WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing outdoor nighttime

  1. Providence nighttime bracing, in treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simony, A.; Beuschau, Inge; Quisth, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Since 2008 the non-surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) in the southern part of Denmark, went from full-time bracing with Boston brace, to Providence night-time bracing. Methods: Since 2008, skeletally immature patients diagnosed with AIS and a primary curve......, but it seems like patients treated with Providence braces are more likely to experience back pain than healthy adolescents and surgically treated scoliosis patients....

  2. Initial experience with the providence nighttime bracing in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quisth, Lena; Beuschau, Inge; Simony, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Since 2008 the primary non-surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) in the southern part of Denmark, went from full-time bracing with Boston brace, to Providence nighttime bracing. Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of nighttime bracing, with the Providence brace...

  3. Private Assistance in Outdoor Recreation. A Directory of Organizations Providing Aid to Individuals and Public Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    In an effort to aid private recreation area developers and operators, and other individuals interested in outdoor recreation, this Bureau of Outdoor Recreation publication lists a number of professional societies and national organizations providing low-cost publications and other aids to planning, development, and operation of outdoor recreation…

  4. Macro-linkages between health and outdoor recreation: the role of parks and recreation providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall S. Rosenberger; Terry R. Bergerson; Jeffrey D. Kline

    2009-01-01

    Physical inactivity, overweight, and obesity are growing national concerns owing to their associations with chronic diseases and overall well-being. Parks and recreation providers play a pivotal role in addressing these public health issues by providing the public with infrastructure that enables outdoor physical activity. Our analysis of county-level data for Oregon...

  5. Flexibility Predicts Curve Progression in Providence Nighttime Bracing of Patients With Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrt-Nissen, Søren; Hallager, Dennis W; Gehrchen, Martin; Dahl, Benny

    2016-11-15

    Retrospective cohort study. To determine treatment outcome with providence brace (PB) and to assess the ability of pretreatment supine lateral bending radiographs (SLBR) in predicting curve progression. Results from treatment with the PB for adolescent idiopathic ccoliosis (AIS) have been inconsistent and further research is needed. The association between flexibility, as determined by pretreatment SLBR, and curve progression has not previously been examined. All patients treated with the PB from 2006 to 2011 who met Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) bracing criteria were included. Flexibility of the curve was determined based on SLBR and radiographic variables were registered at beginning of treatment and at skeletal maturity (SM) or before surgery. An increase in standing Cobb angle by more than 5 degrees was considered progression. Follow-up SRS-22 scores were compared with a control group with minor AIS. Analysis included multiple linear and logistic regression. A total of 63 patients were included. Mean age was 13.3 years (SD: 1.5) and mean standing Cobb angle was 34° (SD: 5°). Radiographic progression was observed in 43% of patients at SM and surgical rate was 27% and 37% at SM and 2-year follow up, respectively. SRS-22 total scores were similar but the mental health score was significantly better in the control group (P = 0.042). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that decreased flexibility adjusted for age, Cobb angle, and menarchal status was significantly associated with curve progression (P flexibility was associated with a decrease in risk of curve progression ≥6° (odds ratio = 0.95; 95% confidence interval 0.90-0.98; P = 0.013). Progression was seen in 43% of AIS patients treated with the PB. Increase in flexibility was independently associated with a decreased risk of progression. 3.

  6. Disrupted Nighttime Sleep in Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Thomas; Dauvilliers, Yves; Mignot, Emmanuel; Montplaisir, Jacques; Paul, Josh; Swick, Todd; Zee, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Characterize disrupted nighttime sleep (DNS) in narcolepsy, an important symptom of narcolepsy. Methods: A panel of international narcolepsy experts was convened in 2011 to build a consensus characterization of DNS in patients with narcolepsy. A literature search of the Medline (1965 to date), Medline In-Process (latest weeks), Embase (1974 to date), Embase Alert (latest 8 weeks), and Biosis (1965 to date) databases was conducted using the following search terms: narcolepsy and disrupted nighttime sleep, disturbed nighttime sleep, fragmented sleep, consolidated sleep, sleep disruption, and narcolepsy questionnaire. The purpose of the literature search was to identify publications characterizing the nighttime sleep of patients with narcolepsy. The panel reviewed the literature. Nocturnal sleep can also be disturbed by REM sleep abnormalities such as vivid dreaming and REM sleep behavior disorder; however, these were not reviewed in the current paper, as we were evaluating for idiopathic sleep disturbances. Results: The literature reviewed provide a consistent characterization of nighttime sleep in patients with narcolepsy as fragmented, with reports of frequent, brief nightly awakenings with difficulties returning to sleep and associated reports of poor sleep quality. Polysomnographic studies consistently report frequent awakenings/arousals after sleep onset, more stage 1 (S1) sleep, and more frequent shifts to S1 sleep or wake from deeper stages of sleep. The consensus of the International Experts' Panel on Narcolepsy was that DNS can be distressing for patients with narcolepsy and that treatment of DNS warrants consideration. Conclusions: Clinicians involved in the management of patients with narcolepsy should investigate patients' quality of nighttime sleep, give weight and consideration to patient reports of nighttime sleep experience, and consider DNS a target for treatment. Citation: Roth T; Dauvilliers Y; Mignot E; Montplaisir J; Paul J

  7. Disrupted nighttime sleep in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Thomas; Dauvilliers, Yves; Mignot, Emmanuel; Montplaisir, Jacques; Paul, Josh; Swick, Todd; Zee, Phyllis

    2013-09-15

    Characterize disrupted nighttime sleep (DNS) in narcolepsy, an important symptom of narcolepsy. A panel of international narcolepsy experts was convened in 2011 to build a consensus characterization of DNS in patients with narcolepsy. A literature search of the Medline (1965 to date), Medline In-Process (latest weeks), Embase (1974 to date), Embase Alert (latest 8 weeks), and Biosis (1965 to date) databases was conducted using the following search terms: narcolepsy and disrupted nighttime sleep, disturbed nighttime sleep, fragmented sleep, consolidated sleep, sleep disruption, and narcolepsy questionnaire. The purpose of the literature search was to identify publications characterizing the nighttime sleep of patients with narcolepsy. The panel reviewed the literature. Nocturnal sleep can also be disturbed by REM sleep abnormalities such as vivid dreaming and REM sleep behavior disorder; however, these were not reviewed in the current paper, as we were evaluating for idiopathic sleep disturbances. The literature reviewed provide a consistent characterization of nighttime sleep in patients with narcolepsy as fragmented, with reports of frequent, brief nightly awakenings with difficulties returning to sleep and associated reports of poor sleep quality. Polysomnographic studies consistently report frequent awakenings/arousals after sleep onset, more stage 1 (S1) sleep, and more frequent shifts to S1 sleep or wake from deeper stages of sleep. The consensus of the International Experts' Panel on Narcolepsy was that DNS can be distressing for patients with narcolepsy and that treatment of DNS warrants consideration. Clinicians involved in the management of patients with narcolepsy should investigate patients' quality of nighttime sleep, give weight and consideration to patient reports of nighttime sleep experience, and consider DNS a target for treatment.

  8. Outdoor allergens.

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Christine Anne; Burge, Harriet A

    2000-01-01

    Outdoor allergens are an important part of the exposures that lead to allergic disease. Understanding the role of outdoor allergens requires a knowledge of the nature of outdoor allergen-bearing particles, the distributions of their source, and the nature of the aerosols (particle types, sizes, dynamics of concentrations). Primary sources for outdoor allergens include vascular plants (pollen, fern spores, soy dust), and fungi (spores, hyphae). Nonvascular plants, algae, and arthropods contrib...

  9. Outdoor allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, H A; Rogers, C A

    2000-01-01

    Outdoor allergens are an important part of the exposures that lead to allergic disease. Understanding the role of outdoor allergens requires a knowledge of the nature of outdoor allergen-bearing particles, the distributions of their source, and the nature of the aerosols (particle types, sizes, dynamics of concentrations). Primary sources for outdoor allergens include vascular plants (pollen, fern spores, soy dust), and fungi (spores, hyphae). Nonvascular plants, algae, and arthropods contribute small numbers of allergen-bearing particles. Particles are released from sources into the air by wind, rain, mechanical disturbance, or active discharge mechanisms. Once airborne, they follow the physical laws that apply to all airborne particles. Although some outdoor allergens penetrate indoor spaces, exposure occurs mostly outdoors. Even short-term peak outdoor exposures can be important in eliciting acute symptoms. Monitoring of airborne biological particles is usually by particle impaction and microscopic examination. Centrally located monitoring stations give regional-scale measurements for aeroallergen levels. Evidence for the role of outdoor allergens in allergic rhinitis is strong and is rapidly increasing for a role in asthma. Pollen and fungal spore exposures have both been implicated in acute exacerbations of asthma, and sensitivity to some fungal spores predicts the existence of asthma. Synergism and/or antagonism probably occurs with other outdoor air particles and gases. Control involves avoidance of exposure (staying indoors, preventing entry of outdoor aerosols) as well as immunotherapy, which is effective for pollen but of limited effect for spores. Outdoor allergens have been the subject of only limited studies with respect to the epidemiology of asthma. Much remains to be studied with respect to prevalence patterns, exposure and disease relationships, and control. PMID:10931783

  10. Redesigning nighttime care for personal care residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, D J; Klaasen, K S; Sloan, J A

    2001-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of non-disruptive nighttime care for residents in a personal care setting. The sample consisted of 18 personal care home residents in an urban, 388-bed, long-term care facility located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. The study used a quasi-experimental, single-arm design, exposing all residents to both intervention and control conditions. Independent variables were the current nighttime routine of regular rounds to turn and change residents, and a non-disruptive plan of care in which residents were checked hourly by staff and necessary care was provided when they were awake. Outcome variables included total sleep from evening bedtime to morning awakening, longest period of uninterrupted sleep at night, amount of time spent sleeping during the day, self-reported restfulness of cognitively intact residents, and skin condition. Findings suggested that the non-disruptive nighttime care routine increased total sleep by an average of 30 minutes a night for each resident. The amount of uninterrupted sleep increased by approximately 45 minutes with the new routine. No significant differences were noted in the amount of time spent sleeping during the day. There was no evidence of skin breakdown during any phase of the study. Clinical implications of this study demonstrate a need for gerontological nurses to re-evaluate nighttime care routines in personal care settings.

  11. Providing Recreation Services for all Individuals: The Connection of Inclusive Practices to Commercial, Community, and Outdoor Recreation Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatt, Jennifer A.; Jorgensen, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities currently represent the largest minority group in the United States, yet recreation undergraduate students often perceive this as a population they may or may not provide services to in their future careers. The activities presented in this paper, Inclusion Knowledge Audits (IKA), are developed to make the connection…

  12. Cultural Adaptation in Outdoor Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizio, Sheila M.; Neill, James

    2005-01-01

    Outdoor programs often intentionally provide a different culture and the challenge of working out how to adapt. Failure to adapt, however, can cause symptoms of culture shock, including homesickness, negative personal behavior, and interpersonal conflict. This article links cross-cultural and outdoor programming literature and provides case…

  13. Financing of Private Outdoor Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A survey of financial institutions was undertaken by the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation to evaluate the demand and availability of private credit for enterprises that provide outdoor recreation. The survey provided basic information for (1) evaluating legislative proposals for loan guarantee programs, (2) nationwide planning, and (3) assessing the…

  14. Outdoor recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. M. Bowker; Ashley Askew; H. Ken Cordell; John C. Bergstrom

    2013-01-01

    Key FindingsBy 2060, the number of southern adults participating in each of 10 different popular outdoor recreation activities is projected to increase. Depending on future demographic, economic, land use, and population changes, the activity demonstrating the least growth in participants is hunting (8–25 percent). The activity projected to...

  15. Recipients of electric-powered indoor/outdoor wheelchairs provided by a national health service: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Andrew O; De Souza, Lorraine H

    2013-12-01

    To describe the characteristics across all ages of powered wheelchair users and the assistive technology prescribed by a regional specialist wheelchair service. Cross-sectional study. Regional wheelchair service. Electric-powered indoor/outdoor wheelchair (EPIOC) users (N=544) with 262 boys and men (mean age ± SD, 41.7±20.7y; range, 8-82y) and 282 girls and women (mean age ± SD, 47.2±19.7y; range, 7-92y). Not applicable. Demographic, clinical/diagnostic details of EPIOC recipients, including pain, (kypho)scoliosis, and ventilators. Technical features, including specialized (adaptive) seating, tilt in space, and modified control systems. Factors were related to age groups: 1 (0-15y), 2 (16-24y), 3 (25-54y), 4 (55-74y), and 5 (≥75y). Neurologic/neuromuscular conditions predominated (81%) with cerebral palsy (18.9%) and multiple sclerosis (16.4%). Conditions presenting at birth or during childhood constituted 39%. Of the participants, 99 had problematic pain, 83 had (kypho)scoliosis, and 11 used ventilators. Specialized (adaptive) seating was provided to 169 users (31%); most had cerebral palsy or muscular dystrophy. Tilt in space was used by 258 (53%) participants. Younger people were more likely to receive tilt in space than older ones. Only 92 had specialized (adaptive) seating and tilt in space (mean age ± SD, 29±17.8y; range, 8-72y). Of the participants, 52 used modified control systems. The diversity of EPIOC users across age and diagnostic groups is shown. Their complex interrelations with these technical features of EPIOC prescriptions are explored. Younger users were more complex because of age-related changes. This study provides outcomes of the EPIOC prescription for this heterogeneous group of very severely disabled people. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Outdoor recreation resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter J. Betz; Donald B.K. English; H. Ken Cordell

    1999-01-01

    The authors examine recreation resources and opportunities by the four types of providers: Federal, State, local governments, and the private sector. They discuss the trend of partnerships in the provision of outdoor recreation opportunities, especially two types that emerged in the 1990’s: Scenic Byways and Watchable Wildlife opportunities. Where possible, the authors...

  17. The impacts of land cover types on urban outdoor thermal environment: the case of Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hai; Dong, Li

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the microclimatic behavior of different land cover types in urban parks and, the correlation between air temperature and land cover composition to understand how land cover affects outdoor thermal environment during hot summer. To address this issue, air temperatures were measured on four different land cover types at four observation sites inside an urban park in Beijing, China, meanwhile, the land cover composition of each site was quantified with CAD, by drawing corresponding areas on the aerial photographs. The results showed that the average air temperature difference among four land cover types was large during the day and small during the night. At noon, the average air temperature differed significantly among four land cover types, whereas on night, there was no significant difference among different land cover types. Results of the linear regression indicated that during daytime, there was a strong negative correlation between air temperature and percent tree cover; while at nighttime, a significant negative correlation was observed between air temperature and percent lawn cover. It was shown that as the percent tree cover increased by 10 %, the air temperature decreased by 0.26 °C during daytime, while as the percent lawn cover increased by 10 %, the air temperature decreased by 0.56 °C during nighttime. Results of this study help to clarify the effects of land cover on urban outdoor thermal environment, and can provide assistance to urban planner and designer for improving green space planning and design in the future.

  18. Actividades al Aire Libre (Outdoor Activities). OBIS/Mini-Corps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Univ., Berkeley. Lawrence Hall of Science.

    The all-Spanish version of the Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies (OBIS)/Mini-Corps Outdoor Activities set contains twenty education and recreational activities which provide a variety of outdoor biological experiences and incorporate language skills into outdoor education. Prepared especially for use by migrant children aged 10-15 in a…

  19. Reducing indoor residential exposures to outdoor pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

    2003-07-01

    The basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks.

  20. Outdoors classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanska-Markowska, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Why should students be trapped within the four walls of the classroom when there are a lot of ideas to have lessons led in the different way? I am not a fan of having lessons at school. For many students it is also boring to stay only at school, too. So I decided to organize workshops and trips to Universities or outdoors. I created KMO ( Discoverer's Club for Teenagers) at my school where students gave me some ideas and we started to make them real. I teach at school where students don't like science. I try hard to change their point of view about it. That's why I started to take parts in different competitions with my students. Last year we measured noise everywhere by the use of applications on a tablet to convince them that noise is very harmful for our body and us. We examined that the most harmful noises were at school's breaks, near the motorways and in the households. We also proved that acoustic screens, which were near the motorways, didn't protect us from noise. We measured that 30 meters from the screens the noise is the same as the motorway. We won the main prize for these measurements. We also got awards for calculating the costs of a car supplied by powered by a solar panel. We measured everything by computer. This year we decided to write an essay about trees and weather. We went to the forest and found the cut trees because we wanted to read the age of tree from the stump. I hadn't known earlier that we could read the weather from the tree's grain. We examined a lot of trees and we can tell that trees are good carriers of information about weather and natural disasters. I started studies safety education and I have a lot of ideas how to get my students interested in this subject that is similar to P.E., physics and chemistry, too. I hope that I will use my abilities from European Space Education Resource Office and GIFT workshop. I plan to use satellite and space to teach my students how they can check information about terrorism, floods or other

  1. Residential design and outdoor area accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Sherril L

    2009-01-01

    The outdoor environment can provide many positive and therapeutic benefits for persons with complex neurological conditions. In order to benefit from outdoor exposure and experiences, individuals need to be able to access that environment. This article provides a discussion of physical and programmatic access to outdoor living elements in homes and residential facilities for persons with neuro-disabilities. Design considerations for outdoor elements such as common gathering areas, walking paths and paths to/between elements, gardens (viewing and working), and resting areas are presented using legal standards or universal design principles as guides.

  2. A Youth Perspective on Outdoor Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardin, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Arizona Outdoor Recreation Coordinating Commission and Arizona State Parks Board conducted a survey of students in grades 4-12 to gather information on their recreation needs and desires. Results provided recreation planners and providers with a profile of the young outdoor recreation customer to help them develop the most appropriate…

  3. Missouri Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri State Inter-Agency for Outdoor Recreation, Jefferson.

    The document is a summary of the Missouri State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan, which was designed to provide guidelines for allocation of resources for needed recreation facilities. The plan identifies the present and future needs for outdoor recreation and recommends ways of meeting these needs. This 1967 document provides a brief history…

  4. Outdoor lighting guide

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    As concern grows over environmental issues and light pollution, this book satisfies a need for a straightforward and accessible guide to the use, design and installation of outdoor lighting.This all-inclusive guide to exterior lighting from the Institution of Lighting Engineers, recognized as the pre-eminent professional source in the UK for authoritative guidance on exterior lighting, provides a comprehensive source of information and advice on all forms of exterior lighting, from floodlighting, buildings and road lighting to elaborate Christmas decorations. Useful to practitioners

  5. Measurement-based modeling of daytime and nighttime oxidation of atmospheric mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, Eran; Gabay, Maor; Peleg, Mordechai; Fredj, Erick

    2017-04-01

    Accurate characterization of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) chemical oxidation pathways and their kinetics is critically important for assessing the transfer of atmospheric mercury to bioaquatic systems. Recent comprehensive field measurements have suggested that the nitrate radical (NO3) plays a role in efficient nighttime oxidation of GEM, and that the role of the hydroxyl radical (OH) as a GEM oxidant has been underestimated. We used the CAABA/MECCA chemical box model and additional kinetic calculations to analyze these measurement results, in order to investigate the nighttime and daytime oxidation of GEM. We assumed a second-order reaction for the NO3 induced nighttime oxidation of GEM. Our analysis demonstrated that nighttime oxidation of GEM has to be included in the model to account for the measured variations in nighttime reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) concentration. A lower limit and best-fit rate constant for GEM nighttime oxidation are provided. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a rate for nighttime oxidation of GEM has been determined based on field measurements. Our analysis further indicates that OH has a much more important role in GEM oxidation than commonly considered. A lower-limit rate constant for the OH-RGM reaction is provided.

  6. Education and Outdoor Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A special study was conducted to determine the needs and demands of the public for outdoor recreation. Increasing amounts of leisure time of the American people are being used for outdoor recreation activities. Ways in which education can help people realize optimum benefit from recreational use of the outdoor environment are discussed.…

  7. Daytime Sleep Aids and Nighttime Cognitive Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eddy, Douglas; Barton, Emily; Cardenas, Rebecca; French, Jonathan; Gibbons, John; Hickey, Patrick; Miller, James; Ramsey, Carol; Storm, William

    2005-01-01

    .... This study compared two doses of the hypnotic zolpidem, two doses of melatonin and placebo for their effects on daytime sleep, on nighttime cognitive performance and on mood in an operationally...

  8. Parents' Perceptions of Preschool Activities: Exploring Outdoor Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasuriya, Avanthi; Williams, Marcia; Edwards, Todd; Tandon, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: Outdoor play is important for children's health and development, yet many preschool-age children in child care settings do not receive the recommended 60 min/day of outdoor play. Child care providers have previously described parent-related barriers to increasing outdoor playtime, including parents not providing appropriate…

  9. Cooling of the Building Structure by Night-time Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai

    seen as a promising passive cooling concept. Many successful examples of passively cooled buildings demonstrate the possibility of providing good thermal comfort conditions without the need for energy-intensive air conditioning systems. However, due to uncertainties in the prediction of thermal comfort......, architects and engineers are still hesitant to apply passive cooling techniques. The basic concept of night-time ventilation involves cooling the building structure overnight in order to provide a heat sink during the occupancy period. As this requires a sufficiently high temperature difference between...... the ambient air and the building structure, the efficiency of night cooling is highly sensitive to climatic conditions and hence also to climate warming. In the first part of this PhD study, the potential for passive cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation was evaluated by analysing climatic data...

  10. Planning and Design of Outdoor Sports Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    Information required for the planning and design of outdoor sports facilities is provided in the format of an outline text and design criteria placed opposite an accompanying page of definitive drawings. Scope of the manual covers those outdoor sports and games most commonly played for competition and/or recreation by military and civilian…

  11. Outdoor Adventure and Health: Supporting Empirical Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Camille J.

    Outdoor adventure education programs may offer opportunities for improving overall wellness beyond the realm of physical fitness. A hypothetical framework is presented as follows: (1) outdoor adventure experiences provide individuals with opportunities to be truly challenged; (2) success in challenging situations builds self-efficacy and…

  12. OUTDOOR EDUCATION AND GEOGRAPHICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREA GUARAN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the reflection on the relationship between values and methodological principles of Outdoor Education and spatial and geographical education perspectives, especially in pre-school and primary school, which relates to the age between 3 and 10 years. Outdoor Education is an educational practice that is already rooted in the philosophical thought of the 16th and the 17th centuries, from John Locke to Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and in the pedagogical thought, in particular Friedrich Fröbel, and it has now a quite stable tradition in Northern Europe countries. In Italy, however, there are still few experiences and they usually do not have a systematic and structural modality, but rather a temporarily and experimentally outdoor organization. In the first part, this paper focuses on the reasons that justify a particular attention to educational paths that favour outdoors activities, providing also a definition of outdoor education and highlighting its values. It is also essential to understand that educational programs in open spaces, such as a forest or simply the schoolyard, surely offers the possibility to learn geographical situations. Therefore, the question that arises is how to finalize the best stimulus that the spatial location guarantees for the acquisition of knowledge, skills and abilities about space and geography.

  13. Associations between nighttime traffic noise and sleep: the Finnish public sector study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halonen, Jaana I; Vahtera, Jussi; Stansfeld, Stephen; Yli-Tuomi, Tarja; Salo, Paula; Pentti, Jaana; Kivimäki, Mika; Lanki, Timo

    2012-10-01

    Associations between traffic noise and sleep problems have been detected in experimental studies, but population-level evidence is scarce. We studied the relationship between the levels of nighttime traffic noise and sleep disturbances and identified vulnerable population groups. Noise levels of nighttime-outdoor traffic were modeled based on the traffic intensities in the cities of Helsinki and Vantaa, Finland. In these cities, 7,019 public sector employees (81% women) responded to postal surveys on sleep and health. We linked modeled outdoor noise levels to the residences of the employees who responded to the postal survey. We used logistic regression models to estimate associations of noise levels with subjectively assessed duration of sleep and symptoms of insomnia (i.e., difficulties falling asleep, waking up frequently during the night, waking up too early in the morning, nonrestorative sleep). We also used stratified models to investigate the possibility of vulnerable subgroups. For the total study population, exposure to levels of nighttime-outside (L(night, outside)) traffic noise > 55 dB was associated with any insomnia symptom ≥ 2 nights per week [odds ratio (OR) = 1.32; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05, 1.65]. Among participants with higher trait anxiety scores, which we hypothesized were a proxy for noise sensitivity, the ORs for any insomnia symptom at exposures to L(night, outside) traffic noises 50.1-55 dB and > 55 dB versus ≤ 45 dB were 1.34 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.80) and 1.61 (95% CI: 1.07, 2.42), respectively. Nighttime traffic noise levels > 50 dB L(night, outside) was associated with insomnia symptoms among persons with higher scores for trait anxiety. For the total study population, L(night, outside) > 55 dB was positively associated with any symptoms.

  14. Universal Design and Outdoor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Helene Arbouet

    2013-01-01

    Engagement in the natural environment provides authentic and concrete opportunities for children to enhance development in all domains (Bailie, 2010). As children play and explore in nature they build gross motor development moving through the outdoors. Learning outside and in nature not only allows for learning across subject areas and…

  15. Outdoor Play: Combating Sedentary Lifestyles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thigpen, Betsy

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly sedentary lifestyles are contributing to overweight and other health concerns as children spend less and less time outside engaged in active play. Outdoor play provides important opportunities to explore the natural world, interact with peers, engage in vigorous physical activity, and learn about our environment. However, outdoor…

  16. Developing Scene Understanding Neural Software for Realistic Autonomous Outdoor Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    salient objects and environments providing mutual context (i.e., a primary or key object in an outdoor scene embedded in a realistic environmental ...tracking: a two part vision system for small robot navigation in forested environment . Proc. SPIE 8387, Unmanned Systems Technology XIV Conference; 2012...of realistic autonomous outdoor missions in complex and changing environments . Scene understanding for realistic outdoor missions has been

  17. Federal outdoor recreation trends: effects on economic opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric White; J.M. Bowker; Ashley E. Askew; Linda L. Langner; J. Ross Arnold; Donald B.K. English

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor recreation is a central way that people interact with the natural environment. Federal land agencies are key providers of settings, facilities, and landscapes for recreation. Outdoor recreation is also an important driver of economic activity in rural communities near recreation destinations and across the United States. Future participation in outdoor...

  18. Federal Outdoor Recreation Programs and Recreation-Related Environmental Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This is the first revision of "Federal Outdoor Recreation Programs," updating information first provided in May, 1968, by the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation in cooperation with other Federal agencies. Programs described in this publication broadly reflect the scope of Federal involvement in outdoor recreation and related environmental efforts. The…

  19. Relationships between brightness of nighttime lights and population density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naizhuo, Z.

