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Sample records for providing positive reactivity

  1. Sleep deprivation affects reactivity to positive but not negative stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, June J; Callan, Christina; Posey, J Laura

    2015-12-01

    The current study examined the effects of partial and total sleep deprivation on emotional reactivity. Twenty-eight partially sleep-deprived participants and 31 totally sleep-deprived participants rated their valence and arousal responses to positive and negative pictures across four testing sessions during the day following partial sleep deprivation or during the night under total sleep deprivation. The results suggest that valence and arousal ratings decreased under both sleep deprivation conditions. In addition, partial and total sleep deprivation had a greater negative effect on positive events than negative events. These results suggest that sleep-deprived persons are more likely to respond less to positive events than negative events. One explanation for the current findings is that negative events could elicit more attentive behavior and thus stable responding under sleep deprivation conditions. As such, sleep deprivation could impact reactivity to emotional stimuli through automated attentional and self-regulatory processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Positive urgency and emotional reactivity: Evidence for altered responding to positive stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sheri L; Haase, Claudia M; Beermann, Ursula; Sanchez, Amy H; Tharp, Jordan A; Lwi, Sandy J; Casey, James J; Nguyen, Nguyen Khoi

    2017-04-01

    Positive urgency, defined as a tendency to become impulsive during positive affective states, has gained support as a form of impulsivity that is particularly important for understanding psychopathology. Despite this, little is known about the emotional mechanisms and correlates of this form of impulsivity. We hypothesized that positive urgency would be related to greater emotional reactivity in response to a positive film clip. Seventy-five undergraduates watched a positive film clip, and a multimodal assessment of emotion was conducted, including subjective emotional experience, physiological activation (i.e., heart rate, respiratory sinus arrhythmia, skin conductance), and facial emotional behavior (i.e., objectively coded using the Facial Action Coding System). Positive urgency was not significantly related to greater positive emotional reactivity but rather a more complex array of emotions expressed in facial behavior, as indexed by similar levels of positive yet greater levels of negative behavior. These findings show that positive urgency may be linked to altered emotionality, but does not appear related to heightened positive emotional reactivity. Potential implications for functional outcomes are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. No praise, please: Depressive symptoms, reactivity to positive social interaction, and fear of positive evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenberger, Julia; Wiggert, Nicole; Agroskin, Dmitrij; Wilhelm, Frank H; Blechert, Jens

    2017-03-01

    Depression is characterized by depressed mood and loss of interest or pleasure. Resulting alterations in emotional reactivity have been explained by three different accounts: 'positive attenuation', 'negative potentiation', and 'emotion context insensitivity'. Despite the importance of depression-related emotional alteration in social interactions, research with naturalistic interpersonal stimuli is scarce and underlying mechanisms largely unknown. Hence, the present study examined subjective emotional reactivity to brief negative, positive, and neutral social-evaluative videos as a function of depressive symptoms in an adult sample (N = 84). Fear of positive evaluation (FPE) and fear of negative evaluation (FNE), often conceptualized as cognitive components of social anxiety, were examined as possible mediators. Results revealed that more depression symptoms were related to diminished pleasantness responses to both positive and neutral videos. When considering all three video conditions simultaneously, only responses to positive videos remained significantly related to depression scores, supporting the 'positive attenuation' account. Moreover, FPE was found to uniquely mediate the relationship between depressive symptoms and pleasantness responses to positive videos. Results indicate that emotional reactivity to positive interpersonal stimuli is relevant for theoretical and clinical considerations of depression. This research underlines the importance of FPE not only for understanding social anxiety but also depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Positive maternal C-reactive protein predicts neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ji Hyun; Namgung, Ran; Park, Min Soo; Park, Koo In; Lee, Chul

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of maternal inflammatory marker: C-reactive protein (CRP) in predicting early onset neonatal sepsis (that occurring within 72 hours after birth). 126 low birth weight newborns (gestation 32±3.2 wk, birth weight 1887±623 g) and their mothers were included. Neonates were divided into sepsis group (n=51) including both proven (positive blood culture) and suspected (negative blood culture but with more than 3 abnormal clinical signs), and controls (n=75). Mothers were subgrouped into CRP positive ≥1.22 mg/dL (n=48) and CRP negative neonatal sepsis according to maternal condition. Maternal CRP was significantly higher in neonatal sepsis group than in control (3.55±2.69 vs. 0.48±0.31 mg/dL, p=0.0001). Maternal CRP (cutoff value >1.22 mg/dL) had sensitivity 71% and specificity 84% for predicting neonatal sepsis. Maternal CRP positive group had more neonatal sepsis than CRP negative group (71% vs. 29%, pneonatal sepsis in maternal CRP positive group versus CRP negative group was 10.68 (95% confidence interval: 4.313-26.428, pneonatal sepsis significantly increased in the case of positive maternal CRP (≥1.22 mg/dL). In newborn of CRP positive mother, the clinician may be alerted to earlier evaluation for possible neonatal infection prior to development of sepsis.

  5. Amygdala reactivity to fearful faces correlates positively with impulsive aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Fisher, Patrick M; Hjordt, Liv V

    2018-01-01

    Facial expressions robustly activate the amygdala, a brain structure playing a critical role in aggression. Whereas previous studies suggest that amygdala reactivity is related to various measures of impulsive aggression, we here estimate a composite measure of impulsive aggression and evaluate...... whether it is associated with amygdala reactivity to angry and fearful faces. We estimated amygdala reactivity with functional magnetic resonance imaging in 47 men with varying degree of aggressive traits (19 incarcerated violent offenders and 28 healthy controls). We modeled a composite "impulsive...... aggression" trait construct (LVagg) using a linear structural equation model, with a single latent variable capturing the shared correlation between five self-report measures of trait aggression, anger and impulsivity. We tested for associations between amygdala reactivity and the LVagg, adjusting for age...

  6. IMU/GPS System Provides Position and Attitude Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching Fang

    2006-01-01

    A special navigation system is being developed to provide high-quality information on the position and attitude of a moving platform (an aircraft or spacecraft), for use in pointing and stabilization of a hyperspectral remote-sensing system carried aboard the platform. The system also serves to enable synchronization and interpretation of readouts of all onboard sensors. The heart of the system is a commercially available unit, small enough to be held in one hand, that contains an integral combination of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) type, Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, a differential GPS subsystem, and ancillary data-processing subsystems. The system utilizes GPS carrier-phase measurements to generate time data plus highly accurate and continuous data on the position, attitude, rotation, and acceleration of the platform. Relative to prior navigation systems based on IMU and GPS subsystems, this system is smaller, is less expensive, and performs better. Optionally, the system can easily be connected to a laptop computer for demonstration and evaluation. In addition to airborne and spaceborne remote-sensing applications, there are numerous potential terrestrial sensing, measurement, and navigation applications in diverse endeavors that include forestry, environmental monitoring, agriculture, mining, and robotics.

  7. Reactivation of viral replication in anti-HBe positive chronic HBsAg carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, K; Aldershvile, J; Kryger, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Reactivation of hepatitis B virus replication was investigated in an unselected group of 44 HBV DNA negative, anti-HBe positive chronic HBsAg carriers. Twenty-five patients (54%) were intravenous drug addicts and 7 (16%) were male homosexuals. Sixteen patients had evidence of delta infection...... and five of the seven male homosexuals had human immunodeficiency virus infection. The patients were followed for 1 to 180 months (median, 24 months) while HBV DNA negative, anti-HBe positive. Reactivation, defined as reappearance of HBV DNA or HBeAg, or both, was detected in six patients corresponding...... to an annual reactivation rate of 5%. Reactivation in four patients was detected by reversion to HBV DNA positivity only, whereas HBeAg/anti-HBe status remained unchanged. Two patients became both HBV DNA and HBeAg positive. None of the patients developed hepatitis-like symptoms and transaminase elevation...

  8. Teacher-Provided Positive Attending to Improve Student Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perle, Jonathan G.

    2016-01-01

    A teacher serves many important roles within a classroom, including an educator and a manager of child behavior. Inattention, overactivity, and noncompliance have long been cited as some of the most common areas of reported difficulty for schools (Axelrod & Zank, 2012; Goldstein, 1995). The evidence-based practice of positive attending (i.e.,…

  9. Psilocybin-Induced Decrease in Amygdala Reactivity Correlates with Enhanced Positive Mood in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraehenmann, Rainer; Preller, Katrin H; Scheidegger, Milan; Pokorny, Thomas; Bosch, Oliver G; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2015-10-15

    The amygdala is a key structure in serotonergic emotion-processing circuits. In healthy volunteers, acute administration of the serotonin 1A/2A/2C receptor agonist psilocybin reduces neural responses to negative stimuli and induces mood changes toward positive states. However, it is little-known whether psilocybin reduces amygdala reactivity to negative stimuli and whether any change in amygdala reactivity is related to mood change. This study assessed the effects of acute administration of the hallucinogen psilocybin (.16 mg/kg) versus placebo on amygdala reactivity to negative stimuli in 25 healthy volunteers using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Mood changes were assessed using the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule and the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. A double-blind, randomized, cross-over design was used with volunteers counterbalanced to receive psilocybin and placebo in two separate sessions at least 14 days apart. Amygdala reactivity to negative and neutral stimuli was lower after psilocybin administration than after placebo administration. The psilocybin-induced attenuation of right amygdala reactivity in response to negative stimuli was related to the psilocybin-induced increase in positive mood state. These results demonstrate that acute treatment with psilocybin decreased amygdala reactivity during emotion processing and that this was associated with an increase of positive mood in healthy volunteers. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of amygdala hyperactivity and negative mood states in patients with major depression. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Stress and strain provide positional and directional cues in development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behruz Bozorg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphogenesis of organs necessarily involves mechanical interactions and changes in mechanical properties of a tissue. A long standing question is how such changes are directed on a cellular scale while being coordinated at a tissular scale. Growing evidence suggests that mechanical cues are participating in the control of growth and morphogenesis during development. We introduce a mechanical model that represents the deposition of cellulose fibers in primary plant walls. In the model both the degree of material anisotropy and the anisotropy direction are regulated by stress anisotropy. We show that the finite element shell model and the simpler triangular biquadratic springs approach provide equally adequate descriptions of cell mechanics in tissue pressure simulations of the epidermis. In a growing organ, where circumferentially organized fibers act as a main controller of longitudinal growth, we show that the fiber direction can be correlated with both the maximal stress direction and the direction orthogonal to the maximal strain direction. However, when dynamic updates of the fiber direction are introduced, the mechanical stress provides a robust directional cue for the circumferential organization of the fibers, whereas the orthogonal to maximal strain model leads to an unstable situation where the fibers reorient longitudinally. Our investigation of the more complex shape and growth patterns in the shoot apical meristem where new organs are initiated shows that a stress based feedback on fiber directions is capable of reproducing the main features of in vivo cellulose fiber directions, deformations and material properties in different regions of the shoot. In particular, we show that this purely mechanical model can create radially distinct regions such that cells expand slowly and isotropically in the central zone while cells at the periphery expand more quickly and in the radial direction, which is a well established growth pattern

  11. Reactivation of viral replication in anti-HBe positive chronic HBsAg carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, K; Aldershvile, J; Kryger, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Reactivation of hepatitis B virus replication was investigated in an unselected group of 44 HBV DNA negative, anti-HBe positive chronic HBsAg carriers. Twenty-five patients (54%) were intravenous drug addicts and 7 (16%) were male homosexuals. Sixteen patients had evidence of delta infection...

  12. Emotional Stress-reactivity and Positive Affect among College Students: The Role of Depression History

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Hara, Ross E.; Armeli, Stephen; Boynton, Marcella H.; Tennen, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Multiple theories posit that people with a history of depression are at higher risk for a depressive episode than people who have never experienced depression, which may be partly due to differences in stress-reactivity. Additionally, both the dynamic model of affect and the broaden-and-build theory suggest that stress and positive affect interact to predict negative affect, but this moderation has never been tested in the context of depression history. The current study used multilevel modeling to examine these issues among 1549 college students with or without a history of depression. Students completed a 30-day online diary study in which they reported daily their perceived stress, positive affect, and negative affect (including depression, anxiety, and hostility). On days characterized by higher than usual stress, students with a history of depression reported greater decreases in positive affect and greater increases in depressed affect than students with no history. Furthermore, the relations between daily stress and both depressed and anxious affect were moderated by daily positive affect among students with remitted depression. These results indicate that students with a history of depression show greater stress-reactivity even when in remission, which may place them at greater risk for recurrence. These individuals may also benefit more from positive affect on higher stress days despite being less likely to experience positive affect on such days. The current findings have various implications both clinically and for research on stress, mood, and depression. PMID:24274764

  13. Use of continuous positive airway pressure reduces airway reactivity in adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busk, Michael; Busk, Nancy; Puntenney, Paula; Hutchins, Janet; Yu, Zhangsheng; Gunst, Susan J; Tepper, Robert S

    2013-02-01

    Asthma is characterised by airway hyperreactivity, which is primarily treated with β-adrenergic bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory agents. However, mechanical strain during breathing is an important modulator of airway responsiveness and we have previously demonstrated in animal models that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) resulted in lower in vivo airway reactivity. We now evaluated whether using nocturnal CPAP decreased airway reactivity in clinically-stable adults with asthma. Adults with stable asthma and normal spirometry used nocturnal CPAP (8-10 cmH(2)O) or sham treatment (0-2 cmH(2)O) for 7 days. Spirometry and bronchial challenges were obtained before and after treatment. The primary outcome was the provocative concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (PC(20)). The CPAP group (n=16) had a significant decrease in airway reactivity (change in (Δ)logPC(20) 0.406, p<0.0017) while the sham group (n=9) had no significant change in airway reactivity (ΔlogPC(20) 0.003, p=0.9850). There was a significant difference in the change in airway reactivity for the CPAP versus the sham group (ΔlogPC(20) 0.41, p<0.043). Our findings indicate that chronic mechanical strain of the lungs produced using nocturnal CPAP for 7 days reduced airway reactivity in clinically stable asthmatics. Future studies of longer duration are required to determine whether CPAP can also decrease asthma symptoms and/or medication usage.

  14. Emotional stress-reactivity and positive affect among college students: the role of depression history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Ross E; Armeli, Stephen; Boynton, Marcella H; Tennen, Howard

    2014-02-01

    Multiple theories posit that people with a history of depression are at higher risk for a depressive episode than people who have never experienced depression, which may be partly due to differences in stress-reactivity. In addition, both the dynamic model of affect and the broaden-and-build theory suggest that stress and positive affect interact to predict negative affect, but this moderation has never been tested in the context of depression history. The current study used multilevel modeling to examine these issues among 1,549 college students with or without a history of depression. Students completed a 30-day online diary study in which they reported daily their perceived stress, positive affect, and negative affect (including depression, anxiety, and hostility). On days characterized by higher than usual stress, students with a history of depression reported greater decreases in positive affect and greater increases in depressed affect than students with no history. Furthermore, the relations between daily stress and both depressed and anxious affect were moderated by daily positive affect among students with remitted depression. These results indicate that students with a history of depression show greater stress-reactivity even when in remission, which may place them at greater risk for recurrence. These individuals may also benefit more from positive affect on higher stress days despite being less likely to experience positive affect on such days. The current findings have various implications both clinically and for research on stress, mood, and depression. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Cr(III) reactivity and foot dermatitis in Cr(VI) positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Barré; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2006-01-01

    Chromium allergy has become synonymous with Cr(VI) allergy. However, real exposure to chromium from leather products may include both Cr(III) and Cr(VI). In this study, we investigate the reactivity to both Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in consecutive patients to analyse the relation between foot eczema......(VI), of which 31 also had a positive Cr(III) reaction. No Cr(VI) negative patients had a positive reaction to Cr(III). An increased risk of foot dermatitis was found in Cr(VI) positive patients with a concomitant positive or doubtful reaction to Cr(III) compared with Cr(VI) positive patients with no reactions...... to Cr(III). The increased risk was not due to a higher degree of sensitivity to Cr(VI). Leather was reported most frequently as the suspected cause of chromium dermatitis (54%). However, Cr(VI) allergics having foot eczema and positive or doubtful Cr(III) reactions often had positive reactions to other...

  16. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Airway Reactivity in Asthma. A Randomized, Sham-controlled Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Holbrook, Janet T.; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Brown, Robert H., Jr.; Drye, Lea T.; Irvin, Charles G.; Schwartz, Alan R.; Tepper, Robert S.; Wise, Robert A; Yasin, Razan Z.; Busk, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Studies have demonstrated that application of stress suppresses airway smooth muscle contractility. In animal models of asthma, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) reduced airway reactivity. Short-term studies of CPAP in patients with asthma showed reductions in airway reactivity.

  17. Navigation towards a goal position: from reactive to generalised learned control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire da Silva, Valdinei [Laboratorio de Tecnicas Inteligentes - LTI, Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, trav.3, n.158, Cidade Universitaria Sao Paulo (Brazil); Selvatici, Antonio Henrique [Universidade Nove de Julho, Rua Vergueiro, 235, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Reali Costa, Anna Helena, E-mail: valdinei.freire@gmail.com, E-mail: antoniohps@uninove.br, E-mail: anna.reali@poli.usp.br [Laboratorio de Tecnicas Inteligentes - LTI, Escola Politecnica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, trav.3, n.158, Cidade Universitaria Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-03-01

    The task of navigating to a target position in space is a fairly common task for a mobile robot. It is desirable that this task is performed even in previously unknown environments. One reactive architecture explored before addresses this challenge by denning a hand-coded coordination of primitive behaviours, encoded by the Potential Fields method. Our first approach to improve the performance of this architecture adds a learning step to autonomously find the best way to coordinate primitive behaviours with respect to an arbitrary performance criterion. Because of the limitations presented by the Potential Fields method, especially in relation to non-convex obstacles, we are investigating the use of Relational Reinforcement Learning as a method to not only learn to act in the current environment, but also to generalise prior knowledge to the current environment in order to achieve the goal more quickly in a non-convex structured environment. We show the results of our previous efforts in reaching goal positions along with our current research on generalised approaches.

  18. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A is positively correlated to first trimester skin microvascular reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobaeus, C; Kahan, T; Jörneskog, G; Bremme, K; Andolf, E; Thorsell, M

    2017-04-11

    To investigate if there is a correlation between levels of circulating maternal pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) and first trimester maternal vascular function. A cross-sectional study of 53 healthy non-smoking, pregnant, nulliparous women in Stockholm, Sweden. PAPP-A and vascular function were assessed during gestational week 11-14. Forearm skin microcirculation was investigated by laser Doppler perfusion imaging during iontophoresis of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) to assess endothelium dependent and endothelium independent microvascular vasodilatation, respectively. Vascular endothelial dependent and independent vasodilatation in the brachial artery was evaluated by post-ischemic hyperaemia induced flow mediated vasodilatation (FMD) and by sublingual glyceryl trinatrate (GTN), respectively. PAPP-A related to skin microvascular endothelial function index, i.e. peak Ach/peak SNP (β for PAPP-A 1.008 (0.34 - 1.68), r 2  = 0.17, P = 0.004). PAPP-A also related inversely to FMD (β for PAPP-A = -0.052 (-0.094 - -0.011), r 2  = 0.14, P = 0.014) but did not to FMD/GTN. The results were retained in multivariate analyses including known confounding factors. First trimester endothelium dependent skin microvascular reactivity was positively related to PAPP-A-levels. If confirmed, these novel findings suggest that first trimester skin microvascular reactivity could be a useful early marker for placental function. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. [Ethnic and psychophysiological analysis of brief reactive psychosis. Autobiographical data and the position of reactive psychosis among psychoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouchouse, J C

    1996-01-01

    The account of an acute schizophrenic episode personally experienced by the author is given here. It relates its rare early stages, the sudden outbreak of the psychotic state, the collapsing of the ego and the internal journey with its catastrophic and mystical thematic. The present positions on acute schizophrenic episodes are related. It is desirable that they should be considered independently from schizophrenics.

  20. Lanthanide ions (III) as sensitizers of melatonin oxidation in reaction mixtures providing reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarek, Małgorzata, E-mail: mkaczmar@amu.edu.pl

    2015-06-15

    Chemiluminescence (CL) of the reactive systems providing strong oxidants (reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen) containing lanthanide ions (III) and melatonin, was studied. Kinetic curves of emission decay and spectral distributions of chemiluminescence were obtained. Analysis of differences in the intensity of chemiluminescence and CL spectra proved that excitation of Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions takes place with the energy transfer from the products of melatonin oxidation: N{sup 1}-acetyl-N{sup 2}-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) and N{sup 1}-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AMK) to the lanthanide ions. In the system Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) a linear correlation was established between the integrated CL intensity and melatonin concent. - Highlights: • Chemiluminescence (CL) of melatonin (Mel) oxidation by reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. • Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions as sensitizers of a melatonin oxidation process. • New CL method for determination of melatonin in pharmaceutical preparations based on CL of Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) system.

  1. Frequency of positive results of vibroacoustic stimulation test in evaluating fetus health of pregnant women with non-reactive NST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    soheila Akbari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Non-Stress Test (NST is one of the most common methods used to evaluat fetus health, which its results are presented as reactive and non-reactive. One of the limitations of this test is the high number of false non-reactive cases. Different studies have suggested a combination of vibroacoustic stimulation and NST to reduce the number of non-reactive cases and duration of the test. Materials and Methods: The present study examined a group of tests, and used simple randomized sampling. The number of the sample was 55 individuals and the data collection tools were NST, sonography instruments, NST result paper, a tooth brusher, a watch, a demographic questionnaire, and a checklist. Vibroacoustic stimulation with an electronic brush was performed on fetus head situated on mother’s abdomen for 3 seconds and then NST was continued for a further 20 minutes. Then the results were recorded. The obtained data were gathered by SPSS 19 software, and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: In this study, 85.5% of the non-reactive cases changed into reactive through vibroacoustic stimulation. The amount of false positive was lower with vibroacoustic stimulation in comparison with NST. Conclusion: Vibroacoustic stimulation, as a technique for evaluating fetus health, makes it possible to save time, costs and personnel. It is also leads to sooner and better diagnosis of fetus health.

  2. Is exposure to an effective contingency management intervention associated with more positive provider beliefs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Kimberly C; Carpenedo, Carolyn M; Stitzer, Maxine L; Dugosh, Karen L; Petry, Nancy M; Roll, John M; Saladin, Michael E; Cohen, Allan J; Hamilton, John; Reese, Karen; Sillo, Gina R; Stabile, Patricia Quinn; Sterling, Robert C

    2012-06-01

    This study empirically examined opinions of treatment providers regarding contingency management (CM) programs while controlling for experience with a specific efficacious CM program. In addition to empirically describing provider opinions, we examined whether the opinions of providers at the sites that implemented the CM program were more positive than those of matched providers at sites that did not implement it. Participants from 7 CM treatment sites (n = 76) and 7 matched nonparticipating sites (n = 69) within the same nodes of the National Institute of Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network completed the Provider Survey of Incentives (PSI), which assesses positive and negative beliefs about incentive programs. An intent-to-treat analysis found no differences in the PSI summary scores of providers in CM program versus matched sites, but correcting for experience with tangible incentives showed significant differences, with providers from CM sites reporting more positive opinions than those from matched sites. Some differences were found in opinions regarding costs of incentives, and these generally indicated that participants from CM sites were more likely to see the costs as worthwhile. The results from the study suggest that exposing community treatment providers to incentive programs may itself be an effective strategy in prompting the dissemination of CM interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Do LGBT aging trainings effectuate positive change in mainstream elder service providers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Kristen E; Krinsky, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to provide empirical evidence regarding whether attitudes, beliefs, and intentions of elder-service providers can be positively affected as a result of attending cultural competency training on the unique challenges of sexual and gender minorities. Stigmatization throughout the lifespan may have a causal influence on barriers to care, social isolation, and concomitant health disparities. Data were collected for this study at 4 Massachusetts training events to pilot a cultural competency workshop on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) aging for mainstream elder service providers. This quasi-experimental study included the analysis of pre- and posttest surveys completed by the service-provider attendees (N = 76). The analytic strategy included descriptive statistics, paired t tests, chi-square analyses, and repeated measures analyses of variance. Findings revealed statistically significant improvement in numerous aspects of providers' knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions subsequent to the training sessions. These included (p = .000) awareness of LGBT resources, policy disparities, spousal benefits for same-sex couples, and the intention to challenge homophobic remarks. This study concludes that mainstream elder-service provider training on LGBT aging issues results in positive change. Recommendations include long-term follow up of participants, the inception of agency-level surveys to appraise institutional culture change, and increased curriculum on transgender older adults.

  4. Penerapan Model Multidimensional Scaling dalam Pemetaan Brand Positioning Internet Service Provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertus Tang Herman

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this high-tech era, there have been tremendous advances in tech-based products and services. Internet is one of them that have widened the world’s eyes to a new borderless marketplace. High competition among internet service providers has pushed companies to create competitive advantage and brilliant marketing strategies. They undertake positioning mapping to describe product or service’s positioning amongst many competitors. The right positioning strategy becomes a powerful weapon to win in the battle. This research is designed to create positioning mapping based on perceptual mapping. The researcher uses Multidimensional Scaling and image mapping to achieve this research goal. Sampling is using non-probability sampling in Jakarta. Based on non-attribute approach, the research findings show that there is similarity between two different brands. Thus, both brands are competing against one another. On the other hand, CBN and Netzap provider reflect some differences to others. And some brands require some improvements in terms of network reliability.

  5. Positive selection of natural poly-reactive B cells in the periphery occurs independent of heavy chain allelic inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ying; Ji, Qiuhe; Lin, Ying; Fu, Meng; Gao, Jixin; Zhang, Ping; Hu, Xingbin; Feng, Lei; Liu, Yufeng; Han, Hua; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Natural autoreactive B cells are important mediators of autoimmune diseases. Receptor editing is known to play an important role in both central and peripheral B cell tolerance. However, the role of allelic inclusion in the development of natural autoreactive B cells is not clear. Previously, we generated μ chain (TgV(H)3B4I) and μ/κ chains (TgV(H/L)3B4) transgenic mice using transgene derived from the 3B4 hybridoma, which produce poly-reactive natural autoantibodies. In this study, we demonstrate that a considerable population of B cells edited their B cells receptors (BCRs) via light chain or heavy chain allelic inclusion during their development in TgV(H)3B4I mice. Additionally, allelic inclusion occurred more frequently in the periphery and promoted the differentiation of B cells into marginal zone or B-1a cells in TgV(H)3B4I mice. B cells from TgV(H/L)3B4 mice expressing the intact transgenic 3B4 BCR without receptor editing secreted poly-reactive 3B4 antibody. Interestingly, however, B cell that underwent allelic inclusion in TgV(H)3B4I mice also produced poly-reactive autoantibodies in vivo and in vitro. Our findings suggest that receptor editing plays a minor role in the positive selection of B cells expressing natural poly-reactive BCRs, which can be positively selected through heavy chain allelic inclusion to retain their poly-reactivity in the periphery.

  6. Positive selection of natural poly-reactive B cells in the periphery occurs independent of heavy chain allelic inclusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xing

    Full Text Available Natural autoreactive B cells are important mediators of autoimmune diseases. Receptor editing is known to play an important role in both central and peripheral B cell tolerance. However, the role of allelic inclusion in the development of natural autoreactive B cells is not clear. Previously, we generated μ chain (TgV(H3B4I and μ/κ chains (TgV(H/L3B4 transgenic mice using transgene derived from the 3B4 hybridoma, which produce poly-reactive natural autoantibodies. In this study, we demonstrate that a considerable population of B cells edited their B cells receptors (BCRs via light chain or heavy chain allelic inclusion during their development in TgV(H3B4I mice. Additionally, allelic inclusion occurred more frequently in the periphery and promoted the differentiation of B cells into marginal zone or B-1a cells in TgV(H3B4I mice. B cells from TgV(H/L3B4 mice expressing the intact transgenic 3B4 BCR without receptor editing secreted poly-reactive 3B4 antibody. Interestingly, however, B cell that underwent allelic inclusion in TgV(H3B4I mice also produced poly-reactive autoantibodies in vivo and in vitro. Our findings suggest that receptor editing plays a minor role in the positive selection of B cells expressing natural poly-reactive BCRs, which can be positively selected through heavy chain allelic inclusion to retain their poly-reactivity in the periphery.

  7. Are Change of Direction Speed and Reactive Agility Useful for Determining the Optimal Field Position for Young Soccer Players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorilli, Giovanni; Iuliano, Enzo; Mitrotasios, Michalis; Pistone, Eugenio M.; Aquino, Giovanna; Calcagno, Giuseppe; di Cagno, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Change Of Direction Speed (CODS) and Reactive Agility (RA) are two determining factors in the ability of young soccer players. We aimed to verify if CODS and RA could be useful in order to establish the best young soccer player field position. Ninety-two elite soccer players (15.18 ± 1.21 years, weight 59.18 ± 9.93, height 1.72 ± 0.08, BMI 19.76 ± 2.22), belonging to two youth categories from the Italian First and Second Divisions, volunteered in this study. The participants included 32 defenders (15.06 ± 0.80 years), 37 midfielders (15.11 ± 0.84 years) and 23 forwards (15.48 ± 1.16 years), and they underwent two tests, each one performed in two different ways: the Y-Agility Test, carried out in a planned and reactive mode (Y-PLAN and Y-REAC), and the Illinois for Change of Direction Test (ICODT) performed with and without the ball. REAC-INDEX, which represents the index of reactivity, was calculated as Y-REAC minus Y-PLAN. The difference between the two scores of ICODT (ICODT with the ball minus ICODT without the ball) represents the TECHN-INDEX. Multivariate Analysis of Variances (MANOVA) was used to evaluate significant differences among all position groups, for all the test scores. MANOVA showed no significant differences in test scores or in TECHN-INDEX among the groups, except for the forwards, who were significantly more reactive than the defenders (p Agility is a key skill required for soccer success, and it is based on greater levels of motor control, when compared to pre-planned CODS. No significant differences amongst players in different field positions for CODS and Agility performances were found. This study does not recommend to use Agility and CODS as indicators to assign the players roles in youth soccer. PMID:28630578

  8. Are Change of Direction Speed and Reactive Agility Useful for Determining the Optimal Field Position for Young Soccer Players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorilli, Giovanni; Iuliano, Enzo; Mitrotasios, Michalis; Pistone, Eugenio M; Aquino, Giovanna; Calcagno, Giuseppe; di Cagno, Alessandra

    2017-06-01

    Change Of Direction Speed (CODS) and Reactive Agility (RA) are two determining factors in the ability of young soccer players. We aimed to verify if CODS and RA could be useful in order to establish the best young soccer player field position. Ninety-two elite soccer players (15.18 ± 1.21 years, weight 59.18 ± 9.93, height 1.72 ± 0.08, BMI 19.76 ± 2.22), belonging to two youth categories from the Italian First and Second Divisions, volunteered in this study. The participants included 32 defenders (15.06 ± 0.80 years), 37 midfielders (15.11 ± 0.84 years) and 23 forwards (15.48 ± 1.16 years), and they underwent two tests, each one performed in two different ways: the Y-Agility Test, carried out in a planned and reactive mode (Y-PLAN and Y-REAC), and the Illinois for Change of Direction Test (ICODT) performed with and without the ball. REAC-INDEX, which represents the index of reactivity, was calculated as Y-REAC minus Y-PLAN. The difference between the two scores of ICODT (ICODT with the ball minus ICODT without the ball) represents the TECHN-INDEX. Multivariate Analysis of Variances (MANOVA) was used to evaluate significant differences among all position groups, for all the test scores. MANOVA showed no significant differences in test scores or in TECHN-INDEX among the groups, except for the forwards, who were significantly more reactive than the defenders (p soccer.

  9. Perspectives of Never-in-Care HIV-Positive Patients and Providers in Rakai, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertrude Nakigozi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Early entry into HIV care is low in Sub-Saharan Africa. In Rakai, about a third (31.5% of HIV-positive clients who knew their serostatus did not enroll into free care services. This qualitative study explored barriers to entry into care from HIV-positive clients who had never enrolled in care and HIV care providers. Methods. We conducted 48 in-depth interviews among HIV-infected individuals aged 15–49 years, who had not entered care within six months of result receipt and referral for free care. Key-informant interviews were conducted with 12 providers. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcripts subjected to thematic content analysis based on the health belief model. Results. Barriers to using HIV care included fear of stigma and HIV disclosure, women’s lack of support from male partners, demanding work schedules, and high transport costs. Programmatic barriers included fear of antiretroviral drug side effects, long waiting and travel times, and inadequate staff respect for patients. Denial of HIV status, belief in spiritual healing, and absence of AIDS symptoms were also barriers. Conclusion. Targeted interventions to combat stigma, strengthen couple counseling and health education programs, address gender inequalities, and implement patient-friendly and flexible clinic service hours are needed to address barriers to HIV care.

  10. Are Change of Direction Speed and Reactive Agility Useful for Determining the Optimal Field Position for Young Soccer Players?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Fiorilli, Enzo Iuliano, Michalis Mitrotasios, Eugenio M. Pistone, Giovanna Aquino, Giuseppe Calcagno, Alessandra di Cagno

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Change Of Direction Speed (CODS and Reactive Agility (RA are two determining factors in the ability of young soccer players. We aimed to verify if CODS and RA could be useful in order to establish the best young soccer player field position. Ninety-two elite soccer players (15.18 ± 1.21 years, weight 59.18 ± 9.93, height 1.72 ± 0.08, BMI 19.76 ± 2.22, belonging to two youth categories from the Italian First and Second Divisions, volunteered in this study. The participants included 32 defenders (15.06 ± 0.80 years, 37 midfielders (15.11 ± 0.84 years and 23 forwards (15.48 ± 1.16 years, and they underwent two tests, each one performed in two different ways: the Y-Agility Test, carried out in a planned and reactive mode (Y-PLAN and Y-REAC, and the Illinois for Change of Direction Test (ICODT performed with and without the ball. REAC-INDEX, which represents the index of reactivity, was calculated as Y-REAC minus Y-PLAN. The difference between the two scores of ICODT (ICODT with the ball minus ICODT without the ball represents the TECHN-INDEX. Multivariate Analysis of Variances (MANOVA was used to evaluate significant differences among all position groups, for all the test scores. MANOVA showed no significant differences in test scores or in TECHN-INDEX among the groups, except for the forwards, who were significantly more reactive than the defenders (p < 0.05. The strong and significant Pearson’s Correlation between ICODT with and without the ball (p < 0.01 demonstrated that physical and technical preparations have the same relevance in all positions. No significant differences were found among players in different field positions for CODS and RA performances, both with and without the ball. This study does not recommend to use RA and CODS as indicators to assign the players roles in youth soccer.

  11. Evaluation of the static belt fit provided by belt-positioning booster seats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Matthew P; Ebert, Sheila M; Sherwood, Christopher P; Klinich, Kathleen D; Manary, Miriam A

    2009-05-01

    Belt-positioning booster seats are recommended for children who use vehicle seat belts as primary restraints but who are too small to obtain good belt fit. Previous research has shown that belt-positioning boosters reduce injury risk, but the belt fit produced by the wide range of boosters in the US market has not previously been assessed. The present study describes the development of a method for quantifying static belt fit with a Hybrid-III 6-year-old test dummy. The measurement method was applied in a laboratory seat mockup to 31 boosters (10 in both backless and highback modes) across a range of belt geometries obtained from in-vehicle measurements. Belt fit varied widely across boosters. Backless boosters generally produced better lap belt fit than highback boosters, largely because adding the back component moved the dummy forward with respect to the lap belt routing guides. However, highback boosters produced more consistent shoulder belt fit because of the presence of belt routing guides near the shoulder. Some boosters performed well on both lap belt and shoulder belt fit. Lap belt fit in dedicated boosters was generally better than in combination restraints that also can be used with an integrated harness. Results demonstrate that certain booster design features produce better belt fit across a wide range of belt geometries. Lap belt guides that hold the belt down, rather than up, and shoulder belt guides integrated into the booster backrest provided better belt fit.

  12. An Integral Model to Provide Reactive and Proactive Services in an Academic CSIRT Based on Business Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Fuertes

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cyber-attacks have increased in severity and complexity. That requires, that the CERT/CSIRT research and develops new security tools. Therefore, our study focuses on the design of an integral model based on Business Intelligence (BI, which provides reactive and proactive services in a CSIRT, in order to alert and reduce any suspicious or malicious activity on information systems and data networks. To achieve this purpose, a solution has been assembled, that generates information stores, being compiled from a continuous network transmission of several internal and external sources of an organization. However, it contemplates a data warehouse, which is focused like a correlator of logs, being formed by the information of feeds with diverse formats. Furthermore, it analyzed attack detection and port scanning, obtained from sensors such as Snort and Passive Vulnerability Scanner, which are stored in a database, where the logs have been generated by the systems. With such inputs, we designed and implemented BI systems using the phases of the Ralph Kimball methodology, ETL and OLAP processes. In addition, a software application has been implemented using the SCRUM methodology, which allowed to link the obtained logs to the BI system for visualization in dynamic dashboards, with the purpose of generating early alerts and constructing complex queries using the user interface through objects structures. The results demonstrate, that this solution has generated early warnings based on the level of criticality and level of sensitivity of malware and vulnerabilities as well as monitoring efficiency, increasing the level of security of member institutions.

  13. A Context-Aware Model to Provide Positioning in Disaster Relief Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Moreno

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of the work performed during disaster relief efforts is highly dependent on the coordination of activities conducted by the first responders deployed in the affected area. Such coordination, in turn, depends on an appropriate management of geo-referenced information. Therefore, enabling first responders to count on positioning capabilities during these activities is vital to increase the effectiveness of the response process. The positioning methods used in this scenario must assume a lack of infrastructure-based communication and electrical energy, which usually characterizes affected areas. Although positioning systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS have been shown to be useful, we cannot assume that all devices deployed in the area (or most of them will have positioning capabilities by themselves. Typically, many first responders carry devices that are not capable of performing positioning on their own, but that require such a service. In order to help increase the positioning capability of first responders in disaster-affected areas, this paper presents a context-aware positioning model that allows mobile devices to estimate their position based on information gathered from their surroundings. The performance of the proposed model was evaluated using simulations, and the obtained results show that mobile devices without positioning capabilities were able to use the model to estimate their position. Moreover, the accuracy of the positioning model has been shown to be suitable for conducting most first response activities.

  14. Cross-reactive Carbohydrate Determinant Contributes to the False Positive IgE Antibody to Peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komei Ito

    2005-01-01

    Conclusions: Social education about the features of peanut allergy is needed in Japan. Anti-CCD IgE antibody was suggested to be one of the mechanisms contributing to the false positive detection of peanut IgE. Detection of anti-HRP or anti-bromelain IgE can be a useful tool to recognize the presence of anti-CCD antibodies.

  15. HSP70 immune reactivity and TUNEL positivity in the liver of toluene-inhaled and melatonin-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Ufuk; Ogeturk, Murat; Kuloglu, Tuncay; Sapmaz, Hilal Irmak; Kocaman, Nevin; Zararsiz, Ismail; Sarsilmaz, Mustafa

    2013-07-01

    Toluene is a clear, colorless and volatile hydrocarbon that is metabolized in liver, produced free oxygen radicals and can mediate cellular damage. Melatonin which is a pineal gland hormone is a very potent antioxidant. It can make the cellular membrane more durable against oxidative attacks and protect nuclear DNA from oxidative damage. This study aimed to investigate heat shock protein (HSP)70 immune reactivity and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) positivity (apoptotic activity) in the liver of toluene-inhaled and melatonin-treated rats. A total of 21 adult male Wistar albino rats were divided at random into 3 equal groups. Animals in group I were designated as control. The rats in group II were exposed to toluene (3000 ppm/1 h/day) for 30 days, while the rats in group III were treated with melatonin (10 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally) plus toluene inhalation. At the end of the 30-day experimental period, all rats were killed by decapitation. Then the liver tissues of rats were removed and tissue specimens were embedded in paraffin blocks. The specimens were stained with periodic acid-schiff (PAS) following routine histological procedures. Sections obtained from paraffin blocks were used for immune detection of TUNEL and HSP70. In light microscopic observations of tissues from toluene-inhaled rats, massive hepatocyte degeneration, ballooning degeneration and decreased PAS positivity were observed. Increased TUNEL positivity and HSP70 immune reactivity were determined in toluene-inhaled group and melatonin treatment decreased all these adverse effects.

  16. Rosaceae-associated exercise-induced anaphylaxis with positive SPT and negative IgE reactivity to Pru p 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, A; Di Rienzo Businco, A; Bondanini, F; Mistrello, G; Carlucci, A; Tripodi, S

    2011-08-01

    Food-dependent-exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is characterized by anaphylactic symptoms after exercise following ingestion of food. We present a case of FDEIA induced by Rosacee fruits showing some diagnostic problems. A 12 years-old boy with seasonal allergy to olive and cypressus pollens, experienced two distinct episodes of FDEIA, grade 4 and 3 of the Sampson Scale respectively, during intense exercise, about 30 minutes after eating a peach with peel or some cherries. SPT with commercial peach extract and fresh Rosacee fruits scored positive while SPT with a date palm profilin-enriched extract was negative. On in vitro tests total IgE were 44 kU/l and IgE for peach, cherry, Prup 3, Prup 1, Bet v 1, Bet v 2, Bet v 4 were negative. SPT with Prup 3 UniCAP device (cellulose polymer in a plastic reserve highly binding allergen protein) was negative. An oral food challenge, performed at rest using a commercial peach juice, scored negative. An immunoblot analysis performed with peach extract was negative. The main peculiarity of this case of FDEIA is the discrepancy between positive SPT and negative in-vitro findings. The positive SPT with the commercial peach extract suggested hypersensitivity to lipid transfer protein; however, no IgE reactivity to rPrup 3 was found in-vitro. The negative immunoblot analysis, possibly caused by the low levels of specific IgE, did not allow us to investigate the nature of the relevant allergen protein further. It is possible that this patient reacted to a different peach allergen or, alternatively, that he recognized an isoform of LTP that is different fr-om that in Uni-CAP. This case emphasizes once more the diagnostic relevance of SPT with extracts and fresh material to be performed before investigating IgE reactivity to single allergen components in-vitro.

  17. Using reactive transport codes to provide mechanistic biogeochemistry representations in global land surface models: CLM-PFLOTRAN 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, G.; Yuan, F.; Bisht, G.; Hammond, G. E.; Lichtner, P. C.; Kumar, J.; Mills, R. T.; Xu, X.; Andre, B.; Hoffman, F. M.; Painter, S. L.; Thornton, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    We explore coupling to a configurable subsurface reactive transport code as a flexible and extensible approach to biogeochemistry in land surface models; our goal is to facilitate testing of alternative models and incorporation of new understanding. A reaction network with the CLM-CN decomposition, nitrification, denitrification, and plant uptake is used as an example. We implement the reactions in the open-source PFLOTRAN code, coupled with the Community Land Model (CLM), and test at Arctic, temperate, and tropical sites. To make the reaction network designed for use in explicit time stepping in CLM compatible with the implicit time stepping used in PFLOTRAN, the Monod substrate rate-limiting function with a residual concentration is used to represent the limitation of nitrogen availability on plant uptake and immobilization. To achieve accurate, efficient, and robust numerical solutions, care needs to be taken to use scaling, clipping, or log transformation to avoid negative concentrations during the Newton iterations. With a tight relative update tolerance to avoid false convergence, an accurate solution can be achieved with about 50 % more computing time than CLM in point mode site simulations using either the scaling or clipping methods. The log transformation method takes 60-100 % more computing time than CLM. The computing time increases slightly for clipping and scaling; it increases substantially for log transformation for half saturation decrease from 10-3 to 10-9 mol m-3, which normally results in decreasing nitrogen concentrations. The frequent occurrence of very low concentrations (e.g. below nanomolar) can increase the computing time for clipping or scaling by about 20 %; computing time can be doubled for log transformation. Caution needs to be taken in choosing the appropriate scaling factor because a small value caused by a negative update to a small concentration may diminish the update and result in false convergence even with very tight relative

  18. PerPos: A Platform Providing Cloud Services for Pervasive Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blunck, Henrik; Godsk, Torben; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    -based building model manager that allows users to manage building models stored in the PerPos cloud for annotation, logging, and navigation purposes. A core service in the PerPos platform is sensor fusion for positioning that makes it seamless and efficient to combine a rich set of position sensors to obtain...

  19. True positivity of anti-Hepatitis C Virus Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay reactive blood donors: A prospective study done in western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Tulsiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A significant number of safe donations are removed from the blood supply, because of the reactive anti-HCV screening test results. This study aimed to assess if the HCV (Hepatitis C Virus seropositive donors were confirmed positive or not. Materials and Methods: More than 68,000 blood donors′ samples were routinely screened and 140 samples were found to be anti-HCV ELISA reactive. These 140 samples were tested by NAT. The NAT negative samples were tested by RIBA. Analysis of samples reactive in single ELISA kit vs. two ELISA kits was done. Results: Out of 140 anti-HCV ELISA reactive samples, a total of 16 (11.43% were positive by NAT. The results of 124 RIBA showed 6 (4.84% positive, 92 (74.19% negative, and 26 (20.97% indeterminate results. None of the sample which was reactive in only single ELISA kit was positive by NAT or RIBA. Conclusion: Only a minority of blood donors with repeatedly reactive anti-HCV screening test is positive by confirmatory testing, but all these blood units are discarded as per existing legal provisions in India. Efforts should be made to retain these donors and also donor units.

  20. Reactive oxygen signaling and MAPK activation distinguish Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-positive versus EBV-negative Burkitt's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerimele, Francesca; Battle, Traci; Lynch, Rebecca; Frank, David A; Murad, Emma; Cohen, Cynthia; Macaron, Nada; Sixbey, John; Smith, Kenneth; Watnick, Randolph S; Eliopoulos, Aristidis; Shehata, Bahig; Arbiser, Jack L

    2005-01-04

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive B cell neoplasm, which is one of the most common neoplasms of childhood. It is highly widespread in East Africa, where it appears in endemic form associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, and around the world in a sporadic form in which EBV infection is much less common. In addition to being the first human neoplasm to be associated with EBV, BL is associated with a characteristic translocation, in which the Ig promoter is translocated to constitutively activate the c-myc oncogene. Although many BLs respond well to chemotherapy, a significant fraction fails to respond to therapy, leading to death. In this article, we demonstrate that EBV-positive BL expresses high levels of activated mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and that ROS directly regulate NF-kappaB activation. EBV-negative BLs exhibit activation of phosphoinositol 3-kinase, but do not have elevated levels of ROS. Elevated reactive oxygen may play a role in diverse forms of viral carcinogenesis in humans, including cancers caused by EBV, hepatitis B, C, and human T cell lymphotropic virus. Our findings imply that inhibition of ROS may be useful in the treatment of EBV-induced neoplasia.

  1. Reactive oxygen signaling and MAPK activation distinguish Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV)-positive versus EBV-negative Burkitt's lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerimele, Francesca; Battle, Traci; Lynch, Rebecca; Frank, David A.; Murad, Emma; Cohen, Cynthia; Macaron, Nada; Sixbey, John; Smith, Kenneth; Watnick, Randolph S.; Eliopoulos, Aristidis; Shehata, Bahig; Arbiser, Jack L.

    2005-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive B cell neoplasm, which is one of the most common neoplasms of childhood. It is highly widespread in East Africa, where it appears in endemic form associated with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection, and around the world in a sporadic form in which EBV infection is much less common. In addition to being the first human neoplasm to be associated with EBV, BL is associated with a characteristic translocation, in which the Ig promoter is translocated to constitutively activate the c-myc oncogene. Although many BLs respond well to chemotherapy, a significant fraction fails to respond to therapy, leading to death. In this article, we demonstrate that EBV-positive BL expresses high levels of activated mitogen-activated protein kinase and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and that ROS directly regulate NF-κB activation. EBV-negative BLs exhibit activation of phosphoinositol 3-kinase, but do not have elevated levels of ROS. Elevated reactive oxygen may play a role in diverse forms of viral carcinogenesis in humans, including cancers caused by EBV, hepatitis B, C, and human T cell lymphotropic virus. Our findings imply that inhibition of ROS may be useful in the treatment of EBV-induced neoplasia. PMID:15611471

  2. The role of maternity care providers in promoting shared decision making regarding birthing positions during the second stage of labor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijze, M.J.; Low, L.K.; Korstjens, I.; Lagro-Janssen, T.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Through the use of a variety of birthing positions during the second stage of labor, a woman can increase progress, improve outcomes, and have a positive birth experience. The role that a maternity care provider has in determining which position a woman uses during the second stage of

  3. Does the triple P-Positive Parenting Program provide value for money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Sanders, Matthew R; Turner, Karen M T; Murphy-Brennan, Majella; Carter, Rob

    2007-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the economic case for the implementation of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program on a population basis in Queensland, Australia, in order to reduce the prevalence of conduct disorder in children. Threshold analysis was undertaken together with a limited cost-effectiveness analysis. The Triple P-Positive Parenting Program is a dominant intervention; that is, it costs less than the amount it saves, until the reduction in prevalence falls below 7% where net costs become positive. Triple P is likely to be a worthwhile use of limited health funds. The economic case is promising, but further research is required to confirm the study results.

  4. Improved Prevention Counseling by HIV Care Providers in a Multisite, Clinic-Based Intervention: Positive STEPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrun, Mark; Cook, Paul F.; Bradley-Springer, Lucy A.; Gardner, Lytt; Marks, Gary; Wright, Julie; Wilson, Tracey E.; Quinlivan, E. Byrd; O'Daniels, Christine; Raffanti, Stephen; Thompson, Melanie; Golin, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have recommended that HIV care clinics incorporate prevention into clinical practice. This report summarizes HIV care providers' attitudes and counseling practices before and after they received training to deliver a counseling intervention to patients. Providers at seven HIV clinics received training…

  5. How much nutrients could biochar-related positive priming effect provide to crops?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiven, Samuel

    2017-04-01

    From a carbon mass balance perspective, positive priming effect is usually seen as a counter balancing effect of the global change mitigation potential of biochar. However, the decomposition of the native organic matter due to the inputs of another source of carbon can be also seen as a possible source of nutrients for the crop on the short scale. The direction of priming effect reported in several recent publications, i.e. positive during the first months / years, and then negative on the longer term, indicate that this nutrient mining may be an aspect to look at when it comes to crop yield improvement effect due to biochar. In this presentation, I will review the existing knowledge about this nutrient priming effect and try to quantify it importance.

  6. Stigmatized Attitude of Healthcare Providers: A Barrier for Delivering Health Services to HIV Positive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooshin Zarei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Despite the success of developed countries in preventing the spread of HIV/AIDS, the disease is expanding in developing countries where an unfavorable attitude exists among people, health professionals and employees. This study aimed to assess the stigmatized attitude among health care providers toward people living with HIV (PLWHA. Methods: The study is a cross-sectional survey. The data were gathered using a structured questionnaire. The study sample included 575 health care providers of public and private hospitals in Shiraz. The data were gathered using a structured questionnaire in spring 2014. Data analysis was carried out using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences, version 21. Results: The most dominant attitude of the health care providers toward HIV/AIDS patients was related to fear (42.42%. According to the results of this study, there was a significant relationship between stigmatized attitude of the health care providers and their religious beliefs, society stigmatized attitude, and knowledge of transmission routes. The relationship between social stigmatized attitude of health care providers and their knowledge of transmission routes, with their willingness to provide services to patients is significant, as well (P<0.05. 39.6% and 46.2% of the respondents preferred not to provide services to the prostitutes and homosexual patients. Conclusion: Fear of contamination and social stigmatized attitude are the main impediments to dealing with patients and providing services to them. Hence, it seems that creating an effective knowledge about transmission and correcting the socio-cultural beliefs of health providers are two key strategies to tackle this problem.

  7. Consolidation and assessment of a technique to provide fast and precise point positioning (Fast-PPP)

    OpenAIRE

    Rovira Garcia, Adrià

    2016-01-01

    The research of this paper-based dissertation is focused on the Fast Precise Point Positioning (Fast-PPP) technique. The novelty relies on using an accurate ionosphere model, in combination with the standard precise satellite clock and orbit products, to reduce the convergence time of state-of-the-art high-accuracy navigation techniques from approximately one hour to few minutes. My first contribution to the Fast-PPP technique as a Ph.D. student has been the design and implementation of a ...

  8. Patient-provider relationship predicts mental and physical health indicators for HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankoff, Sarah M; McCullough, Mary B; Pantalone, David W

    2013-06-01

    We used secondary data analysis to examine associations among aspects of patient-provider relationships and mental and physical health indicators. Positive patient perceptions of patient-provider relationships were associated with fewer mental health symptoms in this outpatient sample of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (N = 171). Regression analyses revealed the role of anxiety and depression in explaining associations between two aspects of patient-provider relationships (i.e. quality of information offered and provider interactional style) and health-related quality of life. The findings demonstrated the importance of patient-provider relationships to improving physical health and functioning and maintaining engagement in care, among HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  9. Neurology advanced practice providers: A position paper of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Heidi B; Fritz, Joseph V; Govindarajan, Raghav; Penfold Murray, Rebecca; Boyle, Kathryn B; Getchius, Thomas S D; Freimer, Miriam

    2015-08-01

    There are many factors driving health care reform, including unsustainable costs, poor outcomes, an aging populace, and physician shortages. These issues are particularly relevant to neurology. New reimbursement models are based on value and facilitated by the use of multidisciplinary teams. Integration of advanced practice providers (APPs) into neurology practice offers many advantages with new models of care. Conversely, there are many and varied challenges financially and logistically with these practice models. The American Academy of Neurology has formed a Work Group to address the needs of both neurologists and neurologic APPs and monitor the effect of APPs on quality and cost of neurologic care.

  10. The social patterns of a biological risk factor for disease: race, gender, socioeconomic position, and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, Pamela; Karraker, Amelia; Friedman, Elliot

    2012-07-01

    Understand the links between race and C-reactive protein (CRP), with special attention to gender differences and the role of class and behavioral risk factors as mediators. This study utilizes the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project data, a nationally representative study of older Americans aged 57-85 to explore two research questions. First, what is the relative strength of socioeconomic versus behavioral risk factors in explaining race differences in CRP levels? Second, what role does gender play in understanding race differences? Does the relative role of socioeconomic and behavioral risk factors in explaining race differences vary when examining men and women separately? When examining men and women separately, socioeconomic and behavioral risk factor mediators vary in their importance. Indeed, racial differences in CRP among men aged 57-74 are little changed after adjusting for both socioeconomic and behavioral risk factors with levels 35% higher for black men as compared to white men. For women aged 57-74, however, behavioral risk factors explain 30% of the relationship between race and CRP. The limited explanatory power of socioeconomic position and, particularly, behavioral risk factors, in elucidating the relationship between race and CRP among men, signals the need for research to examine additional mediators, including more direct measures of stress and discrimination.

  11. Detailed neutronic study of the power evolution for the European Sodium Fast Reactor during a positive insertion of reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facchini, A.; Giusti, V.; Ciolini, R. [Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering (DICI), University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 2, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Tuček, K.; Thomas, D. [Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport (JRC - IET), European Commission, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); D' Agata, E., E-mail: elio.dagata@ec.europa.eu [Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport (JRC - IET), European Commission, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • This paper studies the effect of an unexpected runway of a control rod in the ESFR. • The power peaked fuel pin within the core was identified. • The increase of the fission power density of the fuel pin has been evaluated. • Radial/axial fission power density of the power peaked fuel pin has been evaluated. - Abstract: The new reactor concepts proposed in the Generation IV International Forum require the development and validation of new components and new materials. Inside the Collaborative Project on the European Sodium Fast Reactor, several accidental scenario have been studied. Nevertheless, none of them coped with mechanical safety assessment of the fuel cladding under accidental conditions. Among the accidental conditions considered, there is the unprotected transient of overpower (UTOP), due to the insertion, at the end of the first fuel cycle, of a positive reactivity into the reactor core as a consequence of the unexpected runaway of one control rod. The goal of the study was the search for a detailed distribution of the fission power, in the radial and axial directions, within the power peaked fuel pin under the above accidental conditions. Results show that after the control rod ejection an increase from 658 W/cm{sup 3} to 894 W/cm{sup 3}, i.e. of some 36%, is expected for the power peaked fuel pin. This information will represent the base to investigate, in a future work, the fuel cladding safety margin.

  12. The relationship of C-reactive protein levels and positive culture with quality of life in acute rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schalek P

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Petr Schalek, Zuzana Hornáčková, Aleš Hahn Ear, Nose and Throat department, 3rd Medical Faculty of Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic Background: Acute rhinosinusitis (ARS has been shown to significantly reduce patient quality of life (QoL. While the QoL in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis has been the subject of intensive research over the last decade, studies measuring the impact of ARS on patient QoL have remained relatively scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the QoL and parameters suggestive of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (C-reactive protein [CRP] levels and positive culture and to see if measurement of the QoL could be used as an indicator for antibiotic treatment in ARS.Methods: Eighty patients with ARS were enrolled in the study. A novel QoL instrument for patients with ARS, called Measurement of Acute Rhinosinusitis (MARS questionnaire, was given to patients at the time of diagnosis. We assessed patient QoL, obtained endoscopically guided cultures from the middle meatus, and measured levels of CRP. The relationship between QoL MARS scores (QoL-Mscores and CRP was determined using a correlation coefficient. To compare QoL-Mscores, relative to culture-positive and culture-negative patients, the Student’s t-test was used.Results: No correlation between the QoL, assessed using the MARS questionnaire, and positive middle meatus culture was demonstrated (P=0.332. A weak correlation was found between QoL-Mscores and CRP values, with a correlation coefficient of 0.221 and P=0.0498.Conclusion: No correlation between the QoL in ARS patients and positive culture was found in this study. The clinical significance of the correlation between QoL-Mscores and CRP values in the antibiotic decision making process needs further research. Keywords: endoscopy, quality of life, questionnaires, anti-bacterial agents

  13. Positive psychological impact of treating victims of politically motivated violence among hospital-based health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Shimon; Wexler, Isaiah D; Alkalay, Yasmin; Meiner, Zeev; Kreitler, Shulamith

    2008-01-01

    Health care personnel treating victims of politically motivated violence are at risk for traumatic stress symptoms. Few studies have assessed the positive psychological impact of politically motivated violence on health care workers. In this study, the level of positive psychological impact among health care workers with recurrent exposure to victims of politically motivated violence was examined. A validated questionnaire survey of health care personnel treating victims of politically motivated violence during 2000-2005 in two hospital settings was conducted. Positive psychological impact was assessed by the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory and traumatic stress symptoms were assessed using the Revised Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Inventory. Subjects included physicians (surgeons and anesthesiologists), nurses, and psychotherapists. The rate of response to the mail-in questionnaires was 68.3% (n = 138). The sample consisted of 70 physicians, 37 nurses, and 31 hospital-based psychotherapists. Positive psychological impact was noted for the entire sample and among all professions. Traumatic stress symptoms predicted positive psychological impact for the entire sample and for each profession, and there was a curvilinear relationship between traumatic stress symptoms and positive psychological impact. Women experienced greater levels of positive psychological impact. Hospital-based health care providers treating victims of politically motivated violence experience both positive and negative psychological impact. Individuals who are more traumatized by their experience are more likely to also have a positive psychological impact. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Effect of continuous positive airway pressure on C-reactive protein levels in sleep apnea: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Michael; Samuelson, Christian G; Hamilton, Craig; Fisher, Michelle; Kelley, Kanwar; Joseph, Ninos J; Wang, Pa-Chun; Lin, Hsin-Ching

    2012-09-01

    Evaluate the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, reported either as a primary or secondary end point among patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) based on a meta-analysis of published studies. English-language searches of PubMed, Ovid, and the Cochrane databases were completed. Reference sections of identified studies were also examined for additional relevant articles to review. Studies of adult patients with OSAHS who reported pre- and post-CPAP treatment CRP were reviewed and analyzed. Two independent reviewers extracted data from 10 peer-reviewed studies, which were combined using a random effects meta-analysis model. The CPAP treatment was found to lead to a significant reduction in CRP levels (17.8%, P = .002). This corresponds to an effect size of -0.485 (-0.731, -0.240). Sensitivity analysis was done to determine the impact of study design. Both case-control studies and case-series studies yielded a significant effect. Sensitivity analysis also yielded a significant effect for studies with average body mass index pressure, and studies treating patients ≤ 3 months. Analysis of publication bias, however, revealed a likelihood of "missing" studies. Although there is a significant lack of high-quality studies addressing this question, this analysis suggests that treatment with CPAP leads to a statistically significant reduction in CRP levels. However, the mean pre- and posttreatment CRP levels observed are considered "high risk" for cardiovascular morbidity. The clinical significance of this finding as it relates to cardiovascular risk reduction and the relationship between CRP and OSAHS requires further study.

  15. Hepatitis B Virus Reactivation After 23 Months of Rituximab-based Chemotherapy in an HBsAg-negative, Anti-HBs-positive Patient With Follicular Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Cheng Lee

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A 72-year-old female negative for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and positive for antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs was diagnosed to have follicular lymphoma in 2006. Seventeen cycles of rituximab-based chemotherapy were administered over 23 months. Twelve days after the last cycle of chemotherapy, serum aminotransferase levels were elevated, and hepatitis serology tests revealed reappearance of HBsAg and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg, loss of anti-HBs, and positivity for hepatitis B virus (HBV DNA. Antiviral treatment with entecavir was administered immediately, and the hepatitis flare was controlled. Rituximab-based chemotherapy can induce HBV reactivation even in HBsAg-negative, anti-HBs-positive patients. Early recognition and prompt antiviral treatment is crucial for patients with HBV reactivation during anticancer therapy.

