WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing potential targets

  1. Vitiligo blood transcriptomics provides new insights into disease mechanisms and identifies potential novel therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey-Rao, Rama; Sinha, Animesh A

    2017-01-28

    Significant gaps remain regarding the pathomechanisms underlying the autoimmune response in vitiligo (VL), where the loss of self-tolerance leads to the targeted killing of melanocytes. Specifically, there is incomplete information regarding alterations in the systemic environment that are relevant to the disease state. We undertook a genome-wide profiling approach to examine gene expression in the peripheral blood of VL patients and healthy controls in the context of our previously published VL-skin gene expression profile. We used several in silico bioinformatics-based analyses to provide new insights into disease mechanisms and suggest novel targets for future therapy. Unsupervised clustering methods of the VL-blood dataset demonstrate a "disease-state"-specific set of co-expressed genes. Ontology enrichment analysis of 99 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) uncovers a down-regulated immune/inflammatory response, B-Cell antigen receptor (BCR) pathways, apoptosis and catabolic processes in VL-blood. There is evidence for both type I and II interferon (IFN) playing a role in VL pathogenesis. We used interactome analysis to identify several key blood associated transcriptional factors (TFs) from within (STAT1, STAT6 and NF-kB), as well as "hidden" (CREB1, MYC, IRF4, IRF1, and TP53) from the dataset that potentially affect disease pathogenesis. The TFs overlap with our reported lesional-skin transcriptional circuitry, underscoring their potential importance to the disease. We also identify a shared VL-blood and -skin transcriptional "hot spot" that maps to chromosome 6, and includes three VL-blood dysregulated genes (PSMB8, PSMB9 and TAP1) described as potential VL-associated genetic susceptibility loci. Finally, we provide bioinformatics-based support for prioritizing dysregulated genes in VL-blood or skin as potential therapeutic targets. We examined the VL-blood transcriptome in context with our (previously published) VL-skin transcriptional profile to address

  2. Potential targets for lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified potential therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network study comprehensively characterized the lung squamous cell carcinoma gen

  3. Obesity: Current and potential pharmacotherapeutics and targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswami, Vidya; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2017-02-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic that contributes to a number of health complications including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neuropsychiatric disorders. Pharmacotherapeutic strategies to treat obesity are urgently needed. Research over the past two decades has increased substantially our knowledge of central and peripheral mechanisms underlying homeostatic energy balance. Homeostatic mechanisms involve multiple components including neuronal circuits, some originating in hypothalamus and brain stem, as well as peripherally-derived satiety, hunger and adiposity signals that modulate neural activity and regulate eating behavior. Dysregulation of one or more of these homeostatic components results in obesity. Coincident with obesity, reward mechanisms that regulate hedonic aspects of food intake override the homeostatic regulation of eating. In addition to functional interactions between homeostatic and reward systems in the regulation of food intake, homeostatic signals have the ability to alter vulnerability to drug abuse. Regarding the treatment of obesity, pharmacological monotherapies primarily focus on a single protein target. FDA-approved monotherapy options include phentermine (Adipex-P®), orlistat (Xenical®), lorcaserin (Belviq®) and liraglutide (Saxenda®). However, monotherapies have limited efficacy, in part due to the recruitment of alternate and counter-regulatory pathways. Consequently, a multi-target approach may provide greater benefit. Recently, two combination products have been approved by the FDA to treat obesity, including phentermine/topiramate (Qsymia®) and naltrexone/bupropion (Contrave®). The current review provides an overview of homeostatic and reward mechanisms that regulate energy balance, potential therapeutic targets for obesity and current treatment options, including some candidate therapeutics in clinical development. Finally, challenges in anti-obesity drug development are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  4. Obesity: Current and Potential Pharmacotherapeutics and Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswami, Vidya; Dwoskin, Linda P.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic that contributes to a number of health complications including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neuropsychiatric disorders. Pharmacotherapeutic strategies to treat obesity are urgently needed. Research over the past two decades has increased substantially our knowledge of central and peripheral mechanisms underlying homeostatic energy balance. Homeostatic mechanisms involve multiple components including neuronal circuits, some originating in hypothalamus and brain stem, as well as peripherally-derived satiety, hunger and adiposity signals that modulate neural activity and regulate eating behavior. Dysregulation of one or more of these homeostatic components results in obesity. Coincident with obesity, reward mechanisms that regulate hedonic aspects of food intake override the homeostatic regulation of eating. In addition to functional interactions between homeostatic and reward systems in the regulation of food intake, homeostatic signals have the ability to alter vulnerability to drug abuse. Regarding the treatment of obesity, pharmacological monotherapies primarily focus on a single protein target. FDA-approved monotherapy options include phentermine (Adipex-P®), orlistat (Xenical®), lorcaserin (Belviq®) and liraglutide (Saxenda®). However, monotherapies have limited efficacy, in part due to the recruitment of alternate and counter-regulatory pathways. Consequently, a multi-target approach may provide greater benefit. Recently, two combination products have been approved by the FDA to treat obesity, including phentermine/topiramate (Qsymia®) and naltrexone/bupropion (Contrave®). The current review provides an overview of homeostatic and reward mechanisms that regulate energy balance, potential therapeutic targets for obesity and current treatment options, including some candidate therapeutics in clinical development. Finally, challenges in anti-obesity drug development are discussed. PMID:27773782

  5. Proteomic and transcriptomic analysis of heart failure due to volume overload in a rat aorto-caval fistula model provides support for new potential therapeutic targets - monoamine oxidase A and transglutaminase 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrak Jiri

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic hemodynamic overloading leads to heart failure (HF due to incompletely understood mechanisms. To gain deeper insight into the molecular pathophysiology of volume overload-induced HF and to identify potential markers and targets for novel therapies, we performed proteomic and mRNA expression analysis comparing myocardium from Wistar rats with HF induced by a chronic aorto-caval fistula (ACF and sham-operated rats harvested at the advanced, decompensated stage of HF. Methods We analyzed control and failing myocardium employing iTRAQ labeling, two-dimensional peptide separation combining peptide IEF and nano-HPLC with MALDI-MS/MS. For the transcriptomic analysis we employed Illumina RatRef-12v1 Expression BeadChip. Results In the proteomic analysis we identified 2030 myocardial proteins, of which 66 proteins were differentially expressed. The mRNA expression analysis identified 851 differentially expressed mRNAs. Conclusions The differentially expressed proteins confirm a switch in the substrate preference from fatty acids to other sources in the failing heart. Failing hearts showed downregulation of the major calcium transporters SERCA2 and ryanodine receptor 2 and altered expression of creatine kinases. Decreased expression of two NADPH producing proteins suggests a decreased redox reserve. Overexpression of annexins supports their possible potential as HF biomarkers. Most importantly, among the most up-regulated proteins in ACF hearts were monoamine oxidase A and transglutaminase 2 that are both potential attractive targets of low molecular weight inhibitors in future HF therapy.

  6. Potential targets for the treatment of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyston, Charlotte J; Stanley, Joanna L; Baker, Philip N

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a disorder of pregnancy, typically characterized by hypertension and proteinuria observed after the 20th week of gestation. Preeclampsia has dire consequences for both maternal and neonatal health: it is associated with 50,000 - 100,000 annual deaths globally, as well as serious fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality, including increased risk of fetal growth restriction and still birth. Despite the severe health, social, and economic costs of preeclampsia, currently the only curative therapy is delivery of the baby and placenta, which itself carries the associated risks of premature birth. The lack of treatments for this condition is attributable to a number of causes, including but not limited to: a partial understanding of the complex pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this complex disease; an inability to sensitively predict women who will go on to develop the disease; and a paucity of robust animal models with which to test new treatments. Recently, progress has been made in identifying potential new therapeutic targets. This review will discuss in detail the evidence supporting further investigation of these targets, which include angiogenic factors, agents that increase vasodilation, anti-inflammatory drugs, substances that reduce oxidative stress, and statins. New therapeutic targets have the potential to make a significant positive impact on maternal and neonatal health. It is exciting that a number of potential therapies are currently being investigated; however, it is also vital that basic research continues to identify potential mechanisms and targets, and that any potential therapy is thoroughly tested before progression to clinical trial.

  7. Metalloproteinases: potential therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    In different inflammatory diseases, many metalloproteinases are over expressed and thought to promote progression of the disease. Understanding roles of these enzymes in disease progression as well as in normal homeostasis is crucial to identify target enzymes for the disease. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the autoimmune inflammatory diseases in which around 1-2 % of the world populations are suffered from. Roles of metalloproteinases are well documented in RA, but so far none of them is proposed to be a target enzyme. However, there are at least three enzymes that can potentially be molecular targets to inhibit progression of RA. Understanding roles of these enzymes in more detail and developing highly selective inhibitors to these enzymes would be essential for novel antimetalloproteinase therapies in future.

  8. Activating mutations in ALK provide a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Rani E; Sanda, Takaomi; Hanna, Megan; Fröhling, Stefan; Luther, William; Zhang, Jianming; Ahn, Yebin; Zhou, Wenjun; London, Wendy B; McGrady, Patrick; Xue, Liquan; Zozulya, Sergey; Gregor, Vlad E; Webb, Thomas R; Gray, Nathanael S; Gilliland, D Gary; Diller, Lisa; Greulich, Heidi; Morris, Stephan W; Meyerson, Matthew; Look, A Thomas

    2008-10-16

    Neuroblastoma, an embryonal tumour of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system, accounts for approximately 15% of all deaths due to childhood cancer. High-risk neuroblastomas are rapidly progressive; even with intensive myeloablative chemotherapy, relapse is common and almost uniformly fatal. Here we report the detection of previously unknown mutations in the ALK gene, which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, in 8% of primary neuroblastomas. Five non-synonymous sequence variations were identified in the kinase domain of ALK, of which three were somatic and two were germ line. The most frequent mutation, F1174L, was also identified in three different neuroblastoma cell lines. ALK complementary DNAs encoding the F1174L and R1275Q variants, but not the wild-type ALK cDNA, transformed interleukin-3-dependent murine haematopoietic Ba/F3 cells to cytokine-independent growth. Ba/F3 cells expressing these mutations were sensitive to the small-molecule inhibitor of ALK, TAE684 (ref. 4). Furthermore, two human neuroblastoma cell lines harbouring the F1174L mutation were also sensitive to the inhibitor. Cytotoxicity was associated with increased amounts of apoptosis as measured by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of ALK expression in neuroblastoma cell lines with the F1174L mutation also resulted in apoptosis and impaired cell proliferation. Thus, activating alleles of the ALK receptor tyrosine kinase are present in primary neuroblastoma tumours and in established neuroblastoma cell lines, and confer sensitivity to ALK inhibition with small molecules, providing a molecular rationale for targeted therapy of this disease.

  9. Therapeutic Potential of Targeting the Ghrelin Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colldén, Gustav; Tschöp, Matthias H; Müller, Timo D

    2017-04-11

    Ghrelin was discovered in 1999 as the endogenous ligand of the growth-hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR1a). Since then, ghrelin has been found to exert a plethora of physiological effects that go far beyond its initial characterization as a growth hormone (GH) secretagogue. Among the numerous well-established effects of ghrelin are the stimulation of appetite and lipid accumulation, the modulation of immunity and inflammation, the stimulation of gastric motility, the improvement of cardiac performance, the modulation of stress, anxiety, taste sensation and reward-seeking behavior, as well as the regulation of glucose metabolism and thermogenesis. Due to a variety of beneficial effects on systems' metabolism, pharmacological targeting of the endogenous ghrelin system is widely considered a valuable approach to treat metabolic complications, such as chronic inflammation, gastroparesis or cancer-associated anorexia and cachexia. The aim of this review is to discuss and highlight the broad pharmacological potential of ghrelin pathway modulation for the treatment of anorexia, cachexia, sarcopenia, cardiopathy, neurodegenerative disorders, renal and pulmonary disease, gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, inflammatory disorders and metabolic syndrome.

  10. Promoting target models by potential measures

    OpenAIRE

    Dubiel, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    Direct marketers use target models in order to minimize the spreading loss of sales efforts. The application of target models has become more widespread with the increasing range of sales efforts. Target models are relevant for offline marketers sending printed mails as well as for online marketers who have to avoid intensity. However business has retained its evaluation since the late 1960s. Marketing decision-makers still prefer managerial performance measures of the economic benefit of a t...

  11. Protein tyrosine phosphatases as potential therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rong-Jun; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Ruo-Yu; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2014-10-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a key regulatory process in virtually all aspects of cellular functions. Dysregulation of protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a major cause of human diseases, such as cancers, diabetes, autoimmune disorders, and neurological diseases. Indeed, protein tyrosine phosphorylation-mediated signaling events offer ample therapeutic targets, and drug discovery efforts to date have brought over two dozen kinase inhibitors to the clinic. Accordingly, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are considered next-generation drug targets. For instance, PTP1B is a well-known targets of type 2 diabetes and obesity, and recent studies indicate that it is also a promising target for breast cancer. SHP2 is a bona-fide oncoprotein, mutations of which cause juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and solid tumors. In addition, LYP is strongly associated with type 1 diabetes and many other autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes recent findings on several highly recognized PTP family drug targets, including PTP1B, Src homology phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2(SHP2), lymphoid-specific tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), CD45, Fas associated phosphatase-1 (FAP-1), striatal enriched tyrosine phosphatases (STEP), mitogen-activated protein kinase/dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (MKP-1), phosphatases of regenerating liver-1 (PRL), low molecular weight PTPs (LMWPTP), and CDC25. Given that there are over 100 family members, we hope this review will serve as a road map for innovative drug discovery targeting PTPs.

  12. Classification accuracy of claims-based methods for identifying providers failing to meet performance targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Rebecca A.; Benjamin-Johnson, Rhondee; Onega, Tracy; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Zhu, Weiwei; Fenton, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Quality assessment is critical for healthcare reform but data sources are lacking for measurement of many important healthcare outcomes. With over 49 million people covered by Medicare as of 2010, Medicare claims data offer a potentially valuable source that could be used in targeted health care quality improvement efforts. However, little is known about the operating characteristics of provider profiling methods using claims-based outcome measures that may estimate provider performance with error. Motivated by the example of screening mammography performance, we compared approaches to identifying providers failing to meet guideline targets using Medicare claims data. We used data from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium and linked Medicare claims to compare claims-based and clinical estimates of cancer detection rate. We then demonstrated the performance of claim-based estimates across a broad range of operating characteristics using simulation studies. We found that identification of poor performing providers was extremely sensitive to algorithm specificity, with no approach identifying more than 65% of poorly performing providers when claims-based measures had specificity of 0.995 or less. We conclude that claims have the potential to contribute important information on healthcare outcomes to quality improvement efforts. However, to achieve this potential, development of highly accurate claims-based outcome measures should remain a priority. PMID:25302935

  13. Virtual target screening to rapidly identify potential protein targets of natural products in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Pevzner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Inherent biological viability and diversity of natural products make them a potentially rich source for new therapeutics. However, identification of bioactive compounds with desired therapeutic effects and identification of their protein targets is a laborious, expensive process. Extracts from organism samples may show desired activity in phenotypic assays but specific bioactive compounds must be isolated through further separation methods and protein targets must be identified by more specific phenotypic and in vitro experimental assays. Still, questions remain as to whether all relevant protein targets for a compound have been identified. The desire is to understand breadth of purposing for the compound to maximize its use and intellectual property, and to avoid further development of compounds with insurmountable adverse effects. Previously we developed a Virtual Target Screening system that computationally screens one or more compounds against a collection of virtual protein structures. By scoring each compound-protein interaction, we can compare against averaged scores of synthetic drug-like compounds to determine if a particular protein would be a potential target of a compound of interest. Here we provide examples of natural products screened through our system as we assess advantages and shortcomings of our current system in regards to natural product drug discovery.

  14. Virtual target screening to rapidly identify potential protein targets of natural products in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Pevzner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Inherent biological viability and diversity of natural products make them a potentially rich source for new therapeutics. However, identification of bioactive compounds with desired therapeutic effects and identification of their protein targets is a laborious, expensive process. Extracts from organism samples may show desired activity in phenotypic assays but specific bioactive compounds must be isolated through further separation methods and protein targets must be identified by more specific phenotypic and in vitro experimental assays. Still, questions remain as to whether all relevant protein targets for a compound have been identified. The desire is to understand breadth of purposing for the compound to maximize its use and intellectual property, and to avoid further development of compounds with insurmountable adverse effects. Previously we developed a Virtual Target Screening system that computationally screens one or more compounds against a collection of virtual protein structures. By scoring each compound-protein interaction, we can compare against averaged scores of synthetic drug-like compounds to determine if a particular protein would be a potential target of a compound of interest. Here we provide examples of natural products screened through our system as we assess advantages and shortcomings of our current system in regards to natural product drug discovery.

  15. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com .

  16. Sphingolipid and Ceramide Homeostasis: Potential Therapeutic Targets

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    Simon A. Young

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells where they have been attributed a plethora of functions from the formation of structural domains to polarized cellular trafficking and signal transduction. Recent research has identified and characterised many of the key enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism and this has led to a heightened interest in the possibility of targeting these processes for therapies against cancers, Alzheimer's disease, and numerous important human pathogens. In this paper we outline the major pathways in eukaryotic sphingolipid metabolism and discuss these in relation to disease and therapy for both chronic and infectious conditions.

  17. Reactor potential for magnetized target fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, J.E

    2001-06-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a possible pathway to thermonuclear fusion different from both magnetic fusion and inertial confinement fusion. An imploding cylindrical metal liner compresses a preheated and magnetized plasma configuration until thermonuclear conditions are achieved. In this report the Magnetized Target Fusion concept is evaluated and a zero-dimensional computer model of the plasma, liner and circuit as a connected system is designed. The results of running this code are that thermonuclear conditions are achieved indeed, but only during a very short time. At peak compression the pressure from the compressed plasma and magnetic field is so large reversing the liner implosion into an explosion. The time period of liner motion reversal is termed the dwell time and is crucial to the performance of the fusion system. Parameters as liner thickness and plasma density are certainly of significant importance to the dwell time, but it seems like a reactor based on the MTF principle hardly can become economic if not innovative solutions are introduced. In the report two such solutions are presented as well.

  18. Prediction of potential drug targets based on simple sequence properties

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    Lai Luhua

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past decades, research and development in drug discovery have attracted much attention and efforts. However, only 324 drug targets are known for clinical drugs up to now. Identifying potential drug targets is the first step in the process of modern drug discovery for developing novel therapeutic agents. Therefore, the identification and validation of new and effective drug targets are of great value for drug discovery in both academia and pharmaceutical industry. If a protein can be predicted in advance for its potential application as a drug target, the drug discovery process targeting this protein will be greatly speeded up. In the current study, based on the properties of known drug targets, we have developed a sequence-based drug target prediction method for fast identification of novel drug targets. Results Based on simple physicochemical properties extracted from protein sequences of known drug targets, several support vector machine models have been constructed in this study. The best model can distinguish currently known drug targets from non drug targets at an accuracy of 84%. Using this model, potential protein drug targets of human origin from Swiss-Prot were predicted, some of which have already attracted much attention as potential drug targets in pharmaceutical research. Conclusion We have developed a drug target prediction method based solely on protein sequence information without the knowledge of family/domain annotation, or the protein 3D structure. This method can be applied in novel drug target identification and validation, as well as genome scale drug target predictions.

  19. Retinoids as potential targets for Alzheimer's disease.

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    Sodhi, Rupinder K; Singh, Nirmal

    2014-05-01

    Vitamin A and its derivatives, the retinoids, modulate several physiological and pathological processes through their interactions with nuclear retinoid receptor proteins termed as retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs). An increasing body of evidence signifies the existence of retinoid signaling in diverse brain areas including cortex, amygdala, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and striatum suggesting its involvement in adult brain functions. Defective retinoid signaling has been evidenced in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Reports demonstrate that vitamin A deprived mice exhibit serious defects in spatial learning and memory signifying its importance in the maintenance of memory functions. Retinoid signaling impacts the development of AD pathology through multiple pathways. Ligand activation of RAR and RXR in APP/PS1 transgenic mice ameliorated the symptoms of AD and reduced amyloid accumulation and tau hyperphosphorylation. Retinoids also reduce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by astrocytes and the microglia. Studies also suggest that neuronal cell lines treated with retinoid agonists exhibit an up-regulation in the expression and activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Reports depict that retinoic acid isomers enhance, the expression of genes linked with cholesterol efflux e.g. apoe, abca-1 and abcg-1 proteins in astrocytes. Furthermore numerous studies also indicate antioxidant potential of retinoids. Through this review we concisely summarize the biology of retinoids, emphasizing on their probable neuroprotective mechanisms that will help to elucidate the pivotal role of these receptors in AD pathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dyslipidemia in Obesity: Mechanisms and Potential Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Willem F. Elte

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has become a major worldwide health problem. In every single country in the world, the incidence of obesity is rising continuously and therefore, the associated morbidity, mortality and both medical and economical costs are expected to increase as well. The majority of these complications are related to co-morbid conditions that include coronary artery disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, respiratory disorders and dyslipidemia. Obesity increases cardiovascular risk through risk factors such as increased fasting plasma triglycerides, high LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, elevated blood glucose and insulin levels and high blood pressure. Novel lipid dependent, metabolic risk factors associated to obesity are the presence of the small dense LDL phenotype, postprandial hyperlipidemia with accumulation of atherogenic remnants and hepatic overproduction of apoB containing lipoproteins. All these lipid abnormalities are typical features of the metabolic syndrome and may be associated to a pro-inflammatory gradient which in part may originate in the adipose tissue itself and directly affect the endothelium. An important link between obesity, the metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia, seems to be the development of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues leading to an enhanced hepatic flux of fatty acids from dietary sources, intravascular lipolysis and from adipose tissue resistant to the antilipolytic effects of insulin. The current review will focus on these aspects of lipid metabolism in obesity and potential interventions to treat the obesity related dyslipidemia.

  1. Dyslipidemia in obesity: mechanisms and potential targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klop, Boudewijn; Elte, Jan Willem F; Cabezas, Manuel Castro

    2013-04-12

    Obesity has become a major worldwide health problem. In every single country in the world, the incidence of obesity is rising continuously and therefore, the associated morbidity, mortality and both medical and economical costs are expected to increase as well. The majority of these complications are related to co-morbid conditions that include coronary artery disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, respiratory disorders and dyslipidemia. Obesity increases cardiovascular risk through risk factors such as increased fasting plasma triglycerides, high LDL cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, elevated blood glucose and insulin levels and high blood pressure. Novel lipid dependent, metabolic risk factors associated to obesity are the presence of the small dense LDL phenotype, postprandial hyperlipidemia with accumulation of atherogenic remnants and hepatic overproduction of apoB containing lipoproteins. All these lipid abnormalities are typical features of the metabolic syndrome and may be associated to a pro-inflammatory gradient which in part may originate in the adipose tissue itself and directly affect the endothelium. An important link between obesity, the metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia, seems to be the development of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues leading to an enhanced hepatic flux of fatty acids from dietary sources, intravascular lipolysis and from adipose tissue resistant to the antilipolytic effects of insulin. The current review will focus on these aspects of lipid metabolism in obesity and potential interventions to treat the obesity related dyslipidemia.

  2. The potential predictability of fire danger provided by ECMWF forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giuseppe, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    The European Forest Fire Information System (EFFIS), is currently being developed in the framework of the Copernicus Emergency Management Services to monitor and forecast fire danger in Europe. The system provides timely information to civil protection authorities in 38 nations across Europe and mostly concentrates on flagging regions which might be at high danger of spontaneous ignition due to persistent drought. The daily predictions of fire danger conditions are based on the US Forest Service National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS), the Canadian forest service Fire Weather Index Rating System (FWI) and the Australian McArthur (MARK-5) rating systems. Weather forcings are provided in real time by the European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) forecasting system. The global system's potential predictability is assessed using re-analysis fields as weather forcings. The Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED4) provides 11 years of observed burned areas from satellite measurements and is used as a validation dataset. The fire indices implemented are good predictors to highlight dangerous conditions. High values are correlated with observed fire and low values correspond to non observed events. A more quantitative skill evaluation was performed using the Extremal Dependency Index which is a skill score specifically designed for rare events. It revealed that the three indices were more skilful on a global scale than the random forecast to detect large fires. The performance peaks in the boreal forests, in the Mediterranean, the Amazon rain-forests and southeast Asia. The skill-scores were then aggregated at country level to reveal which nations could potentiallty benefit from the system information in aid of decision making and fire control support. Overall we found that fire danger modelling based on weather forecasts, can provide reasonable predictability over large parts of the global landmass.

  3. Identification of a Potential Target of Capsaicin by Computational Target Fishing

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    Xuan-yi Ye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Capsaicin, the component responsible for the pungency of chili peppers, shows beneficial effects in many diseases, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the potential targets of capsaicin were predicted using PharmMapper and confirmed via chemical-protein interactome (CPI and molecular docking. Carbonic anhydrase 2 was identified as the main disease-related target, with the pharmacophore model matching well with the molecular features of capsaicin. The relation was confirmed by CPI and molecular docking and supported by previous research showing that capsaicin is a potent inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes. The present study provides a basis for understanding the mechanisms of action of capsaicin or those of other natural compounds.

  4. Smartphone medication adherence apps: potential benefits to patients and providers.

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    Dayer, Lindsey; Heldenbrand, Seth; Anderson, Paul; Gubbins, Paul O; Martin, Bradley C

    2013-01-01

    To provide an overview of medication adherence, discuss the potential for smartphone medication adherence applications (adherence apps) to improve medication nonadherence, evaluate features of adherence apps across operating systems (OSs), and identify future opportunities and barriers facing adherence apps. Medication nonadherence is a common, complex, and costly problem that contributes to poor treatment outcomes and consumes health care resources. Nonadherence is difficult to measure precisely, and interventions to mitigate it have been largely unsuccessful. Using smartphone adherence apps represents a novel approach to improving adherence. This readily available technology offers many features that can be designed to help patients and health care providers improve medication-taking behavior. Currently available apps were identified from the three main smartphone OSs (Apple, Android, and Blackberry). In addition, desirable features for adherence apps were identified and ranked by perceived importance to user desirability using a three-point rating system: 1, modest; 2, moderate; or 3, high. The 10 highest-rated apps were installed and subjected to user testing to assess app attributes using a standard medication regimen. RESULTS 160 adherence apps were identified and ranked. These apps were most prevalent for the Android OS. Adherence apps with advanced functionality were more prevalent on the Apple iPhone OS. Among all apps, MyMedSchedule, MyMeds, and RxmindMe rated the highest because of their basic medication reminder features coupled with their enhanced levels of functionality. Despite being untested, medication apps represent a possible strategy that pharmacists can recommend to nonadherent patients and incorporate into their practice.

  5. TCGA bladder cancer study reveals potential drug targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with TCGA have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease. They also discovered that, at the molecular level, some subtypes of bla

  6. Sample size calculations for clinical trials targeting tauopathies: A new potential disease target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Duffy, Joseph R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Machulda, Mary M.; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Weigand, Stephen D.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Spychalla, Anthony J.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford R.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Disease-modifying therapies are being developed to target tau pathology, and should, therefore, be tested in primary tauopathies. We propose that progressive apraxia of speech should be considered one such target group. In this study, we investigate potential neuroimaging and clinical outcome measures for progressive apraxia of speech and determine sample size estimates for clinical trials. We prospectively recruited 24 patients with progressive apraxia of speech who underwent two serial MRI with an interval of approximately two years. Detailed speech and language assessments included the Apraxia of Speech Rating Scale (ASRS) and Motor Speech Disorders (MSD) severity scale. Rates of ventricular expansion and rates of whole brain, striatal and midbrain atrophy were calculated. Atrophy rates across 38 cortical regions were also calculated and the regions that best differentiated patients from controls were selected. Sample size estimates required to power placebo-controlled treatment trials were calculated. The smallest sample size estimates were obtained with rates of atrophy of the precentral gyrus and supplementary motor area, with both measures requiring less than 50 subjects per arm to detect a 25% treatment effect with 80% power. These measures outperformed the other regional and global MRI measures and the clinical scales. Regional rates of cortical atrophy therefore provide the best outcome measures in progressive apraxia of speech. The small sample size estimates demonstrate feasibility for including progressive apraxia of speech in future clinical treatment trials targeting tau. PMID:26076744

  7. Dihydrofolate reductase: A potential drug target in trypanosomes and leishmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccotto, Fabio; Martin, Andrew C. R.; Laskowski, Roman A.; Thornton, Janet M.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    1998-05-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase has successfully been used as a drug target in the area of anti-cancer, anti-bacterial and anti-malarial chemotherapy. Little has been done to evaluate it as a drug target for treatment of the trypanosomiases and leishmaniasis. A crystal structure of Leishmania major dihydrofolate reductase has been published. In this paper, we describe the modelling of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei dihydrofolate reductases based on this crystal structure. These structures and models have been used in the comparison of protozoan, bacterial and human enzymes in order to highlight the different features that can be used in the design of selective anti-protozoan agents. Comparison has been made between residues present in the active site, the accessibility of these residues, charge distribution in the active site, and the shape and size of the active sites. Whilst there is a high degree of similarity between protozoan, human and bacterial dihydrofolate reductase active sites, there are differences that provide potential for selective drug design. In particular, we have identified a set of residues which may be important for selective drug design and identified a larger binding pocket in the protozoan than the human and bacterial enzymes.

  8. Potentialities of the internal target station at the Nuclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Malakhov, A I; Anisimov, Yu S; Artiomov, A S; Bazilev, S N; Khrenov, A N; Kliman, J; Krasnov, V A; Matousek, V; Morhac, M; Starikov, A Yu; Shabunov, A V; Slepnev, V M; Turzó, I

    2000-01-01

    The potentialities of the internal target station used in physics experiments at the Nuclotron, as well as its construction, hardware and software configurations are described. The remote control of the station is performed by means of a PC and is based on operative presentation of the magnetic field cycle, the beam parameters and the target position on screen. Consequently, the space-time trajectory of motion of a chosen target can be determined in an interactive way by an operator. During the accelerator operation the motion is carried out by means of a stepper motor.

  9. Metabolic Enzymes of Helminth Parasites: Potential as Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timson, David J

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways that extract energy from carbon compounds are essential for an organism's survival. Therefore, inhibition of enzymes in these pathways represents a potential therapeutic strategy to combat parasitic infections. However, the high degree of similarity between host and parasite enzymes makes this strategy potentially difficult. Nevertheless, several existing drugs to treat infections by parasitic helminths (worms) target metabolic enzymes. These include the trivalent antimonials that target phosphofructokinase and Clorsulon that targets phosphoglycerate mutase and phosphoglycerate kinase. Glycolytic enzymes from a variety of helminths have been characterised biochemically, and some inhibitors identified. To date none of these inhibitors have been developed into therapies. Many of these enzymes are externalised from the parasite and so are also of interest in the development of potential vaccines. Less work has been done on tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and oxidative phosphorylation complexes. Again, while some inhibitors have been identified none have been developed into drug-like molecules. Barriers to the development of novel drugs targeting metabolic enzymes include the lack of experimentally determined structures of helminth enzymes, lack of direct proof that the enzymes are vital in the parasites and lack of cell culture systems for many helminth species. Nevertheless, the success of Clorsulon (which discriminates between highly similar host and parasite enzymes) should inspire us to consider making serious efforts to discover novel anthelminthics, which target metabolic enzymes.

  10. Glycan Markers as Potential Immunological Targets in Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Denong; Wu, Lisa; Liu, Xiaohe

    2017-01-01

    We present here an experimental approach for exploring a new class of tumor biomarkers that are overexpressed by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and are likely targetable in immunotherapy against tumor metastasis. Using carbohydrate microarrays, anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were scanned against a large panel of carbohydrate antigens to identify potential tumor glycan markers. Subsequently, flow cytometry and fiber-optic array scanning technology (FAST) were applied to determine whether the identified targets are tumor-specific cell-surface markers and are, therefore, likely suitable for targeted immunotherapy. Finally, the tumor glycan-specific antibodies identified were validated using cancer patients' blood samples for their performance in CTC-detection and immunotyping analysis. In this article, identifying breast CTC-specific glycan markers and targeting mAbs serve as examples to illustrate this tumor biomarker discovery strategy.

  11. Fixation-related potentials : Foveal versus parafoveal target identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.M.; Brinkhuis, M.A.B.; Reuderink, B.; Hogervorst, M.A.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2014-01-01

    The P300 event-related potential (ERP) can be used to infer whether an observer is looking at a target or not. Common practice in P300 BCIs and experiments is that observers are asked to fixate their eyes while stimuli are presented. First studies have shown that it is also possible to distinguish

  12. Nrf2: a potential therapeutic target for diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Mittal, Ruchika

    2017-08-01

    Different aspects involved in pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy are related to inflammatory and apoptotic pathways. This article summarizes evidence that Nrf2 acts as a bridging link in various inflammatory and apoptotic pathways impacting progression of diabetic neuropathy. Nrf2 is involved in expression of various antioxidant proteins (such as detoxifying enzymes) via antioxidant response element (ARE) binding site. Under normal conditions, Nrf2 is inactive and remains in the cytosol. Hyperglycemia is a strong stimulus for oxidative stress and inflammation that downregulates the activity of Nrf2 through various neuroinflammatory pathways. Acute hyperglycemia increases the expression of Nrf2, but persistent hyperglycemia decreases its expression. This downregulation of Nrf2 causes various microvascular changes, which result in diabetic neuropathy. The key contribution of Nrf2 in progression of diabetic neuropathy has been summarized in the article. Despite involvement of Nrf2 in progression of diabetic neuropathy, targeting Nrf2 activators as a therapeutic potential will provide important new insights into the ways that influence treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

  13. Potential of acylated peptides to target the influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lauster

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For antiviral drug design, especially in the field of influenza virus research, potent multivalent inhibitors raise high expectations for combating epidemics and pandemics. Among a large variety of covalent and non-covalent scaffold systems for a multivalent display of inhibitors, we created a simple supramolecular platform to enhance the antiviral effect of our recently developed antiviral Peptide B (PeBGF, preventing binding of influenza virus to the host cell. By conjugating the peptide with stearic acid to create a higher-order structure with a multivalent display, we could significantly enhance the inhibitory effect against the serotypes of both human pathogenic influenza virus A/Aichi/2/1968 H3N2, and avian pathogenic A/FPV/Rostock/34 H7N1 in the hemagglutination inhibition assay. Further, the inhibitory potential of stearylated PeBGF (C18-PeBGF was investigated by infection inhibition assays, in which we achieved low micromolar inhibition constants against both viral strains. In addition, we compared C18-PeBGF to other published amphiphilic peptide inhibitors, such as the stearylated sugar receptor mimicking peptide (Matsubara et al. 2010, and the “Entry Blocker” (EB (Jones et al. 2006, with respect to their antiviral activity against infection by Influenza A Virus (IAV H3N2. However, while this strategy seems at a first glance promising, the native situation is quite different from our experimental model settings. First, we found a strong potential of those peptides to form large amyloid-like supramolecular assemblies. Second, in vivo, the large excess of cell surface membranes provides an unspecific target for the stearylated peptides. We show that acylated peptides insert into the lipid phase of such membranes. Eventually, our study reveals serious limitations of this type of self-assembling IAV inhibitors.

  14. Psychosocial predictors of supervisor-, peer-, subordinate-, and service-provider-targeted aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inness, Michelle; Leblanc, Manon Mireille; Barling, Julian

    2008-11-01

    The authors investigate whether known person predictors (trait anger, trait aggression) and situational predictors (perceived interpersonal mistreatment, perceived organizational sanctions against aggression) of supervisor-targeted aggression also predict employee's aggression toward other workplace targets, namely peers, subordinates, and customers' aggression toward service providers. The authors also investigate the moderating impact of situational factors on the relationship between person factors and aggression. Participants (N = 308) were asked whether they had a conflict with their supervisor, a subordinate, a work peer, and/or a service provider in the past 6 months. Different patterns of main and interaction effects emerged across the 4 targets, suggesting the importance of accounting for the target of aggression in workplace aggression research.

  15. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torquato, Salvatore [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  16. Wake potential of swift ion in amorphous carbon target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bahnam, Nabil janan; Ahmad, Khalid A.; Aboo Al-Numan, Abdullah Ibrahim

    2017-02-01

    The wake potential and wake phenomena for swift proton in an amorphous carbon target were studied by utilising various dielectric function formalisms, including the Drude dielectric function, the Drude-Lorentz dielectric function and quantum dielectric function. The Drude model results exhibited a damped oscillatory behaviour in the longitudinal direction behind the projectile; the pattern of these oscillations decreases exponentially in the transverse direction. In addition, the wake potential extends slightly ahead of the projectile which also depends on the proton coordinate and velocity. The effect of electron binding on the wake potential, characterised by the ratio ωp2/ω02 = 10 to 0.1, has been studied alongside the Drude-Lorentz dielectric function and quantum dielectric function formalisms; the results evidently show that the wake potential dip depth decreases with more oscillations when the electron density ratio ωp2/ω02 decreases from 10 to 0.1. One of the primary objectives of the present work is to construct a reasonably realistic procedure for simulating the response of target to swift ions by combining an expression for the induced wake potential along with several important dielectric function models; the aim of this research is to reduce computational complexity without sacrificing accuracy. This is regarded as being an efficient strategy in that it creates suitable computer simulation procedures which are relevant to actual solids. After comparing this method with other models, the main differences and similarities have been noted while the end results have proved encouraging.

  17. Photosensitizer-mediated mitochondria-targeting nanosized drug carriers: Subcellular targeting, therapeutic, and imaging potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yeon Su; Kwon, Kiyoon; Yoon, Kwonhyeok; Huh, Kang Moo; Kang, Han Chang

    2017-03-30

    Mitochondria-targeting drug carriers have considerable potential because of the presence of many molecular drug targets in the mitochondria and their pivotal roles in cellular viability, metabolism, maintenance, and death. To compare the mitochondria-targeting abilities of triphenylphosphonium (TPP) and pheophorbide a (PhA) in nanoparticles (NPs), this study prepared mitochondria-targeting NPs using mixtures of methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-(SS-PhA)2 [mPEG-(SS-PhA)2 or PPA] and TPP-b-poly(ε-caprolactone)-b-TPP [TPP-b-PCL-b-TPP or TPCL], which were designated PPAn-TPCL4-n (0≤n≤4) NPs. With increasing TPCL content, the formed PPAn-TPCL4-n NPs decreased in size from 33nm to 18nm and increased in terms of positive zeta-potentials from -12mV to 33mV. Although the increased TPCL content caused some dark toxicity of the PPAn-TPCL4-n NPs due to the intrinsic positive character of TPCL, the NPs showed strong light-induced killing effects in tumor cells. In addition, the mitochondrial distribution of the PPAn-TPCL4-n NPs was analyzed and imaged by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, respectively. Thus, the PhA-containing NPs specifically targeted the mitochondria, and light stimulation caused PhA-mediated therapeutic effects and imaging functions. Expanding the capabilities of these nanocarriers by incorporating other drugs should enable multiple potential applications (e.g., targeting, therapy, and imaging) for combination and synergistic treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Polyamine Transport and Synthesis in Trichomonas vaginalis: Potential Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Sanchez, Maria Elizbeth; Villalpando, Jose Luis; Quintas-Granados, Laura Itzel; Arroyo, Rossana

    2017-01-01

    Polyamines are essential for many biological processes in all organisms. Here we show a current landscape of studies and strategies implemented for the study of polyamine metabolism, as well as molecular aspects that implicate the role of key enzymes, transport proteins, inhibitors, and the study of novel molecules as potential therapeutic targets. This review focused on the synthesis, interconversion and function of these molecules in Trichomonas vaginalis, a common sexually transmitted parasite of humans. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Macrophages associated with tumors as potential targets and therapeutic intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Warren, Galya; Wei, Xin

    2014-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form approximately 50% of tumor mass. TAMs were shown to promote tumor growth by suppressing immunocompetent cells, inducing neovascularization and supporting cancer stem cells. TAMs retain mobility in tumor mass, which can potentially be employed for better intratumoral biodistribution of nanocarriers and effective tumor growth inhibition. Due to the importance of TAMs, they are increasingly becoming principal targets of novel therapeutic approaches. In this review, we compare features of macrophages and TAMs that are essential for TAM-directed therapies, and illustrate the advantages of nanomedicine that are related to the preferential capture of nanocarriers by Mϕ in the process of drug delivery. We discuss recent efforts in reprogramming or inhibiting tumor-protecting properties of TAMs, and potential strategies to increase efficacy of conventional chemotherapy by combining with macrophage-associated delivery of nanodrugs.

  20. Mirabegron: potential off target effects and uses beyond the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehvari, Nodi; da Silva Junior, Edilson Dantas; Bengtsson, Tore; Hutchinson, Dana S

    2017-12-15

    The ®3 -adrenoceptor was initially an attractive target by several pharmaceutical companies due to its high expression in rodent adipose tissue, where its activation resulted in decreased adiposity and improved metabolic outputs (such as glucose handling) in animal models of obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, several drugs acting at the β3 -adrenoceptor failed in clinical trials. This was thought to be due to their lack of efficacy at the human receptor. Recently mirabegron, a ®3 -adrenoceptor agonist with human efficacy, was approved in North America, Europe, Japan and Australia for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome. There are indications that mirabegron may act at other receptors/targets, but whether they have any clinical relevance is relatively unknown. Besides overactive bladder syndrome, mirabegron may have other uses such as in the treatment of heart failure or metabolic disease. This review gives an overview on the off-target effects of mirabegron and its potential use in the treatment of other diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Viroporins: structure, function and potential as antiviral targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Claire; Griffin, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    The channel-forming activity of a family of small, hydrophobic integral membrane proteins termed 'viroporins' is essential to the life cycles of an increasingly diverse range of RNA and DNA viruses, generating significant interest in targeting these proteins for antiviral development. Viroporins vary greatly in terms of their atomic structure and can perform multiple functions during the virus life cycle, including those distinct from their role as oligomeric membrane channels. Recent progress has seen an explosion in both the identification and understanding of many such proteins encoded by highly significant pathogens, yet the prototypic M2 proton channel of influenza A virus remains the only example of a viroporin with provenance as an antiviral drug target. This review attempts to summarize our current understanding of the channel-forming functions for key members of this growing family, including recent progress in structural studies and drug discovery research, as well as novel insights into the life cycles of many viruses revealed by a requirement for viroporin activity. Ultimately, given the successes of drugs targeting ion channels in other areas of medicine, unlocking the therapeutic potential of viroporins represents a valuable goal for many of the most significant viral challenges to human and animal health.

  2. Potential Vaccine Targets against Rabbit Coccidiosis by Immunoproteomic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongyan; Dong, Ronglian; Qiu, Baofeng; Jing, Jin; Zhu, Shunxing; Liu, Chun; Jiang, Yingmei; Wu, Liucheng; Wang, Shengcun; Miao, Jin; Shao, Yixiang

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify antigens for a vaccine or drug target to control rabbit coccidiosis. A combination of 2-dimensional electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometric analysis were used to identify novel antigens from the sporozoites of Eimeria stiedae . Protein spots were recognized by the sera of New Zealand rabbits infected artificially with E. stiedae . The proteins were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) analysis in combination with bioinformatics. Approximately 868 protein spots were detected by silver-staining, and a total of 41 immunoreactive protein spots were recognized by anti- E. stiedae sera. Finally, 23 protein spots were successfully identified. The proteins such as heat shock protein 70 and aspartyl protease may have potential as immunodiagnostic or vaccine antigens. The immunoreactive proteins were found to possess a wide range of biological functions. This study is the first to report the proteins recognized by sera of infected rabbits with E. stiedae , which might be helpful in identifying potential targets for vaccine development to control rabbit coccidiosis.

  3. Deep brain stimulation in Huntington's disease: assessment of potential targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mayur; Deogaonkar, Milind

    2015-05-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder that has very few effective therapeutic interventions. Since the disease has a defined neural circuitry abnormality, neuromodulation could be an option. Case reports, original research, and animal model studies were selected from the databases of Medline and PubMed. All related studies published up to July 2014 were included in this review. The following search terms were used: "Deep brain stimulation," "DBS," "thalamotomy," "pallidal stimulation," and "Huntington's Disease," "HD," "chorea," or "hyperkinetic movement disorders." This review examines potential nodes in the HD circuitry that could be modulated using deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy. With rapid evolution of imaging and ability to reach difficult targets in the brain with refined DBS technology, some phenotypes of HD could potentially be treated with DBS in the near future. Further clinical studies are warranted to validate the efficacy of neuromodulation and to determine the most optimal target for HD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. CD47: a potential immunotherapy target for eliminating cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, F; Gao, F; Li, H; Liu, H; Zhang, Y; Zheng, R; Zhang, Y; Chen, J; Li, X; Liu, G; Jia, Y

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between the immune system and cancer growth and aggravation has been discussed over a century. A number of molecules have been shown to participate in this process. CD47, a normal universally expressed member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, plays multiple functions in immune system. Researches demonstrated that CD47 was also highly expressed on the surface of tumor cells as well as cancer stem cells (CSCs). Whether the highly expressed CD47 was associated with tumor growth, metastasis, recurrence, or drug resistance has become the hotspot. Besides the roles of CD47 in tumor immunoregulation, the monoclonal antibodies targeting CD47 used in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and bladder CSCs were reported, which shed new light on tumor treatment. CSCs have been recognized as the root of tumor drug resistance and recurrence. Whether CD47 on CSCs could serve as a potential target for future anti-cancer treatment forms the focus of our review. Here we highlight the potential roles of CD47 in immune system, and discuss the promising therapeutic application of anti-CD47 antibodies for eliminating tumor cells.

  5. MicroRNAs and potential targets in osteosarcoma: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie B. Sampson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in children and young adults. Surgery and multi-agent chemotherapy are the standard treatment regimens for this disease. New therapies are being investigated to improve overall survival in patients. Molecular targets that actively modulate cell processes such as cell-cycle control, cell proliferation, metabolism and apoptosis, have been studied, but it remains a challenge to develop novel, effective targeted therapies to treat this heterogeneous and complex disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that play critical roles in regulating cell processes including growth, development and disease. miRNAs function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors to regulate gene and protein expression. Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma with the potential for development in disease diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on the role of miRNAs and their target genes and evaluate their potential use as therapeutic agents in osteosarcoma. We also summarize the efficacy of inhibition of oncogenic miRNAs or expression of tumor suppressor miRNAs in preclinical models of osteosarcoma. Recent progress on systemic delivery as well as current applications for miRNAs as therapeutic agents has seen the advancement of miR-34a in clinical trials for adult patients with non-resectable primary liver cancer or metastatic cancer with liver involvement. We suggest a global approach to the understanding of the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma may identify candidate miRNAs as promising biomarkers for this rare disease.

  6. The potential of natural products for targeting PPARα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Rigano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs α, -γ and -β/δ are ligand-activated transcription factors and members of the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptor. These receptors play key roles in maintaining glucose and lipid homeostasis by modulating gene expression. PPARs constitute a recognized druggable target and indeed several classes of drugs used in the treatment of metabolic disease symptoms, such as dyslipidemia (fibrates, e.g. fenofibrate and gemfibrozil and diabetes (thiazolidinediones, e.g. rosiglitazone and pioglitazone are ligands for the various PPAR isoforms. More precisely, antidiabetic thiazolidinediones act on PPARγ, while PPARα is the main molecular target of antidyslipidemic fibrates. Over the past few years, our understanding of the mechanism underlying the PPAR modulation of gene expression has greatly increased. This review presents a survey on terrestrial and marine natural products modulating the PPARα system with the objective of highlighting how the incredible chemodiversity of natural products can provide innovative leads for this “hot” target.

  7. Identification of a STAT5 target gene, Dpf3, provides novel insights in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Theodorou

    Full Text Available STAT5 controls essential cellular functions and is encoded by two genes, Stat5a and Stat5b. To provide insight to the mechanisms linking hematologic malignancy to STAT5 activation/regulation of target genes, we identified STAT5 target genes and focused on Dpf3 gene, which encodes for an epigenetic factor. Dpf3 expression was induced upon IL-3 stimulation in Ba/F3 cells, while strong binding of both STAT5a and STAT5b was detected in its promoter. Reduced expression of Dpf3 was detected in Ba/F3 cells with Stat5a and Stat5b knock-down, suggesting that this gene is positively regulated by STAT5, upon IL-3 stimulation. Furthermore, this gene was significantly up-regulated in CLL patients, where DPF3 gene/protein up-regulation and strong STAT5 binding to the DPF3 promoter, correlated with increased STAT5 activation, mainly in non-malignant myeloid cells (granulocytes. Our findings provide insights in the STAT5 dependent transcriptional regulation of Dpf3, and demonstrate for the first time increased STAT5 activation in granulocytes of CLL patients. Novel routes of investigation are opened to facilitate the understanding of the role of STAT5 activation in the communication between non-malignant myeloid and malignant B-cells, and the functions of STAT5 target genes networks in CLL biology.

  8. Astrocytes pathology in ALS: A potential therapeutic target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johann, Sonja

    2017-06-15

    The mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are multifactorial and include genetic and environmental factors. Nowadays, it is well accepted that neuronal loss is driven by non-cell autonomous toxicity. Non-neuronal cells, such as astrocytes, have been described to significantly contribute to motoneuron cell death and disease progression in cell culture experiments and animal models of ALS. Astrocytes are essential for neuronal survival and function by regulating neurotransmitter and ion homeostasis, immune response, blood flow and glucose uptake, antioxidant defence and growth factor release. Based on their significant functions in "housekeeping" the central nervous system (CNS), they are no longer thought to be passive bystanders but rather contributors to ALS pathogenesis. Findings from animal models have broadened our knowledge about different pathomechanisms in ALS, but therapeutic approaches to impede disease progression failed. So far, there is no cure for ALS and effective medication to slow down disease progression is limited. Targeting only a single aspect of this multifactorial disease may exhibit therapeutic limitations. Hence, novel cellular targets must be defined and new pharmaceutical strategies, such as combinatorial drug therapies are urgently needed. The present review discusses the physiological role of astrocytes and current hypotheses of astrocyte pathology in ALS. Furthermore, recent investigation of potential drug candidates in astrocyte cell culture systems and animal models, as well as data obtained from clinical trials, will be addressed. The central role of astrocytes in ALS pathogenesis makes them a promising target for pharmaceutical interventions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Multiplexed Targeted Quantitative Proteomics Predicts Hepatic Glucuronidation Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaillan, Guillaume; Rouleau, Michèle; Klein, Kathrin; Fallon, John K; Caron, Patrick; Villeneuve, Lyne; Smith, Philip C; Zanger, Ulrich M; Guillemette, Chantal

    2015-09-01

    Phase II metabolism is prominently governed by UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) in humans. These enzymes regulate the bioactivity of many drugs and endogenous small molecules in many organs, including the liver, a major site of regulation by the glucuronidation pathway. This study determined the expression of hepatic UGTs by targeted proteomics in 48 liver samples and by measuring the glucuronidation activity using probe substrates. It demonstrates the sensitivity and accuracy of nano-ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry to establish the complex expression profiles of 14 hepatic UGTs in a single analysis. UGT2B7 is the most abundant UGT in our collection of livers, expressed at 69 pmol/mg microsomal proteins, whereas UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT2B4, and UGT2B15 are similarly abundant, averaging 30-34 pmol/mg proteins. The average relative abundance of these five UGTs represents 81% of the measured hepatic UGTs. Our data further highlight the strong relationships in the expression of several UGTs. Most notably, UGT1A4 correlates with most measured UGTs, and the expression levels of UGT2B4/UGT2B7 displayed the strongest correlation. However, significant interindividual variability is observed for all UGTs, both at the level of enzyme concentrations and activity (coefficient of variation: 45%-184%). The reliability of targeted proteomics quantification is supported by the high correlation between UGT concentration and activity. Collectively, these findings expand our understanding of hepatic UGT profiles by establishing absolute hepatic concentrations of 14 UGTs and further suggest coregulated expression between most abundant hepatic UGTs. Data support the value of multiplexed targeted quantitative proteomics to accurately assess specific UGT concentrations in liver samples and hepatic glucuronidation potential. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. Cognitive 'Omics': Pattern-Based Validation of Potential Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyertyán, István

    2017-02-01

    Despite the abundance of cognitive enhancer mechanisms identified in basic research, drugs approved for cognitive disorders are scarce and of limited efficacy. Although the so-called 'gold-standard' animal assays are well suited to the study of fundamental learning processes, they fail to predict clinical efficacy against complex and robust cognitive defects. Preclinical validation of potential drug targets requires new approaches with higher translational value. Here I propose a rodent cognitive test system that encompasses several learning paradigms each modeling a certain human cognitive domain. Cognitive deficits are brought about by several impairing methods and a particular mechanism of action is tested on each defective cognitive function. The outcome is a cognitive efficacy pattern that should then be matched to the cognitive deficit patterns of the clinical disorders. The best fit will highlight the clinical indication with the greatest chance for success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cytokines: Roles in atherosclerosis disease progression and potential therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Joe W. E.; Ramji, Dipak P.

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the primary cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), is a chronic inflammatory disorder in the walls of medium and large arteries. CVD is currently responsible for about one in three global deaths and this is expected to rise in the future due to an increase in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes. Current therapies for atherosclerosis mainly modulate lipid homeostasis and whilst successful at reducing the risk of a CVD-related death, they are associated with considerable residual risk and various side effects. There is therefore a need for alternative therapies aimed at regulating inflammation in order to reduce atherogenesis. This review will highlight the key role cytokines play during disease progression as well as potential therapeutic strategies to target them. PMID:27357616

  12. Health care provider targeted interventions to improve medication adherence: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, V. S.; Ruppar, T. M.; Enriquez, M.; Cooper, P. S.; Chan, K. C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective This systematic review applied meta-analytic procedures to synthesize medication adherence (also termed compliance) interventions that focus on health care providers. Design Comprehensive searching located studies testing interventions that targeted health care providers and reported patient medication adherence behavior outcomes. Search strategies included 13 computerized databases, hand searches of 57 journals, and both author and ancestry searches. Study sample, intervention characteristics, design, and outcomes were reliably coded. Standardized mean difference effect sizes were calculated using random-effects models. Heterogeneity was examined with Q and I2 statistics. Exploratory moderator analyses used meta-analytic analog of ANOVA and regression. Results Codable data were extracted from 218 reports of 151,182 subjects. The mean difference effect size was 0.233. Effect sizes for individual interventions varied from .088 to 0.301. Interventions were more effective when they included multiple strategies. Risk of bias assessment documented larger effect sizes in studies with larger samples, studies that used true control groups (as compared to attention control), and studies without intention-to-treat analyses. Conclusion Overall, this meta-analysis documented that interventions targeted to health care providers significantly improved patient medication adherence. The modest overall effect size suggests that interventions addressing multiple levels of influence on medication adherence may be necessary to achieve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25728214

  13. Mitochondrial VDAC1: A Key Gatekeeper as Potential Therapeutic Target

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    Amadou K. S. Camara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are the key source of ATP that fuels cellular functions, and they are also central in cellular signaling, cell division and apoptosis. Dysfunction of mitochondria has been implicated in a wide range of diseases, including neurodegenerative and cardiac diseases, and various types of cancer. One of the key proteins that regulate mitochondrial function is the voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1, the most abundant protein on the outer membrane of mitochondria. VDAC1 is the gatekeeper for the passages of metabolites, nucleotides, and ions; it plays a crucial role in regulating apoptosis due to its interaction with apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins, namely members of the Bcl-2 family of proteins and hexokinase. Therefore, regulation of VDAC1 is crucial not only for metabolic functions of mitochondria, but also for cell survival. In fact, multiple lines of evidence have confirmed the involvement of VDAC1 in several diseases. Consequently, modulation or dysregulation of VDAC1 function can potentially attenuate or exacerbate pathophysiological conditions. Understanding the role of VDAC1 in health and disease could lead to selective protection of cells in different tissues and diverse diseases. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role of VDAC1 in the pathogenesis of diseases and as a potentially effective target for therapeutic management of various pathologies.

  14. CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor As Potential Target against Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Ester; Ferrer, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    The CB2 receptor is one of the components of the endogenous cannabinoid system, a complex network of signaling molecules and receptors involved in the homeostatic control of several physiological functions. Accumulated evidence suggests a role for CB2 receptors in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and indicates their potential as a therapeutic target against this neurodegenerative disease. Levels of CB2 receptors are significantly increased in post-mortem AD brains, mainly in microglia surrounding senile plaques, and their expression levels correlate with the amounts of Aβ42 and β-amyloid plaque deposition. Moreover, several studies on animal models of AD have demonstrated that specific CB2 receptor agonists, which are devoid of psychoactive effects, reduce AD-like pathology, resulting in attenuation of the inflammation associated with the disease but also modulating Aβ and tau aberrant processing, among other effects. CB2 receptor activation also improves cognitive impairment in animal models of AD. This review discusses available data regarding the role of CB2 receptors in AD and the potential usefulness of specific agonists of these receptors against AD.

  15. Type I interferon: potential therapeutic target for psoriasis?

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    Yihong Yao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease characterized by aberrant epidermal differentiation, surface scale formation, and marked cutaneous inflammation. To better understand the pathogenesis of this disease and identify potential mediators, we used whole genome array analysis to profile paired lesional and nonlesional psoriatic skin and skin from healthy donors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We observed robust overexpression of type I interferon (IFN-inducible genes and genomic signatures that indicate T cell and dendritic cell infiltration in lesional skin. Up-regulation of mRNAs for IFN-alpha subtypes was observed in lesional skin compared with nonlesional skin. Enrichment of mature dendritic cells and 2 type I IFN-inducible proteins, STAT1 and ISG15, were observed in the majority of lesional skin biopsies. Concordant overexpression of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha-inducible gene signatures occurred at the same disease sites. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Up-regulation of TNF-alpha and elevation of the TNF-alpha-inducible gene signature in lesional skin underscore the importance of this cytokine in psoriasis; these data describe a molecular basis for the therapeutic activity of anti-TNF-alpha agents. Furthermore, these findings implicate type I IFNs in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Consistent and significant up-regulation of type I IFNs and their associated gene signatures in psoriatic skin suggest that type I IFNs may be potential therapeutic targets in psoriasis treatment.

  16. Type I interferon: potential therapeutic target for psoriasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yihong; Richman, Laura; Morehouse, Chris; de los Reyes, Melissa; Higgs, Brandon W; Boutrin, Anmarie; White, Barbara; Coyle, Anthony; Krueger, James; Kiener, Peter A; Jallal, Bahija

    2008-07-16

    Psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease characterized by aberrant epidermal differentiation, surface scale formation, and marked cutaneous inflammation. To better understand the pathogenesis of this disease and identify potential mediators, we used whole genome array analysis to profile paired lesional and nonlesional psoriatic skin and skin from healthy donors. We observed robust overexpression of type I interferon (IFN)-inducible genes and genomic signatures that indicate T cell and dendritic cell infiltration in lesional skin. Up-regulation of mRNAs for IFN-alpha subtypes was observed in lesional skin compared with nonlesional skin. Enrichment of mature dendritic cells and 2 type I IFN-inducible proteins, STAT1 and ISG15, were observed in the majority of lesional skin biopsies. Concordant overexpression of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha-inducible gene signatures occurred at the same disease sites. Up-regulation of TNF-alpha and elevation of the TNF-alpha-inducible gene signature in lesional skin underscore the importance of this cytokine in psoriasis; these data describe a molecular basis for the therapeutic activity of anti-TNF-alpha agents. Furthermore, these findings implicate type I IFNs in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Consistent and significant up-regulation of type I IFNs and their associated gene signatures in psoriatic skin suggest that type I IFNs may be potential therapeutic targets in psoriasis treatment.

  17. Neurodegeneration in diabetic retina and its potential drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ola, Mohammad Shamsul; Alhomida, Abdullah S

    2014-07-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the major complications of diabetes causing vision loss and blindness worldwide. DR is widely recognized as a neurodegenerative disease as evidenced from early changes at cellular and molecular levels in the neuronal component of the diabetic retina, which is further supported by various retinal functional tests indicating functional deficits in the retina soon after diabetes progression. Diabetes alters the level of a number of neurodegenerative metabolites, which increases influx through several metabolic pathways which in turn induce an increase in oxidative stress and a decrease in neurotrophic factors, thereby damage retinal neurons. Loss of neurons may implicate in vascular pathology, a clinical signs of DR observed at later stages of the disease. Here, we discuss diabetes-induced potential metabolites known to be detrimental to neuronal damage and their mechanism of action. In addition, we highlight important neurotrophic factors, whose level have been found to be dysregulated in diabetic retina and may damage neurons. Furthermore, we discuss potential drugs and strategies based on targeting diabetes-induced metabolites, metabolic pathways, oxidative stress, and neurotrophins to protect retinal neurons, which may ameliorate vision loss and vascular damage in DR.

  18. Metabolic Alterations of Thyroid Cancer as Potential Therapeutic Targets

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    Domenico Ciavardelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer (TC is the most frequent endocrine tumor with a growing incidence worldwide. Besides the improvement of diagnosis, TC increasing incidence is probably due to environmental factors and lifestyle modifications. The actual diagnostic criteria for TC classification are based on fine needle biopsy (FNAB and histological examination following thyroidectomy. Since in some cases it is not possible to make a proper diagnosis, classical approach needs to be supported by additional biomarkers. Recently, new emphasis has been given to the altered cellular metabolism of proliferating cancer cells which require high amount of glucose for energy production and macromolecules biosynthesis. Also TC displays alteration of energy metabolism orchestrated by oncogenes activation and tumor suppressors inactivation leading to abnormal proliferation. Furthermore, TC shows significant metabolic heterogeneity within the tumor microenvironment and metabolic coupling between cancer and stromal cells. In this review we focus on the current knowledge of metabolic alterations of TC and speculate that targeting TC metabolism may improve current therapeutic protocols for poorly differentiated TC. Future studies will further deepen the actual understandings of the metabolic phenotype of TC cells and will give the chance to provide novel prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets in tumors with a more aggressive behavior.

  19. Pyruvate kinase M2: a potential target for regulating inflammation

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    Jose Carlos eAlves-Filho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyruvate kinase (PK is the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the last step of glycolysis. Of the four PK isoforms expressed in mammalian cells, PKM2 has generated the most interest due to its impact on changes in cellular metabolism observed in cancer as well as in activated immune cells. As our understanding of dysregulated metabolism in cancer develops, and in light of the growing field of immunometabolism, intense efforts are in place to define the mechanism by which PKM2 regulates the metabolic profile of cancer as well as of immune cells. The enzymatic activity of PKM2 is heavily regulated by endogenous allosteric effectors as well as by intracellular signalling pathways, affecting both the enzymatic activity of PKM2 as a pyruvate kinase and the regulation of the recently described non-canonical nuclear functions of PKM2. We here review the current literature on PKM2 and its regulation, and discuss the potential for PKM2 as a therapeutic target in inflammatory and metabolic disorders.

  20. MPS1 kinase as a potential therapeutic target in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimova, Irina; Ng, June; Harris, Peter; Birks, Diane; Donson, Andrew; Taylor, Michael D; Foreman, Nicholas K; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Vibhakar, Rajeev

    2016-11-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common type of malignant brain tumor that affects children. Although recent advances in chemotherapy and radiation have improved outcomes, high-risk patients perform poorly with significant morbidity. Gene expression profiling has revealed that monopolar spindle 1 (MPS1) (TTK1) is highly expressed in medulloblastoma patient samples compared to that noted in normal cerebellum. MPS1 is a key regulator of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), a mitotic mechanism specifically required for proper chromosomal alignment and segregation. The SAC can be activated in aneuploid cancer cells and MPS1 is overexpressed in many types of cancers. A previous study has demonstrated the effectiveness of inhibiting MPS1 with small-molecule inhibitors, but the role of MPS1 in medulloblastoma is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that MPS1 inhibition by shRNA or with a small-molecule drug, NMS-P715, resulted in decreased cell growth, inhibition of clonogenic potential and induction of apoptosis in cells belonging to both the Shh and group 3 medulloblastoma genomic signature. These findings highlight MPS1 as a rational therapeutic target for medulloblastoma.

  1. Exosomes: a potential key target in cardio-renal syndrome

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    Laura eGonzalez-Calero

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes have proven roles in regulating immune response, antigen presentation, RNA and protein transfer, and cell–cell (organ–organ interaction/signaling. These microvesicles can be considered a mechanism of non-classical secretion of proteins, and they represent a sub-proteome, thus assisting in the difficult task of biomarker discovery in a biological fluid as urine, plasma or serum. A potential role of exosomes in the cardio-renal syndrome is currently underexplored. Cardiovascular disease (CVD continues to be the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and, particularly, rates of cardiovascular events and death consistently increase as kidney function worsens. In other words, chronic kidney disease acts as a risk multiplier. Unfortunately, the relationship between markers of cardiovascular risk in kidney pathology often differs from that in the general population. Efforts in the search for novel action mechanisms simultaneously operating in both pathologies are thus of maximum interest.This article focuses to the role of exosomes in cardiovascular and renal diseases, in the search for novel key targets of interaction between heart and kidneys.

  2. Transient Receptor Potential Channels as Targets for Phytochemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    To date, 28 mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been cloned and characterized. They are grouped into six subfamilies on the basis of their amino acid sequence homology: TRP Ankyrin (TRPA), TRP Canonical (TRPC), TRP Melastatin (TRPM), TRP Mucolipin (TRPML), TRP Polycystin (TRPP), and TRP Vanilloid (TRPV). Most of the TRP channels are nonselective cation channels expressed on the cell membrane and exhibit variable permeability ratios for Ca2+ versus Na+. They mediate sensory functions (such as vision, nociception, taste transduction, temperature sensation, and pheromone signaling) and homeostatic functions (such as divalent cation flux, hormone release, and osmoregulation). Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the specific roles of these TRP channels and their activation mechanisms. In this Review, the emphasis will be on the activation of TRP channels by phytochemicals that are claimed to exert health benefits. Recent findings complement the anecdotal evidence that some of these phytochemicals have specific receptors and the activation of which is responsible for the physiological effects. Now, the targets for these phytochemicals are being unveiled; a specific hypothesis can be proposed and tested experimentally to infer a scientific validity of the claims of the health benefits. The broader and pressing issues that have to be addressed are related to the quantities of the active ingredients in a given preparation, their bioavailability, metabolism, adverse effects, excretion, and systemic versus local effects. PMID:24926802

  3. Epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylase: therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Ian F; Dexter, David T

    2013-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder affecting more than 4million people worldwide. The primary motor symptoms of the disease are due to degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons. Dopamine replacement therapies have therefore revolutionised disease management by partially controlling these symptoms. However these drugs can produce debilitating side effects when used long term and do not protect degenerating neurons against death. Recent evidence has highlighted a pathological imbalance in PD between the acetylation and deacetylation of the histone proteins around which deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is coiled, in favour of excessive histone deacetylation. This mechanism of adding/removing acetyl groups to histone lysine residues is one of many epigenetic regulatory processes which control the expression of genes, many of which will be essential for neuronal survival. Hence, such epigenetic modifications may have a pathogenic role in PD. It has therefore been hypothesised that if this pathological imbalance can be corrected with the use of histone deacetylase inhibiting agents then neurodegeneration observed in PD can be ameliorated. This article will review the current literature with regard to epigenetic changes in PD and the use of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) in PD: examining the evidence of the neuroprotective effects of numerous HDACIs in cellular and animal models of Parkinsonian cell death. Ultimately answering the question: does epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylases hold therapeutic potential in PD? Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ion Channels in Obesity: Pathophysiology and Potential Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Luiz H C; Souza, Iara L L; Pinheiro, Lílian S; Silva, Bagnólia A

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease related to metabolic disorders and associated with genetic determinants. Currently, ion channels activity has been linked to many of these disorders, in addition to the central regulation of food intake, energetic balance, hormone release and response, as well as the adipocyte cell proliferation. Therefore, the objective of this work is to review the current knowledge about the influence of ion channels in obesity development. This review used different sources of literature (Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science) to assess the role of ion channels in the pathophysiology of obesity. Ion channels present diverse key functions, such as the maintenance of physiological homeostasis and cell proliferation. Cell biology and pharmacological experimental evidences demonstrate that proliferating cells exhibit ion channel expression, conductance, and electrical properties different from the resting cells. Thereby, a large variety of ion channels has been identified in the pathogenesis of obesity such as potassium, sodium, calcium and chloride channels, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and transient receptor potential channels. The fundamental involvement of these channels on the generation of obesity leads to the progress in the knowledge about the mechanisms responsible for the obesity pathophysiology, consequently emerging as new targets for pharmacological modulation.