    2012-12-01

    lit area, relatively large under-estimations would emerge in the urban core regions. Previous studies have shown that GDP, carbon dioxide emission, and electric power consumption strongly correlate to urban population (Ghosh et al., 2010; Sutton et al., 2007; Zhao et al., 2012). Thus, although this study only examined the relationships between brightness of nighttime lights and population density, the results can provide insight for the spatial disaggregations of socioeconomic data (e.g. GDP, carbon dioxide emission, and electric power consumption) using the satellite nighttime light image data. Simply distributing the socioeconomic data to each pixel in proportion to the DN value of the nighttime light images may generate relatively large errors. References Bharit N, Tatem AJ, Ferrari MJ, Grais RF, Djibo A, Grenfell BT, 2011. Science, 334:1424-1427. Ghosh T, Elvidge CD, Sutton PC, Baugh KE, Ziskin D, Tuttle BT, 2010. Energies, 3:1895-1913. Oda T, Maksyutov S, 2011. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11:543-556. Sutton PC, Elvidge CD, Ghosh T, 2007. International Journal of Ecological Economics and Statistics, 8:5-21. Zhao N, Ghosh T, Samson EL, 2012. International Journal of Remote sensing, 33:6304-6320.

  20. Outdoor Adventure Programs Build Character Five Ways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Lester R.

    1986-01-01

    Outdoor adventure programs can provide opportunities for personal growth in areas commonly neglected by our mechanistic society. The specific qualities and abilities required of leaders in order for programs to fulfill their human growth potential are discussed. (MT)

  1. Economics of Outdoor Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clawson, Marion; Knetsch, Jack L.

    Written for the purposes of presenting an overview of outdoor recreation in the United States and defining the significant outdoor recreation policy issues of the next 10 to 20 years, this document also includes major sections on recreation resources and economic considerations. Projections to the year 2000 are made for a national time budget,…

  2. Selected Outdoor Recreation Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    In this recreational information report, 96 tables are compiled from Bureau of Outdoor Recreation programs and surveys, other governmental agencies, and private sources. Eight sections comprise the document: (1) The Bureau of Outdoor Recreation, (2) Federal Assistance to Recreation, (3) Recreation Surveys for Planning, (4) Selected Statistics of…

  3. Daily light integral and day light quality: Potentials and pitfalls of nighttime UV treatments on cucumber powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthaparan, Aruppillai; Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn; Stensvand, Arne; Gislerød, Hans Ragnar

    2017-10-01

    Nighttime ultraviolet (UV) radiation, if applied properly, has a significant potential for management of powdery mildews in many crop species. In this study, the role of growth light duration, irradiance, a combination of both (daily light integral) and light spectral quality (blue or red) on the efficacy of UV treatments against powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera xanthii and the growth performance of cucumber plants was studied in growth chambers. Increasing daily light integral provided by high-pressure sodium lamps (HPS) decreased efficacy of nighttime UV treatments against P. xanthii, but it increased plant growth. Furthermore, the efficacy of nighttime UV decreased when day length was increased from 16 to 20h at a constant daily light integral. The efficacy of nighttime UV increased if red light was applied after UV treatment, showing the possibility of day length extension without reducing the effect of UV. Increasing the dose of blue light during daytime reduced the efficacy of nighttime UV in controlling the disease, whereas blue deficient growth light (light after nighttime UV reduced its disease control efficacy. This showed the importance of maintaining a minimum of blue light in the growth light before nighttime UV treatment. Findings from this study showed that optimization of nighttime UV for management of powdery mildew is dependent on the spectral composition of the photosynthetically active radiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Daytime Napping, Nighttime Sleeping, and Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianjun; Huang, Xuemei; Park, Yikyung; Hollenbeck, Albert; Blair, Aaron; Schatzkin, Arthur; Chen, Honglei

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests that daytime sleepiness may predate clinical diagnosis of Parkinson disease. The authors examined daytime napping and nighttime sleeping durations, reported in 1996–1997 by 220,934 US NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study participants, in relation to Parkinson disease diagnoses at 3 clinical stages: established (cases diagnosed before 1995, n = 267), recent (1995–1999, n = 396), and prediagnostic (2000 and after, n = 770). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were derived from multivariate logistic regression models. Longer daytime napping was associated with higher odds of Parkinson disease at all 3 clinical stages: the odds ratios comparing long nappers (>1 hour/day) with nonnappers were 3.9 (95% confidence interval: 2.8, 5.6) for established cases, 2.2 (95% confidence interval: 1.7, 3.0) for recent cases, and 1.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.2, 1.9) for prediagnostic cases. Further control for health status or nighttime sleeping duration attenuated the association for established cases but made little difference for recent or prediagnostic cases. In the nighttime sleeping analysis, a clear U-shaped association with Parkinson disease was observed for established cases; however, this association was attenuated markedly for recent cases and disappeared for prediagnostic cases. This study supports the notion that daytime sleepiness, but not nighttime sleeping duration, is one of the early nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease. PMID:21402730

  5. Nighttime Lights of North America - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer is an image of nighttime lights for North America, including the Caribbean and most of Mexico. The data were collected in 1996 and 1997 as part of the...

  6. Outdoor recreation and ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentin, Sandra

    similarities and differences in outdoor recreation patterns of adolescents with ethnic Danish and ethnic minority background. There are e.g. no differences in the number of days spent on outdoor recreation pr. year. Among both the ethnic Danish and ethnic minority group adolescents, the stated reasons...... for visiting natural areas were most often social, such as being with family and friends, and health and well-being reasons (exercise and relaxing from stress). However, the ethnic minority adolescents more often stated “to be with family” as an important reason for visiting green spaces compared...... to their ethnic Danish counterparts. The adolescents use different areas for outdoor recreation: the adolescents with ethnic Danish background use sports grounds for outdoor recreation, while adolescents with ethnic minority backgrounds use urban green spaces for outdoor recreation. For activities reported...

  7. Leptospirosis Risk in Outdoor Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button Past Emails Leptospirosis Risk in Outdoor Activities Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir People who enjoy outdoor activities where freshwater or wet soil are encountered may ...

  8. Multiple night-time light-emitting diode lighting strategies impact grassland invertebrate assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Thomas W; Bennie, Jonathan; Cruse, Dave; Blumgart, Dan; Inger, Richard; Gaston, Kevin J

    2017-07-01

    White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are rapidly replacing conventional outdoor lighting technologies around the world. Despite rising concerns over their impact on the environment and human health, the flexibility of LEDs has been advocated as a means of mitigating the ecological impacts of globally widespread outdoor night-time lighting through spectral manipulation, dimming and switching lights off during periods of low demand. We conducted a three-year field experiment in which each of these lighting strategies was simulated in a previously artificial light naïve grassland ecosystem. White LEDs both increased the total abundance and changed the assemblage composition of adult spiders and beetles. Dimming LEDs by 50% or manipulating their spectra to reduce ecologically damaging wavelengths partially reduced the number of commoner species affected from seven to four. A combination of dimming by 50% and switching lights off between midnight and 04:00 am showed the most promise for reducing the ecological costs of LEDs, but the abundances of two otherwise common species were still affected. The environmental consequences of using alternative lighting technologies are increasingly well established. These results suggest that while management strategies using LEDs can be an effective means of reducing the number of taxa affected, averting the ecological impacts of night-time lighting may ultimately require avoiding its use altogether. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Outdoor recreation and ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentin, Sandra

    to their ethnic Danish counterparts. The adolescents use different areas for outdoor recreation: the adolescents with ethnic Danish background use sports grounds for outdoor recreation, while adolescents with ethnic minority backgrounds use urban green spaces for outdoor recreation. For activities reported...... often reported using green areas to “drink beer with friends” and “do sunbathing”. The third paper reflects on the different national approaches towards ethnic minorities’ access to natural areas, in four example-countries Germany, Denmark, United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. This was done through...

  10. Predictive role of the nighttime blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tine W; Li, Yan; Boggia, José

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies addressed the predictive value of the nighttime blood pressure (BP) as captured by ambulatory monitoring. However, arbitrary cutoff limits in dichotomized analyses of continuous variables, data dredging across selected subgroups, extrapolation of cross-sectional studies to prospe......Numerous studies addressed the predictive value of the nighttime blood pressure (BP) as captured by ambulatory monitoring. However, arbitrary cutoff limits in dichotomized analyses of continuous variables, data dredging across selected subgroups, extrapolation of cross-sectional studies...... of conclusive evidence proving that nondipping is a reversible risk factor, the option whether or not to restore the diurnal blood pressure profile to a normal pattern should be left to the clinical judgment of doctors and should be individualized for each patient. Current guidelines on the interpretation...

  11. Outdoor fitness routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000891.htm Outdoor fitness routine To use the sharing features on this ... you and is right for your level of fitness. Here are some ideas: Warm up first. Get ...

  12. Outdoor air Pollution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, PBC

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available regions. Ambient air pollution relates to the quality of outdoor air and will be discussed in this chapter, with a focus on the air pollutants which are typically regulated in this context internationally....

  13. Adverse Health Effects of Nighttime Lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, M.

    2012-06-01

    The effects of poor lighting and glare on public safety are well-known, as are the harmful environmental effects on various species and the environment in general. What is less well-known is the potential harmful medical effects of excessive poor nighttime lighting. A significant body of research has been developed over the last few years regarding this problem. One of the most significant effects is the startling increased risk for breast cancer by excessive exposure to nighttime lighting. The mechanism is felt to be by disruption of the circadian rhythm and suppression of melatonin production from the pineal gland. Melatonin has an anticancer effect that is lost when its production is disrupted. I am in the process of developing a monograph that will summarize this important body of research, to be presented and endorsed by the American Medical Association, and its Council of Science and Public health. This paper is a brief overall summary of this little known potential harmful effect of poor and excessive nighttime lighting.

  14. Passive nighttime warming facility for forest ecosystem research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxmoore, R. J.; Hanson, P. J.; Beauchamp, J. J.; Joslin, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    A nighttime warming experiment is proposed. Over the last four decades a significant rise in nighttime minimum temperature has been determined from analysis of meteorological records from a global distribution of locations. The experiment involves nighttime deployment of infrared (IR) reflecting curtains around four sides of a forest canopy and across the top of the forest to mimic the top-down warming effect of cloud cover. The curtains are deployed with cable and pulley systems mounted on a tower and scaffolding structure built around the selected forest site. The trunk space is not enclosed except as an optional manipulation. The curtains reflect long-wave radiation emitted from the forest and ground back into the forest warming the trees, litter, and soil. Excellent infrared reflection can be obtained with commercially available fabrics that have aluminum foil bonded to one side. A canopy warming of 3 to 5 degrees C is expected on cloudless nights, and on cloudy nights, a warming of 1 to 3 degrees C is anticipated relative to a control plot. The curtains are withdrawn by computer control during the day and also at night during periods with precipitation or excessive wind. Examples of hypothesized ecosystem responses to nighttime warming include: (1) increase in tree maintenance respiration (decreasing carbon reserves and ultimately tree growth), (2) increase in the length of the growing season (increasing growth), (3) increase in soil respiration, (4) increase in litter decomposition, (5) increase in mineralization of N and other nutrients from soil organic matter, (6) increase in nutrient uptake (increasing growth), and (7) increase in N immobilization in litter. Hypothesis 1 has the opposite consequence for tree growth to Hypotheses 2 and 6, and thus opposite consequences for the feedback regulation that vegetation has on net greenhouse gas releases to the atmosphere. If Hypothesis 1 is dominant, warming could lead to more warming from the additional CO(2

  15. Treating nighttime fears in young children with bibliotherapy: evaluating anxiety symptoms and monitoring behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Krystal M; Amatya, Kaushalendra; Coffman, Mary F; Ollendick, Thomas H

    2015-03-01

    Children's nighttime fears are a normal part of child development and are transient for most children, but result in considerable distress for others. The present study evaluated a 4-week bibliotherapy intervention designed to treat young children with persistent and interfering nighttime fears utilizing a multiple baseline design. Nine children between 5 and 7 years of age with specific phobia diagnoses were randomized into one of three baseline control conditions (1, 2, or 3 weeks). The treatment protocol involved parents reading Uncle Lightfoot, Flip that Switch: Overcoming Fear of the Dark, Academic Version (Coffman, 2012) with their children over 4 weeks while engaging in activities prescribed in the book. Assessments took place at baseline, post treatment, and 1 month following treatment. Daily and weekly tracking of nighttime behaviors was also obtained. Pre-post group analyses revealed that eight of the nine children demonstrated clinically significant change in anxiety severity. In addition, decreases in child-reported nighttime fears were observed, as were parent-reported decreases in separation anxiety and increases in the number of nights children slept in their own bed. The present study provides initial support for the use of bibliotherapy in the treatment of nighttime fears. Further replication and evaluation are needed to determine appropriate length of treatment and long-term effects. Implications of the findings are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Luminous device with dual daytime and nighttime use of energy

    OpenAIRE

    Lira-Cantú, Mónica

    2010-01-01

    [EN] Applicable both indoors and outdoors, in desk lamps, street lamps, spotlights in 1.", football stadiums, etc., ofthe type which comprises a housing, the interior of which contains a luminous element , either a light bulb, LEDs or the like, said luminous device being provided with at least one transparent or semi-transparent photovoltaic solar cell which is used to convert solar energy into electrical energy during the hours of sunlight and to convert light energy int...

  17. Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Mark S; Gray, Casey; Babcock, Shawna; Barnes, Joel; Bradstreet, Christa Costas; Carr, Dawn; Chabot, Guylaine; Choquette, Louise; Chorney, David; Collyer, Cam; Herrington, Susan; Janson, Katherine; Janssen, Ian; Larouche, Richard; Pickett, William; Power, Marlene; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen; Simon, Brenda; Brussoni, Mariana

    2015-06-08

    A diverse, cross-sectorial group of partners, stakeholders and researchers, collaborated to develop an evidence-informed Position Statement on active outdoor play for children aged 3-12 years. The Position Statement was created in response to practitioner, academic, legal, insurance and public debate, dialogue and disagreement on the relative benefits and harms of active (including risky) outdoor play. The Position Statement development process was informed by two systematic reviews, a critical appraisal of the current literature and existing position statements, engagement of research experts (N=9) and cross-sectorial individuals/organizations (N=17), and an extensive stakeholder consultation process (N=1908). More than 95% of the stakeholders consulted strongly agreed or somewhat agreed with the Position Statement; 14/17 participating individuals/organizations endorsed it; and over 1000 additional individuals and organizations requested their name be listed as a supporter. The final Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play states: "Access to active play in nature and outdoors--with its risks--is essential for healthy child development. We recommend increasing children's opportunities for self-directed play outdoors in all settings--at home, at school, in child care, the community and nature." The full Position Statement provides context for the statement, evidence supporting it, and a series of recommendations to increase active outdoor play opportunities to promote healthy child development.

  18. Experimental Investigation of the Heat Transfer in a Room using Night-Time Coling by Mixing Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Nørgaard, Jesper; Daniels, Ole

    2011-01-01

    For many years focus has been on reducing the energy need for heating in buildings. This has lead to buildings with low energy demands for heating but often at the expense of the need for cooling of the building. In order to design buildings with low or zero energy need energy efficient strategie...... account for a large part of the energy transfer from the ceiling the results from this investigation compared to previous investigations showed that the total energy exchange from the ceiling was only slightly affected by changing the emissivity of the floor....... of full-scale measurements. The efficiency of night-time ventilation depends on the outdoor temperature and the heat transfer between the room air and the building constructions. In a full-scale test room the heat transfer was investigated during 12 hour of discharging by night-time ventilation. Three...

  19. Minimizing Variation in Outdoor CPV Power Ratings: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, M.; Marion, B.; Rodriguez, J.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-07-01

    The CPV community has agreed to have both indoor and outdoor power ratings at the module level. The indoor rating provides a repeatable measure of module performance as it leaves the factory line while the outdoor rating provides a measure of true performance under real world conditions. The challenge with an outdoor rating is that the spectrum, temperature, wind speed, etc are constantly in flux and therefore the resulting power rating varies from day to day and month to month. This work examines different methodologies for determining the outdoor power rating with the goal of minimizing variation even if data are collected under changing meteorological conditions.

  20. Predicting outdoor sound

    CERN Document Server

    Attenborough, Keith; Horoshenkov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    1. Introduction  2. The Propagation of Sound Near Ground Surfaces in a Homogeneous Medium  3. Predicting the Acoustical Properties of Outdoor Ground Surfaces  4. Measurements of the Acoustical Properties of Ground Surfaces and Comparisons with Models  5. Predicting Effects of Source Characteristics on Outdoor Sound  6. Predictions, Approximations and Empirical Results for Ground Effect Excluding Meteorological Effects  7. Influence of Source Motion on Ground Effect and Diffraction  8. Predicting Effects of Mixed Impedance Ground  9. Predicting the Performance of Outdoor Noise Barriers  10. Predicting Effects of Vegetation, Trees and Turbulence  11. Analytical Approximations including Ground Effect, Refraction and Turbulence  12. Prediction Schemes  13. Predicting Sound in an Urban Environment.

  1. Climatic potential for passive cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai; Manz, H.; Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    , Eastern and Northern Europe. The basic concept involves cooling the building structure overnight in order to provide a heat sink that is available during the occupancy period. In this study, the potential for passive cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation was evaluated by analysing climatic data......Due to an overall trend towards less heating and more cooling demands in buildings in many European countries over the last few decades, passive cooling by night-time ventilation is seen as a promising technique, particularly for commercial buildings in the moderate or cold climates of Central...

  2. Outdoor recreation and ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentin, Sandra

    The thesis has three aims: The first aim is to review the existing knowledge about ethnic minorities’ outdoor recreation in Europe. The second aim is to investigate similarities and differences in outdoor recreation patterns between adolescents with ethnic Danish and ethnic minority background...... carried out during some part of the year, “going for a walk”, “barbequing”, “taking a trip with family” were frequently cited by both groups, but more common among adolescents with ethnic minority background. “Walking the dog” was much more common among adolescents with Danish background, who also more...

  3. Outdoor PV Degradation Comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, D. C.; Smith, R. M.; Osterwald, C. R.; Gelak, E.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-02-01

    As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output; may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined; accurately. At the Performance and Energy Rating Testbed (PERT) at the Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) at the; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) more than 40 modules from more than 10 different manufacturers; were compared for their long-term outdoor stability. Because it can accommodate a large variety of modules in a; limited footprint the PERT system is ideally suited to compare modules side-by-side under the same conditions.

  4. Outdoor Recreation, Outdoor Education and the Economy of Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Interviews and a literature review found that outdoor recreation contributes significantly to Scotland's tourist income, particularly in rural areas; outdoor education centers are significant employers in certain rural areas; the provision of outdoor education by secondary schools has decreased in the last 20 years; and therapeutic outdoor…

  5. Estimation of Mexico's Informal Economy and Remittances Using Nighttime Imagery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tilottama Ghosh; Sharolyn Anderson; Rebecca L Powell; Paul C Sutton; Christopher D Elvidge

    2009-01-01

    .... This research explores the potential for estimating the formal and informal economy for Mexico using known relationships between the spatial patterns of nighttime satellite imagery and economic...

  6. Modelling night-time ecosystem respiration by a constrained source optimization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun-Tai Lai; Gabriel Katul; John Butnor; David Ellsworth; Ram Oren

    2002-01-01

    One of the main challenges to quantifying ecosystem carbon budgets is properly quantifying the magnitude of night-time ecosystem respiration. Inverse Lagrangian dispersion analysis provides a promising approach to addressing such a problem when measured mean CO2 concentration profiles and nocturnal velocity statistics are available. An inverse...

  7. Outdoor production of microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vree, de Jeroen H.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the production of microalgae under outdoor conditions, for this research was done at pilot scale. Microalgae are an interesting alternative to currently used sources for bulk commodities as food, feed and chemicals. Research activities within the field are shattered; different

  8. Outdoor Experiences and Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Heather E.

    2017-01-01

    Positive outdoor teaching and learning experiences and sound pedagogical approaches undoubtedly have contributed towards an understanding of environmental sustainability but it is not always clear how, and to what extent, education can translate into action. This article argues, with reference to social learning theory, that role modelling,…

  9. Outdoor Ecology School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Anna Gahl

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her high school environmental science students led third graders on a dynamic learning adventure as part of their first annual Outdoor Ecology School. At the water-monitoring site in a nearby national forest, the elementary students conducted field research and scavenger hunts, discovered animal habitats,…

  10. Outdoor recreation participation trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; Barbara L. McDonald; R. Jeff Teasley; John C. Bergstrom; Jack Martin; Jim Bason; Vernon R. Leeworthy

    1999-01-01

    As part of the national assessment of outdoor recreation trends, the authors have taken a look at participation patterns and levels of participation across activities and across segments of our society. The primary source of data is the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment (NSRE). The NSRE is the latest in the continuing series of National Recreation...

  11. Outdoor Education in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Ray H.

    In Dallas in 1970, high school outdoor education began as a cocurricular woods and waters boys' club sponsored by a community sportsman. Within one year, it grew into a fully accredited, coeducational, academic course with a curriculum devoted to the study of wildlife in Texas, ecology, conservation, hunting, firearm safety, fishing, boating and…

  12. "Friluftsliv": Traditional Norwegian Outdoor Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellnes, Atle

    1992-01-01

    Nature and outdoor life are part of Norway's national identity, as exemplified by a long history of nature-inspired art and literature, the formation of outdoor organizations since the turn of the century, and the development of skiing. Norwegian traditional outdoor life is characterized as travelling with respectful use of nature, to achieve a…

  13. Children and the Outdoor Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Laila; Sandberg, Anette

    2010-01-01

    In this article we will discuss the outdoor environment for younger children with the help of two different concepts. The first concept, affordance, is well known in the discussion about outdoor environments. What the affordance in the outdoor environment is perceived as can differ between actors. How the affordance is used can be another source…

  14. Outdoor Recreation Action. Report 25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This report from the Department of Interior presents information concerning individual state actions and projects related to the broad topic of outdoor recreation. Included are data on the following topics: rights-of-way for recreation; federal financing of outdoor recreation; state and local financing of outdoor recreation; federal acquisition…

  15. Outdoor Education and Science Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, José M.; Brewer, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Elementary students have limited opportunities to learn science in an outdoor setting at school. Some suggest this is partially due to a lack of teacher efficacy teaching in an outdoor setting. Yet the research literature indicates that outdoor learning experiences develop positive environmental attitudes and can positively affect science…

  16. Stomata-controlled nighttime COS fluxes in a boreal forest: implications for the use of COS as a GPP tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijmans, Linda M. J.; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Seibt, Ulli; Vesala, Timo; Mammarella, Ivan; Baker, Ian T.; Franchin, Alessandro; Kolari, Pasi; Sun, Wu; Keskinen, Helmi; Levula, Janne; Chen, Huilin

    2016-04-01

    Carbonyl Sulfide (COS) is a promising new tracer that can be used to partition the Net Ecosystem Exchange into gross primary production (GPP) and respiration. COS and CO2 vegetation fluxes are closely related as these gases share the same diffusion pathway into stomata. This close coupling is the fundamental principle for the use of COS as tracer for GPP. Nonetheless, in contrast to CO2 , the uptake of COS by vegetation is not light-dependent, and therefore the vegetative uptake of COS can continue during the night as long as stomata are open. Nighttime stomatal conductance is observed in a variety of studies, and also nighttime depletion of COS concentrations is reported several times but it is not confirmed with field measurements that the depletion of COS in the night is indeed driven by stomatal opening. In the summer of 2015 a campaign took place at the SMEAR II site in Hyytiälä, Finland to provide better constrained COS flux data for boreal forests using a combination of COS measurements, i.e. atmospheric profile concentrations up to 125 m, eddy-covariance fluxes and soil chamber fluxes, and collocated measurements of stomatal conductance and 222Radon. A high correlation between concentrations of 222Radon and COS implies that the radon-tracer method is a valuable tool to derive nighttime ecosystem COS fluxes. We find that soils contribute to 17% of the total ecosystem COS flux during nighttime in the peak growing season. Nighttime ecosystem COS fluxes show a correlation with stomatal conductance (R2 = 0.3), indicating that nighttime COS fluxes are primarily driven by vegetation. The COS vegetation fluxes will be compared with calculated fluxes from the Simple Biosphere model. Furthermore, the nighttime vegetative COS uptake covers a substantial fraction (25%) of the daily maximum COS uptake by vegetation. Accurate quantification of nighttime COS uptake is required to be able to use COS as a useful tracer for GPP.

  17. Rain and Romanticism: The Environment in Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor education provides an opportunity to engage with natural environments in ways that are distinct from other physical education teacher education (PETE) courses. This research examines how pre-service teachers (PSTs) within a PETE degree experienced "environment" on an outdoor education camp. Using self-study methodology and…

  18. Bringing Outdoor Challenge Education Inside the Business Communication Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuFrene, Debbie D.; Sharbrough, William; Clipson, Tim; McCall, Miles

    1999-01-01

    Describes present-day outdoor challenge education and briefly notes its history. Argues that it provides a framework for organizations to improve teamwork, problem solving, risk-taking, self-esteem, and interpersonal communication. Describes how advantages of outdoor education can be maintained when a program goes indoors. Notes advantages of…

  19. Index to Selected Outdoor Recreation Literature. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A partial index to selected outdoor recreation literature received by the Department of the Interior Library during 1966 provides 991 abstracts retrievable by subject index, name index, geographic index, and publications appendices. Subject categories include outdoor recreation resources, administration of resources and programs, recreation users'…

  20. Index to Selected Outdoor Recreation Literature. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A partial index to selected outdoor recreation literature received by the Department of the Interior Library during late 1966 and the first six months of 1967 provides 847 abstracts which are retrievable by subject, name, and geographic indexes. Subject categories include outdoor recreation resources, administration of resources and programs,…

  1. Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Mark S.; Gray, Casey; Babcock, Shawna; Barnes, Joel; Costas Bradstreet, Christa; Carr, Dawn; Chabot, Guylaine; Choquette, Louise; Chorney, David; Collyer, Cam; Herrington, Susan; Janson, Katherine; Janssen, Ian; Larouche, Richard; Pickett, William; Power, Marlene; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen; Simon, Brenda; Brussoni, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    A diverse, cross-sectorial group of partners, stakeholders and researchers, collaborated to develop an evidence-informed Position Statement on active outdoor play for children aged 3–12 years. The Position Statement was created in response to practitioner, academic, legal, insurance and public debate, dialogue and disagreement on the relative benefits and harms of active (including risky) outdoor play. The Position Statement development process was informed by two systematic reviews, a critical appraisal of the current literature and existing position statements, engagement of research experts (N = 9) and cross-sectorial individuals/organizations (N = 17), and an extensive stakeholder consultation process (N = 1908). More than 95% of the stakeholders consulted strongly agreed or somewhat agreed with the Position Statement; 14/17 participating individuals/organizations endorsed it; and over 1000 additional individuals and organizations requested their name be listed as a supporter. The final Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play states: “Access to active play in nature and outdoors—with its risks— is essential for healthy child development. We recommend increasing children’s opportunities for self-directed play outdoors in all settings—at home, at school, in child care, the community and nature.” The full Position Statement provides context for the statement, evidence supporting it, and a series of recommendations to increase active outdoor play opportunities to promote healthy child development. PMID:26062040

  2. Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Tremblay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A diverse, cross-sectorial group of partners, stakeholders and researchers, collaborated to develop an evidence-informed Position Statement on active outdoor play for children aged 3–12 years. The Position Statement was created in response to practitioner, academic, legal, insurance and public debate, dialogue and disagreement on the relative benefits and harms of active (including risky outdoor play. The Position Statement development process was informed by two systematic reviews, a critical appraisal of the current literature and existing position statements, engagement of research experts (N = 9 and cross-sectorial individuals/organizations (N = 17, and an extensive stakeholder consultation process (N = 1908. More than 95% of the stakeholders consulted strongly agreed or somewhat agreed with the Position Statement; 14/17 participating individuals/organizations endorsed it; and over 1000 additional individuals and organizations requested their name be listed as a supporter. The final Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play states: “Access to active play in nature and outdoors—with its risks— is essential for healthy child development. We recommend increasing children’s opportunities for self-directed play outdoors in all settings—at home, at school, in child care, the community and nature.” The full Position Statement provides context for the statement, evidence supporting it, and a series of recommendations to increase active outdoor play opportunities to promote healthy child development.

