design This is a single-blinded, parallel three-armed cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT with two treatment groups of (1 brief SC advice using the AWARD model, active referral to SC services plus a referral card and a health warning leaflet (active referral group and (2 brief SC advice using AWARD model and health warning leaflet (brief advice group and a control group receives general very brief advice with a self-help booklet. A total of 1291 smokers will be recruited from 66 clusters (recruitment sessions with 22 will be allocated to each of the two intervention and one control groups. SC ambassadors will be trained for delivering the interventions and conducting telephone follow-up. The primary outcomes are self-reported 7-days point prevalence (PP abstinence at 3 and 6 months follow-up. Intention-to-treat principle and multi-level regressions will be used for data analysis. Discussion This is the first RCT on assessing a model combining brief advice and active referral to SC services among community smokers. The results will inform the practices of SC services and intervention studies. Trial registration NCT02539875 (ClinicalTrials.gov registry; registered retrospectively on 22 July 2015

  7. Ethical and practical challenges in providing noninvasive prenatal testing for chromosome abnormalities: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Peter; Chapman, Audrey R

    2016-04-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) through the analysis of cell-free DNA in maternal plasma has rapidly changed screening for fetal chromosome abnormalities. We review practical and ethical challenges associated with the transition, progress in their resolution, and identify new emerging difficulties. NIPT is an advanced screening test for trisomies 21, 18, and 13 that was initially limited to women at high risk for an affected pregnancy. It is now recognized as suitable for all women. The testing has been expanded to include sex chromosome abnormalities and some microdeletion syndromes. Some ethicists are concerned about inclusion of disorders that have less severe phenotypes. Clinical providers have experienced difficulty in maintaining an up-to-date knowledge about the scope of NIPT, differences between tests, who should be offered the testing, performance of tests, reasons for false-positive results, and optimal patient management following positive results. Some of the practical difficulties associated with the introduction can be attributed to this knowledge gap. There remain some important ethical issues associated with NIPT. We believe that the same ethical and legal principles that were considered in the justification of conventional prenatal screening can be used to assess the appropriateness of additional NIPT applications.

  8. Identifying attitudes, beliefs and reported practices of nurses and doctors as immunization providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielak, Karen L; McIntyre, Cheryl C; Tu, Andrew W; Remple, Valencia P; Halperin, Beth; Buxton, Jane A

    2010-07-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to examine the attitudes, beliefs, behavioural intentions and self-reported behaviour of nurses and physicians relating to key immunization behaviours and compare the findings for nurses and physicians. Immunization is an important and effective public health intervention. Understanding immunization providers' attitudes and beliefs toward immunization has the potential to improve educational efforts and lead to behavioural change. A postal survey was conducted with all immunization providers in British Columbia, Canada, in 2005. The survey elicited data on demographics, practice characteristics, attitudes, perceived social norms and perceived behavioural control related to key immunization behaviours. Responses were received from 344 nurses and 349 physicians. The response rate was 67% for nurses and 22% for physicians. More nurses than physicians thought that administering all recommended vaccines at one visit was important (89.2% vs. 63.2%P vaccines (82.4% vs. 48.7%P vaccines at one visit (98.8% vs. 73.8%P vaccine each year was important (88.9%, 87.1% respectively P = 0.65). The foundational work done to develop the survey tool can be used to modify it so that survey findings can be validated according to the Theory of Planned Behaviour. The results could inform the development of behavioural change interventions targeting the identified determinants of immunization provider behaviour.

  9. Collaboration of midwives in primary care midwifery practices with other maternity care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmelink, J Catja; Wiegers, Therese A; de Cock, T Paul; Klomp, Trudy; Hutton, Eileen K

    2017-12-01

    interactions with physicians (GPs, obstetricians and paediatricians). Midwives with more work experience were more satisfied with their collaboration with GPs. Midwives from the southern region of the Netherlands were more satisfied with collaboration with GPs and obstetricians. Compared to the urban areas, in the rural or mixed areas the midwives were more satisfied regarding their collaboration with MCA(O)s and clinical midwives. Midwives from non-Dutch origin were less satisfied with the collaboration with paediatricians. No relations were found between the overall mean satisfaction of collaboration and work-related and personal characteristics and attitude towards work. Inter-professionals relations in maternity care in the Netherlands can be enhanced, especially the primary care midwives' interactions with physicians and with maternity care providers in the northern and central part of the Netherlands, and in urban areas. Future exploratory or deductive research may provide additional insight in the collaborative practice in everyday work setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Parents' professional sources of advice regarding child discipline and their use of corporal punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Catherine A; Moeller, William; Hamvas, Lauren; Rice, Janet C

    2013-02-01

    Parents (n = 500) were surveyed about which professional groups they were most likely to seek and follow advice from regarding child discipline as well as their use of corporal punishment (CP). Nearly half of the parents reported that they were most likely to seek child discipline advice from pediatricians (48%), followed by religious leaders (21%) and mental health professionals (18%). Parents who sought advice from religious leaders (vs pediatricians) had nearly 4 times the odds of reporting use of CP. Parents reported that they were more likely to follow the advice of pediatricians than any other professional; however, black parents were as likely to follow the advice of religious leaders as that of pediatricians. Pediatricians play a central role in advising parents about child discipline. Efforts to engage pediatricians in providing violence prevention counseling should continue. Increased efforts are needed to engage other professionals, especially religious leaders, in providing such advice to parents.

  11. Parents’ professional sources of advice regarding child discipline and their use of corporal punishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Catherine A.; Moeller, William; Hamvas, Lauren; Rice, Janet C.

    2014-01-01

    Parents (n=500) were surveyed about which professional groups they were most likely to seek and follow advice from regarding child discipline as well as their use of corporal punishment (CP). Nearly half of parents reported that they were most likely to seek child discipline advice from pediatricians (48%), followed by religious leaders (21%) and mental health professionals (18%). Parents that sought advice from religious leaders (vs. pediatricians) had nearly 4 times the odds of reporting use of CP. Parents reported they were more likely to follow the advice of pediatricians than any other professional; however, Black parents were as likely to follow the advice of religious leaders as that of pediatricians. Pediatricians play a central role in advising parents about child discipline. Efforts to engage pediatricians in providing violence prevention counseling should continue. Increased efforts are needed to engage other professionals, especially religious leaders, in providing such advice to parents. PMID:23185082

  12. I don't get it : Response difficulties in answering political attitude questions in Voting Advice Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamoen, Naomi; Holleman, Bregje

    2017-01-01

    Voting Advice Applications are online tools that provide users with a voting advice based on their answers to a set of political attitude questions. This study investigated to what extent VAA users understand the questions that lead to the voting advice, and what search and response behaviour they

  13. Australian practice nurses' perceptions of their role and competency to provide nutrition care to patients living with chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Sarah; Ball, Lauren; Leveritt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition is important in the management of chronic disease, and practice nurses in the Australian primary care setting are increasingly providing nutrition care to patients living with chronic disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate practice nurses' perceptions of their role and competency to provide nutrition care to patients living with chronic disease in Australia. Twenty practice nurses currently employed in general practice participated in an individual semi-structured telephone interview. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Practice nurses perceived themselves to be in a prime position to provide opportunistic nutrition care to patients. Participants perceived that the ideal role of a practice nurse is to advocate for nutrition and provide a basic level of nutrition care to patients; however, the interpretation of the term 'basic' varied between participants. Participants perceived that practice nurses are highly trusted and approachable, which they valued as important characteristics for the provision of nutrition care. Barriers to providing nutrition care included time constraints, lack of nutrition knowledge and lack of confidence. Participants were concerned about the availability and accessibility of nutrition education opportunities for practice nurses. The present study has demonstrated that practice nurses perceive themselves as having a significant role in the provision of nutrition care to patients with chronic disease in the Australian primary care setting. Further investigation of strategies to enhance the effectiveness of nutrition care provision by practice nurses is warranted.

  14. USDA food and nutrient databases provide the infrastructure for food and nutrition research, policy, and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Jaspreet K C; Moshfegh, Alanna J; Holden, Joanne M; Harris, Ellen

    2013-02-01

    The USDA food and nutrient databases provide the basic infrastructure for food and nutrition research, nutrition monitoring, policy, and dietary practice. They have had a long history that goes back to 1892 and are unique, as they are the only databases available in the public domain that perform these functions. There are 4 major food and nutrient databases released by the Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center (BHNRC), part of the USDA's Agricultural Research Service. These include the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, the Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database, the Food and Nutrient Database for Dietary Studies, and the USDA Food Patterns Equivalents Database. The users of the databases are diverse and include federal agencies, the food industry, health professionals, restaurants, software application developers, academia and research organizations, international organizations, and foreign governments, among others. Many of these users have partnered with BHNRC to leverage funds and/or scientific expertise to work toward common goals. The use of the databases has increased tremendously in the past few years, especially the breadth of uses. These new uses of the data are bound to increase with the increased availability of technology and public health emphasis on diet-related measures such as sodium and energy reduction. Hence, continued improvement of the databases is important, so that they can better address these challenges and provide reliable and accurate data.

  15. Best Practices in Physics Program Assessment: Should APS Provide Accreditation Standards for Physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodapp, Theodore

    The Phys21 report, ``Preparing Physics Students for 21st Century Careers,'' provides guidance for physics programs to improve their degree programs to make them more relevant for student career choices. Undertaking such changes and assessing impact varies widely by institution, with many departments inventing assessments with each periodic departmental or programmatic review. American Physical Society has embarked on a process to integrate information from Phys21, the results of other national studies, and educational research outcomes to generate a best-practices guide to help physics departments conduct program review, assessment, and improvement. It is anticipated that departments will be able to use this document to help with their role in university-level accreditation, and in making the case for improvements to departmental programs. Accreditation of physics programs could stem from such a document, and I will discuss some of the thinking of the APS Committee on Education in creating this guide, and how they are advising APS to move forward in the higher education landscape that is increasingly subject to standards-based evaluations. I will describe plans for the design, review, and dissemination of this guide, and how faculty can provide input into its development. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1540570. Opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the NSF.

  16. Civil Forensic Psychiatry: part 3 - practical aspects of managing a medico-legal practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Anthony H

    2018-02-01

    This is the third in a series of papers on Civil Forensic Psychiatry and provides practical advice for forensic psychiatrists, general psychiatrists and trainees who are expanding or contemplating a medico-legal aspect to their practice. Attention to the practice setting, office layout, recording of information, management of documentation, screening of briefs and proper timetabling can improve safety, quality, reliability and workload manageability.

  17. Primary care providers' knowledge, practices, and perceived barriers to the treatment and prevention of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivack, Jordan G; Swietlik, Maggie; Alessandrini, Evaline; Faith, Myles S

    2010-07-01

    This study evaluated primary care providers' (PCPs, pediatricians, and nurse practitioners) knowledge, current practices, and perceived barriers to childhood obesity prevention and treatment, with an emphasis on first-year well-child care visits. A questionnaire was distributed to 192 PCPs in the primary care network at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) addressing (i) knowledge of obesity and American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines, (ii) anticipatory guidance practices at well visits regarding nutrition and exercise, and (iii) perceived barriers to childhood obesity treatment and prevention. Eighty pediatricians and seven nurse practitioners responded, and a minority correctly identified the definition (26%) and prevalence (9%) of childhood overweight and AAP guidelines for exercise (39%) and juice consumption (44%). Most PCPs (81%) spent 11-20 min per well visit during the first 2 years, and 79% discussed diet, nutrition, and exercise for > or =3 min. Although >95% of PCPs discussed juice, fruits and vegetables, sippy cups, and finger foods during the first year, over 35% never discussed fast food, TV, or candy, and 55% never discussed exercise. Few rated current resources as adequate to treat or prevent childhood obesity. Over 90% rated the following barriers for obesity prevention and treatment as important or very important: parent is not motivated, child is not motivated, parents are overweight, families often have fast food, watch too much TV, and do not get enough exercise. In conclusion, there is much room to improve PCPs' knowledge of obesity and AAP guidelines. Although PCPs rate fast-food consumption, TV viewing, and lack of exercise as important treatment barriers, many never discussed these topics during the first year.

  18. Continuous Care Provided Through Comprehensive Medication Management in an Acute Care Practice Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, T David; Pinelli, Nicole R; Jarmul, Jamie A; Waldron, Kayla M; Eckel, Stephen F; Cicci, Jonathan D; Bates, Jill S; Amerine, Lindsey B

    2017-10-01

    Pharmacy practice models that foster pharmacists' accountability for medication-related outcomes are imperative for the profession. Comprehensive medication management (CMM) is an opportunity to advance patient care. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of a CMM practice model in the acute care setting on organizational, patient, and financial outcomes. Three adult service lines focused on at-risk patients identified using internal risk stratification methodology were implemented. Core CMM elements included medication reconciliation, differentiated clinical pharmacy services, inpatient MTM consultations, discharge services, and documentation. Mixed methods compared the effect of the CMM model before and after implementation. Historical patients served as comparative controls in an observational design. Pharmacists completed a 60-minute interview regarding their experiences. Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic coding to characterize perception of the model. Three pharmacists implemented the model on cardiology, hematology/oncology, and surgery transplant services and provided services to 75 patients during the study. A total of 145 medication-related problems were identified and resolved. CMM was associated with a nonsignificant reduction of 8.8% in 30-day hospital readmission rates ( P = 0.64) and a 24.9% reduction in 30-day hospital utilization ( P = 0.41) as well as a significant reduction of 86.5% in emergency department visits ( P = 0.02). Patients receiving discharge prescriptions from our outpatient pharmacies increased by 21.4%, resulting in an 11.3% increase in discharge prescription capture and additional revenue of $5780. Themes identified from qualitative interviews included CMM structure, challenges, value, and resources. This study demonstrated successful implementation of a CMM model that positively affected organizational, patient, and financial outcomes.

  19. [Practical chemistry education provided by team-based learning (TBL) and peer evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, Tomohisa; Konishi, Motomi; Nishida, Takahiro; Kushihata, Taro; Sone, Tomomichi; Kurio, Wasako; Yamamoto, Yumi; Nishikawa, Tomoe; Yanada, Kazuo; Nakamura, Mitsutaka

    2014-01-01

    Learning chemistry is cumulative: basic knowledge and chemical calculation skills are required to gain understanding of higher content. However, we often suffer from students' lack of learning skills to acquire these concepts. One of the reasons is the lack of adequate training in the knowledge and skills of chemistry, and one of the reasons for this lack is the lack of adequate evaluation of training procedures and content. Team-based learning (TBL) is a strong method for providing training in the knowledge and skills of chemistry and reaffirms the knowledge and skills of students of various levels. In our faculty, TBL exercises are provided for first-year students concurrently with lectures in physical chemistry and analytical chemistry. In this study, we researched the adoption of a peer evaluation process for this participatory learning model. Questionnaires taken after TBL exercises in the previous year showed a positive response to TBL. Further, a questionnaire taken after TBL exercises in the spring semester of the current year also yielded a positive response not only to TBL but also to peer evaluation. In addition, a significant correlation was observed between the improvement of students' grades in chemistry classes and the feeling the percentage (20%) of peer evaluation in overall evaluation low (logistic regression analysis, p=0.022). On the basis of the findings, we argue that TBL provides a generic, practical learning environment including an effective focus on learning strategy and evaluation of knowledge, skills, and attitudes, and studies on the educational effects of TBL and peer evaluation.

  20. Student giving health advice to family and friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Simon; Yousuf, Asim

    2016-06-01

    This study explored graduate-entry medical students' experiences of health-advice requests from their family and friends. This was a descriptive thematic analysis study involving a convenience sample of medical students from the University of Warwick 4-year MB ChB graduate-entry medicine programme. Each participating student attended a one-to-one semi-structured interview. Audio recordings of the interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Data saturation of the main themes was achieved following 14 interviews. Of the 14 students, eight (57%) were males and six (43%) were females. Students were asked to advise on a range of human and veterinary health issues. They were prepared to offer advice on health issues that they felt competent to manage: for example, first-aid scenarios that a 'reasonable layperson' or a first-aider would be able to help with. The nature of health advice given by students became increasingly complex as they progressed through their degree programme; however, they generally refrained from giving advice on complex health issues and chose to refer the individual to seek help from competent professionals instead. Previous research highlighted inappropriate advice could delay individuals seeking help from competent professionals, resulting in adverse clinical outcomes; however, we recommend that students should not be discouraged to act as good Samaritans. Instead, educators could help them to explore the professionalism and ethical issues raised by these requests, and the practical ways of handling these requests sensitively through discussion of case scenarios with acceptable and inappropriate behaviours. This study explored graduate-entry medical students' experiences of health-advice requests from their family and friends. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Supporting Aboriginal Women to Quit Smoking: Antenatal and Postnatal Care Providers' Confidence, Attitudes, and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzelepis, Flora; Daly, Justine; Dowe, Sarah; Bourke, Alex; Gillham, Karen; Freund, Megan

    2017-05-01

    Tobacco use during pregnancy is substantially higher among Aboriginal women compared to non-Aboriginal women in Australia. However, no studies have investigated the amount or type of smoking cessation care that staff from Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal services provide to clients who smoke or staff confidence to do so. This study examined Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal staff confidence, perceived role and delivery of smoking cessation care to Aboriginal women and characteristics associated with provision of such care. Staff from 11 Aboriginal Maternal and Infant Health Services and eight Aboriginal Child and Family Health services in the Hunter New England Local Health District in Australia completed a cross-sectional self-reported survey (n = 67, response rate = 97.1%). Most staff reported they assessed clients' smoking status most or all of the time (92.2%). However, only a minority reported they offered a quitline referral (42.2%), provided follow-up support (28.6%) or provided nicotine replacement therapy (4.7%) to most or all clients who smoked. Few staff felt confident in motivating clients to quit smoking (19.7%) and advising clients about using nicotine replacement therapy (15.6%). Staff confident with talking to clients about how smoking affected their health had significantly higher odds of offering a quitline referral [OR = 4.9 (1.7-14.5)] and quitting assistance [OR = 3.9 (1.3-11.6)] to clients who smoke. Antenatal and postnatal staff delivery of smoking cessation care to pregnant Aboriginal women or mothers with young Aboriginal children could be improved. Programs that support Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal providers to deliver smoking cessation care to clients are needed. Aboriginal antenatal and postnatal service staff have multiple opportunities to assist Aboriginal women to quit smoking during pregnancy and postpartum. However, staff confidence and practices of offering various forms of smoking cessation support to pregnant Aboriginal

  2. Nursery nutrition in Liverpool: an exploration of practice and nutritional analysis of food provided.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Mike; Lloyd-Williams, Ffion; Weston, Gemma; Macklin, Julie; McFadden, Kate

    2011-10-01

    To explore nutrition and food provision in pre-school nurseries in order to develop interventions to promote healthy eating in pre-school settings. Quantitative data were gathered using questionnaires and professional menu analysis. In the community, at pre-school nurseries. All 130 nurseries across Liverpool were a sent questionnaire (38 % response rate); thirty-four menus were returned for analysis (26 % response rate). Only 21 % of respondents stated they had adequate knowledge on nutrition for pre-school children. Sixty-one per cent of cooks reported having received only a 'little' advice on healthy eating and this was often not specific to under-5 s nutrition. Fifty-seven per cent of nurseries did not regularly assess their menus for nutritional quality. The menu analysis revealed that all menus were deficient in energy, carbohydrate, Fe and Zn. Eighty-five per cent of nurseries had Na/salt levels which exceed guidelines. Nurseries require support on healthy eating at policy, knowledge and training levels. This support should address concerns relating to both menu planning and ingredients used in food provision and meet current guidelines on food provision for the under-5 s.

  3. Characterizing providers' immunization communication practices during health supervision visits with vaccine-hesitant parents: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opel, Douglas J; Robinson, Jeffrey D; Heritage, John; Korfiatis, Carolyn; Taylor, James A; Mangione-Smith, Rita

    2012-02-08

    To determine the feasibility of using direct observation of provider-parent immunization discussions and to characterize provider communication practices with vaccine-hesitant parents. Over a 6 month period in 2010, we videotaped immunization discussions between pediatric providers and vaccine-hesitant parents during health supervision visits involving children 2-15 months old (N=24) in the Seattle area, Washington, USA. Videotapes were analyzed using the qualitative method of conversation analysis. We approached 96 parents seen by 9 different providers. Of those who were eligible (N=56), we enrolled 43% (N=24). Four videotaped visits were excluded from analysis for failure to obtain parental HIPAA authorization. Of the remaining 20 visits, there were ≥2 visits each that involved children aged 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, and 15 months, and all videotaped visits contained at least a brief immunization discussion. We identified 6 communication practices and several behavior types within each practice relevant to immunization: Practice 1, providers' initiations of the topic of vaccination; Types: participatory or presumptive format; Practice 2, parents' responses to providers' topic initiations; Types: strong or weak acceptance or resistance; Practice 3, providers' follow-ups to parent's responses; Types: no, immediate, or delayed pursuit; Practice 4, parents' vaccine-related questions or statements; Types: fact- or concern-based; Practice 5, providers' explicit solicitations of parent's questions/concerns; Types: designed to discourage or encourage discussion; and Practice 6, parents' responses to providers' solicitations of questions/concerns; Types: no question or fact- or concern-based inquiry. Direct observation of immunization discussions in the primary care pediatric setting is feasible and yields insight into several provider-parent immunization communication practices that are worthy of further study to determine which are effective at improving parental acceptance of

  4. Advice for Loved Ones and Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the System Books & Resources Employment Issues Finding the Right Doctor Benefits and Insurance Relationships Advice for Loved Ones Sexual & Reproductive Health Sharing Your Diagnosis Support Groups For Clinicians ...

  5. Guidelines and Advice for Successful Publication Provided by Journal Editors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Luke T.; Smith, Alice; Labach, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    Journal publication is an important indicator of research productivity for individual researchers, as well as academic institutions. However, for novice faculty members, the publication process can appear equivocal and daunting. If the academic does not actively engage themselves early in this process, then her or his career becomes an uphill (and…

  6. Teaching Spelling: A Practical Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Faye; Snowball, Diane

    Premised on the idea that spelling should be taught in the context of writing, this book is designed to enhance teachers' understanding of how their students learn to spell and to provide advice and practical activities for the day-to-day classroom program. The first part of the book provides specific information about management of the class…

  7. The travel advice as an inhibiting factor of tourist movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mylonopoulos Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    obstructing the free movement of tourists, as provided for in international treaties and declarations. As no systematic research on the impact of travel advice on a country and the degree of influence depending on the issuing entity (state, international organization or private entity has been carried out so far, further investigation of the issue is suggested, by performing research, both on travelers and travel organizations on the effects of issuing travel advice.

  8. Translating sickle cell guidelines into practice for primary care providers with Project ECHO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Shook

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approximately 100,000 persons with sickle cell disease (SCD live in the United States, including 15,000 in the Midwest. Unfortunately, many patients experience poor health outcomes due to limited access to primary care providers (PCPs who are prepared to deliver evidence-based SCD care. Sickle Treatment and Outcomes Research in the Midwest (STORM is a regional network established to improve care and outcomes for individuals with SCD living in Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. Methods: STORM investigators hypothesized that Project ECHO® methodology could be replicated to create a low-cost, high-impact intervention to train PCPs in evidence-based care for pediatric and young adult patients with SCD in the Midwest, called STORM TeleECHO. This approach utilizes video technology for monthly telementoring clinics consisting of didactic and case-based presentations focused on the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI evidence-based guidelines for SCD. Results: Network leads in each of the STORM states assisted with developing the curriculum and are recruiting providers for monthly clinics. To assess STORM TeleECHO feasibility and acceptability, monthly attendance and satisfaction data are collected. Changes in self-reported knowledge, comfort, and practice patterns will be compared with pre-participation, and 6 and 12 months after participation. Conclusions: STORM TeleECHO has the potential to increase implementation of the NHLBI evidence-based guidelines, especially increased use of hydroxyurea, resulting in improvements in the quality of care and outcomes for children and young adults with SCD. This model could be replicated in other pediatric chronic illness conditions to improve PCP knowledge and confidence in delivering evidence-based care.

  9. Technology for dementia: attitudes and practices of occupational therapists in providing assistive technology for way finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Fiona; Clemson, Lindy Maxted; Mackenzie, Lynette

    2017-05-01

    One of the many difficulties a person with dementia can experience is difficulty with way finding and subsequently getting lost in the community. Prescriptions of assistive technology are a key role for occupational therapists. This study aimed to describe the attitudes and practices of occupational therapists in recommending and using assistive technology for persons with dementia who have difficulties with way finding in the community. An online survey was distributed to members of Occupational Therapy Australia NSW and included 25 items on demographics, frequency of use of assistive technology and assessment. A total of 85 occupational therapists responded to the survey. Significant differences were identified in the approaches used, the types of assistive technology used and the evaluation of outcomes, between community-based and hospital-based occupational therapists. Over half of the participants had never prescribed any of the assistive devices listed in the survey for people with dementia. The most frequently prescribed assistive devices were low-tech items that were already freely available to carers and other professions. Therapists used a conservative approach to problem solving with their clients with dementia. There is a limited understanding from occupational therapists about available interventions for people with dementia. Implications for Rehabilitation There is limited awareness on how assistive technology might be used to support occupational performance for persons with dementia. This survey suggests that occupational therapists experience barriers in identifying and providing appropriate assistive technology for this group. Access to targeted education and online resources for occupational therapists is recommended to provide better awareness of the types of assistive technology available to assist persons with dementia and their caregivers.

  10. Assessment of Barriers to Providing Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPEs in the Hospital Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Gibson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The primary objective of the study is to identify the barriers to providing Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPEs in the hospital setting. Methods: Potential barriers to IPPEs were identified via literature review and interviews with current IPPE preceptors from various institutions. Based on this information, an electronic survey was developed and distributed to IPPE preceptors in order to assess student, preceptor, logistical and college or school of pharmacy related barriers that potentially exist for providing IPPE in the hospital setting. Results: Sixty-eight of the 287 eligible survey respondents (24% completed the electronic survey. Seventy-six percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that available time was a barrier to precepting IPPE students even though a majority of respondents reported spending a third or more of their day with an IPPE student when on rotation. Seventy-three percent of respondents disagreed or strongly disagreed that all preceptors have consistent performance expectations for students, while just 46% agreed or strongly agreed that they had adequate training to precept IPPEs. Sixty-five percent of respondents agreed that IPPE students have the ability to be a participant in patient care and 70% of preceptors believe that IPPE students should be involved in patient care. Conclusions: Conducting IPPEs in the institutional setting comes with challenges. Based on the results of this study, experiential directors and colleges/schools of pharmacy could make a positive impact on the quality and consistency of IPPEs by setting student expectations and training preceptors on appropriate and consistent expectations for students.   Type: Original Research

  11. Health care provider confidence and exercise prescription practices of Exercise is Medicine Canada workshop attendees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Myles W; Shields, Christopher A; Oh, Paul I; Fowles, Jonathon R

    2017-04-01

    The Exercise is Medicine Canada (EIMC) initiative promotes physical activity counselling and exercise prescription within health care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate perceptions and practices around physical activity counselling and exercise prescription in health care professionals before and after EIMC training. Prior to and directly following EIMC workshops, 209 participants (physicians (n = 113); allied health professionals (AHPs) (n = 54), including primarily nurses (n = 36) and others; and exercise professionals (EPs) (n = 23), including kinesiologists (n = 16), physiotherapists (n = 5), and personal trainers (n = 2)) from 7 provinces completed self-reflection questionnaires. Compared with AHPs, physicians saw more patients (78% > 15 patients/day vs 93% exercise counselling during routine client encounters (48% vs 72% in most sessions; p exercise counselling into sessions (2.74 ± 0.71, out of 5) compared with AHPs (2.17 ± 0.94; p = 0.001) and EPs (1.43 ± 0.66; p exercise prescription as lack of patient interest (2.77 ± 0.85 out of 4), resources (2.65 ± 0.82 out of 4), and time (2.62 ± 0.71 out of 4). The majority of physicians (85%) provided a written prescription for exercise in exercise routinely, and 33% planned on increasing physical activity and exercise counselling, measured through open-ended responses.

  12. A Qualitative Study of Advice from Bereaved Parents and Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Amanda L.; Miller, Kimberly S.; Barrera, Maru; Davies, Betty; Foster, Terrah L.; Gilmer, Mary Jo; Hogan, Nancy; Vannatta, Kathryn; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite a growing bereavement literature, relatively little is known about what families find helpful after a child’s death and how best to assist them during the grieving process. This qualitative study explored advice from 40 families (65 parents, 39 siblings) of children died who cancer 6–19 months earlier. Content analysis emphasized the individual nature of grief and revealed advice that fit into three temporal categories: before the death, soon after, and long-term. Findings are discussed in the context of contemporary theory and provide insight into the development and timing of grief interventions. PMID:21895435

  13. [Dietary advice in type 2 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigalleau, Vincent; Gonzalez, Concepcion; Raffaitin, Christelle; Gin, Henri

    2010-04-20

    The dietary advice is a part of the global care for type 2 diabetes. First, overweight implies a caloric restriction. When poor glucose control is associated with weight gain, important errors are obvious (excess fat and sugar), providing more pills or insulin without correcting them is poorly effective, but promotes further weight gain. Normal body weight, or poor glucose control despite loss of weight, needs to reappraise the diagnosis: diabetes type, intercurrent disease. The cofactors of the "metabolic syndrom" are usually present, so saturated fat has to be reduced, while maintaining fish, fruits, vegetables and whole grain cereals. Blood pressure and dyslipidemia may need further counselling about dietary sodium, carbohydrates, cholesterol. When insulin, sulfonylurea or glinids are indicated, the dietary intake of carbohydrates has to be regular to avoid hypoglycemia.

  14. Utilisation of Evidence-Based Practices by ASD Early Intervention Service Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Jessica M.; Ferguson, Sarah; Fordyce, Kathryn; Joosten, Annette; Paku, Sofia; Stephens, Miranda; Trembath, David; Keen, Deb

    2017-01-01

    A number of autism intervention practices have been demonstrated to be effective. However, the use of unsupported practices persists in community early intervention settings. Recent research has suggested that personal, professional and workplace factors may influence intervention choices. The aim of this research was to investigate knowledge and…

  15. Dear author--advice from a retiring editor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samet, J M

    1999-09-01

    This commentary, detailing the handling of a manuscript by the editor and guiding authors on preparing manuscripts and responding to reviews, provides parting advice to authors from a retiring editor. A close reading of this commentary will give some insight into the editorial process at the American Journal of Epidemiology through the observations of one of its editors.

  16. Personalized nutrition advice : an everyday-life perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, L.I.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents societal preconditions for Personalized Nutrition Advice (PNA) that result from an everyday-life perspective on this innovative approach. Generally, PNA is regarded as promising, because it provides users with highly specific information on individual health risks and benefits

  17. Understanding of and adherence to advice after telephone counselling by nurse: a survey among callers to a primary emergency out-of-hours service in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Elisabeth

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate how callers understand the information given by telephone by registered nurses in a casualty clinic, to what degree the advice was followed, and the final outcome of the condition for the patients. Methods The study was conducted at a large out-of-hours inter-municipality casualty clinic in Norway during April and May 2010. Telephone interviews were performed with 100 callers/patients who had received information and advice by a nurse as a sole response. Six topics from the interview guide were compared with the telephone record files to check whether the caller had understood the advice. In addition, questions were asked about how the caller followed the advice provided and the patient's outcome. Results 99 out of 100 interviewed callers stated that they had understood the nurse's advice, but interpreted from the telephone records, the total agreement for all six topics was 82.6%. 93 callers/patients stated that they followed the advice and 11 re-contacted the casualty clinic. 22 contacted their GP for the same complaints the same week, of whom five patients received medical treatment and one was hospitalised. There were significant difference between the native-Norwegian and the non-native Norwegian regarding whether they trusted the nurse (p = 0.017, and if they got relevant answers to their questions (p = 0.005. Conclusion Callers to the out-of-hours service seem to understand the advice given by the registered nurses, and a large majority of the patients did not contact their GP or other health services again with the same complaints. Practice Implication Medical and communicative training must be an important part of the continuous improvement strategy within the out-of-hour services.

  18. Current attitudes and practices of obesity counselling by health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrin, Christine; Kahan, Scott; Turner, Monique; Gallagher, Christine; Dietz, William H

    Relatively few patients receive obesity counselling consistent with the USPSTF guidelines, and many health care professionals (HCPs) are biased in their attitudes towards obesity management. A national sample of family physicians, internists, OB/GYN physicians, and nurse practitioners (NPs) completed a web-based survey of beliefs, practice, and knowledge regarding obesity management. A majority of HCPs believe that it is both the patient's and the provider's responsibility to ensure that the patient is counselled about obesity. Obesity (77%), obesity-related diseases (79%), or obesity-related risk factors (71%) prompt HCPs to offer obesity counselling; 59% of HCPs wait for the patient to broach the subject of their weight. Increased blood pressure (89%) and heart disease risks (90%) are the most common themes in counselling. Across all HCPs except NPs "exercise" is discussed more frequently than "physical activity" (85% vs 81%), "diet" more frequently than "eating habits" (77% vs 75%), and "obesity" more frequently than "unhealthy weight" (60% vs 45%). NPs are more likely to discuss physical activity, eating habits, and unhealthy weight instead. To improve counselling for obesity, HCPs reported needing more time (70%), training in obesity management (53%), improved reimbursement (53%), and better tools to help patients recognise obesity risks (50%). Obesity-related diseases, risk factors, or obesity alone predict obesity counselling amongst HCPs. Better training in weight management and tools to help patients recognise risks appear to be key elements in helping patients compare the risks of what they may consider invasive therapy against the risks of continued obesity. Copyright © 2016 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of advanced practice providers (nurse practitioners and physician assistants) on surgical residents' critical care experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Steven A; Davis, Sarah A; Banes, Caroline T; Dennis, Bradley M; May, Addison K; Gunter, Oliver D

    2015-11-01

    Teaching hospitals often employ advanced practice providers (nurse practitioners and physician assistants or APPs) to counteract residents' work-hour restrictions. With increased utilization of APPs in labor-intense areas, such as intensive care units (ICUs), APPs may have an impact on resident education and experience. No studies have investigated the direct role an APP plays on the training experience of a surgical resident in the ICU. An institutional review board-approved survey was emailed to residents in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited general surgery programs. Surveys asked about demographics, residency and/or ICU characteristics, and the effects of APPs on patient care, workflow, and educational experience. Regression analysis determined predictors of resident perception. A total of 354 of 1178 residents responded to the survey (30%). Some residents felt that nurses calling APPs preferentially for patient-care issues interfered with education (17%) and residents' ability to follow patients (12%) and was associated with overall detrimental effects to ICU experience on regression (odds ratio, 3.7; confidence interval, 1.5-9.1). Most residents reported positive effects of APPs, such as reduced resident workload (79.8%), teaching protocols and/or guidelines (60.3%), enhanced patient care (60.3%), and enhanced communication (50.5%). When asked how APPs affected their overall ICU experience, 48.4% reported positive effects, 20.6% reported "no effect," and 31% reported detrimental effects. Only a minority of residents perceived that APPs detract from training, particularly those who felt excluded when nurses preferentially contact APPs with patient-care issues. APPs have the potential to enhance training and ICU experience, as reflected in many of the responses. Strategies to maintain direct nurse and resident communication might preserve residents' perception of the educational value of APPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All

  20. Refugees' advice to physicians: how to ask about mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Patricia J

    2014-08-01

    About 45.2 million people were displaced from their homes in 2012 due to persecution, political conflict, generalized violence and human rights violations. Refugees who endure violence are at increased risk of developing chronic psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder and major depression. The primary care visit may be the first opportunity to detect the devastating psychological effects of trauma. Physicians and refugees have identified communication barriers that inhibit discussions about mental health. In this study, refugees offer advice to physicians about how to assess the mental health effects of trauma. Ethnocultural methodology informed 13 focus groups with 111 refugees from Burma, Bhutan, Somali and Ethiopia. Refugees responded to questions concerning how physicians should ask about mental health in acceptable ways. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using thematic categorization informed by Spradley's Developmental Research Sequence. Refugees recommended that physicians should take the time to make refugees comfortable, initiate direct conversations about mental health, inquire about the historical context of symptoms and provide psychoeducation about mental health and healing. Physicians may require specialized training to learn how to initiate conversations about mental health and provide direct education and appropriate mental health referrals in a brief medical appointment. To assist with making appropriate referrals, physicians may also benefit from education about evidence-based practices for treating symptoms of refugee trauma. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. 5 CFR 2635.107 - Ethics advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ethics advice. 2635.107 Section 2635.107 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH General Provisions § 2635.107 Ethics advice. (a) As required by §§ 2638.201...