  5. Aquaporin-4: A Potential Therapeutic Target for Cerebral Edema

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    Guanghui Tang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporin-4 (AQP4 is a family member of water-channel proteins and is dominantly expressed in the foot process of glial cells surrounding capillaries. The predominant expression at the boundaries between cerebral parenchyma and major fluid compartments suggests the function of aquaporin-4 in water transfer into and out of the brain parenchyma. Accumulating evidences have suggested that the dysregulation of aquaporin-4 relates to the brain edema resulting from a variety of neuro-disorders, such as ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, trauma, etc. During edema formation in the brain, aquaporin-4 has been shown to contribute to the astrocytic swelling, while in the resolution phase, it has been seen to facilitate the reabsorption of extracellular fluid. In addition, aquaporin-4-deficient mice are protected from cytotoxic edema produced by water intoxication and brain ischemia. However, aquaporin-4 deletion exacerbates vasogenic edema in the brain of different pathological disorders. Recently, our published data showed that the upregulation of aquaporin-4 in astrocytes probably contributes to the transition from cytotoxic edema to vasogenic edema. In this review, apart from the traditional knowledge, we also introduce our latest findings about the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and microRNA-29b on aquaporin-4, which could provide powerful intervention tools targeting aquaporin-4.

  6. AAC as a Potential Target Gene to Control Verticillium dahliae

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    Xiaofeng Su

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Verticillium dahliae invades the roots of host plants and causes vascular wilt, which seriously diminishes the yield of cotton and other important crops. The protein AAC (ADP, ATP carrier is responsible for transferring ATP from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm. When V. dahliae protoplasts were transformed with short interfering RNAs (siRNAs targeting the VdAAC gene, fungal growth and sporulation were significantly inhibited. To further confirm a role for VdAAC in fungal development, we generated knockout mutants (ΔVdACC. Compared with wild-type V. dahliae (Vd wt, ΔVdAAC was impaired in germination and virulence; these impairments were rescued in the complementary strains (ΔVdAAC-C. Moreover, when an RNAi construct of VdAAC under the control of the 35S promoter was used to transform Nicotiana benthamiana, the expression of VdAAC was downregulated in the transgenic seedlings, and they had elevated resistance against V. dahliae. The results of this study suggest that VdAAC contributes to fungal development, virulence and is a promising candidate gene to control V. dahliae. In addition, RNAi is a highly efficient way to silence fungal genes and provides a novel strategy to improve disease resistance in plants.

  7. Nutraceuticals: Potential for Chondroprotection and Molecular Targeting of Osteoarthritis

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    Daniel J. Leong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative joint disease and a leading cause of adult disability. There is no cure for OA, and no effective treatments which arrest or slow its progression. Current pharmacologic treatments such as analgesics may improve pain relief but do not alter OA disease progression. Prolonged consumption of these drugs can result in severe adverse effects. Given the nature of OA, life-long treatment will likely be required to arrest or slow its progression. Consequently, there is an urgent need for OA disease-modifying therapies which also improve symptoms and are safe for clinical use over long periods of time. Nutraceuticals—food or food products that provide medical or health benefits, including the prevention and/or treatment of a disease—offer not only favorable safety profiles, but may exert disease- and symptom-modification effects in OA. Forty-seven percent of OA patients use alternative medications, including nutraceuticals. This review will overview the efficacy and mechanism of action of commonly used nutraceuticals, discuss recent experimental and clinical data on the effects of select nutraceuticals, such as phytoflavonoids, polyphenols, and bioflavonoids on OA, and highlight their known molecular actions and limitations of their current use. We will conclude with a proposed novel nutraceutical-based molecular targeting strategy for chondroprotection and OA treatment.

  8. Solute carrier transporters: potential targets for digestive system neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Zhu, Xiao Yan; Liu, Lu Ming; Meng, Zhi Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Digestive system neoplasms are the leading causes of cancer-related death all over the world. Solute carrier (SLC) superfamily is composed of a series of transporters that are ubiquitously expressed in organs and tissues of digestive systems and mediate specific uptake of small molecule substrates in facilitative manner. Given the important role of SLC proteins in maintaining normal functions of digestive system, dysregulation of these protein in digestive system neoplasms may deliver biological and clinical significance that deserves systemic studies. In this review, we critically summarized the recent advances in understanding the role of SLC proteins in digestive system neoplasms. We highlighted that several SLC subfamilies, including metal ion transporters, transporters of glucose and other sugars, transporters of urea, neurotransmitters and biogenic amines, ammonium and choline, inorganic cation/anion transporters, transporters of nucleotide, amino acid and oligopeptide organic anion transporters, transporters of vitamins and cofactors and mitochondrial carrier, may play important roles in mediating the initiation, progression, metastasis, and chemoresistance of digestive system neoplasms. Proteins in these SLC subfamilies may also have diagnostic and prognostic values to particular cancer types. Differential expression of SLC proteins in tumors of digestive system was analyzed by extracting data from human cancer database, which revealed that the roles of SLC proteins may either be dependent on the substrates they transport or be tissue specific. In addition, small molecule modulators that pharmacologically regulate the functions of SLC proteins were discussed for their possible application in the treatment of digestive system neoplasms. This review highlighted the potential of SLC family proteins as drug target for the treatment of digestive system neoplasms.

  9. Pharmacoinformatics elucidation of potential drug targets against migraine to target ion channel protein KCNK18

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    Sehgal SA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sheikh Arslan Sehgal, Mubashir Hassan, Sajid Rashid National Center for Bioinformatics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan Abstract: Migraine, a complex debilitating neurological disorder is strongly associated with potassium channel subfamily K member 18 (KCNK18. Research has emphasized that high levels of KCNK18 may be responsible for improper functioning of neurotransmitters, resulting in neurological disorders like migraine. In the present study, a hybrid approach of molecular docking and virtual screening were followed by pharmacophore identification and structure modeling. Screening was performed using a two-dimensional similarity search against recommended migraine drugs, keeping in view the physicochemical properties of drugs. LigandScout tool was used for exploring pharmacophore properties and designing novel molecules. Here, we report the screening of four novel compounds that have showed maximum binding affinity against KCNK18, obtained through the ZINC database, and Drug and Drug-Like libraries. Docking studies revealed that Asp-46, Ile-324, Ile-44, Gly-118, Leu-338, Val-113, and Phe-41 are critical residues for receptor–ligand interaction. A virtual screening approach coupled with docking energies and druglikeness rules illustrated that ergotamine and PB-414901692 are potential inhibitor compounds for targeting KCNK18. We propose that selected compounds may be more potent than the previously listed drug analogs based on the binding energy values. Further analysis of these inhibitors through site-directed mutagenesis could be helpful for exploring the details of ligand-binding pockets. Overall, the findings of this study may be helpful for designing novel therapeutic targets to cure migraine. Keywords: migraine, bioinformatics, modeling and docking, KCNK18, TRESK, virtual screening, pharmacoinformatics

  10. Siglec-15 is a potential therapeutic target for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Yusuke; Takahata, Masahiko; Mikuni, Shintaro; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Hamano, Hiroki; Angata, Takashi; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu; Kinjo, Masataka; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2015-02-01

    organization of osteoclasts in both RANKL and TNF-α induced osteoclastogenesis. The present findings indicate that Siglec-15 is involved in estrogen deficiency-induced differentiation of osteoclasts and is thus a potential therapeutic target for postmenopausal osteoporosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Developmental windows of breast cancer risk provide opportunities for targeted chemoprevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Holly A.; Lyons, Traci R.; Giles, Erin D.; Borges, Virginia F.; Schedin, Pepper

    2014-01-01

    The magnitude of the breast cancer problem implores researchers to aggressively investigate prevention strategies. However, several barriers currently reduce the feasibility of breast cancer prevention. These barriers include the inability to accurately predict future breast cancer diagnosis at the individual level, the need for improved understanding of when to implement interventions, uncertainty with respect to optimal duration of treatment, and negative side effects associated with currently approved chemoprevention therapies. None-the-less, the unique biology of the mammary gland, with its postnatal development and conditional terminal differentiation, may permit the resolution of many of these barriers. Specifically, lifecycle-specific windows of breast cancer risk have been identified that may be amenable to risk-reducing strategies. Here, we argue for prevention research focused on two of these lifecycle windows of risk: postpartum mammary gland involution and peri-menopause. We provide evidence that these windows are highly amenable to targeted, limited duration treatments. Such approaches could result in the prevention of postpartum and postmenopausal breast cancers, correspondingly. PMID:23664839

  12. Nonstructural Proteins of Alphavirus—Potential Targets for Drug Development

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    Farhana Abu Bakar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are enveloped, positive single-stranded RNA viruses, typically transmitted by arthropods. They often cause arthralgia or encephalitic diseases in infected humans and there is currently no targeted antiviral treatment available. The re-emergence of alphaviruses in Asia, Europe, and the Americas over the last decade, including chikungunya and o’nyong’nyong viruses, have intensified the search for selective inhibitors. In this review, we highlight key molecular determinants within the alphavirus replication complex that have been identified as viral targets, focusing on their structure and functionality in viral dissemination. We also summarize recent structural data of these viral targets and discuss how these could serve as templates to facilitate structure-based drug design and development of small molecule inhibitors.

  13. Lithium inhibits tumorigenic potential of PDA cells through targeting hedgehog-GLI signaling pathway.

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    Zhonglu Peng

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling pathway plays a critical role in the initiation and development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA and represents an attractive target for PDA treatment. Lithium, a clinical mood stabilizer for mental disorders, potently inhibits the activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β that promotes the ubiquitin-dependent proteasome degradation of GLI1, an important downstream component of hedgehog signaling. Herein, we report that lithium inhibits cell proliferation, blocks G1/S cell-cycle progression, induces cell apoptosis and suppresses tumorigenic potential of PDA cells through down-regulation of the expression and activity of GLI1. Moreover, lithium synergistically enhances the anti-cancer effect of gemcitabine. These findings further our knowledge of mechanisms of action for lithium and provide a potentially new therapeutic strategy for PDA through targeting GLI1.

  14. Wzy-dependent bacterial capsules as potential drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Daniel J; Standish, Alistair; Kobe, Bostjan; Morona, Renato

    2012-10-01

    The bacterial capsule is a recognized virulence factor in pathogenic bacteria. It likely works as an antiphagocytic barrier by minimizing complement deposition on the bacterial surface. With the continual rise of bacterial pathogens resistant to multiple antibiotics, there is an increasing need for novel drugs. In the Wzy-dependent pathway, the biosynthesis of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is regulated by a phosphoregulatory system, whose main components consist of bacterial-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) and their cognate phosphatases. The ability to regulate capsule biosynthesis has been shown to be vital for pathogenicity, because different stages of infection require a shift in capsule thickness, making the phosphoregulatory proteins suitable as drug targets. Here, we review the role of regulatory proteins focusing on Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli and discuss their suitability as targets in structure-based drug design.

  15. The prolactin receptor as a therapeutic target in human diseases: browsing new potential indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, Vincent; Touraine, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) signaling has emerged as a relevant target in breast and prostate cancers. This has encouraged various laboratories to develop compounds targeting the PRL receptor (PRLR). As the latter is widely distributed, it is timely to address whether other conditions could also benefit from such inhibitors. The authors briefly overview the two classes of PRLR blockers, which involve: i) PRL-core based analogs that have been validated as competitive antagonists in various preclinical models, and ii) anti-PRLR neutralizing antibodies that are currently in clinical Phase I for advanced breast and prostate cancers. The main purpose of this review is to discuss the multiple organs/diseases that may be considered as potential targets/indications for such inhibitors. This is done in light of reports suggesting that PRLR expression/signaling is increased in disease, and/or that systemic or locally elevated PRL levels correlate with (or promote) organ pathogenesis. The two immediate challenges in the field are i) to provide the scientific community with potent anti-prolactin receptor antibodies to map prolactin receptor expression in target organs, and ii) to take advantage of the availability of functionally validated PRLR blockers to establish the relevance of these potential indications in humans.

  16. Omen: identifying potential spear-phishing targets before the email is sent.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Jeremy Daniel.

    2013-07-01

    We present the results of a two year project focused on a common social engineering attack method called "spear phishing". In a spear phishing attack, the user receives an email with information specifically focused on the user. This email contains either a malware-laced attachment or a link to download the malware that has been disguised as a useful program. Spear phishing attacks have been one of the most effective avenues for attackers to gain initial entry into a target network. This project focused on a proactive approach to spear phishing. To create an effective, user-specific spear phishing email, the attacker must research the intended recipient. We believe that much of the information used by the attacker is provided by the target organization's own external website. Thus when researching potential targets, the attacker leaves signs of his research in the webserver's logs. We created tools and visualizations to improve cybersecurity analysts' abilities to quickly understand a visitor's visit patterns and interests. Given these suspicious visitors and log-parsing tools, analysts can more quickly identify truly suspicious visitors, search for potential spear-phishing targeted users, and improve security around those users before the spear phishing email is sent.

  17. Potential of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

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    Yang HW

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Hung-Wei Yang,1,2 Mu-Yi Hua,1 Hao-Li Liu,3 Chiung-Yin Huang,2 Kuo-Chen Wei21Molecular Medicine Research Center, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, 3Department of Electrical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, TaiwanAbstract: Nanoparticles (NPs play an important role in the molecular diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of therapeutic outcomes in various diseases. Their nanoscale size, large surface area, unique capabilities, and negligible side effects make NPs highly effective for biomedical applications such as cancer therapy, thrombolysis, and molecular imaging. In particular, nontoxic superparamagnetic magnetic NPs (MNPs with functionalized surface coatings can conjugate chemotherapeutic drugs or be used to target ligands/proteins, making them useful for drug delivery, targeted therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, transfection, and cell/protein/DNA separation. To optimize the therapeutic efficacy of MNPs for a specific application, three issues must be addressed. First, the efficacy of magnetic targeting/guidance is dependent on particle magnetization, which can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions during synthesis. Second, the tendency of MNPs to aggregate limits their therapeutic use in vivo; surface modifications to produce high positive or negative charges can reduce this tendency. Finally, the surface of MNPs can be coated with drugs which can be rapidly released after injection, resulting in targeting of low doses of the drug. Drugs therefore need to be conjugated to MNPs such that their release is delayed and their thermal stability enhanced. This chapter describes the creation of nanocarriers with a high drug-loading capacity comprised of a high-magnetization MNP core and a shell of aqueous, stable, conducting polyaniline derivatives and their applications in cancer therapy. It further summarizes some

  18. Potential neuroimmunological targets in the treatment of anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, R.H.; Tang, Zhen; Baldwin, D.S.

    2013-01-01

    In the translation of psychoneuroimmunology research into clinical practice, one critical step is to identify biomarkers for improved diagnosis and targeting of interventions. Inflammatory markers deserve special attention due to their crucial role linking various health conditions and disorders. In this chapter, we discuss the pivotal roles of cytokines in signalling to the brain and leading to behavioural changes. This is followed by a review of recent research findings into neuroimmunology...

  19. The Potential of Targeting Ribosome Biogenesis in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunfei Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Overall survival for patients with ovarian cancer (OC has shown little improvement for decades meaning new therapeutic options are critical. OC comprises multiple histological subtypes, of which the most common and aggressive subtype is high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC. HGSOC is characterized by genomic structural variations with relatively few recurrent somatic mutations or dominantly acting oncogenes that can be targeted for the development of novel therapies. However, deregulation of pathways controlling homologous recombination (HR and ribosome biogenesis has been observed in a high proportion of HGSOC, raising the possibility that targeting these basic cellular processes may provide improved patient outcomes. The poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitor olaparib has been approved to treat women with defects in HR due to germline BRCA mutations. Recent evidence demonstrated the efficacy of targeting ribosome biogenesis with the specific inhibitor of ribosomal RNA synthesis, CX-5461 in v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC-driven haematological and prostate cancers. CX-5461 has now progressed to a phase I clinical trial in patients with haematological malignancies and phase I/II trial in breast cancer. Here we review the currently available targeted therapies for HGSOC and discuss the potential of targeting ribosome biogenesis as a novel therapeutic approach against HGSOC.

  20. Identification of polycystic ovary syndrome potential drug targets based on pathobiological similarity in the protein-protein interaction network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wan; Wei, Wenqing; Li, Yiran; Xie, Ruiqiang; Guo, Shanshan; Wang, Yahui; Jiang, Jing; Chen, Binbin; Lv, Junjie; Zhang, Nana; Chen, Lina; He, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrinological disorders in reproductive aged women. PCOS and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) are closely linked in multiple levels and possess high pathobiological similarity. Here, we put forward a new computational approach based on the pathobiological similarity to identify PCOS potential drug target modules (PPDT-Modules) and PCOS potential drug targets in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN). From the systems level and biological background, 1 PPDT-Module and 22 PCOS potential drug targets were identified, 21 of which were verified by literatures to be associated with the pathogenesis of PCOS. 42 drugs targeting to 13 PCOS potential drug targets were investigated experimentally or clinically for PCOS. Evaluated by independent datasets, the whole PPDT-Module and 22 PCOS potential drug targets could not only reveal the drug response, but also distinguish the statuses between normal and disease. Our identified PPDT-Module and PCOS potential drug targets would shed light on the treatment of PCOS. And our approach would provide valuable insights to research on the pathogenesis and drug response of other diseases. PMID:27191267

  1. S100-alarmins: potential therapeutic targets for arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austermann, Judith; Zenker, Stefanie; Roth, Johannes

    2017-07-01

    In arthritis, inflammatory processes are triggered by numerous factors that are released from joint tissues, promoting joint destruction and pathological progression. During inflammation, a novel family of pro-inflammatory molecules called alarmins is released, amplifying inflammation and joint damage. Areas covered: With regard to the role of the alarmins S100A8 and S100A9 in the pathogenesis of arthritis, recent advances and the future prospects in terms of therapeutic implications are considered. Expert opinion: There is still an urgent need for novel treatment strategies addressing the local mechanisms of joint inflammation and tissue destruction, offering promising therapeutic alternatives. S100A8 and S100A9, which are the most up-regulated alarmins during arthritis, are endogenous triggers of inflammation, defining these proteins as promising targets for local suppression of arthritis. In murine models, the blockade of S100A8/S100A9 ameliorates inflammatory processes, including arthritis, and there are several lines of evidence that S100-alarmins may already be targeted in therapeutic approaches in man.

  2. DEPDC5 as a potential therapeutic target for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kenneth A; Scheffer, Ingrid E

    2017-06-01

    Dishevelled, Egl-10 and Pleckstrin (DEP) domain-containing protein 5 (DEPDC5) is a protein subunit of the GTPase-activating proteins towards Rags 1 (GATOR1) complex. GATOR1 is a recently identified modulator of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. mTOR is a key regulator of cell proliferation and metabolism; disruption of the mTOR pathway is implicated in focal epilepsy, both acquired and genetic. Tuberous sclerosis is the prototypic mTOR genetic syndrome with epilepsy, however GATOR1 gene mutations have recently been shown to cause lesional and non-lesional focal epilepsy. Areas covered: This review summarizes the mTOR pathway, including regulators and downstream effectors, emphasizing recent developments in the understanding of the complex role of the GATOR1 complex. We review the epilepsy types associated with mTOR overactivity, including tuberous sclerosis, polyhydramnios megalencephaly symptomatic epilepsy, cortical dysplasia, non-lesional focal epilepsy and post-traumatic epilepsy. Currently available mTOR inhibitors are discussed, primarily rapamycin analogs and ATP competitive mTOR inhibitors. Expert opinion: DEPDC5 is an attractive therapeutic target in focal epilepsy, as effects of DEPDC5 agonists would likely be anti-epileptogenic and more selective than currently available mTOR inhibitors. Therapeutic effects might be synergistic with certain existing dietary therapies, including the ketogenic diet.

  3. Intracerebral Event-related Potentials to Subthreshold Target Stimuli

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázdil, M.; Rektor, I.; Daniel, P.; Dufek, M.; Jurák, Pavel

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 4 (2001), s. 650-661 ISSN 1388-2457 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/98/0490 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : event-related potentials * intracerebral recordings * oddball paradigm Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.922, year: 2001

  4. Cryptophycins: cytotoxic cyclodepsipeptides with potential for tumor targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Christine; Figueras, Eduard; Borbely, Adina N; Sewald, Norbert

    2017-07-01

    Cryptophycins are a class of 16-membered highly cytotoxic macrocyclic depsipeptides isolated from cyanobacteria. The biological activity is based on their ability to interact with tubulin. They interfere with microtubule dynamics and prevent microtubules from forming correct mitotic spindles, which causes cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Their strong antiproliferative activities with 100-fold to 1000-fold potency compared with those of paclitaxel and vinblastine have been observed. Cryptophycins are highly promising drug candidates, as their biological activity is not negatively affected by P-glycoprotein, a drug efflux system commonly found in multidrug-resistant cancer cell lines and solid tumors. Cryptophycin-52 had been investigated in phase II clinical trials but failed because of its high neurotoxicity. Recently, cryptophycin conjugates with peptides and antibodies have been developed for targeted delivery in tumor therapy. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. PPARδ Activity in Cardiovascular Diseases: A Potential Pharmacological Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Tesse

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, and particularly of PPARα and PPARγ, using selective agonists, is currently used in the treatment of metabolic diseases such as hypertriglyceridemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PPARα and PPARγ anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in cardiovascular cells were extensively clarified in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models. In contrast, the role of PPARδ in cardiovascular system is poorly understood. Prostacyclin, the predominant prostanoid released by vascular cells, is a putative endogenous agonist for PPARδ, but only recently PPARδ selective synthetic agonists were found, improving studies about the physiological and pathophysiological roles of PPARδ activation. Recent reports suggest that the PPARδ activation may play a pivotal role to regulate inflammation, apoptosis, and cell proliferation, suggesting that this transcriptional factor could become an interesting pharmacological target to regulate cardiovascular cell apoptosis, proliferation, inflammation, and metabolism.

  6. Tumor-colonizing bacteria: a potential tumor targeting therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Chao; Wang, Jiansheng

    2014-08-01

    In 1813, Vautier published his observation of tumor regression in patients who had suffered from gas gangrene. Since then, many publications have described the use of bacteria as antitumor therapy. For example, Bifidobacterium and Clostridium have been shown to selectively colonize tumors and to reduce tumor size. In addition, recent studies have focused on the use of genetic engineering to induce the expression of pro-drug converting enzymes, cytokines, specific antibodies, or suicide genes in tumor-colonizing bacteria. Moreover, some animal experiments have reported the treatment of tumors with engineered bacteria, and few side effects were observed. Therefore, based on these advances in tumor targeting therapy, bacteria may represent the next generation of cancer therapy.

  7. Endocannabinoid signaling in female reproductive events: a potential therapeutic target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarrone, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 30 years after the discovery in 1964 of the psychoactive ingredient of cannabis (Cannabis sativa), Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, its endogenous counterparts were discovered and collectively termed endocannabinoids (eCBs): N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide) in 1992 and 2-arachidonoylglycerol in 1995. Since then, intense research has identified additional eCBs and an ensemble of proteins that bind, synthesize and degrade them, the so-called eCB system. Altogether, these new compounds have been recognized as key mediators of several aspects of human pathophysiology, and in particular of female fertility. Here, the main features of the eCB system are presented, in order to put in a better perspective the relevance of eCB signaling in virtually all steps of human reproduction and to highlight emerging hopes that elements of this system might indeed become novel targets to combat fertility problems.

  8. Intermolecular interaction of thiosemicarbazone derivatives to solvents and a potential Aedes aegypti target

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, João Bosco P.; Hallwass, Fernando; da Silva, Aluizio G.; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo; Ramos, Mozart N.; Espíndola, José Wanderlan P.; de Oliveira, Ana Daura T.; Brondani, Dalci José; Leite, Ana Cristina L.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2015-08-01

    DFT calculations were used to access information about structure, energy and electronic properties of series of phenyl- and phenoxymethyl-(thio)semicarbazone derivatives with demonstrated activity against the larvae of Aedes aegypti in stage L4. The way as the thiosemicarbazone derivatives can interact with solvents like DMSO and water were analyzed from the comparison between calculated and experimental 1H NMR chemical shifts. The evidences of thiosemicarbazone derivatives making H-bond interaction to solvent have provide us insights on how they can interact with a potential A. aegypti's biological target, the Sterol Carrier Protein-2.

  9. p27: a barometer of signaling deregulation and potential predictor of response to targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wander, Seth A; Zhao, Dekuang; Slingerland, Joyce M

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 by upstream mitogenic signaling pathways regulates its stability, localization, and biological function. In human cancers, loss of the antiproliferative action of p27 can arise through reduced protein levels and/or cytoplasmic mislocalization, leading to increased cell proliferation and/or cell migration, respectively. Reduced p27 expression levels and p27 mislocalization have potential prognostic and therapeutic implications in various types of human cancers. This review highlights mechanisms of functional deregulation of p27 by oncogenic signaling that provide an important molecular rationale for pathway targeting in cancer treatment. ©2010 AACR.

  10. Leucine-zipper and Sterile-α Motif Kinase (ZAK): A Potential Target for Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu; Zhang, Qingwen; Li, Zhengqiu; Ding, Ke; Lu, Xiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-zipper and sterile-α motif kinase (ZAK) is a member of mixed-lineage kinase family (MLKs), which is considered as a new potential target for different physiological disorders, including myocardial hypertrophy and cardiac fibrosis, inflammation and cancer. However, the progress on its biological functions and small molecule inhibitors is limited. Only several multi-kinases inhibitors are reported to non-selectively bind with ZAK with various potencies. Herein, we provide an updated overview on the biological functions and small molecular inhibitors of ZAKs.

  11. RAGE and Soluble RAGE: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Koyama, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2007-01-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is known to be involved in microvascular complications in diabetes. RAGE is also profoundly associated with macrovascular complications in diabetes through regulation of atherogenesis, angiogenic response, vascular injury, and inflammatory response. The potential significance of RAGE in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease appears not to be confined solely to nondiabetic rather than diabetic conditions. Numerous truncated forms of RAGE...

  12. Using Click Chemistry to Identify Potential Drug Targets in Plasmodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Plasmodium. 67 68 3 Introduction 69 70 Malaria infection begins with the infection by Plasmodium ‘sporozoites’ of the liver. After 71 asexual...the Plasmodium mammalian cycle. Identifying parasite proteins that are required for liver infection can lead to novel drugs against malaria . For the...sporozoite infection and whose inhibition could be exploited to prevent the first step of a malaria infection. Thus, we have identified two potential

  13. Design of a Potent CB1 Receptor Antagonist Series: Potential Scaffold for Peripherally-Targeted Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Robert L; Carpino, Philip A; Gautreau, Denise; Hadcock, John R; Iredale, Philip A; Kelly-Sullivan, Dawn; Lizano, Jeffrey S; O'Connor, Rebecca E; Schneider, Steven R; Scott, Dennis O; Ward, Karen M

    2012-05-10

    Antagonism of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) receptor signaling has been demonstrated to inhibit feeding behaviors in humans, but CB1-mediated central nervous system (CNS) side effects have halted the marketing and further development of the lead drugs against this target. However, peripherally restricted CB1 receptor antagonists may hold potential for providing the desired efficacy with reduced CNS side effect profiles. In this report we detail the discovery and structure-activity-relationship analysis of a novel bicyclic scaffold (3) that exhibits potent CB1 receptor antagonism and oral activity in preclinical feeding models. Optimization of physical properties has led to the identification of analogues which are predicted to have reduced CNS exposure and could serve as a starting point for the design of peripherally targeted CB1 receptor antagonists.

  14. The endocannabinoid system as a potential therapeutic target for pain modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulugöl, Ahmet

    2014-06-01

    Although cannabis has been used for pain management for millennia, very few approved cannabinoids are indicated for the treatment of pain and other medical symptoms. Cannabinoid therapy re-gained attention only after the discovery of endocannabinoids and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the enzymes playing a role in endocannabinoid metabolism. Nowadays, research has focused on the inhibition of these degradative enzymes and the elevation of endocannabinoid tonus locally; special emphasis is given on multi-target analgesia compounds, where one of the targets is the endocannabinoid degrading enzyme. In this review, I provide an overview of the current understanding about the processes accounting for the biosynthesis, transport and metabolism of endocannabinoids, and pharmacological approaches and potential therapeutic applications in this area, regarding the use of drugs elevating endocannabinoid levels in pain conditions.

  15. Erythropoietin Pathway: A Potential Target for the Treatment of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongyang Ma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade, accumulating evidence from both clinical and experimental studies has indicated that erythropoietin may have antidepressant effects. In addition to the kidney and liver, many organs have been identified as secretory tissues for erythropoietin, including the brain. Its receptor is expressed in cerebral and spinal cord neurons, the hypothalamus, hippocampus, neocortex, dorsal root ganglia, nerve axons, and Schwann cells. These findings may highlight new functions for erythropoietin, which was originally considered to play a crucial role in the progress of erythroid differentiation. Erythropoietin and its receptor signaling through JAK2 activate multiple downstream signaling pathways including STAT5, PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, and MAPK. These factors may play an important role in inflammation and neuroprogression in the nervous system. This is particularly true for the hippocampus, which is possibly related to learning, memory, neurocognitive deficits and mood alterations. Thus, the influence of erythropoietin on the downstream pathways known to be involved in the treatment of depression makes the erythropoietin-related pathway an attractive target for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Focusing on erythropoietin may help us understand the pathogenic mechanisms of depression and the molecular basis of its treatment.

  16. The potential for targeting extracellular LOX proteins in human malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayorca-Guiliani A

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Alejandro Mayorca-Guiliani, Janine T Erler Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: The extracellular matrix (ECM is the physical scaffold where cells are organized into tissues and organs. The ECM may be modified during cancer to allow and promote proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. The family of lysyl oxidase (LOX enzymes cross-links collagens and elastin and, therefore, is a central player in ECM deposition and maturation. Extensive research has revealed how the LOX proteins participate in every stage of cancer progression, and two family members, LOX and LOX-like 2, have been linked to metastasis, the final stage of cancer responsible for over 90% of cancer patient deaths. However, LOX biosynthesis results in by-product with antiproliferative properties in certain cancers, and LOX enzymes may have different effects depending on the molecular network in which they are active. Therefore, the design of therapies targeting the LOX family needs to be guided by the molecular makeup of the individual disease and will probably require other agents to act on both the LOX enzymes and their associated network. Keywords: cancer, extracellular matrix, lysyl oxidase, metastasis

  17. Erythropoietin Pathway: A Potential Target for the Treatment of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chongyang; Cheng, Fafeng; Wang, Xueqian; Zhai, Changming; Yue, Wenchao; Lian, Yajun; Wang, Qingguo

    2016-05-06

    During the past decade, accumulating evidence from both clinical and experimental studies has indicated that erythropoietin may have antidepressant effects. In addition to the kidney and liver, many organs have been identified as secretory tissues for erythropoietin, including the brain. Its receptor is expressed in cerebral and spinal cord neurons, the hypothalamus, hippocampus, neocortex, dorsal root ganglia, nerve axons, and Schwann cells. These findings may highlight new functions for erythropoietin, which was originally considered to play a crucial role in the progress of erythroid differentiation. Erythropoietin and its receptor signaling through JAK2 activate multiple downstream signaling pathways including STAT5, PI3K/Akt, NF-κB, and MAPK. These factors may play an important role in inflammation and neuroprogression in the nervous system. This is particularly true for the hippocampus, which is possibly related to learning, memory, neurocognitive deficits and mood alterations. Thus, the influence of erythropoietin on the downstream pathways known to be involved in the treatment of depression makes the erythropoietin-related pathway an attractive target for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Focusing on erythropoietin may help us understand the pathogenic mechanisms of depression and the molecular basis of its treatment.

  18. Targeted treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical potential of obinutuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolej L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lukáš Smolej 4th Department of Internal Medicine – Hematology, University Hospital Hradec Králové and Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Králové, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic Abstract: Introduction of targeted agents revolutionized the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL in the past decade. Addition of chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab to chemotherapy significantly improved efficacy including overall survival (OS in untreated fit patients; humanized anti-CD52 antibody alemtuzumab and fully human anti-CD20 antibody ofatumumab lead to improvement in refractory disease. Novel small molecule inhibitors such as ibrutinib and idelalisib demonstrated excellent activity and were very recently licensed in relapsed/refractory CLL. Obinutuzumab (GA101 is the newest monoclonal antibody approved for the treatment of CLL. This novel, glycoengineered, type II humanized anti-CD20 antibody is characterized by enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and direct induction of cell death compared to type I antibodies. Combination of obinutuzumab and chlorambucil yielded significantly better OS in comparison to chlorambucil monotherapy in untreated comorbid patients. These results led to approval of obinuzutumab for the treatment of CLL. Numerous clinical trials combining obinutuzumab with other cytotoxic drugs and novel small molecules are currently under way. This review focuses on the role of obinutuzumab in the treatment of CLL. Keywords: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, anti-CD20 antibodies, chlorambucil, rituximab, ofatumumab, obinutuzumab, overall survival

  19. Targeted treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical potential of obinutuzumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolej, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of targeted agents revolutionized the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in the past decade. Addition of chimeric monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab to chemotherapy significantly improved efficacy including overall survival (OS) in untreated fit patients; humanized anti-CD52 antibody alemtuzumab and fully human anti-CD20 antibody ofatumumab lead to improvement in refractory disease. Novel small molecule inhibitors such as ibrutinib and idelalisib demonstrated excellent activity and were very recently licensed in relapsed/refractory CLL. Obinutuzumab (GA101) is the newest monoclonal antibody approved for the treatment of CLL. This novel, glycoengineered, type II humanized anti-CD20 antibody is characterized by enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and direct induction of cell death compared to type I antibodies. Combination of obinutuzumab and chlorambucil yielded significantly better OS in comparison to chlorambucil monotherapy in untreated comorbid patients. These results led to approval of obinuzutumab for the treatment of CLL. Numerous clinical trials combining obinutuzumab with other cytotoxic drugs and novel small molecules are currently under way. This review focuses on the role of obinutuzumab in the treatment of CLL.

  20. GEMINs: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Spinal Muscular Atrophy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca eBorg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The motor neuron degenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA remains one of the most frequently inherited causes of infant mortality. Afflicted patients loose the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene but retain one or more copies of SMN2, a homologue that is incorrectly spliced. Primary treatment strategies for SMA aim at boosting SMN protein levels, which are insufficient in patients. SMN is known to partner with a set of diverse proteins collectively known as GEMINs to form a macromolecular complex. The SMN-GEMINs complex is indispensible for chaperoning the assembly of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs, which are key for pre-mRNA splicing. Pharmaceutics that alleviate the neuromuscular phenotype by restoring the fundamental function of SMN without augmenting its levels are also crucial in the development of an effective treatment. Their use as an adjunct therapy is predicted to enhance benefit to patients. Inspired by the surprising discovery revealing a premier role for GEMINs in snRNP biogenesis together with in vivo studies documenting their requirement for the correct function of the motor system, this review speculates on whether GEMINs constitute valid targets for SMA therapeutic development.

  1. CD30 is a potential therapeutic target in malignant mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabir, Snehal; Kresak, Adam; Yang, Michael; Fu, Pingfu; Wildey, Gary; Dowlati, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    CD30 is a cytokine receptor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFRSF8) that acts as a regulator of apoptosis. The presence of CD30 antigen is important in the diagnosis of Hodgkin’s disease and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. There have been sporadic reports of CD30 expression in non-lymphoid tumors, including malignant mesothelioma. Given the remarkable success of brentuximab vedotin, an antibody-drug conjugate directed against CD30 antigen, in lymphoid malignancies, we undertook a study to examine the incidence of CD30 in mesothelioma and to investigate the ability to target CD30 antigen in mesothelioma. Mesothelioma tumor specimens (N = 83) were examined for CD30 expression by immunohistochemistry. Positive CD30 expression was noted in 13 mesothelioma specimens, primarily those of epithelial histology. There was no significant correlation of CD30 positivity with either tumor grade, stage or survival. Examination of four mesothelioma cell lines (H28, H2052, H2452, and 211H) for CD30 expression by both FACS analysis and confocal microscopy showed that CD30 antigen localized to the cell membrane. Brentuximab vedotin treatment of cultured mesothelioma cells produced a dose-dependent decrease in cell growth and viability at clinically relevant concentrations. Our studies validate the presence of CD30 antigen in a subgroup of epithelial-type mesothelioma tumors and indicate that selected mesothelioma patients may derive benefit from brentuximab vedotin treatment. PMID:25589494

  2. Potential targets in the search for extraterrestrial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the potential for increasing understanding of the origins of terrestrial life by examination of other planets. If living organisms should be found on another planet, they could only have been transported from an inhabited planet or originated independently. The fundamental chemical and structural attributes of terrestrial organisms are so remarkably uniform that any living forms outside the terrestrial blueprint would almost certainly be regarded as alien organisms. It has been shown experimentally by various investigators that life can exist in an extremely wide range of temperatures and pressures. The presence of an atmosphere appears to be necessary.

  3. Do Lower Target Temperatures or Prolonged Cooling Provide Improved Outcomes for Comatose Survivors of Cardiac Arrest Treated With Hypothermia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Eisuke; Dote, Keigo; Kato, Masaya; Sasaki, Shota; Oda, Noboru; Nakano, Yoshinori; Miura, Katsuya; Inoue, Ichiro; Kihara, Yasuki

    2015-09-21

    Optimal protocols for targeted temperature management are still unclear. This study investigated whether lower target temperatures and/or prolonged cooling could provide improved outcomes in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. This observational study was conducted using the prospectively collected targeted temperature management database in Hiroshima, Japan. Between September 2003 and September 2014, 237 patients treated with TTM after cardiac arrest were enrolled in this study. The target temperatures and durations were assigned by the treating physicians regardless of the patients' conditions. Favorable outcomes were defined as a cerebral performance category scale of 1 or 2 at the 90-day follow-up time point. The rate of favorable outcomes were similar between the patients whose protocols of target temperature were 28 hours and target temperatures <34°C were associated with more frequent lethal arrhythmia, pneumonia, and/or bleedings. Prolonged durations of cooling and rewarming ≥28 hours may not improve outcomes and may increase complications. Further studies are necessary to assess the hypothesis that target temperatures <34°C provide improved outcomes in patients treated with extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  4. Plasmodium glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: A potential malaria diagnostic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Robert G E; Hurdayal, Ramona; Choveaux, David; Przyborski, Jude M; Coetzer, Theresa H T; Goldring, J P Dean

    2017-08-01

    Malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are immunochromatographic tests detecting Plasmodial histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aldolase. HRP2 is only expressed by Plasmodium falciparum parasites and the protein is not expressed in several geographic isolates. LDH-based tests lack sensitivity compared to HRP2 tests. This study explored the potential of the Plasmodial glycolytic enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), as a new malaria diagnostic biomarker. The P. falciparum and P. yoelii proteins were recombinantly expressed in BL21(DE3) Escherischia coli host cells and affinity purified. Two epitopes (CADGFLLIGEKKVSVFA and CAEKDPSQIPWGKCQV) specific to P. falciparum GAPDH and one common to all mammalian malaria species (CKDDTPIYVMGINH) were identified. Antibodies were raised in chickens against the two recombinant proteins and the three epitopes and affinity purified. The antibodies detected the native protein in parasite lysates as a 38 kDa protein and immunofluorescence verified a parasite cytosolic localization for the native protein. The antibodies suggested a 4-6 fold higher concentration of native PfGAPDH compared to PfLDH in immunoprecipitation and ELISA formats, consistent with published proteomic data. PfGAPDH shows interesting potential as a malaria diagnostic biomarker. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Introduction to the special issue: GIS-based mineral potential targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Mahyar; Nykänen, Vesa

    2017-04-01

    Mineral potential targeting using geographical information system is an efficient technique to delimit a study area for further exploration of mineral deposits. This introduction presents an overview of the mineral potential modeling methods and future perspectives of research in the fields of target generation and summarizes the papers that have been incorporated into this Special Issue of the Journal of African Earth Sciences.

  6. p53 Abnormalities and Potential Therapeutic Targeting in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Teoh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available p53 abnormalities are regarded as an independent prognostic marker in multiple myeloma. Patients harbouring this genetic anomaly are commonly resistant to standard therapy. Thus, various p53 reactivating agents have been developed in order to restore its tumour suppressive abilities. Small molecular compounds, especially, have gained popularity in its efficacy against myeloma cells. For instance, promising preclinical results have steered both nutlin-3 and PRIMA-1 into phase I/II clinical trials. This review summarizes different modes of p53 inactivation in myeloma and highlights the current p53-based therapies that are being utilized in the clinic. Finally, we discuss the potential and promise that the novel small molecules possess for clinical application in improving the treatment outcome of myeloma.

  7. DTMiner: identification of potential disease targets through biomedical literature mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Zhang, Meizhuo; Xie, Yanping; Wang, Fan; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Kenny Q; Wei, Jia

    2016-12-01

    Biomedical researchers often search through massive catalogues of literature to look for potential relationships between genes and diseases. Given the rapid growth of biomedical literature, automatic relation extraction, a crucial technology in biomedical literature mining, has shown great potential to support research of gene-related diseases. Existing work in this field has produced datasets that are limited both in scale and accuracy. In this study, we propose a reliable and efficient framework that takes large biomedical literature repositories as inputs, identifies credible relationships between diseases and genes, and presents possible genes related to a given disease and possible diseases related to a given gene. The framework incorporates name entity recognition (NER), which identifies occurrences of genes and diseases in texts, association detection whereby we extract and evaluate features from gene-disease pairs, and ranking algorithms that estimate how closely the pairs are related. The F1-score of the NER phase is 0.87, which is higher than existing studies. The association detection phase takes drastically less time than previous work while maintaining a comparable F1-score of 0.86. The end-to-end result achieves a 0.259 F1-score for the top 50 genes associated with a disease, which performs better than previous work. In addition, we released a web service for public use of the dataset. The implementation of the proposed algorithms is publicly available at http://gdr-web.rwebox.com/public_html/index.php?page=download.php The web service is available at http://gdr-web.rwebox.com/public_html/index.php CONTACT: jenny.wei@astrazeneca.com or kzhu@cs.sjtu.edu.cn Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted lipid nanoparticles retain self-assembled nanostructures and provide high specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jiali; Scoble, Judith A.; Li, Nan; Lovrecz, George; Waddington, Lynne J.; Tran, Nhiem; Muir, Benjamin W.; Coia, Gregory; Kirby, Nigel; Drummond, Calum J.; Mulet, Xavier

    2015-02-01

    Next generation drug delivery utilising nanoparticles incorporates active targeting to specific sites. In this work, we combined targeting with the inherent advantages of self-assembled lipid nanoparticles containing internal nano-structures. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting, PEGylated lipid nanoparticles using phytantriol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-PEG-maleimide amphiphiles were created. The self-assembled lipid nanoparticles presented here have internal lyotropic liquid crystalline nano-structures, verified by synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and cryo-transmission electron microscopy, that offer the potential of high drug loading and enhanced cell penetration. Anti-EGFR Fab' fragments were conjugated to the surface of nanoparticles via a maleimide-thiol reaction at a high conjugation efficiency and retained specificity following conjugation to the nanoparticles. The conjugated nanoparticles were demonstrated to have high affinity for an EGFR target in a ligand binding assay.Next generation drug delivery utilising nanoparticles incorporates active targeting to specific sites. In this work, we combined targeting with the inherent advantages of self-assembled lipid nanoparticles containing internal nano-structures. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting, PEGylated lipid nanoparticles using phytantriol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-PEG-maleimide amphiphiles were created. The self-assembled lipid nanoparticles presented here have internal lyotropic liquid crystalline nano-structures, verified by synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and cryo-transmission electron microscopy, that offer the potential of high drug loading and enhanced cell penetration. Anti-EGFR Fab' fragments were conjugated to the surface of nanoparticles via a maleimide-thiol reaction at a high conjugation efficiency and retained specificity following conjugation to the nanoparticles. The conjugated nanoparticles

  9. Unintended Sunburn: A Potential Target for Sun Protection Messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine F. H. McLeod

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New Zealand (NZ has the highest melanoma incidence rate in the world. Primary prevention efforts focus on reducing sunburn incidence and increasing sun protective practices in the population. However, sunburn from excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR remains common. To reduce sunburn incidence, it is important to examine those individuals who experience unintended sunburn. This study aims to use data from the NZ Triennial Sun Protection Survey to describe respondents who were not intending to tan but were sunburnt after outdoor UVR exposure. Information on sociodemographics, concurrent weather conditions, sun protection attitudes and knowledge, and outdoor behaviour was also collected. The results showed 13.5% of respondents’ experienced unintended sunburn during the survey weekend but had not attempted to obtain a tan that summer. Respondents who reported unintended sunburn were more likely than others to have been near water and in unshaded areas, used sunscreen, had higher SunSmart knowledge scores, had lower positive attitudes towards tanning, and were outdoors for a longer duration with less body coverage. As sunburn was unintended these respondents’ outdoor sun protective behaviours may be amenable to change. Future public health initiatives should focus on increasing sun protection (clothing and shade and reducing potential barriers to sun protection.

  10. The Woman's Heart: Insights into New Potential Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfrilli, Daniele; Pofi, Ricardo; Feola, Tiziana; Lenzi, Andrea; Giannetta, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an increasingly common cause of death in women. There is as yet no consensus on the analysis of cardiovascular risk factors with regard to the specific, personalised treatment of pre- and post-menopausal women. Clinically significant cardioprotective and antiremodelling effects have been observed in animal and human studies exploring chronic inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5). The relationship between the heart, estrogens and PDE5 inhibitors (PDE5is) remains unclear. Experimental data suggest potential beneficial effects on cardiac geometry, function, endothelial function and microvascular coronary flow in women. It was recently postulated that the efficacy of PDE5is is estrogen-dependent in female heart disease. A registered randomised, placebo-controlled study, RECOGITO (NCT01803828), aimed at identifying the genderspecific efficacy of long-term PDE5 inhibition in diabetic cardiomyopathy, is currently recruiting patients. Estrogen receptor modulation could be a new promising approach to heart protection via PDE5is. PDE5is could be indicated as a gender-oriented strategy in modulated cardiac dysfunction and remodelling and in cardiac risk factors for selected cardiovascular diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Candida albicans Heat Shock Proteins and Hsps-Associated Signaling Pathways as Potential Antifungal Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ying; Li, Tao; Yu, Cuixiang; Sun, Shujuan

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, the incidence of invasive fungal infections has increased notably. Candida albicans (C. albicans), a common opportunistic fungal pathogen that dwells on human mucosal surfaces, can cause fungal infections, especially in immunocompromised and high-risk surgical patients. In addition, the wide use of antifungal agents has likely contributed to resistance of C. albicans to traditional antifungal drugs, increasing the difficulty of treatment. Thus, it is urgent to identify novel antifungal drugs to cope with C. albicans infections. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) exist in most organisms and are expressed in response to thermal stress. In C. albicans, Hsps control basic physiological activities or virulence via interaction with a variety of diverse regulators of cellular signaling pathways. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that Hsps confer drug resistance to C. albicans. Many studies have shown that disrupting the normal functions of C. albicans Hsps inhibits fungal growth or reverses the tolerance of C. albicans to traditional antifungal drugs. Here, we review known functions of the diverse Hsp family, Hsp-associated intracellular signaling pathways and potential antifungal targets based on these pathways in C. albicans. We hope this review will aid in revealing potential new roles of C. albicans Hsps in addition to canonical heat stress adaptions and provide more insight into identifying potential novel antifungal targets. PMID:29312897

  12. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential for Targeting Human Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etame, Arnold B.

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) remains a major challenge to the advancement and application of systemic anti-cancer therapeutics into the central nervous system. The structural and physiological delivery constraints of the BBB significantly limit the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, thereby making systemic administration a non-viable option for the vast majority of chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, the lack of specificity of conventional systemic chemotherapy when applied towards malignant brain tumors remains a major shortcoming. Hence novel therapeutic strategies that focus both on targeted and enhanced delivery across the BBB are warranted. In recent years nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as attractive vehicles for efficient delivery of targeted anti-cancer therapeutics. In particular, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained prominence in several targeting applications involving systemic cancers. Their enhanced permeation and retention within permissive tumor microvasculature provide a selective advantage for targeting. Malignant brain tumors also exhibit transport-permissive microvasculature secondary to blood brain barrier disruption. Hence AuNPs may have potential relevance for brain tumor targeting. However, the permeation of AuNPs across the BBB has not been well characterized, and hence is a potential limitation for successful application of AuNP-based therapeutics within the central nervous system (CNS). In this dissertation, we designed and characterized AuNPs and assessed the role of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the physical and biological properties of AuNPs. We established a size-dependent permeation profile with respect to core size as well as PEG length when AuNPs were assessed through a transport-permissive in-vitro BBB. This study was the first of its kind to systematically examine the influence of design on permeation of AuNPs through transport-permissive BBB. Given the significant delivery limitations through the non

  13. Elasticity, adhesion and tether extrusion on breast cancer cells provide a signature of their invasive potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyakov, Georges; Thiebot, Bénédicte; Campillo, Clément C; Labdi, Sid; Séverac, Childérick; Pelta, Juan; Dague, Etienne

    2016-10-05

    We use single cell force spectroscopy to compare elasticity, adhesion and tether extrusion on four breast cancer cell lines with an increasing invasive potential. We perform cell attachment/detachment experiments either on fibronectin or on another cell using an Atomic Force Microscope. Our study on the membrane tether formation from cancer cells show that they are easier to extrude from aggressive invasive cells. Measured elastic modulus values confirm that more invasive cells are softer. Moreover, the adhesion force increases with the invasive potential. Our results provide a mechanical signature of breast cancer cells that correlates with their invasivity.

  14. Assessing Potential Impact of Bt Eggplants on Non-Target Arthropods in the Philippines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario V Navasero

    Full Text Available Studies on potential adverse effects of genetically engineered crops are part of an environmental risk assessment that is required prior to the commercial release of these crops. Of particular concern are non-target organisms (NTOs that provide important ecosystem services. Here, we report on studies conducted in the Philippines over three cropping seasons with Bt eggplants expressing Cry1Ac for control of the eggplant fruit and shoot borer (EFSB, Leucinodes orbonalis, to examine potential effects on field abundance, community composition, structure and biodiversity of NTO's, particularly non-target arthropod (NTA communities. We document that many arthropod taxa are associated with Bt eggplants and their non-Bt comparators and that the number of taxa and their densities varied within season and across trials. However, we found few significant differences in seasonal mean densities of arthropod taxa between Bt and non-Bt eggplants. As expected, a lower abundance of lepidopteran pests was detected in Bt eggplants. Higher abundance of a few non-target herbivores was detected in non-Bt eggplants as were a few non-target beneficials that might control them. Principal Response Curve (PRC analyses showed no statistically significant impact of Bt eggplants on overall arthropod communities through time in any season. Furthermore, we found no significant adverse impacts of Bt eggplants on species abundance, diversity and community dynamics, particularly for beneficial NTAs. These results support our previous studies documenting that Bt eggplants can effectively and selectively control the main pest of eggplant in Asia, the EFSB. The present study adds that it can do so without adverse effects on NTAs. Thus, Bt eggplants can be a foundational component for controlling EFSB in an Integrated Pest Management (IPM program and dramatically reduce dependence on conventional insecticides.

  15. Cholinergic Mechanisms in Spinal Locomotion - Potential Target for Rehabilitation Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L M Jordan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments implicate cholinergic brainstem and spinal systems in the control of locomotion. Our results demonstrate that the endogenous cholinergic propriospinal system, acting via M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, is capable of consistently producing well-coordinated locomotor activity in the in vitro neonatal preparation, placing it in a position to contribute to normal locomotion and to provide a basis for recovery of locomotor capability in the absence of descending pathways. Tests of these suggestions, however, reveal that the spinal cholinergic system plays little if any role in the induction of locomotion, because MLR-evoked locomotion in decerebrate cats is not prevented by cholinergic antagonists. Furthermore, it is not required for the development of stepping movements after spinal cord injury, because cholinergic agonists do not facilitate the appearance of locomotion after spinal cord injury, unlike the dramatic locomotion-promoting effects of clonidine, a noradrenergic α-2 agonist. Furthermore, cholinergic antagonists actually improve locomotor activity after spinal cord injury, suggesting that plastic changes in the spinal cholinergic system interfere with locomotion rather than facilitating it. Changes that have been observed in the cholinergic innervation of motoneurons after spinal cord injury do not decrease motoneuron excitability, as expected. Instead, the development of a hyper-cholinergic state after spinal cord injury appears to enhance motoneuron output and suppress locomotion. A cholinergic suppression of afferent input from the limb after spinal cord injury is also evident from our data, and this may contribute to the ability of cholinergic antagonists to improve locomotion. Not only is a role for the spinal cholinergic system in supressing locomotion after SCI suggested by our results, but an obligatory contribution of a brainstem cholinergic relay to reticulospinal locomotor command systems is not confirmed

  16. Enhancing Shared Decision Making Through Carefully Designed Interventions That Target Patient And Provider Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tai-Seale, M.; Elwyn, G.; Wilson, C.J.; Stults, C.; Dillon, E.C.; Li, M.; Chuang, J.; Meehan, A.; Frosch, D.L.

    2016-01-01

    Patient-provider communication and shared decision making are essential for primary care delivery and are vital contributors to patient experience and health outcomes. To alleviate communication shortfalls, we designed a novel, multidimensional intervention aimed at nudging both patients and primary

  17. A resource of potential drug targets and strategic decision-making for obstructive sleep apnoea pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Richard L; Grace, Kevin P; Wellman, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    There is currently no pharmacotherapy for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) but there is no principled a priori reason why there should not be one. This review identifies a rational decision-making strategy with the necessary logical underpinnings that any reasonable approach would be expected to navigate to develop a viable pharmacotherapy for OSA. The process first involves phenotyping an individual to quantify and characterize the critical predisposing factor(s) to their OSA pathogenesis and identify, a priori, if the patient is likely to benefit from a pharmacotherapy that targets those factors. We then identify rational strategies to manipulate those critical predisposing factor(s), and the barriers that have to be overcome for success of any OSA pharmacotherapy. A new analysis then identifies candidate drug targets to manipulate the upper airway motor circuitry for OSA pharmacotherapy. The first conclusion is that there are two general pharmacological approaches for OSA treatment that are of the most potential benefit and are practically realistic, one being fairly intuitive but the second perhaps less so. The second conclusion is that after identifying the critical physiological obstacles to OSA pharmacotherapy, there are current therapeutic targets of high interest for future development. The final analysis provides a tabulated resource of 'druggable' targets that are relatively restricted to the circuitry controlling the upper airway musculature, with these candidate targets being of high priority for screening and further study. We also emphasize that a pharmacotherapy may not cure OSA per se, but may still be a useful adjunct to improve the effectiveness of, and adherence to, other treatment mainstays. © 2017 The Authors. Respirology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  18. Targeting Heat Shock Proteins 60 and 70 of Toxoplasma gondii as a Potential Drug Target: In Silico Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwinder, Kaur; Kho, Mee Teck; Chee, Phui Mun; Lim, Wui Zhuan; Yap, Ivan K S; Choi, Sy Bing; Yam, Wai Keat

    2016-12-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) 60 and 70 are postulated as a potential drug target for toxoplasmosis due to its importance in the developmental and survival of Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). As of today, there have been no reports on three-dimensional (3D) structure of Hsp60 and Hsp70 deposited in the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank. Hence, this study was conducted to predict 3D structures for Hsp60 and Hsp70 in T. gondii by homology modeling. Selection of the best predicted model was done based on multiple scoring functions. In addition, virtual screening was performed to short-list chemical compounds from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Diversity Set III in search of potential inhibitor against Hsp60 and Hsp70 in T. gondii. Prior to virtual screening, binding sites of Hsp60 and Hsp70 were predicted using various servers and were used as the center in docking studies. The Hsps were docked against known natural ligands to validate the method used in estimating free energy of binding (FEB) and possible interactions between ligand and protein. Virtual screening was performed with a total of 1560 compounds from the NCI Diversity Set III. The compounds were ranked subsequently according to their FEB. Molecular basis of interactions of the top five ranked compounds was investigated using Ligplot+. The major interactions exhibited were hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions in binding to Hsp60 and Hsp70. The results obtained provided information and guidelines for the development of inhibitors for Hsp60 and Hsp70 in T. gondii.

  19. Transcriptome and target DNA enrichment sequence data provide new insights into the phylogeny of vespid wasps (Hymenoptera: Aculeata: Vespidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Sarah; Sann, Manuela; Mayer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    and suggest a single origin of using masticated and salivated plant material for building nests by Raphiglossinae, Zethinae, Polistinae, and Vespinae. The inferred phylogenetic relationships and the open access vespid wasp target DNA enrichment probes will provide a valuable tool for future comparative...

  20. Upregulation of MARCKS in kidney cancer and its potential as a therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-H; Fong, L W R; Yu, E; Wu, R; Trott, J F; Weiss, R H

    2017-06-22

    Targeted therapeutics, such as those abrogating hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)/vascular endothelial growth factor signaling, are initially effective against kidney cancer (or renal cell carcinoma, RCC); however, drug resistance frequently occurs via subsequent activation of alternative pathways. Through genome-scale integrated analysis of the HIF-α network, we identified the major protein kinase C substrate MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) as a potential target molecule for kidney cancer. In a screen of nephrectomy samples from 56 patients with RCC, we found that MARCKS expression and its phosphorylation are increased and positively correlate with tumor grade. Genetic and pharmacologic suppression of MARCKS in high-grade RCC cell lines in vitro led to a decrease in cell proliferation and migration. We further demonstrated that higher MARCKS expression promotes growth and angiogenesis in vivo in an RCC xenograft tumor. MARCKS acted upstream of the AKT/mTOR pathway, activating HIF-target genes, notably vascular endothelial growth factor-A. Following knockdown of MARCKS in RCC cells, the IC50 of the multikinase inhibitor regorafenib was reduced. Surprisingly, attenuation of MARCKS using the MPS (MARCKS phosphorylation site domain) peptide synergistically interacted with regorafenib treatment and decreased survival of kidney cancer cells through inactivation of AKT and mTOR. Our data suggest a major contribution of MARCKS to kidney cancer growth and provide an alternative therapeutic strategy of improving the efficacy of multikinase inhibitors.

  1. Gene expression profiling using nanostring digital RNA counting to identify potential target antigens for melanoma immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Rachel E; Abate-Daga, Daniel; Rosati, Shannon F; Zheng, Zhili; Wunderlich, John R; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2013-09-15

    The success of immunotherapy for the treatment of metastatic cancer is contingent on the identification of appropriate target antigens. Potential targets must be expressed on tumors but show restricted expression on normal tissues. To maximize patient eligibility, ideal target antigens should be expressed on a high percentage of tumors within a histology and, potentially, in multiple different malignancies. A Nanostring probeset was designed containing 97 genes, 72 of which are considered potential candidate genes for immunotherapy. Five established melanoma cell lines, 59 resected metastatic melanoma tumors, and 31 normal tissue samples were profiled and analyzed using Nanostring technology. Of the 72 potential target genes, 33 were overexpressed in more than 20% of studied melanoma tumor samples. Twenty of those genes were identified as differentially expressed between normal tissues and tumor samples by ANOVA analysis. Analysis of normal tissue gene expression identified seven genes with limited normal tissue expression that warrant further consideration as potential immunotherapy target antigens: CSAG2, MAGEA3, MAGEC2, IL13RA2, PRAME, CSPG4, and SOX10. These genes were highly overexpressed on a large percentage of the studied tumor samples, with expression in a limited number of normal tissue samples at much lower levels. The application of Nanostring RNA counting technology was used to directly quantitate the gene expression levels of multiple potential tumor antigens. Analysis of cell lines, 59 tumors, and normal tissues identified seven potential immunotherapy targets for the treatment of melanoma that could increase the number of patients potentially eligible for adoptive immunotherapy. ©2013 AACR.

  2. Targeted Evolution of Embedded Librarian Services: Providing Mobile Reference and Instruction Services Using iPads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellrecht, Elizabeth; Chiarella, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The University at Buffalo Health Sciences Library provides reference and instructional services to support research, curricular, and clinical programs of the University at Buffalo. With funding from an NN/LM MAR Technology Improvement Award, the University at Buffalo Health Sciences Library (UBHSL) purchased iPads to develop embedded reference and educational services. Usage statistics were collected over a ten-month period to measure the frequency of iPad use for mobile services. While this experiment demonstrates that the iPad can be used to meet the library user's needs outside of the physical library space, this article will also offer advice for others who are considering implementing their own program.

  3. Specific targeting of whole lymphoma cells to dendritic cells ex vivo provides a potent antitumor vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocikat Ralph

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DC pulsed with tumor-derived antigenic material have widely been used in antitumor vaccination protocols. However, the optimal strategy of DC loading has not yet been established. Our aim was to define requirements of optimal DC vaccines in terms of in vivo protection in a murine B-cell lymphoma model. Methods We compare various loading reagents including whole parental and modified tumor cells and a single tumor-specific antigen, namely the lymphoma idiotype (Id. Bone marrow-derived DC were pulsed in vitro and used for therapy of established A20 lymphomas. Results We show that a vaccine with superior antitumor efficacy can be generated when DC are loaded with whole modified tumor cells which provide both (i antigenic polyvalency and (ii receptor-mediated antigen internalization. Uptake of cellular material was greatly enhanced when the tumor cells used for DC pulsing were engineered to express an anti-Fc receptor immunoglobulin specificity. Upon transfer of these DC, established tumor burdens were eradicated in 50% of mice. By contrast, pulsing DC with unmodified lymphoma cells or with the lymphoma Id, even when it was endowed with the anti-Fc receptor binding arm, was far less effective. A specific humoral anti-Id response could be detected, particularly following delivery of Id protein-pulsed DC, but it was not predictive of tumor protection. Instead a T-cell response was pivotal for successful tumor protection. Interaction of the transferred DC with CD8+ T lymphocytes seemed to play a role for induction of the immune response but was dispensable when DC had received an additional maturation stimulus. Conclusion Our analyses show that the advantages of specific antigen redirection and antigenic polyvalency can be combined to generate DC-based vaccines with superior antitumor efficacy. This mouse model may provide information for the standardization of DC-based vaccination protocols.

  4. Cloud infrastructure for providing tools as a service: quality attributes and potential solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chauhan, Muhammad Aufeef; Ali Babar, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing is being increasingly adopted in various domains for providing on-demand infrastructure and Software as a service (SaaS) by leveraging the utility computing model and virtualization technologies. One of the domains, where cloud computing is expected to gain huge traction is Global...... projects. Through an extensive review of the relevant literature on GSD and Cloud Computing, we have identified a set of quality attributes and potential architectural solutions for a cloud-based infrastructure that can provide TaaS to GSD teams. This paper outlines the promised benefits of TaaS to GSD...... efficiently and cost-effectively. Moreover, variations in tools available/used by different GSD team members can also pose challenges. We assert that providing Tools as a Service (TaaS) to GSD teams through a cloud-based infrastructure can be a promising solution to address the tools related challenges in GSD...

  5. Inflammation and Immune Regulation as Potential Drug Targets in Antidepressant Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frank M; Kirkby, Kenneth C; Lichtblau, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports a mutual relationship between inflammation and major depression. A variety of mechanisms are outlined, indicating how inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis, course and treatment of major depression. In particular, this review addresses 1) inflammatory cytokines as markers of depression and potential predictors of treatment response, 2) findings that cytokines interact with antidepressants and non-pharmacological antidepressive therapies, such as electroconvulsive therapy, deep brain stimulation and physical activity, 3) the influence of cytokines on the cytochrome (CYP) p450-system and drug efflux transporters, and 4) how cascades of inflammation might serve as antidepressant drug targets. A number of clinical trials have focused on agents with immunmodulatory properties in the treatment of depression, of which this review covers nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), cytokine inhibitors, ketamine, polyunsaturated fatty acids, statins and curcumin. A perspective is also provided on possible future immune targets for antidepressant therapy, such as toll-like receptor-inhibitors, glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, oleanolic acid analogs and minocycline. Concluding from the available data, markers of inflammation may become relevant factors for more personalised planning and prediction of response of antidepressant treatment strategies. Agents with anti-inflammatory properties have the potential to serve as clinically relevant antidepressants. Further studies are required to better define and identify subgroups of patients responsive to inflammatory agents as well as to define optimal time points for treatment onset and duration.

  6. Identification and Characterization of Genes Involved in Leishmania Pathogenesis: The Potential for Drug Target Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Duncan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying and characterizing Leishmania donovani genes and the proteins they encode for their role in pathogenesis can reveal the value of this approach for finding new drug targets. Effective drug targets are likely to be proteins differentially expressed or required in the amastigote life cycle stage found in the patient. Several examples and their potential for chemotherapeutic disruption are presented. A pathway nearly ubiquitous in living cells targeted by anticancer drugs, the ubiquitin system, is examined. New findings in ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers in Leishmania show how disruption of those pathways could point to additional drug targets. The programmed cell death pathway, now recognized among protozoan parasites, is reviewed for some of its components and evidence that suggests they could be targeted for antiparasitic drug therapy. Finally, the endoplasmic reticulum quality control system is involved in secretion of many virulence factors. How disruptions in this pathway reduce virulence as evidence for potential drug targets is presented.

  7. Integrated network analysis reveals potentially novel molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets of refractory epilepsies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Chu

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder and a significant health problem. The pathogenesis of epilepsy remains obscure in a significant number of patients and the current treatment options are not adequate in about a third of individuals which were known as refractory epilepsies (RE. Network medicine provides an effective approach for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying complex diseases. Here we integrated 1876 disease-gene associations of RE and located those genes to human protein-protein interaction (PPI network to obtain 42 significant RE-associated disease modules. The functional analysis of these disease modules showed novel molecular pathological mechanisms of RE, such as the novel enriched pathways (e.g., "presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors", "signaling by insulin receptor". Further analysis on the relationships between current drug targets and the RE-related disease genes showed the rational mechanisms of most antiepileptic drugs. In addition, we detected ten potential novel drug targets (e.g., KCNA1, KCNA4-6, KCNC3, KCND2, KCNMA1, CAMK2G, CACNB4 and GRM1 located in three RE related disease modules, which might provide novel insights into the new drug discovery for RE therapy.

  8. Targeting Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase as a Potential Therapeutic Strategy to Restore Adult Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Na; Xu, Tian-Ying; Li, Wen-Lin; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Adult neurogenesis is the process of generating new neurons throughout life in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus of most mammalian species, which is closely related to aging and disease. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), also an adipokine known as visfatin, is the rate-limiting enzyme for mammalian nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) salvage synthesis by generating nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide. Recent findings from our laboratory and other laboratories have provided much evidence that NAMPT might serve as a therapeutic target to restore adult neurogenesis. NAMPT-mediated NAD biosynthesis in neural stem/progenitor cells is important for their proliferation, self-renewal, and formation of oligodendrocytes in vivo and in vitro. Therapeutic interventions by the administration of NMN, NAD, or recombinant NAMPT are effective for restoring adult neurogenesis in several neurological diseases. We summarize adult neurogenesis in aging, ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegenerative disease and review the advances of targeting NAMPT in restoring neurogenesis. Specifically, we provide emphasis on the P7C3 family, a class of proneurogenic compounds that are potential NAMPT activators, which might shed light on future drug development in neurogenesis restoration. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Integrated network analysis reveals potentially novel molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets of refractory epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hongwei; Sun, Pin; Yin, Jiahui; Liu, Guangming; Wang, Yiwei; Zhao, Pengyao; Zhu, Yizhun; Yang, Xiaohan; Zheng, Tiezheng; Zhou, Xuezhong; Jin, Weilin; Sun, Changkai

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder and a significant health problem. The pathogenesis of epilepsy remains obscure in a significant number of patients and the current treatment options are not adequate in about a third of individuals which were known as refractory epilepsies (RE). Network medicine provides an effective approach for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying complex diseases. Here we integrated 1876 disease-gene associations of RE and located those genes to human protein-protein interaction (PPI) network to obtain 42 significant RE-associated disease modules. The functional analysis of these disease modules showed novel molecular pathological mechanisms of RE, such as the novel enriched pathways (e.g., "presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors", "signaling by insulin receptor"). Further analysis on the relationships between current drug targets and the RE-related disease genes showed the rational mechanisms of most antiepileptic drugs. In addition, we detected ten potential novel drug targets (e.g., KCNA1, KCNA4-6, KCNC3, KCND2, KCNMA1, CAMK2G, CACNB4 and GRM1) located in three RE related disease modules, which might provide novel insights into the new drug discovery for RE therapy.