  16. Persistent risk of HBV reactivation despite extensive lamivudine prophylaxis in haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients who are anti-HBc-positive or HBV-negative recipients with an anti-HBc-positive donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, C; Colagrossi, L; Maffongelli, G; Salpini, R; Di Carlo, D; Malagnino, V; Battisti, A; Ricciardi, A; Pollicita, M; Bianchi, A; Picardi, A; Cudillo, L; Cerretti, R; De Angelis, G; Cantonetti, M; Andreoni, M; Perno, C F; Arcese, W; Svicher, V; Sarmati, L

    2016-11-01

    The overall rate of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation was evaluated in a population of 373 haematological stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients treated with lamivudine (LMV) if they were anti-HBc-positive/HBV-DNA-negative recipients or if they were HBV-negative recipients with an anti-HBc-positive donor. The incidence of HBV reactivation was calculated in two groups of autologous (auto) or allogeneic (allo) HSCT patients who were stratified according to their HBV serostatus. The former group included 57 cases: 10 auto-HSCT and 27 allo-HSCT anti-HBc-positive recipients, two auto-HSCT and three allo-HSCT inactive carriers, and 15 allo-HSCT recipients with an anti-HBc-positive donor. Forty-seven (82.4%) patients in this group received LMV prophylaxis (the median (interquartile range, IQR) of LMV treatment was 30 (20-38) months). The second group consisted of 320 anti-HBc-negative auto-HSCT and allo-HSCT recipients with anti-HBc-negative donors. None of these patients received any prophylaxis. Two patients in the first group and two in the second group experienced reactivation of HBV infection, with an incidence of 3.5% (95% CI 0.4-12.1%) and 0.6% (95% CI 0.1-2.2%), respectively. Only one out of four reactivated patients was LMV-treated. The cumulative probability of HBV reactivation at 6 years from HSCT was 15.8% (95% CI 15.2-16.4%). Three of four viral isolates obtained from the HBV-reactivated patients harboured mutations in the immune-active HBsAg-region. In a HSCT population carefully evaluated for HBV prophylaxis, a risk of HBV reactivation persisted in the group of patients who were not LMV-treated. Only one LMV-treated patient experienced reactivation of HBV with a resistant HBV isolate. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Examination of Alzheimer’s-related positive, negative and reactive pathology in the brainstem of APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metaxas, Athanasios; Vaitheeswaran, Ramanan; Ilkjær, Laura

    Aim: While the positive, negative and reactive lesions of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have been extensively characterised in brain areas associated with cognition, such as the cortex and the hippocampus, the status of subcortical structures in AD remains less well characterised. In the present study......, we examined AD-related pathology in the midbrain brainstem of the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of amyloidosis (APP/PS1). Methods: For positive lesions, fresh-frozen brainstem sections from female, 12 months old, transgenic and control mice (n=6/genotype) were stained for amyloid beta and tau, using 6E10...... immunohistochemistry and the Gallyas silver stain respectively. Negative lesions were examined by tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) 2 immunohistochemistry, and by measuring binding and mRNA levels of the serotonin transporter (SERT). Reactive lesions were investigated by Iba1 immunostaining of microglial cells...

  18. Alloactivated HLA class II-positive T-cell lines induce IL-2 reactivity but lack accessory cell function in mixed leukocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, N; Dickmeiss, E; Hofmann, B

    1989-01-01

    Recently, much interest has focused on the role of HLA class II antigens in T cell-T cell interactions. We have studied the stimulatory capability in the primary mixed leukocyte reaction and the primed lymphocyte reaction of 11 alloactivated, HLA-DR- or -DP-reactive CD4-positive T-cell lines (Ta)...... cells. Thus, allogeneic class II-positive Ta can induce interleukin 2 responsiveness but lack accessory cell function(s) necessary for the induction of interleukin 2 production in primed and unprimed T cells....

  19. Induction of endothelial cell apoptosis by heat-shock protein 60-reactive antibodies from anti-endothelial cell autoantibody-positive systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieudé, Mélanie; Senécal, Jean-Luc; Raymond, Yves

    2004-10-01

    To determine whether anti-endothelial cell autoantibodies (AECAs) from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome are involved in the initial endothelial cell (EC) membrane perturbation effect that is postulated to provide a target for antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) binding and, hence, to trigger the thrombotic cascade. To identify the AECA antigenic target on ECs and to determine the mechanism whereby the EC membrane is disrupted. AECAs from SLE patients were assayed for binding to ECs by flow cytometry. Positive AECAs were assayed by immunoblotting, and a consensus antigen was identified by mass spectrometry. This candidate antigen was tested in recombinant form for AECA recognition. AECAs were affinity-purified on this antigen and incubated with ECs to determine their physiologic effects. Anti-Hsp60 antibody titers were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The relationship of anti-Hsp60 status and lupus anticoagulant (LAC) status to thrombotic manifestations between disease onset and the last followup visit were analyzed. Most of the SLE sera (73%) possessed IgG that bound to the surface of ECs. These positive IgG shared reactivity against a 60-kd EC surface polypeptide that was identified as human Hsp60. The presence of Hsp60 at the EC surface was established using anti-Hsp60 antibodies from commercial sources or affinity-purified from SLE sera that bound ECs. Incubation of ECs with these anti-Hsp60 antibodies induced apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner, as determined by Hoechst 33342 dye staining of condensed nuclei and by annexin V binding to surface phosphatidylserine. Anti-Hsp60 antibodies were not restricted to SLE patients, but were found in patients with other autoimmune diseases. However, anti-Hsp60 antibodies were significantly associated with an increased frequency of thrombosis when present in combination with LAC in the SLE patients. The presence of Hsp60 at the surface of ECs serves as a

  20. A Flexible Binding Site Architecture Provides New Insights into CcpA Global Regulation in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Catabolite control protein A (CcpA is the master regulator in Gram-positive bacteria that mediates carbon catabolite repression (CCR and carbon catabolite activation (CCA, two fundamental regulatory mechanisms that enable competitive advantages in carbon catabolism. It is generally regarded that CcpA exerts its regulatory role by binding to a typical 14- to 16-nucleotide (nt consensus site that is called a catabolite response element (cre within the target regions. However, here we report a previously unknown noncanonical flexible architecture of the CcpA-binding site in solventogenic clostridia, providing new mechanistic insights into catabolite regulation. This novel CcpA-binding site, named crevar, has a unique architecture that consists of two inverted repeats and an intervening spacer, all of which are variable in nucleotide composition and length, except for a 6-bp core palindromic sequence (TGTAAA/TTTACA. It was found that the length of the intervening spacer of crevar can affect CcpA binding affinity, and moreover, the core palindromic sequence of crevar is the key structure for regulation. Such a variable architecture of crevar shows potential importance for CcpA’s diverse and fine regulation. A total of 103 potential crevar sites were discovered in solventogenic Clostridium acetobutylicum, of which 42 sites were picked out for electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs, and 30 sites were confirmed to be bound by CcpA. These 30 crevar sites are associated with 27 genes involved in many important pathways. Also of significance, the crevar sites are found to be widespread and function in a great number of taxonomically different Gram-positive bacteria, including pathogens, suggesting their global role in Gram-positive bacteria.

  1. Does an extra kidney-ureter-bladder radiograph taken in the upright position during routine intravenous urography provide diagnostic benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürel, Kamil; Gürel, Safiye; Kalfaoğlu, Melike; Yilmaz, Ozlem; Metin, Ahmet

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the diagnostic benefit of taking a kidney-ureter-bladder (KUB) radiograph in an upright position during routine intravenous urography (IVU). Between February 2005 and September 2007, 170 consecutive patients were included in the study. A basal IVU exam consisted of pre-contrast supine KUB, post-contrast supine KUB at the 7th and 15th minutes, and supine pelvic radiographs with full bladder and post-voiding. When needed, additional compression and/or oblique radiographs were taken. In this study, for all patients, a post-contrast 15th minute upright KUB radiograph was added to IVU. Two consecutive radiographs taken at the 15th minute postcontrast in supine and upright positions were evaluated by consensus of 2 radiologists. Primary benefits were improved filling and emptying of the collecting system, and secondary benefits were nephroptosis and ascertaining diagnosis of phlebolith. Of 170 patients, 337 kidneys and collecting systems (n = 168 right; n = 169 left) were examined. Improved filling, emptying of the collecting system, nephroptosis, ascertaining diagnosis of phleboliths were detected with the rates of 12.5%, 44.2%, 8.3%, and 3.2%, respectively. Improved filling was significant in the presence of hydronephrosis (P IVU (P < 0.05) on either side. Upright KUB radiographs provide supplementary data about urine flow in terms of improved filling and emptying of the collecting system.

  2. The psychophysiology of parenting: Individual differences in autonomic reactivity to positive and negative mood inductions and observed parental affect during dyadic interactions with children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Arin M; Dawson, Glen C; Danzo, Sarah; McKillop, Hannah N

    2017-02-01

    Parenting is a complex activity driven, in part, by parental emotional and physiological responses. However, work examining the physiological underpinnings of parenting behavior is still in its infancy, and very few studies have examined such processes beyond early childhood. The current study examines associations between Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) indices of parents' physiological reactivity to positive and negative mood states and observed parental affect during a series of discussion tasks with their adolescent child. Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia (RSA) was measured as an index of parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activation while viewing film clips designed to induce neutral, sad, and amused mood states. Parental positive affect, anger, and distress were observed during a series of parent-child discussion tasks, which included an ambiguous discussion regarding adolescent growth, a conflict discussion, and a fun-activity planning discussion. Results supported the association between aspects of parental physiological reactivity and observed affect during dyadic interactions. Further, RSA interacted with maternal depression to predict observed positive affect, anger, and distress, although differences across tasks and specific emotions were found regarding the nature of the interaction effects. Overall, results suggest that such neurobiological processes may be particularly important predictors of parental behavior, particularly in at-risk populations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Implicit but not explicit affectivity predicts circadian and reactive cortisol: using the implicit positive and negative affect test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirin, Markus; Kazén, Miguel; Rohrmann, Sonja; Kuhl, Julius

    2009-04-01

    Self-report measures assess mental processes or representations that are consciously accessible. In contrast, implicit measures assess automatic processes that often operate outside awareness. Whereas self-report measures have often failed to show expected relationships with endocrine stress responses, little effort has been made to relate implicit measures to endocrine processes. The present work examines whether implicit affectivity as assessed by the Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test (IPANAT) predicts cortisol regulation. In Study 1, implicit low positive affectivity, but not negative affectivity, significantly predicted circadian cortisol release. In Study 2, implicit negative affectivity, but not positive affectivity, significantly predicted the cortisol response to acute stress. By contrast, cortisol regulation was not predicted by self-reported affectivity. The findings support the use of implicit affectivity measures in studying individual differences in endocrine stress responses and point to a differential role of positive and negative affectivity in baseline versus stress-contingent cortisol release, respectively.

  4. Extensively re-organized systemic lymph nodes provide a feasible environment for self-reactivity in lupus-prone NZB × NZW F1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Yoichi; Ozawa, Madoka; Kanda, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Arata; Kawamura, Toshihiko; Narita, Ichiei; Katakai, Tomoya

    2017-12-31

    Lymphadenopathy is a frequently observed symptom in systemic lupus erythematosus, although the immunological role of lymph nodes (LNs) in systemic autoimmunity remains largely unknown. Here, we performed comprehensive and systematic analyses of LNs in lupus-prone NZB × NZW F1 (BWF1) mice, demonstrating extensive tissue re-organization of the systemic LNs with follicular expansion, hyper germinal center (GC) formation, atrophy of the paracortical T-cell area and expansion of the medulla in aged BWF1 mice bearing glomerulonephritis. The proportion of B cells was significantly increased in these reactive LNs but not in the spleen, and lymphocyte subsets involved in antibody production, i.e. GC B cells, follicular helper T cells and plasma cells, were elevated. Draining LNs of the affected organs, such as the renal and cervical nodes, showed enhanced tissue re-organization and accumulation of effector lymphocytes, suggesting the presence of a positive feedback loop of regional responses. LN cells isolated from disease-bearing animals produced anti-DNA antibody, indicating activation of autoreactive lymphocytes in situ. The substantial development of disease and LN alterations in mice that received a splenectomy at a young age points to the importance of other secondary lymphoid organs, most likely LNs, for the progression of autoimmune responses independent of the spleen. Taken together, our findings highlight the value of taking LN alterations and activities into consideration for understanding the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmunity. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Reactivation of tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment in a patient with a positive QuantiFERON-RD1 test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Munk, Martin E; Andersen, Ase Bengaard

    2004-01-01

    A patient with polymyositis developed tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment. Tuberculin Skin Test and chest X-ray failed to demonstrate latent tuberculosis, whereas a blood sample that was tested with a modified QuantiFERON-TB-assay, using the recombinant ESAT-6 and CFP-10, was positive...

  6. Planting woody crops on dredged contaminated sediment provides both positive and negative effects in terms of remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, William, E-mail: w.hartley@salford.ac.uk [School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Cockcroft Building, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Riby, Philip [School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Byrom Street, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Nicholas M. [Department of Ecology, Lincoln University, Lincoln 7647, Canterbury (New Zealand); Shutes, Brian [Urban Pollution Research Centre, Department of Natural Sciences, Middlesex University, Hendon, London NW4 4BT (United Kingdom); Sparke, Shaun [School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Byrom Street, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom); Scholz, Miklas [School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Cockcroft Building, Salford M5 4WT (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    There is currently a requirement for studies focusing on the long-term sustainability of phytoremediation technologies. Trace element uptake by Salix, Populus and Alnus species planted in dredged contaminated canal sediment and concentrations in sediment and pore waters were investigated, eight years after a phytoremediation trial was initiated in NW England. Soil biological activity was also measured using invertebrate and microbial assays to determine soil quality improvements. Zinc was the dominant trace metal in foliage and woody stems, and the most mobile trace element in sediment pore water ({approx}14 mg l{sup -1}). Biological activity had improved; earthworm numbers had increased from 5 to 24, and the QBS index (an index of microarthropod groups in soil) had increased from 70 to 88. It is concluded that biological conditions had improved and natural processes appear to be enhancing soil quality, but there remains a potential risk of trace element transfer to the wider environment. - Highlights: > Trees provide positive and negative effects for remediation of dredged sediment. > Biological conditions had improved and natural processes enhance soil quality. > Zinc was the dominant trace metal in foliage and sediment pore waters. > Metal contaminants remain a problem in relation to their wider environmental fate. > A sustainable environment appears to be forming as a result of natural attenuation. - Soil biological quality improves in a woody crop stand eight years after a phytoremediation trial.

  7. Reactivation of tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment in a patient with a positive QuantiFERON-RD1 test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Munk, Martin E; Andersen, Ase Bengaard

    2004-01-01

    A patient with polymyositis developed tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment. Tuberculin Skin Test and chest X-ray failed to demonstrate latent tuberculosis, whereas a blood sample that was tested with a modified QuantiFERON-TB-assay, using the recombinant ESAT-6 and CFP-10, was positive...... indicating that this patient was latently infected before immunosuppressive therapy. This case indicates the risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis given that the subject is RD1 responsive, and we believe that preventive anti-tuberculous treatment could have prevented this case...... of tuberculosis. We suggest that RD1 based tests are evaluated further in immunocompromised patients....

  8. Reactivation of tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment in a patient with a positive QuantiFERON-RD1 test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Munk, Martin E; Andersen, Ase Bengaard

    2004-01-01

    A patient with polymyositis developed tuberculosis during immunosuppressive treatment. Tuberculin Skin Test and chest X-ray failed to demonstrate latent tuberculosis, whereas a blood sample that was tested with a modified QuantiFERON-TB-assay, using the recombinant ESAT-6 and CFP-10, was positive...... indicating that this patient was latently infected before immunosuppressive therapy. This case indicates the risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis given that the subject is RD1 responsive, and we believe that preventive anti-tuberculous treatment could have prevented this case...

  9. Risk of hepatitis B reactivation in HBsAg-negative/HBcAb-positive patients with undetectable serum HBV DNA after treatment with rituximab for lymphoma: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zilin; Li, Xiaodong; Wu, Shunquan; Liu, Yan; Qiao, Yan; Xu, Dongping; Li, Jin

    2017-08-30

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative/hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb)-positive patients with undetectable serum hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA have experienced and resolved hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Lymphoma patients with resolved HBV infection have high risk of HBV reactivation when treated with robust immunosuppressive agents, but the reported rate varies extensively between different studies. This study aims to estimate the risk of HBV reactivation in HBsAg-negative/HBcAb-positive patients receiving rituximab-containing chemotherapy for lymphoma. Databases were searched for papers published in English until 8 August 2016. The pooled risk of HBV reactivation was estimated using a random-effects model. Data from 15 studies were retrieved, including a total of 1312 HBsAg-negative/HBcAb-positive lymphoma patients treated with rituximab-containing chemotherapy. The results revealed HBV reactivation rate of 9.0 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.05-0.15]. In subgroup analysis, the reactivation rates for prospective and retrospective studies were 17 % (I (2) = 87.3 %; 95 % 0.08-0.39, p HBV reactivation in HBsAg-negative/HBcAb-positive patients with rituximab treatment for lymphoma. Prophylactic use of anti-HBV agents should be seriously considered for such patients.

  10. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein in early diagnosis of sepsis caused by either Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H H; Zhang, M W; Guo, J B; Li, J; Su, L

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis is the most frequent cause of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are well-known predictors of sepsis. Serum PCT levels are associated with blood culture positivity in patients with sepsis, but the magnitude of elevation of PCT and CRP levels at the onset of sepsis is unknown in Gram-negative (GN) bacteremia and in Gram-positive (GP) bacteremia. To evaluate the PCT and CRP levels in 72 h at the onset of sepsis in GN and GP bacteremia. We retrospectively analyzed the data from 648 blood-positive specimens from three integrated teaching hospitals in Xiamen, China. One hundred and forty-seven adult patients with sepsis within 72 h enrolled in the study. Serum PCT and CRP level were assessed according GN or GP bacteremia. A total of 147 (22.68 %) patients were eligible for inclusion in the study, including 56 GP sepsis and 91 GN sepsis. PCT, but not CRP levels, was significantly higher in patients in the GP group than in the GN group (23.64 vs 6.18 ng/mL, p < 0.001). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve of PCT was 0.73 (95 % confidence interval 0.65-0.81) and that under the ROC curve of CRP was 0.52 (95 % confidence interval 0.43-0.62). A positive predictive value of 72.5 % and a negative predictive value of 67.9 % were achieved with a PCT cutoff value of 2.1 ng/ml. Serum PCT levels are higher in GN sepsis than GP sepsis in 72 h. There are not differences in CRP. The separation of PCT and CRP phenomenon is helpful for early diagnosis of GP sepsis.

  11. Plasma concentrations of copeptin, C-reactive protein and procalcitonin are positively correlated with APACHE II scores in patients with sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Feng, Bing; Gao, Dongna; Zhang, Yu

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the correlation between Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score and plasma concentrations of copeptin, C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin in patients with sepsis. Patients with sepsis were prospectively enrolled. APACHE II scores were determined during the first 24 h after admission to the intensive care unit. Plasma copeptin, CRP and procalcitonin were quantified at admission, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Survival at 28 days after admission was recorded. APACHE II score was significantly positively correlated with plasma copeptin, CRP and procalcitonin concentrations. Survivors (n = 15) had significantly lower APACHE II scores and copeptin, CRP and procalcitonin concentrations than nonsurvivors (n = 26). APACHE II score, copeptin at 72 h, CRP at 48 h and procalcitonin at 24 h were independent risk factors for death. Plasma copeptin, CRP and procalcitonin concentrations were positively correlated with APACHE II score in patients with sepsis, and reflected disease severity. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. A genomic survey of positive selection in Burkholderia pseudomallei provides insights into the evolution of accidental virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tannistha Nandi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Certain environmental microorganisms can cause severe human infections, even in the absence of an obvious requirement for transition through an animal host for replication ("accidental virulence". To understand this process, we compared eleven isolate genomes of Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp, a tropical soil microbe and causative agent of the human and animal disease melioidosis. We found evidence for the existence of several new genes in the Bp reference genome, identifying 282 novel genes supported by at least two independent lines of supporting evidence (mRNA transcripts, database homologs, and presence of ribosomal binding sites and 81 novel genes supported by all three lines. Within the Bp core genome, 211 genes exhibited significant levels of positive selection (4.5%, distributed across many cellular pathways including carbohydrate and secondary metabolism. Functional experiments revealed that certain positively selected genes might enhance mammalian virulence by interacting with host cellular pathways or utilizing host nutrients. Evolutionary modifications improving Bp environmental fitness may thus have indirectly facilitated the ability of Bp to colonize and survive in mammalian hosts. These findings improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of melioidosis, and establish Bp as a model system for studying the genetics of accidental virulence.

  13. Cancer Drugs Provide Positive Value In Nine Countries, But The United States Lags In Health Gains Per Dollar Spent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Vega, Sebastian; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-05-01

    Cancer drugs account for a growing share of health care expenditure, raising questions about how much value is gained from their use. We used a proprietary international data set to examine real-world cancer drug consumption and expenditure in the period 2004-14 in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States and to explore the value obtained. Even after adjusting for population and epidemiological factors, we found that the United States spent more than the other countries on cancer drugs, yet it often had lower utilization. All nine countries-most notably France and Japan-witnessed an improvement in neoplasm-related years of potential life lost, which suggests that although the costs of drugs have risen, their therapeutic benefits have increased as well. Net economic value derived from cancer drug expenditures appears to have remained positive, with base-case analyses indicating that the United States obtained an estimated $32.6 billion in net positive return from cancer drug care in 2014. However, the United States lags behind other countries in health gains obtained per dollar spent on cancer drugs, which suggests an opportunity to improve value in the oncology drug market. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  14. Ultrasound indoor positioning system based on a low-power wireless sensor network providing sub-centimeter accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Carlos; Segura, José Carlos; De la Torre, Ángel

    2013-03-13

    This paper describes the TELIAMADE system, a new indoor positioning system based on time-of-flight (TOF) of ultrasonic signal to estimate the distance between a receiver node and a transmitter node. TELIAMADE system consists of a set of wireless nodes equipped with a radio module for communication and a module for the transmission and reception of ultrasound. The access to the ultrasonic channel is managed by applying a synchronization algorithm based on a time-division multiplexing (TDMA) scheme. The ultrasonic signal is transmitted using a carrier frequency of 40 kHz and the TOF measurement is estimated by applying a quadrature detector to the signal obtained at the A/D converter output. Low sampling frequencies of 17.78 kHz or even 12.31 kHz are possible using quadrature sampling in order to optimize memory requirements and to reduce the computational cost in signal processing. The distance is calculated from the TOF taking into account the speed of sound. An excellent accuracy in the estimation of the TOF is achieved using parabolic interpolation to detect of maximum of the signal envelope at the matched filter output. The signal phase information is also used for enhancing the TOF measurement accuracy. Experimental results show a root mean square error (rmse) less than 2 mm and a standard deviation less than 0.3 mm for pseudorange measurements in the range of distances between 2 and 6 m. The system location accuracy is also evaluated by applying multilateration. A sub-centimeter location accuracy is achieved with an average rmse of 9.6 mm.

  15. Ultrasound Indoor Positioning System Based on a Low-Power Wireless Sensor Network Providing Sub-Centimeter Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel De la Torre

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the TELIAMADE system, a new indoor positioning system based on time-of-flight (TOF of ultrasonic signal to estimate the distance between a receiver node and a transmitter node. TELIAMADE system consists of a set of wireless nodes equipped with a radio module for communication and a module for the transmission and reception of ultrasound. The access to the ultrasonic channel is managed by applying a synchronization algorithm based on a time-division multiplexing (TDMA scheme. The ultrasonic signal is transmitted using a carrier frequency of 40 kHz and the TOF measurement is estimated by applying a quadrature detector to the signal obtained at the A/D converter output. Low sampling frequencies of 17.78 kHz or even 12.31 kHz are possible using quadrature sampling in order to optimize memory requirements and to reduce the computational cost in signal processing. The distance is calculated from the TOF taking into account the speed of sound. An excellent accuracy in the estimation of the TOF is achieved using parabolic interpolation to detect of maximum of the signal envelope at the matched filter output. The signal phase information is also used for enhancing the TOF measurement accuracy. Experimental results show a root mean square error (rmse less than 2 mm and a standard deviation less than 0.3 mm for pseudorange measurements in the range of distances between 2 and 6 m. The system location accuracy is also evaluated by applying multilateration. A sub-centimeter location accuracy is achieved with an average rmse of 9.6 mm.

  16. Explaining the Positive Relationship Between Fourth-Grade Children's Body Mass Index and Energy Intake at School-Provided Meals (Breakfast and Lunch)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, Caroline H.; Baxter, Suzanne D.; Royer, Julie A.; Hitchcock, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: A 2010 publication showed a positive relationship between children's body mass index (BMI) and energy intake at school-provided meals (as assessed by direct meal observations). To help explain that relationship, we investigated 7 outcome variables concerning aspects of school-provided meals: energy content of items selected, number of…

  17. Strategies for providing upper extremity amputees with tactile and hand position feedback--moving closer to the bionic arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riso, R R

    1999-01-01

    A continuing challenge for prostheses developers is to replace the sensory function of the hand. This includes tactile sensitivity such as finger contact, grip force, object slippage, surface texture and temperature, as well as proprioceptive sense. One approach is sensory substitution whereby an intact sensory system such as vision, hearing or cutaneous sensation elsewhere on the body is used as an input channel for information related to the prosthesis. A second technique involves using electrical stimulation to deliver sensor derived information directly to the peripheral afferent nerves within the residual limb. Stimulation of the relevant afferent nerves can ultimately come closest to restoring the original sensory perceptions of the hand, and to this end, researchers have already demonstrated some degree of functionality of the transected sensory nerves in studies with amputee subjects. This paper provides an overview of different types of nerve interface components and the advantages and disadvantages of employing each of them in sensory feedback systems. Issues of sensory perception, neurophysiology and anatomy relevant to hand sensation and function are discussed with respect to the selection of the different types of nerve interfaces. The goal of this paper is to outline what can be accomplished for implementing sensation into artificial arms in the near term by applying what is present or presently attainable technology.

  18. False positive reactivity of a substance P-antibody in the ectodermal/epithelial plug of the nose, ear, eye and perineum of the human and mouse fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumoto, Hiroshi; Katori, Yukio; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Cho, Baik Hwan; Murakami, Gen; Shibata, Shunichi; Matsubara, Akio

    2010-08-01

    Epithelial/ectodermal plug formation in the developing nose, ear, and eye regions is followed by canalization/recanalization mediated by cell death. However, the mechanism is not well understood. Recently, substance P (SP)-mediated cell death, rather than cell apoptosis, has been reported in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Horizontal paraffin sections of 5 human fetuses at 15-16 weeks of gestation were used to examine the entire area of the nose, ear, eye and perineum with immunohistochemistry for SP and its receptor neurokinin-1 (NK-1), and protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 and S100 protein to identify whether the positive cells had neural origins. The deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method was also conducted to identify apoptosis. Four SP antibodies were commercially obtained and compared the results. In addition, using the same antibodies for SP, those results were compared with fetal mouse heads (E14-17). Substance P immunoreactivity of one of the 4 antibodies (sc9758) was clearly found in the nasal plug, the epithelium of the anterior nasal cavity, the entire excretory tear duct, the marginal palpebral conjunctiva, the auditory meatal plug, the parotid duct, the external urethral orifice and, the preputial lamella along the future prepuce. Immunoreactivity was usually seen in enlarged round cells in humans. In fetal mouse heads, in spite of negative reaction in all these sites, the midline epithelial seam at the palate fusion and the oral epithelium especially at and near the tooth germ specifically reacted with the sc9758. Nevertheless, the other 3 antibodies did not react at any of those sites both in human and mouse fetuses. NK-1 receptor-positive cells were seen in the nose and meatal plugs and preputial lamella, but not in the tear duct. S100 protein, PGP 9.5, and TUNEL method all demonstrated negative reactivity at any sc9758-positive sites. Consequently, the present immunoreactivity of the sc9758

  19. Attitudes of women and men living with HIV and their healthcare providers towards pregnancy and abortion by HIV-positive women in Nigeria and Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ann M; Bankole, Akinrinola; Awolude, Olutoin; Audam, Suzette; Oladokun, Adesina; Adewole, Isaac

    2015-01-01

    Fertility decisions among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) are complicated by disease progression, the health of their existing children and possible antiretroviral therapy (ART) use, among other factors. Using a sample of HIV-positive women (n = 353) and men (n = 299) from Nigeria and Zambia and their healthcare providers (n = 179), we examined attitudes towards childbearing and abortion by HIV-positive women. To measure childbearing and abortion attitudes, we used individual indicators and a composite measure (an index). Support for an HIV-positive woman to have a child was greatest if she was nulliparous or if her desire to have a child was not conditioned on parity and lowest if she already had an HIV-positive child. Such support was found to be lower among HIV-positive women than among HIV-positive men, both of which were lower than reported support from their healthcare providers. There was wider variation in support for abortion depending on the measure than there was for support for childbearing. Half of all respondents indicated no or low support for abortion on the index measure while between 2 and 4 in 10 respondents were supportive of HIV-positive women being able to terminate a pregnancy. The overall low levels of support for abortion indicate that most respondents did not see HIV as a medical condition which justifies abortion. Respondents in Nigeria and those who live in urban areas were more likely to support HIV-positive women's childbearing. About a fifth of HIV-positive respondents reported being counselled to end childbearing after their diagnosis. In summary, respondents from both Nigeria and Zambia demonstrate tempered support of (continued) childbearing among HIV-positive women while anti-abortion attitudes remain strong. Access to ART did not impart a strong effect on these attitudes. Therefore, pronatalist attitudes remain in place in the face of HIV infection.

  20. Patient and provider perspectives on improving the linkage of HIV-positive pregnant women to long-term HIV care and treatment in eastern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Haneefa; Kyeyagalire, Robert; Lunsford, Sarah Smith

    2014-01-01

    Despite strong evidence that antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and improves the health of HIV-positive mothers, many HIV-positive pregnant women do not enrol into long-term HIV care and treatment. This study examined barriers and facilitators to the linkage of HIV-positive pregnant women from antenatal care (ANC) to long-term HIV care from patient and provider perspectives, following the implementation of a collaborative quality improvement project in Eastern Uganda. It also solicited recommendations for improving linkages to HIV care. Structured interviews were conducted with 11 health providers and 48 HIV-positive mothers enrolled in HIV care. Facilitators to linking HIV-positive pregnant women to long-term HIV care identified included support from expert clients, escorted referrals, same-day HIV care registration, and coordination between ANC and HIV services. Barriers reported included shortages in HIV testing kits and fear of social, physical and medical consequences. Participants recommended integration of ANC and HIV services, reduction in waiting times, HIV counselling by expert clients, and community-based approaches for improving linkages to HIV care. Linking HIV-positive pregnant women to HIV care can be improved through deliberate implementation of quality improvement interventions in facilities to address barriers to access and provide stronger support and community mobilisation.

  1. Functionalization of reactive polymer multilayers with RGD and an anti-fouling motif: RGD density provides control over human corneal epithelial cell-substrate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocce, Elizabeth J.; Broderick, Adam H.; Murphy, Kaitlin C.; Liliensiek, Sara J.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Lynn, David M.; Nealey, Paul F.

    2011-01-01

    Our study demonstrates that substrates fabricated using a ‘reactive’ layer-by-layer approach promote well-defined cell-substrate interactions of human corneal epithelial cells. Specifically, crosslinked and amine-reactive polymer multilayers were produced by alternating ‘reactive’ deposition of an azlactone-functionalized polymer [poly(2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone)] and a primary amine-containing polymer [branched poly(ethylene imine)]. Advantages of our system include a 5 to 30-fold decrease in deposition time compared to traditional polyelectrolyte films and direct modification of the films with peptides. Our films react with mixtures of an adhesion-promoting peptide containing Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) and the small molecule d-glucamine, a chemical motif which is non-fouling. Resulting surfaces prevent protein adsorption and promote cell attachment through specific peptide interactions. The specificity of cell attachment via immobilized RGD sequences was verified using both a scrambled RDG peptide control as well as soluble-RGD competitive assays. Films were functionalized with monotonically increasing surface densities of RGD which resulted in both increased cell attachment and the promotion of a tri-phasic proliferative response of a human corneal epithelial cell line (hTCEpi). The ability to treat PEI/PVDMA films with peptides for controlled cell-substrate interactions enables the use of these films in a wide range of biological applications. PMID:21972074

  2. Dynamics of C-reactive protein and white blood cell count in critically ill patients with nosocomial Gram positive vs. Gram negative bacteremia: a historical cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Depuydt Pieter O

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nosocomial bacteremia is associated with a poor prognosis. Early adequate therapy has been shown to improve outcome. Consequently, rapid detection of a beginning sepsis is therefore of the utmost importance. This historical cohort study was designed to evaluate if different patterns can be observed in either C-reactive protein (CRP and white blood cell count (WCC between Gram positive bacteremia (GPB vs. Gram negative bacteremia (GNB, and to assess the potential benefit of serial measurements of both biomarkers in terms of early antimicrobial therapy initiation. Methods A historical study (2003–2004 was conducted, including all adult intensive care unit patients with a nosocomial bacteremia. CRP and WCC count measurements were recorded daily from two days prior (d-2 until one day after onset of bacteremia (d+1. Delta (Δ CRP and Δ WCC levels from the level at d-2 onward were calculated. Results CRP levels and WCC counts were substantially higher in patients with GNB. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that GNB and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II score were independently associated with a CRP increase of 5 mg/dL from d-2 to d+1, and both were also independently associated with an increase of WCC levels from d-2 to d+1 of 5,000 × 103 cells/mm3. Conclusion Increased levels of CRP and WCC are suggestive for GNB, while almost unchanged CRP and WCC levels are observed in patients with GPB. However, despite the different patterns observed, antimicrobial treatment as such cannot be guided based on both biomarkers.

  3. Cross-Reactivity of Anti-HIV-1 T Cell Immune Responses among the Major HIV-1 Clades in HIV-1-Positive Individuals from 4 Continents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul M. Coplan; Swati B. Gupta; Sheri A. Dubey; Punnee Pitisuttithum; Alex Nikas; Bernard Mbewe; Efthyia Vardas; Mauro Schechter; Esper G. Kallas; Dan C. Freed; Tong-Ming Fu; Christopher T. Mast; Pilaipan Puthavathana; James Kublin; Kelly Brown Collins; John Chisi; Richard Pendame; Scott J. Thaler; Glenda Gray; James Mcintyre; Walter L. Straus; Jon H. Condra; Devan V. Mehrotra; Harry A. Guess; Emilio A. Emini; John W. Shiver

    2005-01-01

    .... Therefore, we quantified the cross-clade reactivity, among unvaccinated individuals, of anti-HIV-1 T cell responses to the infecting HIV-1 clade relative to other major circulating clades. Methods...

  4. “Experiences with disclosure of HIV-positive status to the infected child”: Perspectives of healthcare providers in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adellah Sariah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The specific age to which an HIV infected child can be disclosed to is stipulated to begin between ages 4 and 6 years. It has also been documented that before disclosure of HIV positive status to the infected child. Health care providers should consider children’s cognitive-developmental ability. However, observation and situation analysis show that, health care providers still feel uncomfortable disclosing the HIV positive status to the infected child. The aim of the study was to explore healthcare providers’ experiences in disclosure of HIV-positive status to the infected child. Methods A qualitative study involving 20 health care providers who attend HIV-positive children was conducted in September, 2014 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Participants were selected from ten HIV care and treatment clinics (CTC by purposive sampling. An interview guide, translated into participants’ national language (Kiswahili was used during in-depth interviews. Sampling followed the principle of data saturation. The interviews focused on perspectives of health-care providers regarding their experience with paediatric HIV disclosure. Data from in-depth interviews were transcribed into text; data analysis followed qualitative content analysis. Results The results show how complex the process of disclosure to children living with HIV can be to healthcare providers. Confusion was noted among healthcare providers about their role and responsibility in the process of disclosing to the HIV infected child. This was reported to be largely due to unclear guidelines and lack of standardized training in paediatric HIV disclosure. Furthermore, healthcare providers were concerned about parental hesitancy to disclose early to the child due to lack of disclosure skills and fear of stigma. In order to improve the disclosure process in HIV infected children, healthcare providers recommended further standardized training on paediatric HIV disclosure with

  5. A chromosome 5q31.1 locus associates with tuberculin skin test reactivity in HIV-positive individuals from tuberculosis hyper-endemic regions in east Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobota, Rafal S; Stein, Catherine M; Kodaman, Nuri; Maro, Isaac; Wieland-Alter, Wendy; Igo, Robert P; Magohe, Albert; Malone, LaShaunda L; Chervenak, Keith; Hall, Noemi B; Matee, Mecky; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Joloba, Moses; Moore, Jason H; Scott, William K; Lahey, Timothy; Boom, W Henry; von Reyn, C Fordham; Williams, Scott M; Sirugo, Giorgio

    2017-06-01

    One in three people has been infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), and the risk for MTB infection in HIV-infected individuals is even higher. We hypothesized that HIV-positive individuals living in tuberculosis-endemic regions who do not get infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis are genetically resistant. Using an "experiment of nature" design that proved successful in our previous work, we performed a genome-wide association study of tuberculin skin test positivity using 469 HIV-positive patients from prospective study cohorts of tuberculosis from Tanzania and Uganda to identify genetic loci associated with MTB infection in the context of HIV-infection. Among these individuals, 244 tested were tuberculin skin test (TST) positive either at enrollment or during the >8 year follow up, while 225 were not. We identified a genome-wide significant association between a dominant model of rs877356 and binary TST status in the combined cohort (Odds ratio = 0.2671, p = 1.22x10-8). Association was replicated with similar significance when examining TST induration as a continuous trait. The variant lies in the 5q31.1 region, 57kb downstream from IL9. Two-locus analyses of association of variants near rs877356 showed a haplotype comprised of rs877356 and an IL9 missense variant, rs2069885, had the most significant association (p = 1.59x10-12). We also replicated previously linked loci on chromosomes 2, 5, and 11. IL9 is a cytokine produced by mast cells and TH2 cells during inflammatory responses, providing a possible link between airway inflammation and protection from MTB infection. Our results indicate that studying uninfected, HIV-positive participants with extensive exposure increases the power to detect associations in complex infectious disease.

  6. Cytomegalovirus reactivation posthematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and type of graft: A step toward rationalizing CMV testing and positively impacting the economics of HSCT in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppuluri, Ramya; Subburaj, Divya; Jayaraman, Dhaarani; Swaminathan, Venkateswaran Vellaichamy; Mullanfiroze, Khushnuma; Vaidhyanathan, Lakshman; Raj, Revathi

    2017-11-01

    We aimed to determine a correlation between cytomegalovirus reactivation post hematopoeitic stem cell transplantation (post-HSCT) with the type of graft source, defining children at risk. We analyzed data on children less than 18 years of age undergoing HSCT from 2002 to May 2016 (n = 464). Correlation between reactivation and graft source was analyzed statistically. Reactivation occurred in 3% of children with matched-related donor (MRD) transplants, 33.3% with unrelated peripheral blood stem cells, 17.4% with unrelated cords, and 36.5% (15/41) with mismatched or haploidentical grafts (P = <0.0001). MRD does not warrant weekly PCR, unlike unrelated or haploidentical donors, thus defining protocols for developing countries with limited resources. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effect of using HIV and infant feeding counselling cards on the quality of counselling provided to HIV positive mothers: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babaniyi Olusegun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Counselling human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive mothers on safer infant and young child feeding (IYCF options is an important component of programmes to prevent mother to child transmission of HIV, but the quality of counselling is often inadequate. The aim of this study was to determine the effect the World Health Organization HIV and infant feeding cards on the quality of counselling provided to HIV positive mothers by health workers about safer infant feeding options. Method This was a un-blinded cluster-randomized controlled field trial in which 36 primary health facilities in Kafue and Lusaka districts in Zambia were randomized to intervention (IYCF counselling with counselling cards or non- intervention arm (IYCF counselling without counselling cards. Counselling sessions with 10 HIV positive women attending each facility were observed and exit interviews were conducted by research assistants. Results Totals of 180 women in the intervention group and 180 women in the control group were attended to by health care providers and interviewed upon exiting the health facility. The health care providers in the intervention facilities more often discussed the advantages of disclosing their HIV status to a household member (RR = 1.46, 95% CI [1.11, 1.92]; used visual aids in explaining the risk of HIV transmission through breast milk (RR = 4.65, 95% CI [2.28, 9.46]; and discussed the advantages and disadvantages of infant feeding options for HIV positive mothers (all p values Conclusion The addition of counselling cards to the IYCF counselling session for HIV positive mothers were a valuable aid to counselling and significantly improved the quality of the counselling session.

  8. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems, t...

  9. Challenges faced by health-care providers offering infant-feeding counseling to HIV-positive women in sub-Saharan Africa: a review of current research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, Emily L; Chan, Jessica; Butler, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) has been identified as the optimal nutrition and critical behavior in attaining human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-free infant survival in resource-limited settings. Health-care providers (HCPs) in clinic- and community-settings throughout sub-Saharan Africa (sSA) provide infant-feeding counseling. However, rates of EBF at 6 months of age are suboptimal. HCPs are uniquely positioned to educate HIV-positive mothers and provide support by addressing known barriers to EBF. However, limited evidence exists on the experiences faced by HCPs in providing counseling on infant feeding to HIV-positive women. Our objective is to describe experiences faced by HCPs when delivering infant-feeding counseling in the context of HIV in program settings in sSA. We searched a range of electronic databases, including PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO from January 1990 to February 2013, in addition to hand-searching, cross-reference searching, and personal communications. The search was limited to publications in English. Empirical studies of HCP experiences providing infant-feeding counseling in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV programs in sSA were selected. We identified 10 peer-reviewed articles reporting HCP challenges in infant-feeding counseling that met inclusion criteria. Articles included qualitative, cross-sectional and mixed-method studies, and cumulatively reported 31 challenges faced by HCPs. Among the challenges identified, the most commonly reported were personal beliefs held by the HCPs toward infant feeding in the context of HIV, contradictory messages, staff workload, directive counseling styles, and a lack of practical strategies to offer mothers, often leading to improvised counseling approaches. Counseling strategies need to be developed that are relevant, meaningful, and responsive to the needs of both HCPs and mothers.

  10. The Relationship of Repeated Technical Assistance Support Visits to the Delivery of Positive Health, Dignity, and Prevention (PHDP) Messages by Healthcare Providers in Mozambique: A Longitudinal Multilevel Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutin, Sarah A; Amico, K Rivet; Hunguana, Elsa; Munguambe, António Orlando; Rose, Carol Dawson

    Positive health, dignity, and prevention (PHDP) is Mozambique's strategy to engage clinicians in the delivery of prevention messages to their HIV-positive clients. This national implementation strategy uses provider trainings on offering key messages and focuses on intervening on 9 evidence-based risk reduction areas. We investigated the impact of longitudinal technical assistance (TA) as an addition to this basic training. We followed 153 healthcare providers in 5 Mozambican provinces over 6 months to evaluate the impact of on-site, observation-based TA on PHDP implementation. Longitudinal multilevel models were estimated to model change in PHDP message delivery over time among individual providers. With each additional TA visit, providers delivered about 1 additional PHDP message ( P < .001); clinicians and nonclinicians started at about the same baseline level, but clinicians improved more quickly ( P = .004). Message delivery varied by practice sector; maternal and child health sectors outperformed other sectors. Longitudinal TA helped reach the programmatic goals of the PHDP program in Mozambique.

  11. Reactivity Network: Secondary Sources for Inorganic Reactivity Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, E. K.

    1989-01-01

    Provides an eclectic annotated bibliography of secondary sources for inorganic reactivity information of interest to reactivity network review authors and to anyone seeking information about simple inorganic reactions in order to develop experiments and demonstrations. Gives 119 sources. (MVL)

  12. Inhibition of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK activity provides a therapeutic approach for CLTC-ALK-positive human diffuse large B cell lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Cerchietti

    Full Text Available ALK positive diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL are a distinct lymphoma subtype associated with a poor outcome. Most of them feature a t(2;17 encoding a clathrin (CLTC-ALK fusion protein. The contribution of deregulated ALK-activity in the pathogenesis and maintenance of these DLBCLs is not yet known. We established and characterized the first CLTC-ALK positive DLBCL cell line (LM1. LM1 formed tumors in NOD-SCID mice. The selective ALK inhibitor NVP-TAE684 inhibited growth of LM1 cells in vitro at nanomolar concentrations. NVP-TAE684 repressed ALK-activated signalling pathways and induced apoptosis of LM1 DLBCL cells. Inhibition of ALK-activity resulted in sustained tumor regression in the xenotransplant tumor model. These data indicate a role of CLTC-ALK in the maintenance of the malignant phenotype thereby providing a rationale therapeutic target for these otherwise refractory tumors.

  13. Messages on pregnancy and family planning that providers give women living with HIV in the context of a Positive Health, Dignity, and Prevention intervention in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilliard S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Starr Hilliard, Sarah A Gutin, Carol Dawson Rose Department of Community Health Systems, School of Nursing, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA Background: Family planning is an important HIV prevention tool for women living with HIV (WLHIV. In Mozambique, the prevalence of HIV among women of reproductive age is 13.1% and the average fertility rate is high. However, family planning and reproductive health for WLHIV are under-addressed in Mozambique. This study explores provider descriptions of reproductive health messages in order to identify possible barriers and facilitators to successfully addressing family planning and pregnancy concerns of WLHIV. Methods: In 2006, a Positive Health, Dignity, and Prevention program was introduced in Mozambique focused on training health care providers to work with patients to reduce their transmission risks. Providers received training on multiple components, including family planning and prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT. In-depth interviews were conducted with 31 providers who participated in the training in five rural clinics in three provinces. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: Analysis showed that providers' clinical messages on family planning, pregnancy, and PMTCT for WLHIV could be arranged along a continuum. Provider statements ranged from saying that WLHIV should not become pregnant and condoms are the only valid form of family planning for WLHIV, to suggesting that WLHIV can have safe pregnancies. Conclusion: These data indicate that many providers continue to believe that WLHIV should not have children and this represents a challenge for integrating family planning into the care of WLHIV. Also, not offering WLHIV a full selection of family planning methods severely limits their ability to protect themselves from unintended pregnancies and to fully exercise their reproductive rights. Responding to the reproductive health

  14. The transcriptomes of cave and surface populations of Gammarus minus (Crustacea: Amphipoda provide evidence for positive selection on cave downregulated transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Carlini

    Full Text Available Gammarus minus, a freshwater amphipod living in the cave and surface streams in the eastern USA, is an excellent model for investigating evolutionary adaptation to the subterranean environment. RNA-Seq was conducted on one pair of morphologically distinct sister populations inhabiting surface and cave habitats to identify genes that were differentially expressed in the two populations, as well as to compare levels and patterns of genetic variation within and between populations. Of the 104,630 transcripts identified in the transcriptome assembly, 57% had higher average levels of expression in the cave population. After Benjamini-Hochberg correction for multiple tests, 1517 and 551 transcripts were significantly upregulated or downregulated, respectively, in the cave population, indicating an almost three-fold enrichment of cave-upregulated genes. The average level of nucleotide diversity across all transcripts was significantly lower in the cave population. Within the cave population, where the average nucleotide diversity of cave-downregulated transcripts was 75% that of the cave-upregulated transcripts, a highly significant difference, whereas within the spring population the nucleotide diversities of cave-downregulated and cave-upregulated transcripts was virtually identical. Three lines of evidence suggest that the reduced variation in cave downregulated transcripts is due to positive selection in the cave population: 1 the average neutrality index of cave-downregulated genes was < 1, consistent with positive selection, and significantly less than that of cave-upregulated genes; 2 Tajima's D was positively correlated with the cave:surface expression ratio, and 3 cave-downregulated transcripts were significantly more likely to be highly diverged from their surface homologs than cave-upregulated transcripts. Five transcripts had fixed premature termination codons in the cave population. The expression patterns and sequence variation in one

  15. The transcriptomes of cave and surface populations of Gammarus minus (Crustacea: Amphipoda) provide evidence for positive selection on cave downregulated transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, David B; Fong, Daniel W

    2017-01-01

    Gammarus minus, a freshwater amphipod living in the cave and surface streams in the eastern USA, is an excellent model for investigating evolutionary adaptation to the subterranean environment. RNA-Seq was conducted on one pair of morphologically distinct sister populations inhabiting surface and cave habitats to identify genes that were differentially expressed in the two populations, as well as to compare levels and patterns of genetic variation within and between populations. Of the 104,630 transcripts identified in the transcriptome assembly, 57% had higher average levels of expression in the cave population. After Benjamini-Hochberg correction for multiple tests, 1517 and 551 transcripts were significantly upregulated or downregulated, respectively, in the cave population, indicating an almost three-fold enrichment of cave-upregulated genes. The average level of nucleotide diversity across all transcripts was significantly lower in the cave population. Within the cave population, where the average nucleotide diversity of cave-downregulated transcripts was 75% that of the cave-upregulated transcripts, a highly significant difference, whereas within the spring population the nucleotide diversities of cave-downregulated and cave-upregulated transcripts was virtually identical. Three lines of evidence suggest that the reduced variation in cave downregulated transcripts is due to positive selection in the cave population: 1) the average neutrality index of cave-downregulated genes was < 1, consistent with positive selection, and significantly less than that of cave-upregulated genes; 2) Tajima's D was positively correlated with the cave:surface expression ratio, and 3) cave-downregulated transcripts were significantly more likely to be highly diverged from their surface homologs than cave-upregulated transcripts. Five transcripts had fixed premature termination codons in the cave population. The expression patterns and sequence variation in one such transcript

  16. Dual Blockade of HER-2 Provides a Greater Magnitude of Benefit in Patients With Hormone-Negative Versus Hormone-Positive Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovitz, Mark; Williams, Casey; Loibl, Sibylle; Leyland-Jones, Brian

    2016-12-01

    The dual small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor lapatinib blocks both human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER-1) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) tyrosine kinase activity by binding reversibly to the ATP-binding site of the receptor's intracellular domain. Lapatinib, in combination with capecitabine, has been approved in 2007 for the treatment of patients with advanced HER-2 + breast cancer upon progressive disease following standard chemotherapy. Approval was also extended to the treatment of postmenopausal women with advanced hormone receptor (HR)-positive and HER-2-positive breast cancer in 2010. More recently, clinical trials that have investigated the efficacy of dual HER-2 blockade in both the metastatic and neoadjuvant breast cancer settings. For example, in 2013 the European Medicines Agency approved the combination of lapatinib and trastuzumab in HER-2 + /HR - patients. We review the efficacy results from dual HER-2 blockade studies and present new post hoc analysis efficacy data according to HR status. We show that dual blockade of HER-2 appears to provide a greater magnitude of benefit in the HR - versus the HR + subgroup of patients. Finally, we examine the potential of molecularly subtyping HER-2 + tumors using the PAM50 test as a predictor of response to treatment with the combination of trastuzumab and lapatinib. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Reactive arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerloni, V; Fantini, F

    1990-01-01

    The term reactive arthritis was introduced to describe an acute non-purulent arthritis complicating an infection elsewhere in the body. Reactive arthritis can also be classified into HLA-B27 associated and non-associated forms. Rheumatic fever is an example of the HLA-B27 non-associated forms with genetic factors other than HLA-B27 involved. HLA-B27 associated reactive arthritis includes enteric, urogenic and idiopathic arthritides. The bacteria known to trigger post-enteritic reactive arthritis are: Yersinia, Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, Clostridium difficile and Brucella; those known to trigger post-urethritic reactive arthritis are Chlamydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum, but often the germ remains unidentified. Mechanisms through which susceptibility to reactive arthritis is linked to HLA-B27 antigen are still incompletely understood, but a clue could be cross-reactivity between B27 and a surface antigen of pathogenic germs. The clinical profile of the disease is characterized by an asymmetrical oligoarthritis with involvement particularly of the peripheral joints of the lower limbs. The arthritis generally recovers without sequelae within a few weeks or months. Accompanying features can be the involvement of enthesis and tendon sheets in form of a talalgia or dactylitis. In some cases the arthritis can relapse and chronicize. In some cases, in addition, involvement of the axial skeleton can occur (spondylitis and/or sacroiliitis). Another feature of the disease is the frequent association with typical extra-articular manifestations such as uveitis and muco-cutaneous lesions.

  18. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems......, the need for mathematically based formal methodology is increasingly important. There are many books that look at particular methodologies for such systems. This book offers a more balanced introduction for graduate students and describes the various approaches, their strengths and weaknesses, and when...

  19. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems, t...... into account. The book has arisen from various courses taught in Denmark and Iceland and is designed to give students a broad introduction to the area, with exercises throughout....

  20. Paraquat-induced reactive oxygen species inhibit neutrophil apoptosis via a p38 MAPK/NF-κB-IL-6/TNF-α positive-feedback circuit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Wang

    Full Text Available Paraquat (PQ, a widely used herbicide and potent reactive oxygen species (ROS inducer, can injure multiple tissues and organs, especially the lung. However, the underlying mechanism is still poorly understood. According to previous reports, neutrophil aggregation and excessive ROS production might play pivotal pathogenetic roles. In the present study, we found that PQ could prolong neutrophil lifespan and induce ROS generation in a concentration-independent manner. Activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, p38 mitogen-activated kinase (p38 MAPK, and myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1 but not Akt signaling pathways were involved in this process, as well as increasing levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and IL-1β. Furthermore, the proinflammatory mediators IL-6 and TNF-α could in turn promote ROS generation, creating a vicious cycle. The existence of such a feedback loop is supported by our finding that neutrophil apoptosis is attenuated by PQ in a concentration-independent manner and could partially explain the clinical dilemma why oxygen therapy will exacerbate PQ induced tissue injury.

  1. Power coefficient of reactivity in CANDU 6 Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Adams, R.; Boyle, S.; Connolly, A.; Kastanya, D.; Khaial, A.; Lau, V. [CANDU Energy Inc., Mississauga (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    The Power Coefficient of Reactivity (PCR) measures the change in reactor core reactivity per unit change in reactor power and is an integral quantity which captures the contributions of the fuel temperature, coolant void and coolant temperature reactivity feedbacks. All nuclear reactor designs provide a balance between the inherent nuclear characteristics and the engineered reactivity control features, to ensure that changes in reactivity in all operating conditions are maintained within a safe range. The CANDU reactor design takes advantage of the inherent nuclear characteristics of small reactivity coefficient, minimal excess reactivity and very long prompt neutron lifetime to mitigate the magnitude of the demand on the engineered systems for controlling reactivity. In particular, CANDU reactors have always taken advantage of the small value of the PCR associated with its design characteristics, such that the overall design of the reactor does not depend on the sign of the PCR. This is a contrast to other reactor design concepts which are dependent on a PCR which is both large and negative in the design of their engineered systems for controlling reactivity. It will be demonstrated that during a Loss of Regulation Control (LORC) event, the impact of having a positive power coefficient, or of hypothesizing a PCR larger than that estimated for CANDU, has no significant impact on the reactor safety. Since the CANDU 6 PCR is small, its role in the operation or safety of the reactor is not significant.

  2. Do clinical decision-support reminders for medical providers improve isoniazid preventative therapy prescription rates among HIV-positive adults? Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Eric P; Catalani, Caricia; Diero, Lameck; Carter, E Jane; Gardner, Adrian; Ndwiga, Charity; Keny, Aggrey; Owiti, Philip; Israelski, Dennis; Biondich, Paul

    2015-04-09

    This document describes a research protocol for a study designed to estimate the impact of implementing a reminder system for medical providers on the use of isoniazid preventative therapy (IPT) for adults living with HIV in western Kenya. People living with HIV have a 5% to 10% annual risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB) once infected with TB bacilli, compared to a 5% lifetime risk in HIV-negative people with latent TB infection. Moreover, people living with HIV have a 20-fold higher risk of dying from TB. A growing body of literature suggests that IPT reduces overall TB incidence and is therefore of considerable benefit to patients and the larger community. However, in 2009, of the estimated 33 million people living with HIV, only 1.7 million (5%) were screened for TB, and about 85,000 (0.2%) were offered IPT. This study will examine the use of clinical decision-support reminders to improve rates of initiation of preventative treatment in a TB/HIV co-morbid population living in a TB endemic area. This will be a pragmatic, parallel-group, cluster-randomized superiority trial with a 1:1 allocation to treatment ratio. For the trial, 20 public medical facilities that use clinical summary sheets generated from an electronic medical records system will participate as clusters. All HIV-positive adult patients who complete an initial encounter at a study cluster and at least one return encounter during the study period will be included in the study cohort. The primary endpoint will be IPT prescription at 3 months post the initial encounter. We will conduct both individual-level and cluster-level analyses. Due to the nature of the intervention, the trial will not be blinded. This study will contribute to the growing evidence base for the use of electronic health interventions in low-resource settings to promote high-quality clinical care, health system optimization and positive patient outcomes. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01934309, registered 29

  3. A STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF SUBSTITUENTS AND OF SOLVENT ON THE REACTIVITY OF THE NORMAL AND ABNORMAL POSITIONS OF UNSYMMETRICAL ORGANIC EPOXIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of substituents and solvents on the reaction between styrene oxide and benzylamine were investigated. The rate measurements on the...ethanol, rho is positive for the normal reaction and negative for the abnormal reaction . The effect of substituents in the benzylamine molecule was...determined by a kinetic study of the reactions of m-chloro- and 3,4-dimethylbenzylamine with styrene oxide in ethanol at 3 temperatures . The results

  4. Reactive arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is one of the spondyloarthropathy family of clinical syndromes. The clinical features are those shared by other members of the spondyloarthritis family, though it is distinguished by a clear relationship with a precipitating infection. Susceptibility to reactive arthritis is closely linked with the class 1 HLA allele B27; it is likely that all sub-types pre-dispose to this condition. The link between HLA B27 and infection is mirrored by the development of arthritis in HLA B27-transgenic rats. In this model, arthritis does not develop in animals maintained in a germ-free environment. Infections of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and respiratory tract appear to provoke reactive arthritis and a wide range of pathogens has now been implicated. Although mechanistic parallels may exist, reactive arthritis is distinguished from Lyme disease, rheumatic fever and Whipple's disease by virtue of the distinct clinical features and the link with HLA B27. As in these conditions both antigens and DNA of several micro-organisms have been detected in joint material from patients with reactive arthritis. The role of such disseminated microbial elements in the provocation or maintenance of arthritis remains unclear. HLA B27-restricted T-cell responses to microbial antigens have been demonstrated and these may be important in disease pathogenesis. The importance of dissemination of bacteria from sites of mucosal infection and their deposition in joints has yet to be fully understood. The role of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of reactive arthritis is being explored; in some circumstances, both the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of certain antibiotics appear to be valuable. The term reactive arthritis should be seen as a transitory one, reflecting a concept which may itself be on the verge of replacement, as our understanding of the condition develops. Nevertheless it appropriately describes arthritis that is associated with demonstrable

  5. Content and reactivity to product perfumes in fragrance mix positive and negative eczema patients. A study of perfumes used in toiletries and skin-care products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Andersen, K E

    1997-01-01

    if perfumed cosmetics are used. Furthermore, patients suspected of perfume allergy need to be tested with their own perfumed products, as far from all cases of perfume allergy are detected by the fragrance mix and/or balsam of Peru in the European standard patch test series.......The aim of the study was to investigate the elicitation potential of perfumes from 17 commonly sold lower-price cosmetic products. 8 of the perfumes were from stay-on cosmetics and 9 were from wash-off cosmetics. Each perfume was tested in 500 consecutive eczema patients, who also were tested...... with the European standard patch test series. 4.2% reacted to 1 or more of the wash-off product perfumes and 3.2% to 1 or more of the stay-on product perfumes. Concordant positive reactions between the fragrance mix and the product perfumes were found in 81.3% of positive reactions to the stay-on product perfumes...

  6. Content and reactivity to product perfumes in fragrance mix positive and negative eczema patients. A study of perfumes used in toiletries and skin-care products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Rastogi, Suresh Chandra; Andersen, K E

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the elicitation potential of perfumes from 17 commonly sold lower-price cosmetic products. 8 of the perfumes were from stay-on cosmetics and 9 were from wash-off cosmetics. Each perfume was tested in 500 consecutive eczema patients, who also were tested...... with the European standard patch test series. 4.2% reacted to 1 or more of the wash-off product perfumes and 3.2% to 1 or more of the stay-on product perfumes. Concordant positive reactions between the fragrance mix and the product perfumes were found in 81.3% of positive reactions to the stay-on product perfumes...... and in 52.4% of the reactions to the wash-off product perfumes. Compared to the fragrance mix alone, only 1 additional case of contact allergy to the product perfumes was detected by balsam of Peru. Chemical analysis revealed that between 1 and 5 of the chemically-defined constituents of the fragrance mix...

  7. Content and reactivity to product perfumes in fragrance mix positive and negative eczema patients. A study of perfumes used in toiletries and skin-care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, J D; Rastogi, S C; Andersen, K E; Menné, T

    1997-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the elicitation potential of perfumes from 17 commonly sold lower-price cosmetic products. 8 of the perfumes were from stay-on cosmetics and 9 were from wash-off cosmetics. Each perfume was tested in 500 consecutive eczema patients, who also were tested with the European standard patch test series. 4.2% reacted to 1 or more of the wash-off product perfumes and 3.2% to 1 or more of the stay-on product perfumes. Concordant positive reactions between the fragrance mix and the product perfumes were found in 81.3% of positive reactions to the stay-on product perfumes and in 52.4% of the reactions to the wash-off product perfumes. Compared to the fragrance mix alone, only 1 additional case of contact allergy to the product perfumes was detected by balsam of Peru. Chemical analysis revealed that between 1 and 5 of the chemically-defined constituents of the fragrance mix were present in all of the product perfumes. Geraniol was found in 12 of the 17 perfumes and was most often detected. The concentration of the target fragrance materials ranged from 0.005%-1.35 w/v%. It is concluded that the allergenic constituents of the fragrance mix are impossible to avoid if perfumed cosmetics are used. Furthermore, patients suspected of perfume allergy need to be tested with their own perfumed products, as far from all cases of perfume allergy are detected by the fragrance mix and/or balsam of Peru in the European standard patch test series.