  2. Young Children's Trust in Overtly Misleading Advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Gail D.; Sritanyaratana, Lalida; Vanderbilt, Kimberly E.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of 3- and 4-year-old children to disregard advice from an overtly misleading informant was investigated across five studies (total "n" =212). Previous studies have documented limitations in young children's ability to reject misleading advice. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that these limitations are primarily…

  3. Explaining customer experience of digital financial advice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Raaij, W.F.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to analyze the customer experience of digital-driven financial advice systems. It is the objective of this study to develop a cross-cultural model for validating customer experiences of digital financial advice. In doing so, both objective and subjective system aspects have

  4. Teachers' Accounts of Their Perceptions and Practices of Providing Written Feedback to Nursing Students on Their Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Sajid; Gul, Raisa; Lakhani, Arusa; Rizvi, Nusrat Fatima

    2014-01-01

    Written feedback can facilitate students' learning in several ways. However, the teachers' practices of written feedback may be affected by various factors. This study aimed to explore the nurse teachers' accounts of their perceptions and practices of providing written feedback. A descriptive exploratory design was employed in the study. A…

  5. HIV prevention advice for people with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nicola; Akhtar, Athfah; Tosh, Graeme E; Clifton, Andrew V

    2014-12-08

    People with serious mental illness have rates of Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) infection higher than expected in the general population for the same demographic area. Despite this elevated prevalence, UK national strategies around sexual health and HIV prevention do not state that people with serious mental illness are a high risk group. However, a significant proportion in this group are sexually active and engage in HIV-risk behaviours including having multiple sexual partners, infrequent use of condoms and trading sex for money or drugs. Therefore we propose the provision of HIV prevention advice could enhance the physical and social well being of this population. To assess the effects of HIV prevention advice in reducing morbidity, mortality and preserving the quality of life in people with serious mental illness. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Trials Register (24 January, 2012), which is based on regular searches of CINAHL, BIOSIS, AMED, EMBASE, PubMed, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and registries of clinical trials. There is no language, date, document type, or publication status limitations for inclusion of records in the register. We planned to include all randomised controlled trials focusing on HIV prevention advice versus standard care or comparing HIV prevention advice with other more focused methods of delivering care or information for people with serious mental illness. Review authors (NW, AC, AA, GT) independently screened search results and did not identify any studies that fulfilled the review's criteria. We did not identify any randomised studies that evaluated advice regarding HIV for people with serious mental illness. The excluded studies illustrate that randomisation of packages of care relevant to both people with serious mental illness and HIV risk are possible. Policy makers, clinicians, researchers and service users need to collaborate to produce guidance on how best to provide advice for people with serious mental illness in

  6. Sport participation and Ramadan observance: Advice for the athlete

    OpenAIRE

    Shephard, Roy J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A growing number of Muslim athletes now engage in international competition. This raises the question of the advice they should be given if a major event occurs during the month of Ramadan. Methods: A narrative review has been based upon books and extensive reviews completed by the author and other investigators. Results: Practical considerations hamper assessment of the effects of Ramadan upon physical performance, but there seem small decreases in muscular strength and both an...

  7. Disparities in hypertension control advice according to smoking status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caban-Martinez, Alberto J; Davila, Evelyn P; Zhao, Wei; Arheart, Kristopher; Hooper, Monica Webb; Byrne, Margaret; Messiah, Antoine; Dietz, Noella; Huang, Youjie; Fleming, Lora E; Lee, David J

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is the most common modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Blood pressure (BP) reduction, particularly among smokers, is highly effective at preventing cardiovascular diseases. We examined the association between patient smoking status and hypertension management advice. Adults who participated in the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System with self-reported hypertension were examined (n=51,063). Multivariable logistic regression analysis controlling for age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, insurance status, body mass index, alcohol use, self-reported general health and survey design were conducted to examine the association between smoking status (never, former, or current) and receipt of hypertension control advice. After controlling for potential confounders, being a current smoker was significantly associated with lower odds of receiving advice to lower salt intake (Adjusted Odds Ratio, AOR, 0.91 [95% confidence interval=0.84-0.99]), exercise (AOR 0.89 [0.80-0.98]), and to take hypertensive medication (AOR 0.80 [0.66-0.98]) compared to never smokers. However, hypertensive smokers had greater odds of receiving advice to reduce alcohol consumption (AOR 1.23 [1.10-1.45]). Although healthcare providers are in an optimal position to provide patient education to improve BP control, hypertensive smokers may be less likely to receive important BP control lifestyle modification messages from their healthcare provider than non-smokers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Frequent attenders in general practice: problem solving treatment (PST) provided by nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, B.; van Oppen, P.C.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Smit, J.H.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is a need for assistance from primary care mental health workers in general practice in the Netherlands. General practitioners (GPs) experience an overload of frequent attenders suffering from psychological problems. Problem Solving Treatment (PST) is a brief psychological

  9. Frequent attenders in general practice: problem solving treatment provided by nurses [ISRCTN51021015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuders, B.; van Oppen, P.C.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Smit, J.H.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is a need for assistance from primary care mental health workers in general practice in the Netherlands. General practitioners (GPs) experience an overload of frequent attenders suffering from psychological problems. Problem Solving Treatment (PST) is a brief psychological

  10. Frequent attenders in general practice: problem solving treatment provided by nurses [ISRCTN51021015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuders, B.; Oppen, van P.C.; Marwijk, van H.W.J.; Smit, J.H.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for assistance from primary care mental health workers in general practice in the Netherlands. General practitioners (GPs) experience an overload of frequent attenders suffering from psychological problems. Problem Solving Treatment (PST) is a brief psychological

  11. Assessing drivers ability to carry out headway advice in motorway car driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risto, Malte; Martens, Marieke Hendrikje; nb,

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve throughput on motorways, a headway advisory system is being developed. This system could enable drivers to choose their headway differently by providing in-vehicle advice. How well are drivers able to follow a time or a distance headway advice and what effect has vehicle speed

  12. Patients, evidence and genes: an exploration of GPs' perspectives on gene-based personalized nutrition advice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, L.I.; Molder, te H.F.M.; Hiddink, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Nutrigenomics science examines the response of individuals to food compounds using post-genomics technology. It is expected that in the future, personalized nutrition advice can be provided based on information about genetic make-up. Objectives. Gene-based personalized nutrition advice

  13. A study of the cost-effectiveness of providing psychomotor practice in teaching intravenous infusion techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegstad, L N; Zsohar, H

    1986-01-01

    Does psychomotor practice affect the student's ability to perform venipuncture? This was the primary question in a study conducted to compare two versions of an instructional program--a no-practice version and a costly version that involved practice on the simulated arm. The initial study was composed of 40 (20 each group) Junior nursing students enrolled in a baccalaureate program. The instructional program for both groups included a handout of the task-by-task description of the procedure; a performance check list, a 10-minute color videotape demonstrating the entire process, and a live demonstration on a simulated arm. Each group took a post test which covered the cognitive aspects of the task. The practice group was able to practice on the simulated arm prior to evaluation on a live subject. The cognitive scores for both groups were near 90% and the performance scores above 80%. Since there was no significant difference between the groups the study was repeated with another group of students from the same school. This group differed slightly from the original group in that they had no experience with venipuncture. The second study contained 34 students and the cognitive scores were 91% for both groups and above 80% for the performance scores. The results indicated that the least costly version was equally effective and presents nursing education with an opportunity to evaluate skills teaching to determine the most effective, efficient and/or economical method to teach skills.

  14. Performance assessment in health care providers: a critical review of evidence and current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Karen E Stc; Coates, Vivien; Kelly, Billy; Boore, Jennifer R P; Cundell, Jill H; Gracey, Jacquie; McFetridge, Brian; McGonigle, Mary; Sinclair, Marlene

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate methods of performance assessment through an international literature review and a survey of current practice. Over the past two decades health care organizations have focussed on promoting high quality care in conjunction with retaining motivated staff. Cognisant of such initiatives, we sought to evaluate assessment methods for qualified staff according to their utility in the working environment. A systematic literature search was completed and each paper independently reviewed. All health care organizations in Northern Ireland submitted details of their performance assessments. Each was critically appraised using a utility index. Performance was not universally defined. A broad range of assessments were identified, each method had advantages and disadvantages. Although many lacked rigorous testing, areas of good practice were also noted. No single method is appropriate for assessing clinical performance. Rather, this study endorses proposals for a multi-method strategy to ensure that performance assessment demonstrates all attributes required for effective nursing and midwifery practice.

  15. Using Health Provider Insights to Inform Pediatric HIV Disclosure: A Qualitative Study and Practice Framework from Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    John-Stewart, Grace; Shah, Brandi; Wamalwa, Dalton; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth; Kelley, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Optimal pediatric HIV disclosure impacts illness and developmental experiences while improving access to timely treatment. However, disclosure rates in high HIV prevalence countries remain low and there are limited data on best practices. We conducted a qualitative study of disclosure practices and interviewed healthcare providers from five pediatric HIV clinics in Kenya. We identified themes central to disclosure practices, rationale for approaches, barriers to implementing disclosure, and creative strategies to overcome challenges. We used these insights to develop a practice-based framework for disclosure that is sensitive to practical challenges. Overall, providers had limited training but extensive experience in disclosure, endorsed individualized disclosure practices, invested substantial time on disclosure despite clinical burden, and noted adverse outcomes associated with unplanned or abrupt disclosure. Providers advocated for an approach to disclosure that is child-centered but respects caregiver fears and values. Caregiver support was provided to enable caregivers to be the person who ultimately disclosed HIV status to children. Unplanned or abrupt disclosure to children was reported to have severe and persistent adverse impact and was a stimulus to accelerate disclosure in scenarios when providers believed children may be suspecting their diagnosis. Based on these expert insights, the framework we developed incorporates concurrent evaluation of child and caregiver readiness, identifies cues to prompt disclosure discussions, includes caregiver education and support, and utilizes a gradual approach of unveiling HIV diagnosis to the child. PMID:25216105

  16. Association of provider opioid prescribing practices and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services hierarchical condition category score: A retrospective examination of correlation between the volume of provider-prescribed opioid medications and provider panel complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick North

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Opioids are being prescribed at increasing rates in primary care practices, and among individual providers there is significant variability in opioid prescribing. Primary care practices also vary significantly in complexity of their patients, ranging from healthy patients to those with multiple comorbidities. Our objective was to examine individual primary care providers for an association between their opioid prescribing and the complexity/risk of their panel of patients (a panel of patients is a group of patients whose medical care is the responsibility of a specific healthcare provider or care team. Methods: We retrospectively examined 12 months of opioid prescription data from a primary care practice. We obtained counts of opioids prescribed by providers in the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota primary care practice. For patients paneled (assigned to family medicine and internal medicine, we used the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services hierarchical condition category patient risk score as a measure of patient complexity. After adjusting the opioid counts for panel patient count (to get opioid counts per patient, we used linear regression analysis to determine the correlation between the hierarchical condition category risk and the amount of opioid prescribed by individual providers. Results: Among our combined 103 primary care providers, opioid unit counts prescribed per patient were highly correlated with the providers’ hierarchical condition category panel risk score (r2 = 0.54. After excluding three outliers, r2 was 0.74. With and without the outliers, the correlation was very significant (p  0.45 showed significant correlation with hierarchical condition category (r2 = 0.26; p = 0.001. Conclusion: When examining differences in primary care providers’ opioid prescribing practices, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services endorsed risk score (the hierarchical condition category score can help

  17. Practice nurses mental health provide space to patients to discuss unpleasant emotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, E.C.; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van

    2016-01-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: A core skill of practice nurses' mental health is to recognize and explore patients' unpleasant emotions. Patients rarely express their unpleasant emotions directly and spontaneously, but instead give indirect signs that something is worrying them. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS

  18. Practice nurses mental health provide space to patients to discuss unpleasant emotions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, E.C.M.; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, A.M. van

    2016-01-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? A core skill of practice nurses' mental health is to recognize and explore patients' unpleasant emotions. Patients rarely express their unpleasant emotions directly and spontaneously, but instead give indirect signs that something is worrying them.

  19. Adoption of Evidence-Based Practices among Substance Abuse Treatment Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Nancy A.; Shopshire, Michael; Tajima, Barbara; Gruber, Valerie; Guydish, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    This research was conducted at a Substance Abuse Forum designed to address local community needs by focusing on Evidence-Based Practices (EBPs) in addiction treatment. The purpose of the study was to assess substance abuse treatment professionals' readiness to adopt EBPs, experience with EBPs, and attitudes toward EBPs, as well as agency support…

  20. Knowledge of Child Abuse and Reporting Practices among Early Care and Education Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinehart, Laura; Kenny, Maureen C.

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to assess child abuse knowledge and reporting practices of a diverse sample of early care and education (ECE) practitioners. One hundred and thirty-seven practitioners in the state of Florida completed the "Early Childhood Educators Child Abuse Questionnaire." Results revealed that only a minority of participants have…

  1. Practical considerations in the pharmacological treatment of postherpetic neuralgia for the primary care provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massengill JS

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Jamie S Massengill,1 John L Kittredge2 1JSM Medical, Edmond, OK, USA; 2Michiana Spine, Sports and Occupational Rehab, PC, Mishawaka, IN, USA Abstract: An estimated one million individuals in the US are diagnosed with herpes zoster (HZ; shingles each year. Approximately 20% of these patients will develop postherpetic neuralgia (PHN, a complex HZ complication characterized by neuropathic pain isolated to the dermatome that was affected by the HZ virus. PHN is debilitating, altering physical function and quality of life, and commonly affects vulnerable populations, including the elderly and the immunocompromised. Despite the availability of an immunization for HZ prevention and several approved HZ treatments, the incidence of PHN is increasing. Furthermore, management of the neuropathic pain associated with PHN is often suboptimal, and the use of available therapeutics may be complicated by adverse effects and complex, burdensome treatment regimens, as well as by patients' comorbidities and polypharmacy, which may lead to drug–drug interactions. Informed and comprehensive assessments of currently available pharmacological treatment options to achieve effective pain control in the primary care setting are needed. In this article, we discuss the situation in clinical practice, review currently recommended prevention and treatment options for PHN, and outline practical considerations for the management of this neuropathic pain syndrome, with a focus on optimal, individual-based treatment plans for use in the primary care setting. Keywords: herpes zoster, postherpetic neuralgia, primary care, clinical practice, pharmacological treatment, practical guidelines

  2. Providing Assistance to the Victims of Adolescent Dating Violence: A National Assessment of School Nurses' Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Telljohann, Susan K.; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Hendershot, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study assessed the perceptions and practices of school nurses regarding adolescent dating violence (ADV). Methods: The membership list of the National Association of School Nurses was used to identify a national random cross-sectional sample of high school nurses in the United States (N?=?750). A valid and reliable survey…

  3. Relationship of Evidence-Based Practice and Treatments: A Survey of Community Mental Health Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMeo, Michelle A.; Moore, G. Kurt; Lichtenstein, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based treatments (EBTs) are "interventions" that have been proven effective through rigorous research methodologies. Evidence-based practice (EBP), however, refers to a "decision-making process" that integrates the best available research, clinician expertise, and client characteristics. This study examined community mental health service…

  4. Do immunisation procedures match provider perception? A study from the South Carolina Pediatric Practice Research Network (SCPPRN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James R; Freeland, Katherine D; Kolasa, Maureen S; McElligott, James T; Darden, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    Immunisation coverage of children by 19 months of age in US primary care practices is below the desired goal of 80%. In order to improve this rate, primary care providers must first understand the specific processes of immunisation delivery within their office settings. This paper aims to identify key components in identifying strategies for quality improvement (QI) of immunisation delivery. We surveyed a South Carolina Pediatric Practice Research Network (SCPPRN) representative for each of six paediatric practices. The surveys included questions regarding immunisation assessment, medical record keeping, opportunities for immunisation administration and prompting. Subsequently, research staff visited the participating practices to directly observe their immunisation delivery process and review patient charts in order to validate survey responses and identify areas for QI. Most survey responses were verified using direct observation of actual practice or chart review. However, observation of actual practice and chart review identified key areas for improvement of immunisation delivery. Although four practices responded that they prompted for needed immunisations at sick visits, only one did so. We also noted considerable variation among and within practices in terms of immunising with all indicated vaccines during sick visits. In addition, most practices had multiple immunisation forms and all administered immunisations were not always recorded on all forms, making it difficult to determine a child's immunisation status. For any QI procedure, including immunisation delivery, providers must first understand how the process within their practice actually occurs. Direct observation of immunisation processes and medical record review enhances survey responses in identifying areas for improvement. This study identified several opportunities that practices can use to improve immunisation delivery, particularly maintaining accurate and easy-to-locate immunisation records

  5. Advice to speak English in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Martín, Mario Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Abstract This article addresses the issue of advice given to immigrant parents to speak English only with their children in Australia, as reflected in the Spanish-speaking community. The article shows that something that appears to be down to chance, i.e. whether this advice is given or not, has a social explanation. This social explanation is based on understanding several social variables such as the ethnic identity of the adviser and the year in which the advice was given, as we...

  6. Pharmacist services provided in general practice clinics: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Edwin C K; Stewart, Kay; Elliott, Rohan A; George, Johnson

    2014-01-01

    Integration of pharmacists into primary care general practice clinics has the potential to improve interdisciplinary teamwork and patient care; however this practice is not widespread. The aim of this study was to review the effectiveness of clinical pharmacist services delivered in primary care general practice clinics. A systematic review of English language randomized controlled trials cited in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts was conducted. Studies were included if pharmacists had a regular and ongoing relationship with the clinic; delivered an intervention aimed at optimizing prescribing for, and/or medication use by, clinic patients; and were physically present within the clinic for all or part of the intervention, or for communication with staff. The search generated 1484 articles. After removal of duplicates and screening of titles and abstracts against inclusion criteria, 131 articles remained. A total of 38 studies were included in the review and assessed for quality. Seventeen studies had common endpoints (blood pressure, glycosylated hemoglobin, cholesterol and/or Framingham risk score) and were included in meta-analyses. Twenty-nine of the 38 studies recruited patients with specific medical conditions, most commonly cardiovascular disease (15 studies) and/or diabetes (9 studies). The remaining 9 studies recruited patients at general risk of medication misadventure. Pharmacist interventions usually involved medication review (86.8%), with or without other activities delivered collaboratively with the general practitioner (family physician). Positive effects on primary outcomes related to medication use or clinical outcomes were reported in 19 studies, mixed effects in six studies, and no effect in 13 studies. The results of meta-analyses favored the pharmacist intervention, with significant improvements in blood pressure, glycosylated hemoglobin, cholesterol and Framingham

  7. An exploration of knowledge, attitudes and advice given by health professionals to parents in Ireland about the introduction of solid foods. A pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Allcutt, Claire

    2010-04-21

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: For the purposes of this paper "weaning is defined as the introduction of the first solid foods to infants". Global recommendations by the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommend that all infants be exclusively breast-fed for the first six months of life. No global recommendations have been made for formula fed infants. In Europe it is recommended that weaning foods should be introduced between 18 weeks and 26 weeks regardless of whether infants are breast or formula fed. In the United Kingdom it is recommended that solids be introduced at around six-months for both breast and formula fed infants. In Ireland official guidelines recommend that breast fed infants should be introduced solids at 6 months of age while for formula fed infants the recommendation is for 4 months. The disparity between these global, European, UK and local recommendations may be a source of confusion for parents and health care professional based in Ireland. Emerging evidence suggests that babies in Ireland are given solid foods before the recommended age but there has been little investigation of the weaning advice provided by health professionals. Since community health professionals have routine parent interactions in the pre-weaning and early-weaning period and hence are in a unique position to positively influence parental weaning decisions, this study aimed to explore their knowledge, attitudes and advice practices about weaning. METHODS: A mixed-methods approach was used for the research, commencing with a multi-disciplinary focus group to guide and develop a questionnaire. Questionnaires were then distributed in a postal survey to General Practitioners (GPs) (n 179), Practice Nurses (PNs) (n 121), Public Health Nurses (PHNs) (n 107) and Community Dieticians (CDs) (n 8). RESULTS: The results indicate varying levels of knowledge of official weaning recommendations and a variety of advice practices. CDs and PHNs acknowledged a clear role in providing weaning

  8. An exploration of knowledge, attitudes and advice given by health professionals to parents in Ireland about the introduction of solid foods. A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweeney Mary-Rose

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the purposes of this paper "weaning is defined as the introduction of the first solid foods to infants". Global recommendations by the World Health Organisation (WHO recommend that all infants be exclusively breast-fed for the first six months of life. No global recommendations have been made for formula fed infants. In Europe it is recommended that weaning foods should be introduced between 18 weeks and 26 weeks regardless of whether infants are breast or formula fed. In the United Kingdom it is recommended that solids be introduced at around six-months for both breast and formula fed infants. In Ireland official guidelines recommend that breast fed infants should be introduced solids at 6 months of age while for formula fed infants the recommendation is for 4 months. The disparity between these global, European, UK and local recommendations may be a source of confusion for parents and health care professional based in Ireland. Emerging evidence suggests that babies in Ireland are given solid foods before the recommended age but there has been little investigation of the weaning advice provided by health professionals. Since community health professionals have routine parent interactions in the pre-weaning and early-weaning period and hence are in a unique position to positively influence parental weaning decisions, this study aimed to explore their knowledge, attitudes and advice practices about weaning. Methods A mixed-methods approach was used for the research, commencing with a multi-disciplinary focus group to guide and develop a questionnaire. Questionnaires were then distributed in a postal survey to General Practitioners (GPs (n 179, Practice Nurses (PNs (n 121, Public Health Nurses (PHNs (n 107 and Community Dieticians (CDs (n 8. Results The results indicate varying levels of knowledge of official weaning recommendations and a variety of advice practices. CDs and PHNs acknowledged a clear role in providing

  9. Practice development: providing benefits for both managers and older patients with delerium and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzant, Kim

    2008-03-01

    This article describes the ways in which practice development can aid Nurse Managers to enhance both efficiency and effectiveness, focussing particularly on the care of older people with delerium and dementia. Practitioners caring for this group of patients in acute general hospitals need specialist skills, particularly skills in working with the unusual ('challenging') behaviours that these patients often exhibit. These skills are rarely present at the point of registration but practice development techniques can facilitate the acquisition of appropriate skills with resultant benefits for both patients and organization. The study contains an outline of the ways in which a practice development approach can be delivered and appraised: the theories are outlined, strategies for delivery of the techniques are described and methods of evaluation are suggested. These theories and techniques are being applied in a project in Portsmouth called 'Rise to the Challenge', which has the specific aim of improving the care of people with delerium and dementia in an acute hospital setting. This project is currently running and will be evaluated in the summer of 2008.

  10. Oncology nursing: educating advanced practice nurses to provide culturally competent care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Theresa Pluth; Phillips, Janice; Delengowski, Anne; Griffiths, Margaret; Purnell, Larry

    2011-01-01

    More than 37 million persons or 12.4% of the U.S. population are older than 65 years. These numbers are expected to reach 71.5 million (20% of the population) by 2030. This older population is becoming more racially and ethnically diverse as the overall minority and culturally diverse populations increase. Although the incidence and mortality rates from several major cancers have declined due to advances in cancer care, these advances have lagged among the underserved and more vulnerable racially and culturally diverse populations. Moreover, the disparity between the gender and the racial mix of nurses and the overall population continues to widen. Thus, a growing need for professional nurses and advanced practice nurses with formal educational preparation in all areas of oncology nursing exists. This article (a) highlights significant cancer disparities among diverse populations, (b) describes how cultural belief systems influence cancer care and decision making, and (c) explicates the need to prepare advanced practice nurses for careers that include cancer care of diverse and vulnerable populations through formal oncology educational programs. The "Top 10" reasons for becoming an advanced practice nurse specializing in the oncologic care of patients from diverse and underserved populations are presented. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Home Care Pharmacy Practice in Canada: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Services Provided, Remuneration, Barriers, and Facilitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Sherilyn; MacKeigan, Linda

    2017-01-01

    As the population ages, and individuals desire to remain in their homes as long as possible, the need for in-home care is expected to increase. However, pharmacists have rarely been included in studies of in-home care, and little is known about the prevalence or effectiveness of pharmacists' home-based services in Canada. To identify pharmacy practices in Canada that regularly provide in-home patient care and to identify specific services provided, remuneration obtained, and barriers and facilitators influencing the provision of home-based care. A link to a web-based survey was posted in e-newsletters of provincial, territorial, and national pharmacy associations in Canada. In addition, pharmacists known to the researchers as providing in-home clinical services were contacted directly. The survey was open from October to December 2015. Practices or organizations that performed at least one home visit per week for clinical purposes, with documentation of the services provided, were eligible to participate. One response per practice or organization was allowed. Seventeen practices meeting the inclusion criteria were identified, representing community, hospital, and clinic settings. Home visits were most commonly performed for individuals with complex medication regimens or nonadherence to medication therapy. The most common services were conducting medication reconciliation and reviews and counselling patients about medication adherence. No practices or organizations billed patients for these services, yet lack of remuneration was an important barrier identified by many respondents. Although 12 (71%) of the respondents collected data for evaluative purposes, collection of clinical or health system outcome data was rare. Few Canadian pharmacy practices that provide in-home patient care at least once a week could be identified. Data collection suitable to establish an evidence base for this service was infrequently performed by practices and organizations providing

  12. No Effect of Writing Advice on Reading Comprehension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Laura Winther

    2018-01-01

    This article considers text comprehension through the integrated perspectives of language processing research and practical writing advice as expressed in writing guides and language policies. Such guides for instance include advice to use active constructions instead of passives and sentences...... instead of nominalizations. These recommended and problem constructions and two other contrasts were investigated in an eye-tracking experiment where 27 students read four authentic texts where the target constructions had been manipulated. A mixed-effects regression analysis showed no difference between...... recommended and problem constructions, while several control variables were significant. This result indicates that the linguistic manipulations are not in themselves crucial to text comprehension, and it is hypothesized that the central aspect for text comprehension is how the linguistic manipulations...

  13. Influenza Vaccination among Pregnant Women: Patient Beliefs and Medical Provider Practices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stark, Lauren M; Power, Michael L; Turrentine, Mark; Samelson, Renee; Siddiqui, Maryam M; Paglia, Michael J; Strassberg, Emmie R; Kelly, Elizabeth; Murtough, Katie L; Schulkin, Jay

    2016-01-01

    ...% of patients reported receiving a recommendation. Age, education, a medical provider's recommendation, and educational materials were found to positively influence patient beliefs about the influenza...

  14. Clinician advice to quit smoking among seniors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shadel, William G; Elliott, Marc N; Haas, Ann C; Haviland, Amelia M; Orr, Nate; Farmer, Melissa M; Ma, Sai; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Farley, Donna O; Cleary, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Little smoking research in the past 20years includes persons 50 and older; herein we describe patterns of clinician cessation advice to US seniors, including variation by Medicare beneficiary characteristics...

  15. Post-abortion family planning counselling practice among abortion service providers in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Longmei; Wu, Shangchun; Li, Jiong

    2017-01-01

    /doctor' [1.99 (1.01,3.92), 2.32 (1.22,4.40) and 2.34 (1.06,5.17), respectively]. Conclusions: The majority of providers could provide PAFP counselling to women undergone an abortion, but some of them had insufficient time to make it available. Education, knowledge about fertility and reproductive health...

  16. Engineering practice variation through provider agreement: a cluster-randomized feasibility trial

    OpenAIRE

    McCarren M; Twedt EL; Mansuri FM; Nelson PR; Peek BT

    2014-01-01

    Madeline McCarren,1 Elaine L Twedt,1 Faizmohamed M Mansuri,2 Philip R Nelson,3 Brian T Peek3 1Pharmacy Benefits Management Services, Department of Veterans Affairs, Hines, IL, 2Wilkes-Barre VA Medical Center, Wilkes-Barre, PA, 3Charles George VA Medical Center, Asheville, NC, USA Purpose: Minimal-risk randomized trials that can be embedded in practice could facilitate learning health-care systems. A cluster-randomized design was proposed to compare treatment strategies by assigning clusters...

  17. Guidance for health and social care providers, principles of good practice in medication reconciliation

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ward, Marie

    2017-07-17

    Healthcare organisations have a responsibility for ensuring that the governance of workplace settings creates a culture that supports good professional practice. Encouraging such a culture needs to start from an understanding of the factors that make it difficult for health professionals to raise issues of concern in relation to patient safety. The focus of this study is to determine whether a customised education intervention, developed as part of the study, with interns and senior house officers (SHOs) can imbue a culture of medical professionalism in relation to patient safety and support junior doctors to raise issues of concern, while shaping a culture of responsiveness and learning.

  18. Knowledge, attitude & practice on human papillomavirus vaccination: A cross-sectional study among healthcare providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Cheena Chawla

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The findings reinforce continued medical education of healthcare providers, particularly those from the government sector on HPV vaccination for cervical cancer prevention. Public education is also pertinent for a successful HPV vaccination programme in the country.

  19. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding dengue infection among public sector healthcare providers in Machala, Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Handel, Andrew S.; Ayala, Efra?n Beltr?n; Borbor-Cordova, Mercy J.; Fessler, Abigail G.; Finkelstein, Julia L.; Espinoza, Roberto Xavier Robalino; Ryan, Sadie J.; Stewart-Ibarra, Anna M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue fever is a rapidly emerging infection throughout the tropics and subtropics with extensive public health burden. Adequate training of healthcare providers is crucial to reducing infection incidence through patient education and collaboration with public health authorities. We examined how public sector healthcare providers in a dengue-endemic region of Ecuador view and manage dengue infections, with a focus on the 2009 World Health Organization (WHO) Dengue Guidelines. Metho...

  20. Practicing provider-initiated HIV testing in high prevalence settings: consent concerns and missed preventive opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Shayo Elizabeth H; Blystad Astrid; Njeru Mercy K; Nyamongo Isaac K; Fylkesnes Knut

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Counselling is considered a prerequisite for the proper handling of testing and for ensuring effective HIV preventive efforts. HIV testing services have recently been scaled up substantially with a particular focus on provider-initiated models. Increasing HIV test rates have been attributed to the rapid scale-up of the provider-initiated testing model, but there is limited documentation of experiences with this new service model. The aim of this study was to determine the ...

  1. Clinical pharmacy consultations provided by American and Kenyan pharmacy students during an acute care advanced pharmacy practice experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastakia, Sonak D; Vincent, William R; Manji, Imran; Kamau, Evelyn; Schellhase, Ellen M

    2011-04-11

    To compare the clinical consultations provided by American and Kenyan pharmacy students in an acute care setting in a developing country. The documented pharmacy consultation recommendations made by American and Kenyan pharmacy students during patient care rounds on an advanced pharmacy practice experience at a referral hospital in Kenya were reviewed and classified according to type of intervention and therapeutic area. The Kenyan students documented more interventions than American students (16.7 vs. 12.0 interventions/day) and provided significantly more consultations regarding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and antibiotics. The top area of consultations provided by American students was cardiovascular diseases. American and Kenyan pharmacy students successfully providing clinical pharmacy consultations in a resource-constrained, acute-care practice setting suggests an important role for pharmacy students in the reconciliation of prescriber orders with medication administration records and in providing drug information.

  2. Fluid resuscitation practices in cardiac surgery patients in the USA: a survey of health care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Aronson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluid resuscitation during cardiac surgery is common with significant variability in clinical practice. Our goal was to investigate current practice patterns of fluid volume expansion in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries in the USA. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of 124 cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiovascular anesthesiologists, and perfusionists. Survey questions were designed to assess clinical decision-making patterns of intravenous (IV fluid utilization in cardiovascular surgery for five types of patients who need volume expansion: (1 patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB without bleeding, (2 patients undergoing CPB with bleeding, (3 patients undergoing acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH, (4 patients requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO or use of a ventricular assist device (VAD, and (5 patients undergoing either off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCABG surgery or transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. First-choice fluid used in fluid boluses for these five patient types was requested. Descriptive statistics were performed using Kruskal-Wallis test and follow-up tests, including t tests, to evaluate differences among respondent groups. Results The most commonly preferred indicators of volume status were blood pressure, urine output, cardiac output, central venous pressure, and heart rate. The first choice of fluid for patients needing volume expansion during CPB without bleeding was crystalloids, whereas 5% albumin was the most preferred first choice of fluid for bleeding patients. For volume expansion during ECMO or VAD, the respondents were equally likely to prefer 5% albumin or crystalloids as a first choice of IV fluid, with 5% albumin being the most frequently used adjunct fluid to crystalloids. Surgeons, as a group, more often chose starches as an adjunct fluid to crystalloids for patients needing volume expansion during CPB without bleeding. Surgeons

  3. Factors influencing practice variation in the management of nephrotic syndrome: a qualitative study of pediatric nephrology care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Susan M; Flynn, Rachel; Zappitelli, Michael; Dart, Allison; Parekh, Rulan; Pinsk, Maury; Mammen, Cherry; Wade, Andrew; Scott, Shannon D

    2017-06-07

    Treatment protocols for childhood nephrotic syndrome are highly variable between providers and care centres. We conducted a qualitative study to understand the complex multilevel processes that lead to practice variation and influence provider management of nephrotic syndrome. Focus groups with multidisciplinary pediatric nephrology care providers (n = 67) from 10 Canadian pediatric nephrology centres that had more than 1 pediatric nephrologist were conducted between September 2013 and April 2015. Focus group discussions were guided by the Ottawa Model for Research Use. We used a semistructured interview guide to elicit participants' perspectives regarding 1) the work setting and context of the clinical environment, 2) reasons for variation at the provider level and 3) clinical practice guidelines for nephrotic syndrome. Focus group discussions were transcribed and analyzed concurrently with the use of qualitative content analysis. Emerging themes were grouped into 2 categories: centre-level factors and provider-level factors. At the centre level, the type of care model used, clinic structures and resources, and lack of communication and collaboration within and between Canadian centres influenced care variation. At the provider level, use of experiential knowledge versus empirical knowledge and interpretation of patient characteristics influenced provider management of nephrotic syndrome. Centre- and provider-level factors play an important role in shaping practice differences in the management of childhood nephrotic syndrome. Further research is needed to determine whether variation in care is associated with disparities in outcomes. Copyright 2017, Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  4. Birth Care Providers' Experiences and Practices in a Brazilian Alongside Midwifery Unit: An Ethnographic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Michelly Christiny M; Reberte Gouveia, Luciana M; Reis-Queiroz, Jessica; Hoga, Luiza A K

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of a new birthing facility in a country such as Brazil requires an extensive in-depth analysis of the challenges faced. The aim of this study was to explore beliefs, values, experiences, and practices related to the provision of birthing and neonatal care with the implementation of a new birth care facility structure called alongside midwifery units in Brazil. The study utilizes an ethnographic method to evaluate members of a Brazilian public hospital's midwifery unit. The ethnographic study focuses on the cultural theme of "between the proposed and the possible": the following birthing care guidelines require overcoming numerous obstacles, and four other cultural subthemes toward revealing the analyzed birth care team's perspectives. The study found that prior training and preparation of all members of the care team, as well as the provision of adequate institutional infrastructure are essential for the implementation of a new and innovative birthing care center.