  10. The enteric nervous system is a potential autoimmune target in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Marie; Jabari, Samir; Voussen, Barbara; Enders, Michael; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Cossais, François; Wedel, Thilo; Boettner, Martina; Schwarz, Anna; Weyer, Linda; Göcer, Oktay; Schroeter, Michael; Maeurer, Mathias; Woenckhaus, Matthias; Pollok, Karolin; Radbruch, Helena; Klotz, Luisa; Scholz, Claus-Jürgen; Nickel, Joachim; Friebe, Andreas; Addicks, Klaus; Ergün, Süleyman; Lehmann, Paul V; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2017-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in young adults that has serious negative socioeconomic effects. In addition to symptoms caused by CNS pathology, the majority of MS patients frequently exhibit gastrointestinal dysfunction, which was previously either explained by the presence of spinal cord lesions or not directly linked to the autoimmune etiology of the disease. Here, we studied the enteric nervous system (ENS) in a B cell- and antibody-dependent mouse model of MS by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy at different stages of the disease. ENS degeneration was evident prior to the development of CNS lesions and the onset of neurological deficits in mice. The pathology was antibody mediated and caused a significant decrease in gastrointestinal motility, which was associated with ENS gliosis and neuronal loss. We identified autoantibodies against four potential target antigens derived from enteric glia and/or neurons by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. Antibodies against three of the target antigens were also present in the plasma of MS patients as confirmed by ELISA. The analysis of human colon resectates provided evidence of gliosis and ENS degeneration in MS patients compared to non-MS controls. For the first time, this study establishes a pathomechanistic link between the well-established autoimmune attack on the CNS and ENS pathology in MS, which might provide a paradigm shift in our current understanding of the immunopathogenesis of the disease with broad diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  11. HIF-1α- Targeting Acriflavine Provides Long Term Survival and Radiological Tumor Response in Brain Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangraviti, Antonella; Raghavan, Tula; Volpin, Francesco; Skuli, Nicolas; Gullotti, David; Zhou, Jinyuan; Asnaghi, Laura; Sankey, Eric; Liu, Ann; Wang, Yuan; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Gorelick, Noah; Serra, Riccardo; Peters, Michael; Schriefer, Destiny; Delaspre, Fabien; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Eberhart, Charles G; Brem, Henry; Olivi, Alessandro; Tyler, Betty

    2017-11-02

    Tumor progression, limited efficacy of current standard treatments, and the rise in patient mortality are associated with gene expression caused by the synergistic action of intratumoral hypoxia and HIF-1α activation. For this reason, recent investigations have focused on HIF-targeting therapeutic agents, with encouraging preclinical and clinical results in solid tumors. Here we describe the efficacy of a HIF-1α inhibitor, Acriflavine, and demonstrate its potency against brain cancer. This safe antibacterial dye induces cell death and apoptosis in several glioma cell lines, targets HIF-1α-mediated pathways, and decreases the level of PGK1, VEGF and HIF-1α in vitro and in vivo. Administered locally via biodegradable polymers, Acriflavine provides significant benefits in survival resulting in nearly 100% long term survival, confirmed by MRI and histological analyses. This study reports preclinical evidence that this safe, small molecule can contribute to brain tumor therapy and highlights the significance of HIF-1α-targeting molecules.

  12. Identification of thioaptamer ligand against E-selectin: potential application for inflamed vasculature targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman P Mann

    Full Text Available Active targeting of a drug carrier to a specific target site is crucial to provide a safe and efficient delivery of therapeutics and imaging contrast agents. E-selectin expression is induced on the endothelial cell surface of vessels in response to inflammatory stimuli but is absent in the normal vessels. Thus, E-selectin is an attractive molecular target, and high affinity ligands for E-selectin could be powerful tools for the delivery of therapeutics and/or imaging agents to inflamed vessels. In this study, we identified a thiophosphate modified aptamer (thioaptamer, TA against E-selectin (ESTA-1 by employing a two-step selection strategy: a recombinant protein-based TA binding selection from a combinatorial library followed by a cell-based TA binding selection using E-selectin expressing human microvascular endothelial cells. ESTA-1 selectively bound to E-selectin with nanomolar binding affinity (K(D = 47 nM while exhibiting minimal cross reactivity to P- and L-selectin. Furthermore, ESTA-1 binding to E-selectin on the endothelial cells markedly antagonized the adhesion (over 75% inhibition of sLe(x positive HL-60 cells at nanomolar concentration. ESTA-1 also bound specifically to the inflamed tumor-associated vasculature of human carcinomas derived from breast, ovarian, and skin but not to normal organs, and this binding was highly associated with the E-selectin expression level. Similarly, intravenously injected ESTA-1 demonstrated distinct binding to the tumor vasculature in a breast cancer xenograft model. Together, our data substantiates the discovery of a thioaptamer (ESTA-1 that binds to E-selectin with high affinity and specificity, thereby highlighting the potential application of ESTA-1 for E-selectin targeted delivery.

  13. PharmMapper 2017 update: a web server for potential drug target identification with a comprehensive target pharmacophore database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Shen, Yihang; Wang, Shiwei; Li, Shiliang; Zhang, Weilin; Liu, Xiaofeng; Lai, Luhua; Pei, Jianfeng; Li, Honglin

    2017-05-03

    The PharmMapper online tool is a web server for potential drug target identification by reversed pharmacophore matching the query compound against an in-house pharmacophore model database. The original version of PharmMapper includes more than 7000 target pharmacophores derived from complex crystal structures with corresponding protein target annotations. In this article, we present a new version of the PharmMapper web server, of which the backend pharmacophore database is six times larger than the earlier one, with a total of 23 236 proteins covering 16 159 druggable pharmacophore models and 51 431 ligandable pharmacophore models. The expanded target data cover 450 indications and 4800 molecular functions compared to 110 indications and 349 molecular functions in our last update. In addition, the new web server is united with the statistically meaningful ranking of the identified drug targets, which is achieved through the use of standard scores. It also features an improved user interface. The proposed web server is freely available at http://lilab.ecust.edu.cn/pharmmapper/. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. NPY receptors as potential targets for anti‐obesity drug development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yulyaningsih, Ernie; Zhang, Lei; Herzog, Herbert; Sainsbury, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    The neuropeptide Y system has proven to be one of the most important regulators of feeding behaviour and energy homeostasis, thus presenting great potential as a therapeutic target for the treatment...

  15. Directional R-Loop Formation by the CRISPR-Cas Surveillance Complex Cascade Provides Efficient Off-Target Site Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Rutkauskas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas systems provide bacteria and archaea with adaptive immunity against foreign nucleic acids. In type I CRISPR-Cas systems, invading DNA is detected by a large ribonucleoprotein surveillance complex called Cascade. The crRNA component of Cascade is used to recognize target sites in foreign DNA (protospacers by formation of an R-loop driven by base-pairing complementarity. Using single-molecule supercoiling experiments with near base-pair resolution, we probe here the mechanism of R-loop formation and detect short-lived R-loop intermediates on off-target sites bearing single mismatches. We show that R-loops propagate directionally starting from the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM. Upon reaching a mismatch, R-loop propagation stalls and collapses in a length-dependent manner. This unambiguously demonstrates that directional zipping of the R-loop accomplishes efficient target recognition by rapidly rejecting binding to off-target sites with PAM-proximal mutations. R-loops that reach the protospacer end become locked to license DNA degradation by the auxiliary Cas3 nuclease/helicase without further target verification.

  16. Realizing the Clinical Potential of Cancer Nanotechnology by Minimizing Toxicological and Targeted Delivery Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay; Sharma, Arati; Robertson, Gavin P.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the potential to make smart drugs that would be capable of targeting cancer but not normal cells and loading combinations of cooperating agents into a single nano-sized particle to more effectively treat this disease. However, to realize the full potential of this technology the negative aspects associated with these nanoparticles needs to be overcome. This review discusses concerns in the field limiting realization of the full clinical potential of this technology, which are toxicity and targeted delivery. Strategies to overcome these hurdles are also reviewed which could lead to attainment of the full clinical potential of this exciting technology. PMID:23139207

  17. Realizing the clinical potential of cancer nanotechnology by minimizing toxicologic and targeted delivery concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay; Sharma, Arati; Robertson, Gavin P

    2012-11-15

    Nanotechnology has the potential to make smart drugs that would be capable of targeting cancer but not normal cells and to load combinations of cooperating agents into a single nanosized particle to more effectively treat this disease. However, to realize the full potential of this technology, the negative aspects associated with these nanoparticles need to be overcome. This review discusses concerns in the field limiting realization of the full clinical potential of this technology, which are toxicity and targeted delivery. Strategies to overcome these hurdles are also reviewed, which could lead to attainment of the full clinical potential of this exciting technology. ©2012 AACR.

  18. Integrin αvβ3 targeting activity study of different retro-inverso sequences of RGD and their potentiality in the designing of tumor targeting peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yayuan; Mei, Ling; Yu, Qianwen; Zhang, Qianyu; Gao, Huile; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2015-12-01

    Retro-inverso peptide represented the isomer of a parent peptide in which the direction of the sequence was reversed and the chirality of each amino acid residue was inverted. Generally, retro-inverso peptides possessed equal or even higher activities compared to the original peptide. RGD was a commonly used ligand for tumor and vascular targeting due to its affinity to integrin αvβ3 receptors. The biological activity study of the isomers of RGD would indeed provide useful suggestions for the design of tumor targeting peptides. Therefore, the tumor targeting activities of octa-arginine which was modified with different retro-inverso sequences of RGD peptide were investigated in this study. Three different tandem peptides (R8-GDGR, R8-GdGr and R8-GdGR) were designed on the basis of R8-GRGD. The tumor targeting activities of these tandem peptides were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, R8-GdGR displayed selective binding affinity to integrin αvβ3 at the cellular level, and exhibited efficient tumor homing and penetrating capabilities in vivo. Meanwhile, R8-GdGR also showed stronger neovessel targeting ability compared to the others. In conclusion, all the results demonstrated that dGR possessed similar biological activity to RGD and was a potential ligand for further designing of tumor targeting peptides.

  19. Local self-government potential in sustainable development of region providing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Bobrovska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing decentralization of power in Ukraine enhances abilities of each region to independently choose their development path and use their own resources. It requires reviewing and updating of mechanisms and instruments of local government and public administration projected to increase the sustainability of development. This necessitates further research of issues of this extremely complex phenomenon. The problem of sustainable development of the regions and their internal capacities over the past decades has attracted the attention of many Ukrainian scientists. They considered the question of the essence and characteristics of this phenomenon, categorical apparatus, and formed approaches to the assessment of the state etc. Existing scientific researchers provided an opportunity for better understanding and deepening of the issues of processes of development formation, becoming the basis for further research. The purpose of the article is the definition of the potential of local governments in the sustainable development of the region, finding approaches for improving management and rational use of resources to enhance the regional development. Development of regions is the scope of display of results and public nature of local self-government. However, the results which are achieved by regional development and its level of sustainability do not meet the needs of society. The results of ongoing reforms, their economic, environmental and social significance do not correspond to spent resources and efforts of society. Strategies of regions for the transition to sustainable development are not systematic. To search for answers and ways to address the issues of the article attempts to identify common root causes in the organization of local government, the underlying increase its impact in the direction of creating conditions and ensure the flow of sustainable regional development through research and their potential influential factors. It is

  20. E-health: potential benefits and challenges in providing and accessing sexual health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minichiello, Victor; Rahman, Saifur; Dune, Tinashe; Scott, John; Dowsett, Gary

    2013-08-30

    E-health has become a burgeoning field in which health professionals and health consumers create and seek information. E-health refers to internet-based health care and information delivery and seeks to improve health service locally, regionally and worldwide. E-sexual health presents new opportunities to provide online sexual health services irrespective of gender, age, sexual orientation and location. The paper used the dimensions of the RE-AIM model (reach, efficacy, adoption, implementation and maintenance) as a guiding principle to discuss potentials of E-health in providing and accessing sexual health services. There are important issues in relation to utilising and providing online sexual health services. For healthcare providers, e-health can act as an opportunity to enhance their clients' sexual health care by facilitating communication with full privacy and confidentiality, reducing administrative costs and improving efficiency and flexibility as well as market sexual health services and products. Sexual health is one of the common health topics which both younger and older people explore on the internet and they increasingly prefer sexual health education to be interactive, non-discriminate and anonymous. This commentary presents and discusses the benefits of e-sexual health and provides recommendations towards addressing some of the emerging challenges. The provision of sexual health services can be enhanced through E-health technology. Doing this can empower consumers to engage with information technology to enhance their sexual health knowledge and quality of life and address some of the stigma associated with diversity in sexualities and sexual health experiences. In addition, e-sexual health may better support and enhance the relationship between consumers and their health care providers across different locations. However, a systematic and focused approach to research and the application of findings in policy and practice is required to ensure that

  1. Assessing a nephrology-focused YouTube channel's potential to educate health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Tejas; Sanghani, Vivek; Fang, Xiangming; Christiano, Cynthia; Ferris, Maria

    2013-01-01

    YouTube has emerged as a potential teaching tool. Studies of the teaching potential of YouTube videos have not addressed health care provider (HCP) satisfaction; a necessary prerequisite for any teaching tool. We conducted a 4-month investigation to determine HCP satisfaction with a nephrology-specific YouTube channel. The Nephrology On-Demand YouTube channel was analyzed from January 1 through April 30, 2011. Sixty-minute nephrology lectures at East Carolina University were compressed into 10-minute videos and uploaded to the channel. HCPs were asked to answer a 5-point Likert questionnaire regarding the accuracy, currency, objectivity and usefulness of the digital format of the teaching videos. Means, standard deviations and 2-sided chi-square testing were performed to analyze responses. Over 80% of HCPs considered the YouTube channel to be accurate, current and objective. A similar percentage considered the digital format useful despite the compression of videos and lack of audio. The nephrology-specific YouTube channel has the potential to educate HCPs of various training backgrounds. Additional studies are required to determine if such specialty-specific channels can improve knowledge acquisition and retention.

  2. Potential Diagnostic, Prognostic and Therapeutic Targets of MicroRNAs in Human Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ming Tsai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human gastric cancer (GC is characterized by a high incidence and mortality rate, largely because it is normally not identified until a relatively advanced stage owing to a lack of early diagnostic biomarkers. Gastroscopy with biopsy is the routine method for screening, and gastrectomy is the major therapeutic strategy for GC. However, in more than 30% of GC surgical patients, cancer has progressed too far for effective medical resection. Thus, useful biomarkers for early screening or detection of GC are essential for improving patients’ survival rate. MicroRNAs (miRNAs play an important role in tumorigenesis. They contribute to gastric carcinogenesis by altering the expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Because of their stability in tissues, serum/plasma and other body fluids, miRNAs have been suggested as novel tumor biomarkers with suitable clinical potential. Recently, aberrantly expressed miRNAs have been identified and tested for clinical application in the management of GC. Aberrant miRNA expression profiles determined with miRNA microarrays, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and next-generation sequencing approaches could be used to establish sample specificity and to identify tumor type. Here, we provide an up-to-date summary of tissue-based GC-associated miRNAs, describing their involvement and that of their downstream targets in tumorigenic and biological processes. We examine correlations among significant clinical parameters and prognostic indicators, and discuss recurrence monitoring and therapeutic options in GC. We also review plasma/serum-based, GC-associated, circulating miRNAs and their clinical applications, focusing especially on early diagnosis. By providing insights into the mechanisms of miRNA-related tumor progression, this review will hopefully aid in the identification of novel potential therapeutic targets.

  3. GIS prospectivity mapping and 3D modeling validation for potential uranium deposit targets in Shangnan district, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiayu; Wang, Gongwen; Sha, Yazhou; Liu, Jiajun; Wen, Botao; Nie, Ming; Zhang, Shuai

    2017-04-01

    Integrating multi-source geoscience information (such as geology, geophysics, geochemistry, and remote sensing) using GIS mapping is one of the key topics and frontiers in quantitative geosciences for mineral exploration. GIS prospective mapping and three-dimensional (3D) modeling can be used not only to extract exploration criteria and delineate metallogenetic targets but also to provide important information for the quantitative assessment of mineral resources. This paper uses the Shangnan district of Shaanxi province (China) as a case study area. GIS mapping and potential granite-hydrothermal uranium targeting were conducted in the study area combining weights of evidence (WofE) and concentration-area (C-A) fractal methods with multi-source geoscience information. 3D deposit-scale modeling using GOCAD software was performed to validate the shapes and features of the potential targets at the subsurface. The research results show that: (1) the known deposits have potential zones at depth, and the 3D geological models can delineate surface or subsurface ore-forming features, which can be used to analyze the uncertainty of the shape and feature of prospectivity mapping at the subsurface; (2) single geochemistry anomalies or remote sensing anomalies at the surface require combining the depth exploration criteria of geophysics to identify potential targets; and (3) the single or sparse exploration criteria zone with few mineralization spots at the surface has high uncertainty in terms of the exploration target.

  4. Preferences for a potential longer-acting injectable contraceptive: perspectives from women, providers, and policy makers in Kenya and Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolley, Elizabeth E; McKenna, Kevin; Mackenzie, Caroline; Ngabo, Fidele; Munyambanza, Emmanuel; Arcara, Jennet; Rademacher, Kate H; Lendvay, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Background: Between 1995 and 2005, injectable use doubled worldwide. However, discontinuation rates remain high, partly because of side effects but also because of missed appointments for reinjection. A longer-acting injectable (LAI) may improve compliance by reducing the required number of reinjection visits, thereby reducing unintentional discontinuation. This study examined acceptability of LAI characteristics comprising the target product profile (TPP). Methods: In 2012, we conducted qualitative case studies in Kenya and Rwanda, consisting of 19 focus group discussions (FGDs) with 177 current, previous, or never users of injectables and 46 in-depth interviews (IDIs) with providers, program implementers, and policy makers. FGDs and IDIs assessed current injectable experiences; attitudes toward potential LAI products; and perceptions of TPP attributes, including ranking preferences for the most and least important characteristics. In addition, we obtained completed electronic surveys from 28 international family planning opinion leaders about the perceived need for an LAI, important product characteristics, and challenges to LAI development or introduction. Results: Many FGD participants and interviewees spontaneously expressed strong interest in an LAI, but there was some variation in TPP preferences. The majority of participants ranked effectiveness as the most important TPP attribute. Providers were generally more concerned about side effects than potential users; some potential users suggested that side effects were related less to the product than to their own body chemistry and that side effects were acceptable as long as they did not last a long time or disrupt daily activities. Women and providers, especially in Kenya, preferred a method with a predictable return to fertility. Some participants associated amenorrhea with delayed or reduced fertility. Most women and providers preferred delivery of the LAI in a single, prepackaged, disposable injection

  5. Multiplatform molecular profiling identifies potentially targetable biomarkers in malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatalica, Zoran; Vranic, Semir; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Xiu, Joanne; Ocal, Idris Tolgay; McGill, John; Bender, Ryan P; Discianno, Erin; Schlum, Aaron; Sanati, Souzan; Palazzo, Juan; Reddy, Sandeep; Pockaj, Barbara

    2016-01-12

    Malignant phyllodes tumor is a rare breast malignancy with sarcomatous overgrowth and with limited effective treatment options for recurrent and metastatic cases. Recent clinical trials indicated a potential for anti-angiogenic, anti-EGFR and immunotherapeutic approaches for patients with sarcomas, which led us to investigate these and other targetable pathways in malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast. Thirty-six malignant phyllodes tumors (including 8 metastatic tumors with two cases having matched primary and metastatic tumors) were profiled using gene sequencing, gene copy number analysis, whole genome expression, and protein expression. Whole genome expression analysis demonstrated consistent over-expression of genes involved in angiogenesis including VEGFA, Angiopoietin-2, VCAM1, PDGFRA, and PTTG1. EGFR protein overexpression was observed in 26/27 (96%) of cases with amplification of the EGFR gene in 8/24 (33%) cases. Two EGFR mutations were identified including EGFRvIII and a presumed pathogenic V774M mutation, respectively. The most common pathogenic mutations included TP53 (50%) and PIK3CA (15%). Cases with matched primary and metastatic tumors harbored identical mutations in both sites (PIK3CA/KRAS and RB1 gene mutations, respectively). Tumor expression of PD-L1 immunoregulatory protein was observed in 3/22 (14%) of cases. Overexpression of molecular biomarkers of increased angiogenesis, EGFR and immune checkpoints provides novel targeted therapy options in malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast.

  6. Type II transmembrane serine proteases as potential target for anti-influenza drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woo-Jin; Seong, Baik Lin

    2017-11-01

    The outbreak of an influenza pandemic as well as the continued circulation of seasonal influenza highlights the need for effective antiviral therapies. The emergence of drug-resistant strains further necessitates the development of novel antivirals that target the host factors crucial for viral replication. Area covered: This review summarizes the current understanding of the structural and functional properties of type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) as a proteolytic activator of influenza virus infection and discusses their potential as antiviral targets. It also explores the experimental evidence accumulated for inhibitors of TTSPs as novel, broad-spectrum antivirals against various influenza virus subtypes. The review also provides an overview of the properties of small molecules, proteins, and peptides that efficiently inhibit the proteolytic activation of the influenza virus. Expert opinion: TTSPs activate a wide range of influenza virus subtypes including avian influenza viruses, both in vitro and in vivo, via proteolytic cleavage of influenza hemagglutinin (HA) into infection-competent fusogenic conformation. Other viruses such as SARS-, MERS-coronaviruses and human metapneumoviruses may use the same host cell proteases for activation, implying that TTSP inhibition might be a novel strategy for developing broad-spectrum antiviral agents for respiratory viral infections.

  7. Distinct responses of compartmentalized glutathione redox potentials to pharmacologic quinones targeting NQO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L; Ponnuraj, Nagendraprabhu; Beaudoin, Jessica N; Leslie, Matthew T; Kenis, Paul J; Gaskins, H Rex

    2017-01-29

    Deoxynyboquinone (DNQ), a potent novel quinone-based antineoplastic agent, selectively kills solid cancers with overexpressed cytosolic NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) via excessive ROS production. A genetically encoded redox-sensitive probe was used to monitor intraorganellar glutathione redox potentials (EGSH) as a direct indicator of cellular oxidative stress following chemotherapeutic administration. Beta-lapachone (β-lap) and DNQ-induced spatiotemporal redox responses were monitored in human lung A549 and pancreatic MIA-PaCa-2 adenocarcinoma cells incubated with or without dicumarol and ES936, potent NQO1 inhibitors. Immediate oxidation of EGSH in both the cytosol and mitochondrial matrix was observed in response to DNQ and β-lap. The DNQ-induced cytosolic oxidation was fully prevented with NQO1 inhibition, whereas mitochondrial oxidation in A549 was NQO1-independent in contrast to MIA-PaCa-2 cells. However, at pharmacologic concentrations of β-lap both quinone-based substrates directly oxidized the redox probe, a possible sign of off-target reactivity with cellular thiols. Together, these data provide new evidence that DNQ's direct and discerning NQO1 substrate specificity underlies its pharmacologic potency, while β-lap elicits off-target responses at its effective doses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Individuals' attentional bias toward an envied target's name: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jun; Liu, Yongfang; Zhang, Entao; Luo, Junlong; Chen, Jie

    2013-08-29

    Individuals may pay more attention to information about envied targets. Thus, we further investigate the neural correlates underlying the cognitive processing of envy-related stimuli. Participants read information about target persons characterized by two domains: levels of possession and self-relevance of comparison. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were then recorded for three target names (high-envy, moderate-envy, and low-envy) while participants performed a three-stimulus oddball task. The results showed that high- and moderate-envy target names elicited larger P300 amplitudes than did low-envy target names. Specifically, high-envy target names elicited larger P300 amplitudes than did low-envy target names at the left, central, and right sites; in contrast, moderate-envy target names elicited larger P300 amplitudes than did low-envy target names only at central sites. P300 amplitudes did not differ between high- and moderate-envy target names. Thus, we extend previous behavioral findings by showing that people preferentially attend toward envy-related stimuli, as reflected by enhanced P300 amplitudes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. MicroRNAs As Potential Targets for Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriram, Varsha; Kumar, Vinay; Devarumath, Rachayya M.; Khare, Tushar S.; Wani, Shabir H.

    2016-01-01

    The microRNAs (miRNAs) are small (20–24 nt) sized, non-coding, single stranded riboregulator RNAs abundant in higher organisms. Recent findings have established that plants assign miRNAs as critical post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in sequence-specific manner to respond to numerous abiotic stresses they face during their growth cycle. These small RNAs regulate gene expression via translational inhibition. Usually, stress induced miRNAs downregulate their target mRNAs, whereas, their downregulation leads to accumulation and function of positive regulators. In the past decade, investigations were mainly aimed to identify plant miRNAs, responsive to individual or multiple environmental factors, profiling their expression patterns and recognizing their roles in stress responses and tolerance. Altered expressions of miRNAs implicated in plant growth and development have been reported in several plant species subjected to abiotic stress conditions such as drought, salinity, extreme temperatures, nutrient deprivation, and heavy metals. These findings indicate that miRNAs may hold the key as potential targets for genetic manipulations to engineer abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants. This review is aimed to provide recent updates on plant miRNAs, their biogenesis and functions, target prediction and identification, computational tools and databases available for plant miRNAs, and their roles in abiotic stress-responses and adaptive mechanisms in major crop plants. Besides, the recent case studies for overexpressing the selected miRNAs for miRNA-mediated enhanced abiotic stress tolerance of transgenic plants have been discussed. PMID:27379117

  10. Finding potential drug targets against Shigella flexneri through druggable proteome exploration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Uzzal Hossain

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Background: Shigella flexneri is a gram negative bacteria that causes the infectious disease ‘shigellosis’. Shigella flexneri (S. flexneri is responsible for developing diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps in human. Antibiotics are mostly given to patients infected with shigella. Resistance to antibiotics can hinder its treatment significantly. Upon identification of essential therapeutic targets, vaccine and drug could be effective therapy for the treatment of shigellosis. Methods: The study was designed for the identification and qualitative characterization for potential drug targets from S. flexneri by using the subtractive genome analysis. A set of computational tools were used to identify essential proteins those are required for the survival of S. flexneri. Total proteome (13503 proteins of S. flexneri was retrieved from NCBI and further analyzed by subtractive channel analysis. After identification of the metabolic proteins we have also performed its qualitative characterization to pave the way for the identification of promising drug targets. Results: Subtractive analysis revealed that a list of 53 targets of S. flexneri were human non-homologous essential metabolic proteins that might be used for potential drug targets. We have also found that 11 drug targets are involved in unique pathway. Most of these proteins are cytoplasmic, can be used as broad spectrum drug targets, can interact with other proteins and show the druggable properties. The functionality and drug binding site analysis suggest a promising effective way to design the new drugs against S. flexneri. Conclusion: We have identified 13 potential novel drug and one vaccine target(s against S. flexneri. The outcome might also be used as module as well as circuit design in systems biology. Keywords: S. flexneri, drug target, therapeutics, metabolic proteins, proteome

  11. Metabolic analysis of radioresistant medulloblastoma stem-like clones and potential therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lue; Moritake, Takashi; Ito, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Yasui, Hironobu; Nakagawa, Hidehiko; Hirayama, Aki; Inanami, Osamu; Tsuboi, Koji

    2017-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is a fatal brain tumor in children, primarily due to the presence of treatment-resistant medulloblastoma stem cells. The energy metabolic pathway is a potential target of cancer therapy because it is often different between cancer cells and normal cells. However, the metabolic properties of medulloblastoma stem cells, and whether specific metabolic pathways are essential for sustaining their stem cell-like phenotype and radioresistance, remain unclear. We have established radioresistant medulloblastoma stem-like clones (rMSLCs) by irradiation of the human medulloblastoma cell line ONS-76. Here, we assessed reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondria function, oxygen consumption rate (OCR), energy state, and metabolites of glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle in rMSLCs and parental cells. rMSLCs showed higher lactate production and lower oxygen consumption rate than parental cells. Additionally, rMSLCs had low mitochondria mass, low endogenous ROS production, and existed in a low-energy state. Treatment with the metabolic modifier dichloroacetate (DCA) resulted in mitochondria dysfunction, glycolysis inhibition, elongated mitochondria morphology, and increased ROS production. DCA also increased radiosensitivity by suppression of the DNA repair capacity through nuclear oxidization and accelerated the generation of acetyl CoA to compensate for the lack of ATP. Moreover, treatment with DCA decreased cancer stem cell-like characters (e.g., CD133 positivity and sphere-forming ability) in rMSLCs. Together, our findings provide insights into the specific metabolism of rMSLCs and illuminate potential metabolic targets that might be exploited for therapeutic benefit in medulloblastoma.

  12. A systematic in silico search for target similarity identifies several approved drugs with potential activity against the Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadlla Alves Bispo

    Full Text Available Most of the drugs in use against Plasmodium falciparum share similar modes of action and, consequently, there is a need to identify alternative potential drug targets. Here, we focus on the apicoplast, a malarial plastid-like organelle of algal source which evolved through secondary endosymbiosis. We undertake a systematic in silico target-based identification approach for detecting drugs already approved for clinical use in humans that may be able to interfere with the P. falciparum apicoplast. The P. falciparum genome database GeneDB was used to compile a list of ≈600 proteins containing apicoplast signal peptides. Each of these proteins was treated as a potential drug target and its predicted sequence was used to interrogate three different freely available databases (Therapeutic Target Database, DrugBank and STITCH3.1 that provide synoptic data on drugs and their primary or putative drug targets. We were able to identify several drugs that are expected to interact with forty-seven (47 peptides predicted to be involved in the biology of the P. falciparum apicoplast. Fifteen (15 of these putative targets are predicted to have affinity to drugs that are already approved for clinical use but have never been evaluated against malaria parasites. We suggest that some of these drugs should be experimentally tested and/or serve as leads for engineering new antimalarials.

  13. Identification of multi-targeted anti-migraine potential of nystatin and development of its brain targeted chitosan nanoformulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotra, Priti; Thakur, Aman; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Shailendra Kumar

    2017-03-01

    The complex pathophysiology involved in migraine necessitates the drug treatment to act on several receptors simultaneously. The present investigation was an attempt to discover the unidentified anti-migraine activity of the already marketed drugs. Shared featured pharmacophore modeling was employed for this purpose on six target receptors (β2 adrenoceptor, Dopamine D3, 5HT1B, TRPV1, iGluR5 kainate and CGRP), resulting in the generation of five shared featured pharmacophores, which were further subjected to virtual screening of the ligands obtained from Drugbank database. Molecular docking, performed on the obtained hit compounds from virtual screening, indicated nystatin to be the only active lead against the receptors iGluR5 kainate receptor (1VSO), CGRP (3N7R), β2 adrenoceptor (3NYA) and Dopamine D3 (3PBL) with a high binding energy of -11.1, -10.9, -10.2 and -12kcal/mole respectively. The anti-migraine activity of nystatin was then adjudged by fabricating its brain targeted chitosan nanoparticles. Its brain targeting efficacy, analyzed qualitatively by confocal laser scanning microscopy, demonstrated a significant amount of drug reaching the brain. The pharmacodynamic models on Swiss male albino mice revealed significant anti-migraine activity of the nanoformulation. The present study reports for the first time the therapeutic potential of nystatin in migraine management, hence opening avenues for its future exploration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Toxins: A Potential form of Anti-Virulence Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Cin; Neoh, Hui-min; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen and the leading cause of a wide range of severe clinical infections. The range of diseases reflects the diversity of virulence factors produced by this pathogen. To establish an infection in the host, S. aureus expresses an inclusive set of virulence factors such as toxins, enzymes, adhesins, and other surface proteins that allow the pathogen to survive under extreme conditions and are essential for the bacteria’s ability to spread through tissues. Expression and secretion of this array of toxins and enzymes are tightly controlled by a number of regulatory systems. S. aureus is also notorious for its ability to resist the arsenal of currently available antibiotics and dissemination of various multidrug-resistant S. aureus clones limits therapeutic options for a S. aureus infection. Recently, the development of anti-virulence therapeutics that neutralize S. aureus toxins or block the pathways that regulate toxin production has shown potential in thwarting the bacteria’s acquisition of antibiotic resistance. In this review, we provide insights into the regulation of S. aureus toxin production and potential anti-virulence strategies that target S. aureus toxins. PMID:26999200

  15. NF-κB pathway activators as potential ageing biomarkers: targets for new therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistreri, Carmela R; Candore, Giuseppina; Accardi, Giulia; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Lio, Domenico

    2013-06-20

    Chronic inflammation is a major biological mechanism underpinning biological ageing process and age-related diseases. Inflammation is also the key response of host defense against pathogens and tissue injury. Current opinion sustains that during evolution the host defense and ageing process have become linked together. Thus, the large array of defense factors and mechanisms linked to the NF-κB system seem to be involved in ageing process. This concept leads us in proposing inductors of NF-κB signaling pathway as potential ageing biomarkers. On the other hand, ageing biomarkers, represented by biological indicators and selected through apposite criteria, should help to characterize biological age and, since age is a major risk factor in many degenerative diseases, could be subsequently used to identify individuals at high risk of developing age-associated diseases or disabilities. In this report, some inflammatory biomarkers will be discussed for a better understanding of the concept of biological ageing, providing ideas on eventual working hypothesis about potential targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies and improving, as consequence, the quality of life of elderly population.

  16. Tumor Targeting Potential of Lipid-Based Nano-Pharmaceuticals (LNPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kshitij; Yavlovich, Amichai; Puri, Anu; Blumenthal, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Nanoparticle-mediated targeted drug delivery has become the modality of interest for cancer/tumor therapy as it reduces the undesirable delivery to normal cells and improves efficacy of the pharmaceuticals. Among all the nanosystems, lipid-based nano-pharmaceuticals (LNPs) have been most extensively studied for cancer therapy. Doxil formulation was the first LNP that has been approved for cancer treatment. When conjugated with ligands, LNPs can be targeted to tumor cells. This chapter focuses on the targeting potential of LNPs for cancer therapy. We will discuss the advantages of enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect (passive targeting) for preferential tumor accumulation of LNPs, the importance of pegylation to avoid reticulo-endothelial system uptake and active targeting strategies using various targeting ligands that can be coupled to the LNP surface to target the tumor region (tumor cells/tumor vasculature). Targeted LNPs show higher binding affinity, greater intracellular localization and thereby increased cancer cell killing in comparison to non targeted LNPs. However, contrasting reports exist that pose challenges to the notion that targeted LNPs are advantageous. Recent trends have also demonstrated the concept of dual targeting that simultaneously homes LNPs to receptors on the tumor cells and biomarkers expressed on the tumor vasculature. In addition, targeting with multiple ligands on the LNPs has also been explored. These approaches may prove to be a better answer for next generation of LNPs for delivery of anti-cancer agents. However, more extensive studies are required to get their clinical approval in anti-cancer therapy.

  17. Potential of polarization lidar to provide profiles of CCN- and INP-relevant aerosol parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-E. Mamouri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the potential of polarization lidar to provide vertical profiles of aerosol parameters from which cloud condensation nucleus (CCN and ice nucleating particle (INP number concentrations can be estimated. We show that height profiles of particle number concentrations n50, dry considering dry aerosol particles with radius  > 50 nm (reservoir of CCN in the case of marine and continental non-desert aerosols, n100, dry (particles with dry radius  >  100 nm, reservoir of desert dust CCN, and of n250, dry (particles with dry radius  >  250 nm, reservoir of favorable INP, as well as profiles of the particle surface area concentration sdry (used in INP parameterizations can be retrieved from lidar-derived aerosol extinction coefficients σ with relative uncertainties of a factor of 1.5–2 in the case of n50, dry and n100, dry and of about 25–50 % in the case of n250, dry and sdry. Of key importance is the potential of polarization lidar to distinguish and separate the optical properties of desert aerosols from non-desert aerosol such as continental and marine particles. We investigate the relationship between σ, measured at ambient atmospheric conditions, and n50, dry for marine and continental aerosols, n100, dry for desert dust particles, and n250, dry and sdry for three aerosol types (desert, non-desert continental, marine and for the main lidar wavelengths of 355, 532, and 1064 nm. Our study is based on multiyear Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET photometer observations of aerosol optical thickness and column-integrated particle size distribution at Leipzig, Germany, and Limassol, Cyprus, which cover all realistic aerosol mixtures. We further include AERONET data from field campaigns in Morocco, Cabo Verde, and Barbados, which provide pure dust and pure marine aerosol scenarios. By means of a simple CCN parameterization (with n50, dry or n100, dry as input and available INP

  18. Identification of potential target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 and HUVEC cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulec, Cagri, E-mail: cagri.gulec@gmail.com; Coban, Neslihan, E-mail: neslic@istanbul.edu.tr; Ozsait-Selcuk, Bilge, E-mail: ozsaitb@istanbul.edu.tr; Sirma-Ekmekci, Sema, E-mail: semasirma@gmail.com; Yildirim, Ozlem, E-mail: ozlm-yildirim@hotmail.com; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan, E-mail: nihanerginel@yahoo.com

    2017-04-01

    ROR-alpha is a nuclear receptor, activity of which can be modulated by natural or synthetic ligands. Due to its possible involvement in, and potential therapeutic target for atherosclerosis, we aimed to identify ROR-alpha target genes in monocytic and endothelial cell lines. We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by tiling array (ChIP-on-chip) for ROR-alpha in monocytic cell line THP1 and endothelial cell line HUVEC. Following bioinformatic analysis of the array data, we tested four candidate genes in terms of dependence of their expression level on ligand-mediated ROR-alpha activity, and two of them in terms of promoter occupancy by ROR-alpha. Bioinformatic analyses of ChIP-on-chip data suggested that ROR-alpha binds to genomic regions near the transcription start site (TSS) of more than 3000 genes in THP1 and HUVEC. Potential ROR-alpha target genes in both cell types seem to be involved mainly in membrane receptor activity, signal transduction and ion transport. While SPP1 and IKBKA were shown to be direct target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 monocytes, inflammation related gene HMOX1 and heat shock protein gene HSPA8 were shown to be potential target genes of ROR-alpha. Our results suggest that ROR-alpha may regulate signaling receptor activity, and transmembrane transport activity through its potential target genes. ROR-alpha seems also to play role in cellular sensitivity to environmental substances like arsenite and chloroprene. Although, the expression analyses have shown that synthetic ROR-alpha ligands can modulate some of potential ROR-alpha target genes, functional significance of ligand-dependent modulation of gene expression needs to be confirmed with further analyses.

  19. Identification of potential target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 and HUVEC cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, Cagri; Coban, Neslihan; Ozsait-Selcuk, Bilge; Sirma-Ekmekci, Sema; Yildirim, Ozlem; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan

    2017-04-01

    ROR-alpha is a nuclear receptor, activity of which can be modulated by natural or synthetic ligands. Due to its possible involvement in, and potential therapeutic target for atherosclerosis, we aimed to identify ROR-alpha target genes in monocytic and endothelial cell lines. We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by tiling array (ChIP-on-chip) for ROR-alpha in monocytic cell line THP1 and endothelial cell line HUVEC. Following bioinformatic analysis of the array data, we tested four candidate genes in terms of dependence of their expression level on ligand-mediated ROR-alpha activity, and two of them in terms of promoter occupancy by ROR-alpha. Bioinformatic analyses of ChIP-on-chip data suggested that ROR-alpha binds to genomic regions near the transcription start site (TSS) of more than 3000 genes in THP1 and HUVEC. Potential ROR-alpha target genes in both cell types seem to be involved mainly in membrane receptor activity, signal transduction and ion transport. While SPP1 and IKBKA were shown to be direct target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 monocytes, inflammation related gene HMOX1 and heat shock protein gene HSPA8 were shown to be potential target genes of ROR-alpha. Our results suggest that ROR-alpha may regulate signaling receptor activity, and transmembrane transport activity through its potential target genes. ROR-alpha seems also to play role in cellular sensitivity to environmental substances like arsenite and chloroprene. Although, the expression analyses have shown that synthetic ROR-alpha ligands can modulate some of potential ROR-alpha target genes, functional significance of ligand-dependent modulation of gene expression needs to be confirmed with further analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tumor microenvironment: driving forces and potential therapeutic targets for breast cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong-Yan; Shao, Zhi-Min; Li, Da-Qiang

    2017-03-29

    Distant metastasis to specific target organs is responsible for over 90% of breast cancer-related deaths, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unclear. Mounting evidence suggests that the interplay between breast cancer cells and the target organ microenvironment is the key determinant of organ-specific metastasis of this lethal disease. Here, we highlight new findings and concepts concerning the emerging role of the tumor microenvironment in breast cancer metastasis; we also discuss potential therapeutic intervention strategies aimed at targeting components of the tumor microenvironment.

  1. Critical analysis of the potential for therapeutic targeting of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inokuchi M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mikito Inokuchi,1 Keiji Kato,1 Kazuyuki Kojima,2 Kenichi Sugihara1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, 2Department of Minimally Invasive Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Multidisciplinary treatment including chemotherapy has become the global standard of care for patients with metastatic gastric cancer (mGC; nonetheless, survival remains poor. Although many molecular-targeted therapies have been developed for various cancers, only anti-HER2 treatment has produced promising results in patients with mGC. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR plays a key role in cell proliferation, antiapoptosis, and metastasis in signaling pathways from the tyrosine kinase receptor, and its activation has been demonstrated in gastric cancer (GC cells. This review discusses the clinical relevance of mTOR in GC and examines its potential as a therapeutic target in patients with mGC. Preclinical studies in animal models suggest that suppression of the mTOR pathway inhibits the proliferation of GC cells and delays tumor progression. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has been evaluated as second- or third-line treatment in clinical trials. Adverse events were well tolerated although the effectiveness of everolimus alone was limited. Everolimus is now being evaluated in combination with chemotherapy in Phase III clinical studies in this subgroup of patients. Two Phase III studies include exploratory biomarker research designed to evaluate the predictive value of the expression or mutation of molecules related to the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. These biomarker studies may lead to the realization of targeted therapy for selected patients with mGC in the future. Keywords: gastric cancer, mTOR, everolimus

  2. Strategies to surmount the potential barriers to providing anti-discriminatory care in Irish healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, Kathleen; Tilki, Mary; Taylor, Georgina

    2012-02-01

    This article aims to explore some of the potential Irish specific barriers to providing anti-discriminatory care to non-Irish nationals in health and social care settings and considers strategies to overcome them. There has been a rapid and unprecedented increase in the ethnic and cultural diversity of the population in Ireland over the past 10 years. This brings with it both opportunities and challenges. The challenges that are particularly poignant include Irish nationals adapting to a multicultural society and integrating migrants into mainstream society. Historically, Ireland's relative homogeneity as a nation has been reflected in their health services, suggesting the need for an approach that addresses the more diverse needs of their growing multicultural population. Increasing awareness in the Irish health care setting of the complexity of working transculturally is important to interrogate the concept of privilege and the presence of racist practices. Unless practitioners are consciously aware of the personal, social and professional values that inform their attitudes and practices, their ability to be culturally competent will be at best superficial. The need to challenge attitudes, deep rooted social behaviour and misinformation which underline racial hostility is essential. Attention should focus on creating an environment of trust where critical reflection occurs, blame is avoided, risk managed and new ideas developed, tested and evaluated.

  3. Identification and validation of potential conserved microRNAs and their targets in peach (Prunus persica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhihong; Luo, Xiaoyan; Shi, Ting; Cai, Bin; Zhang, Zhen; Cheng, Zongming; Zhuang, Weibing

    2012-09-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small, endogenous, non-coding RNA molecules that negatively regulate gene expression at the transcriptional or the post-transcriptional level. Although a large number of miRNAs have been identified in many plant species, especially from model plants and crops, they remain largely unknown in peach. In this study, 110 potential miRNAs belonging to 37 families were identified using computational methods. A total of 43 potential targets were found for 21 families based on near-perfect or perfect complementarity between the plant miRNA and the target sequences. A majority of the targets were transcription factors which play important roles in peach development. qRT-PCR analysis of RNA samples prepared from different peach tissues for 25 miRNA families revealed that miRNAs were differentially expressed in different tissues. Furthermore, two target genes were experimentally verified by detection of the miRNA-mediated mRNA cleavage sites in peach using RNA ligase-mediated 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE). Finally, we studied the expression pattern of the two target genes in three different tissues of peach to further understand the mechanism of the interaction between miRNAs and their target genes.

  4. The polycomb repressive complex 2 is a potential target of SUMO modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Madi Riising

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2 functions as a transcriptional repressor through a mechanism that involves methylation of Histone H3 at lysine 27. The PRC2 complex activity is essential for cellular proliferation, development, and cell fate decisions. PRC2 target genes include important regulators of development and proliferation as well as tumor suppressor genes. Consistent with this, the activity of several Polycomb group (PcG proteins is deregulated in human cancer suggesting an important role for PcGs in tumor development. Whereas the downstream functions of PcGs are well characterized, the mechanisms of their recruitment to target genes and the regulation of their activity are not fully understood.Here we show that the two PRC2 components SUZ12 and EZH2 are sumoylated in vitro and in vivo. Among several putative sumoylation sites we have mapped the major site of SUZ12 sumoylation. Furthermore, we show that SUZ12 interacts with the E2-conjugating enzyme UBC9 both in vitro and in vivo and that mutation of the SUZ12 sumoylation site does not abolish this binding. Finally, we provide evidence that the E3-ligase PIASXbeta interacts and enhances the sumoylation of SUZ12 in vivo suggesting that PIASXbeta could function as an E3-ligase for SUZ12.Taken together, our data identify sumoylation as a novel post-translational modification of components of the PRC2 complex, which could suggest a potential new mechanism to modulate PRC2 repressive activity. Further work aimed to identify the physiological conditions for these modifications will be required to understand the role of SUZ12 and EZH2 sumoylation in PcG-mediated epigenetic regulation of transcription.

  5. Potential targets in the discovery of new hair growth promoters for androgenic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ruchy; De-Eknamkul, Wanchai

    2014-07-01

    Androgenic alopecia (AGA) is the major type of scalp hair loss affecting 60 - 70% of the population worldwide. It is caused by two potent androgens, namely testosterone (T) and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT). Till date, only two FDA-approved synthetic drugs, minoxidil and finasteride, are used to cure AGA with only 35 and 48% success, respectively; therefore, a search for new drug based on the mechanism of androgens action is still needed. Relevant literature was reviewed to identify current therapeutic targets and treatments for AGA. The potential targets are classified into three categories: i) 5α-reductase; ii) androgen receptor and iii) growth-factor-producing genes related to hair growth. Relevant assay systems using the right targets are required in order to obtain specific and effective drugs for AGA treatment. It is unlikely that single targeted agents will be sufficient for treating AGA, and therefore, it would be a challenge to obtain compounds with multiple activities.

  6. Assessment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa N5,N10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-cyclohydrolase as a potential antibacterial drug target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Eadsforth

    Full Text Available The bifunctional enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase - cyclohydrolase (FolD is identified as a potential drug target in Gram-negative bacteria, in particular the troublesome Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In order to provide a comprehensive and realistic assessment of the potential of this target for drug discovery we generated a highly efficient recombinant protein production system and purification protocol, characterized the enzyme, carried out screening of two commercial compound libraries by differential scanning fluorimetry, developed a high-throughput enzyme assay and prosecuted a screening campaign against almost 80,000 compounds. The crystal structure of P. aeruginosa FolD was determined at 2.2 Å resolution and provided a template for an assessment of druggability and for modelling of ligand complexes as well as for comparisons with the human enzyme. New FolD inhibitors were identified and characterized but the weak levels of enzyme inhibition suggest that these compounds are not optimal starting points for future development. Furthermore, the close similarity of the bacterial and human enzyme structures suggest that selective inhibition might be difficult to attain. In conclusion, although the preliminary biological data indicates that FolD represents a valuable target for the development of new antibacterial drugs, indeed spurred us to investigate it, our screening results and structural data suggest that this would be a difficult enzyme to target with respect to developing the appropriate lead molecules required to underpin a serious drug discovery effort.

  7. Mito-methyl coumarin, a novel mitochondria-targeted drug with great antitumor potential was synthesized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanan; Xu, Wenqing

    2017-07-15

    Due to higher transmembrane potential of tumor cells, enhanced accumulation of cationic drugs in tumor mitochondria has been attributed to a higher (more negative inside) mitochondrial transmembrane potential compared with normal cells, emerging researchers are focus on developing mitochondria-targeted antitumor drugs. Coumarins showed great potential on antitumor, but mitochondria-targeted coumarin derivatives have not been reported. In the present study, we synthesized mitochondria-targeted-methyl coumarin (mito-methyl coumarin) through coupling 6-methyl coumarin to TPP. We confirmed that mito-methyl coumarin inhibited HeLa cells proliferation selectively, induced ROS generation, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, promoted mitochondria Ca 2+ accumulation, decreased mitochondria mass and induced HeLa cells apoptosis, but methyl coumarin did not. These results demonstrate that we succeed in synthesizing a novel mitochondria-targeted drug, mito-methyl coumarin, which is effective in inhibiting HeLa cells proliferation and inducing HeLa cells apoptosis through promoting ROS generation and mitochondria Ca 2+ accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of MiR-181a as a potential therapeutic target in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Purpose: To investigate microRNA-181 (miR-181) as a potential therapeutic target in osteoarthritis. (OA). Methods: MiR-181 ... in the treatment of OA. Keywords: MicroRNA, Osteoarthritis, Apoptosis, B-cell lymphoma 2, Transfection, Chondrocytes .... 500 ng total RNA using a specific stem-loop primer. Following this ...

  9. Evaluation of MiR-181a as a potential therapeutic target in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate microRNA-181 (miR-181) as a potential therapeutic target in osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: MiR-181 expression was evaluated in articular cartilage samples obtained from OA patients undergoing knee arthroplasty and non-OA (control) patients undergoing other orthopedic procedures. Following the ...

  10. HIV life cycle and potential targets for drug activity | Miller | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV life cycle and potential targets for drug activity. S Miller. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  11. Computational models of neuronal biophysics and the characterization of potential neuropharmacological targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Michele; Blackwell, Kim T; Migliore, Michele; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2008-01-01

    The identification and characterization of potential pharmacological targets in neurology and psychiatry is a fundamental problem at the intersection between medicinal chemistry and the neurosciences. Exciting new techniques in proteomics and genomics have fostered rapid progress, opening numerous questions as to the functional consequences of ligand binding at the systems level. Psycho- and neuro-active drugs typically work in nerve cells by affecting one or more aspects of electrophysiological activity. Thus, an integrated understanding of neuropharmacological agents requires bridging the gap between their molecular mechanisms and the biophysical determinants of neuronal function. Computational neuroscience and bioinformatics can play a major role in this functional connection. Robust quantitative models exist describing all major active membrane properties under endogenous and exogenous chemical control. These include voltage-dependent ionic channels (sodium, potassium, calcium, etc.), synaptic receptor channels (e.g. glutamatergic, GABAergic, cholinergic), and G protein coupled signaling pathways (protein kinases, phosphatases, and other enzymatic cascades). This brief review of neuromolecular medicine from the computational perspective provides compelling examples of how simulations can elucidate, explain, and predict the effect of chemical agonists, antagonists, and modulators in the nervous system.

  12. Computational Models of Neuronal Biophysics and the Characterization of Potential Neuropharmacological Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Michele; Blackwell, Kim T.; Migliore, Michele; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2012-01-01

    The identification and characterization of potential pharmacological targets in neurology and psychiatry is a fundamental problem at the intersection between medicinal chemistry and the neurosciences. Exciting new techniques in proteomics and genomics have fostered rapid progress, opening numerous questions as to the functional consequences of ligand binding at the systems level. Psycho- and neuro-active drugs typically work in nerve cells by affecting one or more aspects of electrophysiological activity. Thus, an integrated understanding of neuropharmacological agents requires bridging the gap between their molecular mechanisms and the biophysical determinants of neuronal function. Computational neuroscience and bioinformatics can play a major role in this functional connection. Robust quantitative models exist describing all major active membrane properties under endogenous and exogenous chemical control. These include voltage-dependent ionic channels (sodium, potassium, calcium, etc.), synaptic receptor channels (e.g. glutamatergic, GABAergic, cholinergic), and G protein coupled signaling pathways (protein kinases, phosphatases, and other enzymatic cascades). This brief review of neuromolecular medicine from the computational perspective provides compelling examples of how simulations can elucidate, explain, and predict the effect of chemical agonists, antagonists, and modulators in the nervous system. PMID:18855673

  13. Aberrant expression of histone deacetylases 4 in cognitive disorders: molecular mechanisms and a potential target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yili Wu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Histone acetylation is a major mechanism of chromatin remodeling, contributing to epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. Histone deacetylases (HDACs are involved in both physiological and pathological conditions by regulating the status of histone acetylation. Although histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4, a member of the HDAC family, may lack histone deacetylase activity, it is actively involved in regulating the transcription of genes involved in synaptic plasticity, neuronal survival and neurodevelopment by interacting with transcription factors, signal transduction molecules and HDAC3, another member of the HDAC family. HDAC4 is highly expressed in brain and its homeostasis is crucial for the maintenance of cognitive function. Accumulated evidence shows that HDAC4 expression is dysregulated in several brain disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases and mental disorders. Moreover, cognitive impairment is a characteristic feature of these diseases. It indicates that aberrant HDAC4 expression plays a pivotal role in cognitive impairment of these disorders. This review aims to describe the current understanding of HDAC4’s role in the maintenance of cognitive function and its dysregulation in neurodegenerative diseases and mental disorders, discuss underlying molecular mechanisms, and provide an outlook into targeting HDAC4 as a potential therapeutic approach to rescue cognitive impairment in these diseases.

  14. Transient receptor potential ion channels in primary sensory neurons as targets for novel analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Valente, J; Andreou, A P; Urban, L; Nagy, I

    2014-05-01

    The last decade has witnessed an explosion in novel findings relating to the molecules involved in mediating the sensation of pain in humans. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels emerged as the greatest group of molecules involved in the transduction of various physical stimuli into neuronal signals in primary sensory neurons, as well as, in the development of pain. Here, we review the role of TRP ion channels in primary sensory neurons in the development of pain associated with peripheral pathologies and possible strategies to translate preclinical data into the development of effective new analgesics. Based on available evidence, we argue that nociception-related TRP channels on primary sensory neurons provide highly valuable targets for the development of novel analgesics and that, in order to reduce possible undesirable side effects, novel analgesics should prevent the translocation from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane and the sensitization of the channels rather than blocking the channel pore or binding sites for exogenous or endogenous activators. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Transient receptor potential ion channels in primary sensory neurons as targets for novel analgesics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Valente, J; Andreou, A P; Urban, L; Nagy, I

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an explosion in novel findings relating to the molecules involved in mediating the sensation of pain in humans. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels emerged as the greatest group of molecules involved in the transduction of various physical stimuli into neuronal signals in primary sensory neurons, as well as, in the development of pain. Here, we review the role of TRP ion channels in primary sensory neurons in the development of pain associated with peripheral pathologies and possible strategies to translate preclinical data into the development of effective new analgesics. Based on available evidence, we argue that nociception-related TRP channels on primary sensory neurons provide highly valuable targets for the development of novel analgesics and that, in order to reduce possible undesirable side effects, novel analgesics should prevent the translocation from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane and the sensitization of the channels rather than blocking the channel pore or binding sites for exogenous or endogenous activators. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24283624

  16. Analysis of mice with targeted deletion of AQP9 gene provides conclusive evidence for expression of AQP9 in neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylonakou, Maria N; Petersen, Petur H; Rinvik, Eric

    2009-01-01

    and mouse liver, the organ with the highest level of AQP9. By blue native gel analysis it could be demonstrated that the brain contains tetrameric AQP9, corresponding to the functional form of AQP9. The band corresponding to the AQP9 tetramer was absent in AQP9 knockout brain and liver. Immunocytochemistry...... gene expression in brain, based on a quantitative and multipronged approach that includes the use of animals with targeted deletion of the AQP9 gene. We show by real-time PCR that AQP9 mRNA concentration in rat and mouse brain is approximately 3% and approximately 0.5%, respectively, of that in rat....... The present data provide conclusive evidence for the presence of tetrameric AQP9 in brain and for the expression of AQP9 in neurons....

  17. Glycogen metabolism has a key role in the cancer microenvironment and provides new targets for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zois, Christos E; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer cells and contributes to their adaption within the tumour microenvironment and resistance to anticancer therapies. Recently, glycogen metabolism has become a recognised feature of cancer cells since it is upregulated in many tumour types, suggesting that it is an important aspect of cancer cell pathophysiology. Here, we provide an overview of glycogen metabolism and its regulation, with a focus on its role in metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells under stress conditions such as hypoxia, glucose deprivation and anticancer treatment. The various methods to detect glycogen in tumours in vivo as well as pharmacological modulators of glycogen metabolism are also reviewed. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic value of targeting glycogen metabolism as a strategy for combinational approaches in cancer treatment.

  18. Potential nanotechnologies and molecular targets in the quest for efficient chemotherapy in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoda, Khadija; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Bijukumar, Divya; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2015-04-01

    Ovarian cancer, considered one of the most fatal gynecological cancers, goes largely undiagnosed until metastasis presents itself, usually once the patient is in the final stages and thus, too late for worthwhile therapy. Targeting this elusive disease in its early stages would improve the outcome for most patients, while the information generated thereof would increase the possibility of preventative mechanisms of therapy. This review discusses various molecular targets as possible moieties to be incorporated in a holistic drug delivery system or the more aptly termed 'theranostic' system. These molecular targets can be used for targeting, visualizing, diagnosing, and ultimately, treating ovarian cancer in its entirety. Currently implemented nanoframeworks, such as nanomicelles and nanoliposomes, are described and the effectiveness of nanostructures in tumor targeting, treatment functions, and overcoming the drug resistance challenge is discussed. Novel nanotechnology strategies such as the development of nanoframeworks decorated with targeted ligands of a molecular nature may provide an efficient chemotherapy, especially when instituted in combination with imaging, diagnostic, and ultimately, therapeutic moieties. An imperative aspect of utilizing nanotechnology in the treatment of ovarian cancer is the flexibility of the drug delivery system and its ability to overcome standard obstacles such as: i) successfully treating the desired cells through direct targeting; ii) reducing toxicity levels of treatment by achieving direct targeting; and iii) delivery of targeted therapy using an efficient vehicle that is exceptionally degradable in response to a particular stimulus. The targeting of ovarian cancer in its early stages using imaging and diagnostic nanotechnology is an area that can be improved upon by combining therapeutic moieties with molecular biomarkers. The nanotechnology and molecular markers mentioned in this review have generally been used for either

  19. ROR1 and ROR2 in Human Malignancies: Potentials for Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilly eRebagay

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapies require cellular protein expression that meets specific requirements that will maximize effectiveness, minimize off-target toxicities, and provide an opportunity for a therapeutic effect. The receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptors (ROR are possible targets for therapy that may meet such requirements. RORs are transmembrane proteins that are part of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK family. The RORs have been shown to play a role in tumor-like behavior, such as cell migration and cell invasiveness and are normally not expressed in normal adult tissue. As part of the large effort in target discovery, ROR proteins have recently been found to be expressed in human cancers. Their unique expression profiles may provide a novel class of therapeutic targets for small molecules against the kinase or for antibody-based therapies against these receptors. Being restricted on tumor cells and not on most normal tissues, RORs are excellent targets for the treatment of minimal residual disease, the final hurdle in the curative approach to many cancers, including solid tumors such as neuroblastoma. In this review, we summarize the biology of RORs as they relate to human cancer, and highlight the therapeutic approaches directed toward them.

  20. Genomic identification of potential targets unique to Candida albicans for the discovery of antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Himanshu; Luqman, Suaib; Meena, Abha; Khan, Feroz

    2014-01-01

    Despite of modern antifungal therapy, the mortality rates of invasive infection with human fungal pathogen Candida albicans are up to 40%. Studies suggest that drug resistance in the three most common species of human fungal pathogens viz., C. albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus (causing mortality rate up to 90%) and Cryptococcus neoformans (causing mortality rate up to 70%) is due to mutations in the target enzymes or high expression of drug transporter genes. Drug resistance in human fungal pathogens has led to an imperative need for the identification of new targets unique to fungal pathogens. In the present study, we have used a comparative genomics approach to find out potential target proteins unique to C. albicans, an opportunistic fungus responsible for severe infection in immune-compromised human. Interestingly, many target proteins of existing antifungal agents showed orthologs in human cells. To identify unique proteins, we have compared proteome of C. albicans [SC5314] i.e., 14,633 total proteins retrieved from the RefSeq database of NCBI, USA with proteome of human and non-pathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results showed that 4,568 proteins were identified unique to C. albicans as compared to those of human and later when these unique proteins were compared with S. cerevisiae proteome, finally 2,161 proteins were identified as unique proteins and after removing repeats total 1,618 unique proteins (42 functionally known, 1,566 hypothetical and 10 unknown) were selected as potential antifungal drug targets unique to C. albicans.

  1. Sonic hedgehog signaling inhibition provides opportunities for targeted therapy by sulforaphane in regulating pancreatic cancer stem cell self-renewal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Rodova

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling pathway has been associated with cancer stem cells (CSC and implicated in the initiation of pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic CSCs are rare tumor cells characterized by their ability to self-renew, and are responsible for tumor recurrence accompanied by resistance to current therapies. The lethality of these incurable, aggressive and invasive pancreatic tumors remains a daunting clinical challenge. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the role of Shh pathway in pancreatic cancer and to examine the molecular mechanisms by which sulforaphane (SFN, an active compound in cruciferous vegetables, inhibits self-renewal capacity of human pancreatic CSCs. Interestingly, we demonstrate here that Shh pathway is highly activated in pancreatic CSCs and plays important role in maintaining stemness by regulating the expression of stemness genes. Given the requirement for Hedgehog in pancreatic cancer, we investigated whether hedgehog blockade by SFN could target the stem cell population in pancreatic cancer. In an in vitro model, human pancreatic CSCs derived spheres were significantly inhibited on treatment with SFN, suggesting the clonogenic depletion of the CSCs. Interestingly, SFN inhibited the components of Shh pathway and Gli transcriptional activity. Interference of Shh-Gli signaling significantly blocked SFN-induced inhibitory effects demonstrating the requirement of an active pathway for the growth of pancreatic CSCs. SFN also inhibited downstream targets of Gli transcription by suppressing the expression of pluripotency maintaining factors (Nanog and Oct-4 as well as PDGFRα and Cyclin D1. Furthermore, SFN induced apoptosis by inhibition of BCL-2 and activation of caspases. Our data reveal the essential role of Shh-Gli signaling in controlling the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs. We propose that pancreatic cancer preventative effects of SFN may result from inhibition of the Shh pathway

  2. Potential For Plug-In Electric Vehicles To Provide Grid Support Services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, F. G.; Luo, Y.; Mohanpurkar, M.; Hovsapian, R.; Scoffield, D.

    2017-04-01

    Since the modern-day introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), scientists have proposed leveraging PEV battery packs as distributed energy resources for the electric grid. PEV charging can be controlled not only to provide energy for transportation but also to provide grid services and to facilitate the integration of renewable energy generation. With renewable generation increasing at an unprecedented rate, most of which is non-dispatchable and intermittent, the concept of using PEVs as controllable loads is appealing to electric utilities. This additional functionality could also provide value to PEV owners and drive PEV adoption. It has been widely proposed that PEVs can provide valuable grid services, such as load shifting to provide voltage regulation. The objective this work is to address the degree to which PEVs can provide grid services and mutually benefit the electric utilities, PEV owners, and auto manufacturers.

  3. Systems integration of biodefense omics data for analysis of pathogen-host interactions and identification of potential targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter B McGarvey

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The NIAID (National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases Biodefense Proteomics program aims to identify targets for potential vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics for agents of concern in bioterrorism, including bacterial, parasitic, and viral pathogens. The program includes seven Proteomics Research Centers, generating diverse types of pathogen-host data, including mass spectrometry, microarray transcriptional profiles, protein interactions, protein structures and biological reagents. The Biodefense Resource Center (www.proteomicsresource.org has developed a bioinformatics framework, employing a protein-centric approach to integrate and support mining and analysis of the large and heterogeneous data. Underlying this approach is a data warehouse with comprehensive protein + gene identifier and name mappings and annotations extracted from over 100 molecular databases. Value-added annotations are provided for key proteins from experimental findings using controlled vocabulary. The availability of pathogen and host omics data in an integrated framework allows global analysis of the data and comparisons across different experiments and organisms, as illustrated in several case studies presented here. (1 The identification of a hypothetical protein with differential gene and protein expressions in two host systems (mouse macrophage and human HeLa cells infected by different bacterial (Bacillus anthracis and Salmonella typhimurium and viral (orthopox pathogens suggesting that this protein can be prioritized for additional analysis and functional characterization. (2 The analysis of a vaccinia-human protein interaction network supplemented with protein accumulation levels led to the identification of human Keratin, type II cytoskeletal 4 protein as a potential therapeutic target. (3 Comparison of complete genomes from pathogenic variants coupled with experimental information on complete proteomes allowed the identification and

  4. Potential impact of miR-137 and its targets in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie eWright

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The significant impact of microRNAs (miRNAs on disease pathology is becoming increasingly evident. These small non-coding RNAs have the ability to post-transcriptionally silence the expression of thousands of genes. Therefore, dysregulation of even a single miRNA could confer a large polygenic effect. Schizophrenia is a genetically complex illness thought to involve multiple genes each contributing a small risk. Large genome-wide association studies identified miR-137, a miRNA shown to be involved in neuronal maturation, as one of the top risk genes. To assess the potential mechanism of impact of miR-137 in this disorder and identify its targets, we used a combination of literature searches, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA, and freely accessible bioinformatics resources. Using TargetScan and the Schizophrenia Gene Resource (SZGR database, we found that in addition to CSMD1, C10orf26, CACNA1C, TCF4, and ZNF804A, five schizophrenia risk genes whose transcripts are also validated miR-137 targets, there are other schizophrenia-associated genes that may be targets of miR-137, including ERBB4, GABRA1, GRIN2A, GRM5, GSK3B, NRG2 and HTR2C. IPA analyses of all the potential targets identified several nervous system functions as the top canonical pathways including synaptic long-term potentiation, a process implicated in learning and memory mechanisms and recently shown to be altered in patients with schizophrenia. Among the subset of targets involved in nervous system development and function, the top scoring pathways were ephrin receptor signaling and axonal guidance, processes that are critical for proper circuitry formation and were shown to be disrupted in schizophrenia. These results suggest that miR-137 may indeed play a substantial role in the genetic etiology of schizophrenia by regulating networks involved in neural development and brain function.