  8. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems, t...... into account. The book has arisen from various courses taught in Denmark and Iceland and is designed to give students a broad introduction to the area, with exercises throughout......., the need for mathematically based formal methodology is increasingly important. There are many books that look at particular methodologies for such systems. This book offers a more balanced introduction for graduate students and describes the various approaches, their strengths and weaknesses, and when...... they are best used. Milner's CCS and its operational semantics are introduced, together with the notions of behavioural equivalences based on bisimulation techniques and with recursive extensions of Hennessy-Milner logic. In the second part of the book, the presented theories are extended to take timing issues...

  9. Installation test involving two cryomagnets. A short straight section is positioned next to a cryodipole using a remote-controlled Transfer Equipment Set provided by the Slovakian company ZTS VVU Kosice.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2004-01-01

    Installation test involving two cryomagnets. A short straight section is positioned next to a cryodipole using a remote-controlled Transfer Equipment Set provided by the Slovakian company ZTS VVU Kosice.

  10. Helping the Helpers: An International Training Program for Professionals Providing Social Services for HIV-Positive Children and Their Families in Southern Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Over one hundred children and some of their parents were infected with HIV in state hospitals in the Chimkent region in Southern Kazakhstan. After this tragedy, the Regional Department of Public Health organized social services for these families and asked the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) to provide them with training and…

  11. Evaluating the utility of provider-recorded clinical status in the medical records of HIV-positive adults in a limited-resource setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonbraker, Samantha; Befus, Montina; Nadal, Leonel Lerebours; Halpern, Mina; Larson, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Provider-reported summaries of clinical status may assist with clinical management of HIV in resource poor settings if they reflect underlying biological processes associated with HIV disease progression. However, their ability to do so is rarely evaluated. Therefore, we aimed to assess the relationship between a provider-recorded summary of clinical status and indicators of HIV progression. Data were abstracted from 201 randomly selected medical records at a large HIV clinic in the Dominican Republic. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to examine the relationship between provider-assigned clinical status and demographic (gender, age, nationality, education) and clinical factors (reported medication adherence, CD4 cell count, viral load). The mean age of patients was 41.2 (SD = ±10.9) years and most were female (n = 115, 57%). None of the examined characteristics were significantly associated with provider-recorded clinical status. Higher CD4 cell counts were more likely for females (OR = 2.2 CI: 1.12–4.31) and less likely for those with higher viral loads (OR = 0.33 CI: 0.15–0.72). Poorer adherence and lower CD4 cell counts were significantly associated with higher viral loads (OR = 4.46 CI: 1.11–20.29 and 6.84 CI: 1.47–37.23, respectively). Clinics using provider-reported summaries of clinical status should evaluate the performance of these assessments to ensure they are associated with biologic indicators of disease progression. PMID:27495146

  12. Lost opportunities to identify and treat HIV-positive patients: results from a baseline assessment of provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling (PITC) in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Saeed; Schwarz, Monica; Flick, Robert J; Rees, Chris A; Harawa, Mwelura; Simon, Katie; Robison, Jeff A; Kazembe, Peter N; Kim, Maria H

    2016-04-01

    To assess implementation of provider-initiated testing and counselling (PITC) for HIV in Malawi. A review of PITC practices within 118 departments in 12 Ministry of Health (MoH) facilities across Malawi was conducted. Information on PITC practices was collected via a health facility survey. Data describing patient visits and HIV tests were abstracted from routinely collected programme data. Reported PITC practices were highly variable. Most providers practiced symptom-based PITC. Antenatal clinics and maternity wards reported widespread use of routine opt-out PITC. In 2014, there was approximately 1 HIV test for every 15 clinic visits. HIV status was ascertained in 94.3% (5293/5615) of patients at tuberculosis clinics, 92.6% (30,675/33,142) of patients at antenatal clinics and 49.4% (6871/13,914) of patients at sexually transmitted infection clinics. Reported challenges to delivering PITC included test kit shortages (71/71 providers), insufficient physical space (58/71) and inadequate number of HIV counsellors (32/71) while providers from inpatient units cited the inability to test on weekends. Various models of PITC currently exist at MoH facilities in Malawi. Only antenatal and maternity clinics demonstrated high rates of routine opt-out PITC. The low ratio of facility visits to HIV tests suggests missed opportunities for HIV testing. However, the high proportion of patients at TB and antenatal clinics with known HIV status suggests that routine PITC is feasible. These results underscore the need to develop clear, standardised PITC policy and protocols, and to address obstacles of limited health commodities, infrastructure and human resources. © 2016 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Can Bias Evaluation Provide Protection Against False-Negative Results in QT Studies Without a Positive Control Using Exposure-Response Analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferber, Georg; Zhou, Meijian; Dota, Corina; Garnett, Christine; Keirns, James; Malik, Marek; Stockbridge, Norman; Darpo, Borje

    2017-01-01

    The revised ICH E14 document allows the use of exposure-response analysis to exclude a small QT effect of a drug. If plasma concentrations exceeding clinically relevant levels is achieved, a positive control is not required. In cases when this cannot be achieved, there may be a need for metrics to protect against false-negative results. The objectives of this study were to create bias in electrocardiogram laboratory QT-interval measurements and define a metric that can be used to detect bias severe enough to cause false-negative results using exposure-response analysis. Data from the IQ-CSRC study, which evaluated the QT effect of 5 QT-prolonging drugs, were used. Negative bias using 3 deterministic and 2 random methods was introduced into the reported QTc values and compared with fully automated data from the underlying electrocardiogram algorithm (COMPAS). The slope estimate of the Bland-Altman plot was used as a bias metric. With the deterministic bias methods, negative bias, measured between electrocardiogram laboratory values and COMPAS, had to be larger than approximately -20 milliseconds over a QTcF range of 100 milliseconds to cause failures to predict the QT effect of ondansetron, quinine, dolasetron, moxifloxacin, and dofetilide. With the random methods, the rate of false-negatives was ≤5% with bias severity < -10 milliseconds for all 5 drugs when plasma levels exceeded those of interest. Severe and therefore detectable bias has to be introduced into reported QTc values to cause false-negative predictions with exposure-response analysis. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  14. Topical Treatment With an Agent Disruptive to em>P. acnesem> Biofilm Provides Positive Therapeutic Response: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Michael J; Myntti, Matthew F

    2016-06-01

    The traditional disease model of acne has been one of follicular plugging due to 'sticky epithelial cells' associated with increased sebum production with deep follicular anaerobic conditions favoring em>P. acnesem>- generated inflammation. em>P. acnesem> biofilms have been found more frequently in patients with acne than controls. Biofilms are genetically coded to create adhesion to the pilosebaceous unit followed by production of a mucopolysaccharide coating capable of binding to lipid surfaces. Traditional therapies for acne have involved mixtures of oral and topical antibiotics admixed with topical keratolytics and retinoids, which are aimed at traditional bacterial reduction as well as downregulating the inflammatory cascade. These approaches are limited by side effect and compliance/tolerability issues. As the em>P. acnesem> biofilm may, in fact, be the instigator of this process, we studied the use of a topical agent designed to reduce the em>P. acnesem> biofilm to see if reducing the biofilm would be therapeutically efficacious. We present data of a proprietary topical non-prescription agent with a novel pharmaco mechanism designed to attack the biofilm produced by em>P. acnesem>. Our data shows a decrease of inflammatory lesions by 44% and non-inflammatory lesions by 32% after 12 weeks and also provided for a meaningful improvement in the quality of life of the patients in the study. These improvements were achieved with a product that was not associated with burning, chafing, irritation, or erythema, which can be seen with topical treatments. It is apparent from this study that by addressing the biofilm which protects the em>P. acnesem> bacteria through the use of the Acne Gel, the incidence of acne symptoms can be greatly reduced, while having no negative impacts on the patients' skin (ClinicalTrials.gov registry number NCT02404285). em>J Drugs Dermatol. em>2016;15(6):677-683.

  15. Position Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Position Information Data Asset provides the ability to search for active SSA position descriptions using various search criteria. An individual may search by PD...

  16. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator

    2008-07-01

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would

  17. Spring 5 & reactive streams

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Clozel, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Spring is a framework widely used by the world-wide Java community, and it is also extensively used at CERN. The accelerator control system is constituted of 10 million lines of Java code, spread across more than 1000 projects (jars) developed by 160 software engineers. Around half of this (all server-side Java code) is based on the Spring framework. Warning: the speakers will assume that people attending the seminar are familiar with Java and Spring’s basic concepts. Spring 5.0 and Spring Boot 2.0 updates (45 min) This talk will cover the big ticket items in the 5.0 release of Spring (including Kotlin support, @Nullable and JDK9) and provide an update on Spring Boot 2.0, which is scheduled for the end of the year. Reactive Spring (1h) Spring Framework 5.0 has been released - and it now supports reactive applications in the Spring ecosystem. During this presentation, we'll talk about the reactive foundations of Spring Framework with the Reactor project and the reactive streams specification. We'll al...

  18. A Raf-like MAPKKK gene, GhRaf19, negatively regulates tolerance to drought and salt and positively regulates resistance to cold stress by modulating reactive oxygen species in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Haihong; Hao, Lili; Guo, Xulei; Liu, Shuchang; Yan, Yan; Guo, Xingqi

    2016-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) function at the top level of MAPK cascades and play important roles in plant development and stress responses. Although MAPKKKs comprise the largest family in the MAPK cascades, very few Raf-like MAPKKKs have been functionally identified, especially in the economically important crop cotton. In this study, a Raf-like MAPKKK gene, GhRaf19, was characterized for the first time in cotton. Our data show that the expression of GhRaf19 was inhibited by PEG and NaCl and induced by cold (4°C) and H2O2. Furthermore, when GhRaf19 was silenced in cotton using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), tolerance to drought and salt stress were enhanced, the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was reduced, and ROS-related gene expression was increased. Consistent with these results, in N. benthamiana, overexpressing-GhRaf19 reduced tolerance to drought and salt. However, GhRaf19-silenced plants showed lowered resistance to cold in cotton, and this effect was correlated with the accumulation of ROS. In contrast, overexpressing GhRaf19 in N. benthamiana increased resistance to cold by inducing higher levels of expression and activity of ROS-related antioxidant genes/enzymes. These results indicate that GhRaf19 negatively regulates tolerance to drought and salt and positively regulates resistance to cold stress by modulating cellular ROS in cotton. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Maternal prenatal stress and infant emotional reactivity six months postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolvi, Saara; Karlsson, Linnea; Bridgett, David J; Korja, Riikka; Huizink, Anja C; Kataja, Eeva-Leena; Karlsson, Hasse

    2016-07-15

    Maternal prenatal stress has been related to infant negative affect. However, it is still unclear how different sources of maternal prenatal stress such as depressive, anxiety and pregnancy-specific anxiety symptoms are associated with reactivity outcomes. This study aimed to test the associations between different sources of maternal prenatal stress and the aspects of infant emotional reactivity at six months. Our study population (n=282) was drawn from the FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study. Prenatal stress was measured by questionnaires on maternal depression, general anxiety and pregnancy-specific anxiety at three time points across pregnancy (gwk 14, 24, 34). Based on the symptom scores, the sample was divided into mothers with high stress during pregnancy (n=110) and mothers with low stress during pregnancy (n=172). Mother-reported infant emotional reactivity and its subscales were measured six months postpartum. After controlling for background variables and maternal postnatal symptoms, overall negative emotional reactivity (β=0.20, ppredictors were found for infant positive reactivity after adjusting for confounders. Mother reports of both maternal symptoms and infant reactivity were used, which might increase the risk of reporting bias. The findings suggest that mothers experiencing stress should be provided intervention during pregnancy, and that screening should have a particular focus on pregnancy-related worries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Sodium void reactivity comparison for advanced liquid-metal reactor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbin, K.D.; Kessler, S.F.; Gedeon, S.R.; Omberg, R.P. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) program in the US is based on metal as the reference fuel because of its favorable neutronic feedback characteristics for passive safety. Favorable relationships exist between core performance and safety that provide a passively safe metal fuel system with a large margin to sodium boiling. Because of this, the reduction of the positive sodium void coefficient of reactivity is not an overriding design objective. A positive sodium void effect with metal fuel is due to neutron spectral hardening that dominates capture and leakage changes during sodium voiding. This can produce as much as 5-$ positive sodium void reactivity for mixed plutonium-uranium fuel in a smaller core designed for a near-zero burnup reactivity swing. It is possible to reduce the positive void feedback and its effect on hypothetical loss-of-flow (LOF) scenarios with a commensurate increase in burnup swing. However, metal fuel's small Doppler coefficient, excellent fuel conductivity, and resultant small temperature gradients provide less reactivity feedback to handle postulated transient overpower (TOP) events for cores with significant burnup reactivity swings. The purpose of this work was to study the relationship between reduction of the sodium void and the resultant increase in the burnup reactivity swing for an ALMR modeled with metal, nitride, and oxide fuel.

  1. Cardiovascular reactivity as a mechanism linking child trauma to adolescent psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heleniak, Charlotte; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Ormel, Johan; Riese, Harriette

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in physiological reactivity to stress are argued to be central mechanisms linking adverse childhood environmental experiences to internalizing and externalizing psychopathology. Childhood trauma exposure may influence physiological reactivity to stress in distinct ways from other forms of childhood adversity. This study applied a novel theoretical model to investigate the impact of childhood trauma on cardiovascular stress reactivity – the biopsychosocial model of challenge and threat. This model suggests that inefficient cardiovascular responses to stress – a threat as opposed to challenge profile – are characterized by blunted cardiac output (CO) reactivity and increased vascular resistance. We examined whether childhood trauma exposure predicted an indicator of the threat profile of cardiovascular reactivity and whether such a pattern was associated with adolescent psychopathology in a population-representative sample of 488 adolescents (M = 16.17 years old, 49.2% boys) in the TRacking Adolescents’ Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS). Exposure to trauma was associated with both internalizing and externalizing symptoms and a pattern of cardiovascular reactivity consistent with the threat profile, including blunted CO reactivity during a social stress task. Blunted CO reactivity, in turn, was positively associated with externalizing, but not internalizing symptoms and mediated the link between trauma and externalizing psychopathology. None of these associations varied by gender. The biopsychosocial model of challenge and threat provides a novel theoretical framework for understanding disruptions in physiological reactivity to stress following childhood trauma exposure, revealing a potential pathway linking such exposure with externalizing problems in adolescents. PMID:27568327

  2. Solvent reactivation of adhesives in textile conservation: survey and comparison with heat reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Medina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Current practice of solvent reactivation of adhesives in textile conservation was assessed using two methodologies: an international survey of conservators, and practical tests that provided a comparative study between two different reactivation techniques, heat and solvents. Despite some recent technical developments in the application of solvent reactivation for the treatment of textiles, the survey pointed out that conservators are using solvent reactivation techniques less often than more familiar and longer established heat reactivation techniques. The comparative study proved that the two adhesive reactivating techniques (solvents or heat produce very different results in practice. Moreover, different solvent reactivation techniques (applied via brush or in vapour form and different solvents used to reactivate the adhesive also produce diverse results. Some of the possible variables to consider when selecting reactivation techniques for adhesives are highlighted.

  3. Facile Preparation of a Thiol-Reactive (18)F-Labeling Agent and Synthesis of (18)F-DEG-VS-NT for PET Imaging of a Neurotensin Receptor-Positive Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhanhong; Li, Lin; Liu, Shuanglong; Yakushijin, Fumiko; Yakushijin, Kenichi; Horne, David; Conti, Peter S; Li, Zibo; Kandeel, Fouad; Shively, John E

    2014-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that neurotensin receptors (NTRs) play key roles in cancer growth and survival. In this study, we developed a simple and efficient method to radiolabel neurotensin peptide with (18)F for NTR-targeted imaging. The thiol-reactive reagent (18)F-(2-(2-(2-fluoroethoxy)ethoxy)ethylsulfonyl)ethane ((18)F-DEG-VS) was facilely prepared through 1-step radiofluorination. After high-pressure liquid chromatography purification, (18)F-DEG-VS was incubated with the c(RGDyC) and c(RGDyK) peptide mixture to evaluate its specificity toward the reactive thiol. Thiolated neurotensin peptide was then labeled with (18)F using this novel synthon, and the resulting imaging probe was subjected to receptor-binding assay and small-animal PET studies in a murine xenograft model. The imaging results and metabolic stability of (18)F-DEG-VS-NT were compared with the thiol-specific maleimide derivative N-[2-(4-(18)F-fluorobenzamido)ethyl]maleimide-neurotensin ((18)F-FBEM-NT). (18)F-DEG-VS was obtained in high labeling yield. The reaction of (19)F-DEG-VS was highly specific for thiols at neutral pH, whereas the lysine of c(RGDyK) reacted at a pH greater than 8.5. (18)F-DEG-VS-c(RGDyC) was the preferred product when both c(RGDyK) and c(RGDyC) were incubated together with (18)F-DEG-VS. Thiolated neurotensin peptide (Cys-NT) efficiently reacted with (18)F-DEG-VS, with a 95% labeling yield (decay-corrected). The radiochemical purity of the (18)F-DEG-VS-NT was greater than 98%, and the specific activity was about 19.2 ± 4.3 TBq/mmol. Noninvasive small-animal PET demonstrated that (18)F-DEG-VS-NT had an NTR-specific tumor uptake in subcutaneous HT-29 xenografts. The tumor-to-muscle, tumor-to-liver, and tumor-to-kidney ratios reached 30.65 ± 22.31, 11.86 ± 1.98, and 1.91 ± 0.43 at 2 h after injection, respectively, based on the biodistribution study. Receptor specificity was demonstrated by blocking experiment. Compared with (18)F-FBEM-NT, (18)F-DEG-VS-NT was

  4. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  5. Reactive Kripke semantics

    CERN Document Server

    Gabbay, Dov M

    2013-01-01

    This text offers an extension to the traditional Kripke semantics for non-classical logics by adding the notion of reactivity. Reactive Kripke models change their accessibility relation as we progress in the evaluation process of formulas in the model. This feature makes the reactive Kripke semantics strictly stronger and more applicable than the traditional one. Here we investigate the properties and axiomatisations of this new and most effective semantics, and we offer a wide landscape of applications of the idea of reactivity. Applied topics include reactive automata, reactive grammars, rea

  6. Reactivation of hepatitis B virus during targeted therapies for cancer and immune-mediated disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganò, Mauro; Serra, Giuseppe; Casella, Giovanni; Grossi, Glenda; Lampertico, Pietro

    2016-07-01

    Targeted therapies have gained popularity in the treatment of several oncologic and immune-mediated diseases. Immunosuppression caused by these drugs has been associated to reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in both hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive patients (overt infection) and HBsAg negative/anti-hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) positive carriers (resolved infection), leading to premature discontinuation of therapy and potentially fatal hepatitis. This review summarizes the evidence of HBV reactivation in patients with overt or resolved HBV infection undergoing targeted therapies for cancer or immune-mediated disorders, providing recommendations for the management of these patients. The risk of HBV reactivation relies on the immunosuppressive potency and duration of these therapies, the underlying disease and the virological patient's profile. However, HBV reactivation is preventable by screening for HBV markers in all patients scheduled to receive targeted therapies, assessing the virological profile and patient's clinical state, followed by appropriate antiviral treatment or prophylaxis in those patients at high risk of HBV reactivation. Close monitoring of HBV carriers at low risk of reactivation is warranted with the aim to start antiviral therapy as soon as HBV reactivates.

  7. Neurophysiological evidence of an association between cognitive control and defensive reactivity processes in young children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L. Lo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between cognitive control and affective processes, such as defensive reactivity, are intimately involved in healthy and unhealthy human development. However, cognitive control and defensive reactivity processes are often studied in isolation and rarely examined in early childhood. To address these gaps, we examined the relationships between multiple neurophysiological measures of cognitive control and defensive reactivity in young children. Specifically, we assessed two event-related potentials thought to index cognitive control processes – the error-related negativity (ERN and error positivity (Pe – measured across two tasks, and two markers of defensive reactivity processes – startle reflex and resting parietal asymmetry – in a sample of 3- to 7-year old children. Results revealed that measures of cognitive control and defensive reactivity were related such that evidence of poor cognitive control (smaller ERN was associated with high defensive reactivity (larger startle and greater right relative to left parietal activity. The strength of associations between the ERN and measures of defensive reactivity did not vary by age, providing evidence that poor cognitive control relates to greater defensive reactivity across early childhood years.

  8. Bortezomib Induced Hepatitis B Reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It has recently been reported that hepatitis B (HBV reactivation often occurs after the use of rituximab and stem cell transplantation in patients with lymphoma who are hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg negative. However, clinical data on HBV reactivation in multiple myeloma (MM is limited to only a few reported cases. Bortezomib and lenalidomide have remarkable activity in MM with manageable toxicity profiles, but reactivation of viral infections may emerge as a problem. We present a case of MM that developed HBV reactivation after bortezomib and lenalidomide therapy. Case Report. A 73-year-old female with a history of marginal cell lymphoma was monitored without requiring therapy. In 2009, she developed MM, presenting as a plasmacytoma requiring vertebral decompression and focal radiation. While receiving radiation she developed renal failure and was started on bortezomib and liposomal doxorubicin. After a transient response to 5 cycles, treatment was switched to lenalidomide. Preceding therapy initiation, her serology indicated resolved infection. Serial monitoring for HBV displayed seroconversion one month after change in therapy. Conclusion. Bortezomib associated late HBV reactivation appears to be a unique event that requires further confirmation and brings to discussion whether hepatitis B core positive individuals would benefit from monitoring of HBV activation while on therapy.

  9. Impact of wind power plant reactive current injection during asymmetrical grid faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göksu, Ömer; Teodorescu, Remus; Bak, Claus Leth

    2013-01-01

    ) are requested to stay connected and inject positive-sequence reactive current in order to boost positive-sequence grid voltage during short-circuit grid faults, irrespective of the fault type; symmetrical or asymmetrical. However, as shown in this study, when WPPs inject pure positive-sequence reactive current...... in case of asymmetrical faults, as a conventional method (CM) in accordance with the grid code requirement, positive-sequence grid voltage is boosted, but also higher negative sequence voltage in the grid and higher overvoltages at the non-faulty phases occur. In this study, an alternative injection...... method, where WTs are injecting both positive and negative sequence currents during asymmetrical faults, providing improved grid support, is given and compared with the CM. In addition, effect of coupling between positive, negative and zero sequences when WPPs are injecting currents during asymmetrical...

  10. Monadic Functional Reactive Programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van der Ploeg (Atze); C Shan

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractFunctional Reactive Programming (FRP) is a way to program reactive systems in functional style, eliminating many of the problems that arise from imperative techniques. In this paper, we present an alternative FRP formulation that is based on the notion of a reactive computation: a

  11. Raman Spectroscopic Measurements of Dermal Carotenoids in Breast Cancer Operated Patients Provide Evidence for the Positive Impact of a Dietary Regimen Rich in Fruit and Vegetables on Body Oxidative Stress and BC Prognostic Anthropometric Parameters: A Five-Year Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Perrone

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermal carotenoids are a feasible marker of the body antioxidative network and may reveal a moderate to severe imbalance of the redox status, thereby providing indication of individual oxidative stress. In this work noninvasive Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS measurements of skin carotenoids (skin carotenoid score (SCS were used to provide indications of individual oxidative stress, each year for five years, in 71 breast cancer (BC patients at high risk of recurrence. Patients’ SCS has been correlated with parameters relevant to BC risk, waist circumference (WC, and body mass index (BMI, in the aim of monitoring the effect of a dietary regimen intended to positively affect BC risk factors. The RRS methodological approach in BC patients appeared from positive correlation between patients’ SCS and blood level of lycopene. The level of skin carotenoids was inversely correlated with the patients’ WC and BMI. At the end of the 5 y observation BC patients exhibited a significant reduction of WC and BMI and increase of SCS, when strictly adhering to the dietary regimen. In conclusion, noninvasive measurements of skin carotenoids can (i reveal an oxidative stress condition correlated with parameters of BC risk and (ii monitor dietary-related variations in BC patients.

  12. Reactivity of Alkyldibenzothiophenes Using Theoretical Descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Rivera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical calculations of the reactivity of dibenzothiophene and its methyl, dimethyl, and trimethyl derivatives show that local reactivity descriptors reproduce their experimental desulfurization reactivity trend if the first desulfurization step involves directly the sulfur atom, which only occurs if the sulfur atom is blocked at most by one methyl group. In the series of molecules {4,7-dimethyldibenzothiophene, x,4,7-trimethyldibenzothiophene (x=1,2,3}, the most reactive molecule is 2,4,7-trimethyldibenzothiophene, and local descriptors show that the reactivity is linked to the activity of the sulfur atom, which is higher in 2,4,7-trimethyldibenzothiophene due to the position of the third methyl substitute, located in the para position with respect to the carbon bonded to the sulfur atom. The electrostatic potential of 2,4,7-trimethyldibenzothiophene shows one effective adsorption site, while 1,4,7-trimethyldibenzothiophene and 3,4,7-trimethyldibenzothiophene have more sites, contributing to the higher reactivity of 2,4,7-trimethyldibenzothiophene. The index of reactivity of other descriptors was evaluated and the effect of the position of the methyl substituents on adsorption parameters, as the dipole moment and the atomic charges were also studied.

  13. Links between white matter microstructure and cortisol reactivity to stress in early childhood: Evidence for moderation by parenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroon I. Sheikh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis (measured via cortisol reactivity may be a biological marker of risk for depression and anxiety, possibly even early in development. However, the structural neural correlates of early cortisol reactivity are not well known, although these would potentially inform broader models of mechanisms of risk, especially if the early environment further shapes these relationships. Therefore, we examined links between white matter architecture and young girls' cortisol reactivity and whether early caregiving moderated these links. We recruited 45 6-year-old girls based on whether they had previously shown high or low cortisol reactivity to a stress task at age 3. White matter integrity was assessed by calculating fractional anisotropy (FA of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans. Parenting styles were measured via a standardized parent–child interaction task. Significant associations were found between FA in white matter regions adjacent to the left thalamus, the right anterior cingulate cortex, and the right superior frontal gyrus (all ps < .001. Further, positive early caregiving moderated the effect of high cortisol reactivity on white matter FA (all ps ≤ .05, with high stress reactive girls who received greater parent positive affect showing white matter structure more similar to that of low stress reactive girls. Results show associations between white matter integrity of various limbic regions of the brain and early cortisol reactivity to stress and provide preliminary support for the notion that parenting may moderate associations.

  14. Impact of a computer-assisted, provider-delivered intervention on sexual risk behaviors in HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Laura H; Grimley, Diane M; Gao, Hongjiang; Aban, Inmaculada; Chen, Huey; Raper, James L; Saag, Michael S; Rhodes, Scott D; Hook, Edward W

    2013-04-01

    Innovative strategies are needed to assist providers with delivering secondary HIV prevention in the primary care setting. This longitudinal HIV clinic-based study conducted from 2004-2007 in a Birmingham, Alabama HIV primary care clinic tested a computer-assisted, provider-delivered intervention designed to increase condom use with oral, anal and vaginal sex, decrease numbers of sexual partners and increase HIV disclosure among HIV-positive men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM). Significant declines were found for the number of unprotected insertive anal intercourse acts with HIV+ male partners during the intervention period (p = 0.0003) and with HIV-/UK male partners (p = 0.0007), as well as a 47% reduction in the number of male sexual partners within the preceding 6 months compared with baseline (p = 0.0008). These findings confirm and extend prior reports by demonstrating the effectiveness of computer-assisted, provider-delivered messaging to accomplish risk reduction in patients in the HIV primary care setting.

  15. Do oral contraceptives act as mood stabilizers? Evidence of positive affect stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarva, J A; Oinonen, K A

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that oral contraceptives (OCs) may provide a stabilizing effect on affect. The present study examined whether OC users and nonusers differ in their affect reactivity in response to four laboratory mood induction procedures. A sample of 107 undergraduate students (40 OC users, 36 nonusers, and 31 men) completed the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) before and after completing a series of four mood-induction procedures (i.e., positive affect, jealousy, social ostracism, and parental feelings affect inductions). OC users experienced a blunted positive affect response to the tasks when compared with nonusers and men. Women who used OCs for less than two years showed the lowest positive affect reactivity. The groups did not differ in terms of negative affect reactivity. The results suggest that hormonal contraceptives may reduce the degree of positive affect change that women experience in response to environmental events. Possible mechanisms for an OC-induced positive affect stabilization effect are discussed.

  16. Reactive Programming in Java

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Reactive Programming in gaining a lot of excitement. Many libraries, tools, and frameworks are beginning to make use of reactive libraries. Besides, applications dealing with big data or high frequency data can benefit from this programming paradigm. Come to this presentation to learn about what reactive programming is, what kind of problems it solves, how it solves them. We will take an example oriented approach to learning the programming model and the abstraction.

  17. Position indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, David E.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described in which a position indicator is provided for detecting and indicating the position of a movable element inside a pressure vessel. The movable element may be a valve element or similar device which moves about an axis. Light from a light source is transmitted from a source outside the pressure vessel to a first region inside the pressure vessel in alignment with the axis of the movable element. The light is redirected by a reflector prism to a second region displaced radially from the first region. The reflector prism moves in response to movement of the movable element about its axis such that the second region moves arcuately with respect to the first region. Sensors are arrayed in an arc corresponding to the arc of movement of the second region and signals are transmitted from the sensors to the exterior of the reactor vessel to provide indication of the position of the movable element.

  18. B-type natriuretic peptide is a long-term predictor of all-cause mortality, whereas high-sensitive C-reactive protein predicts recurrent short-term troponin T positive cardiac events in chest pain patients: a prognostic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staines Harry

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have addressed whether the combined use of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP improves risk stratification for mortality and cardiovascular events in a population with chest pain and suspected acute coronary syndromes (ACS. Therefore, we wanted to assess the incremental prognostic value of these biomarkers with respect to long-term all-cause mortality and recurrent troponin T (TnT positive cardiac events in 871 patients admitted to the emergency department. Methods Blood samples were obtained immediately following admission. Results After a follow-up period of 24 months, 129 patients had died. The BNP levels were significantly higher among patients dying than in long-term survivors (401 (145–736 versus 75 (29–235 pq/mL [median, 25 and 75% percentiles], p = 0.000. In a multivariable Cox regression model for death within 2 years, the hazard ratio (HR for BNP in the highest quartile (Q4 was 5.13 (95% confidence interval (CI, 1.97–13.38 compared to the lowest quartile (Q1 and was associated with all-cause mortality above and beyond age, congestive heart failure and the index diagnosis ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. HsCRP rendered no prognostic information for all-cause mortality. However, within 30 days, the adjusted HR for patients with recurrent TnT cardiac positive events hsCRP in Q4 was 14.79 (95% CI, 1.89–115.63 compared with Q1 and was associated with recurrent ischemic events above and beyond age, hypercholesterolemia and TnT values at admission. Conclusion BNP may act as a clinically useful biomarker when obtained at admission in an unselected patient population following hospitalization with chest pain and potential ACS, and may provide complementary prognostic information to established risk determinants at long-term follow-up. Our data do not support the hypothesis that the additional assessment of hsCRP will lead to better risk stratification

  19. Alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR) facts book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This document provides detailed information on alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR). It primarily discusses alkali-silica reaction (ASR), covering the chemistry, symptoms, test methods, prevention, specifications, diagnosis and prognosis, and mitigation...

  20. Flows of Reactive Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Prud'homme, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The modeling of reactive flows has progressed mainly with advances in aerospace, which gave birth to a new science called aerothermochemistry, as well as through developments in chemical and process engineering. The methods employed, the phenomena investigated, and the aims of modeling differ for each field; however, in all cases, the results obtained have considerably enriched the working knowledge of reactive flows. This work examines basic concepts and methods necessary to study reactive flows and transfer phenomena in areas such as fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and chemistry. Specific topics covered include: * Equations of state * Transfer phenomena and chemical kinetics * Balance equations of reactive flows * Dimensionless numbers and similarity * Chemical reactors * Coupled phenomena * Turbulent flow concepts * Boundary layers and fluid layers * Reactive and nonreactive waves * Interface phenomena * Multiphase flow concepts The book presents tools of interest to graduate students, researchers in math...

  1. Smell differential reactivity, but not taste differential reactivity, is related to food neophobia in toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnery-Patris, Sandrine; Wagner, Sandra; Rigal, Natalie; Schwartz, Camille; Chabanet, Claire; Issanchou, Sylvie; Nicklaus, Sophie

    2015-12-01

    Previous research has identified relationships between chemosensory reactivity and food neophobia in children. However, most studies have investigated this relationship using declarative data and without separately analysing smell and taste reactivity. Our first objective was to assess the relationships between smell and taste differential reactivity in toddlers (i.e. reactivity towards several stimuli), using experimental behavioural measurements. The second objective was to determine the relationships between smell (or taste) differential reactivity and food neophobia in toddlers, with the hypothesis that the more responsive a toddler was across food odours or tastes, the more neophobic s/he would be. An additional objective was to determine whether the potential relationships between smell (or taste) differential reactivity and food neophobia differ according to gender. One hundred and twenty-three toddlers aged from 20 to 22 months from the Opaline birth cohort (Observatory of Food Preferences in Infants and Children) were involved. A questionnaire was used to assess child's food neophobia. Toddlers' differential reactivity for smell (and for taste) was defined as the variability of behavioural responses over 8 odorants, and over the five basic tastes. Smell and taste differential reactivities were not correlated. Food neophobia scores were modestly but significantly positively correlated with smell differential reactivity but not with taste differential reactivity. When gender was considered, smell reactivity and neophobia were correlated only among boys. This indicates the need to study smell and taste reactivity separately to determine their associations with eating behaviours. This suggests that the rejection of novel foods in neophobic boys could be partly due to food odour. This finding is new and clearly requires further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. First OH reactivity measurements in Harvard Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdlinger-Blatt, I. S.; Martin, S. T.; Hansel, A.; McKinney, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    The OH reactivity provides critical insight into the HOx budget under actual atmospheric conditions, and has implications for the production of ozone and the formation of secondary organic material. Previous studies have indicated that the OH reactivity measured at field sites often exceeds model estimations, but current experiments remain inconclusive about the origin of the discrepancy between the modeled and measured OH reactivity (Lou et al., 2010). As of now there are only a limited number of atmospheric studies of total OH reactivity available, so to improve understanding of the OH reactivity more studies are needed. The first OH reactivity measurements in the northeastern United States are being performed during the summer of 2013 at Harvard Forest. Harvard forest, is located about 100 km west of the Boston metropolitan area, is one of the most intensively studied forests in North America. The main biogenic VOC emitted from Harvard Forest is isoprene followed by monoterpenes and methanol. Sampling for the OH reactivity measurements will be conducted from a 30m tall meteorological tower at the Harvard Forest site. The air is drawn into a reaction cell where the OH reactivity is determined using the Comparative Reactivity Method (Sinha et al., 2008) employing a High-Sensitivity Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (Lindinger et al., 1998, Hansel et al., 1998). In addition to the OH reactivity measurements, the most abundant compounds present in the air sample will be quantified using PTR-MS. The quantification of these compounds is needed to compare the theoretical calculated OH reactivity with the measured OH reactivity data. The measurements will be used to evaluate our understanding of the OH budget at Harvard Forest. References: A. Hansel, A. Jordan, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, and W. Lindinger.: Improved Detection Limit of the Proton-transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer: On-line Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds at Mixing Ratios of a Few PPTV

  3. Reactive transport modeling of trichloroethene treatment with declining reactivity of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeen, Sung-Wook; Mayer, K Ulrich; Gillham, Robert W; Blowes, David W

    2007-02-15

    Evolving reactivity of iron, resulting from precipitation of secondary minerals within iron permeable reactive barriers (PRBs), was included in a reactive transport model for trichloroethene (TCE) treatment. The accumulation of secondary minerals and reactivity loss were coupled using an empirically derived relationship that was incorporated into an existing multicomponent reactive transport code (MIN3P) by modifying the kinetic expressions. The simulation results were compared to the observations from long-term column experiments, which were designed to assess the effects of carbonate mineral formation on the performance of iron for TCE treatment. The model successfully reproduced the evolution of iron reactivity and the dynamic changes in geochemical conditions and contaminant treatment. Predictions under various hydrogeochemical conditions showed that TCE would be treated effectively for an extended period of time without a significant loss of permeability. Although there are improvements yet to be made, this study provides a significant advance in our ability to predict long-term performance of iron PRBs.

  4. Mammographic image quality in relation to positioning of the breast: A multicentre international evaluation of the assessment systems currently used, to provide an evidence base for establishing a standardised method of assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, K; Parashar, D; Bouverat, G; Poulos, A; Gullien, R; Stewart, E; Aarre, R; Crystal, P; Wallis, M

    2017-11-01

    Optimum mammography positioning technique is necessary to maximise cancer detection. Current criteria for mammography appraisal lack reliability and validity with a need to develop a more objective system. We aimed to establish current international practice in assessing image quality (IQ), of screening mammograms then develop and validate a reproducible assessment tool. A questionnaire sent to centres in countries undertaking population screening identified practice, participants for an expert panel (EP) of radiologists/radiographers and a testing panel (TP) of radiographers. The EP developed category criteria and descriptors using a modified Delphi process to agree definitions. The EP scored 12 screening mammograms to test agreement then a main set of 178 cases. Weighted scores were derived for each descriptor enabling calculation of numerical parameters for each new category. The TP then scored the main set. Statistical analysis included ANOVA, t-tests and Kendall's coefficient. 11 centres in 8 countries responded forming an EP of 7 members and TP of 44 members. The EP showed moderate agreement when the scoring the mini test set W = 0.50 p < 0.001 and the main set W = 0.55 p < 0.001, 'posterior nipple line' being the most difficult descriptor. The weighted total scores differentiated the 4 new categories Perfect, Good, Adequate and Inadequate (p < 0.001). We have developed an assessment tool by Delphi consensus and weighted consensus criteria. We have successfully tabulated a range of numerical scores for each new category providing the first validated and reproducible mammography IQ scoring system. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antiretroviral therapy provided to HIV-infected Malawian women in a randomized trial diminishes the positive effects of lipid-based nutrient supplements on breast-milk B vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Lindsay H; Hampel, Daniela; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; York, Emily R; Adair, Linda S; Flax, Valerie L; Tegha, Gerald; Chasela, Charles S; Kamwendo, Debbie; Jamieson, Denise J; Bentley, Margaret E

    2015-12-01

    Little information is available on B vitamin concentrations in human milk or on how they are affected by maternal B vitamin deficiencies, antiretroviral therapy, or maternal supplementation. The objective was to evaluate the effects of antiretroviral therapy and/or lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) on B vitamin concentrations in breast milk from HIV-infected women in Malawi. Breast milk was collected from 537 women recruited within the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals, and Nutrition study at 2 or 6 wk and 24 wk postpartum. Women were assigned to receive antiretrovirals and LNSs, antiretrovirals only, LNSs only, or a control. Antiretrovirals and LNSs were given to the mothers from weeks 0 to 28. The antiretrovirals were zidovudine/lamivudine and nelfinavir or lopinavir/ritonavir. LNSs provided 93-118% of the Recommended Dietary Allowances of thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pyridoxine, and vitamin B-12. Infants were exclusively breastfed. LNSs increased milk concentrations of all vitamins except thiamin, whereas antiretrovirals lowered concentrations of nicotinamide, pyridoxal, and vitamin B-12. Although antiretrovirals alone had no significant effect on riboflavin concentrations, they negatively affected the LNS-induced increase in this vitamin. Thiamin was not influenced by the study interventions. Concentrations of all B vitamins were much lower than usually accepted values. All B vitamins were low in milk, and all but thiamin were increased by maternal supplementation with LNSs. Antiretrovirals alone decreased concentrations of some B vitamins in milk. When LNS was given in addition to antiretrovirals, the negative effect of antiretrovirals offset the positive effect of LNSs for all vitamins except thiamin. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00164762. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. REACTIVE POWER COMPENSATOR WITH SMOOTH CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Burlaka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reactive power compensation devices are widely used: thyristor-control reactors (TCR and thyristor-switched capacitors (TSC. The TCR disadvantages are discussed. The TSC disadvantages are: influence of higher harmonics on nonsinusoidal voltage power system, the inability to ensure the smooth regulation. The proposed reactive power compensator consists of series with active filter and capacitors with step switch. Reactive power compensator’s control system is proposed. Hysteretic control of the inverter with current feedback is applied. DC-voltage regulator provides balance of active power. The control system allows overcompensation or undercompensation of reactive power modes. Reactive power distribution regulator performs the redistribution of power between switching capacitors and active filter. Minimization condition of this regulator is active filter’s power. Adjustment properties of reactive power compensator are analyzed. The choice of relations between the capacitors TSC steps to minimize the installed capacity of the active filter and the number of stages in TSC is considered. The approach that makes possible to «isolate» capacitors from harmonic currents and provide smooth control of reactive power is proposed

  7. Modeling and simulation of reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bortoli, De AL; Pereira, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Modelling and Simulation of Reactive Flows presents information on modeling and how to numerically solve reactive flows. The book offers a distinctive approach that combines diffusion flames and geochemical flow problems, providing users with a comprehensive resource that bridges the gap for scientists, engineers, and the industry. Specifically, the book looks at the basic concepts related to reaction rates, chemical kinetics, and the development of reduced kinetic mechanisms. It considers the most common methods used in practical situations, along with equations for reactive flows, and va

  8. Reactive Turing machines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baeten, Jos; Luttik, Bas; Tilburg, P.J.A

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe propose reactive Turing machines (RTMs), extending classical Turing machines with a process-theoretical notion of interaction, and use it to define a notion of executable transition system...

  9. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Artritis reactiva: Esenciales: hojas informativas de fácil lectura View/Download/Order Publications Reactive Arthritis, Easy-to- ... Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy Open Source Data Public Data Listing NIH... ...

  10. Reactive Attachment Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment plan Reactive Attachment Disorder and Disinhibited Social Engagement Disorder are serious clinical conditions. However, close and ongoing ... you find Facts for Families © helpful and would like to make good mental health a reality, consider donating to the ...

  11. Taskable Reactive Agent Communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Myers, Karen

    2002-01-01

    The focus of Taskable Reactive Agent Communities (TRAC) project was to develop mixed-initiative technology to enable humans to supervise and manage teams of agents as they perform tasks in dynamic environments...

  12. Reactive sputter deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Mahieu, Stijn

    2008-01-01

    In this valuable work, all aspects of the reactive magnetron sputtering process, from the discharge up to the resulting thin film growth, are described in detail, allowing the reader to understand the complete process. Hence, this book gives necessary information for those who want to start with reactive magnetron sputtering, understand and investigate the technique, control their sputtering process and tune their existing process, obtaining the desired thin films.

  13. (Too) Anxious to help? Social support provider anxiety and cardiovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent de Grey, Robert G; Uchino, Bert N; Smith, Timothy W; Baucom, Brian R W

    2018-01-01

    Provider factors, such as anxiety, may be important in understanding effects of received social support (SS), which are less consistently positive than those of perceived SS. Due to the dyadic nature of support, anxiety on the part of the provider was predicted to influence the effectiveness of received SS. This laboratory study examined effects of SS provider anxiety within unacquainted dyads on cardiovascular reactivity during acute stress. 148 participants were assigned to support roles, and each dyad was randomized to low or high provider anxiety. Results include that SS provider anxiety resulted in greater blood pressure reactivity and less recovery toward baseline diastolic blood pressure within the dyad. Overall, it appears provider anxiety contributes to less effective SS for recipients and that health costs may accompany providing and receiving support under nonoptimal conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasniqi, Xhevdet; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Gashi, Masar; Berisha, Blerim; Abazi, Flora; Koçinaj, Dardan

    2009-12-18

    We report a case of a 49-year-old patient who developed poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis. The woman presented with constitutional symptoms, arthritis, urinary infection and conjunctivitis. The blood culture was positive for the staphylococcal coagulase negative infection. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated, whereas the rheumatoid factor was negative. Radiographic findings confirmed diagnosis of pleuropneumonia, and one year later of chronic asymmetric sacroileitis. Physicians should be aware of possible reactive arthritis after staphylococcal coagulase negative bacteremia.

  15. The impact of fuel temperature reactivity coefficient on loss of reactivity control accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. H.; Ryu, E. H.; Song, Y. M.; Jung, J. Y. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Nuclear reactors experience small power fluctuations or anticipated operational transients during even normal power operation. During normal operation, the reactivity is mainly controlled by liquid zone controllers, adjuster rods, mechanical control absorbers, and moderator poison. Even when the reactor power is increased abruptly and largely from an accident and when reactor control systems cannot be actuated quickly due to a fast transient, the reactor should be controlled and stabilized by its inherent safety parameter, such as a negative PCR (Power Coefficient of Reactivity) feedback. A PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor), it is well designed for the reactor to have a negative PCR so that the reactor can be safely shut down or stabilized whenever an abrupt reactivity insertion into the reactor core occurs or the reactor power is abruptly increased. However, it is known that a CANDU reactor has a small amount of PCR, as either negative or positive, because of the different design basis and safety concepts from a PWR. CNSC's regulatory and safety regime has stated that; The PCR of CANDU reactors does not pose a significant risk. Consistent with Canadian nuclear safety requirements, nuclear power plants must have an appropriate combination of inherent and engineered safety features incorporated into the design of the reactor safety and control systems. A reactor design that has a PCR is quite acceptable provided that the reactor is stable against power fluctuations, and that the probability and consequences of any potential accidents that would be aggravated by a positive reactivity feedback are maintained within CNSCprescribed limits. Recently, it was issued licensing the refurbished Wolsong unit 1 in Korea to be operated continuously after its design lifetime in which the calculated PCR was shown to have a small positive value by applying the recent physics code systems, which are composed of WIMS IST, DRAGON IST, and RFSP IST. These code systems were

  16. Men with high serotonin 1B receptor binding respond to provocations with heightened amygdala reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Fisher, Patrick M; Hjordt, Liv V

    2018-01-01

    Serotonin signalling influences amygdala reactivity to threat-related emotional facial expressions in healthy adults, but in vivo serotonin signalling has never been investigated in the context of provocative stimuli in aggressive individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate associations...... (LV1B) modelling shared correlation between 5-HT1BR binding across multiple brain regions (neocortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, raphe, amygdala, hippocampus and striatum). We tested whether the LV1B was associated with amygdala, striatal and prefrontal reactivity to provocations......, adjusting for age, injected mass and group. Across participants, LV1B was statistically significantly positively associated with amygdala (p = 0.01) but not with striatal (p = 0.2) or prefrontal reactivity to provocations (p = 0.3). These findings provide novel evidence that 5-HT1BR levels are linked...

  17. Behavioral Reactivity and Approach-Withdrawal Bias in Infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hane, Amie Ashley; Fox, Nathan A.; Henderson, Heather A.; Marshall, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Seven hundred seventy-nine infants were screened at 4 months of age for motor and emotional reactivity. At age 9 months, infants who showed extreme patterns of motor and negative (n = 75) or motor and positive (n = 73) reactivity and an unselected control group (n = 86) were administered the Laboratory Temperament Assessment Battery, and baseline…

  18. Clojure reactive programming

    CERN Document Server

    Borges, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    If you are a Clojure developer who is interested in using Reactive Programming to build asynchronous and concurrent applications, this book is for you. Knowledge of Clojure and Leiningen is required. Basic understanding of ClojureScript will be helpful for the web chapters, although it is not strictly necessary.

  19. Optimization of reactive mufflers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komkin, A. I.

    2010-05-01

    A new approach to optimization of reactive mufflers, which is based on use of muffler prototype with nondimensional geometrical parameters and integral criterion of acoustic performance of mufflers, is proposed. Implementation of the approach using the example of chamber mufflers is considered.

  20. Chemical reactivities of bleomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padbury, G; Sligar, S S

    1985-07-05

    Ferric bleomycin was tested for its ability to catalyze a set of six oxidative reactions characteristic of the heme-containing proteins, cytochrome P-450 and chloroperoxidase. These reactions included peroxyacid decarboxylation and aliphatic hydroxylation as typical cytochrome P-450 chemistries. Peroxyacid-supported oxygen evolution and hydrogen peroxide-mediated chlorination were utilized as characteristic chloroperoxidase reactivities. A typical peroxidative reaction and heteroatom dealkylation, common to both O2 activating enzymes, were also studied. Bleomycin was found to catalyze peroxidation of o-dianisidine. The ferric drug complex was found competent in carrying out N-demethylation of N,N-dimethylaniline when peroxides or peroxyacids or iodosobenzene were used as the oxidants. N-Demethylation was not achieved when N,N-dimethylaniline-N-oxide was substituted as the oxidant under similar conditions. Hydroxylation of cumene and decarboxylation of phenylperacetic acid were not found to be catalyzed by bleomycin. Oxygen evolution from m-chloroperbenzoic acid and chlorination of monochlorodimedone from chloride ion and hydrogen peroxide were found to be catalyzed by bleomycin. Cytochrome P-450cam was also evaluated for O2 evolution, and halogenation activity and was found not to demonstrate such reactivities. The results of this initial survey, along with those of previous studies, appear to indicate that the chemical reactivity of bleomycin can be more closely aligned with the reactivities demonstrated by chloroperoxidase than those of cytochrome P-450.

  1. Reactive Turing machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.M. Baeten (Jos); S.P. Luttik (Bas); P.J.A. van Tilburg

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe propose reactive Turing machines (RTMs), extending classical Turing machines with a process-theoretical notion of interaction, and use it to define a notion of executable transition system. We show that every computable transition system with a bounded branching degree is simulated

  2. Hydroxyquinones: Synthesis and Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros Spyroudis

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Quinones having hydroxy groups directly attached to the quinone ring constitute a very interesting class of quinoid compounds. A great number of hydroxyquinones are found in nature and the majority of them exhibit unique biological activity. Their syntheses and their main reactivity patterns are reviewed in this paper.

  3. Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-13

    The Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT) is used to determine the thermal stability of High Explosives (HEs) and chemical compatibility between (HEs) and alien materials. The CRT is one of the small-scale safety tests performed on HE at the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF).

  4. Control Rod Driveline Reactivity Feedback Model for Liquid Metal Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young-Min; Jeong, Hae-Yong; Chang, Won-Pyo; Cho, Chung-Ho; Lee, Yong-Bum

    2008-01-15

    The thermal expansion of the control rod drivelines (CRDL) is one important passive mitigator under all unprotected accident conditions in the metal and oxide cores. When the CRDL are washed by hot sodium in the coolant outlet plenum, the CRDL thermally expands and causes the control rods to be inserted further down into the active core region, providing a negative reactivity feedback. Since the control rods are attached to the top of the vessel head and the core attaches to the bottom of the reactor vessel (RV), the expansion of the vessel wall as it heats will either lower the core or raise the control rods supports. This contrary thermal expansion of the reactor vessel wall pulls the control rods out of the core somewhat, providing a positive reactivity feedback. However this is not a safety factor early in a transient because its time constant is relatively large. The total elongated length is calculated by subtracting the vessel expansion from the CRDL expansion to determine the net control rod expansion into the core. The system-wide safety analysis code SSC-K includes the CRDL/RV reactivity feedback model in which control rod and vessel expansions are calculated using single-nod temperatures for the vessel and CRDL masses. The KALIMER design has the upper internal structures (UIS) in which the CRDLs are positioned outside the structure where they are exposed to the mixed sodium temperature exiting the core. A new method to determine the CRDL expansion is suggested. Two dimensional hot pool thermal hydraulic model (HP2D) originally developed for the analysis of the stratification phenomena in the hot pool is utilized for a detailed heat transfer between the CRDL mass and the hot pool coolant. However, the reactor vessel wall temperature is still calculated by a simple lumped model.

  5. Positioning consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkier, Bente; Keller, Margit

    2014-01-01

    positionings emerges based on empirical examples of research in parent–children consumption. Positionings are flexible discursive fixations of the relationship between the performances of the practitioner, other practitioners, media discourse and consumption activities. The basic positioning types...

  6. Positive nickel patch tests in infants are of low clinical relevance and rarely reproducible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortz, Charlotte G; Kjaer, Henrik F; Eller, Esben

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported patch test reactivity to nickel sulphate in a cohort of unselected infants tested repeatedly at 3-18 months of age. A reproducible positive reaction at 12 and 18 months was selected as a sign of nickel sensitivity provided a patch test with an empty Finn chamber was ne...

  7. Impact of long-term meditation practice on cardiovascular reactivity during perception and reappraisal of affective images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Sergei V; Reva, Natalia V; Loktev, Konstantin V; Korenyok, Vladimir V; Aftanas, Lyubomir I

    2015-03-01

    Meditation has been found to be an efficient strategy for coping with stress in healthy individuals and in patients with psychosomatic disorders. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the psychophysiological mechanisms of beneficial effects of meditation on cardiovascular reactivity. We examined effects of long-term Sahaja Yoga meditation on cardiovascular reactivity during affective image processing under "unregulated" and "emotion regulation" conditions. Twenty two experienced meditators and 20 control subjects participated in the study. Under "unregulated" conditions participants were shown neutral and affective images and were asked to attend to them. Under "emotion regulation" conditions they down-regulated negative affect through reappraisal of negative images or up-regulated positive affect through reappraisal of positive images. Under "unregulated" conditions while anticipating upcoming images meditators vs. controls did not show larger pre-stimulus total peripheral resistance and greater cardiac output for negative images in comparison with neutral and positive ones. Control subjects showed TPR decrease for negative images only when they consciously intended to reappraise them (i.e. in the "emotion regulation" condition). Both meditators and controls showed comparable cardiovascular reactivity during perception of positive stimuli, whereas up-regulating of positive affect was associated with more pronounced cardiac activation in meditators. The findings provide some insight into understanding the beneficial influence of meditation on top-down control of emotion and cardiovascular reactivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reactive dispersive contaminant transport in coastal aquifers: Numerical simulation of a reactive Henry problem

    KAUST Repository

    Nick, H.M.

    2013-02-01

    The reactive mixing between seawater and terrestrial water in coastal aquifers influences the water quality of submarine groundwater discharge. While these waters come into contact at the seawater groundwater interface by density driven flow, their chemical components dilute and react through dispersion. A larger interface and wider mixing zone may provide favorable conditions for the natural attenuation of contaminant plumes. It has been claimed that the extent of this mixing is controlled by both, porous media properties and flow conditions. In this study, the interplay between dispersion and reactive processes in coastal aquifers is investigated by means of numerical experiments. Particularly, the impact of dispersion coefficients, the velocity field induced by density driven flow and chemical component reactivities on reactive transport in such aquifers is studied. To do this, a hybrid finite-element finite-volume method and a reactive simulator are coupled, and model accuracy and applicability are assessed. A simple redox reaction is considered to describe the degradation of a contaminant which requires mixing of the contaminated groundwater and the seawater containing the terminal electron acceptor. The resulting degradation is observed for different scenarios considering different magnitudes of dispersion and chemical reactivity. Three reactive transport regimes are found: reaction controlled, reaction-dispersion controlled and dispersion controlled. Computational results suggest that the chemical components\\' reactivity as well as dispersion coefficients play a significant role on controlling reactive mixing zones and extent of contaminant removal in coastal aquifers. Further, our results confirm that the dilution index is a better alternative to the second central spatial moment of a plume to describe the mixing of reactive solutes in coastal aquifers. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  9. A clay permeable reactive barrier to remove Cs-137 from groundwater: Column experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pourcq, K; Ayora, C; García-Gutiérrez, M; Missana, T; Carrera, J

    2015-11-01

    Clay minerals are reputed sorbents for Cs-137 and can be used as a low-permeability material to prevent groundwater flow. Therefore, clay barriers are employed to seal Cs-137 polluted areas and nuclear waste repositories. This work is motivated by cases where groundwater flow cannot be impeded. A permeable and reactive barrier to retain Cs-137 was tested. The trapping mechanism is based on the sorption of cesium on illite-containing clay. The permeability of the reactive material is provided by mixing clay on a matrix of wood shavings. Column tests combined with reactive transport modeling were performed to check both reactivity and permeability. Hydraulic conductivity of the mixture (10(-4) m/s) was sufficient to ensure an adequate hydraulic performance of an eventual barrier excavated in most aquifers. A number of column experiments confirmed Cs retention under different flow rates and inflow solutions. A 1D reactive transport model based on a cation-exchange mechanism was built. It was calibrated with batch experiments for high concentrations of NH4+ and K+ (the main competitors of Cs in the exchange positions). The model predicted satisfactorily the results of the column experiments. Once validated, it was used to investigate the performance and duration of a 2 m thick barrier under different scenarios (flow, clay content, Cs-137 and K concentration). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment of dyeing wastewater including reactive dyes (Reactive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-15

    Aug 15, 2013 ... Treatment of dyeing wastewater including reactive dyes. (Reactive Red RB, Reactive Black B, ... Keywords: Rhizopus arrhizus, wastewater treatment, decolourisation, textile dye. INTRODUCTION. Dyeing effluents ... as bacteria, yeasts, algae and fungi, are able to remove differ- ent classes of dyes (Fu and ...

  11. Treatment of dyeing wastewater including reactive dyes (Reactive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The decolourisation potential of growing Rhizopus arrhizus fungal strain in liquid medium containing thiamine was investigated for the removal of anionic reactive dyes such as Reactive Red RB (RR), Reactive Black B (RBB) and Remazol Blue (RB) and a cationic basic dye Methylene Blue (MB). To determine the optimal ...

  12. Evaluation of false positivity and cross reactivity in the investigation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · Journal Quality.

  13. Impact of sleep restriction versus idealized sleep on emotional experience, reactivity and regulation in healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Radhika; Palmer, Cara A; Jackson, Christine; Farris, Samantha G; Alfano, Candice A

    2017-08-01

    Sleep loss is associated with affective disturbances and disorders; however, there is limited understanding of specific mechanisms underlying these links, especially in adolescence. The current study tested the effects of sleep restriction versus idealized sleep on adolescents' emotional experience, reactivity and regulation (specifically cognitive reappraisal). Following 1 week of sleep monitoring, healthy adolescents (n = 42; ages 13-17 years) were randomized to 1 night of sleep restriction (4 h) or idealized sleep (9.5 h). The following day, adolescents provided self-reports of affect and anxiety and completed a laboratory-based task to assess: (1) emotional reactivity in response to positive, negative, and neutral images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS); and (2) ability to use cognitive reappraisal to decrease negative emotional responses. Large effects were observed for the adverse impact of sleep restriction on positive affect and anxiety as well as a medium-sized effect for negative affect, compared to the idealized sleep condition. Subjective reactivity to positive and neutral images did not differ between the groups, but a moderate effect was detected for reactivity to negative images whereby sleep-restricted teens reported greater reactivity. Across both sleep conditions, use of cognitive reappraisal down-regulated negative emotion effectively; however, sleep restriction did not impact upon adolescents' ability to use this strategy. These findings add to a growing body of literature demonstrating the deleterious effects of sleep restriction on aspects of emotion and highlight directions for future research in adolescents. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  14. Links between white matter microstructure and cortisol reactivity to stress in early childhood: evidence for moderation by parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Haroon I; Joanisse, Marc F; Mackrell, Sarah M; Kryski, Katie R; Smith, Heather J; Singh, Shiva M; Hayden, Elizabeth P

    2014-01-01

    Activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (measured via cortisol reactivity) may be a biological marker of risk for depression and anxiety, possibly even early in development. However, the structural neural correlates of early cortisol reactivity are not well known, although these would potentially inform broader models of mechanisms of risk, especially if the early environment further shapes these relationships. Therefore, we examined links between white matter architecture and young girls' cortisol reactivity and whether early caregiving moderated these links. We recruited 45 6-year-old girls based on whether they had previously shown high or low cortisol reactivity to a stress task at age 3. White matter integrity was assessed by calculating fractional anisotropy (FA) of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans. Parenting styles were measured via a standardized parent-child interaction task. Significant associations were found between FA in white matter regions adjacent to the left thalamus, the right anterior cingulate cortex, and the right superior frontal gyrus (all ps parent positive affect showing white matter structure more similar to that of low stress reactive girls. Results show associations between white matter integrity of various limbic regions of the brain and early cortisol reactivity to stress and provide preliminary support for the notion that parenting may moderate associations.

  15. Links between white matter microstructure and cortisol reactivity to stress in early childhood: Evidence for moderation by parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Haroon I.; Joanisse, Marc F.; Mackrell, Sarah M.; Kryski, Katie R.; Smith, Heather J.; Singh, Shiva M.; Hayden, Elizabeth P.

    2014-01-01

    Activity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis (measured via cortisol reactivity) may be a biological marker of risk for depression and anxiety, possibly even early in development. However, the structural neural correlates of early cortisol reactivity are not well known, although these would potentially inform broader models of mechanisms of risk, especially if the early environment further shapes these relationships. Therefore, we examined links between white matter architecture and young girls' cortisol reactivity and whether early caregiving moderated these links. We recruited 45 6-year-old girls based on whether they had previously shown high or low cortisol reactivity to a stress task at age 3. White matter integrity was assessed by calculating fractional anisotropy (FA) of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans. Parenting styles were measured via a standardized parent–child interaction task. Significant associations were found between FA in white matter regions adjacent to the left thalamus, the right anterior cingulate cortex, and the right superior frontal gyrus (all ps parent positive affect showing white matter structure more similar to that of low stress reactive girls. Results show associations between white matter integrity of various limbic regions of the brain and early cortisol reactivity to stress and provide preliminary support for the notion that parenting may moderate associations. PMID:25379418

  16. Programming Reactive Extensions and LINQ

    CERN Document Server

    Liberty, Jesse

    2011-01-01

    Pro Reactive Extensions and LINQ is a deep dive into the next important technology for .NET developers: Reactive Extensions. This in-depth tutorial goes beyond what is available anywhere else to teach how to write WPF, Silverlight, and Windows Phone applications using the Reactive Extensions (Rx) to handle events and asynchronous method calls. Reactive programming allows you to turn those aspects of your code that are currently imperative into something much more event-driven and flexible. For this reason, it's sometimes referred to as LINQ for Events. Reactive programming hinges on the concep

  17. Towards a quantitative understanding of total OH reactivity: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yudong; Shao, Min; Wang, Xuemei; Nölscher, Anke C.; Kessel, Stephan; Guenther, Alex; Williams, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Over the past fifty years, considerable efforts have been devoted to measuring the concentration and chemical speciation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ambient air and emissions. Recently, it has become possible to directly determine the overall effect of atmospheric trace gases on the oxidant hydroxyl radicals (OH), by measuring OH reactivity (OH loss frequency). Quantifying total OH reactivity is one way to characterize the roles of VOCs in formation of ground-level ozone and secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Approaches for measuring total OH reactivity in both emissions and ambient air have been progressing and have been applied in a wide range of studies. Here we evaluate the main techniques used to measure OH reactivity, including two methods directly measuring OH decay and one comparative reactivity method (CRM), and summarize the existing experimental and modeling studies. Total OH reactivity varies significantly on spatial, diurnal, seasonal and vertical bases. Comparison with individually detected OH sinks often reveals a significant missing reactivity, ranging from 20% to over 80% in some environments. Missing reactivity has also been determined in most source emission studies. These source measurements, as well as numerical models, have indicated that both undetected primary emissions and unmeasured secondary products could contribute to missing reactivity. A quantitative understanding of total OH reactivity of various sources and ambient environments will enhance our understanding of the suite of compounds found in emissions as well as chemical processes, and will also provide an opportunity for the improvement of atmospheric chemical mechanisms.