  5. Social Media and the Practicing Hematologist: Twitter 101 for the Busy Healthcare Provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael A; Majhail, Navneet S; Wood, William A; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Chaboissier, Mélanie

    2015-12-01

    Social media is a relatively new form of media that includes social networks for communication dissemination and interaction. Patients, physicians, and other users are active on social media including the microblogging platform Twitter. Many online resources are available to facilitate joining and adding to online conversations. Social media can be used for professional uses, therefore, we include anecdotes of physicians starting on and implementing social media successfully despite the limits of time in busy practices. Various applications demonstrating the utility of social media are explored. These include case discussions, patient groups, research collaborations, medical education, and crowdsourcing/crowdfunding. Social media is integrating into the professional workflow for some individuals and hematology/oncology societies. The potential for improving hematology care and research is just starting to be explored.

  6. Strategic Planning: A Practical Primer for the Healthcare Provider: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Neil; Brockmann, Erich N; Lacho, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Entrepreneurs are known for opportunity recognition--that is, "How can I start a business to make money from this opportunity?" However, once a commercial entity is formed to take advantage of an opportunity, the leadership priority shifts from entrepreneurial to strategic. A strategic perspective leverages limited resources to position a business for future success relative to rivals in a competitive environment. Often, the talents needed for one priority are not the same as those needed for the other. This article, the first part of a two-part article, intends to simplify the transition from an entrepreneurial to a strategic focus. It walks an entrepreneur through the strategic management planning process using a fictional business. The various tasks in the process (i.e., mission, vision, internal analysis, external analysis) are illustrated with examples from a typical primary physician's private practice. The examples show how the strategic management tasks are interrelated and ultimately lead to a philosophical approach to managing a business.

  7. Lipid management in contemporary community practice: Results from the Provider Assessment of Lipid Management (PALM) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navar, Ann Marie; Wang, Tracy Y; Li, Shuang; Robinson, Jennifer G; Goldberg, Anne C; Virani, Salim; Roger, Veronique L; Wilson, Peter W F; Elassal, Joseph; Lee, L Veronica; Peterson, Eric D

    2017-11-01

    The latest cholesterol guidelines have shifted focus from achieving low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) targets toward statin use and intensity guided by atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk. Statin use and intensity were evaluated in 5,905 statin-eligible primary or secondary prevention patients from 138 PALM Registry practices. Overall, 74.7% of eligible adults were on statins; only 42.4% were on guideline-recommended intensity. Relative to primary prevention patients, ASCVD patients were more likely to be on a statin (83.6% vs 63.4%, Pobesity, hypertension, and lower 10-year ASCVD risk were associated with increased odds of receiving recommended intensity. Among ASCVD patients, those with coronary artery disease were more likely to be on recommended intensity than cerebrovascular or peripheral vascular disease patients (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.41-2.09), as were those seen by cardiologists (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.12-1.83). Median LDL-C levels were highest among patients not on statins (124.0 mg/dL) and slightly higher among those on lower-than-recommended intensity compared with recommended-therapy recipients (88.0 and 84.0 mg/dL, respectively; P≤.0001). In routine contemporary practice, 1 in 4 guideline-eligible patients was not on a statin; less than half were on the recommended statin intensity. Untreated and undertreated patients had significantly higher LDL-C levels than those receiving guideline-directed statin treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Continuous quality improvement programs provide new opportunities to drive value innovation initiatives in hospital-based radiology practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Joseph R; Schomer, Don F

    2009-07-01

    Imaging services constitute a huge portion of the of the total dollar investment within the health care enterprise. Accordingly, this generates competition among medical specialties organized along service lines for their pieces of the pie and increased scrutiny from third-party payers and government regulators. These market and political forces create challenge and opportunity for a hospital-based radiology practice. Clearly, change that creates or builds greater value for patients also creates sustainable competitive advantage for a radiology practice. The somewhat amorphous concept of quality constitutes a significant value driver for innovation in this scenario. Quality initiatives and programs seek to define and manage this amorphous concept and provide tools for a radiology practice to create or build more value. Leadership and the early adoption of these inevitable programs by a radiology practice strengthens relationships with hospital partners and slows the attrition of imaging service lines to competitors.

  9. Health care provider education as a tool to enhance antibiotic stewardship practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Christopher A; Luther, Vera P

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic stewardship education for health care providers provides a foundation of knowledge and an environment that facilitates and supports optimal antibiotic prescribing. There is a need to extend this education to medical students and health care trainees. Education using passive techniques is modestly effective for increasing prescriber knowledge, whereas education using active techniques is more effective for changing prescribing behavior. Such education has been shown to enhance other antibiotic stewardship interventions. In this review, the need and suggested audience for antibiotic stewardship education are highlighted, and effective education techniques are recommended for increasing knowledge of antibiotics and improving their use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Strategies to promote adherence to nutritional advice in patients with chronic kidney disease: a narrative review and commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beto JA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Judith A Beto, Katherine A Schury, Vinod K Bansal Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Loyola University Healthcare System, Loyola University of Chicago, Maywood, IL, USA Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD requires extensive changes to food and lifestyle. Poor adherence to diet, medications, and treatments has been estimated to vary between 20% and 70%, which in turn can contribute to increased mortality and morbidity. Delivering effective nutritional advice in patients with CKD coordinates multiple diet components including calories, protein, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, and fluid. Dietary intake studies have shown difficulty in adhering to the scope and complexity of the CKD diet parameters. No single educational or clinical strategy has been shown to be consistently effective across CKD populations. Highest adherence has been observed when both diet and education efforts are individualized to each patient and adapted over time to changing lifestyle and CKD variables. This narrative review and commentary summarizes nutrition education literature and published strategies for providing nutritional advice in CKD. A cohort of practical and effective strategies for increasing dietary adherence to nutritional advice are provided that include communicating with "talking control" principles, integrating patient-owned technology, acknowledging the typical food pattern may be snacking rather than formal meals, focusing on a single goal rather than multiple goals, creating active learning and coping strategies (frozen sandwiches, visual hands-on activities, planting herb gardens, and involving the total patient food environment. Keywords: talking control, technology-enhanced learning, hemodialysis, nutrition education, education strategies

  11. Childcare Providers' Use of Practices to Promote Young Children's Social-Emotional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steed, Elizabeth A.; Roach, Andrew T.

    2017-01-01

    Findings are presented regarding childcare providers' use of evidence-based strategies to promote preschoolers' social-emotional competence in 38 urban childcare classrooms. Descriptive results from classroom observations and childcare teachers' interviews indicated that in the absence of training, childcare teaching staff implemented few of these…

  12. Continuity and Change: Employers' Training Practices and Partnerships with Training Providers. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erica; Smith, Andy; Tuck, Jacqueline; Callan, Victor

    2017-01-01

    A number of factors influence the motivations of employers to train their workforce and the ways in which they engage with the training system. This study combines a national survey and interviews with Australian employers and registered training organisations (RTOs) to provide a comprehensive picture of the way in which employers navigate the…

  13. Considerations of Administrative Licensure, Provider Type, and Leadership Quality: Recommendations for Research, Policy, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackmann, Donald G.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews U.S. administrative licensure regulations, focusing on type of school leader licensure, provider types, and leadership quality. Licensure obtained through university-based and alternative routes is examined. Due to limited research on alternative school administrative licensure, regulations in medicine, psychology,…

  14. Maintaining Long-Distance Friendships: Communication Practices for Seeking and Providing Social Support across Geographic Divides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobburi, Patipan

    2012-01-01

    People seek and provide support through their personal social network, especially when they must cope with stress, deal with an emergency, or need help. Coping with a new culture or new environment is a stressful situation that sojourner students must face. Support through friendship plays an important role in facing such new situations. Focusing…

  15. Establishing best practices to improve usability of web interfaces providing atmospheric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, N.; Daudert, B.

    2014-12-01

    Accessing scientific data through an online portal can be a frustrating task. The concept of making web interfaces easy to use known as "usability" has been thoroughly researched in the field of e-commerce but has not been explicitly addressed in the atmospheric sciences. As more observation stations are installed, satellite missions flown, models run, and field campaigns performed, large amounts of data are produced. Portals on the Internet have become the favored mechanisms to share this information and are ever increasing in number. Portals are often created without being tested for usability with the target audience though the expenses of testing are low and the returns high. To remain competitive and relevant in the provision of atmospheric data, it is imperative that developers understand design elements of a successful portal to make their product stand out among others. This presentation informs the audience of the benefits and basic principles of usability for web pages presenting atmospheric data. We will also share some of the best practices and recommendations we have formulated from the results of usability testing performed on two data provision web sites hosted by the Western Regional Climate Center.

  16. Providing Nutritional Care in the Office Practice: Teams, Tools, and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Robert F

    2016-11-01

    Provision of dietary counseling in the office setting is enhanced by using team-based care and electronic tools. Effective provider-patient communication is essential for fostering behavior change: the key component of lifestyle medicine. The principles of communication and behavior change are skill-based and grounded in scientific theories and models. Motivational interviewing and shared decision making, a collaboration process between patients and their providers to reach agreement about a health decision, is an important process in counseling. The stages of change, self-determination, health belief model, social cognitive model, theory of planned behavior, and cognitive behavioral therapy are used in the counseling process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Does Risk-Adjusted Payment Influence Primary Care Providers' Decision on Where to Set Up Practices?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrichson, Jens; Anell, Anders; Dackehag, Margareta

    Providing equal access to health care is an important objective in most health care systems. It is especially pertinent in systems like the Swedish primary care market, where providers are free to establish themselves in any part of the country. To improve equity in access to care, 15 out 21 county...... capitation on the supply of private primary care centers. We use a dataset that combines information on all primary care centers in Sweden during 2005-2013, the payment system and other conditions for establishing new primary care centers used in the county councils, and demographic, geographic......-adjusted capitation significantly increase the number of private primary care centers in areas with relatively high Care Need Index values. The adjustment results in a changed distribution of private centers within county councils; the total number of private centers does not increase in county councils using care...

  18. Switching basal insulins in type 2 diabetes: practical recommendations for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sarah L; Trujillo, Jennifer M; Anderson, John E; Tanenberg, Robert J

    2017-12-27

    Basal insulin remains the mainstay of treatment of type 2 diabetes when diet changes and exercise in combination with oral drugs and other injectable agents are not sufficient to control hyperglycemia. Insulin therapy should be individualized, and several factors influence the choice of basal insulin; these include pharmacological properties, patient preferences, and lifestyle, as well as health insurance plan formularies. The recent availability of basal insulin formulations with longer durations of action has provided further dosing flexibility; however, patients may need to switch agents throughout therapy for a variety of personal, clinical, or economic reasons. Although a unit-to-unit switching approach is usually recommended, this conversion strategy may not be appropriate for all patients and types of insulin. Glycemic control and risk of hypoglycemia must be closely monitored by health care providers during the switching process. In addition, individual changes in care and formulary coverage need to be adequately addressed in order to enable a smooth transition with optimal outcomes.

  19. Current practice and knowledge of oral care for cancer patients: a survey of supportive health care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, Gerry J.; Epstein, Joel B.; Williams, Karen B.; Gorsky, Meir; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.

    2005-01-01

    The Oral Care Study Section of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) and the International Society for Oral Oncology (ISOO) conducted a survey on clinical practices of oral/dental management of cancer patients among supportive health care providers. The main purpose was

  20. Is there a difference between center and home care providers' training, perceptions, and practices related to obesity prevention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhee; Shim, Jae Eun; Wiley, Angela R; Kim, Keunsei; McBride, Brent A

    2012-11-01

    To compare the obesity related training, practices, and perceptions of home child care providers and center care providers. A self-administered survey was collected from child care providers who attended local child care training workshops in east central Illinois from March 2009 to August 2010. Study results were based on responses from 88 home care providers and 94 center providers. The survey questions addressed child care providers' training in the prior year, their obesity prevention practices including written policies, their perceptions of influences on children's health, and factors determining food menu selection. Paired t tests and Chi-square tests were used to compare the difference by child care type. 81.9% of home care providers and 58.6% of center care providers received nutrition training, while 66.7 and 43.0% of these providers received physical activity training, respectively. Nutrition content, guidelines or state regulations, and food availability were the most important factors that influenced both types of care providers' food service menus. Both care provider types perceived they have less influence on children's food preferences, eating habits, and weight status compared to the home environment. However, home care providers perceived a smaller discrepancy between the influences of child care and home environments compared to center care providers. Compared to center providers, home care providers were more likely to have had training, be involved with health promotion activities, and rate their influence higher on children's health behaviors. Findings underscore the need for obesity prevention efforts in both types of child care settings.

  1. Provider-agency fit in substance abuse treatment organizations: implications for learning climate, morale, and evidence-based practice implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Alex T; van den Berk-Clark, Carissa

    2015-05-12

    Substance abuse agencies have been slow to adopt and implement evidence-based practices (EBPs), due in part to poor provider morale and organizational climates that are not conducive to successful learning and integration of these practices. Person-organization fit theory suggests that alignment, or fit, between provider- and agency-level characteristics regarding the implementation of EBPs may influence provider morale and organizational learning climate and, thus, implementation success. The current study hypothesized that discrepancies, or lack of fit, between provider- and agency-level contextual factors would negatively predict provider morale and organizational learning climate, outcomes shown to be associated with successful EBP implementation. Direct service providers (n = 120) from four substance abuse treatment agencies responded to a survey involving provider morale, organizational learning climate, agency expectations for EBP use, agency resources for EBP use, and provider attitudes towards EBP use. Difference scores between combinations of provider- and agency-level factors were computed to model provider-agency fit. Quadratic regression analyses were conducted to more adequately and comprehensively model the level of the dependent variables across the entire "fit continuum". Discrepancies, or misfit, between agency expectations and provider attitudes and between agency resources and provider attitudes were associated with poorer provider morale and weaker organizational learning climate. For all hypotheses, the curvilinear model of provider-agency discrepancies significantly predicted provider morale and organizational learning climate, indicating that both directions of misfit (provider factors more favorable than agency factors, and vice-versa) were detrimental to morale and climate. However, outcomes were most negative when providers viewed EBPs favorably, but perceived that agency expectations and resources were less supportive of EBP use. The

  2. Patient responses to inhaler advice given by community pharmacies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Susanne; Aarup, Kristine Hallberg Friis; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of counseling in community pharmacy depends on its ability to help patients improve their use of medicine and thereby health status, by their adherence to recommendations. Studies showing how patients respond to daily pharmacy counseling are, however, scarce. The aim......, this aspect should be investigated further, as this could help staff providing adequate counseling to patients. Further, pharmacy staff should focus more on supporting patients implementing their health advice at home....

  3. Why Financial Advice Cannot Substitute for Financial Literacy?

    OpenAIRE

    M. Debbich

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the ability of financial advice provided by sellers of financial services to substitute for financial literacy of customers. I set up a simple theoretical model in which an informed financial advisor communicates with a less informed customer of financial services. Given the existence of a conflict of interest from the advisor's perspective, the model predicts that only well financially sophisticated customers receive relevant information from the advisor. This fact tends ...

  4. Neuraminidase activity provides a practical read-out for a high throughput influenza antiviral screening assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Meng

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of influenza strains that are resistant to commonly used antivirals has highlighted the need to develop new compounds that target viral gene products or host mechanisms that are essential for effective virus replication. Existing assays to identify potential antiviral compounds often use high throughput screening assays that target specific viral replication steps. To broaden the search for antivirals, cell-based replication assays can be performed, but these are often labor intensive and have limited throughput. Results We have adapted a traditional virus neutralization assay to develop a practical, cell-based, high throughput screening assay. This assay uses viral neuraminidase (NA as a read-out to quantify influenza replication, thereby offering an assay that is both rapid and sensitive. In addition to identification of inhibitors that target either viral or host factors, the assay allows simultaneous evaluation of drug toxicity. Antiviral activity was demonstrated for a number of known influenza inhibitors including amantadine that targets the M2 ion channel, zanamivir that targets NA, ribavirin that targets IMP dehydrogenase, and bis-indolyl maleimide that targets protein kinase A/C. Amantadine-resistant strains were identified by comparing IC50 with that of the wild-type virus. Conclusion Antivirals with specificity for a broad range of targets are easily identified in an accelerated viral inhibition assay that uses NA as a read-out of replication. This assay is suitable for high throughput screening to identify potential antivirals or can be used to identify drug-resistant influenza strains.

  5. Consumers' intention to use health recommendation systems to receive personalized nutrition advice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Wendel (Sonja); B.G.C. Dellaert (Benedict); A. Ronteltap (Amber); H.C.M. van Trijp (Hans)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Sophisticated recommendation systems are used more and more in the health sector to assist consumers in healthy decision making. In this study we investigate consumers' evaluation of hypothetical health recommendation systems that provide personalized nutrition advice. We

  6. Consumers’ intention to use health recommendation systems to receive personalized nutrition advice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendel, S.; Dellaert, B.G.C.; Ronteltap, A.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sophisticated recommendation systems are used more and more in the health sector to assist consumers in healthy decision making. In this study we investigate consumers' evaluation of hypothetical health recommendation systems that provide personalized nutrition advice. We examine

  7. Attitudes and beliefs toward the use of a dental diagnostic terminology A survey of dental providers in a dental practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramoni, Rachel B.; Walji, Muhammad F.; Kim, Soyun; Tokede, Oluwabunmi; McClellan, Lyle; Simmons, Kristen; Skourtes, Eugene; Yansane, Alfa; White, Joel M.; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Attitudes and views are critical to the adoption of innovation. While there have been broadening calls for a standardized dental diagnostic terminology, little is known about the views of private practice dental team members towards the adoption of such a terminology. Methods A survey was developed using validated questions identified through literature review. Domain experts’ input allowed for further modifications. The final survey was administered electronically to 814 team members at a multi-office practice based in the Pacific Northwest. Results Response proportion was 92%. The survey had excellent reliability (Cronbach alpha coefficient = 0.87). Results suggested that participants showed, in general, positive attitudes and beliefs towards using a standardized diagnostic terminology in their practices. Additional written comments by participants highlighted the potential for improved communication with use of the terminology. Conclusions Dental providers and staff in one multi-office practice showed positive attitudes towards the use of a diagnostic terminology, specifically they believed it would improve communication between the dentist and patient as well as among providers, while expressing some concerns if using standardized dental diagnostic terms helps clinicians to deliver better dental care. Practical Implications As the dental profession is advancing towards the use of standardized diagnostic terminologies, successful implementation will require that dental team leaders prepare their dental teams by gauging their attitude toward the use of such a terminology. PMID:26025826

  8. Understanding teen dating violence: practical screening and intervention strategies for pediatric and adolescent healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter-Wilson, Elizabeth; Richmond, Tracy

    2011-08-01

    Teen dating violence (TDV) is a serious and potentially lethal form of relationship violence in adolescence. TDV is highly correlated with several outcomes related to poor physical and mental health. Although incidence and prevalence data indicate high rates of exposure to TDV among adolescents throughout the United States, significant confusion remains in healthcare communities concerning the definition and implications of TDV. Additionally, healthcare providers are uncertain about effective screening and intervention methods. The article will review the definition and epidemiology of TDV and discuss possible screening and intervention strategies. TDV research is a relatively new addition to the field of relationship violence. Although some confusion remains, the definition and epidemiology of TDV are better understood, which has greatly led to effective ways in which to screen and intervene when such violence is detected. Universal screening with a focus on high-risk subgroups combined with referrals to local and national support services are key steps in reducing both primary and secondary exposure. TDV is a widespread public health crisis with serious short-term and long-term implications. It is necessary for pediatric and adolescent healthcare providers to be aware of TDV and its potential repercussions, as well as possible methods for screening and intervention. More research is needed to better understand TDV as well as to further define effective screening and intervention protocol for the clinical environment.

  9. Knowledge, attitude, and practice towards blood donation among health care providers in hospitals at Bahir Dar City, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abera, Bayeh; Mohammed, Beyan; Betela, Wendmagegn; Yimam, Reshid; Oljira, Adam; Ahmed, Merhab; Tsega, Wubet; Mulu, Wondemagegn; Yizengaw, Endalew

    2017-06-01

    Like other sub-Saharan Africa, in Ethiopia there is a shortage of adequate and safe blood supplies. Health care providers are potential resource and promoter of voluntary blood donation. This study was conducted to determine the knowledge, attitude and practice towards blood donation among health care providers in Bahir Dar City, Ethiopia. Paper based questionnaire was distributed to 276 health care providers from May 01 to June 30, 2016. Overall, 42.8% had donated blood at least once. Of these, males accounted for 60%. The median age of blood donors was 26 years. Voluntary-unpaid donation was 21.2%. Overall, 75.5% health care providers were knowledgeable. The levels of knowledge were significantly different among different disciplines (One-way ANOVA; F=69.7; P=0.004). Males were more knowledgeable than females (Pattitude was 78.6%. Previous practice of blood donation determined the odds of favorable attitude to be a future regular voluntary-unpaid blood donor (OR: 5.7, 95% CI: 3.2-10.4). Majority of health care providers had adequate knowledge and favorable attitude. However, voluntary-unpaid donation practice (21.1%) was lower compared to 100% target of voluntary-unpaid donation. There should be motivation packages to enhance voluntary-unpaid blood donation among health care professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of office-based intravenous deep sedation providers upon traditional sedation practices employed in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, Michael; Guelmann, Marcio; Primosch, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This survey intended to determine how the implementation of office-based IV deep sedation by a third party provider (OIVSED) impacted the traditional sedation practices employed in pediatric dentistry private practice settings. A digital survey was e-mailed to 924 members of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry practicing in California, Florida, and New York, chosen because these states had large samples of practicing pediatric dentists in geographically disparate locations. 151 pediatric dentists using OIVSED responded to the survey. Improved efficiency, safety and quality of care provided, and increased parental acceptance were reported advantages of this service. Although less costly than hospital-based general anesthesia, the average fee for this service was a deterrent to some parents considering this option. Sixty-four percent of respondents continued to provide traditional sedation modalities, mostly oral sedation, in their offices, as parenteral routes taught in their training programs were less often selected. OIVSED users reported both a reduction in the use of traditional sedation modalities in their offices and use of hospital-based GA services in exchange for perceived improvements in efficiency, safety and quality of care delivered. Patient costs, in the absence of available health insurance coverage, inhibited accessing this service by some parents.

  11. Cancer and the LGBTQ Population: Quantitative and Qualitative Results from an Oncology Providers' Survey on Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamargo, Christina L; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Sanchez, Julian A; Schabath, Matthew B

    2017-10-07

    Despite growing social acceptance, the LGBTQ population continues to face barriers to healthcare including fear of stigmatization by healthcare providers, and providers' lack of knowledge about LGBTQ-specific health issues. This analysis focuses on the assessment of quantitative and qualitative responses from a subset of providers who identified as specialists that treat one or more of the seven cancers that may be disproportionate in LGBTQ patients. A 32-item web-based survey was emailed to 388 oncology providers at a single institution. The survey assessed: demographics, knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors. Oncology providers specializing in seven cancer types had poor knowledge of LGBTQ-specific health needs, with fewer than half of the surveyed providers (49.5%) correctly answering knowledge questions. Most providers had overall positive attitudes toward LGBTQ patients, with 91.7% agreeing they would be comfortable treating this population, and would support education and/or training on LGBTQ-related cancer health issues. Results suggest that despite generally positive attitudes toward the LGBTQ population, oncology providers who treat cancer types most prevalent among the population, lack knowledge of their unique health issues. Knowledge and practice behaviors may improve with enhanced education and training on this population's specific needs.

  12. Weight Advice Associated With Male Firefighter Weight Perception and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Austin L; Poston, Walker S C; Jahnke, Sara A; Haddock, C Keith; Luo, Sheng; Delclos, George L; Day, R Sue

    2015-10-01

    The high prevalence of overweight and obesity threatens the health and safety of the fire service. Healthcare professionals may play an important role in helping firefighters achieve a healthy weight by providing weight loss counseling to at-risk firefighters. This study characterizes the impact of healthcare professional weight loss advice on firefighter weight perceptions and weight loss behaviors among overweight and obese male firefighters. A national sample of 763 overweight and obese male firefighters who recalled visiting a healthcare provider in the past 12 months reported information regarding healthcare visits, weight perceptions, current weight loss behaviors, and other covariates in 2011-2012. Analyzed in 2013, four unique multilevel logistic regression models estimated the association between healthcare professional weight loss advice and the outcomes of firefighter-reported weight perceptions, intentions to lose weight, reduced caloric intake, and increased physical activity. Healthcare professional weight loss advice was significantly associated with self-perception as overweight (OR=4.78, 95% CI=2.16, 10.57) and attempted weight loss (OR=2.06, 95% CI=1.25, 3.38), but not significantly associated with reduced caloric intake (OR=1.26, 95% CI=0.82, 1.95) and increased physical activity (OR=1.51, 95% CI=0.89, 2.61), after adjusting for confounders. Healthcare professional weight loss advice appears to increase the accuracy of firefighter weight perceptions, promote weight loss attempts, and may encourage dieting and physical activity behaviors among overweight firefighters. Healthcare providers should acknowledge their ability to influence the health behaviors of overweight and obese patients and make efforts to increase the quality and frequency of weight loss recommendations for all firefighters. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Women's access and provider practices for the case management of malaria during pregnancy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Hill

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: WHO recommends prompt diagnosis and quinine plus clindamycin for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in the first trimester and artemisinin-based combination therapies in subsequent trimesters. We undertook a systematic review of women's access to and healthcare provider adherence to WHO case management policy for malaria in pregnant women. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched the Malaria in Pregnancy Library, the Global Health Database, and the International Network for the Rational Use of Drugs Bibliography from 1 January 2006 to 3 April 2014, without language restriction. Data were appraised for quality and content. Frequencies of women's and healthcare providers' practices were explored using narrative synthesis and random effect meta-analysis. Barriers to women's access and providers' adherence to policy were explored by content analysis using NVivo. Determinants of women's access and providers' case management practices were extracted and compared across studies. We did not perform a meta-ethnography. Thirty-seven studies were included, conducted in Africa (30, Asia (4, Yemen (1, and Brazil (2. One- to three-quarters of women reported malaria episodes during pregnancy, of whom treatment was sought by >85%. Barriers to access among women included poor knowledge of drug safety, prohibitive costs, and self-treatment practices, used by 5%-40% of women. Determinants of women's treatment-seeking behaviour were education and previous experience of miscarriage and antenatal care. Healthcare provider reliance on clinical diagnosis and poor adherence to treatment policy, especially in first versus other trimesters (28%, 95% CI 14%-47%, versus 72%, 95% CI 39%-91%, p = 0.02, was consistently reported. Prescribing practices were driven by concerns over side effects and drug safety, patient preference, drug availability, and cost. Determinants of provider practices were access to training and facility type (public versus private. Findings were

  14. Evidence-based practice implementation: The impact of public versus private sector organization type on organizational support, provider attitudes, and adoption of evidence-based practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sommerfeld David H

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of this study is to extend research on evidence-based practice (EBP implementation by examining the impact of organizational type (public versus private and organizational support for EBP on provider attitudes toward EBP and EBP use. Both organization theory and theory of innovation uptake and individual adoption of EBP guide the approach and analyses in this study. We anticipated that private sector organizations would provide greater levels of organizational support for EBPs leading to more positive provider attitudes towards EBPs and EBP use. We also expected attitudes toward EBPs to mediate the association of organizational support and EBP use. Methods Participants were mental health service providers from 17 communities in 16 states in the United States (n = 170. Path analyses were conducted to compare three theoretical models of the impact of organization type on organizational support for EBP and of organizational support on provider attitudes toward EBP and EBP use. Results Consistent with our predictions, private agencies provided greater support for EBP implementation, and staff working for private agencies reported more positive attitudes toward adopting EBPs. Organizational support for EBP partially mediated the association of organization type on provider attitudes toward EBP. Organizational support was significantly positively associated with attitudes toward EBP and EBP use in practice. Conclusion This study offers further support for the importance of organizational context as an influence on organizational support for EBP and provider attitudes toward adopting EBP. The study demonstrates the role organizational support in provider use of EBP in practice. This study also suggests that organizational support for innovation is a malleable factor in supporting use of EBP. Greater attention should be paid to organizational influences that can facilitate the dissemination and implementation of EBPs in

  15. Modelling Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, Ian; Gani, Rafiqul

    2011-01-01

    requirements; model construction; model solution; model verification; model validation and finally model deployment and maintenance. Within the adopted methodology, each step is discussedthrough the consideration of key issues and questions relevant to the modelling activity. Practical advice, based on many...

  16. Post-abortion family planning counselling practice among abortion service providers in China: a nationwide cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Longmei; Wu, Shangchun; Li, Jiong; Wang, Kun; Xu, Jialin; Temmerman, Marleen; Zhang, Wei-Hong

    2017-02-01

    To assess the practice of post-abortion family planning (PAFP) counselling among Chinese abortion service providers, and identify the influencing factors. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted between July and September 2013 among abortion services providers in 30 provinces in China. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify the factors that influenced PAFP counselling. 94% of the 579 service providers responded to the questionnaire in the survey. The median age was 39 years (range 20-72), and 95% were females. 92% providers showed a positive attitude and had promoted the PAFP counselling services; however, only 57% spent more than 10 min for it. The overall knowledge on PAFP was limited to the participants. After adjusting for potential confounding factors: providers from the middle region (compared with 'east region', ORadj = 3.33, 95% CI: 2.12-5.21) conducted more PAFP counseling; providers with more knowledge (ORadj = 2.08, 95% CI: 1.38-3.15) provided more counseling; and compared with 'middle school and below', providers with higher education gave more counseling [ORadj(95% CI)] for 'college', 'university' and 'master/doctor' [1.99 (1.01,3.92), 2.32 (1.22,4.40) and 2.34 (1.06,5.17), respectively]. The majority of providers could provide PAFP counselling to women undergone an abortion, but some of them had insufficient time to make it available. Education, knowledge about fertility and reproductive health and residence region were the main factors influencing the practice. Training of health providers and integrating family planning as a part of abortion services are essential to provide adequate PAFP to abortion seekers, thereby reducing the risk of unintended pregnancy.

  17. Primary care providers' physical activity counseling and referral practices and barriers for cardiovascular disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, John D; Bellissimo, Moriah P; Watson, Kathleen B; Loustalot, Fleetwood; Fulton, Janet E; Carlson, Susan A

    2017-12-27

    The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends offering or referring adults who are overweight or obese and have additional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors to intensive behavioral counseling interventions to promote a healthful diet and physical activity for CVD prevention. This study determined the proportion of primary care providers (PCPs) who discussed physical activity with most of their at-risk patients and referred them to intensive behavioral counseling, and reported barriers to counseling. Our analyses used data from DocStyles 2015, a Web-based panel survey of 1251 PCPs. Overall, 58.6% of PCPs discussed physical activity with most of their at-risk patients. Among these PCPs, the prevalence of components offered ranged from 98.5% encouraging increased physical activity to 13.9% referring to intensive behavioral counseling. Overall, only 8.1% both discussed physical activity with most at-risk patients and referred to intensive behavioral counseling. Barriers related to PCPs' attitudes and beliefs about counseling (e.g., counseling is not effective) were significantly associated with both discussing physical activity with most at-risk patients and referring them to intensive behavioral counseling (adjusted odds ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-3.20). System-level barriers (e.g., referral services not available) were not. Just over half of PCPs discussed physical activity with most of their at-risk patients, and few both discussed physical activity and referred patients to intensive behavioral counseling. Overcoming barriers related to attitudes and beliefs about physical activity counseling could help improve low levels of counseling and referrals to intensive behavioral counseling for CVD prevention. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Advice to stay active or structured exercise in the management of sciatica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Matt; Hartvigsen, Jan; Ferreira, Manuela L

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A systematic review and meta-analysis. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the evidence on comparative effectiveness of advice to stay active versus supervised structured exercise in the management of sciatica. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Conservative management of sciatica usually includes......) that exercise provides small, superior effects compared with advice to stay active on leg pain in the short term for patients suffering with sciatica. However there is moderate quality evidence showing no difference between advice to stay active and exercise on leg pain and disability status in people...... with sciatica in the long term....

  19. 77 FR 48169 - The Information Technology Agreement: Advice and Information on the Proposed Expansion: Part 1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ...Following receipt of a request on July 31, 2012, from the United States Trade Representative (USTR) under section 115 of the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (19 U.S.C. 3524) and section 332(g) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1332(g)), the U.S. International Trade Commission (Commission) instituted two investigations for the purpose of providing the requested advice and information: investigation No. 332-532, The Information Technology Agreement: Advice and Information on the Proposed Expansion: Part 1, and investigation No. 332-536, The Information Technology Agreement: Advice and Information on the Proposed Expansion: Part 2.

  20. Knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns among healthcare providers in the prevention of recurrent kidney stones in Northern Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Derek; Abara, Emmanuel; Parmar, Malvinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Introducton: Kidney stone recurrence is common. Preventive measures can lead to improved quality of life and costs savings to the individual and healthcare system. Guidelines to prevent recurrent kidney stones are published by various urological societies. Adherence to guidelines amongst healthcare professionals in general is poor, while adherence to preventive management guidelines regarding stone disease is unknown. To understand this issue, we conducted an online study to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns of healthcare practitioners in Northern Ontario. Methods: We used the database of healthcare providers affiliated with the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, in Sudbury (East Campus) and Thunder Bay (West Campus), Ontario. We designed the survey based on current best practice guidelines for the management of recurrent kidney stones. Questions covered 3 domains: knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns. Demographic data were also collected. The survey was distributed electronically to all participants. Results: A total of 68 healthcare providers completed the survey. Of these, most were primary care physicians (72%). To keep uniformity, we analyzed the data of this homogenous group. A total of 70% of the respondents were aware of the current guidelines; however, only 43% applied their knowledge in clinical practice. Most participants lacked confidence while answering most items in the attitude domain. Conclusions: Most primary care physician respondents were aware of the appropriate preventive measures for recurrent kidney stones; however, they do not appear to apply this knowledge effectively in clinical practice. A low response rate is a limitation of our study. Further studies involving a larger sample size may lead to information sharing and collaborative care among healthcare providers. PMID:25485006

  1. Knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns among healthcare providers in the prevention of recurrent kidney stones in Northern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Derek; Abara, Emmanuel; Parmar, Malvinder S

    2014-11-01

    Kidney stone recurrence is common. Preventive measures can lead to improved quality of life and costs savings to the individual and healthcare system. Guidelines to prevent recurrent kidney stones are published by various urological societies. Adherence to guidelines amongst healthcare professionals in general is poor, while adherence to preventive management guidelines regarding stone disease is unknown. To understand this issue, we conducted an online study to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns of healthcare practitioners in Northern Ontario. We used the database of healthcare providers affiliated with the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, in Sudbury (East Campus) and Thunder Bay (West Campus), Ontario. We designed the survey based on current best practice guidelines for the management of recurrent kidney stones. Questions covered 3 domains: knowledge, attitudes, and practice patterns. Demographic data were also collected. The survey was distributed electronically to all participants. A total of 68 healthcare providers completed the survey. Of these, most were primary care physicians (72%). To keep uniformity, we analyzed the data of this homogenous group. A total of 70% of the respondents were aware of the current guidelines; however, only 43% applied their knowledge in clinical practice. Most participants lacked confidence while answering most items in the attitude domain. Most primary care physician respondents were aware of the appropriate preventive measures for recurrent kidney stones; however, they do not appear to apply this knowledge effectively in clinical practice. A low response rate is a limitation of our study. Further studies involving a larger sample size may lead to information sharing and collaborative care among healthcare providers.