  3. Sleep and nighttime energy consumption in early childhood: a population‐based cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, J.; Llewellyn, C. H.; Johnson, L.; van Jaarsveld, C. H. M.; Syrad, H.; Fisher, A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Shorter sleep is a risk factor for weight gain in young children. Experimental studies show that sleep deprivation is associated with higher nighttime energy intake, but no studies have examined the patterning of energy intake in relation to nighttime sleep duration in young children. Objectives The objectives of the study were to test the hypothesis that shorter‐sleeping children would show higher nighttime energy intake and to examine whether the additional calories were from drinks, snacks or meals. Methods Participants were 1278 families from the Gemini twin cohort, using data from one child per family selected at random to avoid clustering effects. Nighttime sleep duration was measured at 16 months of age using the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire. Energy intake by time of day and eating episode (meal, snack, drink) were derived from 3‐day diet diaries completed when children were 21 months. Results Consistent with our hypothesis, shorter‐sleeping children consumed more calories at night only (linear trend P weight, gestational age, maternal education, weight and daytime sleep. Conclusions Shorter‐sleeping, young children consume more calories, predominantly at night, and from milk drinks. Parents should be aware that providing milk drinks at night may contribute to excess intake. This provides a clear target for intervention that may help address associations between sleep and weight observed in later childhood. PMID:25565402

  4. An improved method for retrieving nighttime aerosol optical thickness from the VIIRS Day/Night Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHardy, T. M.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Miller, S. D.; Hyer, E. J.; Kuehn, R. E.

    2015-11-01

    Using Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) data, a method, dubbed the "variance method", is developed for retrieving nighttime aerosol optical thickness (τ) values through the examination of the dispersion of radiance values above an artificial light source. Based on the improvement of a previous algorithm, this updated method derives a semi-quantitative indicator of nighttime τ using artificial light sources. Nighttime τ retrievals from the newly developed method are inter-compared with an interpolated value from late afternoon and early morning ground observations from four AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sites as well as column-integrated τ from one High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) site at Huntsville, AL, during the NASA Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) campaign, providing full diel coverage. Sensitivity studies are performed to examine the effects of lunar illumination on VIIRS τ retrievals made via the variance method, revealing that lunar contamination may have a smaller impact than previously thought; however, the small sample size of this study limits the conclusiveness thus far. VIIRS τ retrievals yield a coefficient of determination (r2) of 0.60 and a root-mean-squared error (RMSE) of 0.18 when compared against straddling daytime-averaged AERONET τ values. Preliminary results suggest that artificial light sources can be used for estimating regional and global nighttime aerosol distributions in the future.

  5. 9 CFR 3.127 - Facilities, outdoor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... artificial means shall be provided to allow all animals kept outdoors to protect themselves from direct... them protection and to prevent discomfort to such animals. Individual animals shall be acclimated... Administrator. The fence must be constructed so that it protects the animals in the facility by restricting...

  6. Vandalism and outdoor recreation: symposium proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam S. Alfano; Arthur W. [tech. coord.] Magil

    1976-01-01

    Resource managers, law enforcement officers, designers, and social scientists provide 24 papers giving an overview of vandalism on outdoor recreation areas; a measure of the difficult control problems which must be solved; some insights for design of buildings, fixtures, and site layouts to reduce or repel vandalism; and a profile of vandals, with respect to the...

  7. Confirmation of the Conditional Outdoor Leadership Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Tim; Priest, Simon

    1991-01-01

    Responses of 75 expert outdoor leaders from Canada and the United States concerning leadership in 12 hypothetical backpacking scenarios provided partial support for a theory that predicted probability of leadership style (democratic, autocratic, or abdicratic) based on favorability of conditions, task orientation, and relationship orientation.…

  8. Passive Cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai; Manz, Heinrich; Heiselberg, Per

    Due to an overall trend towards an increasing cooling energy demand in buildings in many European countries over the last few decades, passive cooling by night-time ventilation is seen as a promising concept. However, because of uncertainties in thermal comfort predictions, architects and engineers...... will remain, especially if night-time ventilation is applied in combination with other cooling methods. Building energy simulations showed that the performance of night-time ventilation is also affected by the heat transfer at internal room surfaces, as the cooling effect is very limited for heat transfer...

  9. Nighttime snacking, stress, and migraine activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Dana P; Smitherman, Todd A; Penzien, Donald B; Porter, John A H; Martin, Vincent T; Houle, Timothy T

    2014-04-01

    Missing meals and fasting have long been reported as headache triggers. Stress also has received attention for its role in precipitating headaches. This study explored the effects of eating behaviors on new-onset headache. Analyzing only the 1070 of 1648 (64.9%) diary days that followed a non-headache day, the study included 34 migraineurs who contributed a median (25th, 75th percentile) of 28 (22, 40) days of diary entries. Multivariable survival modeling with random effects was conducted, and hazards ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Nighttime snacking was associated with a 40% reduction in the odds of experiencing a headache compared to having no food (p=0.013). Eating a late dinner was associated with a 21% reduction in the odds of headache when compared to no additional food, but this association was not statistically significant (p=0. 22). These results demonstrate the potential for eating behaviors to be targeted in headache management, as regulated eating habits may have the potential to reduce the occurrence of headache. Although no causal relationship can be established, these results indicate that further research into the mechanisms of the association between eating behaviors and headache activity is warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Indoor and Outdoor Allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Madhavi; Hays, Amy

    2016-09-01

    In last 30 to 40 years there has been a significant increase in the incidence of allergy. This increase cannot be explained by genetic factors alone. Increasing air pollution and its interaction with biological allergens along with changing lifestyles are contributing factors. Dust mites, molds, and animal allergens contribute to most of the sensitization in the indoor setting. Tree and grass pollens are the leading allergens in the outdoor setting. Worsening air pollution and increasing particulate matter worsen allergy symptoms and associated morbidity. Cross-sensitization of allergens is common. Treatment involves avoidance of allergens, modifying lifestyle, medical treatment, and immunotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Outdoor recreation-related outdoor education: scope of the research (1995-2010) 2

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Philippa

    2012-01-01

    This is part two of an article on the scope of the New Zealand outdoor recreation-related outdoor education research published from January 1995 to June 2010. It draws on the literature covered the 2010 Sport and Recreation New Zealand-funded Outdoor Recreation Research Stocktake, which included outdoor education material. This part covers resources for outdoor recreation-related outdoor education, and impacts of and participation in outdoor recreation-related outdoor education. It concludes ...

  12. The Suitability of Different Nighttime Light Data for GDP Estimation at Different Spatial Scales and Regional Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxin Dai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nighttime light data offer a unique view of the Earth’s surface and can be used to estimate the spatial distribution of gross domestic product (GDP. Historically, using a simple regression function, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS has been used to correlate regional and global GDP values. In early 2013, the first global Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP visible infrared imaging radiometer suite (VIIRS nighttime light data were released. Compared with DMSP/OLS, they have a higher spatial resolution and a wider radiometric detection range. This paper aims to study the suitability of the two nighttime light data sources for estimating the GDP relationship between the provincial and city levels in Mainland China, as well as of different regression functions. First, NPP/VIIRS nighttime light data for 2014 are corrected with DMSP/OLS data for 2013 to reduce the background noise in the original data. Subsequently, three regression functions are used to estimate the relationship between nighttime light data and GDP statistical data at the provincial and city levels in Mainland China. Then, through the comparison of the relative residual error (RE and the relative root mean square error (RRMSE parameters, a systematical assessment of the suitability of the GDP estimation is provided. The results show that the NPP/VIIRS nighttime light data are better than the DMSP/OLS data for GDP estimation, whether at the provincial or city level, and that the power function and polynomial models are better for GDP estimation than the linear regression model. This study reveals that the accuracy of GDP estimation based on nighttime light data is affected by the resolution of the data and the spatial scale of the study area, as well as by the land cover types and industrial structures of the study area.

  13. Unintended environmental impacts of nighttime freight logistics activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    In recent years, the reduction of freight vehicle trips during peak hours has been a common : policy goal. To this end, policies have been implemented to shift logistics operations to : nighttime hours. The purpose of such policies has generally been...

  14. Impact of nighttime paving operations on asphalt roughness behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The relationship between nighttime construction scheduling and future road quality in terms of roughness was investigated. Research was three-phased: interviews with local leaders in paving, on-site observations, and historical data analyses. Intervi...

  15. Investigation of Mountaineering and Outdoor Sports Clubs with Activity Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak GÜRER

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Current study aims to identify activity areas of mountaineering and outdoor sports clubs in Turkey that organize activities regularly. Universe of the study was composed of mountaineering and outdoor sports clubs that were active between the dates of 11 March 2012 and 5 January 2013. This study and the sample included 49 active outdoor sports clubs that could be reached in the region. Data were collected via surveys. Obtained data were analyzed and interpreted with the help of statistical package program (SPSS 16.0. Frequencies and percentage distributions were provided. Criteria for the provision of outdoor sports activities in clubs include requests from members and geographical conditions of the area. It is observed that those clubs provide outdoor walks approximately for 21-40 members. There are clubs without trainers. Clubs provide mountaineering and rock climbing activities the most. Aegean and Marmara Regions are more active compared to other regions. In general, most of the clubs are active in areas such as mountaineering, rock climbing and outdoor walks. It is suggested that local administrations and federations support outdoor sports clubs

  16. Trends in outdoor recreation legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    George H. Siehl

    1980-01-01

    The two decades which have passed since the era of the Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission (ORRRC) have been active and fruitful in terms of Federal recreation legislation. The Commission and its final report "Outdoor Recreation for America" strongly influenced the burst of recreation legislation in the 1960's. Even today, the studies prepared...

  17. A Review of Criteria for Outdoor Classroom in Selected Tertiary Educational Institutions in Kuala Lumpur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheran, Y.; Fadzidah, A.; Nur Fadhilah, R.; Farha, S.

    2017-12-01

    A proper design outdoor environment in higher institutions contributes to the students’ learning performances and produce better learning outcomes. Campus surrounding has the potential to provide an informal outdoor learning environment, especially when it has the existing physical element, like open spaces and natural features, that may support the learning process. However, scholarly discourses on environmental aspects in tertiary education have minimal environmental inputs to fulfill students’ needs for outdoor exposure. Universities have always emphasized on traditional instructional methods in classroom settings, without concerning the importance of outdoor classroom towards students’ learning needs. Moreover, the inconvenience and discomfort outdoor surrounding in campus environment offers a minimal opportunity for students to study outside the classroom, and students eventually do not favor to utilize the spaces because no learning facility is provided. Hence, the objective of this study is to identify the appropriate criteria of outdoor areas that could be converted to be outdoor classrooms in tertiary institutions. This paper presents a review of scholars’ work in regards to the characteristics of the outdoor classrooms that could be designed as part of contemporary effective learning space, for the development of students’ learning performances. The information gathered from this study will become useful knowledge in promoting effective outdoor classroom and create successful outdoor learning space in landscape campus design. It I hoped that the finding of this study could provide guidelines on how outdoor classrooms should be designed to improve students’ academic achievement.

  18. Assessment of brief interventions for nighttime fears in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Jonathan; Sadeh, Avi

    2012-01-01

    Nighttime fears (NF) and sleep problems continue to be major problems in clinical services. The aim was to assess the effects of two brief interventions on NF, and related sleep problems and parental fear-reducing behaviors in children. One hundred and four children aged 4-6 years with significant NF were randomly assigned into two intervention groups: the Huggy-Puppy intervention (HPI), which is based on providing children a puppy doll with a request to take care of the doll, and a revised version (HPI-r) which is based on providing the same doll with a cover story that the doll will serve as a protector. At baseline, the domains of NF, behavior problems, and sleep disruptions were assessed. Data were collected from parents and children using objective and subjective measures. The effects of the interventions were assessed by comparing four time points: baseline, first week of intervention, 1 month, and 6 months after initial intervention time. A waiting list comparison group (WL) was used as spontaneous recovery comparison group. Both interventions significantly reduced NF with similar impact. The improvement after 1 month was significantly higher than in the WL group. Furthermore, both interventions significantly reduced parental fear management behaviors and children's sleep problems. Finally, the reduction in NF and parental fear management strategies were maintained 6 months post-treatment. Relatively simple and cost-effective doll interventions can reduce NF and their associated sleep problems. Further research is needed to implement these interventions for other anxiety disorders in childhood.

  19. Association between Nighttime Sleep and Napping in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Suzanne E.; Hall, Martica; Boudreau, Robert; Matthews, Karen A.; Cauley, Jane A.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Stone, Katie L.; Rubin, Susan M.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Newman, Anne B.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Napping might indicate deficiencies in nighttime sleep, but the relationship is not well defined. We assessed the association of nighttime sleep duration and fragmentation with subsequent daytime sleep. Design: Cross-sectional study. Participants: 235 individuals (47.5% men, 29.7% black), age 80.1 (2.9) years. Measurements and Results: Nighttime and daytime sleep were measured with wrist actigraphy and sleep diaries for an average of 6.8 (SD 0.7) nights. Sleep parameters included total nighttime sleep (h), movement and fragmentation index (fragmentation), and total daytime sleep (h). The relationship of total nighttime sleep and fragmentation to napping (yes/no) was assessed using logistic regression. In individuals who napped, mixed random effects models were used to determine the association between the previous night sleep duration and fragmentation and nap duration, and nap duration and subsequent night sleep duration. All models were adjusted for age, race, gender, BMI, cognitive status, depression, cardiovascular disease, respiratory symptoms, diabetes, pain, fatigue, and sleep medication use. Naps were recorded in sleep diaries by 178 (75.7%) participants. The odds ratios (95% CI) for napping were higher for individuals with higher levels of nighttime fragmentation (2.1 [0.8, 5.7]), respiratory symptoms (2.4 [1.1, 5.4]), diabetes (6.1 [1.2, 30.7]), and pain (2.2 [1.0, 4.7]). Among nappers, neither sleep duration nor fragmentation the preceding night was associated with nap duration the next day. Conclusion: More sleep fragmentation was associated with higher odds of napping although not with nap duration. Further research is needed to determine the causal association between sleep fragmentation and daytime napping. Citation: Goldman SE; Hall M; Boudreau R; Matthews KA; Cauley JA; Ancoli-Israel S; Stone KL; Rubin SM; Satterfield S; Simonsick EM; Newman AB. Association between nighttime sleep and napping in older adults. SLEEP 2008

  20. Night-time lights: A global, long term look at links to socio-economic trends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Proville

    Full Text Available We use a parallelized spatial analytics platform to process the twenty-one year totality of the longest-running time series of night-time lights data-the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP dataset-surpassing the narrower scope of prior studies to assess changes in area lit of countries globally. Doing so allows a retrospective look at the global, long-term relationships between night-time lights and a series of socio-economic indicators. We find the strongest correlations with electricity consumption, CO2 emissions, and GDP, followed by population, CH4 emissions, N2O emissions, poverty (inverse and F-gas emissions. Relating area lit to electricity consumption shows that while a basic linear model provides a good statistical fit, regional and temporal trends are found to have a significant impact.

  1. Night-time lights: A global, long term look at links to socio-economic trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proville, Jeremy; Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Wagner, Gernot

    2017-01-01

    We use a parallelized spatial analytics platform to process the twenty-one year totality of the longest-running time series of night-time lights data-the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) dataset-surpassing the narrower scope of prior studies to assess changes in area lit of countries globally. Doing so allows a retrospective look at the global, long-term relationships between night-time lights and a series of socio-economic indicators. We find the strongest correlations with electricity consumption, CO2 emissions, and GDP, followed by population, CH4 emissions, N2O emissions, poverty (inverse) and F-gas emissions. Relating area lit to electricity consumption shows that while a basic linear model provides a good statistical fit, regional and temporal trends are found to have a significant impact.

  2. Outdoor recreation-related outdoor education: scope of the research (1995-2010) 2

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Philippa

    2012-01-01

    Article made available with the permission of the New Zealand Journal of Outdoor Education. This is part two of an article on the scope of the New Zealand outdoor recreation-related outdoor education research published from January 1995 to June 2010. It draws on the literature covered the 2010 Sport and Recreation New Zealand-funded Outdoor Recreation Research Stocktake, which included outdoor education material. This part covers resources for outdoor recreation-related outdoor education, ...

  3. Outdoor air pollution: overview and historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tze-Ming; Shofer, Scott; Gokhale, Janaki; Kuschner, Ware G

    2007-04-01

    Outdoor air pollution is a significant public health hazard in population centers throughout the world. Recognition of air pollution as a nuisance dates back many centuries. Decades of research have established a strong link between air pollution and a spectrum of adverse health effects. Health care practitioners rarely consider the health risk of air pollution in the course of patient care and generally do not provide risk modification strategies as part of patient management. The purpose of this article is to provide front line clinicians with: 1) an overview of the evolution in scientific understanding about air pollution and its health effects, 2) an introduction to the hazards contemporary air pollution presents to patients, and 3) an introduction to the contributions of specific pollutants to outdoor air quality.

  4. The Seniors' Outdoor Survey: An Observational Tool for Assessing Outdoor Environments at Long-Term Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodiek, Susan; Nejati, Adeleh; Bardenhagen, Eric; Lee, Chanam; Senes, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    To describe the development and psychometric testing of the Seniors' Outdoor Survey (SOS), an instrument for evaluating how well the outdoor space in a long-term care setting supports the preferences and outdoor usage of residents. Content validity of the main SOS items initially was based on relevant literature and preliminary studies in diverse long-term care settings. After conducting a multiregional pilot study with 152 outdoor spaces at 68 assisted living facilities, the instrument was substantially revised and tested for interrater and test-retest reliability with 22 outdoor spaces at 12 long-term care settings, using 2 raters. Validity was examined using content analysis of resident survey responses (N = 1,128) from the multiregional study and specific item validation by subject matter experts (N = 53). The final instrument contains 60 ratable items organized in 5 domains: access to nature (14 items), outdoor comfort and safety (15 items), walking and outdoor activities (14 items), indoor-outdoor connection (11 items), and connection to the world (6 items). Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) estimates of interrater reliability were .91 for the overall instrument, ranging from .83 to .98 for the 5 domains. Interrater reliability (ICC) was above .70 for more than 79% of individual items. Test-retest reliability (ICC) was .92, ranging from .81 to .98 for domains. The SOS tool fills a gap in the available environmental assessment instruments, providing a reliable way for researchers, providers, and designers to evaluate and compare the supportive potential of outdoor spaces for long-term care residents. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Night-time symptoms: a forgotten dimension of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Agusti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep quality is often poor in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, but these night-time symptoms are frequently unnoticed by physicians and/or not reported by patients themselves. Therefore, the prevalence and clinical impact of sleep disturbances and night-time symptoms in COPD is not well understood and has not been a clinical focus to date. To address this gap, an expert panel meeting was convened in Barcelona, Spain, in March 2011 to discuss the aetiology, evolution, burden, long-term clinical consequences and optimal management of night-time symptoms in COPD. The term “night-time symptoms” in COPD has not been distinctly defined in an objective sense but epidemiological data suggests that the prevalence of nocturnal symptoms and symptomatic sleep disturbance may exceed 75% in patients with COPD. The panel concluded that night-time symptoms in COPD are prevalent and bothersome; that their cause(s are multiple and include demographic factors, such as age and obesity, pharmacotherapy, disease-specific symptoms and the presence of comorbid sleep disorders, and other medical conditions; and that potential long-term consequences can include lung function changes, increased exacerbation frequency, emergence or worsening of cardiovascular disease, cognitive effects, depression, impaired quality of life and increased mortality. To date, few interventional studies have investigated them, but emerging data suggest that bronchodilator therapy can improve them if deployed appropriately. In summary, night-time symptoms in COPD warrant further clinical investigation with validated tools.

  6. The Health Impact of Nighttime Eating: Old and New Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber W. Kinsey

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nighttime eating, particularly before bed, has received considerable attention. Limiting and/or avoiding food before nighttime sleep has been proposed as both a weight loss strategy and approach to improve health and body composition. Indeed, negative outcomes have been demonstrated in response to large mixed meals in populations that consume a majority of their daily food intake during the night. However, data is beginning to mount to suggest that negative outcomes may not be consistent when the food choice is small, nutrient-dense, low energy foods and/or single macronutrients rather than large mixed-meals. From this perspective, it appears that a bedtime supply of nutrients can promote positive physiological changes in healthy populations. In addition, when nighttime feeding is combined with exercise training, any adverse effects appear to be eliminated in obese populations. Lastly, in Type I diabetics and those with glycogen storage disease, eating before bed is essential for survival. Nevertheless, nighttime consumption of small (~150 kcals single nutrients or mixed-meals does not appear to be harmful and may be beneficial for muscle protein synthesis and cardiometabolic health. Future research is warranted to elucidate potential applications of nighttime feeding alone and in combination with exercise in various populations of health and disease.

  7. Final Report: Education, Public Access, and Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    supervision was provided by Mr. Roger Hamilton, Chief, RAB; Mr. Chegter 0. Martin , Acting Chief, SB; Mr. J. L. Decell, Acting Chief, NRD; and Dr. John...Alicia Ridell, Outdoor Recreation Planner National Park Service George H. Siehl , Specialist in Natural Resources Policy Congressional Research Service...Spectrum for Outdoor Recreation Planning on Army Installations," Technical Report N-124, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA. Siehl

  8. Efficient Pedestrian Detection at Nighttime Using a Thermal Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jeonghyun; Hong, Sungjun; Kim, Jisu; Kim, Euntai

    2017-08-10

    Most of the commercial nighttime pedestrian detection (PD) methods reported previously utilized the histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) or the local binary pattern (LBP) as the feature and the support vector machine (SVM) as the classifier using thermal camera images. In this paper, we propose a new feature called the thermal-position-intensity-histogram of oriented gradient (TPIHOG or T π HOG) and developed a new combination of the T π HOG and the additive kernel SVM (AKSVM) for efficient nighttime pedestrian detection. The proposed T π HOG includes detailed information on gradient location; therefore, it has more distinctive power than the HOG. The AKSVM performs better than the linear SVM in terms of detection performance, while it is much faster than other kernel SVMs. The combined T π HOG-AKSVM showed effective nighttime PD performance with fast computational time. The proposed method was experimentally tested with the KAIST pedestrian dataset and showed better performance compared with other conventional methods.

  9. CFC Outdoor Tournament 2011

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of whether you’re a fan of the "beautiful game", you’ve probably heard that the CFC Outdoor Tournament 2011 is the sporting event of the year for the CERN Football Club. This unmissable social, cultural and sporting event will be a chance for CERNois to mingle with external visitors. In the 2011 edition of this legendary tournament, which is over 45 years old, the principle of “fair play” is once again on display. Ten teams – 8 from CERN – are competing for the CFC title. The tournament concludes with a final on 7 July final. Along with a thrilling match, there will also be a host of festivities for the final, including an exhibition game, the final awards ceremony, surprise gifts, a barbeque, musical performances, and more! Make sure to highlight 7 July (after 18.00) on your agenda, and take advantage of what will surely be an unforgettable day! The final tournament matches have been in progress since April and are ...

  10. New hospital telemedicine services: potential market for a nighttime telehospitalist service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Richard B; Simpson, Kit N; Kazley, Abby S; Giarrizzi, Dana P

    2014-10-01

    A critical shortage in the supply of physicians in the United States has necessitated innovative approaches to physician service delivery. Telemedicine is a viable service delivery model for a variety of physician and health services. Telemedicine is most effective when applied where physician resources are scarce, patient care is time sensitive, and service volume may be distributed across a network. Shortages in critical care and neurology specialists have led to the use of tele-intensive care unit and telestroke services in hospital settings. These hospital-based telemedicine services have gained acceptance and recommendation. Hospitalist staffing shortages may provide an opportunity to apply similar telemedicine models to hospitalist medicine. This study assesses the potential market for a nighttime telehospitalist service. An analysis of the Florida state hospital discharge dataset investigated the potential market for a new nighttime telehospitalist service. Admissions were filtered and stratified for common hospitalist metrics, time of day, and age of patients. Admissions were further expressed by hour of day and location. Nineteen percent of common hospitalist admissions occurred between 7:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m., with a range of 17%-27% or 0.23-10.09 admissions per night per facility. Eighty percent of admissions occurred prior to midnight. Nonrural facilities averaged 6.69 hospitalist admissions per night, whereas rural facilities averaged 1.35 admissions per night. The low volume of nighttime admissions indicates an opportunity to leverage a telehospitalist physician service to deliver inpatient medical admission services across a network. Lower volumes of nighttime admissions in rural facilities may indicate a market for telehospitalist solutions to address the dilemma of hospitalist staffing shortages.

  11. Remote sensing of PM2.5 during cloudy and nighttime periods using ceilometer backscatter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siwei; Joseph, Everette; Min, Qilong; Yin, Bangsheng; Sakai, Ricardo; Payne, Megan K.