  18. Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  19. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-11-25

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  20. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  1. Prediction of peptide reactivity with human IVIg through a knowledge-based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Barbarini

    Full Text Available The prediction of antibody-protein (antigen interactions is very difficult due to the huge variability that characterizes the structure of the antibodies. The region of the antigen bound to the antibodies is called epitope. Experimental data indicate that many antibodies react with a panel of distinct epitopes (positive reaction. The Challenge 1 of DREAM5 aims at understanding whether there exists rules for predicting the reactivity of a peptide/epitope, i.e., its capability to bind to human antibodies. DREAM 5 provided a training set of peptides with experimentally identified high and low reactivities to human antibodies. On the basis of this training set, the participants to the challenge were asked to develop a predictive model of reactivity. A test set was then provided to evaluate the performance of the model implemented so far.We developed a logistic regression model to predict the peptide reactivity, by facing the challenge as a machine learning problem. The initial features have been generated on the basis of the available knowledge and the information reported in the dataset. Our predictive model had the second best performance of the challenge. We also developed a method, based on a clustering approach, able to "in-silico" generate a list of positive and negative new peptide sequences, as requested by the DREAM5 "bonus round" additional challenge.The paper describes the developed model and its results in terms of reactivity prediction, and highlights some open issues concerning the propensity of a peptide to react with human antibodies.

  2. Ubiquitous positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Mannings, Robin

    2008-01-01

    This groundbreaking resource offers a practical, in-depth understanding of Ubiquitous Positioning - positioning systems that identify the location and position of people, vehicles and objects in time and space in the digitized networked economy. The future and growth of ubiquitous positioning will be fueled by the convergence of many other areas of technology, from mobile telematics, Internet technology, and location systems, to sensing systems, geographic information systems, and the semantic web. This first-of-its-kind volume explores ubiquitous positioning from a convergence perspective, of

  3. A Universal Reactive Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Reif; Mørk, Simon; Sørensen, Morten U.

    1997-01-01

    Turing showed the existence of a model universal for the set of Turing machines in the sense that given an encoding of any Turing machine asinput the universal Turing machine simulates it. We introduce the concept of universality for reactive systems and construct a CCS processuniversal...... in the sense that, given an encoding of any CCS process, it behaves like this process up to weak bisimulation. This construction has arather non-constructive use of silent actions and we argue that this would be the case for any universal CCS process....

  4. Stress reactivity and emotion in premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Q

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Qing Liu,1 Yongshun Wang,2 Cornelis Hermanus van Heck,3 Wei Qiao4 1Department of Nuclear Medicine and Medical PET Center, The Second Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 2School of Physical Education and Sport, Huaqiao University, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China; 3DCC, Donders Institute for Neuroscience and Neurocognition, Arnhem, the Netherlands; 4Department of Physical Education, Xiamen Institute of Technology, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China Background: Hormone level fluctuation across the menstrual cycle causes women to experience negative emotions and also affects their mood regulation and stress sensitivity. However, the stress reactivity and emotional variations in women with premenstrual syndrome (PMS, who are especially sensitive to the variations in hormone cycles, have not been explained. Methods: The present study used an electroencephalogram (EEG stress evaluation test, a physiology stress evaluation test, and the positive affect and negative affect scale (PANAS to evaluate the stress reactivity pattern and emotional state of women with PMS. Results: The results showed that women with PMS had higher negative affect and lower positive affect compared with controls. Moreover, under stressful conditions, the women with PMS had a higher alpha activity and a lower respiration rate than the controls. The differences in stress reactivity and emotional states between women with PMS and controls were based on a covariant analysis with menstrual cycle (luteal and follicular phases as the covariate. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that, compared with controls, women suffering from PMS have a continuous abnormality in emotional state and stress reactivity, which was independent of the menstrual cycle. Keywords: premenstrual syndrome, stress reactivity, emotion, EEG stress evaluation test, physiology stress evaluation test

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Potential impact of reactive vaccination in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and debate regarding reactive vaccination to control cholera outbreaks. It provides insights into the practical challenges that might be associated with reactive vaccination and the potential value of the intervention, and suggests areas of future study. The Zimbabwe cholera outbreak is considered to be over. However,.

  6. Reactivity Monitoring of Accelerator-Driven Nuclear Reactor Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenhove, W.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis provides a methodology and set-up of a reactivity monitoring tool for Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS). The reactivity monitoring tool should guarantee the operation of an ADS at a safe margin from criticality. Robustness is assured in different aspects of the monitoring tool: the choice

  7. Multi-technology positioning

    CERN Document Server

    Lohan, Elena-Simona; Wymeersch, Henk; Seco-Granados, Gonzalo; Nykänen, Ossi

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an overview of positioning technologies, applications and services in a format accessible to a wide variety of readers. Readers who have always wanted to understand how satellite-based positioning, wireless network positioning, inertial navigation, and their combinations work will find great value in this book. Readers will also learn about the advantages and disadvantages of different positioning methods, their limitations and challenges. Cognitive positioning, adding the brain to determine which technologies to use at device runtime, is introduced as well. Coverage also includes the use of position information for Location Based Services (LBS), as well as context-aware positioning services, designed for better user experience. • Brings understanding of positioning technology to readers from a variety of disciplines • Reviews multiple techniques, providing insight on the pros, cons and challenges related to each • Designed to be a tutorial on basic principles, avoiding unnecessary de...

  8. Exposing Position Uncertainty in Middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langdal, Jakob; Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Toftkjær, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, the goal for positioning middleware is to provide developers with seamless position transparency, i.e., providing a connection between the application domain and the positioning sensors while hiding the complexity of the positioning technologies in use. A key part of the hidden com...... concepts is best supported when provided with a programming method with declarative constructs....

  9. Integração de informação e reativação da memória: impacto positivo de uma intervenção cognitivo-motora em bebês Information integration and memory reactivation: the positive effects of a cognitive-motor intervention in babies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Skilhan de Almeida

    2010-03-01

    , aged between six to eight months, born full term, adapted to day care centers and staying there for seven hours per day. In the day care center, the ratio caregiver/baby was 1/6. The patients belong to low income' large families and they did not participate in intervention programs. A cognitive-motor intervention was provided to the Intervention Group using visual tracking, toy manipulation and postural control activities. No intervention was provided to the Control Group. The day care routine activities were maintained for both groups. Three manipulation activities were assessed in the beginning of the program, after a month (retention and three days after retention. Statistical analysis applied the chi-square with Yates correction, Fisher exact test and Cochran test. RESULTS: The Intervention Group showed a significantly superior performance when compared to the Control Group in the retrieval of memory information, both at retention and post-retention tests. Significant and positive changes were also observed for the Intervention Group in the time factor. The older babies in the Intervention Group showed a better capacity to evocate information compared to the youngest ones. This trend was not observed for the Control Group. CONCLUSIONS: In order to nourish a baby's global development, interventions should be organized implementing tasks with diversity and appropriate learning intervals, which take into consideration the babies' capacity to maintain the information and to integrate them to new challenges

  10. Seeing Your Health Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reduce Font Size 100% Increase Font Size Positive Spin Basics Federal Response Digital Tools Events Blog Home ... that may assist you. Be on time. Most healthcare providers have full appointment schedules—if you are ...

  11. Memory reactivation or reinstatement and the mismatch negativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Walter; Sussman, Elyse; Molholm, Sophie; Foxe, John J

    2002-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the memory underlying the mismatch negativity (MMN) can be deactivated by a period of silence and later reactivated. An alternative is that the memory becomes inapplicable due to a period of silence and subsequently reinstated. Both interpretations rest on the absence of a MMN for a deviant in Position 1 of a train (showing deactivation or inapplicability of the memory) and the presence of a MMN in Position 2 of the train (evidencing reactivation or reinstatement of the memory). In these studies, the standards were fixed across all trains of a given condition. Hence, it is not clear if the MMN elicited in Position 2 requires presentation of multiple trains with identical standards or only a single train. Experiment 1 showed that a single train is sufficient. With data from recent studies, Experiment 2 showed that MMNs in Position 2 of trains are due to reinstatement rather than reactivation of the memory.

  12. Cross-reactivity of Nocardia spp. in the fungal (1-3)-β-d-glucan assay performed on cerebral spinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koncan, Raffaella; Favuzzi, Vincenza; Ligozzi, Marco; Sorrentino, Annarita; Cornaglia, Giuseppe; Cascio, Giuliana Lo

    2015-02-01

    Cerebral spinal fluid from a patient affected by a brain abscess caused by Nocardia abscessus gave a positive result for (1-3)-β-d-glucan (BG) assay, in absence of any fungal infection. This study aimed to assess whether Nocardia spp. show cross-reactivity with BG assay. All Nocardia spp. analyzed provided positive reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Schizophrenia and pain reactivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnot, Olivier; Tordjman, Sylvie

    2008-11-01

    Medical practitioners do not for a long time pay enough attention to patient's pain. This approach is in the line of society feelings. Pain was long consider to be a contingency to withstand as showed in Christian's bible or Stoicism's principle. Changes in mentality appear in present times. It Seems obvious that for sociological and scientific reasons pain's care in medical and psychiatric disorders is now an important subject. Recent research in autistic disorders suggest that insensitivity observed in autism is not and analgesic phenomenon but a different behavioural reactivity to pain. Prevalence of schizophrenic disorder is from 0.5 to 1%. It is also a complex disorder that has defied decades of concerted efforts to uncover its origins and attenuate its symptoms. The most promising hypotheses suggest that neurodevelopmental impairment increases the risk of later schizophrenia. Most of recent researches in this topic did focus to trait or state markers. According to the vulnerability models of schizophrenia, trait marker are clinical, psychological, physiological, anatomical or cognitive impairments found in patients with schizophrenia during all the course of the illness and even before the onset. Several lines of evidence (case report, epidemiological studies, experimental studies) suggest that patients with schizophrenia shows a relative insensitivity to physical pain. We will review and critic the scientific literature in this specific topic. We will see if datas are relevant with the neurodevelopmental hypothesis and vulnerability models. An OLDMEDLINE/MEDLINE query was performed to identify 50 articles relevant to our subject. 9 were case report or case series, 21 were clinical or epidemiological studies, 15 were experimental studies and we also found 5 previous review. Clinical and experimental data strongly suggest a decrease of Behavioural Reactivity to Pain (BRP) but there is a lack of argument to prove a real analgesia. Because schizophrenia is a

  14. Pembrolizumab reactivates pulmonary granulomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majdi Al-dliw

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoid like reaction is a well-known entity that occurs as a consequence to several malignancies or their therapies. Immunotherapy has gained a lot of interest in the past few years and has recently gained approval as first line therapy in multiple advanced stage malignancies. Pneumonitis has been described as complication of such therapy. Granulomatous inflammation has been only rarely reported subsequent to immunotherapy. We describe a case of granulomatous inflammation reactivation affecting the lungs in a patient previously exposed to Pembrolizumab and have evidence of a distant granulomatous infection. We discuss potential mechanisms of the inflammation and assert the importance of immunosuppression in controlling the dis-inhibited immune system.

  15. Reactive intermediates in the gas phase generation and monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Setser, D W

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Intermediates in the Gas Phase: Generation and Monitoring covers methods for reactive intermediates in the gas phase. The book discusses the generation and measurement of atom and radical concentrations in flow systems; the high temperature flow tubes, generation and measurement of refractory species; and the electronically excited long-lived states of atoms and diatomic molecules in flow systems. The text also describes the production and detection of reactive species with lasers in static systems; the production of small positive ions in a mass spectrometer; and the discharge-excite

  16. Photoinactivation of mcr-1 positive Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caires, C. S. A.; Leal, C. R. B.; Rodrigues, A. C. S.; Lima, A. R.; Silva, C. M.; Ramos, C. A. N.; Chang, M. R.; Arruda, E. J.; Oliveira, S. L.; Nascimento, V. A.; Caires, A. R. L.

    2018-01-01

    The emergence of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae, mostly in Escherichia coli due to the mcr-1 gene, has revealed the need to develop alternative approaches in treating mcr-1 positive bacterial infections. This is because colistin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic and one of the ‘last-resort’ antibiotics for multidrug resistant bacteria. The present study evaluated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the efficacy of photoinactivation processes to kill a known mcr-1 positive E. coli strain. Eosin methylene-blue (EMB) was investigated as a photoantimicrobial agent for inhibiting the growth of a mcr-1 positive E. coli strain obtained from a patient with a diabetic foot infection. The photoantimicrobial activity of EMB was also tested in a non-multidrug resistant E. coli strain. The photoinactivation process was tested using light doses in the 30–45 J cm‑2 range provided by a LED device emitting at 625 nm. Our findings demonstrate that a mcr-1 positive E. coli strain is susceptible to photoinactivation. The results show that the EMB was successfully photoactivated, regardless of the bacterial multidrug resistance; inactivating the bacterial growth by oxidizing the cells in accordance with the generation of the oxygen reactive species. Our results suggest that bacterial photoinactivation is an alternative and effective approach to kill mcr-1 positive bacteria.

  17. Homogenization in chemical reactive flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Conca

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the homogenization of two nonlinear models for chemical reactive flows through the exterior of a domain containing periodically distributed reactive solid grains (or reactive obstacles. In the first model, the chemical reactions take place on the walls of the grains, while in the second one the fluid penetrates the grains and the reactions take place therein. The effective behavior of these reactive flows is described by a new elliptic boundary-value problem containing an extra zero-order term which captures the effect of the chemical reactions.

  18. Cross-reactivity between Parietaria pollen and beet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minciullo, P L; Mistrello, G; Patafi, M; Zanoni, D; Gangemi, S

    2007-01-01

    Allergy to beet is very rare. Until now, only a few reports about asthma induced by inhaling the vapor of cooked beet have been published. We describe two patients with allergic rhinitis and positive skin prick tests to Parietaria and beet only. To investigate possible cross-reactivity between Parietaria pollen and beet, we performed laboratory assays that showed beet-specific IgE in the sera of both patients and possible cross-reactivity between Parietaria and beet in one patient.

  19. Poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Krasniqi, Xhevdet; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Gashi, Masar; Berisha, Blerim; Abazi, Flora; Ko?inaj, Dardan

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 49-year-old patient who developed poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis. The woman presented with constitutional symptoms, arthritis, urinary infection and conjunctivitis. The blood culture was positive for the staphylococcal coagulase negative infection. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated, whereas the rheumatoid factor was negative. Radiographic findings confirmed diagnosis of pleuropneumonia, and one year later of chr...

  20. Reactive navigation in dynamic environment using a multisensor predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, K T; Chang, C C

    1999-01-01

    A reactive navigation system for an autonomous mobile robot in unstructured dynamic environments is presented. The motion of moving obstacles is estimated for robot motion planning and obstacle avoidance. A multisensor-based obstacle predictor is utilized to obtain obstacle-motion information. Sensory data from a CCD camera and multiple ultrasonic range finders are combined to predict obstacle positions at the next sampling instant. A neural network, which is trained off-line, provides the desired prediction on-line in real time. The predicted obstacle configuration is employed by the proposed virtual force based navigation method to prevent collision with moving obstacles. Simulation results are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed navigation system in an environment with multiple mobile robots or moving objects. This system was implemented and tested on an experimental mobile robot at our laboratory. Navigation results in real environment are presented and analyzed.

  1. Researcher Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khawaja, Iram; Mørck, Line Lerche

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the complex and multilayered process of researcher positioning,specifically in relation to the politically sensitive study of marginalised and "othered"groups such as Muslims living in Denmark. We discuss the impact of different ethnic,religious, and racial backgrounds...... involvement by the researcher, which challenges traditional perspectives onresearch and researcher positioning. A key point in this regard is the importance ofconstant awareness of and reflection on the multiple ways in which one's positioningas a researcher influences the research process. Studying the other...... calls for closereflections on one's own position, theoretically, personally, and politically, taking intoaccount one's complicity in either overcoming or reproducing processes of otheringand marginalisation....

  2. Dune field reactivation from blowouts: Sevier Desert, UT, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchyn, Thomas E.; Hugenholtz, Chris H.

    2013-12-01

    Dune field reactivation (a shift from vegetated to unvegetated state) has important economic, social, and environmental implications. In some settings reactivation is desired to preserve environmental values, but in arid regions reactivation is typically a form of land degradation. Little is known about reactivation due to a lack of published records, making modeling and prediction difficult. Here we detail dune reactivations from blowout expansion in the Sevier Desert, Utah, USA. We use historical aerial photographs and satellite imagery to track the transition from stable, vegetated dunes to actively migrating sediment in 3 locations. We outline a reactivation sequence: (i) disturbance breaches vegetation and exposes sediment, then (ii) creates a blowout with a deposition apron that (iii) advances downwind with a slipface or as a sand sheet. Most deposition aprons are not colonized by vegetation and are actively migrating. To explore causes we examine local sand flux, climate data, and stream flow. Based on available data the best explanation we can provide is that some combination of anthropogenic disturbance and climate may be responsible for the reactivations. Together, these examples provide a rare glimpse of dune field reactivation from blowouts, revealing the timescales, behaviour, and morphodynamics of devegetating dune fields.

  3. Researcher positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Line Lerche; Khawaja, Iram

    2009-01-01

    abstract  This article focuses on the complex and multi-layered process of researcher positioning, specifically in relation to the politically sensitive study of marginalised and ‘othered' groups such as Muslims living in Denmark. We discuss the impact of different ethnic, religious and racial...... political and personal involvement by the researcher, which challenges traditional perspectives on research and researcher positioning. A key point in this regard is the importance of constant awareness of and reflection on the multiple ways in which one's positioning as a researcher influences the research...... process. Studying the other calls for close reflections on one's own position, theoretically, personally, and politically, taking into account one's complicity in either overcoming or reproducing processes of othering and marginalisation. [i] We use the term (ethnic) minoritised, not as a distinction...

  4. The associations between parenting styles and proactive and reactive aggression in Hong Kong children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Fung, Annis Lai Chu

    2015-12-01

    Previous research suggests that reactive and proactive aggression may be differentially related to family contextual (e.g. parenting practices) factors. However, the existing research has focused largely on children and adolescents from Western countries, and no study has examined the parenting-aggression association using a parenting style measure sensitive to Asian culture. In this study parenting styles (i.e. warmth, control and guan/training) and proactive and reactive aggression were assessed in a large sample of school children in Hong Kong, China (N = 4,175, mean age = 11.75). We found that: (a) both low warmth (in boys only) and guan (i.e. high expectation and close supervision, in both boys and girls) were associated with elevated parent-reported proactive aggression, (b) high restrictive control (i.e. dominating and rejecting) was associated with high reactive aggression (in both boys and girls) based on parent- or child-report data, and with high proactive aggression (in boys only) based on parent-report data, and (c) guan was also positively associated with parent-reported reactive aggression. Findings provide more information about the Parenting Inventory using a large Asian sample, and extend existing research on familial correlates of different types of aggression. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  5. Referencing cross-reactivity of detection antibodies for protein array experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemass, Darragh; O'Kennedy, Richard; Kijanka, Gregor S

    2016-01-01

    Protein arrays are frequently used to profile antibody repertoires in humans and animals. High-throughput protein array characterisation of complex antibody repertoires necessitates the use of extensively validated secondary detection antibodies. This article details the validation of an affinity-isolated anti-chicken IgY antibody produced in rabbit and a goat anti-rabbit IgG antibody conjugated with alkaline phosphatase using protein arrays consisting of 7,390 distinct human proteins. Probing protein arrays with secondary antibodies in absence of chicken serum revealed non-specific binding to 61 distinct human proteins. Despite the identified non-specific binding, the tested antibodies are well suited for use in protein array experiments as the cross-reactive binding partners can be readily excluded from further analysis. The evident cross-reactivity of the tested secondary detection antibodies points towards the necessity of platform-specific antibody characterisation studies for all secondary immunoreagents. Furthermore, secondary antibody characterisation using protein arrays enables the generation of reference lists of cross-reactive proteins, which can be then marked as potential false positives in follow-up experiments. Providing such cross-reactivity reference lists accessible to the wider research community may help to interpret data generated with the same antibodies in applications not only related to protein arrays such as immunoprecipitation, Western blots or other immunoassays.

  6. Streaming Pool: reuse, combine and create reactive streams with pleasure

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    When connecting together heterogeneous and complex systems, it is not easy to exchange data between components. Streams of data are successfully used in industry in order to overcome this problem, especially in the case of "live" data. Streams are a specialization of the Observer design pattern and they provide asynchronous and non-blocking data flow. The ongoing effort of the ReactiveX initiative is one example that demonstrates how demanding this technology is even for big companies. Bridging the discrepancies of different technologies with common interfaces is already done by the Reactive Streams initiative and, in the JVM world, via reactive-streams-jvm interfaces. Streaming Pool is a framework for providing and discovering reactive streams. Through the mechanism of dependency injection provided by the Spring Framework, Streaming Pool provides a so called Discovery Service. This object can discover and chain streams of data that are technologically agnostic, through the use of Stream IDs. The stream to ...

  7. Weigle Reactivation in Acinetobacter Calcoaceticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berenstein, Dvora

    1982-01-01

    Weigle (W)-reactivation was demonstrated in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus for the UV-irra-diated lysogenic phage P78. The reactivation factor (survival of irradiated phage on irradiated bacteria/ survival on unirradiated bacteria) reached a maximum value of 20. This was obtained at UV-doses giving...

  8. Stress Reactivity in Male Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpley, Christopher F.; Fleming, Richard K.

    1989-01-01

    Measured heart rate reactivity of typical sample of male undergraduates. Found cardiac reactivity of undergraduate males in response to a stressor task was not a function of success at or familiarity with task but was more likely an outcome of genetic factors. (Author/ABL)

  9. Cortisol reactivity in young infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Beijers, R.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.; Weerth, C. de

    2010-01-01

    In this systematic review on empirical studies of cortisol reactivity to acute stressors in infants, we specifically focus on the role of infant age in the early development of cortisol reactivity to stressors. Our findings indicate that many psychological stressors do not provoke a cortisol

  10. The effect of alcohol priming on neural markers of alcohol cue-reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Kelly E; Ghahremani, Dara G; Ray, Lara A

    2015-01-01

    Priming doses of alcohol are associated with increased desire to drink and disinhibitory effects on subsequent control over drinking. Despite the importance of alcohol priming in the cue-reactivity literature, the effects of priming on brain responses to alcohol cues remains unclear. Furthermore, evidence suggests this relationship may be moderated by OPRM1 genotype. Twenty individuals with alcohol dependence (six females; 90% Caucasian; mean age = 29.4) who were prospectively genotyped on the OPRM1 gene underwent two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions, before and after a priming dose of alcohol, each including a gustatory alcohol cue reactivity paradigm and self-reported craving measures. Self-reported alcohol craving generally increased and remained higher for alcohol versus water cue presentations across pre- and post-priming scans. Compared to alcohol cues delivered during the post-priming scan, alcohol cues delivered pre-priming were associated with greater activation in regions including the hippocampus, amygdala, inferior frontal gyrus, temporal cortex, and occipital cortex. Controlling for alcoholism severity increased statistical significance of activation in these regions. Follow-up analyses revealed a positive correlation between alcoholism severity and pre- versus post-priming alcohol cue-reactivity primarily in frontal regions. OPRM1 genotype was also found to moderate alcohol cue-reactivity across scans. This study provides initial evidence of alcohol cue-elicited habituation in fronto-temporal regions, despite continued craving, following a priming dose of alcohol. Further, it provides preliminary evidence for moderating roles of alcoholism severity and OPRM1 genotype on priming-related changes in cue-reactivity, adding to our understanding of the function of alcohol priming in alcohol dependence.

  11. A comparative classification of coal reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolin, A.; Jensen, A.; Storm Pedersen, L. [Technical Univ. Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Toerslev Jensen, P.; Dam-Johansen, K. [Elsam I/S, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    Based on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) tests, a qualitative reactivity classification of nine different coals ranking from subbituminous to low volatile bituminous with respect to one coal, Cerrejon, is presented. The classification agrees well with a corresponding one obtained from another study by entrained flow reactor (EFR) experiments. Two Southern Hemisphere coals (Australia), however, showed a higher reactivity with respect to the Northern Hemisphere coal Cerrejon (Colombia) in the low temperature TGA experiments. It appears that TGA can provide a simple means for determining a fuel reactivity classification that may be applied to full scale suspension fired plants. The combustion behaviour of the Cerrejon coals was investigated at different temperatures and oxygen concentrations to determine the activation energy and reaction order. In addition, TGA tests revealed that for this coal, increasing values of the heat treatment temperature and holding time during pyrolysis result in lower char reactivities. This is attributed to the severity of the pyrolysis process and thereby the influence of thermal annealing effects. (orig.)

  12. Emotion Reactivity, Comfort Expressing Emotions, and Future Suicidal Ideation in Emerging Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco-Roman, Lillian; Moore, Alyssa; Tsypes, Aliona; Jacobson, Colleen; Miranda, Regina

    2018-01-01

    Emotion reactivity and difficulties in expressing emotions have been implicated in risk for suicidal behavior. This study examined comfort in expressing emotions (positive vs. negative) and depressive symptoms as mediators of the prospective relation between emotion reactivity and suicidal ideation. Emerging adults (N = 143; 72% female; 28% White) completed measures of emotion reactivity, comfort expressing emotions, and suicidal ideation at baseline and of depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation 12 months later. Emotion reactivity predicted suicidal ideation at follow-up through depressive symptoms. Difficulty expressing love-but not happiness, sadness, and anger-partially mediated the relationship between emotion reactivity and suicidal ideation at follow-up before but not after adjusting for baseline ideation. The relation between high emotion reactivity and suicidal ideation may be explained by discomfort in the expression of positive emotions and by depressive symptoms. Promotion of comfort in positive emotion expression may reduce vulnerability to suicidal ideation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Synthesis and luminescence properties of reactive ternary europium complexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dong-cai; Shu, Wan-gen; Zhang, Wei; Liu, You-nian; Zhou, Yue

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, five new reactive ternary europium complexes were synthesized with the first ligand of 1,10-phenanthroline and the reactive second ligands of maleic anhydride, acrylonitrile, undecenoic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid, and also characterized by means of elemental analysis, EDTA titrimetric method, FTIR spectra and UV spectra. The fluorescence spectra show that the five new ternary complexes have much higher luminescence intensity than their corresponding binary complexes, and the synergy ability sequence of the five reactive ligands is as follows: linoleic acid > oleic acid > acrylonitrile > maleic anhydride > undecenoic acid. At the same time, the reactive ternary europium complexes coordinated with the reactive ligands, which can be copolymerized with other monomers, will provide a new way for the synthesis of bonding-type rare earth polymer functional materials with excellent luminescence properties.

  14. Positional games

    CERN Document Server

    Hefetz, Dan; Stojaković, Miloš; Szabó, Tibor

    2014-01-01

    This text serves as a thorough introduction to the rapidly developing field of positional games. This area constitutes an important branch of combinatorics, whose aim it is to systematically develop an extensive mathematical basis for a variety of two-player perfect information games. These range from such popular games as Tic-Tac-Toe and Hex to purely abstract games played on graphs and hypergraphs. The subject of positional games is strongly related to several other branches of combinatorics such as Ramsey theory, extremal graph and set theory, and the probabilistic method. These notes cover a variety of topics in positional games, including both classical results and recent important developments. They are presented in an accessible way and are accompanied by exercises of varying difficulty, helping the reader to better understand the theory. The text will benefit both researchers and graduate students in combinatorics and adjacent fields.

  15. Genome reactivation after the silence in mitosis: recapitulating mechanisms of development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaret, Kenneth S

    2014-04-28

    Transcription is silenced during mitosis and reactivated at mitotic exit. The dynamics and identities of "bookmarking" transcription factors and chromatin marks that mediate reactivation often recapitulate those observed during cell identity establishment in development. Thus, features of postmitotic gene reactivation can provide insights into mechanisms of developmental cell fate establishment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Positive criminology in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronel, Natti; Segev, Dana

    2014-11-01

    The discourse regarding offender rehabilitation has been criticized by various scholars who have claimed that reducing negative causes and managing risk will not automatically prompt positive human development and elements that are associated with desistance. Positive criminology is an innovative concept that challenges the common preoccupation with negative elements, by placing emphasis on human encounters and forces of inclusion that are experienced positively by target individuals and that can promote crime desistance. However, as the concept is relatively new, there are still no guiding principles for the practice of positive criminology that could direct research and the criminal justice system. This article attempts to fill that gap by providing principles that could be practiced by criminal justice personnel and examples of different interventions that reflect positive criminology. The article also provides ideological explanations for adopting the concept of positive criminology in practice. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. Non-natural and photo-reactive amino acids as biochemical probes of immune function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gómez-Nuñez

    Full Text Available Wilms tumor protein (WT1 is a transcription factor selectively overexpressed in leukemias and cancers; clinical trials are underway that use altered WT1 peptide sequences as vaccines. Here we report a strategy to study peptide-MHC interactions by incorporating non-natural and photo-reactive amino acids into the sequence of WT1 peptides. Thirteen WT1 peptides sequences were synthesized with chemically modified amino acids (via fluorination and photo-reactive group additions at MHC and T cell receptor binding positions. Certain new non-natural peptide analogs could stabilize MHC class I molecules better than the native sequences and were also able to elicit specific T-cell responses and sometimes cytotoxicity to leukemia cells. Two photo-reactive peptides, also modified with a biotin handle for pull-down studies, formed covalent interactions with MHC molecules on live cells and provided kinetic data showing the rapid clearance of the peptide-MHC complex. Despite "infinite affinity" provided by the covalent peptide bonding to the MHC, immunogenicity was not enhanced by these peptides because the peptide presentation on the surface was dominated by catabolism of the complex and only a small percentage of peptide molecules covalently bound to the MHC molecules. This study shows that non-natural amino acids can be successfully incorporated into T cell epitopes to provide novel immunological, biochemical and kinetic information.

  18. Reactive power cost determination and allocation using generalized tracing methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, A.; Bashiri, S. [Iran Univ. of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    A generalized tracing method was proposed for the allocation of standard 30 bus power system reactive power costs. Reactive power costs were divided into 2 parts: direct costs and opportunity costs. Generator opportunity costs were calculated using power flow calculations when no voltage limitation was applied to system buses. The cost of transformers with tap changers and the generating cost of reactive power via capacitor banks with switching facilities were considered. The cost of capacitor banks was calculated using the costs of generating reactive power through the capacitor bank, along with installation costs and consumption rates. The transmission line was classified based on the direction of reactive power flow. Generator domain was described as the set of buses which received generating power from the generators. Load domain was described as the set of buses in which power consumed by the load provided a path for power flow. A reactive power tracing algorithm was implemented on a 30 bus power system. The algorithm was able to determine the contribution of generators and loads and the contribution of each load on reactive power losses. Generator contributions were determined for each bus. The cost of reactive power was allocated by determined source and load contributions in each domain. It was concluded that the proposed method can be used to accurately allocate generation and transmission costs. 8 refs., 6 tabs., 5 figs.

  19. Integrated Design and Control of Reactive and Non-Reactive Distillation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    , an alternative approach is to tackle process design and controllability issues simultaneously, in the early stages of process design. This simultaneous synthesis approach provides optimal/near optimal operation and more efficient control of conventional (non-reactive binary distillation columns) (Hamid et al......., 2010) as well as complex chemical processes; for example, intensified processes such as reactive distillation (Mansouri et al., 2015). Most importantly, it identifies and eliminates potentially promising design alternatives that may have controllability problems later. To date, a number...... of methodologies have been proposed and applied on various problems to address the interactions between process design and control, and they range from optimization-based approaches to model-based methods (Sharifzadeh, 2013). In this work, integrated design and control of non-reactive distillation, ternary...

  20. Reatividade animal Confinement reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walsiara Estanislau Maffei

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A reatividade é definida como a reação do animal quando contido num ambiente de contenção móvel. Ela é quantificada por meio do teste de reatividade animal em ambiente de contenção móvel - REATEST®. Este teste consiste num dispositivo eletrônico acoplado à balança e num software específico. O dispositivo capta a movimentação que o animal provoca na balança, durante 20 segundos e a envia para o software que a processa determinando a reatividade do animal numa escala contínua de pontos. Pontuações maiores são de animais mais reativos (mais agressivo. A reatividade foi criada com os objetivos de solucionar os problemas até então existentes na seleção para temperamento e de permitir estimação de parâmetros genéticos mais confiáveis. Ela é uma característica objetiva que tem grande variabilidade fenotípica e é de quantificação rápida, fácil e segura, além de poder ser quantificada em qualquer tipo de balança, o que permite maior aplicabilidade. Ela não interfere nas práticas de manejo das fazendas porque é quantificada no momento da pesagem dos animais. Sua herdabilidade na raça Nelore é de 0,39 ao ano e 0,23 ao sobreano e suas correlações genéticas com ganho de peso diário são de -0,28 do nascimento até desmama e de -0,49 do desmame até ano. Já suas correlações genéticas com desenvolvimento do perímetro escrotal do ano ao sobreano variam de -0,25 e -0,41.The confinement reactivity (CR has been used as a measure of temperament in Brazil and it is defined as the animal reaction when contained in the scale. It is quantified through the animal reactivity test - REATEST®. This test consists of an electronic device coupled to the scale and of specific software. The device captures the movement that the animal provokes in the scale, during 20 seconds and sends it for the software that processes this movement and determines the animal CR in a continuous scale of points. Higher punctuations belong to

  1. Sexual Orientation Modulates Endocrine Stress Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juster, Robert-Paul; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Mendrek, Adrianna; Pfaus, James G.; Smith, Nathan Grant; Johnson, Philip Jai; Lefebvre-Louis, Jean-Philippe; Raymond, Catherine; Marin, Marie-France; Sindi, Shireen; Lupien, Sonia J.; Pruessner, Jens C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Biological sex differences and sociocultural gender diversity influence endocrine stress reactivity. Although numerous studies have shown that men typically activate stronger stress responses than women when exposed to laboratory-based psychosocial stressors, it is unclear whether sexual orientation further modulates stress reactivity. Given that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals frequently report heightened distress secondary to stigma-related stressors, we investigated whether cortisol stress reactivity differs between LGB individuals and heterosexual individuals in response to a well-validated psychosocial stressor. METHODS The study population comprised 87 healthy adults (mean age, 25 years) who were grouped according to their biological sex and their gendered sexual orientation: lesbian/bisexual women (n = 20), heterosexual women (n = 21), gay/bisexual men (n = 26), and heterosexual men (n = 20). Investigators collected 10 salivary cortisol samples throughout a 2-hour afternoon visit involving exposure to the Trier Social Stress Test modified to maximize between-sex differences. RESULTS Relative to heterosexual women, lesbian/bisexual women showed higher cortisol stress reactivity 40 min after exposure to the stressor. In contrast, gay/bisexual men displayed lower overall cortisol concentrations throughout testing compared with heterosexual men. Main findings were significant while adjusting for sex hormones (estradiol-to-progesterone ratio in women and testosterone in men), age, self-esteem, and disclosure status (whether LGB participants had completed their “coming out”). CONCLUSIONS Our results provide novel evidence for gender-based modulation of cortisol stress reactivity based on sexual orientation that goes beyond well-established between-sex differences. This study raises several important avenues for future research related to the physiologic functioning of LGB populations and gender diversity more broadly. PMID:25444167

  2. Endometrial metaplasias and reactive changes: a spectrum of altered differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolae, Alina; Preda, Ovidiu; Nogales, Francisco F

    2011-02-01

    Endometrial metaplasias and changes (EMCs) are conditions frequently overlooked and misdiagnosed. The aim of this review is to update current issues and provide a classification with a practical clinicopathological approach. Hormonal or irritative stimuli are the main inducing factors of EMCs, although some metaplasias have a mutational origin. EMCs vary from reactive, degenerative lesions to those able to associate with malignancy or those having a preneoplastic potential. The most common types of EMCs are ciliated tubal metaplasia (CTM) and mucinous metaplasia (MM), which occur in simple and complex glands, and possibly these architectural changes hold the same prognostic significance as they do in hyperplastic endometrioid lesions. Immunohistochemically, CTM is positive for LhS28, bcl-2, PAX2 and p16(INK4A). Complex CTM is likely to be a precursor of ciliated endometrioid-type carcinomas. MMs should be evaluated architecturally, taking into account that their atypicality is minimal. The differentiation between complex MM and mucinous carcinoma may be extremely difficult. Surface complex, papillary MM in endometrial polyps can be considered as benign. Intestinal-type endometrial MM is rare and its presence should prompt further investigation of associated lesions in the endocervix. Endometrial squamous metaplasia (ESS) is often linked to chronic irritative situations. It should be differentiated from secondary involvement by a human papilomavirus-related cervical lesion. Morular metaplasia is a mutational phenomenon with a distinct phenotype that helps to differentiate it from ESS. Morules are benign, hormonally inert structures that are often markers of complex endometrioid glandular architecture, and they are associated with an attenuated malignancy. Endometrial reactive changes are commonly associated with desquamation or hormonal imbalance. The frequent, p16(INK4A) positive, benign surface papillary syncytial change may be misdiagnosed, in some cases, as

  3. Cytomegalovirus reactivation in ICU patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazian, Laurent; Hraiech, Sami; Lehingue, Samuel; Roch, Antoine; Chiche, Laurent; Wiramus, Sandrine; Forel, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 20 years have passed since we reported our results of histologically proven cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia in non-immunocompromised ICU patients. Even if there are more recent reports suggesting that CMV may worsen the outcomes for ICU patients, there is no definite answer to this question: is CMV a potential pathogen for ICU patients or is it simply a bystander? We will describe the pathophysiology of active CMV infection and the most recent insights concerning the epidemiological aspects of these reactivations. Cytomegalovirus can be pathogenic by a direct organ insult (such as for the lung), by decreasing host defences against other microorganisms and/or by enhancing the body's inflammatory response (as in acute respiratory distress syndrome). The incidence of active CMV infection is dependent on the diagnostic method used. Using the most sophisticated available biological tools, the incidence can reach 15-20% of ICU patients (20-40% in ICU patients with positive CMV serology). In adequately powered cohorts of patients, active CMV infection appears to be associated with worse outcomes for mechanically ventilated ICU patients. There is no absolute direct proof of a negative impact of active CMV infection on the health outcomes of mechanically ventilated patients. Prospective randomized trials are lacking. Future trials should examine the potential benefits for health outcomes of using antiviral treatments. Such treatments could be prophylactic, pre-emptive or used only when there is an end-organ disease. Cytomegalovirus infection may affect health outcomes for ICU patients. Additional prospective trials are necessary to confirm this hypothesis.

  4. Interaction between trait anxiety and trait anger predict amygdala reactivity to angry facial expressions in men but not women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carré, Justin M; Fisher, Patrick M; Manuck, Stephen B; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2012-01-01

    .... Here, we report the novel finding that individual differences in trait anger are positively correlated with bilateral dorsal amygdala reactivity to angry facial expressions, but only among men...

  5. Controlled positioning of nanoparticles on a micrometer scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Enderle

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available For many applications it is desirable to have nanoparticles positioned on top of a given substrate well separated from each other and arranged in arrays of a certain geometry. For this purpose, a method is introduced combining the bottom-up self-organization of precursor-loaded micelles providing Au nanoparticles (NPs, with top-down electron-beam lithography. As an example, 13 nm Au NPs are arranged in a square array with interparticle distances >1 µm on top of Si substrates. By using these NPs as masks for a subsequent reactive ion etching, the square pattern is transferred into Si as a corresponding array of nanopillars.

  6. Sensitization to reactive textile dyes in patients with contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzini, B M; Motolese, A; Conti, A; Ferdani, G; Seidenari, S

    1996-03-01

    Reactive dyes are used especially for colouring natural fibres (cotton, silk and wool) that are widely used in Western countries, particularly Italy, in the production of clothes. The aim of our study was to investigate sensitization to the most commonly used reactive textile dyes in patients undergoing patch tests, and to assess the clinical relevance of contact sensitization to these dyes. 1813 consecutive patients underwent patch tests with the GIRDCA standard series and an additional textile series of 12 reactive dyes. 18 of these patients were sensitized to reactive dyes (0.99%) (4 only to reactive dyes). The dyes most frequently responsible for positive patch tests were Red Cibacron CR and Violet Remazol 5R (respectively, 8 and 5 positivities). In 5 cases only was a history of intolerance to particular garments given; of 4 patch tests performed with pieces of garment, 2 were positive. In 1 occupationally-exposed patient, airborne contact dermatitis was suspected. Owing to the lack of up-to-date patch test series, some cases of allergic contact dermatitis from textile dyes are probably misdiagnosed: new colouring agents are continuously introduced to the market, so that a close relationship with textile industry is necessary to improve our diagnostic tools.

  7. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  8. Summertime OH reactivity from a receptor coastal site in the Mediterranean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannoni, Nora; Gros, Valerie; Sarda Esteve, Roland; Kalogridis, Cerise; Michoud, Vincent; Dusanter, Sebastien; Sauvage, Stephane; Locoge, Nadine; Colomb, Aurelie; Bonsang, Bernard

    2017-10-01

    Total hydroxyl radical (OH) reactivity, the total loss frequency of the hydroxyl radical in ambient air, provides the total loading of OH reactants in air. We measured the total OH reactivity for the first time during summertime at a coastal receptor site located in the western Mediterranean Basin. Measurements were performed at a temporary field site located in the northern cape of Corsica (France), during summer 2013 for the project CARBOSOR (CARBOn within continental pollution plumes: SOurces and Reactivity)-ChArMEx (Chemistry and Aerosols Mediterranean Experiment). Here, we compare the measured total OH reactivity with the OH reactivity calculated from the measured reactive gases. The difference between these two parameters is termed missing OH reactivity, i.e., the fraction of OH reactivity not explained by the measured compounds. The total OH reactivity at the site varied between the instrumental LoD (limit of detection = 3 s-1) to a maximum of 17 ± 6 s-1 (35 % uncertainty) and was 5 ± 4 s-1 (1σ SD - standard deviation) on average. It varied with air temperature exhibiting a diurnal profile comparable to the reactivity calculated from the concentration of the biogenic volatile organic compounds measured at the site. For part of the campaign, 56 % of OH reactivity was unexplained by the measured OH reactants (missing reactivity). We suggest that oxidation products of biogenic gas precursors were among the contributors to missing OH reactivity.

  9. [Hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maazoun, F; Deschamps, O; Barros-Kogel, E; Ngwem, E; Fauchet, N; Buffet, P; Froissart, A

    2015-11-01

    Hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly is a rare and severe form of chronic malaria. This condition is a common cause of splenomegaly in endemic areas. The pathophysiology of hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly involves an intense immune reaction (predominantly B cell-driven) to repeated/chronic infections with Plasmodium sp. The diagnosis may be difficult, due to a poorly specific clinical presentation (splenomegaly, fatigue, cytopenias), a long delay between residence in a malaria-endemic area and onset of symptoms, and a frequent absence of parasites on conventional thin and thick blood smears. A strongly contributive laboratory parameter is the presence of high levels of total immunoglobulin M. When the diagnostic of hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly is considered, search for anti-Plasmodium antibodies and Plasmodium nucleic acids (genus and species) by PCR is useful. Diagnosis of hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly relies on the simultaneous presence of epidemiological, clinical, biological and follow-up findings. Regression of both splenomegaly and hypersplenism following antimalarial therapy allows the differential diagnosis with splenic lymphoma, a common complication of hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly. Although rare in Western countries, hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly deserves increased medical awareness to reduce the incidence of incorrect diagnosis, to prevent progression to splenic lymphoma and to avoid splenectomy. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Consistency of heart rate and sympathovagal reactivity across different autonomic contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, R P; Shapiro, P A; Bagiella, E; Fishkin, P E; Gorman, J M; Myers, M M

    1995-09-01

    Theories that psychophysiological reactivity constitutes a risk factor for coronary artery disease assume that reactivity is a consistent individual characteristic. We tested this assumption by measuring reactivity to three psychologically challenging tasks performed by 22 healthy subjects across different autonomic contexts produced by positional change. Dependent variables included heart rate (HR), low-frequency (LF; 0.04-0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (HF; 0.15-0.50 Hz) heart period variability, and the LF/HF ratio. HR (r = .44, p < .05) and LF/HF ratio (r = .48, p = .03) reactivity were modestly correlated across the different autonomic contexts, but HF and LF power reactivity were not. These findings suggest that HR reactivity to psychological challenge is a modestly consistent characteristic of individuals, despite differences in autonomic context. Although the same is true of cardiac sympathovagal balance, reactivity of HF and LF power were less consistent.

  11. Reactive sites influence in PMMA oligomers reactivity: a DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, C. V.; Vásquez, S. R.; Flores, N.; García, L.; Rico, J. L.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we present a theoretical study of methyl methacrylate (MMA) living anionic polymerization. The study was addressed to understanding two important experimental observations made for Michael Szwarc in 1956. The unexpected effect of reactive sites concentration in the propagation rate, and the self-killer behavior of MMA (deactivating of living anionic polymerization). The theoretical calculations were performed by density functional theory (DFT) to obtain the frontier molecular orbitals values. These values were used to calculate and analyze the chemical interaction descriptors in DFT-Koopmans’ theorem. As a result, it was observed that the longest chain-length species (related with low concentration of reactive sites) exhibit the highest reactivity (behavior associated with the increase of the propagation rate). The improvement in this reactivity was attributed to the crosslinking produced in the polymethyl methacrylate chains. Meanwhile, the self-killer behavior was associated with the intermolecular forces present in the reactive sites. This behavior was associated to an obstruction in solvation, since the active sites remained active through all propagation species. The theoretical results were in good agreement with the Szwarc experiments.

  12. C-reactive protein and bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Jørgensen, P E; Nexø, E

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to review published articles on the diagnostic accuracy of C-reactive protein (CRP) tests with cerebrospinal fluid and serum in diagnosing bacterial meningitis. The literature from 1980 and onwards was searched using the electronic databases of MEDLINE, and we used summary...... measured in serum, and 4 in which it had been measured in both cerebrospinal fluid and serum. The odds ratio for bacterial meningitis versus aseptic meningitis for a positive CRP test with cerebrospinal fluid was estimated at 241 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 59-980), and the central tendencies.......06-0.08, respectively, the post-test probability of not having bacterial meningitis given a negative test is very high (> or = 97%), in the range of a pre-test probability (prevalence of bacterial meningitis) from 10 to 30%, whereas the post-test probability of bacterial meningitis given a positive test is considerably...

  13. Affective reactivity to daily stressors is associated with elevated inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Nancy L; Graham-Engeland, Jennifer E; Ong, Anthony D; Almeida, David M

    2015-12-01

    Inflammation increases the risk of chronic diseases, but the links between emotional responses to daily events and inflammation are unknown. We examined individual differences in affective reactivity to daily stressors (i.e., changes in positive and negative affect in response to stressors) as predictors of inflammatory markers interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP). A cross-sectional sample of 872 adults from the National Study of Daily Experiences (substudy of Midlife in the United States II) reported daily stressors and affect during telephone interviews for 8 days. Blood samples were obtained at a separate clinic visit and assayed for inflammatory markers. Multilevel models estimated trait affective reactivity slopes for each participant, which were inputted into regression models to predict inflammation. People who experienced greater decreases in positive affect on days when stressors occurred (i.e., positive affect reactivity) had elevated log IL-6, independent of demographic, physical, psychological, and behavioral factors (B = 1.12, SE = 0.45, p = .01). Heightened negative affect reactivity was associated with higher log CRP among women (p = .03) but not men (p = .57); health behaviors accounted for this association in women. Adults who fail to maintain positive affect when faced with minor stressors in everyday life appear to have elevated levels of IL-6, a marker of inflammation. Women who experience increased negative affect when faced with minor stressors may be at particular risk of elevated inflammation. These findings add to growing evidence regarding the health implications of affective reactivity to daily stressors. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Therapy Provider Phase Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Therapy Provider Phase Information dataset is a tool for providers to search by their National Provider Identifier (NPI) number to determine their phase for...

  15. Reactive system verification case study: Fault-tolerant transputer communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, D. Francis; Hamory, Philip J.

    1993-01-01

    A reactive program is one which engages in an ongoing interaction with its environment. A system which is controlled by an embedded reactive program is called a reactive system. Examples of reactive systems are aircraft flight management systems, bank automatic teller machine (ATM) networks, airline reservation systems, and computer operating systems. Reactive systems are often naturally modeled (for logical design purposes) as a composition of autonomous processes which progress concurrently and which communicate to share information and/or to coordinate activities. Formal (i.e., mathematical) frameworks for system verification are tools used to increase the users' confidence that a system design satisfies its specification. A framework for reactive system verification includes formal languages for system modeling and for behavior specification and decision procedures and/or proof-systems for verifying that the system model satisfies the system specifications. Using the Ostroff framework for reactive system verification, an approach to achieving fault-tolerant communication between transputers was shown to be effective. The key components of the design, the decoupler processes, may be viewed as discrete-event-controllers introduced to constrain system behavior such that system specifications are satisfied. The Ostroff framework was also effective. The expressiveness of the modeling language permitted construction of a faithful model of the transputer network. The relevant specifications were readily expressed in the specification language. The set of decision procedures provided was adequate to verify the specifications of interest. The need for improved support for system behavior visualization is emphasized.

  16. Reactivity to nicotine cues over repeated cue reactivity sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRowe, Steven D.; Saladin, Michael E.; Carpenter, Matthew J.; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated whether reactivity to nicotine-related cues would attenuate across four experimental sessions held one week apart. Participants were nineteen non-treatment seeking, nicotine-dependent males. Cue reactivity sessions were performed in an outpatient research center using in vivo cues consisting of standardized smoking-related paraphernalia (e.g., cigarettes) and neutral comparison paraphernalia (e.g., pencils). Craving ratings were collected before and after both cue presentations while physiological measures (heart rate, skin conductance) were collected before and during the cue presentations. Although craving levels decreased across sessions, smoking-related cues consistently evoked significantly greater increases in craving relative to neutral cues over all four experimental sessions. Skin conductance was higher in response to smoking cues, though this effect was not as robust as that observed for craving. Results suggest that, under the described experimental parameters, craving can be reliably elicited over repeated cue reactivity sessions. PMID:17537583

  17. Position in Educational Activity and Empathy Ability in Adolescence and Teenage Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimenkova E.N.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of the relationship between empathy and learning activity position in adolescence and young. We present the results of empirical research of 78 assisting professions students (psychologists and teachers and 42 Polytechnic College students with the techniques of studying empathic abilities (questionnaire of the Interpersonal Reactivity Index of M. Davis in the adaptation of TD Karyagina, projective technique "Consolation Strategies" Vasiluk and EV Sheryagina, processing in the modification of AB Kholmogorova, and the the subject position (the questionnaire "Subject Position in studying activity" by Yu.V. Zaretsky and V.K. Zaretsky. Students less likely to use emotional support, the objective position is more clearly expressed and less subjective in relation to learning activity. Subjects with a subjective learning activity position have stronger empathy, perspective taking and the ability to provide support. Subjects with a subject position often use emotional support.

  18. Reactive arthritis--the appropriate name.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynan, Yoav; Rimar, Doron

    2008-04-01

    Reiter's syndrome is an eponym used to denote the triad of arthritis, urethritis and conjunctivitis. This syndrome is named after Hans Conrad Julius Reiter, who was involved in the activities of the Nazi Racial Hygiene Program related to involuntary sterilization, euthanasia and criminal research projects. Reiter defamed the entire medical profession and it was therefore suggested that the term Reiter's syndrome be changed to reactive arthritis. We undertook to investigate the use of the eponym Reiter syndrome in medical literature, medical schools in Israel and medical textbooks, compared to the term reactive arthritis, by searching Medline between the years 2003 and 2007, 14 current medical textbooks, curricula of the four medical schools in Israel, and computerized patient file systems in Israel. We found a decline in the use of the eponym in articles published between 2003 (18%) and 2007 (9%); however, most textbooks (13/14) still use it. Two of the four medical schools in Israel continue to use the eponym. The eponym appears in the computerized patient files of all four healthcare providers in Israel. We hold that the continued use of the eponym Reiter syndrome in medical textbooks, medical schools and computerized patients files in Israel is honoring an abomination and is inconsistent with medical principles. Awareness is still lacking and we suggest deleting the Reiter syndrome eponym from use, and replacing it with the more appropriate term--reactive arthritis.

  19. The diffusion-active permeable reactive barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Alex O; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2010-03-01

    Using the biogeochemical model CCBATCH, which we expanded to include transport processes, we study a novel approach for the treatment of aquifers contaminated with toxic concentrations of metals, the diffusion-active permeable reactive barrier (DAPRB), which is based on generation of sulfide by Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) as the groundwater moves through a layered treatment zone. In the DAPRB, layers of low conductivity (low-K) containing reactive materials are intercalated between layers of high conductivity (high-K) that transport the groundwater across the barrier. Because diffusion dominates transport in the reactive layers, microbial communities can take advantage there of the chemical-gradient mechanism for protection from toxicants. The ideal sulfidic DAPRB design includes particulate organic matter (POM) and solid sulfate mineral inside the reactive (low-K) layer. This leads to sulfate reduction and the formation of sulfide ligands that complex with toxic metals, such as Zn(2+) in the high-K layer. We perform a theoretical biogeochemical analysis of the ideal configuration of a DAPRB for treatment of Zn-contaminated groundwater. Our analysis using the expanded CCBATCH confirms the gradient-resistance mechanism for bio-protection, with the ZnS bio-sink forming at the intersection of the Zn and sulfide plumes inside the high-K layers of the DAPRB. The detailed DAPRB analysis also shows that total alkalinity and pH distributions are representative footprints of the two key biogeochemical processes taking place, sulfidogenesis and Zn immobilization as sulfide mineral. This is so because these two reactions consume or produce acidic hydrogen and alkalinity. Additionally, because Zn immobilization is due to ZnS mineral precipitation, the ZnS mineral distribution is a good indicator for the bio-sink. Bio-sinks are located for the most part within the high-K layers, and their exact position depends on the relative magnitude of metal and sulfide fluxes. Finally

  20. Altered Brain Reactivity to Game Cues After Gaming Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyeon Min; Chung, Hwan Jun; Kim, Sang Hee

    2015-08-01

    Individuals who play Internet games excessively show elevated brain reactivity to game-related cues. This study attempted to test whether this elevated cue reactivity observed in game players is a result of repeated exposure to Internet games. Healthy young adults without a history of excessively playing Internet games were recruited, and they were instructed to play an online Internet game for 2 hours/day for five consecutive weekdays. Two control groups were used: the drama group, which viewed a fantasy TV drama, and the no-exposure group, which received no systematic exposure. All participants performed a cue reactivity task with game, drama, and neutral cues in the brain scanner, both before and after the exposure sessions. The game group showed an increased reactivity to game cues in the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). The degree of VLPFC activation increase was positively correlated with the self-reported increase in desire for the game. The drama group showed an increased cue reactivity in response to the presentation of drama cues in the caudate, posterior cingulate, and precuneus. The results indicate that exposure to either Internet games or TV dramas elevates the reactivity to visual cues associated with the particular exposure. The exact elevation patterns, however, appear to differ depending on the type of media experienced. How changes in each of the regions contribute to the progression to pathological craving warrants a future longitudinal study.

  1. Competition of Reactive red 4, Reactive orange 16 and Basic blue 3 during biosorption of Reactive blue 4 by polysulfone-immobilized Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayaraghavan, K. [Division of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Research Institute of Industrial Technology, Chonbuk National University, Chonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: drkvijy@chonbuk.ac.kr; Yun, Yeoung-Sang [Division of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Research Institute of Industrial Technology, Chonbuk National University, Chonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: ysyun@chonbuk.ac.kr

    2008-05-01

    Competition of Reactive red 4 (RR4), Reactive orange 16 (RO16) and Basic blue 3 (BB3) during biosorption of Reactive blue 4 (RB4) by polysulfone-immobilized protonated Corynebacterium glutamicum (PIPC) was investigated in batch and column mode of operations. Through potentiometric titrations, and with the aid of proton-binding model, carboxyl, phosphonate and amine were identified as functional groups of PIPC, with apparent pK{sub a} values of 3.47 {+-} 0.05, 7.08 {+-} 0.07 and 9.90 {+-} 0.05 mmol/g, respectively. Since reactive dyes release dye anions (ROSO{sub 3}{sup -}) in solutions, the positively charged amine groups were responsible for biosorption. PIPC favored biosorption at pH 3 when RB4 was studied/used as single-solute; while the presence of RR4 and RO16 severely affected the RB4 biosorption. When present as a single-solute, PIPC recorded 184.5 mg RB4/g; while PIPC exhibited 126.9, 120.9 and 169.6 mg RB4/g in the presence of RR4, RO16 and BB3, respectively. In general, the accessibility of amine group depends on the molecular size, number of sulfonate groups and reactivity of each reactive dye. Single and multicomponent Freundlich equations successfully described the biosorption isotherms. With 0.1 M NaOH, it is possible to reuse PIPC for RB4 biosorption in 10 repeated cycles. Column experiments in an up-flow packed column coincided with batch results, that is PIPC showed strong preference towards highly reactive and relatively small RB4 anions; however, the presence of competing dyes hinder the RB4 column biosorption performance.

  2. You and Your Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reduce Font Size 100% Increase Font Size Positive Spin Basics Federal Response Digital Tools Events Blog Home ... AIDS and Aging Awareness Day AHRQ Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality AIDS 2012 International AIDS Conference 2012 ...

  3. Reactivity in pain-free subjects and a clinical pain population: evaluation of the Kohn Reactivity Scale-dutch Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuijzen, Dieuwke S; Noordermeer, Siri D S; van Wijck, Albert J M; Snijders, Tom J; Geenen, Rinie

    2013-07-01

    Patients with pain are more reactive to various types of sensations, not limited to pain alone. A potential useful instrument to assess reactivity is the Kohn Reactivity Scale (KRS). This study examines the psychometric characteristics of the KRS-Dutch version and its ability to differentiate between subjects with and without pain. Internal consistency, convergent validity, and test-retest reliability of the Dutch translation of the KRS were assessed in 321 pain-free control subjects and different subgroups of this sample. Subsequently, reactivity scores were compared between the pain-free subjects and 291 pain patients who were referred to a pain clinic for treatment. Reliability analyses indicated good internal consistency (α ≥ 0.77) and high test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation = 0.95) of the KRS in the control subjects. Validity analyses yielded positive correlations of the KRS with related constructs like pain vigilance and awareness (r = 0.37), symptom severity (r = 0.29), and the personality characteristic neuroticism (r = 0.20). Pain patients had overall significantly higher KRS scores than the pain-free subjects indicating increased reactivity, particularly for the patients with medically unexplained pain. These findings indicate that the KRS is a useful instrument to screen for reactivity in pain patients, which may be of particular relevance for those suffering from medically unexplained pain. © 2012 The Authors Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  4. beta-Aminoalcohols as Potential Reactivators of Aged Sarin-/Soman-Inhibited Acetylcholinesterase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-08

    against soman. To estimate the efficiency of aged AChE reactivation with molecule 2, one would need to Figure 3. Steps and energetics of aged sarin...This approach includes high- quality quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calcula- tions, providing reliable reactivation steps and energetics ...assess the steps and energetics of aged AChE reactivation. Details of the approach are provided in the Supporting Information. The final stage of the

  5. CRANE POSITIONING APPARATUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsiedel, F.W.; Wolff, H.

    1960-06-28

    An apparatus is described for automatically accomplishing the final accurate horizontal positioning of a crane after the latter has been placed to within 1/8 in. of its selected position. For this purpose there is provided a tiltable member on the crane mast for lowering into contact with a stationary probe. Misalignment of the tiltable member, with respect to the probe as the member is lowered, causes tilting of the latter to actuate appropriate switches that energize motors for bringing the mast into proper position. When properly aligned the member is not tilted and a central switch is actuated to indicate the final alignment of the crane.

  6. Position paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Papadakis, Michael; Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Sports cardiology is a new and rapidly evolving subspecialty. It aims to elucidate the cardiovascular effects of regular exercise and delineate its benefits and risks, so that safe guidance can be provided to all individuals engaging in sports and/or physical activity in order to attain the maximum...... potential benefit at the lowest possible risk. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) advocates systematic preparticipation cardiovascular screening in an effort to identify competitive athletes at risk of exercise-related cardiovascular events and sudden cardiac death. However, the implementation...... of preparticipation screening is hindered because of lack of structured training and as a result lack of sufficient expertise in the field of sports cardiology. In 2008 the European Society of Cardiology published a core curriculum for the general cardiologist, in which sports cardiology was incorporated within...