  2. Telemedical Advice to Long Distance Passenger Ferries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Olaf Chresten; Bøggild, Niels Bo; Kristensen, Søren

    were of the central type such as migraine, meningitis pain or other types of headaches. For treatment of pain mainly paracetamol, NSAIDs and opioids was used. Paracetamol was offered to all with pain without any registration. Among the patients with nociceptive pain 4 were treated with NSAIDs and one......Background: Radio medical (RM) advice for seafarers and travelling passengers is important and can be Radio medical (RM) advice for seafarers and travelling passengers is important and can be crucial for the optimal medical treatment on board ships. The aim was to analyse the data from...

  3. Post-tonsillectomy dietary advice: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millington, A J F; Gaunt, A C; Phillips, J S

    2016-10-01

    To determine if there is evidence that post-tonsillectomy dietary advice affects post-operative morbidity. A systematic review was conducted of Embase, Medline, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and PsycInfo, to November 2014. Seventeen articles were included; their heterogeneous nature prevented meta-analysis. Of these, all three small, randomised studies showed no statistical difference in morbidity between restricted and non-restricted diets. Most post-tonsillectomy dietary advice is based on historical anecdotes and not rigorous scientific testing. The existing small-scale, randomised studies show no statistical difference in morbidity between non-restricted and restricted diets.

  4. Attitudes, practices, and barriers to adolescent suicide and mental health screening: a survey of pennsylvania primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Guy S; O'Malley, Alana; Wintersteen, Matthew B; Peters, Sherry; Yunghans, Suzanne; Biddle, Virginia; O'Brien, Connell; Schrand, Susan

    2012-01-01

    To determine primary care providers' rates of screening for suicide and mental health problems in adolescents and the factors that promote or discourage this practice. Overall, 671 medical professionals (ie, pediatricians, family physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) completed an electronic survey. The 53 items focused on (1) attitudes, knowledge, and comfort with general psychosocial and suicide screening and (2) current practices and barriers regarding screening and referrals to behavioral health services. Forty percent had a patient attempt suicide in the past year, and 7.7% had 6 or more patients attempt suicide. At a well visit, 67% screened for mental health, and 35.2% screened for suicide risk. Most (61.1%) primary care providers rarely screened for suicide or only when it was indicated. Only 14.2% of primary care providers often used a standardized suicide screening tool. Factors associated with screening were being knowledgeable about suicide risk, being female, working in an urban setting, and having had a suicidal patient. Only 3.0% reported adequate compensation for these practices, and 44% agreed that primary care providers frequently use physical health billing codes for behavioral health services. Nearly 90% said parent involvement was needed if adolescents were to follow through with referrals to mental health services. Only 21% frequently heard back from the behavioral health providers after a referral was made. Policy that promotes mental health education for primary care providers, provides reimbursement for mental health screening, and encourages better service integration could increase suicide screening and save healthcare costs and patients' lives.

  5. Urban-rural differences in attitudes and practices toward long-acting reversible contraceptives among family planning providers in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaaler, Margaret L; Kalanges, Lauri K; Fonseca, Vincent P; Castrucci, Brian C

    2012-03-01

    Despite the elevated rates of teen and unplanned pregnancies across the United States, long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) remain a less utilized birth control method. The present study investigated family planning providers' attitudes and considerations when recommending family planning methods and LARCs to clients. Additionally, this study explored whether urban-rural differences exist in providers' attitudes toward LARCs and in clients' use of LARCs. Data were collected using an online survey of family planning providers at Title X clinics in Texas. Survey data was linked to family planning client data from the Family Planning Annual Report (2008). Findings indicated that, although providers were aware of the advantages of LARCs, clients' LARC use remains infrequent. Providers reported that the benefits of hormone implants include their effectiveness for 3 years and that they are an option for women who cannot take estrogen-based birth control. Providers acknowledged the benefits of several types of LARCs; however, urban providers were more likely to acknowledge the benefits of hormone implants compared with their rural counterparts. Results also indicated barriers to recommending LARCs, such as providers' misinformation about LARCs and their caution in recommending LARCs to adolescents. However, findings also indicated providers lack training in LARC insertion, specifically among those practicing in rural areas. In light of the effectiveness and longevity of LARCs, teenagers and clients living in rural areas are ideal LARC candidates. Increased training among family planning providers, especially for those practicing in rural areas, may increase their recommendations of LARCs to clients. Copyright © 2012 Jacobs Institute of Women

  6. A survey of exercise advice and recommendations in United Kingdom paediatric cardiac clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig A; Gowing, Lucy; Horn, Richard; Stuart, Alan Graham

    2017-07-01

    Physical activity and exercise have important health benefits for children and adolescents with CHD. The objective of this study was to survey the provision of advice and recommendations in United Kingdom paediatric CHD clinics. A three-page questionnaire was sent out to paediatric cardiac consultants in the United Kingdom, paediatric consultants with expertise in cardiology, and nursing staff (Paediatricians with Expertise in Cardiology Special Interest Group), as well as all members of the British Congenital Cardiovascular Association. The aim of this questionnaire was to determine the extent and scope of current information provision and to assess the importance that clinicians place on this advice. There were 68 responses in total, and the data showed that, of these, 24 (36%) clinicians had never provided paediatric CHD patients with written advice about exercise. Only 27 (39%) clinicians provided physical activity advice at every appointment. Lack of time during consultation (n=39, 56.9%), lack of training (n=38, 55.2%), and uncertainty about appropriate recommendations (n=38, 55.2%) were identified as the main factors preventing clinicians from providing patients with advice about physical activity. Although healthcare providers consider physical activity to be very important, the provision of clear, specific advice and recommendations is underutilised; therefore, more education and provision of resources to support the promotion of exercise need to be provided to clinicians and their support teams.

  7. Influence of Family History of Diabetes on Health Care Provider Practice and Patient Behavior Among Nondiabetic Oregonians

    OpenAIRE

    Zlot, Amy I.; Bland, Mary Pat; Silvey, Kerry; Epstein, Beth; Leman, Richard F.; Mielke, Beverly

    2008-01-01

    Introduction People with a family history of diabetes are at increased risk of developing diabetes; however, the effect of family history of diabetes on health care provider practice and patient behavior has not been well defined. Methods We analyzed data from the 2005 Oregon Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a state-based, random-digit?dialed telephone survey, to evaluate, among people with diabetes, associations between family history of diabetes and 1) patients' reports of health...

  8. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings. Part III. Determining which practices are most effective and installing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-01

    The training program is designed to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy-efficient buildings. A teacher guide and student workbook are available to supplement the basic manual. Subjects covered in Part III are: determining which practices are most efficient and economical; installing energy-saving materials; and improving efficiency of equipment.

  9. Designing occupancy studies: general advice and allocating survey effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, D.I.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2005-01-01

    1. The fraction of sampling units in a landscape where a target species is present (occupancy) is an extensively used concept in ecology. Yet in many applications the species will not always be detected in a sampling unit even when present, resulting in biased estimates of occupancy. Given that sampling units are surveyed repeatedly within a relatively short timeframe, a number of similar methods have now been developed to provide unbiased occupancy estimates. However, practical guidance on the efficient design of occupancy studies has been lacking. 2. In this paper we comment on a number of general issues related to designing occupancy studies, including the need for clear objectives that are explicitly linked to science or management, selection of sampling units, timing of repeat surveys and allocation of survey effort. Advice on the number of repeat surveys per sampling unit is considered in terms of the variance of the occupancy estimator, for three possible study designs. 3. We recommend that sampling units should be surveyed a minimum of three times when detection probability is high (> 0.5 survey-1), unless a removal design is used. 4. We found that an optimal removal design will generally be the most efficient, but we suggest it may be less robust to assumption violations than a standard design. 5. Our results suggest that for a rare species it is more efficient to survey more sampling units less intensively, while for a common species fewer sampling units should be surveyed more intensively. 6. Synthesis and applications. Reliable inferences can only result from quality data. To make the best use of logistical resources, study objectives must be clearly defined; sampling units must be selected, and repeated surveys timed appropriately; and a sufficient number of repeated surveys must be conducted. Failure to do so may compromise the integrity of the study. The guidance given here on study design issues is particularly applicable to studies of species

  10. Effectiveness of manual therapy or pulsed shortwave diathermy in addition to advice and exercise for neck disorders: a pragmatic randomized controlled trial in physical therapy clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Krysia; Hill, Jonathan; Lewis, Martyn; Sim, Julius; Daniels, Jane; Hay, Elaine M

    2005-04-15

    To determine whether manual therapy or pulsed shortwave diathermy, in addition to advice and exercise, provide better clinical outcome at 6 months than advice and exercise alone in primary care patients with nonspecific neck disorders. This was a multicenter, 3-arm randomized controlled trial in 15 physical therapy departments. Of the 735 screened patients, 350 were recruited to the study (mean age 51 years) from July 2000 to June 2002. Participants were randomized to advice and exercise plus manual therapy, advice and exercise plus pulsed shortwave, or advice and exercise alone. Assessments were undertaken at baseline, 6 weeks, and 6 months. The primary outcome was the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire. Analysis was by intention to treat. Of the participants, 115 were allocated to advice and exercise, 114 to advice and exercise plus manual therapy, and 121 to advice and exercise plus pulsed shortwave; 98% received the allocated treatment. There was 93% followup at 6 months. The mean +/- SD fall in Northwick Park score at 6 months was 11.5 +/- 15.7 for advice and exercise alone, 10.2 +/- 14.1 for advice and exercise plus manual therapy, and 10.3 +/- 15.0 for advice and exercise plus pulsed shortwave. There were no statistically significant differences in mean changes between groups. The addition of pulsed shortwave or manual therapy to advice and exercise did not provide any additional benefits in the physical therapy treatment of neck disorders.

  11. Goal conflict, goal facilitation, and health professionals' provision of physical activity advice in primary care: An exploratory prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Neil C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The theory of planned behaviour has well-evidenced utility in predicting health professional behaviour, but focuses on a single behaviour isolated from the numerous potentially conflicting and facilitating goal-directed behaviours performed alongside. Goal conflict and goal facilitation may influence whether health professionals engage in guideline-recommended behaviours, and may supplement the predictive power of the theory of planned behaviour. We hypothesised that goal facilitation and goal conflict contribute to predicting primary care health professionals' provision of physical activity advice to patients with hypertension, over and above predictors of behaviour from the theory of planned behaviour. Methods Using a prospective predictive design, at baseline we invited a random sample of 606 primary care health professionals from all primary care practices in NHS Grampian and NHS Tayside (Scotland to complete postal questionnaires. Goal facilitation and goal conflict were measured alongside theory of planned behaviour constructs at baseline. At follow-up six months later, participants self-reported the number of patients, out of those seen in the preceding two weeks, to whom they provided physical activity advice. Results Forty-four primary care physicians and nurses completed measures at both time points (7.3% response rate. Goal facilitation and goal conflict improved the prediction of behaviour, accounting for substantial additional variance (5.8% and 8.4%, respectively in behaviour over and above intention and perceived behavioural control. Conclusions Health professionals' provision of physical activity advice in primary care can be predicted by perceptions about how their conflicting and facilitating goal-directed behaviours help and hinder giving advice, over and above theory of planned behaviour constructs. Incorporating features of multiple goal pursuit into the theory of planned behaviour may help to better

  12. Consider the source: adolescents and adults similarly follow older adult advice more than peer advice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico S Lourenco

    Full Text Available Individuals learn which of their actions are likely to be rewarded through trial and error. This form of learning is critical for adapting to new situations, which adolescents frequently encounter. Adolescents are also greatly influenced by their peers. The current study tested the extent to which adolescents rely on peer advice to guide their actions. Adolescent and young adult participants completed a probabilistic learning task in which they chose between four pairs of stimuli with different reinforcement probabilities, with one stimulus in each pair more frequently rewarded. Participants received advice about two of these pairs, once from a similarly aged peer and once from an older adult. Crucially, this advice was inaccurate, enabling the dissociation between experience-based and instruction-based learning. Adolescents and adults learned equally well from experience and no age group difference was evident in the overall influence of advice on choices. Surprisingly, when considering the source of advice, there was no evident influence of peer advice on adolescent choices. However, both adolescents and adults were biased toward choosing the stimulus recommended by the older adult. Contrary to conventional wisdom, these data suggest that adolescents may prioritize the advice of older adults over that of peers in certain decision-making contexts.

  13. Consider the source: adolescents and adults similarly follow older adult advice more than peer advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenco, Frederico S; Decker, Johannes H; Pedersen, Gloria A; Dellarco, Danielle V; Casey, B J; Hartley, Catherine A

    2015-01-01

    Individuals learn which of their actions are likely to be rewarded through trial and error. This form of learning is critical for adapting to new situations, which adolescents frequently encounter. Adolescents are also greatly influenced by their peers. The current study tested the extent to which adolescents rely on peer advice to guide their actions. Adolescent and young adult participants completed a probabilistic learning task in which they chose between four pairs of stimuli with different reinforcement probabilities, with one stimulus in each pair more frequently rewarded. Participants received advice about two of these pairs, once from a similarly aged peer and once from an older adult. Crucially, this advice was inaccurate, enabling the dissociation between experience-based and instruction-based learning. Adolescents and adults learned equally well from experience and no age group difference was evident in the overall influence of advice on choices. Surprisingly, when considering the source of advice, there was no evident influence of peer advice on adolescent choices. However, both adolescents and adults were biased toward choosing the stimulus recommended by the older adult. Contrary to conventional wisdom, these data suggest that adolescents may prioritize the advice of older adults over that of peers in certain decision-making contexts.

  14. ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE TOWARDS CONSANGUINEOUS MARRIAGES AMONG A COHORT OF MULTIETHNIC HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS IN SAUDI ARABIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnaqeb, Dhekra; Hamamy, Hanan; Youssef, Amira M; Al-Rubeaan, Khalid

    2016-12-29

    This study aimed to assess knowledge, attitude and practice related to consanguinity among multiethnic health care providers in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Using a cross-sectional study design, a validated, self-administered close-ended questionnaire was randomly distributed to health care providers in different health institutions in the country between 1st August 2012 and 31st July 2013. A total of 1235 health care providers completed the study questionnaire. Of the 892 married participants (72.23% of total), 11.43% were married to a first cousin, and were predominantly Arabs, younger than 40 years and male. Only 17.80% of the patients seen by the health care providers requested consanguinity related counselling. A knowledge barrier was expressed by 27.49% of the participants, and 85.67% indicated their willingness to have more training in basic genetic counselling. A language barrier was expressed as a limiting factor to counselling for consanguinity among non-Arabs. The health care providers had a major dearth of knowledge that was reflected in their attitude and practice towards consanguinity counselling. This finding indicates the need for more undergraduate and postgraduate medical and nursing education and training in the counselling of consanguineous couples. It is recommended that consanguinity counselling is included in the current premarital screening and counselling programmes in the Kingdom.

  15. A Delphi Study: Exploring Faculty Perceptions of the Best Practices Influencing Student Persistence in Blended Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Kim Elise

    2010-01-01

    This Delphi study explored the instructional practices of community college faculty who were teaching blended or Web-assisted courses and how these practices influenced student persistence. The Delphi method provided qualitative data in the form of expert advice through consensus building on the instructional practices most likely to influence…

  16. Mortgage risks, debt literacy and financial advice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, Raun; van Rooij, Maarten C.J.

    2016-01-01

    A limited understanding of mortgage contracts and the risks involved may have contributed to the outbreak of the 2007–2008 financial crisis. We developed a special questionnaire relating mortgage loan decisions to financial knowledge and financial advice. Our results demonstrate that homeowners

  17. Advice Complexity of the Online Search Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemente, Jhoirene; Hromkovič, Juraj; Komm, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The online search problem is a fundamental problem in finance. The numerous direct applications include searching for optimal prices for commodity trading and trading foreign currencies. In this paper, we analyze the advice complexity of this problem. In particular, we are interested in identifying...

  18. Good Intentions, Bad Advice for Bilingual Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlin, Rebecca; Paneque, Oneyda M.

    2006-01-01

    Quite often, educators tell families of children who are learning English as a second language to speak only English, and not their native language, at home. Although these educators may have good intentions, the authors argue that the educators' advice to families is misguided and stems from misunderstandings about the nature of bilingualism and…

  19. A New Paradigm in Mortgage Loan Advice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otterstedt, Margrét Sesselja; Rasmussen, Kourosh Marjani; Kulahci, Murat

    2013-01-01

    The Danish mortgage market has undergone considerable changes during the last 15 years. New and more complex variations of loan products have been introduced. Nevertheless, mortgage loan advice has remained, by large, unchanged. This paper addresses a study where a number of new refinancing rules...

  20. Voting Advice Applications and electoral turnout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemenis, Konstantinos; Rosema, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades Voting Advice Applications (VAAs) have become popular tools among voters, especially in several countries with a multi-party system. In this paper we test if the use of VAAs stimulates electoral participation. We use survey data from the Netherlands, where such tools are

  1. Evaluation of the impact of restructuring wound management practices in a community care provider in Niagara, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Theresa; Zuiliani, Nancy; Posnett, John

    2008-06-01

    The burden of chronic wounds is substantial, and this burden is set to increase as the population ages. The challenge for community health services is significant. Wound care is labour intensive, and demand for services is set to increase at a time when the availability of nursing resources is likely to be severely limited. In March 2005, the Niagara community health care provider implemented a radical reorganisation of wound management practices designed to ensure that available resources, particularly nurse time, were being used in the most efficient way. An evaluation of the impact of the reorganisation has shown improvements in clinical practice and better patient outcomes. The use of traditional wound care products reduced from 75% in 2005 to 20% in 2007 in line with best practice recommendations, and frequency of daily dressing changes reduced from 48% in 2005 to 15% in 2007. In a comparison of patients treated in 2005 and 2006, average time to healing was 51.5 weeks in 2005 compared with 20.9 weeks in 2006. Total treatment cost was lower in 2006 by $10,700 (75%) per patient. Overall, improvements in wound management practice led to a net saving of $3.8 million in the Niagara wound care budget.

  2. Exploring the views of healthcare professionals on increasing smoking cessation advice for patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Ho ShuYing; McGee Hannah; McElvaney Noel G; Doyle Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background: Smoking cessation advice provided by healthcare professionals can be effective in increasing smoking cessation among patients. Any successful intervention will require staff knowledge of local barriers to implementation. However, the views of Irish healthcare professionals on increasing the provision of smoking cessation advice and the associated barriers remain unexplored. Aims: To explore the views of Irish healthcare professionals on barriers to increasing smoking cessation ...

  3. Understanding the drivers of interprofessional collaborative practice among HIV primary care providers and case managers in HIV care programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavronicolas, Heather A; Laraque, Fabienne; Shankar, Arti; Campbell, Claudia

    2017-05-01

    Care coordination programmes are an important aspect of HIV management whose success depends largely on HIV primary care provider (PCP) and case manager collaboration. Factors influencing collaboration among HIV PCPs and case managers remain to be studied. The study objective was to test an existing theoretical model of interprofessional collaborative practice and determine which factors play the most important role in facilitating collaboration. A self-administered, anonymous mail survey was sent to HIV PCPs and case managers in New York City. An adapted survey instrument elicited information on demographic, contextual, and perceived social exchange (trustworthiness, role specification, and relationship initiation) characteristics. The dependent variable, perceived interprofessional practice, was constructed from a validated scale. A sequential block wise regression model specifying variable entry order examined the relative importance of each group of factors and of individual variables. The analysis showed that social exchange factors were the dominant drivers of collaboration. Relationship initiation was the most important predictor of interprofessional collaboration. Additional influential factors included organisational leadership support of collaboration, practice settings, and frequency of interprofessional meetings. Addressing factors influencing collaboration among providers will help public health programmes optimally design their structural, hiring, and training strategies to foster effective social exchanges and promote collaborative working relationships.

  4. Diagnostic work-up of neurological syndromes in a rural African setting: knowledge, attitudes and practices of health care providers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Mpanya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurological disorders of infectious origin are common in rural sub-Saharan Africa and usually have serious consequences. Unfortunately, these syndromes are often poorly documented for lack of diagnostic tools. Clinical management of these diseases is a major challenge in under-equipped rural health centers and hospitals. We documented health care provider knowledge, attitudes and practices related to this syndrome in two rural health zones in Bandundu Province, Democratic Republic of Congo. METHODS: We used a qualitative research approach combining observation, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. We observed 20 patient-provider contacts related to a neurological syndrome, conducted 12 individual interviews and 4 focus group discussions with care providers. All interviews were audiotaped and the transcripts were analyzed with the software ATLAS.ti. RESULTS: Care providers in this region usually limit their diagnostic work-up to clinical examination primarily because of the financial hurdles in this entirely out-of-pocket payment system. The patients prefer to purchase drugs rather than diagnostic tests. Moreover the general lack of diagnostic tools and the representation of the clinician as a "diviner" do not enhance any use of laboratory or other diagnostic methods. CONCLUSION: Innovation in diagnostic technology for neurological disorders is badly needed in Central-Africa, but its uptake in clinical practice will only be a success if tools are simple, affordable and embedded in a patient-centered approach.

  5. Clean delivery practices in rural northern Ghana: a qualitative study of community and provider knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyer Cheryl A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge, attitudes and practices of community members and healthcare providers in rural northern Ghana regarding clean delivery are not well understood. This study explores hand washing/use of gloves during delivery, delivering on a clean surface, sterile cord cutting, appropriate cord tying, proper cord care following delivery, and infant bathing and cleanliness. Methods In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using NVivo 9.0. Results 253 respondents participated, including women with newborn infants, grandmothers, household and compound heads, community leaders, traditional birth attendants, and formally trained health care providers. There is widespread understanding of the need for clean delivery to reduce the risk of infection to both mothers and their babies during and shortly after delivery. Despite this understanding, the use of gloves during delivery and hand washing during and after delivery were mentioned infrequently. The need for a clean delivery surface was raised repeatedly, including explicit discussion of avoiding delivering in the dirt. Many activities to do with cord care involved non-sterile materials and practices: 1 Cord cutting was done with a variety of tools, and the most commonly used were razor blades or scissors; 2 Cord tying utilized a variety of materials, including string, rope, thread, twigs, and clamps; and 3 Cord care often involved applying traditional salves to the cord - including shea butter, ground shea nuts, local herbs, local oil, or “red earth sand.” Keeping babies and their surroundings clean was mentioned repeatedly as an important way to keep babies from falling ill. Conclusions This study suggests a widespread understanding in rural northern Ghana of the need for clean delivery. Nonetheless, many recommended clean delivery practices are ignored. Overarching themes emerging from this study included the increasing use of

  6. Beliefs, Knowledge, Implementation, and Integration of Evidence-Based Practice Among Primary Health Care Providers: Protocol for a Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Filipa; Salvi, Mireille; Verloo, Henk

    2017-08-01

    The adoption of evidence-based practice (EBP) is promoted because it is widely recognized for improving the quality and safety of health care for patients, and reducing avoidable costs. Providers of primary care face numerous challenges to ensuring the effectiveness of their daily practices. Primary health care is defined as: the entry level into a health care services system, providing a first point of contact for all new needs and problems; patient-focused (not disease-oriented) care over time; care for all but the most uncommon or unusual conditions; and coordination or integration of care, regardless of where or by whom that care is delivered. Primary health care is the principal means by which to approach the main goal of any health care services system: optimization of health status. This review aims to scope publications examining beliefs, knowledge, implementation, and integration of EBPs among primary health care providers (HCPs). We will conduct a systematic scoping review of published articles in the following electronic databases, from their start dates until March 31, 2017: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) via PubMed (from 1946), Embase (from 1947), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; from 1937), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; from 1992), PsycINFO (from 1806), Web of Science (from 1900), Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) database (from 1998), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE; from 1996), Trip medical database (from 1997), and relevant professional scientific journals (from their start dates). We will use the predefined search terms of, "evidence-based practice" and, "primary health care" combined with other terms, such as, "beliefs", "knowledge", "implementation", and "integration". We will also conduct a hand search of the bibliographies of all relevant articles and a search for unpublished studies using Google Scholar, ProQuest, Mednar, and World

  7. It is important that they care - older persons' experiences of telephone advice nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmström, Inger K; Nokkoudenmäki, Mai-Britt; Zukancic, Selma; Sundler, Annelie J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to explore older persons' experiences of telephone advice nursing at primary healthcare centres. Telephone advice nursing is expanding worldwide, and the older population is increasing. Little is known about older persons' experiences of telephone advice nursing provided by primary healthcare. This study has a descriptive design with a qualitative inductive approach. Data were collected via interviews with a purposive sample of 10 older persons in 2014. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The older persons' experiences were described in two themes: the patient-friendly aspects of telephone advice nursing and the patient-unfriendly aspects of telephone advice nursing. The themes can be understood as two sides of the same coin; the differences point to both the advantages and disadvantages of the service and are further illuminated through seven subthemes. This study contributes to increased awareness of the advantages and disadvantages of the telephone advice nursing system as experienced by older persons. To be the focus of attention during calls was highlighted as important; and clear communication was deemed crucial. When the communication between the nurse and the older persons was perceived as good and the perspective of the caller was the focus, an experience of safety and satisfaction was described. Older persons had great confidence in the telephone nurses' competence and perceived their ability to access the service as mostly good, even if it was sometimes difficult to use the service. The communicative competence of telephone nurses is essential when providing telephone advice nursing to older persons. In addition, a person-centred approach is important to provide optimal care in telephone advice nursing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Effects of distance between initial estimates and advice on advice utilization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas Schultze; Anne-Fernandine Rakotoarisoa; Stefan Schulz-Hardt Data

    2015-01-01

    ... confidence shifts due to social validation. Whereas previous research suggests that advice is weighted less the more it differs from one's initial opinion, we consistently find evidence of a curvilinear pattern...

  9. 75 FR 65031 - U.S.-Trans-Pacific Partnership Free Trade Agreement Including Malaysia: Advice on the Probable...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ... COMMISSION U.S.-Trans-Pacific Partnership Free Trade Agreement Including Malaysia: Advice on the Probable... Including Malaysia: Advice on the Probable Economic Effect of Providing Duty-Free Treatment for Imports..., Singapore, and Vietnam). In his letter of October 5, 2010, the USTR advised the Commission that Malaysia has...

  10. Can genetic-based advice help you lose weight? Findings from the Food4Me European randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celis-Morales, C.; Marsaux, C.F.M.; Livingstone, K.M.; Navas-Carretero, S.; San-Cristobal, R.; Fallaize, R.; Macready, A.L.; O'Donovan, C.; Woolhead, C.; Forster, H.; Kolossa, S.; Daniel, H.; Moschonis, G.; Mavrogianni, C.; Manios, Y.; Surwillo, A.; Traczyk, I.; Drevon, C.A.; Grimaldi, K.; Bouwman, J.; Gibney, M.J.; Walsh, M.C.; Gibney, E.R.; Brennan, L.; Lovegrove, J.A.; Martinez, J.A.; Saris, W.H.M.; Mathers, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: There has been limited evidence about whether genotype-tailored advice provides extra benefits in reducing obesityrelated traits compared with the benefits of conventional one-size-fitsall advice. Objective: We determined whether the disclosure of information on fat-mass and

  11. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices among health care providers regarding complementary and alternative medicine in Trinidad and Tobago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahall, Mandreker; Legall, George

    2017-03-08

    Health care providers are often ill prepared to interact about or make acceptable conclusions on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) despite its widespread use. We explored the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of health care providers regarding CAM. This cross-sectional study was conducted between March 1 and July 31, 2015 among health care providers working mainly in the public sector in Trinidad and Tobago. A 34-item questionnaire was distributed and used for data collection. Questionnaire data were analysed using inferential and binary logistic regression models. Response rate was 60.3% (362/600). Responders were 172 nurses, 77 doctors, 30 pharmacists, and 83 other health care providers of unnamed categories (mainly nursing assistants). Responders were predominantly female (69.1%), Indo-Trinidadian (55.8%), Christian (47.5%), self-claimed "very religious" (48.3%), and had alternative, and physical types of CAM, but had no knowledge of energy therapy and therapeutic methods. Sex, ethnicity, and type of health care provider were associated with both personal use and recommendation for the use of CAM. Predictors of CAM use were sex, religion, and type of health care provider; predictors of recommendation for the use of CAM were sex and type of health care provider. About half of health care providers (51.4%) and doctors (52%) were likely to ask their patients about CAM and medicine alone. Less than 10% said conventional medicine should be used alone. Knowledge about CAM is low among health care providers. The majority engages in using CAM but is reluctant to recommend it. Predictors of CAM use were sex, religion, and profession; predictors of recommendation for the use of CAM were sex and profession. Health care providers feel the future lies in integrative medicine.

  12. Impact of educational intervention on knowledge, attitude and awareness of good clinical practice among health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Divya; Walia, Rani; Sharma, Poonam; Kaur, Harmanjeet; Agnihotri, Pallak

    2017-01-01

    Clinical trials play an important role in the generation of evidence-based data in health care practices. To ensure the credibility of data and the safety and well-being of the patients Good clinical practice (GCP) guidelines play an important role. At present, we have little knowledge about awareness of GCP guidelines among health care providers in India. To assess the level of awareness, and perception of the health care providers toward GCP and subsequent change in these after a dayer training session on GCP guidelines. A cross-sectional descriptive questionnaire-based study was conducted amongst health care providers, that is, doctors, dentists, nurses of a Tertiary Health Care and Teaching Institute. Participants were given descriptive questionnaire; they completed the questionnaire before and after undergoing a day training program in GCP guidelines. The impact of the effectiveness of educational intervention among healthcare professionals was evaluated by two-tailed Z-test. Out of 120 participants, 80 were medical doctors, 20 dental doctors, and 20 nurses. A dayse training program on GCP guidelines was found to increase positive attitudes toward various aspects of clinical trials. A day's training program on GCP guidelines may help to increase the knowledge as well as awareness about principles and techniques of clinical research, which will increase the credibility of clinical research in the country.

  13. Influences of attribution and stigma on working relationships with providers practicing Western psychiatry in the Taiwanese context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang-Pei; Wu, Hui-Ching; Huang, Chun-Jen

    2014-12-01

    This study examined influences of causal attributions of schizophrenia and perceived and internalized mental illness stigma on perceived working alliance with, and informational support received from doctors practicing Western psychiatry in the Taiwanese social-cultural context. This cross-sectional quantitative study used a non-probability, purposive sampling technique to recruit 212 Taiwanese diagnosed with schizophrenia from Taiwanese Alliance of the Mentally Ill, 4 community mental health rehabilitation centres and 2 psychiatric hospitals between July 2012 and March 2013. Linear regression models were used for analysis. The results showed that environmental attributions were positively associated with both perceived working alliance and perceived informational support, while supernatural attributions were negatively associated with perceived working alliance and perceived informational support. Perceived stigma had a negative association with perceived working alliance. The discrimination domain of internalized stigma specifically had a positive association with perceived working alliance, while the withdraw domain had a negative association with perceived informational support. Findings inform the importance of culturally sensitive practices in developing an effective working relationship. Western psychiatric care providers need to explore consumers' casual attributions of mental illness and understand the impact of stigma so that providers may successfully engage consumers in care and provide tailored illness education and information.

  14. Anticipatory guidance for children and adolescents with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD): practice points for primary health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon-Dearman, Ana; Green, Courtney R; Andrew, Gail; LeBlanc, Nicole; Cook, Jocelynn L

    2015-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is an umbrella term that describes the range of effects that can occur in an individual who was prenatally exposed to alcohol and includes an array of complex neurodevelopmental and physical findings. To give primary healthcare providers (PHCP) evidence-based recommendations for supporting and managing the symptoms of FASD after patients have received a diagnosis. MethodsPrimary health recommendations for the management of children and adolescents with FASD were developed based on expert clinical judgment and supported by evidence-based research, where appropriate. The format was adapted from other health supervision practice guidelines as developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Clinical practice "Points" for the PHCP are highlighted. A reference table of anticipatory recommendations by age is presented. In most cases, the initial screening and referral for diagnosis will be made by the PHCP, and they will be responsible for ongoing management. It is anticipated that these recommendations will provide the PHCP with evidence to support the longitudinal health care of children and adolescents with FASD and their families as they transition throughout all developmental stages. There is a pressing need for the involvement of PHCP in the active care of children and adolescents with FASD and their families over the lifespan. PHCP are trained in screening, prevention, and management of health needs, and are in the position to coordinate sub-specialty referrals as needed. Engaging PHCP will provide a truly integrated care system for individuals with FASD and their families.

  15. Adolescent health care in a large multispecialty prepaid group practice. Who provides it and how well are they doing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitsner, I. N.; Borok, G. M.; Neinstein, L.; MacKenzie, R.

    1992-01-01

    Adolescents are at risk for pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, suicide, homicide, accidents, and substance abuse. Adolescent medicine involves an overlap of many skills needed to provide routine medical care, as well as care for those conditions that require psychosocial assessment. We report the results of a mail survey covering care of this age group by practitioners of pediatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, family practice, and adolescent medicine in a large, multispecialty, prepaid group practice. The mail survey covered 10 areas of adolescent care. Adolescent medicine physicians expressed the highest level of perceived knowledge and competence in these areas, with family practitioners ranked second. More than 50% of internists and pediatricians felt only fair to poor competence for a variety of adolescent conditions, whereas a third of internists and pediatricians reported that they liked to care for adolescents. Physicians in all 4 of the primary care specialties reported a need for a teen health center for both consultation and education. These results are similar to those reported for pediatricians and primary care physicians in private practice and for residents in internal medicine. PMID:1615655

  16. Following celebrities’ medical advice: meta-narrative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Charlie

    2013-01-01

    Objective To synthesise what is known about how celebrities influence people’s decisions on health. Design Meta-narrative analysis of economics, marketing, psychology, and sociology literatures. Data sources Systematic searches of electronic databases: BusinessSource Complete (1886-), Communication & Mass Media Complete (1915-), Humanities Abstracts (1984-), ProQuest Political Science (1985-), PsycINFO (1806-), PubMed (1966-), and Sociology Abstracts (1952-). Inclusion criteria Studies discussing mechanisms of celebrities’ influence on people in any context. Results Economics literature shows that celebrity endorsements act as signals of credibility that differentiate products or ideas from competitors and can catalyse herd behaviour. Marketing studies show that celebrities transfer their desirable attributes to products and use their success to boost their perceived credibility. Psychology shows that people are classically conditioned to react positively to the advice of celebrities, experience cognitive dissonance if they do not, and are influenced by congruencies with their self conceptions. Sociology helps explain the spread of celebrity medical advice as a contagion that diffuses through social networks and people’s desire to acquire celebrities’ social capital. Conclusions The influence of celebrity status is a deeply rooted process that can be harnessed for good or abused for harm. A better understanding of celebrity can empower health professionals to take this phenomenon seriously and use patient encounters to educate the public about sources of health information and their trustworthiness. Public health authorities can use these insights to implement regulations and restrictions on celebrity endorsements and design counter marketing initiatives—perhaps even partnering with celebrities—to discredit bogus medical advice while promoting evidence based practices.