  5. SLC7A5 act as a potential leukemic transformation target gene in myelodysplastic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Song, Jing; Chen, Bobin; Xu, Xiaoping; Lin, Guowei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogenous group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by increased risk of leukemic transformation. This study identifies microRNAs(miRNA) and miRNA targets that might represent leukemic transformation markers for MDS. Methods Based on our previously established nested case-control study cohort of MDS patients, we chose paired patients to undergo Angilent 8 × 15K human miRNA microarrays. Target prediction analysis was administrated using targetscan 5.1 software. We further investigated the function of target gene in MDS cell line using siRNA method, including cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, cell cycle and electron microscope. Results Finally we screened a subset of 7 miRNAs to be significantly differentially expressed between the case (at the end of follow up with leukemic transformation) and control group (at the end of follow up without leukemic transformation). Target prediction analysis revealed SLC7A5 was the common target gene of these 7 miRNAs. Further study on the function of SLC7A5 gene in SKM-1 cell line showed that downregulation of SLC7A5 inhibited SKM-1 cells proliferation, increased apoptosis and caused cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 stage. Conclusion Our data indicate that SLC7A5 gene may act as a potential leukemic transformation target gene in MDS. PMID:26657287

  6. RNA sequencing atopic dermatitis transcriptome profiling provides insights into novel disease mechanisms with potential therapeutic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Ungar, Benjamin; Correa da Rosa, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genomic profiling of lesional and nonlesional skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) using microarrays has led to increased understanding of AD and identification of novel therapeutic targets. However, the limitations of microarrays might decrease detection of AD genes. These li......Background: Genomic profiling of lesional and nonlesional skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) using microarrays has led to increased understanding of AD and identification of novel therapeutic targets. However, the limitations of microarrays might decrease detection of AD genes...... (criteria: fold change, ≥2.0; false discovery rate ≤0.05) in lesional versus nonlesional skin from 18 patients with moderate-to-severe AD, with real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry used for validation. Results: Both platforms showed robust disease transcriptomes and correlated well with RT-PCR...... RNA-seq showed somewhat better agreement with RT-PCR (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.57 and 0.70 for microarrays and RNA-seq vs RT-PCR, respectively), bias was not eliminated. Among genes uniquely identified by using RNA-seq were triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1...

  7. Genome sequence of foxtail millet (Setaria italica) provides insights into grass evolution and biofuel potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Gengyun; Liu, Xin; Quan, Zhiwu

    2012-01-01

    Foxtail millet (Setaria italica), a member of the Poaceae grass family, is an important food and fodder crop in arid regions and has potential for use as a C(4) biofuel. It is a model system for other biofuel grasses, including switchgrass and pearl millet. We produced a draft genome (∼423 Mb...

  8. Targeting Ras signaling in AML: RALB is a small GTPase with big potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Emily J; Eckfeldt, Craig E

    2017-07-06

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a devastating malignancy for which novel treatment approaches are desperately needed. Ras signaling is an attractive therapeutic target for AML because a large proportion of AMLs have mutations in NRAS, KRAS, or genes that activate Ras signaling, and key Ras effectors are activated in virtually all AML patient samples. This has inspired efforts to develop Ras-targeted treatment strategies for AML. Due to the inherent difficulty and disappointing efficacy of targeting Ras proteins directly, many have focused on inhibiting Ras effector pathways. Inhibiting the major oncogenic Ras effectors, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and/or phosphatidylinositiol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathways, has generally demonstrated modest efficacy for AML. While this may be in part related to functional redundancy between these pathways, it is now clear that other Ras effectors have key oncogenic roles. Specifically, the Ras-like (Ral) GTPases have emerged as critical mediators of Ras-driven transformation and AML cell survival. Our group recently uncovered a critical role for RALB signaling in leukemic cell survival and a potential mediator of relapse following Ras-targeted therapy in AML. Furthermore, we found that RALB signaling is hyperactivated in AML patient samples, and inhibiting RALB has potent anti-leukemic activity in preclinical AML models. While key questions remain regarding the importance of RALB signaling across the genetically diverse spectrum of AML, the specific mechanism(s) that promotes leukemic cell survival downstream of RALB, and how to pharmacologically target RALB signaling effectively - RALB has emerged as a critical Ras effector and potential therapeutic target for AML.

  9. Immunohistochemical detection of a potential molecular therapeutic target for canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Mami; Hoshino, Yuki; Izumi, Yusuke; Takagi, Satoshi

    2016-05-03

    Canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA) is a progressive malignant neoplasm of dogs for which there is currently no effective treatment. A recent study suggested that receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), the PI3K/Akt/m-TOR and MAPK pathways are all activated in canine and human HSA. The aim of the present study was to investigate the overexpression of these proteins by immunohistochemistry in canine splenic HSA to identify potential molecular therapeutic targets. A total of 10 splenic HSAs and two normal splenic samples surgically resected from dogs were sectioned and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological diagnosis or analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The expression of RTKs, c-kit, VEGFR-2 and PDGFR-2, as well as PI3K/Akt/m-TOR and MEK was higher in canine splenic HSAs compared to normal spleens. These proteins may therefore be potential therapeutic targets in canine splenic HSA.

  10. Adipokines: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Vascular Dysfunction in Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Wanees Ahmed El husseny

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipokines are bioactive molecules that regulate several physiological functions such as energy balance, insulin sensitization, appetite regulation, inflammatory response, and vascular homeostasis. They include proinflammatory cytokines such as adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP and anti-inflammatory cytokines such as adiponectin, as well as vasodilator and vasoconstrictor molecules. In obesity and type II diabetes mellitus (DM, insulin resistance causes impairment of the endocrine function of the perivascular adipose tissue, an imbalance in the secretion of vasoconstrictor and vasodilator molecules, and an increased production of reactive oxygen species. Recent studies have shown that targeting plasma levels of adipokines or the expression of their receptors can increase insulin sensitivity, improve vascular function, and reduce the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Several reviews have discussed the potential of adipokines as therapeutic targets for type II DM and obesity; however, this review is the first to focus on their therapeutic potential for vascular dysfunction in type II DM and obesity.

  11. Internal combustion engine run on biogas is a potential solution to meet Indonesia emission target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambarita, Himsar

    2017-09-01

    Indonesia has released two different Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions reduction targets. The first target, released in 2009, is reduction GHG emissions 26% from Business-as-Usual (BAU) level using own budget and up 41% if supported international aids by 2020. The second target is reduction 29% and 41% from BAU by 2030 using own budget and with international support, respectively. In this paper, the BAU emissions and emissions reduction target of these two targets are elaborated. In addition, the characteristics of emissions from transportation sector are discussed. One of the potential mitigation actions is switching fuel in transportation sector. The results the most promising mitigation action in the transportation is switching oil fuel with biofuel. The Government of Indonesia (GoI) focuses on using biodiesel and bioethanol to run internal combustion engine in transportation sector and biogas is aimed to fuel power plant unit. However, there is very limited of success stories on using biogas in the power plant. The barriers and challenges will be discussed here. It is suggested to run internal combustion engine with biogas.

  12. Doxorubicin-loaded micelle targeting MUC1: a potential therapeutics for triple negative breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khondee, Supang; Chittasupho, Chuda; Tima, Singkome; Anuchapreeda, Songyot

    2017-07-12

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive disease associated with poor prognosis and lack of validated targeted therapy. Thus chemotherapy is a main adjuvant treatment for TNBC patients, but it associates with severe toxicities. For a better treatment outcome, we developed an alternative therapeutic, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded micelles targeting human mucin1 protein (MUC1) that is less toxic, more effective and targeted to TNBC. From many candidate peptides, QNDRHPR-GGGSK (QND) and HSQLPQV-GGGSK (HSQ), were identified computationally, synthesized and purified using solid phase peptide synthesis and semi-preparative HPLC. The peptides showed significant high binding to MUC1 expressing cells using a fluorescent microscope. The peptides were then conjugated on pegylated octadecyl lithocholate copolymer. DOX-encapsulated micelles were formed through self-assembly. MUC1-targeted micelles were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Drug entrapment efficiency was examined using a microplate reader. Cytotoxicity and binding and uptake were also investigated. Two types of DOX-loaded micelles with different targeting peptides, QND or HSQ, were developed. DOX-loaded micelles were spherical in shape with average particle size around 300-320 nm. Drug entrapment efficiency of untargeted and targeted DOX micelles was about 71-93%. Targeted QND-DOX and HSQ-DOX micelles exhibited significantly higher cytotoxicity compared to free DOX and untargeted DOX micelles on BT549-Luc cells. In addition, significantly greater binding and uptake were observed for QND-DOX and HSQ-DOX micelles on BT549-Luc and T47D cells. Taken together, these results suggested that QND-DOX and HSQ-DOX micelles have a potential application in the treatment of TNBC-expressing MUC1. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Potential impact of spatially targeted adult tuberculosis vaccine in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sourya; Chatterjee, Susmita; Rao, Krishna D; Dowdy, David W

    2016-03-01

    Some of the most promising vaccines in the pipeline for tuberculosis (TB) target adolescents and adults. Unlike for childhood vaccines, high-coverage population-wide vaccination is significantly more challenging for adult vaccines. Here, we aimed to estimate the impact of vaccine delivery strategies that were targeted to high-incidence geographical 'hotspots' compared with randomly allocated vaccination. We developed a spatially explicit mathematical model of TB transmission that distinguished these hotspots from the general population. We evaluated the impact of targeted and untargeted vaccine delivery strategies in India--a country that bears more than 25% of global TB burden, and may be a potential early adopter of the vaccine. We collected TB notification data and conducted a demonstration study in the state of Gujarat to validate our estimates of heterogeneity in TB incidence. We then projected the impact of randomly vaccinating 8% of adults in a single mass campaign to a spatially targeted vaccination preferentially delivered to 80% of adults in the hotspots, with both strategies augmented by continuous adolescent vaccination. In consultation with vaccine developers, we considered a vaccine efficacy of 60%, and evaluated the population-level impact after 10 years of vaccination. Spatial heterogeneity in TB notification (per 100,000/year) was modest in Gujarat: 190 in the hotspots versus 125 in the remaining population. At this level of heterogeneity, the spatially targeted vaccination was projected to reduce TB incidence by 28% after 10 years, compared with a 24% reduction projected to achieve via untargeted vaccination--a 1.17-fold augmentation in the impact of vaccination by spatially targeting. The degree of the augmentation was robust to reasonable variation in natural history assumptions, but depended strongly on the extent of spatial heterogeneity and mixing between the hotspot and general population. Identifying high-incidence hotspots and quantifying

  14. The Potentially Affected Fraction for Target Species: Additional data and calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Traas TP; Luttik R; Posthumus R; ECO; CSR

    1998-01-01

    In studying the possibilities for mapping toxic pressure of contaminants (expressed as Potentially Affected Fraction, PAF) on such target species as butterflies, dragonflies, amphibians, reptiles and plants, the toxicity data available for butterflies, damselflies, dragonflies and reptiles were found to be insufficient. Low PAF values (less than 1%) for copper, zinc and cadmium were found for amphibians at median surface water concentrations. PAF calculations for higher plants indicate a high...

  15. Ghrelin is a prognostic marker and a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gr?nberg, Malin; Ahlin, Cecilia; Naeser, Ylva; Janson, Eva Tiensuu; Holmberg, Lars; Fj?llskog, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin are gastrointestinal peptides, encoded by the same preproghrelin gene. Both are expressed in breast cancer tissue and ghrelin has been implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Despite recent advances in breast cancer management the need for new prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer remains high. We studied the prognostic impact of ghrelin and obestatin in women with node negative breast cancer. Within a cohort of women with breast cancer...

  16. The Mitochondria-targeted Nitroxide JP4-039 Augments Potentially Lethal Irradiation Damage Repair

    OpenAIRE

    RAJAGOPALAN, MALOLAN S.; GUPTA, KANIKA; EPPERLY, MICHAEL W.; FRANICOLA, DARCY; ZHANG, XICHEN; WANG, HONG; ZHAO, HONG; TYURIN, VLADIMIR A.; PIERCE, JOSHUA G.; KAGAN, VALERIAN E.; WIPF, PETER; KANAI, ANTHONY J.; GREENBERGER, JOEL S.

    2009-01-01

    It was unknown if a mitochondria-targeted nitroxide (JP4-039) could augment potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) of cells in quiescence. We evaluated 32D cl 3 murine hematopoietic progenitor cells which were irradiated and then either centrifuged to pellets (to simulate PLDR conditions) or left in exponential growth for 0, 24, 48 or 72 h. Pelleted cells demonstrated cell cycle arrest with a greater percentage in the G1-phase than did exponentially growing cells. Irradiation survival curves...

  17. Tumor subtype-specific cancer-testis antigens as potential biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets for cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Jun; Caballero, Otavia L.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Weinstein, John N.; Riggins, Gregory J.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Zhao, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens are potential targets for cancer immunotherapy because of their restricted expression in immune-privileged germ cells and various malignancies. Current application of CT-based immunotherapy has been focused on CT expression-rich tumors such as melanoma and lung cancers. In this study, we surveyed CT expression using the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) datasets for ten common cancer types. We show that, CT expression is specific and enriched within certain cancer molecul...

  18. siRNAs targeting PB2 and NP genes potentially inhibit replication of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, we have designed three siRNAs (PB2-2235, PB2-479 and NP-865) targeting PB2 and NP genes of avian influenza virus and evaluated their potential, measured by hemagglutination (HA), plaque reduction and Real time RT-PCR assay, in inhibiting H5N1 virus (A/chicken/Navapur/7972/2006) replication in ...

  19. Potential and Dunkelfeld offenders: two neglected target groups for prevention of child sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Gerard A; Mundt, Ingrid A; Feelgood, Steven; Hupp, Elena; Neutze, Janina; Ahlers, Christoph J; Goecker, David; Beier, Klaus M

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about men who have not yet committed child sexual abuse but may be at risk of doing so (potential offenders) and the factors that distinguish these men from undetected child sexual abuse offenders with a sexual interest in children (Dunkelfeld offenders). The present study describes and compares potential and Dunkelfeld offenders, which can be viewed as ideal target groups for (primary) prevention efforts with respect to child sexual abuse. Also, this study seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of using a telephone screening procedure to conduct research with these groups. Using a computer assisted telephone interview (CATI), data on demographics, mental health, sexuality, criminal history, and victim characteristics were collected from respondents in a nation-wide media campaign, which informed potential (re-)offenders of child sexual abuse of a research and treatment project. Many participants reported recurrent sexual fantasies involving minors, as well as related distress, suggesting a high prevalence of pedophilia and hebephilia. More than half feared they would sexually abuse a minor, and Dunkelfeld offenders reported 3.2 victims on average. Group comparisons revealed that Dunkelfeld offenders were, for example, more likely to perceive themselves being at risk of offending, compared to potential offenders. The results suggest that targeting potential and Dunkelfeld offenders could prove a worthwhile approach in the prevention of child sexual abuse.

  20. Natural antigenic differences in the functionally equivalent extracellular DNABII proteins of bacterial biofilms provide a means for targeted biofilm therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, C J; Davey, M E; Bakaletz, L O; Goodman, S D

    2017-04-01

    Bacteria that persist in the oral cavity exist within complex biofilm communities. A hallmark of biofilms is the presence of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), which consists of polysaccharides, extracellular DNA (eDNA), and proteins, including the DNABII family of proteins. The removal of DNABII proteins from a biofilm results in the loss of structural integrity of the eDNA and the collapse of the biofilm structure. We examined the role of DNABII proteins in the biofilm structure of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis and the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii. Co-aggregation with oral streptococci is thought to facilitate the establishment of P. gingivalis within the biofilm community. We demonstrate that DNABII proteins are present in the EPS of both S. gordonii and P. gingivalis biofilms, and that these biofilms can be disrupted through the addition of antisera derived against their respective DNABII proteins. We provide evidence that both eDNA and DNABII proteins are limiting in S. gordonii but not in P. gingivalis biofilms. In addition, these proteins are capable of complementing one another functionally. We also found that whereas antisera derived against most DNABII proteins are capable of binding a wide variety of DNABII proteins, the P. gingivalis DNABII proteins are antigenically distinct. The presence of DNABII proteins in the EPS of these biofilms and the antigenic uniqueness of the P. gingivalis proteins provide an opportunity to develop therapies that are targeted to remove P. gingivalis and biofilms that contain P. gingivalis from the oral cavity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The Economic Potential of Three Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy Systems Providing Thermal Energy to Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cutler, Dylan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Flores-Espino, Francisco [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stark, Greg [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jenkin, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report is one of a series of reports that Idaho National Laboratory and National Renewable Energy Laboratory are producing to investigate the technical and economic aspects of nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems (N-R HESs). Previous reports provided results of an analysis of two N-R HES scenarios. This report builds that analysis with a Texas-synthetic gasoline scenario providing the basis in which the N-R HES sells heat directly to an industrial customer. Subsystems were included that convert electricity to heat, thus allowing the renewable energy subsystem to generate heat and benefit from that revenue stream. Nuclear and renewable energy sources are important to consider in the energy sector's evolution because both are considered to be clean and non-carbon-emitting energy sources.

  2. E-health: potential benefits and challenges in providing and accessing sexual health services

    OpenAIRE

    Minichiello, Victor; Rahman, Saifur; Dune, Tinashe; Scott, John; Dowsett, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Background E-health has become a burgeoning field in which health professionals and health consumers create and seek information. E-health refers to internet-based health care and information delivery and seeks to improve health service locally, regionally and worldwide. E-sexual health presents new opportunities to provide online sexual health services irrespective of gender, age, sexual orientation and location. Discussion The paper used the dimensions of the RE-AIM model (reach, efficacy, ...

  3. Genome sequence of foxtail millet (Setaria italica) provides insights into grass evolution and biofuel potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Gengyun; Liu, Xin; Quan, Zhiwu

    2012-01-01

    Foxtail millet (Setaria italica), a member of the Poaceae grass family, is an important food and fodder crop in arid regions and has potential for use as a C(4) biofuel. It is a model system for other biofuel grasses, including switchgrass and pearl millet. We produced a draft genome (∼423 Mb......) anchored onto nine chromosomes and annotated 38,801 genes. Key chromosome reshuffling events were detected through collinearity identification between foxtail millet, rice and sorghum including two reshuffling events fusing rice chromosomes 7 and 9, 3 and 10 to foxtail millet chromosomes 2 and 9......, respectively, that occurred after the divergence of foxtail millet and rice, and a single reshuffling event fusing rice chromosome 5 and 12 to foxtail millet chromosome 3 that occurred after the divergence of millet and sorghum. Rearrangements in the C(4) photosynthesis pathway were also identified....

  4. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and pregnancy-potential for improvements in Australasian maternity health providers' knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, A W; Luk, W; Nassar, N; Hui, L; Dyer, K; Rawlinson, W

    2017-07-11

    To assess the knowledge, practice and attitudes of maternity clinicians regarding congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV). It is the most common congenital infection, and well-recognized cause of neurodevelopmental disability and hearing loss. New consensus recommendations state all pregnant women and health-care providers should be educated about congenital CMV infection and preventive measures. An email questionnaire was distributed in October 2015 to specialists, diplomates (general practitioners), and trainees of the Royal Australian New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG), and Victorian and New South Wales midwives. 774 responded: (37.3% specialists, 17.3% diplomates, 16.8% trainees, 28.6% midwives). Clinicians had variable knowledge of fetal sequelae, transmission routes and prevention. Overall, 30.2% felt confident about discussing CMV in pregnancy: less than 10% of midwives (7.4%) and less than half of specialists (47.1%, p maternity clinicians lack confidence and knowledge about congenital CMV. Few (<10%) routinely provide advice on prevention. There is urgent need for clinical guidance and patient information to reduce the burden of disease.

  5. Exposure of anesthesia providers in recovery from substance abuse to potential triggering agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Heather; Bryson, Ethan O

    2011-11-01

    To determine the experience, attitudes, and opinions of anesthesia providers in recovery from addiction to anesthetic agents, who subsequently undergo surgery or who require opioid analgesics for injuries or other conditions. Survey instrument. Academic medical center. Physicians and nurse-anesthetists in recovery in the United States. A link to a survey was posted on the Anesthetists in Recovery website on January 17, 2010 and allowed to remain active for a period of one week. The survey also was distributed via email to recovering anesthesiologists in a "snowball sampling" method. Completed surveys were reviewed, and data were compiled using Survey Monkey, with categorical variables described as frequencies and percentages. A total of 30 surveys were returned, with 27 (90%) reporting a history of abusing anesthetics or drugs commonly found in the work environment, and 19 (65.5%) reporting abuse of recreational drugs and drugs used during the administration of anesthesia. Twenty-eight (93%) respondents reported finding themselves in a situation that necessitated they receive their former drug of choice for legitimate medical reasons while in recovery. Anesthesia care providers in recovery from addiction to anesthetic agents may undergo subsequent exposure to these agents due to medical necessity. Participation in a program of recovery with support from family members may decrease the risk of relapse but does not eliminate it. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Large anti-HER2/neu liposomes for potential targeted intraperitoneal therapy of micrometastatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofou, Stavroula; Enmon, Richard; Palm, Stig; Kappel, Barry; Zanzonico, Pat; McDevitt, Michael R.; Scheinberg, David A.; Sgouros, George

    2011-01-01

    Effective targeting and killing of intraperitoneally disseminated micrometastases remains a challenge. Objective/Methods In this work, we evaluated the potential of antibody-labeled PEGylated large liposomes as vehicles for direct intraperitoneal (i.p.) drug delivery with the aim to enhance the tumor-to-normal organ ratio and to improve the bioexposure of cancer cells to the delivered therapeutics while shifting the toxicities toward the spleen. These targeted liposomes are designed to combine: (1) specific targeting to and internalization by cancer cells mediated by liposome-conjugated tumor-specific antibodies, (2) slow clearance from the peritoneal cavity, and (3) shift of normal organ toxicities from the liver to the spleen due to their relatively large size. Results Conjugation of anti-HER2/neu antibodies to the surface of large (approximately 600 nm in diameter) PEGylated liposomes results in fast, specific binding of targeted liposomes to cancer cells in vitro, followed by considerable cellular internalization. In vivo, after i.p. administration, these liposomes exhibit fast, specific binding to i.p. cancerous tumors. Large liposomes are slowly cleared from the peritoneal cavity, and they exhibit increased uptake by the spleen relative to the liver, while targeted large liposomes demonstrate specific tumor uptake at early times. Although tissue and tumor uptake are greater for cationic liposomes, the tumor-to-liver and spleen-to-liver ratios are similar for both membrane compositions, suggesting a primary role for the liposome’s size, compared to the liposome’s surface charge. Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that large targeted liposomes administered i.p. could be a potent drug-delivery strategy for locoregional therapy of i.p. micrometastatic tumors. PMID:20070139

  7. Evaluation of cell membrane integrity as a potential antimicrobial target for plant products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitemerere, Tariro A; Mukanganyama, Stanley

    2014-07-30

    There is urgent need to discover new antimicrobial compounds with diverse chemical structures and mechanisms of action due to increasing new and re-emerging infectious diseases. Additionally, appearance of undesirable side effects of certain antibiotics and increasing resistance to antibiotics in current clinical use is also a cause for concern. Bacterial cell membranes are a possible target for developing new antibacterial drugs since membrane-based efflux pump systems play an important role in bacterial pathogenicity and antimicrobial resistance in bacteria. Hence, the objective of our study was to evaluate bacterial membrane integrity of two species of bacteria; Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in the presence of ethanolic leaf extracts of two plant species Callistemon citrinus and Vernonia adoensis from Zimbabwe. Bacterial efflux pump inhibition using both leaf extracts was determined by monitoring the transport of Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) across the cell membrane and IC50 values were obtained. Membrane permeabilizing properties of both extracts were also evaluated using the membrane potential sensitive dye 3'3 dipropylthiadicarbocyanine (diSC3-5). Haemolysis effect of both extracts on sheep erythrocytes was also investigated. Both extracts inhibited bacterial efflux pumps which resulted in the accumulation of R6G inside the cell. The IC50 values for C. citrinus and V. adoensis against S. aureus were 1.44 mg/ml and 1.61 mg/ml, respectively. Both leaf extracts however, showed similar IC50 values of 1.64 mg/ml against P. aeruginosa. Both plant extracts showed some significant effects on permeability of the bacterial membrane when a 24-28% increase of diSC3-5 dye release was observed for S. aureus and 45-53% of dye was released from P. aeruginosa cell membrane after a 60 minute incubation period. In addition, both extracts exhibited haemolytic effects on sheep erythrocytes at concentrations greater than 2.5 mg/ml. These plant extracts may provide new

  8. Small molecules targeting glycogen synthase kinase 3 as potential drug candidates for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchena, Miguel; Villarejo-Zori, Beatriz; Zaldivar-Diez, Josefa; Palomo, Valle; Gil, Carmen; Hernández-Sánchez, Catalina; Martínez, Ana; de la Rosa, Enrique J

    2017-12-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal dystrophy that courses with progressive degeneration of retinal tissue and loss of vision. Currently, RP is an unpreventable, incurable condition. We propose glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) inhibitors as potential leads for retinal cell neuroprotection, since the retina is also a part of the central nervous system and GSK-3 inhibitors are potent neuroprotectant agents. Using a chemical genetic approach, diverse small molecules with different potency and binding mode to GSK-3 have been used to validate and confirm GSK-3 as a pharmacological target for RP. Moreover, this medicinal chemistry approach has provided new leads for the future disease-modifying treatment of RP.

  9. Genetic vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus provides protection without disease potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Teresa R; Rangel, David; Graham, Barney S; Brough, Douglas E; Gall, Jason G

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of infectious lower respiratory disease in infants and the elderly. As there is no vaccine for RSV, we developed a genetic vaccine approach that induced protection of the entire respiratory tract from a single parenteral administration. The approach was based on adenovirus vectors derived from newly isolated nonhuman primate viruses with low seroprevalence. We show for the first time that a single intramuscular (IM) injection of the replication-deficient adenovirus vectors expressing the RSV fusion (F0) glycoprotein induced immune responses that protected both the lungs and noses of cotton rats and mice even at low doses and for several months postimmunization. The immune response included high titers of neutralizing antibody that were maintained ≥ 24 weeks and RSV-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. The vectors were as potently immunogenic as a human adenovirus 5 vector in these two key respiratory pathogen animal models. Importantly, there was minimal alveolitis and granulocytic infiltrates in the lung, and type 2 cytokines were not produced after RSV challenge even under conditions of partial protection. Overall, this genetic vaccine is highly effective without potentiating immunopathology, and the results support development of the vaccine candidate for human testing.

  10. Cellular Signaling Pathway Alterations and Potential Targeted Therapies for Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Giunti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parafollicular C-cell-derived medullary thyroid cancer (MTC comprises 3% to 4% of all thyroid cancers. While cytotoxic treatments have been shown to have limited efficacy, targeted molecular therapies that inhibit rearranged during transfection (RET and other tyrosine kinase receptors that are mainly involved in angiogenesis have shown great promise in the treatment of metastatic or locally advanced MTC. Multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as vandetanib, which is already approved for the treatment of progressive MTC, and cabozantinib have shown distinct advantages with regard to rates of disease response and control. However, these types of tyrosine kinase inhibitor compounds are able to concurrently block several types of targets, which limits the understanding of RET as a specific target. Moreover, important resistances to tyrosine kinase inhibitors can occur, which limit the long-term efficacy of these treatments. Deregulated cellular signaling pathways and genetic alterations in MTC, particularly the activation of the RAS/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR cascades and RET crosstalk signaling, are now emerging as novel and potentially promising therapeutic treatments for aggressive MTC.

  11. Characterisation of the Candida albicans Phosphopantetheinyl Transferase Ppt2 as a Potential Antifungal Drug Target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine S Dobb

    Full Text Available Antifungal drugs acting via new mechanisms of action are urgently needed to combat the increasing numbers of severe fungal infections caused by pathogens such as Candida albicans. The phosphopantetheinyl transferase of Aspergillus fumigatus, encoded by the essential gene pptB, has previously been identified as a potential antifungal target. This study investigated the function of its orthologue in C. albicans, PPT2/C1_09480W by placing one allele under the control of the regulatable MET3 promoter, and deleting the remaining allele. The phenotypes of this conditional null mutant showed that, as in A. fumigatus, the gene PPT2 is essential for growth in C. albicans, thus fulfilling one aspect of an efficient antifungal target. The catalytic activity of Ppt2 as a phosphopantetheinyl transferase and the acyl carrier protein Acp1 as a substrate were demonstrated in a fluorescence transfer assay, using recombinant Ppt2 and Acp1 produced and purified from E.coli. A fluorescence polarisation assay amenable to high-throughput screening was also developed. Therefore we have identified Ppt2 as a broad-spectrum novel antifungal target and developed tools to identify inhibitors as potentially new antifungal compounds.

  12. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a potential targeting agent for delivery of boron to malignant gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capala, J.; Barth, R.F.; Adams, D.M.; Bailey, M.Q.; Soloway, A.H. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Carlsson, J. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Sciences

    1994-12-31

    The majority of high grade gliomas express an amplified epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, and this often is associated with an increase in cell surface receptor expression. The rapid internalization and degradation of EGF-EGFR complexes, as well as their high affinity make EGF a potential targeting agent for delivery of {sup 10}B to tumor cells with an amplified number of EGFR. Human glioma cells can expresses as many as 10{sup 5} {minus}10{sup 6} EGF receptors per cell, and if these could be saturated with boronated EGF, then > 10{sup 8} boron atoms would be delivered per cell. Since EGF has a comparatively low molecular weight ({approximately} 6 kD), this has allowed us to construct relatively small bioconjugates containing {approximately} 900 boron atoms per EGF molecule{sup 3}, which also had high affinity for EGFR on tumor cells. In the present study, the feasibility of using EGF receptors as a potential target for therapy of gliomas was investigated by in vivo scintigraphic studies using {sup 131}I{minus} or {sup 99m}{Tc}-labeled EGF in a rat brain tumor model. Our results indicate that intratumorally delivered boron- EGF conjugates might be useful for targeting EGFR on glioma cells if the boron containing moiety of the conjugates persisted intracellularly. Further studies are required, however, to determine if this approach can be used for BNCT of the rat glioma.

  13. Investigation of potential targets of Porphyromonas CRISPRs among the genomes of Porphyromonas species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Masaki; Maruyama, Fumito; Sekizaki, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    The oral bacterial species Porphyromonas gingivalis, a periodontal pathogen, has plastic genomes that may be driven by homologous recombination with exogenous deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is incorporated by natural transformation and conjugation. However, bacteriophages and plasmids, both of which are main resources of exogenous DNA, do not exist in the known P. gingivalis genomes. This could be associated with an adaptive immunity system conferred by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (cas) genes in P. gingivalis as well as innate immune systems such as a restriction-modification system. In a previous study, few immune targets were predicted for P. gingivalis CRISPR/Cas. In this paper, we analyzed 51 P. gingivalis genomes, which were newly sequenced, and publicly available genomes of 13 P. gingivalis and 46 other Porphyromonas species. We detected 6 CRISPR/Cas types (classified by sequence similarity of repeat) in P. gingivalis and 12 other types in the remaining species. The Porphyromonas CRISPR spacers with potential targets in the genus Porphyromonas were approximately 23 times more abundant than those with potential targets in other genus taxa (1,720/6,896 spacers vs. 74/6,896 spacers). Porphyromonas CRISPR/Cas may be involved in genome plasticity by exhibiting selective interference against intra- and interspecies nucleic acids. PMID:28837670

  14. Exploring the potential of a structural alphabet-based tool for mining multiple target conformations and target flexibility insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regad, Leslie; Chéron, Jean-Baptiste; Triki, Dhoha; Senac, Caroline; Flatters, Delphine; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2017-01-01

    Protein flexibility is often implied in binding with different partners and is essential for protein function. The growing number of macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank entries and their redundancy has become a major source of structural knowledge of the protein universe. The analysis of structural variability through available redundant structures of a target, called multiple target conformations (MTC), obtained using experimental or modeling methods and under different biological conditions or different sources is one way to explore protein flexibility. This analysis is essential to improve the understanding of various mechanisms associated with protein target function and flexibility. In this study, we explored structural variability of three biological targets by analyzing different MTC sets associated with these targets. To facilitate the study of these MTC sets, we have developed an efficient tool, SA-conf, dedicated to capturing and linking the amino acid and local structure variability and analyzing the target structural variability space. The advantage of SA-conf is that it could be applied to divers sets composed of MTCs available in the PDB obtained using NMR and crystallography or homology models. This tool could also be applied to analyze MTC sets obtained by dynamics approaches. Our results showed that SA-conf tool is effective to quantify the structural variability of a MTC set and to localize the structural variable positions and regions of the target. By selecting adapted MTC subsets and comparing their variability detected by SA-conf, we highlighted different sources of target flexibility such as induced by binding partner, by mutation and intrinsic flexibility. Our results support the interest to mine available structures associated with a target using to offer valuable insight into target flexibility and interaction mechanisms. The SA-conf executable script, with a set of pre-compiled binaries are available at http://www.mti.univ-paris-diderot.fr/recherche/plateformes/logiciels.

  15. Exploring the potential of a structural alphabet-based tool for mining multiple target conformations and target flexibility insight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Regad

    Full Text Available Protein flexibility is often implied in binding with different partners and is essential for protein function. The growing number of macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank entries and their redundancy has become a major source of structural knowledge of the protein universe. The analysis of structural variability through available redundant structures of a target, called multiple target conformations (MTC, obtained using experimental or modeling methods and under different biological conditions or different sources is one way to explore protein flexibility. This analysis is essential to improve the understanding of various mechanisms associated with protein target function and flexibility. In this study, we explored structural variability of three biological targets by analyzing different MTC sets associated with these targets. To facilitate the study of these MTC sets, we have developed an efficient tool, SA-conf, dedicated to capturing and linking the amino acid and local structure variability and analyzing the target structural variability space. The advantage of SA-conf is that it could be applied to divers sets composed of MTCs available in the PDB obtained using NMR and crystallography or homology models. This tool could also be applied to analyze MTC sets obtained by dynamics approaches. Our results showed that SA-conf tool is effective to quantify the structural variability of a MTC set and to localize the structural variable positions and regions of the target. By selecting adapted MTC subsets and comparing their variability detected by SA-conf, we highlighted different sources of target flexibility such as induced by binding partner, by mutation and intrinsic flexibility. Our results support the interest to mine available structures associated with a target using to offer valuable insight into target flexibility and interaction mechanisms. The SA-conf executable script, with a set of pre-compiled binaries are available at

  16. The Sigma-1 Receptor as a Regulator of Dopamine Neurotransmission: A Potential Therapeutic Target for Methamphetamine Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambo, Danielle O; Lebowitz, Joseph J; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2018-01-19

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is a major public health issue around the world, yet there are currently no effective pharmacotherapies for the treatment of METH addiction. METH is potent psychostimulant that increases extracellular dopamine levels by targeting the dopamine transporter (DAT) and alters neuronal activity in the reward centers of the brain. One promising therapeutic target for the treatment of METH addiction is the sigma-1 receptor (σ1R). The σ1R is an endoplasmic reticulum-localized chaperone protein that is activated by cellular stress, and, unique to this chaperone, its function can also be induced or inhibited by different ligands. Upon activation of this unique "chaperone receptor", the σ1R regulates a variety of cellular functions and possesses neuroprotective activity in the brain. Interestingly, a variety of σ1R ligands modulate dopamine neurotransmission and reduce the behavioral effects of METH in animal models of addictive behavior, suggesting that the σ1R may be a viable therapeutic target for the treatment of METH addiction. In this review, we provide background on METH and the σ1R as well as a literature review regarding the role of σ1Rs in modulating both dopamine neurotransmission and the effects of METH. We aim to highlight the complexities of σ1R pharmacology and function as well as the therapeutic potential of the σ1R as a target for the treatment of METH addiction. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Proteomic analysis of Chlorella vulgaris: Potential targets for enhanced lipid accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarnieri, Michael T.; Nag, Ambarish; Yang, Shihui; Pienkos, Philip T.

    2013-11-01

    Oleaginous microalgae are capable of producing large quantities of fatty acids and triacylglycerides. As such, they are promising feedstocks for the production of biofuels and bioproducts. Genetic strain-engineering strategies offer a means to accelerate the commercialization of algal biofuels by improving the rate and total accumulation of microalgal lipids. However, the industrial potential of these organisms remains to be met, largely due to the incomplete knowledgebase surrounding the mechanisms governing the induction of algal lipid biosynthesis. Such strategies require further elucidation of genes and gene products controlling algal lipid accumulation. In this study, we have set out to examine these mechanisms and identify novel strain-engineering targets in the oleaginous microalga, Chlorella vulgaris. Comparative shotgun proteomic analyses have identified a number of novel targets, including previously unidentified transcription factors and proteins involved in cell signaling and cell cycle regulation. These results lay the foundation for strain-improvement strategies and demonstrate the power of translational proteomic analysis.

  18. The N-myc Oncogene: Maximizing its Targets, Regulation, and Therapeutic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Himisha

    2014-06-01

    N-myc (MYCN), a member of the Myc family of basic-helix-loop-helix-zipper (bHLHZ) transcription factors, is a central regulator of many vital cellular processes. As such, N-myc is well recognized for its classic oncogenic activity and association with human neuroblastoma. Amplification and overexpression of N-myc has been described in other tumor types, particularly those of neural origin and neuroendocrine tumors. This review outlines N-myc's contribution to normal development and oncogenic progression. In addition, it highlights relevant transcriptional targets and mechanisms of regulation. Finally, the clinical implications of N-Myc as a biomarker and potential as a target using novel therapeutic approaches are discussed. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. In silico target fishing for the potential targets and molecular mechanisms of baicalein as an antiparkinsonian agent: discovery of the protective effects on NMDA receptor-mediated neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Fang, Jian-Song; Bai, Xiao-Yu; Zhou, Dan; Wang, Yi-Tao; Liu, Ai-Lin; Du, Guan-Hua

    2013-06-01

    The flavonoid baicalein has been proven effective in animal models of parkinson's disease; however, the potential biological targets and molecular mechanisms underlying the antiparkinsonian action of baicalein have not been fully clarified. In the present study, the potential targets of baicalein were predicted by in silico target fishing approaches including database mining, molecular docking, structure-based pharmacophore searching, and chemical similarity searching. A consensus scoring formula has been developed and validated to objectively rank the targets. The top two ranked targets catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) have been proposed as targets of baicalein by literatures. The third-ranked one (N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor, NMDAR) with relatively low consensus score was further experimentally tested. Although our results suggested that baicalein significantly attenuated NMDA-induced neurotoxicity including cell death, intracellular nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, extracellular NO reduction in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, baicalein exhibited no inhibitory effect on [(3) H]MK-801 binding study, indicating that NMDAR might not be the target of baicalein. In conclusion, the results indicate that in silico target fishing is an effective method for drug target discovery, and the protective role of baicalein against NMDA-induced neurotoxicity supports our previous research that baicalein possesses antiparkinsonian activity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Eph receptor A10 has a potential as a target for a prostate cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, Kazuya [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saito-Asagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); Yamashita, Takuya [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saito-Asagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Inoue, Masaki [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saito-Asagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); Higashisaka, Kazuma [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saito-Asagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saito-Asagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); The Center of Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Abe, Yasuhiro [Cancer Biology Research Center, Sanford Research/USD, 2301 E. 60th Street N, Sioux Falls, SD 57104 (United States); Mukai, Yohei [Laboratory of Innovative Antibody Engineering and Design, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saito-Asagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); Kamada, Haruhiko [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saito-Asagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); The Center of Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); and others

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • EphA10 mRNA is overexpressed in breast, prostate and colon cancer cell lines. • EphA10 is overexpressed in clinical prostate tumors at mRNA and protein levels. • Anti-EphA10 antibodies were cytotoxic on EphA10-positive prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: We recently identified Eph receptor A10 (EphA10) as a novel breast cancer-specific protein. Moreover, we also showed that an in-house developed anti-EphA10 monoclonal antibody (mAb) significantly inhibited proliferation of breast cancer cells, suggesting EphA10 as a promising target for breast cancer therapy. However, the only other known report for EphA10 was its expression in the testis at the mRNA level. Therefore, the potency of EphA10 as a drug target against cancers other than the breast is not known. The expression of EphA10 in a wide variety of cancer cells was studied and the potential of EphA10 as a drug target was evaluated. Screening of EphA10 mRNA expression showed that EphA10 was overexpressed in breast cancer cell lines as well as in prostate and colon cancer cell lines. Thus, we focused on prostate cancers in which EphA10 expression was equivalent to that in breast cancers. As a result, EphA10 expression was clearly shown in clinical prostate tumor tissues as well as in cell lines at the mRNA and protein levels. In order to evaluate the potential of EphA10 as a drug target, we analyzed complement-dependent cytotoxicity effects of anti-EphA10 mAb and found that significant cytotoxicity was mediated by the expression of EphA10. Therefore, the idea was conceived that the overexpression of EphA10 in prostate cancers might have a potential as a target for prostate cancer therapy, and formed the basis for the studies reported here.

  1. DNA-binding specificities of plant transcription factors and their potential to define target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Zorrilla, José M; López-Vidriero, Irene; Carrasco, José L; Godoy, Marta; Vera, Pablo; Solano, Roberto

    2014-02-11

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression through binding to cis-regulatory specific sequences in the promoters of their target genes. In contrast to the genetic code, the transcriptional regulatory code is far from being deciphered and is determined by sequence specificity of TFs, combinatorial cooperation between TFs and chromatin competence. Here we addressed one of these determinants by characterizing the target sequence specificity of 63 plant TFs representing 25 families, using protein-binding microarrays. Remarkably, almost half of these TFs recognized secondary motifs, which in some cases were completely unrelated to the primary element. Analyses of coregulated genes and transcriptomic data from TFs mutants showed the functional significance of over 80% of all identified sequences and of at least one target sequence per TF. Moreover, combining the target sequence information with coexpression analysis we could predict the function of a TF as activator or repressor through a particular DNA sequence. Our data support the correlation between cis-regulatory elements and the sequence determined in vitro using the protein-binding microarray and provides a framework to explore regulatory networks in plants.

  2. NF-κB as potential target in the treatment of melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madonna Gabriele

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The RAS/MAP kinase pathway has attracted attention because activating mutations of the BRAF serine/threonine kinase was described in over 50% of melanomas. Very recently, selective and potent BRAF inhibitors have been developed. Several other signal transduction pathways have been found to be constitutively active or mutated in other subsets of melanoma tumors that are potentially targetable with new agents. Among these, NFκB is another pathway that melanoma tumors use to achieve survival, proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. Inhibition of NF-κB activation appears to be a very promising option for anti-cancer therapies.

  3. New oral targeted therapies for metastatic breast cancer disrupt the traditional patients' management-A healthcare providers' view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E; Pourtau, L; Di Palma, M; Delaloge, S

    2017-11-01

    Although a cure still cannot be expected for metastatic breast cancer, thanks to progressive advances in treatments, life expectancy has been increasing over the past 15 years. This study aims to present the impact on the organisation of patients' management of newly released oral targeted therapies dedicated to metastatic breast cancer and the obstacles to their diffusion. Our work is based on the analysis of 40 semi-structured interviews, conducted with oncology healthcare professionals in three regions of France (2015-2016). It shows three main results. First, the prescription of an oral targeted therapy requires greater collaboration between healthcare professionals than traditional intravenous oncology drugs, which may be challenging. Second, there remain many barriers to the dissemination of oral targeted therapies. Third, taking an oral targeted therapy keeps the patient away from the hospital facility and asks for a strong therapeutic alliance. The management of oral targeted therapies is time-consuming for medical oncologists and disrupts the traditional care pathway. The multiplication of actors involved in patients' management reinforces the slowdown in the deployment and acceptance of therapeutic innovations. More players equal a higher risk of slowdown. Questioning and re-designing hospital organisation and management modalities towards this type of care are critical. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The potential of targeted antiangiogenesis therapies in the treatment of esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu WW

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Wen Wen Xu,1,2 Bin Li,1,2,3 Annie L M Cheung1,2,31Department of Anatomy, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, 2The University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Institute of Research and Innovation (HKU-SIRI, 3Centre for Cancer Research, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Esophageal cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide and its incidence is increasing at an alarming rate. Despite advances in surgical techniques and combined multimodality therapy, the survival rate of esophageal cancer remains poor. Clearly, the time is ripe for introducing novel strategies such as targeted therapies to improve treatment outcome. The significance of angiogenesis and angiogenic factors in the progression and aggressiveness of esophageal cancer is well documented. However, although increasing numbers of antiangiogenic agents designed to inhibit angiogenesis through multiple mechanisms have been developed in the past few decades, and some of them have shown promising results in preclinical and clinical studies, there is as yet no antiangiogenic agent approved for esophageal cancer. This review provides a summary of angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, the molecular mechanisms that regulate these processes, and the strategies for targeting angiogenesis in tumors. We will also present the rationale and challenges of antiangiogenic therapy, and the antiangiogenic agents that have been tested in preclinical studies or clinical trials for esophageal cancer. With further research bringing a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in angiogenesis, and as new angiogenesis-targeting agents continue to evolve, there are reasons to be optimistic that targeting angiogenesis may bring new opportunities to cure this highly lethal disease.Keywords: esophageal cancer, angiogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor, targeted therapies

  5. NPY receptors as potential targets for anti-obesity drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulyaningsih, Ernie; Zhang, Lei; Herzog, Herbert; Sainsbury, Amanda

    2011-07-01

    The neuropeptide Y system has proven to be one of the most important regulators of feeding behaviour and energy homeostasis, thus presenting great potential as a therapeutic target for the treatment of disorders such as obesity and at the other extreme, anorexia. Due to the initial lack of pharmacological tools that are active in vivo, functions of the different Y receptors have been mainly studied in knockout and transgenic mouse models. However, over recent years various Y receptor selective peptidic and non-peptidic agonists and antagonists have been developed and tested. Their therapeutic potential in relation to treating obesity and other disorders of energy homeostasis is discussed in this review. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Potentials of Long Noncoding RNAs (LncRNAs in Sarcoma: From Biomarkers to Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Min

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoma includes some of the most heterogeneous tumors, which make the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of these rare yet diverse neoplasms especially challenging. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are important regulators of cancer initiation and progression, which implies their potential as neoteric prognostic and diagnostic markers in cancer, including sarcoma. A relationship between lncRNAs and sarcoma pathogenesis and progression is emerging. Recent studies demonstrate that lncRNAs influence sarcoma cell proliferation, metastasis, and drug resistance. Additionally, lncRNA expression profiles are predictive of sarcoma prognosis. In this review, we summarize contemporary advances in the research of lncRNA biogenesis and functions in sarcoma. We also highlight the potential for lncRNAs to become innovative diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers as well as therapeutic targets in sarcoma.

  7. Therapeutic potential of mGluR5 targeting in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil eKumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Decades of research dedicated towards Alzheimer's disease (AD has culminated in much of the current understanding of the neurodegeneration associated with disease. However, delineating the pathophysiology and finding a possible cure for the disease is still wanting. This is in part due to the lack of knowledge pertaining to the connecting link between neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory pathways. Consequently, the inefficacy and ill-effects of the drugs currently available for AD encourage the need for alternative and safe therapeutic intervention. In this review we highlight the potential of mGluR5, a metabotropic glutamatergic receptor, in understanding the mechanism underlying the neuronal death and neuroinflammation in AD. We also discuss the role of mGlu5 receptor in mediating the neuron-glia interaction in the disease. Finally, we discuss the potential of mGluR5 as target for treating AD.

  8. The gut-kidney axis in chronic renal failure: A new potential target for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Tawfik; Tzukert, Keren; Abel, Roy; Abu Rmeileh, Ayman; Levi, Ronen; Ilan, Yaron

    2017-07-01

    Evidence is accumulating to consider the gut microbiome as a central player in the gut-kidney axis. Microbiome products, such as advanced glycation end products, phenols, and indoles, are absorbed into the circulation but are cleared by normal-functioning kidneys. These products then become toxic and contribute to the uremic load and to the progression of chronic kidney failure. In this review, we discuss the gut-kidney interaction under the state of chronic kidney failure as well as the potential mechanisms by which a change in the gut flora (termed gut dysbiosis) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) exacerbates uremia and leads to further progression of CKD and inflammation. Finally, the potential therapeutic interventions to target the gut microbiome in CKD are discussed. © 2016 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  9. Drug design with Cdc7 kinase: a potential novel cancer therapy target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Sawa

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Masaaki Sawa1, Hisao Masai21Carna Biosciences, Inc., Kobe, Japan; 2Genome Dynamics Project, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Identification of novel molecular targets is critical in development of new and efficient cancer therapies. Kinases are one of the most common drug targets with a potential for cancer therapy. Cell cycle progression is regulated by a number of kinases, some of which are being developed to treat cancer. Cdc7 is a serine-threonine kinase originally discovered in budding yeast, which has been shown to be necessary to initiate the S phase. Inhibition of Cdc7 in cancer cells retards the progression of the S phase, accumulates DNA damage, and induces p53-independent cell death, but the same treatment in normal cells does not significantly affect viability. Low-molecular-weight compounds that inhibit Cdc7 kinase with an IC50 of less than 10 nM have been identified, and shown to be effective in the inhibition of tumor growth in animal models. Thus Cdc7 kinase can be recognized as a novel molecular target for cancer therapy.Keywords: Cdc7 kinase, cell cycle, replication fork, genome stability, DNA damages, ATP-binding pocket, kinase inhibitor

  10. Tumor imaging and targeting potential of an Hsp70-derived 14-mer peptide.

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    Mathias Gehrmann

    Full Text Available We have previously used a unique mouse monoclonal antibody cmHsp70.1 to demonstrate the selective presence of a membrane-bound form of Hsp70 (memHsp70 on a variety of leukemia cells and on single cell suspensions derived from solid tumors of different entities, but not on non-transformed cells or cells from corresponding 'healthy' tissue. This antibody can be used to image tumors in vivo and target them for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Tumor-specific expression of memHsp70 therefore has the potential to be exploited for theranostic purposes. Given the advantages of peptides as imaging and targeting agents, this study assessed whether a 14-mer tumor penetrating peptide (TPP; TKDNNLLGRFELSG, the sequence of which is derived from the oligomerization domain of Hsp70 which is expressed on the cell surface of tumor cells, can also be used for targeting membrane Hsp70 positive (memHsp70+ tumor cells, in vitro.The specificity of carboxy-fluorescein (CF- labeled TPP (TPP to Hsp70 was proven in an Hsp70 knockout mammary tumor cell system. TPP specifically binds to different memHsp70+ mouse and human tumor cell lines and is rapidly taken up via endosomes. Two to four-fold higher levels of CF-labeled TPP were detected in MCF7 (82% memHsp70+ and MDA-MB-231 (75% memHsp70+ cells compared to T47D cells (29% memHsp70+ that exhibit a lower Hsp70 membrane positivity. After 90 min incubation, TPP co-localized with mitochondrial membranes in memHsp70+ tumors. Although there was no evidence that any given vesicle population was specifically localized, fluorophore-labeled cmHsp70.1 antibody and TPP preferentially accumulated in the proximity of the adherent surface of cultured cells. These findings suggest a potential association between membrane Hsp70 expression and cytoskeletal elements that are involved in adherence, the establishment of intercellular synapses and/or membrane reorganization.This study demonstrates the specific binding and rapid

  11. The Potential Role of Aerobic Exercise to Modulate Cardiotoxicity of Molecularly Targeted Cancer Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoski, Susan; Mackey, John R.; Douglas, Pamela S.; Haykowsky, Mark J.; Jones, Lee W.

    2013-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapeutics (MTT) are the future of cancer systemic therapy. They have already moved from palliative therapy for advanced solid malignancies into the setting of curative-intent treatment for early-stage disease. Cardiotoxicity is a frequent and potentially serious adverse complication of some targeted therapies, leading to a broad range of potentially life-threatening complications, therapy discontinuation, and poor quality of life. Low-cost pleiotropic interventions are therefore urgently required to effectively prevent and/or treat MTT-induced cardiotoxicity. Aerobic exercise therapy has the unique capacity to modulate, without toxicity, multiple gene expression pathways in several organ systems, including a plethora of cardiac-specific molecular and cell-signaling pathways implicated in MTT-induced cardiac toxicity. In this review, we examine the molecular signaling of antiangiogenic and HER2-directed therapies that may underpin cardiac toxicity and the hypothesized molecular mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective properties of aerobic exercise. It is hoped that this knowledge can be used to maximize the benefits of small molecule inhibitors, while minimizing cardiac damage in patients with solid malignancies. PMID:23335619

  12. The potential role of aerobic exercise to modulate cardiotoxicity of molecularly targeted cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jessica M; Lakoski, Susan; Mackey, John R; Douglas, Pamela S; Haykowsky, Mark J; Jones, Lee W

    2013-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapeutics (MTT) are the future of cancer systemic therapy. They have already moved from palliative therapy for advanced solid malignancies into the setting of curative-intent treatment for early-stage disease. Cardiotoxicity is a frequent and potentially serious adverse complication of some targeted therapies, leading to a broad range of potentially life-threatening complications, therapy discontinuation, and poor quality of life. Low-cost pleiotropic interventions are therefore urgently required to effectively prevent and/or treat MTT-induced cardiotoxicity. Aerobic exercise therapy has the unique capacity to modulate, without toxicity, multiple gene expression pathways in several organ systems, including a plethora of cardiac-specific molecular and cell-signaling pathways implicated in MTT-induced cardiac toxicity. In this review, we examine the molecular signaling of antiangiogenic and HER2-directed therapies that may underpin cardiac toxicity and the hypothesized molecular mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective properties of aerobic exercise. It is hoped that this knowledge can be used to maximize the benefits of small molecule inhibitors, while minimizing cardiac damage in patients with solid malignancies.

  13. Ghrelin is a prognostic marker and a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönberg, Malin; Ahlin, Cecilia; Naeser, Ylva; Janson, Eva Tiensuu; Holmberg, Lars; Fjällskog, Marie-Louise

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin are gastrointestinal peptides, encoded by the same preproghrelin gene. Both are expressed in breast cancer tissue and ghrelin has been implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Despite recent advances in breast cancer management the need for new prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer remains high. We studied the prognostic impact of ghrelin and obestatin in women with node negative breast cancer. Within a cohort of women with breast cancer with tumor size ≤ 50 mm, no lymph node metastases and no initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy, 190 women were identified who died from breast cancer and randomly selected 190 women alive at the corresponding time as controls. Tumor tissues were immunostained with antibodies versus the peptides. Ghrelin expression was associated with better breast cancer specific survival in univariate analyses (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.36-0.84) and in multivariate models, adjusted for endocrine treatment and age (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.36-0.89). Obestatin expression was non-informative (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.60-2.46). Ghrelin expression is independent prognostic factor for breast cancer death in node negative patients-halving the risk for dying of breast cancer. Our data implies that ghrelin could be a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer treatment.

  14. Ghrelin is a prognostic marker and a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Grönberg

    Full Text Available Ghrelin and obestatin are gastrointestinal peptides, encoded by the same preproghrelin gene. Both are expressed in breast cancer tissue and ghrelin has been implicated in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Despite recent advances in breast cancer management the need for new prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in breast cancer remains high. We studied the prognostic impact of ghrelin and obestatin in women with node negative breast cancer. Within a cohort of women with breast cancer with tumor size ≤ 50 mm, no lymph node metastases and no initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy, 190 women were identified who died from breast cancer and randomly selected 190 women alive at the corresponding time as controls. Tumor tissues were immunostained with antibodies versus the peptides. Ghrelin expression was associated with better breast cancer specific survival in univariate analyses (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.36-0.84 and in multivariate models, adjusted for endocrine treatment and age (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.36-0.89. Obestatin expression was non-informative (OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.60-2.46. Ghrelin expression is independent prognostic factor for breast cancer death in node negative patients-halving the risk for dying of breast cancer. Our data implies that ghrelin could be a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer treatment.

  15. Target-directed Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry: A Study on Potentials and Pitfalls as Exemplified on a Bacterial Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Priska; Pang, Lijuan; Silbermann, Marleen; Eriş, Deniz; Mühlethaler, Tobias; Schwardt, Oliver; Ernst, Beat

    2017-08-25

    Target-directed dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) is an emerging technique for the efficient identification of inhibitors of pharmacologically relevant targets. In this contribution, we present an application for a bacterial target, the lectin FimH, a crucial virulence factor of uropathogenic E. coli being the main cause of urinary tract infections. A small dynamic library of acylhydrazones was formed from aldehydes and hydrazides and equilibrated at neutral pH in presence of aniline as nucleophilic catalyst. The major success factors turned out to be an accordingly adjusted ratio of scaffolds and fragments, an adequate sample preparation prior to HPLC analysis, and the data processing. Only then did the ranking of the dynamic library constituents correlate well with affinity data. Furthermore, as a support of DCC applications especially to larger libraries, a new protocol for improved hit identification was established. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Plasma membrane proteomics of human breast cancer cell lines identifies potential targets for breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne S Ziegler

    Full Text Available The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease.

  17. Potential implications of the bystander effect on TCP and EUD when considering target volume dose heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderson, Michael J; Kirkby, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In light of in vitro evidence suggesting that radiation-induced bystander effects may enhance non-local cell killing, there is potential for impact on radiotherapy treatment planning paradigms such as the goal of delivering a uniform dose throughout the clinical target volume (CTV). This work applies a bystander effect model to calculate equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) for external beam prostate treatment and compares the results with a more common model where local response is dictated exclusively by local absorbed dose. The broad assumptions applied in the bystander effect model are intended to place an upper limit on the extent of the results in a clinical context. EUD and TCP of a prostate cancer target volume under conditions of increasing dose heterogeneity were calculated using two models: One incorporating bystander effects derived from previously published in vitro bystander data ( McMahon et al. 2012 , 2013a); and one using a common linear-quadratic (LQ) response that relies exclusively on local absorbed dose. Dose through the CTV was modelled as a normal distribution, where the degree of heterogeneity was then dictated by changing the standard deviation (SD). Also, a representative clinical dose distribution was examined as cold (low dose) sub-volumes were systematically introduced. The bystander model suggests a moderate degree of dose heterogeneity throughout a target volume will yield as good or better outcome compared to a uniform dose in terms of EUD and TCP. For a typical intermediate risk prostate prescription of 78 Gy over 39 fractions maxima in EUD and TCP as a function of increasing SD occurred at SD ∼ 5 Gy. The plots only dropped below the uniform dose values for SD ∼ 10 Gy, almost 13% of the prescribed dose. Small, but potentially significant differences in the outcome metrics between the models were identified in the clinically-derived dose distribution as cold sub-volumes were introduced. In terms of

  18. Exploring the Potential Emotional and Behavioural Impact of Providing Personalised Genomic Risk Information to the Public: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Amelia K; Keogh, Louise A; Newson, Ainsley J; Hersch, Jolyn; Butow, Phyllis; Cust, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    To explore the potential emotional and behavioural impact of providing information on personalised genomic risk to the public, using melanoma as an example, to aid research translation. We conducted four focus groups in which 34 participants were presented with a hypothetical scenario of an individual's lifetime genomic risk of melanoma (using the term 'genetic risk'). We asked about understanding of genetic risk, who would choose to receive this risk information, potential emotional and behavioural impacts, and other concerns or potential benefits. Data were analysed thematically. Participants thought this risk information could potentially motivate preventive behaviours such as sun protection and related it to screening for other diseases including breast cancer. Factors identified as influencing the decision to receive genetic risk information included education level, children, age and gender. Participants identified potential negative impacts on the recipient such as anxiety and worry, and proposed that this could be mitigated by providing additional explanatory and prevention information, and contact details of a health professional for further discussion. Participants' concerns included workplace and insurance discrimination. Participants recognised the potential for both positive and negative emotional and behavioural impacts related to receiving information on the personalised genomic risk of melanoma. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Evaluation of potential internal target volume of liver tumors using cine-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akino, Yuichi; Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2014-11-01

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is widely used for evaluating moving tumors, including lung and liver cancers. For patients with unstable respiration, however, the 4DCT may not visualize tumor motion properly. High-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences (cine-MRI) permit direct visualization of respiratory motion of liver tumors without considering radiation dose exposure to patients. Here, the authors demonstrated a technique for evaluating internal target volume (ITV) with consideration of respiratory variation using cine-MRI. The authors retrospectively evaluated six patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to hepatocellular carcinoma. Before acquiring planning CT, sagittal and coronal cine-MRI images were acquired for 30 s with a frame rate of 2 frames/s. The patient immobilization was conducted under the same condition as SBRT. Planning CT images were then acquired within 15 min from cine-MRI image acquisitions, followed by a 4DCT scan. To calculate tumor motion, the motion vectors between two continuous frames of cine-MRI images were calculated for each frame using the pyramidal Lucas-Kanade method. The target contour was delineated on one frame, and each vertex of the contour was shifted and copied onto the following frame using neighboring motion vectors. 3D trajectory data were generated with the centroid of the contours on sagittal and coronal images. To evaluate the accuracy of the tracking method, the motion of clearly visible blood vessel was analyzed with the motion tracking and manual detection techniques. The target volume delineated on the 50% (end-exhale) phase of 4DCT was translated with the trajectory data, and the distribution of the occupancy probability of target volume was calculated as potential ITV (ITV Potential). The concordance between ITV Potential and ITV estimated with 4DCT (ITV 4DCT) was evaluated using the Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC). The distance between blood vessel positions

  20. Evaluation of potential internal target volume of liver tumors using cine-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akino, Yuichi, E-mail: akino@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 5650871, Japan and Miyakojima IGRT Clinic, Miyakojima-ku, Osaka 5340021 (Japan); Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Toshihiko [Miyakojima IGRT Clinic, Miyakojima-ku, Osaka 5340021 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is widely used for evaluating moving tumors, including lung and liver cancers. For patients with unstable respiration, however, the 4DCT may not visualize tumor motion properly. High-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences (cine-MRI) permit direct visualization of respiratory motion of liver tumors without considering radiation dose exposure to patients. Here, the authors demonstrated a technique for evaluating internal target volume (ITV) with consideration of respiratory variation using cine-MRI. Methods: The authors retrospectively evaluated six patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to hepatocellular carcinoma. Before acquiring planning CT, sagittal and coronal cine-MRI images were acquired for 30 s with a frame rate of 2 frames/s. The patient immobilization was conducted under the same condition as SBRT. Planning CT images were then acquired within 15 min from cine-MRI image acquisitions, followed by a 4DCT scan. To calculate tumor motion, the motion vectors between two continuous frames of cine-MRI images were calculated for each frame using the pyramidal Lucas–Kanade method. The target contour was delineated on one frame, and each vertex of the contour was shifted and copied onto the following frame using neighboring motion vectors. 3D trajectory data were generated with the centroid of the contours on sagittal and coronal images. To evaluate the accuracy of the tracking method, the motion of clearly visible blood vessel was analyzed with the motion tracking and manual detection techniques. The target volume delineated on the 50% (end-exhale) phase of 4DCT was translated with the trajectory data, and the distribution of the occupancy probability of target volume was calculated as potential ITV (ITV {sub Potential}). The concordance between ITV {sub Potential} and ITV estimated with 4DCT (ITV {sub 4DCT}) was evaluated using the Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC). Results

  1. Direct Keap1-Nrf2 disruption as a potential therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Kerr

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nrf2, a transcriptional activator of cell protection genes, is an attractive therapeutic target for the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. Current Nrf2 activators, however, may exert toxicity and pathway over-activation can induce detrimental effects. An understanding of the mechanisms mediating Nrf2 inhibition in neurodegenerative conditions may therefore direct the design of drugs targeted for the prevention of these diseases with minimal side-effects. Our study provides the first in vivo evidence that specific inhibition of Keap1, a negative regulator of Nrf2, can prevent neuronal toxicity in response to the AD-initiating Aβ42 peptide, in correlation with Nrf2 activation. Comparatively, lithium, an inhibitor of the Nrf2 suppressor GSK-3, prevented Aβ42 toxicity by mechanisms independent of Nrf2. A new direct inhibitor of the Keap1-Nrf2 binding domain also prevented synaptotoxicity mediated by naturally-derived Aβ oligomers in mouse cortical neurons. Overall, our findings highlight Keap1 specifically as an efficient target for the re-activation of Nrf2 in AD, and support the further investigation of direct Keap1 inhibitors for the prevention of neurodegeneration in vivo.

  2. Metaplastic Breast Cancer: Molecular Typing and Identification of Potential Targeted Therapies at a Single Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edenfield, Jessica; Schammel, Christine; Collins, Justin; Schammel, David; Edenfield, W Jeff

    2017-02-01

    Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) is a rare and aggressive histologic subtype of breast cancer comprising approximately 0.5% to 5.0% of all invasive breast cancers with a poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. We investigated MBC at our institution to evaluate outcomes and investigate the molecular profile of our cohort to determine the presence of mutations for which there are targeted therapies. We found our cohort to consist mainly of the matrix-producing variant (72%) with 48% having the stereotypical estrogen receptor-negative/progesterone receptor-negative/human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative phenotype. While the overall survival of our cohort was an average of 1679 days (4.6 years), we had a surprising number of patients with second primaries (40%) and distant metastases (40%), yet few recurrences (12%). Molecular analysis of the tumors indicated that one gene mutation, CSFIR, was significantly associated with outcome (P = .021); however, the cohort was defined by frequent mutations in ERBB4 (36%), PIK3CA (48%), and FLT3 (60%), for which there are now targeted therapies. While surgery is the appropriate first step in the management of this aggressive malignancy, the collection of data pertaining to the use of targeted agents, although anecdotal, may provide clues to better treatment for these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Targeting extracellular matrix remodeling in disease: Could resveratrol be a potential candidate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Renu; Agarwal, Puneet

    2017-02-01

    Disturbances of extracellular matrix homeostasis are associated with a number of pathological conditions. The ability of extracellular matrix to provide contextual information and hence control the individual or collective cellular behavior is increasingly being recognized. Hence, newer therapeutic approaches targeting extracellular matrix remodeling are widely investigated. We reviewed the current literature showing the effects of resveratrol on various aspects of extracellular matrix remodeling. This review presents a summary of the effects of resveratrol on extracellular matrix deposition and breakdown. Mechanisms of action of resveratrol in extracellular matrix deposition involving growth factors and their signaling pathways are discussed. Involvement of phosphoinositol-3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and role of transcription factors and sirtuins on the effects of resveratrol on extracellular matrix homeostasis are summarized. It is evident from the literature presented in this review that resveratrol has significant effects on both the synthesis and breakdown of extracellular matrix. The major molecular targets of the action of resveratrol are growth factors and their signaling pathways, phosphoinositol-3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, transcription factors, and SIRT-1. The effects of resveratrol on extracellular matrix and the molecular targets appear to be related to experimental models, experimental environment as well as the doses.

  4. A Platinum(IV) Pro-drug Preferentially Targets IDO Providing Enhanced Ovarian Cancer Immuno-Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Awuah, Samuel G.; Zheng, Yao-Rong; Bruno, Peter M.; Hemann, Michael T.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an immunosuppressive enzyme in human tumors, leads to immune evasion and tumor tolerance. IDO is therefore a tumor immunotherapeutic target, and several IDO inhibitors are currently undergoing clinical trials. IDO inhibitors can enhance the efficacy of common cancer chemotherapeutics. Here we investigated Pt(IV) – (D)-1-methyltryptophan conjugates 1 and 2 for combined immunomodulation and DNA cross-link-triggered apoptosis for cancer ‘immuno-ch...

  5. Huntingtin Haplotypes Provide Prioritized Target Panels for Allele-specific Silencing in Huntington Disease Patients of European Ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Chris; Collins, Jennifer A; Skotte, Niels H; Southwell, Amber L; Warby, Simon C; Caron, Nicholas S; Doty, Crystal N; Nguyen, Betty; Griguoli, Annamaria; Ross, Colin J; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Hayden, Michael R

    2015-11-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the Huntingtin gene (HTT). Heterozygous polymorphisms in cis with the mutation allow for allele-specific suppression of the pathogenic HTT transcript as a therapeutic strategy. To prioritize target selection, precise heterozygosity estimates are needed across diverse HD patient populations. Here we present the first comprehensive investigation of all common target alleles across the HTT gene, using 738 reference haplotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project and 2364 haplotypes from HD patients and relatives in Canada, Sweden, France, and Italy. The most common HD haplotypes (A1, A2, and A3a) define mutually exclusive sets of polymorphisms for allele-specific therapy in the greatest number of patients. Across all four populations, a maximum of 80% are treatable using these three target haplotypes. We identify a novel deletion found exclusively on the A1 haplotype, enabling potent and selective silencing of mutant HTT in approximately 40% of the patients. Antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the deletion reduce mutant A1 HTT mRNA by 78% in patient cells while sparing wild-type HTT expression. By suppressing specific haplotypes on which expanded CAG occurs, we demonstrate a rational approach to the development of allele-specific therapy for a monogenic disorder.