    2017-06-01

    Monitoring PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter d ≤ 2.5 µm) mass concentration has become of more importance recently because of the negative impacts of fine particles on human health. However, monitoring PM2.5 during cloudy and nighttime periods is difficult since nearly all the passive instruments used for aerosol remote sensing are not able to measure aerosol optical depth (AOD) under either cloudy or nighttime conditions. In this study, an empirical model based on the regression between PM2.5 and the near-surface backscatter measured by ceilometers was developed and tested using 6 years of data (2006 to 2011) from the Howard University Beltsville Campus (HUBC) site. The empirical model can explain ˜ 56, ˜ 34 and ˜ 42 % of the variability in the hourly average PM2.5 during daytime clear, daytime cloudy and nighttime periods, respectively. Meteorological conditions and seasons were found to influence the relationship between PM2.5 mass concentration and the surface backscatter. Overall the model can explain ˜ 48 % of the variability in the hourly average PM2.5 at the HUBC site when considering the seasonal variation. The model also was tested using 4 years of data (2012 to 2015) from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was geographically and climatologically different from the HUBC site. The results show that the empirical model can explain ˜ 66 and ˜ 82 % of the variability in the daily average PM2.5 at the ARM SGP site and HUBC site, respectively. The findings of this study illustrate the strong need for ceilometer data in air quality monitoring under cloudy and nighttime conditions. Since ceilometers are used broadly over the world, they may provide an important supplemental source of information of aerosols to determine surface PM2.5 concentrations.

  12. Visual Rhetoric in Outdoor Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Seliger, Marja

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a research, the aim of which is to find out how graphic expressions and visual language can be used for persuasion. The research material consists of outdoor advertisements photographed in their actual exhibition places in a city environment. Outdoor advertising media, which are used to communicate visual messages from a sender to several addressees, participate in building the visual city culture and open manifold solutions in design. The visual language used in the resear...

  13. Monitoring the trajectory of urban nighttime light hotspots using a Gaussian volume model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiming; Jiang, Ruowei; Wang, Ke; Huang, Lingyan; Ye, Ziran; Gan, Muye; Ji, Biyong

    2018-03-01

    Urban nighttime light hotspot is an ideal representation of the spatial heterogeneity of human activities within a city, which is sensitive to regional urban expansion pattern. However, most of previous studies related to nighttime light imageries focused on extracting urban extent, leaving the spatial variation of radiance intensity insufficiently explored. With the help of global radiance calibrated DMSP-OLS datasets (NTLgrc), we proposed an innovative framework to explore the spatio-temporal trajectory of polycentric urban nighttime light hotspots. Firstly, NTLgrc was inter-annually calibrated to improve the consistency. Secondly, multi-resolution segmentation and region-growing SVM classification were employed to remove blooming effect and to extract potential clusters. At last, the urban hotspots were identified by a Gaussian volume model, and the resulting parameters were used to quantitatively depict hotspot features (i.e., intensity, morphology and centroid dynamics). The result shows that our framework successfully captures hotspots in polycentric urban area, whose Ra2 are over 0.9. Meanwhile, the spatio-temporal dynamics of the hotspot features intuitively reveal the impact of the regional urban growth pattern and planning strategies on human activities. Compared to previous studies, our framework is more robust and offers an effective way to describe hotspot pattern. Also, it provides a more comprehensive and spatial-explicit understanding regarding the interaction between urbanization pattern and human activities. Our findings are expected to be beneficial to governors in term of sustainable urban planning and decision making.

  14. Can botox improve night-time overactive bladder symptoms in women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotla, Pawel; Cartwright, Rufus; Futyma, Konrad; Bogusiewicz, Michal; Skorupska, Katarzyna; Winkler, Izabela; Rechberger, Tomasz

    2017-03-01

    Despite the efficacy of intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox) therapy for urgency, urgency incontinence, and daytime frequency, its value in treatment of nocturia remains unclear. The aim of the prospective observational study was to assess the effect of onabotulinumtoxinA on night-time symptoms in women with overactive bladder (OAB), including nocturia, night-time urgency incontinence, and nocturnal voided volume as end-points. Women with idiopathic OAB (with at least one episode of urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) per day, ≥8 micturitions per 24 hr, and ≥2 nocturia episodes per night) were enrolled. Patients with nocturnal polyuria were excluded. Botox (100 U) was administered in 20 intra-detrusor injections. Post-void residual volumes (PVR) were checked at 2, 4, and 12 weeks. Participants completed a 3-day bladder diary and the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ) before and 12 weeks after treatment, and reported the efficacy of the treatment on visual analog scale (VAS) at the final follow-up visit. Seventy-six women completed the study. Botox injections were effective in the reduction of nocturia episodes (mean -0.98; P Botox injection provides significant benefit for night-time symptoms in OAB patients. Our results are applicable for women without nocturnal polyuria, and should prove useful when counseling patients about the risks and benefits of Botox. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:648-652, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Association between nighttime sleep and napping in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Suzanne E; Hall, Martica; Boudreau, Robert; Matthews, Karen A; Cauley, Jane A; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Stone, Katie L; Rubin, Susan M; Satterfield, Suzanne; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Newman, Anne B

    2008-05-01

    Napping might indicate deficiencies in nighttime sleep, but the relationship is not well defined. We assessed the association of nighttime sleep duration and fragmentation with subsequent daytime sleep. Cross-sectional study. 235 individuals (47.5% men, 29.7% black), age 80.1 (2.9) years. Nighttime and daytime sleep were measured with wrist actigraphy and sleep diaries for an average of 6.8 (SD 0.7) nights. Sleep parameters included total nighttime sleep (h), movement and fragmentation index (fragmentation), and total daytime sleep (h). The relationship of total nighttime sleep and fragmentation to napping (yes/no) was assessed using logistic regression. In individuals who napped, mixed random effects models were used to determine the association between the previous night sleep duration and fragmentation and nap duration, and nap duration and subsequent night sleep duration. All models were adjusted for age, race, gender, BMI, cognitive status, depression, cardiovascular disease, respiratory symptoms, diabetes, pain, fatigue, and sleep medication use. Naps were recorded in sleep diaries by 178 (75.7%) participants. The odds ratios (95% CI) for napping were higher for individuals with higher levels of nighttime fragmentation (2.1 [0.8, 5.7]), respiratory symptoms (2.4 [1.1, 5.4]), diabetes (6.1 [1.2, 30.7]), and pain (2.2 [1.0, 4.7]). Among nappers, neither sleep duration nor fragmentation the preceding night was associated with nap duration the next day. More sleep fragmentation was associated with higher odds of napping although not with nap duration. Further research is needed to determine the causal association between sleep fragmentation and daytime napping.

  16. [Pathological nighttime fears in children: Clinical specificities and effective therapeutics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducasse, D; Denis, H

    2015-09-01

    Pathological nighttime fears in children have been little studied. However, this disorder is commonly encountered in medical consultations and is discomforting and dysfunctional for both the child and the family. Most nighttime fears are part and parcel of normal development, and emanate from increasingly sophisticated cognitive development in the growing child. Thus, most children report a variety of coping strategies generally helpful in reducing their anxiety, which resolves spontaneously in the growing child. Nevertheless, in about 10% of children, nighttime fears are related to one or more anxiety disorders according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria. Then, it is estimated that severe nighttime fears and sleep problems occur in 20-30% of children. This problem is not transient and has to be treated. This study aims to review clinical features of nighttime fears and possible treatments for these patients and their families. This systematic review follows the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis (PRISMA) statement guidelines. Two databases (Medline and Web of Science) were searched combining the search terms: nighttime fears AND children. English and French languages were imposed. There were no publication date or publication status limitations. Pathological nighttime fears are responsible for emotional (crying, panic, tantrums at bedtime, loss of confidence, self-disparaging negative statements, and feeling of social embarrassment) and behavioral (wandering alone in the house at night, calls for parental or sibling comfort, bed sharing with parents or siblings, light source at night, refusal to go to the toilet alone at night) disturbances. This leads to a poor quality of sleep interfering with school learning, and also affects social development and family functioning. A full assessment has to be made to eliminate organic causes, have a baseline functioning, and search for comorbid anxiety diseases

  17. Coral Reef Watch, Nighttime Temperature, 50 km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Coral Reef Watch provides sea surface temperature (SST) products derived from NOAA's Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). This data provides...

  18. Cuff inflations do not affect night-time blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Emilie H; Theilade, Simone; Hansen, Tine W

    2015-01-01

    Discomfort related to cuff inflation may bias 24 h ambulatory blood pressure (BP) measurements, especially during night-time. We accessed the impact of cuff inflations by comparing 24 h BP recorded with a cuff-less tonometric wrist device and an upper-arm oscillometric cuff device. Fifty...

  19. Recognition of rail car retroreflective patterns for improving nighttime conspicuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Every year in the United States, accidents at highway-railroad grade crossings take place where the motorist hits the side of the train at night. In a portion of these nighttime accidents, the motorist fails to see the train in the grade crossing. On...

  20. Fast natural color mapping for night-time imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, M.A.; Toet, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new method to render multi-band night-time imagery (images from sensors whose sensitive range does not necessarily coincide with the visual part of the electromagnetic spectrum, e.g. image intensifiers, thermal camera's) in natural daytime colors. The color mapping is derived from the

  1. Napping in College Students and Its Relationship with Nighttime Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lichuan; Hutton Johnson, Stacy; Keane, Kathleen; Manasia, Michael; Gregas, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the habit of napping and its relationship with nighttime sleep in college students. Participants: Four hundred and forty undergraduate students who responded to an anonymous online survey in April 2010. Methods: Three questions were asked to determine the frequency, length, and timing of napping during the past month. Sleep…

  2. Color the night : applying daytime colors to nighttime imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toet, A.

    2003-01-01

    We present a method to give (fused) multiband night-time imagery a natural day-time color appearance. For input, the method requires a false color RGB image that is produced by mapping 3 individual bands (or the first 3 principal components) of a multiband nightvision system to the respective

  3. Potential of NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light Imagery for Modeling the Regional Economy of China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xi Li; Huimin Xu; Xiaoling Chen; Chang Li

    2013-01-01

    ...) Satellite has become a new satellite used to monitor nighttime light. This study performed the first evaluation on the NPP-VIIRS nighttime light imagery in modeling economy, analyzing 31 provincial regions and 393 county regions in China...

  4. Effects of nighttime air temperature during kernel development on rice physicochemical and functional properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated nighttime air temperatures (NTATs) occurring during critical grain-filling stages affected rice physicochemical properties, which impacted functional quality. Six cultivars were grown at multiple field locations from northern to southern Arkansas during 2007 to 2010. Nighttime temperature...

  5. Autophagy contributes to nighttime energy availability for growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Masanori; Hidema, Jun; Makino, Amane; Ishida, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular process leading to the vacuolar degradation of cytoplasmic components. Autophagic degradation of chloroplasts is particularly activated in leaves under conditions of low sugar availability. Here, we investigated the importance of autophagy in the energy availability and growth of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). autophagy-deficient (atg) mutants showed reduced growth under short-day conditions. This growth inhibition was largely relieved under continuous light or under short-day conditions combined with feeding of exogenous sucrose, suggesting that autophagy is involved in energy production at night for growth. Arabidopsis accumulates starch during the day and degrades it for respiration at night. Nighttime energy availability is perturbed in starchless mutants, in which a lack of starch accumulation causes a transient sugar deficit at night. We generated starchless and atg double mutants and grew them under different photoperiods. The double mutants showed more severe phenotypes than did atg or starchless single mutants: reduced growth and early cell death in leaves were observed when plants were grown under 10-h photoperiods. Transcript analysis of dark-inducible genes revealed that the sugar starvation symptoms observed in starchless mutants became more severe in starchless atg double mutants. The contents of free amino acids (AAs) increased, and transcript levels of several genes involved in AA catabolism were elevated in starchless mutant leaves. The increases in branched-chain AA and aromatic AA contents were partially compromised in starchless atg double mutants. We conclude that autophagy can contribute to energy availability at night by providing a supply of alternative energy sources such as AAs.

  6. Nighttime sleep duration and hedonic eating in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, L; Wardle, J; Llewellyn, C H; Fisher, A

    2015-10-01

    Higher food intake is implicated in the elevated risk of obesity associated with shorter sleep in children, but the mechanisms driving higher intake are uncertain. Research in adults suggests that acute sleep deprivation affects brain reward systems, which increases responsiveness to palatable foods. However, there have been few studies addressing habitual sleep duration, and few in children, among whom the strongest associations with body mass index (BMI) are seen. The objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that shorter-sleeping children are more food responsive and explore the mediation of the relationship between sleep and weight by food responsiveness (FR). Participants were families from Gemini, a UK twin birth cohort, who had provided complete information on their children's sleep and appetite at age 5 years (n=1008). One child from each twin pair was randomly selected for analyses. Nighttime sleep duration was calculated from parent-reported bedtime and wake time, and categorised as shorter, adequate or longer according to age-specific reference values. FR was assessed with the Child Eating Behaviour Questionnaire. BMI s.d. scores (BMI-SDS) were calculated from parent-measured heights and weights using the UK 1990 reference data and were available for 494 children. There was a significant linear association between shorter sleep and higher FR at age 5 years (P for linear trend=0.032), which was maintained after adjusting for age, sex, birth weight, maternal education and BMI-SDS. In the subset with BMI data at age 5 years, shorter sleep was associated with higher BMI-SDS (P=0.026) as expected. Testing for mediation by adding FR to the model attenuated the linear relationship to borderline significance (P=0.049), suggesting partial mediation. Shorter sleep in childhood is associated with higher FR, which may partly explain the association between shorter sleep and adiposity in childhood.

  7. Nighttime chemistry at a high altitude site above Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven S.; Dubé, William P.; Tham, Yee Jun; Zha, Qiaozhi; Xue, Likun; Poon, Steven; Wang, Zhe; Blake, Donald R.; Tsui, Wilson; Parrish, David D.; Wang, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Nighttime reactions of nitrogen oxides influence ozone, volatile organic compounds, and aerosol and are thus important to the understanding of regional air quality. Despite large emissions and rapid recent growth of nitrogen oxide concentrations, there are few studies of nighttime chemistry in China. Here we present measurements of nighttime nitrogen oxides, NO3 and N2O5, from a coastal mountaintop site in Hong Kong adjacent to the megacities of the Pearl River Delta region. This is the first study of nighttime chemistry from a site within the residual layer in China. Key findings include the following. First, highly concentrated urban NOx outflow from the Pearl River Delta region was sampled infrequently at night, with N2O5 mixing ratios up to 8 ppbv (1 min average) or 12 ppbv (1 s average) in nighttime aged air masses. Second, the average N2O5 uptake coefficient was determined from a best fit to the available steady state lifetime data as γ(N2O5) = 0.014 ± 0.007. Although this determination is uncertain due to the difficulty of separating N2O5 losses from those of NO3, this value is in the range of previous residual layer determinations of N2O5 uptake coefficients in polluted air in North America. Third, there was a significant contribution of biogenic hydrocarbons to NO3 loss inferred from canister samples taken during daytime. Finally, daytime N2O5 mixing ratios were in accord with their predicted photochemical steady state. Heterogeneous uptake of N2O5 in fog is determined to be an important production mechanism for soluble nitrate, even during daytime.

  8. STcorr: An IDL code for image based normalization of lapse rate and illumination effects on nighttime TIR imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, İnan; Labazuy, Philippe; Aydar, Erkan

    2012-06-01

    Thermal infrared imagery (TIR) is a useful tool to detect and quantify the surface temperature anomalies associated with geothermal fields. Accurate detection of anomalies in surface temperature is an important aspect of geothermal research. Although day-time TIR images have long been used for temperature anomaly mapping, the increase in the spatial resolution and the number of acquisitions of nighttime thermal imagery provide new perspectives to the remote geothermal monitoring and exploration. However, the nighttime thermal imagery requires appropriate corrections in order to minimize some major artefacts. These corrections are namely: the masking of small scale thermal anomalies by the lapse rate, the relict diurnal heat due to the radiation of sun and the slope effect. Moreover, the correction of nighttime TIR imagery according to the altitude, slope aspect and the slope of the study area provide more reliable data. STcorr is an Interactive Data Language (IDL) code for the correction of altitude, aspect and slope effects in nighttime thermal imagery using image based polynomial regression analysis. Standard ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) Surface Kinetic Temperature (ST) image and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) are used to calculate a lapse rate model. Upon the retrieval of lapse rate, an illumination correction is performed based on the relationship between the corrected image and the aspect and slope images, interactive and "step by step" structure of the code permit user to improve the quality of the output. An ASTER nighttime ST image of the Mt. Nemrut volcano has been corrected using STcorr as an example. The procedure improves the reliability of the output after the retrieval of altitude, aspect and slope effects. Thermal anomalies observed in the Mt. Nemrut are consistent with the hydrothermal activity and the hot spots detected by self-potential measurements in the area.

  9. Fear of moving outdoors and development of outdoor walking difficulty in older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rantakokko, Merja; Mänty, Minna; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    To study which individual characteristics and environmental factors correlate with fear of moving outdoors and whether fear of moving outdoors predicts development of mobility limitation.......To study which individual characteristics and environmental factors correlate with fear of moving outdoors and whether fear of moving outdoors predicts development of mobility limitation....

  10. Outdoor Irrigation Measurement and Verification Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnik, Charles W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stoughton, Kate M [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Figueroa, Jorge [Western Resource Advocates, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-12-05

    This measurement and verification (M&V) protocol provides procedures for energy service companies (ESCOs) and water efficiency service companies (WESCOs) to determine water savings resulting from water conservation measures (WCMs) in energy performance contracts associated with outdoor irrigation efficiency projects. The water savings are determined by comparing the baseline water use to the water use after the WCM has been implemented. This protocol outlines the basic structure of the M&V plan, and details the procedures to use to determine water savings.

  11. Outdoor recreation in forest policy and legislation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Carsten; Pouta, Eija; Gentin, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    The benefists of outdoor recreation and the need for recreation inventories and monitoring are described in various policy and legislation documents at the European level. The objective of this paper is to analyse how these recreational aspects are reflected at the national level in core forest...... indicates that a consistent forest recreation monitoring system, linked to sustainable forest management, as describes for example in the Helsinki process, should be better transferred into national policuy and legislation. Compareable data across Europe could then provide a sound base for making decisions...

  12. Multilayer Controller for Outdoor Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reske-Nielsen, Anders; Mejnertsen, Asbjørn; Andersen, Nils Axel

    2006-01-01

    A full software and hardware solution has been designed, implemented and tested for control of a small agricultural automatic tractor. The objective was to realise a user-friendly, multi-layer controller architecture for an outdoor platform. The collaborative research work was done as a part...

  13. Expanding & strengthening outdoor recreation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter S. Hopkins

    1971-01-01

    Though the Forest Service has pioneered in outdoor recreation research, the funding for recreation research has been inadequate. Specific needs for research are outlined. There is a need to define recreation and recreation research in terms that busy legislators can understand.

  14. Outdoor Learning and Sustainability Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Margaret; Dawson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    A shared conference presentation describes two ways of bringing education for sustainable development into education. The first part concentrated on putting science into outdoor learning backed up by a series of mind-mapping activities. The second was about linking schools with their surrounding communities to develop ways of working together. An…

  15. Outdoor Recreation Activities at Cispus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cispus Environmental Center, Randle, WA.

    Most of the activities in this booklet have been developed around skills related to the outdoors and, in particular, to the logging industry and forest fire fighting. The activities attempt to develop muscles, coordination skills, and teamwork. They also give the students (junior high school or high school) and staff the opportunity to do…

  16. Positive Psychology and Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Dene S.; Davis-Berman, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    A relatively new movement in psychology, positive psychology, has many implications for the field of outdoor education. Positive psychology has the goal of fostering excellence through the understanding and enhancement of factors that lead to growth. It embraces the view that growth occurs when positive factors are present, as opposed to the…

  17. Outdoor Experiential Education: Its Power and Pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Alan

    1985-01-01

    Traces origin of outdoor education to Aristotle. Expresses concern over cutbacks and "back to basics" movements that are eliminating outdoor programs. Proposes outdoor educators examine program objectives, staff, student needs, focus, and techniques to improve physiological and psychological aspects and avoid instructor traps to become stronger,…

  18. Outdoor Acoustics as a General Discipline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1999-01-01

    A tutorial paper exploring the characteristics of sound outdoors. Outdoor acoustics is contrasted to room acoustics. A number of important aspects of outdoor acoustics are exemplified and theoretical approaches are outlined. These are influence of ground impedance, influence of weather, screening...

  19. Outdoor Leadership Skills: A Program Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shooter, Wynn; Sibthorp, Jim; Paisley, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Successful hiring, training, and pairing or grouping of staff requires administrators to consider the relationship between their programs' goals and the specific outdoor leadership skills of individual leaders. Authors have divided outdoor leadership skills into a three-category structure, and models of outdoor leadership have focused on skills…

  20. Benchmarking Outdoor Expeditionary Program Risk Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerts-Brandsma, Lisa; Furman, Nate; Sibthorp, Jim

    2017-01-01

    In 2003, the University of Utah and the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) completed a study that developed a risk management taxonomy in the outdoor adventure industry and assessed how different outdoor expeditionary programs (OEPs) managed risk (Szolosi, Sibthorp, Paisley, & Gookin, 2003). By unifying the language around risk, the…

  1. A Phenomenology of Outdoor Education Leader Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Stephanie C.; Lauzon, Lara L.; Meldrum, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Limited qualitative research exists on the experiences of outdoor education leaders. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the job-related experiences of outdoor education leaders within and outside the workplace. Five participants who had experience as outdoor education leaders completed in-depth, one-on-one interviews about…

  2. 77 FR 33597 - Great Outdoors Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... natural beauty. To uphold this tradition, I was proud to launch the America's Great Outdoors Initiative...! initiative is encouraging children and families to explore the outdoors and engage in outdoor recreation as... us the opportunity to get active, explore, and strengthen our bonds with family and friends. This...

  3. A Program for Outdoor Recreation Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC.

    The categorical sections of the proposed program for outdoor recreation research are (1) principal findings and recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences, (2) the social and behavioral dimensions of outdoor recreation, (3) the economics of outdoor recreation, and (4) the operation of recreation service systems. Among the specific topics…

  4. Outdoor Recreation Action: Federal, State, Local, Private.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, George M., Ed.

    This booklet reports on outdoor recreation actions taken at the federal, state, local, and private levels. The Land and Water Conservation Fund and the financing of outdoor recreation on all levels are discussed. New agencies, personnel, reorganizations, resolutions, and recommendations for the organization and administration of outdoor recreation…

  5. Equatorial enhancement of the nighttime OH mesospheric infrared airglow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D J [Utah State University, EL-302, Logan, UT 84322-4140 (United States); Thurgood, B K [Utah State University, EL-302, Logan, UT 84322-4140 (United States); Harrison, W K [Utah State University, EL-302, Logan, UT 84322-4140 (United States); Mlynczak, M G [NASA Langley Research Center, Mail Stop 401-B, Hampton, VA 23665-5225 (United States); Russell, J M [Center for Atmospheric Sciences, Hampton University, 23 Tyler Street Hampton, VA 23668 (United States)

    2007-05-15

    Global measurements of the hydroxyl mesospheric airglow over an extended period of time have been made possible by the NASA SABER infrared sensor aboard the TIMED satellite which has been functioning since December of 2001. The orbital mission has continued over a significant portion of a solar cycle. Experimental data from SABER for several years have exhibited equatorial enhancements of the nighttime mesospheric OH ({delta}v=2) airglow layer consistent with the high average diurnal solar flux. The brightening of the OH airglow typically means more H+O{sub 3} is being reacted. At both the spring and autumn seasonal equinoxes when the equatorial solar UV irradiance mean is greatest, the peak volume emission rate (VER) of the nighttime Meinel infrared airglow typically appears to be both significantly brighter plus lower in altitude by several kilometres at low latitudes compared with midlatitude findings.

  6. Napping in college students and its relationship with nighttime sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lichuan; Hutton Johnson, Stacy; Keane, Kathleen; Manasia, Michael; Gregas, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. To examine the habit of napping and its relationship with nighttime sleep in college students. Four hundred and forty undergraduate students who responded to an anonymous online survey in April 2010. Three questions were asked to determine the frequency, length, and timing of napping during the past month. Sleep quality was measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The PSQI score significantly differed among self-reported nap-frequency (p=.047) and nap-length (p=.017) groups, with those who napped more than 3 times per week and those who napped more than 2 hours having the poorest sleep quality. Students who napped between 6 and 9 pm had shorter sleep on school nights compared with students in other nap-timing groups (p=.002). College students who are self-reported frequent, long, and late nappers may have a higher risk of poor nighttime sleep quality and more severe sleep deprivation.

  7. The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution: a mechanistic appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Kevin J; Bennie, Jonathan; Davies, Thomas W; Hopkins, John

    2013-11-01

    The ecological impacts of nighttime light pollution have been a longstanding source of concern, accentuated by realized and projected growth in electrical lighting. As human communities and lighting technologies develop, artificial light increasingly modifies natural light regimes by encroaching on dark refuges in space, in time, and across wavelengths. A wide variety of ecological implications of artificial light have been identified. However, the primary research to date is largely focused on the disruptive influence of nighttime light on higher vertebrates, and while comprehensive reviews have been compiled along taxonomic lines and within specific research domains, the subject is in need of synthesis within a common mechanistic framework. Here we propose such a framework that focuses on the cross-factoring of the ways in which artificial lighting alters natural light regimes (spatially, temporally, and spectrally), and the ways in which light influences biological systems, particularly the distinction between light as a resource and light as an information source. We review the evidence for each of the combinations of this cross-factoring. As artificial lighting alters natural patterns of light in space, time and across wavelengths, natural patterns of resource use and information flows may be disrupted, with downstream effects to the structure and function of ecosystems. This review highlights: (i) the potential influence of nighttime lighting at all levels of biological organisation (from cell to ecosystem); (ii) the significant impact that even low levels of nighttime light pollution can have; and (iii) the existence of major research gaps, particularly in terms of the impacts of light at population and ecosystem levels, identification of intensity thresholds, and the spatial extent of impacts in the vicinity of artificial lights. © 2013 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2013 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  8. Assessing Light Pollution in China Based on Nighttime Light Imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Jiang; Guojin He; Tengfei Long; Chen Wang; Yuan Ni; Ruiqi Ma

    2017-01-01

    Rapid urbanization and economic development inevitably lead to light pollution, which has become a universal environmental issue. In order to reveal the spatiotemporal patterns and evolvement rules of light pollution in China, images from 1992 to 2012 were selected from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) and systematically corrected to ensure consistency. Furthermore, we employed a linear regression trend method and nighttime light index method...

  9. Private lands and outdoor recreation in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Jeff Teasley; John C. Bergstrom; H. Ken Cordell; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Paul Gentle

    1999-01-01

    Outdoor recreation on private land is influenced by myriad factors. To provide background and context on these factors, this chapter first overviews the private land situation in the United States and provides general information and discussion related to ownership and tenure, land-use patterns, legal restrictions, and economic conditions, including taxation issues....