  17. Developing leaflets to give dental health advice to Aboriginal families with young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinkhorn, Fiona; Wallace, Janet; Smith, Leanne; Blinkhorn, Anthony S

    2014-08-01

    Dental caries (decay) is a serious problem for young Aboriginal children, causing pain and stress. Treatment often involves extraction of teeth under a general anaesthetic. However, dental caries can be prevented by reducing the frequency of sugar consumption and brushing teeth twice a day with fluoride toothpaste. Such straightforward advice could be given to families by Aboriginal Health Workers who are trusted by their communities and have an existing advisory role. This paper reports on the development of dental health advice leaflets for use in Aboriginal communities. An Aboriginal reference panel was recruited to comment on dental health advice leaflets prepared by an Aboriginal graphic designer. The panel was asked to consider the design, cultural appropriateness and practicality of the leaflets. Comments were collected through email and face-to-face discussions, which were collated and the leaflets altered accordingly. The advice from the panel resulted in greater use of pictures. For example large green ticks and red crosses highlighted healthy and unhealthy behaviours, respectively. The tooth brushing leaflet was amended to emphasise the safe storage of toothpaste in order to keep it out of reach of young children. The panel stated that all leaflets should incorporate the Aboriginal flag, and proposed that fridge magnets might be beneficial as all family members would benefit from seeing the messages every day. The consultation process refined dental advice leaflets to reflect the views of an Aboriginal Reference Panel, in terms of design, cultural competence and practicality. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  18. Endorsing good quality assurance practices in molecular pathology: risks and recommendations for diagnostic laboratories and external quality assessment providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembuyser, Lien; Dequeker, Elisabeth M C

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance is an indispensable element in a molecular diagnostic laboratory. The ultimate goal is to warrant patient safety. Several risks that can compromise high quality procedures are at stake, from sample collection to the test performed by the laboratory, the reporting of test results to clinicians, and the organization of effective external quality assessment schemes. Quality assurance should therefore be safeguarded at each level and should imply a holistic multidisciplinary approach. This review aims to provide an overview of good quality assurance practices and discusses certain risks and recommendations to promote and improve quality assurance for both diagnostic laboratories and for external quality assessment providers. The number of molecular targets is continuously rising, and new technologies are evolving. As this poses challenges for clinical implementation and increases the demand for external quality assessment, the formation of an international association for improving quality assurance in molecular pathology is called for.

  19. Smartphone mobile application delivering personalized, real-time sun protection advice: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, David B; Berwick, Marianne; Lantz, Kathy; Buller, Mary Klein; Shane, James; Kane, Ilima; Liu, Xia

    2015-05-01

    Mobile smartphones are rapidly emerging as an effective means of communicating with many Americans. Using mobile applications (apps), they can access remote databases, track time and location, and integrate user input to provide tailored health information. A smartphone mobile app providing personalized, real-time sun protection advice was evaluated in a randomized clinical trial. The trial was conducted in 2012 and had a randomized pretest-posttest controlled design with a 10-week follow-up. Data were collected from a nationwide population-based survey panel. A sample of 604 non-Hispanic and Hispanic adults from the Knowledge Panel 18 years or older who owned an Android smartphone were enrolled. The mobile app provided advice on sun protection (ie, protection practices and risk of sunburn) and alerts (to apply or reapply sunscreen and get out of the sun), hourly UV Index, and vitamin D production based on the forecast UV Index, the phone's time and location, and user input. Percentage of days using sun protection and time spent outdoors (days and minutes) in the midday sun and number of sunburns in the past 3 months were collected. Individuals in the treatment group reported more shade use (mean days staying in the shade, 41.0% vs 33.7%; P = .03) but less sunscreen use (mean days, 28.6% vs 34.5%; P = .048) than controls. There was no significant difference in number of sunburns in the past 3 months (mean, 0.60 in the treatment group vs 0.62 for controls; P = .87). Those who used the mobile app reported spending less time in the sun (mean days keeping time in the sun to a minimum, 60.4% for app users vs 49.3% for nonusers; P = .04) and using all protection behaviors combined more (mean days, 39.4% vs 33.8%; P = .04). The mobile app improved some sun protection. Use of the mobile app was lower than expected but associated with increased sun protection. Providing personalized advice when and where people are in the sun may help reduce sun exposure.

  20. Contrasting views of animal healthcare providers on worm control practices for sheep and goats in an arid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddiqi, H A; Jabbar, A; Babar, W; Sarwar, M; Iqbal, Z; Cabaret, J

    2012-02-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted to determine the worm control practices and anthelmintic usage of 150 key respondents involved in sheep and goat production in the arid Thal area of Pakistan. The information was collected by visiting farms, and interviewing the key respondents which included veterinary officers (n = 15), veterinary assistants (n = 51), traditional practitioners (n = 24), and small and large scale sheep/goat farm herders and owners (n = 60). Among all interviewed animal healthcare providers, the veterinary officers had the highest level of awareness of parasitic infection and advocated the use of modern available anthelmintics according to the predefined schedule. The farmers on the other hand, had the lowest level of knowledge about parasitic infections. They used modern anthelmintics at low frequencies (every six months) following an unusual practice of diluting the medicine. Veterinary assistants had a medium level of awareness about the parasitic infections using anthelmintic treatments when they deemed necessary rather than following a predefined treatment schedule. Traditional practitioners were also aware of parasitic infections and used traditional anthelmintics or a combination of the traditional and modern anthelmintics. The animal health providers had a different awareness and knowledge of parasitic infections which resulted in contrasting proposals for its' control. The farmers used worm control measures in accordance with their own views and those of animal healthcare advisors, combining modern and traditional treatments. This study provides the first insight into the differing views of those animal healthcare providers who form the basis for effective parasitic control within the sheep and goat industry of an arid region.

  1. Contrasting views of animal healthcare providers on worm control practices for sheep and goats in an arid environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddiqi H.A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A questionnaire survey was conducted to determine the worm control practices and anthelmintic usage of 150 key respondents involved in sheep and goat production in the arid Thal area of Pakistan. The information was collected by visiting farms, and interviewing the key respondents which included veterinary officers (n = 15, veterinary assistants (n = 51, traditional practitioners (n = 24, and small and large scale sheep/goat farm herders and owners (n = 60. Among all interviewed animal healthcare providers, the veterinary officers had the highest level of awareness of parasitic infection and advocated the use of modern available anthelmintics according to the predefined schedule. The farmers on the other hand, had the lowest level of knowledge about parasitic infections. They used modern anthelmintics at low frequencies (every six months following an unusual practice of diluting the medicine. Veterinary assistants had a medium level of awareness about the parasitic infections using anthelmintic treatments when they deemed necessary rather than following a predefined treatment schedule. Traditional practitioners were also aware of parasitic infections and used traditional anthelmintics or a combination of the traditional and modern anthelmintics. The animal health providers had a different awareness and knowledge of parasitic infections which resulted in contrasting proposals for its control. The farmers used worm control measures in accordance with their own views and those of animal healthcare advisors, combining modern and traditional treatments. This study provides the first insight into the differing views of those animal healthcare providers who form the basis for effective parasitic control within the sheep and goat industry of an arid region.

  2. A study with Paperless Electronic Medical Advice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Sheng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to drive the EMR’s further application and rapid expansion clinically based on the electronic medical advice as the core thereby realizing the paperless EMR. This paper has analyzed the implementation effects of electronic medical advice, followed by discussion of frequently asked questions (FAQ and development direction, and finally analyzed the solution of paperless EMR. It indicates that electronic signatures and unitrust time stamp are keys to achieve the paperless EMR. The laws and regulations, new ideas, paperless consultation sheets, all data integration and sharing, virtual printing technology, application of wireless and mobile ward-round trolley, etc. within the health care field shall be proposed to be improved. It is significantly important to save the medical costs, reduce the medical negligence, achieve the paperless EMR and build a high-quality digital hospital.

  3. Communication of Science Advice to Government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2016-01-01

    There are various ways to construct good processes for soliciting and understanding science. Our critique of advisory models finds that a well-supported chief science advisor (CSA) best ensures the provision of deliberative, informal, and emergency advice to government. Alternatively, bias, increasingly manifest as science-based advocacy, can hinder communication, diminish credibility, and distort scientific evidence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Power in telephone-advice nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Vesa

    2010-03-01

    Power is a central aspect of nursing, especially in telephone-advice nursing, where nurses assess callers' medical problems and decide what measures that need to be taken. This article presents a framework for understanding how power operates in social interaction between nurses and callers in telephone-advice nursing in primary care in Sweden. Power is analysed as the result of nurses and callers being oriented to five social structures that are relevant to their actions in this context, namely the organization of telephone-advice nursing, the social stock of medical knowledge, the professional division of labour between nurses and doctors, structures of social interaction and structures of emotions. While structural constraints govern some actions to a high degree, calls take place in an organizational free room that give nurses more leeway for acting more creatively. The discussion focuses on the introduction of new technologies of control, for instance computerized decision support systems and audio recording of calls, and on how they reduce the free room. Empirical data consist of 276 audio-recorded telephone calls to 13 nurses at six primary-care centres and of qualitative interviews with 18 nurses.

  5. Abstinence and teenagers: prevention counseling practices of health care providers serving high-risk patients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Cynthia C; Henderson, Jillian T; Schalet, Amy; Becker, Davida; Stratton, Laura; Raine, Tina R

    2010-06-01

    Abstinence-only education has had little demonstrable impact on teenagers' sexual behaviors, despite significant policy and funding efforts. Given the struggle over resources to improve teenagers' reproductive health outcomes, the views of clinicians serving teenagers at high risk for unintended pregnancy and STDs merit particular attention. In 2005, a qualitative study with 31 clinicians serving low-income, at-risk patients was conducted. A semistructured interview guide was used to ask clinicians about adolescent pregnancy, HIV and STD prevention counseling, and when they include abstinence. Thematic content analysis was used to examine the content of the counseling and the techniques used in different situations. Providers reported offering comprehensive counseling, presenting abstinence as a choice for teenagers, along with information about contraceptives and condoms. Several providers mentioned that with young, sexually inexperienced teenagers, they discuss delaying sexual activity and suggest other ways to be affectionate, while giving information on condoms. Providers explained how they assess whether teenagers feel ready to be sexually active and try to impart skills for healthy relationships. Some described abstinence as giving teenagers a way to opt out of unwanted sexual activity. Many support abstinence if that is the patient's desire, but routinely dispense condoms and contraceptives. Overall, providers did not give abstinence counseling as a rigid categorical concept in their preventive practices, but as a health tool to give agency to teenagers within a harm reduction framework. Their approach may be informative for adolescent policies and programs in the future.

  6. Malaria treatment perceptions, practices and influences on provider behaviour: comparing hospitals and non-hospitals in south-east Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dike Nkem

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People seek treatment for malaria from a wide range of providers ranging from itinerant drug sellers to hospitals. However, there are lots of problems with treatment provision. Hence, factors influencing treatment provision in hospitals and non-hospitals require further investigation in order to remedy the situation. Objectives To examine the knowledge, pattern of treatment provision and factors influencing the behaviour of hospitals and non-hospitals in the treatment of malaria, so as to identify loci for interventions to improve treatment of the disease. Methods A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 225 providers from hospitals and non-hospitals about their malaria treatment practices and factors that influence their provision of malaria treatment services in south-east Nigeria. The data from hospitals and other providers were compared for systematic differences. Results 73.5% of hospitals used microscopy to diagnose malaria and only 34.5.1% of non-hospitals did (p Conclusion There are many challenges to appropriate provision of malaria treatment services, although challenges are less in hospitals compared to other types of non-hospitals. Improving proper diagnosis of malaria and improving the knowledge of providers about malaria are interventions that could be used to improve malaria treatment provision.

  7. 76 FR 66135 - Investment Advice-Participants and Beneficiaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... Investment Advice; Participants and Beneficiaries; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No. 206... Administration 29 CFR Part 2550 RIN 1210-AB35 Investment Advice--Participants and Beneficiaries AGENCY: Employee... of 1986, relating to the provision of investment advice to participants and beneficiaries in...

  8. The speech act of advice in Setswana educational contexts | Dlali ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main purpose of this article is to examine the linguistic pragmatics of advice in Setswana. This article will attempt to present an account of the speech act of advice within the broad framework of Brown and Levinson's (1987) politeness theory and explore a range of features of advice in Setswana. The research ...

  9. 32 CFR 776.10 - Informal ethics advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Informal ethics advice. 776.10 Section 776.10... § 776.10 Informal ethics advice. (a) Advisors. Covered attorneys may seek informal ethics advice either... of Director, JA Division, HQMC; and (5) Head, Standards of Conduct/Government Ethics Branch...

  10. Current Practices in Home Management of Nasogastric Tube Placement in Pediatric Patients: A Survey of Parents and Homecare Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northington, LaDonna; Lyman, Beth; Guenter, Peggi; Irving, Sharon Y; Duesing, Lori

    Enteral feeding tubes are used in pediatric patients to deliver nutrition, fluids or medications. The literature related to short-term feeding tube (nasogastric [NG], hereafter known as NGT, or orogastric [OGT],) use in pediatric homecare patients is sparse. This descriptive study sought to gather baseline information about these children and how their feeding tubes are managed at home. Specifically, we sought to better understand how the tubes are placed and the method(s) used for tube placement verification. Two surveys were distributed: one to parents and one to homecare providers who have direct patient contact. Responses were obtained from 144 parents and 66 homecare providers. Over half of the children were 12months of age or younger and had a 6 Fr feeding tube. Over 75% (108) had an NGT for 1year or less. Predominantly parents replaced the NGT but a few children self-inserted their tubes. Feeding tube placement was verified by auscultation (44%) or measurement of gastric pH (25%) in the parent's survey. Twenty-six percent of parents indicated they had misplaced an NGT at least once and 35 parents described symptoms of pulmonary misplacement. The homecare provider data indicated auscultation (39%) and pH measurement of gastric contents (28%) to verify NG tube placement location. Study results confirms a need for consistency of practice among health care professionals and in parent education for those children who require NGTs at home. It is troubling that auscultation is still widely used for NGT location confirmation despite practice alerts that warn against its use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Variation in hepatitis B immunization coverage rates associated with provider practices after the temporary suspension of the birth dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullooly John P

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1999, the American Academy of Pediatrics and U.S. Public Health Service recommended suspending the birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine due to concerns about potential mercury exposure. A previous report found that overall national hepatitis B vaccination coverage rates decreased in association with the suspension. It is unknown whether this underimmunization occurred uniformly or was associated with how providers changed their practices for the timing of hepatitis B vaccine doses. We evaluate the impact of the birth dose suspension on underimmunization for the hepatitis B vaccine series among 24-month-olds in five large provider groups and describe provider practices potentially associated with underimmunization following the suspension. Methods Retrospective cohort study of children enrolled in five large provider groups in the United States (A-E. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between the birth dose suspension and a child's probability of being underimmunized at 24 months for the hepatitis B vaccine series. Results Prior to July 1999, the percent of children who received a hepatitis B vaccination at birth varied widely (3% to 90% across the five provider groups. After the national recommendation to suspend the hepatitis B birth dose, the percent of children who received a hepatitis B vaccination at birth decreased in all provider groups, and this trend persisted after the policy was reversed. The most substantial decreases were observed in the two provider groups that shifted the first hepatitis B dose from birth to 5–6 months of age. Accounting for temporal trend, children in these two provider groups were significantly more likely to be underimmunized for the hepatitis B series at 24 months of age if they were in the birth dose suspension cohort compared with baseline (Group D OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.7 – 4.4; Group E OR 3.1, 95% CI 2.3 – 4.2. This represented 6% more children in Group D and 9

  12. The implementation of ergonomics advice and the stage of change approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothmore, Paul; Aylward, Paul; Karnon, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the implementation of injury prevention advice tailored according to the Stage of Change (SOC) approach. The managers of 25 workgroups, drawn from medium to large companies across a wide range of occupational sectors were allocated to receive either standard ergonomics advice or ergonomics advice tailored according to the workgroup SOC. Twelve months after the advice was provided, semi-structured interviews were conducted with each manager. In a multivariate model, managers who had received tailored advice were found to have implemented significantly more of the recommended changes (IRR = 1.68, 95% CI 1.07-2.63) and more "additional" changes (IRR = 1.90, 95% CI 1.12-3.20). Qualitative analysis identified that the key barriers and facilitators to the implementation of changes were largely related to worker resistance to change and the attitudes of senior managers towards health and safety. The findings from this study suggest that the implementation of ergonomics recommendations may be improved by the tailoring of advice according to SOC principles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of public alcohol and tobacco use on general practitioners' advice: an international comparative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, L.; Boerma, W.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Saunders, J.B.; Zee, J. van der

    2002-01-01

    Background: Efficacy of advice for substance use is proven in general practice. Studies show high variability of perfomance. Especially intercountry variability has rarely been taken into account. Aim: To study the influence of public tobacco and alcohol use and health service characteristics on the

  14. Mothers’ Use of Social Media to Inform Their Practices for Pumping and Providing Pumped Human Milk to Their Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rei Yamada

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite U.S. mothers’ wide adoption of pumps and bottles to provide human milk (HM to their infants, mothers lack comprehensive, evidence-based guidelines for these practices. Thus, some women use online sources to seek information from each other. We aimed to characterize the information women sought online about pumping. We used data provided by ~25,000 women in an open cohort within a discussion forum about parenting. We examined 543 posts containing questions about providing pumped HM cross-sectionally and longitudinally in three time intervals: prenatal, 0 through 1.5 months postpartum, and 1.5 to 4.5 months postpartum. We used thematic analysis with Atlas.ti to analyze the content of posts. During pregnancy, women commonly asked questions about how and where to obtain pumps, both out-of-pocket and through insurance policies. Between 0–1.5 months postpartum, many mothers asked about how to handle pumped HM to ensure its safety as fed. Between 1.5–4.5 months postpartum, mothers sought strategies to overcome constraints to pumping both at home and at work and also asked about stopping pumping and providing their milk. Women’s questions related to ensuring the safety of pumped HM represent information women need from health professionals, while their questions related to obtaining pumps suggest that women may benefit from clearer guidelines from their insurance providers. The difficulties women face at home and at work identify avenues through which families and employers can support women to meet their goals for providing HM.

  15. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Regarding Epidemiology and Management of Travelers' Diarrhea: A Survey of Front-Line Providers in Iraq and Afghanistan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanders, John W

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between medical knowledge and clinical practice, a survey on travelers' diarrhea was administered to military health care providers attending a professional development...

  16. Advancing the application of systems thinking in health: advice seeking behavior among primary health care physicians in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Asmat U; Willis, Cameron D; Hamid, Saima; Ulikpan, Anar; Hill, Peter S

    2014-08-26

    Using measles and tuberculosis as case examples, with a systems thinking approach, this study examines the human advice-seeking behavior of primary health care (PHC) physicians in a rural district of Pakistan. This study analyzes the degree to which the existing PHC system supports their access to human advice, and explores in what ways this system might be strengthened to better meet provider needs. The study was conducted in a rural district of Pakistan and, with a cross-sectional study design, it employed a range of research methods, namely extensive document review for mapping existing information systems, social network analysis of physicians' advice-seeking practice, and key stakeholder interviews for an in-depth understanding of the experience of physicians. Illustrations were prepared for information flow mechanism, sociographs were generated for analyzing social networks, and content analysis of qualitative findings was carried out for in-depth interpretation of underlying meanings. The findings of this study reveal that non-availability of competent supervisory staff, a focus on improving performance indicators rather than clinical guidance, and a lack of a functional referral system have collectively created an environment in which PHC physicians have developed their own strategies to overcome these constraints. They are well aware of the human expertise available within and outside the district. However, their advice-seeking behavior was dependent upon existence of informal social interaction with the senior specialists. Despite the limitations of the system, the physicians proactively used their professional linkages to seek advice and also to refer patients to the referral center based on their experience and the facilities that they trusted. The absence of functional referral systems, limited effective linkages between PHC and higher levels of care, and a focus on programmatic targets rather than clinical care have each contributed to the isolation

  17. Preventing HIV transmission among Iranian prisoners: Initial support for providing education on the benefits of harm reduction practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshrati, Babak; Asl, Rahim Taghizadeh; Dell, Colleen Anne; Afshar, Parviz; Millson, Peggy Margaret E; Kamali, Mohammad; Weekes, John

    2008-01-01

    Background Harm reduction is a health-centred approach that seeks to reduce the health and social harms associated with high-risk behaviors, such as illicit drug use. The objective of this study is to determine the association between the beliefs of a group of adult, male prisoners in Iran about the transmission of HIV and their high-risk practices while in prison. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2004. The study population was a random selection of 100 men incarcerated at Rajaei-Shahr prison. The data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Focus group discussions were held at the prison to guide the design of the questionnaire. The relationship between components of the Health Belief Model (HBM) and prisoners' risky HIV-related behaviors was examined. Results Calculating Pearson's correlation coefficient, a significant, positive association was found between the benefit component of the HBM and prisoners not engaging in HIV high-risk behaviors. Conclusion Educational harm reduction initiatives that promote the effectiveness of strategies designed to reduce the risk of HIV transmission may decrease prisoners' high-risk behaviors. This finding provides initial support for the Iran prison system's current offering of HIV/AIDS harm reduction programming and suggests the need to offer increased education about the effectiveness of HIV prevention practices. PMID:18541032

  18. Preventing HIV transmission among Iranian prisoners: Initial support for providing education on the benefits of harm reduction practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millson Peggy

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Harm reduction is a health-centred approach that seeks to reduce the health and social harms associated with high-risk behaviors, such as illicit drug use. The objective of this study is to determine the association between the beliefs of a group of adult, male prisoners in Iran about the transmission of HIV and their high-risk practices while in prison. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2004. The study population was a random selection of 100 men incarcerated at Rajaei-Shahr prison. The data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Focus group discussions were held at the prison to guide the design of the questionnaire. The relationship between components of the Health Belief Model (HBM and prisoners' risky HIV-related behaviors was examined. Results Calculating Pearson's correlation coefficient, a significant, positive association was found between the benefit component of the HBM and prisoners not engaging in HIV high-risk behaviors. Conclusion Educational harm reduction initiatives that promote the effectiveness of strategies designed to reduce the risk of HIV transmission may decrease prisoners' high-risk behaviors. This finding provides initial support for the Iran prison system's current offering of HIV/AIDS harm reduction programming and suggests the need to offer increased education about the effectiveness of HIV prevention practices.

  19. Evaluation of the Metered-Dose Inhaler Technique among Health Care Providers Practicing in Hamadan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nadi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Poor inhaler technique is a common problem both in asthma patients and health care providers , which contributes to poor asthma control. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correctness of metered-dose inhaler (MDI technique in a sample of physicians , pharmacists and nurses practicing in Hamadan University hospitals. A total of 176 healthcare providers (35 internists and general physicians , 138 nurses and 3 pharmacists were participated voluntary in this study. After the participants answered a questionnaire aimed at identifying their involvement in MDI prescribing and counseling , a trained observer assessed their MDI technique using a checklist of ten steps.Of the 176 participants , 35(20% were physician , and 3 subjects (2% were pharmacists , and 138 (78% were nurses. However only 6 participants (3.4% performed all steps correctly. Physicians performed significantly better than non-physicians (8.6% vs. 2.13%.The majority of healthcare providers responsible for instructing patients on the correct MDI technique were unable to perform this technique correctly ‘indicating the need for regular formal training programmes on inhaler techniques.

  20. Code of Practice for Scientific Diving: Principles for the Safe Practice of Scientific Diving in Different Environments. Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science 53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, N. C., Ed.; Max, M. D., Ed.

    This publication has been prepared to provide scientific divers with guidance on safe practice under varying experimental and environmental conditions. The Code offers advice and recommendations on administrative practices, insurance, terms of employment, medical standards, training standards, dive planning, safety with different breathing gases…

  1. Combining QOF data with the care bundle approach may provide a more meaningful measure of quality in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Wet Carl

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant minority of patients do not receive all the evidence-based care recommended for their conditions. Health care quality may be improved by reducing this observed variation. Composite measures offer a different patient-centred perspective on quality and are utilized in acute hospitals via the ‘care bundle’ concept as indicators of the reliability of specific (evidence-based care delivery tasks and improved outcomes. A care bundle consists of a number of time-specific interventions that should be delivered to every patient every time. We aimed to apply the care bundle concept to selected QOF data to measure the quality of evidence-based care provision. Methods Care bundles and components were selected from QOF indicators according to defined criteria. Five clinical conditions were suitable for care bundles: Secondary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD, Stroke & Transient Ischaemic Attack (TIA, Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD and Diabetes Mellitus (DM. Each bundle has 3-8 components. A retrospective audit was undertaken in a convenience sample of nine general medical practices in the West of Scotland. Collected data included delivery (or not of individual bundle components to all patients included on specific disease registers. Practice level and overall compliance with bundles and components were calculated in SPSS and expressed as a percentage. Results Nine practices (64.3% with a combined patient population of 56,948 were able to provide data in the format requested. Overall compliance with developed QOF-based care bundles (composite measures was as follows: CHD 64.0%, range 35.0-71.9%; Stroke/TIA 74.1%, range 51.6-82.8%; CKD 69.0%, range 64.0-81.4%; and COPD 82.0%, range 47.9-95.8%; and DM 58.4%, range 50.3-65.2%. Conclusions In this small study compliance with individual QOF-based care bundle components was high, but overall (‘all or nothing’ compliance was

  2. Using plant clinic registers to assess the quality of diagnoses and advice given to farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Solveig; Boa, Eric; Mafabi, Moses

    2012-01-01

    validated diagnoses. The majority of recommendations (82%) were assessed ‘partially effective’. ‘Best practice’ was recommended for 10% and ineffective advice was given in 8% of the cases with considerable variation between diseases. Practical implications: Plant doctors need more training in symptom...... clinic registers have been used to systematically assess quality of plant clinic services. Apart from being a valuable tool for quality assessment of extension, the plant clinic registers constitute a novel source of regular information about pests, diseases and farmer demand that can help improve......Purpose: This study developed a framework for quality assessment of diagnoses and advice given at plant clinics. Design/methodology/approach: Clinic registers from five plant clinics in Uganda (2006-2010) were used to develop quality assessment protocols for diagnoses and advice given by plant...

  3. Knowledge, Attitudes, Practices and Beliefs about Medical Male Circumcision (MMC) among a Sample of Health Care Providers in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dévieux, Jessy G; Saxena, Anshul; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Klausner, Jeffrey D; Jean-Gilles, Michèle; Madhivanan, Purnima; Gaston, Stéphanie; Rubens, Muni; Theodore, Harry; Deschamps, Marie-Marcelle; Koenig, Serena P; Pape, Jean William

    2015-01-01

    Haiti has the highest number of people living with HIV infection in the Caribbean/Latin America region. Medical male circumcision (MMC) has been recommended to help prevent the spread of HIV. We sought to assess knowledge, attitudes, practices and beliefs about MMC among a sample of health care providers in Haiti. A convenience sample of 153 health care providers at the GHESKIO Centers in Haiti responded to an exploratory survey that collected information on several topics relevant to health providers about MMC. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the responses and multivariable logistic regression was conducted to determine opinions of health care providers about the best age to perform MMC on males. Bayesian network analysis and sensitivity analysis were done to identify the minimum level of change required to increase the acceptability of performing MMC at age less than 1 year. The sample consisted of medical doctors (31.0%), nurses (49.0%), and other health care professionals (20.0%). Approximately 76% showed willingness to offer MMC services if they received training. Seventy-six percent believed that their male patients would accept circumcision, and 59% believed infancy was the best age for MMC. More than 90% of participants said that MMC would reduce STIs. Physicians and nurses who were willing to offer MMC if provided with adequate training were 2.5 (1.15-5.71) times as likely to choose the best age to perform MMC as less than one year. Finally, if the joint probability of choosing "the best age to perform MMC" as one year or older and having the mistaken belief that "MMC prevents HIV entirely" is reduced by 63% then the probability of finding that performing MMC at less than one year acceptable to health care providers is increased by 35%. Participants demonstrated high levels of knowledge and positive attitudes towards MMC. Although this study suggests that circumcision is acceptable among certain health providers in Haiti, studies with larger and

  4. Anticipatory guidance and early child development: pediatrician advice, parent behaviors, and unmet needs as reported by parents from different backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs-Orme, Terri; Holden Nixon, Barbara; Herrod, Henry G

    2011-08-01

    Anticipatory guidance is acknowledged as an important aspect of pediatric practice, and research shows that parents expect and value the information and advice they receive from their pediatric health care providers. This study surveyed 373 parents (88% mothers) of infants in waiting rooms of diverse pediatric practices in Memphis,Tennessee, about their recall of anticipatory guidance received, unmet needs for anticipatory guidance, preferences for sources of information, and activities to promote healthy development. Most parents recalled specific guidance received (diet, communication, and discipline being the most common), and unmet needs (discipline and development being among the most common). Disadvantaged parents reported the fewest unmet needs. Most parents readily named specific activities they engage in to promote development, including reading, educational toys, and nurturing.

  5. The importance of nutrition, diet and lifestyle advice for cancer survivors - the role of nursing staff and interprofessional workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jane L; Girot, Elizabeth A

    2013-06-01

    To examine current guidelines and the evidence base to illustrate the importance of nutrition, diet and lifestyle advice to support people who have survived cancer and help them integrate back into normal life, improve their quality of life and potentially improve their chance of long-term survival. Cancer survivors need to know about nutrition and other lifestyle behaviour changes to help them recover and potentially reduce the risk of the same cancer recurring or a new cancer developing. From this perspective, frontline registered nurses are in a prime position to support cancer survivors who are in their care. Discursive paper. On the basis of the international research evidence and a critical analysis of recent policy and practice literature, themes emerged, which illustrate the importance of nutrition, diet and lifestyle advice for cancer survivors. This paper discusses the need for more focused education and greater interprofessional working for quality care delivery. New professional guidance for emerging frontline nurses indicates they should be able to provide appropriate and more consistent advice on nutritional issues, physical activity and weight management, although more research is needed to understand the right mode of nutrition training. Additionally, interprofessional working needs improving as well as encouraging cancer survivors to respond. High-quality nutrition education and training is required for nurses working across both the acute and primary care sectors. They require this to effectively monitor and advise patients and to know when, where and from whom they can access more specialist help. Interprofessional collaborative working across multi-centre settings (National Health Service and non-National Health Service) is key to provide the best effective care and support for cancer survivors. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Unrealistic optimism in advice taking: A computational account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Yuan Chang; Zaki, Jamil

    2018-02-01

    Expert advisors often make surprisingly inaccurate predictions about the future, yet people heed their suggestions nonetheless. Here we provide a novel, computational account of this unrealistic optimism in advice taking. Across 3 studies, participants observed as advisors predicted the performance of a stock. Advisors varied in their accuracy, performing reliably above, at, or below chance. Despite repeated feedback, participants exhibited inflated perceptions of advisors' accuracy, and reliably "bet" on advisors' predictions more than their performance warranted. Participants' decisions tightly tracked a computational model that makes 2 assumptions: (a) people hold optimistic initial expectations about advisors, and (b) people preferentially incorporate information that adheres to their expectations when learning about advisors. Consistent with model predictions, explicitly manipulating participants' initial expectations altered their optimism bias and subsequent advice-taking. With well-calibrated initial expectations, participants no longer exhibited an optimism bias. We then explored crowdsourced ratings as a strategy to curb unrealistic optimism in advisors. Star ratings for each advisor were collected from an initial group of participants, which were then shown to a second group of participants. Instead of calibrating expectations, these ratings propagated and exaggerated the unrealistic optimism. Our results provide a computational account of the cognitive processes underlying inflated perceptions of expertise, and explore the boundary conditions under which they occur. We discuss the adaptive value of this optimism bias, and how our account can be extended to explain unrealistic optimism in other domains. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Spiritual care competence for contemporary nursing practice: A quantitative exploration of the guidance provided by fundamental nursing textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Fiona; Neill, Freda; Murphy, Maryanne; Begley, Thelma; Sheaf, Greg

    2015-11-01

    Spirituality is receiving unprecedented attention in the nursing literature. Both the volume and scope of literature on the topic is expanding, and it is clear that this topic is of interest to nurses. There is consensus that the spiritual required by clients receiving health ought to be an integrated effort across the health care team. Although undergraduate nurses receive some education on the topic, this is ad hoc and inconsistent across universities. Textbooks are clearly a key resource in this area however the extent to which they form a comprehensive guide for nursing students and nurses is unclear. This study provides a hitherto unperformed analysis of core nursing textbooks to ascertain spirituality related content. 543 books were examined and this provides a range of useful information about inclusions and omissions in this field. Findings revealed that spirituality is not strongly portrayed as a component of holistic care and specific direction for the provision of spiritual care is lacking. Fundamental textbooks used by nurses and nursing students ought to inform and guide integrated spiritual care and reflect a more holistic approach to nursing care. The religious and/or spiritual needs of an increasingly diverse community need to be taken seriously within scholarly texts so that this commitment to individual clients' needs can be mirrored in practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The practice of commissioning healthcare from a private provider: learning from an in-depth case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Naomi; Sheaff, Rod; Mahon, Ann; Byng, Richard; Mannion, Russell; Charles, Nigel; Exworthy, Mark; Llewellyn, Sue

    2013-01-01

    The direction of health service policy in England is for more diversification in the design, commissioning and provision of health care services. The case study which is the subject of this paper was selected specifically because of the partnering with a private sector organisation to manage whole system redesign of primary care and to support the commissioning of services for people with long term conditions at risk of unplanned hospital admissions and associated service provision activities. The case study forms part of a larger Department of Health funded project on the practice of commissioning which aims to find the best means of achieving a balance between monitoring and control on the one hand, and flexibility and innovation on the other, and to find out what modes of commissioning are most effective in different circumstances and for different services. A single case study method was adopted to explore multiple perspectives of the complexities and uniqueness of a public-private partnership referred to as the "Livewell project". 10 single depth interviews were carried out with key informants across the GP practices, the PCT and the private provider involved in the initiative. The main themes arising from single depth interviews with the case study participants include a particular understanding about the concept of commissioning in the context of primary care, ambitions for primary care redesign, the importance of key roles and strong relationships, issues around the adoption and spread of innovation, and the impact of the current changes to commissioning arrangements. The findings identified a close and high trust relationship between GPs (the commissioners) and the private commissioning support and provider firm. The antecedents to the contract for the project being signed indicated the importance of leveraging external contacts and influence (resource dependency theory). The study has surfaced issues around innovation adoption in the healthcare context

  9. Sport participation and Ramadan observance: Advice for the athlete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy J. Shephard

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A growing number of Muslim athletes now engage in international competition. This raises the question of the advice they should be given if a major event occurs during the month of Ramadan. Methods: A narrative review has been based upon books and extensive reviews completed by the author and other investigators. Results: Practical considerations hamper assessment of the effects of Ramadan upon physical performance, but there seem small decreases in muscular strength and both anaerobic and aerobic capacity.  Nevertheless, athletes who wish to observe Ramadan can reduce such effects by prior adjustment of diet and training plans, minimizing sleep loss, and careful management of fluid and food intake during the period of intermittent fasting. Conclusion: Competitors in most events can observe Ramadan with a small loss of athletic performance. However, intermittent fasting can endanger health for individuals with type I diabetes mellitus, and for participants in ultra-endurance events (particularly under hot conditions.

  10. Dietary advice for muscularity, leanness and weight control in Men's Health magazine: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Toni M; Russell, Jean M; Barker, Margo E

    2014-10-11

    fat-burning, good fats and consumption of single foods, with relatively little mention of dietary restriction. Despite the widespread use of scientific information to endorse dietary advice, the content, format and scientific basis of dietary content of MH leaves much to be desired. The dietary advice as provided may not be conducive to public health.

  11. Data governance for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronis, Katerina; Moysey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Data governance is characterised from broader definitions of governance. These characteristics are then mapped to a framework that provides a practical representation of the concepts. This representation is further developed with operating models and roles. Several information related scenarios covering both clinical and non-clinical domains are considered in information terms and then related back to the data governance framework. This assists the reader in understanding how data governance would help address the issues or achieve a better outcome. These elements together enable the reader to gain an understanding of the data governance framework and how it applies in practice. Finally, some practical advice is offered for establishing and operating data governance as well as approaches for justifying the investment.