  7. COAL SLAGGING AND REACTIVITY TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald P. McCollor; Kurt E. Eylands; Jason D. Laumb

    2003-10-01

    Union Fenosa's La Robla I Power Station is a 270-MW Foster Wheeler arch-fired system. The unit is located at the mine that provides a portion of the semianthracitic coal. The remaining coals used are from South Africa, Russia, Australia, and China. The challenges at the La Robla I Station stem from the various fuels used, the characteristics of which differ from the design coal. The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and the Lehigh University Energy Research Center (LUERC) undertook a program to assess problematic slagging and unburned carbon issues occurring at the plant. Full-scale combustion tests were performed under baseline conditions, with elevated oxygen level and with redistribution of air during a site visit at the plant. During these tests, operating information, observations and temperature measurements, and coal, slag deposit, and fly ash samples were obtained to assess slagging and unburned carbon. The slagging in almost all cases appeared due to elevated temperatures rather than fuel chemistry. The most severe slagging occurred when the temperature at the sampling port was in excess of 1500 C, with problematic slagging where first-observed temperatures exceeded 1350 C. The presence of anorthite crystals in the bulk of the deposits analyzed indicates that the temperatures were in excess of 1350 C, consistent with temperature measurements during the sampling period. Elevated temperatures and ''hot spots'' are probably the result of poor mill performance, and a poor distribution of the coal from the mills to the specific burners causes elevated temperatures in the regions where the slag samples were extracted. A contributing cause appeared to be poor combustion air mixing and heating, resulting in oxygen stratification and increased temperatures in certain areas. Air preheater plugging was observed and reduces the temperature of the air in the windbox, which leads to poor combustion

  8. [Reactive nitrogen and oxygen species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzanowska-Tarasiewicz, Helena; Kuźmicka, Ludmiła; Tarasiewicz, Mirosław

    2009-10-01

    Reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are mainly free radicals which including non-paired electrons. They are constantly formed as side products of biological reactions. They are also generated directly and indirectly by the cells which were exposed to environmental stress, i.e., UV radiation, ionizing radiation, xenobioticts, light-absorbing compounds, e.g., porphyrines. These factors, which are a source of free radicals, initiate a significant signaling cascade inducing many changes in cells, such as cancerogenic transformation or cell death. Cells protect themselves against oxidative stress by means of antioxidative enzymes and compounds which in their structure have redox sensitive spots.

  9. Reactive iron in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of reactive iron oxides on sediment pore-water chemistry is considered in detail. A carefully calibrated extraction scheme is used to determine the depth distributions of reactive iron phases at two very different localities: the relatively iron-rich Mississippi Delta and the relatively iron-poor FOAM site in Long Island Sound. Closed system incubations are used to characterize the rates of reaction between sulfide and both naturally occurring and pure iron mineral phases. Rates of iron liberation to pore solution are measured in the presence and absence of sulfate reduction, and the origin of dissolved iron in organic-rich sediments is speculated upon.

  10. Neural substrates of cue reactivity and craving in gambling disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbrick-Oldfield, E H; Mick, I; Cocks, R E; McGonigle, J; Sharman, S P; Goldstone, A P; Stokes, P R A; Waldman, A; Erritzoe, D; Bowden-Jones, H; Nutt, D; Lingford-Hughes, A; Clark, L

    2017-01-03

    Cue reactivity is an established procedure in addictions research for examining the subjective experience and neural basis of craving. This experiment sought to quantify cue-related brain responses in gambling disorder using personally tailored cues in conjunction with subjective craving, as well as a comparison with appetitive non-gambling stimuli. Participants with gambling disorder (n=19) attending treatment and 19 controls viewed personally tailored blocks of gambling-related cues, as well as neutral cues and highly appetitive (food) images during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan performed ~2-3 h after a usual meal. fMRI analysis examined cue-related brain activity, cue-related changes in connectivity and associations with block-by-block craving ratings. Craving ratings in the participants with gambling disorder increased following gambling cues compared with non-gambling cues. fMRI analysis revealed group differences in left insula and anterior cingulate cortex, with the gambling disorder group showing greater reactivity to the gambling cues, but no differences to the food cues. In participants with gambling disorder, craving to gamble correlated positively with gambling cue-related activity in the bilateral insula and ventral striatum, and negatively with functional connectivity between the ventral striatum and the medial prefrontal cortex. Gambling cues, but not food cues, elicit increased brain responses in reward-related circuitry in individuals with gambling disorder (compared with controls), providing support for the incentive sensitization theory of addiction. Activity in the insula co-varied with craving intensity, and may be a target for interventions.

  11. Titanium-Oxygen Reactivity Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafey, J. E.; Scheck, W. G.; Witzell, W. E.

    1962-01-01

    A program has been conducted at Astronautics to investigate the likelihood of occurrence of the catastrophic oxidation of titanium alloy sheet under conditions which simulate certain cases of accidental failure of the metal while it is in contact with liquid or gaseous oxygen. Three methods of fracturing the metal were used; they consisted of mechanical puncture, tensile fracture of welded joints, and perforation by very high velocity particles. The results of the tests which have been conducted provide further evidence of the reactivity of titanium with liquid and gaseous oxygen. The evidence indicates that the rapid fracturing of titanium sheet while it is in contact with oxygen initiates the catastrophic oxidation reaction. Initiation occurred when the speed of the fracture was some few feet per second, as in both the drop-weight puncture tests and the static tensile fracture tests of welded joints, as well as when the speed was several thousand feet per second, as in the simulated micrometeoroid penetration tests. The slow propagation of a crack, however, did not initiate the reaction. It may logically be concluded that the localized frictional heat of rapid fracture and/or spontaneous oxidation (exothermic) of minute particles emanating from the fracture cause initiation of the reaction. Under conditions of slow fracture, however, the small heat generated may be adequately dissipated and the reaction is not initiated. A portion of the study conducted consisted of investigating various means by which the reaction might be retarded or prevented. Providing a "barrier" at the titanium-oxygen interface consisting of either aluminum metal or a coating of a petroleum base corrosion inhibitor appeared to be only partially effective in retarding the reaction. The accidental puncturing or similar rupturing of thin-walled pressurized oxygen tanks on missiles and space vehicle will usually constitute loss of function, and may sometimes cause their catastrophic destruction

  12. Rituximab Administration and Reactivation of HBV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Tsutsumi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Rituximab is a drug used for the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and its range of use has expanded to the treatment of collagen diseases such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and rheumatoid arthritis. One serious complication of rituximab use is the reactivation of dormant hepatitis B virus, and prevention of this phenomenon has become an urgent issue. This paper provides a general outline of the problem through an analysis of patient cases that we and other groups have experienced to date.

  13. Flavanols and Platelet Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A. Pearson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet activity and platelet-endothelial cell interactions are important in the acute development of thrombosis, as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. An increasing number of foods have been reported to have platelet-inhibitory actions, and research with a number of flavanol-rich foods, including, grape juice, cocoa and chocolate, suggests that these foods may provide some protection against thrombosis. In the present report, we review a series of in vivo studies on the effects of flavanol-rich cocoa and chocolate on platelet activation and platelet-dependent primary hemostasis. Consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa inhibited several measures of platelet activity including, epinephrine- and ADP-induced glycoprotein (GP IIb/IIIa and P-Selectin expression, platelet microparticle formation, and epinephrine-collagen and ADP-collagen induced primary hemostasis. The epinephrine-induced inhibitory effects on GP IIb/IIIa and primary hemostasis were similar to, though less robust than those associated with the use of low dose (81 mg aspirin. These data, coupled with information from other studies, support the concept that flavanols present in cocoa and chocolate can modulate platelet function through a multitude of pathways.

  14. Cognitive Reactivity to Success and Failure Relate Uniquely to Manic and Depression Tendencies and Combine in Bipolar Tendencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Raes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined simultaneously the relations between cognitive reactivity to success and failure, on the one hand, and depression, manic, and bipolar tendencies, on the other hand. Participants (161 students completed measures of success and failure reactivity, current manic and depressive symptoms, and tendencies towards depression, mania, and bipolarity. Results showed that respondents with a greater tendency towards depression evidenced greater (negative reactivity to failure, whereas those with a greater tendency toward mania evidenced greater (positive reactivity to success. Depression vulnerability was unrelated to success reactivity, and manic vulnerability was unrelated to failure reactivity. Tendencies toward bipolarity correlated significantly with both failure and success reactivity in a negative and positive manner, respectively. These findings add to the growing body of literature, suggesting that different features or cognitive tendencies are related to depression vulnerability versus manic vulnerability and imply that these “mirrored” cognitive features both form part of vulnerability to bipolar disorder.

  15. Quantitative reactive modeling and verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzinger, Thomas A

    Formal verification aims to improve the quality of software by detecting errors before they do harm. At the basis of formal verification is the logical notion of correctness, which purports to capture whether or not a program behaves as desired. We suggest that the boolean partition of software into correct and incorrect programs falls short of the practical need to assess the behavior of software in a more nuanced fashion against multiple criteria. We therefore propose to introduce quantitative fitness measures for programs, specifically for measuring the function, performance, and robustness of reactive programs such as concurrent processes. This article describes the goals of the ERC Advanced Investigator Project QUAREM. The project aims to build and evaluate a theory of quantitative fitness measures for reactive models. Such a theory must strive to obtain quantitative generalizations of the paradigms that have been success stories in qualitative reactive modeling, such as compositionality, property-preserving abstraction and abstraction refinement, model checking, and synthesis. The theory will be evaluated not only in the context of software and hardware engineering, but also in the context of systems biology. In particular, we will use the quantitative reactive models and fitness measures developed in this project for testing hypotheses about the mechanisms behind data from biological experiments.

  16. Separability of local reactivity descriptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    There have been recent studies on the qualitative and quantitative description of these con- cepts and use of these in the selectivity of reactions in catalysis, adsorption and molecular recognition. Global reactivity descriptors (GRD), like softness, hardness and chemical potential along with concept of hard soft acid base ...

  17. Menstrual cycle and skin reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Damm, P; Skouby, S O

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that a cyclic variation exists in skin reactivity to irritant stimuli. Twenty-nine healthy women with regular menstrual cycles were challenged with sodium lauryl sulfate as an irritant patch test at day 1 and at days 9 through 11 of the menstrual cycle. The skin response...

  18. Monoamine Oxidase A (MAOA) and Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) Gene Polymorphisms Interact with Maternal Parenting in Association with Adolescent Reactive Aggression but not Proactive Aggression: Evidence of Differential Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenxin; Cao, Cong; Wang, Meiping; Ji, Linqin; Cao, Yanmiao

    2016-04-01

    To date, whether and how gene-environment (G × E) interactions operate differently across distinct subtypes of aggression remains untested. More recently, in contrast with the diathesis-stress hypothesis, an alternative hypothesis of differential susceptibility proposes that individuals could be differentially susceptible to environments depending on their genotypes in a "for better and for worse" manner. The current study examined interactions between monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) T941G and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphisms with maternal parenting on two types of aggression: reactive and proactive. Moreover, whether these potential G × E interactions would be consistent with the diathesis-stress versus the differential susceptibility hypothesis was tested. Within the sample of 1399 Chinese Han adolescents (47.2 % girls, M age = 12.32 years, SD = 0.50), MAOA and COMT genes both interacted with positive parenting in their associations with reactive but not proactive aggression. Adolescents with T alleles/TT homozygotes of MAOA gene or Met alleles of COMT gene exhibited more reactive aggression when exposed to low positive parenting, but less reactive aggression when exposed to high positive parenting. These findings provide the first evidence for distinct G × E interaction effects on reactive versus proactive aggression and lend further support for the differential susceptibility hypothesis.

  19. Preferred provider organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, J D

    1984-05-01

    The 1980s has marked the beginning of a new alternative health care delivery system: the preferred provider organization ( PPO ). This system has developed from the health maintenance organization model and is predominant in California and Colorado. A PPO is a group of providers, usually hospitals and doctors, who agree to provide health care to subscribers for a negotiated fee that is usually discounted. Preferred provider organizations are subject to peer review and strict use controls in exchange for a consistent volume of patients and speedy turnaround on claims payments. This article describes the factors leading to the development of PPOs and the implications for occupational therapy.

  20. RSA Reactivity in Current and Remitted Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylsma, Lauren M.; Salomon, Kristen; Taylor-Clift, April; Morris, Bethany H.; Rottenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Low resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) levels and blunted RSA reactivity are thought to index impaired emotion regulation capacity. Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) has been associated with abberant RSA reactivity and recovery to a speech stressor task relative to healthy controls. Whether impaired RSA functioning reflects aspects of the depressed mood state or a stable vulnerability marker for depression is unknown. Methods We compared resting RSA and RSA reactivity between individuals with MDD (n=49), remitted depression (RMD, n=24), and healthy controls (n=45). ECG data were collected during a resting baseline, a paced-breathing baseline, and two reactivity tasks (speech stressor, cold exposure). Results A group by time quadratic effect emerged (F=4.36(2,109), p=.015) for RSA across phases of the speech stressor (baseline, instruction, preparation, speech, recovery). Follow-up analyses revealed that those with MDD uniquely exhibited blunted RSA reactivity, whereas RMD and controls both exhibited normal task-related vagal withdrawal and post-task recovery. The group by time interaction remained after covariation for age, sex, waist circumference, physical activity, and respiration, but not sleep quality. Conclusions These results provide new evidence that abberant RSA reactivity marks features that track the depressed state, such as poor sleep, rather than a stable trait evident among asymtomatic persons. PMID:24367127

  1. Nickel patch test reactivity and the menstrual cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohold, A E; Halkier-Sørensen, L; Thestrup-Pedersen, K

    1994-01-01

    Premenstrual exacerbation of allergic contact dermatitis and varying allergic patch test responses have been reported at different points of the period. Using a dilution series of nickel sulphate, we studied the variation in patch test reactivity in nickel allergic women in relation...... were tested first on day 7-10 and the other half first on day 20-24. There was no difference in the degree of patch test reactivity, when the results from day 7-10 and day 20-24 were compared (p > 0.4). However, when we compared the patch test results from the first and second test procedure, we found...... of positive patch tests led to an increased skin reactivity towards the same allergen, when the patients were retested weeks later....

  2. Emotional reactivity to valence-loaded stimuli are related to treatment response of neurocognitive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne; De Raedt, Rudi; Namur, Victoria; Valiengo, Leandro C L; Lotufo, Paulo A; Bensenor, Isabela M; Baeken, Chris; Boggio, Paulo S; Brunoni, Andre R

    2016-01-15

    Emotional Context Insensitivity (ECI) is a psychological feature observed in depressed patients characterized by a decreased emotional reactivity when presented to positive- and negative valence-loaded stimuli. Given that fronto-cingulate-limbic circuits are implicated in abnormal reactivity to valence-loaded stimuli, neurocognitive treatments engaging the prefrontal cortex may be able to modulate this emotional blunting observed in MDD. Therefore, our goal was to evaluate emotional reactivity in depressed patients before and after a combination of neurocognitive interventions that engage the prefrontal cortex (cognitive control training and/or transcranial direct current stimulation). In line with the premises of the ECI framework, before the start of the antidepressant intervention, patients showed blunted emotional reactivity after exposure to negative valence-loaded stimuli. This emotional reactivity pattern changed after 9 sessions of the intervention: positive affect decreased and negative affect increased after watching a series of negative valence-loaded stimuli (i.e. images). Interestingly, higher emotional reactivity (as indexed by a larger increase in negative affect after watching the valence-loaded stimuli) at baseline predicted reductions in depression symptoms after the intervention. On the other hand, higher emotional reactivity (as indexed by a decrease in positive affect) after the intervention was marginally associated with reductions in depression symptoms. To conclude, emotional reactivity increased after the neurocognitive antidepressant intervention and it was directly associated to the degree of depression improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Measurements of total OH reactivity during PROPHET-AMOS 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusanter, S.; Sigler, P. S. R.; Stevens, P. S.; Bottorff, B.; Lew, M.; Sklaveniti, S.; Leonardis, T.; Locoge, N.

    2016-12-01

    As the main oxidant in the daytime atmosphere, the hydroxyl radical (OH) initiates the oxidation of organic trace gases and the formation of pollutants such as ozone and secondary organic aerosols. Understanding both the sources and sinks of OH is therefore important to address issues related to air quality and climate change. However, previous measurements of the total loss frequency of OH, also referred to as total OH reactivity have found discrepancies between measured values and those calculated from collocated measurements of OH radical sinks, especially in forested environments characterized by high concentrations of biogenic volatile organic carbon (BVOCs). Additional measurements of total OH reactivity together with measurements of BVOCs are needed to understand the source of this missing reactivity and to further constrain atmospheric chemistry models. Measurements of total OH reactivity were performed during the PROPHET 2016 - AMOS field campaign (Program for Research on Oxidants: PHotochemisty, Emissions, & Transport - Atmospheric Measurements of Oxidants in Summer) using the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) and the Total OH Loss Rate Method (TOHLM). The monitoring site, a Northen Michigan forest where previous measurements of total OH reactivity revealed an incomplete understanding of OH sinks, is characterized by large emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes and a low impact of anthropogenic emissions. In this presentation, we will show a comparison of the two methods to assess the reliability of OH reactivity measurements in this environment. In addition, concomitant measurements of volatile organic compounds and inorganic species were used to perform a comprehensive apportionment of OH sinks. We will provide insights into the OH reactivity budget and will show how it compares to previous studies performed at the same site.

  4. Building Service Provider Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Kristin; Jaura, Manya; Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.

    In this paper we study whether and how the interaction between clients and the service providers contributes to the development of capabilities in service provider firms. In situations where such a contribution occurs, we analyze how different types of activities in the production process...

  5. Providing free autopoweroff plugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Lynge; Hansen, Lars Gårn; Fjordbak, Troels

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidence of the effect of providing households with cheap energy saving technology is sparse. We present results from a field experiment in which autopoweroff plugs were provided free of charge to randomly selected households. We use propensity score matching to find treatment effects...

  6. Speciation of OH reactivity above the canopy of an isoprene-dominated forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kaiser

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of OH reactivity, the inverse lifetime of the OH radical, can provide a top–down estimate of the total amount of reactive carbon in an air mass. Using a comprehensive measurement suite, we examine the measured and modeled OH reactivity above an isoprene-dominated forest in the southeast United States during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS field campaign. Measured and modeled species account for the vast majority of average daytime reactivity (80–95 % and a smaller portion of nighttime and early morning reactivity (68–80 %. The largest contribution to total reactivity consistently comes from primary biogenic emissions, with isoprene contributing ∼  60 % in the afternoon, and ∼  30–40 % at night and monoterpenes contributing ∼  15–25 % at night. By comparing total reactivity to the reactivity stemming from isoprene alone, we find that ∼  20 % of the discrepancy is temporally related to isoprene reactivity, and an additional constant ∼  1 s−1 offset accounts for the remaining portion. The model typically overestimates measured OVOC concentrations, indicating that unmeasured oxidation products are unlikely to influence measured OH reactivity. Instead, we suggest that unmeasured primary emissions may influence the OH reactivity at this site.

  7. Applicability of DFT model in reactive distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, Maciej

    2017-11-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) applicability to reactive distillation is discussed. Brief modeling techniques description of distillation and rectification with chemical reaction is provided as a background for quantum method usage description. The equilibrium and nonequilibrium distillation models are described for that purpose. The DFT quantum theory is concisely described. The usage of DFT in the modeling of reactive distillation is described in two parts. One of the fundamental and very important component of distillation modeling is vapor-liquid equilibrium description for which the DFT quantum approach can be used. The representative DFT models, namely COSMO-RS (Conductor like Screening Model for Real Solvents), COSMOSPACE (COSMO Surface Pair Activity Coefficient) and COSMO-SAC (SAC - segment activity coefficient) approaches are described. The second part treats the way in which the chemical reaction is described by means of quantum DFT method. The intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) method is described which is used to find minimum energy path of substrates to products transition. The DFT is one of the methods which can be used for that purpose. The literature data examples are provided which proves that IRC method is applicable for chemical reaction kinetics description.

  8. Reactive Arthritis Caused by Yersinia enterocolitica Enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Kazuya; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Tsuji, Yoshika; Kawahara, Chieko; Michitsuji, Toru; Higashi, Shuntaro; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of reactive arthritis (ReA) triggered by Yersinia enterocolitica enteritis. A 24-year-old Japanese man developed polyarthritis in the lower limbs. Two weeks prior to these symptoms, he noted diarrhea, right lower abdominal pain and a fever. Y. enterocolitica was not isolated from a stool culture; however, he was diagnosed with ReA based on the colonoscopic findings of a high anti-Y. enterocolitica antibody titer and HLA-B27 antigen positivity. Following treatment with methotrexate and steroids, his arthritis improved. This is the first reported Japanese case of ReA in the English literature after a gastrointestinal infection caused by Y. enterocolitica.

  9. A case of subungual reactive eccrine syringofibroadenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunis, A; Andre, J; Forton, F; Wanet, J; Song, M

    2001-01-01

    Eccrine syringofibroadenoma (ESFA) is a rare eccrine tumor. We report the case of a 70-year-old woman who had presented a pincer nail deformity on the toes for 55 years and a left painless subungual tumor for 2 years. Histologic examination revealed branching anastomosing strands of epithelial cells with ductal structures in a fibrovascular stroma. The luminal cells showed positive staining for carcinoembryonic antigen, as in acrosyringeal cells and cells of dermal ducts. To our knowledge, our case is the first with a subungual location. In the context of chronic trauma due to a pincer nail, it may be classified in the reactive subtype recently described. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  10. Serial follow-up of repeat voluntary blood donors reactive for anti-HCV ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhury N

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Voluntary non-remunerated repeat blood donors are perceived to be safer than the first time blood donors. This study was planned for follow-up of previous hepatitis C virus (HCV test results of anti-HCV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA reactive repeat blood donors. The aim was to suggest a protocol for re-entry of the blood donors who are confirmed HCV negative by nucleic acid test (NAT and recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA. A group of repeat voluntary donors were followed retrospectively who became reactive on a cross sectional study and showed HCV reactivity while donating blood regularly. Material and Methods: A total of 51,023 voluntary non remunerated blood donors were screened for anti-HCV ELISA routinely. If anybody showed positivity, they were tested by two ELISA kits (screening and confirmatory and then confirmed infection status by NAT and or RIBA. The previous HCV test results of repeat donors reactive by anti-HCV ELISA were looked back from the records. Data of donors who were repeat reactive with single ELISA kit (in the present study were analyzed separately from those reactive with two ELISA kits (in the present study. Results: In this study, 140 (0.27% donors who were reactive by anti HCV ELISA were included. Out of them, 35 were repeat voluntary donors and 16 (11.43% were reactive with single ELISA kit. All 16 donors were reactive by single ELISA kit occasionally in previous donations. Their present ELISA positive donations were negative for HCV NAT and RIBA. A total of 19 (13.57% donors were reactive with two ELISA kits. In their previous donations, the donors who were reactive even once with two ELISA kits were consistently reactive by the same two ELISA kits in their next donations also. Conclusion: Donor sample reactive by only single ELISA kit may not be considered as infectious for disposal as they were negative by NAT and or RIBA. One time ELISA positivity was found probably due to ELISA kit

  11. Characteristics of HPV-specific antibody responses induced by infection and vaccination: cross-reactivity, neutralizing activity, avidity and IgG subclasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherpenisse, Mirte; Schepp, Rutger M; Mollers, Madelief; Meijer, Chris J L M; Berbers, Guy A M; van der Klis, Fiona R M

    2013-01-01

    In order to assess HPV-specific IgG characteristics, we evaluated multiple aspects of the humoral antibody response that will provide insight in the HPV humoral immune response induced by HPV infection and vaccination. Cross-reactivity of HPV-specific antibodies induced by infection or vaccination was assessed with VLP16 or 18 inhibition using a VLP-based multiplex immunoassay (MIA) for HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58. HPV16/18 specific IgG1-4 subclasses and avidity were determined with the VLP-MIA in sera after HPV infection and after vaccination. Neutralizing antibodies were determined in a small subset of single-seropositive and multi-seropositive naturally derived antibodies. Naturally derived antibodies from single-positive sera were highly genotype-specific as homologue VLP-inhibition percentages varied between 78-94%. In multi-positive sera, cross-reactive antibodies were observed both within and between α7 and α9 species. After vaccination, cross-reactive antibodies were mainly species-specific. Avidity of vaccine-derived HPV-specific antibodies was 3 times higher than that of antibodies induced by HPV infection (pHPV infection and vaccination. In the small subset tested, the number of single-positive sera with neutralizing capacity was higher than of multi-positive sera. Naturally derived HPV-specific antibodies from single-positive samples showed different characteristics in terms of cross-reactivity and neutralizing capacity compared with antibodies from multi-positive sera. Post-vaccination, HPV antibody avidity was approximately 3 times higher than antibody avidity induced by HPV infection. Therefore, antibody avidity might be a potential surrogate of protection.

  12. Characteristics of HPV-specific antibody responses induced by infection and vaccination: cross-reactivity, neutralizing activity, avidity and IgG subclasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirte Scherpenisse

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: In order to assess HPV-specific IgG characteristics, we evaluated multiple aspects of the humoral antibody response that will provide insight in the HPV humoral immune response induced by HPV infection and vaccination. METHODS: Cross-reactivity of HPV-specific antibodies induced by infection or vaccination was assessed with VLP16 or 18 inhibition using a VLP-based multiplex immunoassay (MIA for HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58. HPV16/18 specific IgG1-4 subclasses and avidity were determined with the VLP-MIA in sera after HPV infection and after vaccination. Neutralizing antibodies were determined in a small subset of single-seropositive and multi-seropositive naturally derived antibodies. RESULTS: Naturally derived antibodies from single-positive sera were highly genotype-specific as homologue VLP-inhibition percentages varied between 78-94%. In multi-positive sera, cross-reactive antibodies were observed both within and between α7 and α9 species. After vaccination, cross-reactive antibodies were mainly species-specific. Avidity of vaccine-derived HPV-specific antibodies was 3 times higher than that of antibodies induced by HPV infection (p<0.0001. IgG1 and IgG3 were found to be the predominant subclasses observed after HPV infection and vaccination. In the small subset tested, the number of single-positive sera with neutralizing capacity was higher than of multi-positive sera. CONCLUSION: Naturally derived HPV-specific antibodies from single-positive samples showed different characteristics in terms of cross-reactivity and neutralizing capacity compared with antibodies from multi-positive sera. Post-vaccination, HPV antibody avidity was approximately 3 times higher than antibody avidity induced by HPV infection. Therefore, antibody avidity might be a potential surrogate of protection.

  13. Preliminary Analysis on Reactivity Insertion Transient of Natural Circulation Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Hyung Min [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Kune Yull [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    When a malfunction of the reactor control system occurs, there's a chance that the positive reactivity is inserted into the core, resulting in the increase of the core power. With the combination of the failure of the related safety features, this may raise the temperature of the core material beyond the design limit to break its integrity. For the fast nuclear reactors like FFTF and CRBRP, the overpower trip is initiated when the power reaches 115% of rated value to keep the fuel from melting. In this study, the system response to the reactivity insertion transient on a liquid metal cooled natural circulation reactor is analyzed utilizing an in-house code based on a momentum integral model. Utilizing an in-house system analysis code, a set of numerical simulation is carried out on the reactivity ramp insertion transients which showed that the role of reactivity feedback is significant in mitigating the time to failure, and the evolution of the natural circulation mass flow is rather slow to generate meaningful feedback effect. It is also observed that in terms of the peak cladding temperature, smaller reactivity insertion transient generated more severe outcome owing to increased accumulation of the thermal energy within fuel pins. Thus, it may require an extra attention to carefully monitor and capture the mild transients to avoid potential drastic results.

  14. A case of false-positive test results in a pregnant woman of unknown HIV status at delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Pascale; Blick, Kenneth E

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a false-positive HIV result in an apparently healthy pregnant woman. Since no prenatal HIV testing had been performed, we screened for HIV reactivity utilizing the Architect HIV-Ag/Ab Combo assay. Results obtained were inconsistent in that they were repeatedly HIV reactive on a single serum sample while nonreactive on a plasma sample. However, both sample types were nonreactive on the Advia Centaur HIV-1/O/2 and Oraquick assays. For further confirmation, an HIV-1 Western blot and viral load were performed; blot results were indeterminate while the viral load was undetectable. We concluded that the repeatedly reactive serum serology results were false-positive. While the cause of this false reactivity is not clear, most likely fibrin microclots in the serum sample interfered with the assay and thus accounted for the false positivity. Plasma may thus provide a more appropriate sample type when using the Architect assay, especially when testing pregnant women. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP).

  15. Framework for reactive mass transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Mønster; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2014-01-01

    Reactive transport modeling is applicable for a range of porous materials. Here the modeling framework is focused on cement-based materials, where ion diffusion and migration are described by the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equation system. A two phase vapor/liquid flow model, with a sorption hysteresis...... for aqueous, pure phase and solid solution reactions. Numerical examples, with cement-based materials, are constructed to demonstrate transient phase change modeling. A simulation of pure multi-species leaching from the material, showing deterioration of the solid phases is described and calculated. A second...... simulation, showing multi-species ingress with formation of new solid phases in the domain is described and calculated. It is shown that the numerical solution method is capable of solving the reactive mass transport system for the examples considered. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  16. Melioidosis: reactivation during radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegasothy, B.V.; Goslen, J.B.; Salvatore, M.A.

    1980-05-01

    Melioidosis is caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei, a gram-negative, motile bacillus which is a naturally occurring soil saprophyte. The organism is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Philippines, Australia, and parts of Central and South America. Most human disease occurs from infection acquired in these countries. Infection with P pseudomallei may produce no apparent clinical disease. Acute pneumonitis or septicemia may result from inhalation of the organism, and inoculation into sites of trauma may cause localized skin abscesses, or the disease may remain latent and be reactivated months or years later by trauma, burns, or pneumococcal pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis, influenza, or bronchogenic carcinoma. The last is probably the commonest form of melioidosis seen in the United States. We present the first case of reactivation of melioidosis after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the lung, again emphasizing the need to consider melioidosis in a septic patient with a history of travel, especially to Southeast Asia.

  17. A Search of Reactivated Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Quan-Zhi

    2017-05-01

    Dormant or near-dormant short-period comets can unexpectedly regain the ability to eject dust. In many known cases, the resurrection is short-lived and lasts less than one orbit. However, it is possible that some resurrected comets can remain active in later perihelion passages. We search the archival images of various facilities to look for these “reactivated” comets. We identify two candidates, 297P/Beshore and 332P/Ikeya-Murakami, both of which were found to be inactive or weakly active in the previous orbit before their discovery. We derive a reactivation rate of ˜ 0.007 {{comet}}-1 {{orbit}}-1, which implies that typical short-period comets only become temporarily dormant a few times or less. Smaller comets are prone to rotational instability and may undergo temporary dormancy more frequently. Next generation high-cadence surveys may find more reactivation events of these comets.

  18. Mesoscopic Modeling of Reactive Transport Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Q.; Chen, L.; Deng, H.

    2012-12-01

    Reactive transport processes involving precipitation and/or dissolution are pervasive in geochemical, biological and engineered systems. Typical examples include self-assembled patterns such as Liesegang rings or bands, cones of stalactites in limestones caves, biofilm growth in aqueous environment, formation of mineral deposits in boilers and heat exchangers, uptake of toxic metal ions from polluted water by calcium carbonate, and mineral trapping of CO2. Compared to experimental studies, a numerical approach enables a systematic study of the reaction kinetics, mass transport, and mechanisms of nucleation and crystal growth, and hence provides a detailed description of reactive transport processes. In this study, we enhance a previously developed lattice Boltzmann pore-scale model by taking into account the nucleation process, and develop a mesoscopic approach to simulate reactive transport processes involving precipitation and/or dissolution of solid phases. The model is then used to simulate the formation of Liesegang precipitation patterns and investigate the effects of gel on the morphology of the precipitates. It is shown that this model can capture the porous structures of the precipitates and can account for the effects of the gel concentration and material. A wide range of precipitation patterns is predicted under different gel concentrations, including regular bands, treelike patterns, and for the first time with numerical models, transition patterns from regular bands to treelike patterns. The model is also applied to study the effect of secondary precipitate on the dissolution of primary mineral. Several types of dissolution and precipitation processes are identified based on the morphology and structures of the precipitates and on the extent to which the precipitates affect the dissolution of the primary mineral. Finally the model is applied to study the formation of pseudomorph. It is demonstrated for the first time by numerical simulation that a

  19. Reactive polymer fused deposition manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunc, Vlastimil; Rios, Orlando; Love, Lonnie J.; Duty, Chad E.; Johs, Alexander

    2017-05-16

    Methods and compositions for additive manufacturing that include reactive or thermosetting polymers, such as urethanes and epoxies. The polymers are melted, partially cross-linked prior to the depositing, deposited to form a component object, solidified, and fully cross-linked. These polymers form networks of chemical bonds that span the deposited layers. Application of a directional electromagnetic field can be applied to aromatic polymers after deposition to align the polymers for improved bonding between the deposited layers.

  20. Brachial artery reactivity in patients with severe sepsis: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Wexler, Orren; M Morgan, Mary Anne; Gough, Michael S.; Steinmetz, Sherry D; Mack, Cynthia M.; Darling, Denise C.; Doolin, Kathleen P.; Apostolakos, Michael J.; Graves, Brian T; Frampton, Mark W.; Chen, Xucai; Pietropaoli, Anthony P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound measurements of brachial artery reactivity in response to stagnant ischemia provide estimates of microvascular function and conduit artery endothelial function. We hypothesized that brachial artery reactivity would independently predict severe sepsis and severe sepsis mortality. Methods This was a combined case-control and prospective cohort study. We measured brachial artery reactivity in 95 severe sepsis patients admitted to the medical and surgical intensive care un...

  1. Reactive sclerosis of the pedicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-01-15

    The vertebral pedicles of the neural arch represent the 'eyes' through which normal variants, anomalies and acquired pathologic conditions can be detected on lumbar spine radiographs. Close scrutiny of the size, shape, density and margins of the pedicles may permit the radiologist to suggest a wide variety of disease. Radiologic attention is almost always directed at determining of sclerosis or lysis of the pedicle. Numerous conditions causing sclerosis of the pedicle have been reported and among them osteoidosteoma and osteoblastoma are well known tumors. However the real significance of reactive sclerosis of the pedicle related to the unstable neural arch such as contralateral spondyloysis have drawn little attention in the literature. The purpose of this report is to analyze the nature of arch deficiency which is the primary lesion related to the sclerotic pedicle, and emphasizes the significance of radiologic features of reactive pedicular sclerosis for clinical practice. Cautious observation of both sclerotic lesion and the contralateral neural arch is essential in radiologic evaluation of the scleortic pedicle and the presence of a contraslateral pars defect in the same vertebral segment suggests reactive sclerosis of the pedicle.

  2. A Struggle for Leadership Recognition: The AIIB, Reactive Chinese Assertiveness, and Regional Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H.S. Åberg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to contribute to the ongoing debate about “Chinese assertiveness”. The paper dissects the central articles on the topic and evaluates their conceptual and theoretical insights. It ascertains that the concept of assertiveness is poorly substantiated; that proponents of “Chinese assertiveness” largely claim that it derives from structural factors that produced effects in Chinese foreign policy behavior prior to the US pivot to Asia; and ultimately, that critical accounts, since they reject the very concept, lack theories that can explain Chinese assertiveness. This article attempts to address these shortcomings. First, the article reconceptualizes assertiveness and connects it to grand strategy change. Second, this change is reactive and occurs after, not prior to the US pivot. Third, in order to provide greater theoretical adequacy, this article combines material factors with institutional factors and show how they dialectically interact with status aspiration, as part of the struggle for the positional good of leadership. To show the conceptual and theoretical plausibility of the argument, the paper outlines the dialectical interplay between positional barriers in the ADB and the US pivot to Asia, on the one hand, and reactive Chinese assertiveness and the AIIB, on the other.

  3. An Optimal Reactive Power Control Strategy for a DFIG-Based Wind Farm to Damp the Sub-Synchronous Oscillation of a Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the auxiliary damping control with the reactive power loop on the rotor-side converter of doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG-based wind farms to depress the sub-synchronous resonance oscillations in nearby turbogenerators. These generators are connected to a series capacitive compensation transmission system. First, the damping effect of the reactive power control of the DFIG-based wind farms was theoretically analyzed, and a transfer function between turbogenerator speed and the output reactive power of the wind farms was introduced to derive the analytical expression of the damping coefficient. The phase range to obtain positive damping was determined. Second, the PID phase compensation parameters of the auxiliary damping controller were optimized by a genetic algorithm to obtain the optimum damping in the entire subsynchronous frequency band. Finally, the validity and effectiveness of the proposed auxiliary damping control were demonstrated on a modified version of the IEEE first benchmark model by time domain simulation analysis with the use of DigSILENT/PowerFactory. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that this derived damping factor expression and the condition of the positive damping can effectively analyze their impact on the system sub-synchronous oscillations, the proposed wind farms reactive power additional damping control strategy can provide the optimal damping effect over the whole sub-synchronous frequency band, and the control effect is better than the active power additional damping control strategy based on the power system stabilizator.

  4. OH reactivity for screening crop volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannoni, N.; Gros, V.; Truong, F.; Ciuraru, R.; Lafouge, F.; Gonzaga, L.; Boissard, C.; Laville, P.; Bonsang, B.; Baisnee, D.; Sarda Esteve, R.; Durand, B.; Geudet, J. C.; Zurfluh, O.; Fanucci, O.; Loubet, B.

    2016-12-01

    Total OH reactivity is the first-order total loss rate of the hydroxyl radical in the atmosphere due to reactive molecules. The tremendous potential of measuring OH reactivity is to directly know the complete budget of reactive trace molecules in ambient air. An original approach is combining the total OH reactivity with the summed OH reactivity of trace gases measured at a field site. This serves to determine whether the composition of reactive compounds is fully understood. So far, sites characterized by opposite types of emissions have been investigated, including, forests, megacities and remote sites. Here, we apply this method to investigate agricultural crops emissions. Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) is globally one of the most diffused crop cultivation and emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from wheat croplands implemented in models are affected by high uncertainty. We measured OH reactivity and reactive gases over a winter wheat cropland located in North-West Europe during June 2016. Specifically, the total OH reactivity was measured through the Comparative Reactivity Method while reactive gases as VOCs, CH4, O3, NOx were measured through a number of additional techniques, including proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) and gas chromatography (GC-FID). We will present preliminary results of our measurements.

  5. Biodecolorization and biodegradation of Reactive Blue by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-06-18

    Jun 18, 2007 ... Reactive Red (33%) and Coloron Violet (66%) were decolorized moderately.The dye Coloron Black (9%) was highly ... ues into river and lakes lead to higher biological oxygen demand (BOD) causing serious ... Reactive Red, Reactive Blue were purchased from Evergreen Ind- ustries, Ahmedabad, India.

  6. Prehospital Providers' Perceptions on Providing Patient and Family Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Emily M; Sampayo, Esther M; Shah, Manish I; Doughty, Cara B

    2017-01-01

    A gap exists in understanding a provider's approach to delivering care that is mutually beneficial to patients, families, and other providers in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes, beliefs, and perceived barriers to providing patient and family centered care (PFCC) in the prehospital setting and to describe potential solutions for improving PFCC during critical pediatric events. We conducted a qualitative, cross-sectional study of a purposive sample of Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and paramedics from an urban, municipal, fire-based EMS system, who participated in the Pediatric Simulation Training for Emergency Prehospital Providers (PediSTEPPS) course. Two coders reviewed transcriptions of audio recordings from participants' first simulation scenario debriefings and performed constant comparison analysis to identify unifying themes. Themes were verified through member checking with two focus groups of prehospital providers. A total of 122 EMTs and paramedics participated in 16 audiotaped debriefing sessions and two focus groups. Four overarching themes emerged regarding the experience of PFCC by prehospital providers: (1) Perceived barriers included the prehospital environment, limited manpower, multi-tasking medical care, and concern for interference with patient care; (2) Providing emotional support comprised of empathetically comforting caregivers, maintaining a calm demeanor, and empowering families to feel involved; (3) Effective communication strategies consisted of designating a family point person, narration of actions, preempting the next steps, speaking in lay terms, summarizing during downtime, and conveying a positive first impression; (4) Tactics to overcome PFCC barriers were maintaining a line of sight, removing and returning a caregiver to and from the scene, and providing situational awareness. Based on debriefings from simulated scenarios, some prehospital providers identified the provision of

  7. Modeling of SPERT IV Reactivity Initiated Transient Tests in EUREKA-2/RR Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Badrun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available EUREKA-2/RR code has been used for SPERT IV reactor benchmark calculations against the experimental results provided by IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency obtained for a series of transient tests initiated by step insertion of different magnitudes of positive reactivity with varying degrees of different controlled parameters such as reactor initial power, coolant temperature and coolant flow condition. 20 out of 39 tests that fall under forced convection mode have been considered for the present simulation provided the reactor scram system is disabled. Peak power and peak clad temperature due to transient have been calculated and it was found that although peak clad temperature values agreed, the peak power values seem to underestimate the experimental values. Further study appears to be needed to identify the limitations in modeling or examining the effect of input parameters during modeling to obtain the better simulation results.

  8. Provider of Services File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The POS file consists of two data files, one for CLIA labs and one for 18 other provider types. The file names are CLIA and OTHER. If downloading the file, note it...

  9. The Provident Principal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, John R.

    This monograph offers leadership approaches for school principals. Discussion applies the business leadership theory of Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus to the role of the principal. Each of the booklet's three parts concludes with discussion questions. Part 1, "Visions and Values for the Provident Principal," demonstrates the importance of…

  10. What HERA may provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); De Roeck, Albert [CERN, Genf (Switzerland); Bartles, Jochen [Univ. Hamburg (DE). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II] (and others)

    2008-09-15

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. (orig.)

  11. care Providers in Ibadan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and eighty six respondents (77.7%) were aware of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT). Awareness ... Key Words: malaria in pregnancy, intermittent preventive treatment, malaria control, health care providers. Department of Obstetrics .... Auxiliary nurses do not have formal training prior to employment.

  12. Visible Light Photocatalysis for the Generation and Use of Reactive Azolyl and Polyfluoroaryl Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Amandeep; Weaver, Jimmie D

    2016-10-18

    chemical space. The odd electron species can form challenging bonds with minimal prefunctionalization of the coupling partner. For instance, some of the intermediates can be utilized for C-H functionalizations to selectively make crowded amines or to synthesize biarenes substituted at every ortho position. While photocatalysis is not the only manner of accomplishing electron transfer, the catalytic generation of the reactive species in which the concentration of the transient odd electron species is kept low, provides a synthetic handle that can be used to improve reaction outcomes. This is elegantly demonstrated in a number of examples in which redox sensitive groups located on substrates survive the reaction. In addition, the underlying basic concepts associated with radical anion fragmentation are reviewed and provide the backdrop for discussion throughout the Account.

  13. Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in chronically medicated schizophrenic patients: a positive correlation Níveis séricos do fator neurotrófico derivado do cérebro e dos produtos de reação com o ácido tiobarbitúrico em pacientes com esquizofrenia cronicamente medicados: correlação positiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Severino Gama

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The neurotrophins, antioxidant enzymes and oxidative markers have reciprocal interactions. This report verified in chronically stable medicated schizophrenic patients whether there are correlations between the serum levels of superoxide dismutase, a key enzyme in the antioxidant defense, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, a direct index of lipid peroxidation, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, the most widely distributed neurotrophin. METHOD: Sixty DSM-IV schizophrenic patients were included (43 males, 17 females. Mean age was 34.7 ± 10.8 years, mean age at first episode was 19.8 ± 7.9 years, and mean illness duration was 14.9 ± 8.5 years. Each subject had a blood sample collected for the determination of serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and superoxide dismutase. RESULTS: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels showed a positive correlation with thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels (r = 0.333, p = 0.009. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels were not correlated with superoxide dismutase levels (r = - 0.181, p = 0.166, and superoxide dismutase levels were not correlated with thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels (r = 0.141, p = 0.284. CONCLUSIONS: The positive correlation between brain-derived neurotrophic factor and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances suggests the need of further investigation on intracellular interactions of neurotrophins, antioxidant enzymes and oxidative markers. In addition, this opens a venue for investigation on treatments for the prevention of neurotoxicity along the course of schizophrenia.OBJETIVO: As neurotrofinas, enzimas antioxidantes e marcadores de oxidação têm interações. Este estudo verificou se existem correlações entre os níveis séricos de superóxido-dismutase, uma enzima chave na defesa antioxidante, os produtos de reação com o ácido tiobarbitúrico, um indicador direto de peroxidação lip

  14. Assessment of RELAP5 point kinetic model against reactivity insertion transient in the IAEA 10 MW MTR research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamidouche, T., E-mail: t.hamidouche@crna.d [Division de l' Environnement, de la Surete et des Dechets Radioactifs, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 02 Boulevard Frantz Fanon, BP 399 Alger RP (Algeria); Bousbia-Salah, A. [DIMNP - University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 02, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    The current study emphasizes an aspect related to the assessment of a model embedded in a computer code. The study concerns more particularly the point neutron kinetics model of the RELAP5/Mod3 code which is worldwide used. The model is assessed against positive reactivity insertion transient taking into account calculations involving thermal-hydraulic feedback as well as transients with no feedback effects. It was concluded that the RELAP5 point kinetics model provides unphysical power evolution trends due most probably to a bug during the programming process.

  15. Nuclear data sensitivity and uncertainty assessment of sodium voiding reactivity coefficients of an ASTRID-like sodium fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuria, García-Herranz; Anne-Laurène, Panadero; Ana, Martinez; Sandro, Pelloni; Konstantin, Mikityuk; Andreas, Pautz

    2017-09-01

    The EU 7th Framework ESNII+ project was launched in 2013 with the strategic orientation of preparing ESNII for Horizon 2020. ESNII stands for the European Industrial Initiative on Nuclear Energy, created by the European Commission in 2010 to promote the development of a new generation of nuclear systems in order to provide a sustainable solution to cope with Europe's growing energy needs while meeting the greenhouse gas emissions reduction target. The designs selected by the ESNII+ project are technological demonstrators of Generation-IV systems. The prototype for the sodium cooled fast reactor technology is ASTRID (standing for Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration), which detailed design phase is foreseen to be initiated in 2019. The ASTRID core has a peculiar design which was created in order to tackle the main neutronic challenge of sodium cooled fast reactors: the inherent overall positive reactivity feedback in case of sodium voiding occurring in the core. Indeed, the core is claimed by its designers to have an overall negative reactivity feedback in this scenario. This feature was demonstrated for an ASTRID-like core within the ESNII+ framework studies performed by nine European institutions. In order to shift the paradigm towards best-estimate plus uncertainties, the nuclear data sensitivity analysis and uncertainty propagation on reactivity coefficients has to be carried out. The goal of this work is to assess the impact of nuclear data uncertainties on sodium voiding reactivity feedback coefficients in order to get a more complete picture of the actual safety margins of the ASTRID low void-core design. The nuclear data sensitivity analysis is performed in parallel using SCALE TSUNAMI-3D and the newly developed GPT SERPENT 2 module. A comparison is carried out between the two methodologies. Uncertainty on the sodium reactivity feedbacks is then calculated using TSAR module of SCALE and the necessary safety margins conclusions

  16. Nuclear data sensitivity and uncertainty assessment of sodium voiding reactivity coefficients of an ASTRID-like sodium fast reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria García-Herranz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The EU 7th Framework ESNII+ project was launched in 2013 with the strategic orientation of preparing ESNII for Horizon 2020. ESNII stands for the European Industrial Initiative on Nuclear Energy, created by the European Commission in 2010 to promote the development of a new generation of nuclear systems in order to provide a sustainable solution to cope with Europe’s growing energy needs while meeting the greenhouse gas emissions reduction target. The designs selected by the ESNII+ project are technological demonstrators of Generation-IV systems. The prototype for the sodium cooled fast reactor technology is ASTRID (standing for Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration, which detailed design phase is foreseen to be initiated in 2019. The ASTRID core has a peculiar design which was created in order to tackle the main neutronic challenge of sodium cooled fast reactors: the inherent overall positive reactivity feedback in case of sodium voiding occurring in the core. Indeed, the core is claimed by its designers to have an overall negative reactivity feedback in this scenario. This feature was demonstrated for an ASTRID-like core within the ESNII+ framework studies performed by nine European institutions. In order to shift the paradigm towards best-estimate plus uncertainties, the nuclear data sensitivity analysis and uncertainty propagation on reactivity coefficients has to be carried out. The goal of this work is to assess the impact of nuclear data uncertainties on sodium voiding reactivity feedback coefficients in order to get a more complete picture of the actual safety margins of the ASTRID low void-core design. The nuclear data sensitivity analysis is performed in parallel using SCALE TSUNAMI-3D and the newly developed GPT SERPENT 2 module. A comparison is carried out between the two methodologies. Uncertainty on the sodium reactivity feedbacks is then calculated using TSAR module of SCALE and the necessary safety

  17. Internet Medline providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, D L; Coady, T R

    1998-01-01

    Each database in this review has features that will appeal to some users. Each provides a credible interface to information available within the Medline database. The major differences are pricing and interface design. In this context, features that cost more and might seem trivial to the occasional searcher may actually save time and money when used by the professional. Internet Grateful Med is free, but Ms. Coady and I agree the availability of only three ANDable search fields is a major functional limitation. PubMed is also free but much more powerful. The command line interface that permits very sophisticated searches requires a commitment that casual users will find intimidating. Ms. Coady did not believe the feedback currently provided during a search was sufficient for sustained professional use. Paper Chase and Knowledge Finder are mature, modestly priced Medline search services. Paper Chase provides a menu-driven interface that is very easy to use, yet permits the user to search virtually all of Medline's data fields. Knowledge Finder emphasizes the use of natural language queries but fully supports more traditional search strategies. The impact of the tradeoff between fuzzy and Boolean strategies offered by Knowledge Finder is unclear and beyond the scope of this review. Additional software must be downloaded to use all of Knowledge Finders' features. Other providers required no software beyond the basic Internet browser, and this requirement prevented Ms. Coady from evaluating Knowledge Finder. Ovid and Silver Platter offer well-designed interfaces that simplify the construction of complex queries. These are clearly services designed for professional users. While pricing eliminates these for casual use, it should be emphasized that Medline citation access is only a portion of the service provided by these high-end vendors. Finally, we should comment that each of the vendors and government-sponsored services provided prompt and useful feedback to e

  18. Quantum Theory of Reactive Scattering in Phase Space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goussev, A.; Schubert, R.; Waalkens, H.; Wiggins, S.; Nicolaides, CA; Brandas, E

    2010-01-01

    We review recent results on quantum reactive scattering from a phase space perspective. The approach uses classical and quantum versions of Poincare-Birkhoff normal form theory and the perspective of dynamical systems theory. Over the past 10 years the classical normal form theory has provided a

  19. Evaluation of reactivity of horses in the presence of unknown stimulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Ferrari Calviello

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to evaluate reactivity of horses during usual brushing management against the repeated presence of an unknown sonorous stimulus. Twenty Mangalarga Marchador horses, distributed in different categories (mares and foals, were evaluated. The animals were allocated into the control treatment (N = 10 and the treatment with unknown sonorous stimulus (N = 10 from a rattle and a tambourine. Four consecutive evaluations were carried out first (day 0, 1, 2, 3. Two consecutive assessments were carried out after 30 days of the first collection (day 30 and 31, and two consecutive assessments were carried out 15 days after the second evaluation (day 45 and 46. The behavioral observations were made by assigning a score to behaviors of movement, position of ears and eyes, breathing, and vocalization during brushing management. A response variable called reactivity was attributed to each animal, ranging from score 1 (not reactive or calm animal to reactivity score 4 (very reactive or aggressive animal. For statistical analysis, the results were adjusted to a logistic regression model using the categories, day, and treatment as covariates. The animals of the unknown stimuli showed greater reactivity. The days of the experimental period influenced the reactivity of animals between 6 and 7 months old, with a decrease in the possibilities of the animals to have a higher reactivity. The maturity of the foal with repeated exposure to the unknown sound stimulus may decrease the possibility of the animal being reactive.

  20. Measurements of total OH reactivity at the PROPHET site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickly, Pamela; Sakowski, Joseph; Bottorff, Brandon; Lew, Michelle; Stevens, Philip; Sklaveniti, Sofia; Léonardis, Thierry; Locoge, Nadine; Dusanter, Sébastien

    2017-04-01

    As the main oxidant in the daytime atmosphere, the hydroxyl radical (OH) initiates the oxidation of organic trace gases and the formation of pollutants such as ozone and secondary organic aerosols. Understanding both the sources and sinks of OH is therefore important to address issues related to air quality and climate change. Total OH reactivity measurements have proved to be of interest to investigate the OH budget and have highlighted an incomplete understanding of OH sinks in forested environments, which are characterized by high concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and their oxidation products. A research facility located in a Michigan forest, US, has hosted several campaigns of OH reactivity measurements over the last 15 years through the PROPHET (Program for Research on Oxidants: Photochemistry, Emission and Transport) program. This site is characterized by deciduous trees emitting isoprene and other BVOCs and a low impact of anthropogenic emissions. Measurements of OH reactivity were performed during PROPHET 1998 and CABINEX 2009. More recently, OH reactivity was measured during the PROPHET 2016 - AMOS (Atmospheric Measurements of Oxidants in summer) field campaign using the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) and the Total OH Loss Rate Method (TOHLM). In this presentation, we will show that the two measurement techniques agree within uncertainties, giving confidence in the measured OH reactivity. In addition, concomitant measurements of trace gases (VOCs, NOx, O3) made by online and offline instruments were used to perform a comprehensive apportionment of OH sinks. We will provide insights into the OH reactivity budget and will show how it compares to the previous abovementioned studies.

  1. Measuring and monitoring KIPT Neutron Source Facility Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zhong, Zhaopeng [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on developing and constructing a neutron source facility at Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven subcritical system. The accelerator has a 100 kW electron beam using 100 MeV electrons. The subcritical assembly has keff less than 0.98. To ensure the safe operation of this neutron source facility, the reactivity of the subcritical core has to be accurately determined and continuously monitored. A technique which combines the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method is purposed to determine the reactivity of the KIPT subcritical assembly at various conditions. In particular, the area-ratio method can determine the absolute reactivity of the subcritical assembly in units of dollars by performing pulsed-neutron experiments. It provides reference reactivities for the flux-to-current ratio method to track and monitor the reactivity deviations from the reference state while the facility is at other operation modes. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to simulate both methods using the numerical model of the KIPT subcritical assembly. It is found that the reactivities obtained from both the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method are spatially dependent on the neutron detector locations and types. Numerical simulations also suggest optimal neutron detector locations to minimize the spatial effects in the flux-to-current ratio method. The spatial correction factors are calculated using Monte Carlo methods for both measuring methods at the selected neutron detector locations. Monte Carlo simulations are also performed to verify the accuracy of the flux-to-current ratio method in monitoring the reactivity swing during a fuel burnup cycle.

  2. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Yu, Zhenzhen

    2017-04-11

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  3. Reactivity in decision-form games

    OpenAIRE

    Carfì, David

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the reactivity in decision-form games. The concept of reactivity allows us to give a natural concept of rationalizable solution for decision-form games: the solubility by elimination of sub-reactive strategies. This concept of solubility is less demanding than the concept of solubility by elimination of non-reactive strategies (introduced by the author and already studied and applied to economic games). In the work we define the concept of super-reactivity, the preo...

  4. Study on Reactive Automatic Compensation System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhe, Sun; Qingyang, Liang; Peiqing, Luo; Chenfei, Zhang

    At present, low-voltage side of transformer is public in urban distribution network, as inductive load of household appliances is increasing, the power factor decreased, this lead to a large loss of public transformer low voltage side, the supply voltage indicators can not meet user's requirements. Therefore, the design of reactive power compensation system has become another popular research. This paper introduces the principle of reactive power compensation, analyzes key technologies of reactive power compensation, design an overall program of reactive power automatic compensation system to conquer various deficiencies of reactive power automatic compensation equipment.

  5. An evaluation of the Positive Emotional Experiences Scale: A preliminary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene van Wyk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The positive organisational behaviour movement emphasises the advantages of psychological strengths in business. The psychological virtues of positive emotional experiences can potentially promote human strengths to the advantages of business functioning and the management of work conditions. This is supported by Fredrickson’s broaden-and-build theory that emphasises the broadening of reactive thought patterns through experiences of positive emotions.Research purpose: A preliminary psychometric evaluation of a positive measurement of dimensions of emotional experiences in the workplace, by rephrasing the Kiefer and Barclay Toxic Emotional Experiences Scale.Motivation for the study: This quantitative Exploratory Factor Analysis investigates the factorial structure and reliability of the Positive Emotional Experiences Scale, a positive rephrased version of the Toxic Emotional Experiences Scale.Research approach, design and method: This Exploratory Factor Analysis indicates an acceptable three-factor model for the Positive Emotional Experiences Scale. These three factors are: (1 psychological recurrent positive state, (2 social connectedness and (3 physical refreshed energy, with strong Cronbach’s alphas of 0.91, 0.91 and 0.94, respectively.Main findings: The three-factor model of the Positive Emotional Experiences Scale provides a valid measure in support of Fredrickson’s theory of social, physical and psychological endured personal resources that build positive emotions.Practical/Managerial implications: Knowledge gained on positive versus negative emotional experiences could be applied by management to promote endured personal resources that strengthen positive emotional experiences.Contribution/value-add: The contribution of this rephrased Positive Emotional Experiences Scale provides a reliable measure of assessment of the social, physical and endured psychological and personal resources identified in Fredrickson’s broaden

  6. Studies Of Positive-Position-Feedback Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanson, James L.; Caughey, Thomas K.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses theoretical and experimental studies of positive-position-feedback control for suppressing vibrations in large flexible structures. Positive-position-feedback control involves placement of actuators and sensors on structure; control voltages applied to actuators in response to outputs of sensors processed via compensator algorithm. Experiments demonstrate feasibility of suppressing vibrations by positive position feedback, and spillover of vibrational energy into uncontrolled modes has stabilizing effect if control gain sufficiently small.

  7. Positionality at the Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Vanner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available As a Western feminist supporting and researching gender equality in education in postcolonial contexts, I often wonder: Am I doing more harm than good? The privilege of my social location means that my efforts to support education in postcolonial contexts risk being patronizing, insulting, threatening, imperialist, and recolonizing. Yet neglecting and ignoring postcolonial contexts similarly reflects and reproduces a privileged position. I provide a tentative framework designed to address positionality, power, and privilege while creating an ethical research process for working in a postcolonial context. Beginning with an identification of positionality, the objectives of research, and guiding theoretical frameworks to situate the research in relation to the participants and context, I proceed to establish a methodology designed to minimize the negative effects of power and maximize participants’ empowerment. I position myself as a bricoleur, layering feminist standpoint theory and postcolonial theory, and propose the collaborative data collection and analysis techniques, with particular attention to ethical and cultural sensitivity, using a social constructivist approach to grounded theory. This article highlights the need for Western researchers to reflect upon the power dynamics of their research in postcolonial contexts and develop a strategy for conducting empowering research that prevents the misrepresentation and exploitation of participants. Observations from my doctoral thesis data collection provide examples of how these concepts were operationalized in practice as well as reflections on the disconnect between theorizing and conducting ethical research in postcolonial contexts.

  8. Adaptive Compensation of Reactive Power With Shunt Active Power Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Asiminoaei, Lucian; Hansen, Steffan

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptive method for compensating the reactive power with an active power filter (APF), which is initially rated for mitigation of only the harmonic currents given by a nonlinear industrial load. It is proven that, if the harmonic currents do not load the APF at the rated...... power, the available power can be used to provide a part of the required reactive power. Different indicators for designing such application are given, and it is proven that the proposed adaptive algorithm represents an added value to the APF. The algorithm is practically validated on a laboratory setup...... with a 7-kVA APF....

  9. Preparing to provide MTM services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Zandra M; Mahdavian, Soheyla L; Woodard, Todd J

    2015-02-01

    Medication Therapy Management (MTM) has been a way for pharmacist to enhance their position as an integral member of the health care team as the need for improved clinical and economic outcomes in relation to the US health care system became apparent. MTM Certificate training programs are provided by numerous organizations. Collaboration Practice Agreements (CPA) are gaining significance as the role of the pharmacist is expanding in the care of patients as part of a multidisciplinary health care team. One major hurdle that many pharmacists are faced with is receiving reimbursement for the services provided. The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 recognized that pharmacists play an important role in the management of patient care and that pharmacists bring an expertise and knowledge that will help to identify and resolve patient medication therapy problems. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Michael

    2015-06-01

    C-reactive protein is a better indicator of inflammation than the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. It is more sensitive and responds more quickly to changes in the clinical situation. False negative and false positive results are more common when measuring the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Renal disease, female sex and older age increase the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate has value in detecting low-grade bone infection, and in monitoring some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

  11. Reactive capability limits of wind farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villacorta, A.R. [European Univ., Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Gomez, S.A.; Rodriguez Amenedo, J.L. [Carlos III Univ., Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2005-07-01

    Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) technology can be classified into two main types: fixed speed and variable speed. Fixed speed WECS use an induction generator connected directly to the grid while variable speed WECS use a power converter to connect the generator to the grid. Fixed speed WECS require shunt capacitors for reactive power compensation, while variable speed WECS have reactive power capability. Under the Spanish grid code, wind farms have to operate in a range of power factor values. This paper determines the reactive power capability of wind farms equipped with both fixed and variable speed WECS. The reactive power capability can be represented as a reactive capability curve. In this paper, the reactive capability curve is used to calculate the additional reactive power compensation needed to meet the requirements of the Spanish grid code. (Author)

  12. Psychological and neuroendocrine reactivity to ostracism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolinski, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This study used the ostracism detection theory to investigate how ostracism impacts individuals in two ways: (1) immediate poststressor needs, mood, ruminative thoughts, and desire to affiliate, and (2) short-term affective and cortisol reactivity. A total of 58 college students were randomly assigned to the inclusion or ostracism conditions of Cyberball, a virtual ball-tossing game. Immediately following the experimental manipulation, ostracized participants reported more thwarted psychological need states, more negative mood, and fewer positive ruminative thoughts, relative to their included counterparts. Ostracized participants reported a greater interest in affiliating with others in online or in-person settings. In the short-term, ostracized males reported more hostility than included males, although the scores were within expected norms for most males. There was no relation between Cyberball condition and gender across time for depression, anxiety, or positive affect. Approximately 20 min after the onset of the stressor, women in the luteal phase and women taking oral contraceptives in the ostracized group displayed higher cortisol than their counterparts in the included group. Relative to baseline, however, cortisol did not reliably increase after the onset of the stressor. Ostracized females taking oral contraceptives showed the greatest decline in cortisol, compared to included oral contraceptive users. Overall, results suggest that most of the negative effects of ostracism are immediate and limited to psychological, not neuroendocrine, responses. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Providing Compassion through Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Royeen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meg Kral, MS, OTR/L, CLT, is the cover artist for the Summer 2015 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. Her untitled piece of art is an oil painting and is a re-creation of a photograph taken while on vacation. Meg is currently supervisor of outpatient services at Rush University Medical Center. She is lymphedema certified and has a specific interest in breast cancer lymphedema. Art and occupational therapy serve similar purposes for Meg: both provide a sense of flow. She values the outcomes, whether it is a piece of art or improved functional status

  14. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ysla S. Catalina & Providence

    OpenAIRE

    Diazgranados, Carlos Nicolás; Torres Carreño, Guillermo Andrés; Castell, Edmon; Moreno, Santiago; Ramirez, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    Esta Hoja de Mano pertenece a la exposición temporal "Ysla S. Catalina & Providence". Contiene un resumen histórico de las Islas de Santa Catalina y Providencia en los idiomas inglés y español y un mapa del siglo VI que lo hace más didáctico apoyado por figuras recortables. Esta muestra hace parte del proyecto IDA y VUELTA del Sistema de Patrimonio Cultural y Museos SPM que gestiona la descentralización del patrimonio cultural de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia a otras ciudades del pa...