  10. Federal outdoor recreation trends: Effects on economic opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric M. White; Michael Bowker; Ashley E. Askew; Linda L. Langner; J. Ross Arnold; Don English

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor recreation plays a significant role in American lives. It provides physical challenges and well-being, helps develop lifelong skills, provokes interest and inquiry, inspires wonder and awe of the natural world, and often provides an alternative to daily routines. Recreation contributes greatly to the physical, mental, and spiritual health of individuals, bonds...

  11. Modeling emission rates and exposures from outdoor cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Rufus; Princevac, Marko; Weltman, Robert; Ghasemian, Masoud; Arora, Narendra K.; Bond, Tami

    2017-09-01

    Approximately 3 billion individuals rely on solid fuels for cooking globally. For a large portion of these - an estimated 533 million - cooking is outdoors, where emissions from cookstoves pose a health risk to both cooks and other household and village members. Models that estimate emissions rates from stoves in indoor environments that would meet WHO air quality guidelines (AQG), explicitly don't account for outdoor cooking. The objectives of this paper are to link health based exposure guidelines with emissions from outdoor cookstoves, using a Monte Carlo simulation of cooking times from Haryana India coupled with inverse Gaussian dispersion models. Mean emission rates for outdoor cooking that would result in incremental increases in personal exposure equivalent to the WHO AQG during a 24-h period were 126 ± 13 mg/min for cooking while squatting and 99 ± 10 mg/min while standing. Emission rates modeled for outdoor cooking are substantially higher than emission rates for indoor cooking to meet AQG, because the models estimate impact of emissions on personal exposure concentrations rather than microenvironment concentrations, and because the smoke disperses more readily outdoors compared to indoor environments. As a result, many more stoves including the best performing solid-fuel biomass stoves would meet AQG when cooking outdoors, but may also result in substantial localized neighborhood pollution depending on housing density. Inclusion of the neighborhood impact of pollution should be addressed more formally both in guidelines on emissions rates from stoves that would be protective of health, and also in wider health impact evaluation efforts and burden of disease estimates. Emissions guidelines should better represent the different contexts in which stoves are being used, especially because in these contexts the best performing solid fuel stoves have the potential to provide significant benefits.

  12. Factors that differentially affect daytime and nighttime sleep in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi eIshimoto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Rest in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has key characteristics of mammalian sleep and is thus considered as a fly version of sleep. Drosophila sleep has been studied extensively, with the aim of gaining fundamental insights into the evolutionarily conserved functions of sleep as well as the mechanisms that regulate it. An interesting question that has not yet been addressed is whether fly sleep can be classified into distinct sleep types, each having particular biological roles—like REM and non-REM sleep in birds and mammals. Typically, Drosophila sleep displays a bimodal pattern, consisting of distinct daytime and nighttime components. Notably, daytime and nighttime sleep differ with respect to a number of qualities, such as sleep bout lengths and arousal thresholds. In this short review, we describe several genetic and environmental factors that differentially affect daytime and nighttime sleep, highlighting the observations suggesting the notion that these temporally distinct components of Drosophila sleep may have unique biological functions and be regulated by different homeostatic regulatory mechanisms.

  13. Nighttime Lights, Socioeconomic Development, and Revitalization Policies in Northeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, M.; Smith, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    Nighttime lights are typically used as a proxy for population and economic growth, yet they can also reveal socioeconomic decline. We use two night light datasets to infer socioeconomic patterns and trends in the Russian Far East, Northeast China, and North Korea, a cross-border region impacted by the 1991 collapse of the USSR. First, using the annual stable light composites from the DMSP/OLS satellites, we find that generally, nighttime lights declined in the Russian Far East, increased in Northeast China, and fluctuated in North Korea between 1992 and 2012. By 2012, lighting in most of the Russian Far East had not recovered to 1992 levels. In Northeast China, a government revitalization program may have increased lighting during the mid-2000s, suggesting sensitivity of remotely sensed nighttime lights to regional development policies. Yet caveats with DMSP/OLS data include low spatial and radiometric resolutions, saturation, and blooming. The Day/Night Band (DNB) of the Suomi NPP satellite, however, launched in October 2011, has higher quality, enabling improved monitoring of socioeconomic trends in the region. For our second night lights dataset, we use both nightly images and monthly DNB composites to make inferences regarding socioeconomic activities at finer spatial and temporal resolutions from 2012-2015. Cross-border activity in particular emerges in finer detail, allowing us to examine specific transport corridors and sites of industrial and natural resource production that involve both Russian and Chinese partners.

  14. Nighttime bracing versus observation for early adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemann, John M; Shah, Suken A; Price, Charles T

    2014-09-01

    Spinal bracing is widely utilized in patients with moderate severity adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with the goal of preventing curve progression and therefore preventing the need for surgical correction. Bracing is typically initiated in patients with a primary curve angle between 25 and 40 degrees, who are Risser sign 0 to 2 and TLSO wear if they progressed to >25 degrees primary curve Cobb angle. Curve progression was monitored with minimum 2-year follow-up. Sixteen patients in the observation group and 21 patients in the bracing group completed 2-year follow-up. All patients in the observation group progressed to fulltime bracing threshold. In the nighttime bracing group, 29% of the patients did not progress to 25 degrees primary curve magnitude. Rate of progression to surgical magnitude was similar in the 2 groups. Risser 0 patients presenting with mild idiopathic scoliosis are at high risk for progression to >25 degrees primary curve magnitude. Treatment with the Charleston nighttime bending brace may reduce progression to full-time bracing threshold. No difference in progression to surgical intervention was shown between nighttime bracing and observation for small curves. Level II--therapeutic study (prospective comparative study).

  15. Outdoor Adventure Risk Management: Curriculum Design Principles from Industry and Educational Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Nevin; Robinson, David W.

    2005-01-01

    Leaders working in the outdoor adventure field are faced with making critical decisions that keep students, clients, or customers safe from the perils of risk-related activities while enabling them to benefit from these experiences. The knowledge and competency necessary to analyze and manage risk is integral to those providing outdoor adventure…

  16. Place-Based Curriculum Making: Devising a Synthesis between Primary Geography and Outdoor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor learning provides children with an opportunity to experience the interdisciplinary nature of the real world through interactions with each other and the planet. Geographical enquiry involves exploring the outdoors in an investigative capacity. Space, place and sustainability are three core concepts in primary geography, although…

  17. The Effect of Outdoor Learning Activities on the Development of Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Günseli; Özyilmaz Akamca, Güzin

    2017-01-01

    Learning ought to be supported by both in class activities and outdoor activities contributing to structuring knowledge. Outdoor activities allow children to actively participate and to learn by doing. Learning requires a lot of work and activities. These activities, which provide primary experiences, help children to change theoretical knowledge…

  18. Using deep learning to quantify the beauty of outdoor places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seresinhe, Chanuki Illushka; Preis, Tobias; Moat, Helen Susannah

    2017-07-01

    Beautiful outdoor locations are protected by governments and have recently been shown to be associated with better health. But what makes an outdoor space beautiful? Does a beautiful outdoor location differ from an outdoor location that is simply natural? Here, we explore whether ratings of over 200 000 images of Great Britain from the online game Scenic-Or-Not, combined with hundreds of image features extracted using the Places Convolutional Neural Network, might help us understand what beautiful outdoor spaces are composed of. We discover that, as well as natural features such as 'Coast', 'Mountain' and 'Canal Natural', man-made structures such as 'Tower', 'Castle' and 'Viaduct' lead to places being considered more scenic. Importantly, while scenes containing 'Trees' tend to rate highly, places containing more bland natural green features such as 'Grass' and 'Athletic Fields' are considered less scenic. We also find that a neural network can be trained to automatically identify scenic places, and that this network highlights both natural and built locations. Our findings demonstrate how online data combined with neural networks can provide a deeper understanding of what environments we might find beautiful and offer quantitative insights for policymakers charged with design and protection of our built and natural environments.

  19. Daytime space cooling with phase change material ceiling panels discharged using rooftop photovoltaic/thermal panels and night-time ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourdakis, Eleftherios; Pean, Thibault Quentin; Gennari, Luca

    2016-01-01

    the photovoltaic/thermal varied from 56% to 122%. The phase change material ceiling panels were thus, capable of providing an acceptable thermal environment and the photovoltaic/thermal panels were able to provide most of the required electricity and cold water needed for cooling.......The possibility of using photovoltaic/thermal panels for producing cold water through the process of night-time radiative cooling was experimentally examined. The cold water was used to discharge phase change material in ceiling panels in a climatic chamber. Both night-time radiative cooling...

  20. Pedestrian Friendly Outdoor Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koltai, R. N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGowan, T. K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The GATEWAY program followed two pedestrian-scale lighting projects that required multiple mockups – one at Stanford University in California and the other at Chautauqua Institution in upstate New York. The report provides insight into pedestrian lighting criteria, how they differ from street and area lighting criteria, and how solid-state lighting can be better applied in pedestrian applications.

  1. Indoor-outdoor relationships of particulate matter and nitrogen oxides under different outdoor meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Andy T.

    Respirable suspended particulate matter and nitrogen oxides concentrations were measured inside and outside a student office in an urban location during a 9-month period. Direct reading tapered-element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) instruments and passive sampling techniques were used to provide indoor and outdoor hourly averages of the two pollutants during the sampling period. The variations and correlations of the pollutant concentrations and the indoor-outdoor (IO) ratio against various outdoor meteorological factors, namely temperature, humidity, pressure, wind speed and solar irradiation were studied. Using a data-mining procedure, suitable sets of data were amassed and grouped together to study the effect of these individual weather parameters on the IO ratio. It is found through statistical regression techniques that temperature, humidity and solar irradiation play a vital role in the variation of the IO ratio. In fact, the IO ratio shows convincing tendency of increase with increase of these three weather parameters. On the other hand, both pressure and wind speed seems to have relatively little effect on the IO ratio.

  2. Informing outdoor smokefree policy: methods for measuring the proportion of people smoking in outdoor public areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, George; Russell, Marie; Jenkin, Gabrielle; Patel, Vimal; Wilson, Nick

    2013-03-01

    To advance the design and implementation of outdoor smokefree area policies, we aimed to develop simple, low-cost methods for measuring smoking in a variety of public places. Two methods were developed and were used by solo observers during March 2011-February 2012 to measure the proportion of people smoking at a variety of sites. Both methods performed well (n=5553 people observed); the first at 58 sites in the UK and New Zealand (n=3191 observed); the second at 33 sites in New Zealand (n=2362 observed), with significant differences found between the smoking at types of sites and between countries. For the two countries combined, the proportions of people smoking (amongst those over 12 years) in children's play areas was significantly lower compared to all the other sites combined (risk ratio=0.39; 95%CI: 0.20 to 0.76; p=0.002). Solo observers can establish the proportion of people smoking in a range of outdoor sites. Such methods can inform outdoor smokefree area policymaking by providing baseline and post-policy data to enable location targeting and policy evaluation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Perception for Outdoor Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    geometry. This geometry, usd for shifting the roeds to provide traiing examples, can also be used to measure how far along die Mering ar the crer of...search for branches terminates when none of the candidates have high enough probability. A variation on this process confines the serch to the top portion...intersection hu been deteted in one image, the search in subsequent image can be confined to a xallw nap of locaion and ugiles, depending on vehicle motion

  4. PARENTS ATTITUDE ABOUT OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Martinović

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A questionnaire-based survey was conducted on a sample of 238 parents whose children attend the third and fourth grades in two Belgrade elementary schools: “Oslobodioci Beograda” and “Borislav Pekic”. The aim of this study was to deter¬mi¬ne the incidence of outdoor activities and the attitude of the third and fourth graders’ parents towards it. Statistical data processing was based on the use of the –R, and every question represented a random variable. The analysis of the collected data has proved the presence of outdoor activities among these pupils and their positive attitude towards camping out, as well as a positive attitude of their parents.

  5. A Qualitative Investigation of Californian Youth Interests in the Outdoors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marni Goldenberg

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Prior research has found connections between youth participation in recreational activities and academic achievement, civic involvement, and improved health. To investigate California youth outdoor recreation attitudes, behaviors, and constraints, eight focus groups were conducted with community recreation center youth participants. Youth answered 10 questions about their experiences, attitudes, and perceptions of outdoor recreation. Data were analyzed using grounded theory. Three to seven axial codes were identified for each question. Results showed that youth want to have more access to outdoor recreational activities. However, there are frequently considerable constraints for the youth to overcome including draws of technology, family obligations, and laziness. Safety was a recurring concern among participants. Understanding youth attitudes and perceptions allows managers to meet youth needs, program for youth interests, and provides a strong foundation for marketing and as a rational for funding grants.

  6. Estimation of the PM2.5 Pollution Levels in Beijing Based on Nighttime Light Data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program-Operational Linescan System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runya Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nighttime light data record the artificial light on the Earth’s surface and can be used to estimate the degree of pollution associated with particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5 in the ground-level atmosphere. This study proposes a simple method for monitoring PM2.5 concentrations at night by using nighttime light imagery from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program-Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS. This research synthesizes remote sensing and geographic information system techniques and establishes a back propagation neural-network (BP network model. The BP network model for nighttime light data performed well in estimating the PM2.5 pollution in Beijing. The correlation coefficient between the BP network model predictions and the corrected PM2.5 concentration was 0.975; the root mean square error was 26.26 μg/m3, with a corresponding average PM2.5 concentration of 155.07 μg/m3; and the average accuracy was 0.796. The accuracy of the results primarily depended on the method of selecting regions in the DMSP nighttime light data. This study provides an opportunity to measure the nighttime environment. Furthermore, these results can assist government agencies in determining particulate matter pollution control areas and developing and implementing environmental conservation planning.

  7. Outdoor sports and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrle, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is estimated to be one of the most important risk factors for nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Athletes practicing outdoor sports receive considerable UV doses because of training and competition schedules with high sun exposure, and in alpine sports, by altitude-related increase of UV radiation and reflection from snow- and ice-covered surfaces. Extreme UV exposure in outdoor sports such as skiing, mountaineering, cycling, or triathlon has been documented in a series of dosimetric studies. Sweating because of physical exercise may contribute to UV-related skin damage as it increases the individual photosensitivity of the skin, facilitating the risk of sunburns. Large epidemiological studies showed that recreational activities such as sun exposure on the beach or during water sports were associated with an increased risk of basal cell carcinoma, whereas skiing has been shown to be at increased risk for squamous cell carcinoma. Risk factors of cutaneous melanoma such as the number of melanocytic nevi and solar lentigines have been found to be more frequent in subjects practicing endurance outdoor sports. An increased risk for cutaneous melanoma may be assumed for these athletes. In addition to the important sun exposure, exercise-induced immunosuppression may increase the risk for nonmelanoma skin cancer and cutaneous melanoma in athletes. Frequently, athletes seem to know little about the risk of sun exposure. Protective means such as avoiding training and competition with considerable sun exposure, choosing adequate clothing, and applying water-resistant sunscreen still need to be propagated in the community of outdoor sportsmen.

  8. Design of outdoor urban spaces for thermal comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriet J. Plumley

    1977-01-01

    Microclimates in outdoor urban spaces may be modified by controlling the wind and radiant environments in these spaces. Design guidelines were developed to specify how radiant environments may be selected or modified to provide conditions for thermal comfort. Fanger's human-thermal-comfort model was used to determine comfortable levels of radiant-heat exchange for...

  9. Factors that Influence Women's Technical Skill Development in Outdoor Adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Karen; Loeffler, TA

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical foundation for understanding women's technical skill development (TSD) in outdoor adventure. An examination of societal and biological factors influencing women's TSD focuses on gender role socialization, sense of competence, technical conditioning, sexism, spatial ability, and risk-taking. The article suggests…

  10. Outdoor Education, A Bibliography of ERIC Abstracts: Supplement No. 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools, Las Cruces, NM.

    A supplement to seven previous bibliographies, this bibliography provides a guide to some of the latest resource material, research findings, and/or developments in outdoor education. Part I contains 68 citations and abstracts which appeared in "Resources in Education" (RIE) from the January 1977 issue through the October 1977 issue. Part II…

  11. Harmonizing outdoor recreation and bird conservation targets in protected areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, Rogier; Sierdsema, Henk; Foppen, Ruud P.B.; Henkens, René J.H.G.; Opdam, Paul F.M.; Eupen, van Michiel

    2017-01-01

    In protected areas managers have to achieve conservation targets while providing opportunities for outdoor recreation. This dual mandate causes conflicts in choosing between management options. Furthermore, the persistence of a protected species within the management unit often depends on how

  12. Outdoor Adventure Education for Children in Scotland: Quantifying the Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrutton, Roger A.

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor adventure education (OAE) is widely recognised for its ability to elicit personal and social development for its participants. However, quantitative evidence on which this recognition is based is frequently questioned, and is virtually absent in Scotland. To provide some of the first statistically determined evidence from Scotland that OAE…

  13. Outdoor recreation in shifting societal and natural landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda H. Mockrin; J. M.  Bowker; Katherine  Smith; Cindi  West

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor recreation contributes to public health, supports hundreds of thousands of jobs, and  provides billions of dollars annually to rural economies. Visitors to federal lands alone spent $51  billion in 2012 in nearby communities during their trips to recreate on public lands and waters  (Forest Service National Center for Natural Resources Economic Research 2014)....

  14. Quantification of Outdoor Mobility by Use of Accelerometer-Measured Physical Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Taraldsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hip fractures in older persons are associated with both low levels of daily physical activity and loss of outdoor mobility. The aim was to investigate if accelerometer-based measures of physical behaviour can be used to determine if people undertake outdoor walking and to provide reference values for physical behaviour outcomes related to outdoor mobility. Older persons (n=245, ≥70 years, one year after hip fracture, participated. Six objective measures of physical behaviour collected by an activity monitor were compared with self-reported outdoor mobility assessed with the Nottingham Extended ADL scale. All measures of time and length in upright periods were significantly lower in participants who reported not walking outdoors (p<0.001. A set of cut-off points for the different physical behaviour variables was generated. Maximum length of upright events discriminated best between groups, with 31 minutes as a threshold to determine if a person is more likely to report that they walk outdoors (sensitivity: 0.805, specificity: 0.704, and AUC: 0.871 or 41 minutes or more to determine if a person is more likely to report outdoor walking on their own (AUC: 0.891. Physical behaviour variables from activity monitoring can provide information about patterns of physical behaviour related to outdoor activity performance.

  15. A Simulation Study on the Urban Population of China Based on Nighttime Light Data Acquired from DMSP/OLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingxu Huang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The urban population (UP measure is one of the most direct indicators that reflect the urbanization process and the impacts of human activities. The dynamics of UP is of great importance to studying urban economic, social development, and resource utilization. Currently, China lacks long time series UP data with consistent standards and comparability over time. The nighttime light images from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s (DMSP Operational Linescan System (OLS allow the acquisition of continuous and highly comparable long time series UP information. However, existing studies mainly focus on simulating the total population or population density level based on the nighttime light data. Few studies have focused on simulating the UP in China. Based on three regression models (i.e., linear, power function, and exponential, the present study discusses the relationship between DMSP/OLS nighttime light data and the UP and establishes optimal regression models for simulating the UPs of 339 major cities in China from 1990 to 2010. In addition, the present study evaluated the accuracy of UP and non-agricultural population (NAP simulations conducted using the same method. The simulation results show that, at the national level, the power function model is the optimal regression model between DMSP/OLS nighttime light data and UP data for 1990–2010. At the provincial scale, the optimal regression model varies among different provinces. The linear regression model is the optimal regression model for more than 60% of the provinces. In addition, the comparison results show that at the national, provincial, and city levels, the fitting results of the UP based on DMSP/OLS nighttime light data are better than those of the NAP. Therefore, DMSP/OLS nighttime light data can be used to effectively retrieve the UP of a large-scale region. In the context of frequent population flows between urban and rural areas in China and difficulty in obtaining

  16. Unknotting night-time muscle cramp: a survey of patient experience, help-seeking behaviour and perceived treatment effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blyton Fiona

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Night-time calf cramping affects approximately 1 in 3 adults. The aim of this study was to explore the experience of night-time calf cramp; if and where people seek treatment advice; and perceived treatment effectiveness. Methods 80 adults who experienced night-time calf cramp at least once per week were recruited from the Hunter region, NSW, Australia through newspaper, radio and television advertisements. All participants completed a pilot-tested survey about muscle cramp. Quantitative data were analysed with independent-sample t-tests, Chi square tests and Fisher's tests. Qualitative data were transcribed and sorted into categories to identify themes. Results Median recalled age of first night-time calf cramp was 50 years. Most participants recalled being awoken from sleep by cramping, and experiencing cramping of either calf muscle, calf-muscle soreness in the days following cramp and cramping during day-time. Despite current therapies, mean usual pain intensity was 66 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. Participants described their cramps as being 'unbearable', 'unmanageable' and 'cruel'. One participant stated that 'sometimes I just wish I could cut my legs open' and another reported 'getting about 2 h sleep a night due to cramps'. Most participants had sought advice about their night-time calf cramps from a health professional. Participants identified 49 different interventions used to prevent night-time calf cramp. Of all treatment ratings, 68% described the intervention used to prevent cramp as being 'useless' or of 'a little help'. Of 14 participants who provided additional information regarding their use of quinine, eight had a current prescription of quinine for muscle cramp at the time of the survey. None had been asked by their prescribing doctor to stop using quinine. Conclusion Night time calf cramps typically woke sufferers from sleep, affected either leg and caused ongoing pain. Most participants

  17. A Region Tracking-Based Vehicle Detection Algorithm in Nighttime Traffic Scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqiang Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The preceding vehicles detection technique in nighttime traffic scenes is an important part of the advanced driver assistance system (ADAS. This paper proposes a region tracking-based vehicle detection algorithm via the image processing technique. First, the brightness of the taillights during nighttime is used as the typical feature, and we use the existing global detection algorithm to detect and pair the taillights. When the vehicle is detected, a time series analysis model is introduced to predict vehicle positions and the possible region (PR of the vehicle in the next frame. Then, the vehicle is only detected in the PR. This could reduce the detection time and avoid the false pairing between the bright spots in the PR and the bright spots out of the PR. Additionally, we present a thresholds updating method to make the thresholds adaptive. Finally, experimental studies are provided to demonstrate the application and substantiate the superiority of the proposed algorithm. The results show that the proposed algorithm can simultaneously reduce both the false negative detection rate and the false positive detection rate.

  18. One day prediction of nighttime VLF amplitudes using nonlinear autoregression and neural network modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, H.; Hobara, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The electric field amplitude of very low frequency (VLF) transmitter from Hawaii (NPM) has been continuously recorded at Chofu (CHF), Tokyo, Japan. The VLF amplitude variability indicates lower ionospheric perturbation in the D region (60-90 km altitude range) around the NPM-CHF propagation path. We carried out the prediction of daily nighttime mean VLF amplitude by using Nonlinear Autoregressive with Exogenous Input Neural Network (NARX NN). The NARX NN model, which was built based on the daily input variables of various physical parameters such as stratospheric temperature, total column ozone, cosmic rays, Dst, and Kp indices possess good accuracy during the model building. The fitted model was constructed within the training period from 1 January 2011 to 4 February 2013 by using three algorithms, namely, Bayesian Neural Network (BRANN), Levenberg Marquardt Neural Network (LMANN), and Scaled Conjugate Gradient (SCG). The LMANN has the largest Pearson correlation coefficient (r) of 0.94 and smallest root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 1.19 dB. The constructed models by using LMANN were applied to predict the VLF amplitude from 5 February 2013 to 31 December 2013. As a result the one step (1 day) ahead predicted nighttime VLF amplitude has the r of 0.93 and RMSE of 2.25 dB. We conclude that the model built according to the proposed methodology provides good predictions of the electric field amplitude of VLF waves for NPM-CHF (midlatitude) propagation path.

  19. The Chamber for Studying Rice Response to Elevated Nighttime Temperature in Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An in situ temperature-controlled field chamber was developed for studying a large population of rice plant under different nighttime temperature treatments while maintaining conditions similar to those in the field during daytime. The system consists of a pipe hoop shed-type chamber with manually removable covers manipulated to provide a natural environment at daytime and a relatively stable and accurate temperature at night. Average air temperatures of 22.4 ± 0.3°C at setting of 22°C, 27.6 ± 0.4°C at 27°C, and 23.8 ± 0.7°C ambient conditions were maintained with the system. No significant horizontal and vertical differences in temperature were found and only slight changes in water temperatures were observed between the chambers and ambient conditions at 36 days after transplanting. A slight variation in CO2 concentration was observed at the end of the treatment during the day, but the 10-μmol CO2 mol−1 difference was too small to alter plant response. The present utilitarian system, which only utilizes an air conditioner/heater, is suitable for studying the effect of nighttime temperature on plant physiological responses with minimal perturbation of other environmental factors. At the same time, it will enable in situ screening of many rice genotypes.

  20. Maternal caffeine consumption and infant nighttime waking: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Iná S; Matijasevich, Alicia; Domingues, Marlos R

    2012-05-01

    Coffee and other caffeinated beverages are commonly consumed in pregnancy. In adults, caffeine may interfere with sleep onset and have a dose-response effect similar to those seen during insomnia. In infancy, nighttime waking is a common event. With this study, we aimed to investigate if maternal caffeine consumption during pregnancy and lactation leads to frequent nocturnal awakening among infants at 3 months of age. All children born in the city of Pelotas, Brazil, during 2004 were enrolled on a cohort study. Mothers were interviewed at delivery and after 3 months to obtain information on caffeine drinking consumption, sociodemographic, reproductive, and behavioral characteristics. Infant sleeping pattern in the previous 15 days was obtained from a subsample. Night waking was defined as an episode of infant arousal that woke the parents during nighttime. Multivariable analysis was performed by using Poisson regression. The subsample included 885 of the 4231 infants born in 2004. All but 1 mother consumed caffeine in pregnancy. Nearly 20% were heavy consumers (≥300 mg/day) during pregnancy and 14.3% at 3 months postpartum. Prevalence of frequent nighttime awakeners (>3 episodes per night) was 13.8% (95% confidence interval: 11.5%-16.0%). The highest prevalence ratio was observed among breastfed infants from mothers consuming ≥300 mg/day during the whole pregnancy and in the postpartum period (1.65; 95% confidence interval: 0.86-3.17) but at a nonsignificant level. Caffeine consumption during pregnancy and by nursing mothers seems not to have consequences on sleep of infants at the age of 3 months.