  12. Consumers’ intention to use health recommendation systems to receive personalized nutrition advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Sophisticated recommendation systems are used more and more in the health sector to assist consumers in healthy decision making. In this study we investigate consumers' evaluation of hypothetical health recommendation systems that provide personalized nutrition advice. We examine consumers' intention to use such a health recommendation system as a function of options related to the underlying system (e.g. the type of company that generates the advice) as well as intermediaries (e.g. general practitioner) that might assist in using the system. We further explore if the effect of both the system and intermediaries on intention to use a health recommendation system are mediated by consumers' perceived effort, privacy risk, usefulness and enjoyment. Methods 204 respondents from a consumer panel in the Netherlands participated. The data were collected by means of a questionnaire. Each respondent evaluated three hypothetical health recommendation systems on validated multi-scale measures of effort, privacy risk, usefulness, enjoyment and intention to use the system. To test the hypothesized relationships we used regression analyses. Results We find evidence that the options related to the underlying system as well as the intermediaries involved influence consumers' intention to use such a health recommendation system and that these effects are mediated by perceptions of effort, privacy risk, usefulness and enjoyment. Also, we find that consumers value usefulness of a system more and enjoyment less when a general practitioner advices them to use a health recommendation system than if they use it out of their own curiosity. Conclusions We developed and tested a model of consumers' intention to use a health recommendation system. We found that intermediaries play an important role in how consumers evaluate such a system over and above options of the underlying system that is used to generate the recommendation. Also, health-related information services seem to

  13. Consumers' intention to use health recommendation systems to receive personalized nutrition advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Sonja; Dellaert, Benedict G C; Ronteltap, Amber; van Trijp, Hans C M

    2013-04-04

    Sophisticated recommendation systems are used more and more in the health sector to assist consumers in healthy decision making. In this study we investigate consumers' evaluation of hypothetical health recommendation systems that provide personalized nutrition advice. We examine consumers' intention to use such a health recommendation system as a function of options related to the underlying system (e.g. the type of company that generates the advice) as well as intermediaries (e.g. general practitioner) that might assist in using the system. We further explore if the effect of both the system and intermediaries on intention to use a health recommendation system are mediated by consumers' perceived effort, privacy risk, usefulness and enjoyment. 204 respondents from a consumer panel in the Netherlands participated. The data were collected by means of a questionnaire. Each respondent evaluated three hypothetical health recommendation systems on validated multi-scale measures of effort, privacy risk, usefulness, enjoyment and intention to use the system. To test the hypothesized relationships we used regression analyses. We find evidence that the options related to the underlying system as well as the intermediaries involved influence consumers' intention to use such a health recommendation system and that these effects are mediated by perceptions of effort, privacy risk, usefulness and enjoyment. Also, we find that consumers value usefulness of a system more and enjoyment less when a general practitioner advices them to use a health recommendation system than if they use it out of their own curiosity. We developed and tested a model of consumers' intention to use a health recommendation system. We found that intermediaries play an important role in how consumers evaluate such a system over and above options of the underlying system that is used to generate the recommendation. Also, health-related information services seem to rely on endorsement by the medical sector

  14. Let Me Give You a Piece of Advice: Empirical Papers about Advice Taking in Marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Tzioti (Stefanie)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractUsing advice in decision making is widespread for all sorts of important personal and professional decisions. Yet, traditional research on individual decision making has failed to systematically study the impact that social interactions about a decision problem can have on the decision

  15. European practices of providing of efficiency of self-organizations institutions of population in the context of public services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Serohina

    2017-06-01

    level of financing carried out by persons with appropriate competence and qualifications. The example of Portugal discloses the status of self-organization institutions as public benefit organizations, which provides them of advantages, particularly in competition with private sector organizations. However, in the light of practical implementation of the principle of subsidiarity and other elements of decentralization is appropriate to introduce European experience in the domestic soil in the context of attracting self-organization institutions in the scope of public services delivery. The results of the study formulated the main components of a mechanism to ensure effectiveness of the self-organizations institutions in the provision of public services: subsidies of statutory activities; delegation of services; regulatory support; recognition of the status of self-organization institutions as public benefit organizations; limitation of agreements terms.

  16. Providing reviews of evidence to COPD patients: qualitative study of barriers and facilitating factors to patient-mediated practice change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Melanie; Wildgoose, Deborah; Veale, Antony J; Smith, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to identify barriers and facilitating factors to people with COPD performing the following actions: (a) reading a manual that contained summaries of evidence on treatments used in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and (b) at a medical consultation, asking questions that were provided in the manual and were designed to prompt doctors to review current treatments in the light of evidence. The manual was developed using current best practice and was designed to facilitate reading and discussion with doctors. In-depth interviews were held with patients who had received the manual. Of 125 intervention participants from a controlled clinical trial of the manual, 16 were interviewed in their homes in and around Adelaide, South Australia. Plain language writing and a simple layout facilitated reading of the manual by participants. Where the content matched the interests of participants this also facilitated reading. On the other hand, some participants showed limited interest in the evidence summaries. Participant comments indicated that they did not see it as possible or acceptable for patients to master research evidence or initiate discussions of evidence with doctors. These appeared to be the main barriers to effectiveness of the manual. If evidence summaries for patients are to be used in disease management, they should be understandable and relevant to patients and provide a basis for discussion between patients and doctors. Work is now needed so that we can both present evidence summaries in a way that is relevant to patients and reduce the barriers to patient-initiated discussions of evidence.

  17. Enhancing pediatric workforce diversity and providing culturally effective pediatric care: implications for practice, education, and policy making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    This policy statement serves to combine and update 2 previously independent but overlapping statements from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) on culturally effective health care (CEHC) and workforce diversity. The AAP has long recognized that with the ever-increasing diversity of the pediatric population in the United States, the health of all children depends on the ability of all pediatricians to practice culturally effective care. CEHC can be defined as the delivery of care within the context of appropriate physician knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of all cultural distinctions, leading to optimal health outcomes. The AAP believes that CEHC is a critical social value and that the knowledge and skills necessary for providing CEHC can be taught and acquired through focused curricula across the spectrum of lifelong learning. This statement also addresses workforce diversity, health disparities, and affirmative action. The discussion of diversity is broadened to include not only race, ethnicity, and language but also cultural attributes such as gender, religious beliefs, sexual orientation, and disability, which may affect the quality of health care. The AAP believes that efforts must be supported through health policy and advocacy initiatives to promote the delivery of CEHC and to overcome educational, organizational, and other barriers to improving workforce diversity.

  18. Practical Advice for Teachers and Coaches: Handling Acute Athletic Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kevin; Ormond, Tom; Griffin, Lisa; Maina, Michael; Jones, Christopher; Goldman, Alexander Steven; McMichael, Callaway

    2016-01-01

    Safety concerns are among the first considerations in the design and implementation of any curriculum. However, in the dynamic worlds of physical education and coaching, athletic injuries will inevitably arise, regardless of the proactive strategies in place. These situations will vary in nature, and the student's or athlete's risk of further…

  19. Nutrition myths and healthy dietary advice in clinical practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lesser, Lenard I; Mazza, Mary Carol; Lucan, Sean C

    2015-01-01

    Healthy dietary intake is important for the maintenance of general health and wellness, the prevention of chronic illness, the optimization of life expectancy, and the clinical management of virtually all disease states. Dietary myths (i.e...

  20. Vegan diets: practical advice for athletes and exercisers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David Rogerson

    2017-01-01

    .... While little data could be found in the sports nutrition literature specifically, it was revealed elsewhere that veganism creates challenges that need to be accounted for when designing a nutritious diet...

  1. [The role of science in policy making--EuSANH-ISA project, framework for science advice for health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianciara, Dorota; Piotrowicz, Maria; Bielska-Lasota, Magdalena; Wysocki, Mirosław J

    2012-01-01

    Governments and other authorities (including MPs) should be well informed on issues of science and technology. This is particularly important in the era of evidence-based practice. This implies the need to get expert advice. The process by which scientific knowledge is transmitted, along with proposals how to solve the problem, is called science advice. The main aim of the article is to discuss the issue of science advice--definitions, interaction between science and policymaking, and its position in contemporary policies. The second aim is to present European Science Advisory Network for Health (EuSANH), EuSANH-ISA project, and framework for science advice for health which was developed by participants. Furthermore, the role of civil society in decision-making process and science advice is also discussed. Interaction between scientists and policy-makers are described in terms of science-push approach (technocratic model), policy-pull (decisionistic) and simultaneous push-pull approach (pragmatic). The position of science advice is described in historical perspective from the 50s, especially in the last two decades. Description relies to USA, Canada and UK. Principles of scientific advice to government (Government Office for Science, UK) are quoted. Some important documents related to science advice in EU and UN are mentioned. EuSANH network is described as well as EuSANH-ISA project, with its objectives and outcomes. According to findings of this project, the process of science advice for health should follow some steps: framing the issue to be covered; planning entire process leading to the conclusion; drafting the report; reviewing the report and revision; publishing report and assessing the impact on policy.

  2. The Financial Coaching Advice Model: An Exploration into how it Satisfies Expectations of Quality Advice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Knutsen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available For 20 years, the financial planning sector in Australia has been transitioning from a sales-orientated force to aprofession of qualified and skilled practitioners. Today, the potential for professional financial planning adviceto benefit Australians financially, economically and psychologically is recognised by government. Financially,these benefits include increased savings, less interest expense through faster debt reduction, higher investmentreturns and appropriate levels of insurance. Economically, a more financially literate society has the potentialfor less reliance on an already burdened social security system. Psychologically, the benefits include the peaceof mind that comes from an individual being confident in financial matters. However, despite this level ofrecognition and development, national surveys have reported that only a small percentage of the populationactually seek professional financial advice. The factors attributing to these low percentages included the gapsin financial literacy limiting an individual’s engagement in financial matters and consumer’s current mistrust ofthe financial advice business models that remain dominated by commission-driven product sales. Thesedeficiencies have led some financial planning firms to break from financial product sales as the primary advicemodel and focus on financial coaching. Exploratory interviews with the practitioners and clients of a selectedfinancial planning firm have generated insightful discussion into how a financial coaching advice model isachieving the financial, economic and psychological benefits recognised by government as the potentialoutcomes of professional financial advice. The aim of this paper is to present the findings from that discussionand demonstrate the opportunities embedded within a financial coaching advice model. It is argued that thisdiscussion offers a foundation for future research direction in an area currently under researched in

  3. Maternal perceptions of advice on sleep in young children: How, what, and when?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Rosalind E M; Gardani, Maria

    2018-02-27

    Parental knowledge on sleep hygiene in children may be a contributing factor for sleep difficulties in preschoolers. As sleep is crucial for healthy development, it is important to understand how parental knowledge can be improved. The aim of this qualitative study was to develop an understanding of advice available in the United Kingdom (UK) on sleep in young children. This study employed constructivist grounded theory methodology. Participants were recruited via social media and a previously constructed participant database. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analysed. Fourteen mothers were interviewed independently, whilst one mother was interviewed together with her husband. Themes relating to how UK mothers wish advice on sleep to be formulated, what they believe it should include and when they would like to receive it, were identified from the data. Specifically, this study suggests that UK mothers value experience and thus recommends that advice be made through collaboration projects involving both professionals and parents. It also suggests that advice should be readily available and given to expecting parents prior to the arrival of their baby as well as at regular follow-ups. In addition, the participating mothers wanted advice to be balanced and non-judgemental. This study looks at the views of mainly White British mothers currently residing within the United Kingdom. Thus, it may not represent the views of everyone in the United Kingdom. Nevertheless, it still makes important recommendations for practice. For example, relationships between health professionals and parents need to be improved and information on different sleeping practices widely dispersed. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Poor sleep is common in young children. Young children's sleep quality can be affected by parental behaviours. Parents lack knowledge of sleep in young children. What does this study add? According to this study: It would

  4. Health care provider management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: analysis of trends in attitudes and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Chad; Glauser, Terry Ann; Burton, B Stephen; Schneider, Doron; Dubois, Anne Marie; Patel, Daxa

    2014-05-01

    To identify attitudes and practices of endocrinologists (ENDOs), family practitioners (FPs), internists (IMs), primary care nurse practitioners (NPs), physician assistants (PAs), certified diabetes educators (CDEs), retail pharmacists (R-PHs), and hospital pharmacists (H-PHs) with respect to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) management; to compare current study data with results from a similar 2011 study. A nominal group technique focus group identified barriers to optimal management of patients with T2DM. Five case-vignette surveys were created, 1 for each group of health care professionals (HCPs): ENDOs; FPs and IMs; NPs and PAs; CDEs; and R-PHs and H-PHs. Surveys were tailored to each group. Versions were as similar as possible to each other and to the 2011 surveys to facilitate comparisons. Questions assessed guideline familiarity; knowledge of insulin formulations, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors; patterns of referral to ENDOs and CDEs; as well as cultural barriers and communication barriers. Surveys were distributed by e-mail/fax to a nationally representative, random sample of US HCPs during January and February 2013. Notable shifts from 2011 included NPs' increased familiarity with American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines; FPs, IMs, NPs, and PAs continued comfort with prescribing long-acting basal insulin but less with basal-bolus, Neutral Protamine Hagedorn insulin alone, or human premixed insulin; increased pharmacists' comfort in discussing long-acting basal insulin; increased likelihood that FPs will refer patients with recurrent hypoglycemia unable to achieve target glycated hemoglobin level to an ENDO; and continued incorporation of insulin and incretins into treatment regimens. The trends suggest gaps in perception, knowledge, and management practices to be addressed by education. Most HCPs lack confidence in using insulin regimens more complex than long-acting insulin alone. All

  5. Lifestyle advice provision to teenage and young adult cancer patients: the perspective of health professionals in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Gemma; Hough, Rachael; Gravestock, Helen; Williams, Kate; Fisher, Abigail

    2017-12-01

    Health professionals are an important source of information for teenage and young adult (TYA) cancer patients. However, little is known about health professionals' provision of lifestyle advice to young people with cancer who are in their care. An online survey was distributed to health professionals within the UK who identified themselves as working with TYA cancer patients. Health professional awareness of lifestyle guidance, provision of lifestyle advice to young people and views on lifestyle information format and delivery were explored. Ninety-five health professionals (44% nurses; 28% allied health professionals; 17% physicians) completed the survey. The majority (72%) of respondents were aware of some lifestyle guidance for cancer patients. However, less than half of TYA health professionals (46%) were able to successfully recall the source of the guidelines and less than a third reported proving specific advice to the majority of their patients on weight management, smoking, alcohol consumption and sun safety. Many health professionals (38%) felt that they were not the right person to provide advice and cited lack of resources as a key barrier to advice provision. The majority (95%) reported being interested in a resource containing relevant lifestyle information that could be given to young people with cancer. TYA health professionals' awareness of lifestyle guidance and provision of advice regarding health behaviour is sub-optimal. Clear and comprehensive guidance written specifically for TYA health professionals could overcome the reported barriers and improve professionals' confidence in addressing and providing advice on lifestyle to young people with cancer.

  6. Discharge against medical advice in a pediatric emergency center in the State of Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Abdulateef

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze cases that had left the Pediatric Emergency Center Al Sadd, Doha (PEC against medical advice, with the aim of developing policies to help reduce this occurrence. Methodology: All patients that were admitted to the main PEC observation room for treatment and/or investigation and subsequently left against medical advice from February 18, 2007 to June 18, 2007, were followed by a phone call, and a questionnaire, which was completed by the departmental patient representative. Results: 99,133 patients attended the facility during the study period. Of those, 106 left the facility against medical advice. Ninety-four guardians were successfully contacted. 90% of the cases were in children below 2 years of age. In 87% of the cases the mother was the main decision maker for leaving against medical advice. Domestic obligations were the leading cause of DAMA (discharge against medical advice, reported in 45% of the cases. Respondents reported that the consequences of DAMA were well explained by medical staff before they left the facility however, they had not met with the departmental patient representative during their stay. Conclusion:As the majority of DAMA cases occurred in infants, medical staff should address the concerns of this group early on in the course of treatment. Maintaining communication and providing support, in particular for mothers of higher risk groups may help to reduce the rate of DAMA cases.

  7. Friends with Benefits, but without the Sex: Straight Women and Gay Men Exchange Trustworthy Mating Advice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Russell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although research has made progress in elucidating the benefits exchanged within same- and opposite-sex friendships formed between heterosexual men and women, it is less clear why straight women and gay men form close relationships with one another. The current experiments begin to address this question by exploring a potential benefit hypothesized to be uniquely available to straight women and gay men in the context of these friendships: trustworthy mating advice. Experiment 1 revealed that straight women perceive mating-relevant advice from a gay man to be more trustworthy than similar advice offered by a straight man or woman. Experiment 2 demonstrated that gay men perceive mating advice offered by a straight woman to be more trustworthy than advice offered by a lesbian woman or another gay man. Overall, the results provide initial experimental evidence that relationships between gay men and straight women may be characterized by a mutual exchange of mating-relevant benefits in the absence of sexual interest or competition.

  8. Friends with benefits, but without the sex: straight women and gay men exchange trustworthy mating advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Eric M; DelPriore, Danielle J; Butterfield, Max E; Hill, Sarah E

    2013-02-09

    Although research has made progress in elucidating the benefits exchanged within same- and opposite-sex friendships formed between heterosexual men and women, it is less clear why straight women and gay men form close relationships with one another. The current experiments begin to address this question by exploring a potential benefit hypothesized to be uniquely available to straight women and gay men in the context of these friendships: trustworthy mating advice. Experiment 1 revealed that straight women perceive mating-relevant advice from a gay man to be more trustworthy than similar advice offered by a straight man or woman. Experiment 2 demonstrated that gay men perceive mating advice offered by a straight woman to be more trustworthy than advice offered by a lesbian woman or another gay man. Overall, the results provide initial experimental evidence that relationships between gay men and straight women may be characterized by a mutual exchange of mating-relevant benefits in the absence of sexual interest or competition.

  9. Advice from working women with retired partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Eileen L; Adorno, Gail

    2016-01-01

    in the 21st century, as more women are employed full-time and couples increasingly share egalitarian values, more women continue employment after their partners have voluntarily retired. However, we know very little about the experiences of this growing population of women. We asked working women with retired partners to share their advice for other women who may face this developmental transition. Open-ended responses from 97 women were analyzed to identify pertinent issues and themes. Four primary content areas were identified: time management, division of household labor, financial planning, and communication. Communication between partners was both a topic of concern as well as the solution suggested to resolve conflicts or differences that may arise when women live with a retired partner. It is expected that future changes in the workforce and improvements in the gender balance within relationships will continue to impact experiences for working women with retired partners.

  10. The effects of civility on advice, leadership, and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porath, Christine L; Gerbasi, Alexandra; Schorch, Sebastian L

    2015-09-01

    Workplace incivility is rampant and on the rise-with costs to individuals and organizations. Despite the increased need for civility, little is known about potential individual benefits of civility, defined as behavior involving politeness and regard for others in the workplace, within workplace norms for respect (Andersson & Pearson, 1999). Recent research has suggested that being civil may be hazardous to influence, power, and income (see Forni, 2002; Judge et al., 2012).Yet, throughout history, civil behavior has been extolled because it paid dividends to the person who behaved well. The focus of this research is whether that holds true in organizations. Using social exchange theory, we developed hypotheses about how civility benefits people, and investigated this in 2 studies. First, in a 2-wave social network study of a research and development department (n = 31) of a biotechnology firm, we found that people who perceived a colleague as civil would be more likely to seek that person out for work advice and to see that person as a leader. The more the individual was perceived as civil by others in his or her network, the better his or her performance. Being sought out for work advice and being viewed as a leader mediated this effect. In the second experiment (n = 162), we extended our understanding of what drove these benefits. We found that people who are civil were perceived as warm and competent, and these positive perceptions, in turn, helped to explain the benefits garnered. We discuss theoretical and practical implications. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Trafficking and Trauma: Insight and Advice for the Healthcare System From Sex-trafficked Women Incarcerated on Rikers Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Anita; Pfeiffer, Megan R; Rosner, Zachary; Shea, Judy A

    2017-12-01

    Sex-trafficked persons experience significant trauma while exploited, resulting in complex health issues and barriers to health care. Incorporating survivor perspectives is critical in optimizing health care delivery for this population. We interviewed sex-trafficking survivors regarding their experiences with trauma while being trafficked and elicited advice about health care delivery. Qualitative interviews were conducted in New York City's Rikers Island jail from July to September 2015. In total, 21 English-speaking women who had experienced sex trafficking were the subjects of the study. Interview domains included: interpersonal violence, behavioral health, and health care delivery advice. Interviewees described experiencing severe and chronic trauma perpetrated by traffickers and sex buyers. Substance use was the primary method of coping with trauma. With regard to mental health, interviewees noted diagnoses of depression, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder, low self-esteem, and challenges in intimate relationships. Health care delivery themes included approaches to discussing trafficking in health care settings, concerns regarding sexual assault examinations, and suggestions for improving direct-services and prevention programming. With this perspective into the complex intersection of trauma and behavioral health that sex-trafficked women can experience, health care providers can better understand the context and recommendations regarding trauma-informed care practices for this population. Our results also offer several avenues for future studies with regard to discussing trafficking in clinical settings and an opportunity for stakeholders to incorporate survivor-based input to improve health care for this population.

  12. Preparing MSW Students to Provide Integrated Behavioral Health Services in Rural Communities: The Importance of Relationships in Knowledge Building and Practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carrie W Rishel; Helen P Hartnett; Brandi L Davis

    2016-01-01

    .... This shift prompts the need for providers who understand the interrelationship among physical and behavioral health and who are prepared to practice in an interprofessional and team-based approach...

  13. Development and usability of a computer-tailored pedometer-based physical activity advice for breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cocker, K; Charlier, C; Van Hoof, E; Pauwels, E; Lechner, L; Bourgois, J; Spittaels, H; Vandelanotte, C; De Bourdeaudhuij, I

    2015-09-01

    This observational study aimed to adapt a computer-tailored step advice for the general population into a feasible advice for breast cancer survivors and to test its usability. First, several adaptations were made to the original design (adding cancer-related physical activity (PA) barriers and beliefs, and self-management strategies to improve survivors' personal control). Second, the adapted advice was evaluated in two phases: (1) a usability testing in healthy women (n = 3) and survivors (n = 6); and (2) a process evaluation during 3 weeks in breast cancer survivors (n = 8). Preliminary usability testing revealed no problems during logging-in; however, three survivors misinterpreted some questions. After refining the questionnaire and advice, survivors evaluated the advice as interesting, attractive to read, comprehensible and credible. Inactive survivors found the advice novel, but too long. The process evaluation indicated that the majority of the women (n = 5/8) reported increased steps. Monitoring step counts by using a pedometer was perceived as an important motivator to be more active. To conclude, this study provides initial support for the usability and acceptability of a computer-tailored pedometer-based PA advice for breast cancer survivors. After testing efficacy and effectiveness of this intervention, this tool can broaden the reach of PA promotion in breast cancer survivors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Response Scales in Voting Advice Applications: Do Different Designs Produce Different Outcomes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosema, Martin; Louwerse, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Voting Advice Applications (VAAs) represent popular election campaign tools in many countries, enabling voters to discover which party or candidate provides the best match with their political preferences. This article examines the effects of design choices on these tools by focusing on the response

  15. Leadership Indian Style: A Comparison of Kautilya's Advice with Akbar's Experience. Draft Copy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roupp, Heidi

    To provide a learning unit on leadership, religious tolerance, and social customs, this paper used a 16th century Mogul Indian prince's life to promote discussion on these topics. The story of Akbar's life included his early years, education, and leadership ability, and advice from Kautilya, a fourth century Indian statesman, was interspersed…

  16. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, G.; Heemink, A.; Lu, S.; Segers, A.; Weber, K.; Lin, H.X.

    2016-01-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain,

  17. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: Reviewing Current Best Practice to Provide High-Quality Extracorporeal Therapy to Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Michael J; Karakala, Nithin

    2017-07-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) use continues to expand globally. Despite improving technology, CRRT remains a complex intervention. Delivery of high-quality CRRT requires close collaboration of a multidisciplinary team including members of the critical care medicine, nephrology, nursing, pharmacy, and nutrition support teams. While significant gaps in medical evidence regarding CRRT persist, the growing evidence base supports evolving best practice and consensus to define high-quality CRRT. Unfortunately, there is wide variability in CRRT operating characteristics and limited uptake of these best practices. This article will briefly review the current best practice on important aspects of CRRT delivery including CRRT dose, anticoagulation, dialysis vascular access, fluid management, and drug dosing in CRRT. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. "Relinquish the reins": persuasion and consensus in the discourse of pregnancy and childbirth advice literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Ornaith

    2015-03-01

    Popular pregnancy and childbirth advice books constitute an important source of information for pregnant women. These texts shape women's perceptions of pregnancy, childbirth and the medical care they will receive during this time. This article reports on a study of the enactment of power relations between pregnant women and their medical caregivers in the discourse of pregnancy and childbirth advice literature and its implications for practice. The study focuses on the discursive positioning of women in relation to medical personnel through a critical discourse analysis of two popular advice books, one in English and one in French. The article suggests that through the use of a number of key discursive strategies, pregnant women are constructed as under the control of the medical institution in these texts. However, this control is not achieved by an overt oppressive discourse, instead it is achieved through persuasion and consensus by generating the consent of pregnant women to comply with medical norms. The medical institution is represented in these texts as a dominant force while women are constructed as powerless recipients of medical care. Medical professionals should firstly consider whether the power relations represented in these texts correspond to those enacted in clinics and delivery rooms. Secondly, caregivers should be cautious about recommending popular pregnancy and childbirth advice books to women as the relationship between pregnant women and their caregivers may be undermined by the negative power asymmetry enacted in these texts. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bereaved Siblings' Advice to Health Care Professionals Working With Children With Cancer and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lövgren, Malin; Bylund-Grenklo, Tove; Jalmsell, Li; Wallin, Alexandra Eilegård; Kreicbergs, Ulrika

    2016-07-01

    Siblings of children with cancer experience psychosocial distress during the illness and after bereavement, but often stand outside the spotlight of attention and care. This study explored bereaved siblings' advice to health care professionals (HCPs) working with children with cancer and their families. In a nationwide Swedish survey of bereaved siblings, 174/240 (73%) participated. Of these, 108 answered an open-ended question about what advice they would give to HCPs working with children with cancer and their families. In this study, responses to this single question were analyzed using content analysis. The most common advice, suggested by 56% of siblings, related to their own support. One third suggested giving better medical information to siblings. Some siblings wanted to be more practically involved in their brother's/sister's care and suggested that HCPs should give parents guidance on how to involve siblings. Other common advice related to psychosocial aspects, such as the siblings' wish for HCPs to mediate hope, yet also realism, and the importance of asking the ill child about what care they wanted. Information, communication, and involvement should be emphasized by HCPs to support siblings' psychosocial needs in both the health care setting and within the family. © 2015 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  20. What is the quality of smoking cessation advice in guidelines of tobacco-related diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovica, Ilze; Agrawal, Sanjay; Gregory, Benjamin; Britton, John; Leonardi-Bee, Jo

    2015-12-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for a range of diseases, and quitting smoking provides considerable benefits to health. It therefore follows that clinical guidelines on disease management, particularly for diseases caused by smoking, should include smoking cessation. The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which this is the case. We conducted a systematic review investigating clinical guidelines and recommendations issued by UK national or European transnational medical speciality associations and societies issued between 2000 and 2012 on a range of diseases caused by smoking. We then investigated whether selected guidelines contained reference to smoking cessation and smoking cessation advice. Although the extent to which smoking and smoking cessation was mentioned in the guidelines varied between diseases, only 60% of guidelines identified recognised that smoking is a risk factor for the development of the disease and 40% recommended smoking cessation. Only 19% of guidelines provided detailed information on how to deliver smoking cessation support. Smoking cessation is not comprehensively addressed in current UK and transnational European clinical practice guidelines and recommendations. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  1. 29 CFR 1400.735-3 - Advice and counseling service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advice and counseling service. 1400.735-3 Section 1400.735-3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE STANDARDS OF CONDUCT, RESPONSIBILITIES, AND DISCIPLINE General § 1400.735-3 Advice and counseling service...

  2. Advice-giving in the English lingua franca classroom

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    including Italian, Spanish, and French, mixed with elements of Greek, Turkish, Arabic and. Persian to create the pidgin tongue first ... Nevertheless, regardless of the dialect spoken or the political popularity of ..... requesting advice. Replies like me too and I also clearly indicate identification with the advice-seeker on the part ...

  3. Discharge against medical advice amongst orthopaedic patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Discharge Against Medical Advice (DAMA) is a term used when patients opt to leave a hospital against the advice of the doctor. Trauma patients account for a significant percentage of these. This study was aimed at determining the prevalence of and reasons for DAMA amongst Orthopaedic and trauma ...

  4. Incidence and reasons for Discharge Against Medical Advice in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These have resulted in poorer treatment outcome and patients' dissatisfaction that sometime result in discharge against medical advice. This study is to ascertain the reasons for the growing incidence of discharges against medical advice in the medical wards of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port ...

  5. Discharge Against Medical Advice in Enugu, South Eastern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In exercising freedom to determine their own future without external restraints, patients admitted to hospital sometimes opt to leave against medical advice. ... Results: One hundred and fifteen medical patients left hospital against medical advice (82 males and 33 females) and 92 of them (80%) were admitted ...

  6. What Makes Proteges Take Mentors' Advice in Formal Mentoring Relationships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, SuJin; Kim, Do-Yeong

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the factors affecting a protege's willingness to take a mentor's advice. The sample for this study consisted of 183 proteges from two different South Korean organizations who were part of formal mentoring programs. We found protege commitment to be the principal factor that predisposes a protege to take advice from mentors and…

  7. Emotions in advice taking: the roles of agency and valence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hooge, I.E.; Verlegh, P.W.J.; Tzioti, S.C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, advice taking has received attention in decision-making research, and some studies suggest that emotions may play a role in this process. Yet a clear account of how emotions influence advice taking is lacking. The current research introduces a parsimonious explanation by suggesting that

  8. 19 CFR 111.39 - Advice to client.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Advice to client. 111.39 Section 111.39 Customs... CUSTOMS BROKERS Duties and Responsibilities of Customs Brokers § 111.39 Advice to client. (a) Withheld or false information. A broker must not withhold information relative to any customs business from a client...

  9. The Perceived Impact of Agricultural Advice in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Alexander; Hudson, John

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: We examine the impact of advice given by extension agents to Ethiopian farmers, as perceived by the farmers themselves. Design/methodology/approach: Using survey data from 2014, we analyze the perceived impact of advice on farmers' incomes and crop yields. We use a bootstrapped instrumental variable (IV) estimator and the conditional…

  10. Discharge from hospital against medical advice among paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The reasons underlying discharge against medical advice by Paediatric patients varies from place to place. Discharge against medical advice is frustrating to the medical personnel and deprives the patient of adequate medical care. This study aims to determine the prevalence and factors associated with ...

  11. Treatment Options for Back Pain Provided Online in Canadian Magazines: Comparison against Evidence from a Clinical Practice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sniderman, Jhase A.; Roffey, Darren M.; Lee, Richard; Papineau, Gabrielle D.; Miles, Isabelle H.; Wai, Eugene K.; Kingwell, Stephen P.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based treatments for adult back pain have long been confirmed, with research continuing to narrow down the scope of recommended practices. However, a tension exists between research-driven treatments and unsubstantiated modalities and techniques promoted to the public. This disparity in knowledge translation, which results in…

  12. Treatment of mental health problems in general practice: a survey of psychotropics prescribed and other treatments provided.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijswijk, E. van; Borghuis, M.; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Zitman, F.G.; Weel, C. van

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Real-life data on the treatment of patients with mental health problems are important as a reference to evaluate care and benchmarking. This study describes the treatment of mental health problems in general practice as diagnosed by general practitioners (GP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data

  13. Smart Energy Management for Households - A practical guide for designers, HEMS developers, energy providers, and the building industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    This publication is an extended version of the summary and conclusions of the doctoral thesis ‘Smart Energy Management for Households’. It is specifically intended to give practitioners dealing with HEMS in their day to day profession practical tools to strive to improve the use and effectiveness of

  14. Combined effect of new complete dentures and simple dietary advice on nutritional status in edentulous patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komagamine, Yuriko; Kanazawa, Manabu; Iwaki, Maiko; Jo, Ayami; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Amagai, Noriko; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2016-11-09

    between the groups at 3 and 6 months and within-group changes are to be compared using the paired t test. Simple dietary advice that can be implemented by a dentist would be more practical in clinical practice than tailored dietary counseling. The results of this study will provide beneficial information on dietary intake changes for both edentulous individuals requesting new complete dentures and dentists. University Hospital Medical Information Network Center Unique Trial Number: UMIN000017879 . Registered on 12 June 2015.

  15. Providing education on evidence-based practice improved knowledge but did not change behaviour: a before and after study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovarini Meryl

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many health professionals lack the skills to find and appraise published research. This lack of skills and associated knowledge needs to be addressed, and practice habits need to change, for evidence-based practice to occur. The aim of this before and after study was to evaluate the effect of a multifaceted intervention on the knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour of allied health professionals. Methods 114 self-selected occupational therapists were recruited. The intervention included a 2-day workshop combined with outreach support for eight months. Support involved email and telephone contact and a workplace visit. Measures were collected at baseline, post-workshop, and eight months later. The primary outcome was knowledge, measured using the Adapted Fresno Test of Evidence-Based Practice (total score 0 to 156. Secondary outcomes were attitude to evidence-based practice (% reporting improved skills and confidence; % reporting barriers, and behaviour measured using an activity diary (% engaging/not engaging in search and appraisal activities, and assignment completion. Results Post-workshop, there were significant gains in knowledge which were maintained at follow-up. The mean difference in the Adapted Fresno Test total score was 20.6 points (95% CI, 15.6 to 25.5. The change from post-workshop to follow-up was small and non-significant (mean difference 1.2 points, 95% CI, -6.0 to 8.5. Fewer participants reported lack of searching and appraisal skills as barriers to evidence-based practice over time (searching = 61%, 53%, 24%; appraisal 60%, 65%, 41%. These differences were statistically significant (p = 0.0001 and 0.010 respectively. Behaviour changed little. Pre-workshop, 6% engaged in critical appraisal increasing to 18% post-workshop and 18% at follow-up. Nearly two thirds (60% were not reading any research literature at follow-up. Twenty-three participants (20.2% completed their assignment. Conclusion Evidence

  16. It ain't what you do, it's the way that you do it: a qualitative study of advice for young cannabis users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Nathan; McCambridge, Jim; Slym, Renee L; Rollnick, Stephen

    2009-03-01

    Advice is a widely recommended and practised intervention with young drug users. Study of precisely how advice is given and received in any setting has, however, been limited. We qualitatively analysed 106 audio-recordings of advice sessions on cannabis use for young people within a randomised trial. Inductive data analysis was guided by a focus on practitioner behaviour which served to engage the active participation of the young drug user in the session. A cluster of 'Information Management' activities was identified together with an 'Interactive Orientation' evident in a series of specific behaviours. Participants were most successfully engaged when both were combined, understood here as 'Personalised Advice-giving'. These components identified in this exploratory study might assist further research in rectifying the absence of a solid empirical basis for effective practice in advice giving with young drug users and more widely.