  16. Reactive ion plating of TiO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howson, R.P.; Suzuki, K.; Bishop, C.A.; Ridge, M.I. (Loughborough Univ. of Technology (UK). Dept. of Physics)

    TiO/sub 2/ films have been produced from a variety of sources utilising various ion assisted techniques to provide surface energy. It was found that reactive rf bias on plating using electron beam evaporated titanium metal could give films of refractive index of close to 2.5 and equivalent to those made by conventional reactive evaporation onto substrates at elevated temperatures. Neutralised ion beam and oxygen plasma guns were not so successful, as was the use of sources of TiO/sub 2/ and TiO. Reactive planar magnetron sputtering of titanium metal could be equally successful if the source was operated in the metal sputtering mode, this could be achieved with sufficient stability with the use of a pulsed flow of the oxygen supply.

  17. Trends in reactivity of oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftelund, Anja

    , and I) and OH on a wide range of rutile oxide surfaces. Furthermore, Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations are found for the adsorption of a large number of molecules (including Cl, Br and I) on transition metal oxides. In these relations the activation energies scale linearly with the dissociative...... chemisorption energies. It turns out that the BEP relation for rutile oxides is almost coinciding with the dissociation line, i.e. no barrier exists for the reactive surfaces. The heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of hydrogen halides (HCl, HBr, and HI) is investigated. A micro-kinetic model is solved...

  18. Modeling the early stages of reactive wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Daniel; Warren, James A; Boettinger, William J

    2010-11-01

    Recent experimental studies of molten metal droplets wetting high-temperature reactive substrates have established that the majority of triple-line motion occurs when inertial effects are dominant. In light of these studies, this paper investigates wetting and spreading on reactive substrates when inertial effects are dominant using a thermodynamically derived diffuse interface model of a binary three-phase material. The liquid-vapor transition is modeled using a van der Waals diffuse interface approach, while the solid-fluid transition is modeled using a phase field approach. The results from the simulations demonstrate an O(t(-1/2)) spreading rate during the inertial regime and oscillations in the triple-line position when the metal droplet transitions from inertial to diffusive spreading. It is found that the spreading extent is reduced by enhancing dissolution by manipulating the initial liquid composition. The results from the model exhibit good qualitative and quantitative agreement with a number of recent experimental studies of high-temperature droplet spreading, particularly experiments of copper droplets spreading on silicon substrates. Analysis of the numerical data from the model suggests that the extent and rate of spreading are regulated by the spreading coefficient calculated from a force balance based on a plausible definition of the instantaneous interface energies. A number of contemporary publications have discussed the likely dissipation mechanism in spreading droplets. Thus, we examine the dissipation mechanism using the entropy-production field and determine that dissipation primarily occurs in the locality of the triple-line region during the inertial stage but extends along the solid-liquid interface region during the diffusive stage.

  19. On Variable Reverse Power Flow-Part I: Active-Reactive Optimal Power Flow with Reactive Power of Wind Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aouss Gabash

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that using battery storage systems (BSSs to provide reactive power provision in a medium-voltage (MV active distribution network (ADN with embedded wind stations (WSs can lead to a huge amount of reverse power to an upstream transmission network (TN. However, unity power factors (PFs of WSs were assumed in those studies to analyze the potential of BSSs. Therefore, in this paper (Part-I, we aim to further explore the pure reactive power potential of WSs (i.e., without BSSs by investigating the issue of variable reverse power flow under different limits on PFs in an electricity market model. The main contributions of this work are summarized as follows: (1 Introducing the reactive power capability of WSs in the optimization model of the active-reactive optimal power flow (A-R-OPF and highlighting the benefits/impacts under different limits on PFs. (2 Investigating the impacts of different agreements for variable reverse power flow on the operation of an ADN under different demand scenarios. (3 Derivation of the function of reactive energy losses in the grid with an equivalent-π circuit and comparing its value with active energy losses. (4 Balancing the energy curtailment of wind generation, active-reactive energy losses in the grid and active-reactive energy import-export by a meter-based method. In Part-II, the potential of the developed model is studied through analyzing an electricity market model and a 41-bus network with different locations of WSs.

  20. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

  1. Review of existing reactive transport software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassley, W., LLNL

    1998-02-03

    Simulations of thermal and hydrological evolution following the potential emplacement of a subterranean nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, NV provide data that suggest the inevitability of dependent, simultaneous chemical evolution in this system. These chemical changes will modify significantly both the magnitude and structure of local porosity and permeability; hence, they will have a dynamic feedback effect on the evolving thermal and hydrological regime. Yet, despite this intimate interdependence of transport and chemical processes, a rigorous quantitative analysis of the post- emplacement environment that incorporates this critical feedback mechanism has not been completed to date. As an initial step in this direction, the present document outlines the fundamental chemical and transport processes that must be accounted for in such an analysis, and reviews the inventory of existing software that encodes these processed in explicitly coupled form. A companion report describes the prioritization of specific capabilities that are needed for modeling post-emplacement reactive transport at Yucca Mountain.

  2. Transport and Reactivity of Decontaminants to Provide Hazard Mitigation of Chemical Warfare Agents from Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    diluted and the analytes were quantified using gas chromatography (GC) for HD and GD (Agilent 6890/7890 GC equipped with a 5975 mass selective detector...Agilent Technologies; Santa Clara, CA]) or using liquid chromatography (LC) with a mass spectrometer for VX (Agilent 1200/1290 series LC and Applied...Membranes .2. Neoprene, SBR, EPDM, NBR, and Natural-Rubber Versus Normal- Alkanes . J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 1991, 42 (8), 2329–2336. 24. Harogoppad, S.B

  3. Passive Reactive Berm (PRBerm) to Provide Low Maintenance Lead Containment at Active Small Arms Firing Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    24 4.1 SITE LOCATION AND HISTORY ...4.1 SITE LOCATION AND HISTORY Charleston Air Force Base, also known as Joint Base Charleston, is a United States Air Force base located in North...Percent Difference (RPD) and Relative Standard Deviation ( RSD ) of quality control samples included for analysis. Calibrations and correlation in the

  4. Passive Reactive Berm (PRBerm) to Provide Low Maintenance Lead Containment at Active Small Arms Firing Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    A nonwoven geomembrane fabric is a barrier between native soils and the ballistic impact media. Amended sand is placed on top of the newly...store bullets. Earthen backstops require immediate care to revegetate, to prevent potential ongoing erosion problems. Use of fiber mulch, filter fabric...different ballistic sand and amendments*. Lysimeter study and amendments Lead b (µg/L) DOC (mg/L) pH Filtered Total Study Goals 150 50 6 to 9

  5. Quantum Entanglement and Chemical Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Espíritu, M; Esquivel, R O; López-Rosa, S; Dehesa, J S

    2015-11-10

    The water molecule and a hydrogenic abstraction reaction are used to explore in detail some quantum entanglement features of chemical interest. We illustrate that the energetic and quantum-information approaches are necessary for a full understanding of both the geometry of the quantum probability density of molecular systems and the evolution of a chemical reaction. The energy and entanglement hypersurfaces and contour maps of these two models show different phenomena. The energy ones reveal the well-known stable geometry of the models, whereas the entanglement ones grasp the chemical capability to transform from one state system to a new one. In the water molecule the chemical reactivity is witnessed through quantum entanglement as a local minimum indicating the bond cleavage in the dissociation process of the molecule. Finally, quantum entanglement is also useful as a chemical reactivity descriptor by detecting the transition state along the intrinsic reaction path in the hypersurface of the hydrogenic abstraction reaction corresponding to a maximally entangled state.

  6. The association between heart rate reactivity and fluid intelligence in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yu; Borlam, Deborah; Zhang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to examine (a) whether findings of increased cardiovascular reactivity in relation to cognitive ability seen in infants, young adults and the elderly can be extended to middle childhood and (b) which specific aspect(s) of intelligence is related to cardiovascular reactivity. We examined cardiovascular activity in 340 8- and 9-year-old children during a number judgment task and measured fluid and crystallized IQ using the WISC-IV (Wechsler, 2003). Regression analyses revealed that heart rate (HR) reactivity was positively associated with fluid intelligence and perceptual reasoning in particular, after controlling for the effects of sex, age, task performance, social adversity, and resting HR. Intelligence scores were not associated with respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) reactivity. Findings are consistent with prior literature in infants and older populations and for the first time suggest that the association between HR reactivity and cognitive ability is specific for fluid reasoning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Airborne measurement of OH reactivity during INTEX-B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of OH reactivity, the inverse of the OH lifetime, provides a powerful tool to investigate atmospheric photochemistry. A new airborne OH reactivity instrument was designed and deployed for the first time on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the second phase of Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-B (INTEX-B campaign, which was focused on the Asian pollution outflow over Pacific Ocean and was based in Hawaii and Alaska. The OH reactivity was measured by adding OH, generated by photolyzing water vapor with 185 nm UV light in a moveable wand, to the flow of ambient air in a flow tube and measuring the OH signal with laser induced fluorescence. As the wand was pulled back away from the OH detector, the OH signal decay was recorded; the slope of −Δln(signal/Δ time was the OH reactivity. The overall absolute uncertainty at the 2σ confidence levels is about 1 s−1 at low altitudes (for decay about 6 s−1, and 0.7 s−1 at high altitudes (for decay about 2 s−1. From the median vertical profile obtained in the second phase of INTEX-B, the measured OH reactivity (4.0±1.0 s−1 is higher than the OH reactivity calculated from assuming that OH was in steady state (3.3±0.8 s−1, and even higher than the OH reactivity that was calculated from the total measurements of all OH reactants (1.6±0.4 s−1. Model calculations show that the missing OH reactivity is consistent with the over-predicted OH and under-predicted HCHO in the boundary layer and lower troposphere. The over-predicted OH and under-predicted HCHO suggest that the missing OH sinks are most likely related to some highly reactive VOCs that have HCHO as an oxidation product.

  8. The specific IgE reactivity pattern of weed pollen-induced allergic rhinitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Demin; Lai, Xuxin; Gjesing, Birgitte; Zhong, Nanshan; Zhang, Luo; Spangfort, Michael D

    2011-05-01

    Specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) reactivity towards the major mugwort allergen Art v 1 is a good indicator for Art v sensitization. Allergens from the ragweed species Amb t and Amb a possibly share common IgE-binding epitopes. The aim of this study was to investigate the reactivity pattern of IgE in Chinese patients with weed pollen-induced allergic rhinitis. Sera from 50 weed pollen-induced allergic rhinitis patients were tested for specific serum IgE reactivity against allergenic extracts of mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris, Art v), short ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia, Amb a), giant ragweed (Ambrosia trifida, Amb t), and single allergens of Art v 1, Art v 3, Amb a 1, and profilin. Sera from 88% of the patients demonstrated positive specific IgE reactivity to Art v, and of these 82% were positive to Art v 1. Sera from 38% of the patients showed positive specific IgE reactivity to both ragweed species Amb t and Amb a. A strong correlation was found between the specific IgE levels of Amb t and Amb a. Of the Amb a IgE-positive patients, 38% were positive for Amb a 1. Of all patient sera tested, 12% were specific IgE-positive to profilin.

  9. What HERA May Provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes; /DESY; De Roeck, Albert; /CERN; Bartels, Jochen; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II; Behnke, Olaf; Blumlein, Johannes; /DESY; Brodsky, Stanley; /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; /Oxford U.; Deak, Michal; /DESY; Devenish, Robin; /Oxford U.; Diehl, Markus; /DESY; Gehrmann, Thomas; /Zurich U.; Grindhammer, Guenter; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Gustafson, Gosta; /CERN /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Khoze, Valery; /Durham U., IPPP; Knutsson, Albert; /DESY; Klein, Max; /Liverpool U.; Krauss, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Kutak, Krzysztof; /DESY; Laenen, Eric; /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Lonnblad, Leif; /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Motyka, Leszek; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II /Birmingham U. /Southern Methodist U. /DESY /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /CERN /Paris, LPTHE /Hamburg U. /Penn State U.

    2011-11-10

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. The HERA accelerator and the HERA experiments H1, HERMES and ZEUS stopped running in the end of June 2007. This was after 15 years of very successful operation since the first collisions in 1992. A total luminosity of {approx} 500 pb{sup -1} has been accumulated by each of the collider experiments H1 and ZEUS. During the years the increasingly better understood and upgraded detectors and HERA accelerator have contributed significantly to this success. The physics program remains in full swing and plenty of new results were presented at DIS08 which are approaching the anticipated final precision, fulfilling and exceeding the physics plans and the previsions of the upgrade program. Most of the analyses presented at DIS08 were still based on the so called HERA I data sample, i.e. data taken until 2000, before the shutdown for the luminosity upgrade. This sample has an integrated luminosity of {approx} 100 pb{sup -1}, and the four times larger statistics sample from HERA II is still in the process of being analyzed.

  10. Effect of reactive and non-reactive counterion micelles upon the alkaline degradation of indomethacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah S. Al-Ayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, kinetics of alkaline degradation of well known drug, indomethacin (2-[1-(4-chlorobenzoyl-5-methoxy-2-methylindol-3-yl]acetic acid, was studied in presence of excess [NaOH]. The rate of hydrolysis of substrate was independent of the [indomethacin] though it increased linearly with increasing the hydroxide ion concentration with a positive slope, suggesting the following rate law: kobs = k1[OH−]. Cationic surfactants having non-reactive ions (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB and cetyltrimethylammonium sulfate (CTA2SO4 first increased the rate constants at lower concentrations and then decreased it at higher concentrations while in case of the surfactant with reactive counterions (cetyltrimethylammonium hydroxide, CTAOH the rate increases sharply at lower concentrations of surfactant until it reaches to a plateau in contrast to the appearance of maxima in case of CTAB and (CTA2SO4. Anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, inhibited the reaction rate at all concentrations used in the study. Pseudophase ion-exchange model was used for analyzing the effect of cationic micelles while the inhibition by SDS micelles was fitted using the Menger–Portnoy model. The effect of salts (NaCl, NaBr and (CH34NBr was also seen on the hydrolysis of indomethacin and it was found that all salts inhibited the rate of reaction. The inhibition followed the trend NaCl < NaBr < (CH34NBr.

  11. ISSP Position Stand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Stambulova, Natalia; Si, Gangyan

    2013-01-01

    but as relational and ␣uid; and (c) focusing on meaning (instead of cause) in cross-cultural and cultural research projects, and cultural praxis work. In the paper, we ␣rst provide an overview of the concepts of cultural competence and ethics of difference. Second, we present a step-by-step approach for developing...... a culturally competent project rooted either within cross-cultural or cultural research. Third, we focus on cultural praxis as a project that blends theory, research, and lived culture of practice. Finally, we summarize main points in nine postulates and provide recommendations for enhancing cultural......The multicultural landscape of contemporary sport sets a challenge to rethink sport and exercise psychology research and practice through a culturally re␣exive lens. This ISSP Position Stand provides a rigorous synthesis and engagement with existing scholarship to outline a roadmap for future work...

  12. Child maltreatment and autonomic nervous system reactivity: identifying dysregulated stress reactivity patterns by using the biopsychosocial model of challenge and threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Katie A; Sheridan, Margaret A; Alves, Sonia; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2014-09-01

    Disruptions in stress response system development have been posited as mechanisms linking child maltreatment (CM) to psychopathology. Existing theories predict elevated sympathetic nervous system reactivity after CM, but evidence for this is inconsistent. We present a novel framework for conceptualizing stress reactivity after CM that uses the biopsychosocial model of challenge and threat. We predicted that in the context of a social-evaluative stressor, maltreated adolescents would exhibit a threat pattern of reactivity, involving sympathetic nervous system activation paired with elevated vascular resistance and blunted cardiac output (CO) reactivity. A sample of 168 adolescents (mean age =14.9 years) participated. Recruitment targeted maltreated adolescents; 38.2% were maltreated. Electrocardiogram, impedance cardiography, and blood pressure were acquired at rest and during an evaluated social stressor (Trier Social Stress Test). Pre-ejection period (PEP), CO, and total peripheral resistance reactivity were computed during task preparation, speech delivery, and verbal mental arithmetic. Internalizing and externalizing symptoms were assessed. Maltreatment was unrelated to PEP reactivity during preparation or speech, but maltreated adolescents had reduced PEP reactivity during math. Maltreatment exposure (F(1,145) = 3.8-9.4, p = .053-models.

  13. Cardiac parasympathetic reactivation following exercise: implications for training prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jamie; Peake, Jonathan M; Buchheit, Martin

    2013-12-01

    The objective of exercise training is to initiate desirable physiological adaptations that ultimately enhance physical work capacity. Optimal training prescription requires an individualized approach, with an appropriate balance of training stimulus and recovery and optimal periodization. Recovery from exercise involves integrated physiological responses. The cardiovascular system plays a fundamental role in facilitating many of these responses, including thermoregulation and delivery/removal of nutrients and waste products. As a marker of cardiovascular recovery, cardiac parasympathetic reactivation following a training session is highly individualized. It appears to parallel the acute/intermediate recovery of the thermoregulatory and vascular systems, as described by the supercompensation theory. The physiological mechanisms underlying cardiac parasympathetic reactivation are not completely understood. However, changes in cardiac autonomic activity may provide a proxy measure of the changes in autonomic input into organs and (by default) the blood flow requirements to restore homeostasis. Metaboreflex stimulation (e.g. muscle and blood acidosis) is likely a key determinant of parasympathetic reactivation in the short term (0-90 min post-exercise), whereas baroreflex stimulation (e.g. exercise-induced changes in plasma volume) probably mediates parasympathetic reactivation in the intermediate term (1-48 h post-exercise). Cardiac parasympathetic reactivation does not appear to coincide with the recovery of all physiological systems (e.g. energy stores or the neuromuscular system). However, this may reflect the limited data currently available on parasympathetic reactivation following strength/resistance-based exercise of variable intensity. In this review, we quantitatively analyse post-exercise cardiac parasympathetic reactivation in athletes and healthy individuals following aerobic exercise, with respect to exercise intensity and duration, and fitness

  14. Navicular bone position determined by positional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Philip; Johannsen, Finn E; Hangaard, Stine

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine intraobserver, interobserver and between-day reproducibility of positional MRI for evaluation of navicular bone height (NVH) and medial navicular position (MNP). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Positional MRI (pMRI) of the foot was performed on ten healthy participants (0.25 T G......: Navicular height and medial navicular position can be measured by pMRI in a very reproducible manner within and between observers. Increased measurement variation is observed between-days in supine position, which may be due to small positional differences or other unknown biomechanical factors....

  15. Unpacking social hypersensitivity: vulnerability to the absence of positive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikara, Mina; Girgus, Joan S

    2010-10-01

    Navigating social life requires accurately calibrated sensitivity to external feedback, thus extreme sensitivity to external feedback may be maladaptive. Using a daily diary design, the authors investigated whether the relationship between social hypersensitivity and daily events predicted level, lability, and reactivity of both self-esteem and affect. Relative to their less sensitive peers, socially hypersensitive people exhibited lower levels of self-esteem and greater negative affect and experienced greater fluctuations in self-esteem and negative affect. Although most people were negatively reactive to the presence of negative feedback, socially hypersensitive people were negatively reactive to the absence of positive feedback as well. The authors argue that reactivity to the absence of positive feedback is a fundamental, heretofore untested aspect of what makes social hypersensitivity a pernicious orientation.

  16. Cross-reactivity profiles of hybrid capture II, cobas, and APTIMA human papillomavirus assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Sarah Nørgaard; Rebolj, Matejka; Ejegod, Ditte Møller

    2016-01-01

    Background High-risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) testing is replacing cytology in cervical cancer screening as it is more sensitive for preinvasive cervical lesions. However, the bottleneck of HPV testing is the many false positive test results (positive tests without cervical lesions). Here, we...... evaluated to what extent these can be explained by cross-reactivity, i.e. positive test results without evidence of high-risk HPV genotypes. The patterns of cross-reactivity have been thoroughly studied for hybrid capture II (HC2) but not yet for newer HPV assays although the manufacturers claimed...

  17. Subject reactivity effects and alcohol treatment outcome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, P R; Maisto, S A

    2000-11-01

    Attributions regarding alcohol treatment research protocols influencing clinical outcomes have persisted for more than 25 years. Although well-designed alcohol treatment outcome studies typically involve frequent, and often comprehensive, research assessment protocols, procedures are seldom in place to control or account for possible subject reactivity to the research protocol. This article presents a theoretical basis for a relationship between research protocols and treatment outcomes. The article reviews the relevant alcohol treatment outcome literature and presents a "weight of evidence" regarding subject reactivity effects and alcohol treatment outcome research assessment protocols. Also, the FRAMES (feedback, responsibility, advice, menu, empathy and self-efficacy) model was coupled with self-regulation theory to provide a theoretical explanation of how research assessment protocols might contribute to clinically relevant behavioral change. Researcher attributions, empirical investigations and theoretical considerations all provide evidence that is consistent with the existence of subject reactivity to research assessment protocols. Recommendations are made regarding interpretation of data collected as part of an alcohol treatment outcome study, control of potential subject reactivity confounding variables and directions for future research.

  18. Elevated C-reactive protein in adolescents: roles of stress and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Carissa A; Matthews, Karen A; Hall, Martica

    2013-06-01

    Psychological stress can up-regulate inflammatory processes and increase disease risk. In the context of stress, differences in how individuals cope might have implications for health. The goal of this study was to evaluate associations among stress, coping, and inflammation in a sample of African American and white adolescents. Adolescents (n = 245) completed self-report measures of stressful life events and coping, provided daily diary reports of interpersonal conflict for 7 days, and provided fasting blood samples for assessment of C-reactive protein (CRP). In regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking, and socioeconomic status, there were no significant associations between stress and CRP, but significant interactions between stress and coping emerged. For adolescents reporting more unpleasant stressful life events in the past 12 months, positive engagement coping was inversely associated with CRP (β= -.19, p adolescents reporting fewer stressful life events. Positive engagement coping was significantly and inversely associated with CRP in the context of interpersonal stress, whether measured as stressful life events reflecting interpersonal conflict (e.g., arguments with parents or siblings, conflict between adults in the home, and friendship ended) or frequency of arguments with others reported in daily diaries. Disengagement coping was unrelated to CRP. Findings suggest that positive engagement coping is associated with lower levels of inflammation, but only when adolescents are challenged by significant stress.

  19. Experiment and CFD Analysis of Reactive Muffler

    OpenAIRE

    Yunshi Yao; Shaodong Wei; Jinpeng Zhao; Shibin Chen; Zhongxu Feng; Jinxi Yue

    2013-01-01

    A conventional muffler used in vibratory rollers is usually designed based on experience and its performance could be enhanced in a large degree through structure optimization. In order to evaluate performance of reactive muffler and its effect on power loss of engine, flow field of muffler was discussed by CFD comparing with experimental test and the structure of reactive muffler was optimized. Based on results of simulation and optimization, the reactive muffler used in vibratory rollers wi...

  20. Controlling reactive materials by crystallisation and hosting

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The research herein presents an approach to stabilising reactive materials by engineering and designing strategies for forming multi-component materials containing the reactive molecules by use of their non-covalent intermolecular interactions. These interactions may be utilised as part of a design approach to create new materials of more beneficial physical and chemical properties for the desired application.The reactive materials focussed on in this research are organic peroxyacids, in part...

  1. Reactive power compensation a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, Wolfgang; Just, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The comprehensive resource on reactive power compensation, presenting the design, application and operation of reactive power equipment and installations The area of reactive power compensation is gaining increasing importance worldwide. If suitably designed, it is capable of improving voltage quality significantly, meaning that losses in equipment and power systems are reduced, the permissible loading of equipment can be increased, and the over-all stability of system operation improved. Ultimately, energy use and CO2 emisson are reduced. This unique guide discusses the

  2. Emotional Reactivity, Behavior Problems, and Social Adjustment at School Entry in a High-risk Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvin, Carla B; Bierman, Karen L; Gatzke-Kopp, Lisa M

    2016-11-01

    Prior research suggests that heightened emotional reactivity to emotionally distressing stimuli may be associated with elevated internalizing and externalizing behaviors, and contribute to impaired social functioning. These links were explored in a sample of 169 economically-disadvantaged kindergarteners (66 % male; 68 % African American, 22 % Hispanic, 10 % Caucasian) oversampled for elevated aggression. Physiological measures of emotional reactivity (respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA], heart rate [HR], and cardiac pre-ejection period [PEP]) were collected, and teachers and peers provided ratings of externalizing and internalizing behavior, prosocial competence, and peer rejection. RSA withdrawal, HR reactivity, and PEP shortening (indicating increased arousal) were correlated with reduced prosocial competence, and RSA withdrawal and HR reactivity were correlated with elevated internalizing problems. HR reactivity was also correlated with elevated externalizing problems and peer rejection. Linear regressions controlling for age, sex, race, verbal proficiency, and resting physiology showed that HR reactivity explained unique variance in both teacher-rated prosocial competence and peer rejection, and contributed indirectly to these outcomes through pathways mediated by internalizing and externalizing problems. A trend also emerged for the unique contribution of PEP reactivity to peer-rated prosocial competence. These findings support the contribution of emotional reactivity to behavior problems and social adjustment among children living in disadvantaged urban contexts, and further suggest that elevated reactivity may confer risk for social difficulties in ways that overlap only partially with internalizing and externalizing behavior problems.

  3. Electroencephalographic reactivity testing in unconscious patients: a systematic review of methods and definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admiraal, M M; van Rootselaar, A-F; Horn, J

    2017-02-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) reactivity testing is often presented as a clear-cut element of electrophysiological testing. Absence of EEG reactivity is generally considered an indicator of poor outcome, especially in patients after cardiac arrest. However, guidelines do not clearly describe how to test for reactivity and how to evaluate the results. In a quest for clear guidelines, we performed a systematic review aimed at identifying testing methods and definitions of EEG reactivity. We systematically searched the literature between 1970 and May 2016. Methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the QUality In Prognostic Studies tool. Quality of the descriptions of stimulus protocol and reactivity definition was rated on a four-category grading scale based on reproducibility. We found that protocols for EEG reactivity testing vary greatly and descriptions of protocols are almost never replicable. Furthermore, replicable definitions of presence or absence of EEG reactivity are never provided. In order to draw firm conclusions on EEG reactivity as a prognostic factor, future studies should include a precise stimulation protocol and reactivity definition to facilitate guideline formation. © 2016 EAN.

  4. Amine reactivity with charged sulfuric acid clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Bzdek

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of charged species produced by electrospray of an ammonium sulfate solution in both positive and negative polarities is examined using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS. Positively-charged ammonium bisulfate cluster composition differs significantly from negatively-charged cluster composition. For positively-charged clusters all sulfuric acid is neutralized to bisulfate, whereas for negatively-charged clusters the degree of sulfuric acid neutralization is cluster size-dependent. With increasing cluster size (and, therefore, a decreasing role of charge, both positively- and negatively-charged cluster compositions converge toward ammonium bisulfate. The reactivity of negatively-charged sulfuric acid-ammonia clusters with dimethylamine and ammonia is also investigated by FTICR-MS. Two series of negatively-charged clusters are investigated: [(HSO4(H2SO4x] and [(NH4x(HSO4x+1(H2SO43]. Dimethylamine substitution for ammonia in [(NH4 x(HSO4 x+1(H2SO43] clusters is nearly collision-limited, and subsequent addition of dimethylamine to neutralize H2SO4 to bisulfate is within one order of magnitude of the substitution rate. Dimethylamine addition to [(HSO4 (H2SO4 x] clusters is either not observed or very slow. The results of this study indicate that amine chemistry will be evident and important only in large ambient negative ions (>m/z 400, whereas amine chemistry may be evident in small ambient positive ions. Addition of ammonia to unneutralized clusters occurs at a rate that is ~2–3 orders of magnitude slower than incorporation of dimethylamine either by substitution or addition

  5. Self-reactive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-01-01

    -proteins expressed in regulatory immune cells have been reported, especially in patients with cancer. The seemingly lack of tolerance toward such proteins is interesting, as it suggests a regulatory function of self-reactive T (srT) cells, which may be important for the fine tuning of the immune system....... In particular, surprising has been the description of cytotoxic srT cells that are able to eliminate normal regulatory immune cells. Such srT cells may be important as effector cells that suppress regulatory suppressor cells. The current knowledge of the nature and function of srT cells is still limited. Still......, the therapeutic targeting of srT cells offers a novel approach to harness immune-regulatory networks in cancer....

  6. Child temperament and parental depression predict cortisol reactivity to stress in middle childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackrell, Sarah V M; Sheikh, Haroon I; Kotelnikova, Yuliya; Kryski, Katie R; Jordan, Patricia L; Singh, Shiva M; Hayden, Elizabeth P

    2014-02-01

    Children's cortisol reactivity to stress is an important mediator of depression risk, making the search for predictors of such reactivity an important goal for psychopathologists. Multiple studies have linked maternal depression and childhood behavioral inhibition (BI) independently to child cortisol reactivity, yet few have tested multivariate models of these risks. Further, paternal depression and other child temperament traits, such as positive emotionality (PE), have been largely ignored despite their potential relevance. We therefore examined longitudinal associations between child fear/BI and PE and parental depression, and children's cortisol stress reactivity, in 205 7-year-olds. Paternal depression and child fear/BI predicted greater cortisol stress reactivity at a follow-up of 164 9-year-olds, and maternal depression and child PE interacted to predict children's cortisol reactivity, such that higher child PE predicted lower cortisol reactivity in the context of maternal depression. Results highlight the importance of both parents' depression, as well as multiple facets of child temperament, in developing more comprehensive models of childhood cortisol reactivity to stress. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Summertime OH reactivity from a receptor coastal site in the Mediterranean Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zannoni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Total hydroxyl radical (OH reactivity, the total loss frequency of the hydroxyl radical in ambient air, provides the total loading of OH reactants in air. We measured the total OH reactivity for the first time during summertime at a coastal receptor site located in the western Mediterranean Basin. Measurements were performed at a temporary field site located in the northern cape of Corsica (France, during summer 2013 for the project CARBOSOR (CARBOn within continental pollution plumes: SOurces and Reactivity–ChArMEx (Chemistry and Aerosols Mediterranean Experiment. Here, we compare the measured total OH reactivity with the OH reactivity calculated from the measured reactive gases. The difference between these two parameters is termed missing OH reactivity, i.e., the fraction of OH reactivity not explained by the measured compounds. The total OH reactivity at the site varied between the instrumental LoD (limit of detection  =  3 s−1 to a maximum of 17 ± 6 s−1 (35 % uncertainty and was 5 ± 4 s−1 (1σ SD – standard deviation on average. It varied with air temperature exhibiting a diurnal profile comparable to the reactivity calculated from the concentration of the biogenic volatile organic compounds measured at the site. For part of the campaign, 56 % of OH reactivity was unexplained by the measured OH reactants (missing reactivity. We suggest that oxidation products of biogenic gas precursors were among the contributors to missing OH reactivity.

  8. Immune reactivity to food coloring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojdani, Aristo; Vojdani, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    Artificial food dyes are made from petroleum and have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the enhancement of the color of processed foods. They are widely used in the food and pharmaceutical industries to increase the appeal and acceptability of their products. Synthetic food colorants can achieve hues not possible for natural colorants and are cheaper, more easily available, and last longer. However, since the use of artificial food coloring has become widespread, many allergic and other immune reactive disorders have increasingly been reported. During the past 50 y, the amount of synthetic dye used in foods has increased by 500%. Simultaneously, an alarming rise has occurred in behavioral problems in children, such as aggression, attention deficit disorder (ADD), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The ingestion of food delivers the greatest foreign antigenic load that challenges the immune system. Artificial colors can also be absorbed via the skin through cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. The molecules of synthetic colorants are small, and the immune system finds it difficult to defend the body against them. They can also bond to food or body proteins and, thus, are able to act in stealth mode to circumvent and disrupt the immune system. The consumption of synthetic food colors, and their ability to bind with body proteins, can have significant immunological consequences. This consumption can activate the inflammatory cascade, can result in the induction of intestinal permeability to large antigenic molecules, and could lead to cross-reactivities, autoimmunities, and even neurobehavioral disorders. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recently found a 41% increase in diagnoses of ADHD in boys of high-school age during the past decade. More shocking is the legal amount of artificial colorants allowed by the FDA in the foods, drugs, and cosmetics that we consume and use every day. The consuming public is largely

  9. Generation and Role of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species Induced by Plasma, Lasers, Chemical Agents, and Other Systems in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Nayansi; Ryu, Jae Jun

    2017-01-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) has been found to occur during inflammatory procedures, during cell ischemia, and in various crucial developmental processes such as cell differentiation and along cell signaling pathways. The most common sources of intracellular RONS are the mitochondrial electron transport system, NADH oxidase, and cytochrome P450. In this review, we analyzed the extracellular and intracellular sources of reactive species, their cell signaling pathways, the mechanisms of action, and their positive and negative effects in the dental field. In dentistry, ROS can be found—in lasers, photosensitizers, bleaching agents, cold plasma, and even resin cements, all of which contribute to the generation and prevalence of ROS. Nonthermal plasma has been used as a source of ROS for biomedical applications and has the potential for use with dental stem cells as well. There are different types of dental stem cells, but their therapeutic use remains largely untapped, with the focus currently on only periodontal ligament stem cells. More research is necessary in this area, including studies about ROS mechanisms with dental cells, along with the utilization of reactive species in redox medicine. Such studies will help to provide successful treatment modalities for various diseases. PMID:29204250

  10. Generation and Role of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species Induced by Plasma, Lasers, Chemical Agents, and Other Systems in Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Nayansi; Ryu, Jae Jun; Choi, Eun Ha; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) has been found to occur during inflammatory procedures, during cell ischemia, and in various crucial developmental processes such as cell differentiation and along cell signaling pathways. The most common sources of intracellular RONS are the mitochondrial electron transport system, NADH oxidase, and cytochrome P450. In this review, we analyzed the extracellular and intracellular sources of reactive species, their cell signaling pathways, the mechanisms of action, and their positive and negative effects in the dental field. In dentistry, ROS can be found-in lasers, photosensitizers, bleaching agents, cold plasma, and even resin cements, all of which contribute to the generation and prevalence of ROS. Nonthermal plasma has been used as a source of ROS for biomedical applications and has the potential for use with dental stem cells as well. There are different types of dental stem cells, but their therapeutic use remains largely untapped, with the focus currently on only periodontal ligament stem cells. More research is necessary in this area, including studies about ROS mechanisms with dental cells, along with the utilization of reactive species in redox medicine. Such studies will help to provide successful treatment modalities for various diseases.

  11. Deep Space Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Andrew T. (Inventor); Riedel, Joseph E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A single, compact, lower power deep space positioning system (DPS) configured to determine a location of a spacecraft anywhere in the solar system, and provide state information relative to Earth, Sun, or any remote object. For example, the DPS includes a first camera and, possibly, a second camera configured to capture a plurality of navigation images to determine a state of a spacecraft in a solar system. The second camera is located behind, or adjacent to, a secondary reflector of a first camera in a body of a telescope.

  12. Reactive searching and infotaxis in odor source localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voges, Nicole; Chaffiol, Antoine; Lucas, Philippe; Martinez, Dominique

    2014-10-01

    Male moths aiming to locate pheromone-releasing females rely on stimulus-adapted search maneuvers complicated by a discontinuous distribution of pheromone patches. They alternate sequences of upwind surge when perceiving the pheromone and cross- or downwind casting when the odor is lost. We compare four search strategies: three reactive versus one cognitive. The former consist of pre-programmed movement sequences triggered by pheromone detections while the latter uses Bayesian inference to build spatial probability maps. Based on the analysis of triphasic responses of antennal lobe neurons (On, inhibition, Off), we propose three reactive strategies. One combines upwind surge (representing the On response to a pheromone detection) and spiral casting, only. The other two additionally include crosswind (zigzag) casting representing the Off phase. As cognitive strategy we use the infotaxis algorithm which was developed for searching in a turbulent medium. Detection events in the electroantennogram of a moth attached to a robot indirectly control this cyborg, depending on the strategy in use. The recorded trajectories are analyzed with regard to success rates, efficiency, and other features. In addition, we qualitatively compare our robotic trajectories to behavioral search paths. Reactive searching is more efficient (yielding shorter trajectories) for higher pheromone doses whereas cognitive searching works better for lower doses. With respect to our experimental conditions (2 m from starting position to pheromone source), reactive searching with crosswind zigzag yields the shortest trajectories (for comparable success rates). Assuming that the neuronal Off response represents a short-term memory, zigzagging is an efficient movement to relocate a recently lost pheromone plume. Accordingly, such reactive strategies offer an interesting alternative to complex cognitive searching.

  13. Synemin is expressed in reactive astrocytes and Rosenthal fibers in Alexander disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekny, Tulen; Faiz, Maryam; Wilhelmsson, Ulrika; Curtis, Maurice A; Matej, Radoslav; Skalli, Omar; Pekny, Milos

    2014-01-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with prominent white matter degeneration and the presence of Rosenthal fibers containing aggregates of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and small stress proteins HSP27 and αB-crystallin, and widespread reactive gliosis. AxD is caused by mutations in GFAP, the main astrocyte intermediate filament protein. We previously showed that intermediate filament protein synemin is upregulated in reactive astrocytes after neurotrauma. Here, we examined immunohistochemically the presence of synemin in reactive astrocytes and Rosenthal fibers in two patients with AxD. There was an abundance of GFAP-positive Rosenthal fibers and widespread reactive gliosis in the white matter and subpial regions. Many of the GFAP-positive reactive astrocytes were positive for synemin, and synemin was also present in Rosenthal fibers. We show that synemin is expressed in reactive astrocytes in AxD, and is also present in Rosenthal fibers. The potential role of synemin in AxD pathogenesis remains to be investigated. © 2013 APMIS Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. The conformity of BPP and vibroacoustic stimulation results in fetal non reactive non stress test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Modarres

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most frequently used test for evaluation of fetal health is the Non Stress Test (NST. Unfortunately it has a high incidence of false positive results. The combination of vibroacoustic stimulation with the NTS has been shown to reduce non reactive results. Methods: A tests assessment method was chosen with a simple randomized sampling. 40 pregnant women with non reactive NST in the first 20 minutes who received VAS in one of Tehran University's Hospitals were compared with BPP scores. A vibroacoustic stimulation was applied for a 3 seconds on the maternal abdomen and fallowed within 10 minutes.Data collection tools were NST, sonography instruments ,NST result paper, tooth brusher, watch, demographic questioner and check list. Data analysis was made by descriptive static and by using the Fisher's Exact Test (with level of significant at p<0/05. All statistical analysis were performed using an spss/win. Results: After VAS, 70% of non reactive tracing became reactive. All cases with fetal reactivity response after a VAS had a subsequent BPP score of 8 (negative predictive value of 100%. False positivity of VAS was lower than NST. Conclusion: VAS offers benefits, by decreasing the incidence of non reactive test and reducing test time. VAS lowers the rate of false positive NST. VAS is safe and allows more efficient of prenatal services. This test could be used as a rapid antepartum test to predict fetal well-being.

  15. Social stimulation and corticolimbic reactivity in premenstrual dysphoric disorder: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), characterized by luteal phase-induced negative affect and loss of impulse control, often results in compromised social interactions. Although amygdala activation is generally linked to negative affect, increased amygdala reactivity to aversive stimuli in the luteal phase has not been consistently reported in PMDD. We tested the hypothesis that amygdala hyper-reactivity in PMDD is symptom specific, rather than generalized, and linked to socially relevant stimuli. Blood oxygenation level dependent signal changes during exposure to negative images with social and non-social content were evaluated in the mid-follicular and late luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Fourteen women with PMDD and 13 healthy controls participated. Results When compared with healthy controls, women with PMDD in the luteal phase had enhanced reactivity to social stimuli compared to non-social stimuli in the amygdala and insula, but attenuated reactivity in the anterior cingulate cortex. Functional couplings between emotion processing and controlling areas were significantly different, being positive in women with PMDD and negative in healthy controls. Changes in progesterone levels in women with PMDD correlated positively with altered amygdala reactivity. Conclusions Socially relevant aversive stimulation elicited enhanced activity in affective processing brain regions that were functionally coupled to compromised activity in cognitive control areas. Because increased reactivity correlated positively with alterations in ovarian steroid levels, data preliminary support the hypothesis that enhanced progesterone sensitivity in PMDD affects corticolimbic processing of social emotions. PMID:24572042

  16. Reactive-transport modelling of gypsum dissolution in a coastal karst aquifer in Puglia, southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Claudia; Fidelibus, Maria Dolores

    2015-11-01

    The gypsum coastal aquifer of Lesina Marina (Puglia, southern Italy) has been affected by sinkhole formation in recent decades. Previous studies based on geomorphologic and hydrogeological data ascribed the onset of collapse phenomena to the erosion of material that fills palaeo-cavities (suffosion sinkholes). The change in the hydrodynamic conditions of groundwater induced by the excavation of a canal within the evaporite formation nearly 100 years ago was identified as the major factor in triggering the erosion, while the contribution of gypsum dissolution was considered negligible. A combined reactive-transport/density-dependent flow model was applied to the gypsum aquifer to evaluate whether gypsum dissolution rate is a dominant or insignificant factor in recent sinkhole formation under current hydrodynamic conditions. The conceptual model was first defined with a set of assumptions based on field and laboratory data along a two-dimensional transect of the aquifer, and then a density-dependent, tide-influenced flow model was set up and solved using the numerical code SEAWAT. Finally, the resulting transient flow field was used by the reactive multicomponent transport model PHT3D to estimate the gypsum dissolution rate. The validation tests show that the model accurately represents the real system, and the multi-disciplinary approach provides consistent information about the causes and evolution time of dissolution processes. The modelled porosity development rate is too low to represent a significant contribution to the recent sinkhole formation in the Lesina Marina area, although it justifies cavity formation and cavity position over geological time.

  17. Utilizing the σ-complex stability for quantifying reactivity in nucleophilic substitution of aromatic fluorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Liljenberg

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A computational approach using density functional theory to compute the energies of the possible σ-complex reaction intermediates, the “σ-complex approach”, has been shown to be very useful in predicting regioselectivity, in electrophilic as well as nucleophilic aromatic substitution. In this article we give a short overview of the background for these investigations and the general requirements for predictive reactivity models for the pharmaceutical industry. We also present new results regarding the reaction rates and regioselectivities in nucleophilic substitution of fluorinated aromatics. They were rationalized by investigating linear correlations between experimental rate constants (k from the literature with a theoretical quantity, which we call the sigma stability (SS. The SS is the energy change associated with formation of the intermediate σ-complex by attachment of the nucleophile to the aromatic ring. The correlations, which include both neutral (NH3 and anionic (MeO− nucleophiles are quite satisfactory (r = 0.93 to r = 0.99, and SS is thus useful for quantifying both global (substrate and local (positional reactivity in SNAr reactions of fluorinated aromatic substrates. A mechanistic analysis shows that the geometric structure of the σ-complex resembles the rate-limiting transition state and that this provides a rationale for the observed correlations between the SS and the reaction rate.

  18. Conjunctival lymphoma arising from reactive lymphoid hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukuhara Junichi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Extra nodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (EMZL of the conjunctiva typically arises in the marginal zone of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. The pathogenesis of conjunctival EMZL remains unknown. We describe an unusual case of EMZL arising from reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (RLH of the conjunctiva. A 35-year-old woman had fleshy salmon-pink conjunctival tumors in both eyes, oculus uterque (OU. Specimens from conjunctival tumors in the right eye, oculus dexter (OD, revealed a collection of small lymphoid cells in the stroma. Immunohistochemically, immunoglobulin (Ig light chain restriction was not detected. In contrast, diffuse atypical lymphoid cell infiltration was noted in the left eye, oculus sinister (OS, and positive for CD20, a marker for B cells OS. The tumors were histologically diagnosed as RLH OD, and EMZL OS. PCR analysis detected IgH gene rearrangement in the joining region (JH region OU. After 11 months, a re-biopsy specimen demonstrated EMZL based on compatible pathological and genetic findings OD, arising from RLH. This case suggests that even if the diagnosis of the conjunctival lymphoproliferative lesions is histologically benign, confirmation of the B-cell clonality by checking IgH gene rearrangement should be useful to predict the incidence of malignancy.

  19. Sniff to see. Comparing sniffing position versus simple head extension position for glottic exposure - A prospective, randomized cross over study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant Sahay

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Sniffing position provides better glottis exposure and it is easier to intubate a patient in the sniffing position as compared to simple head extension position. Sniffing position should therefore be used as initial position when attempting intubation.

  20. [Congenital syphilis after reactivation of "healed" maternal primary infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieker, S; Siefert, S; Lemke, J; Püst, B

    2000-01-01

    The congenital syphilis is an infectious fetopathy which is able to affect the whole organism. In most cases symptoms are not obvious before week fourth to twelve of life. The infection of the mother is the precondition for the child's disease. The placental transfer takes place after the fifth to sixth month of gestation. We report about an eight week old baby with congenital syphilis. The positive maternal laboratory findings in the 4th month of pregnancy have been interpreted as a completely cured earlier infection causing a sero scar. The diagnosis became evident by serological tests detecting reactivation of maternal infection in late pregnancy and the clinical signs of acute infection of the child. There is a high risk of reactivation of maternal syphilis in the third trimenon even if the mother does not show any symptoms. In this case further serological tests in the prenatal care and careful examination of the newborn must be initiated.

  1. Dynamic power management for reactive stream processing on the SCC tiled architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karavadara, Nilesh; Zolda, Michael; Nga Nguyen, Vu Thien; Knoop, Jens; Kirner, Raimund

    2016-01-01

    .... Many modern processors support some form of DVFS.In this article, we focus on the development of an execution framework that provides lightweight DVFS support for reactive stream processing systems (RSPS...

  2. Social information processing problems related to reactive and proactive aggression of adolescents in residential treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostermeijer, S.; van Nieuwenhuijzen, M.; van de Ven, P.M.; Popma, A.; Jansen, L.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents in residential treatment predominantly show externalizing problems. To provide more tailored treatments, gaining knowledge on underlying processes is important. Aggression is often subdivided in defensive/reactive, and instrumental/proactive aggression. The social information processing

  3. Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appen, Jan von; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Momber, Ilan; Klapp, David; Scheven, Alexander von

    2011-05-01

    As power generation from variable distributed energy resources (DER) grows, energy flows in the network are changing, increasing the requirements for ancillary services, including voltage support. With the appropriate power converter, DER can provide ancillary services such as frequency control and voltage support. This paper outlines the economic potential of DERs coordinated in a microgrid to provide reactive power and voltage support at its point of common coupling. The DER Customer Adoption Model assesses the costs of providing reactive power, given local utility rules. Depending on the installed DER, the cost minimizing solution for supplying reactive power locally is chosen. Costs include the variable cost of the additional losses and the investment cost of appropriately over-sizing converters or purchasing capacitors. A case study of a large health care building in San Francisco is used to evaluate different revenue possibilities of creating an incentive for microgrids to provide reactive power.

  4. Cue reactivity and its inhibition in pathological computer game players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Robert C; Krüger, Jenny-Kathinka; Neumann, Britta; Schott, Björn H; Kaufmann, Christian; Heinz, Andreas; Wüstenberg, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Despite a rising social relevance of pathological computer game playing, it remains unclear whether the neurobiological basis of this addiction-like behavioral disorder and substance-related addiction are comparable. In substance-related addiction, attentional bias and cue reactivity are often observed. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance study using a dot probe paradigm with short-presentation (attentional bias) and long-presentation (cue reactivity) trials in eight male pathological computer game players (PCGPs) and nine healthy controls (HCs). Computer game-related and neutral computer-generated pictures, as well as pictures from the International Affective Picture System with positive and neutral valence, served as stimuli. PCGPs showed an attentional bias toward both game-related and affective stimuli with positive valence. In contrast, HCs showed no attentional bias effect at all. PCGPs showed stronger brain responses in short-presentation trials compared with HCs in medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and anterior cingulate gyrus and in long-presentation trials in lingual gyrus. In an exploratory post hoc functional connectivity analyses, for long-presentation trials, connectivity strength was higher between right inferior frontal gyrus, which was associated with inhibition processing in previous studies, and cue reactivity-related regions (left orbitofrontal cortex and ventral striatum) in PCGPs. We observed behavioral and neural effects in PCGPs, which are comparable with those found in substance-related addiction. However, cue-related brain responses were depending on duration of cue presentation. Together with the connectivity result, these findings suggest that top-down inhibitory processes might suppress the cue reactivity-related neural activity in long-presentation trials. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. Secure provision of reactive power ancillary services in competitive electricity markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Samahy, Ismael

    The research work presented in this thesis discusses various complex issues associated with reactive power management and pricing in the context of new operating paradigms in deregulated power systems, proposing appropriate policy solutions. An integrated two-level framework for reactive power management is set forth, which is both suitable for a competitive market and ensures a secure and reliable operation of the associated power system. The framework is generic in nature and can be adopted for any electricity market structure. The proposed hierarchical reactive power market structure comprises two stages: procurement of reactive power resources on a seasonal basis, and real-time reactive power dispatch. The main objective of the proposed framework is to provide appropriate reactive power support from service providers at least cost, while ensuring a secure operation of the power system. The proposed procurement procedure is based on a two-step optimization model. First, the marginal benefits of reactive power supply from each provider, with respect to system security, are obtained by solving a loadability-maximization problem subject to transmission security constraints imposed by voltage and thermal limits. Second, the selected set of generators is determined by solving an optimal power flow (OPF)-based auction. This auction maximizes a societal advantage function comprising generators' offers and their corresponding marginal benefits with respect to system security, and considering all transmission system constraints. The proposed procedure yields the selected set of generators and zonal price components, which would form the basis for seasonal contracts between the system operator and the selected reactive power service providers. The main objective of the proposed reactive power dispatch model is to minimize the total payment burden on the Independent System Operator (ISO), which is associated with reactive power dispatch. The real power generation is

  6. Second Reactivation of Neurocysticercosis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Young Sup; Hwang, Hee Young; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Jee Eun; Kim, Hyung Sik [Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    This report describes the first case involving a second reactivation of neurocysticercosis. There was peripheral enhancement and surrounding edema at multiple calcified lesions in both cerebral hemispheres on the brain MRI. One must be aware of the possibility of reactivation of neurocysticercosis to make the correct diagnosis

  7. Exploring the potential ramifications of missing reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, J.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements of OH reactivity, the inverse lifetime of the OH radical, are becoming an increasingly common method of quantifying the total amount of reactive carbon in an airmass. Several studies have demonstrated discrepancies between measured OH reactivity and the OH reactivity calculated from the summation of measured and modeled species, especially in forested regions. This missing reactivity is the product of the total mass of unmeasured compounds ([X]) and its effective reaction rate with OH (kX+OH). The impact of this unmeasured, underpredicted reactive carbon is dependent on the distribution of the total (kX+OH[X]) between each of these components. In this study, we examine possible ranges of kX+OH and [X] that could account for the total missing reactivity, and discuss the air-quality relevant implications. For example, fast reaction rates and low concentrations could lead to production of reaction products on smaller spatial and temporal scales. In contrast, slower rates and higher concentrations could produce an enhancement of the regional background of oxidized organic compounds. Additionally, while the quantification of total reactivity is tied to the production of peroxy radicals, its capacity to form secondary organic aerosol is dependent on its speciation. We discuss these concepts in the framework of the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign, and extend our analysis to a variety of forested environments.

  8. Florid reactive periostitis of the hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambhekar, Nirmala A; Desai, Saral S; Puri, Ajay; Agarwal, Manish

    2004-11-01

    Reactive periostitis of the hand can be a confounding lesion on both radiological and histological grounds. An erroneous diagnosis of a malignant tumor, particularly an osteosarcoma, is a possibility. Two cases of florid reactive periostitis of the hand mistaken for osteosarcoma are reported here to illustrate this entity and caution against a diagnostic pitfall.

  9. Florid reactive periostitis of the hands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jambhekar, Nirmala A.; Desai, Saral S. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Department of Pathology, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India); Puri, Ajay; Agarwal, Manish [Tata Memorial Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Mumbai, Maharashtra (India)

    2004-11-01

    Reactive periostitis of the hand can be a confounding lesion on both radiological and histological grounds. An erroneous diagnosis of a malignant tumor, particularly an osteosarcoma, is a possibility. Two cases of florid reactive periostitis of the hand mistaken for osteosarcoma are reported here to illustrate this entity and caution against a diagnostic pitfall. (orig.)

  10. Adolescents' Emotional Reactivity across Relationship Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Emily C.; Buehler, Cheryl; Blair, Bethany L.

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents' emotional reactivity in family, close friendships, and romantic relationships was examined in a community-based sample of 416 two-parent families. Six waves of annual data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Emotional reactivity to interparental conflict during early adolescence was associated prospectively with…

  11. Dietary restraint and heightened reactivity to food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstrom, Jeffrey M; Yates, Heather M; Witcomb, Gemma L

    2004-03-01

    Previously, studies have explored the relationship between dietary behavior and salivary reactivity to food. Despite this, it remains unclear which behaviors are associated with enhanced reactivity. One problem is that measures of behavior have not been compared directly. In particular, it is unclear whether elevated reactivity is associated with measures of dietary restraint or with measures of failed dietary control and a tendency to overeat. To address this problem, we compared the association between salivary reactivity and scores on the subscales of the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (restraint, disinhibition, and hunger). Estimates of reactivity were derived from the difference between a baseline saliva measure and a similar measure taken in close proximity to hot pizza. Our second aim was to explore how salivary reactivity changes after a meal. Female participants (N=40) were tested before and after a lunch (cheese sandwiches). All tended to show reactivity to pizza before but not after lunch. No significant differences were associated with the disinhibition or hunger subscales. However, prelunch reactivity was significantly greater in those participants with high scores on the restraint scale. This does not appear to be related to reported levels of hunger before lunch. Rather, it may reveal an intrinsic difference between the reaction of restrained and unrestrained eaters to food.

  12. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV ... 003356.htm . Accessed October 2011. (© 1995–2011). Unit Code 9731: C-Reactive Protein (CRP), Serum. Mayo Clinic ...

  13. The reactive extrusion of thermoplastic polyurethane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Vincent Wilhelmus Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to increase the understanding of the reactive extrusion of thermoplastic polyurethane. Overall, several issues were identified: • Using a relative simple extrusion model, the reactive extrusion process can be described. This model can be used to further investigate

  14. Frustrated Lewis pairs: Design and reactivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 127; Issue 2. Frustrated Lewis pairs: Design and reactivity. Sanjoy Mukherjee Pakkirisamy Thilagar. Volume 127 Issue 2 ... main group as well as transition metal chemistry. The design strategies adopted for FLP systems and their unique reactivity are discussed here.

  15. In Situ Solid-Gas Reactivity of Nanoscaled Metal Borides from Molten Salt Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Gouget, Guillaume; Debecker, Damien P.; Kim, Ara; Olivieri, Giorgia; Gallet, Jean-Jacques; Bournel, Fabrice; Thomas, Cyril; Ersen, Ovidiu; Moldovan, Simona; Sanchez, Clément; Carenco , Sophie; Portehault, David

    2017-01-01

    Metal borides have mostly been studied as bulk materials. The nanoscale provides new opportunities to investigate the properties of these materials, e.g., nanoscale hardening and surface reactivity. Metal borides are often considered stable solids because of their covalent character, but little is known on their behavior under a reactive atmosphere, especially reductive gases. We use molten salt synthesis at 750 °C to provide cobalt monoboride (CoB) nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous layer...

  16. Guidelines for Distribution System Operators on Reactive Power Provision by Electric Vehicles in Low Voltage Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zecchino, Antonio; Marinelli, Mattia; Træholt, Chresten

    2017-01-01

    The increasing success of electric vehicles is bringing new technical challenges to power system operators. This work intends to provide guidelines for distribution system operators in terms of reactive power requirements when evaluating and authorizing electric vehicles supply equipment with fast...... the amount of reactive power that an individual electric vehicle is expected to provide when connected to a low voltage feeder, in order to benefit of the desired voltage rise effect in comparison to the case of unitary power factor....

  17. Sleep problems predict cortisol reactivity to stress in urban adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrug, Sylvie; Tyson, Anna; Turan, Bulent; Granger, Douglas A

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the role of sleep problems and sleep duration on stress-related HPA axis reactivity among urban, low income adolescents. A total of 84 adolescents (M age 13.36 years; 50% male; 95% African American) and their parents provided information on adolescents' sleep problems and sleep quantity. Adolescents completed a standardized social stress test in the laboratory (the Trier Social Stress Test; TSST). Saliva samples collected before and after the TSST yielded measures of cortisol pre-test, 15 min post-test, and 55 min post-test, as well as overall cortisol secretion and its increase (AUCG and AUCI). More sleep problems and longer sleep duration predicted higher cortisol reactivity to the TSST, particularly among females. Self-reports of sleep were more consistently related to stress-related cortisol reactivity than parent reports. Sleep problems and longer sleep duration may place adolescents at risk for HPA axis hyper-reactivity to stress, contributing to academic, behavioral and health problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Time to wake up: reactive countermeasures to sleep inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilditch, Cassie J; Dorrian, Jillian; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-12-07

    Sleep inertia is the period of impaired performance and grogginess experienced after waking. This period of impairment is of concern to workers who are on-call, or nap during work hours, and need to perform safety-critical tasks soon after waking. While several studies have investigated the best sleep timing and length to minimise sleep inertia effects, few have focused on countermeasures -especially those that can be implemented after waking (i.e. reactive countermeasures). This structured review summarises current literature on reactive countermeasures to sleep inertia such as caffeine, light, and temperature and discusses evidence for the effectiveness and operational viability of each approach. Current literature does not provide a convincing evidence-base for a reactive countermeasure. Caffeine is perhaps the best option, although it is most effective when administered prior to sleep and is therefore not strictly reactive. Investigations into light and temperature have found promising results for improving subjective alertness; further research is needed to determine whether these countermeasures can also attenuate performance impairment. Future research in this area would benefit from study design features highlighted in this review. In the meantime, it is recommended that proactive sleep inertia countermeasures are used, and that safety-critical tasks are avoided immediately after waking.

  19. Research advances in hepatitis B virus reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Mengyuan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In non-active or cured patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV infection, when the body′s immune homeostasis is broken, HBV reactivation may occur, with the manifestations of liver inflammation and increased HBV DNA level, and lead to varying degrees of abnormal liver function, liver failure, and even death. Systematic management from the aspects of the screening of HBV reactivation, risk stratification of immunosuppression regimens, and patient's individual information needs to be solved urgently. It is very important to perform the screening of HBV serological markers before immunosuppressive therapy and chemotherapy, evaluate the risk of HBV reactivation, and develop individualized prophylactic antiviral therapy. Complete removal of covalently closed circular DNA in hepatocytes is essential for preventing HBV reactivation. This article summarizes related research advances in HBV reactivation from the aspects of its etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  20. IgE reactivity to hen egg white allergens in dogs with cutaneous adverse food reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakura, Hidekatsu; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Saito, Taku; Miyaji, Kazuki; Fujimura, Masato; Masuda, Kenichi; Okamoto, Noriaki; DeBoer, Douglas J; Sakaguchi, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    Dogs with cutaneous adverse food reactions (CAFR) often have specific IgE to food allergens. Egg white, which is majorly composed of ovomucoid, ovalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme, is a food allergen in dogs. Information of the IgE reactivity to purified egg white allergens supports accurate diagnosis and efficiency treatment in humans. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no studies on the IgE reactivity to purified egg white allergens in dogs. Here, we investigated the IgE reactivity to crude and purified allergens of hen egg white in dogs with CAFR. First, when we examined serum samples from 82 dogs with CAFR for specific IgE to crude egg white by ELISA, 9.8% (8/82) of the dogs with CAFR showed the IgE reactivity to crude egg white. We then used sera from the eight dogs with positive IgE reactivity to crude egg white to examine the IgE reactivity to four purified allergens, ovomucoid, ovalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme, by ELISA. We found that 75% (6/8) of the dogs showed IgE reactivity to both ovomucoid and ovalbumin, and that 37.5% (3/8) of the dogs showed IgE reactivity to ovotransferrin. None (0/8) showed IgE reactivity to lysozyme. Moreover, validating these results, the immunoblot analyses were performed using the sera of the three dogs showing the highest IgE reactivity to crude egg white. Both anti-ovomucoid and anti-ovalbumin IgE were detected in the sera of these dogs, while anti-ovotransferrin IgE was not detected. Considering these, ovomucoid and ovalbumin appears to be the major egg white allergens in dogs with CAFR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Integrated reactive absorption process for synthesis of fatty esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Anton Alexandru; Bildea, Costin Sorin

    2011-01-01

    Reactive separations using green catalysts offer great opportunities for manufacturing fatty esters, involved in specialty chemicals and biodiesel production. Integrating reaction and separation into one unit provides key benefits such as: simplified operation, no waste, reduced capital investment and low operating costs. This work presents a novel heat-integrated reactive absorption process that eliminates all conventional catalyst related operations, efficiently uses the raw materials and equipment, and considerably reduces the energy requirements for biodiesel production--85% lower as compared to the base case. Rigorous simulations based on experimental results were carried out using Aspen Plus and Dynamics. Despite the high degree of integration, the process is well controllable using an efficient control structure proposed in this work. The main results are provided for a plant producing 10 ktpy fatty acid methyl esters from methanol and waste vegetable oil with high free fatty acids content, using sulfated zirconia as solid acid catalyst. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Simulations of highly reactive fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, L E; Manaa, M R; Reed, E J

    2005-07-21

    We report density functional molecular dynamics simulations to determine the early chemical events of hot (T = 3000 K) and dense (1.97 g/cm{sup 3}, V/V{sub 0} = 0.68) nitromethane (CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}). The first step in the decomposition process is an intermolecular proton abstraction mechanism that leads to the formation of CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2}H and the aci ion H{sub 2}CNO{sub 2}{sup -}, in support of evidence from static high-pressure and shock experiments. An intramolecular hydrogen transfer that transforms nitromethane into the aci acid form, CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}H, accompanies this event. This is the first confirmation of chemical reactivity with bond selectivity for an energetic material near the condition of fully reacted specimen. We also report the decomposition mechanism followed up to the formation of H{sub 2}O as the first stable product.