  1. Typology of alcohol consumers in five Australian nighttime entertainment districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Amy; Norman, Thomas; Bruno, Raimondo; Pennay, Amy; Droste, Nicolas; Jenkinson, Rebecca; Quinn, Brendan; Lubman, Dan I; Miller, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how types of alcohol consumers differ is important for public policy targeted at reducing adverse events. The aims of the present study were to identify typologies of alcohol consumers in Australian nighttime entertainment districts based on risk factors for harm and to examine variation between the identified groups in drinking setting and harms. Street-intercept surveys were conducted with 5556 alcohol consumers in and around licensed venues in five Australian cities between November 2011 and June 2012. Latent class analysis identified groups based on age and sex, and blood alcohol concentration, pre-drinking, energy drink use and illicit drug use during that night. Four classes were identified: general patron group (33%), young pre-drinker group (27%), intoxicated male pre-drinker group (31%) and intoxicated illicit drug male group (9%). The proportion of the general patron group interviewed decreased over the night, while the other groups increased (particularly in regional cities). As compared with the general patron group, the remaining three groups reported increased odds of being involved in aggression and any alcohol-related injuries in the past 3 months, with highest rates of harm amongst the intoxicated illicit drug male group. Alcohol consumers in nighttime entertainment districts are not a homogeneous group. One-third have a low likelihood of risky consumption practices; however, representation of this consumer class diminishes throughout the night. Elevated harms amongst groups characterised by certain risk factors (e.g. pre-drinking and illicit drug use) emphasise the importance of addressing these behaviours in public policy. [Peacock A, Norman T, Bruno B, Pennay, Droste N, Jenkinson R, Quinn B, Lubman DI, Miller P. Typology of alcohol consumers in five Australian nighttime entertainment districts. Drug Alcohol Rev 2016;35:539-548]. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  2. The Anisotropy of High Latitude Nighttime F-Region Irregularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-31

    RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TTL E ard Svt (Ite) TYPE OF REPORT G PERIOD COVERED TrilE ANISOTROPY OF H1(2I LATITUDE NIGHTTIME Technical Report F-REGIOIN...1 value based upon Wideband satellite data collected between 1976 and 1978. Both analyses base their conclusions on the assumption that the average...the model to the data is as follows: For the first third of the pass (up to about 1121 UT or 0100 corrected local magnetic time) from the orientation

  3. Stable Nighttime Light Decreased in Protected Area of California: Findings from DMSP-OLS Observations and the Importance for Protected Area Policy Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, S.; Gillespie, T. W.

    2016-12-01

    Stable nighttime light, an indicator of persisting human activity and light pollution is a well-recognized disturbance to the wilderness of protected areas (PAs). Mostly supported by in situ observations, very limited studies of light pollution for PAs focused at a regional level and on a continuous time span to support policy making effectively. DMSP-OLS stable nighttime series provide continuous observation of nightlight and have been widely applied in studies focusing on human activities. In this study, we employed inter-calibrated DMSP-OLS nightlight series from 1992 to 2012 to evaluate the change of intensity and extension of stable nighttime light inside California PAs. We observed a decrease of stable nighttime light and a shrinkage in spatial extent in PAs located in all ecoregions from 1992 to 2012, especially before 2004. Such decrease and shrinkage occurred mostly in southern California and the Bay Area where mega metropolitan clusters locate. The successful application of protecting strategies in PAs and the improved technologies of lighting may contribute to the relieving of light pollution in PAs. However, the stable nighttime light slightly increased since 2004, when there was limited room for stricter protective regulations and the pressure from population growth persisted. Population density explained most spatial distribution of nightlight in years with census tract level demographic data available, except PAs with the highest wilderness such as Sierra Nevada Mts. We anticipate to improve the models with the newest remote sensing nighttime product from NASA Suomi-NPP and annually updated demographic data from American Community Survey at census tract level in the future to provide a cost-effective evaluation on protecting strategies. Such evaluation will support land managers of PAs and local policy-makers for modification and proposal of policies.

  4. Context-Specific Outdoor Time and Physical Activity among School-Children Across Gender and Age: Using Accelerometers and GPS to Advance Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinker, Charlotte Demant; Schipperijn, Jasper; Kerr, Jacqueline; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Troelsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Being outdoors has a positive influence on health among children. Evidence in this area is limited and many studies have used self-reported measures. Objective context-specific assessment of physical activity patterns and correlates, such as outdoor time, may progress this field. To employ novel objective measures to assess age and gender differences in context-specific outdoor weekday behavior patterns among school-children [outdoor time and outdoor moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA)] and to investigate associations between context-specific outdoor time and MVPA. A total of 170 children had at least one weekday of 9 h combined accelerometer and global positioning system data and were included in the analyses. The data were processed using the personal activity and location measurement system (PALMS) and a purpose-built PostgreSQL database resulting in context-specific measures for outdoor time, outdoor MVPA, and overall daily MVPA. In addition, 4 domains (leisure, school, transport, and home) and 11 subdomains (e.g., urban green space and sports facilities) were created and assessed. Multilevel analyses provided results on age and gender differences and the association between outdoor time and MVPA. Girls compared to boys had fewer outdoor minutes (p outdoors (p outdoor MVPA minutes during the day (p outdoor minutes (p outdoor MVPA (p outdoor time (p outdoor time was associated with 9.9 more minutes of MVPA (p outdoor time and physical activity patterns has been developed and can be expanded to other populations. Different context-specific patterns were found for gender and age, suggesting different strategies may be needed to promote physical activity.

  5. Correcting incompatible DN values and geometric errors in nighttime lights time series images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Naizhuo [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Zhou, Yuyu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Samson, Eric L. [Mayan Esteem Project, Farmington, CT (United States)

    2014-09-19

    The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) nighttime lights imagery has proven to be a powerful remote sensing tool to monitor urbanization and assess socioeconomic activities at large scales. However, the existence of incompatible digital number (DN) values and geometric errors severely limit application of nighttime light image data on multi-year quantitative research. In this study we extend and improve previous studies on inter-calibrating nighttime lights image data to obtain more compatible and reliable nighttime lights time series (NLT) image data for China and the United States (US) through four steps: inter-calibration, geometric correction, steady increase adjustment, and population data correction. We then use gross domestic product (GDP) data to test the processed NLT image data indirectly and find that sum light (summed DN value of pixels in a nighttime light image) maintains apparent increase trends with relatively large GDP growth rates but does not increase or decrease with relatively small GDP growth rates. As nighttime light is a sensitive indicator for economic activity, the temporally consistent trends between sum light and GDP growth rate imply that brightness of nighttime lights on the ground is correctly represented by the processed NLT image data. Finally, through analyzing the corrected NLT image data from 1992 to 2008, we find that China experienced apparent nighttime lights development in 1992-1997 and 2001-2008 respectively and the US suffered from nighttime lights decay in large areas after 2001.

  6. Urban Land Extraction Using VIIRS Nighttime Light Data: An Evaluation of Three Popular Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinyin Dou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Timely and accurate extraction of urban land area using the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS nighttime light data is important for urban studies. However, a comprehensive assessment of the existing methods for extracting urban land using VIIRS nighttime light data remains inadequate. Therefore, we first reviewed the relevant methods and selected three popular methods for extracting urban land area using nighttime light data. These methods included local-optimized thresholding (LOT, vegetation-adjusted nighttime light urban index (VANUI, integrated nighttime lights, normalized difference vegetation index, and land surface temperature support vector machine classification (INNL-SVM. Then, we assessed the performance of these methods for extracting urban land area based on the VIIRS nighttime light data in seven evaluation areas with various natural and socioeconomic conditions in China. We found that INNL-SVM had the best performance with an average kappa of 0.80, which was 6.67% higher than the LOT and 2.56% higher than the VANUI. The superior performance of INNL-SVM was mainly attributed to the integration of information on nighttime light, vegetation cover, and land surface temperature. This integration effectively reduced the commission and omission errors arising from the overflow effect and low light brightness of the VIIRS nighttime light data. Additionally, INNL-SVM can extract urban land area more easily. Thus, we suggest that INNL-SVM has great potential for effectively extracting urban land with VIIRS nighttime light data at large scales.

  7. Characterizing Aggregated Exposure to Primary Particulate Matter: Recommended Intake Fractions for Indoor and Outdoor Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantke, Peter; Jolliet, Olivier; Apte, Joshua Schulz

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM_(2.5)) from indoor and outdoor sources is a leading environmental contributor to global disease burden. In response, we established under the auspices of the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative a coupled indoor-outdoor emission-to-exposure framework to provide...... different levels of spatial detail. Emission-to-exposure archetypes range from global indoor and outdoor averages, via archetypal urban and indoor settings, to 3646 real-world cities in 16 parameterized sub-continental regions. Population intake fractions from urban and rural outdoor sources are lowest...... indoor sources range from 470 ppm to 62,000 ppm, mainly as function of air exchange rate and occupancy. Indoor exposure typically contributes 80–90% to overall exposure from outdoor sources. Our framework facilitates improvements in air pollution reduction strategies and life cycle impact assessments....

  8. Spatial analysis and facility characteristics of outdoor recreational areas in Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Fatih; Demirci, Ali

    2010-05-01

    This article reports the results of a study that explored whether outdoor recreational areas are sufficient in Istanbul in terms of their surface area and facility characteristics. All the municipalities in 32 subprovinces of Istanbul were sent a survey in 2007 and asked to prepare a list of their outdoor recreational areas including their names, addresses, size, and facilities. All the data collected from the municipalities were used to create a GIS-based inventory by using GIS and remote sensing. As the study revealed, the outdoor recreational areas in Istanbul are far behind meeting the recreational needs of the residents in terms of area per person and facility characteristics. There are 2,470 areas which were dedicated to outdoor recreational activities in Istanbul. Total surface area of all these outdoor recreational areas is 19,2 sq kilometers; this means 1.52 m(2) recreational area per person in the city. This value is very low when compared to that of many cities in Europe and USA. As the study also revealed, the majority of outdoor recreational areas in Istanbul are poor in facility. Majority of the existing outdoor recreational areas are small and do not provide the public with many opportunities to engage in different outdoor activities. A more sustainable and efficient recreational plan is needed in Istanbul to meet the various recreational needs of its residents.

  9. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol for nighttime agitation in severe dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Sebastian; Mahlberg, Richard; Eichmann, Uta; Kunz, Dieter

    2006-05-01

    Nighttime agitation occurs frequently in patients with dementia and represents the number one burden on caregivers today. Current treatment options are few and limited due to substantial side effects. The aim of the study was to measure the effect of the cannabinoid dronabinol on nocturnal motor activity. In an open-label pilot study, six consecutive patients in the late stages of dementia and suffering from circadian and behavioral disturbances-five patients with Alzheimer's disease and one patient with vascular dementia-were treated with 2.5 mg dronabinol daily for 2 weeks. Motor activity was measured objectively using actigraphy. Compared to baseline, dronabinol led to a reduction in nocturnal motor activity (P=0.028). These findings were corroborated by improvements in Neuropsychiatric Inventory total score (P=0.027) as well as in subscores for agitation, aberrant motor, and nighttime behaviors (P<0.05). No side effects were observed. The study suggests that dronabinol was able to reduce nocturnal motor activity and agitation in severely demented patients. Thus, it appears that dronabinol may be a safe new treatment option for behavioral and circadian disturbances in dementia.

  10. Enhanced Statistical Estimation of Air Temperature Incorporating Nighttime Light Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhao Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Near surface air temperature (Ta is one of the most critical variables in climatology, hydrology, epidemiology, and environmental health. In situ measurements are not efficient for characterizing spatially heterogeneous Ta, while remote sensing is a powerful tool to break this limitation. This study proposes a mapping framework for daily mean Ta using an enhanced empirical regression method based on remote sensing data. It differs from previous studies in three aspects. First, nighttime light data is introduced as a predictor (besides land surface temperature, normalized difference vegetation index, impervious surface area, black sky albedo, normalized difference water index, elevation, and duration of daylight considering the urbanization-induced Ta increase over a large area. Second, independent components are extracted using principal component analysis considering the correlations among the above predictors. Third, a composite sinusoidal coefficient regression is developed considering the dynamic Ta-predictor relationship. This method was performed at 333 weather stations in China during 2001–2012. Evaluation shows overall mean error of −0.01 K, root mean square error (RMSE of 2.53 K, correlation coefficient (R2 of 0.96, and average uncertainty of 0.21 K. Model inter-comparison shows that this method outperforms six additional empirical regressions that have not incorporated nighttime light data or considered predictor independence or coefficient dynamics (by 0.18–2.60 K in RMSE and 0.00–0.15 in R2.

  11. Savanna Tree Seedlings are Physiologically Tolerant to Nighttime Freeze Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Keefe, Kimberly; Nippert, Jesse B.; Swemmer, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    Freeze events can be important disturbances in savanna ecosystems, yet the interactive effect of freezing with other environmental drivers on plant functioning is unknown. Here, we investigated physiological responses of South African tree seedlings to interactions of water availability and freezing temperatures. We grew widely distributed South African tree species (Colophospermum mopane, Combretum apiculatum, Acacia nigrescens, and Cassia abbreviata) under well-watered and water-limited conditions and exposed individuals to nighttime freeze events. Of the four species studied here, C. mopane was the most tolerant of lower water availability. However, all species were similarly tolerant to nighttime freezing and recovered within one week following the last freezing event. We also show that water limitation somewhat increased freezing tolerance in one of the species (C. mopane). Therefore, water limitation, but not freezing temperatures, may restrict the distribution of these species, although the interactions of these stressors may have species-specific impacts on plant physiology. Ultimately, we show that unique physiologies can exist among dominant species within communities and that combined stresses may play a currently unidentified role in driving the function of certain species within southern Africa. PMID:26870065

  12. Sport Transition of JPSS VIIRS Imagery for Night-time Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuell, Kevin; LeRoy, Anita; Smith, Matt; Miller, Steve; Kann, Diedre; Bernhardt, David; Reydell, Nezette; Cox, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The NASA/Short-term Prediction, Research, and Transition (SPoRT) Program and NOAA/Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) work within the NOAA/Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Proving Ground to demonstrate the unique capabilities of the VIIRS instrument. Very similar to MODIS, the VIIRS instrument provides many high-resolution visible and infrared channels in a broad spectrum. In addition, VIIRS is equipped with a low-light sensor that is able to detect light emissions from the land and atmosphere as well as reflected sunlight by the lunar surface. This band is referred to as the Day-Night Band due to the sunlight being used at night to see cloud and topographic features just as one would typically see in day-time visible imagery. NWS forecast offices that collaborate with SPoRT and CIRA have utilized MODIS imagery in operations, but have longed for more frequent passes of polar-orbiting data. The VIIRS instrument enhances SPoRT collaborations with WFOs by providing another day and night-time pass, and at times two additional passes due to its large swath width. This means that multi-spectral, RGB imagery composites are more readily available to prepare users for their use in GOES-R era and high-resolution imagery for use in high-latitudes is more frequently able to supplement standard GOES imagery within the SPoRT Hybrid GEO-LEO product. The transition of VIIRS also introduces the new Day-Night Band capability to forecast operations. An Intensive Evaluation Period (IEP) was conducted in Summer 2013 with a group of "Front Range" NWS offices related to VIIRS night-time imagery. VIIRS single-channel imagery is able to better analyze the specific location of fire hotspots and other land features, as well as provide a more true measurement of various cloud and aerosol properties than geostationary measurements, especially at night. Viewed within the SPoRT Hybrid imagery, the VIIRS data allows forecasters to better interpret the more frequent, but

  13. Outdoor recreation-related outdoor education: scope of the research (1995-2010) I

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Philippa

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the scope of the New Zealand outdoor recreationrelated outdoor education research literature published from January 1995 to June 2010. It draws on the literature covered by the 2010 Sport and Recreation New Zealand-funded Outdoor Recreation Research Stocktake, which included outdoor education material. This article is divided into two parts, both published in this issue of the journal. Part one describes how the stocktake was conducted and reports on the research liter...

  14. Nighttime Sleep Duration and Sleep Behaviors among Toddlers from Low-Income Families: Associations with Obesogenic Behaviors and Obesity and the Role of Parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Erin R; Calamaro, Christina J; Bentley, Lauren M; Hurley, Kristen M; Wang, Yan; Black, Maureen M

    2016-10-01

    Shortened sleep duration is associated with poor health and obesity among young children. Little is known about relationships among nighttime sleep duration, sleep behaviors, and obesogenic behaviors/obesity among toddlers. This study characterizes sleep behaviors/duration and examines relationships with obesogenic behaviors/obesity among toddlers from low-income families. Mothers of toddlers (age 12-32 months) were recruited from urban/suburban sites serving low-income families. Mothers provided demographic information and completed the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire (BISQ); a 6-item Toddler Sleep Behavior Scale was derived (TSBS-BISQ, higher score reflects more recommended behaviors). Toddler weight/length were measured; obesity defined as ≥95th percentile weight-for-length. Measures of obesogenic behaviors: physical activity [accelerometry, minutes/day in Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA)] and diet quality [24-hour recall, Healthy Eating Index 2005 (HEI-2005)]. Bivariate and adjusted multivariable models examined associations between nighttime sleep behaviors/duration and obesogenic behaviors/obesity. Sample included 240 toddlers (mean age = 20.2 months), 55% male, 69% black, 59% urban. Toddlers spent 55.4 minutes/day in MVPA, mean HEI-2005 score was 55.4, 13% were obese. Mean sleep duration was 9.1 hours, with 35% endorsing 5-6 recommended sleep behaviors (TSBS-BISQ). In multivariable models, MVPA was positively related to sleep duration; obese toddlers had a shorter nighttime sleep duration than healthy weight toddlers [odds ratio = 0.69, p = 0.014]. Nighttime sleep duration was associated with high TSBS-BISQ scores, F = 6.1, p = 0.003. Toddlers with a shorter nighttime sleep duration are at higher risk for obesity and inactivity. Interventions to promote healthy sleep behaviors among toddlers from low-income families may improve nighttime sleep duration and reduce obesogenic behaviors/obesity.

  15. Flexibility Predicts Curve Progression in Providence Nighttime Bracing of Patients With Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohrt-Nissen, Søren; Hallager, Dennis Winge; Gehrchen, Poul Martin

    2016-01-01

    for adolescent idiopathic ccoliosis (AIS) have been inconsistent and further research is needed. The association between flexibility, as determined by pretreatment SLBR, and curve progression has not previously been examined. METHODS: All patients treated with the PB from 2006 to 2011 who met Scoliosis Research...

  16. Outdoor Recreation in Florida: A Comprehensive Program for Meeting Florida's Outdoor Recreation Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Natural Resources, Tallahassee.

    A comprehensive program for meeting outdoor recreational needs in Florida is described in this planning and reference document in terms of objectives for the program through the year 1975 (with projections to the year 2000). The scope and nature of outdoor recreation are defined, and a justification for an outdoor recreation program is presented.…

  17. A Lunchtime Walk in Nature Enhances Restoration of Autonomic Control during Night-Time Sleep: Results from a Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie F. Gladwell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Walking within nature (Green Exercise has been shown to immediately enhance mental well-being but less is known about the impact on physiology and longer lasting effects. Heart rate variability (HRV gives an indication of autonomic control of the heart, in particular vagal activity, with reduced HRV identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Night-time HRV allows vagal activity to be assessed whilst minimizing confounding influences of physical and mental activity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a lunchtime walk in nature increases night-time HRV. Participants (n = 13 attended on two occasions to walk a 1.8 km route through a built or a natural environment. Pace was similar between the two walks. HRV was measured during sleep using a RR interval sensor (eMotion sensor and was assessed at 1–2 h after participants noted that they had fallen asleep. Markers for vagal activity were significantly greater after the walk in nature compared to the built walk. Lunchtime walks in nature-based environments may provide a greater restorative effect as shown by vagal activity than equivalent built walks. Nature walks may improve essential recovery during night-time sleep, potentially enhancing physiological health.

  18. Nighttime Aerosol Optical Thickness Retrievals Via the VIIRS Day/Night Band and the Effects of Lunar Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHardy, T. M.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Miller, S. D.; Hyer, E. J.; Kuehn, R.

    2015-12-01

    Using Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) data, a method for retrieving aerosol optical thickness (AOT) values at night via the examination of the dispersion of radiance values above an artificial light source ,dubbed the "variance method", is presented. Based on the improvement of a previous algorithm, this updated method derives a semi-quantitative indicator of nighttime AOT using artificial light sources. Nighttime DNB AOT retrievals from the variance method are compared with an AOT value from late afternoon and early morning ground observations from four AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sites as well as column integrated from one High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) site at Huntsville, AL during the NASA Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) campaign, providing full diel coverage. An emphasis is placed on sensitivity studies performed to examine the effects of lunar illumination on VIIRS DNB AOT retrievals made via the variance method. Although the small sample size of this study limits the conclusiveness thus far, investigation reveals that lunar contamination may have a smaller impact on VIIRS DNB AOT retrievals made using this method than previously thought. Preliminary results suggest that artificial light sources can be used for estimating regional and global nighttime aerosol distributions in the future.

  19. Nature connection, outdoor play, and environmental stewardship in residential environmental education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrejewski, Robert G.

    A lack of exposure to the natural world has led to a generation of children disconnected from nature. This phenomenon has profound negative implications for the physical and psychological well being of today's youth. Residential environmental education provides one avenue to connect children to nature. One purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Outdoor School, a residential environmental education program, on ecological knowledge, children's connection to nature, school belonging, outdoor play attitude, environmental stewardship attitude, outdoor play behavior, and environmental stewardship behavior, as reported by participants. A quasi-experimental research design was utilized in the study. A total of 228 fifth grade students (156 treatment, 72 control) from central Pennsylvania participated. The results of the program evaluation indicated that Outdoor School was successful in achieving significant, positive gains in the areas of ecological knowledge, connection to nature, outdoor play behavior, and environmental stewardship behavior. No change was found from pretest to post-test in outdoor play attitudes, environmental stewardship attitudes, and school belonging. Additionally, the study addressed gaps in the literature regarding the relationship between connection to nature, environmental stewardship, and outdoor play using two different approaches. An adaptation of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) was used to predict outdoor play behavior in children. In this model, favorable attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control lead to intentions to perform a given behavior. Intention to perform the behavior is the best predictor for behavior performance. For this study, participants' feeling of connection to nature was added as an affective independent variable. This model explained 45% of the variance in outdoor play. The hypothesis that a connection to nature would be a significant predictor of both attitudes toward outdoor play was

  20. Examination of the current practice of lighting in Virginia : nighttime work zones and improving safety through the development of nighttime lighting specifications : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This project evaluated current nighttime work zone lighting practices for limited-access highways and primary routes in Virginia through (1) an on-site evaluation of lighting levels in work zones; (2) an illuminance characterization of various commer...

  1. Delivering Formal Outdoor Learning in Protected Areas: A Case Study of Scottish Natural Heritage National Nature Reserves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    In most countries, protected area management agencies provide formal outdoor learning opportunities for a wide range of educational groups. For high-quality formal outdoor learning programmes that provide a range of experiences to be effectively delivered, specific resources and infrastructure are needed. Using the case study of Scottish Natural…

  2. Robust Crop and Weed Segmentation under Uncontrolled Outdoor Illumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Y. Jeon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An image processing algorithm for detecting individual weeds was developed and evaluated. Weed detection processes included were normalized excessive green conversion, statistical threshold value estimation, adaptive image segmentation, median filter, morphological feature calculation and Artificial Neural Network (ANN. The developed algorithm was validated for its ability to identify and detect weeds and crop plants under uncontrolled outdoor illuminations. A machine vision implementing field robot captured field images under outdoor illuminations and the image processing algorithm automatically processed them without manual adjustment. The errors of the algorithm, when processing 666 field images, ranged from 2.1 to 2.9%. The ANN correctly detected 72.6% of crop plants from the identified plants, and considered the rest as weeds. However, the ANN identification rates for crop plants were improved up to 95.1% by addressing the error sources in the algorithm. The developed weed detection and image processing algorithm provides a novel method to identify plants against soil background under the uncontrolled outdoor illuminations, and to differentiate weeds from crop plants. Thus, the proposed new machine vision and processing algorithm may be useful for outdoor applications including plant specific direct applications (PSDA.

  3. Emerging Environmental and Weather Challenges in Outdoor Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Brocherie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Given the climatic changes around the world and the growing outdoor sports participation, existing guidelines and recommendations for exercising in naturally challenging environments such as heat, cold or altitude, exhibit potential shortcomings. Continuous efforts from sport sciences and exercise physiology communities aim at minimizing the risks of environmental-related illnesses during outdoor sports practices. Despite this, the use of simple weather indices does not permit an accurate estimation of the likelihood of facing thermal illnesses. This provides a critical foundation to modify available human comfort modeling and to integrate bio-meteorological data in order to improve the current guidelines. Although it requires further refinement, there is no doubt that standardizing the recently developed Universal Thermal Climate Index approach and its application in the field of sport sciences and exercise physiology may help to improve the appropriateness of the current guidelines for outdoor, recreational and competitive sports participation. This review first summarizes the main environmental-related risk factors that are susceptible to increase with recent climate changes when exercising outside and offers recommendations to combat them appropriately. Secondly, we briefly address the recent development of thermal stress models to assess the thermal comfort and physiological responses when practicing outdoor activities in challenging environments.

  4. Basic illustrated knots for the outdoors

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobson, Cliff

    2008-01-01

    Cliff Jacobson is one of North America's most respected outdoors writers and wilderness canoe guides. His experiences as a professional outfitter and canoeing consultant have resulted in more than a dozen top-selling books on camping, canoeing, navigation, and outdoor skills.

  5. Lyme Disease: A Challenge for Outdoor Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcombe, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Describes signs and symptoms of Lyme disease; life cycle and feeding habits of the deer tick (Ixodes dammini), which transmits the spirochete bacterium; tick control measures; outdoor precautions; and veterinary considerations. Discusses the disease's potential impact on outdoor education, and suggests a reasoned, nonhysterical approach. Contains…

  6. Teaching STEM Outdoors: Activities for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selly, Patty Born

    2017-01-01

    Nurture young children's innate tendencies toward exploration, sensory stimulation, and STEM learning when you connect outdoor learning with STEM curriculum. Discover the developmental benefits of outdoor learning and how the rich diversity of settings and materials in nature gives rise to questions and inquiry for deeper learning. Full of…

  7. Outdoor Furniture, Artwork, Fences, and Play Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark T. Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Wood exposed outdoors can last for centuries. What kind of wood you choose and how you protect it can make a big difference in how long the wood lasts. Two conditions influence the service life of outdoor wood: weathering and decay.

  8. New Hampshire - an outdoor recreation trend leader

    Science.gov (United States)

    George T. Hamilton

    1980-01-01

    It seems appropriate (at least to me) that a national symposium focusing on trends in outdoor recreation be held in the Granite State; a state which has played historically a role in the evolution of a variety of recreation activities far out of proportion to its size and population. After all, outdoor recreation is more than 150 years old here in New Hampshire.