  17. Relationship of Provider and Practice Volume to Performance Measure Adherence for Coronary Artery Disease, Heart Failure, and Atrial Fibrillation: Results From the National Cardiovascular Data Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Lisa M; Jones, Philip; Chan, Paul S; Andrei, Adin-Christian; Maddox, Thomas M; Farmer, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    There is a reported association between high clinical volume and improved outcomes. Whether this relationship is true for outpatients with coronary artery disease (CAD), heart failure (HF), and atrial fibrillation (AF) remains unknown. Using the PINNACLE Registry (2009-2012), average monthly provider and practice volumes were calculated for CAD, HF, and AF. Adherence with 4 American Heart Association CAD, 2 HF, and 1 AF performance measure were assessed at the most recent encounter for each patient. Hierarchical logistic regression models were used to assess the relationship between provider and practice volume and performance on eligible quality measures. Data incorporated patients from 1094 providers at 71 practices (practice level analyses n=654 535; provider level analyses n=529 938). Median monthly provider volumes were 79 (interquartile range [IQR], 51-117) for CAD, 27 (16-45) for HF, and 37 (24-54) for AF. Median monthly practice volumes were 923 (IQR, 476-1455) for CAD, 311 (145-657) for HF, and 459 (185-720) for AF. Overall, 55% of patients met all CAD measures, 72% met all HF measures, and 58% met the AF measure. There was no definite relationship between practice volume and concordance for CAD, AF, or HF (P=0.56, 0.52, and 0.79, respectively). In contrast, higher provider volume was associated with increased concordance for CAD and AF performance measures (Pperformance was modest and variable. Higher provider volume was positively associated with quality, whereas practice volume was not. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Practice and Perceived Importance of Advance Care Planning and Difficulties in Providing Palliative Care in Geriatric Health Service Facilities in Japan: A Nationwide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoya, Shoji; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Maeno, Takami

    2018-03-01

    The provision of end-of-life (EOL) care by geriatric health service facilities (GHSFs) in Japan is increasing. Advance care planning (ACP) is one of the most important issues to provide quality EOL care. This study aimed to clarify the practice and perceived importance of ACP and the difficulties in providing palliative care in GHSFs. A self-report questionnaire was mailed to head nurses at 3437 GHSFs nationwide. We asked participants about their practices regarding ACP, their recognition of its importance, and their difficulties in providing palliative care. We also analyzed the relationship between these factors and EOL care education. Among 844 respondents (24.5% response rate), approximately 69% to 81% of head nurses confirmed that GHSF residents and their families understood disease conditions and goals of care. There was a large discrepancy between the actual practice of ACP components and the recognition of their importance (eg, asking residents about existing advance directive [AD; 27.5% practiced it, while 79.6% considered it important]; recommending completion of an AD [18.1% vs 68.4%], and asking for designation of a health-care proxy [30.4% vs 76.8%]). The EOL care education was provided at 517 facilities (61.3%). Head nurses working at EOL care education-providing GHSFs practiced ACP significantly more frequently and had significantly fewer difficulties in providing palliative care. A large discrepancy was found between GHSF nurses' practice of ACP and their recognition of its importance. Providing EOL care education in GHSFs may increase ACP practices and enhance respect for resident's preferences concerning EOL care.

  19. Challenges faced by genetics service providers' practicing in a culturally and linguistically diverse population: an Australian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mona; Barlow-Stewart, Kristine; Meiser, Bettina; Muchamore, Ian

    2009-10-01

    This paper explores the perceived challenges facing clinical genetics practitioners in multicultural Australia. Focus groups conducted with 53 practitioners explored: 1) participants' experiences and definitions of cultural diversity; 2) their use of educational resources with clients; 3) their experiences with culturally diverse groups/individuals in practice; 4) their experiences working with interpreters; and 5) the impact culturally specific educational training and/or experiential learning had on their confidence or practice when dealing with culturally diverse clients. Participants viewed culture as extending beyond traditional definitions such as ethnicity, language and religion. Most respondents had experienced positive results working with health care interpreters, although at times, this was a challenge for the family as they preferred privacy and the use of family members as interpreters. Another commonly reported challenge was the limited availability of reliable, culturally appropriate translated resources. Some participants expressed concern that learning theories about specific cultures may lead to stereotypes and that opportunities for formal cultural competence training were limited. Recommendations for practice include the targeting of educational resources to meet the needs of a diverse community and placing cultural competence on the agenda for ongoing training and maintenance of professional standards for clinical genetics practitioners to avoid the current ad hoc approach.

  20. Research based empathic knowledge for nursing: a translational strategy for disseminating phenomenological research findings to provide evidence for caring practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Kathleen T; Todres, Les

    2011-04-01

    We are interested in the kind of knowledge that is particularly relevant to caring practice and the way in which qualitative research findings can serve such knowledge. As phenomenological researchers we have been engaged with the question of how findings from such research can be re-presented and expressed more aesthetically. Such a movement towards a more aesthetic phenomenology may serve the communicative concern to express phenomena relevant to caring practice in ways that appeal to the 'head, hand and heart'. The paper first offers some thoughts about the complex kind of knowledge relevant to caring that is not only technical or propositional, but actionable and aesthetically moving as well. We call this kind of knowledge 'embodied relational understanding'. Further, the paper outlines the development of one way of serving a more aesthetic phenomenology whereby research findings can be faithfully and evocatively translated into more empathically impactful expressions. We call this process 'embodied interpretation'. It is guided by an epistemological framework grounded in the philosophies of Gadamer and Gendlin. We finally illustrate the process with reference to the experience of living after Stroke, and consider the value of this translational process for nursing education and practice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Primary Care Provider Utilization: A Descriptive Analysis of Family Practice Referral Rates Before and After the Family Practice Service Reorganization at Reynolds Army Community Hospital, Fort Sill, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    focuses on the referrals originating from the family practice clinics and directed to the four largest specialty departments at RACH: Obstetrics ...patterns in HMOs found that the four most frequently referred to specialties were general surgery, otolaryngology, orthopedics, and obstetrics ...n=19) and doctors of osteopathy (DO) (n=5). The experience of these physicians ranges from residency graduates with six months of post-residency

  2. Impact of Symptoms and Care Practices on Nursing Home Residents at the End of Life: A Rating by Front-line Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoben, Matthias; Chamberlain, Stephanie A; Knopp-Sihota, Jennifer A; Poss, Jeffrey W; Thompson, Genevieve N; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2016-02-01

    Burdensome symptoms and potentially inappropriate care practices are common at the end of life for nursing home residents. Appropriately managing symptoms and limiting aggressive care practices is key to high-quality end-of-life care. Little research is available, however, on the opinions of nursing home care providers about the impact of symptoms and practices for both residents and care facilities. Our objectives were to (1) identify common burdensome symptoms and potentially inappropriate practices at the end of life for nursing home residents, (2) develop and assess the feasibility of a procedure to have various groups of nursing home care providers rate impact of symptoms and practices, and (3) generate recommendations for action and further research, with key policy and decision makers. Proof-of-concept study. Partnered research by researchers, health professionals, and decision makers to identify and explore the impact of burdensome symptoms and potentially inappropriate care practices for nursing home residents at the end of life. Thirty-six nursing homes from Alberta, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan. A total of 6007 residents (prevalence rating); 4 medical directors, 5 directors of care, 4 nurse practitioners, 4 registered nurses, 5 licensed practical nurses, 5 care aides (impact rating); and 13 key policy or decision makers from Alberta, British Columbia, and Manitoba (expert panel). Based on a literature search and data in the Resident Assessment Instrument-Minimum Data Set (RAI-MDS) 2.0, we generated lists of burdensome symptoms and potentially inappropriate care practices for nursing home residents at the end of life. We rated prevalence of those symptoms and practices in the last quarter before death as high, medium, or low. Care providers rated the burden of symptoms and inappropriateness of practices as high, medium, or low. Directors of care rated the unnecessary cost of those symptoms and practices to a nursing home as high, medium, or low. We ranked

  3. A cost-effectiveness analysis of provider interventions to improve health worker practice in providing treatment for uncomplicated malaria in Cameroon: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiseman Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Governments and donors all over Africa are searching for sustainable, affordable and cost-effective ways to improve the quality of malaria case management. Widespread deficiencies have been reported in the prescribing and counselling practices of health care providers treating febrile patients in both public and private health facilities. Cameroon is no exception with low levels of adherence to national guidelines, the frequent selection of non-recommended antimalarials and the use of incorrect dosages. This study evaluates the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of introducing two different provider training packages, alongside rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs, designed to equip providers with the knowledge and practical skills needed to effectively diagnose and treat febrile patients. The overall aim is to target antimalarial treatment better and to facilitate optimal use of malaria treatment guidelines. Methods/Design A 3-arm stratified, cluster randomized trial will be conducted to assess whether introducing RDTs with provider training (basic or enhanced is more cost-effective than current practice without RDTs, and whether there is a difference in the cost effectiveness of the provider training interventions. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients attending facilities that report a fever or suspected malaria and receive treatment according to malaria guidelines. This will be measured by surveying patients (or caregivers as they exit public and mission health facilities. Cost-effectiveness will be presented in terms of the primary outcome and a range of secondary outcomes, including changes in provider knowledge. Costs will be estimated from a societal and provider perspective using standard economic evaluation methodologies. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00981877

  4. The Influence of Financial Risk Tolerance on Investment Decision-Making in a Financial Advice Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linh T.M. Nguyen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Client risk tolerance is universally assessed in the advisory process to help financial advisers provide suitable advice that assists clients in their investment decision-making. Although there is a well-established literature on risk tolerance and decision-making, little is known about financial risk tolerance and its influence on investor decisions in the financial advice context. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine this influence with a focus on the key expected risk tolerance determinants: client financial literacy, trust in the financial advice service, and relationship length with the service. A new theoretical model and related hypotheses were proposed and tested using survey data from financial adviser clients in Australia (N=538. Results revealed a positive relationship between client risk tolerance and investment decision-making. Further, client trust and relationship length with the service were found to be positively associated with client financial literacy and risk tolerance. These findings, which provide a more comprehensive understanding of how risk tolerance and its antecedents influence client decisions, have the potential to improve advice in the financial services industry.

  5. General practitioner management of genetic aspects of a cardiac disease: a scenario-based study to anticipate providers' practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Challen, K.; Harris, H.; Kristoffersson, U.; Nippert, I.; Schmidtke, J.; Kate, L.P. ten; Benjamin, C.; Anionwu, E.; Plass, A.M.; Julian-Reynier, C.; Harris, R.

    2010-01-01

    It is increasingly recognised that genetics will have to be integrated into all parts of primary health care. Previous research has demonstrated that involvement and confidence in genetics varies amongst primary care providers. We aimed to analyse perceptions of primary care providers regarding

  6. General practitioner management of genetic aspects of a cardiac disease: a scenario-based study to anticipate providers' practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Challen, K.; Harris, H.; Kristoffersson, U.; Nippert, I.; Schmidtke, J.; ten Kate, L.P.; Benjamin, C.; Anionwu, E.; Plass, A.M.C.; Julian-Reynier, C.; Harris, R

    2010-01-01

    It is increasingly recognised that genetics will have to be integrated into all parts of primary health care. Previous research has demonstrated that involvement and confidence in genetics varies amongst primary care providers. We aimed to analyse perceptions of primary care providers regarding

  7. Assessing healthcare providers' knowledge and practices relating to insecticide-treated nets and the prevention of malaria in Ghana, Laos, Senegal and Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman Steven J

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research evidence is not always being disseminated to healthcare providers who need it to inform their clinical practice. This can result in the provision of ineffective services and an inefficient use of resources, the implications of which might be felt particularly acutely in low- and middle-income countries. Malaria prevention is a particularly compelling domain to study evidence/practice gaps given the proven efficacy, cost-effectiveness and disappointing utilization of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs. Methods This study compares what is known about ITNs to the related knowledge and practices of healthcare providers in four low- and middle-income countries. A new questionnaire was developed, pilot tested, translated and administered to 497 healthcare providers in Ghana (140, Laos (136, Senegal (100 and Tanzania (121. Ten questions tested participants' knowledge and clinical practice related to malaria prevention. Additional questions addressed their individual characteristics, working context and research-related activities. Ordinal logistic regressions with knowledge and practices as the dependent variable were conducted in addition to descriptive statistics. Results The survey achieved a 75% response rate (372/497 across Ghana (107/140, Laos (136/136, Senegal (51/100 and Tanzania (78/121. Few participating healthcare providers correctly answered all five knowledge questions about ITNs (13% or self-reported performing all five clinical practices according to established evidence (2%. Statistically significant factors associated with higher knowledge within each country included: 1 training in acquiring systematic reviews through the Cochrane Library (OR 2.48, 95% CI 1.30-4.73; and 2 ability to read and write English well or very well (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.05-2.70. Statistically significant factors associated with better clinical practices within each country include: 1 reading scientific journals from their own country (OR

  8. Passing the baton: a grounded practical theory of handoff communication between multidisciplinary providers in two Department of Veterans Affairs outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Christopher J; Maguen, Shira; Daley, Aaron; Cohen, Greg; Seal, Karen H

    2013-01-01

    Handoffs are communication processes that enact the transfer of responsibility between providers across clinical settings. Prior research on handoff communication has focused on inpatient settings between provider teams and has emphasized patient safety. This study examines handoff communication within multidisciplinary provider teams in two outpatient settings. To conduct an exploratory study that describes handoff communication among multidisciplinary providers, to develop a theory-driven descriptive framework for outpatient handoffs, and to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of different handoff types. Qualitative, in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 31 primary care, mental health, and social work providers in two Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center outpatient clinics. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed using Grounded Practical Theory to develop a theoretical model of and a descriptive framework for handoff communication among multidisciplinary providers. Multidisciplinary providers reported that handoff decisions across settings were made spontaneously and without clear guidelines. Two situated values, clinic efficiency and patient-centeredness, shaped multidisciplinary providers' handoff decisions. Providers reported three handoff techniques along a continuum: the electronic handoff, which was the most clinically efficient; the provider-to-provider handoff, which balanced clinic efficiency and patient-centeredness; and the collaborative handoff, which was the most patient-centered. Providers described handoff choice as a practical response to manage constituent features of clinic efficiency (time, space, medium of communication) and patient-centeredness (information continuity, management continuity, relational continuity, and social interaction). We present a theoretical and descriptive framework to help providers evaluate differential handoff use, reflect on situated values guiding clinic communication, and guide

  9. Adaptation and validation of the Evidence-Based Practice Belief and Implementation scales for French-speaking Swiss nurses and allied healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloo, Henk; Desmedt, Mario; Morin, Diane

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate two psychometric properties of the French versions of the Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales, namely their internal consistency and construct validity. The Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales developed by Melnyk et al. are recognised as valid, reliable instruments in English. However, no psychometric validation for their French versions existed. Secondary analysis of a cross sectional survey. Source data came from a cross-sectional descriptive study sample of 382 nurses and other allied healthcare providers. Cronbach's alpha was used to evaluate internal consistency, and principal axis factor analysis and varimax rotation were computed to determine construct validity. The French Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales showed excellent reliability, with Cronbach's alphas close to the scores established by Melnyk et al.'s original versions. Principal axis factor analysis showed medium-to-high factor loading scores without obtaining collinearity. Principal axis factor analysis with varimax rotation of the 16-item Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs scale resulted in a four-factor loading structure. Principal axis factor analysis with varimax rotation of the 17-item Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scale revealed a two-factor loading structure. Further research should attempt to understand why the French Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scale showed a two-factor loading structure but Melnyk et al.'s original has only one. The French versions of the Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales can both be considered valid and reliable instruments for measuring Evidence-Based Practice beliefs and implementation. The results suggest that the French Evidence-Based Practice Beliefs and Evidence-Based Practice Implementation scales are valid and reliable and can therefore be used to

  10. Career Advice for Young Allergy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radon, Katja; Nowak, Dennis; Vogelberg, Christian; Ruëff, Franziska

    2016-08-08

    One-third of all young persons entering the work force have a history of atopic disease. Occupationally induced allergy and asthma generally arise in the first few months on the job, while pre-existing symptoms tend to worsen. Young persons with a history of an atopic disease should receive evidence-based advice before choosing a career. We systematically searched PubMed for cohort studies investigating the new onset of asthma, rhinitis, or hand eczema among job trainees from before the start of training and onward into the first few years on the job. The search revealed 514 articles; we read their abstracts and selected 85 full-text articles for further analysis. 24 of these met the inclusion criteria. According to present evidence, atopy and a history of allergic disease (allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis) are the main risk factors for occupationally induced disease. The predictive value of a personal history of allergic diseases for the later development of an occupationally induced disease varies from 9% to 64% in the studies we analyzed. It follows that only young people with severe asthma or severe atopic eczema should be advised against choosing a job that is associated with a high risk of allergy, e.g., hairdressing or working with laboratory animals. Young people with a history of other atopic diseases should be counseled about their individual risk profile. In view of the relatively poor predictive value of pre-existing atopic disease, secondary prevention is particularly important. This includes frequent medical follow-up of the course of symptoms over the first few years on the job. If sensitization or allergic symptoms arise, it should be carefully considered whether exposure reduction will enable the apprentice to stay on the job.

  11. Dos and don’ts in human resources management a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    With this book, an international group of approximate 50 HR leaders, professors and senior consultants compiled their knowledge and experience in an easy-to-navigate format to allow busy HR executives finding exactly the advice they need. Re-inventing the wheel – unfortunately – still is a common practice in Human Resources Management. Traditional literature on HR fails to provide advice based on current, real-life experience and online forums lack a logical structure. Hence, there is a clear need for a resource with practical, structured and experience-based advice on Human Resources Management. The book also provides readers from other functional areas and job starters a realistic insight into today's HR management – be it as a personal career orientation or as a way to enrich their overall management knowledge.

  12. Family planning practice among Nigerian student midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetoro, O O; Anate, M

    1988-12-01

    An analysis of the various contraceptive methods practiced by a total of 462 student midwives from the Northern and Southern parts of Nigeria over a 3-years period is presented. The differences in age distribution, the type of contraceptive agents used, the reasons for using them, and the side effects in the two groups are statistically significant. The need to provide acceptable contraceptive advice to the rural communities by the midwives is discussed.

  13. Health Care Providers’ Attitudes and Practices Regarding the use of Advance Directives in a Military Health Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-02

    providers’ erroneous beliefs that these documents are mainly for the terminally ill and elderly . Additionally, inadequate health care provider training...expected to die when injured due to lack of HCPs on the battlefield, lack of treatment options available, and death by secondary infection or malnourishment ...Doukas and McCullough (1995) all supported the counseling of healthy patients. Layson et al. (1994) stated that 70 to 92 % of elderly outpatients

  14. Top-selling childbirth advice books: a discourse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Holly Powell; Nardini, Katrina; McLeod-Waldo, Rebecca; Ennis, Linda

    2009-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that one-third of women receive information about pregnancy and childbirth through books. Messages about what characteristics are normal (or expected) in childbirth are disseminated in a variety of ways, including popular childbirth education books, but little study of them has been conducted. The purpose of this investigation is to address that gap by examining the discussions about childbirth in the 10 top-selling books in the United States. Discourse analysis (relating to the public, personal, and political discussions about a specific phenomenon) was used to study 10 best-selling United States childbirth advice books marketed to childbearing women during the first week of November 2007. Book styles ranged from clinical descriptions of pregnancy and birth primarily offering reassurance, self-help information, and danger signs to more folksy and humorous commentaries. Presentation of scientific evidence to support recommendations was uneven and at times inaccurate. Five focal areas of discourse included body image, labor and birth, pain, power and control, and life preparation for motherhood. Top-selling books shine an interesting light on the current state of United States maternity practices. Women and health professionals should assess them carefully and engage with each other about their recommendations and implications for childbirth.

  15. Dietary Advice on Prescription: A novel approach to dietary counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Johansson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a novel approach to giving dietary advice, which is called “Dietary Advice on Prescription” (DAP; Matordning på Recept [MoR] in Swedish. It is the same principle as prescription on medicine and “Physical Activity on Prescription” (PAP; Fysisk aktivitet på Recept [FaR] in Swedish. The main idea is that a written prescription will strengthen the oral advice and emphasize certain aspects of the dietary recommendation. The DAP is on the brink of being tested in a planned study.

  16. E-Mail Communication Practices and Preferences Among Patients and Providers in a Large Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Natalie; Maganti, Manjula; Dobriyal, Aditi; Sheinis, Michal; Wei, Alice C; Ringash, Jolie; Krzyzanowska, Monika K

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about how electronic mail (e-mail) is currently used in oncology practice to facilitate patient care. The objective of our study was to understand the current e-mail practices and preferences of patients and physicians in a large comprehensive cancer center. Separate cross-sectional surveys were administered to patients and physicians (staff physicians and clinical fellows) at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with current e-mail use. Record review was performed to assess the impact of e-mail communication on care. The survey was completed by 833 patients. E-mail contact with a member of the health care team was reported by 41% of respondents. The team members contacted included administrative assistants (52%), nurses (45%), specialist physicians (36%), and family physicians (18%). Patient factors associated with a higher likelihood of e-mail contact with the health care team included younger age, higher education, higher income, enrollment in a clinical trial, and receipt of multiple treatments. Eighty percent of physicians (n = 63 of 79) reported previous contact with a patient via e-mail. Physician factors associated with a greater likelihood of e-mail contact with patients included older age, more senior clinical position, and higher patient volume. Nine hundred sixty-two patient records were reviewed, with e-mail correspondence documented in only 9% of cases. E-mail is commonly used for patient care but is poorly documented. The use of e-mail in this setting can be developed with appropriate guidance; however, there may be concerns about widening the gap between certain groups of patients. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. CAH to CAH: EHR implementation advice to critical access hospitals from peer experts and other key informants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, C K; Sievert, M C; Hicks, L L; Alexander, G L; Hearne, L B; Holmes, J H

    2014-01-01

    The US government allocated $30 billion to implement electronic health records (EHRs) in hospitals and provider practices through policy addressing Meaningful Use (MU). Most small, rural hospitals, particularly those designated as Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs), comprising nearly a quarter of US hospitals, had not implemented EHRs before. Little is known about implementation in this setting. Socio-technical factors differ between larger hospitals and CAHs, which continue to lag behind other hospitals in EHR adoption. The main objective is to provide EHR implementation advice for CAHs from a spectrum of experts with an emphasis on recommendations from their peers at CAHs that have undertaken the process. The secondary objective is to begin to identify implementation process differences at CAHs v. larger hospitals. We interviewed 41 experts, including 16 CAH staff members from EHR teams at 10 CAHs that recently implemented EHRs. We qualitatively analyzed the interviews to ascertain themes and implementation recommendations. Nineteen themes emerged. Under each theme, comments by experts provide in-depth advice on all implementation stages including ongoing optimization and use. We present comments for three top themes as ranked by number of CAH peer experts commenting - EHR System Selection, EHR Team, and Preparatory Work - and for two others, Outside Partners/Resources and Clinical Decision Support (CDS)/Knowledge Management (KM). Comments for remaining themes are included in tables. CAH experts rank the themes differently from all experts, a likely indication of the differences between hospitals. Comments for each theme indicate the specific difficulties CAHs encountered. CAH staffs have little or no EHR experience before implementation. A factor across themes is insufficient system and process knowledge, compounded by compressed implementation schedules. Increased, proactive self-education, via available outside partners and information resources, will mitigate

  18. Providing health information to the general public: a survey of current practices in academic health sciences libraries*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Sue M.

    2000-01-01

    A questionnaire was mailed to 148 publicly and privately supported academic health sciences libraries affiliated with Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC)–accredited medical schools in the United States and Canada to determine level of access and services provided to the general public. For purposes of this study, “general public” was defined as nonaffiliated students or health care professionals, attorneys and other nonhealth-related professionals, patients from affiliated or other hospitals or clinics, and general consumers. One hundred five (71%) libraries responded. Results showed 98% of publicly supported libraries and 88% of privately supported libraries provided access to some or all of the general public. Publicly supported libraries saw greater numbers of public patrons, often provided more services, and were more likely to circulate materials from their collections than were privately supported libraries. A significant number of academic health sciences libraries housed a collection of consumer-oriented materials and many provided some level of document delivery service, usually for a fee. Most allowed the public to use some or all library computers. Results of this study indicated that academic health sciences libraries played a significant role in serving the information-seeking public and suggested a need to develop written policies or guidelines covering the services that will be provided to minimize the impact of this service on primary clientele. PMID:10658965

  19. [Pre-travel advice and patient education of Hungarian travellers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Ingrid; Felkai, Péter

    2018-03-01

    According to international surveys, over half of the travellers face some kind of health issue when travelling. The overwhelming majority of travel-related illnesses can be prevented with pre-travel medical consultations, but the syllabus and content of the consultation have to match the travel habits and culture of the given society. This publication explores the specificities and travel habits of Hungarian travellers. One hundred participants of a travel exhibition completed a survey about their international travel. As the survey was not representative, the data could only be processed through simple statistical methods. However, since the exhibition was presumably attended by those wishing to travel, the conclusions drawn from the results are worth publishing, since no similar survey in Hungary has been published before. Based on the suitable classification of age groups in travel medicine, 11% of the participants were adolescents / young adults (aged 15-24), 81% adults (25-59) and 8% elderly (60-74). Twenty-eight percent of the participants travel multiple times a year, 40% yearly and 32% of them less frequently; 16% of the adults, 8% of the adolescents and 4% of the elderly age group travel multiple times a year. The travel destinations of Hungarian travellers have remained practically unchanged since a study was conducted 13 years ago: the vast majority (95%) travelled within Europe, 2% to the United States, and 11% of them elsewhere. Since Hungarians do not travel to endemic areas, only 5% consulted their general practitioners (GPs) prior to travelling, and 29% did when they had to be vaccinated. Forty-two percent of those wishing to travel never consult their GPs, even though 29% of them are aware of some chronic illness. Instead, 51% gather their health information from the internet and only 6% from their doctors. By the contradiction between the poor health status of the majority of Hungarian travellers and the negligence of seeking pre-travel advice

  20. Health advice obtained by tourists travelling to Magnetic Island: a risk area for 'Irukandji' jellyfish in North Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Peter A; Harrison, Simone L; Fenner, Peter J; Durrheim, David N; Swinbourne, Anne L

    2005-02-01

    Little is known about the travel health advice obtained by tourists travelling to Magnetic Island, which is a known risk area for the potentially fatal 'Irukandji' jellyfish on the Great Barrier Reef coast of north Queensland, Australia. Structured interviews were conducted with 208 ferry passengers (93% response) travelling between Townsville (Latitude 19 degrees S) and Magnetic Island. Less than half of the international tourists (21, 46%) had obtained travel health advice before coming to north Queensland, although they were significantly more likely to have done so than domestic tourists (pjellyfish was (pjellyfish. Most of the international tourists travelled to north Queensland by bus (30, 65%), while most domestic tourists arrived by private car (12, 40%) or plane (10, 33%). Only a small proportion of international tourists knew about Irukandji jellyfish and most tourists had not received travel health advice. The majority of tourists had not received further information about Irukandji jellyfish risk whilst on the island. All travellers to popular north Queensland tourist areas need travel health advice, which includes advice on avoiding contact with Irukandji and Chironex box jellyfish. Health promotion campaigns directed at providing this advice need to be aware that most tourists to north Queensland arrive by bus or car and the only 'shared' vehicle, at least to Magnetic Island, is the passenger ferry.

  1. A systematic review and meta-analysis of nutrition therapy compared with dietary advice in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Grith; Andersen, Henning Keinke; Snorgaard, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite recommendations, many patients with type 2 diabetes receive dietary advice from nurses or doctors instead of individualized nutrition therapy (INT) that is provided by a dietitian. Objective: We performed a meta-analysis to compare the effect of INT that is provided by a regis......Background: Despite recommendations, many patients with type 2 diabetes receive dietary advice from nurses or doctors instead of individualized nutrition therapy (INT) that is provided by a dietitian. Objective: We performed a meta-analysis to compare the effect of INT that is provided...

  2. The influential role of personal advice networks on general practitioners' performance: a social capital perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calciolari, Stefano; González-Ortiz, Laura G; Lega, Federico

    2017-08-08

    In several health systems of advanced countries, reforms have changed primary care in the last two decades. The literature has assessed the effects of a variety of interventions and individual factors on the behavior of general practitioners (GPs). However, there has been a lack of investigation concerning the influence of the resources embedded in the GPs' personal advice networks (i.e., social capital) on GPs' capacity to meet defined objectives. The present study has two goals: (a) to assess the GPs' personal advice networks according to the social capital framework and (b) to test the influence of such relationships on GPs' capacity to accomplish organizational goals. The data collection relied on administrative data provided by an Italian local health authority (LHA) and a survey administered to the GPs of the selected LHA. The GPs' personal advice networks were assessed through an ad-hoc instrument and interpreted as egocentric networks. Multivariate regression analyses assessed two different performance measures. Social capital may influence the GPs' capacity to meet targets, though the influence differs according to the objective considered. In particular, the higher the professional heterogeneity of a GP personal advice network, the lower her/his capacity is to meet targets of prescriptive appropriateness. Our findings might help to design more effective primary care reforms depending on the pursued goals. However, further research is needed.

  3. Sales Managers’ Performance and Social Capital: the Impact of an Advice Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Pimentel Claro

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to research a sales manager’s social network and demonstrate that sales managers who are central in closure structures of an advice network achieve high sales performance. Considering the results obtained and the discussion provided in the hypotheses presentation, we argue that sales managers must have accurate perceptions of their network. Two different networks were analyzed: friendship and advice; and we also considered two different views of network structure that claim to make an impact on performance and, to explore this claim, we examined whether sales managers, in order to improve sales performance, develop either a highly cohesive network or one containing structural holes. Census data was collected from over 500 personnel of an agricultural input retailer with 23 divisions. Estimates from a sample of 101 sales managers demonstrated, in the advice network, how important a highly cohesive structure is to a sales manager’s performance. These results suggest that firms should encourage contacts among their personnel to disseminate and share technical and commercial information. By stimulating cohesive structures of contacts for the purpose of receiving advice, firms create an environment for sales managers to develop relationships of trust in which social norms prevail.

  4. Latino family childcare providers' beliefs, attitudes, and practices related to promotion of healthy behaviors among preschool children: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Ana C; Salkeld, Judith A; Greaney, Mary L; Sands, Faith D

    2015-01-01

    The continuing rise of obesity among Latinos is a public health concern with an immediate need for early prevention. Changes in family structures have increased demand and reliance for child care for young children. Latino children are the fastest-growing segment of the child population in the United States, and research shows that Latino families use preschools and day care centers much less than those of other ethnic groups, apparently because of cultural preferences for family-like care. Given that many low income Latino children attend family child care homes (FCCHs), there is a need to explore the role that FCCH providers may play in establishing and reinforcing children's early healthful eating and physical activity behaviors and consequently in the prevention of childhood obesity. Using purposive sampling, six focus groups were conducted in Spanish with licensed Latino FCCH providers (n = 44). Data was analyzed to identify recurrent themes. Latino FCCH providers described how they play an influential role in promoting healthful eating and physical activity behaviors of preschool children in their care. They also identified many barriers and challenges in establishing and maintaining healthful nutrition and physical activity behaviors, including high cost of healthy foods, cold weather, and physical environment of FCCH. Latino FCCH providers can have a strong impact in promoting healthful behaviors in low-income, Latino communities. They may be able to effectively deliver interventions targeting low-income, minority families to promote healthful eating and physical activity behaviors and prevent child obesity.

  5. Providers caring for adolescents with perinatally-acquired HIV: Current practices and barriers to communication about sexual and reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Jamie N; Fair, Cynthia D

    2014-11-01

    The population of adolescents and young adults (AYA) with perinatally-acquired HIV (PHIV) present challenges to HIV healthcare providers (HHCPs). Originally not expected to survive childhood, they are now living well into young adulthood. Little is known about the type of sexual and reproductive (SRH) information/services offered to AYA with PHIV by HHCPs. HHCPs (n=67) were recruited using snowball sampling, and completed an online survey. Providers' most frequently endorsed SRH topics discussed with both male and female patients included condom use (77.3%), STD prevention (73.1%), and screening (62.1%). Providers' reports indicated that females received significantly more education about SRH topics overall. The most frequently noted barriers to SRH communication included more pressing health concerns (53.0%), parent/guardian not receptive (43.9%), and lack of time during appointment (43.9%). Provider-reported SRH conversations with HHCPs were highly focused on horizontal transmission and pregnancy prevention. Salient social aspects of SRH promotion for AYAs with PHIV (e.g., managing disclosure and romantic relationships) were less commonly discussed, though such conversations may serve to reduce secondary transmission and enhance the overall well-being of AYA with PHIV. Findings indicated that further work must be done to identify strategies to address unmet SRH needs of the aging population of AYA with PHIV.

  6. Providing Recreation Services for all Individuals: The Connection of Inclusive Practices to Commercial, Community, and Outdoor Recreation Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatt, Jennifer A.; Jorgensen, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities currently represent the largest minority group in the United States, yet recreation undergraduate students often perceive this as a population they may or may not provide services to in their future careers. The activities presented in this paper, Inclusion Knowledge Audits (IKA), are developed to make the connection…

  7. Mind the gap: knowledge and practice of providers treating uncomplicated malaria at public and mission health facilities, pharmacies and drug stores in Cameroon and Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangham-Jefferies, Lindsay; Hanson, Kara; Mbacham, Wilfred; Onwujekwe, Obinna; Wiseman, Virginia

    2015-11-01

    Artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) has been the first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in Cameroon since 2004 and Nigeria since 2005, though many febrile patients receive less effective antimalarials. Patients often rely on providers to select treatment, and interventions are needed to improve providers' practice and encourage them to adhere to clinical guidelines. Providers' adherence to malaria treatment guidelines was examined using data collected in Cameroon and Nigeria at public and mission facilities, pharmacies and drug stores. Providers' choice of antimalarial was investigated separately for each country. Multilevel logistic regression was used to determine whether providers were more likely to choose ACT if they knew it was the first-line antimalarial. Multiple imputation was used to impute missing data that arose when linking exit survey responses to details of the provider responsible for selecting treatment. There was a gap between providers' knowledge and their practice in both countries, as providers' decision to supply ACT was not significantly associated with knowledge of the first-line antimalarial. Providers were, however, more likely to supply ACT if it was the type of antimalarial they prefer. Other factors were country-specific, and indicated providers can be influenced by what they perceived their patients prefer or could afford, as well as information about their symptoms, previous treatment, the type of outlet and availability of ACT. Public health interventions to improve the treatment of uncomplicated malaria should strive to change what providers prefer, rather than focus on what they know. Interventions to improve adherence to malaria treatment guidelines should emphasize that ACT is the recommended antimalarial, and it should be used for all patients with uncomplicated malaria. Interventions should also be tailored to the local setting, as there were differences between the two countries in providers' choice of antimalarial

  8. Continence advice by telehealth for young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Caroline; Henderson, Lisa; Levy, Sharon

    Children and young people operate in an advanced technological world where new, exciting opportunities exist for remote interactions. To engage with these service users, we set up a nurse-led telehealth facility that enabled young people with spina bifida to access specialist continence service from home. This article describes efforts to embed this innovation into practice and offer insight to some of the challenges we faced in the process. It offers practical guidance on setting up similar services.

  9. Supporting adherence to oral anticancer agents: clinical practice and clues to improve care provided by physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses and pharmacists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, L.; Boons, C.C.; Verbrugghe, M.; Bemt, B.J.F van den; Hecke, A. Van; Hugtenburg, J.G.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Healthcare provider (HCP) activities and attitudes towards patients strongly influence medication adherence. The aim of this study was to assess current clinical practices to support patients in adhering to treatment with oral anticancer agents (OACA) and to explore clues to improve the

  10. Investigating the Practice of Providing Written Corrective Feedback Types by ESL Teachers at the Upper Secondary Level in High Performance Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Norasyikin

    2016-01-01

    The past few decades has seen the rapid development of WCF (written corrective feedback) study. The present study examined the practice of providing WCF by teachers. The aim of this study was to determine the types of WCF used by English teachers. The study is an explanatory sequential mixed-methods design using open-ended and close-ended survey…

  11. Mixed methods survey of zoonotic disease awareness and practice among animal and human healthcare providers in Moshi, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Helen L.; Mnzava, Kunda W; Mitchell, Sara T.; Melubo, Matayo L.; Kibona, Tito J.; Cleaveland, Sarah; Kazwala, Rudovick R.; Crump, John A; Sharp, Joanne P.; Halliday, J.E.B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Zoonoses are common causes of human and livestock illness in\\ud Tanzania. Previous studies have shown that brucellosis, leptospirosis, and Q fever\\ud account for a large proportion of human febrile illness in northern Tanzania, yet they\\ud are infrequently diagnosed. We conducted this study to assess awareness and\\ud knowledge regarding selected zoonoses among healthcare providers in Moshi,\\ud Tanzania; to determine what diagnostic and treatment protocols are utilized; and obtain\\...