  6. Huntingtin Haplotypes Provide Prioritized Target Panels for Allele-specific Silencing in Huntington Disease Patients of European Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Chris; Collins, Jennifer A; Skotte, Niels H; Southwell, Amber L; Warby, Simon C; Caron, Nicholas S; Doty, Crystal N; Nguyen, Betty; Griguoli, Annamaria; Ross, Colin J; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Hayden, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the Huntingtin gene (HTT). Heterozygous polymorphisms in cis with the mutation allow for allele-specific suppression of the pathogenic HTT transcript as a therapeutic strategy. To prioritize target selection, precise heterozygosity estimates are needed across diverse HD patient populations. Here we present the first comprehensive investigation of all common target alleles across the HTT gene, using 738 reference haplotypes from the 1000 Genomes Project and 2364 haplotypes from HD patients and relatives in Canada, Sweden, France, and Italy. The most common HD haplotypes (A1, A2, and A3a) define mutually exclusive sets of polymorphisms for allele-specific therapy in the greatest number of patients. Across all four populations, a maximum of 80% are treatable using these three target haplotypes. We identify a novel deletion found exclusively on the A1 haplotype, enabling potent and selective silencing of mutant HTT in approximately 40% of the patients. Antisense oligonucleotides complementary to the deletion reduce mutant A1 HTT mRNA by 78% in patient cells while sparing wild-type HTT expression. By suppressing specific haplotypes on which expanded CAG occurs, we demonstrate a rational approach to the development of allele-specific therapy for a monogenic disorder. PMID:26201449

  7. P2X receptors in the cardiovascular system and their potential as therapeutic targets in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralevic, Vera

    2015-01-01

    This review considers the expression and roles of P2X receptors in the cardiovascular system in health and disease and their potential as therapeutic targets. P2X receptors are ligand gated ion channels which are activated by the endogenous ligand ATP. They are formed from the assembly of three P2X subunit proteins from the complement of seven (P2X1-7), which can associate to form homomeric or heteromeric P2X receptors. The P2X1 receptor is widely expressed in the cardiovascular system, being located in the heart, in the smooth muscle of the majority of blood vessels and in platelets. P2X1 receptors expressed in blood vessels can be activated by ATP coreleased with noradrenaline as a sympathetic neurotransmitter, leading to smooth muscle depolarisation and contraction. There is evidence that the purinergic component of sympathetic neurotransmission is increased in hypertension, identifying P2X1 receptors as a possible therapeutic target in this disorder. P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptors are expressed on cardiac sympathetic neurones and may, through positive feedback of neuronal ATP at this prejunctional site, amplify sympathetic neurotransmission. Activation of P2X receptors expressed in the heart increases cardiac myocyte contractility, and an important role of the P2X4 receptor in this has been identified. Deletion of P2X4 receptors in the heart depresses contractile performance in models of heart failure, while overexpression of P2X4 receptors has been shown to be cardioprotective, thus P2X4 receptors may be therapeutic targets in the treatment of heart disease. P2X receptors have been identified on endothelial cells. Although immunoreactivity for all P2X1-7 receptor proteins has been shown on the endothelium, relatively little is known about their function, with the exception of the endothelial P2X4 receptor, which has been shown to mediate endothelium-dependent vasodilatation to ATP released during shear stress. The potential of P2X receptors as therapeutic targets

  8. Differential Expression of FosB Proteins and Potential Target Genes in Select Brain Regions of Addiction and Depression Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A Gajewski

    Full Text Available Chronic exposure to stress or drugs of abuse has been linked to altered gene expression throughout the body, and changes in gene expression in discrete brain regions are thought to underlie many psychiatric diseases, including major depressive disorder and drug addiction. Preclinical models of these disorders have provided evidence for mechanisms of this altered gene expression, including transcription factors, but evidence supporting a role for these factors in human patients has been slow to emerge. The transcription factor ΔFosB is induced in the prefrontal cortex (PFC and hippocampus (HPC of rodents in response to stress or cocaine, and its expression in these regions is thought to regulate their "top down" control of reward circuitry, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc. Here, we use biochemistry to examine the expression of the FosB family of transcription factors and their potential gene targets in PFC and HPC postmortem samples from depressed patients and cocaine addicts. We demonstrate that ΔFosB and other FosB isoforms are downregulated in the HPC but not the PFC in the brains of both depressed and addicted individuals. Further, we show that potential ΔFosB transcriptional targets, including GluA2, are also downregulated in the HPC but not PFC of cocaine addicts. Thus, we provide the first evidence of FosB gene expression in human HPC and PFC in these psychiatric disorders, and in light of recent findings demonstrating the critical role of HPC ΔFosB in rodent models of learning and memory, these data suggest that reduced ΔFosB in HPC could potentially underlie cognitive deficits accompanying chronic cocaine abuse or depression.

  9. Conical targets and pinch confinement for inertial fusion: Opacity calculations of plasmas by using parametric potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velarde, P.M.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Eliezer, S.; Piera, M.; Chacon, L. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fusion Nuclear

    1996-12-31

    Conical microducts and minithrottles can be used to accelerate micropellets of fusionable fuel up to very high speeds ({approx}10{sup 8} cm/s). The central collision of two pellets flying in opposite directions can produce a hot plasma where fusion reactions are triggered. The main drawback of this scheme is the short confinement time provided by the external guide tube (throttle). To obtain high yield, an extra force of confinement is advisable. In this paper, the performance of fuel implosions within conical targets and the effect of ultrashort magnetic fields and pinch forces are analyzed. Although very high currents are needed to stretch the confinement time, modern technologies based on pulse-power machines and fast discharges induced by ultrashort lasers can provide a solution to this problem. (Author).

  10. Fatty acid amide hydrolase: a potential target for next generation therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarrone, Mauro

    2006-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are amides, esters and ethers of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which act as new lipid mediators. Anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamine; AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol are the main endogenous agonists of cannabinoid receptors, able to mimic several pharmacological effects of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, the active principle of Cannabis sativa preparations like hashish and marijuana. The activity of AEA at its receptors is limited by cellular uptake through a specific membrane transporter, followed by intracellular degradation by a fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Growing evidence demonstrates that FAAH is the critical regulator of the endogenous levels of AEA, suggesting that it may serve as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of human disorders. In particular, FAAH inhibitors may be next generation therapeutic drugs of potential value for the treatment of pathologies in the central nervous system and in the periphery. Here, the potential applications of these inhibitors for human disease will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the properties of hydro(pero)xy-anandamides. In fact, these oxygenated derivatives of AEA are the most powerful inhibitors of FAAH of natural origin as yet discovered. In addition, new insights into the promoter region of FAAH gene will be presented, and the therapeutic potential of mimetics of transcription factors of this gene in the management of human infertility will be discussed.

  11. Myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1): a potential therapeutic target for cancer and PNKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junxia; Zhao, Wuli; Liu, Hong; He, Hongwei; Shao, Rongguang

    2017-11-15

    Human myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1) is a functional gene also known as paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD). It is localised on human chromosome 2q35 and three different isomers, MR-1L, MR-1M and MR-1S, are formed by alternative splicing. MR-1S promotes cardiac hypertrophy and is closely related to cancer. MR-1S is overexpressed in haematologic and solid malignancies, such as hepatoma, breast cancer and chronic myelogenous leukaemia. MR-1S causes disordered cell differentiation, initiates malignant transformation and accelerates metastasis. MR-1S directly phosphorylates and activates the MEK-ERK-RSK pathway to accelerate cancer growth and facilitates metastasis by activating the MLC2-FAK-AKT pathway. Silencing MR-1 inhibits cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. MR-1S causes disordered cell differentiation, initiates malignant transformation and accelerates metastasis. MR-1 interacts with eukaryotic translation initiation factors and MRIP-1, which contains Ras GTPase, PH and zinc-containing ArfGap domains, as well as three ankyrin repeats. Mutations in the N-terminal region of MR-1L and MR-1S are the main causes of PNKD (a hereditary disease characterised by paroxysmal dystonic choreoathetosis) and targeting the mutated protein could provide symptomatic relief. These findings provide compelling evidence that MR-1 might be a diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for solid tumours, myelogenous leukaemia and PNKD.

  12. Candida and candidiasis: the cell wall as a potential molecular target for antifungal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozalbo, Daniel; Roig, Patricia; Villamón, Eva; Gil, María Luisa

    2004-06-01

    The fungal species Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen, which causes serious infections in humans, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Depending on the underlying host defect, C. albicans causes a variety of infections, ranging from superficial mucocutaneous candidiasis to life-threatening disseminated infections. Both the limited spectrum of antifungal drugs currently in clinical use and the emergence of resistances make necessary the development of new effective antifungal drugs with minimal side effects; however, such a research is limited by the small number of specific target sites identified to date. The cell wall is a fungal specific dynamic structure essential to almost every aspect of the biology and pathogenicity of C. albicans. Its structure confers physical protection and shape to fungal cells, and as the most external part of the fungus, the cell wall mediates the interaction with the host, including adhesion to host tissues and modulation of the host anti-Candida immune response. Consequently, the fungal cell wall can be considered as a suitable target for development of new antifungal compounds. Therefore two distinct types of potential cell wall-related targets can be envisaged, according to their mode of action in inhibiting infection: (i) inhibition of cell wall biogenesis, which may impair cell wall integrity and thus cell viability, and (ii) modification of host-fungus interactions by inhibiting or blocking putative virulence factors, which may impair host colonization and progress of the infectious process. Antibodies specific to cell wall antigens may protect against infection by a variety of mechanisms and may evolve into save antifungal agents.

  13. CCL5 neutralization restricts cancer growth and potentiates the targeting of PDGFRβ in colorectal carcinoma.

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    Béatrice Cambien

    Full Text Available Increased CCL5 levels are markers of an unfavourable outcome in patients with melanoma, breast, cervical, prostate, gastric or pancreatic cancer. Here, we have assessed the role played by CCL5/CCR5 interactions in the development of colon cancer. To do so, we have examined a number of human colorectal carcinoma clinical specimens and found CCL5 and its receptors over-expressed within primary as well as liver and pulmonary metastases of patients compared to healthy tissues. In vitro, CCL5 increased the growth and migratory responses of colon cancer cells from both human and mouse origins. In addition, systemic treatment of mice with CCL5-directed antibodies reduced the extent of development of subcutaneous colon tumors, of liver metastases and of peritoneal carcinosis. Consistently, we found increased numbers of CD45-immunoreactive cells within the stroma of the remaining lesions as well as at the interface with the healthy tissue. In contrast, selective targeting of CCR5 through administration of TAK-779, a CCR5 antagonist, only partially compromised colon cancer progression. Furthermore, CCL5 neutralization rendered the tumors more sensitive to a PDGFRβ-directed strategy in mice, this combination regimen offering the greatest protection against liver metastases and suppressing macroscopic peritoneal carcinosis. Collectively, our data demonstrate the involvement of CCL5 in the pathogenesis of colorectal carcinoma and point to its potential value as a therapeutic target.

  14. Fusogenic potential of sperm membrane lipids: nature's wisdom to accomplish targeted gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Shaikh Muhammad; Hasan, Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Nadeem; Khan, Umber; Owais, Mohammad

    2006-04-17

    The membrane-membrane fusion during fertilization of oocyte by spermatozoa is believed to be mainly mediated by so called "fusion proteins". In the present study we have tried to demonstrate that beside the proteins, lipid components of membrane may play an important role in fusion of oocyte with spermatozoa. Conventional membrane-membrane fusion assays were used as means to demonstrate fusogenic potential of human sperm membrane lipids. The liposomes (spermatosomes) made of the lipids isolated from sperm membrane were found to undergo strong membrane-membrane fusion as evident from fluorescence dequenching and resonance energy transfer assays. Furthermore, the fusion of these liposomes with living cells (J774 A.1 macrophage cell line) was demonstrated to result in an effective transfer of a water-soluble fluorescent probe (calcein) to cytosol of the target cell. Lastly, the liposomes were demonstrated to behave like efficient vehicles for the in vivo cytosolic delivery of the antigens to target cells resulting in elicitation of antigen specific CD8(+) T cell responses.

  15. Rho-Kinase/ROCK as a Potential Drug Target for Vitreoretinal Diseases

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    Muneo Yamaguchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rho-associated kinase (Rho-kinase/ROCK was originally identified as an effector protein of the G protein Rho. Its involvement in various diseases, particularly cancer and cardiovascular disease, has been elucidated, and ROCK inhibitors have already been applied clinically for cerebral vasospasm and glaucoma. Vitreoretinal diseases including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and proliferative vitreoretinoapthy are still a major cause of blindness. While anti-VEGF therapy has recently been widely used for vitreoretinal disorders due to its efficacy, attention has been drawn to new unmet needs. The importance of ROCK in pathological vitreoretinal conditions has also been elucidated and is attracting attention as a potential therapeutic target. ROCK is involved in angiogenesis and hyperpermeability and also in the pathogenesis of various pathologies such as inflammation and fibrosis. It has been expected that ROCK inhibitors will become new molecular target drugs for vitreoretinal diseases. This review summarizes the recent progress on the mechanisms of action of ROCK and their applications in disease treatment.

  16. Th17 Cells as Potential Probiotic Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owaga, Eddy; Hsieh, Rong-Hong; Mugendi, Beatrice; Masuku, Sakhile; Shih, Chun-Kuang; Chang, Jung-Su

    2015-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterized by wasting and chronic intestinal inflammation triggered by various cytokine-mediated pathways. In recent years, it was shown that T helper 17 (Th17) cells are involved in the pathogenesis of IBD, which makes them an attractive therapeutic target. Th17 cells preferentially produce interleukin (IL)-17A-F as signature cytokines. The role of the interplay between host genetics and intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of IBD was demonstrated. Probiotics are live microorganisms that when orally ingested in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the host by modulating the enteric flora or by stimulating the local immune system. Several studies indicated the effectiveness of probiotics in preventing and treating IBD (ulcerative colitis, and Crohn's disease). Furthermore, there is mounting evidence of probiotics selectively targeting the Th17 lineage in the prevention and management of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases such as IBD. This review highlights critical roles of Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of IBD and the rationale for using probiotics as a novel therapeutic approach for IBD through manipulation of Th17 cells. The potential molecular mechanisms by which probiotics modulate Th17 cells differentiation and production are also discussed.

  17. TRESK channel as a potential target to treat T-cell mediated immune dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jaehee [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dawon, E-mail: dawon@gnu.ac.kr [Medical Research Center for Neural Dysfunction, Department of Physiology, Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-25

    In this review, we propose that TRESK background K{sup +} channel could serve as a potential therapeutic target for T-cell mediated immune dysfunction. TRESK has many immune function-related properties. TRESK is abundantly expressed in the thymus, the spleen, and human leukemic T-lymphocytes. TRESK is highly activated by Ca{sup 2+}, calcineurin, acetylcholine, and histamine which induce hypertrophy, whereas TRESK is inhibited by immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin A and FK506. Cyclosporine A and FK506 target the binding site of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to inhibit calcineurin. Interestingly, TRESK possesses an NFAT-like docking site that is present at its intracellular loop. Calcineurin has been found to interact with TRESK via specific NFAT-like docking site. When the T-cell is activated, calcineurin can bind to the NFAT-docking site of TRESK. The activation of both TRESK and NFAT via Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT/TRESK pathway could modulate the transcription of new genes in addition to regulating several aspects of T-cell function.

  18. Tumor subtype-specific cancer-testis antigens as potential biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets for cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Caballero, Otavia L; Yung, W K Alfred; Weinstein, John N; Riggins, Gregory J; Strausberg, Robert L; Zhao, Qi

    2014-04-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens are potential targets for cancer immunotherapy because of their restricted expression in immune-privileged germ cells and various malignancies. Current application of CT-based immunotherapy has been focused on CT expression-rich tumors such as melanoma and lung cancers. In this study, we surveyed CT expression using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) datasets for ten common cancer types. We show that CT expression is specific and enriched within certain cancer molecular subtypes. For example, HORMAD1, CXorf61, ACTL8, and PRAME are highly enriched in the basal subtype of breast cancer; MAGE and CSAG are most frequently activated in the magnoid subtype of lung adenocarcinoma; and PRAME is highly upregulated in the ccB subtype of clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Analysis of CT gene expression and DNA methylation indicates that some CTs are regulated epigenetically, whereas others are controlled primarily by tissue- and subtype-specific transcription factors. Our results suggest that although for some CT expression is associated with patient outcome, not many are independent prognostic markers. Thus, CTs with shared expression pattern are heterogeneous molecules with distinct activation modes and functional properties in different cancers and cancer subtypes. These data suggest a cancer subtype-orientated application of CT antigen as biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets.

  19. Pan-Nematoda Transcriptomic Elucidation of Essential Intestinal Functions and Therapeutic Targets With Broad Potential

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    Qi Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The nematode intestine is continuous with the outside environment, making it easily accessible to anthelmintics for parasite control, but the development of new therapeutics is impeded by limited knowledge of nematode intestinal cell biology. We established the most comprehensive nematode intestinal functional database to date by generating transcriptional data from the dissected intestines of three parasitic nematodes spanning the phylum, and integrating the results with the whole proteomes of 10 nematodes (including 9 pathogens of humans or animals and 3 host species and 2 outgroup species. We resolved 10,772 predicted nematode intestinal protein families (IntFams, and studied their presence and absence within the different lineages (births and deaths among nematodes. Conserved intestinal cell functions representing ancestral functions of evolutionary importance were delineated, and molecular features useful for selective therapeutic targeting were identified. Molecular patterns conserved among IntFam proteins demonstrated large potential as therapeutic targets to inhibit intestinal cell functions with broad applications towards treatment and control of parasitic nematodes.

  20. Pan-Nematoda Transcriptomic Elucidation of Essential Intestinal Functions and Therapeutic Targets With Broad Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Rosa, Bruce A; Jasmer, Douglas P; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-09-01

    The nematode intestine is continuous with the outside environment, making it easily accessible to anthelmintics for parasite control, but the development of new therapeutics is impeded by limited knowledge of nematode intestinal cell biology. We established the most comprehensive nematode intestinal functional database to date by generating transcriptional data from the dissected intestines of three parasitic nematodes spanning the phylum, and integrating the results with the whole proteomes of 10 nematodes (including 9 pathogens of humans or animals) and 3 host species and 2 outgroup species. We resolved 10,772 predicted nematode intestinal protein families (IntFams), and studied their presence and absence within the different lineages (births and deaths) among nematodes. Conserved intestinal cell functions representing ancestral functions of evolutionary importance were delineated, and molecular features useful for selective therapeutic targeting were identified. Molecular patterns conserved among IntFam proteins demonstrated large potential as therapeutic targets to inhibit intestinal cell functions with broad applications towards treatment and control of parasitic nematodes.

  1. A comparative chemogenomics strategy to predict potential drug targets in the metazoan pathogen, Schistosoma mansoni.

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    Conor R Caffrey

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a prevalent and chronic helmintic disease in tropical regions. Treatment and control relies on chemotherapy with just one drug, praziquantel and this reliance is of concern should clinically relevant drug resistance emerge and spread. Therefore, to identify potential target proteins for new avenues of drug discovery we have taken a comparative chemogenomics approach utilizing the putative proteome of Schistosoma mansoni compared to the proteomes of two model organisms, the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans and the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster. Using the genome comparison software Genlight, two separate in silico workflows were implemented to derive a set of parasite proteins for which gene disruption of the orthologs in both the model organisms yielded deleterious phenotypes (e.g., lethal, impairment of motility, i.e., are essential genes/proteins. Of the 67 and 68 sequences generated for each workflow, 63 were identical in both sets, leading to a final set of 72 parasite proteins. All but one of these were expressed in the relevant developmental stages of the parasite infecting humans. Subsequent in depth manual curation of the combined workflow output revealed 57 candidate proteins. Scrutiny of these for 'druggable' protein homologs in the literature identified 35 S. mansoni sequences, 18 of which were homologous to proteins with 3D structures including co-crystallized ligands that will allow further structure-based drug design studies. The comparative chemogenomics strategy presented generates a tractable set of S. mansoni proteins for experimental validation as drug targets against this insidious human pathogen.

  2. The centrosome protein NEDD1 as a potential pharmacological target to induce cell cycle arrest

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    Etievant Chantal

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NEDD1 is a protein that binds to the gamma-tubulin ring complex, a multiprotein complex at the centrosome and at the mitotic spindle that mediates the nucleation of microtubules. Results We show that NEDD1 is expressed at comparable levels in a variety of tumor-derived cell lines and untransformed cells. We demonstrate that silencing of NEDD1 expression by treatment with siRNA has differential effects on cells, depending on their status of p53 expression: p53-positive cells arrest in G1, whereas p53-negative cells arrest in mitosis with predominantly aberrant monopolar spindles. However, both p53-positive and -negative cells arrest in mitosis if treated with low doses of siRNA against NEDD1 combined with low doses of the inhibitor BI2536 against the mitotic kinase Plk1. Simultaneous reduction of NEDD1 levels and inhibition of Plk1 act in a synergistic manner, by potentiating the anti-mitotic activity of each treatment. Conclusion We propose that NEDD1 may be a promising target for controlling cell proliferation, in particular if targeted in combination with Plk1 inhibitors.

  3. The sweet trap in tumors: aerobic glycolysis and potential targets for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li; Chen, Xun; Wang, Liantang; Chen, Shangwu

    2016-06-21

    Metabolic change is one of the hallmarks of tumor, which has recently attracted a great of attention. One of main metabolic characteristics of tumor cells is the high level of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen, known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect. The energy production is much less in glycolysis pathway than that in tricarboxylic acid cycle. The molecular mechanism of a high glycolytic flux in tumor cells remains unclear. A large amount of intermediates derived from glycolytic pathway could meet the biosynthetic requirements of the proliferating cells. Hypoxia-induced HIF-1α, PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway, and many other factors, such as oncogene activation and tumor suppressor inactivation, drive cancer cells to favor glycolysis over mitochondrial oxidation. Several small molecules targeting glycolytic pathway exhibit promising anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we will focus on the latest progress in the regulation of aerobic glycolysis and discuss the potential targets for the tumor therapy.

  4. Cytokines and cytokine networks target neurons to modulate long-term potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, G Aleph; Cotman, Carl W

    2017-04-01

    Cytokines play crucial roles in the communication between brain cells including neurons and glia, as well as in the brain-periphery interactions. In the brain, cytokines modulate long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular correlate of memory. Whether cytokines regulate LTP by direct effects on neurons or by indirect mechanisms mediated by non-neuronal cells is poorly understood. Elucidating neuron-specific effects of cytokines has been challenging because most brain cells express cytokine receptors. Moreover, cytokines commonly increase the expression of multiple cytokines in their target cells, thus increasing the complexity of brain cytokine networks even after single-cytokine challenges. Here, we review evidence on both direct and indirect-mediated modulation of LTP by cytokines. We also describe novel approaches based on neuron- and synaptosome-enriched systems to identify cytokines able to directly modulate LTP, by targeting neurons and synapses. These approaches can test multiple samples in parallel, thus allowing the study of multiple cytokines simultaneously. Hence, a cytokine networks perspective coupled with neuron-specific analysis may contribute to delineation of maps of the modulation of LTP by cytokines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis of raloxifene-chitosan conjugate: A novel chitosan derivative as a potential targeting vehicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, Fatemeh Yazdi; Mohammadi, Zohreh; Yousefi, Maryam; Majdejabbari, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan is a biocompatible, non-toxic and biodegradable biopolymer. Due to the presence of functional groups on its surface, it can be modified and used as a carrier in targeted drug/gene delivery systems. In this study, raloxifene (a selective estrogen receptor ligand) was conjugated to chitosan using different methods. The conjugates were investigated by means of FTIR, TGA and physical properties assessments. Cell viability was evaluated by XTT assay. FTIR and TGA results confirmed that the conjugation between chitosan and raloxifene occurred more efficiently when trimethyl chitosan in the presence of triethylamine and excess amount of linker was used. XTT assay on MCF-7 cell line illustrated that more than 80% of cells were viable after 24h exposure to selected molecules. These findings confirm that the conjugation of raloxifene-chitosan can occur successfully using special synthesis condition and this novel chitosan derivative can be introduced as a potential drug/gene targeting agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The NR4A nuclear receptors as potential targets for anti-aging interventions.

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    Paillasse, Michael R; de Medina, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    The development of innovative anti-aging strategy is urgently needed to promote healthy aging and overcome the occurrence of age-related diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Genomic instability, deregulated nutrient sensing and mitochondrial dysfunction are established hallmark of aging. Interestingly, the orphan nuclear receptors NR4A subfamily (NR4A1, NR4A2 and NR4A3) are nutrient sensors that trigger mitochondria biogenesis and improve intrinsic mitochondrial function. In addition, NR4A receptors are components of DNA repair machinery and promote DNA repair. Members of the NR4A subfamily should also be involved in anti-aging properties of hormesis since these receptors are induced by various form of cellular stress and stimulate protective cells response such as anti-oxidative activity and DNA repair. Previous studies reported that NR4A nuclear receptors subfamily is potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of age related disorders (e.g. metabolic syndromes, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases). Consequently, we propose that targeting NR4A receptors might constitute a new approach to delay aging and the onset of diseases affecting our aging population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Protection of Coronary Endothelial Function during Cardiac Surgery: Potential of Targeting Endothelial Ion Channels in Cardioprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelium plays a critical role in the control of blood flow by producing vasoactive factors to regulate vascular tone. Ion channels, in particular, K+ channels and Ca2+-permeable channels in endothelial cells, are essential to the production and function of endothelium-derived vasoactive factors. Impairment of coronary endothelial function occurs in open heart surgery that may result in reduction of coronary blood flow and thus in an inadequate myocardial perfusion. Hyperkalemic exposure and concurrent ischemia-reperfusion during cardioplegic intervention compromise NO and EDHF-mediated function and the impairment involves alterations of K+ channels, that is, KATP and KCa, and Ca2+-permeable TRP channels in endothelial cells. Pharmacological modulation of these channels during ischemia-reperfusion and hyperkalemic exposure show promising results on the preservation of NO and EDHF-mediated endothelial function, which suggests the potential of targeting endothelial K+ and TRP channels for myocardial protection during cardiac surgery.

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi P21: a potential novel target for chagasic cardiomyopathy therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Thaise Lara; Machado, Fabrício Castro; Alves da Silva, Aline; Teixeira, Samuel Cota; Borges, Bruna Cristina; dos Santos, Marlus Alves; Martins, Flávia Alves; Brígido, Paula Cristina; Rodrigues, Adele Aud; Notário, Ana Flávia Oliveira; Ferreira, Bruno Antônio; Servato, João Paulo Silva; Deconte, Simone Ramos; Lopes, Daiana Silva; Ávila, Veridiana Melo Rodrigues; Araújo, Fernanda de Assis; Tomiosso, Tatiana Carla; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; da Silva, Claudio Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, which is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America. It is estimated that 10%–30% of all infected individuals will acquire chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). The etiology of CCC is multifactorial and involves parasite genotype, host genetic polymorphisms, immune response, signaling pathways and autoimmune progression. Herein we verified the impact of the recombinant form of P21 (rP21), a secreted T. cruzi protein involved in host cell invasion, on progression of inflammatory process in a polyester sponge-induced inflammation model. Results indicated that rP21 can recruit immune cells induce myeloperoxidase and IL-4 production and decrease blood vessels formation compared to controls in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, T. cruzi P21 may be a potential target for the development of P21 antagonist compounds to treat chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26574156

  9. Molecular Targets Related to Inflammation and Insulin Resistance and Potential Interventions

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    Sandro M. Hirabara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and insulin resistance are common in several chronic diseases, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. Various studies show a relationship between these two factors, although the mechanisms involved are not completely understood yet. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of insulin resistance and inflammation and the molecular aspects on inflammatory pathways interfering in insulin action. Moreover, we explore interventions based on molecular targets for preventing or treating correlated disorders, advances for a better characterization, and understanding of the mechanisms and mediators involved in the different inflammatory and insulin resistance conditions. Finally, we address biotechnological studies for the development of new potential therapies and interventions.

  10. Naringenin and quercetin--potential anti-HCV agents for NS2 protease targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulu, S Sajitha; Thabitha, A; Vino, S; Priya, A Mohana; Rout, Madhusmita

    2016-01-01

    Nonstructural proteins of hepatitis C virus had drawn much attention for the scientific fraternity in drug discovery due to its important role in the disease. 3D structure of the protein was predicted using molecular modelling protocol. Docking studies of 10 medicinal plant compounds and three drugs available in the market (control) with NS2 protease were employed by using rigid docking approach of AutoDock 4.2. Among the molecules tested for docking study, naringenin and quercetin revealed minimum binding energy of - 7.97 and - 7.95 kcal/mol with NS2 protease. All the ligands were docked deeply within the binding pocket region of the protein. The docking study results showed that these compounds are potential inhibitors of the target; and also all these docked compounds have good inhibition constant, vdW+Hbond+desolv energy with best RMSD value.

  11. Pathophysiology of cardiorenal syndrome in patients with heart failure: potential therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahama, Hiroyuki; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2017-10-01

    Despite the development of pharmacological inventions and new nonpharmacological techniques to prevent and treat heart failure (HF), the mortality rate in patients with symptomatic HF remains high. To conquer these difficulties, the pathophysiology of HF should be considered within a wide range of views. Given the diverse mechanisms of HF pathophysiology, renal and cardiac functions have close and complementary interconnections. Recent studies have suggested that communication between the kidney and heart through bidirectional pathways causes significant pathological changes. This review summarizes the pathophysiology of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) from three different viewpoints, namely, underlying chronic kidney disease, worsening renal function during hospitalization due to HF, and resistance to diuretics. We also summarize the presently available data on the pathophysiology of CRS, identify the challenges associated with some clinical approaches, and explore the potential therapeutic target for CRS. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Nitric oxide signaling in human ovarian cancer: A potential therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sehemy, Ahmed; Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Fu, YangXin

    2016-04-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death due to gynecologic malignancies worldwide. Current therapy regimens are ineffective to treat advanced ovarian cancers, presenting a need to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional gaseous molecule that is generated by cancer, stromal and endothelial cells and plays a multifaceted role in cancer biology through multiple mechanisms. Accumulating evidence suggests that NO signaling is involved in multiple aspects of ovarian cancer, including growth, apoptosis, cancer-stromal cell interaction, angiogenesis and response to chemotherapy. This review will discuss the experimental and clinical evidence of the involvement of NO signaling in ovarian cancer and the therapeutic potential of targeting NO signaling in ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. RORα, a Potential Tumor Suppressor and Therapeutic Target of Breast Cancer

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    Jun Du

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The function of the nuclear receptor (NR in breast cancer progression has been investigated for decades. The majority of the nuclear receptors have well characterized natural ligands, but a few of them are orphan receptors for which no ligand has been identified. RORα, one member of the retinoid orphan nuclear receptor (ROR subfamily of orphan receptors, regulates various cellular and pathological activities. RORα is commonly down-regulated and/or hypoactivated in breast cancer compared to normal mammary tissue. Expression of RORα suppresses malignant phenotypes in breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Activity of RORα can be categorized into the canonical and non-canonical nuclear receptor pathways, which in turn regulate various breast cancer cellular function, including cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion. This information suggests that RORα is a potent tumor suppressor and a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer.

  14. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels as Potential Therapeutic Targets in Neurodegeneration and Neuroinflammation

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    Audrey Ortega-Ramírez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs are a family of proton-sensing channels that are voltage insensitive, cation selective (mostly permeable to Na+, and nonspecifically blocked by amiloride. Derived from 5 genes (ACCN1–5, 7 subunits have been identified, 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3, 4, and 5, that are widely expressed in the peripheral and central nervous system as well as other tissues. Over the years, different studies have shown that activation of these channels is linked to various physiological and pathological processes, such as memory, learning, fear, anxiety, ischemia, and multiple sclerosis to name a few, so their potential as therapeutic targets is increasing. This review focuses on recent advances that have helped us to better understand the role played by ASICs in different pathologies related to neurodegenerative diseases, inflammatory processes, and pain.

  15. Molecular Targets Related to Inflammation and Insulin Resistance and Potential Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabara, Sandro M.; Gorjão, Renata; Vinolo, Marco A.; Rodrigues, Alice C.; Nachbar, Renato T.; Curi, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation and insulin resistance are common in several chronic diseases, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. Various studies show a relationship between these two factors, although the mechanisms involved are not completely understood yet. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of insulin resistance and inflammation and the molecular aspects on inflammatory pathways interfering in insulin action. Moreover, we explore interventions based on molecular targets for preventing or treating correlated disorders, advances for a better characterization, and understanding of the mechanisms and mediators involved in the different inflammatory and insulin resistance conditions. Finally, we address biotechnological studies for the development of new potential therapies and interventions. PMID:23049242

  16. Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan 4 and Its Potential As an Antibody Immunotherapy Target across Different Tumor Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Ilieva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4 has been associated with the pathology of multiple types of such as melanoma, breast cancer, squamous cell carcinoma, mesothelioma, neuroblastoma, adult and pediatric sarcomas, and some hematological cancers. CSPG4 has been reported to exhibit a role in the growth and survival as well as in the spreading and metastasis of tumor cells. CSPG4 is overexpressed in several malignant diseases, while it is thought to have restricted and low expression in normal tissues. Thus, CSPG4 has become the target of numerous anticancer treatment approaches, including monoclonal antibody-based therapies. This study reviews key potential anti-CSPG4 antibody and immune-based therapies and examines their direct antiproliferative/metastatic and immune activating mechanisms of action.

  17. mTOR, a Potential Target to Treat Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator in various cellular processes, including cell growth, gene expression, and synaptic functions. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is frequently accompanied by monogenic disorders, such as tuberous sclerosis complex, phosphatase and tensin homolog tumor hamartoma syndrome, neurofibromatosis 1, and fragile X syndrome, in which mTOR is hyperactive. Mutations in the genes involved in the mTOR-mediated signaling pathway have been identified in some cases of syndromic ASD. Evidences indicate a pathogenic role for hyperactive mTOR-mediated signaling in ASD associated with these monogenic disorders, and mTOR inhibitors are a potential pharmacotherapy for ASD. Abnormal synaptic transmission through metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 may underlie in a part of ASD associated with hyperactive mTOR-mediated signaling. In this review, the relationship between mTOR and ASD is discussed.

  18. Connexin: a potential novel target for protecting the central nervous system?

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    Hong-yan Xie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Connexin subunits are proteins that form gap junction channels, and play an important role in communication between adjacent cells. This review article discusses the function of connexins/hemichannels/gap junctions under physiological conditions, and summarizes the findings regarding the role of connexins/hemichannels/gap junctions in the physiological and pathological mechanisms underlying central nervous system diseases such as brain ischemia, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, epilepsy, brain and spinal cord tumor, migraine, neuroautoimmune disease, Alzheimer′s disease, Parkinson′s disease, X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease, spastic paraplegia and maxillofacial dysplasia. Connexins are considered to be a potential novel target for protecting the central nervous system.

  19. Identification of chemokines associated with the recruitment of decidual leukocytes in human labour: potential novel targets for preterm labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Sarah A; Tower, Clare L; Jones, Rebecca L

    2013-01-01

    study provides compelling evidence that chemokines regulate decidual leukocyte recruitment during labour. The 6 chemokines identified represent potential novel therapeutic targets to block PTL.

  20. Large-scale identification of potential drug targets based on the topological features of human protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhan-Chao; Zhong, Wen-Qian; Liu, Zhi-Qing; Huang, Meng-Hua; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiao-Yong

    2015-04-29

    Identifying potential drug target proteins is a crucial step in the process of drug discovery and plays a key role in the study of the molecular mechanisms of disease. Based on the fact that the majority of proteins exert their functions through interacting with each other, we propose a method to recognize target proteins by using the human protein-protein interaction network and graph theory. In the network, vertexes and edges are weighted by using the confidence scores of interactions and descriptors of protein primary structure, respectively. The novel network topological features are defined and employed to characterize protein using existing databases. A widely used minimum redundancy maximum relevance and random forests algorithm are utilized to select the optimal feature subset and construct model for the identification of potential drug target proteins at the proteome scale. The accuracies of training set and test set are 89.55% and 85.23%. Using the constructed model, 2127 potential drug target proteins have been recognized and 156 drug target proteins have been validated in the database of drug target. In addition, some new drug target proteins can be considered as targets for treating diseases of mucopolysaccharidosis, non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and pseudo-von Willebrand, etc. It is anticipated that the proposed method may became a powerful high-throughput virtual screening tool of drug target. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Activation of AKT by hypoxia: a potential target for hypoxic tumors of the head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stegeman Hanneke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only a minority of cancer patients benefits from the combination of EGFR-inhibition and radiotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC. A potential resistance mechanism is activation of EGFR and/or downstream pathways by stimuli in the microenvironment. The aim of this study was to find molecular targets induced by the microenvironment by determining the in vitro and in vivo expression of proteins of the EGFR-signaling network in 6 HNSCC lines. As hypoxia is an important microenvironmental parameter associated with poor outcome in solid tumors after radiotherapy, we investigated the relationship with hypoxia in vitro and in vivo. Methods Six human HNSCC cell lines were both cultured as cell lines (in vitro and grown as xenograft tumors (in vivo. Expression levels were determined via western blot analysis and localization of markers was assessed via immunofluorescent staining. To determine the effect of hypoxia and pAKT-inhibition on cell survival, cells were incubated at 0.5% O2 and treated with MK-2206. Results We observed strong in vitro-in vivo correlations for EGFR, pEGFR and HER2 (rs=0.77, p=0.10, rs=0.89, p=0.03 and rs=0.93, p=0.02, respectively, but not for pAKT, pERK1/2 or pSTAT3 (all rs0.30. In vivo, pAKT expression was present in hypoxic cells and pAKT and hypoxia were significantly correlated (rs=0.51, p=0.04. We confirmed in vitro that hypoxia induces activation of AKT. Further, pAKT-inhibition via MK-2206 caused a significant decrease in survival in hypoxic cells (p Conclusions These data suggest that (pEGFR and HER2 expression is mostly determined by intrinsic features of the tumor cell, while the activation of downstream kinases is highly influenced by the tumor microenvironment. We show that hypoxia induces activation of AKT both in vitro and in vivo, and that hypoxic cells can be specifically targeted by pAKT-inhibition. Targeting pAKT is thus a potential way to overcome therapy resistance

  2. Potential for Hybrid Poplar Riparian Buffers to Provide Ecosystem Services in Three Watersheds with Contrasting Agricultural Land Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Fortier

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In temperate agricultural watersheds, the rehabilitation of tree vegetation in degraded riparian zones can provide many ecosystem services. This study evaluated ecosystem service provision potential following the conversion of non-managed herbaceous buffers to hybrid poplar (Populus spp. buffers in three watersheds (555–771 km2 of southern Québec (Canada, with contrasting agricultural land uses. To extrapolate services at the watershed level, total stream length where hybrid poplars could be established was calculated using GIS data from hydrological and land cover maps. After nine years, a 100% replacement of herbaceous buffers by hybrid poplar buffers along farm streams could lead to the production of 5280–76,151 tons of whole tree (stems + branches biomass, which could heat 0.5–6.5 ha of greenhouses for nine years, with the potential of displacing 2–29 million litres of fuel oil. Alternatively, the production of 3887–56,135 tons of stem biomass (fuelwood could heat 55–794 new farmhouses or 40–577 old farmhouses for nine years. Producing fuelwood in buffers rather than in farm woodlots could create forest conservation opportunities on 300–4553 ha. Replacing all herbaceous buffers by poplar buffers could provide potential storage of 2984–42,132 t C, 29–442 t N and 3–56 t P in plant biomass, if woody biomass is not harvested. The greatest potential for services provision was in the Pike River watershed where agriculture is the dominant land use. A review of the potential services of poplar buffers is made, and guidelines for managing services and disservices are provided.

  3. A clip-based protocol for breast boost radiotherapy provides clear target visualisation and demonstrates significant volume reduction over time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Lorraine [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Cox, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Morgia, Marita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Atyeo, John [Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Lamoury, Gillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    The clinical target volume (CTV) for early stage breast cancer is difficult to clearly identify on planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Surgical clips inserted around the tumour bed should help to identify the CTV, particularly if the seroma has been reabsorbed, and enable tracking of CTV changes over time. A surgical clip-based CTV delineation protocol was introduced. CTV visibility and its post-operative shrinkage pattern were assessed. The subjects were 27 early stage breast cancer patients receiving post-operative radiotherapy alone and 15 receiving post-operative chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. The radiotherapy alone (RT/alone) group received a CT scan at median 25 days post-operatively (CT1rt) and another at 40 Gy, median 68 days (CT2rt). The chemotherapy/RT group (chemo/RT) received a CT scan at median 18 days post-operatively (CT1ch), a planning CT scan at median 126 days (CT2ch), and another at 40 Gy (CT3ch). There was no significant difference (P = 0.08) between the initial mean CTV for each cohort. The RT/alone cohort showed significant CTV volume reduction of 38.4% (P = 0.01) at 40 Gy. The Chemo/RT cohort had significantly reduced volumes between CT1ch: median 54 cm{sup 3} (4–118) and CT2ch: median 16 cm{sup 3}, (2–99), (P = 0.01), but no significant volume reduction thereafter. Surgical clips enable localisation of the post-surgical seroma for radiotherapy targeting. Most seroma shrinkage occurs early, enabling CT treatment planning to take place at 7 weeks, which is within the 9 weeks recommended to limit disease recurrence.

  4. Identification of polycystic ovary syndrome potential drug targets based on pathobiological similarity in the protein-protein interaction network

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hao; He, Yuehan; Li, Wan; Wei, Wenqing; Li, Yiran; Xie, Ruiqiang; Guo, Shanshan; Wang, Yahui; Jiang, Jing; Chen, Binbin; Lv, Junjie; Zhang, Nana; Chen, Lina; He, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrinological disorders in reproductive aged women. PCOS and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) are closely linked in multiple levels and possess high pathobiological similarity. Here, we put forward a new computational approach based on the pathobiological similarity to identify PCOS potential drug target modules (PPDT-Modules) and PCOS potential drug targets in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN). From the systems level and biologi...

  5. EGFR as a potential target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer: dilemma and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedaeinia, Reza; Avan, Amir; Manian, Mostafa; Salehi, Rasoul; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is among the most lethal solid tumors with grim prognosis. This dismal outcome can partially be explained by the resistance to currently available chemotherapy regimens or the failure of most anticancer agents, which prompted the development of new and effective therapeutic-approaches, such as inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Some of these EGFR inhibitors (e.g., erlotinib) are approved for lungcancer, however available data are inconclusive for treatment of pancreatic cancer patients with EGFR-targeted-therapies. Here we describe the critical role of EGFR pathway in pancreatic-cancer, strategies to enhance the effectiveness of EGFRinhibitors as well as the preclinical/clinical studies with particular emphasis on recent findings with monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine-inhibitors. Several combinations of EGFR inhibitors with other agents illustrate inhibition of tumor-induced angiogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, combination of erlotinib with gemcitabine showed statistically significance in overall-survival, compared to gemcitabine-alone. However high cost, little survival gain and increased risk of toxicities have limited its efficacy. Considering the multiple genetic mutations and the crosstalk of signaling pathways, (1) development of multiple targeted-therapies; (2) identification of predictive-biomarkers; and (3) those patients who are most likely benefit from therapy, could provide valuable direction for the clinical development of EGFR inhibitors. Moreover further preclinical/clinical studies are warranted to identify determinants of the activity of EGFR-inhibitors and mechanisms leading to resistance to EGFR inhibitors, through the analysis of genetic and environmental alterations affecting EGFR and parallel pro-cancer pathways. These studies will be critical to improve the efficacy and selectivity of current anticancer strategies targeting EGFR in pancreatic cancer.

  6. Receptor tyrosine kinase (c-Kit inhibitors: a potential therapeutic target in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbaspour Babaei M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Maryam Abbaspour Babaei,1 Behnam Kamalidehghan,2,3 Mohammad Saleem,4–6 Hasniza Zaman Huri,1,7 Fatemeh Ahmadipour1 1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Department of Medical Genetics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB, Shahrak-e Pajoohesh, 3Medical Genetics Department, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 4Department of Urology, 5Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, 6Section of Molecular Therapeutics & Cancer Health Disparity, The Hormel Institute, Austin, MN, USA; 7Clinical Investigation Centre, University Malaya Medical Centre, Lembah Pantai, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Abstract: c-Kit, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is involved in intracellular signaling, and the mutated form of c-Kit plays a crucial role in occurrence of some cancers. The function of c-Kit has led to the concept that inhibiting c-Kit kinase activity can be a target for cancer therapy. The promising results of inhibition of c-Kit for treatment of cancers have been observed in some cancers such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor, acute myeloid leukemia, melanoma, and other tumors, and these results have encouraged attempts toward improvement of using c-Kit as a capable target for cancer therapy. This paper presents the findings of previous studies regarding c-Kit as a receptor tyrosine kinase and an oncogene, as well as its gene targets and signaling pathways in normal and cancer cells. The c-Kit gene location, protein structure, and the role of c-Kit in normal cell have been discussed. Comprehending the molecular mechanism underlying c-Kit-mediated tumorogenesis is consequently essential and may lead to the identification of future novel drug targets. The potential mechanisms by which c-Kit induces cellular transformation have been described. This study aims to elucidate the function of c

  7. Identification of Pathways in Liver Repair Potentially Targeted by Secretory Proteins from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Winkler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The beneficial impact of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC on both acute and chronic liver diseases has been confirmed, although the molecular mechanisms behind it remain elusive. We aim to identify factors secreted by undifferentiated and hepatocytic differentiated MSC in vitro in order to delineate liver repair pathways potentially targeted by MSC. Methods: Secreted factors were determined by protein arrays and related pathways identified by biomathematical analyses. Results: MSC from adipose tissue and bone marrow expressed a similar pattern of surface markers. After hepatocytic differentiation, CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, ICAM-1 increased and CD166 (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, ALCAM decreased. MSC secreted different factors before and after differentiation. These comprised cytokines involved in innate immunity and growth factors regulating liver regeneration. Pathway analysis revealed cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, chemokine signalling pathways, the complement and coagulation cascades as well as the Januskinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NOD-like receptor signalling pathways as relevant networks. Relationships to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α signalling seemed also relevant. Conclusion: MSC secreted proteins, which differed depending on cell source and degree of differentiation. The factors might address inflammatory and growth factor pathways as well as chemo-attraction and innate immunity. Since these are prone to dysregulation in most liver diseases, MSC release hepatotropic factors, potentially supporting liver regeneration.

  8. Application of local singularity in prospecting potential oil/gas Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyu Bao

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Together with generalized self-similarity and the fractal spectrum, local singularity analysis has been introduced as one part of the new 3S principle and technique for mineral resource assessment based on multifractal modeling, which has been demonstrated to be useful for anomaly delineation. Local singularity is used in this paper to characterize the property of multifractal distribution patterns of geochemical indexes to delineate potential areas for oil/gas exploration using the advanced GeoDAS GIS technology. Geochemical data of four oil/gas indexes, consisting of acid-extracted methane (SC1, ethane (SC2, propane (SC3, and secondary carbonate (ΔC, from 9637 soil samples amassed within a large area of 11.2×104 km2 in the Songpan-Aba district, Sichuan Province, southwestern China, were analyzed. By eliminating the interference of geochemical oil/gas data with the method of media-modification and Kriging, the prospecting area defined by the local singularity model is better identified and the results show that the subareas with higher singularity exponents for the four oil/gas indexes are potential targets for oil/gas exploration. These areas in the shape of rings or half-rings are spatially associated with the location of the known producing drilling well in this area. The spatial relationship between the anomalies delineated by oil/gas geochemical data and distribution patterns of local singularity exponents is confirmed by using the stable isotope of δ13C.

  9. Semaphorin 7A as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Franco, Ana; Eixarch, Herena; Costa, Carme; Gil, Vanessa; Castillo, Mireia; Calvo-Barreiro, Laura; Montalban, Xavier; Del Río, José A; Espejo, Carmen

    2017-08-01

    Semaphorin 7A (sema7A) is classified as an immune semaphorin with dual functions in the immune system and in the central nervous system (CNS). These molecules are of interest due to their potential role in multiple sclerosis (MS), which is a chronic demyelinating and neurodegenerative disease of autoimmune origin. In this study, we elucidated the role of sema7A in neuroinflammation using both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. In an in vitro model of neuroinflammation, using cerebellar organotypic slice cultures, we observed that challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin did not affect demyelination or cell death in sema7A-deficient cultures compared to wild-type cultures. Moreover, the in vivo outcome of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in sema7A-deficient mice was altered in an antigen- and adjuvant-dose-dependent manner, while no differences were observed in the wild-type counterparts. Altogether, these results indicate that sema7A is involved in peripheral immunity and CNS inflammation in MS pathogenesis. Indeed, these data suggest that sema7A might be a potential therapeutic target to treat MS and autoimmune conditions.

  10. CB2 cannabinoid receptor as potential target against Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester eAso

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The CB2 receptor is one of the components of the endogenous cannabinoid system, a complex network of signaling molecules and receptors involved in the homeostatic control of several physiological functions. Accumulated evidence suggests a role for CB2 receptors in Alzheimer's disease (AD and indicates their potential as a therapeutic target against this neurodegenerative disease. Levels of CB2 receptors are significantly increased in post-mortem AD brains, mainly in microglia surrounding senile plaques, and their expression levels correlate with the amounts of Aβ42 and β-amyloid plaque deposition. Moreover, several studies on animal models of AD have demonstrated that specific CB2 receptor agonists, which are devoid of psychoactive effects, reduce AD-like pathology, resulting in attenuation of the inflammation associated with the disease but also modulating Aβ and tau aberrant processing, among other effects. CB2 receptor activation also improves cognitive impairment in animal models of AD. This review discusses available data regarding the role of CB2 receptors in AD and the potential usefulness of specific agonists of these receptors against AD.

  11. Carbohydrate Microarrays Identify Blood Group Precursor Cryptic Epitopes as Potential Immunological Targets of Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Denong; Tang, Jin; Liu, Shaoyi; Huang, Jiaoti

    2015-01-01

    Using carbohydrate microarrays, we explored potential natural ligands of antitumor monoclonal antibody HAE3. This antibody was raised against a murine mammary tumor antigen but was found to cross-react with a number of human epithelial tumors in tissues. Our carbohydrate microarray analysis reveals that HAE3 is specific for an O-glycan cryptic epitope that is normally hidden in the cores of blood group substances. Using HAE3 to screen tumor cell surface markers by flow cytometry, we found that the HAE3 glycoepitope, gp(HAE3), was highly expressed by a number of human breast cancer cell lines, including some triple-negative cancers that lack the estrogen, progesterone, and Her2/neu receptors. Taken together, we demonstrate that HAE3 recognizes a conserved cryptic glycoepitope of blood group precursors, which is nevertheless selectively expressed and surface-exposed in certain breast tumor cells. The potential of this class of O-glycan cryptic antigens in breast cancer subtyping and targeted immunotherapy warrants further investigation.

  12. Surface modified fluorescent quantum dots with neurotransmitter ligands for potential targeting of cell signaling applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Alexandra A P; Saliba, Juliana B; Mansur, Herman S

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of combining nanotechnology with nanomedicine opens a broad field of research which may truly revolutionize our society. The neural system plays a crucial role in the human body, and most related diseases can dramatically change the quality of life. Thus, the present study reports a novel approach for using neurotransmitters as ligands in the synthesis of surface-modified fluorescent nanocrystals for potential use in cell labeling applications. Briefly, CdS quantum dots (QDs) were prepared using L-glutamic and L-aspartic as surface capping agents via a one-step chemical processing method, which resulted in stable aqueous colloidal systems at room temperature and ambient pressure. UV-visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the synthesis and relative stability of peptide-capped CdS nanocrystals. The results demonstrate that both ligands were effective in nucleating and stabilizing CdS quantum dots in colloidal aqueous suspensions, with an estimated dimension below 3.3 nm and with fluorescence activity. Thus, novel nanohybrids were developed based on QDs bioconjugated to surface-active neurotransmitter moieties suitable for investigation as potential biomarkers in cell targeting and signaling applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Carbohydrate Microarrays Identify Blood Group Precursor Cryptic Epitopes as Potential Immunological Targets of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using carbohydrate microarrays, we explored potential natural ligands of antitumor monoclonal antibody HAE3. This antibody was raised against a murine mammary tumor antigen but was found to cross-react with a number of human epithelial tumors in tissues. Our carbohydrate microarray analysis reveals that HAE3 is specific for an O-glycan cryptic epitope that is normally hidden in the cores of blood group substances. Using HAE3 to screen tumor cell surface markers by flow cytometry, we found that the HAE3 glycoepitope, gpHAE3, was highly expressed by a number of human breast cancer cell lines, including some triple-negative cancers that lack the estrogen, progesterone, and Her2/neu receptors. Taken together, we demonstrate that HAE3 recognizes a conserved cryptic glycoepitope of blood group precursors, which is nevertheless selectively expressed and surface-exposed in certain breast tumor cells. The potential of this class of O-glycan cryptic antigens in breast cancer subtyping and targeted immunotherapy warrants further investigation.

  14. Targeting TRPV1 and TRPV2 for potential therapeutic interventions in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Nathan; Koch, Sheryl E; Rubinstein, Jack

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, encompassing a variety of cardiac and vascular conditions. Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels, specifically TRPV type 1 (TRPV1) and TRPV type 2 (TRPV2), are relatively recently described channels found throughout the body including within and around the cardiovascular system. They are activated by a variety of stimuli including high temperatures, stretch, and pharmacologic and endogenous ligands. The TRPV1 channel has been found to be an important player in the pathway of the detection of chest pain after myocardial injury. Activation of peripheral TRPV1 via painful stimuli or capsaicin has been shown to have cardioprotective effects, whereas genetic abrogation of TRPV1 results in increased myocardial damage after ischemia and reperfusion injury in comparison to wild-type mice. Furthermore, blood pressure changes have been noted upon TRPV1 stimulation. Similarly, the TRPV2 channel has also been associated with changes in blood pressure and cardiac function depending on how and where the channel is activated. Interestingly, overexpression of TRPV2 channels in the heart induces dystrophic cardiomyopathy; however, stimulation under physiologic conditions leads to improved cardiac function. Probenecid, a TRPV2 agonist, has been studied as a model therapy for its inotropic effects and potential use in the treatment of cardiomyopathy. In this review, we present an up to date account of the growing evidence that supports the study of TRPV1 and TRPV2 channels as targets for therapeutic agents of cardiovascular diseases. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  15. Exosomes As Potential Biomarkers and Targeted Therapy in Colorectal Cancer: A Mini-Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kha Wai Hon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The number of colorectal cancer (CRC cases have increased gradually year by year. In fact, CRC is one of the most widely diagnosed cancer in men and women today. This disease is usually diagnosed at a later stage of the development, and by then, the chance of survival has declined significantly. Even though substantial progress has been made in understanding the basic molecular mechanism of CRC, there is still a lack of understanding in using the available information for diagnosing CRC effectively. Liquid biopsies are minimally invasive and have become the epitome of a good screening source for stage-specific diagnosis, measuring drug response and severity of the disease. There are various circulating entities that can be found in biological fluids, and among them, exosomes, have been gaining considerable attention. Exosomes can be found in almost all biological fluids including serum, urine, saliva, and breast milk. Furthermore, exosomes carry valuable molecular information such as proteins and nucleic acids that directly reflects the source of the cells. Nevertheless, the inconsistent yield and isolation process and the difficulty in obtaining pure exosomes have become major obstacles that need to be addressed. The potential usage of exosomes as biomarkers have not been fully validated and explored yet. This review attempts to uncover the potential molecules that can be derived from CRC-exosomes as promising biomarkers or molecular targets for effective diagnosing of CRC.

  16. LINGO-1 and AMIGO3, potential therapeutic targets for neurological and dysmyelinating disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Foale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leucine rich repeat proteins have gained considerable interest as therapeutic targets due to their expression and biological activity within the central nervous system. LINGO-1 has received particular attention since it inhibits axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury in a RhoA dependent manner while inhibiting leucine rich repeat and immunoglobulin-like domain-containing protein 1 (LINGO-1 disinhibits neuron outgrowth. Furthermore, LINGO-1 suppresses oligodendrocyte precursor cell maturation and myelin production. Inhibiting the action of LINGO-1 encourages remyelination both in vitro and in vivo. Accordingly, LINGO-1 antagonists show promise as therapies for demyelinating diseases. An analogous protein to LINGO-1, amphoterin-induced gene and open reading frame-3 (AMIGO3, exerts the same inhibitory effect on the axonal outgrowth of central nervous system neurons, as well as interacting with the same receptors as LINGO-1. However, AMIGO3 is upregulated more rapidly after spinal cord injury than LINGO-1. We speculate that AMIGO3 has a similar inhibitory effect on oligodendrocyte precursor cell maturation and myelin production as with axogenesis. Therefore, inhibiting AMIGO3 will likely encourage central nervous system axonal regeneration as well as the production of myelin from local oligodendrocyte precursor cell, thus providing a promising therapeutic target and an area for future investigation.

  17. Bystander protein protects potential vaccine-targeting ligands against intestinal proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Fabian; Bade, Steffen; Hirst, Timothy R; Frey, Andreas

    2009-07-20

    Endowing mucosal vaccines with ligands that target antigen to mucosal lymphoid tissues may improve immunization efficacy provided that the ligands withstand the proteolytic environment of the gastro-intestinal tract until they reach their destination. Our aim was to investigate whether and how three renowned ligands - Ulex europaeus agglutinin I and the B subunits of cholera toxin and E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin - master this challenge. We assessed the digestive power of natural murine intestinal fluid (natIF) using assays for trypsin, chymotrypsin and pancreatic elastase along with a test for nonspecific proteolysis. The natIF was compared with simulated murine intestinal fluid (simIF) that resembled the trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase activities of its natural counterpart but lacked or contained albumins as additional protease substrates. The ligands were exposed to the digestive fluids and degradation was determined. The studies revealed that (i) the three pancreatic endoproteases constitute only one third of the total protease activity of natIF and (ii) the ligands resist proteolysis in natIF and protein-enriched simIF over 3 h but (iii) are partially destroyed in simIF that lacks additional protease substrate. We assume that the proteins of natIF are preferred substrates for the intestinal proteases and thus can protect vaccine-targeting ligands from destruction.

  18. Potential chemotherapeutic targets for Japanese encephalitis: current status of antiviral drug development and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Konishi, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) remains a public health threat in Asia. Although several vaccines have been licensed, ∼ 67,900 cases of the disease are estimated to occur annually, probably because the vaccine coverage is low. Therefore, effective antiviral drugs are required to control JE. However, no licensed anti-JE drugs are available, despite extensive efforts to develop them. We provide a general overview of JE and JE virus, including its transmission cycle, distribution, structure, replication machinery, immune evasion mechanisms and vaccines. The current situation in antiviral drug development is then reviewed and future perspectives are discussed. Although the development of effective anti-JE drugs is an urgent issue, only supportive care is currently available. Recent progress in our understanding of the viral replication machinery and immune evasion strategies has identified new targets for anti-JE drug development. To date, most candidate drugs have only been evaluated in single-drug formulations, and efficient drug delivery to the CNS has virtually not been considered. However, an effective anti-JE treatment is expected to be achieved with multiple-drug formulations and a targeted drug delivery system in the near future.

  19. LINGO-1 and AMIGO3, potential therapeutic targets for neurological and dysmyelinating disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foale, Simon; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Fulton, Daniel; Ahmed, Zubair

    2017-08-01

    Leucine rich repeat proteins have gained considerable interest as therapeutic targets due to their expression and biological activity within the central nervous system. LINGO-1 has received particular attention since it inhibits axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury in a RhoA dependent manner while inhibiting leucine rich repeat and immunoglobulin-like domain-containing protein 1 (LINGO-1) disinhibits neuron outgrowth. Furthermore, LINGO-1 suppresses oligodendrocyte precursor cell maturation and myelin production. Inhibiting the action of LINGO-1 encourages remyelination both in vitro and in vivo. Accordingly, LINGO-1 antagonists show promise as therapies for demyelinating diseases. An analogous protein to LINGO-1, amphoterin-induced gene and open reading frame-3 (AMIGO3), exerts the same inhibitory effect on the axonal outgrowth of central nervous system neurons, as well as interacting with the same receptors as LINGO-1. However, AMIGO3 is upregulated more rapidly after spinal cord injury than LINGO-1. We speculate that AMIGO3 has a similar inhibitory effect on oligodendrocyte precursor cell maturation and myelin production as with axogenesis. Therefore, inhibiting AMIGO3 will likely encourage central nervous system axonal regeneration as well as the production of myelin from local oligodendrocyte precursor cell, thus providing a promising therapeutic target and an area for future investigation.

  20. Scientific Opinion on the assessment of potential impacts of genetically modified plants on non-target organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arpaia, Salvatore; Bartsch, Detlef; Delos, Marc

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms to establish a self-tasking Working Group with the aim of (1) producing a scientific review of the current guidance of the GMO Panel for Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA), focusing on the potential impacts...... of GM plants on Non-Target Organisms (NTOs), (2) proposing criteria for NTOs selection, and (3) providing advise on standardized testing methodology. This initiative was undertaken in response to a need and request from a wide range of stakeholders, including the European Commission and Member States......, for which assessment and measurement endpoints shall be developed; the need to initiate the scientific risk assessment by setting testable hypotheses; criteria for appropriate selection of test species and ecological functional groups; appropriate laboratory and field studies to collect relevant NTO data...

  1. Improving support for parents of children with hearing loss: provider training on use of targeted communication strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Karen; Nelson, Lauri; Blaiser, Kristina; Price, Tanner; Twohig, Michael

    2015-02-01

    When proper protocols are followed, children who are identified with a permanent hearing loss early in life have opportunities to develop language on par with their typical hearing peers. Young children with hearing loss are dependent on their parents to manage intervention during early years critical to their development, and parents' ability to effectively integrate recommendations in daily life is foundational for intervention success. Audiologists and early intervention professionals not only need to provide current evidence-based services, but also must address parents' emotional and learning needs related to their child's hearing loss. This study explored practice patterns related to education and support provided to parents of children with hearing loss and the influence of an in-service training on provider attitudes. This study used a prepost design with a self-report questionnaire to identify practice patterns related to communication skills and support used by providers when working with parents of children with hearing loss. A total of 45 participants (21 professionals and 24 graduate students) currently working with children completed the pretraining questionnaire, and 29 participants (13 professionals and 16 graduate students) completed the postquestionnaire. Data were collected using an online questionnaire before the training and 1 mo after training. Descriptive analyses were done to identify trends, and paired-samples t-tests were used to determine changes pretraining to posttraining. Findings revealed that professionals most frequently teach skills to mothers (91%) and infrequently teach skills to fathers (19%) and other caregivers (10%). Professionals reported frequently collaborating with other intervention providers (76%) and infrequently collaborating with primary care physicians (19%). One-third of the professionals reported addressing symptoms of depression and anxiety as an interfering factor with the ability to implement management

  2. Providing effective trauma care: the potential for service provider views to enhance the quality of care (qualitative study nested within a multicentre longitudinal quantitative study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Kate; Earthy, Sarah; Sleney, Jude; Barnes, Jo; Kellezi, Blerina; Barker, Marcus; Clarkson, Julie; Coffey, Frank; Elder, Georgina; Kendrick, Denise

    2014-07-08

    To explore views of service providers caring for injured people on: the extent to which services meet patients' needs and their perspectives on factors contributing to any identified gaps in service provision. Qualitative study nested within a quantitative multicentre longitudinal study assessing longer term impact of unintentional injuries in working age adults. Sampling frame for service providers was based on patient-reported service use in the quantitative study, patient interviews and advice of previously injured lay research advisers. Service providers' views were elicited through semistructured interviews. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Participants were recruited from a range of settings and services in acute hospital trusts in four study centres (Bristol, Leicester, Nottingham and Surrey) and surrounding areas. 40 service providers from a range of disciplines. Service providers described two distinct models of trauma care: an 'ideal' model, informed by professional knowledge of the impact of injury and awareness of best models of care, and a 'real' model based on the realities of National Health Service (NHS) practice. Participants' 'ideal' model was consistent with standards of high-quality effective trauma care and while there were examples of services meeting the ideal model, 'real' care could also be fragmented and inequitable with major gaps in provision. Service provider accounts provide evidence of comprehensive understanding of patients' needs, awareness of best practice, compassion and research but reveal significant organisational and resource barriers limiting implementation of knowledge in practice. Service providers envisage an 'ideal' model of trauma care which is timely, equitable, effective and holistic, but this can differ from the care currently provided. Their experiences provide many suggestions for service improvements to bridge the gap between 'real' and 'ideal' care. Using service provider views to inform service design

  3. Targeting Medicare consumers. Managed care providers can make inroads by understanding preference and cost-sensitivity issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensrud, J; Sylvestre, E; Sivadas, E

    1997-01-01

    The authors' conjoint study provided valuable information on the preferences of the hugh Medicare-eligible and soon-to-be-eligible markets. Leading the list were hospitalization coverage, skilled nursing facilities, and out-of-area coverage. The task of defining choice sets was made easier and more meaningful by selecting the top six attributes for each respondent. Asking respondents to rank levels within each attribute and assessing the importance of the various levels provided a more robust estimate of consumer preferences. Using an innovative price-sensitivity method preserved the integrity of the data. The method minimized respondent fatigue and enabled the authors to gather price-sensitivity data from respondents who were not actually paying for their health services. Respondents preferred Supplemental F and Medicare products even though they placed more value on the qualities of alternative health care products. This suggests that managed care providers need to change consumer perceptions about their products.

  4. Cross species association examination of UCN3 and CRHR2 as potential pharmacological targets for antiobesity drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity now constitutes a leading global public health problem. Studies have shown that insulin resistance affiliated with obesity is associated with intramyocellular lipid (IMCL accumulation. Therefore, identification of genes associated with the phenotype would provide a clear target for pharmaceutical intervention and care for the condition. We hypothesized that urocortin 3 (UCN3 and corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2 are associated with IMCL and subcutaneous fat depth (SFD, because the corticotropin-releasing hormone family of peptides are capable of strong anorectic and thermogenic effects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We annotated both bovine UCN3 and CRHR2 genes and identified 12 genetic mutations in the former gene and 5 genetic markers in the promoter region of the latter gene. Genotyping of these 17 markers on Wagyu times Limousin F(2 progeny revealed significant associations between promoter polymorphisms and SFD (P = 0.0203-0.0685 and between missense mutations of exon 2 and IMCL (P = 0.0055-0.0369 in the bovine UCN3 gene. The SFD associated promoter SNPs caused a gain/loss of 12 potential transcription regulatory binding sites, while the IMCL associated coding SNPs affected the secondary structure of UCN3 mRNA. However, none of five polymorphisms in CRHR2 gene clearly co-segregated with either trait in the population (P>0.6000. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Because UCN3 is located on human chromosome 10p15.1 where quantitative trait loci for obesity have been reported, our cross species study provides further evidence that it could be proposed as a potential target for developing antiobesity drugs. None of the markers in CRHR2 was associated with obesity-type traits in cattle, which is consistent with findings in human. Therefore, CRHR2 does not lend itself to the development of antiobesity drugs.