  9. A National Standard for Outdoor Leadership Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockrell, David; LaFollette, Jude

    1985-01-01

    As the number of outdoor and adventure organizations using wild lands increases, certification of outdoor leaders is perhaps one technique to increase awareness of potential wilderness hazards and to minimize damage to wilderness areas. The Wilderness Education Association's certification is described. (MT)

  10. United States of America: outdoor recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.Ken Cordell; G.Theodore Green; V.R. Leeworthy; R. Stephens; M.J. Fly; Carter J. Betz

    2005-01-01

    the first nationwide survey of outdoor recreation in the USA was conducted in 1960 for the outdoor recreation resources review commission (ORRC, 1962; Cordell et al., 1996). since that time, seven additional national surveys have been conducted, in 1965, 1970, 1972, 1977, 1983, 1995, and 2000/01 - summary details are presented in Table 16.1.

  11. UNBC: Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Pat

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the University of Northern British Columbia's (UNBC's) Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management (ORTM) Program, which focuses squarely on the management of outdoor recreation as it relates to conservation (i.e., in and around parks and protected areas), tourism that is both based in and concerned with the natural/cultural…

  12. Rugged Practices: Embodying Authenticity in Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda-Cook, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    When people recreate outdoors, they value the quality of the experience. This study examines rhetorical practices that sustain or undermine perceived authentic outdoor recreation experiences. I conducted a rhetorical analysis of my fieldnotes gathered through participant observation and interview transcripts of online and in-person interviews. I…

  13. Subject related teaching in udeskole (outdoor school)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Karen Seierøe

    ’ in Teaching mother tongue in the outdoors, to read and teach literature on places in secondary and high school (Eggersen, 2016). Secondly, Art and aesthetics learning in the outdoors, how can place based art and relational aesthetics as selected artistic practices be an inspiration and a role model...

  14. Canopy uptake dominates nighttime carbonyl sulfide fluxes in a boreal forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijmans, Linda MJ; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Seibt, Ulli; Sun, Wu; Vesala, Timo; Mammarella, Ivan; Kolari, Pasi; Aalto, Juho; Franchin, Alessandro; Vecchi, Roberta; Valli, Gianluigi; Chen, Huilin

    2017-01-01

    Nighttime vegetative uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS) can exist due to the incomplete closure of stomata and the light independence of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase, which complicates the use of COS as a tracer for gross primary productivity (GPP). In this study we derived night-time COS fluxes in a

  15. Nighttime radiative cooling potential of unglazed and PV/T solar collectors: parametric and experimental analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pean, Thibault Quentin; Gennari, Luca; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2015-01-01

    Nighttime radiative cooling technology has been studied both by means of simulations and experiments, to evaluate its potential and to validate the existing theoretical models used to describe it. Photovoltaic/thermal panels (PV/T) and unglazed solar collectors have been chosen as case studies....... The obtained values showed a good agreement with the ones found in the literature about solar panels or other kinds of heat sinks used for radiative cooling applications. The panels provided a cooling performance per night ranging between 0.2 and 0.9 kWh/m2 of panel. The COP values (defined as the ratio....... An experimental setup has been constructed and tested during summer of 2014, at the Technical University of Denmark. The cooling performance (heat loss) has been measured simultaneously for both types of panels, installed side-by-side. The experimental results have been compared with the results from a commercial...

  16. Determinants of cortisol awakening responses to naps and nighttime sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Jaime K; Wolf, Jutta M

    2016-01-01

    The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is a phenomenon describing the sharp increase in basal cortisol levels shortly after waking from sleep. While extensively studied, little is known about the role of sleep architecture contributing to CAR. Furthermore, the potential for CAR after a shorter bout of sleep--a nap--has not been directly investigated. The current studies thus aimed at assessed sleep duration, time of day, and sleep architecture as potential determinants of the cortisol awakening response. Saliva samples were collected during the first hour (0, 30, 45, 60 min) following several EEG-monitored laboratory sleep conditions. Those included afternoon naps wherein 17 participants (4 men; ages 18-26) napped for 50 min and 24 participants (11 men; ages 18-24) napped for 90 min. Furthermore, 20 participants (10 men; ages 18-35) visited the lab twice and in addition to staying overnight, napped 90 min in the morning either under placebo conditions or pharmacologically-manipulated sleep conditions (5mg Zolpidem). Cortisol increases were observed in response to each sleep condition except to 50-min afternoon naps. Furthermore, CARs were predicted by Stage 2 sleep when following nighttime sleep (r=.46, p=.04) and by Stage 1 sleep when following placebo morning naps (r=.54, p=.01). The current study established cortisol awakening responses to naps and implicates sleep duration and architecture in the generation of CAR to both napping and nighttime sleep. Assessing CAR in conjunction with the specific type of sleep may thus contribute to our understanding of mechanisms underlying positive and negative health effects of napping. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. When Thinking Impairs Sleep: Trait, Daytime and Nighttime Repetitive Thinking in Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancee, Jaap; Eisma, Maarten C; van Zanten, Kristopher B; Topper, Maurice

    2017-01-01

    We performed two studies in individuals with sleep problems to investigate trait, daytime, and nighttime repetitive thinking as risk factors for insomnia. In Study 1, 139 participants completed questionnaires on worry, rumination, insomnia, anxiety, depression, and a sleep diary. Trait rumination and trait worry were not associated with sleep impairment. In Study 2, 64 participants completed similar measures and a daytime and nighttime sleep-related worry diary. Only nighttime sleep-related worry was consistently associated with sleep impairment. Overall, results indicate that nighttime sleep-related worry is important in the maintenance of insomnia, whereas effects of trait and daytime repetitive thinking are more benign. Treatment for insomnia can potentially be improved by focusing more on nighttime sleep-related worry.

  18. Reducing the ecological consequences of night-time light pollution: options and developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Kevin J; Davies, Thomas W; Bennie, Jonathan; Hopkins, John

    2012-12-01

    1. Much concern has been expressed about the ecological consequences of night-time light pollution. This concern is most often focused on the encroachment of artificial light into previously unlit areas of the night-time environment, but changes in the spectral composition, duration and spatial pattern of light are also recognized as having ecological effects.2. Here, we examine the potential consequences for organisms of five management options to reduce night-time light pollution. These are to (i) prevent areas from being artificially lit; (ii) limit the duration of lighting; (iii) reduce the 'trespass' of lighting into areas that are not intended to be lit (including the night sky); (iv) change the intensity of lighting; and (v) change the spectral composition of lighting.3. Maintaining and increasing natural unlit areas is likely to be the most effective option for reducing the ecological effects of lighting. However, this will often conflict with other social and economic objectives. Decreasing the duration of lighting will reduce energy costs and carbon emissions, but is unlikely to alleviate many impacts on nocturnal and crepuscular animals, as peak times of demand for lighting frequently coincide with those in the activities of these species. Reducing the trespass of lighting will maintain heterogeneity even in otherwise well-lit areas, providing dark refuges that mobile animals can exploit. Decreasing the intensity of lighting will reduce energy consumption and limit both skyglow and the area impacted by high-intensity direct light. Shifts towards 'whiter' light are likely to increase the potential range of environmental impacts as light is emitted across a broader range of wavelengths.4.Synthesis and applications. The artificial lightscape will change considerably over coming decades with the drive for more cost-effective low-carbon street lighting solutions and growth in the artificially lit area. Developing lighting strategies that minimize adverse

  19. Nighttime Environmental Products from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite: Science Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, M. O.; Wang, Z.; Kalb, V.; Cole, T.; Oda, T.; Stokes, E.; Molthan, A.

    2016-12-01

    A new generation of satellite instruments, represented by the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (Suomi-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), offer global measurements of nocturnal visible and near-infrared light suitable for urban science research. While many promising urban-focused applications have been developed using nighttime satellite imagery in the past 25 years, most studies to-date have been limited by the quality of the captured imagery and the retrieval methods used in heritage (DMSP/OLS) products. Instead, science-quality products that are temporally consistent, global in extent, and local in resolution were needed to monitor human settlements worldwide —particularly for studies within dense urban areas. Since the first-light images from the VIIRS were received in January 2012, the NASA Land Science Investigator-led Processing System (Land SIPS) team has worked on maximizing the capabilities of these low-light measurements to generate a wealth of new information useful for understanding urbanization processes, urban functions, and the vulnerability of urban areas to climate hazards. In a recent case study, our team demonstrated that tracking daily dynamic VIIRS nighttime measurements can provide valuable information about the character of the human activities and behaviors that shape energy consumption and vulnerability (Roman and Stokes, 2015). Moving beyond mapping the physical qualities of urban areas (e.g. land cover and impervious area), VIIRS measurements provide insight into the social, economic, and cultural activities that shape energy and infrastructure use. Furthermore, as this time series expands and is merged with other sources of optical remote sensing data (e.g., Landsat-8 and Sentinel 2), VIIRS has the potential to increase our understanding of changes in urban form, structure, and infrastructure—factors that may also influence urban resilience—and how the increasing frequency and severity of climate

  20. Indoor/outdoor relationships and diurnal/nocturnal variations in water-soluble ion and PAH concentrations in the atmospheric PM2.5 of a business office area in Jinan, a heavily polluted city in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanhong; Yang, Lingxiao; Meng, Chuanping; Yuan, Qi; Yan, Chao; Dong, Can; Sui, Xiao; Yao, Lan; Yang, Fei; Lu, Yaling; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-02-01

    Indoor/outdoor and diurnal/nocturnal variations in PM2.5 and associated water-soluble ions and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were examined in a business office during the summer and autumn of 2010 in Jinan, China. Both indoor and outdoor PM2.5 levels were higher than the value recommended by the WHO, and outdoor sources were found to be the major contributors to indoor PM2.5. SO42-, NO3- and NH4+ were the dominant water-soluble ions in both indoor and outdoor particles. During daytime, NO3- mainly came from indoor sources, which was related to the temperature difference between the indoor and outdoor air. During daytime, the 15 monitored PAHs were all largely from indoor sources, while during nighttime, the 3 -4-ring PAHs were mainly generated indoors and the 5-6-ring PAHs predominantly came from the outdoor air. The diurnal/nocturnal variations of PAHs suggested that gas/particle partitioning driven by temperature makes a significant contribution to the variation in PAH concentrations. The diagnostic ratios revealed that biomass burning had an important contribution to outdoor PAH concentrations in autumn. The results of a risk assessment of PAH pollution suggested that indoor PAHs present more carcinogenic and mutagenic risks during daytime. Our results indicated that serious indoor air pollution in a business office presents a high health risk for workers.

  1. Nighttime Foreground Pedestrian Detection Based on Three-Dimensional Voxel Surface Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Fangbing; Wei, Lisong; Yang, Tao; Lu, Zhaoyang

    2017-10-16

    Pedestrian detection is among the most frequently-used preprocessing tasks in many surveillance application fields, from low-level people counting to high-level scene understanding. Even though many approaches perform well in the daytime with sufficient illumination, pedestrian detection at night is still a critical and challenging problem for video surveillance systems. To respond to this need, in this paper, we provide an affordable solution with a near-infrared stereo network camera, as well as a novel three-dimensional foreground pedestrian detection model. Specifically, instead of using an expensive thermal camera, we build a near-infrared stereo vision system with two calibrated network cameras and near-infrared lamps. The core of the system is a novel voxel surface model, which is able to estimate the dynamic changes of three-dimensional geometric information of the surveillance scene and to segment and locate foreground pedestrians in real time. A free update policy for unknown points is designed for model updating, and the extracted shadow of the pedestrian is adopted to remove foreground false alarms. To evaluate the performance of the proposed model, the system is deployed in several nighttime surveillance scenes. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is capable of nighttime pedestrian segmentation and detection in real time under heavy occlusion. In addition, the qualitative and quantitative comparison results show that our work outperforms classical background subtraction approaches and a recent RGB-D method, as well as achieving comparable performance with the state-of-the-art deep learning pedestrian detection method even with a much lower hardware cost.

  2. Nighttime Foreground Pedestrian Detection Based on Three-Dimensional Voxel Surface Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrian detection is among the most frequently-used preprocessing tasks in many surveillance application fields, from low-level people counting to high-level scene understanding. Even though many approaches perform well in the daytime with sufficient illumination, pedestrian detection at night is still a critical and challenging problem for video surveillance systems. To respond to this need, in this paper, we provide an affordable solution with a near-infrared stereo network camera, as well as a novel three-dimensional foreground pedestrian detection model. Specifically, instead of using an expensive thermal camera, we build a near-infrared stereo vision system with two calibrated network cameras and near-infrared lamps. The core of the system is a novel voxel surface model, which is able to estimate the dynamic changes of three-dimensional geometric information of the surveillance scene and to segment and locate foreground pedestrians in real time. A free update policy for unknown points is designed for model updating, and the extracted shadow of the pedestrian is adopted to remove foreground false alarms. To evaluate the performance of the proposed model, the system is deployed in several nighttime surveillance scenes. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is capable of nighttime pedestrian segmentation and detection in real time under heavy occlusion. In addition, the qualitative and quantitative comparison results show that our work outperforms classical background subtraction approaches and a recent RGB-D method, as well as achieving comparable performance with the state-of-the-art deep learning pedestrian detection method even with a much lower hardware cost.

  3. Meta-analysis of timolol on diurnal and nighttime intraocular pressure and blood pressure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Princeton Wen-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the nighttime intraocular pressure (IOP) and blood pressure (BP) response to timolol treatment in patients with ocular hypertension or primary open-angle glaucoma. METHODS: This was a meta-analysis of previously published studies that must have been randomized, prospective, crossover or parallel, single or double-masked trials. The treatment period must have been >\\/=2 weeks with >\\/=19 patients per treatment arm for a crossover, and >\\/=50 patients for a parallel designed trial. Studies must have included both baseline and treated 24-hour curves. RESULTS: For the IOP analysis, we included 8 articles with 340 patients. A reduction from baseline was observed for timolol at each time point and for the 24-hour curve (p<\\/=0.009). When 2 studies, in which timolol was used adjunctively, were removed, a similar difference was observed as above at each time point and for the 24-hour curve (p<\\/=0.003). In 2 studies, there were small reductions from baseline for the mean diastolic and systolic BPs at most time points and for the 24-hour curve (3.9 and 4.2 mmHg, respectively) with timolol treatment. The ocular perfusion pressure did not show any difference between baseline and timolol treatment at any time point or for the 24-hour curve (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis suggests that topical timolol therapy provides an ocular hypotensive effect over the 24-hour curve, including the nighttime hours, and while small reductions in the systolic and diastolic pressures occur, the ocular perfusion pressure is not altered over 24 hours.

  4. Culm Age and Rhizome Affects Night-Time Water Recharge in the Bamboo Phyllostachys pubescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiuhua; Zhao, Ping; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Zhu, Liwei; Hu, Yanting; Ouyang, Lei; Ni, Guangyan; Ye, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Bamboo species-the only herbaceous trees-have unique structural and physiological characteristics that differ from those of other tree taxa. However, the role of night-time water use in bamboo is poorly understood and has rarely been investigated. We studied the day- and night-time sap flow response to culm age and rhizome structure in three age levels (juvenile, mature, and senescent) of Phyllostachys pubescens growing in the Nankun Mountain Natural Reserve, South China. We found that sap flow density and whole-tree hydraulic conductance decreased with culm age. After cutting of rhizome, the day-time sap flow and night-time water recharge decreased obviously. In addition, night-time water recharge accounted for the largest proportion (up to 30%) of total daily transpiration in normal senescent bamboos. Therefore, our study indicates that the connected rhizome system and night-time water recharge played a significant role in water compensation during the day and at night in bamboos. Night-time water recharge is especially critical to senescent bamboos, given their weaker transpiration due to the lower whole-tree hydraulic conductance, and consequently, they are more dependent on night-time water recharge for fulfilling their whole-day water consumption needs.

  5. [Solar ultraviolet radiation risk in outdoor workers: a specific project of Tuscany Region (Italy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miligi, Lucia; Benvenuti, Alessandra; Legittimo, Patrizia; Badiali, Anna Maria; Cacciarini, Valentina; Chiarugi, Alessandra; Crocetti, Emanuele; Alberghini Maltoni, Simona; Pinto, Iole; Zipoli, Gaetano; Grifoni, Daniele; Carnevale, Francesco; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Cherubini Di Simplicio, Francesca; Poggiali, Sara; Sartorelli, Pietro; Sirna, Riccardo; Amati, Rodolfo; Centi, Letizia; Festa, Gianluca; Fiumalbi, Carla; Fedi, Aldo; Giglioli, Senio; Mancini, Rossana; Panzone, Tina; Petrioli, Giuseppe; Trombetti, Alessandra; Volpi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    The aims of Tuscany Regional project were: to study the sun protection attitude of outdoor workers; to measure solar ultraviolet (UV) exposure in work environment; to describe the frequency of photoaging, precancerous lesions, and skin cancers in outdoor workers; to collect information on solar ultraviolet radiation exposure from incident cases of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer (NMSC) recruited from Tuscany Cancer Registry. Outdoor workers completed a questionnaire devoted to collect information on sun protection attitudes during a typical summer working week. Environmental and personal measurements were carried out. Expert dermatologists examined outdoor workers to assess the frequency of photoaging, precancerous lesions, and skin cancer. A structured questionnaire was mailed to incident cases of NMSC. Information were collected on personal habits and working history, focusing on solar ultraviolet radiation exposure. Agriculture, construction, quarrying and fishing activities were considered: 292 employees responded to questions about the type of clothing used in the morning and in the afternoon,while working outdoors; 637 outdoor workers underwent skin examination. We contacted 743 cases of NMSC occurred in 2004; 498 subjects accepted to participate in this study. The clothing worn by surveyed subjects was often inadequate compared to the high level of exposure to UV. The skin examination of 637 outdoor workers highlighted 2 melanomas, 7 epitheliomas and 35 actinic keratoses. Among the 498 cases of NMSC, 135 (27%) were diagnosed in outdoor workers. Most represented economic activity sectors were: agriculture, construction, transport, sports. The characterization of outside workers revealed unsatisfactory sun protection behaviours. Moreover, previously undetected skin cancers were diagnosed. The study on MNSC confirms the complexity of studying the exposure to UV radiation. The Tuscany Regional project provided useful information on the risk of solar ultraviolet

  6. Investigation of time-resolved atmospheric conditions and indoor/outdoor particulate matter concentrations in homes with gas and biomass cook stoves in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Heather A; Pardyjak, Eric R

    2014-07-01

    This paper reports findings from a case study designed to investigate indoor and outdoor air quality in homes near the United States-Mexico border During the field study, size-resolved continuous particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured in six homes, while outdoor PM was simultaneously monitored at the same location in Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, during March 14-30, 2009. The purpose of the experiment was to compare PM in homes using different fuels for cooking, gas versus biomass, and to obtain a spatial distribution of outdoor PM in a region where local sources vary significantly (e.g., highway, border crossing, unpaved roads, industry). Continuous PM data were collected every 6 seconds using a valve switching system to sample indoor and outdoor air at each home location. This paper presents the indoor PM data from each home, including the relationship between indoor and outdoor PM. The meteorological conditions associated with elevated ambient PM events in the region are also discussed. Results indicate that indoor air pollution has a strong dependence on cooking fuel, with gas stoves having hourly averaged median PM3 concentrations in the range of 134 to 157 microg m(-3) and biomass stoves 163 to 504 microg m(-1). Outdoor PM also indicates a large spatial heterogeneity due to the presence of microscale sources and meteorological influences (median PM3: 130 to 770 microg m(-3)). The former is evident in the median and range of daytime PM values (median PM3: 250 microg m(-3), maximum: 9411 microg m(-3)), while the meteorological influences appear to be dominant during nighttime periods (median PM3: 251 microg m(-3), maximum: 10,846 microg m(-3)). The atmospheric stability is quantified for three nighttime temperature inversion episodes, which were associated with an order of magnitude increase in PM10 at the regulatory monitor in Nogales, AZ (maximum increase: 12 to 474 microg m(-3)). Implications: Regulatory air quality standards are based on outdoor

  7. Effective, Exemplary, Extraordinary? Towards an Understanding of "Extraordinary" Outdoor Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Heidi; Penney, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    The outdoor education literature commonly discusses what it means to be an effective outdoor leader and judgements about the effectiveness or quality of outdoor leadership and leaders are an everyday occurrence in outdoor leaders' professional lives. The basis upon which qualitative judgements are made about leaders and/or leadership and the…

  8. Context-specific outdoor time and physical activity among school-children across gender and age: Using accelerometers and GPS to advance methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Demant Klinker

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Being outdoors has a positive influence on health among children. Evidence in this area is limited and many studies have used self-reported measures. Objective context-specific assessment of physical activity patterns and correlates, such as outdoor time, may progress this field.Aims: To employ novel objective measures to assess age and gender differences in context-specific outdoor weekday behavior patterns among school-children (outdoor time and outdoor MVPA and to investigate associations between context-specific outdoor time and MVPA.Methods: A total of 170 children had at least one weekday of nine hours combined accelerometer and GPS data and were included in the analyses. The data were processed using the Personal Activity and Location Measurement System and a purpose-built PostgreSQL database resulting in context-specific measures for outdoor time, outdoor MVPA and overall daily MVPA. In addition, four domains (leisure, school, transport and home and 11 subdomains (e.g. urban green space, sports facilities were created and assessed. Multilevel analyses provided results on age and gender differences and the association between outdoor time and MVPA.Results: Girls compared to boys had fewer outdoors minutes (pConclusion:A new methodology to assess context-specific outdoor time and physical activity patterns has been developed and can be expanded to other populations. Different context-specific patterns were found for gender and age, suggesting different strategies may be needed to promote physical activity

  9. Outdoor Air Pollution, Heart Attack and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated outdoor ambient air particle pollution triggers heart attacks, strokes, and abnormal heart rhythms and worsens heart failure in individuals at high risk due to underlying medical conditions. Emergency Medical Services in communities are the first responders to these eme...

  10. 78 FR 33955 - Great Outdoors Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    .... And through the 21st Century Conservation Service Corps, young men and women will get hands-on... on earth. For centuries, America's great outdoors have given definition to our national character and...

  11. Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weekend Warriors expand/collapse Vitamin D Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter Winter sports enthusiasts are ... skiing! Be Mindful of Time Spent in the Sun, Regardless of the Season If possible, ski early ...

  12. 75 FR 32077 - Great Outdoors Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... countless opportunities for exploration, recreation, and reflection, whether in solitude or with family and... Americans to explore the great outdoors and to continue our Nation's tradition of conserving our lands for...

  13. The little book of maths outdoors

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Terry

    2013-01-01

    This is a unique book that supports the current thinking behind outdoor learning. It features over 40 ideas for outdoor activities that support mathematics in the early years and the specific areas of learning in the revised EYFS. All the ideas are tried and tested by Terry and this book will prove to be popular in the early years and well into Key stage 1.

  14. Self-focused thinking predicts nighttime physiological de-arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Keisuke; Ueno, Mayumi; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2014-03-01

    Excessive focus on the internal self has maladaptive consequences for mental and physical health. Although the emotional functions of self-focus have been well established, no study has examined physiological arousal during the daily experience of self-focused thinking. The present study investigates the association between self-focus and autonomic activity using the experience sampling method with ambulatory monitoring of heart rate variability (HRV). Forty-five students reported the content of their thoughts during their daily activities while their heart rate (HR) was being recorded. Multilevel modeling analyses showed that HRV was lower (and HR was higher) over the sampling day if participants engaged in more self-focus, while HRV increased (and HR decreased) from midday to nighttime if participants did not engage in self-focused thinking. These results suggest that self-focus at night is associated with increased physiological arousal, and leads to inhibition of de-arousal associated with normal sleep processes. Implications for insomnia are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Contribution of Outdoor Recreation and Outdoor Education to the Economy of Scotland: Case Studies and Preliminary Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Outdoor recreation and education contribute substantially to the Scottish economy. Outdoor recreation generates considerable tourism income, much of it in rural areas, and also extends the traditional tourist season. Outdoor education centers are significant employers in certain rural areas. In addition, "therapeutic" outdoor programs…

  16. Outdoor thermal comfort and behaviour in urban area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inavonna, I.; Hardiman, G.; Purnomo, A. B.

    2018-01-01

    Outdoor comfort is important due to the public spaces functions. Open spaces provide thermal comfort and a pleasant experience to improve the city life quality effectively. The influence of thermal comfort in outdoor activities is a complex problem. This paper presents a literature review and discussion of aspects of physical, psychology, and social behaviour toward outdoor thermal comfort. The valuation is determined not only by the “physical state” but also by the “state of mind”. The assessment is static and objective (i.e., physical and physiological characteristics) that it should be measured. Furthermore, an effective model to provide the knowledge of climatic conditions, as well as the dynamic and subjective aspects (i.e., psychological and social characteristics and behaviour), requires a comprehensive interview and observation. The model will be examined to describe the behaviour that is a reflection of perception and behaviour toward the environment. The adaptation process will constantly evolve so that it becomes a continuous cause between human behaviour and the spatial setting of the formation, which is eventually known as places and not just spaces. This evolutionary process is a civic art form.

  17. Screening the working environment in outdoor pig systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Q; Torén, A; Salomon, E

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated how well organic growing-fattening pig systems provided a safe and healthy working environment and identified areas where improvements are needed. The study formed part of a larger project aimed at identifying strategies for creating a good animal and working environment and resource-efficient nutrient management in outdoor pig systems. Field studies were carried out at six Swedish farms in two types of outdoor pig systems (mobile and stationary). A method known as WEST (Work Environment Screening Tool) and a modified version of WEST, called WEST-agriculture (WEST-AG), were utilized for screening. Together, the two methods covered six factors of the working environment. The results were expressed in WEST-AG points and WEST points, an economic measure of the risk of impacts on health and productivity expressed as Swedish Krona (SEK) per thousand working hours. The results demonstrated that the risk of injury and ergonomic load during manual feeding and watering was much higher than during semi-automatic feeding and watering at farms with the mobile system. The study also identified other health-risk areas and provided valuable information for further improvement of the working environment in different outdoor pig systems.

  18. Reducing ultraviolet radiation exposure among outdoor workers: State of the evidence and recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buller David B

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Outdoor workers have high levels of exposure to ultraviolet radiation and the associated increased risk of skin cancer. This paper describes a review of: 1 descriptive data about outdoor workers' sun exposure and protection and related knowledge, attitudes, and policies and 2 evidence about the effectiveness of skin cancer prevention interventions in outdoor workplaces. Data sources Systematic evidence-based review. Data synthesis We found variable preventive practices, with men more likely to wear hats and protective clothing and women more likely to use sunscreen. Few data document education and prevention policies. Conclusion Reports of interventions to promote sun-safe practices and environments provide encouraging results, but yield insufficient evidence to recommend current strategies as effective. Additional efforts should focus on increasing sun protection policies and education programs in workplaces and evaluating whether they improve the health behavior of outdoor workers.