  12. An Expert's Advice: What To Do If You Have Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... An Expert's Advice: What To Do If You Have Psoriasis Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of Contents ... too expensive to continue for very long. We have to make it more accessible and more affordable. ...

  13. (NotGood Parents’ Advices? The Value of Parental Permissions, Drivers and Injunctions in the Life of Modern Youth. The Research Educational Transactional Analyst’s Perspective [(Niedobre rady rodziców? Obecność rodzicielskich, przyzwoleń, nakazów i zakazów w życiu współczesnej młodzieży. Badawcza perspektywa edukacjnego analityka transakcyjnego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianna SARNAT-CIASTKO

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to determine the relevance of advices that are given to children by their parents on their development. The author assumed that these types of messages might have a diagnostic value, because it may not only show the direction in which – according to the mothers or fathers – their child should follow, but also contain a set of practical tips which help achieve this goal. The parental advices may also be a source of knowledge about the quality of family relations and upbringing style that is used in a particular household. They can also indicate a lack of mutual contact. Making such an insight into the parental advices can be done by means of the tools provided by the transactional analysis which will also be presented in this text by the analysis of collected research material.

  14. The Do-Well study: protocol for a randomised controlled trial, economic and qualitative process evaluations of domiciliary welfare rights advice for socio-economically disadvantaged older people recruited via primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haighton, Catherine; Moffatt, Suzanne; Howel, Denise; McColl, Elaine; Milne, Eugene; Deverill, Mark; Rubin, Greg; Aspray, Terry; White, Martin

    2012-05-28

    Older people in poor health are more likely to need extra money, aids and adaptations to allow them to remain independent and cope with ill health, yet in the UK many do not claim the welfare benefits to which they are entitled. Welfare rights advice interventions lead to greater welfare income, but have not been rigorously evaluated for health benefits. This study will evaluate the effects on health and well-being of a domiciliary welfare rights advice service provided by local government or voluntary organisations in North East England for independent living, socio-economically disadvantaged older people (aged ≥60 yrs), recruited from general (primary care) practices. The study is a pragmatic, individually randomised, single blinded, wait-list controlled trial of welfare rights advice versus usual care, with embedded economic and qualitative process evaluations. The qualitative study will examine whether the intervention is delivered as intended; explore responses to the intervention and examine reasons for the trial findings; and explore the potential for translation of the intervention into routine policy and practice. The primary outcome is the effect on health-related quality of life, measured using the CASP 19 questionnaire. Volunteer men and women aged ≥60 years (1/household) will be identified from general practice patient registers. Patients in nursing homes or hospitals at the time of recruitment will be excluded. General practice populations will be recruited from disadvantaged areas of North East England, including urban, rural and semi-rural areas, with no previous access to targeted welfare rights advice services delivered to primary care patients. A minimum of 750 participants will be randomised to intervention and control arms in a 1:1 ratio. Achieving a trial design that is both ethical and acceptable to potential participants, required methodological compromises. The choice of follow-up length required a trade-off between sufficient time

  15. Recommendations and administration of the HPV vaccine to 11- to 12-year-old girls and boys: a statewide survey of Georgia vaccines for children provider practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, John S; Tarasenko, Yelena N; Dixon, Betty T; Vogel, Robert L; Tedders, Stuart H

    2014-10-01

    This study explores the prevalence and provider- and practice-related correlates of physician recommendation and administration of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, Gardasil, to 11- to 12-year-old girls and the intention to recommend the HPV vaccine to 11- to 12-year-old boys in Georgia. The study also describes physician knowledge about and barriers to HPV vaccination. This cross-sectional study was conducted from December 2010 to February 2011. The study sample was drawn using the Georgia Vaccines for Children (VFC) provider list as a sampling frame and probability 1-stage cluster sampling with counties as clusters. The final analytic sample was restricted to 206 provider locations. Weighted percentages and corresponding statistics were calculated accounting for selection probabilities, nonresponse, and the cluster sample design. Among Georgia VFC providers attending to 11- to 12-year-old girls, 46% had always recommended that their patients get the HPV vaccination and 41% had vaccinated their female patients. Among Georgia VFC providers attending to 11- to 12-year-old boys, 20% would always recommend that their male patients get vaccinated.Physicians most frequently endorsed costs of stocking the vaccine (73%), upfront costs (69%), vaccination (68%), and insurance reimbursements (63%) as barriers to their HPV vaccination practices. Despite the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices' recommendations on HPV vaccination, the prevalence of recommending and administering the HPV vaccine to female and male patients, aged 11 to 12 years, by VFC providers is an ongoing challenge in Georgia.

  16. Mixed Methods Survey of Zoonotic Disease Awareness and Practice among Animal and Human Healthcare Providers in Moshi, Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen L Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Zoonoses are common causes of human and livestock illness in Tanzania. Previous studies have shown that brucellosis, leptospirosis, and Q fever account for a large proportion of human febrile illness in northern Tanzania, yet they are infrequently diagnosed. We conducted this study to assess awareness and knowledge regarding selected zoonoses among healthcare providers in Moshi, Tanzania; to determine what diagnostic and treatment protocols are utilized; and obtain insights into contextual factors contributing to the apparent under-diagnosis of zoonoses.We conducted a questionnaire about zoonoses knowledge, case reporting, and testing with 52 human health practitioners and 10 livestock health providers. Immediately following questionnaire administration, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 60 of these respondents, using the findings of a previous fever etiology study to prompt conversation. Sixty respondents (97% had heard of brucellosis, 26 (42% leptospirosis, and 20 (32% Q fever. Animal sector respondents reported seeing cases of animal brucellosis (4, rabies (4, and anthrax (3 in the previous 12 months. Human sector respondents reported cases of human brucellosis (15, 29%, rabies (9, 18% and anthrax (6, 12%. None reported leptospirosis or Q fever cases. Nineteen respondents were aware of a local diagnostic test for human brucellosis. Reports of tests for human leptospirosis or Q fever, or for any of the study pathogens in animals, were rare. Many respondents expressed awareness of malaria over-diagnosis and zoonoses under-diagnosis, and many identified low knowledge and testing capacity as reasons for zoonoses under-diagnosis.This study revealed differences in knowledge of different zoonoses and low case report frequencies of brucellosis, leptospirosis, and Q fever. There was a lack of known diagnostic services for leptospirosis and Q fever. These findings emphasize a need for improved diagnostic capacity alongside healthcare

  17. An court action for payment from the National Health Fund for health benefits provided in emergency – selected practical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Wąsik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The publication describes the problems of payment seeking by healthcare institutions from the National Health Fund for the so-called “life-saving health benefits”. Issues, which are discussed, include the possibility of health benefits financing in the context of the contract’s limits, the burden of proof to provide the health benefits in emergencies, and the necessary of consult experts on these issues in the context of the conditions of Article 248 § 1 Polish Civil Procedure Code.

  18. Providing for energy efficiency in homes and small buildings. Part I. Understanding and practicing energy conservation in buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parady, W. Harold; Turner, J. Howard

    1980-06-01

    This is a training program to educate students and individuals in the importance of conserving energy and to provide for developing skills needed in the application of energy-saving techniques that result in energy-efficient buildings. A teacher guide and student workbook are available to supplement the basic guide, which contains three parts. Part I considers the following: understanding the importance of energy; developing a concern for conserving energy; understanding the use of energy in buildings; care and maintenance of energy-efficient buildings; and developing energy-saving habits. A bibliography is presented.

  19. A survey of the prevalence of smoking and smoking cessation advice received by inpatients in a large teaching hospital in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bartels, C

    2012-01-06

    BACKGROUND: The adverse effects of smoking are well documented and it is crucial that this modifiable risk factor is addressed routinely. Professional advice can be effective at reducing smoking amongst patients, yet it is not clear if all hospital in-patient smokers receive advice to quit. AIMS: To explore smoking prevalence amongst hospital in-patients and smoking cessation advice given by health professionals in a large university teaching hospital. METHODS: Interviews were carried out over 2 weeks in February 2011 with all eligible in-patients in Beaumont Hospital. RESULTS: Of the 205 patients who completed the survey, 61% stated they had been asked about smoking by a healthcare professional in the past year. Only 44% of current\\/recent smokers stated they had received smoking cessation advice from a health professional within the same timeframe. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions to increase rates of healthcare professional-provided smoking cessation advice are urgently needed.

  20. Oncology care provider perspectives on exercise promotion in people with cancer: an examination of knowledge, practices, barriers, and facilitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, Michelle; Bainbridge, Daryl; Tomasone, Jennifer; Cheifetz, Oren; Juergens, Rosalyn A; Sussman, Jonathan

    2017-07-01

    Despite the reported benefits of physical activity in alleviating the impact of cancer and its treatments, oncology care providers (OCPs) are not routinely discussing exercise with their patients, suggesting a knowledge to action gap. We sought to determine OCP's knowledge, beliefs, barriers, and facilitators to exercise discussion. A survey was administered to OCPs at the cancer center in Hamilton, Ontario. Questions comprised of demographics, knowledge and beliefs regarding exercise guidelines, and barriers and facilitators to exercise discussion. Analysis of survey responses was descriptive. Pearson's chi-squared test was used to examine select associations. There were 120 respondents (61% response rate) representing a diversity of professions. Approximately, 80% of OCPs were not aware of any exercise guidelines in cancer and self-reported poor knowledge on when, how, and which patients to refer to exercise programs. OCPs who reported meeting Canada's Physical Activity guidelines were significantly more likely to identify correct guidelines (p = 0.023) and to report good knowledge on how to provide exercise counseling (p = 0.014). Across OCP groups, barriers to exercise discussion included poor knowledge, lack of time, and safety concerns. Most felt that educational sessions and having an exercise specialist on the clinical team would be beneficial. OCPs have low knowledge regarding exercise counseling, but believe that discussing exercise is a multidisciplinary task and expressed a desire for further training. Interventions will require a multi-pronged approach including education for OCPs and guidance on assessment for exercise safety.

  1. General practice out-of-hours service in Ireland provides a new source of syndromic surveillance data on influenza.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brabazon, E D

    2010-01-01

    The use of routinely available electronic sources of healthcare data on the spread of influenza has the potential to enhance current surveillance activities. This study aimed to develop a method for identifying influenza-related records from general practitioner(GP) out-of-hours (OOH) services in Ireland. Data from one such service were interrogated for keywords relating to influenza-like illness (ILI) and a proxy measure of influenza activity in the community setting was developed. Comparison of this syndromic surveillance measure with national data on ILI consultation rates demonstrated a statistically significant temporal correlation.In five out of six influenza seasons investigated,peaks in the GP OOH influenza-related calls appeared at least one week ahead of peaks in the national ILI consultation rates. The method described in this paper has been extended to nine OOH services in Ireland (covering 70% of the Irish population) to provide weekly figures on self-reported illness for influenza in the community and its data have been incorporated into the national weekly influenza reports produced by the Health Protection Surveillance Centre. These data should provide early warnings of both seasonal and pandemic influenza in Ireland.

  2. Evidence-based training in the era of evidence-based practice: Challenges and opportunities for training of PTSD providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Raymond C; Ruzek, Josef I; Karlin, Bradley E

    2017-01-01

    There is a pressing global need for trained and competent mental health clinicians to deliver evidence-based psychological therapies to millions of trauma survivors in need of care. Three model, large-scale training programs were initiated a decade ago, one in the United Kingdom (U.K.), and two in the United States (U.S.), to disseminate high-quality, evidence-based psychological care to traumatized children and adults in need of assistance. Milestone contributions to implementation science have been made by each of these training programs, although limitations and challenges remain to be considered. In contrast, culturally adapted and simplified PTSD interventions and therapy training programs have also been developed and tested during the past decade, three of which show particular promise for broader implementation. These simplified but evidence-based interventions have been developed for use by lay counsellors or health technicians with minimal or no prior mental health training. Finally, a growing range of technology-based and technology-assisted training models for PTSD providers have also been developed and disseminated in the past decade. This trend is expected to accelerate as more providers become accustomed to acquiring clinical training in this modality or format, although significant barriers to technology-based training will need to be overcome. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Nurses' attitudes toward aging and older adults--examining attitudes and practices among health services providers in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Yvonne; Foreman, Peter; Gething, Lindsay; Petralia, Walter

    2004-09-01

    Data from an applied research project on ageism among health professionals were used to examine nurses' attitudes toward aging and working with older adults. Nurses were compared with groups of other health professionals, and sources of variation within the nurses (e.g., employer, work setting, gerontology education) were examined. Nurses had less accurate knowledge of aging than other health professionals. Nurses expressed higher anxiety about aging and were more likely to believe working with older adults was associated with low esteem in the profession. Nurses were more likely to hold positive attitudes if they worked for a service provider rather than an employment agency, had gerontology education, and worked outside the residential care sector. Improving education in gerontology is an important strategy in improving the attitudes of the profession toward older adults and could help to address nursing shortages in this sector.

  4. Preconception care for women with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A mixed-methods study of provider knowledge and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, J; Boyle, J A; Kirkham, R; Connors, C; Whitbread, C; Oats, J; Barzi, F; McIntyre, D; Lee, I; Luey, M; Shaw, J; Brown, A D H; Maple-Brown, L J

    2017-07-01

    Preconception care may decrease adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with pre-existing diabetes mellitus. Aboriginal Australians are at high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with earlier onset. We explored practitioner views on preconception care delivery for women with T2DM in the Northern Territory, where 31% of births are to Aboriginal women. Mixed-methods study including cross-sectional survey of 156 health practitioners and 11 semi-structured interviews. Practitioners reported low attendance for preconception care however, 51% provided counselling on an opportunistic basis. Rural/remote practitioners were most likely to find counselling feasible. The majority (69%) utilised appropriate guidelines and addressed lifestyle modifications including smoking (81%), weight management (79%), and change medications appropriately such as ceasing ACE inhibitors (69%). Fewer (40%) prescribed the recommended dose of folate (5mg) or felt comfortable recommending delaying pregnancy to achieve optimal preconception glucose control (42%). Themes identified as barriers to care included the complexity of care setting and infrequent preconception consultations. There was a focus on motivation of women to make informed choices about conception, including birth spacing, timing and contraception. Preconception care enablers included cross-cultural communication, a multi-disciplinary care team and strong client-based relationships. Health practitioners are keen to provide preconception counselling and reported knowledge of evidence-based guidelines. Improvements are needed in recommending high dose folate and optimising glucose control. Cross-cultural communication and team-based care were reported as fundamental to successful preconception care in women with T2DM. Continued education and policy changes are required to support practitioners in opportunities to enhance pregnancy planning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Transdisciplinary collaboration and endorsement of pharmacological and psychosocial evidence-based practices by medical and psychosocial substance abuse treatment providers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Rogério M; Spector, Anya Y; Yu, Gary; Campbell, Aimee N C

    To examine the relative contribution of providers' professional affiliation (medical vs. non-medical), involvement in research, and training needs for associations with endorsement of the following evidence-based practices (EBPs): (1) pharmacological - buprenorphine treatment and (2) psychosocial - Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). Secondary analysis from a 2008 survey of a national sample (n = 571) of substance abuse treatment providers (medical, social workers, psychologists and counsellors) affiliated with the United States National Institute on Drug Abuse's National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network. Multivariate linear regression models to analyze cross-sectional survey data. Results demonstrated that medical providers and providers with previous research involvement more strongly endorsed the effectiveness of buprenorphine over CBT. Compared to medical providers, psychosocial providers more strongly endorsed CBT. There was a positive association between needing training in rapport with patients and endorsement of buprenorphine and a negative association with CBT. There was a positive association between needing training in behavioural management and needs assessment and endorsement of CBT. Results underscore the importance of providers' involvement in research and the need for training medical and non-medical providers in practice areas that can purposely enhance their use of pharmacological and psychosocial EBPs.

  6. Association of State-Level Restrictions in Nurse Practitioner Scope of Practice With the Quality of Primary Care Provided to Medicare Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perloff, Jennifer; Clarke, Sean; DesRoches, Catherine M; O'Reilly-Jacob, Monica; Buerhaus, Peter

    2017-09-01

    State scope of practice (SoP) laws impose significant restrictions on the services that a nurse practitioner (NP) may provide in some states, yet evidence about SoP limitations on the quality of primary care is very limited. This study uses six different classifications of state regulations and bivariate and multivariate analyses to compare beneficiaries attributed to primary care nurse practitioners and primary care physicians in 2013 testing two hypotheses: (1) chronic disease management, cancer screening, preventable hospitalizations, and adverse outcomes of care provided by primary care nurse practitioners are better in reduced and restricted practice states compared to states without restrictions and (2) by decreasing access to care, SoP restrictions negatively affect the quality of primary care. Results show a lack of consistent association between quality of primary care provided by NPs and state SoP restrictions. State regulations restricting NP SoP do not improve the quality of care.

  7. Targeting the robo-advice customer: the development of a psychographic segmentation model for financial advice robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thiel, D.; van Raaij, W.F.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the world’s first psychographic market segmentation model that supports personalization, customer education, customer activation, and customer engagement strategies with financial advice robots. As traditional segmentation models in consumer finance primarily

  8. Screening for cancer: advice for high-value care from the American College of Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Timothy J; Harris, Russell P; Qaseem, Amir

    2015-05-19

    Cancer screening is one approach to reducing cancer-related morbidity and mortality rates. Screening strategies vary in intensity. Higher-intensity strategies are not necessarily higher value. High-value strategies provide a degree of benefits that clearly justifies the harms and costs incurred; low-value screening provides limited or no benefits to justify the harms and costs. When cancer screening leads to benefits, an optimal intensity of screening maximizes value. Some aspects of screening practices, especially overuse and underuse, are low value. Screening strategies for asymptomatic, average-risk adults for 5 common types of cancer were evaluated by reviewing clinical guidelines and evidence syntheses from the American College of Physicians (ACP), U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, American Academy of Family Physicians, American Cancer Society, American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, American Gastroenterological Association, and American Urological Association. "High value" was defined as the lowest screening intensity threshold at which organizations agree about screening recommendations for each type of cancer and "low value" as agreement about not recommending overly intensive screening strategies. This information is supplemented with additional findings from randomized, controlled trials; modeling studies; and studies of costs or resource use, including information found in the National Cancer Institute's Physician Data Query and UpToDate. The ACP provides high-value care screening advice for 5 common types of cancer; the specifics are outlined in this article. The ACP strongly encourages clinicians to adopt a cancer screening strategy that focuses on reaching all eligible persons with these high-value screening options while reducing overly intensive, low-value screening.

  9. Arbovirus models to provide practical management tools for mosquito control and disease prevention in the Northern Territory, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacups, Susan P; Whelan, Peter I; Harley, David

    2011-03-01

    Ross River virus (RRV) causes the most common human arbovirus disease in Australia. Although the disease is nonfatal, the associated arthritis and postinfection fatigue can be debilitating for many months, impacting on workforce participation. We sought to create an early-warning system to notify of approaching RRV disease outbreak conditions for major townships in the Northern Territory. By applying a logistic regression model to meteorologic factors, including rainfall, a postestimation analysis of sensitivity and specificity can create rainfall cut-points. These rainfall cut-points indicate the rainfall level above which previous epidemic conditions have occurred. Furthermore, rainfall cut-points indirectly adjust for vertebrate host data from the agile wallaby (Macropus agilis) as the life cycle of the agile wallaby is intricately meshed with the wet season. Once generated, cut-points can thus be used prospectively to allow timely implementation of larval survey and control measures and public health warnings to preemptively reduce RRV disease incidence. Cut-points are location specific and have the capacity to replace previously used models, which require data management and input, and rarely provide timely notification for vector control requirements and public health warnings. These methods can be adapted for use elsewhere.

  10. Knowledge and Practices Relating to Acute Pesticide Poisoning Among Health Care Providers in Selected Regions of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elikana Lekei

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute pesticide poisoning (APP is commonly underdiagnosed in Tanzania. Studies in developing countries suggest that a lack of diagnostic skills among health care providers (HCPs undermines surveillance for APP. This study aimed at characterizing experience and skills of Tanzanian HCPs regarding APP diagnosis and management. Methodology: The population included HCPs responsible for managing APP in Kilimanjaro and Arusha regions (n = 91. The resulting sample included 66 respondents (response rate: 73%. The data were collected in 2005 using a standardized questionnaire. Results: Half of all respondents (50% reported handling at least 1 APP case with 15% reporting handling more than 5 cases in the past. Reported experience of handling an APP case was marginally higher in respondents who reported ⩾4 years of work experience in the health sector compared with those with <4 years of work experience (odds ratio = 1.32; 95% confidence interval = 0.9-1.5. Most of the respondents had high knowledge of exposure routes, reporting awareness of oral (98.5%, inhalational (93.9%, and dermal (77% routes. The study revealed low awareness of pesticide classification by chemical groups (29% or World Health Organization hazard (0% and weak knowledge on pesticide label instructions (55%. Organophosphates accounted for 35% of the pesticide products reported by respondents as being responsible for poisoning. Some treatment options were incorrectly reported as first aid options, and some reported first aid options were wrong or inappropriate. Conclusions: The study revealed that HCPs in northern Tanzania lack adequate skills to diagnose and manage APP. For effective surveillance of APP, there is a need to include training on hazards, classification, diagnosis, and health effects in the training programmes for all HCPs in Tanzania.

  11. Rationale, design and methods of the Study of Work and Pain (SWAP): a cluster randomised controlled trial testing the addition of a vocational advice service to best current primary care for patients with musculoskeletal pain (ISRCTN 52269669).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Annette; Wynne-Jones, Gwenllian; Lawton, Sarah A; van der Windt, Danielle; Main, Chris; Sowden, Gail; Burton, A Kim; Lewis, Martyn; Jowett, Sue; Sanders, Tom; Hay, Elaine M; Foster, Nadine E

    2014-07-10

    Musculoskeletal pain is a major contributor to short and long term work absence. Patients seek care from their general practitioner (GP) and yet GPs often feel ill-equipped to deal with work issues. Providing a vocational case management service in primary care, to support patients with musculoskeletal problems to remain at or return to work, is one potential solution but requires robust evaluation to test clinical and cost-effectiveness. This protocol describes a cluster randomised controlled trial, with linked qualitative interviews, to investigate the effect of introducing a vocational advice service into general practice, to provide a structured approach to managing work related issues in primary care patients with musculoskeletal pain who are absent from work or struggling to remain in work. General practices (n = 6) will be randomised to offer best current care or best current care plus a vocational advice service. Adults of working age who are absent from or struggling to remain in work due to a musculoskeletal pain problem will be invited to participate and 330 participants will be recruited. Data collection will be through patient completed questionnaires at baseline, 4 and 12 months. The primary outcome is self-reported work absence at 4 months. Incremental cost-utility analysis will be undertaken to calculate the cost per additional QALY gained and incremental net benefits. A linked interview study will explore the experiences of the vocational advice service from the perspectives of GPs, nurse practitioners (NPs), patients and vocational advisors. This paper presents the rationale, design, and methods of the Study of Work And Pain (SWAP) trial. The results of this trial will provide evidence to inform primary care practice and guide the development of services to provide support for musculoskeletal pain patients with work-related issues. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN52269669.

  12. Provider performance in treating poor patients - factors influencing prescribing practices in lao PDR: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petzold Max

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Out-of-pocket payments make up about 80% of medical care spending at hospitals in Laos, thereby putting poor households at risk of catastrophic health expenditure. Social security schemes in the form of community-based health insurance and health equity funds have been introduced in some parts of the country. Drug and Therapeutics Committees (DTCs have been established to ensure rational use of drugs and improve quality of care. The objective was to assess the appropriateness and expenditure for treatment for poor patients by health care providers at hospitals in three selected provinces of Laos and to explore associated factors. Methods Cross-sectional study using four tracer conditions. Structured interviews with 828 in-patients at twelve provincial and district hospitals on the subject of insurance protection, income and expenditures for treatment, including informal payment. Evaluation of each patient's medical record for appropriateness of drug use using a checklist of treatment guidelines (maximum score = 10. Results No significant difference in appropriateness of care for patients at different income levels, but higher expenditures for patients with the highest income level. The score for appropriate drug use in insured patients was significantly higher than uninsured patients (5.9 vs. 4.9, and the length of stay in days significantly shorter (2.7 vs. 3.7. Insured patients paid significantly less than uninsured patients, both for medicines (USD 14.8 vs. 43.9 and diagnostic tests (USD 5.9 vs. 9.2. On the contrary the score for appropriateness of drug use in patients making informal payments was significantly lower than patients not making informal payments (3.5 vs. 5.1, and the length of stay significantly longer (6.8 vs. 3.2, while expenditures were significantly higher both for medicines (USD 124.5 vs. 28.8 and diagnostic tests (USD 14.1 vs. 7.7. Conclusions The lower expenditure for insured patients can help reduce

  13. Evidence-based obstetrics in four hospitals in China: An observational study to explore clinical practice, women's preferences and provider's views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ji

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based obstetric care is widely promoted in developing countries, but the success of implementation is not known. Using selected childbirth care procedures in four hospitals in Shanghai, we compared practice against evidence-based information, and explored user and provider views about each procedure. Methods Observational study. Using the Cochrane Library, we identified six procedures that should be avoided as routine and two that should be encouraged. Procedure rate determined by exit interviews with women, verified using hospital notes. Views of women and providers explored with in depth interviews. The study sites were three hospitals in Shanghai and one in neighbouring province of Jiangsu. 150 women at each centre for procedure rate, and 48 in-depth interviews with women and providers. Results Vaginal births were 50% (303/599 of the total. Of the six practices where evidence suggests they should be avoided as routine, three were performed with rates above 70%: pubic shaving (3 hospitals, rectal examination (3 hospitals, and episiotomy (3 hospitals. Most women delivered lying down, pain relief was rarely given, and only in the urban district hospital did women routinely have a companion. Most women wanted support or companionship during labour and to be given pain relief; but current practice is insufficient to meet women's needs. Conclusion Obstetric practice is not following best available evidence in the hospitals studied. There is a need to adjust hospital policy to support the use of interventions proven to be of benefit to women during childbirth, and develop approaches that ensure clinical practice changes.

  14. Calcium and Vitamin D Supplement Prescribing Practices among Providers Caring for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Are We Addressing Bone Health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shylaja Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD have several risk factors for low bone mineral density. The gluten-free, casein-free (GFCF diet is a complementary therapy sometimes used in ASD that raises concerns for the adequacy of calcium and vitamin D intake. This study evaluated the prescribing practices of calcium and vitamin D supplements and the practice of checking 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OHD levels by providers in 100 children with ASD, 50 of whom were on the GFCF diet. Fifty-two percent and 46% of children on the GFCF diet were on some form of vitamin D and calcium supplements, respectively, compared to 18% and 14% of those not on this diet. Twenty-four percent of children in the GFCF group had a documented 25(OHD level compared to none in the non-GFCF group. The data highlight a gap in calcium and vitamin D supplement prescribing practices among providers caring for children with ASD as well as a gap in the practice of checking 25(OHD levels.

  15. Model-based aviation advice on distal volcanic ash clouds by assimilating aircraft in situ measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Guangliang; Heemink, A.W.; Lu, S.; Segers, AJ; Weber, Konradin; Lin, H.X.

    2016-01-01

    The forecast accuracy of distal volcanic ash clouds is important for providing valid aviation advice during volcanic ash eruption. However, because the distal part of volcanic ash plume is far from the volcano, the influence of eruption information on this part becomes rather indirect and uncertain, resulting in inaccurate volcanic ash forecasts in these distal areas. In our approach, we use real-life aircraft in situ observations, measured in the northwestern part of Germany during the 2010 ...

  16. Citizens' views on the practices of zero-grazing and cow-calf separation in the dairy industry: Does providing information increase acceptability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hötzel, Maria J; Cardoso, Clarissa S; Roslindo, Angélica; von Keyserlingk, Marina A G

    2017-05-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess the influence of provision of information on lay citizens' opinions regarding 2 common management practices, zero-grazing and cow-calf separation. To aid in the interpretation of the findings, our secondary aim was to explore the awareness and opinions of Brazilian citizens about these practices. We surveyed a convenience sample of Brazilian citizens (192 men and 208 women), recruited in a public place, with the majority stating that they were largely unfamiliar with animal production and lived in urban environments. Participants were presented short scenarios with information on the primary production factors and welfare concerns for and against zero-grazing (n = 200) or cow-calf separation (n = 200). Participants were then asked to state their position (reject, indifferent, or support), and to provide the reason(s) justifying their position. Immediately following, participants were provided a short statement describing either zero-grazing or cow-calf separation, depending on what question they responded to in the first part. Two closed questions (Q) followed each of these statements: (Q1) "Are you aware of this practice?" with choices yes, somewhat, or no, and (Q2) "What is your position regarding this practice?" with choices reject, indifferent, or support. Only 31 and 33% of the respondents were aware of zero-grazing and cow-calf separation, respectively. Previous awareness of existence of practice did not influence levels of support. Provision of information resulted in more people rejecting the practices of zero-grazing and cow-calf separation. Participants' main justifications to reject zero-grazing and cow-calf separation focused on perceived negative effects of practices on farm animal welfare and product quality, and loss of naturalness. Survey participants, Brazilians living in urban environments, with little or no association with dairy production, were generally unaware that many cows do not have access to

  17. "I think we've got too many tests!": Prenatal providers' reflections on ethical and clinical challenges in the practice integration of cell-free DNA screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, B L; Kraft, S A; Michie, M; Allyse, M

    2016-01-01

    The recent introduction of cell-free DNA-based non-invasive prenatal screening (cfDNA screening) into clinical practice was expected to revolutionize prenatal testing. cfDNA screening for fetal aneuploidy has demonstrated higher test sensitivity and specificity for some conditions than conventional serum screening and can be conducted early in the pregnancy. However, it is not clear whether and how clinical practices are assimilating this new type of testing into their informed consent and counselling processes. Since the introduction of cfDNA screening into practice in 2011, the uptake and scope have increased dramatically. Prenatal care providers are under pressure to stay up to date with rapidly changing cfDNA screening panels, manage increasing patient demands, and keep up with changing test costs, all while attempting to use the technology responsibly and ethically. While clinical literature on cfDNA screening has shown benefits for specific patient populations, it has also identified significant misunderstandings among providers and patients alike about the power of the technology. The unique features of cfDNA screening, in comparison to established prenatal testing technologies, have implications for informed decision-making and genetic counselling that must be addressed to ensure ethical practice. This study explored the experiences of prenatal care providers at the forefront of non-invasive genetic screening in the United States to understand how this testing changes the practice of prenatal medicine. We aimed to learn how the experience of providing and offering this testing differs from established prenatal testing methodologies. These differences may necessitate changes to patient education and consent procedures to maintain ethical practice. We used the online American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Physician Directory to identify a systematic sample of five prenatal care providers in each U.S. state and the District of Columbia. Beginning

  18. Advice to Stay Active or Structured Exercise in the Management of Sciatica: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Matt; Hartvigsen, Jan; Ferreira, Manuela L; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Machado, Aryane F; Lemes, Ítalo R; Maher, Chris G; Ferreira, Paulo H

    2015-09-15

    A systematic review and meta-analysis. To evaluate the evidence on comparative effectiveness of advice to stay active versus supervised structured exercise in the management of sciatica. Conservative management of sciatica usually includes interventions to promote physical activity in the form of advice to stay active or exercise, but there has been no systematic review directly comparing the effectiveness of these 2 approaches. Data Sources included MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PEDro databases. Studies were randomized controlled trials comparing advice with exercise. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the PEDro scale. Pain and disability data were extracted for all time points and converted to a common 0 to 100 scale. Data were pooled with a random effects model for short, intermediate, and long-term follow-ups. The GRADE approach was used to summarize the strength of evidence. Five trials were included in the meta-analysis, which showed a significant, although small effect favoring exercise over advice for reducing leg pain intensity in the short term (weighted mean difference: 11.43 [95% confidence interval, 0.71-22.16]) but no difference for disability (weighted mean difference: 1.45 [95% confidence interval, -2.86 to 5.76]). Furthermore, there was no difference at intermediate and long-term follow-ups between advice and exercise for patient-relevant outcomes. There is low-quality evidence (GRADE) that exercise provides small, superior effects compared with advice to stay active on leg pain in the short term for patients experiencing sciatica. However, there is moderate-quality evidence showing no difference between advice to stay active and exercise on leg pain and disability status in people with sciatica in the long term. 1.

  19. Incorporating cancer risk information into general practice: a qualitative study using focus groups with health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher-Smith, Juliet A; Silarova, Barbora; Ward, Alison; Youell, Jane; Muir, Kenneth R; Campbell, Jackie; Warcaba, Joanne

    2017-03-01

    It is estimated that approximately 40% of all cases of cancer are attributable to lifestyle factors. Providing people with personalised information about their future risk of cancer may help promote behaviour change. To explore the views of health professionals on incorporating personalised cancer risk information, based on lifestyle factors, into general practice. Qualitative study using data from six focus groups with a total of 24 general practice health professionals from the NHS Nene Clinical Commissioning Group in England. The focus groups were guided by a schedule covering current provision of lifestyle advice relating to cancer and views on incorporating personalised cancer risk information. Data were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and then analysed using thematic analysis. Providing lifestyle advice was viewed as a core activity within general practice but the influence of lifestyle on cancer risk was rarely discussed. The word 'cancer' was seen as a potentially powerful motivator for lifestyle change but the fact that it could generate health anxiety was also recognised. Most focus group participants felt that a numerical risk estimate was more likely to influence behaviour than generic advice. All felt that general practice should provide this information, but there was a clear need for additional resources for it to be offered widely. Study participants were in support of providing personalised cancer risk information in general practice. The findings highlight a number of potential benefits and challenges that will inform the future development of interventions in general practice to promote behaviour change for cancer prevention. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  20. The IDEAL study: investigation of dietary advice and lifestyle for women with borderline gestational diabetes: a randomised controlled trial - study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Caroline A; Hague, William M; Middleton, Philippa F; Baghurst, Peter A; McPhee, Andrew J; Tran, Thach S; Yelland, Lisa N; Ashwood, Pat; Han, Shan; Dodd, Jodie M; Robinson, Jeffrey S

    2012-10-09

    The Australian Carbohydrate Intolerance Study in Pregnant Women (ACHOIS) showed that treatment of pregnant women with mild gestational diabetes mellitus is beneficial for both women and their infants. It is still uncertain whether there are benefits of similar treatment for women with borderline gestational diabetes.This trial aims to assess whether dietary and lifestyle advice and treatment given to pregnant women who screen for borderline gestational diabetes reduces neonatal complications and maternal morbidities. Multicentre, randomised controlled trial. Women between 240 and 346 weeks gestation with a singleton pregnancy, a positive oral glucose challenge test (venous plasma glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L) and a normal oral 75 gram glucose tolerance test (fasting venous plasma glucose Women with an abnormal oral glucose tolerance test (fasting venous plasma glucose ≥5.5 mmol/L or 2 hour glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L) will not be eligible and will be offered treatment for gestational diabetes, consistent with recommendations based on results of the ACHOIS trial. Eligible women will be randomised into either the 'Routine Care Group' or the 'Intervention Group'.Study groups: Women in the 'Routine Care Group' will receive routine obstetric care reflecting current clinical practice in Australian hospitals. Women in the 'Intervention Group' will receive obstetric care, which will include dietary and lifestyle advice, monitoring of blood glucose and further medical treatment for hyperglycaemia as appropriate.Primary study outcome: Incidence of large for gestational age infants. A sample size of 682 women will be sufficient to show a 50% reduction in the risk of large for gestational age infants (alpha 0.05 two-tailed, 80% power, 4% loss to follow up) from 14% to 7% with dietary and lifestyle advice and treatment. A conclusive trial outcome will provide reliable evidence of relevance for the care of women with borderline glucose intolerance in pregnancy and their infants. Australian