  3. Development of Reactivity Calculation Code for HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, B. G.; Kim, M. S. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Reactivity of the reactor core is measured by a multi-channel wide range reactivity computer (or called reactivity meter), which uses current signals from the compensated ion chamber (CIC) mounted on the courtside wall of the reflector tank in the pool [1]. Because there were a few difficulties in operating the reactivity meter in the MS-DOS environment, some researches have been carried out to improve and upgrade it on the Windows environment [2]. Nevertheless, it is still hard for reactor operators to immediately check the time-dependent reactivity in case of power excursion because of some limitations such as aging of devices and compatibility issues. In this study, a simple off-line tool which can estimate the timedependent reactivity by using the fission chamber signals has been developed, and utilized to the case of loose parts of dummy rod in the 86-2th cycles of HANARO. In order to check the reactivity quickly for reactor operators, the inverse kinetic quations have been incorporated, and several useful functions have been implemented to the code. in the case of 86-2th cycles of HANARO, the developed code showed good performance to estimate time dependent reactivity. In the future, the on line analysis modules will be implanted to the code with upgrade of the measrement equipment such as current meters and data acquisition devices. Additionally, reactivity will be estimated by using the reactivity meter in the MS-DOS enviroment, and the new Windows version, for the verification of the developed code.

  4. An in vitro model of reactive astrogliosis and its effect on neuronal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Panpan; Wang, Hang; Katagiri, Yasuhiro; Geller, Herbert M

    2012-01-01

    Astrogliosis, whereby astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) become reactive in response to tissue damage, is a prominent process leading to the formation of the glial scar that inhibits axon regeneration after CNS injury. Upon becoming reactive, astrocytes undergo various molecular and morphological changes including upregulating their expression of GFAP and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) as well as other molecules that are inhibitory to axon growth. We have developed an in vitro model of reactive astrogliosis as a result of treating cultured astrocytes with transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), which induces increased expression as well as secretion of CSPGs. These reactive astrocytes show inhibitory effects on neuron growth both in neuron-astrocyte coculture and in neurite guidance spot assay using astrocyte-conditioned medium. These reactive astrocytes provide a vehicle for testing substances that might overcome the glial scar and promote regeneration.

  5. Reactive Power Capability of the Wind Turbine with Doubly Fed Induction Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Jie; Su, Chi; Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    of reactive power compensation, depending on the wind speed and the active power control strategy. This paper analyzes the reactive power capability of Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) based wind turbine, considering the rated stator current limit, the rated rotor current limit, the rated rotor voltage...... and reactive power compensation at the point of common coupling (PCC). Besides the shunt flexible alternating current transmission system (FACTS) devices such as the static var compensator (SVC) and the static synchronous compensator (STATCOM), the wind turbine itself can also provide a certain amount...... limit, and the reactive power capability of the grid side convertor (GSC). The boundaries of reactive power capability of DFIG based wind turbine are derived. The result was obtained using the software MATLAB....

  6. Evidence to Support a Contribution of Polyreactive Antibodies to HLA Serum Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Baoshan; Rong, Chunshu; Porcheray, Fabrice; Moore, Carolina; Girouard, Timothy C; Saidman, Susan L; Wong, Waichi; Fu, Yaowen; Zorn, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the serum reactivity to HLA is essential for the evaluation of transplant candidates and the follow-up of allograft recipients. In this study, we look for evidence at the clonal level that polyreactive antibodies cross-reactive to apoptotic cells and multiple autoantigens can also react to HLA and contribute to the overall serum reactivity. We immortalized B cell clones from the blood of 2 kidney transplant recipients and characterized their reactivity to self-antigens, apoptotic cells as well as native, denatured, and cryptic HLA determinants using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and Luminex assays. We also assessed the reactivity of 300 pretransplant serum specimens to HLA and apoptotic cells. We report here 4 distinct B cell clones cross-reactive to self and HLA class I. All 4 clones reacted to numerous HLA class I alleles but did not appear to target canonical "shared" epitopes. In parallel experiments, we observed a strong correlation between IgG reactivity to HLA and apoptotic cells in pretransplant serum samples collected from 300 kidney transplant recipients. Further analysis revealed that samples with higher reactivity to apoptotic cells displayed significantly higher class I percent panel-reactive antibodies compared to samples with low reactivity to apoptotic cells. We provide here (1) proof of principle at the clonal level that human polyreactive antibodies can cross-react to HLA, multiple self-antigens and apoptotic cells and (2) supportive evidence that polyreactive antibodies contribute to overall HLA reactivity in the serum of patients awaiting kidney transplant.

  7. Hepatitis B virus reactivation after cytotoxic chemotherapy: the disease and its prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindikoglu, Ayse L; Regev, Arie; Schiff, Eugene R

    2006-09-01

    Reactivation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a well-recognized complication in patients with chronic HBV infection who receive cytotoxic or immunosuppressive therapy. In most cases, reactivations occur in patients who are carriers of HBV infection showing positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Reactivation also may occur in patients with resolved infection who are HBsAg negative, anti-HBs positive, and anti-hepatitis B core positive. HBV reactivations can lead to severe flares that may be life-threatening unless recognized and treated promptly. Physician awareness is essential because prophylactic antiviral treatment can diminish the occurrence and improve the outcome of such episodes. Patients undergoing cytotoxic therapy should be checked routinely for HBV serologic markers and serum HBV DNA levels. Patients who are HBV carriers or anti-hepatitis B core positive should be monitored closely during and after the administration of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Prophylactic treatment with a nucleoside or nucleotide analogue should be considered strongly to prevent HBV reactivation in these patients.

  8. The chemical reactivity and structure of collagen studied by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wess, T.J.; Wess, L.; Miller, A. [Univ. of Stirling (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The chemical reactivity of collagen can be studied using neutron diffraction (a non-destructive technique), for certain reaction types. Collagen contains a number of lysine and hydroxylysine side chains that can react with aldehydes and ketones, or these side chains can themselves be converted to aldehydes by lysyl oxidase. The reactivity of these groups not only has an important role in the maintenance of mechanical strength in collagen fibrils, but can also manifest pathologically in the cases of aging, diabetes (reactivity with a variety of sugars) and alcoholism (reactivity with acetaldehyde). The reactivity of reducing groups with collagen can be studied by neutron diffraction, since the crosslink formed in the adduction process is initially of a Schiff base or keto-imine nature. The nature of this crosslink allows it to be deuterated, and the position of this relatively heavy scattering atom can be used in a process of phase determination by multiple isomorphous replacement. This process was used to study the following: the position of natural crosslinks in collagen; the position of adducts in tendon from diabetic rats in vivo and the in vitro position of acetaidehyde adducts in tendon.

  9. Reactive Programming and Clean Architecture in Android Development

    OpenAIRE

    Bui, Duy

    2017-01-01

    Software application becomes more and more complex nowadays. To provide a good software application that is easy to scale, developers need to design a good software architecture. The purpose of the project was to find a good Android architecture that can be used in later projects of the team C63-Studio. The project was implemented by refactoring a legacy Android application of team C63-Studio using clean architecture, dependency injection and reactive programming. From the refactoring...

  10. Flaxseed oil increases aortic reactivity to phenylephrine through reactive oxygen species and the cyclooxygenase-2 pathway in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Dieli Oliveira; Almenara, Camila Cruz Pereira; Broseghini-Filho, Gilson Brás; Silva, Marito Afonso Sousa Costa; Stefanon, Ivanita; Vassallo, Dalton V; Padilha, Alessandra S

    2014-07-03

    Flaxseed oil has the highest concentration of omega-3 α-linolenic acid, which has been associated with cardiovascular benefit. However, the mechanism underlying the vascular effects induced through flaxseed oil is not well known. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the effects of flaxseed oil on vascular function in isolated rat aortic rings. Wistar rats were treated daily with flaxseed oil or a control (mineral oil) intramuscular (i.m.) for fifteen days. Isolated aortic segments were used to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression, superoxide anion levels and vascular reactivity experiments. Flaxseed oil treatment increased the vasoconstrictor response of aortic rings to phenylephrine. Endothelium removal increased the response to phenylephrine in aortic segments isolated from both groups, but the effect was smaller in the treated group. L-NAME incubation similarly increased the phenylephrine response in segments from both groups. The TXA2 synthase inhibitor furegrelate, the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS 398, the TP receptor antagonist SQ 29.548, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger apocynin, the superoxide anion scavengers tiron and the phospholipase A2 inhibitor dexamethasone partially reversed the flaxseed oil-induced increase in reactivity to phenylephrine. These findings suggest that flaxseed oil treatment increased vascular reactivity to phenylephrine through an increase in ROS production and COX-2-derived TXA2 production. The results obtained in the present study provide new insight into the effects of flaxseed oil treatment (i.m.) on vascular function.

  11. Want Positive Behavior? Use Positive Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chip; Freeman-Loftis, Babs

    2012-01-01

    Positive adult language is the professional use of words and tone of voice to enable students to learn in an engaged, active way. This includes learning social skills. To guide children toward choosing and maintaining positive behaviors, adults need to carefully choose the words and tone of voice used when speaking to them. Learning to use…

  12. Positive Education: Positive Psychology and Classroom Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Ernst, Randal M.; Gillham, Jane; Reivich, Karen; Linkins, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Positive education is defined as education for both traditional skills and for happiness. The high prevalence worldwide of depression among young people, the small rise in life satisfaction, and the synergy between learning and positive emotion all argue that the skills for happiness should be taught in school. There is substantial evidence from…

  13. Determinants of Physiological and Perceived Physiological Stress Reactivity in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Brittany E.; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin; Euser, Anja S.; Tulen, Joke H. M.; Franken, Ingmar H. A.; Huizink, Anja C.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Abnormal physiological stress reactivity is increasingly investigated as a vulnerability marker for various physical and psychological health problems. However, studies are inconsistent in taking into account potential covariates that may influence the developing stress system. We systematically tested determinants (individual, developmental, environmental and substance use-related) of physiological and perceived physiological stress reactivity. We also examined the relation between physiological and perceived physiological stress reactivity. Method In a stratified sample of 363 children (7–12 years) and 344 adolescents (13–20 years) from the general population, we examined cortisol, heart rate, respiratory sinus arrhythmia and perceived physiological stress reactivity to a psychosocial stress procedure. Results Using multivariate linear regression models, we found that individual, developmental, environmental and substance use-related factors were related to each of the stress response indices. These determinant factors were different for each of the stress reactivity indices, and different in children versus adolescents. Perceived physiological stress reactivity predicted cortisol reactivity in adolescents only. All other relations between perceived physiological and physiological stress reactivity were not significant. Conclusions As physiological stress variables are often examined as vulnerability markers for the development of health problems, we maintain that it is essential that future studies take into consideration factors that may account for found relations. Our study provides an overview and indication of which variables should be considered in the investigation of the relation between physiological stress indices and illness. PMID:23620785

  14. Determinants of physiological and perceived physiological stress reactivity in children and adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany E Evans

    Full Text Available AIMS: Abnormal physiological stress reactivity is increasingly investigated as a vulnerability marker for various physical and psychological health problems. However, studies are inconsistent in taking into account potential covariates that may influence the developing stress system. We systematically tested determinants (individual, developmental, environmental and substance use-related of physiological and perceived physiological stress reactivity. We also examined the relation between physiological and perceived physiological stress reactivity. METHOD: In a stratified sample of 363 children (7-12 years and 344 adolescents (13-20 years from the general population, we examined cortisol, heart rate, respiratory sinus arrhythmia and perceived physiological stress reactivity to a psychosocial stress procedure. RESULTS: Using multivariate linear regression models, we found that individual, developmental, environmental and substance use-related factors were related to each of the stress response indices. These determinant factors were different for each of the stress reactivity indices, and different in children versus adolescents. Perceived physiological stress reactivity predicted cortisol reactivity in adolescents only. All other relations between perceived physiological and physiological stress reactivity were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: As physiological stress variables are often examined as vulnerability markers for the development of health problems, we maintain that it is essential that future studies take into consideration factors that may account for found relations. Our study provides an overview and indication of which variables should be considered in the investigation of the relation between physiological stress indices and illness.

  15. APPLICATION OF MODIFIED POWER FLOW TRACING METHOD FOR REACTIVE POWER PRICING IN PRACTICAL UTILITY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. SUSITHRA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Competitive trend towards restructuring and unbundling of transmission services has resulted in the need to discover the impact of a particular generator to load. This paper initially presents the analysis of three different reactive power valuation methods namely, Modified Ybus , Virtual flow approach and modified power flow tracing to compute the reactive power output from a particular generator to particular load. Among these methods, the modified power flow electricity tracing method is identified as the best method to trace the reactive power contribution from various reactive power sources to loads, transmission line, etc. Also this proposed method breakdown the total reactive power loss in a transmission line into components to be allocated to individual loads. Secondly, based on this Method a novel allocation method for reactive power service for practical system is proposed. Hence, this method can be useful in providing additional insight into power system operation and can be used to modify existing tariffs of charging for reactive power transmission loss and reactive power transmission services. Simulation and comparison results are shown by taking WSCC 9 and IEEE 30 bus system as test system.

  16. Dysregulated negative emotional reactivity as a predictor of chronic peer victimization in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Paul J; Milich, Richard; Harris, Monica J

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relations of dysregulated negative emotional reactivity, emotional distress, and chronic peer victimization in childhood. A model was proposed whereby dysregulated reactivity was directly and indirectly related to concurrent peer victimization through victimization-related emotional distress. The model further proposed that dysregulated reactivity directly incrementally predicted longitudinal peer victimization above and beyond the effect of concurrent victimization. Two hundred thirteen 9- to 13-year-old children and their parents completed measures of dysregulated reactivity and victimization experiences at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Children also related narratives of personal victimization experiences at baseline that were coded to assess victimization-related emotional distress. Model testing strongly supported the direct association of dysregulated reactivity with concurrent victimization and incremental predictive effects of dysregulated reactivity on peer victimization over time. Model testing also provided support for an indirect effect of dysregulated reactivity on concurrent peer victimization through victimization-related emotional distress. This study demonstrated the powerful role that dysregulated negative emotional reactivity plays in the development of chronic peer victimization over time. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Reactive oxygen species in human semen: validation and qualification of a chemiluminescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessey, Wayne; Perez-Miranda, Ana; Macfarquhar, Rachel; Agarwal, Ashok; Homa, Sheryl

    2014-12-01

    To standardize and validate an assay for reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human semen. ROS levels assayed in blanks, negative and positive control samples (30% H2O2), and human semen, with the use of a luminol-based chemiluminescence assay measured in a single tube luminometer. Andrology laboratory. Semen samples from 19 men attending for routine semen analysis. None. ROS levels reported in relative light units (RLU) per second, adjusted for sperm concentration. The ROS assay equipment performed according to expectations, generating a chemiluminescence signal for positive control samples and semen samples that decayed rapidly and was captured within 10 minutes. Blanks and negative control samples gave negligible readings. There was no significant intra- or interassay variation. Interference from extraneous factors was negligible. The assay distinguished changes in ROS over a wide range of concentrations and provided consistent results between reagent batches. Working reagents remained stable for 3 months. Acceptable levels for negative and positive control samples were established to set criteria for the test passing or failing on any given day. The assay was sensitive to ambient temperature >25°C. ROS declined significantly with time after ejaculation. Mechanical agitation doubled ROS production in semen. These results validate the ROS assay and demonstrate that it is a highly reliable and accurate diagnostic test. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Towards large eddy simulation of reactive flows for internal combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The present work is focused on the detailed investigation of internal combustion engines in terms of flow and combustion analysis using an advanced numerical simulation method in the framework of computational fluid dynamics. The numerical approach used in this work is based on the Large Eddy Simulation technique implemented in STAR-CD, which has the intrinsic capability to accurately observe highly unsteady phenomena of engine flow characteristics. An extended version of the Coherent Flame Model, called 3-Zones Extended Coherent Flame Model (ECFM-3Z), which provides a universal combustion modelling approach available for all modes of technical reacting flows, is applied within the LES context. The ECFM-3Z is a model specially developed, to describe the combustion process taking place in modern internal combustion engines, in which depending on the mixture different modes of combustion exists. This study provides a comprehensive validation of the LES combined with the ECFM-3Z combustion model and reveals a detailed insight into incylinder physical phenomena. After an introduction to the fluid dynamics background in the form of a mathematical and physical description of turbulent reactive flows and their numerical implementation, the ECFM-3Z LES approach is first used for turbulent reactive and non-reactive flows of technical combustion systems of varying complexity to deal with different combustion modes. The results obtained for these flows provide a model performance assessment or predicting experimental measurements for the flow and scalar distribution. The main part of this work is focused on a detailed analysis of a single cylinder spark-ignition direct-injection DISI engine. To guarantee a proper definition of boundary conditions, the intake and exhaust ports are included in the numerical domain until the positions of pressure measurements. A multi-cycle LES was carried out on two meshes with different spatial resolution and provides an insight into the

  19. Reactivity of affect and self-esteem during remission in bipolar affective disorder: an experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Barbara; Uher, Rudolf; Dennington, Louis; Wright, Kim; Donaldson, Catherine

    2011-11-01

    Bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) is characterised by a lifelong vulnerability to develop episodes of depressed or elevated mood in response to stressful life events involving achievement or failure. We hypothesised that this latent vulnerability can manifest as reactivity of affect and self-esteem to experimentally induced experiences of success and failure and is shaped by history of childhood adversity. Twenty-four people with remitted BPAD and twenty-four healthy controls underwent anagram-solving tasks designed to generate experiences of success and failure in two separate sessions. Positive and negative affect and implicit and explicit self-esteem were measured before and after each task. Early adversity was measured by Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. People with BPAD showed larger reactivity of affect and explicit self-esteem in response to experimental success and failure than did healthy controls. There were no significant differences in reactivity of implicit self-esteem. History of childhood trauma predicted increased affective reactivity to failure but not to success. We used a convenience sample. The present experimental paradigm reveals reactivity of affect and self-esteem as features of BPAD, which are present even during good remission and thus are accessible as targets of interventions aiming at relapse prevention. Differential associations with childhood adversity indicate aetiological heterogeneity, with reactivity to failure influenced by early trauma and reactivity to success driven by other mechanisms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Physiologic and pathologic levels of reactive oxygen species in neat semen of infertile men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Nisarg; Sharma, Rakesh; Makker, Kartikeya; Sabanegh, Edmund; Agarwal, Ashok

    2009-11-01

    To define physiologic levels of reactive oxygen species in infertile men and establish a cutoff value of reactive oxygen species level in neat semen with a high sensitivity and specificity to differentiate infertile men from fertile donors (controls). Reactive oxygen species levels were measured in the neat semen samples (n = 51) from fertile donors and infertile patients (n = 54). Reproductive research laboratory at a tertiary care hospital. Infertile patients from male infertility clinic. Reactive oxygen species measurement in neat semen sample using luminol-based chemiluminescence method, receiver operating characteristic curves. Seminal reactive oxygen species levels, cutoff value, sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive values. The best cutoff value to distinguish between healthy fertile donors and infertile men was 0.0185 x 10(6) counted photons per minute/20 x 10(6) sperm. At this threshold, the specificity was 82% and the sensitivity was 78%. This value can be defined as basal reactive oxygen species level in infertile men. Reactive oxygen species levels in neat semen samples as measured by luminol-based chemiluminescence are a highly specific and sensitive test in the diagnosis of infertility. This test also may help clinicians treat patients with seminal oxidative stress.

  1. Serum C-reactive protein and S100A12 concentrations in dogs with hepatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, S M; Fry, J K; Rodrigues Hoffmann, A; Manino, P; Heilmann, R M; Suchodolski, J S; Steiner, J M; Hottinger, H A; Hunter, S L; Lidbury, J A

    2016-09-01

    To describe serum C-reactive protein and S100A12 concentrations in dogs with hepatic disease and to determine whether there is a relationship between the concentration of either and the severity of hepatic necroinflammation. Serum C-reactive protein and S100A12 concentrations were measured in 46 dogs undergoing hepatic biopsy. Dogs were divided into three groups: congenital portosystemic shunts, chronic hepatitis and hepatic neoplasia. The histological severity of hepatic necroinflammation was scored. C-reactive protein and S100A12 concentrations were greater than the upper limit of the reference intervals in 39 and 26% of dogs, respectively. There was no association of disease group with C-reactive protein (P=0·1733) or S100A12 (P=0·1513) concentrations. There was a positive correlation between serum C-reactive protein concentration and hepatic necroinflammatory activity (rs =0·428, P=0·006). Increased serum C-reactive protein and S100A12 concentrations were observed in a subpopulation of dogs with various types of hepatic diseases, suggesting acute-phase inflammation and activation of phagocytic cells, respectively. Dogs with higher hepatic necroinflammatory activity scores tended to have higher serum C-reactive protein concentrations. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding in a larger group of dogs. © 2016 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  2. Emotion Socialization in Anxious Youth: Parenting Buffers Emotional Reactivity to Peer Negative Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Caroline W; Ladouceur, Cecile D; Waller, Jennifer M; Ryan, Neal D; Allen, Kristy Benoit; Sheeber, Lisa; Forbes, Erika E; Dahl, Ronald E; Silk, Jennifer S

    2016-10-01

    Anxious youth exhibit heightened emotional reactivity, particularly to social-evaluative threat, such as peer evaluation and feedback, compared to non-anxious youth. Moreover, normative developmental changes during the transition into adolescence may exacerbate emotional reactivity to peer negative events, particularly for anxious youth. Therefore, it is important to investigate factors that may buffer emotional reactivity within peer contexts among anxious youth. The current study examined the role of parenting behaviors in child emotional reactivity to peer and non-peer negative events among 86 anxious youth in middle childhood to adolescence (Mean age = 11.29, 54 % girls). Parenting behavior and affect was observed during a social-evaluative laboratory speech task for youth, and ecological momentary assessment (EMA) methods were used to examine youth emotional reactivity to typical daily negative events within peer and non-peer contexts. Results showed that parent positive behaviors, and low levels of parent anxious affect, during the stressful laboratory task for youth buffered youth negative emotional reactivity to real-world negative peer events, but not non-peer events. Findings inform our understanding of parenting influences on anxious youth's emotional reactivity to developmentally salient negative events during the transition into adolescence.

  3. Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggren, M.H.; Jha, M.C.

    1989-10-01

    AMAX Research Development Center (AMAX R D) investigated methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbents. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For this program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such as size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation. Two base case sorbents, a spherical pellet and a cylindrical extrude used in related METC-sponsored projects, were used to provide a basis for the aimed enhancement in durability and reactivity. Sorbent performance was judged on the basis of physical properties, single particle kinetic studies based on thermogravimetric (TGA) techniques, and multicycle bench-scale testing of sorbents. A sorbent grading system was utilized to quantify the characteristics of the new sorbents prepared during the program. Significant enhancements in both reactivity and durability were achieved for the spherical pellet shape over the base case formulation. Overall improvements to reactivity and durability were also made to the cylindrical extrude shape. The primary variables which were investigated during the program included iron oxide type, zinc oxide:iron oxide ratio, inorganic binder concentration, organic binder concentration, and induration conditions. The effects of some variables were small or inconclusive. Based on TGA studies and bench-scale tests, induration conditions were found to be very significant.

  4. Analytical Solution for Reactive Solute Transport Considering Incomplete Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellin, A.; Chiogna, G.

    2013-12-01

    The laboratory experiments of Gramling et al. (2002) showed that incomplete mixing at the pore scale exerts a significant impact on transport of reactive solutes and that assuming complete mixing leads to overestimation of product concentration in bimolecular reactions. We consider here the family of equilibrium reactions for which the concentration of the reactants and the product can be expressed as a function of the mixing ratio, the concentration of a fictitious non reactive solute. For this type of reactions we propose, in agreement with previous studies, to model the effect of incomplete mixing at scales smaller than the Darcy scale assuming that the mixing ratio is distributed within an REV according to a Beta distribution. We compute the parameters of the Beta model by imposing that the mean concentration is equal to the value that the concentration assumes at the continuum Darcy scale, while the variance decays with time as a power law. We show that our model reproduces the concentration profiles of the reaction product measured in the Gramling et al. (2002) experiments using the transport parameters obtained from conservative experiments and an instantaneous reaction kinetic. The results are obtained applying analytical solutions both for conservative and for reactive solute transport, thereby providing a method to handle the effect of incomplete mixing on multispecies reactive solute transport, which is simpler than other previously developed methods. Gramling, C. M., C. F. Harvey, and L. C. Meigs (2002), Reactive transport in porous media: A comparison of model prediction with laboratory visualization, Environ. Sci. Technol., 36(11), 2508-2514.

  5. Physics Study of Canada Deuterium Uranium Lattice with Coolant Void Reactivity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsu Park

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a coolant void reactivity analysis of Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU-6 and Advanced Canada Deuterium Uranium Reactor-700 (ACR-700 fuel lattices using a Monte Carlo code. The reactivity changes when the coolant was voided were assessed in terms of the contributions of four factors and spectrum shifts. In the case of single bundle coolant voiding, the contribution of each of the four factors in the ACR-700 lattice is large in magnitude with opposite signs, and their summation becomes a negative reactivity effect in contrast to that of the CANDU-6 lattice. Unlike the coolant voiding in a single fuel bundle, the 2 × 2 checkerboard coolant voiding in the ACR-700 lattice shows a positive reactivity effect. The neutron current between the no-void and voided bundles, and the four factors of each bundle were analyzed to figure out the mechanism of the positive coolant void reactivity of the checkerboard voiding case. Through a sensitivity study of fuel enrichment, type of burnable absorber, and moderator to fuel volume ratio, a design strategy for the CANDU reactor was suggested in order to achieve a negative coolant void reactivity even for the checkerboard voiding case.

  6. Physics study of Canada deuterium uranium lattice with coolant void reactivity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Su; Lee, Hyun Suk; Tak, Tae Woo; Lee, Deok Jung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Ho Cheol [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Central Research Institute (KHNP-CRI), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    This study presents a coolant void reactivity analysis of Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU)-6 and Advanced Canada Deuterium Uranium Reactor-700 (ACR-700) fuel lattices using a Monte Carlo code. The reactivity changes when the coolant was voided were assessed in terms of the contributions of four factors and spectrum shifts. In the case of single bundle coolant voiding, the contribution of each of the four factors in the ACR-700 lattice is large in magnitude with opposite signs, and their summation becomes a negative reactivity effect in contrast to that of the CANDU-6 lattice. Unlike the coolant voiding in a single fuel bundle, the 2 x 2 checkerboard coolant voiding in the ACR-700 lattice shows a positive reactivity effect. The neutron current between the no-void and voided bundles, and the four factors of each bundle were analyzed to figure out the mechanism of the positive coolant void reactivity of the checkerboard voiding case. Through a sensitivity study of fuel enrichment, type of burnable absorber, and moderator to fuel volume ratio, a design strategy for the CANDU reactor was suggested in order to achieve a negative coolant void reactivity even for the checkerboard voiding case.

  7. Severe leptospirosis complicated by Epstein-Barr Virus reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrasch, Matthias; Herfurth, Konstantin; Kläver, Monika; Miethke, Jenny; Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Luge, Enno; Straube, Eberhard; Busch, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Weil's disease is a severe, potentially fatal illness following Leptospira interrogans infection. The reported case of a patient suffering from acute renal failure, jaundice, thrombocytopenia, rhabdomyolysis and encephalitis syndrome highlights the clinical challenge in reference to Weil syndrome complicated by Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) reactivation. The diagnosis of leptospirosis was performed using four different diagnostic methods. Sera were analyzed with an in-house IgM and IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and indirect haemagglutination assay (IHA). Microscopic agglutination test (MAT) was done using 17 reference strains comprising 14 serogroups and 17 serovars. Polyvalent EBV-IgG analysis, EBV-IgG/IgM/IgA western blot analysis as well as quantitative EBV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed. Leptospira IHA showed an initial titer of 1:640 (cut-off 1:320), leptospiral IgG was negative, but IgM was positive. MAT was negative at that time for all 17 strains analyzed. One week later, leptospirosis IHA titer increased to 1:20,480. Leptospiral IgG was now positive, -IgM remained positive and urine was tested negative for leptospiral DNA. The MAT showed positive results for L. interrogans serovar Bataviae, serovar Copenhageni, serovar Pyrogenes and L. borgpetersenii serovar Serjoe. During follow-up examinations, both the leptospiral IgM and IgG remained positive and MAT showed positive results for L. interrogans of different serovars. EBV IgA immunoblot taken at admission was positive for VCA-p18, quantitative EBV-PCR showed an EBV viral load of 2.8E3 copies/ml indicating acute EBV-reactivation. Leptospirosis represents a neglected and re-emerging disease which is difficult to diagnose since Leptospira-PCR from whole blood or urine is frequently negative in the case of early empiric antibiotic treatment. EBV-reactivation might represent a severe complication in Weil's disease which potentially aggravates clinical manifestations of leptospirosis

  8. Filtered density function approach for reactive transport in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Nicolae; Schüler, Lennart; Attinger, Sabine; Knabner, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Spatial filtering may be used in coarse-grained simulations (CGS) of reactive transport in groundwater, similar to the large eddy simulations (LES) in turbulence. The filtered density function (FDF), stochastically equivalent to a probability density function (PDF), provides a statistical description of the sub-grid, unresolved, variability of the concentration field. Besides closing the chemical source terms in the transport equation for the mean concentration, like in LES-FDF methods, the CGS-FDF approach aims at quantifying the uncertainty over the whole hierarchy of heterogeneity scales exhibited by natural porous media. Practically, that means estimating concentration PDFs on coarse grids, at affordable computational costs. To cope with the high dimensionality of the problem in case of multi-component reactive transport and to reduce the numerical diffusion, FDF equations are solved by particle methods. But, while trajectories of computational particles are modeled as stochastic processes indexed by time, the concentration's heterogeneity is modeled as a random field, with multi-dimensional, spatio-temporal sets of indices. To overcome this conceptual inconsistency, we consider FDFs/PDFs of random species concentrations weighted by conserved scalars and we show that their evolution equations can be formulated as Fokker-Planck equations describing stochastically equivalent processes in concentration-position spaces. Numerical solutions can then be approximated by the density in the concentration-position space of an ensemble of computational particles governed by the associated Itô equations. Instead of sequential particle methods we use a global random walk (GRW) algorithm, which is stable, free of numerical diffusion, and practically insensitive to the increase of the number of particles. We illustrate the general FDF approach and the GRW numerical solution for a reduced complexity problem consisting of the transport of a single scalar in groundwater

  9. Production of reactive oxygen species from abraded silicates. Implications for the reactivity of the Martian soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Ebbe N.; Zafirov, Kaloyan; Merrison, Jonathan P.

    2017-01-01

    , but none has been validated in situ and the cause of the observed oxidation has not been resolved. In this study, laboratory simulations of saltation were conducted to examine if and under which conditions wind abrasion of silicates, a process that is common on the Martian surface, can give rise...... lead to a production of H(2)O(2)facilitated by atmospheric O-2 and inhibited by carbon dioxide. Furthermore, during simulated saltation the silicate particles became triboelectrically charged and at pressures similar to the Martian surface pressure we observed glow discharges. Electrical discharges can...... high concentration of CO2. Our experiments provide evidence that wind driven abrasion could enhance the reactivity of the Martian soil and thereby could have contributed to the oxidation of organic compounds and the O-2 release observed in the Labeled Release and the Gas Exchange experiments...

  10. Modeling food matrix effects on chemical reactivity: Challenges and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, Edoardo; Oliviero, Teresa; van Boekel, Martinus A J S

    2017-06-29

    The same chemical reaction may be different in terms of its position of the equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamics) and its kinetics when studied in different foods. The diversity in the chemical composition of food and in its structural organization at macro-, meso-, and microscopic levels, that is, the food matrix, is responsible for this difference. In this viewpoint paper, the multiple, and interconnected ways the food matrix can affect chemical reactivity are summarized. Moreover, mechanistic and empirical approaches to explain and predict the effect of food matrix on chemical reactivity are described. Mechanistic models aim to quantify the effect of food matrix based on a detailed understanding of the chemical and physical phenomena occurring in food. Their applicability is limited at the moment to very simple food systems. Empirical modeling based on machine learning combined with data-mining techniques may represent an alternative, useful option to predict the effect of the food matrix on chemical reactivity and to identify chemical and physical properties to be further tested. In such a way the mechanistic understanding of the effect of the food matrix on chemical reactions can be improved.

  11. Blunted cardiovascular reactivity in dysphoria during reward and punishment anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Jessica; Brinkmann, Kerstin

    2015-03-01

    Hyposensitivity to reward in depression and dysphoria has been found in behavioral and neuroimaging studies. For punishment responsiveness, some studies showed hyposensitivity to punishment while other studies demonstrated hypersensitivity. Only few studies have addressed the motivational question as to whether depressed individuals mobilize less effort in anticipation of a positive or a negative consequence. The present study aimed at investigating reward and punishment responsiveness in subclinical depression from an effort mobilization perspective. Working on a recognition memory task, one third of the participants could earn small amounts of money, one third could lose small amounts of money, and one third could neither earn nor lose money. Effort mobilization was operationalized as participants' cardiovascular reactivity during task performance. As expected, reactivity of cardiac pre-ejection period and heart rate was higher in both incentive conditions compared to the neutral condition for nondysphorics, while it was blunted across conditions for dysphorics. Moreover, the present study found that dysphorics show an altered behavioral response to punishment. These findings thus show that dysphorics present a reduced motivation to obtain a reward or to avoid a punishment in terms of reduced effort-related cardiac reactivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Reactive multiphase flow simulation workshop summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanderHeyden, W.B.

    1995-09-01

    A workshop on computer simulation of reactive multiphase flow was held on May 18 and 19, 1995 in the Computational Testbed for Industry at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. Approximately 35 to 40 people attended the workshop. This included 21 participants from 12 companies representing the petroleum, chemical, environmental and consumer products industries, two representatives from the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies and several from Los Alamos. The dialog at the meeting suggested that reactive multiphase flow simulation represents an excellent candidate for government/industry/academia collaborative research. A white paper on a potential consortium for reactive multiphase flow with input from workshop participants will be issued separately.

  13. On the Construction of Sorted Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Lars; Debois, Søren; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    . Here we present a general construction of sortings. The constructed sortings always sustain the behavioural theory of pure bigraphs (in a precise sense), thus obviating the need to redevelop that theory for each new application. As an example, we recover Milner's local bigraphs as a sorting on pure...... bigraphs. Technically, we give our construction for ordinary reactive systems, then lift it to bigraphical reactive systems. As such, we give also a construction of sortings for ordinary reactive systems. This construction is an improvement over previous attempts in that it produces smaller and much more...

  14. Acute expanded perlite exposure with persistent reactive airway dysfunction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chung-Li; Wang, Jung-Der; Chu, Po-Chin; Guo, Yue-Liang Leon

    2010-01-01

    Expanded perlite has been assumed as simple nuisance, however during an accidental spill out in Taiwan, among 24 exposed workers followed for more than 6 months, three developed persisted respiratory symptoms and positive provocation tests were compatible with reactive airway dysfunction syndrome. During simulation experiment expanded perlite is shown to be very dusty and greatly exceed current exposure permission level. Review of literature and evidence, though exposure of expanded perlite below permission level may be generally safe, precautionary protection of short term heavy exposure is warranted.

  15. Links between mothers' coping styles, toddler reactivity, and sensitivity to toddler's negative emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundson, Jessica A; Leerkes, Esther M

    2012-02-01

    The extent to which engaged maternal coping styles moderate the association between toddler's temperamental reactivity and mothers' sensitivity to children's negative emotions was examined in 89 mother-child dyads. Primiparous mothers completed a measure of coping styles prenatally. When toddlers were 16 months old, mothers completed a measure of perceived toddler temperament and a self-report of how they respond to toddler negative emotions, and maternal sensitivity and temperamental reactivity were observed during emotionally arousing tasks in the laboratory. Mothers' disengaged coping style was positively associated with self-reported insensitive responses to children's negative emotions. Engaged coping moderated the association between toddler temperamental reactivity and both self-reported insensitive responses and observed maternal sensitivity, such that temperamental reactivity was more strongly linked with less sensitive maternal behavior when engaged coping was low. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Links Between Mothers’ Coping Styles, Toddler Reactivity, and Sensitivity to Toddler’s Negative Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundson, Jessica A.; Leerkes, Esther M.

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which engaged maternal coping styles moderate the association between toddler’s temperamental reactivity and mothers’ sensitivity to children’s negative emotions was examined in 89 mother-child dyads. Primiparous mothers completed a measure of coping styles prenatally. When toddlers were 16 months old, mothers completed a measure of perceived toddler temperament and a self-report of how they respond to toddler negative emotions, and maternal sensitivity and temperamental reactivity were observed during emotionally arousing tasks in the laboratory. Mothers’ disengaged coping style was positively associated with self-reported insensitive responses to children’s negative emotions. Engaged coping moderated the association between toddler temperamental reactivity and both self-reported insensitive responses and observed maternal sensitivity, such that temperamental reactivity was more strongly linked with less sensitive maternal behavior when engaged coping was low. PMID:21903276

  17. Predictors of differences between Type A and B individuals in heart rate and blood pressure reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyness, S A

    1993-09-01

    Past estimates of the magnitude of Type A-B differences in cardiovascular reactivity are probably overly conservative. In addition, it is unclear which situations are more likely to elicit excessive reactivity in Type As. The present meta-analysis found that, overall, Type As had greater heart rate (mean d = .22), diastolic blood pressure (d = .22), and especially systolic blood pressure responses (d = .33) than Type Bs; these effect sizes were small but relatively consistent. However, Type As showed especially greater cardiovascular reactivity in situations characterized as having (a) positive or negative feedback evaluation, (b) socially aversive elements such as verbal harassment or criticism, and (c) elements inherent in playing video games. Measures of time urgency, Type A assessment method, and gender were not found to be strongly related to A-B differences in cardiovascular reactivity. Future studies that use more "Type A-relevant" situations will probably find greater effects.

  18. Reactive Software Agent Anesthesia Decision Support System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant H. Kruger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Information overload of the anesthesiologist through technological advances have threatened the safety of patients under anesthesia in the operating room (OR. Traditional monitoring and alarm systems provide independent, spatially distributed indices of patient physiological state. This creates the potential to distract caregivers from direct patient care tasks. To address this situation, a novel reactive agent decision support system with graphical human machine interface was developed. The system integrates the disparate data sources available in the operating room, passes the data though a decision matrix comprising a deterministic physiologic rule base established through medical research. Patient care is improved by effecting change to the care environment by displaying risk factors and alerts as an intuitive color coded animation. The system presents a unified, contextually appropriate snapshot of the patient state including current and potential risk factors, and alerts of critical patient events to the operating room team without requiring any user intervention. To validate the efficacy of the system, a retrospective analysis focusing on the hypotension rules were performed. Results show that even with vigilant and highly trained clinicians, deviations from ideal patient care exist and it is here that the proposed system may allow more standardized and improved patient care and potentially outcomes.

  19. Galileo positioning technology

    CERN Document Server

    Lohan, Elena; Sand, Stephan; Hurskainen, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    This book covers multi-band Galileo receivers (especially E1-E5 bands of Galileo) and addresses all receiver building blocks, from the antenna and front end, through details of the baseband receiver processing blocks, up to the navigation processing, including the Galileo message structure and Position, Velocity, Time (PVT) computation. Moreover, hybridization solutions with communications systems for improved localization are discussed and an open-source GNSS receiver platform (available for download) developed at Tampere University of Technology (TUT) is addressed in detail. • Takes a holistic approach to GALILEO and related systems, such as EGNOS and hybrid solutions on mobile phones; • Provides an invaluable reference to Binary Offset Carrier modulations and related families, which are some of the trademarks of GALILEO; • Includes a detailed survey of GALILEO receiver research in Europe and existing software-defined radio (SDR) GALILEO receiver implementations; • Addresses the multiple challen...

  20. Friction drive position transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waclawik, Ronald E.; Cayer, James L.; Lapointe, Kenneth M.

    1993-06-01

    A spring force loaded contact wheel mounted in a stationary position relative to a reciprocating shaft is disclosed. The apparatus of the present invention includes a tensioning assembly for maintaining absolute contact between the contact wheel and the reciprocating shaft wherein the tensioning assembly urges the contact wheel against the shaft to maintain contact there between so that the wheel turn as the shaft is linearly displaced. A rotary encoding device is coupled to the wheel for translating the angular and rotational movement thereof into an electronic signal for providing linear displacement information and derivative data with respect to displacement of the shaft. Absolute friction contact and cooperative interaction between the shaft and the contact wheel is further enhanced in the preferred embodiment by advantageously selecting the type of surface finish and the amount of surface area of the contact wheel relative to the surface condition of the shaft as well as by reducing the moment of inertia of the contact wheel.

  1. Scalability Optimization of Seamless Positioning Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Machaj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently positioning services are getting more attention not only within research community but also from service providers. From the service providers point of view positioning service that will be able to work seamlessly in all environments, for example, indoor, dense urban, and rural, has a huge potential to open new markets. However, such system does not only need to provide accurate position estimates but have to be scalable and resistant to fake positioning requests. In the previous works we have proposed a modular system, which is able to provide seamless positioning in various environments. The system automatically selects optimal positioning module based on available radio signals. The system currently consists of three positioning modules—GPS, GSM based positioning, and Wi-Fi based positioning. In this paper we will propose algorithm which will reduce time needed for position estimation and thus allow higher scalability of the modular system and thus allow providing positioning services to higher amount of users. Such improvement is extremely important, for real world application where large number of users will require position estimates, since positioning error is affected by response time of the positioning server.

  2. Digital thermal monitoring (DTM) of vascular reactivity closely correlates with Doppler flow velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuilkin, Gary L; Panthagani, David; Metcalfe, Ralph W; Hassan, Haider; Yen, Albert A; Naghavi, Morteza; Hartley, Craig J

    2009-01-01

    The noninvasive measurement of peripheral vascular reactivity, as an indicator of vascular function, provides a valuable tool for cardiovascular screening of at-risk populations. Practical and economical considerations demand that such a test be low-cost and simple to use. To this end, it is advantageous to substitute digital thermal monitoring (DTM) for the more costly and complex Doppler system commonly used for this measurement. A signal processing model was developed to establish the basis for the relationship between finger temperature reactivity and blood flow reactivity following a transient brachial artery occlusion and reperfusion protocol (reactive hyperemia). Flow velocity signals were acquired from the radial artery of human subjects via an 8 MHz Doppler probe while simultaneous DTM signals were acquired from a distal fingertip via DTM sensors. The model transforms the DTM temperature signals into normalized flow signals via a deconvolution method which employs an exponential impulse function. The DTM normalized flow signals were compared to simultaneous, low-frequency, normalized flow signals computed from Doppler sensors. The normalized flow signals, derived from DTM and Doppler sensors, were found to yield similar reactivity responses during reperfusion. The reactivity areas derived from DTM and Doppler sensors, indicative of hyperemic volumes, were found to be within +/- 15%. In conclusion, this signal processing model provides a means to measure vascular reactivity using DTM sensors, that is equivalent to that obtained by more complex Doppler systems.

  3. Intercomparison of the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and pump-probe technique for measuring total OH reactivity in an urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, R. F.; Blocquet, M.; Schoemaecker, C.; Léonardis, T.; Locoge, N.; Fittschen, C.; Hanoune, B.; Stevens, P. S.; Sinha, V.; Dusanter, S.

    2015-10-01

    The investigation of hydroxyl radical (OH) chemistry during intensive field campaigns has led to the development of several techniques dedicated to ambient measurements of total OH reactivity, which is the inverse of the OH lifetime. Three techniques are currently used during field campaigns, including the total OH loss rate method, the pump-probe method, and the comparative reactivity method. However, no formal intercomparison of these techniques has been published so far, and there is a need to ensure that measurements of total OH reactivity are consistent among the different techniques. An intercomparison of two OH reactivity instruments, one based on the comparative reactivity method (CRM) and the other based on the pump-probe method, was performed in October 2012 in a NOx-rich environment, which is known to be challenging for the CRM technique. This study presents an extensive description of the two instruments, the CRM instrument from Mines Douai (MD-CRM) and the pump-probe instrument from the University of Lille (UL-FAGE), and highlights instrumental issues associated with the two techniques. It was found that the CRM instrument used in this study underestimates ambient OH reactivity by approximately 20 % due to the photolysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) inside the sampling reactor; this value is dependent on the position of the lamp within the reactor. However, this issue can easily be fixed, and the photolysis of VOCs was successfully reduced to a negligible level after this intercomparison campaign. The UL-FAGE instrument may also underestimate ambient OH reactivity due to the difficulty to accurately measure the instrumental zero. It was found that the measurements are likely biased by approximately 2 s-1, due to impurities in humid zero air. Two weeks of ambient sampling indicate that the measurements performed by the two OH reactivity instruments are in agreement, within the measurement uncertainties for each instrument, for NOx mixing ratios

  4. On indoor positioning

    OpenAIRE

    Namiot, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the survey of the modern indoor positioning technologies and systems. We discuss Wi-Fi and Bluetooth based positioning systems, light-based and magnetic field systems. It is our first attempt to classify indoor positioning techniques. We try to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of various indoor positioning technologies and systems, compare their accuracy, applicability, working principles and performance parameters

  5. High Risk of Hepatitis B Reactivation among Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Yuan Chen

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infections are common and associated with significant morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. However, the incidence and risk factors of HBV reactivation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are rarely investigated.AML patients followed-up at the National Taiwan University Hospital between 2006 and 2012 were analyzed. The clinical characteristics and laboratory data were retrospectively reviewed.Four hundred and ninety patients comprising 265 men and 225 women were studied. The median age was 52 years (range, 18 - 94. Chronic HBV carriage was documented at the time of leukemia diagnosis in 57 (11.6% patients. Forty-six (80.7% of the 57 HBV carriers received prophylaxis with anti-HBV agents. Sixteen HBV carriers (28.1% developed hepatitis B reactivation during or after chemotherapy, including 7 patients who had discontinued antiviral therapy. The incidence of hepatitis B reactivation among AML patients with HBV carriage was 9.5 per 100 person-years. Prophylaxis with anti-HBV agents significantly decreased the risk of hepatitis B reactivation among HBV carriers (13% vs. 61%, p<0.001. Four (2.8% of 142 patients with initial positive anti-HBsAb and anti-HBcAb experienced hepatitis B reactivation and lost their protective anti-HBsAb. Multivariate analysis revealed that diabetes mellitus (p=0.008, odds ratio (OR = 2.841, 95% confident interval (CI: 0.985-8.193 and carriage of HBsAg (p<0.001, OR=36.878, 95% CI: 11.770-115.547 were independent risk factors for hepatitis B reactivation in AML patients.Hepatitis B reactivation is not uncommon in the HBsAg positive AML patients. Prophylaxis with anti-HBV agent significantly decreased the risk of hepatitis B reactivation.

  6. The Positive Psychology of Youth and Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Grant Jewell

    2003-01-01

    Introduces this theme issue that explores the nature of adolescence and the positive psychology movement that focuses on positive aspects of adolescent development. Articles in this collection provide a window into the exploration of youth strengths. (SLD)

  7. Mild hypothermia reduces cardiac post-ischemic reactive hyperemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van der Pals Jesper

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In experimentally induced myocardial infarction, mild hypothermia (33–35°C is beneficial if applied prior to ischemia or reperfusion. Hypothermia, when applied after reperfusion seems to confer little or no benefit. The mechanism by which hypothermia exerts its cell-protective effect during cardiac ischemia remains unclear. It has been hypothesized that hypothermia reduces the reperfusion damage; the additional damage incurred upon the myocardium during reperfusion. Reperfusion results in a massive increase in blood flow, reactive hyperemia, which may contribute to reperfusion damage. We postulated that hypothermia could attenuate the post-ischemic reactive hyperemia. Methods Sixteen 25–30 kg pigs, in a closed chest model, were anesthetized and temperature was established in all pigs at 37°C using an intravascular cooling catheter. The 16 pigs were then randomized to hypothermia (34°C or control (37°C. The left main coronary artery was then catheterized with a PCI guiding catheter. A Doppler flow wire was placed in the mid part of the LAD and a PCI balloon was then positioned proximal to the Doppler wire but distal to the first diagonal branch. The LAD was then occluded for ten minutes in all pigs. Coronary blood flow was measured before, during and after ischemia/reperfusion. Results The peak flow seen during post-ischemic reactive hyperemia (during the first minutes of reperfusion was significantly reduced by 43 % (p Conclusion Mild hypothermia significantly reduces post-ischemic hyperemia in a closed chest pig model. The reduction of reactive hyperemia during reperfusion may have an impact on cardiac reperfusion injury.

  8. Electrostatic control of acetylcholinesterase reactivity. Final technical report, 1 April 1989-31 December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, H.A.

    1995-07-01

    These studies examined chiral reactivity, the magnitude and importance of steric interactions, and the importance of the electrostatic charge distribution in governing reactivity of acetylcholinesterase (AchE). To do this, we employed a comprehensive series of resolved enantiomeric methylphosphonates, a comprehensive series of alkylphosphonates, and fluorescent methylphosphonates.As a complementary index to detailed stopped-flow analysis of inhibition kinetics, we monitored kinetics of aging and oxime reactivation. Together with equilibrium binding studies, employing the reversible fluorescent ligand decidium diiodide, these provided an independent index of ligand orientation achieved by the organophosphonates within the enzyme active center.

  9. Reactive Power Injection Strategies for Single-Phase Photovoltaic Systems Considering Grid Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Wang, Huai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    like what the conventional power plants do today in the grid regulation participation. Requirements of ancillary services like Low-Voltage Ride-Through (LVRT) associated with reactive current injection and voltage support through reactive power control, have been in effectiveness in some countries, e.......g. Germany and Italy. Those advanced features can be provided by next generation PV systems, and will be enhanced in the future to ensure an even efficient and reliable utilization of PV systems. In light of this, Reactive Power Injection (RPI) strategies for single-phase PV systems are explored...

  10. Reactive Power Injection Strategies for Single-Phase Photovoltaic Systems Considering Grid Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Wang, Huai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    like what the conventional power plants do today in the grid regulation participation. Requirements of ancillary services like Low-Voltage Ride-Through (LVRT) associated with reactive current injection and voltage support through reactive power control, have been in effectiveness in some countries....... Those advanced features can be provided by next-generation PV systems, and will be enhanced in the future to ensure an even efficient and reliable utilization of PV systems. In the light of this, Reactive Power Injection (RPI) strategies for single-phase PV systems are explored in this paper. The RPI...

  11. The Link between Hypersensitivity Syndrome Reaction Development and Human Herpes Virus-6 Reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C. Pritchett

    2012-01-01

    Data Sources and Extraction. Drugs identified as causes of (i idiosyncratic reactions, (ii drug-induced hypersensitivity, drug-induced hepatotoxicity, acute liver failure, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and (iii human herpes virus reactivation in PubMed since 1997 have been collected and discussed. Results. Data presented in this paper show that HHV-6 reactivation is associated with more severe organ involvement and a prolonged course of disease. Conclusion. This analysis of HHV-6 reactivation associated with drug-induced severe cutaneous reactions and hepatotoxicity will aid in causality assessment and clinical diagnosis of possible life-threatening events and will provide a basis for further patient characterization and therapy.

  12. Chemical Reactivity as Described by Quantum Chemical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. De Proft

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Density Functional Theory is situated within the evolution of Quantum Chemistry as a facilitator of computations and a provider of new, chemical insights. The importance of the latter branch of DFT, conceptual DFT is highlighted following Parr's dictum "to calculate a molecule is not to understand it". An overview is given of the most important reactivity descriptors and the principles they are couched in. Examples are given on the evolution of the structure-property-wave function triangle which can be considered as the central paradigm of molecular quantum chemistry to (for many purposes a structure-property-density triangle. Both kinetic as well as thermodynamic aspects can be included when further linking reactivity to the property vertex. In the field of organic chemistry, the ab initio calculation of functional group properties and their use in studies on acidity and basicity is discussed together with the use of DFT descriptors to study the kinetics of SN2 reactions and the regioselectivity in Diels Alder reactions. Similarity in reactivity is illustrated via a study on peptide isosteres. In the field of inorganic chemistry non empirical studies of adsorption of small molecules in zeolite cages are discussed providing Henry constants and separation constants, the latter in remarkable good agreement with experiments. Possible refinements in a conceptual DFT context are presented. Finally an example from biochemistry is discussed : the influence of point mutations on the catalytic activity of subtilisin.

  13. Elementary surface processes during reactive magnetron sputtering of chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monje, Sascha; Corbella, Carles, E-mail: carles.corbella@rub.de; Keudell, Achim von [Research Group Reactive Plasmas, Ruhr-University Bochum, Universitystr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-10-07

    The elementary surface processes occurring on chromium targets exposed to reactive plasmas have been mimicked in beam experiments by using quantified fluxes of Ar ions (400–800 eV) and oxygen atoms and molecules. For this, quartz crystal microbalances were previously coated with Cr thin films by means of high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering. The measured growth and etching rates were fitted by flux balance equations, which provided sputter yields of around 0.05 for the compound phase and a sticking coefficient of O{sub 2} of 0.38 on the bare Cr surface. Further fitted parameters were the oxygen implantation efficiency and the density of oxidation sites at the surface. The increase in site density with a factor 4 at early phases of reactive sputtering is identified as a relevant mechanism of Cr oxidation. This ion-enhanced oxygen uptake can be attributed to Cr surface roughening and knock-on implantation of oxygen atoms deeper into the target. This work, besides providing fundamental data to control oxidation state of Cr targets, shows that the extended Berg's model constitutes a robust set of rate equations suitable to describe reactive magnetron sputtering of metals.

  14. A Developmental Shift from Positive to Negative Connectivity in Human Amygdala-Prefrontal Circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Dylan G.; Humphreys, Kathryn L.; Flannery, Jessica; Goff, Bonnie; Telzer, Eva H.; Shapiro, Mor; Hare, Todd A.; Bookheimer, Susan Y.; Tottenham, Nim

    2013-01-01

    Recent human imaging and animal studies highlight the importance of frontoamygdala circuitry in the regulation of emotional behavior and its disruption in anxiety-related disorders. While tracing studies have suggested changes in amygdala-cortical connectivity through the adolescent period in rodents, less is known about the reciprocal connections within this circuitry across human development, when these circuits are being fine-tuned and substantial changes in emotional control are observed. The present study examined developmental changes in amygdala-prefrontal circuitry across the ages of 4 to 22 years using task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Results suggest positive amygdala-prefrontal connectivity in early childhood that switches to negative functional connectivity during the transition to adolescence. Amygdala-mPFC functional connectivity was significantly positive (greater than zero) among participants younger than ten, whereas functional connectivity was significantly negative (less than zero) among participants ten years and older, over and above the effect of amygdala reactivity. The developmental switch in functional connectivity was paralleled by a steady decline in amygdala reactivity. Moreover, the valence switch might explain age-related improvement in task performance and a developmentally normative decline in anxiety. Initial positive connectivity followed by a valence shift to negative connectivity provides a neurobiological basis for regulatory development and may present novel insight into a more general process of developing regulatory connections. PMID:23467374

  15. PDF methods for turbulent reactive flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew T.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on computation of turbulent combustion, governing equations, closure problem, PDF modeling of turbulent reactive flows, validation cases, current projects, and collaboration with industry and technology transfer.

  16. Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Lawrence R.

    1984-01-01

    Reactivity control assembly for nuclear reactor comprises supports stacked above reactor core for holding control rods. Couplers associated with the supports and a vertically movable drive shaft have lugs at their lower ends for engagement with the supports.

  17. Mixing, entropy and reactive solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiogna, Gabriele; Hochstetler, David L.; Bellin, Alberto; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Rolle, Massimo

    2012-10-01

    Mixing processes significantly affect reactive solute transport in fluids. For example, contaminant degradation in environmental aquatic systems can be limited either by the availability of one or more reactants, brought into contact by physical mixing, or by the kinetics of the (bio)chemical transformations. Appropriate metrics are needed to accurately quantify the interplay between mixing and reactive processes. The exponential of the Shannon entropy of the concentration probability distribution has been proposed and applied to quantify the dilution of conservative solutes either in a given volume (dilution index) or in a given water flux (flux-related dilution index). In this work we derive the transport equation for the entropy of a reactive solute. Adopting a flux-related framework, we show that the degree of uniformity of the solute mass flux distribution for a reactive species and its rate of change are informative measures of physical and (bio)chemical processes and their complex interaction.

  18. Reactive Capture of Carbon Dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase I SBIR, Reactive Innovations, LLC (RIL) proposes to develop a compact and lightweight electrochemical to capture carbon dioxide in the martian...

  19. Reactive Nitrogen in Atmospheric Emission Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excess reactive Nitrogen (NT) has become one of the most pressing environmental problems leading to air pollution, acidification and eutrophication of ecosystems, biodiversity impacts, leaching of nitrates into groundwater and global warming. This paper investigates how current i...

  20. Reactive Protein Synthesis in Pregnant Rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    /kg) groups. At terminal gestation day (GD) ranging from 0-20, the rats were sacrificed, and blood samples and amniotic fluids were collected. Thyroid hormone, C-reactive protein (CRP) and leptin assay was carried using the blood samples.

  1. Neutronic tests and reactivity balance in the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Rose Mary Gomes do Prado; Souza, Luiz Claudio Andrade, E-mail: souzarm@cdtn.br, E-mail: lcas@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the 2014 neutronic tests performed on CDTN's TRIGA IPR-R1 research reactor. Such tests are performed annually, as prescribed by the Safety Analysis Report. The three control rods, Regulating, Shim and Safety, were calibrated and their worth determined to be 0.52 $, 3.08 $ and 2.78 $, respectively. The Shim rod takes 0.44 s to shutdown the reactor and the Safety rod 0.48 s. The maximum reactivity insertion rates are 48 pcm/s by the Shim rod and 46 pcm/s by the Safety rod. Total reactivity excess is 1.88 $. The temperature reactivity coefficient determined is -0.94 cent/deg C. A reactivity insertion of 0.71 $ is necessary in order to achieve the licensed maximum reactor power of 100 kW. Reactivity losses due to xenon poisoning, after operating for 8 h at maximum power, is 0.20 $, and the insertion of a void tube in the Central Thimble corresponds to 0.22 $. A significant amount of reactivity is required to overcome the temperature effect and allow the reactor to operate at full power for extended periods of time. Given all these reactivity losses, a new fuel element should soon be added to the core in order to increase the reactivity excess. Adding this new fuel element to the C ring and moving the element withdrawn from that position to the F ring, replacing a graphite dummy element, would increase 45.5 cents in the reactivity excess worth. Calculations and experimental results will be used to optimize a new core configuration for the reactor. (author)

  2. Nitrification inhibitors mitigated reactive gaseous nitrogen intensity in intensive vegetable soils from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Changhua; Li, Bo; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2018-01-15

    Nitrification inhibitors, a promising tool for reducing nitrous oxide (N2O) losses and promoting nitrogen use efficiency by slowing nitrification, have gained extensive attention worldwide. However, there have been few attempts to explore the broad responses of multiple reactive gaseous nitrogen emissions of N2O, nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia (NH3) and vegetable yield to nitrification inhibitor applications across intensive vegetable soils in China. A greenhouse pot experiment with five consecutive vegetable crops was performed to assess the efficacies of two nitrification inhibitors, namely, nitrapyrin and dicyandiamide on reactive gaseous nitrogen emissions, vegetable yield and reactive gaseous nitrogen intensity in four typical vegetable soils representing the intensive vegetable cropping systems across mainland China: an Acrisol from Hunan Province, an Anthrosol from Shanxi Province, a Cambisol from Shandong Province and a Phaeozem from Heilongjiang Province. The results showed soil type had significant influences on reactive gaseous nitrogen intensity, with reactive gaseous nitrogen emissions and yield mainly driven by soil factors: pH, nitrate, C:N ratio, cation exchange capacity and microbial biomass carbon. The highest reactive gaseous nitrogen emissions and reactive gaseous nitrogen intensity were in Acrisol while the highest vegetable yield occurred in Phaeozem. Nitrification inhibitor applications decreased N2O and NO emissions by 1.8-61.0% and 0.8-79.5%, respectively, but promoted NH3 volatilization by 3.2-44.6% across all soils. Furthermore, significant positive correlations were observed between inhibited N2O+NO and stimulated NH3 emissions with nitrification inhibitor additions across all soils, indicating that reduced nitrification posed the threat of NH3 losses. Additionally, reactive gaseous nitrogen intensity was significantly reduced in the Anthrosol and Cambisol due to the reduced reactive gaseous nitrogen emissions and increased yield

  3. THE IMPACT OF POWER COEFFICIENT OF REACTIVITY ON CANDU 6 REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. KASTANYA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of reactivity coefficients, along with other core nuclear characteristics, determine reactor core behavior in normal operation and accident conditions. The Power Coefficient of Reactivity (PCR is an aggregate indicator representing the change in reactor core reactivity per unit change in reactor power. It is an integral quantity which captures the contributions of the fuel temperature, coolant void, and coolant temperature reactivity feedbacks. All nuclear reactor designs provide a balance between their inherent nuclear characteristics and the engineered reactivity control features, to ensure that changes in reactivity under all operating conditions are maintained within a safe range. The CANDU® reactor design takes advantage of its inherent nuclear characteristics, namely a small magnitude of reactivity coefficients, minimal excess reactivity, and very long prompt neutron lifetime, to mitigate the demand on the engineered systems for controlling reactivity and responding to accidents. In particular, CANDU reactors have always taken advantage of the small value of the PCR associated with their design characteristics, such that the overall design and safety characteristics of the reactor are not sensitive to the value of the PCR. For other reactor design concepts a PCR which is both large and negative is an important aspect in the design of their engineered systems for controlling reactivity. It will be demonstrated that during Loss of Regulation Control (LORC and Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA events, the impact of variations in power coefficient, including a hypothesized larger than estimated PCR, has no safety-significance for CANDU reactor design. Since the CANDU 6 PCR is small, variations in the range of values for PCR on the performance or safety of the reactor are not significant.