  5. HDAC8, A Potential Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors (MPNST.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Lopez

    Full Text Available HDAC isoform-specific inhibitors may improve the therapeutic window while limiting toxicities. Developing inhibitors against class I isoforms poses difficulties as they share high homology among their catalytic sites; however, HDAC8 is structurally unique compared to other class I isoforms. HDAC8 inhibitors are novel compounds and have affinity for class I HDAC isoforms demonstrating anti-cancer effects; little is known about their activity in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST. Recently, we demonstrated anti-MPNST efficacy of HDAC8i in human and murine-derived MPNST pre-clinical models; we now seek to consider the potential therapeutic inhibition of HDAC8 in MPNST.Four Human MPNST cell lines, a murine-derived MPNST cell line, and two HDAC8 inhibitors (PCI-34051, PCI-48012; Pharmacyclics, Inc. Sunnyvale, CA were studied. Proliferation was determined using MTS and clonogenic assays. Effects on cell cycle were determined via PI FACS analysis; effects on apoptosis were determined using Annexin V-PI FACS analysis and cleaved caspase 3 expression. In vivo growth effects of HDAC8i were evaluated using MPNST xenograft models. 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify potential HDAC8 deacetylation substrates.HDAC8i induced cell growth inhibition and marked S-phase cell cycle arrest in human and murine-derived MPNST cells. Relative to control, HDAC8i induced apoptosis in both human and murine-derived MPNST cells. HDAC8i exhibited significant effects on MPNST xenograft growth (p=0.001 and tumor weight (p=0.02. Four potential HDAC8 substrate targets were identified using a proteomic approach: PARK7, HMGB1, PGAM1, PRDX6.MPNST is an aggressive sarcoma that is notoriously therapy-resistant, hence the urgent need for improved anti-MPNST therapies. HDAC8 inhibition may be useful for MPNST by improving efficacy while limiting toxicities as compared to pan-HDACis.

  6. A Promising Approach to Provide Appropriate Colon Target Drug Delivery Systems of Vancomycin HCL: Pharmaceutical and Microbiological Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadria A. Elkhodairy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vancomycin HCl was prepared as orally administered colon target drug delivery tablets for systemic therapy. Tablet matrices containing 10–60% of tablet weight of guar gum (F1–F6 were prepared by direct compression and subjected to in vitro release studies to explore their sustained release in the colon. Various synthetic and natural polymers were incorporated to F6 to modify the drug release rate. Different 15 matrix tablet formulations (F6–F20 were enteric coated with hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose phthalate. F6, F13 and F20 showed promising sustained release results having median dissolution time (MDT values: 8.25, 7.97, and 7.64, respectively. Microbiological assay was performed to test the efficacy of F6, F13, and F20 to inhibit clinical Staphylococcus aureus (SA isolates. Bactericidal activity of F6 was reached after 2, 4, and 24 hours of incubation against MSSA 18, MRSA 29, and MRSA 11 strains, respectively, while it was reached within 6–8 hours in case of F13, and F20 against all strains tested. F13 enhanced log microbial reduction by 1.74, 0.65 and 2.4 CFU/mL compared to F6 while it was 1, 2.57 and 1.57 compared to F20 against MSSA18, MRSA11 and MRSA29, respectively. Vancomycin HCl tablets displayed a promising sustained release in vitro and microbiological inhibitory action on all isolates tested.

  7. Emergency contraception in Mexico City: what do health care providers and potential users know and think about it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, A; Harper, C; Garcia-Barrios, C; Schiavon, R; Heimburger, A; Elul, B; Renoso Delgado, S; Ellertson, C

    1999-10-01

    Emergency contraception promises to reduce Mexico's high unwanted pregnancy and unsafe abortion rates. Because oral contraceptives are sold over-the-counter, several emergency contraceptive regimens are already potentially available to those women who know about the method. Soon, specially packaged emergency contraceptives may also arrive in Mexico. To initiate campaigns promoting emergency contraception, we interviewed health care providers and clients at health clinics in Mexico City, ascertaining knowledge, attitudes, and practices concerning the method. We found limited knowledge, but nevertheless cautious support for emergency contraception in Mexico. Health care providers and clients greatly overestimated the negative health effects of emergency contraception, although clients overwhelmingly reported that they would use or recommend it if needed. Although providers typically advocated medically controlled distribution, clients believed emergency contraception should be more widely available, including in schools and vending machines with information prevalent in the mass media and elsewhere.

  8. A fluorescent protein scaffold for presenting structurally constrained peptides provides an effective screening system to identify high affinity target-binding peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Kadonosono

    Full Text Available Peptides that have high affinity for target molecules on the surface of cancer cells are crucial for the development of targeted cancer therapies. However, unstructured peptides often fail to bind their target molecules with high affinity. To efficiently identify high-affinity target-binding peptides, we have constructed a fluorescent protein scaffold, designated gFPS, in which structurally constrained peptides are integrated at residues K131-L137 of superfolder green fluorescent protein. Molecular dynamics simulation supported the suitability of this site for presentation of exogenous peptides with a constrained structure. gFPS can present 4 to 12 exogenous amino acids without a loss of fluorescence. When gFPSs presenting human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2-targeting peptides were added to the culture medium of HER2-expressing cells, we could easily identify the peptides with high HER2-affinity and -specificity based on gFPS fluorescence. In addition, gFPS could be expressed on the yeast cell surface and applied for a high-throughput screening. These results demonstrate that gFPS has the potential to serve as a powerful tool to improve screening of structurally constrained peptides that have a high target affinity, and suggest that it could expedite the one-step identification of clinically applicable cancer cell-binding peptides.

  9. A fluorescent protein scaffold for presenting structurally constrained peptides provides an effective screening system to identify high affinity target-binding peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadonosono, Tetsuya; Yabe, Etsuri; Furuta, Tadaomi; Yamano, Akihiro; Tsubaki, Takuya; Sekine, Takuya; Kuchimaru, Takahiro; Sakurai, Minoru; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae

    2014-01-01

    Peptides that have high affinity for target molecules on the surface of cancer cells are crucial for the development of targeted cancer therapies. However, unstructured peptides often fail to bind their target molecules with high affinity. To efficiently identify high-affinity target-binding peptides, we have constructed a fluorescent protein scaffold, designated gFPS, in which structurally constrained peptides are integrated at residues K131-L137 of superfolder green fluorescent protein. Molecular dynamics simulation supported the suitability of this site for presentation of exogenous peptides with a constrained structure. gFPS can present 4 to 12 exogenous amino acids without a loss of fluorescence. When gFPSs presenting human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-targeting peptides were added to the culture medium of HER2-expressing cells, we could easily identify the peptides with high HER2-affinity and -specificity based on gFPS fluorescence. In addition, gFPS could be expressed on the yeast cell surface and applied for a high-throughput screening. These results demonstrate that gFPS has the potential to serve as a powerful tool to improve screening of structurally constrained peptides that have a high target affinity, and suggest that it could expedite the one-step identification of clinically applicable cancer cell-binding peptides.

  10. Integrative analysis of kinase networks in TRAIL-induced apoptosis provides a source of potential targets for combination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    So, Jonathan; Pasculescu, Adrian; Dai, Anna Y.

    2015-01-01

    /threonine kinase (PXK) and AP2-associated kinase 1 (AAK1), which promote receptor endocytosis and may enable cells to resist TRAIL-induced apoptosis by enhancing endocytosis of the TRAIL receptors. We assembled protein interaction maps using mass spectrometry-based protein interaction analysis and quantitative...... combination therapies to selectively kill cancer cells....

  11. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 as a potential target for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiamulera, Cristiano; Marzo, Claudio Marcello; Balfour, David J K

    2017-05-01

    Most habitual smokers find it difficult to quit smoking because they are dependent upon the nicotine present in tobacco smoke. Tobacco dependence is commonly treated pharmacologically using nicotine replacement therapy or drugs, such as varenicline, that target the nicotinic receptor. Relapse rates, however, remain high, and there remains a need to develop novel non-nicotinic pharmacotherapies for the dependence that are more effective than existing treatments. The purpose of this paper is to review the evidence from preclinical and clinical studies that drugs that antagonise the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) in the brain are likely to be efficacious as treatments for tobacco dependence. Imaging studies reveal that chronic exposure to tobacco smoke reduces the density of mGluR5s in human brain. Preclinical results demonstrate that negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) at mGluR5 attenuate both nicotine self-administration and the reinstatement of responding evoked by exposure to conditioned cues paired with nicotine delivery. They also attenuate the effects of nicotine on brain dopamine pathways implicated in addiction. Although mGluR5 NAMs attenuate most of the key facets of nicotine dependence, they potentiate the symptoms of nicotine withdrawal. This may limit their value as smoking cessation aids. The NAMs that have been employed most widely in preclinical studies of nicotine dependence have too many "off-target" effects to be used clinically. However, newer mGluR5 NAMs have been developed for clinical use in other indications. Future studies will determine if these agents can also be used effectively and safely to treat tobacco dependence.

  12. Identification of potential inhibitors for oncogenic target of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase using in silico approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surekha, Kanagarajan; Nachiappan, Mutharasappan; Prabhu, Dhamodharan; Choubey, Sanjay Kumar; Biswal, Jayashree; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman

    2017-01-01

    Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) plays a major role in the rate limiting step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway and it is pronounced as a novel target for drug development of cancer. The currently available drugs against DHODH are ineffective and bear various side effects. Three-dimensional structure of the targeted protein was constructed using molecular modeling approach followed by 100 ns molecular dynamics simulations. In this study, High Throughput Virtual Screening (HTVS) was performed using various compound libraries to identify pharmacologically potential molecules. The top four identified lead molecules includes NCI_47074, HitFinder_7630, Binding_66981 and Specs_108872 with high docking score of -9.45, -8.29, -8.04 and -8.03 kcal/mol and the corresponding binding free energy were -16.25, -56.37, -26.93 and -48.04 kcal/mol respectively. Arg122, Arg185, Glu255 and Gly257 are the key residues found to be interacting with the ligands. Molecular dynamics simulations of DHODH-inhibitors complexes were performed to assess the stability of various conformations from complex structures of TtDHODH. Furthermore, stereoelectronic features of the ligands were explored to facilitate charge transfer during the protein-ligand interactions using Density Functional Theoretical approach. Based on in silico analysis, the ligand NCI_47074 ((2Z)-3-({6-[(2Z)-3-carboxylatoprop-2-enamido]pyridin-2-yl}carbamoyl)prop-2-enoate) was found to be the most potent lead molecule which was validated using energetic and electronic parameters and it could serve as a template for designing effective anticancerous drug molecule.

  13. The role of BMPs in bone anabolism and their potential targets SOST and DKK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Nobuhiro

    2012-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) were discovered in 1965 as potent inducers of ectopic bone formation when implanted subcutaneously. BMP2, BMP4, BMP6, and BMP7 are osteoinductive, and BMP2 and BMP7 are currently approved for clinical applications such as bone fracture healing and spine surgery. Although BMPs' role in bone formation is well known, the current clinical data supporting their effectiveness are not robust, possibly in part because BMPs affect bone resorption as well. BMPs can reduce bone mass by inducing osteoclastogenesis via the RANKL-OPG pathway, which is a critical regulator of osteoclasts by osteoblasts. BMPs have both bone anabolic and catabolic effects by affecting multiple cell types in bone such as mesenchymal cells, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and endothelial cells. We recently generated an osteoblast-targeted deletion of BMP signaling using a Cre-loxP strategy and found that BMP signaling in osteoblasts can inhibit Wnt signaling through the Wnt inhibitors DKK1 and SOST. Loss-of-function of either DKK1 or SOST, which are downstream targets of BMPs, causes a high bone mass phenotype in humans and mice, suggesting an importance of DKK1 and SOST for bone mass regulation. There are many bone anabolic effectors that control bone mass such as BMPs, PTH, and Wnt inhibitors. This article will focus on BMPs' effects on bone anabolism and propose a potential network of the bone mass mediators BMPs, PTH, and SOST. We believe it is important to understand this network to guide the clinical application of bone anabolic agents.

  14. Surface localization of glucosylceramide during Cryptococcus neoformans infection allows targeting as a potential antifungal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Rhome

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn is a significant human pathogen that, despite current treatments, continues to have a high morbidity rate especially in sub-Saharan Africa. The need for more tolerable and specific therapies has been clearly shown. In the search for novel drug targets, the gene for glucosylceramide synthase (GCS1 was deleted in Cn, resulting in a strain (Δgcs1 that does not produce glucosylceramide (GlcCer and is avirulent in mouse models of infection. To understand the biology behind the connection between virulence and GlcCer, the production and localization of GlcCer must be characterized in conditions that are prohibitive to the growth of Δgcs1 (neutral pH and high CO(2. These prohibitive conditions are physiologically similar to those found in the extracellular spaces of the lung during infection. Here, using immunofluorescence, we have shown that GlcCer localization to the cell surface is significantly increased during growth in these conditions and during infection. We further seek to exploit this localization by treatment with Cerezyme (Cz, a recombinant enzyme that metabolizes GlcCer, as a potential treatment for Cn. Cz treatment was found to reduce the amount of GlcCer in vitro, in cultures, and in Cn cells inhabiting the mouse lung. Treatment with Cz induced a membrane integrity defect in wild type Cn cells similar to Δgcs1. Cz treatment also reduced the in vitro growth of Cn in a dose and condition dependent manner. Finally, Cz treatment was shown to have a protective effect on survival in mice infected with Cn. Taken together, these studies have established the legitimacy of targeting the GlcCer and other related sphingolipid systems in the development of novel therapeutics.

  15. Vaccination of Sheep with a Methanogen Protein Provides Insight into Levels of Antibody in Saliva Needed to Target Ruminal Methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subharat, Supatsak; Shu, Dairu; Zheng, Tao; Buddle, Bryce M; Kaneko, Kan; Hook, Sarah; Janssen, Peter H; Wedlock, D Neil

    2016-01-01

    Methane is produced in the rumen of ruminant livestock by methanogens and is a major contributor to agricultural greenhouse gases. Vaccination against ruminal methanogens could reduce methane emissions by inducing antibodies in saliva which enter the rumen and impair ability of methanogens to produce methane. Presently, it is not known if vaccination can induce sufficient amounts of antibody in the saliva to target methanogen populations in the rumen and little is known about how long antibody in the rumen remains active. In the current study, sheep were vaccinated twice at a 3-week interval with a model methanogen antigen, recombinant glycosyl transferase protein (rGT2) formulated with one of four adjuvants: saponin, Montanide ISA61, a chitosan thermogel, or a lipid nanoparticle/cationic liposome adjuvant (n = 6/formulation). A control group of sheep (n = 6) was not vaccinated. The highest antigen-specific IgA and IgG responses in both saliva and serum were observed with Montanide ISA61, which promoted levels of salivary antibodies that were five-fold higher than the second most potent adjuvant, saponin. A rGT2-specific IgG standard was used to determine the level of rGT2-specific IgG in serum and saliva. Vaccination with GT2/Montanide ISA61 produced a peak antibody concentration of 7 × 1016 molecules of antigen-specific IgG per litre of saliva, and it was estimated that in the rumen there would be more than 104 molecules of antigen-specific IgG for each methanogen cell. Both IgG and IgA in saliva were shown to be relatively stable in the rumen. Salivary antibody exposed for 1-2 hours to an in vitro simulated rumen environment retained approximately 50% of antigen-binding activity. Collectively, the results from measuring antibody levels and stablility suggest a vaccination-based mitigation strategy for livestock generated methane is in theory feasible.

  16. Algorithm of trajectory guidance of a planning unmanned flight vehicle to a ground target providing the guidance in case the final conditions of guidance are given

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.Г. Водчиць

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available  In the article are obtained the mathematical relations which allow to implement algorithm of trajectory guidance of a unmanned flight vehicle to a ground target providing the guidance in case the final conditions of guidance are given.

  17. Myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1 is a novel biomarker and potential therapeutic target for human ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jingjing

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1 is overexpressed in human cancer cells and plays an essential role in cancer cell growth. However, the significance of MR-1 in human ovarian cancer has not yet been explored. The aim of this study was to examine whether MR-1 is a predictor of ovarian cancer and its value as a therapeutic target in ovarian cancer patients. Methods Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR and quantitative real-time PCR were used to detect MR-1 mRNA levels in tissue samples from 26 ovarian cancer patients and 25 controls with benign ovarian disease. Anti-MR-1 polyclonal antibodies were prepared, tested by ELISA and western blotting, and then used for immunohistochemical analysis of the tissue samples. Adhesion and invasion of 292T cells was also examined after transfection of a pMX-MR-1 plasmid. Knockdown of MR-1 expression was achieved after stable transfection of SKOV3 cells with a short hairpin DNA pGPU6/GFP/Neo plasmid against the MR-1 gene. In addition, SKOV3 cells were treated with paclitaxel and carboplatin, and a potential role for MR-1 as a therapeutic target was evaluated. Results MR-1 was overexpressed in ovarian cancer tissues and SKOV3 cells. 293T cells overexpressed MR-1, and cellular spread and invasion were enhanced after transfection of the pMX-MR-1 plasmid, suggesting that MR-1 is critical for ovarian cancer cell growth. Knockdown of MR-1 expression inhibited cell adhesion and invasion, and treatment with anti-cancer drugs decreased its expression in cancer cells. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which MR-1 might serve as a novel biological marker and potential therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. Conclusions MR-1 may be a biomarker for diagnosis of ovarian cancer. It may also be useful for monitoring of the effects of anti-cancer therapies. Further studies are needed to clarify whether MR-1 is an early

  18. Tweaking Dendrimers and Dendritic Nanoparticles for Controlled Nano-bio Interactions: Potential Nanocarriers for Improved Cancer Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugno, Jason; Hsu, Hao-Jui; Hong, Seungpyo

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have shown great promise in the treatment of cancer, with a demonstrated potential in targeted drug delivery. Among a myriad of nanocarriers that have been recently developed, dendrimers have attracted a great deal of scientific interests due to their unique chemical and structural properties that allow for precise engineering of their characteristics. Despite this, the clinical translation of dendrimers has been hindered due to their drawbacks, such as scale-up issues, rapid systemic elimination, inefficient tumor accumulation, and limited drug loading. In order to overcome these limitations, a series of reengineered dendrimers have been recently introduced using various approaches, including: i) modifications of structure and surfaces; ii) integration with linear polymers; and iii) hybridization with other types of nanocarriers. Chemical modifications and surface engineering have tailored dendrimers to improve their pharmacokinetics and tissue permeation. Copolymerization of dendritic polymers with linear polymers has resulted in various amphiphilic copolymers with self-assembly capabilities and improved drug loading efficiencies. Hybridization with other nanocarriers integrates advantageous characteristics of both systems, which includes prolonged plasma circulation times and enhanced tumor targeting. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the newly emerging drug delivery systems that involve reengineering of dendrimers in an effort to precisely control their nano-bio interactions, mitigating their inherent weaknesses. PMID:26453160

  19. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as Potential Chemotherapeutic Target in Mammal-Dwelling Stages of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Linda J; Brand, Stephen; Santos, Andres; Nohara, Lilian L; Harrison, Justin; Norcross, Neil R; Thompson, Stephen; Smith, Victoria; Lema, Carolina; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Gilbert, Ian H; Almeida, Igor C; Maldonado, Rosa A

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, an endemic and debilitating illness in Latin America. Lately, owing to extensive population movements, this neglected tropical disease has become a global health concern. The two clinically available drugs for the chemotherapy of Chagas disease have rather high toxicity and limited efficacy in the chronic phase of the disease, and may induce parasite resistance. The development of new anti-T. cruzi agents is therefore imperative. The enzyme N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) has recently been biochemically characterized, shown to be essential in Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei, and T. cruzi¸ and proposed as promising chemotherapeutic target in these trypanosomatids. Here, using high-content imaging we assayed eight known trypanosomatid NMT inhibitors, against mammal-dwelling intracellular amastigote and trypomastigote stages and demonstrated that three of them (compounds 1, 5, and 8) have potent anti-proliferative effect at submicromolar concentrations against T. cruzi, with very low toxicity against human epithelial cells. Moreover, metabolic labeling using myristic acid, azide showed a considerable decrease in the myristoylation of proteins in parasites treated with NMT inhibitors, providing evidence of the on-target activity of the inhibitors. Taken together, our data point out to the potential use of NMT inhibitors as anti-T. cruzi chemotherapy.

  20. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as Potential Chemotherapeutic Target in Mammal-Dwelling Stages of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Herrera

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, an endemic and debilitating illness in Latin America. Lately, owing to extensive population movements, this neglected tropical disease has become a global health concern. The two clinically available drugs for the chemotherapy of Chagas disease have rather high toxicity and limited efficacy in the chronic phase of the disease, and may induce parasite resistance. The development of new anti-T. cruzi agents is therefore imperative. The enzyme N-myristoyltransferase (NMT has recently been biochemically characterized, shown to be essential in Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei, and T. cruzi¸ and proposed as promising chemotherapeutic target in these trypanosomatids.Here, using high-content imaging we assayed eight known trypanosomatid NMT inhibitors, against mammal-dwelling intracellular amastigote and trypomastigote stages and demonstrated that three of them (compounds 1, 5, and 8 have potent anti-proliferative effect at submicromolar concentrations against T. cruzi, with very low toxicity against human epithelial cells. Moreover, metabolic labeling using myristic acid, azide showed a considerable decrease in the myristoylation of proteins in parasites treated with NMT inhibitors, providing evidence of the on-target activity of the inhibitors.Taken together, our data point out to the potential use of NMT inhibitors as anti-T. cruzi chemotherapy.

  1. Functional Roles of microRNAs in Agronomically Important Plants—Potential as Targets for Crop Improvement and Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djami-Tchatchou, Arnaud T.; Sanan-Mishra, Neeti; Ntushelo, Khayalethu; Dubery, Ian A.

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that have recently emerged as important regulators of gene expression, mainly through cleavage and/or translation inhibition of the target mRNAs during or after transcription. miRNAs play important roles by regulating a multitude of biological processes in plants which include maintenance of genome integrity, development, metabolism, and adaptive responses toward environmental stresses. The increasing population of the world and their food demands requires focused efforts for the improvement of crop plants to ensure sustainable food production. Manipulation of mRNA transcript abundance via miRNA control provides a unique strategy for modulating differential plant gene expression and miRNAs are thus emerging as the next generation targets for genetic engineering for improvement of the agronomic properties of crops. However, a deeper understanding of its potential and the mechanisms involved will facilitate the design of suitable strategies to obtain the desirable traits with minimum trade-offs in the modified crops. In this regard, this review highlights the diverse roles of conserved and newly identified miRNAs in various food and industrial crops and recent advances made in the uses of miRNAs to improve plants of agronomically importance so as to significantly enhance crop yields and increase tolerance to various environmental stress agents of biotic—or abiotic origin. PMID:28382044

  2. Functional Roles of microRNAs in Agronomically Important Plants-Potential as Targets for Crop Improvement and Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djami-Tchatchou, Arnaud T; Sanan-Mishra, Neeti; Ntushelo, Khayalethu; Dubery, Ian A

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that have recently emerged as important regulators of gene expression, mainly through cleavage and/or translation inhibition of the target mRNAs during or after transcription. miRNAs play important roles by regulating a multitude of biological processes in plants which include maintenance of genome integrity, development, metabolism, and adaptive responses toward environmental stresses. The increasing population of the world and their food demands requires focused efforts for the improvement of crop plants to ensure sustainable food production. Manipulation of mRNA transcript abundance via miRNA control provides a unique strategy for modulating differential plant gene expression and miRNAs are thus emerging as the next generation targets for genetic engineering for improvement of the agronomic properties of crops. However, a deeper understanding of its potential and the mechanisms involved will facilitate the design of suitable strategies to obtain the desirable traits with minimum trade-offs in the modified crops. In this regard, this review highlights the diverse roles of conserved and newly identified miRNAs in various food and industrial crops and recent advances made in the uses of miRNAs to improve plants of agronomically importance so as to significantly enhance crop yields and increase tolerance to various environmental stress agents of biotic-or abiotic origin.

  3. Vaccination of Sheep with a Methanogen Protein Provides Insight into Levels of Antibody in Saliva Needed to Target Ruminal Methanogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supatsak Subharat

    Full Text Available Methane is produced in the rumen of ruminant livestock by methanogens and is a major contributor to agricultural greenhouse gases. Vaccination against ruminal methanogens could reduce methane emissions by inducing antibodies in saliva which enter the rumen and impair ability of methanogens to produce methane. Presently, it is not known if vaccination can induce sufficient amounts of antibody in the saliva to target methanogen populations in the rumen and little is known about how long antibody in the rumen remains active. In the current study, sheep were vaccinated twice at a 3-week interval with a model methanogen antigen, recombinant glycosyl transferase protein (rGT2 formulated with one of four adjuvants: saponin, Montanide ISA61, a chitosan thermogel, or a lipid nanoparticle/cationic liposome adjuvant (n = 6/formulation. A control group of sheep (n = 6 was not vaccinated. The highest antigen-specific IgA and IgG responses in both saliva and serum were observed with Montanide ISA61, which promoted levels of salivary antibodies that were five-fold higher than the second most potent adjuvant, saponin. A rGT2-specific IgG standard was used to determine the level of rGT2-specific IgG in serum and saliva. Vaccination with GT2/Montanide ISA61 produced a peak antibody concentration of 7 × 1016 molecules of antigen-specific IgG per litre of saliva, and it was estimated that in the rumen there would be more than 104 molecules of antigen-specific IgG for each methanogen cell. Both IgG and IgA in saliva were shown to be relatively stable in the rumen. Salivary antibody exposed for 1-2 hours to an in vitro simulated rumen environment retained approximately 50% of antigen-binding activity. Collectively, the results from measuring antibody levels and stablility suggest a vaccination-based mitigation strategy for livestock generated methane is in theory feasible.

  4. Diabetes pathogenic mechanisms and potential new therapies based upon a novel target called TXNIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielen, Lance; Shalev, Anath

    2018-01-19

    Thioredoxin-interacting protein has emerged as a major factor regulating pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and death, key processes in the pathogenesis of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Accumulating evidence based on basic, preclinical, and retrospective epidemiological research suggests that TXNIP represents a promising therapeutic target for diabetes. The present review is aimed at providing an update regarding these developments. TXNIP has been shown to be induced by glucose and increased in diabetes and to promote β-cell apoptosis, whereas TXNIP deletion protected against diabetes. More recently, TXNIP inhibition has also been found to promote insulin production and glucagon-like peptide 1 signaling via regulation of a microRNA. β-Cell TXNIP expression itself was found to be regulated by hypoglycemic agents, carbohydrate-response-element-binding protein, and cytosolic calcium or the calcium channel blocker, verapamil. Retrospective studies now further suggest that verapamil use might be associated with a lower incidence of type 2 diabetes in humans. TXNIP has emerged as a key factor in the regulation of functional β-cell mass and TXNIP inhibition has shown beneficial effects in a variety of studies. Thus, the inhibition of TXNIP may provide a novel approach to the treatment of diabetes.

  5. Human synthetic lethal inference as potential anti-cancer target gene detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solé Ricard V

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two genes are called synthetic lethal (SL if mutation of either alone is not lethal, but mutation of both leads to death or a significant decrease in organism's fitness. The detection of SL gene pairs constitutes a promising alternative for anti-cancer therapy. As cancer cells exhibit a large number of mutations, the identification of these mutated genes' SL partners may provide specific anti-cancer drug candidates, with minor perturbations to the healthy cells. Since existent SL data is mainly restricted to yeast screenings, the road towards human SL candidates is limited to inference methods. Results In the present work, we use phylogenetic analysis and database manipulation (BioGRID for interactions, Ensembl and NCBI for homology, Gene Ontology for GO attributes in order to reconstruct the phylogenetically-inferred SL gene network for human. In addition, available data on cancer mutated genes (COSMIC and Cancer Gene Census databases as well as on existent approved drugs (DrugBank database supports our selection of cancer-therapy candidates. Conclusions Our work provides a complementary alternative to the current methods for drug discovering and gene target identification in anti-cancer research. Novel SL screening analysis and the use of highly curated databases would contribute to improve the results of this methodology.

  6. The potential of targeted antibody prophylaxis in SARS outbreak control: a mathematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaards, Johannes Antonie; Putter, Hein; Jan Weverling, Gerrit; Ter Meulen, Jan; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2007-03-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus-like viruses continue to circulate in animal reservoirs. If new mutants of SARS coronavirus do initiate another epidemic, administration of prophylactic antibodies to risk groups may supplement the stringent isolation procedures that contained the first SARS outbreak. We developed a mathematical model to investigate the effects of hospital admission and targeted antibody prophylaxis on the reproduction number R, defined as the number of secondary cases generated by an index case, during different SARS outbreak scenarios. Assuming a basic reproduction number R(0)=3, admission of patients to hospital within 4.3 days of symptom onset is necessary to achieve outbreak control without the need to further reduce community-based transmission. Control may be enhanced by providing pre-exposure prophylaxis to contacts of hospitalized patients, and through contact tracing and provision of post-exposure prophylaxis. Antibody prophylaxis may also be employed to reduce R below one and thereby restrict outbreak size and duration. Patient isolation alone can be sufficient to control SARS outbreaks provided that the time from onset to admission is short. Antibody prophylaxis as supplemental measure generally allows for containment of higher R(0) values and restricts both the size and duration of an outbreak.

  7. Patients' perceptions of the interpersonal sensitivity of their healthcare providers: the potential role of patient-provider racial/ethnic concordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Karon L; Chiriboga, David A; Jang, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary studies have revealed an association between cultural competence and an improvement in the quality of healthcare services, increased patient satisfaction, and increased effectiveness of services. This study examined factors that helped to explain patients' perceptions of their providers' interpersonal sensitivity - one component of cultural competence. The respondents were 2075 racially/ethnically diverse adults, aged 50 years and older, who responded to a national telephone survey. Results indicate that one of the main factors predicting interpersonal sensitivity is self-rated physical health: those who reported better health were more likely to see their provider as exhibiting higher levels of sensitivity. This was true for Hispanic/Latino patients. The results also suggest that having a provider of the same race/ethnicity was a significant factor only for Hispanic/Latino patients. Despite findings from previous research, racial/ethnic concordance may not be universally effective in improving interpersonal sensitivity in healthcare settings for all racial/ethnic groups.

  8. Upregulated expression of NKG2D and its ligands give potential therapeutic targets for patients with thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, X Y; Zhang, J F; Hu, G M; Li, Q R; Liu, P P; Du, Y

    2015-07-01

    The activating receptor NKG2D (natural killer group 2, member D) of natural killer (NK) cells promotes tumor immune surveillance by targeting ligands selectively induced on cancer cells, and thus having an important role in antitumor immune response. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present as useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. In this study, to elucidate the role of NKG2D-NKG2D ligand interaction in thymoma tissues and to evaluate the potential role of NKG2D ligands as therapeutic target for thymoma, we examined the expression of NKG2D and its specific ligands: MICA (major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related protein A), MICB (major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related protein B) and ULBP (UL16-binding protein) in 36 thymomas (6 subtype A, 6 subtype AB, 8 subtype B1, 5 subtype B2, 6 subtype B3 and 5 subtype C), 15 thymic atrophy and 8 thymic hyperplasia by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-real-time-PCR methods. We demonstrated that both mRNA and protein levels of NKG2D, MICA, MICB and ULBP were upregulated in six types of thymomas compared with those in atrophic thymus or proliferating thymus. Furthermore, the NKG2D ligands were found to be frequently coexpressed on thymoma cells. Furthermore, the expression of MICA, MICB and ULBP in subtype C was higher compared with those in subtype A, AB, B1, B2 and B3. Thus, we concluded that high expressions of NKG2D, MICA, MICB and ULBP1 were shown in patients with thymoma, and this may enhance the recognition function of NK cells to eliminate tumor cells. MICA, MICB and ULBP presented an attractive target for thymoma therapy. The abnormal expression of NKG2D, MICA, MICB and ULBP1 can provide us with evidence of the occurrence of thymoma and could also be used as a target in the treatment of thymoma.

  9. Composition of near-Earth Asteroid 2008 EV5: Potential target for robotic and human exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vishnu; Le Corre, Lucille; Hicks, Michael; Lawrence, Kenneth; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Abell, Paul A.; Gaffey, Michael J.; Hardersen, Paul S.

    2012-11-01

    We observed Potentially Hazardous Asteroid (PHA) 2008 EV5 in the visible (0.30-0.92 μm) and near-IR (0.75-2.5 μm) wavelengths to determine its surface composition. This asteroid is especially interesting because it is a potential target for two sample return mission proposals (Marco Polo-R and Hayabusa-2) and human exploration due to its low delta-v for rendezvous. The spectrum of 2008 EV5 is essentially featureless with exception of a weak 0.48-μm spin-forbidden Fe3+ absorption band. The spectrum also has an overall blue slope. The albedo of 2008 EV5 remains uncertain with a lower limit at 0.05 and a higher end at 0.20 based on thermal modeling. The Busch et al. (Busch et al. [2011]. Icarus 212, 649-660) albedo estimate of 0.12 ± 0.04 is consistent with our thermal modeling results. The albedo and composition of 2008 EV5 are also consistent with a C-type taxonomic classification (Somers, J.M., Hicks, M.D., Lawrence, K.J. [2008]. Bull. Am. Astron. Soc. 40, 440). The best spectral match is with CI carbonaceous chondrites similar to Orgueil, which also have a weak 0.48-μm feature and an overall blue slope. This 0.48-μm feature is also seen in the spectrum of magnetite. The albedo of CI chondrites is at the lower limit of our estimated range for the albedo of 2008 EV5.

  10. Molecular Expression Profile Reveals Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets in Canine Endometrial Lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Azevedo Voorwald

    Full Text Available Cystic endometrial hyperplasia (CEH, mucometra, and pyometra are common uterine diseases in intact dogs, with pyometra being a life threatening disease. This study aimed to determine the gene expression profile of these lesions and potential biomarkers for closed-cervix pyometra, the most severe condition. Total RNA was extracted from 69 fresh endometrium samples collected from 21 healthy female dogs during diestrus, 16 CEH, 15 mucometra and 17 pyometra (eight open and nine closed-cervixes. Global gene expression was detected using the Affymetrix Canine Gene 1.0 ST Array. Unsupervised analysis revealed two clusters, one mainly composed of diestrus and CEH samples and the other by 12/15 mucometra and all pyometra samples. When comparing pyometra with other groups, 189 differentially expressed genes were detected. SLPI, PTGS2/COX2, MMP1, S100A8, S100A9 and IL8 were among the top up-regulated genes detected in pyometra, further confirmed by external expression data. Notably, a particular molecular profile in pyometra from animals previously treated with exogenous progesterone compounds was observed in comparison with pyometra from untreated dogs as well as with other groups irrespective of exogenous hormone treatment status. In addition to S100A8 and S100A9 genes, overexpression of the inflammatory cytokines IL1B, TNF and IL6 as well as LTF were detected in the pyometra from treated animals. Interestingly, closed pyometra was more frequently detected in treated dogs (64% versus 33%, with IL1B, TNF, LBP and CXCL10 among the most relevant overexpressed genes. This molecular signature associated with potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets, such as CXCL10 and COX2, should guide future clinical studies. Based on the gene expression profile we suggested that pyometra from progesterone treated dogs is a distinct molecular entity.

  11. Molecular Expression Profile Reveals Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets in Canine Endometrial Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorwald, Fabiana Azevedo; Marchi, Fabio Albuquerque; Villacis, Rolando Andre Rios; Alves, Carlos Eduardo Fonseca; Toniollo, Gilson Hélio; Amorim, Renee Laufer

    2015-01-01

    Cystic endometrial hyperplasia (CEH), mucometra, and pyometra are common uterine diseases in intact dogs, with pyometra being a life threatening disease. This study aimed to determine the gene expression profile of these lesions and potential biomarkers for closed-cervix pyometra, the most severe condition. Total RNA was extracted from 69 fresh endometrium samples collected from 21 healthy female dogs during diestrus, 16 CEH, 15 mucometra and 17 pyometra (eight open and nine closed-cervixes). Global gene expression was detected using the Affymetrix Canine Gene 1.0 ST Array. Unsupervised analysis revealed two clusters, one mainly composed of diestrus and CEH samples and the other by 12/15 mucometra and all pyometra samples. When comparing pyometra with other groups, 189 differentially expressed genes were detected. SLPI, PTGS2/COX2, MMP1, S100A8, S100A9 and IL8 were among the top up-regulated genes detected in pyometra, further confirmed by external expression data. Notably, a particular molecular profile in pyometra from animals previously treated with exogenous progesterone compounds was observed in comparison with pyometra from untreated dogs as well as with other groups irrespective of exogenous hormone treatment status. In addition to S100A8 and S100A9 genes, overexpression of the inflammatory cytokines IL1B, TNF and IL6 as well as LTF were detected in the pyometra from treated animals. Interestingly, closed pyometra was more frequently detected in treated dogs (64% versus 33%), with IL1B, TNF, LBP and CXCL10 among the most relevant overexpressed genes. This molecular signature associated with potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets, such as CXCL10 and COX2, should guide future clinical studies. Based on the gene expression profile we suggested that pyometra from progesterone treated dogs is a distinct molecular entity. PMID:26222498

  12. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as drug targets for diseases of the digestive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 20 of the 30 mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channel subunits are expressed by specific neurons and cells within the alimentary canal. They subserve important roles in taste, chemesthesis, mechanosensation, pain and hyperalgesia and contribute to the regulation of gastrointestinal motility, absorptive and secretory processes, blood flow, and mucosal homeostasis. In a cellular perspective, TRP channels operate either as primary detectors of chemical and physical stimuli, as secondary transducers of ionotropic or metabotropic receptors, or as ion transport channels. The polymodal sensory function of TRPA1, TRPM5, TRPM8, TRPP2, TRPV1, TRPV3 and TRPV4 enables the digestive system to survey its physical and chemical environment, which is relevant to all processes of digestion. TRPV5 and TRPV6 as well as TRPM6 and TRPM7 contribute to the absorption of Ca2+ and Mg2+, respectively. TRPM7 participates in intestinal pacemaker activity, and TRPC4 transduces muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation to smooth muscle contraction. Changes in TRP channel expression or function are associated with a variety of diseases/disorders of the digestive system, notably gastro-esophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, pain and hyperalgesia in heartburn, functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome, cholera, hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia, infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, esophageal, gastrointestinal and pancreatic cancer, and polycystic liver disease. These implications identify TRP channels as promising drug targets for the management of a number of gastrointestinal pathologies. As a result, major efforts are put into the development of selective TRP channel agonists and antagonists and the assessment of their therapeutic potential. PMID:21420431

  13. Evaluation of NAD(+) -dependent DNA ligase of mycobacteria as a potential target for antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korycka-Machala, Malgorzata; Rychta, Ewelina; Brzostek, Anna; Sayer, Heather R; Rumijowska-Galewicz, Anna; Bowater, Richard P; Dziadek, Jarosław

    2007-08-01

    Mycobacteria contain genes for several DNA ligases, including ligA, which encodes a NAD(+)-dependent enzyme that has been postulated to be a target for novel antibacterial compounds. Using a homologous recombination system, direct evidence is presented that wild-type ligA cannot be deleted from the chromosome of Mycobacterium smegmatis. Deletions of native ligA in M. smegmatis could be obtained only after the integration of an extra copy of M. smegmatis or Mycobacterium tuberculosis ligA into the attB site of the chromosome, with expression controlled by chemically inducible promoters. The four ATP-dependent DNA ligases encoded by the M. smegmatis chromosome were unable to replace the function of LigA. Interestingly, the LigA protein from M. smegmatis could be substituted with the NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase of Escherichia coli or the ATP-dependent ligase of bacteriophage T4. The conditional mutant strains allowed the analysis of the effect of LigA depletion on the growth of M. smegmatis. The protein level of the conditional mutants was estimated by Western blot analysis using antibodies raised against LigA of M. tuberculosis. This revealed that a strong overproduction or depletion of LigA did not affect the growth or survival of mycobacteria under standard laboratory conditions. In conclusion, although NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase is essential for mycobacterial viability, only low levels of protein are required for growth. These findings suggest that very efficient inhibition of enzyme activity would be required if NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase is to be useful as an antibiotic target in mycobacteria. The strains developed here will provide useful tools for the evaluation of the efficacy of any appropriate compounds in mycobacteria.

  14. ABCC4/MRP4: a MYCN-regulated transporter and potential therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony eHuynh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to cytotoxic drugs is thought to be a major cause of treatment failure in childhood neuroblastoma, and members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter superfamily may contribute to this phenomenon by active efflux of chemotherapeutic agents from cancer cells. As a member of the C subfamily of ABC transporters, multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP4/ABCC4 has the ability to export a variety of endogenous and exogenous substances across the plasma membrane. In light of its capacity for chemotherapeutic drug efflux, MRP4 has been studied in the context of drug resistance in a number of cancer cell types. However, MRP4 also influences cancer cell biology independently of chemotherapeutic drug exposure, which highlights the potential importance of endogenous MRP4 substrates in cancer biology. Furthermore, MRP4 is a direct transcriptional target of Myc family oncoproteins and expression of this transporter is a powerful independent predictor of clinical outcome in neuroblastoma. Together these features suggest that inhibition of MRP4 may be an attractive therapeutic approach for neuroblastoma and other cancers that rely on MRP4. In this respect, existing options for MRP4 inhibition are relatively non-selective and thus development of more specific anti-MRP4 compounds should be a major focus of future work in this area.

  15. Long Noncoding RNAs as New Architects in Cancer Epigenetics, Prognostic Biomarkers, and Potential Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseure, Didier; Drak Alsibai, Kinan; Nicolas, Andre; Bieche, Ivan; Morillon, Antonin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genome-wide analysis have revealed that 66% of the genome is actively transcribed into noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) while less than 2% of the sequences encode proteins. Among ncRNAs, high-resolution microarray and massively parallel sequencing technologies have identified long ncRNAs (>200 nucleotides) that lack coding protein function. LncRNAs abundance, nuclear location, and diversity allow them to create in association with protein interactome, a complex regulatory network orchestrating cellular phenotypic plasticity via modulation of all levels of protein-coding gene expression. Whereas lncRNAs biological functions and mechanisms of action are still not fully understood, accumulating data suggest that lncRNAs deregulation is pivotal in cancer initiation and progression and metastatic spread through various mechanisms, including epigenetic effectors, alternative splicing, and microRNA-like molecules. Mounting data suggest that several lncRNAs expression profiles in malignant tumors are associated with prognosis and they can be detected in biological fluids. In this review, we will briefly discuss characteristics and functions of lncRNAs, their role in carcinogenesis, and their potential usefulness as diagnosis and prognosis biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets.

  16. Reactive astrocytes as potential manipulation targets in novel cell replacement therapy of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-Wei; Yung, Kin-Lam; Chan, Ying-Shing

    2005-11-01

    Parkinson' disease (PD) is a most common and debilitating degenerative disease resulted from massive loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, which is characterized by severe motor symptoms of tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and postural instability. Protection of nigral dopamine neurons from progressive degenerative death and cell replacement of novel dopamine neurons are hopeful strategies against PD in humans. The reactive astrocytes or functional activation of astrocytes abundantly occurred in brain insults including trauma, ischemia, and 6-OHDA or MPTP-treated PD animal models. Although they were traditionally assumed to impede neuronal regeneration by forming glial scars, growing evidence has indicated that reactive astrocytes do offer crucial benefits in functional recovery of brain injuries. The reactive astrocytes can produce various neurotrophic factors for neuron survival, synthesize extracellular substrates for axonal outgrowth and synaptogenesis, act as scavengers for free radical and excess glutamate, and promote neurogenesis of neural progenitor cells in the adult brains. We thereafter hypothesize that reactive astrocytes may also play important roles in the protection of nigral dopamine neurons or transplanted dopamine cells through their neurotrophic functions and active interaction with dopamine neurons or neural progenitor cells. Future approaches deserve to target on neurotrophic functions of reactive astrocytes in the basal ganglia and interventions to facilitate survival and axonal regeneration of dopamine neurons or differentiation of dopamine progenitor cells. Novel pharmaceutical and cell replacement strategies will hopefully be developed by potential manipulation of reactive astrocytes in the basal ganglia in prevention and treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  17. Potential of activatable FAP-targeting immunoliposomes in intraoperative imaging of spontaneous metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansi, Felista L; Rüger, Ronny; Böhm, Claudia; Kontermann, Roland E; Teichgraeber, Ulf K; Fahr, Alfred; Hilger, Ingrid

    2016-05-01

    Despite intensive research and medical advances met, metastatic disease remains the most common cause of death in cancer patients. This results from late diagnosis, poor therapeutic response and undetected micrometastases and tumor margins during surgery. One approach to overcome these challenges involves fluorescence imaging, which exploits the properties of fluorescent probes for diagnostic detection of molecular structures at the onset of transformation and for intraoperative detection of metastases and tumor margins in real time. Considering these benefits, many contrast agents suitable for fluorescence imaging have been reported. However, most reports only demonstrate the detection of primary tumors and not the detection of metastases or their application in models of image-guided surgery. In this work, we demonstrate the influence of fibroblast activation protein (FAP) on the metastatic potential of fibrosarcoma cells and elucidate the efficacy of activatable FAP-targeting immunoliposomes (FAP-IL) for image-guided detection of the spontaneous metastases in mice models. Furthermore, we characterized the biodistribution and cellular localization of the liposomal fluorescent components in mice organs and traced their excretion over time in urine and feces. Taken together, activatable FAP-IL enhances intraoperative imaging of metastases. Their high accumulation in metastases, subsequent localization in the bile canaliculi and liver kupffer cells and suitable excretion in feces substantiates their potency as contrast agents for intraoperative imaging. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. pH-Regulatory Proteins as Potential Targets in Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Poder

    Tumor cells exhibit increased glycolytic metabolism, and combined with their high proliferative and anabolic rates, this results in increased intracellular acid production compared to normal cells. As maintenance of a slightly alkaline intracellular pH (pHi) is a prerequisite for cellular surviva......, this work demonstrates important functional roles for the pH-regulatory ion transporters NHE1, NBCn1, MCT1 and -4 in breast cancer and highlights their potential as novel targets in breast cancer treatment....... tissues. The focus of the present PhD study is on understanding the mechanisms through which pH-regulatory transporters are regulated by the breast tumor microenvironment, and how these transporters in turn favor cancer progression. In Paper I, we summarized the recent knowledge on the dynamic...... exhibit distinct spatial organization during 3D growth of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. By pharmacological inhibition and stable shRNA-mediated knockdown, we addressed the specific contributions of the transporters to spheroid growth and show that the specific transporters contribute to breast...

  19. Cancer Targeting Potential of 99mTc-Finasteride in Experimental Model of Prostate Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Gowsia; Passi, Neelima D; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Chadha, Vijayta Dani

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to radiolabel finasteride, a novel 5α-reductase inhibitor, to evaluate its cancer targeting potential in experimental model of prostate carcinogenesis. Finasteride was effectively radiolabeled with 99mTc and showed >90% labeling efficiency. The radiopharmaceutical was found to be stable up to 6 hours in rat serum at 37°C. The blood kinetics of the 99mTc-finasteride followed a biphasic release pattern, whereby fast-release phase was observed at 15 seconds and a slow-release phase was observed after 30 minutes of administration. The plasma protein binding of the radio complex observed was 83.89%. For biodistribution studies, the rats were divided into two groups. Group I served as normal controls, while group II was subjected to carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and hormone testosterone propionate (T) for induction of prostate carcinogenesis, which was confirmed histopathologically. The biodistribution studies on control and carcinogen-treated rats revealed a significant percent-specific uptake in prostate, which was found to be increased significantly as a function of time. The most significant finding of the study was an increase in the percent-specific uptake in prostate of carcinogen-treated animals when compared to the percent-specific uptake in prostate of normal rats after 2 and 4 hours postinjection. The study concludes that 99mTc-finasteride possesses selectively toward prostate cancer tissue and can be explored further for its role in detection of prostate cancer.

  20. Apelin/APJ system: A novel potential therapy target for kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhen; Wu, Lele; Chen, Linxi

    2018-05-01

    Apelin is an endogenous ligand of seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor APJ. Apelin and APJ are distributed in various tissues, including the heart, lung, kidney, and even in tumor tissues. Studies show that apelin mRNA is highly expressed in the inner stripe of kidney outer medulla, which plays an important role in process of water and sodium balance. Additionally, more studies also indicate that apelin/APJ system exerts a broad range of activities in kidney. Therefore, we review the role of apelin/APJ system in kidney diseases such as renal fibrosis, renal ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetic nephropathy, polycystic kidney disease, and hemodialysis (HD). Apelin/APJ system can improve renal interstitial fibrosis by reducing the deposition of extracellular matrix. Apelin/APJ system significantly reduces renal ischemia/reperfusion injury by inhibiting renal cell death. Apelin/APJ system involves the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Apelin/APJ system also predicts the process of polycystic kidney disease. Besides, apelin/APJ system prevents some dialysis complications in HD patients. And apelin/APJ system alleviates chronic kidney disease (CKD) by inhibiting vascular calcification (VC). Overall, apelin/APJ system plays diversified roles in kidney disease and may be a potential target for the treatment of kidney disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The Emerging Role of HMGB1 in Neuropathic Pain: A Potential Therapeutic Target for Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Wan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain (NPP is intolerable, persistent, and specific type of long-term pain. It is considered to be a direct consequence of pathological changes affecting the somatosensory system and can be debilitating for affected patients. Despite recent progress and growing interest in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease, NPP still presents a major diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 mediates inflammatory and immune reactions in nervous system and emerging evidence reveals that HMGB1 plays an essential role in neuroinflammation through receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLR, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, C-X-X motif chemokines receptor 4 (CXCR4, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor. In this review, we present evidence from studies that address the role of HMGB1 in NPP. First, we review studies aimed at determining the role of HMGB1 in NPP and discuss the possible mechanisms underlying HMGB1-mediated NPP progression where receptors for HMGB1 are involved. Then we review studies that address HMGB1 as a potential therapeutic target for NPP.

  2. The therapeutic potential of targeting the BRAF mutation in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Afsane; Hesari, AmirReza; Khazaei, Majid; Hassanian, Seyed Mahdi; Ferns, Gordon A; Avan, Amir

    2018-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the most lethal malignancies globally. BRAF is a member of the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signaling pathway. Its constitutive activation can result in increased cellular growth, development, invasion, and resistance to therapy. A mutation of the BRAF gene is present in 5-10% of metastatic colorectal cancers. BRAF mutations have been found to predict a lack of benefit to anti-EGFR therapy in metastatic CRC. Furthermore, CRC containing the BRAF V600E mutation display an innate resistance to BRAF inhibitors. The mechanisms of cell resistance can be explained at least in part by ERK dependent and ERK in-dependent pathway. Clinical trials evaluating the combinations of BRAF, PI3K, EGFR, and/or MEK inhibitors have revealed promising activity in BRAF mutant containing CRCs. There may be some benefit from future studies that focus on improving the efficacy of combined therapy in CRC with respect to the sustained effects. The aim of current review is to give an overview about the current status and prospective regarding the therapeutic potential of targeting BRAF mutant colorectal cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Long-term potentiation in spinal nociceptive pathways as a novel target for pain therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xian-Guo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Long-term potentiation (LTP in nociceptive spinal pathways shares several features with hyperalgesia and has been proposed to be a cellular mechanism of pain amplification in acute and chronic pain states. Spinal LTP is typically induced by noxious input and has therefore been hypothesized to contribute to acute postoperative pain and to forms of chronic pain that develop from an initial painful event, peripheral inflammation or neuropathy. Under this assumption, preventing LTP induction may help to prevent the development of exaggerated postoperative pain and reversing established LTP may help to treat patients who have an LTP component to their chronic pain. Spinal LTP is also induced by abrupt opioid withdrawal, making it a possible mechanism of some forms of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Here, we give an overview of targets for preventing LTP induction and modifying established LTP as identified in animal studies. We discuss which of the various symptoms of human experimental and clinical pain may be manifestations of spinal LTP, review the pharmacology of these possible human LTP manifestations and compare it to the pharmacology of spinal LTP in rodents.

  4. Long-term potentiation in spinal nociceptive pathways as a novel target for pain therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) in nociceptive spinal pathways shares several features with hyperalgesia and has been proposed to be a cellular mechanism of pain amplification in acute and chronic pain states. Spinal LTP is typically induced by noxious input and has therefore been hypothesized to contribute to acute postoperative pain and to forms of chronic pain that develop from an initial painful event, peripheral inflammation or neuropathy. Under this assumption, preventing LTP induction may help to prevent the development of exaggerated postoperative pain and reversing established LTP may help to treat patients who have an LTP component to their chronic pain. Spinal LTP is also induced by abrupt opioid withdrawal, making it a possible mechanism of some forms of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Here, we give an overview of targets for preventing LTP induction and modifying established LTP as identified in animal studies. We discuss which of the various symptoms of human experimental and clinical pain may be manifestations of spinal LTP, review the pharmacology of these possible human LTP manifestations and compare it to the pharmacology of spinal LTP in rodents. PMID:21443797

  5. Proteomic identification of cyclophilin A as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in oral submucous fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Gong, Wang; Deng, Jing; Sun, Chongkui; Gao, Yijun; Peng, Jieying; Wu, Yingfang; Li, Jiang; Fang, Changyun; Chen, Qianming

    2016-01-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) is a pre-cancerous lesion, which is characterized by fibrosis of the oral submucosa. Despite large body of studies focusing on this disease, the molecular mechanisms underlying the progression of OSF remained unclear. In this study, 2-DE-based proteomic approaches were employed to identify the differently expressed proteins between OSF and normal tissues. In total, 88 proteins were identified with altered expression levels, including CypA. Upregulation of CypA was further validated through immunohistochemistry staining combined with Q-PCR and western blot by using clinical samples. Statistical analyses reveal that CypA expression level is correlated to the progression of OSF. Finally, functional study reveals a pro-proliferative property of CypA in fibroblast cells by using multiple in vitro models. The present data suggest that CypA might be a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for OSF, and will lead to a better understanding of OSF pathogenesis. PMID:27533088

  6. Conotoxins Targeting Neuronal Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtypes: Potential Analgesics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R. McArthur

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC are the primary mediators of electrical signal amplification and propagation in excitable cells. VGSC subtypes are diverse, with different biophysical and pharmacological properties, and varied tissue distribution. Altered VGSC expression and/or increased VGSC activity in sensory neurons is characteristic of inflammatory and neuropathic pain states. Therefore, VGSC modulators could be used in prospective analgesic compounds. VGSCs have specific binding sites for four conotoxin families: μ-, μO-, δ- and ί-conotoxins. Various studies have identified that the binding site of these peptide toxins is restricted to well-defined areas or domains. To date, only the μ- and μO-family exhibit analgesic properties in animal pain models. This review will focus on conotoxins from the μ- and μO-families that act on neuronal VGSCs. Examples of how these conotoxins target various pharmacologically important neuronal ion channels, as well as potential problems with the development of drugs from conotoxins, will be discussed.

  7. Galectin-3 as a marker and potential therapeutic target in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Luo, Minna; Liang, Xi; Wang, Dan; Gu, Xin; Duan, Chao; Gu, Huizi; Chen, Guanglei; Zhao, Xinhan; Zhao, Zuowei; Liu, Caigang

    2014-01-01

    Galectin-3 has a relatively high level of expression in triple-negative breast cancers and is a potential marker for this disease. However, the clinical and prognostic implications of galectin-3 expression in breast cancer remain unclear. We examined mastectomy specimens from 1086 breast cancer cases and matching, adjacent non-cancerous tissues using immunohistochemistry. Overall, triple-negative breast cancers expressed galectin-3 more strongly than did other breast cancers types (63.59% vs 21.36%, P = 0.001). Galectin-3 expression was not found to be an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer by Cox regression analysis, but was associated with chemotherapeutic resistance. Apoptosis was only weakly induced by arsenic trioxide (ATO) treatment in galectin-3-positive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7), although ATO treatment up-regulated galectin-3 expression. Knockdown of galectin-3 in MDA-MB-231 cells sensitized them to killing by ATO. These findings support a possible role for galectin-3 as a marker for triple-negative breast cancer progression and as a therapeutic target in combination with ATO treatment, although the mechanisms that underlie this synergy require further investigation.

  8. Galectin-3 as a marker and potential therapeutic target in breast cancer.

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    Hao Zhang

    Full Text Available Galectin-3 has a relatively high level of expression in triple-negative breast cancers and is a potential marker for this disease. However, the clinical and prognostic implications of galectin-3 expression in breast cancer remain unclear. We examined mastectomy specimens from 1086 breast cancer cases and matching, adjacent non-cancerous tissues using immunohistochemistry. Overall, triple-negative breast cancers expressed galectin-3 more strongly than did other breast cancers types (63.59% vs 21.36%, P = 0.001. Galectin-3 expression was not found to be an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer by Cox regression analysis, but was associated with chemotherapeutic resistance. Apoptosis was only weakly induced by arsenic trioxide (ATO treatment in galectin-3-positive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, although ATO treatment up-regulated galectin-3 expression. Knockdown of galectin-3 in MDA-MB-231 cells sensitized them to killing by ATO. These findings support a possible role for galectin-3 as a marker for triple-negative breast cancer progression and as a therapeutic target in combination with ATO treatment, although the mechanisms that underlie this synergy require further investigation.

  9. Clinical investigation of TROP-2 as an independent biomarker and potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

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    Zhao, Peng; Yu, Hai-Zheng; Cai, Jian-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Colon cancer is associated with a severe demographic and economic burden worldwide. The pathogenesis of colon cancer is highly complex and involves sequential genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Despite extensive investigation, the pathogenesis of colon cancer remains to be elucidated. As the third most common type of cancer worldwide, the treatment options for colon cancer are currently limited. Human trophoblast cell‑surface marker (TROP‑2), is a cell‑surface transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed by several types of epithelial carcinoma. In addition, TROP‑2 has been demonstrated to be associated with tumorigenesis and invasiveness in solid types of tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protein expression of TROP‑2 in colon cancer tissues, and further explore the association between the expression of TROP‑2 and clinicopathological features of patients with colon cancer. The expression and localization of the TROP‑2 protein was examined using western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. Finally, the expression of TROP‑2 expression was correlated to conventional clinicopathological features of colon cancer using a χ2 test. The results revealed that TROP‑2 protein was expressed at high levels in the colon cancer tissues, which was associated with the development and pathological process of colon cancer. Therefore, TROP‑2 may be used as a biomarker to determine the clinical prognosis, and as a potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  10. [Cell signaling pathways interaction in cellular proliferation: Potential target for therapeutic interventionism].

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    Valdespino-Gómez, Víctor Manuel; Valdespino-Castillo, Patricia Margarita; Valdespino-Castillo, Víctor Edmundo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, cellular physiology is best understood by analysing their interacting molecular components. Proteins are the major components of the cells. Different proteins are organised in the form of functional clusters, pathways or networks. These molecules are ordered in clusters of receptor molecules of extracellular signals, transducers, sensors and biological response effectors. The identification of these intracellular signaling pathways in different cellular types has required a long journey of experimental work. More than 300 intracellular signaling pathways have been identified in human cells. They participate in cell homeostasis processes for structural and functional maintenance. Some of them participate simultaneously or in a nearly-consecutive progression to generate a cellular phenotypic change. In this review, an analysis is performed on the main intracellular signaling pathways that take part in the cellular proliferation process, and the potential use of some components of these pathways as target for therapeutic interventionism are also underlined. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Galectin-3 as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Tumors Arising from Malignant Endothelia

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    Kim D. Johnson

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Angiosarcoma (ASA in humans, hemangiosarcoma (HSA in dogs are deadly neoplastic diseases characterized by an aggressive growth of malignant cells with endothelial phenotype, widespread metastasis, poor response to chemotherapy. Galectin-3 (Gal-3, a p-galactoside-binding lectin implicated in tumor progression, metastasis, endothelial cell biology, angiogenesis, regulation of apoptosis, neoplastic cell response to cytotoxic drugs, has not been studied before in tumors arising from malignant endothelia. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Gal-3 could be widely expressed in human ASA, canine HSA, could play an important role in malignant endothelial cell biology. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that 100% of the human ASA (10 of 10, canine HSA (17 of 17 samples analyzed expressed Gal-3. Two carbohydrate-based Gal-3 inhibitors, modified citrus pectin (MCP, lactulosyl-l-leucine (LL, caused a dose-dependent reduction of SVR murine ASA cell clonogenic survival through the inhibition of Gal-3 antiapoptotic function. Furthermore, both MCP, LL sensitized SVR cells to the cytotoxic drug doxorubicin to a degree sufficient to reduce the in vitro IC50 of doxorubicin by 10.7-fold, 3.64old, respectively. These results highlight the important role of Gal-3 in the biology of ASA, identify Gal-3 as a potential therapeutic target in tumors arising from malignant endothelial cells.

  12. Proteomic alterations of fibroblasts induced by ovarian cancer cells reveal potential cancer targets.

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    Zhang, X Y; Hong, S S; Zhang, M; Cai, Q Q; Zhang, M X; Xu, C J

    2017-08-31

    The common spread pattern of ovarian cancer is peritoneal implantation. The growth of the shed ovarian cancer cells in the peritoneal cavity is closely related to the tumor microenvironment. Cancer-associated fibroblasts are vital in the tumor microenvironment. It is not clearly defined that the protein expression alters during the activating process of fibroblasts. This study detected the protein alterations in fibroblasts induced by ovarian cancer cells and explored the potential biological relevance through two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Our data showed that the level of CENPE, BAG2, SOD2, GDI2, CORO1C, CFL1, DSTN, CALD1, PHGDH, PDHA1, AKR1B1, TST and TBCA proteins were significantly up-regulated in the fibroblasts co-cultured with ovarian cancer cells, whereas HSPB1, P4HB and VIM were significantly down-regulated. However, only BAG2, SOD2 and CORO1C proteins were confirmed to be significantly increased by western blot analysis. The differentially expressed proteins were mainly involved in metabolic processes, cellular component organization, responses to stimulus, multicellular organismal processes, localization, protein depolymerization, cellular senescence and the mitotic pathway. These data demonstrated that fibroblasts had an altered protein expression pattern after being induced by ovarian cancer cells, and participated in multiple cell processes resulting in tumor progression. The differentially expressed proteins should be considered as targets for cancer treatment Keywords: ovarian neoplasms, fibroblast, stroma, biomarker, proteomics.

  13. Gut microbiota as a potential target of metabolic syndrome: the role of probiotics and prebiotics.

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    He, Mingqian; Shi, Bingyin

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) comprises central obesity, increased plasma glucose levels, hyperlipidemia and hypertension, and its incidence is increasing due to changes in lifestyle and dietary structure in recent years. MS has been proven to be associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus, leading to morbidity and mortality. In this manuscript, we review recent studies concerning the role of the gut microbiota in MS modulation. Manipulation of the gut microbiota through the administration of prebiotics or probiotics may assist in weight loss and reduce plasma glucose and serum lipid levels, decreasing the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus. To the best of our knowledge, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), bile salt hydrolase (BSH), metabolic endotoxemia and the endocannabinoid (eCB) system are essential in regulating the initiation and progression of MS through the normalization of adipogenesis and the regulation of insulin secretion, fat accumulation, energy homeostasis, and plasma cholesterol levels. Therefore, the gut microbiota may serve as a potential therapeutic target for MS. However, further studies are needed to enhance our understanding of manipulating the gut microbiota and the role of the gut microbiota in MS prevention and treatment.

  14. Maize benefits the predatory beetle, Propylea japonica (Thunberg, to provide potential to enhance biological control for aphids in cotton.

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    Fang Ouyang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biological control provided by natural enemies play an important role in integrated pest management. Generalist insect predators provide an important biological service in the regulation of agricultural insect pests. Our goal is to understand the explicit process of oviposition preference, habitat selection and feeding behavior of predators in farmland ecosystem consisting of multiple crops, which is central to devising and delivering an integrated pest management program. METHODOLOGY: The hypotheses was that maize can serve as habitat for natural enemies and benefits predators to provide potential to enhance biological control for pest insects in cotton. This explicit process of a predatory beetle, Propylea japonica, in agricultural ecosystem composed of cotton and maize were examined by field investigation and stable carbon isotope analysis during 2008-2010. PRINCIPAL FINDING: Field investigation showed that P. japonica adults will search host plants for high prey abundance before laying eggs, indicating indirectly that P. japonica adults prefer to inhabit maize plants and travel to cotton plants to actively prey on aphids. The δ(13C values of adult P. japonica in a dietary shift experiment found that individual beetles were shifting from a C(3- to a C(4-based diet of aphids reared on maize or cotton, respectively, and began to reflect the isotope ratio of their new C(4 resources within one week. Approximately 80-100% of the diet of P. japonica adults in maize originated from a C(3-based resource in June, July and August, while approximately 80% of the diet originated from a C(4-based resource in September. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Results suggest that maize can serve as a habitat or refuge source for the predatory beetle, P. japonica, and benefits predators to provide potential to enhance biological control for insect pests in cotton.

  15. Maize benefits the predatory beetle, Propylea japonica (Thunberg), to provide potential to enhance biological control for aphids in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Fang; Men, Xingyuan; Yang, Bing; Su, Jianwei; Zhang, Yongsheng; Zhao, Zihua; Ge, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Biological control provided by natural enemies play an important role in integrated pest management. Generalist insect predators provide an important biological service in the regulation of agricultural insect pests. Our goal is to understand the explicit process of oviposition preference, habitat selection and feeding behavior of predators in farmland ecosystem consisting of multiple crops, which is central to devising and delivering an integrated pest management program. The hypotheses was that maize can serve as habitat for natural enemies and benefits predators to provide potential to enhance biological control for pest insects in cotton. This explicit process of a predatory beetle, Propylea japonica, in agricultural ecosystem composed of cotton and maize were examined by field investigation and stable carbon isotope analysis during 2008-2010. Field investigation showed that P. japonica adults will search host plants for high prey abundance before laying eggs, indicating indirectly that P. japonica adults prefer to inhabit maize plants and travel to cotton plants to actively prey on aphids. The δ(13)C values of adult P. japonica in a dietary shift experiment found that individual beetles were shifting from a C(3)- to a C(4)-based diet of aphids reared on maize or cotton, respectively, and began to reflect the isotope ratio of their new C(4) resources within one week. Approximately 80-100% of the diet of P. japonica adults in maize originated from a C(3)-based resource in June, July and August, while approximately 80% of the diet originated from a C(4)-based resource in September. Results suggest that maize can serve as a habitat or refuge source for the predatory beetle, P. japonica, and benefits predators to provide potential to enhance biological control for insect pests in cotton.

  16. Combining in vitro protein detection and in vivo antibody detection identifies potential vaccine targets against Staphylococcus aureus during osteomyelitis.

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    den Reijer, P Martijn; Sandker, Marjan; Snijders, Susan V; Tavakol, Mehri; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; van Wamel, Willem J B

    2017-02-01

    Currently, little is known about the in vivo human immune response against Staphylococcus aureus during a biofilm-associated infection, such as osteomyelitis, and how this relates to protein production in biofilms in vitro. Therefore, we characterized IgG responses in 10 patients with chronic osteomyelitis against 50 proteins of S. aureus, analyzed the presence of these proteins in biofilms of the infecting isolates on polystyrene (PS) and human bone in vitro, and explored the relation between in vivo and in vitro data. IgG levels against 15 different proteins were significantly increased in patients compared to healthy controls. Using a novel competitive Luminex-based assay, eight of these proteins [alpha toxin, Staphylococcus aureus formyl peptide receptor-like 1 inhibitor (FlipR), glucosaminidase, iron-responsive surface determinants A and H, the putative ABC transporter SACOL0688, staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN), and serine-aspartate repeat-containing protein E (SdrE)] were also detected in a majority of the infecting isolates during biofilm formation in vitro. However, 4 other proteins were detected in only a minority of isolates in vitro while, vice versa, 7 proteins were detected in multiple isolates in vitro but not associated with significantly increased IgG levels in patients. Detection of proteins was largely confirmed using a transcriptomic approach. Our data provide further insights into potential therapeutic targets, such as for vaccination, to reduce S. aureus virulence and biofilm formation. At the same time, our data suggest that either in vitro or immunological in vivo data alone should be interpreted cautiously and that combined studies are necessary to identify potential targets.

  17. Structure-based virtual screening and molecular docking for the identification of potential multi-targeted inhibitors against breast cancer

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    Yousuf Z

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Zeeshan Yousuf,1 Kanzal Iman,1 Nauman Iftikhar,2 Muhammad Usman Mirza3,4 1Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, The University of Lahore, Lahore, 2National Institute for Genomics and Advanced Biotechnology, National Agricultural Research Centre, Islamabad, 3Centre for Research in Molecular Medicine, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan; 4Medicinal Chemistry, Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, Rega Institute for Medical Research, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Abstract: Breast cancer is characterized by an uncontrolled growth of cells in breast tissue. Genes that foster cell growth in breast cells are overexpressed, giving rise to breast tumors. The identification of effective inhibitors represents a rational chemopreventive strategy. The current in silico study provides a pharmacoinformatic approach for the identification of active compounds against a co-chaperone HSP90 and the human epidermal growth factor receptors EGFR and HER2/neu receptor. The elevated levels of expression of these target proteins have been documented in breast cancer. The utilization of drug-likeness filters helped to evaluate the pharmacological activity of potential lead compounds. Those fulfilling this criterion were subjected to energy minimization for 1000 steepest descent steps at a root means square gradient of 0.02 with an Amber ff12SB force field. Based on molecular docking results and binding interaction analysis, this study represents five chemical compounds (S-258282355, S-258012947, S-259417539, S-258002927, and S-259411474 that indicate high binding energies that range between −8.7 to −10.3 kcal/mol. With high cytochrome P inhibitory promiscuity activity, these multi-targeted potential hits portray not only good physiochemical interactions but also an excellent profile of absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity, which hypothesizes that these compounds can be developed as anticancer

  18. Identification of potential target genes for the tomato fruit-ripening regulator RIN by chromatin immunoprecipitation

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    Nakano Toshitsugu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During ripening, climacteric fruits increase their ethylene level and subsequently undergo various physiological changes, such as softening, pigmentation and development of aroma and flavor. These changes occur simultaneously and are caused by the highly synchronized expression of numerous genes at the onset of ripening. In tomatoes, the MADS-box transcription factor RIN has been regarded as a key regulator responsible for the onset of ripening by acting upstream of both ethylene- and non-ethylene-mediated controls. However, except for LeACS2, direct targets of RIN have not been clarified, and little is known about the transcriptional cascade for ripening. Results Using immunoprecipitated (IPed DNA fragments recovered by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP with anti-RIN antibody from ripening tomato fruit, we analyzed potential binding sites for RIN (CArG-box sites in the promoters of representative ripening-induced genes by quantitative PCR. Results revealed nearly a 5- to 20-fold enrichment of CArG boxes in the promoters of LeACS2, LeACS4, PG, TBG4, LeEXP1, and LeMAN4 and of RIN itself, indicating direct interaction of RIN with their promoters in vivo. Moreover, sequence analysis and genome mapping of 51 cloned IPed DNAs revealed potential RIN binding sites. Quantitative PCR revealed that four of the potential binding sites were enriched 4- to 17-fold in the IPed DNA pools compared with the controls, indicating direct interaction of RIN with these sites in vivo. Near one of the four CArG boxes we found a gene encoding a protein similar to thioredoxin y1. An increase in the transcript level of this gene was observed with ripening in normal fruit but not in the rin mutant, suggesting that RIN possibly induces its expression. Conclusions The presented results suggest that RIN controls fruit softening and ethylene production by the direct transcriptional regulation of cell-wall-modifying genes and ethylene biosynthesis genes

  19. Novel VEGF decoy receptor fusion protein conbercept targeting multiple VEGF isoforms provide remarkable anti-angiogenesis effect in vivo.

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    Qin Wang

    Full Text Available VEGF family factors are known to be the principal stimulators of abnormal angiogenesis, which play a fundamental role in tumor and various ocular diseases. Inhibition of VEGF is widely applied in antiangiogenic therapy. Conbercept is a novel decoy receptor protein constructed by fusing VEGF receptor 1 and VEGF receptor 2 extracellular domains with the Fc region of human immunoglobulin. In this study, we systematically evaluated the binding affinity of conbercept with VEGF isoforms and PlGF by using anti-VEGF antibody (Avastin as reference. BIACORE and ELISA assay results indicated that conbercept could bind different VEGF-A isoforms with higher affinity than reference. Furthermore, conbercept could also bind VEGF-B and PlGF, whereas Avastin showed no binding. Oxygen-induced retinopathy model showed that conbercept could inhibit the formation of neovasularizations. In tumor-bearing nude mice, conbercept could also suppress tumor growth very effectively in vivo. Overall, our study have demonstrated that conbercept could bind with high affinity to multiple VEGF isoforms and consequently provide remarkable anti-angiogenic effect, suggesting the possibility to treat angiogenesis-related diseases such as cancer and wet AMD etc.

  20. A Cell Wall Proteome and Targeted Cell Wall Analyses Provide Novel Information on Hemicellulose Metabolism in Flax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabi, Malika; Goulas, Estelle; Leclercq, Celine C; de Waele, Isabelle; Rihouey, Christophe; Cenci, Ugo; Day, Arnaud; Blervacq, Anne-Sophie; Neutelings, Godfrey; Duponchel, Ludovic; Lerouge, Patrice; Hausman, Jean-François; Renaut, Jenny; Hawkins, Simon

    2017-09-01

    Experimentally-generated (nanoLC-MS/MS) proteomic analyses of four different flax organs/tissues (inner-stem, outer-stem, leaves and roots) enriched in proteins from 3 different sub-compartments (soluble-, membrane-, and cell wall-proteins) was combined with publically available data on flax seed and whole-stem proteins to generate a flax protein database containing 2996 nonredundant total proteins. Subsequent multiple analyses (MapMan, CAZy, WallProtDB and expert curation) of this database were then used to identify a flax cell wall proteome consisting of 456 nonredundant proteins localized in the cell wall and/or associated with cell wall biosynthesis, remodeling and other cell wall related processes. Examination of the proteins present in different flax organs/tissues provided a detailed overview of cell wall metabolism and highlighted the importance of hemicellulose and pectin remodeling in stem tissues. Phylogenetic analyses of proteins in the cell wall proteome revealed an important paralogy in the class IIIA xyloglucan endo-transglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH) family associated with xyloglucan endo-hydrolase activity.Immunolocalisation, FT-IR microspectroscopy, and enzymatic fingerprinting indicated that flax fiber primary/S1 cell walls contained xyloglucans with typical substituted side chains as well as glucuronoxylans in much lower quantities. These results suggest a likely central role of xyloglucans and endotransglucosylase/hydrolase activity in flax fiber formation and cell wall remodeling processes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Identifying food proteins with allergenic potential: evolution of approaches to safety assessment and research to provide additional tools.

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    Ladics, Gregory S; Selgrade, MaryJane K

    2009-08-01

    A safety assessment process exists for genetically engineered crops that includes the evaluation of the expressed protein for allergenic potential. The objectives of this evaluation are twofold: (1) to protect allergic consumers from exposure to known allergenic or cross-reactive proteins, and (2) protect the general population from risks associated with the introduction of genes encoding proteins that are likely to become food allergens. The first systematic approach to address these concerns was formulated by Metcalfe et al. [Metcalfe, D.D., Astwood, J.D., Townsend, R., Sampson, H.A., Taylor, S.L., and Fuchs, R.L. 1996. Assessment of the allergenic potential of foods from genetically engineered crop plants. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr. 36(5), 165-186.] and subsequently Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) [FAO/WHO, 2001. Evaluation of allergenicity of genetically modified foods. Report of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Consultation on Allergenicity of Foods Derived from Biotechnology. January 22-25, 2001. Rome, Italy]. More recently, Codex [Codex Alimentarius Commission, 2003. Alinorm 03/34: Joint FAO/WHO Food Standard Programme, Codex Alimentarius Commission, Twenty-Fifth Session, Rome, Italy, 30 June-5 July, 2003. Appendix III, Guideline for the conduct of food safety assessment of foods derived from recombinant-DNA plants, and Appendix IV, Annex on the assessment of possible allergenicity. pp. 47-60], noting that no single factor is recognized as an identifier for protein allergenicity, suggested a weight of evidence approach be conducted that takes into account a variety of factors and approaches for an overall assessment of allergenic potential. These various recommendations are based on what is known about allergens, including the history of exposure and safety of the gene(s) source; amino acid sequence identity to human allergens; stability to pepsin digestion in vitro; protein abundance in the crop and

  2. HN125: A Novel Immunoadhesin Targeting MUC16 with Potential for Cancer Therapy

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    Xinran Xiang, Mingqian Feng, Mildred Felder, Joseph P. Connor, Yan-gao Man, Manish S. Patankar, Mitchell Ho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mucin MUC16 expresses the repeating peptide epitope CA125 that has been known for decades to be a well-validated cancer marker that is overexpressed on the cell surface of ovarian cancers and other malignant tumors. In spite of recent efforts to make mouse monoclonal antibodies to MUC16 to treat ovarian cancer, a human monoclonal antibody against this mucin has not been described. MUC16 interacts with mesothelin, a protein that mediates heterotypic cancer cell adhesion, indicating that MUC16 and mesothelin play an important role in the peritoneal implantation and metastasis of ovarian tumors. Therefore, a suitable candidate for therapeutic targeting of MUC16 would functionally block the interaction of MUC16 and mesothelin.Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we report the generation of a novel immunoadhesin, HN125, against MUC16 that consists of a functional MUC16 binding domain of mesothelin (IAB and the Fc portion of a human antibody IgG1. The yield for purified HN125 proteins is over 100 µg/mL of HEK-293 culture supernatant. We show that HN125 has high and specific affinity for MUC16-expressing cancer cells by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. HN125 has the ability to disrupt the heterotypic cancer cell adhesion mediated by the MUC16-mesothelin interaction. Moreover, it elicits strong antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity against MUC16-positive cancer cells in vitro.Conclusion/Significance: This report describes a novel human immunotherapeutic agent highly specific for MUC16 with potential for treating ovarian cancer and other MUC16-expressing tumors. Because of its lower immunogenicity in patients, a fully human protein is the most desirable format for clinical applications. We believe that the methods developed here may apply to the generation of other tumor-targeting immunoadhesins when it is difficult to obtain a human monoclonal antibody to a given antigen for clinical applications. The resultant

  3. Scabies mite peritrophins are potential targets of human host innate immunity.

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    Angela Mika

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pruritic scabies lesions caused by Sarcoptes scabiei burrowing in the stratum corneum of human skin facilitate opportunistic bacterial infections. Emerging resistance to current therapeutics emphasizes the need to identify novel targets for protective intervention. We have characterized several protein families located in the mite gut as crucial factors for host-parasite interactions. Among these multiple proteins inhibit human complement, presumably to avoid complement-mediated damage of gut epithelial cells. Peritrophins are major components of the peritrophic matrix often found in the gut of arthropods. We hypothesized that a peritrophin, if abundant in the scabies mite gut, could be an activator of complement. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A novel full length scabies mite peritrophin (SsPTP1 was identified in a cDNA library from scabies mites. The amino acid sequence revealed four putative chitin binding domains (CBD. Recombinant expression of one CBD of the highly repetitive SsPTP1 sequence as TSP-hexaHis-fusion protein resulted in soluble protein, which demonstrated chitin binding activity in affinity chromatography assays. Antibodies against a recombinant SsPTP1 fragment were used to immunohistochemically localize native SsPTP1 in the mite gut and in fecal pellets within the upper epidermis, co-localizing with serum components such as host IgG and complement. Enzymatic deglycosylation confirmed strong N- and O-glycosylation of the native peritrophin. Serum incubation followed by immunoblotting with a monoclonal antibody against mannan binding lectin (MBL, the recognition molecule of the lectin pathway of human complement activation, indicated that MBL may specifically bind to glycosylated SsPTP1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study adds a new aspect to the accumulating evidence that complement plays a major role in scabies mite biology. It identifies a novel peritrophin localized in the mite gut as a potential target of the

  4. Phytochemical-mediated Protein Expression Profiling and the Potential Applications in Therapeutic Drug Target Identifications.

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    Wong, Fai-Chu; Tan, Siok-Thing; Chai, Tsun-Thai

    2016-07-29

    Many phytochemicals derived from edible medicinal plants have been investigated intensively for their various bioactivities. However, the detailed mechanism and their corresponding molecular targets frequently remain elusive. In this review, we present a summary of the research works done on phytochemical-mediated molecular targets, identified via proteomic approach. Concurrently, we also highlighted some pharmaceutical drugs which could be traced back to their origins in phytochemicals. For ease of presentation, these identified protein targets were categorized into two important healthcare-related fields, namely anti-bacterial and anti-cancer research. Through this review, we hope to highlight the usefulness of comparative proteomic as a powerful tool in phytochemical-mediated protein target identifications. Likewise, we wish to inspire further investigations on some of these protein targets identified over the last few years. With contributions from all researchers, the accumulative efforts could eventually lead to the discovery of some target-specific, low-toxicity therapeutic agents.

  5. Small Molecules from Nature Targeting G-Protein Coupled Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Leads for Drug Discovery and Development

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    Charu Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cannabinoid molecules are derived from Cannabis sativa plant which acts on the cannabinoid receptors types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2 which have been explored as potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development. Currently, there are numerous cannabinoid based synthetic drugs used in clinical practice like the popular ones such as nabilone, dronabinol, and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol mediates its action through CB1/CB2 receptors. However, these synthetic based Cannabis derived compounds are known to exert adverse psychiatric effect and have also been exploited for drug abuse. This encourages us to find out an alternative and safe drug with the least psychiatric adverse effects. In recent years, many phytocannabinoids have been isolated from plants other than Cannabis. Several studies have shown that these phytocannabinoids show affinity, potency, selectivity, and efficacy towards cannabinoid receptors and inhibit endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes, thus reducing hyperactivity of endocannabinoid systems. Also, these naturally derived molecules possess the least adverse effects opposed to the synthetically derived cannabinoids. Therefore, the plant based cannabinoid molecules proved to be promising and emerging therapeutic alternative. The present review provides an overview of therapeutic potential of ligands and plants modulating cannabinoid receptors that may be of interest to pharmaceutical industry in search of new and safer drug discovery and development for future therapeutics.

  6. TREK-1 K(+) channels in the cardiovascular system: their significance and potential as a therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonetilleke, Lakshman; Quayle, John

    2012-02-01

    Potassium (K(+) ) channels are important in cardiovascular disease both as drug targets and as a cause of underlying pathology. Voltage-dependent K(+) (K(V) ) channels are inhibited by the class III antiarrhythmic agents. Certain vasodilators work by opening K(+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and K(+) channel activation may also be a route to improving endothelial function. The two-pore domain K(+) (K(2P) ) channels form a group of 15 known channels with an expanding list of functions in the cardiovascular system. One of these K(2P) channels, TREK-1, is the focus of this review. TREK-1 channel activity is tightly regulated by intracellular and extracellular pH, membrane stretch, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), temperature, and receptor-coupled second messenger systems. TREK-1 channels are also activated by volatile anesthetics and some neuroprotectant agents, and they are inhibited by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) as well as amide local anesthetics. Some of the clinical cardiovascular effects and side effects of these drugs may be through their actions on TREK-1 channels. It has recently been suggested that TREK-1 channels have a role in mechano-electrical coupling in the heart. They also seem important in the vascular responses to PUFAs, and this may underlie some of the beneficial cardiovascular effects of the essential dietary fatty acids. Development of selective TREK-1 openers and inhibitors may provide promising routes for intervention in cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Guanylyl cyclase C in colorectal cancer: susceptibility gene and potential therapeutic target.

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    Lin, Jieru E; Li, Peng; Pitari, Giovanni M; Schulz, Stephanie; Waldman, Scott A

    2009-05-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of tumor-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. While mechanisms underlying this disease have been elucidated over the past two decades, these molecular insights have failed to translate into efficacious therapy. The oncogenomic view of cancer suggests that terminal transformation reflects the sequential corruption of signal transduction circuits regulating key homeostatic mechanisms, whose multiplicity underlies the therapeutic resistance of most tumors to interventions targeting individual pathways. Conversely, the paucity of mechanistic insights into proximal pathophysiological processes that initiate and amplify oncogenic circuits preceding accumulation of mutations and transformation impedes development of effective prevention and therapy. In that context, guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), the intestinal receptor for the paracrine hormones guanylin and uroguanylin, whose early loss characterizes colorectal transformation, has emerged as a component of lineage-specific homeostatic programs organizing spatiotemporal patterning along the crypt-surface axis. Dysregulation of GCC signaling, reflecting hormone loss, promotes tumorigenesis through reprogramming of replicative and bioenergetic circuits and genomic instability. Compensatory upregulation of GCC in response to hormone loss provides a unique translational opportunity for prevention and treatment of colorectal tumors by hormone-replacement therapy.

  8. Reduced Treatment-Emergent Sexual Dysfunction as a Potential Target in the Development of New Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Baldwin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleasurable sexual activity is an essential component of many human relationships, providing a sense of physical, psychological, and social well-being. Epidemiological and clinical studies show that depressive symptoms and depressive illness are associated with impairments in sexual function and satisfaction, both in untreated and treated patients. The findings of randomized placebo-controlled trials demonstrate that most of the currently available antidepressant drugs are associated with the development or worsening of sexual dysfunction, in a substantial proportion of patients. Sexual difficulties during antidepressant treatment often resolve as depression lifts but can endure over long periods and may reduce self-esteem and affect mood and relationships adversely. Sexual dysfunction during antidepressant treatment is typically associated with many possible causes, but the risk and type of dysfunction vary with differing compounds and should be considered when making decisions about the relative merits and drawbacks of differing antidepressants. A range of interventions can be considered when managing patients with sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressants, including the prescription of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, but none of these approaches can be considered “ideal.” As treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction is less frequent with certain drugs, presumably related to differences in their pharmacological properties, and because current management approaches are less than ideal, a reduced burden of treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction represents a tolerability target in the development of novel antidepressants.

  9. Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals Potential New Targets for Improving Nitrogen Uptake and Utilization in Sorghum bicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Massel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N fertilizers are a major agricultural input where more than 100 million tons are supplied annually. Cereals are particularly inefficient at soil N uptake, where the unrecovered nitrogen causes serious environmental damage. Sorghum bicolor (sorghum is an important cereal crop, particularly in resource-poor semi-arid regions, and is known to have a high NUE in comparison to other major cereals under limited N conditions. This study provides the first assessment of genetic diversity and signatures of selection across 230 fully sequenced genes putatively involved in the uptake and mobilization of N from a diverse panel of sorghum lines. This comprehensive analysis reveals an overall reduction in diversity as a result of domestication and a total of 128 genes displaying signatures of purifying selection, thereby revealing possible gene targets to improve NUE in sorghum and cereals alike. A number of key genes appear to have been involved in selective sweeps, reducing their sequence diversity. The ammonium transporter (AMT genes generally had low allelic diversity, whereas a substantial number of nitrate/peptide transporter 1 (NRT1/PTR genes had higher nucleotide diversity in domesticated germplasm. Interestingly, members of the distinct race Guinea margaritiferum contained a number of unique alleles, and along with the wild sorghum species, represent a rich resource of new variation for plant improvement of NUE in sorghum.

  10. Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals Potential New Targets for Improving Nitrogen Uptake and Utilization in Sorghum bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massel, Karen; Campbell, Bradley C; Mace, Emma S; Tai, Shuaishuai; Tao, Yongfu; Worland, Belinda G; Jordan, David R; Botella, Jose R; Godwin, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilizers are a major agricultural input where more than 100 million tons are supplied annually. Cereals are particularly inefficient at soil N uptake, where the unrecovered nitrogen causes serious environmental damage. Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) is an important cereal crop, particularly in resource-poor semi-arid regions, and is known to have a high NUE in comparison to other major cereals under limited N conditions. This study provides the first assessment of genetic diversity and signatures of selection across 230 fully sequenced genes putatively involved in the uptake and utilization of N from a diverse panel of sorghum lines. This comprehensive analysis reveals an overall reduction in diversity as a result of domestication and a total of 128 genes displaying signatures of purifying selection, thereby revealing possible gene targets to improve NUE in sorghum and cereals alike. A number of key genes appear to have been involved in selective sweeps, reducing their sequence diversity. The ammonium transporter (AMT) genes generally had low allelic diversity, whereas a substantial number of nitrate/peptide transporter 1 (NRT1/PTR) genes had higher nucleotide diversity in domesticated germplasm. Interestingly, members of the distinct race Guinea margaritiferum contained a number of unique alleles, and along with the wild sorghum species, represent a rich resource of new variation for plant improvement of NUE in sorghum.

  11. Targeting the Toll of Drug Abuse: The Translational Potential of Toll-Like Receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtell, Ryan; Hutchinson, Mark R; Wang, Xiaohui; Rice, Kenner C; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that glial proinflammatory activation importantly contributes to the rewarding and reinforcing effects of a variety of drugs of abuse, including cocaine, methamphetamine, opioids, and alcohol. It has recently been proposed that glia are recognizing, and becoming activated by, such drugs as a CNS immunological response to these agents being xenobiotics; that is, substances foreign to the brain. Activation of glia, primarily microglia, by various drugs of abuse occurs via toll like receptor 4 (TLR4). The detection of such xenobiotics by TLR4 results in the release of glial neuroexcitatory and neurotoxic substances. These glial products of TLR4 activation enhance neuronal excitability within brain reward circuitry, thereby enhancing their rewarding and reinforcing effects. Indeed, selective pharmacological blockade of TLR4 activation, such as with the non-opioid TLR4 antagonist (+)-naltrexone, suppresses a number of indices of drug reward/reinforcement. These include: conditioned place preference, self-administration, drugprimed reinstatement, incubation of craving, and elevations of nucleus accumbens shell dopamine. Notably, TLR4 blockade fails to alter self-administration of food, indicative of a selective effect on drugs of abuse. Genetic disruption of TLR4 signaling recapitulates the effects of pharmacological TLR4 blockade, providing converging lines of evidence of a central importance of TLR4. Taken together, multiple lines of evidence converge to raise TLR4 as a promising therapeutic target for drug abuse.

  12. Perceptions of nonsurgical permanent contraception among potential users, providers, and influencers in Wardha district and New Delhi, India: Exploratory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aengst, Jennifer C; Harrington, Elizabeth K; Bahulekar, Pramod; Shivkumar, Poonam; Jensen, Jeffrey T; Garg, B S

    2017-01-01

    New permanent contraceptive methods are in development, including nonsurgical permanent contraception (NSPC). In the present study, perceptions of NSPC in India among married women, married men, mothers-in-law, providers, and health advocates in Eastern Maharashtra (Wardha district) and New Delhi were examined. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 40 married women and 20 mothers-in-law; surveys with 150 married men; and focus group discussions with obstetrics/gynecology providers and advocates. Transcripts were coded and analyzed using a grounded theory approach, where emerging themes are analyzed during the data collection period. The majority of female respondents expressed support of permanent contraception and interest in NSPC, stating the importance of avoiding surgery and minimizing recovery time. They expressed concerns about safety and efficacy; many felt that a confirmation test would be necessary regardless of the failure rate. Most male respondents were supportive of female permanent contraception (PC) and preferred NSPC to a surgical method, as long as it was safe and effective. Providers were interested in NSPC yet had specific concerns about safety, efficacy, cost, uptake, and government pressure. They also had concerns that a nonsurgical approach could undermine the inherent seriousness of choosing PC. Advocates were interested in NSPC but had concerns about safety and potential misuse in the Indian context. Although perceptions of NSPC were varied, all study populations indicated interest in NSPC. Concerns about safety, efficacy, appropriate patient counseling, and ethics emerged from the present study and should be considered as NSPC methods continue to be developed.

  13. Heterogeneity in primary colorectal cancer and its corresponding metastases: a potential reason of EGFR-targeted therapy failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongqi; Jin, Ketao; Lan, Huanrong; Teng, Lisong

    2011-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapy represents an important approach in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) therapy. However, a number of CRC patients show intrinsic or acquired resistance to EGFR-targeted therapy. EGFR antibody therapy is established in CRC patients with wild-type KRAS. However, up to half of these patients do not respond to this therapy. This phenomenon implied some potential mechanisms of resistance to EGFR inhibitors might exist. One of the potential reasons to explain this phenomenon is heterogeneity of CRC. The heterogeneity of CRC has been well described at the morphological, molecular and genomic levels. This review discussed the potential relationship of heterogeneity, including intratumor heterogeneity of CRC and heterogeneity in primary CRC and its corresponding metastases, to EGFR-targeted therapy failure.

  14. Class I and class II histone deacetylases are potential therapeutic targets for treating pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan; He, Jing; Zhao, Jianyun; Yun, Wenting; Xie, Chengzhi; Taub, Jeffrey W; Azmi, Asfar; Mohammad, Ramzi M; Dong, Yan; Kong, Wei; Guo, Yingjie; Ge, Yubin

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly malignant disease with an extremely poor prognosis. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) have shown promising antitumor activities against preclinical models of pancreatic cancer, either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we sought to identify clinically relevant histone deacetylases (HDACs) to guide the selection of HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) tailored to the treatment of pancreatic cancer. HDAC expression in seven pancreatic cancer cell lines and normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells was determined by Western blotting. Antitumor interactions between class I- and class II-selective HDACIs were determined by MTT assays and standard isobologram/CompuSyn software analyses. The effects of HDACIs on cell death, apoptosis and cell cycle progression, and histone H4, alpha-tubulin, p21, and γH2AX levels were determined by colony formation assays, flow cytometry analysis, and Western blotting, respectively. The majority of classes I and II HDACs were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines, albeit at variable levels. Treatments with MGCD0103 (a class I-selective HDACI) resulted in dose-dependent growth arrest, cell death/apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase, accompanied by induction of p21 and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). In contrast, MC1568 (a class IIa-selective HDACI) or Tubastatin A (a HDAC6-selective inhibitor) showed minimal effects. When combined simultaneously, MC1568 significantly enhanced MGCD0103-induced growth arrest, cell death/apoptosis, and G2/M cell cycle arrest, while Tubastatin A only synergistically enhanced MGCD0103-induced growth arrest. Although MC1568 or Tubastatin A alone had no obvious effects on DNA DSBs and p21 expression, their combination with MGCD0103 resulted in cooperative induction of p21 in the cells. Our results suggest that classes I and II HDACs are potential therapeutic targets for treating pancreatic cancer. Accordingly, treating pancreatic

  15. FGFR gene alterations in lung squamous cell carcinoma are potential targets for the multikinase inhibitor nintedanib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, Masaaki; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Tanizaki, Junko; Sakai, Kazuko; Togashi, Yosuke; Terashima, Masato; De Velasco, Marco Antonio; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Banno, Eri; Nakamura, Yu; Takeda, Masayuki; Ito, Akihiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Okamoto, Isamu; Nishio, Kazuto

    2016-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) gene alterations are relatively frequent in lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and are a potential targets for therapy with FGFR inhibitors. However, little is known regarding the clinicopathologic features associated with FGFR alterations. The angiokinase inhibitor nintedanib has shown promising activity in clinical trials for non-small cell lung cancer. We have now applied next-generation sequencing (NGS) to characterize FGFR alterations in LSCC patients as well as examined the antitumor activity of nintedanib in LSCC cell lines positive for FGFR1 copy number gain (CNG). The effects of nintedanib on the proliferation of and FGFR signaling in LSCC cell lines were examined in vitro, and its effects on tumor formation were examined in vivo. A total of 75 clinical LSCC specimens were screened for FGFR alterations by NGS. Nintedanib inhibited the proliferation of FGFR1 CNG-positive LSCC cell lines in association with attenuation of the FGFR1-ERK signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. FGFR1 CNG (10.7%), FGFR1 mutation (2.7%), FGFR2 mutation (2.7%), FGFR4 mutation (5.3%), and FGFR3 fusion (1.3%) were detected in LSCC specimens by NGS. Clinicopathologic features did not differ between LSCC patients positive or negative for FGFR alterations. However, among the 36 patients with disease recurrence after surgery, prognosis was significantly worse for those harboring FGFR alterations. Screening for FGFR alterations by NGS warrants further study as a means to identify patients with LSCC recurrence after surgery who might benefit from nintedanib therapy. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: a potential target for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Karli; Malik, Bilal; Gray, Anna L; La Spada, Albert R; Hanna, Michael G; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Greensmith, Linda

    2014-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked degenerative motor neuron disease caused by an abnormal expansion in the polyglutamine encoding CAG repeat of the androgen receptor gene. There is evidence implicating endoplasmic reticulum stress in the development and progression of neurodegenerative disease, including polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease and in motor neuron disease, where cellular stress disrupts functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to induction of the unfolded protein response. We examined whether endoplasmic reticulum stress is also involved in the pathogenesis of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice that carry 100 pathogenic polyglutamine repeats in the androgen receptor, and develop a late-onset neuromuscular phenotype with motor neuron degeneration, were studied. We observed a disturbance in endoplasmic reticulum-associated calcium homeostasis in cultured embryonic motor neurons from spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice, which was accompanied by increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress reduced the endoplasmic reticulum-associated cell death pathway. Examination of spinal cord motor neurons of pathogenic mice at different disease stages revealed elevated expression of markers for endoplasmic reticulum stress, confirming an increase in this stress response in vivo. Importantly, the most significant increase was detected presymptomatically, suggesting that endoplasmic reticulum stress may play an early and possibly causal role in disease pathogenesis. Our results therefore indicate that the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway could potentially be a therapeutic target for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy and related polyglutamine diseases. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  17. Focal Adhesion Kinase as a Potential Target in AML and MDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Bing Z; Mak, Po Yee; Wang, Xiangmeng; Yang, Hui; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Mak, Duncan H; Mu, Hong; Ruvolo, Vivian R; Qiu, Yihua; Coombes, Kevin; Zhang, Nianxiang; Ragon, Brittany; Weaver, David T; Pachter, Jonathan A; Kornblau, Steven; Andreeff, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Although overexpression/activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is widely known in solid tumors to control cell growth, survival, invasion, metastasis, gene expression, and stem cell self-renewal, its expression and function in myeloid leukemia are not well investigated. Using reverse-phase protein arrays in large cohorts of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myeloid dysplastic syndrome (MDS) samples, we found that high FAK expression was associated with unfavorable cytogenetics (P = 2 × 10-4) and relapse (P = 0.02) in AML. FAK expression was significantly lower in patients with FLT3-ITD (P = 0.0024) or RAS (P = 0.05) mutations and strongly correlated with p-SRC and integrinβ3 levels. FAK protein levels were significantly higher in CD34+ (P = 5.42 × 10-20) and CD34+CD38- MDS (P = 7.62 × 10-9) cells compared with normal CD34+ cells. MDS patients with higher FAK in CD34+ cells tended to have better overall survival (P = 0.05). FAK expression was significantly higher in MDS patients who later transformed to compared with those who did not transform to AML and in AML patients who transformed from MDS compared with those with de novo AML. Coculture with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) increased FAK expression in AML cells. Inhibition of FAK decreased MSC-mediated adhesion/migration and viability of AML cells and prolonged survival in an AML xenograft murine model. Our results suggest that FAK regulates leukemia-stromal interactions and supports leukemia cell survival; hence, FAK is a potential therapeutic target in myeloid leukemia. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(6); 1133-44. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Interleukin 6 receptor is an independent prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target of ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Isobe

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecologic cancer and new targeted molecular therapies against this miserable disease continue to be challenging. In this study, we analyzed the expressional patterns of Interleukin-6 (IL-6 and its receptor (IL-6R expression in ovarian cancer tissues, evaluated the impact of these expressions on clinical outcomes of patients, and found that a high-level of IL-6R expression but not IL-6 expression in cancer cells is an independent prognostic factor. In in vitro analyses using ovarian cell lines, while six (RMUG-S, RMG-1, OVISE, A2780, SKOV3ip1 and OVCAR-3 of seven overexpressed IL-6R compared with a primary normal ovarian surface epithelium, only two (RMG-1, OVISE of seven cell lines overexpressed IL-6, suggesting that IL-6/IL-6R signaling exerts in a paracrine manner in certain types of ovarian cancer cells. Ovarian cancer ascites were collected from patients, and we found that primary CD11b+CD14+ cells, which were predominantly M2-polarized macrophages, are the major source of IL-6 production in an ovarian cancer microenvironment. When CD11b+CD14+ cells were co-cultured with cancer cells, both the invasion and the proliferation of cancer cells were robustly promoted and these promotions were almost completely inhibited by pretreatment with anti-IL-6R antibody (tocilizumab. The data presented herein suggest a rationale for anti-IL-6/IL-6R therapy to suppress the peritoneal spread of ovarian cancer, and represent evidence of the therapeutic potential of anti-IL-6R therapy for ovarian cancer treatment.

  19. Mucosal permeability and immune activation as potential therapeutic targets of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, Giovanni; Zecchi, Lisa; Barbaro, Raffaella; Cremon, Cesare; Bellacosa, Lara; Marcellini, Marco; De Giorgio, Roberto; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2012-10-01

    There is increasingly convincing evidence supporting the participation of the gut microenvironment in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Studies particularly suggest an interplay between luminal factors (eg, foods and bacteria residing in the intestine), the epithelial barrier, and the mucosal immune system. Decreased expression and structural rearrangement of tight junction proteins in the small bowel and colon leading to increased intestinal permeability have been observed, particularly in postinfectious IBS and in IBS with diarrhea. These abnormalities are thought to contribute to the outflow of antigens through the leaky epithelium, causing overstimulation of the mucosal immune system. Accordingly, subsets of patients with IBS show higher numbers and an increased activation of mucosal immunocytes, particularly mast cells. Immune factors, released by these cells, including proteases, histamine, and prostanoids, participate in the perpetuation of the permeability dysfunction and contribute to the activation of abnormal neural responses involved in abdominal pain perception and changes in bowel habits. All these mechanisms represent new targets for therapeutic approaches in IBS. Probiotics are an attractive therapeutic option in IBS given their recognized safety and by virtue of positive biological effects they can exert on the host. Of importance for the IBS pathophysiology is that preclinical studies have shown that selective probiotic strains exhibit potentially useful properties including anti-inflammatory effects, improvement of mucosal barrier homeostasis, beneficial effects on intestinal microbiota, and a reduction of visceral hypersensitivity. The effect of probiotics on IBS is positive in most randomized, controlled studies, although the gain over the placebo is small. Identifying tailored probiotic approaches for subgroups of IBS patients represents a challenge for the future.

  20. Identification of prognostic collagen signatures and potential therapeutic stromal targets in canine mammary gland carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Case

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in regulating the biologic behavior of breast cancer. In veterinary oncology, there is a need for improved prognostic markers to accurately identify dogs at risk for local and distant (metastatic recurrence of mammary gland carcinoma and therefore would benefit from adjuvant therapy. Collagen density and fiber organization have been shown to regulate tumor progression in both mouse and human mammary tumors, with certain collagen signatures predicting poor outcomes in women with breast cancer. We hypothesized that collagen signatures in canine mammary tumor biopsies can serve as prognostic biomarkers and potential targets for treatment. We used second harmonic generation imaging to evaluate fibrillar collagen density, the presence of a tumor-stromal boundary, tumor associated collagen signatures (TACS and individual collagen fiber characteristics (width, length and straightness in grade I/II and grade III canine mammary tumors. Collagen density, as well as fiber width, length and straightness, were inversely correlated with patient overall survival time. Notably, grade III cases were less likely to have a tumor-stromal boundary and the lack of a boundary predicted poor outcome. Importantly, a lack of a defined tumor-stromal boundary and an increased collagen fiber width were associated with decreased survival even when tumor grade, patient stage, ovariohysterectomy status at the time of mammary tumor excision, and histologic evidence of lymphovascular invasion were considered in a multivariable model, indicating that these parameters could augment current methods to identify patients at high risk for local or metastatic progression/recurrence. Furthermore, these data, which identify for the first time, prognostic collagen biomarkers in naturally occurring mammary gland neoplasia in the dog, support the use of the dog as a translational model for tumor

  1. Clinical application: Restoration of immune homeostasis by autophagy as a potential therapeutic target in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lemeng; Ai, Yuhang; Tsung, Allan

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis-induced lymphocyte and dendritic cell apoptosis contributes to immunosuppression, resulting in an inability to eradicate the primary infection and a propensity to acquire secondary infections. However, the inhibition of apoptosis may produce unexpected and undesirable consequences. Another cellular process, autophagy, is also activated in immune cells. There is increasing evidence to suggest that autophagy confers a protective effect in sepsis. The protective mechanisms underlying this effect include limiting apoptotic cell death and maintaining cellular homeostasis. Therefore, understanding the regulation of immune cell autophagy and apoptosis may provide insight into novel therapeutic strategies. The present review examined potential novel therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring immune homeostasis by inducing autophagy. The restoration of balance between apoptosis and autophagy may be a novel approach for improving sepsis-induced immunosuppression and decreasing susceptibility to sepsis.

  2. A qualitative study: potential benefits and challenges of traditional healers in providing aspects of palliative care in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, L M; Amin, N N

    2014-01-01

    This article draws on selected palliative care providers' views and experiences to reflect on the potential benefits and possible challenges of involving traditional healers in palliative care in rural areas of South Africa. There is increasing consensus that palliative care should be offered by a range of professional and non-professional healthcare givers. Including non-professionals such as traditional healers in a palliative care team may strengthen care provisioning as they have intimate knowledge of patients' local culture and spiritual beliefs. Employing the qualitative method of photo-elicitation, one-on-one discussions about the photographs taken by participants were conducted. The participants - 4 palliative care nurses and 17 home-based care workers - were purposively selected to provide in-depth information about their experiences as palliative caregivers in rural homes. Healthcare workers' experiences revealed that the patients they cared for valued traditional rituals connected to illness, dying, death and bereavement. Participants suggested that traditional healers should be included in palliative care training programs as they could offer appropriate psychological, cultural and spiritual care. A challenge identified by participants was the potential of traditional healers to foster a false sense of longevity in patients facing death. The importance of recognising the value of traditional practices in palliative care should not be underrated in rural South Africa. Traditional healers could enhance palliative care services as they have deep, insider knowledge of patients' spiritual needs and awareness of cultural practices relating to illness, death, dying and bereavement. Incorporating traditional healers into healthcare services where there are differences in the worldviews of healthcare providers and patients, and a sensitivity to mediate cultural differences between caregivers and patients, could have the benefit of providing appropriate care in

  3. Satellite provided customer premise services: A forecast of potential domestic demand through the year 2000. Volume 2: Technical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochvil, D.; Bowyer, J.; Bhushan, C.; Steinnagel, K.; Al-Kinani, G.

    1983-01-01

    The potential United States domestic telecommunications demand for satellite provided customer premises voice, data and video services through the year 2000 were forecast, so that this information on service demand would be available to aid in NASA program planning. To accomplish this overall purpose the following objectives were achieved: development of a forecast of the total domestic telecommunications demand, identification of that portion of the telecommunications demand suitable for transmission by satellite systems, identification of that portion of the satellite market addressable by Computer premises services systems, identification of that portion of the satellite market addressabble by Ka-band CPS system, and postulation of a Ka-band CPS network on a nationwide and local level. The approach employed included the use of a variety of forecasting models, a market distribution model and a network optimization model. Forecasts were developed for; 1980, 1990, and 2000; voice, data and video services; terrestrial and satellite delivery modes; and C, Ku and Ka-bands.

  4. A Pilot Study to Examine the Feasibility and Potential Effectiveness of Using Smartphones to Provide Recovery Support for Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Michael L; Scott, Christy K; Funk, Rodney R; Nicholson, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Smartphone applications can potentially provide recovery monitoring and support in real-time, real-life contexts. Study aims included determining feasibility of (a) adolescents completing ecological momentary assessments (EMAs) and utilizing phone-based ecological momentary interventions (EMIs); and (b) using EMA and EMI data to predict substance use in the subsequent week. Twenty-nine adolescents were recruited at discharge from residential treatment, regardless of their discharge status or length of stay. During the 6-week pilot, youth were prompted to complete an EMA at 6 random times per day and were provided access to a suite of recovery support EMI. Youth completed 87% of the 5580 EMAs. Based on use in the next 7 days, EMA observations were classified into 3 risk groups: "Current Use" in the past 30 minutes (3% of observations), "Unrecognized Risk" (42%), or "Recognized Risk" (55%). All youth had observations in 2 or more risk groups and 38% in all 3. Youth accessed an EMI on average 162 times each week. Participants were 31% female, 48% African American, 21% Caucasian, 7% Hispanic, and 24% Mixed/Other; average age was 16.6 years. During the 90 days prior to entering treatment, youth reported using alcohol (38%), marijuana (41%), and other drugs (7%). When compared with the "Recognized Risk" group's use in the following week (31%), both the "Unrecognized Risk" (50%, odds ratio [OR]=2.08) and "Current Use" (96%, OR=50.30) groups reported significantly higher rates of use in the next week. When an EMI was accessed 2 or more times within the hour following an EMA, the rate of using during the next week was significantly lower than when EMIs were not accessed (32% vs. 43%, OR=0.62). Results demonstrate the feasibility of using smartphones for recovery monitoring and support with adolescents, with potential to reduce use.

  5. An eye fixation-related potentials analysis of the P300 potential for fixations onto a target object when exploring natural scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devillez, Hélène; Guyader, Nathalie; Guérin-Dugué, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The P300 event-related potential has been extensively studied in electroencephalography with classical paradigms that force observers to not move their eyes. This potential is classically used to infer whether a target or a task-relevant stimulus was presented. Few researches have studied this potential through more ecological paradigms where observers were able to move their eyes. In this study, we examined with an ecological paradigm and an adapted methodology the P300 potential using a visual search task that involves eye movements to actively explore natural scenes and during which eye movements and electroencephalographic activity were coregistered. Averaging the electroencephalography signal time-locked to fixation onsets, a P300 potential was observed for fixations onto the target object but not for other fixations recorded for the same visual search or for fixations recorded during the free viewing without any task. Our approach consists of using control experimental conditions with similar eye movements to ensure that the P300 potential was attributable to the fact that the observer gazed at the target rather than to other factors such as eye movement pattern (the size of the previous saccade) or the "overlap issue" between the potentials elicited by two successive fixations. We also proposed to model the time overlap issue of the potentials elicited by consecutive fixations with various durations. Our results show that the P300 potential can be studied in ecological situations without any constraint on the type of visual exploration, with some precautions in the interpretation of results due to the overlap issue.

  6. Development of Targeted Sindbis Virus Vectors for Potential Application to Breast Cancer Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dropulic, Lesia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the proposed research is to develop a propagation-competent (PC) aiphavirus vector that is targeted specifically to receptors expressed on breast cancer cells or to receptors expressed on tumor-associated vasculature...

  7. Non-targeted metabolite profiling and scavenging activity unveil the nutraceutical potential of psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar Patel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Non–targeted metabolomics implies that psyllium (Plantago ovata is a rich source of natural antioxidants, PUFAs (ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids and essential and sulphur–rich amino acids, as recommended by the FAO for human health. Psyllium contains phenolics and flavonoids that possess reducing capacity and ROS scavenging activities. In leaves, seeds and husks, about 76%, 78%, 58% polyunsaturated, 21%, 15%, 20% saturated and 3%, 7%, 22% monounsaturated fatty acids were found, respectively. A range of FAs (C12 to C24 was detected in psyllium and among different plant parts, a high content of the nutritive indicators ω-3 alpha–linolenic acid (57% and ω-6 linoleic acid (18% was detected in leaves. Similarly, total content of phenolics and the essential amino acid valine were also detected utmost in leaves followed by sulphur-rich amino acids and flavonoids. In total, 36 different metabolites were identified in psyllium, out of which 26 (13 each metabolites were detected in leaves and seeds, whereas the remaining 10 were found in the husk. Most of the metabolites are natural antioxidants, phenolics, flavonoids or alkaloids and can be used as nutrient supplements. Moreover, these metabolites have been reported to have several pharmaceutical applications, including anti-cancer activity. Natural plant ROS scavengers, saponins, were also detected. Based on metabolomic data, the probable presence of a flavonoid biosynthesis pathway was inferred, which provides useful insight for metabolic engineering in the future. Non-targeted metabolomics, antioxidants and scavenging activities reveal the nutraceutical potential of the plant and also suggest that psyllium leaves can be used as a green salad as a dietary supplement to daily food.

  8. Non-targeted Metabolite Profiling and Scavenging Activity Unveil the Nutraceutical Potential of Psyllium (Plantago ovata Forsk).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish K; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    Non-targeted metabolomics implies that psyllium (Plantago ovata) is a rich source of natural antioxidants, PUFAs (ω-3 and ω-6 fatty acids) and essential and sulfur-rich amino acids, as recommended by the FAO for human health. Psyllium contains phenolics and flavonoids that possess reducing capacity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activities. In leaves, seeds, and husks, about 76, 78, 58% polyunsaturated, 21, 15, 20% saturated, and 3, 7, 22% monounsaturated fatty acids were found, respectively. A range of FAs (C12 to C24) was detected in psyllium and among different plant parts, a high content of the nutritive indicators ω-3 alpha-linolenic acid CPS (57%) and ω-6 linoleic acid CPS (18%) was detected in leaves. Similarly, total content of phenolics and the essential amino acid valine were also detected utmost in leaves followed by sulfur-rich amino acids and flavonoids. In total, 36 different metabolites were identified in psyllium, out of which 26 (13 each) metabolites were detected in leaves and seeds, whereas the remaining 10 were found in the husk. Most of the metabolites are natural antioxidants, phenolics, flavonoids, or alkaloids and can be used as nutrient supplements. Moreover, these metabolites have been reported to have several pharmaceutical applications, including anti-cancer activity. Natural plant ROS scavengers, saponins, were also detected. Based on metabolomic data, the probable presence of a flavonoid biosynthesis pathway was inferred, which provides useful insight for metabolic engineering in the future. Non-targeted metabolomics, antioxidants and scavenging activities reveal the nutraceutical potential of the plant and also suggest that psyllium leaves can be used as a green salad as a dietary supplement to daily food.

  9. Identification and Initial Characterization of the Effectors of an Anther Smut Fungus and Potential Host Target Proteins

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    Venkata S. Kuppireddy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Plant pathogenic fungi often display high levels of host specificity and biotrophic fungi; in particular, they must manipulate their hosts to avoid detection and to complete their obligate pathogenic lifecycles. One important strategy of such fungi is the secretion of small proteins that serve as effectors in this process. Microbotryum violaceum is a species complex whose members infect members of the Caryophyllaceae; M. lychnidis-dioicae, a parasite on Silene latifolia, is one of the best studied interactions. We are interested in identifying and characterizing effectors of the fungus and possible corresponding host targets; (2 Methods: In silico analysis of the M. lychnidis-dioicae genome and transcriptomes allowed us to predict a pool of small secreted proteins (SSPs with the hallmarks of effectors, including a lack of conserved protein family (PFAM domains and also localized regions of disorder. Putative SSPs were tested for secretion using a yeast secretion trap method. We then used yeast two-hybrid analyses for candidate-secreted effectors to probe a cDNA library from a range of growth conditions of the fungus, including infected plants; (3 Results: Roughly 50 SSPs were identified by in silico analysis. Of these, 4 were studied further and shown to be secreted, as well as examined for potential host interactors. One of the putative effectors, MVLG_01732, was found to interact with Arabidopsis thaliana calcium-dependent lipid binding protein (AtCLB and with cellulose synthase interactive protein 1 orthologues; and (4 Conclusions: The identification of a pool of putative effectors provides a resource for functional characterization of fungal proteins that mediate the delicate interaction between pathogen and host. The candidate targets of effectors, e.g., AtCLB, involved in pollen germination suggest tantalizing insights that could drive future studies.

  10. Potential impact of spatially targeted adult tuberculosis vaccine in Gujarat, India

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Sourya; Chatterjee, Susmita; Rao, Krishna D.; David W Dowdy

    2016-01-01

    Some of the most promising vaccines in the pipeline for tuberculosis (TB) target adolescents and adults. Unlike for childhood vaccines, high-coverage population-wide vaccination is significantly more challenging for adult vaccines. Here, we aimed to estimate the impact of vaccine delivery strategies that were targeted to high-incidence geographical ?hotspots? compared with randomly allocated vaccination. We developed a spatially explicit mathematical model of TB transmission that distinguishe...

  11. Target Word-Specific Experiment by Detecting Event-Related Potential for ALS Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanou, Naoyuki; Sakuma, Kenji; Nakashima, Kenji

    For communication of ALS patients, the authors put emphasis on ERP. This paper described that ALS patient could get high rate of correct judgment on the target word-specific experiment by detecting ERP. For practical use, it is very important that ALS patients can communicate with surrounding person smoothly. The authors discussed how to shorten the time to specify the target word, and discussed the prevention of misjudgment.

  12. Class I and class II histone deacetylases are potential therapeutic targets for treating pancreatic cancer.

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    Guan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is a highly malignant disease with an extremely poor prognosis. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs have shown promising antitumor activities against preclinical models of pancreatic cancer, either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we sought to identify clinically relevant histone deacetylases (HDACs to guide the selection of HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs tailored to the treatment of pancreatic cancer. METHODOLOGY: HDAC expression in seven pancreatic cancer cell lines and normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells was determined by Western blotting. Antitumor interactions between class I- and class II-selective HDACIs were determined by MTT assays and standard isobologram/CompuSyn software analyses. The effects of HDACIs on cell death, apoptosis and cell cycle progression, and histone H4, alpha-tubulin, p21, and γH2AX levels were determined by colony formation assays, flow cytometry analysis, and Western blotting, respectively. RESULTS: The majority of classes I and II HDACs were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines, albeit at variable levels. Treatments with MGCD0103 (a class I-selective HDACI resulted in dose-dependent growth arrest, cell death/apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase, accompanied by induction of p21 and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. In contrast, MC1568 (a class IIa-selective HDACI or Tubastatin A (a HDAC6-selective inhibitor showed minimal effects. When combined simultaneously, MC1568 significantly enhanced MGCD0103-induced growth arrest, cell death/apoptosis, and G2/M cell cycle arrest, while Tubastatin A only synergistically enhanced MGCD0103-induced growth arrest. Although MC1568 or Tubastatin A alone had no obvious effects on DNA DSBs and p21 expression, their combination with MGCD0103 resulted in cooperative induction of p21 in the cells. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that classes I and II HDACs are potential therapeutic targets for

  13. TARGETgene: a tool for identification of potential therapeutic targets in cancer.

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    Chia-Chin Wu

    Full Text Available The vast array of in silico resources and data of high throughput profiling currently available in life sciences research offer the possibility of aiding cancer gene and drug discovery process. Here we propose to take advantage of these resources to develop a tool, TARGETgene, for efficiently identifying mutation drivers, possible therapeutic targets, and drug candidates in cancer. The simple graphical user interface enables rapid, intuitive mapping and analysis at the systems level. Users can find, select, and explore identified target genes and compounds of interest (e.g., novel cancer genes and their enriched biological processes, and validate predictions using user-defined benchmark genes (e.g., target genes detected in RNAi screens and curated cancer genes via TARGETgene. The high-level capabilities of TARGETgene are also demonstrated through two applications in this paper. The predictions in these two applications were then satisfactorily validated by several ways, including known cancer genes, results of RNAi screens, gene function annotations, and target genes of drugs that have been used or in clinical trial in cancer treatments. TARGETgene is freely available from the Biomedical Simulations Resource web site (http://bmsr.usc.edu/Software/TARGET/TARGET.html.

  14. Potential drug targets on insomnia and intervention effects of Jujuboside A through metabolic pathway analysis as revealed by UPLC/ESI-SYNAPT-HDMS coupled with pattern recognition approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xijun; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Yan, Guangli

    2012-02-02

    Potential metabolites from the metabolic pathways could be therapeutic targets and useful for the discovery of broad spectrum drugs. UPLC/ESI-SYNAPT-HDMS coupled with pattern recognition methods including PCA, PLS-DA, OPLS-DA and Heatmap were integrated to examine the global metabolic signature of insomnia and intervention effects of Jujuboside A (JuA). Six unique pathways of the insomnia were identified using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software. The VIP-value threshold cutoff of the metabolites was set to 10, above this threshold, were filtered out as potential target biomarkers. Sixteen distinct metabolites were identified from these pathways, and 6 of them can be considered for rational drug design. It was further experimental validation that the changes in metabolic profiling were restored to their baseline values after JuA treatment according to the multivariate data analysis. Potential metabolite network of the insomnia was preliminarily predicted JuA-target interaction networks, and could be further explored for in silico docking studies with suitable drugs. Thus, our method is an efficient procedure for drug target identification through metabolic analysis. It can guide testable predictions, provide insights into drug action mechanisms and enable us to increase research productivity toward metabolomic drug discovery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Design, synthesis and evaluation of seleno-dihydropyrimidinones as potential multi-targeted therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Rômulo F S; Barbosa, Flavio A R; Nascimento, Vanessa; de Oliveira, Aldo S; Brighente, Inês M C; Braga, Antonio Luiz

    2014-06-07

    In this paper we report the design, synthesis and evaluation of a series of seleno-dihydropyrimidinones as potential multi-targeted therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease. The compounds show excellent results as acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, being as active as the standard drug. All these compounds also show very good antioxidant activity through different mechanisms of action.

  16. Advanced target identification in STN-DBS with beta power of combined local field potentials and spiking activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Rens; Zwartjes - de Klerk, D.G.M; Heida, Tjitske; Wiegers, Evita C.; Contarino, M. Fiorella; de Bie, Rob M.A.; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Schuurman, P. Richard; Veltink, Petrus H.; Bour, Lo J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) for Parkinson’s Disease (PD), often microelectrode recordings (MER) are used for STN identification. However, for advanced target identification of the sensorimotor STN, it may be relevant to use local field potential (LFP)

  17. Dietary supplementation of propionylated starch to domestic cats provides propionic acid as gluconeogenic substrate potentially sparing the amino acid valine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochus, Kristel; Cools, An; Janssens, Geert P J; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Wuyts, Birgitte; Lockett, Trevor; Clarke, Julie M; Fievez, Veerle; Hesta, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    In strict carnivorous domestic cats, a metabolic competition arises between the need to use amino acids for gluconeogenesis and for protein synthesis both in health and disease. The present study investigated the amino acid-sparing potential of propionic acid in cats using dietary propionylated starch (HAMSP) supplementation. A total of thirty cats were fed a homemade diet, supplemented with either HAMSP, acetylated starch (HAMSA) or celite (Control) for three adaptation weeks. Propionylated starch was hypothesised to provide propionic acid as an alternative gluconeogenic substrate to amino acids, whereas acetic acid from HAMSA would not provide any gluconeogenic benefit. Post-adaptation, a 5-d total faecal collection was carried out to calculate apparent protein digestibility coefficients. Fresh faecal and blood samples were collected to analyse fermentation endproducts and metabolites. The apparent protein digestibility coefficients did not differ between supplements (P = 0·372) and were not affected by the protein intake level (P = 0·808). Faecal propionic acid concentrations were higher in HAMSP than in HAMSA (P = 0·018) and Control (P = 0·003) groups, whereas concentrations of ammonia (P = 0·007) were higher in HAMSA than in HAMSP cats. Tendencies for or higher propionylcarnitine concentrations were observed in HAMSP compared with HAMSA (P = 0·090) and Control (P = 0·037) groups, and for tiglyl- + 3-methylcrotonylcarnitine concentrations in HAMSP as compared with Control (P = 0·028) cats. Methylmalonylcarnitine concentrations did not differ between groups (P = 0·740), but were negatively correlated with the protein intake level (r -0·459, P = 0·016). These results suggest that HAMSP cats showed more saccharolytic fermentation patterns than those supplemented with HAMSA, as well as signs of sparing of valine in cats with a sufficient protein intake.

  18. Aminoacylase 3 Is a New Potential Marker and Therapeutic Target in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Duarte, Sergio; Ray, Anamika; Datta, Nakul; Zarrinpar, Ali; Hwang, Lin; Faull, Kym; Pushkin, Alexander; Kurtz, Ira

    2018-01-01

    Ras proteins (HRas, KRas and NRas) are common oncogenes that require membrane association for activation. Previous approaches to block/inhibit Ras membrane association were unsuccessful for cancer treatment in human clinical studies. In the present study we utilized a new approach to decrease Ras membrane association in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines via inhibition of an enzyme aminoacylase 3 (AA3; EC 3.5.1.114). AA3 expression was significantly elevated in the livers of HCC patients and HCC cell lines. Treatment of HepG2 cells with AA3 inhibitors, and HepG2 and HuH7 with AA3 siRNA significantly decreased Ras membrane association and was toxic to these HCC cell lines. AA3 inhibitors also increased the levels of N-acetylfarnesylcysteine (NAFC) and N-acetylgeranylgeranylcysteine (NAGGC) in HepG2 and Huh7 cell lines. We hypothesized that AA3 deacetylates NAFC and NAGGC, and generated farnesylcysteine (FC) and geranylgeranylcysteine (GGC) that are used in HCC cells for the regeneration of farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate providing the prenyl (farnesyl or geranylgeranyl) group for Ras prenylation required for Ras membrane association. This was confirmed experimentally where purified human AA3 was capable of efficiently deacetylating NAFC and NAGGC. Our findings suggest that AA3 inhibition may be an effective approach in the therapy of HCC and that elevated AA3 expression in HCC is potentially an important diagnostic marker.

  19. A multidimensional integration analysis reveals potential bridging targets in the process of colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Yu, Tian; Xue, Dongbo; Sun, Boshi; Shao, Qin; Choudhry, Hani; Marcus, Victoria; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Zhang, Yuguo; Zhang, Weihui; Gao, Zu-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 9% of cancer-related deaths are caused by colorectal cancer. Liver metastasis is a major factor for the high colorectal cancer mortality rate. However, the molecular mechanism underlying colorectal cancer liver metastasis remains unclear. Using a global and multidimensional integration approach, we studied sequencing data, protein-protein interactions, and regulation of transcription factor and non-coding RNAs in primary tumor samples and liver metastasis samples to unveil the potential bridging molecules and the regulators that functionally link different stages of colorectal cancer liver metastasis. Primary tumor samples and liver metastasis samples had modules with significant overlap and crosstalk from which we identified several bridging genes (e.g. KNG1 and COX5B), transcription factors (e.g. E2F4 and CDX2), microRNAs (e.g. miR-590-3p and miR-203) and lncRNAs (e.g. lincIRX5 and lincFOXF1) that may play an important role in the process of colorectal cancer liver metastasis. This study enhances our understanding of the genetic alterations and transcriptional regulation that drive the metastatic process, but also provides the methodology to guide the studies on other metastatic cancers.

  20. The potential of LINGO-1 as a therapeutic target for essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agúndez, José Ag; Jiménez-Jimenez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; García-Martín, Elena

    2015-01-01

    LINGO-1 is a negative regulator of neuronal survival, oligodendrocyte differentiation and axonal outgrowth and regeneration, because it interacts with diverse growth factor receptors blocking or inhibiting their action. Consistent findings obtained in vitro and in animal models suggest that anti-LINGO-1 therapy may be useful in neurodegenerative disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease or essential tremor (ET). Moreover, genetic and pathological evidence provide a robust link between LINGO-1 and ET. In this review, we present an overview of current knowledge on findings linking LINGO-1 and ET, with a special focus on genetic linkage, we include an overview of LINGO1 gene variations according to the 1000 genomes catalog, and we identify potential gene areas where common changes occur because, as well as the risk developing ET, LINGO1 genetic changes may influence the response to anti-LINGO-1 therapy. The goal of anti-LINGO-1 therapy in neurodegenerative diseases is to ease the brakes of neuronal growth and recovery. An anti-LINGO-1 antibody is under clinical trials for MS patients. Before planning trials with ET patients, refinement on the genetic link between LINGO1 and ET, and a detailed genetic and phenotypic assessment of ET patients to be enrolled, should be carried out.

  1. Novel modeling of combinatorial miRNA targeting identifies SNP with potential role in bone density.

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    Claudia Coronnello

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators that bind to their target mRNAs through base complementarity. Predicting miRNA targets is a challenging task and various studies showed that existing algorithms suffer from high number of false predictions and low to moderate overlap in their predictions. Until recently, very few algorithms considered the dynamic nature of the interactions, including the effect of less specific interactions, the miRNA expression level, and the effect of combinatorial miRNA binding. Addressing these issues can result in a more accurate miRNA:mRNA modeling with many applications, including efficient miRNA-related SNP evaluation. We present a novel thermodynamic model based on the Fermi-Dirac equation that incorporates miRNA expression in the prediction of target occupancy and we show that it improves the performance of two popular single miRNA target finders. Modeling combinatorial miRNA targeting is a natural extension of this model. Two other algorithms show improved prediction efficiency when combinatorial binding models were considered. ComiR (Combinatorial miRNA targeting, a novel algorithm we developed, incorporates the improved predictions of the four target finders into a single probabilistic score using ensemble learning. Combining target scores of multiple miRNAs using ComiR improves predictions over the naïve method for target combination. ComiR scoring scheme can be used for identification of SNPs affecting miRNA binding. As proof of principle, ComiR identified rs17737058 as disruptive to the miR-488-5p:NCOA1 interaction, which we confirmed in vitro. We also found rs17737058 to be significantly associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD in two independent cohorts indicating that the miR-488-5p/NCOA1 regulatory axis is likely critical in maintaining BMD in women. With increasing availability of comprehensive high-throughput datasets from patients ComiR is expected to become an essential

  2. Meteoroid Impact Detection for Exploration of Asteroids (MIDEA): Meteoroid Impact Rates on Potential Asteroid Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, N.; Close, S.

    2016-12-01

    Meteoroid impacts on asteroid surfaces produce a plasma that can be sampled by a nearby spacecraft. This plasma provides a mechanism for exploring the surface composition of asteroids using a constellation of free-flying, ultralight sensors. The requirements for detection of the expanding impact plasma is that the meteoroid is large and fast enough to produce sufficient charge, and that the asteroid surface is electrically biased so that the electrons are captured and positive ions are ejected. For a sensor positioned at a distance of 100-500 m, nanogram-sized meteoroids impacting at speeds greater than 20 km/s onto a sunlit surface can produce a detectable signal. We used NASA's Meteoroid Engineering Model (MEM) and the Grün interplanetary flux model to estimate the impact rate of meteoroids on a selection of asteroid candidates. These include near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) as well as several bodies in the main belt. Orbital trajectories were obtained using JPL's Horizons interface, and the sunward-facing meteoroid flux was computed using MEM for µg-sized meteoroids at speeds of 20 km/s or greater. The Grün model was used to scale the flux to ng-sized meteoroids. The figure below shows the maximum and minimum impact rate for each of the target bodies, ordered by their orbital semi-major axis. The NEAs have maximum rates of 0.18 to 0.30 m-2 day-1, corresponding to an impact on each square meter every 3.3 to 5.4 days. The main-belt bodies are impacted far less frequently. However, 1999 JD8, which has a high eccentricity of 0.47, has a maximum impact rate about ten times greater than Elst-Pizarro, despite having a similar semi-major axis. Because of the gossamer nature of the ultralight sensors envisioned for this exploration concept, mission duration is limited by degradation of the electronics. The impacts predicted for NEAs and for some high-eccentricity asteroids in the main belt are frequent enough to allow an asteroid to be well characterized in under a month.

  3. Identification of Potential Drug Targets in Cancer Signaling Pathways using Stochastic Logical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Peican; Aliabadi, Hamidreza Montazeri; Uludağ, Hasan; Han, Jie

    2016-03-18

    The investigation of vulnerable components in a signaling pathway can contribute to development of drug therapy addressing aberrations in that pathway. Here, an original signaling pathway is derived from the published literature on breast cancer models. New stochastic logical models are then developed to analyze the vulnerability of the components in multiple signalling sub-pathways involved in this signaling cascade. The computational results are consistent with the experimental results, where the selected proteins were silenced using specific siRNAs and the viability of the cells were analyzed 72 hours after silencing. The genes elF4E and NFkB are found to have nearly no effect on the relative cell viability and the genes JAK2, Stat3, S6K, JUN, FOS, Myc, and Mcl1 are effective candidates to influence the relative cell growth. The vulnerabilities of some targets such as Myc and S6K are found to vary significantly depending on the weights of the sub-pathways; this will be indicative of the chosen target to require customization for therapy. When these targets are utilized, the response of breast cancers from different patients will be highly variable because of the known heterogeneities in signaling pathways among the patients. The targets whose vulnerabilities are invariably high might be more universally acceptable targets.

  4. Genome of Diaporthe sp. provides insights into the potential inter-phylum transfer of a fungal sesquiterpenoid biosynthetic pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sena Filho, Jose Guedes; Quin, Maureen B.; Spakowicz, Daniel J; Shaw, Jeffrey J.; Kucera, Kaury; Dunican, Brian; Strobel, Scott A.; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Fungi have highly active secondary metabolic pathways which enable them to produce a wealth of sesquiterpenoids that are bioactive. One example is Δ6-protoilludene, the precursor to the cytotoxic illudins, which are pharmaceutically relevant as anticancer therapeutics. To date, this valuable sesquiterpene has only been identified in members of the fungal division Basidiomycota. To explore the untapped potential of fungi belonging to the division Ascomycota in producing Δ6-protoilludene, we isolated the a fungal endophyte Diaporthe sp. BR109 and show that it produces a diversity of terpenoids including Δ6-protoilludene. Using a genome sequencing and mining approach 17 putative novel sesquiterpene synthases were identified in Diaporthe sp. BR109. A phylogenetic approach was used to predict which gene encodes Δ6-protoilludene synthase, which was then confirmed experimentally. These analyses reveal that the sesquiterpene synthase and its putative sesquiterpene scaffold modifying cytochrome P450(s) may have been acquired by inter-phylum horizontal gene transfer from Basidiomycota to Ascomycota. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that inter-phylum transfer of these minimal sequiterpenoid secondary metabolic pathways may have occurred in other fungi. This work provides insights into the evolution of fungal sesquiterpenoid secondary metabolic pathways in the production of pharmaceutically relevant bioactive natural products. PMID:27521636

  5. In Vivo Toxicity Assessment of Occupational Components of the Carbon Nanotube Life Cycle To Provide Context to Potential Health Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Lindsey; Cena, Lorenzo; Orandle, Marlene; Yanamala, Naveena; Dahm, Matthew M; Birch, M Eileen; Evans, Douglas E; Kodali, Vamsi K; Eye, Tracy; Battelli, Lori; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Casuccio, Gary; Bunker, Kristin; Lupoi, Jason S; Lersch, Traci L; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Sager, Tina; Afshari, Aliakbar; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Friend, Sherri; Kang, Jonathan; Siegrist, Katelyn J; Mitchell, Constance A; Lowry, David T; Kashon, Michael L; Mercer, Robert R; Geraci, Charles L; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Sargent, Linda M; Erdely, Aaron

    2017-09-26

    Pulmonary toxicity studies on carbon nanotubes focus primarily on as-produced materials and rarely are guided by a life cycle perspective or integration with exposure assessment. Understanding toxicity beyond the as-produced, or pure native material, is critical, due to modifications needed to overcome barriers to commercialization of applications. In the first series of studies, the toxicity of as-produced carbon nanotubes and their polymer-coated counterparts was evaluated in reference to exposure assessment, material characterization, and stability of the polymer coating in biological fluids. The second series of studies examined the toxicity of aerosols generated from sanding polymer-coated carbon-nanotube-embedded or neat composites. Postproduction modification by polymer coating did not enhance pulmonary injury, inflammation, and pathology or in vitro genotoxicity of as-produced carbon nanotubes, and for a particular coating, toxicity was significantly attenuated. The aerosols generated from sanding composites embedded with polymer-coated carbon nanotubes contained no evidence of free nanotubes. The percent weight incorporation of polymer-coated carbon nanotubes, 0.15% or 3% by mass, and composite matrix utilized altered the particle size distribution and, in certain circumstances, influenced acute in vivo toxicity. Our study provides perspective that, while the number of workers and consumers increases along the life cycle, toxicity and/or potential for exposure to the as-produced material may greatly diminish.

  6. Satellite provided customer promises services, a forecast of potential domestic demand through the year 2000. Volume 4: Sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochvil, D.; Bowyer, J.; Bhushan, C.; Steinnagel, K.; Kaushal, D.; Al-Kinani, G.