  4. The Impact of Power Coefficient of Reactivity on CANDU 6 Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastanya, D.; Boyle, S.; Hopwood, J. [Candu Energy Inc., Mississauga (Canada); Park, Joo Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The combined effects of reactivity coefficients, along with other core nuclear characteristics, determine reactor core behavior in normal operation and accident conditions. The Power Coefficient of Reactivity (PCR) is an aggregate indicator representing the change in reactor core reactivity per unit change in reactor power. It is an integral quantity which captures the contributions of the fuel temperature, coolant void, and coolant temperature reactivity feedbacks. All nuclear reactor designs provide a balance between their inherent nuclear characteristics and the engineered reactivity control features, to ensure that changes in reactivity under all operating conditions are maintained within a safe range. The CANDU reactor design takes advantage of its inherent nuclear characteristics, namely a small magnitude of reactivity coefficients, minimal excess reactivity, and very long prompt neutron lifetime, to mitigate the demand on the engineered systems for controlling reactivity and responding to accidents. In particular, CANDU reactors have always taken advantage of the small value of the PCR associated with their design characteristics, such that the overall design and safety characteristics of the reactor are not sensitive to the value of the PCR. For other reactor design concepts a PCR which is both large and negative is an important aspect in the design of their engineered systems for controlling reactivity. It will be demonstrated that during Loss of Regulation Control (LORC) and Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA) events, the impact of variations in power coefficient, including a hypothesized larger than estimated PCR, has no safety-significance for CANDU reactor design. Since the CANDU 6 PCR is small, variations in the range of values for PCR on the performance or safety of the reactor are not significant.

  5. Immunoassay cross-reactivity of phenylephrine and methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Lindsay B; Cawley, Michael J

    2012-05-01

    Phenylephrine, an α(1) -adrenergic agonist, and methamphetamine, a prescription drug and substance of abuse, have similar chemical structures and thus have the potential to cross-react in qualitative screening tools such as a urine drug screening (UDS) performed by immunoassay. This cross-reactivity may yield a false-positive result that may affect the provision of care in certain patient populations and clinical situations. We describe a 36-year-old woman with confirmed brain death after a short hospital stay who had an initial UDS that was negative for methamphetamine. The patient was assessed for potential organ donation, which included obtaining a follow-up UDS. A urine sample was obtained after being hospitalized for 36 hours, which tested positive for methamphetamine, with no suspected ingestion of the target substance. Confirmatory laboratory testing indicated that intravenous phenylephrine and its metabolites were the likely cause of the false-positive UDS. However, the patient was not deemed to be a suitable candidate for organ donation, but clear documentation of the reason for denial of organ donation was not available in the patient's medical record. To our knowledge, this is the first case published in the English-language literature that describes the clinical occurrence of apparent immunoassay cross-reactivity of methamphetamine and phenylephrine that resulted in a false-positive UDS for methamphetamine. In addition, this report describes the potential implications of this situation on clinical care, including organ donation acceptance. Toxicology screening in the emergency department and intensive care unit is a tool to assist in the diagnosis of medical conditions, but it may not always be reliable. Therefore, positive immunoassay results that may change the management of a patient's condition should be quickly verified with confirmatory testing to minimize unfavorable consequences. © 2012 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  6. Modeling of flow and reactive transport in IPARS

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Mary Fanett

    2012-03-11

    In this work, we describe a number of efficient and locally conservative methods for subsurface flow and reactive transport that have been or are currently being implemented in the IPARS (Integrated Parallel and Accurate Reservoir Simulator). For flow problems, we consider discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods and mortar mixed finite element methods. For transport problems, we employ discontinuous Galerkin methods and Godunov-mixed methods. For efficient treatment of reactive transport simulations, we present a number of state-of-the-art dynamic mesh adaptation strategies and implementations. Operator splitting approaches and iterative coupling techniques are also discussed. Finally, numerical examples are provided to illustrate the capability of IPARS to treat general biogeochemistry as well as the effectivity of mesh adaptations with DG for transport. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers. All rights reserved.

  7. Social support lowers cardiovascular reactivity to an acute stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, S J; Allen, K A; Evans, G W

    1993-01-01

    This study examined whether social support can reduce cardiovascular reactivity to an acute stressor. College students gave a speech in one of three social conditions: alone, in the presence of a supportive confederate, or in the presence of a nonsupportive confederate. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured at rest, before the speech, and during the speech. While anticipating and delivering their speech, supported and alone subjects exhibited significantly smaller increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressures than did nonsupported subjects. Supported subjects also exhibited significantly smaller increases in systolic blood pressure than did alone subjects before and during the speech. Men had higher stress-related increases in blood pressures than did women; but gender did not moderate the effects of social support on cardiovascular reactivity. These results provide experimental evidence of potential health benefits of social support during acute stressors.

  8. Functionalization of whey proteins by reactive supercritical fluid extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanitta Ruttarattanamongkol

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein, a by-product from cheese-making, is often used in a variety of food formulations due to its unsurpassednutritional quality and inherent functional properties. However, the possibilities for the improvement and upgrading of wheyprotein utilization still need to be explored. Reactive supercritical fluid extrusion (SCFX is a novel technique that has beenrecently reported to successfully functionalize commercially available whey proteins into a product with enhanced functionalproperties. The specific goal of this review is to provide fundamental understanding of the reinforcement mechanism andprocessing of protein functionalization by reactive SCFX process. The superimposed extrusion variables and their interactionmechanism affect the physico-chemical properties of whey proteins. By understanding the structure, functional properties andprocessing relationships of such materials, the rational design criteria for novel functionalized proteins could be developedand effectively utilized in food systems.

  9. Characterization of carbon nanomaterial formation and manganese oxide reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumlas, Samantha Lyn

    Characterization of a material's surface, structural and physical properties is essential to understand its chemical reactivity. Control over these properties helps tailor a material to a particular application of interest. The research presented in this dissertation focuses on characterizing a synthetic method for carbon nanomaterials and the determination of structural properties of manganese oxides that contribute to its reactivity for environmental chemistry. In particular, one research effort was focused on the tuning of synthetic parameters towards the formation of carbon nanomaterials from gaseous methane and gaseous mixtures containing various mixtures of methane, argon and hydrogen. In a second research effort, photochemical and water oxidation chemistry were performed on the manganese oxide, birnessite, to aid in the remediation of arsenic from the environment and provide more options for alternative energy catalysts, respectively. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  10. Nucleophilic reactivity of a copper(II)-superoxide complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirovano, Paolo; Magherusan, Adriana M; McGlynn, Ciara; Ure, Andrew; Lynes, Amy; McDonald, Aidan R

    2014-06-02

    Metal-bound superoxide intermediates are often implicated as electrophilic oxidants in dioxygen-activating metalloenzymes. In the nonheme iron α-ketoglutarate dependent oxygenases and pterin-dependent hydroxylases, however, Fe(III)-superoxide intermediates are postulated to react by nucleophilic attack on electrophilic carbon atoms. By reacting a Cu(II)-superoxide complex (1) with acyl chloride substrates, we have found that a metal-superoxide complex can be a very reactive nucleophile. Furthermore, 1 was found to be an efficient nucleophilic deformylating reagent, capable of Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of a number of aldehyde substrates. The observed nucleophilic chemistry represents a new domain for metal-superoxide reactivity. Our observations provide support for the postulated role of metal-superoxide intermediates in nonheme iron α-ketoglutarate dependent and pterin-dependent enzymes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Amygdala Reactivity and Negative Emotionality: Divergent Correlates of Antisocial Personality and Psychopathy Traits in a Community Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Luke W.; Byrd, Amy L.; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth; Hariri, Ahmad R.; Manuck, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have emphasized that antisocial personality disorder (APD) and psychopathy overlap highly but differ critically in several features, notably negative emotionality (NEM) and possibly amygdala reactivity to social signals of threat and distress. Here we examined whether dimensions of psychopathy and APD correlate differentially with NEM and amygdala reactivity to emotional faces. Testing these relationships among healthy individuals, dimensions of psychopathy and APD were generated by the profile matching technique of Lynam and Widiger (2001), using facet scales of the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised, and amygdala reactivity was measured using a well-established emotional faces task, in a community sample of 103 men and women. Higher psychopathy scores were associated with lower NEM and lower amygdala reactivity, whereas higher APD scores were related to greater NEM and greater amygdala reactivity, but only after overlapping variance in APD and psychopathy was adjusted for in the statistical model. Amygdala reactivity did not mediate the relationship of APD and psychopathy scores to NEM. Supplemental analyses also compared other measures of factors within psychopathy in predicting NEM and amygdala reactivity and found that Factor 2 psychopathy was positively related to NEM and amygdala reactivity across measures of psychopathy. The overall findings replicate seminal observations on NEM in psychopathy by Hicks and Patrick (2006) and extend this work to neuroimaging in a normative population. They also suggest that one critical way in which APD and psychopathy dimensions may differ in their etiology is through their opposing levels of NEM and amygdala reactivity to threat. PMID:24661171

  12. Hedonic orientation moderates the association between cognitive control and affect reactivity to daily hassles in adolescent boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipker, Kathrin; Wrzus, Cornelia; Rauers, Antje; Riediger, Michaela

    2017-04-01

    People often seek to regulate their affective reactions when confronted with hassles. Hassle reactivity is lower for people with higher cognitive control, presumably because of better affect regulation. Many adolescents, however, show higher hassle reactivity than children, despite better cognitive control. The present study aims to understand whether motivational differences when seeking to regulate affective experiences moderate the association between cognitive control and hassle reactivity in adolescence. We hypothesized that higher cognitive control is related to lower hassle reactivity only for adolescents with a strong hedonic orientation, that is, for adolescents who seek to maintain or enhance positive or to dampen negative affect. We investigated 149 boys' (age range: 10-20 years) hedonic orientation and affect reactivity toward daily hassles during 2 weeks of experience sampling. Higher cognitive control, assessed with a working memory battery in the laboratory, was associated with stronger hassle reactivity in individuals with low hedonic orientation. The more hedonic-oriented individuals were, the lower was their hassle reactivity, but only in combination with high cognitive control. Our findings illustrate that higher cognitive control is not always related to lower hassle reactivity. Rather, when daily hassles compromise affect balance, hedonic orientation is equally important to understand affect reactivity in adolescent boys. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Supercapacitor to Provide Ancillary Services: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muljadi, Eduard [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gevorgian, Vahan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Luo, Yusheng [Idaho National Laboratory; Mohanpurkar, M. [Idaho National Laboratory; Hovsapian, R. [Idaho National Laboratory; Koritarov, V. [Argonne National Laboratory

    2017-10-09

    Supercapacitor technology has reached a level of maturity as a viable energy storage option available to support a modern electric power system grid; however, its application is still limited because of its energy capacity and the cost of the commercial product. In this paper, we demonstrate transient models of supercapacitor energy storage plants operating in coordination with run-of-the-river (ROR), doubly-fed induction generator hydropower plants (HPP) using a system control concept and architecture developed. A detailed transient model of a supercapacitor energy storage device is coupled with the grid via a three-phase inverter/rectifier and bidirectional DC-DC converter. In addition, we use a version of a 14-bus IEEE test case that includes the models of the supercapacitor energy storage device, ROR HPPs, and synchronous condensers that use the rotating synchronous generators of retired coal-powered plants. The purpose of the synchronous condensers is to enhance the system stability by providing voltage and reactive power control, provide power system oscillations damping, and maintain system inertia at secure levels. The control layer provides coordinated, decentralized operation of distributed ROR HPPs and energy storage as aggregate support to power system operations.

  14. Reward disrupts reactivated human skill memory

    OpenAIRE

    Eran Dayan; Rony Laor-Maayany; Nitzan Censor

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence across species and memory domains shows that when an existing memory is reactivated, it becomes susceptible to modifications. However, the potential role of reward signals in these mechanisms underlying human memory dynamics is unknown. Leaning on a wealth of findings on the role of reward in reinforcing memory, we tested the impact of reinforcing a skill memory trace with monetary reward following memory reactivation, on strengthening of the memory trace. Reinforcing re...

  15. Neighborhood disadvantage and adolescent stress reactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel A. Hackman; Laura M. Betancourt; Brodsky, Nancy L.; Hallam eHurt; Farah, Martha J.

    2012-01-01

    Lower socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with higher levels of life stress, which in turn affect stress physiology. SES is related to basal cortisol and diurnal change, but it is not clear if SES is associated with cortisol reactivity to stress. To address this question, we examined the relationship between two indices of SES, parental education and concentrated neighborhood disadvantage, and the cortisol reactivity of African–American adolescents to a modified version of the Trier Soci...

  16. Rosacea, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Azelaic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Rosacea is a common skin condition thought to be primarily an inflammatory disorder. Neutrophils, in particular, have been implicated in the inflammation associated with rosacea and mediate many of their effects through the release of reactive oxygen species. Recently, the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathophysiology of rosacea has been recognized. Many effective agents for rosacea, including topical azelaic acid and topical metronidazole, have anti-inflammatory properties. in-vitro...

  17. Optical fibers by butyl methacrylate reactive extrusion

    OpenAIRE

    Berthet, Romuald; Chalamet, Yvan; Taha, Mohamed; Zerroukhi, Amar

    2006-01-01

    51 p.; A process for a poly(butyl methacrylate) optical fibers production by reactive extrusion was developed. The reactive system was adapted to the reduced reaction time in the extruder combining concepts based on the free volume theory and a kinetic model for mass polymerization a butyl methacrylate. A kinetic model was proposed and the reaction evolution was simulated at different temperature and initiator concentration. This allowed the choice of reaction conditions in adequation with re...

  18. Self-Adapting Reactive Autonomous Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrecut, M.; Ali, M. K.

    This paper describes a new self-adapting control algorithm for reactive autonomous agents. The architecture of the autonomous agents integrates the reactive behavior with reinforcement learning. We show how these components perform on-line adaptation of the autonomous agents to various complex navigation situations by constructing an internal model of the environment. Also, a discussion on cooperation and coordination of teams of agents is presented.

  19. C-reactive protein and later preeclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebelo, Fernanda; Schlüssel, Michael M; Vaz, Juliana S

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether high C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration during pregnancy is associated with later preeclampsia and whether weight status (BMI) is a potential modifier of the relation between CRP and preeclampsia.......This study aims to determine whether high C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration during pregnancy is associated with later preeclampsia and whether weight status (BMI) is a potential modifier of the relation between CRP and preeclampsia....

  20. Oxime-mediated in vitro reactivation kinetic analysis of organophosphates-inhibited human and electric eel acetylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Arvind Kumar; Sharma, Rahul; Gupta, Bhanushree; Musilek, Kamil; Kuca, Kamil; Acharya, Jyotiranjan; Ghosh, Kallol K

    2016-06-01

    Organophosphate (OP)-based pesticides and nerve agents are highly toxic compounds which interrupt the catalytic mechanism of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by phosphorylating the hydroxyl moiety of serine residue. The inhibited enzyme can be reactivated by the nucleophilic action of oxime reactivators. To analyze the effect of different AChE sources on reactivation efficacy of reactivators, several in vivo studies have carried out using variety of AChE sources like pig, rat and monkey. Investigations on species differences provide a better insight for the development of new reactivators. Hence, present study was mainly targeted on comparative analysis of the reactivation of electric eel and human AChE inhibited by different OP. A series of butene-linked bis-pyridinium mono oximes which vary in functional groups present at the second pyridinium ring have been examined against sarin, VX, tabun and ethyl-paraoxon-poisoned AChE. In case of tabun-inhibited AChEs, tested oximes were better than reference oximes. For VX-poisoned human AChE, reactivator K251 (kr2;1.51 mM (-) (1 )min (-) (1)) showed good reactivation efficacy with standard oximes. Studies stipulated that butene-linked oximes consisting of different functional moieties are good reactivators and found to have better efficacy to reactivate nerve agent-inhibited human AChE in comparison to eel AChE.

  1. Novel roles of folic acid as redox regulator: Modulation of reactive oxygen species sinker protein expression and maintenance of mitochondrial redox homeostasis on hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kun-Goung; Chen, Chi-Fen; Ho, Chun-Te; Liu, Jun-Jen; Liu, Tsan-Zon; Chern, Chi-Liang

    2017-06-01

    We provide herein several lines of evidence to substantiate that folic acid (or folate) is a micronutrient capable of functioning as a novel redox regulator on hepatocellular carcinoma. First, we uncovered that folate deficiency could profoundly downregulate two prominent anti-apoptotic effectors including survivin and glucose-regulated protein-78. Silencing of either survivin or glucose-regulated protein-78 via small interfering RNA interfering technique established that both effectors could serve as reactive oxygen species sinker proteins. Second, folate deficiency-triggered oxidative-nitrosative stress could strongly induce endoplasmic reticulum stress that in turn could provoke cellular glutathione depletion through the modulation of the following two crucial events: (1) folate deficiency could strongly inhibit Bcl-2 expression leading to severe suppression of the mitochondrial glutathione pool and (2) folate deficiency could also profoundly inhibit two key enzymes that governing cellular glutathione redox regulation including γ-glutamylcysteinyl synthetase heavy chain, a catalytic enzyme for glutathione biosynthesis, and mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase 2, an enzyme responsible for providing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate necessary for regenerating oxidized glutathione disulfide back to glutathione via mitochondrial glutathione reductase. Collectively, we add to the literature new data to strengthen the notion that folate is an essential micronutrient that confers a novel role to combat reactive oxygen species insults and thus serves as a redox regulator via upregulating reactive oxygen species sinker proteins and averting mitochondrial glutathione depletion through proper maintenance of redox homeostasis via positively regulating glutathione biosynthesis, glutathione transporting system, and mitochondrial glutathione recycling process.

  2. Neighborhood disadvantage and adolescent stress reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Hackman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lower socioeconomic status (SES is associated with higher levels of life stress, which in turn affect stress physiology. SES is related to basal cortisol and diurnal change, but it is not clear if SES is associated with cortisol reactivity to stress. To address this question, we examined the relationship between two indices of SES, parental education and concentrated neighborhood disadvantage, and the cortisol reactivity of African-American adolescents to a modified version of the Trier Social Stress Test. We found that concentrated disadvantage was associated with cortisol reactivity and this relationship was moderated by gender, such that higher concentrated disadvantage predicted higher cortisol reactivity and steeper recovery in boys but not in girls. Parental education, alone or as moderated by gender, did not predict reactivity or recovery, while neither education nor concentrated disadvantage predicted estimates of baseline cortisol. This finding is consistent with animal literature showing differential vulnerability, by gender, to the effects of adverse early experience on stress regulation and the differential effects of neighborhood disadvantage in adolescent males and females. This suggests that the mechanisms underlying SES differences in brain development and particularly reactivity to environmental stressors may vary across genders.

  3. Ozone reactivity and free radical scavenging behavior of phenolic secondary metabolites in lichens exposed to chronic oxidant air pollution from Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Islas, N; Zambrano, A; Rojas, J L

    2007-08-01

    Lichen secondary metabolites putatively protect lichens from a variety of environmental stress factors, but it is unknown whether these substances respond to air pollution. To assess such a possibility, the three major phenolics of two epiphytic lichen species with contrasting tolerance to chronic air pollution from Mexico City were studied by combining experimental reactivity data and measured field contents. The antioxidant activity and antiradical power of boninic (BO), 2-O-methylsekikaic (MA), and usnic (US) acids, isolated from the tolerant Ramalina asahinae and salazinic acid (SA), atranorin (AT), and chloroatranorin (CA), from the sensitive Parmotrema stuppeum, were determined in vitro by kinetic experiments with ozone and the free radical diphenyl picryl hidrazyl (DPPH*), respectively. In addition, the field contents of these phenolics in the lichens, and the potential antioxidant capacity (PAC) they provide, were compared among three forested sites exposed to urban emissions and a similar, relatively clean site. The six phenolics had antioxidant activity and antiradical power according to these trends: CA > AT > US > SA > or = BO > or = MA for O(3); and CA > AT > US > MA > SA = BO for DPPH*. The three most reactive phenolics are cortical compounds, located in the lichen portion most exposed to the surrounding environment. In contrast, the less reactive SA, BO, and MA are medullary. Such reactivity patterns indicate that some phenolics may provide antioxidative protection at the air-lichen interface. The higher antioxidant power of CA and AT may be due to the reactive hydroxyl groups at positions 2 and 4 of ring A, instead of the less reactive methoxyl at the same positions in both BO and MA. In the field comparisons, total quantified phenolics were significantly higher near Mexico City for both lichens, except for the tolerant R. asahinae at one site. Nevertheless, only the latter species had significantly increased PAC values at all sites near the city

  4. Kepler Certified False Positive Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Stephen T.; Batalha, Natalie Marie; Colon, Knicole Dawn; Coughlin, Jeffrey Langer; Haas, Michael R.; Henze, Chris; Huber, Daniel; Morton, Tim; Rowe, Jason Frank; Mullally, Susan Elizabeth; hide

    2017-01-01

    This document describes the Kepler Certied False Positive table hosted at the Exoplanet Archive1, herein referred to as the CFP table. This table is the result of detailed examination by the Kepler False Positive Working Group (FPWG) of declared false positives in the Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) tables (see, for example, Batalha et al. (2012); Burke et al.(2014); Rowe et al. (2015); Mullally et al. (2015); Coughlin et al. (2015b)) at the Exoplanet Archive. A KOI is considered a false positive if it is not due to a planet orbiting the KOI's target star. The CFP table contains all KOIs in the Exoplanet Archive cumulative KOI table. The purpose of the CFP table is to provide a list of certified false positive KOIs. A KOI is certified as a false positive when, in the judgement of the FPWG, there is no plausible planetary interpretation of the observational evidence, which we summarize by saying that the evidence for a false positive is compelling. This certification process involves detailed examination using all available data for each KOI, establishing a high-reliability ground truth set. The CFP table can be used to estimate the reliability of, for example, the KOI tables which are created using only Kepler photometric data, so the disposition of individual KOIs may differ in the KOI and CFP tables. Follow-up observers may find the CFP table useful to avoid observing false positives.

  5. Structural evidence for substrate-induced synergism and half-sites reactivity in biotin carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalkin, Igor; Miller, J Richard; Evdokimov, Artem; Lightle, Sandra; Yan, Chunhong; Stover, Charles Ken; Waldrop, Grover L

    2008-10-01

    Bacterial acetyl-CoA carboxylase is a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme that consists of three separate proteins: biotin carboxylase (BC), biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase (CT). Acetyl-CoA carboxylase is a potentially attractive target for novel antibiotics because it catalyzes the first committed step in fatty acid biosynthesis. In the first half-reaction, BC catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of BCCP. In the second half-reaction, the carboxyl group is transferred from carboxybiotinylated BCCP to acetyl-CoA to produce malonyl-CoA. A series of structures of BC from several bacteria crystallized in the presence of various ATP analogs is described that addresses three major questions concerning the catalytic mechanism. The structure of BC bound to AMPPNP and the two catalytically essential magnesium ions resolves inconsistencies between the kinetics of active-site BC mutants and previously reported BC structures. Another structure of AMPPNP bound to BC shows the polyphosphate chain folded back on itself, and not in the correct (i.e., extended) conformation for catalysis. This provides the first structural evidence for the hypothesis of substrate-induced synergism, which posits that ATP binds nonproductively to BC in the absence of biotin. The BC homodimer has been proposed to exhibit half-sites reactivity where the active sites alternate or "flip-flop" their catalytic cycles. A crystal structure of BC showed the ATP analog AMPPCF(2)P bound to one subunit while the other subunit was unliganded. The liganded subunit was in the closed or catalytic conformation while the unliganded subunit was in the open conformation. This provides the first structural evidence for half-sites reactivity in BC.

  6. Vaccine-induced cross-genotype reactive neutralizing antibodies against hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Gottwein, Judith M; Houghton, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We detected cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (NtAb) against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in chimpanzees vaccinated with HCV-1 (genotype 1a) recombinant E1/E2 envelope glycoproteins. Five vaccinated chimpanzees, protected following HCV-1 challenge, were initially studied using the heterologous H77......a, with limited reactivity against 2a and 3a. Our study provides encouragement for the development of a recombinant envelope-based vaccine against hepatitis C....

  7. OH reactivity measurements within a boreal forest: evidence for unknown reactive emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Vinayak; Williams, J; Lelieveld, J; Ruuskanen, T M; Kajos, M K; Patokoski, J; Hellen, H; Hakola, H; Mogensen, D; Boy, M; Rinne, J; Kulmala, M

    2010-09-01

    Boreal forests emit large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which react with the hydroxyl radical (OH) to influence regional ozone levels and form secondary organic aerosol. Using OH reactivity measurements within a boreal forest in Finland, we investigated the budget of reactive VOCs. OH reactivity was measured using the comparative reactivity method, whereas 30 individual VOCs were measured using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, thermal-desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, in August 2008. The measured OH reactivity ranged from below detection limit (3.5 s(-1)), to approximately 60 s(-1) in a single pollution event. The average OH reactivity was approximately 9 s(-1) and no diel variation was observed in the profiles. The measured OH sinks (approximately 30 species) accounted for only 50% of the total measured OH reactivity, implying unknown reactive VOCs within the forest. The five highest measured OH sinks were: monoterpenes (1 s(-1)), CO (0.7 s(-1)), isoprene (0.5 s(-1)), propanal and acetone (0.3 s(-1)), and methane (0.3 s(-1)). We suggest that models be constrained by direct OH reactivity measurements to accurately assess the impact of boreal forest emissions on regional atmospheric chemistry and climate.

  8. Positive technology: using interactive technologies to promote positive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe; Baños, Rosa M; Botella, Cristina; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Gaggioli, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    It is generally assumed that technology assists individuals in improving the quality of their lives. However, the impact of new technologies and media on well-being and positive functioning is still somewhat controversial. In this paper, we contend that the quality of experience should become the guiding principle in the design and development of new technologies, as well as a primary metric for the evaluation of their applications. The emerging discipline of Positive Psychology provides a useful framework to address this challenge. Positive Psychology is the scientific study of optimal human functioning and flourishing. Instead of drawing on a "disease model" of human behavior, it focuses on factors that enable individuals and communities to thrive and build the best in life. In this paper, we propose the "Positive Technology" approach--the scientific and applied approach to the use of technology for improving the quality of our personal experience through its structuring, augmentation, and/or replacement--as a way of framing a suitable object of study in the field of cyberpsychology and human-computer interaction. Specifically, we suggest that it is possible to use technology to influence three specific features of our experience--affective quality, engagement/actualization, and connectedness--that serve to promote adaptive behaviors and positive functioning. In this framework, positive technologies are classified according to their effects on a specific feature of personal experience. Moreover, for each level, we have identified critical variables that can be manipulated to guide the design and development of positive technologies.

  9. Molecular Diagnosis of Shrimp Allergy: Efficiency of Several Allergens to Predict Clinical Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Mariona; Grishina, Galina; Yang, Ariana C; Sánchez-García, Silvia; Lin, Jing; Towle, David; Ibañez, Maria Dolores; Sastre, Joaquín; Sampson, Hugh A; Ayuso, Rosalia

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of shellfish allergy remains a challenge for clinicians. Several shellfish allergens have been characterized and their IgE epitopes identified. However, the clinical relevance of this sensitization is still not clear. The objective of this study was to identify allergens and epitopes associated with clinical reactivity to shrimp. Shrimp-sensitized subjects were recruited and grouped based on the history of shrimp-allergic reactions and challenge outcome. IgE reactivity to recombinant crustacean allergens, and IgE and IgG4 reactivity to peptides were determined. Subjects sensitized to dust mites and/or cockroach without shrimp sensitization or reported allergic reactions, as well as nonatopic individuals, were used as controls. A total of 86 subjects were recruited with a skin prick test to shrimp; 74 reported shrimp-allergic reactions, 58 were allergic (38 positive double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge and 20 recent anaphylaxis), and 16 were tolerant. All subjects without a history of reactions had negative challenges. The individuals with a positive challenge more frequently recognized tropomyosin and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding proteins than those found tolerant by the challenge. Especially a sarcoplasmic-calcium-binding-protein positive test is very likely to result in a positive challenge, though the frequency of recognition is low. Subjects with dust mite and/or cockroach allergy not sensitized to shrimp recognized arginine kinase and hemocyanin. Several epitopes of these allergens may be important in predicting clinical reactivity. Tropomyosin and sarcoplasmic-calcium-binding-protein sensitization is associated with clinical reactivity to shrimp. Myosin light chain testing may help in the diagnosis of clinical reactivity. Arginine kinase and hemocyanin appear to be cross-reacting allergens between shrimp and arthropods. Detection of IgE to these allergens and some of their epitopes may be better diagnostic tools in the routine workup

  10. Welding bulk metallic glass using nanostructured reactive multilayer foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenkle, Jonathan C.

    We have used Al/Ni reactive foils to weld Zr57Ti 5Cu20Ni8Al10 metallic glasses. The welds are a composite morphology comprised of glass ligaments and intermetallic AlNi (the product of the reactive foil). The presence of the presumably brittle intermetallic (in lieu of the glass) is expected to limit the mechanical properties of the welds. Based on fracture toughness measurements and the crack propagation paths, we conclude that virtually all of the toughness can be ascribed to the presence of the metallic glass ligaments. Increasing the pressure applied during welding increases the fraction of the joint made of these ligaments and so increases the fracture toughness as well. To eliminate the intermetallic from the weld altogether, we attempted to fabricate reactive mulitlayer foils that form an amorphous product by melting and cooling rapidly during a self-propagating reaction. We began with reactive foils with overall composition Zr2Ni but quickly determined that the foils did not fully melt. We then attempted to lower the melting temperature and increase the glass forming ability and the heat of mixing by adding Al and Cu. These foils again did not fully melt. Finally we systematically determined that foils of overall compositions Hf37Ni63, Ni 80P20, and Ni60P40, which are all known binary metallic glasses, will potentially melt during a self-propagating reaction. Knowledge of the phase transformations during a self-propagating reaction is necessary to engineer reactive foils for future applications. Furthermore, reactive foils provide an opportunity to study phase transformations under high heating rates not easily achievable. Characterizing the processes in the reaction zone however is challenging, requiring both temporal resolution better than ˜ 100 mus (the time required for the reaction front to pass a fixed location) and spatial resolution of phase transformations in situ in Al/Ni multilayers. Unlike previous annealing and quenching studies in these

  11. Reactivation of a dormant earthflow documented by field monitoring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Matteo; Simoni, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    (middle section) of the 1994 earthflow. The upper section essentially consisted of 1 rain gage, 3 surface wire extensometers installed across the main scarp, and 2 instrumented open-standpipe piezometers at 3.6 m depth. In the middle section, 6 instrumented open-standpipe piezometers and 7 pressure sensors directly buried into the ground were installed in the landslide body at depths ranging between 1 and 9 m (about 2 m above the slip surface). Although several sensors were damaged and others were pulled out from the ground during the movement, the reactivation of the earthflow is well documented. The three surface wire extensometers showed a nearly-perfect exponential growth of the displacement rate, that progressively increased from about 1 mm/day one month before the failure to more than 200 mm/day in the last hours. The initial slide in the crown area then loaded the existing, fully-saturated landslide deposits triggering the downslope propagation of the failure. The pressure sensors buried in the landslide material recorded positive pore pressure excesses due to undrained loading (with hydraulic heads well above the ground surface) generally followed by an abrupt decrease, probably related to mechanical unloading or dilation of the landslide mass. These data indicate that the earthflow was reactivated by a relatively small, drained failure in the source area that propagated downslope as an undrained pulse of mechanical compression and extension.

  12. Maternal Dispositional Empathy and Electrodermal Reactivity: Interactive Contributions to Maternal Sensitivity with Toddler-Aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Helen T.; McElwain, Nancy L.; Groh, Ashley M.; Haydon, Katherine C.; Roisman, Glenn I.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated maternal dispositional empathy and skin conductance level (SCL) reactivity to infant emotional cues as joint predictors of maternal sensitivity. Sixty-four mother-toddler dyads (31 boys) were observed across a series of interaction tasks during a laboratory visit, and maternal sensitivity was coded from approximately 55 minutes of observation per family. In a second, mother-only laboratory visit, maternal SCL reactivity to infant cues was assessed using a cry-laugh audio paradigm. Mothers reported on their dispositional empathy via a questionnaire. As hypothesized, mothers with greater dispositional empathy exhibited more sensitive behavior at low, but not high, levels of SCL reactivity to infant cues. Analyses examining self-reported emotional reactivity to the cry-laugh audio paradigm yielded a similar finding: dispositional empathy was related to greater sensitivity when mothers reported low, but not high, negative emotional reactivity. Results provide support for Dix’s (1991) affective model of parenting that underscores the combined contribution of the parent’s empathic tendencies and his/her own emotional experience in response to child emotions. Specificity of the Empathy × Reactivity interaction is discussed with respect to the context in which reactivity was assessed (infant cry versus laugh) and the type of sensitivity examined (sensitivity to the child’s distress versus non-distress). PMID:24955589

  13. KSHV Rta promoter specification and viral reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eGuito

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are obligate intracellular pathogens whose biological success depends upon replication and packaging of viral genomes, and transmission of progeny viruses to new hosts. The biological success of herpesviruses is enhanced by their ability to reproduce their genomes without producing progeny viruses or killing the host cells, a process called latency. Latency permits a herpesvirus to remain undetected in its animal host for decades while maintaining the potential to reactivate, or switch, to a productive life cycle when host conditions are conducive to generating viral progeny. Direct interactions between many host and viral molecules are implicated in controlling herpesviral reactivation, suggesting complex biological networks that control the decision. One viral protein that is necessary and sufficient to switch latent KSHV into the lytic infection cycle is called K-Rta. Rta is a transcriptional activator that specifies promoters by binding direct DNA directly and interacting with cellular proteins. Among these cellular proteins, binding of K-Rta to RBP-Jk is essential for viral reactivation.. In contrast to the canonical model for Notch signaling, RBP-Jk is not uniformly and constitutively bound to the latent KSHV genome, but rather is recruited to DNA by interactions with K-Rta. Stimulation of RBP-Jk DNA binding requires high affinity binding of Rta to repetitive and palindromic CANT DNA repeats in promoters, and formation of ternary complexes with RBP-Jk. However, while K-Rta expression is necessary for initiating KSHV reactivation, K-Rta’s role as the switch is inefficient. Many factors modulate K-Rta’s function, suggesting that KSHV reactivation can be significantly regulated post-Rta expression and challenging the notion that herpesviral reactivation is bistable. This review analyzes rapidly evolving research on KSHV K-Rta to consider the role of K-Rta promoter specification in regulating the progression of KSHV reactivation.

  14. Strategic Positioning and Campaigning

    OpenAIRE

    Glazer, Amihai

    1998-01-01

    Data from U.S. presidential elections show that most third parties take extreme positions rather than positions between those of the major parties. This and other phenomena are explained with an extension of the Downsian model of elections. When parties choose not only positions, but also choose among which voters to campaign, then a small party may choose an extreme position to reduce the effectiveness of campaigns against it, and to induce a big party to campaign against another big party, ...

  15. Querying Data Providing Web Services

    OpenAIRE

    Sabesan, Manivasakan

    2010-01-01

    Web services are often used for search computing where data is retrieved from servers providing information of different kinds. Such data providing web services return a set of objects for a given set of parameters without any side effects. There is need to enable general and scalable search capabilities of data from data providing web services, which is the topic of this Thesis. The Web Service MEDiator (WSMED) system automatically provides relational views of any data providing web service ...

  16. Surface chemistry and surface reactivity of fibrous amphiboles that are not regulated as asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantauzzi, M; Pacella, A; Fournier, J; Gianfagna, A; Andreozzi, G B; Rossi, A

    2012-08-01

    Three fibrous amphiboles that are not regulated as asbestos--two from Biancavilla (Sicily, Italy) and one from Libby (MT, USA)--were studied in order to establish relationships between surface chemistry and surface reactivity. The three fibrous samples, plus one prismatic fluoro-edenite from Biancavilla that was used for comparison, were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in order to obtain their quantitative surface compositions and to determine the chemical environment of the Fe in each case. In particular, the Fe 2p(3/2) peak was fitted and, for the first for these materials, the binding energies of Fe(II) oxide, Fe(III) oxide and Fe(III) oxyhydroxide were identified. Bulk chemistries and Fe oxidation states were obtained from previous studies for the samples from Biancavilla, and were investigated in the present work by electron microprobe (EMP) and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) for the sample from Libby. Comparison between surface and bulk data revealed that the sample with the lowest bulk Fe oxidation state was the one most affected by surface oxidation, while the samples with bulk highly-oxidised Fe were showing very high signal of Fe (III) oxy-hydroxide probably due to weathering. The surface reactivities of the fibrous amphiboles were investigated by measuring the production of the [DMPO, HO]• radical adduct using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Notably, significant chemical reactivity was observed; it was found to be comparable with--or, for the Libby sample, even higher than--that of fibrous tremolite (one of the six asbestos minerals). A positive linear correlation was observed when the production of HO• radical was plotted versus the Fe(II) content on the fibre surface. Data on fibrous tremolite obtained from previous studies were added to substantiate the correlation. These results provide evidence that Fe(II) at the fibre surface controls the production of radicals at the fibre surface. The observed

  17. Increased risk of hepatitis B virus reactivation in systemic lupus erythematosus patients receiving immunosuppressants: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W T; Chen, Y M; Chen, D Y; Lan, J L; Chang, C S; Yeh, H Z; Yang, S S

    2018-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate risk of hepatitis B virus reactivation in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with different hepatitis B virus infection statuses receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Methods We retrospectively analyzed systemic lupus erythematosus patients with positive hepatitis B surface antigen or anti-hepatitis B core IgG antibody who underwent immunosuppressive therapies from January 2001 to December 2012 at a medical center in Taiwan for evidence of hepatitis B virus reactivation. Results During this period, 906 out of 3125 patients who were diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus received screening tests for hepatitis B virus. Thirty-eight patients were identified as hepatitis B surface antigen-positive. Fifteen of 38 (39.5%) hepatitis B surface antigen-positive patients developed hepatitis B virus reactivation, and 53.3% of these patients experienced severe hepatitis flare. Three of 157 hepatitis B surface antigen-negative/anti-hepatitis B core IgG antibody-positive patients (1.9%) experienced hepatitis B surface antigen seroreversion after immunosuppressive therapy. Five patients received prophylactic or preemptive antiviral therapy and none of them developed hepatitis B virus flares. A daily dose of prednisolone greater than 5 mg was a risk factor for hepatitis B reactivation by multivariate logistic analysis. Conclusions The risk of hepatitis B virus reactivation is high in lupus patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Antiviral prophylaxis or preemption can effectively reduce the incidence of hepatitis B virus reactivation in lupus patients.

  18. Perception of eye positions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorteije, J.A.M.; Wezel, R.J.A. van; Lankheet, M.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    In a two-alternative forced-choice psychophysical test human subjects were tested for their ability to perceive their own viewing direction. A small red flash was presented at different horizontal positions left or right from the subjects' eye position on the screen. Eye positions were recorded with

  19. Positive ions of the first- and second-row transition metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical dissociation energies for the first- and second-row transition metal hydride positive ions are critically compared against recent experimental values obtained from ion beam reactive scattering methods. Theoretical spectroscopic parameters and dipole moments are presented for the ground and several low-lying excited states. The calculations employ large Gaussian basis sets and account for electron correlation using the single-reference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction and coupled-pair-functional methods. The Darwin and mass-velocity contributions to the relativistic energy are included in the all-electron calculations on the first-row systems using first-order perturbation theory, and in the second-row systems using the Hay and Wadt relativistic effective core potentials. The theoretical D(0) values for the second-row transition metal hydride positive ions should provide a critical measure of the experimental values, which are not as refined as many of those in the first transition row.

  20. False-positive amphetamine toxicology screen results in three pregnant women using labetalol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Lynn M; Wu, Danny

    2011-02-01

    Labetalol is commonly used for control of hypertension in pregnancy. A component of the workup for new-onset hypertension in pregnancy often includes a urine drug screen. A labetalol metabolite is structurally similar to amphetamine and methamphetamine, thus causing potential cross-reactivity in drug immunoassays. We present one case of cocaine-induced hypertensive crisis superimposed on chronic hypertension and two cases of severe preeclampsia for which patients required escalating doses of labetalol for hypertension, with subsequent false-positive amphetamine urine drug screen results. In pregnant women requiring labetalol for treatment of hypertensive disease, a urine drug screen may be falsely positive for amphetamines and methamphetamines. Providers should be cognizant of this possibility when interpreting the results of urine drug screens.

  1. Physiological Reactivity Moderates the Association between Parental Directing and Young Adolescent Friendship Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Kelly M.; Erath, Stephen A.; Pettit, Gregory S.; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether the longitudinal association between parental directing of friendships (i.e., encouraging or discouraging certain friendships) and young adolescents' friendship adjustment (i.e., friendship quality and friends' positive characteristics) was moderated by skin conductance level reactivity (SCLR) to peer stress.…

  2. Analytical model of reactive transport processes with spatially variable coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Matthew J; Morrow, Liam C

    2015-05-01

    Analytical solutions of partial differential equation (PDE) models describing reactive transport phenomena in saturated porous media are often used as screening tools to provide insight into contaminant fate and transport processes. While many practical modelling scenarios involve spatially variable coefficients, such as spatially variable flow velocity, v(x), or spatially variable decay rate, k(x), most analytical models deal with constant coefficients. Here we present a framework for constructing exact solutions of PDE models of reactive transport. Our approach is relevant for advection-dominant problems, and is based on a regular perturbation technique. We present a description of the solution technique for a range of one-dimensional scenarios involving constant and variable coefficients, and we show that the solutions compare well with numerical approximations. Our general approach applies to a range of initial conditions and various forms of v(x) and k(x). Instead of simply documenting specific solutions for particular cases, we present a symbolic worksheet, as supplementary material, which enables the solution to be evaluated for different choices of the initial condition, v(x) and k(x). We also discuss how the technique generalizes to apply to models of coupled multispecies reactive transport as well as higher dimensional problems.

  3. Neural reactivation links unconscious thought to decision-making performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John David; Bursley, James K; Satpute, Ajay B

    2013-12-01

    Brief periods of unconscious thought (UT) have been shown to improve decision making compared with making an immediate decision (ID). We reveal a neural mechanism for UT in decision making using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging. Participants (N = 33) encoded information on a set of consumer products (e.g. 48 attributes describing four different cars), and we manipulated whether participants (i) consciously thought about this information (conscious thought), (ii) completed a difficult 2-back working memory task (UT) or (iii) made an immediate decision about the consumer products (ID) in a within-subjects blocked design. To differentiate UT neural activity from 2-back working memory neural activity, participants completed an independent 2-back task and this neural activity was subtracted from neural activity occurring during the UT 2-back task. Consistent with a neural reactivation account, we found that the same regions activated during the encoding of complex decision information (right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and left intermediate visual cortex) continued to be activated during a subsequent 2-min UT period. Moreover, neural reactivation in these regions was predictive of subsequent behavioral decision-making performance after the UT period. These results provide initial evidence for post-encoding unconscious neural reactivation in facilitating decision making.

  4. The origin of Reactive Halogen Species in the Polar Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, U.

    2011-12-01

    Reactive halogen species (RHS) play an important role in various parts of the troposphere e.g. in coastal regions, over salt pans, in volcanic plumes and in polar regions. Despite much progress in recent years the origin and some of the chemical interactions of reactive halogen species (RHS) in the polar troposphere are still not quantitatively understood. Among the many unanswered questions are: Why is there an Antarctic - Arctic asymmetry of reactive iodine species? What drives the autocatalytic bromine release from sea salt (the bromine explosion)? Why does the bromine explosion almost exclusively occur during springtime? What is the effect of coupling cycles involving different halogens? What is the vertical extent of the layer containing RHS? The presentation gives an overview of new ground-based field observations illustrating the above questions and providing answers to some of them. Also, recent advances in satellite observations of tropospheric BrO are discussed. In particular new insight is being gained from the synergistic use of satellite observations and ground based measurements of BrO. Also the question of a NOx - driven (rather than HOx - driven) bromine explosion is discussed.

  5. Process Improvement of Reactive Dye Synthesis Using Six Sigma Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanich, Thanapat; Chutima, Parames

    2017-06-01

    This research focuses on the problem occurred in the reactive dye synthesis process of a global manufacturer in Thailand which producing various chemicals for reactive dye products to supply global industries such as chemicals, textiles and garments. The product named “Reactive Blue Base” is selected in this study because it has highest demand and the current chemical yield shows a high variation, i.e. yield variation of 90.4% - 99.1% (S.D. = 2.405 and Cpk = -0.08) and average yield is 94.5% (lower than the 95% standard set by the company). The Six Sigma concept is applied aiming at increasing yield and reducing variation of this process. This approach is suitable since it provides a systematic guideline with five improvement phases (DMAIC) to effectively tackle the problem and find the appropriate parameter settings of the process. Under the new parameter settings, the process yield variation is reduced to range between 96.5% - 98.5% (S.D. = 0.525 and Cpk = 1.83) and the average yield is increased to 97.5% (higher than the 95% standard set by the company).

  6. Differentiating anticipatory from reactive cortisol responses to psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engert, Veronika; Efanov, Simona I; Duchesne, Annie; Vogel, Susanne; Corbo, Vincent; Pruessner, Jens C

    2013-08-01

    Most psychosocial stress studies assess the overall cortisol response without further identifying the temporal dynamics within hormone levels. It has been shown, however, that the amplitude of anticipatory cortisol stress levels has a unique predictive value for psychological health. So far, no "best practice" in how to investigate the anticipatory cortisol stress response has emerged. The goal of the current research was to develop a protocol that would allow for a sensitive and easy-to-implement laboratory-based investigation into anticipatory cortisol stress levels. We initially tested 26 healthy men in either an anticipation- or stress-only condition of the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) to map the distinct timelines of anticipatory and reactive cortisol release profiles (study 1). Subsequently, we administered the TSST to 50 healthy men such that the cortisol responses to anticipatory and reactive stress components could be dissociated (study 2). In both studies we sampled saliva cortisol at high frequency (at baseline, during 10min of anticipation and during and after 10min of acute stress) and the current mood state pre- and post-stress. We found anticipatory responder rates of 20% and 40%, with peak anticipatory cortisol levels between 14 and 20min after onset of anticipation. Visible changes in reactive cortisol levels occurred only after the termination of the acute stressor. We conclude that the best practice to detect a maximum number of anticipatory responders in the TSST would be to extend the anticipation phase to 15min. In doing so, the anticipatory cortisol peak could be captured at a time-point of the actual stressor that is uninfluenced by reactive cortisol levels. Overall, we could reveal several features of anticipatory responders. Most importantly, there was a positive correlation between anticipatory and reactive stress responses. There was no association between anticipatory cortisol and alpha-amylase as well as subjective

  7. The relationship between personality disorder traits and reactive versus proactive motivation for aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbestael, Jill; Cima, Maaike; Lemmens, Anke

    2015-09-30

    There is a strong link between personality disorders (PDs) and aggression. This is reflected in high prevalence rates of PD diagnoses in forensic samples, and in several diagnostic criteria of PDs directly referring to elevated levels of aggression. Aggression can stem from two distinct types of motivation; reactive or impulsive aggression that serves as a defensive reaction to provocation, and proactive or premeditated aggression used to gain extrinsic benefits. Although some clinical conditions like antisocial, borderline, and narcissistic PDs or PD traits, have been empirically linked to reactive and/or proactive aggression, the current study pioneers assessing the relationship between reactive and proactive aggression and traits of all 10 PDs. A mixed sample of patient and non-patient (N=238) participants were administered with the SCID II to assess the level of PD traits; they also completed the Reactive Proactive Questionnaire to determine levels of reactive and proactive aggression. Results showed that paranoid PD traits were positively related to reactive aggression, whereas proactive aggression was uniquely related to antisocial PD traits. This highlights the importance of differentiating between distinct motivations for aggression in PD samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reactivity to 35% carbon dioxide in bulimia nervosa and panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woznica, Andrea; Vickers, Kristin; Koerner, Naomi; Fracalanza, Katie

    2015-08-30

    The inhalation of 35% carbon dioxide (CO₂) induces panic and anxiety in people with panic disorder (PD) and in people with various other psychiatric disorders. The anxiogenic effect of CO₂ in people with eating disorders has received sparse attention despite the fact that PD and bulimia nervosa (BN) have several common psychological and neurobiological features. This study compared CO₂-reactivity across three groups of participants: females with BN, females with PD, and female controls without known risk factors for enhanced CO₂-reactivity (e.g., social anxiety disorder, first degree relatives with PD). Reactivity was measured by self-reported ratings of panic symptomatology and subjective anxiety, analyzed as both continuous variables (change from room-air to CO₂) and dichotomous variables (positive versus negative responses to CO₂). Analyses of each outcome measure demonstrated that CO₂-reactivity was similar across the BN and PD groups, and reactivity within each of these two groups was significantly stronger than that in the control group. This is the first study to demonstrate CO₂-hyperreactivity in individuals with BN, supporting the hypothesis that reactivity to this biological paradigm is not specific to PD. Further research would benefit from examining transdiagnostic mechanisms in CO₂-hyperreactivity, such as anxiety sensitivity, which may account for this study's results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reactivity to in vivo marijuana cues among cannabis-dependent adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kevin M; LaRowe, Steven D; Watson, Noreen L; Carpenter, Matthew J

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis dependence is a common but poorly understood condition in adolescents. Marijuana craving has been posited as a potential contributing factor to continued use and relapse, but relatively few studies have focused on the measurement of craving and reactivity to marijuana cues. The present work sought to explore reactivity to marijuana cues within this age group. Thirty treatment-seeking cannabis-dependent adolescents (age 13-20) completed a cue reactivity session, consisting of exposure to and manipulation of in vivo marijuana cues ("joint" and lighter) and matching neutral cues (pencil and eraser), in counterbalanced order. Subjective craving and physiological reactivity were assessed. Participants demonstrated increased craving and skin conductance reactivity in response to marijuana cues, relative to neutral cues. In vivo marijuana cues appear to elicit significant subjective and physiological reactivity among treatment-seeking cannabis-dependent adolescents. Further work is needed with a larger sample and with a wider variety of cues. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Major depressive disorder and impulsive reactivity to emotion: toward a dual-process view of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Charles S; Johnson, Sheri L; Joormann, Jutta

    2013-09-01

    Dual-process theories of behaviour have been used to suggest that vulnerability to depression involves elevated reactivity to emotions. This study tests that idea, examining self-reported reactivity. Comparison between persons with at least one lifetime episode of major depressive disorder (lifetime MDD) and those without this diagnosis, controlling for symptoms of alcohol use (a potential externalizing confound) and current symptoms of depression (a potential state-dependent confound). Undergraduates (N = 120) completed a clinical interview to diagnose lifetime MDD and a series of self-reports bearing on diverse aspects of self-control, including reactivity to emotion. Thirty-four people were diagnosed with lifetime MDD; 86 did not meet criteria for MDD. The groups were then compared on three factors underlying the scales assessing self-control. The MDD group had higher scores than controls on the two factors that reflect impulsive reactivity to diverse emotions, including emotions that are positive in valence. These effects were not explained by associations with either externalizing symptoms or current depressive symptoms. Reflexive reactivity to emotions characterizes depression, in addition to some externalizing problems, and it may deserve study as a potential trans-diagnostic feature. Reflexive reactivity to emotions characterizes persons diagnosed with major depressive disorder. Findings suggest desirability of focusing treatment partly on management of reflexive reactions to emotions. Measures were self-reports, rather than behavioural responses to emotions. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Position-sensitive radiation detector..

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eijk, C.W.E.; Schooneveld, E.

    1990-01-01

    Abstract of EP 0383389 (A1) Position-sensitive radiation detector provided with a semiconductor structure comprising a wafer of semiconductor material of a first conductivity type having two principal-surfaces situated at relatively short distances from each other, the dimensions of which are

  12. Positive Pedagogy for Sport Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Richard L.; Harvey, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The literature suggests that, despite some challenges in their implementation, player/athlete-centred, inquiry-based approaches to teaching games and coaching team sport can improve game playing ability, increase player/athlete motivation and provide positive affective experiences of learning. A range of these approaches, including Teaching Games…

  13. A Positive Psychology That Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Shane L.; Magyar-Moe, Jeana L.

    2006-01-01

    The Major Contribution intended to situate positive psychology in counseling psychology's past and future and in the complex world we live and work in today. The four reactions (Frazier, Lee,& Steger; Gerstein; Linley; Mollen, Ethington,& Ridley) provide new insights into how counseling psychology has and will contribute to the study of human…

  14. Dynamics of reactive collisions by optical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureña, A. González; Vetter, R.

    This paper reviews recent developments in the study of reactive collisions using optical methods. Although the basic approach is from the experimental viewpoint, attention is paid to the conceptual and theoretical aspects of the physics underlying modern reaction dynamics. After a brief resume of basic concepts and definitions on both scalar and vectorial quantities characterizing the chemical reaction, a significant body of this paper describes the recent achievements using laser techniques, mainly via laser-induced fluorescence, and chemiluminescence. Both high-resolution crossed-beam and high-resolution bulb studies are presented in a complementary fashion, as they provide a detailed picture of reaction dynamics through the measurement of quantum state specific differential cross-sections. Specific examples include the use of Doppler resolved laser-induced fluorescence, multiphoton ionization or Cars studies. Some examples are also included based on the use of product imaging techniques, the novel approach of obtaining quantum state resolved differential cross-sections for chemical reactions. In addition, new data on the collision energy dependence of the collision cross-section, i.e. the excitation function, obtained by highly sensitive collision energy cross-beam techniques is also presented and reviewed. Another part of the paper is dedicated to recent advances in the study of reaction dynamics using electronically excited species. Emphasis is placed not only on the opening of new channels for chemical reactions but also on the possible outcome of the reaction products associated with the different symmetries of the excited potential energy surfaces. Finally, a section is dedicated to recent developments in studies carried out in the area of van der Waals and cluster reactions. The possibility of clocking the chemical act as well as very efficient trapping of reaction intermediates is illustrated with some examples. Throughout the whole paper care is taken to

  15. Lack of allergic cross-reactivity to cephalosporins among patients allergic to penicillins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novalbos, A; Sastre, J; Cuesta, J; De Las Heras, M; Lluch-Bernal, M; Bombín, C; Quirce, S

    2001-03-01

    There are some contradicting data about clinical allergic cross-reactivity to cephalosporins among patients who have had a previous allergic reaction to penicillins. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of administering cephalosporins to penicillin-allergic patients. The diagnosis of penicillin allergy was made by positive skin tests to penicillin reagents and/or provocation tests with the penicillin suspected of causing the allergic reaction. To assess the clinical tolerance to cephalosporins, 41 well-characterized penicillin allergic patients diagnosed by positive skin tests and/or provocation tests were challenged with three cephalosporins that do not share the same side chain to the penicillin that induced the reactions: cephazoline, cefuroxime and ceftriaxone. Skin prick and intradermal tests with all cephalosporins tested were negative. All penicillin-allergic patients tolerated therapeutic doses of the three cephalosporins tested (cephazoline, cefuroxime and ceftriaxone) without any ill effect. These results indicate that the risk of suffering from an allergic reaction on administering cephalosporins to penicillin-allergic patients seems to be very low, provided that cephalosporins with a different side chain to the penicillin responsible for the allergic reaction are used.

  16. Establishment of Karadeniz Technical University Permanent GNSS Station as Reactivated of TRAB IGS Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazancı, Selma Zengin; Kayıkçı, Emine Tanır

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have gained great importance in terms of the benefi ts it provides such as precise geodetic point positioning, determining crustal deformations, navigation, vehicle monitoring systems and meteorological applications etc. As in Turkey, for this purpose, each country has set up its own GNSS station networks like Turkish National Permanent RTK Network analyzed precise station coordinates and velocities together with the International GNSS Service, Turkish National Fundamental GPS Network and Turkish National Permanent GNSS Network (TNPGN) stations not only are utilized as precise positioning but also GNSS meteorology studies so total number of stations are increased. This work is related to the reactivated of the TRAB IGS station which was established in Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Geomatics Engineering. Within the COST ES1206 Action (GNSS4SWEC) KTU analysis center was established and Trop-NET system developed by Geodetic Observatory Pecny (GOP, RIGTC) in order to troposphere monitoring. The project titled "Using Regional GNSS Networks to Strengthen Severe Weather Prediction" was accepted to the scientifi c and technological research council of Turkey (TUBITAK). With this project, we will design 2 new constructed GNSS reference station network. Using observation data of network, we will compare water vapor distribution derived by GNSS Meteorology and GNSS Tomography. At this time, KTU AC was accepted as E-GVAP Analysis Centre in December 2016. KTU reference station is aimed to be a member of the EUREF network with these studies.

  17. Reactivity and Stability of Large Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si eTang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of local stability has a long tradition in community ecology. Stability describes whether an ecological system will eventually return to its original steady state after being perturbed. More recently, the study of the transient dynamics of ecological systems has been recognized as crucial, given that continuously disturbed systems might never reach a steady state, and thus the instantaneous response to perturbations could largely determine species persistence. A stable equilibrium can be nonreactive -- all perturbations decay immediately, or reactive -- some perturbations are initially amplified before decaying. Here we derive analytical criteria for the reactivity of large ecological systems in which species interact at random. We find that in large ecological systems both stability and reactivity are governed by the same quantities: number of species, means of the intra- and inter-specific interaction strengths, variance of inter-specific interactions, and the correlation of pairwise interactions. We identify two phase transitions, one from nonreactivity to reactivity and one from stability to instability. As reactivity is an intermediate state between nonreactivity and instability, it could be used to develop an early-warning signal for systems approaching instability.

  18. Steam-chemical reactivity for irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A.; McCarthy, K.A.; Oates, M.A.; Petti, D.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Smolik, G.R. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental investigation to determine the influence of neutron irradiation effects and annealing on the chemical reactivity of beryllium exposed to steam. The work entailed measurements of the H{sub 2} generation rates for unirradiated and irradiated Be and for irradiated Be that had been previously annealed at different temperatures ranging from 450degC to 1200degC. H{sub 2} generation rates were similar for irradiated and unirradiated Be in steam-chemical reactivity experiments at temperatures between 450degC and 600degC. For irradiated Be exposed to steam at 700degC, the chemical reactivity accelerated rapidly and the specimen experienced a temperature excursion. Enhanced chemical reactivity at temperatures between 400degC and 600degC was observed for irradiated Be annealed at temperatures of 700degC and higher. This reactivity enhancement could be accounted for by the increased specific surface area resulting from development of a surface-connected porosity in the irradiated-annealed Be. (author)

  19. Engineering Surface Properties of Reactive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhye, Richa

    The effect of processing liquids on particle surface hydration and subsequent reactivity of mixtures containing aluminum (Al) with different oxidizing agents was investigated. Processing mixtures of Al and PTFE using a non-polar liquid limited surface hydration and produced significantly lower reactivity than the same mixture processed in a polar liquid. This understanding has been extended toward assessing the influence of processing liquid on reactivity of Al with other oxidizing agents, specifically CuO and MoO3. Al +CuO showed no difference in reactivity as a function of processing liquid. But MoO3 was shown to be more hydration sensitive than CuO and the added water concentration in the overall mixture aided combustion and increased the flame speed when compared to Al +MoO3 processed in a non-polar liquid. To better comprehend this behavior, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to understand molecular variations on an alumina surface. The analysis has strong implications for the reactivity of aluminum (Al) particles passivated by an alumina shell.

  20. Saccadic suppression during voluntary versus reactive saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gremmler, Svenja; Lappe, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Saccades are fast eye movements that reorient gaze. They can be performed voluntarily-for example, when viewing a scene-but they can also be triggered in reaction to suddenly appearing targets. The generation of these voluntary and reactive saccades have been shown to involve partially different cortical pathways. However, saccades of either type confront the visual system with a major challenge from massive image motion on the retina. Despite the fact that the whole scene is swept across the retina, a saccade usually does not elicit a percept of motion. This saccadic omission has been linked to a transient decrease of visual sensitivity during the eye movement, a phenomenon called saccadic suppression. A passive origin of saccadic suppression based on temporal masking has been proposed as well as an active central process that inhibits visual processing during the saccade. The latter one would need to include an extraretinal signal, which is generated already during saccade preparation. Since saccade generation differs for voluntary and reactive saccades, timing and nature of this extraretinal signal as well as its impact on visual sensitivity might also differ. We measured detection thresholds for luminance stimuli that were flashed during voluntary and reactive saccades and during fixation. Detection thresholds were higher during voluntary than during reactive saccades such that suppression appeared stronger during voluntary saccades. Stronger suppression in voluntary saccades could arise from a stronger extraretinal signal that activates suppression or could indicate that a suppression underlying process itself partially differs between voluntary and reactive saccades.