    1984-01-01

    The overall purpose was to forecast the potential United States domestic telecommunications demand for satellite provided customer promises voice, data and video services through the year 2000, so that this information on service demand would be available to aid in NASA program planning. To accomplish this overall purpose the following objectives were achieved: (1) development of a forecast of the total domestic telecommunications demand; (2) identification of that portion of the telecommunications demand suitable for transmission by satellite systems; (3) identification of that portion of the satellite market addressable by consumer promises service (CPS) systems; (4) identification of that portion of the satellite market addressable by Ka-band CPS system; and (5) postulation of a Ka-band CPS network on a nationwide and local level. The approach employed included the use of a variety of forecasting models, a parametric cost model, a market distribution model and a network optimization model. Forecasts were developed for: 1980, 1990, and 2000; voice, data and video services; terrestrial and satellite delivery modes; and C, Ku and Ka-bands.

  7. De Novo Analysis of the Transcriptome of Meloidogyne enterolobii to Uncover Potential Target Genes for Biological Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangyang; Yang, Dan; Niu, Junhai; Zhao, Jianlong; Jian, Heng

    2016-09-01

    Meloidogyne enterolobii is one of the obligate biotrophic root-knot nematodes that has the ability to reproduce on many economically-important crops. We carried out de novo sequencing of the transcriptome of M. enterolobii using Roche GS FLX and obtained 408,663 good quality reads that were assembled into 8193 contigs and 31,860 singletons. We compared the transcripts in different nematodes that were potential targets for biological control. These included the transcripts that putatively coded for CAZymes, kinases, neuropeptide genes and secretory proteins and those that were involved in the RNAi pathway and immune signaling. Typically, 75 non-membrane secretory proteins with signal peptides secreted from esophageal gland cells were identified as putative effectors, three of which were preliminarily examined using a PVX (pGR107)-based high-throughput transient plant expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana (N. benthamiana). Results showed that these candidate proteins suppressed the programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by the pro-apoptosis protein BAX, and one protein also caused necrosis, suggesting that they might suppress plant immune responses to promote pathogenicity. In conclusion, the current study provides comprehensive insight into the transcriptome of M. enterolobii for the first time and lays a foundation for further investigation and biological control strategies.

  8. c9RAN translation: a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Tania F; Cosio, Danielle M; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2013-09-01

    A hexanucleotide (GGGGCC) repeat expansion within a non-coding region of the C9ORF72 gene is the most common mutation associated with both frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Elucidating how these expanded repeats (GGGGCCexp) cause 'c9FTD/ALS' has since become an important goal of the FTD/ALS field. GGGGCCexp transcripts aggregate into discrete nuclear structures, termed RNA foci. This phenomenon, observed in various repeat expansion disorders, is associated with RNA-binding protein sequestration. Of note, recent findings show that GGGGCCexp transcripts also succumb to an alternative fate: repeat-associated non-ATG translation (RAN translation). This unconventional mode of translation, which occurs in the absence of an initiating codon, results in the production of polyGA, polyGP and polyGR peptides. Antibodies generated against these peptides detect high molecular weight, insoluble material in brain homogenates, as well as neuronal inclusions throughout the central nervous system of c9FTD/ALS cases. Given that both foci formation and RAN translation in c9FTD/ALS require the synthesis of GGGGCCexp RNA, therapeutic strategies that target these transcripts and result in their neutralization or degradation could effectively block these two potential pathogenic mechanisms and provide a much needed treatment for c9FTD/ALS.

  9. Investigating the Chemokine Receptor 4 as Potential Theranostic Target in Adrenocortical Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluemel, Christina; Hahner, Stefanie; Heinze, Britta; Fassnacht, Martin; Kroiss, Matthias; Bley, Thorsten A; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Kropf, Saskia; Lapa, Constantin; Schirbel, Andreas; Buck, Andreas K; Herrmann, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare but aggressive endocrine tumor with limited treatment options. Preclinical studies confirmed overexpression of the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) in this cancer type. This study aimed to analyze the role of CXCR4 imaging using Ga-pentixafor for ACC staging and selection of patients for CXCR4-directed endoradiotherapy. Thirty patients with histologically proven advanced, metastasized ACC underwent F-FDG PET/CT and Ga-pentixafor PET/CT within a time interval of 3 ± 4 days to evaluate suitability for CXCR4-directed endoradiotherapy. Scans were analyzed retrospectively for visual extent of ACC and SUVmax/mean of the tumor lesions. Ga-pentixafor PET was compared with F-FDG PET, the reference imaging standard. All patients were rated for suitability of CXCR4-directed endoradiotherapy considering patient's history, previous treatment, and CXCR4 expression of FDG-positive lesions compared with background activity within the same organ. All patients had lesions that were positive for both F-FDG and Ga-pentixafor PET and were rated as positive for disease. In 2 patients (7%), Ga-pentixafor PET identified more lesions compared with F-FDG PET. In 5 patients (17%) and 10 patients (33%), complementary and comparable information, respectively, was provided by dual-tracer imaging. In 13 patients (43%), more tumor lesions were identified by F-FDG PET compared with Ga-pentixafor PET. The F-FDG uptake of the malignant lesions was significantly higher (P < 0.01) than the SUVmax/mean for Ga-pentixafor. Overall, 70% of the patients were rated as suitable or potentially suitable for CXCR4-directed treatment. Ga-pentixafor allows in vivo imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with advanced ACC and may serve as companion diagnostic tool in selecting patients for potential CXCR4-directed endoradiotherapy. Seventy percent of the patients with advanced, metastasized ACC may be suitable for a CXCR4-directed treatment after failure of standard treatment

  10. Melatonin potentiates "inside-out" nano-thermotherapy in human breast cancer cells: a potential cancer target multimodality treatment based on melatonin-loaded nanocomposite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wensheng; Gao, Qin; Wang, Dan; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Jie; Guo, Zhenhu; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xiumei; Sun, Xiaodan; Zhao, Lingyun

    2017-01-01

    With the wide recognition of oncostatic effect of melatonin, the current study proposes a potential breast cancer target multimodality treatment based on melatonin-loaded magnetic nanocomposite particles (Melatonin-MNPs). Melatonin-MNPs were fabricated by the single emulsion solvent extraction/evaporation method. Based on the facilitated transport of melatonin by the GLUT overexpressed on the cell membrane, such Melatonin-MNPs can be more favorably uptaken by MCF-7 cells compared with the melatonin-free nanocomposite particles, which indicates the cancer targeting ability of melatonin molecule. Inductive heating can be generated by exposure to the Melatonin-MNPs internalized within cancer cells under alternative magnetic field, so as to achieve the "inside-out" magnetic nano-thermotherapy. In addition to demonstrating the superior cytotoxic effect of such nano-thermotherapy over the conventional exogenous heating by metal bath, more importantly, the sustainable release of melatonin from the Melatonin-MNPs can be greatly promoted upon responsive to the magnetic heating. The multimodality treatment based on Melatonin-MNPs can lead to more significant decrease in cell viability than any single treatment, suggesting the potentiated effect of melatonin on the cytotoxic response to nano-thermotherapy. This study is the first to fabricate the precisely engineered melatonin-loaded multifunctional nanocomposite particles and demonstrate the potential in breast cancer target multimodality treatment.

  11. Evaluation of non-coding RNAs as potential targets in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimy, Elham; Kuo, Selena Z; Ongkeko, Weg M

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer in the world and has not seen improved survival rates over the past few decades. Current treatment plans include surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, but these are relatively ineffective options for recurrent or metastatic tumors. Therefore, there is a high priority for new therapies that specifically target the resistant HNSCC cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation responsible for tumor initiation and metastasis. Given their vast effects on gene expression and biological processes, including stem cell capabilities, non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have become a promising new repertoire of genes to investigate as potential diagnostic or therapeutic targets. This review presents a comprehensive overview of current investigative studies that can contribute to our understanding of the still tentative link between ncRNA and the biology of HNSCC cancer stem cells. In doing so, we aim to analyze the potential role of stem cell-related ncRNAs in the development of molecularly targeted cancer therapy for HNSCC. Although the majority of updated knowledge on HNSCC and ncRNA focuses heavily on microRNA, we chose to give considerable attention to the promise of other classes of ncRNAs (lncRNA, piRNA, and snoRNA), many of which are not yet well characterized or are yet to be discovered, and thus represent a potentially exciting and untapped pool of molecular targets or biomarkers in HNSCC therapy.

  12. Proteins with complex architecture as potential targets for drug design: a case study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bálint Mészáros

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Lengthy co-evolution of Homo sapiens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the main causative agent of tuberculosis, resulted in a dramatically successful pathogen species that presents considerable challenge for modern medicine. The continuous and ever increasing appearance of multi-drug resistant mycobacteria necessitates the identification of novel drug targets and drugs with new mechanisms of action. However, further insights are needed to establish automated protocols for target selection based on the available complete genome sequences. In the present study, we perform complete proteome level comparisons between M. tuberculosis, mycobacteria, other prokaryotes and available eukaryotes based on protein domains, local sequence similarities and protein disorder. We show that the enrichment of certain domains in the genome can indicate an important function specific to M. tuberculosis. We identified two families, termed pkn and PE/PPE that stand out in this respect. The common property of these two protein families is a complex domain organization that combines species-specific regions, commonly occurring domains and disordered segments. Besides highlighting promising novel drug target candidates in M. tuberculosis, the presented analysis can also be viewed as a general protocol to identify proteins involved in species-specific functions in a given organism. We conclude that target selection protocols should be extended to include proteins with complex domain architectures instead of focusing on sequentially unique and essential proteins only.

  13. Targeting survivin as a potential new treatment for chondrosarcoma of bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Y.; Oosterwijk, van J.G.; Kruisselbrink, A.B.; Briaire, I.H.; Agrogiannis, G.; Baranski, Madrigal Z.; Cleven, A.H.; Cleton, A.M.; Water, van de B.; Danen, E.H.J.; Bovée, J.V.M.G.

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant cartilage-forming bone tumors, which are intrinsically resistant to chemo- and radiotherapy, leaving surgical removal as the only curative treatment option. Therefore, our aim was to identify genes involved in chondrosarcoma cell survival that could serve as a target

  14. Molecular machineries of pH dysregulation in tumor microenvironment: potential targets for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Asgharzadeh

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Taken all, along with other treatment strategies, targeting the key molecular machineries related to intra- and extracellular metabolisms within the TME is proposed as a novel strategy to inhibit or block PETs that are involved in the pH dysregulation of solid tumors.

  15. Targeting of the MAPK and AKT pathways in conjunctival melanoma shows potential synergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, J. (Jinfeng); R.C. Heijkants (Renier C.); A.G. Jochemsen (Aart); M. Dogrusöz (Mehmet); de Lange, M.J. (Mark J.); P.A. van der Velden (Pieter); S.H. van der Burg (Sjoerd); M.J. Jager (Martine); R.M. Verdijk (Robert)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Conjunctival melanoma (CM) is a rare but lethal form of cancer. Similar to cutaneous melanoma, CM frequently carries activating mutations in BRAF and NRAS. We studied whether CM as well as conjunctival benign and premalignant melanocytic lesions express targets in the

  16. The Spatial Distribution of Poverty in Vietnam and the Potential for Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Minot, Nicholas; Baulch, Bob

    2002-01-01

    The authors combine household survey and census data to construct a provincial poverty map of Vietnam and evaluate the accuracy of geographically targeted antipoverty programs. First, they estimate per capita expenditure as a function of selected household and geographic characteristics using the 1998 Vietnam Living Standards Survey. Next, they combine the results with data on the same hou...

  17. Targeted treatment of head and neck squamous-cell carcinoma: potential of lapatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandhi MD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitul D Gandhi, Mark Agulnik Division of Hematology and Oncology, Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Squamous-cell cancer of the head and neck is a heterogeneous malignancy with treatment predicated on a multimodality therapy involving surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. However, this approach results in durable responses in only a subset of patients, and is associated with significant toxicity. In advanced disease, multi-agent platinum-based chemotherapy produces only modest improvements in survival. Increased insight into tumor biology has demonstrated several critical oncogenic pathways offering prospects for targeted therapy that may improve upon the existing treatment strategies. The epidermal growth factor receptor is one such target, and directed therapy with the monoclonal antibody cetuximab has been extensively studied. Lapatinib is an oral agent that targets multiple transmembrane receptors within the epidermal growth factor receptor family, and offers a promising new approach to treatment. This paper reviews the rationale for and clinical activity of lapatinib in squamous-cell cancer of the head and neck. Keywords: epidermal growth factor receptor, targeted therapy, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx

  18. Identification and characterization of potential druggable targets among hypothetical proteins of extensively drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (XDR KZN 605) through subtractive genomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Reaz; Siddiqui, Quratulain Nehal; Azam, Syed Sikander; Saima, Bibi; Wadood, Abdul

    2017-11-22

    Among the resistant isolates of tuberculosis (TB), the multidrug resistance tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) are the areas of growing concern for which the front-line antibiotics are no more effective. As a result, the search of new therapeutic targets against TB is an imperative need of time. On the other hand, the target identification is an a priori step in drug discovery based research. Furthermore, the availability of the complete proteomic data of extensively drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (XDR-MTB) made it possible to carry out in silico analysis for the discovery of new drug targets. In the current study, we aimed to prioritize the potential drug targets among the hypothetical proteins of XDR-TB via subtractive genomics approach. In the subtractive genomics, we stepwise reduced the complete proteome of XDR-MTB to only two hypothetical proteins and evidently proposed them as new therapeutic targets. The 3D structure of one of the two target proteins was predicted via homology modeling and later on, validated by various analysis tools. Our study suggested that the domains identified and the motif hits found in the sequences of the shortlisted drug targets are crucial for the survival of the XDR-MTB. To the best of our knowledge, the current study is the first attempt in which the complete proteomic data of XDR-MTB was subjected to the computational subtractive genomics approach and therefore, would provide an opportunity to identify the unique therapeutic targets against deadly XDR-MTB. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Live cell imaging of mitochondria following targeted irradiation in situ reveals rapid and highly localized loss of membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Dietrich W M; Siebenwirth, Christian; Greubel, Christoph; Ilicic, Katarina; Reindl, Judith; Girst, Stefanie; Muggiolu, Giovanna; Simon, Marina; Barberet, Philippe; Seznec, Hervé; Zischka, Hans; Multhoff, Gabriele; Schmid, Thomas E; Dollinger, Guenther

    2017-04-25

    The reliance of all cell types on the mitochondrial function for survival makes mitochondria an interesting target when trying to understand their role in the cellular response to ionizing radiation. By harnessing highly focused carbon ions and protons using microbeams, we have performed in situ live cell imaging of the targeted irradiation of individual mitochondria stained with Tetramethyl rhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE), a cationic fluorophore which accumulates electrophoretically in polarized mitochondria. Targeted irradiation with both carbon ions and protons down to beam spots of <1 μm induced a near instant loss of mitochondrial TMRE fluorescence signal in the targeted area. The loss of TMRE after targeted irradiation represents a radiation induced change in mitochondrial membrane potential. This is the first time such mitochondrial responses have been documented in situ after targeted microbeam irradiation. The methods developed and the results obtained have the ability to shed new light on not just mitochondria's response to radiation but to further elucidate a putative mechanism of radiation induced depolarization and mitochondrial response.

  20. Is TNF-a-targeted short hairpin RNA (shRNA) a novel potential therapeutic tool in psoriasis treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenderup, Karin; Jakobsen, Maria; Rosada, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    the efficiency of targeting TNF-a with specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and explores its potential in treating psoriasis. ShRNAs targeting human TNF-α mRNA were generated. Their efficiency in down-regulating TNF-a protein expression was evaluated using a Renilla luciferase screening-assay and a transient co......-transfection assay. The expression cassette encoding the most efficient TNF-a shRNA was inserted into a lentiviral vector, allowing proficient gene delivery. The lentiviral vector is integrated into the host genome and establishes life-long infection and persistent shRNA expression. The lentiviral vector expressing...

  1. The Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) List of Near-Earth Asteroids: Identifying Potential Targets for Future Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Paul A.; Barbee, B. W.; Mink, R. G.; Alberding, C. M.; Adamo, D. R.; Mazanek, D. D.; Johnson, L. N.; Yeomans, D. K.; Chodas, P. W.; Chamberlin, A. B.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years, much attention has been focused on the human exploration of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Two independent NASA studies examined the feasibility of sending piloted missions to NEAs [1, 2], and in 2009, the Augustine Commission identified NEAs as high profile destinations for human exploration missions beyond the Earth-Moon system [3]. More recently the current U.S. presidential administration directed NASA to include NEAs as destinations for future human exploration with the goal of sending astronauts to a NEA in the mid to late 2020s. This directive became part of the official National Space Policy of the United States of America as of June 28, 2010 [4]. Detailed planning for such deep space exploration missions and identifying potential NEAs as targets for human spaceflight requires selecting objects from the ever growing list of newly discovered NEAs. Hence NASA developed and implemented the Near-Earth Object (NEO) Human Space Flight (HSF) Accessible Target Study (NHATS), which identifies potential candidate objects on the basis of defined dynamical trajectory performance constraints.

  2. Final work plan : targeted groundwater sampling and monitoring well installation for potential site reclassification at Barnes, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-07-11

    This ''Work Plan'' outlines the scope of work for a targeted groundwater sampling investigation and monitoring well installation at Barnes, Kansas. This activity is being conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with the intergovernmental agreement between the KDHE and the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Data resulting from the proposed work will be used to determine the hydraulic gradient near the former CCC/USDA facility, delineate the downgradient carbon tetrachloride plume, and determine additional monitoring requirements at Barnes. The overall goal is to establish criteria for monitoring leading to potential site reclassification. The proposed work will be performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The Farm Service Agency of the USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a ''Master Work Plan'' (Argonne 2002) to provide general guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The ''Master Work Plan'', approved by the KDHE, contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. This document must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Barnes.

  3. Plant-Pathogen Interaction-Related MicroRNAs and Their Targets Provide Indicators of Phytoplasma Infection in Paulownia tomentosa × Paulownia fortunei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Fan

    Full Text Available Paulownia witches' broom (PaWB caused by a phytoplasma, has caused extensive losses in the yields of paulownia timber and resulted in significant economic losses. However, the molecular mechanisms in Paulownia that underlie the phytoplasma stress are poorly characterized. In this study, we use an Illumina platform to sequence four small RNA libraries and four degradome sequencing libraries derived from healthy, PaWB-infected, and PaWB-infected 15 mg·L-1 and 30 mg·L-1 methyl methane sulfonate (MMS-treated plants. In total, 125 conserved and 118 novel microRNAs (miRNAs were identified and 33 miRNAs responsive to PaWB disease were discovered. Furthermore, 166 target genes for 18 PaWB disease-related miRNAs were obtained, and found to be involved in plant-pathogen interaction and plant hormone signal transduction metabolic pathways. Eleven miRNAs and target genes responsive to PaWB disease were examined by a quantitative real-time PCR approach. Our findings will contribute to studies on miRNAs and their targets in Paulownia, and provide new insights to further understand plant-phytoplasma interactions.

  4. Inosine 5'-Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMPDH) as a Potential Target for the Development of a New Generation of Antiprotozoan Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotie, Jean

    2016-06-19

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the critical step in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, and thus is at the center of cell growth and proliferation. However, although this enzyme has been exploited as potential target for the development of immunosuppressive, anticancer, and antiviral agents, the functional importance of IMPDH as a promising antiprotozoan drug target is still in its infancy mainly because of the availability of alternative nucleotides metabolic pathways in many of these parasites. This situation suggests that the inhibition of IMPDH might have little to no effect on the survival of protozoan parasites. As a result, no IMPDH inhibitor is currently commercially available or has advanced to clinical trials as a potential antiprotozoan drug. Nevertheless, recent advances toward the development of selective inhibitors of the IMPDH enzyme from Crystosporidium parvum as potential drug candidates against cryptosporidiosis should revive further investigations of this drug target in other protozoa parasites. The current review examines the chemical structures and biological activities of reported protozoan's IMPDH inhibitors. SciFinder was used to broadly pinpoint reports published on the topic in the chemical literature, with no specific time frame. Opportunities and challenges towards the development of inhibitors of IMPDH enzymes from protozoa parasites as potential chemotherapies toward the respective diseases they cause are also discussed.

  5. The potential of Beclin 1 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon Yang; Lee, Yu Kyung; Koo, Ja Seung

    2016-01-01

    Beclin 1 plays a crucial role in autophagy via the Beclin 1 interactome, and is involved in various biological processes such as protein sorting, chemokinesis, and cell death. Via these biologic functions, Beclin 1 contributes to both tumor suppression and tumor progression. Beclin 1 plays a key biologic function on cell homeostasis and affects tumorigenesis. In this review, detailing up-to-date knowledge on the tumorigenic role of Beclin 1, its implication in breast cancer, and its utility as a breast cancer-specific drug target is discussed. Because Beclin 1 is expressed in breast cancer cells, Beclin 1 could be a unique, effective drug target for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. However, the expression of Beclin 1 varies according to cancer molecular subtypes, and Beclin 1 is involved in both breast cancer suppression and tumor progression; therefore, the decision of using a Beclin 1 inducer or inhibitor should be made based on breast cancer stage and subtype.

  6. Targeting kit activation: a potential therapeutic approach in the treatment of allergic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina M; Metcalfe, Dean D; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases is increasing worldwide. Hence, there is continued need for novel pharmacological therapies for the treatment of these disorders. As the mast cell is one of the essential cells that contributes to the inflammation associated with allergic diseases, this cell type......E-receptor) on the cell surface. These mediators also contribute to the late and chronic stages of allergic inflammation. Thus, the IgE/antigen response has been a major focus in the development of new drugs targeting mast cells. The essential role that stem cell factor (SCF) and its receptor, Kit, play in mast cell...... remains an attractive target for such pharmacological intervention. Mast cells are major players in the early phase of the allergic response since they generate and release a variety of inflammatory mediators following antigen-dependent aggregation of IgE-bound FcepsilonRI (high affinity Ig...

  7. Epithelial cell migration as a potential therapeutic target in early lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser R. Millar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most lethal cancer type worldwide, with the majority of patients presenting with advanced stage disease. Targeting early stage disease pathogenesis would allow dramatic improvements in lung cancer patient survival. Recently, cell migration has been shown to be an integral process in early lung cancer ontogeny, with preinvasive lung cancer cells shown to migrate across normal epithelium prior to developing into invasive disease. TP53 mutations are the most abundant mutations in human nonsmall cell lung cancers and have been shown to increase cell migration via regulation of Rho-GTPase protein activity. In this review, we explore the possibility of targeting TP53-mediated Rho-GTPase activity in early lung cancer and the opportunities for translating this preclinical research into effective therapies for early stage lung cancer patients.

  8. Unbiased analysis of potential targets of breast cancer susceptibility loci by Capture Hi-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Nicola H.; Broome, Laura R.; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Orr, Nick; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Nagano, Takashi; Andrews, Simon; Wingett, Steven; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Assiotis, Ioannis; Fenwick, Kerry; Maguire, Sarah L.; Campbell, James; Natrajan, Rachael; Lambros, Maryou; Perrakis, Eleni; Ashworth, Alan; Fraser, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common variants that are associated with breast cancer risk. Most of these variants map to non-protein-coding regions and several map to gene deserts, regions of several hundred kilobases lacking protein-coding genes. We hypothesized that gene deserts harbor long-range regulatory elements that can physically interact with target genes to influence their expression. To test this, we developed Capture Hi-C (CHi-C), which, by incorporating a sequence capture step into a Hi-C protocol, allows high-resolution analysis of targeted regions of the genome. We used CHi-C to investigate long-range interactions at three breast cancer gene deserts mapping to 2q35, 8q24.21, and 9q31.2. We identified interaction peaks between putative regulatory elements (“bait fragments”) within the captured regions and “targets” that included both protein-coding genes and long noncoding (lnc) RNAs over distances of 6.6 kb to 2.6 Mb. Target protein-coding genes were IGFBP5, KLF4, NSMCE2, and MYC; and target lncRNAs included DIRC3, PVT1, and CCDC26. For one gene desert, we were able to define two SNPs (rs12613955 and rs4442975) that were highly correlated with the published risk variant and that mapped within the bait end of an interaction peak. In vivo ChIP-qPCR data show that one of these, rs4442975, affects the binding of FOXA1 and implicate this SNP as a putative functional variant. PMID:25122612

  9. The endocannabinoid system: its roles in energy balance and potential as a target for obesity treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Aurore; Gonthier, Marie-Paule

    2010-11-01

    Obesity and cardiometabolic risk continue to be major public health concerns. A better understanding of the physiopathological mechanisms leading to obesity may help to identify novel therapeutic targets. The endocannabinoid system discovered in the early 1990s is believed to influence body weight regulation and cardiometabolic risk factors. This article aims to review the literature on the endocannabinoid system including the biological roles of its major components, namely, the cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands the endocannabinoids and the ligand-metabolising enzymes. The review also discusses evidence that the endocannabinoid system constitutes a new physiological pathway occurring in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues that has a key role in the control of food intake and energy expenditure, insulin sensitivity, as well as glucose and lipid metabolism. Based on the important finding that there is a close association between obesity and the hyperactivity of the endocannabinoid system, interest in blocking stimulation of this pathway to aid weight loss and reduce cardiometabolic risk factor development has become an important area of research. Among the pharmacological strategies proposed, the antagonism of the cannabinoid receptors has been particularly investigated and several clinical trials have been conducted. One challenging pharmacological task will be to target the endocannabinoid system in a more selective, and hence, safe way. As the management of obesity also requires lifestyle modifications in terms of healthy eating and physical activity, the targeting of the endocannabinoid system may represent a novel approach for a multifactorial therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Microglial KCa3.1 Channels as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi Maezawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There exists an urgent need for new target discovery to treat Alzheimer’s disease (AD; however, recent clinical trials based on anti-Aβ and anti-inflammatory strategies have yielded disappointing results. To expedite new drug discovery, we propose reposition targets which have been previously pursued by both industry and academia for indications other than AD. One such target is the calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 (KCNN4, which in the brain is primarily expressed in microglia and is significantly upregulated when microglia are activated. We here review the existing evidence supporting that KCa3.1 inhibition could block microglial neurotoxicity without affecting their neuroprotective phagocytosis activity and without being broadly immunosuppressive. The anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of KCa3.1 blockade would be suitable for treating AD as well as cerebrovascular and traumatic brain injuries, two well-known risk factors contributing to the dementia in AD patients presenting with mixed pathologies. Importantly, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of several KCa3.1 blockers are well known, and a KCa3.1 blocker has been proven safe in clinical trials. It is therefore promising to reposition old or new KCa3.1 blockers for AD preclinical and clinical trials.

  11. NY-ESO-1 as a potential immunotherapeutic target in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesen, Eva; Jilaveanu, Lucia B; Parisi, Fabio; Kluger, Yuval; Camp, Robert L; Kluger, Harriet M

    2014-07-30

    Novel immune therapies targeting tumor specific antigens are being developed. Our purpose was to determine expression of the cancer testes antigen NY-ESO-1 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), as NY-ESO-1 targeting approaches, particularly adoptive cell therapy, have not been evaluated in this disease. We employed tissue microarrays containing >300 unique RCC cases and adjacent benign renal tissue to determine NY-ESO-1 expression using a quantitative immunofluorescence method. In addition, we studied NY-ESO-1 expression in 35 matched primary and metastatic RCC specimens to assess concordance between different tumor sites. NY-ESO-1 was highly expressed in a subset of RCCs. Expression in primary RCC specimens was significantly higher than adjacent normal renal tissue (PESO-1 expression seen in clear cell RCC suggests that NY-ESO-1 targeting approaches should be studied in this disease. Expression is higher in metastatic sites, and discordance between primary and metastatic sites in some patients suggests that patient selection for these therapies should be based on expression in metastatic rather than nephrectomy specimens.

  12. Identification of Vimentin as a Potential Therapeutic Target against HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ortega, Celia; Ramírez, Anna; Casillas, Dionne; Paneque, Taimi; Ubieta, Raimundo; Dubed, Marta; Navea, Leonor; Castellanos-Serra, Lila; Duarte, Carlos; Falcon, Viviana; Reyes, Osvaldo; Garay, Hilda; Silva, Eladio; Noa, Enrique; Ramos, Yassel; Besada, Vladimir; Betancourt, Lázaro

    2016-01-01

    A combination of antiviral drugs known as antiretroviral therapy (ART) has shown effectiveness against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ART has markedly decreased mortality and morbidity among HIV-infected patients, having even reduced HIV transmission. However, an important current disadvantage, resistance development, remains to be solved. Hope is focused on developing drugs against cellular targets. This strategy is expected to prevent the emergence of viral resistance. In this study, using a comparative proteomic approach in MT4 cells treated with an anti-HIV leukocyte extract, we identified vimentin, a molecule forming intermediate filaments in the cell, as a possible target against HIV infection. We demonstrated a strong reduction of an HIV-1 based lentivirus expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in vimentin knockdown cells, and a noteworthy decrease of HIV-1 capsid protein antigen (CAp24) in those cells using a multiround infectivity assay. Electron micrographs showed changes in the structure of intermediate filaments when MT4 cells were treated with an anti-HIV leukocyte extract. Changes in the structure of intermediate filaments were also observed in vimentin knockdown MT4 cells. A synthetic peptide derived from a cytoskeleton protein showed potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 infection, and low cytotoxicity. Our data suggest that vimentin can be a suitable target to inhibit HIV-1. PMID:27314381

  13. A potential molecular target for morphological defects of fetal alcohol syndrome: Kir2.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Emily A

    2013-06-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a developmental disorder that affects up to 0.2% of births. FASD comprises severe cognitive and structural birth defects including cleft lip/palate, small jaw, wide-set eyes, dental abnormalities, digit abnormalities, small head, and short stature. Strict counseling guidelines stress abstaining from alcohol during pregnancy, but the prevalence of FASD persists. The lack of a convincing molecular target has hindered FASD research and treatment. Interestingly, mutations in an inwardly rectifying potassium channel, Kir2.1, cause a similar constellation of birth defects as in FASD. In other words, FASD phenocopies the traits conveyed by Kir2.1 mutations. Furthermore, alcohol directly binds to and modulates Kir2.1. Substantial evidence now suggests that alcohol targets Kir2.1 to cause the birth defects associated with FASD. This review compiles clinical, genetic, biochemical, electrophysiological, and molecular evidence that identifies Kir2.1 as a molecular target for FASD development and possibly therapeutic treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD Associated Neural Defects: Complex Mechanisms and Potential Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Marrs

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD, caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, can result in craniofacial dysmorphism, cognitive impairment, sensory and motor disabilities among other defects. FASD incidences are as high as 2% to 5 % children born in the US, and prevalence is higher in low socioeconomic populations. Despite various mechanisms being proposed to explain the etiology of FASD, the molecular targets of ethanol toxicity during development are unknown. Proposed mechanisms include cell death, cell signaling defects and gene expression changes. More recently, the involvement of several other molecular pathways was explored, including non-coding RNA, epigenetic changes and specific vitamin deficiencies. These various pathways may interact, producing a wide spectrum of consequences. Detailed understanding of these various pathways and their interactions will facilitate the therapeutic target identification, leading to new clinical intervention, which may reduce the incidence and severity of these highly prevalent preventable birth defects. This review discusses manifestations of alcohol exposure on the developing central nervous system, including the neural crest cells and sensory neural placodes, focusing on molecular neurodevelopmental pathways as possible therapeutic targets for prevention or protection.

  15. Inhibition of Farnesyltransferase Potentiates NOTCH-Targeted Therapy against Glioblastoma Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufang Ma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Accumulating evidence suggests that cancer cells with stem cell-like phenotypes drive disease progression and therapeutic resistance in glioblastoma (GBM. NOTCH regulates self-renewal and resistance to chemoradiotherapy in GBM stem cells. However, NOTCH-targeted γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs exhibited limited efficacy in GBM patients. We found that farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs significantly improved sensitivity to GSIs. This combination showed significant antineoplastic and radiosensitizing activities in GBM stem cells, whereas non-stem GBM cells were resistant. These combinatorial effects were mediated, at least partially, through inhibition of AKT and cell-cycle progression. Using subcutaneous and orthotopic GBM models, we showed that the combination of FTIs and GSIs, but not either agent alone, significantly reduced tumor growth. With concurrent radiation, this combination induced a durable response in a subset of orthotopic tumors. These findings collectively suggest that the combination of FTIs and GSIs is a promising therapeutic strategy for GBM through selectively targeting the cancer stem cell subpopulation. : NOTCH-targeted agents may selectively compromise glioblastoma stem cells. In this article, Wang and colleagues demonstrate that farnesyltransferase inhibitors significantly augmented the sensitivity of glioblastoma stem cells to γ-secretase inhibitors and improved tumor growth control in xenograft models. This combination therapy also promoted radiosensitivity and resulted in a durable response in orthotopic glioblastoma models with concurrent radiation. Keywords: Notch, glioblastoma stem cells, γ-secretase inhibitors, farnesyltransferase inhibitors

  16. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of cisplatin-containing EGFR targeting bioconjugates as potential therapeutic agents for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth RF

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rolf F Barth,1 Gong Wu,1 W Hans Meisen,2 Robin J Nakkula,1 Weilian Yang,1 Tianyao Huo,1 David A Kellough,1 Pravin Kaumaya,3–5 Claudia Turro,6 Lawrence M Agius,7 Balveen Kaur2 1Department of Pathology, 2Department of Neurological Surgery, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 4Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, 5Department of Microbiology, 6Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA; 7Department of Pathology, Mater Dei Hospital, University of Malta Medical School, Msida, Malta Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate four different platinated bioconjugates containing a cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum [cis-DDP] fragment and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeting moieties as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of brain tumors using a human EGFR-expressing transfectant of the F98 rat glioma (F98EGFR to assess their efficacy. The first two bioconjugates employed the monoclonal antibody cetuximab (C225 or Erbitux® as the targeting moiety, and the second two used genetically engineered EGF peptides. C225-G5-Pt was produced by reacting cis-DDP with a fifth-generation polyamidoamine dendrimer (G5 and then linking it to C225 by means of two heterobifunctional reagents. The second bioconjugate (C225-PG-Pt employed the same methodology except that polyglutamic acid was used as the carrier. The third and fourth bioconjugates used two different EGF peptides, PEP382 and PEP455, with direct coordination to the Pt center of the cis-DDP fragment. In vivo studies with C225-G5-Pt failed to demonstrate therapeutic activity following intracerebral (ic convection-enhanced delivery (CED to F98EGFR glioma-bearing rats. The second bioconjugate, C225-PG-Pt, failed to show in vitro cytotoxicity. Furthermore, because of its high molecular weight, we decided that lower molecular weight peptides might provide better targeting and microdistribution within the tumor. Both PEP

  17. Comparative Proteomic Analysis Provides insight into the Key Proteins as Possible Targets Involved in Aspirin Inhibiting Biofilm Formation of Staphylococcus xylosus

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    Chang-Geng Xu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus xylosus is an opportunistic pathogen that causes infection in humans and cow mastitis. And S. xylosus possesses a strong ability to form biofilms in vitro. As biofilm formation facilitates resistance to antimicrobial agents, the discovery of new medicinal properties for classic drugs is highly desired. Aspirin, which is the most common active component of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compounds, affects the biofilm-forming capacity of various bacterial species. We have found that aspirin effectively inhibits biofilm formation of S. xylosus by Crystal violet (CV staining and scanning electron microscopy analyses. The present study sought to elucidate possible targets of aspirin in suppressing S. xylosus biofilm formation. Based on an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ fold-change of >1.2 or <0.8 (P-value < 0.05, 178 differentially expressed proteins, 111 down-regulated and 67 up-regulated, were identified after application of aspirin to cells at a 1/2 minimal inhibitory concentration. Gene ontology analysis indicated enrichment in metabolic processes for the majority of the differentially expressed proteins. We then used the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway database to analyze a large number of differentially expressed proteins and identified genes involved in biosynthesis of amino acids pathway, carbon metabolism (pentose phosphate and glycolytic pathways, tricarboxylic acid cycle and nitrogen metabolism (histidine metabolism. These novel proteins represent candidate targets in aspirin-mediated inhibition of S. xylosus biofilm formation at sub-MIC levels. The findings lay the foundation for further studies to identify potential aspirin targets.

  18. Peptide vaccines and peptidomimetics targeting HER and VEGF proteins may offer a potentially new paradigm in cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaumaya, Pravin TP; Foy, Kevin Chu

    2013-01-01

    The ErbB family (HER-1, HER-2, HER-3 and HER-4) of receptor tyrosine kinases has been the focus of cancer immunotherapeutic strategies while antiangiogenic therapies have focused on VEGF and its receptors VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2. Agents targeting receptor tyrosine kinases in oncology include therapeutic antibodies to receptor tyrosine kinase ligands or the receptors themselves, and small-molecule inhibitors. Many of the US FDA-approved therapies targeting HER-2 and VEGF exhibit unacceptable toxicities, and show problems of efficacy, development of resistance and unacceptable safety profiles that continue to hamper their clinical progress. The combination of dif ferent peptide vaccines and peptidomimetics targeting specific molecular pathways that are dysregulated in tumors may potentiate anticancer immune responses, bypass immune tolerance and circumvent resistance mechanisms. The focus of this review is to discuss efforts in our laboratory spanning two decades of rationally developing peptide vaccines and therapeutics for breast cancer. This review highlights the prospective benefit of a new, untapped category of therapies biologically targeted to EGF receptor (HER-1), HER-2 and VEGF with potential peptide ‘blockbusters‘ that could lay the foundation of a new paradigm in cancer immunotherapy by creating clinical breakthroughs for safe and efficacious cancer cures. PMID:22894670

  19. Peptide vaccines and targeting HER and VEGF proteins may offer a potentially new paradigm in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaumaya, Pravin T P; Foy, Kevin Chu

    2012-08-01

    The ErbB family (HER-1, HER-2, HER-3 and HER-4) of receptor tyrosine kinases has been the focus of cancer immunotherapeutic strategies while antiangiogenic therapies have focused on VEGF and its receptors VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2. Agents targeting receptor tyrosine kinases in oncology include therapeutic antibodies to receptor tyrosine kinase ligands or the receptors themselves, and small-molecule inhibitors. Many of the US FDA-approved therapies targeting HER-2 and VEGF exhibit unacceptable toxicities, and show problems of efficacy, development of resistance and unacceptable safety profiles that continue to hamper their clinical progress. The combination of different peptide vaccines and peptidomimetics targeting specific molecular pathways that are dysregulated in tumors may potentiate anticancer immune responses, bypass immune tolerance and circumvent resistance mechanisms. The focus of this review is to discuss efforts in our laboratory spanning two decades of rationally developing peptide vaccines and therapeutics for breast cancer. This review highlights the prospective benefit of a new, untapped category of therapies biologically targeted to EGF receptor (HER-1), HER-2 and VEGF with potential peptide 'blockbusters' that could lay the foundation of a new paradigm in cancer immunotherapy by creating clinical breakthroughs for safe and efficacious cancer cures.

  20. Identification of several potential chromatin binding sites of HOXB7 and its downstream target genes in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Henna; Lepikhova, Tatiana; Sahu, Biswajyoti; Pehkonen, Henna; Pihlajamaa, Päivi; Louhimo, Riku; Gao, Ping; Wei, Gong-Hong; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Jänne, Olli A; Monni, Outi

    2015-11-15

    HOXB7 encodes a transcription factor that is overexpressed in a number of cancers and encompasses many oncogenic functions. Previous results have shown it to promote cell proliferation, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, DNA repair and cell survival. Because of its role in many cancers and tumorigenic processes, HOXB7 has been suggested to be a potential drug target. However, HOXB7 binding sites on chromatin and its targets are poorly known. The aim of our study was to identify HOXB7 binding sites on breast cancer cell chromatin and to delineate direct target genes located nearby these binding sites. We found 1,504 HOXB7 chromatin binding sites in BT-474 breast cancer cell line that overexpresses HOXB7. Seventeen selected binding sites were validated by ChIP-qPCR in several breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we analyzed expression of a large number of genes located nearby HOXB7 binding sites and found several new direct targets, such as CTNND2 and SCGB1D2. Identification of HOXB7 chromatin binding sites and target genes is essential to understand better the role of HOXB7 in breast cancer and mechanisms by which it regulates tumorigenic processes. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  1. Hub nodes in the network of human Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK pathways: Characteristics and potential as drug targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. MD Aksam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins involved in the cross-talk between ERK1/2, ERK5, JNK, and P38 signalling pathways integrate the network of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK pathways. Graph theory-based approach is used to construct the network of MAPK pathways, and to observe the network organisational principles. Connectivity pattern reveals rich-club among the hubs, enabling structural ordering. A positive correlation between the degree of the nodes and percentage of essential protein showed hubs are central to the network architecture and function. Furthermore, attributes like connectivity, inter/intra-pathway class, position in the pathway, protein type and subcellular localization of the essential and non-essential proteins are characterizing complex functional roles. Shared properties of 34 cancerous essential proteins lack to be drug targets. We identified the seven nodes overlapping properties of the hub, essential and causing side effects on targeting them. We exploit the strategy of cancerous, non-hub and non-essential proteins as potential drug targets and identified 4EBP1, BAD, CHOP10, GADD45, HSP27, MKP1, RNPK, MLTKa/b, cPLA2, eEF2K and elF4E. We have illustrated the implication of targeting hub nodes and proposed network-based drug targets which would cause less side effect.

  2. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase: A Potential Target in Treatment of Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Venugopal Vinod; Devaraj, Niranjali

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is responsible for 1.6 million deaths. Approximately 80%-85% of lung cancers are of the non-small-cell variety, which includes squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large-cell carcinoma. Knowing the stage of cancer progression is a requisite for determining which management approach-surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and/or immunotherapy-is optimal. Targeted therapeutic approaches with antiangiogenic monoclonal antibodies or tyrosine kinase inhibitors are one option if tumors harbor oncogene mutations. Another, newer approach is directed against cancer-specific molecules and signaling pathways and thus has more limited nonspecific toxicities. This approach targets the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, HER-1/ErbB1), a receptor tyrosine kinase of the ErbB family, which consists of four closely related receptors: HER-1/ErbB1, HER-2/neu/ErbB2, HER-3/ErbB3, and HER-4/ErbB4. Because EGFR is expressed at high levels on the surface of some cancer cells, it has been recognized as an effective anticancer target. EGFR-targeted therapies include monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Tyrosine kinases are an especially important target because they play an important role in the modulation of growth factor signaling. This review highlights various classes of synthetically derived molecules that have been reported in the last few years as potential EGFR-TK inhibitors (TKIs) and their targeted therapies in NSCLC, along with effective strategies for overcoming EGFR-TKI resistance and efforts to develop a novel potent EGFR-TKI as an efficient target of NSCLC treatment in the foreseeable future.

  3. The effect of polyethylene glycol spacer chain length on the tumor-targeting potential of folate-modified PPI dendrimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Shrikant [Dr. Hari Singh Gour University, Pharmaceutics Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India); Tekade, Rakesh K., E-mail: rakeshtekade@yahoo.com [University of Hawai' i at Hilo, College of Pharmacy (United States); Kesharwani, Prashant, E-mail: prashant_pharmacy04@rediffmail.com; Jain, Narendra K., E-mail: jnarendr@yahoo.co.in [Dr. Hari Singh Gour University, Pharmaceutics Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (India)

    2013-05-15

    The objective of the present investigation was to assess the tumor-targeting potential of ligand-spacer-engineered poly (propylene imine) (PPI) dendrimers as nanoscale drug delivery units for site-specific delivery of a model anticancer agent, docetaxel (DTX). PPI dendrimers were engineered by direct and indirect conjugation of folic acid (FA) via different types of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) [Mw (molecular weight): 1,000, 4,000, 6,000, 7,500] as spacers. The synthesized nanoconjugates (PPIFA, PPIP1FA, PPIP4FA, PPIP6FA, and PPIP7.5FA) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-NMR) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. Nanoconjugates were evaluated for entrapment, in vitro drug release (under various pH conditions) and hemolytic studies. Cell uptake and cytotoxicity studies were performed on human malignant cell lines (MCF-7) using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide [MTT] assay. This debut study explored the effect of PEG spacer length on the targeting potential of folate-conjugated 5.0 G PPI dendrimer. DTX entrapment and in vitro drug release from nanoconjugates augmented, and hemolytic toxicity of nanoconjugates slashed with the molecular weight of PEGs. Further, nanoconjugates with PEG 4000 displayed highest tumor-targeting potential as compared to other spacer conjugated nanoconjugates due to optimized steric hindrance and receptor mediated endocytosis among other PEGs. This work is expected to shed new light on the role of spacer chain length in targeting potential of folate-anchored dendrimer.Graphical Abstract.

  4. Dual targeting of Bcl-2 and VEGF: a potential strategy to improve therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anai, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Noboru; Sakai, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Motoyoshi; Porvasnik, Stacy; Urbanek, Cydney; Cao, Wengang; Goodison, Steve; Rosser, Charles J

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Bcl-2 overexpression stimulates angiogenesis in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells, thus giving these tumors a growth advantage. To further elucidate the relationship between Bcl-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in PC-3-Bcl-2 cells, tumorigenicity and angiogenesis were evaluated in our in vitro and in vivo model treated with antisense Bcl-2 oligodeoxynucleotide (ASO) and bevacizumab. In vitro and in vivo angiogenesis assays, as well as a xenograft tumor model of the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3-Bcl-2, were subjected to ASO alone, bevacizumab alone, or the combination of ASO and bevacizumab. Protein-based assays (e.g., immunohistochemical staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) were utilized to detect molecular changes. Interestingly, targeting Bcl-2 with ASO resulted in the inhibition of in vitro tube formation and inhibition of angiogenesis in Matrigel plugs similar to treatment with bevacizumab. In our PC-3-Bcl-2 xenograft model, ASO alone resulted in 41% reduction in tumor size, bevacizumab alone resulted in a 50% reduction in tumor size, whereas the combination of ASO with bevacizumab was associated with >95% reduction in tumor volume. Reduction in tumor size in all groups was associated with reduction in Bcl-2 and VEGF expression, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of angiogenesis and its associated chemokine production. These findings confirm that Bcl-2 is a pivotal target for cancer therapy and thus, further study of this novel combination of Bcl-2 reduction and angiogenic targeting in human tumors is warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Eicosanoids and Respiratory Viral Infection: Coordinators of Inflammation and Potential Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary K. McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are frequent causes of respiratory infection, and viral respiratory infections are significant causes of hospitalization, morbidity, and sometimes mortality in a variety of patient populations. Lung inflammation induced by infection with common respiratory pathogens such as influenza and respiratory syncytial virus is accompanied by increased lung production of prostaglandins and leukotrienes, lipid mediators with a wide range of effects on host immune function. Deficiency or pharmacologic inhibition of prostaglandin and leukotriene production often results in a dampened inflammatory response to acute infection with a respiratory virus. These mediators may, therefore, serve as appealing therapeutic targets for disease caused by respiratory viral infection.

  6. Targeting of detoxification potential of microorganisms and plants for cleaning environment polluted by organochlorine pesticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Kurashvili

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of presented work is the development phytoremediation method targeted to cleaning environment polluted with organochlorine pesticides, based on joint application of specially selected plants and microorganisms. Initial degradation of pesticides carry out by microorganisms; the forming dehalogenated products easily uptake by the plants and undergo oxidative degradation via plant detoxification enzymes. This approach can complete degradation of toxicants and their mineralization into nontoxic compounds. In the presented work the results of using selected strains from genera Pseudomonas and plants phytoremediators in the model experiments are given. It has been shown that the using developed technological approach effectively decreased degree of pollution in artificially polluted soil samples.

  7. Vitamin D analogues to target residual proteinuria: potential impact on cardiorenal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humalda, Jelmer K; Goldsmith, David J A; Thadhani, Ravi; de Borst, Martin H

    2015-12-01

    Residual proteinuria, the amount of proteinuria that remains during optimally dosed renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockade, is an independent risk factor for progressive renal function loss and cardiovascular complications in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Dual RAAS blockade may reduce residual proteinuria but without translating into improved cardiorenal outcomes at least in diabetic nephropathy; rather, dual RAAS blockade may increase the risk of adverse events. These findings have challenged the concept of residual proteinuria as an absolute treatment target. Therefore, new strategies must be explored to address whether by further reduction of residual proteinuria using interventions not primarily targeting the RAAS benefit in terms of cardiorenal risk reduction would accrue. Both clinical and experimental intervention studies have demonstrated that vitamin D can reduce residual proteinuria through both RAAS-dependent and RAAS-independent pathways. Future research should prospectively explore vitamin D treatment as an adjunct to RAAS blockade in an interventional trial exploring clinically relevant cardiorenal end points. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  8. Using Market Research to Characterize College Students and Identify Potential Targets for Influencing Health Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Carla J.; Ling, Pamela M.; Guo, Hongfei; Windle, Michael; Thomas, Janet L.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; An, Lawrence C.

    2013-01-01

    Marketing campaigns, such as those developed by the tobacco industry, are based on market research, which defines segments of a population by assessing psychographic characteristics (i.e., attitudes, interests). This study uses a similar approach to define market segments of college smokers, to examine differences in their health behaviors (smoking, drinking, binge drinking, exercise, diet), and to determine the validity of these segments. A total of 2,265 undergraduate students aged 18–25 years completed a 108-item online survey in fall 2008 assessing demographic, psychographic (i.e., attitudes, interests), and health-related variables. Among the 753 students reporting past 30-day smoking, cluster analysis was conducted using 21 psychographic questions and identified three market segments – Stoic Individualists, Responsible Traditionalists, and Thrill-Seeking Socializers. We found that segment membership was related to frequency of alcohol use, binge drinking, and limiting dietary fat. We then developed three messages targeting each segment and conducted message testing to validate the segments on a subset of 73 smokers representing each segment in spring 2009. As hypothesized, each segment indicated greater relevance and salience for their respective message. These findings indicate that identifying qualitatively different subgroups of young adults through market research may inform the development of engaging interventions and health campaigns targeting college students. PMID:25264429

  9. NLRP3 inflammasome: Pathogenic role and potential therapeutic target for IgA nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Ling; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Chen, Ann; Wei, Chyou-Wei; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Chu, Ching-Liang; Yu, Yung-Luen; Lo, Chia-Wen; Ka, Shuk-Man

    2017-01-01

    We have previously showed that IL-1β is involved in the pathogenesis of both spontaneously occurring and passively induced IgA nephropathy (IgAN) models. However, the exact causal-relationship between NLRP3 inflammasome and the pathogenesis of IgAN remains unknown. In the present study, we showed that [1] IgA immune complexes (ICs) activated NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages involving disruption of mitochondrial integrity and induction of mitochondrial ROS, bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) and renal intrinsic cells; [2] knockout of NLRP3 inhibited IgA ICs-mediated activation of BMDCs and T cells; and [3] knockout of NLRP3 or a kidney-targeting delivery of shRNA of NLRP3 improved renal function and renal injury in a mouse IgAN model. These results strongly suggest that NLRP3 inflammasome serves as a key player in the pathogenesis of IgAN partly through activation of T cells and mitochondrial ROS production and that a local, kidney-targeting suppression of NLRP3 be a therapeutic strategy for IgAN. PMID:28117341

  10. PPARγ as a Potential Target to Treat Airway Mucus Hypersecretion in Chronic Airway Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchun Shen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway mucus hypersecretion (AMH is a key pathophysiological feature of chronic airway inflammatory diseases such as bronchial asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. AMH contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic airway inflammatory diseases, and it is associated with reduced lung function and high rates of hospitalization and mortality. It has been suggested that AMH should be a target in the treatment of chronic airway inflammatory diseases. Recent evidence suggests that a key regulator of airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, and remodeling is peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and lipid metabolism. PPARγ is expressed in structural, immune, and inflammatory cells in the lung. PPARγ is involved in mucin production, and PPARγ agonists can inhibit mucin synthesis both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that PPARγ is a novel target in the treatment of AMH and that further work on this transcription factor may lead to new therapies for chronic airway inflammatory diseases.

  11. Targeting Deregulated Epigenetic Control in Cancer: Cancer Epigenomics as a Platform for Risk Assessment, Early Detection, Targeted Therapy and Potential for Relapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cancer is a multifaceted disease that involves acquisition of genetic mutations, deletions, and amplifications as well as deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms that fine-tune gene regulation. Key epigenetic mechanisms that include histone modifications, DNA methylation, and non-coding RNA-mediated gene silencing are often deregulated in a variety of cancers. Subnuclear localization of key proteins in the interphase nucleus and bookmarking of genes by lineage commitment factors in mitosis – a new dimension to epigenetic control of fundamental biological processes – is also modified in cancer. In this review, we discuss the various aspects of epigenetic control that are operative in a variety of cancers and their potential for risk assessment, early detection, targeted therapy and personalized medicine. PMID:23589100

  12. The Mechanisms to Consolidate Staff Efforts in the Targeting of Increasing the Competitive Potential of Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legominova Svitlana V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The topicality of focusing efforts to improve the competitive potential of enterprise through intellectualization of its staff, using continuous training in accordance with technological regimes and modern trends, has been rationalized. The author has analyzed the structural features of intellectual capital, determining the need for their efficient interaction to gain competitive value. A combination of behavioristic and cognitive approaches has been proposed, using a holistic model of human resources management in order to ensure efficient management and consideration of specific characteristics of cognitive behavior. It has been proven that the competitive potential of enterprise is directly dependent on the accumulation and diffusion of knowledge, should be of permanent nature, ensuring a stable increase in the competitive potential of enterprise and creating the ground for the formation of leadership positions, thus determining the basic mainstreams of development.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of preeclampsia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Fergus P

    2012-01-31

    Preeclampsia is a multisystemic disorder of pregnancy characterized by hypertension, proteinuria, and maternal endothelial dysfunction. It is a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality and is thought to be attributable, in part, to inadequate trophoblast invasion. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) is a ligand-activated transcription factor expressed in trophoblasts, and the vasculature of which activation has been shown to improve endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in hypertensive conditions. We investigated the effects of the administration of a PPAR-gamma agonist using the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) rat model of preeclampsia. The selective PPAR-gamma agonist, rosiglitazone, was administered to pregnant rats that had undergone RUPP surgery. To investigate whether any observed beneficial effects of PPAR-gamma activation were mediated by the antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase 1, rosiglitazone was administered in combination with the heme oxygenase 1 inhibitor tin-protoporphyrin IX. RUPP rats were characterized by hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and elevated microalbumin:creatinine ratios. Rosiglitazone administration ameliorated hypertension, improved vascular function, and reduced the elevated microalbumin:creatinine ratio in RUPP rats. With the exception of microalbumin:creatinine ratio, these beneficial effects were abrogated in the presence of the heme oxygenase 1 inhibitor. Administration of a PPAR-gamma agonist prevented the development of several of the pathophysiological characteristics associated with the RUPP model of preeclampsia, via a heme oxygenase 1-dependent pathway. The findings from this study provide further insight into the underlying etiology of preeclampsia and a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of preeclampsia.

  14. A computational modelling approach combined with cellular electrophysiology data provides insights into the therapeutic benefit of targeting the late Na+ current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Song, Yejia; Giles, Wayne R; Horvath, Balazs; Chen-Izu, Ye; Belardinelli, Luiz; Rajamani, Sridharan; Clancy, Colleen E

    2015-01-01

    Selective inhibition of the slowly inactivating or late Na+ current (INaL) in patients with inherited or acquired arrhythmia syndrome may confer therapeutic benefit by reducing the incidence of triggers for arrhythmia and suppressing one component of arrhythmia-promoting cardiac substrates (e.g. prolonged refractoriness and spatiotemporal dispersion of action potential duration). Recently, a novel compound that preferentially and potently reduces INaL, GS-458967 (IC50 for block of INaL = 130 nm) has been studied. Experimental measurements of the effects of GS-458967 on endogenous INaL in guinea pig ventricular myocytes demonstrate a robust concentration-dependent reduction in action potential duration (APD). Using experimental data to calibrate INaL and the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K+ current, IKr, in the Faber–Rudy computationally based model of the guinea pig ventricular action potential, we simulated effects of GS-458967 on guinea pig ventricular APD. GS-458967 (0.1 μm) caused a 28.67% block of INaL and 12.57% APD shortening in experiments, while the model predicted 10.06% APD shortening with 29.33% block of INaL. An additional effect of INaL block is to reduce the time during which the membrane potential is in a high resistance state (i.e. the action potential plateau). To test the hypothesis that targeted block of INaL would make ventricular myocytes less susceptible to small electrical perturbations, we used the computational model to test the degree of APD prolongation induced by small electrical perturbations in normal cells and in cells with simulated long QT syndrome. The model predicted a substantial dose-dependent reduction in sensitivity to small electrical perturbations as evidenced by action potential duration at 90% repolarization variability in the presence of GS-458967-induced INaL block. This effect was especially potent in the ‘disease setting’ of inherited long QT syndrome. Using a combined experimental and theoretical

  15. Personal Communication Device Use by Nurses Providing In-Patient Care: Survey of Prevalence, Patterns, and Distraction Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Deborah L; LeVasseur, Sandra A

    2017-04-13

    Coincident with the proliferation of employer-provided mobile communication devices, personal communication devices, including basic and enhanced mobile phones (smartphones) and tablet computers that are owned by the user, have become ubiquitous among registered nurses working in hospitals. While there are numerous benefits of personal communication device use by nurses at work, little is known about the impact of these devices on in-patient care. Our aim was to examine how hospital-registered nurses use their personal communication devices while doing both work-related and non‒work-related activities and to assess the impact of these devices on in-patient care. A previously validated survey was emailed to 14,797 members of two national nursing organizations. Participants were asked about personal communication device use and their opinions about the impact of these devices on their own and their colleagues' work. Of the 1268 respondents (8.57% response rate), only 5.65% (70/1237) never used their personal communication device at work (excluding lunch and breaks). Respondents self-reported using their personal communication devices at work for work-related activities including checking or sending text messages or emails to health care team members (29.02%, 363/1251), as a calculator (25.34%, 316/1247), and to access work-related medical information (20.13%, 251/1247). Fewer nurses reported using their devices for non‒work-related activities including checking or sending text messages or emails to friends and family (18.75%, 235/1253), shopping (5.14%, 64/1244), or playing games (2.73%, 34/1249). A minority of respondents believe that their personal device use at work had a positive effect on their work including reducing stress (29.88%, 369/1235), benefiting patient care (28.74%, 357/1242), improving coordination of patient care among the health care team (25.34%, 315/1243), or increasing unit teamwork (17.70%, 220/1243). A majority (69.06%, 848/1228) of

  16. Wnt pathway reprogramming during human embryonal carcinoma differentiation and potential for therapeutic targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bee Thomas

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs are classified as seminonas or non-seminomas of which a major subset is embryonal carcinoma (EC that can differentiate into diverse tissues. The pluripotent nature of human ECs resembles that of embryonic stem (ES cells. Many Wnt signalling species are regulated during differentiation of TGCT-derived EC cells. This study comprehensively investigated expression profiles of Wnt signalling components regulated during induced differentiation of EC cells and explored the role of key components in maintaining pluripotency. Methods Human embryonal carcinoma cells were stably infected with a lentiviral construct carrying a canonical Wnt responsive reporter to assess Wnt signalling activity following induced differentiation. Cells were differentiated with all-trans retinoic acid (RA or by targeted repression of pluripotency factor, POU5F1. A Wnt pathway real-time-PCR array was used to evaluate changes in gene expression as cells differentiated. Highlighted Wnt pathway genes were then specifically repressed using siRNA or stable shRNA and transfected EC cells were assessed for proliferation, differentiation status and levels of core pluripotency genes. Results Canonical Wnt signalling activity was low basally in undifferentiated EC cells, but substantially increased with induced differentiation. Wnt pathway gene expression levels were compared during induced differentiation and many components were altered including ligands (WNT2B, receptors (FZD5, FZD6, FZD10, secreted inhibitors (SFRP4, SFRP1, and other effectors of Wnt signalling (FRAT2, DAAM1, PITX2, Porcupine. Independent repression of FZD5, FZD7 and WNT5A using transient as well as stable methods of RNA interference (RNAi inhibited cell growth of pluripotent NT2/D1 human EC cells, but did not appreciably induce differentiation or repress key pluripotency genes. Silencing of FZD7 gave the greatest growth suppression in all human EC cell lines

  17. Identification and analysis of potential targets in Streptococcus sanguinis using computer aided protein data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhury MRH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Md Rabiul Hossain Chowdhury,1 Md IqbalKaiser Bhuiyan,2 Ayan Saha,2 Ivan MHAI Mosleh,2 Sobuj Mondol,2 C M Sabbir Ahmed3 1Department of Pharmacy, University of Science and Technology Chittagong, Chittagong, Bangladesh; 2Department of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Chittagong, Chittagong, Bangladesh; 3Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering Discipline, Khulna University, Khulna, Bangladesh Purpose: Streptococcus sanguinis is a Gram-positive, facultative aerobic bacterium that is a member of the viridans streptococcus group. It is found in human mouths in dental plaque, which accounts for both dental cavities and bacterial endocarditis, and which entails a mortality rate of 25%. Although a range of remedial mediators have been found to control this organism, the effectiveness of agents such as penicillin, amoxicillin, trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole, and erythromycin, was observed. The emphasis of this investigation was on finding substitute and efficient remedial approaches for the total destruction of this bacterium. Materials and methods: In this computational study, various databases and online software were used to ascertain some specific targets of S. sanguinis. Particularly, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases were applied to determine human nonhomologous proteins, as well as the metabolic pathways involved with those proteins. Different software such as Phyre2, CastP, DoGSiteScorer, the Protein Function Predictor server, and STRING were utilized to evaluate the probable active drug binding site with its known function and protein–protein interaction. Results: In this study, among 218 essential proteins of this pathogenic bacterium, 81 nonhomologous proteins were accrued, and 15 proteins that are unique in several metabolic pathways of S. sanguinis were isolated through metabolic pathway analysis. Furthermore, four essentially membrane-bound unique proteins that are involved in distinct metabolic

  18. The way forward in biochar research: targeting trade-offs between the potential wins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeffery, S.; Bezemer, T.M.; Cornelissen, G.; Kuyper, T.W.; Lehmann, J.; Mommer, L.; Sohi, S.; Van de Voorde, T.F.J.; Wardle, D.A.; Van Groenigen, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Biochar application to soil is currently widely advocated for a variety of reasons related to sustainability. Typically, soil amelioration with biochar is presented as a multiple-‘win’ strategy, although it is also associated with potential risks such as environmental contamination. The most often

  19. Long-term potentiation in spinal nociceptive pathways as a novel target for pain therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruscheweyh, R.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Drdla, R.; Liu, X.G.; Sandkuhler, J.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) in nociceptive spinal pathways shares several features with hyperalgesia and has been proposed to be a cellular mechanism of pain amplification in acute and chronic pain states. Spinal LTP is typically induced by noxious input and has therefore been hypothesized to

  20. Claudins Overexpression in Ovarian Cancer: Potential Targets for Clostridium Perfringens Enterotoxin (CPE Based Diagnosis and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana P. English

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Claudins are a family of tight junction proteins regulating paracellular permeability and cell polarity with different patterns of expression in benign and malignant human tissues. There are approximately 27 members of the claudin family identified to date with varying cell and tissue-specific expression. Claudins-3, -4 and -7 represent the most highly differentially expressed claudins in ovarian cancer. While their exact role in ovarian tumors is still being elucidated, these proteins are thought to be critical for ovarian cancer cell invasion/dissemination and resistance to chemotherapy. Claudin-3 and claudin-4 are the natural receptors for the Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE, a potent cytolytic toxin. These surface proteins may therefore represent attractive targets for the detection and treatment of chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer and other aggressive solid tumors overexpressing claudin-3 and -4 using CPE-based theranostic agents.

  1. Development of chemical inhibitors of the SARS coronavirus: viral helicase as a potential target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Young-Sam; Jeong, Yong-Joo

    2012-11-15

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was the first pandemic in the 21st century to claim more than 700 lives worldwide. However, effective anti-SARS vaccines or medications are currently unavailable despite being desperately needed to adequately prepare for a possible SARS outbreak. SARS is caused by a novel coronavirus, and one of its components, a viral helicase, is emerging as a promising target for the development of chemical SARS inhibitors. In the following review, we describe the characterization, family classification, and kinetic movement mechanisms of the SARS coronavirus (SCV) helicase-nsP13. We also discuss the recent progress in the identification of novel chemical inhibitors of nsP13 in the context of our recent discovery of the strong inhibition of the SARS helicase by natural flavonoids, myricetin and scutellarein. These compounds will serve as important resources for the future development of anti-SARS medications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Drug addiction: targeting dynamic neuroimmune receptor interactions as a potential therapeutic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jonathan Henry W; Hutchinson, Mark R; Mustafa, Sanam

    2016-02-01

    Drug addiction and dependence have proven to be difficult psychiatric disorders to treat. The limited efficacy of neuronally acting medications, such as acamprosate and naltrexone, highlights the need to identify novel targets. Recent research has underscored the importance of the neuroimmune system in many behavioural manifestations of drug addiction. In this review, we propose that our appreciation for complex phenotypes such as drug addiction and dependence will come with a greater understanding that these disorders are the result of intricate, interconnected signalling pathways that are, if only partially, determined at the receptor level. The idea of receptor heteromerisation and receptor mosaics will be introduced to explain cross talk between the receptors and signalling molecules implicated in neuroimmune signalling pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessing potential targets of calcium action in light-modulated gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    Light, through the mediation of the pigment phytochrome, modulates the gravitropic response of the shoots and roots of many plants. The transduction of both light and gravity stimuli appears to involve Ca(2+)-regulated steps, one or more of which may represent points of intersection between the two transduction chains. To be confident that Ca2+ plays a critical role in stimulus-response coupling for gravitropism, it will be important to identify specific targets of Ca2+ action whose function can be clearly linked to the regulation of growth. Calcium typically exerts its influence on cell metabolism through binding to and activating key regulatory proteins. The three best characterized of these proteins in plants are the calmodulins, calcium-dependent protein kinases, and annexins. In this review we summarize what is known about the structure and function of these proteins and speculate on how their activation by Ca2+ could influence the differential growth response of gravitropism.

  4. MicroRNAs: Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for Alveolar Bone Loss in Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadayoshi Kagiya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease caused by bacterial infection of tooth-supporting structures, which results in the destruction of alveolar bone. Osteoclasts play a central role in bone destruction. Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells. Recently, we and other researchers revealed that microRNAs are involved in osteoclast differentiation. MicroRNAs are novel, single-stranded, non-coding, small (20–22 nucleotides RNAs that act in a sequence-specific manner to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level through cleavage or translational repression of their target mRNAs. They regulate various biological activities such as cellular differentiation, apoptosis, cancer development, and inflammatory responses. In this review, the roles of microRNAs in osteoclast differentiation and function during alveolar bone destruction in periodontal disease are described.

  5. Small-Medium Vessel Vasculitides: is the Complement System a Potential Forgotten Target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballanti, Eleonora; Chimenti, Maria S; Perricone, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Systemic vasculitides are a group of uncommon diseases characterized by blood vessel inflammation. The complement system is involved in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of several autoimmune diseases, including systemic vasculitides. This enzymatic system is a component of the innate immune system. Its main function was initially believed to be limited to the recognition and elimination of pathogens, but research in recent years has demonstrated the important role that complement proteins play in modulating adaptive immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive responses. Its activation is also critical for the development of T cell immunity and natural antibodies as well as for the regulation of autoreactive B cells. In systemic vasculitides, particularly small-medium vesselvasculitides, the complement system has been shown to contribute to the development of inflammatory damage. In view of these crucial functions, the complement system represents an attractive therapeutic target for a wide range of diseases. including vasculitic disorders.

  6. The therapeutic potential of targeting the Kir1.1 (renal outer medullary K(+)) channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Birgit T; Pasternak, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    Kir1.1 (renal outer medullary K(+)) channels are potassium channels expressed almost exclusively in the kidney and play a role in the body's electrolyte and water balance. Potassium efflux through Kir1.1 compliments the role of transporters and sodium channels that are the targets of known diuretics. Consequently, loss-of-function mutations in men and rodents are associated with salt wasting and low blood pressure. On this basis, Kir1.1 inhibitors may have value in the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. Efforts to develop small molecule Kir1.1 inhibitors produced MK-7145, which entered into clinical trials. The present manuscript describes the structure-activity relationships associated with this scaffold alongside other preclinical Kir1.1 blockers.