  19. 0-6781 : improved nighttime work zone channelization in confined urban projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Turning into and out of driveways in confined or : dense urban work zones can present significant : challenges to drivers, especially during nighttime : conditions when other visual cues about the : driveways may be masked in the dark. These : challe...

  20. The relation between residential property and its surroundings and day- and night-time residential burglary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montoya, Lorena; Junger, Marianne; Ongena, Yfke

    This article examines how residential property and its surroundings influence day- and night-time residential burglary. Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles of territoriality, surveillance, access control, target hardening, image maintenance, and activity support underpin

  1. Nighttime feeding likely alters morning metabolism but not exercise performance in female athletes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miller, Elizabeth A; Ormsbee, Michael J; Panton, Lynn B; Eckel, Lisa A; Gorman, Katherine A; Baur, Daniel A; Contreras, Robert J; Spicer, Maria T

    2016-01-01

    .... A nighttime, pre-sleep nutritional strategy could be an alternative method to target the metabolic and hydrating needs of the early morning athlete without compromising sleep or gastrointestinal comfort during exercise...

  2. Behavioral changes in female Asian elephants when given access to an outdoor yard overnight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, David M; Vitale, Cathy

    2016-07-01

    A study was conducted at the Bronx Zoo to determine whether providing elephants with access to an outdoor corral at night had any significant effects on behavior, use of space, and use of a sand corral. Activity budgets for three female Asian elephants were compared when the subjects were housed indoors overnight and when they were given access to an outdoor yard overnight. Observations were recorded via infrared video cameras between the hours of 1900 and 0700 during the months of July-September. Two of the three elephants showed a significant preference for spending time outdoors, whereas, the third elephant spent most of her time indoors. Standing and play behavior increased when the elephants had outdoor access while lying down and feeding behavior decreased. Swaying behavior decreased significantly when the elephants had access to the outdoor yard. The elephants made very little use of a sand-floor stall regardless of whether or not they had access to outdoors. The results of this study, suggest that having access to alternate areas overnight can promote well-being by reducing repetitive behavior and allowing animals to express their preferences for different locations. The relative importance of choice alone vs. the behavioral opportunities provided by choice options for zoo animals is discussed. Zoo Biol. 35:298-303, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effects of Nighttime Light Radiance on the Sleep of the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohayon, Maurice M.; Milesi, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study is to verify if the exposure to greater nighttime radiance is associated with changes in the sleep/wake schedule and with greater sleep disturbances. Methods: The target population was the adults (18 years and older) living in California, USA. This represents 24 million of inhabitants. A total of 3,104 subjects participated in the survey (participation rate 85.6%). The participants were interviewed by telephone using the Sleep-EVAL system. The interviews covered several topics including sleeping habits, sleep quality, sleep disturbances, physical symptoms related to menopause. Chronic insomnia was defined as difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep for at least 3 months. Global nighttime light emissions have been collected by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) sensors. We extracted the radiance calibrated nighttime lights corresponding to the date of the interviews for a three by three window centered on each coordinate corresponding to an interview address. Results: Dissatisfaction with sleep quantity and/or quality was associated with an increased nighttime radiance (p=0.02). Similarly, excessive sleepiness accompanied with impaired functioning was significantly associated with an increased nighttime radiance (p (is) less than 0.0001). The association remained significant after controlling for age, gender and use of a night lamp in the bedroom. Confusional arousals were also significantly associated with an increased nighttime radiance (p (is) less than 0.0001). Bedtime hour was linearly increasing with the intensity of nighttime radiance: the later the bedtime, the greater the nighttime radiance (p (is) less than 0.0001). Similarly, wakeup time became progressively later as the nighttime radiance increased (p (is) less than 0.0001). Both associations remained significant after controlling for age, gender and use of a night lamp in the bedroom. Circadian Rhythm Disorders were the

  4. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming

    OpenAIRE

    Xiumin Yan; Kehong Wang; Lihong Song; Xuefeng Wang; Donghui Wu

    2017-01-01

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatmen...

  5. Characteristics of the nighttime hospital bedside care environment (sound, light, and temperature) for children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Lauri A; Christian, Becky J

    2011-01-01

    Children with cancer must cope not only with their disease and its treatment but also with the environment in which treatment is given. The intensities of sound and light levels required to perform necessary patient care may result in a disruptive nighttime care environment. The purpose of this study was to describe nighttime patterns of environmental factors, sound, light, and temperature levels, at the bedside of children with cancer receiving inpatient chemotherapy. Participants were 15 school-aged children receiving chemotherapy on an inpatient pediatric oncology unit. Sound, light, and temperature in the child's room were measured continuously using a digital-sound pressure-level meter and an external channel data logger. Mean nighttime sound levels were 49.5 (SD, 3.1) dB (range, 34.6-84.8 dB). Sound and light intensities were greatest early in the shift and decreased through the night. A basic mixed linear model identified significant main effects of time of night for both sound (F=50.42, Penvironment with persistently elevated sound levels and abrupt increases in sound intensity throughout the night. Such a disruptive nighttime environment is not conducive to restful nighttime sleep and may serve as an additional source of physiological and psychological stress for hospitalized children with cancer. Efforts are needed to identify modifiable sources of nighttime sound and develop interventions to reduce nighttime sound. Collaborative efforts to organize clinical care to minimize nighttime disruptions may lead to reduced bedside sound levels. © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  6. Impact of Air Distribution on Heat Transfer during Night-Time Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Artmann, Nikolai; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2009-01-01

    Passive cooling by night-time ventilation is seen as a promising approach for energy efficient cooling of buildings. However, uncertainties in prediction of cooling potential and consequenses for thermal comfort restrain architects and engineers from applying this technique. Heat transfer...... ventilation becomes most efficient. A design chart to estimate the performance of night-time cooling during an early stage of building design is proposed....

  7. Efficacy of nighttime brace in preventing progression of idiopathic scoliosis of less than 25°.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateur, G; Grobost, P; Gerbelot, J; Eid, A; Griffet, J; Courvoisier, A

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess, at skeletal maturity, the efficacy of non-operative treatment by isolated nighttime brace in the prevention of progression of progressive idiopathic scoliosis of less than 25°. Isolated nighttime brace treatment is effective in the prevention of progression of mild progressive idiopathic scoliosis (Cobbscoliosis with Cobb anglescoliosis (scoliosis, ensuring a safe curve of around 20°. Level IV, retrospective study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Patterns of GPS measured time outdoors after school and objective physical activity in English children: the PEACH project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ashley R; Page, Angie S; Wheeler, Benedict W; Hillsdon, Melvyn; Griew, Pippa; Jago, Russell

    2010-04-22

    Observational studies have shown a positive association between time outdoors and physical activity in children. Time outdoors may be a feasible intervention target to increase the physical activity of youth, but methods are required to accurately measure time spent outdoors in a range of locations and over a sustained period. The Global Positioning System (GPS) provides precise location data and can be used to identify when an individual is outdoors. The aim of this study was to investigate whether GPS data recorded outdoors were associated with objectively measured physical activity. Participants were 1010 children (11.0 +/- 0.4 years) recruited from 23 urban primary schools in South West England, measured between September 2006 and July 2008. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry (Actigraph GT1M) and children wore a GPS receiver (Garmin Foretrex 201) after school on four weekdays to record time outdoors. Accelerometer and GPS data were recorded at 10 second epochs and were combined to describe patterns of physical activity when both a GPS and accelerometer record were present (outdoors) and when there was accelerometer data only (indoors). ANOVA was used to investigate gender and seasonal differences in the patterns of outdoor and indoor physical activity, and linear regression was used to examine the cross-sectional associations between GPS-measured time outdoors and physical activity. GPS-measured time outdoors was a significant independent predictor of children's physical activity after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Physical activity was more than 2.5 fold higher outdoors than indoors (1345.8 +/- 907.3 vs 508.9 +/- 282.9 counts per minute; F = 783.2, p < .001). Overall, children recorded 41.7 +/- 46.1 minutes outdoors between 3.30 pm and 8.30 pm, with more time spent outdoors in the summer months (p < .001). There was no gender difference in time spent outdoors. Physical activity outdoors was higher in the summer than the winter (p

  9. Improved sapflow methodology reveals considerable night-time ozone uptake by Mediterranean species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mereu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the evident tropospheric ozone impact on plant productivity, an accurate ozone risk assessment for the vegetation has become an issue. There is a growing evidence that ozone stomatal uptake may also take place at night and that the night-time uptake may be more damaging than diurnal uptake. Estimation of night-time uptake in the field is complicated because of instrumental difficulties. Eddy covariance technology is not always reliable because of the low turbulence at night. Leaf level porometry is defective at relative humidity above 70% which often takes place at night. Improved sap flow technology allows to estimate also slow flows that usually take place at night and hence may be, at present, the most trustworthy technology to measure night-time transpiration and hence to derive canopy stomatal conductance and ozone uptake at night. Based on micrometeorological data and the sap flow of three Mediterranean woody species, the night-time ozone uptake of these species was evaluated during a summer season as drought increased. Night-time ozone uptake was from 10% to 18% of the total daily uptake when plants were exposed to a weak drought, but increased up to 24% as the drought became more pronounced. The percentage increase is due to a stronger reduction of diurnal stomatal conductance than night-time stomatal conductance.

  10. Prevalence of night-time dyspnoea in COPD and its implications for prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Marott, Jacob Louis; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    The information on night-time symptoms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is sparse. We investigated the prevalence of night-time dyspnoea in 6616 individuals with COPD recruited from the general population in the Copenhagen area, Denmark, and described characteristics and prognosis...... and sex, the presence of night-time dyspnoea was associated with future COPD exacerbations (hazard ratio (HR) 2.3, 95% CI 1.7-3.0), hospital admissions due to COPD (HR 3.2, 95% CI 2.3-4.4) and mortality (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.3). Prevalence of night-time dyspnoea in COPD increases with disease severity...... of subjects with this symptom. The prevalence of night-time dyspnoea was 4.3%: 2.1% in Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) group A, 12.9% in GOLD B, 2.6% in GOLD C and 16.3% in GOLD D. Compared with individuals without night-time dyspnoea, those with night time dyspnoea had lower...

  11. Indoor-outdoor relationships of particle number and mass in four European cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kos, G.P.A.; Ten Brink, H.M. [ECN Biomass, Coal and Environment, Petten (Netherlands); Hoek, G.; De Hartog, J.; Meliefste, K. [IRAS, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80178, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Harrison, R.; Thomas, S.; Meddings, C. [Division of Environmental Health and Risk Management, University Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Katsouyanni, K.; Karakatsani, A. [Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Avenue, 11527 Athens (Greece); Lianou, M.; Kotronarou, A.; Kavouras, I. [National Observatory of Athens, Institute for Environmental Research and Sustainable Development, V. Pavlou and I. Metaxa Palaia Penteli, 15236 Athens (Greece); Pekkanen, J.; Vallius, M. [Unit of Environmental Epidemiology, KTL-National Public Health Institute, P.O. Box 95, Kuopio (Finland); Kulmala, M.; Puustinen, A. [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FIN-00014, UHEL (Finland); Ayres, J.G. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Van Wijnen, J.H. [Municipal Health Service Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Haemeri, K. [Physics Department, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Topeliuksenkatu 41a A, FIN-00250, Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-02-15

    The number of ultrafine particles in urban air may be more health relevant than the usually measured mass of particles smaller than 2.5 or 10 mm. Epidemiological studies typically assess exposure by measurements at a central site. Limited information is available about how well measurements at a central site reflect exposure to ultrafine particles. The goals of this paper are to assess the relationships between particle number (PN) and mass concentrations measured outdoors at a central site, right outside and inside the study homes. The study was conducted in four European cities: Amsterdam, Athens, Birmingham and Helsinki. Particle mass (PM10 and PM2.5), PN, soot and sulfate concentrations were measured at these sites. Measurements of indoors and outdoors near the home were made during 1 week in 152, mostly non-smoking, homes. In each city continuous measurements were also performed at a central site during the entire study period. The correlation between 24-h average central site outdoor and indoor concentrations was lower for PN (correlation among cities ranged from 0.18 to 0.45) than for PM2.5 (0.40-0.80), soot (0.64-0.92) and sulfate (0.91-0.99). In Athens, the indoor-central site correlation was similar for PN and PM2.5. Infiltration factors for PN and PM2.5 were lower than for sulfate and soot. Night-time hourly average PN concentrations showed higher correlations between indoor and central site, implying that indoor sources explained part of the low correlation found for 24-h average concentrations. Measurements at a central site may characterize indoor exposure to ambient particles less well for ultrafine particles than for fine particle mass, soot and sulfate.

  12. Outdoor Recreation Benchmark 1988: Proceedings of the National Outdoor Recreation Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan H. Watson

    1989-01-01

    BENCHMARK 1988: A National Outdoor Recreation and Wilderness Forum was the first national recreation assessment meeting. The need for this meeting grew out of the desire to incorporate scientific, planning, and administrative peer review into the 1989 RPA Assessment of Outdoor Recreation and Wilderness. This meeting brought together many university and government...

  13. Night-time radical chemistry during the NAMBLEX campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sommariva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Night-time chemistry in the Marine Boundary Layer has been modelled using a number of observationally constrained zero-dimensional box-models. The models were based upon the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM and the measurements were taken during the North Atlantic Marine Boundary Layer Experiment (NAMBLEX campaign at Mace Head, Ireland in July–September 2002. The model could reproduce, within the combined uncertainties, the measured concentration of HO2 (within 30–40% during the night 31 August–1 September and of HO2+RO2 (within 15–30% during several nights of the campaign. The model always overestimated the NO3 measurements made by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS by up to an order of magnitude or more, but agreed with the NO3 Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS measurements to within 30–50%. The most likely explanation of the discrepancy between the two instruments and the model is the reaction of the nitrate radical with inhomogeneously distributed NO, which was measured at concentrations of up to 10 ppt, even though this is not enough to fully explain the difference between the DOAS measurements and the model. A rate of production and destruction analysis showed that radicals were generated during the night mainly by the reaction of ozone with light alkenes. The cycling between HO2/RO2 and OH was maintained during the night by the low concentrations of NO and the overall radical concentration was limited by slow loss of peroxy radicals to form peroxides. A strong peak in [NO2] during the night 31 August–1 September allowed an insight into the radical fluxes and the connections between the HOx and the NO3 cycles.

  14. Assessing Light Pollution in China Based on Nighttime Light Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapid urbanization and economic development inevitably lead to light pollution, which has become a universal environmental issue. In order to reveal the spatiotemporal patterns and evolvement rules of light pollution in China, images from 1992 to 2012 were selected from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS and systematically corrected to ensure consistency. Furthermore, we employed a linear regression trend method and nighttime light index method to demonstrate China’s light pollution characteristics across national, regional, and provincial scales, respectively. We found that: (1 China’s light pollution expanded significantly in provincial capital cities over the past 21 years and hot-spots of light pollution were located in the eastern coastal region. The Yangtze River Delta, Pearl River Delta, and Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei regions have formed light pollution stretch areas; (2 China’s light pollution was mainly focused in areas of north China (NC and east China (EC, which, together, accounted for over 50% of the light pollution for the whole country. The fastest growth of light pollution was observed in northwest China (NWC, followed by southwest China (SWC. The growth rates of east China (EC, central China (CC, and northeast China (NEC were stable, while those of north China (NC and south China (SC declined; (3 Light pollution at the provincial scale was mainly located in the Shandong, Guangdong, and Hebei provinces, whereas the fastest growth of light pollution was in Tibet and Hainan. However, light pollution levels in the developed provinces (Hong Kong, Macao, Shanghai, and Tianjin were higher than those of the undeveloped provinces. Similarly, the light pollution heterogeneities of Taiwan, Beijing, and Shanghai were higher than those of undeveloped western provinces.

  15. Muscle coordination during an outdoor cycling time trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Ollie M; Wakeling, James M

    2012-05-01

    Muscle activity in cycling has primarily been studied in the laboratory; however, conclusions are limited by the ability to recreate realistic environmental conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine muscle coordination patterns in an outdoor time trial and investigate their relationships to power output (PO), total muscle activity (Itot), overall mechanical efficiency (ηO), cadence, and gradient. Surface EMG, gradient, and cycling parameters were measured while cycling 18.8 km outdoors. A principal component analysis was used to establish coordination patterns that were compared with Itot, ηO, PO, cadence, and gradient. PO was positively correlated with Itot, and high PO was associated with elevated rectus femoris and vastus lateralis activity and synchronization of muscles crossing the same joint. PO and cadence demonstrated positive and negative relationships, respectively, with gradient. Relationships between muscle coordination, PO, ηO, Itot, and gradient showed that muscle coordination, PO, and ηO fluctuate during an outdoor time trial as a result of pacing and gradient. A trade-off existed between ηO and PO, and ηO was dependent on muscle activation around the top and bottom of the pedal cycle and activity in more than the knee extensor muscles. Fluctuations in muscle activity due to the changing PO, from pacing and terrain, seemed to mitigate fatigue indices seen in indoor cycling studies. This study provides evidence that muscle activity is dependent on the terrain aspects of the cycle course as muscle coordination changes with the altered locomotor demands. The coordination patterns significantly covaried with PO, Itot, ηO, cadence, and gradient, which highlights the importance of recording these parameters under field conditions and/or careful reproduction of outdoor environments in indoor studies.

  16. Validity and reliability of a radio positioning system for tracking athletes in indoor and outdoor team sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyan, Thuraiappah; Shuttleworth, Richard; Hedley, Mark; Davids, Keith

    2012-12-01

    Radio-frequency local positioning systems (LPS) have the potential to provide accurate location information about sport players for performance analysis, making available for study the emergent nature of interpersonal coordination and collective decision-making behaviour among players in both indoor and outdoor sports. However, no available publications have validated the performance of LPS for indoor sports. The objective of this study was to validate the performance of an LPS in an indoor venue and to compare it to performance observed in an outdoor venue using static and dynamic measurements. Our results showed that the absolute positioning errors obtained from the static measurements of the LPS were comparable for both indoor and outdoor venues, with mean errors of 12.1 cm outdoors and 11.9 cm indoors. From the dynamic measurements, we analysed the relative position error and the distance estimation performance of the system. The 90th-percentile relative position errors were 28 cm for the indoor venue versus 18 cm for the outdoor venue. On average, the LPS overestimated the distance travelled, and the performance was similar for both indoor and outdoor venues. On a linear course, the mean errors of the distance estimates were 2.2% of the total distance indoors and 1.3% outdoors, and on a nonlinear course, they were 2.7% indoors and 3.2% outdoors.

  17. The impact of daycare attendance on outdoor free play in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsley, S; Liang, L Y; Chen, Y; Parkin, P; Maguire, J; Birken, C S

    2017-03-01

    Outdoor free play is important for healthy growth and development in early childhood. Recent studies suggest that the majority of time spent in daycare is sedentary. The objective of this study was to determine whether there was an association between daycare attendance and parent-reported outdoor free play. Healthy children aged 1-5 years recruited to The Applied Research Group for Kids! (TARGet Kids!), a primary care research network, were included. Parents reported daycare use, outdoor free play and potential confounding variables. Multivariable linear regression was used to determine the association between daycare attendance and outdoor free play, adjusted for age, sex, maternal ethnicity, maternal education, neighborhood income and season. There were 2810 children included in this study. Children aged 1 to daycare had 14.70 min less (95% CI -20.52, -8.87; P daycare, respectively. Children who spend more time in daycare have less parent-reported outdoor free play. Parents may be relying on daycare to provide opportunity for outdoor free play and interventions to promote increased active play opportunities outside of daycare are needed.

  18. The Relationship between Outdoor Activity and Health in Older Adults Using GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Buchner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity (PA provides health benefits in older adults. Research suggests that exposure to nature and time spent outdoors may also have effects on health. Older adults are the least active segment of our population, and are likely to spend less time outdoors than other age groups. The relationship between time spent in PA, outdoor time, and various health outcomes was assessed for 117 older adults living in retirement communities. Participants wore an accelerometer and GPS device for 7 days. They also completed assessments of physical, cognitive, and emotional functioning. Analyses of variance were employed with a main and interaction effect tested for ±30 min PA and outdoor time. Significant differences were found for those who spent >30 min in PA or outdoors for depressive symptoms, fear of falling, and self-reported functioning. Time to complete a 400 m walk was significantly different by PA time only. QoL and cognitive functioning scores were not significantly different. The interactions were also not significant. This study is one of the first to demonstrate the feasibility of using accelerometer and GPS data concurrently to assess PA location in older adults. Future analyses will shed light on potential causal relationships and could inform guidelines for outdoor activity.

  19. A Study of Visual Descriptors for Outdoor Navigation Using Google Street View Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Fernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis between several methods to describe outdoor panoramic images is presented. The main objective consists in studying the performance of these methods in the localization process of a mobile robot (vehicle in an outdoor environment, when a visual map that contains images acquired from different positions of the environment is available. With this aim, we make use of the database provided by Google Street View, which contains spherical panoramic images captured in urban environments and their GPS position. The main benefit of using these images resides in the fact that it permits testing any novel localization algorithm in countless outdoor environments anywhere in the world and under realistic capture conditions. The main contribution of this work consists in performing a comparative evaluation of different methods to describe images to solve the localization problem in an outdoor dense map using only visual information. We have tested our algorithms using several sets of panoramic images captured in different outdoor environments. The results obtained in the work can be useful to select an appropriate description method for visual navigation tasks in outdoor environments using the Google Street View database and taking into consideration both the accuracy in localization and the computational efficiency of the algorithm.

  20. Nighttime Supplemental LED Inter-lighting Improves Growth and Yield of Single-truss Tomatoes by Enhancing Photosynthesis in Both Winter and Summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasil Tadesse Tewolde

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Greenhouses with sophisticated environmental control systems, or so-called plant factories with solar light, enable growers to achieve high yields of produce with desirable qualities. In a greenhouse crop with high planting density, low photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD at the lower leaves tends to limit plant growth, especially in the winter when the solar altitude and PPFD at the canopy are low and day length is shorter than in summer. Therefore, providing supplemental lighting to the lower canopy can increase year-round productivity. However, supplemental lighting can be expensive. In some places, the cost of electricity is lower at night, but the effect of using supplemental light at night has not yet been examined. In this study, we examined the effects of supplemental LED inter-lighting (LED inter-lighting hereafter during the daytime or nighttime on photosynthesis, growth, and yield of single-truss tomato plants both in winter and summer. We used LED inter-lighting modules with combined red and blue light to illuminate lower leaves right after the first anthesis. The PPFD of this light was 165 µmol m-2 s-1 measured at 10 cm from the LED module. LED inter-lighting was provided from 4:00 am to 4:00 pm for the daytime treatments and from 10:00 pm to 10:00 am for the nighttime treatments. Plants exposed only to solar light were used as controls. Daytime LED inter-lighting increased the photosynthetic capacity of middle and lower canopy leaves, which significantly increased yield by 27% in winter; however, photosynthetic capacity and yield were not significantly increased during summer. Nighttime LED inter-lighting increased photosynthetic capacity in both winter and summer, and yield increased by 24% in winter and 12% in summer. In addition, nighttime LED inter-lighting in winter significantly increased the total soluble solids and ascorbic acid content of the tomato fruits, by 20% and 25%, respectively. Use of nighttime LED

  1. Nighttime Supplemental LED Inter-lighting Improves Growth and Yield of Single-Truss Tomatoes by Enhancing Photosynthesis in Both Winter and Summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewolde, Fasil T.; Lu, Na; Shiina, Kouta; Maruo, Toru; Takagaki, Michiko; Kozai, Toyoki; Yamori, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Greenhouses with sophisticated environmental control systems, or so-called plant factories with solar light, enable growers to achieve high yields of produce with desirable qualities. In a greenhouse crop with high planting density, low photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) at the lower leaves tends to limit plant growth, especially in the winter when the solar altitude and PPFD at the canopy are low and day length is shorter than in summer. Therefore, providing supplemental lighting to the lower canopy can increase year-round productivity. However, supplemental lighting can be expensive. In some places, the cost of electricity is lower at night, but the effect of using supplemental light at night has not yet been examined. In this study, we examined the effects of supplemental LED inter-lighting (LED inter-lighting hereafter) during the daytime or nighttime on photosynthesis, growth, and yield of single-truss tomato plants both in winter and summer. We used LED inter-lighting modules with combined red and blue light to illuminate lower leaves right after the first anthesis. The PPFD of this light was 165 μmol m-2 s-1 measured at 10 cm from the LED module. LED inter-lighting was provided from 4:00 am to 4:00 pm for the daytime treatments and from 10:00 pm to 10:00 am for the nighttime treatments. Plants exposed only to solar light were used as controls. Daytime LED inter-lighting increased the photosynthetic capacity of middle and lower canopy leaves, which significantly increased yield by 27% in winter; however, photosynthetic capacity and yield were not significantly increased during summer. Nighttime LED inter-lighting increased photosynthetic capacity in both winter and summer, and yield increased by 24% in winter and 12% in summer. In addition, nighttime LED inter-lighting in winter significantly increased the total soluble solids and ascorbic acid content of the tomato fruits, by 20 and 25%, respectively. Use of nighttime LED inter-lighting was also more

  2. Nighttime Supplemental LED Inter-lighting Improves Growth and Yield of Single-Truss Tomatoes by Enhancing Photosynthesis in Both Winter and Summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewolde, Fasil T; Lu, Na; Shiina, Kouta; Maruo, Toru; Takagaki, Michiko; Kozai, Toyoki; Yamori, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Greenhouses with sophisticated environmental control systems, or so-called plant factories with solar light, enable growers to achieve high yields of produce with desirable qualities. In a greenhouse crop with high planting density, low photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) at the lower leaves tends to limit plant growth, especially in the winter when the solar altitude and PPFD at the canopy are low and day length is shorter than in summer. Therefore, providing supplemental lighting to the lower canopy can increase year-round productivity. However, supplemental lighting can be expensive. In some places, the cost of electricity is lower at night, but the effect of using supplemental light at night has not yet been examined. In this study, we examined the effects of supplemental LED inter-lighting (LED inter-lighting hereafter) during the daytime or nighttime on photosynthesis, growth, and yield of single-truss tomato plants both in winter and summer. We used LED inter-lighting modules with combined red and blue light to illuminate lower leaves right after the first anthesis. The PPFD of this light was 165 μmol m(-2) s(-1) measured at 10 cm from the LED module. LED inter-lighting was provided from 4:00 am to 4:00 pm for the daytime treatments and from 10:00 pm to 10:00 am for the nighttime treatments. Plants exposed only to solar light were used as controls. Daytime LED inter-lighting increased the photosynthetic capacity of middle and lower canopy leaves, which significantly increased yield by 27% in winter; however, photosynthetic capacity and yield were not significantly increased during summer. Nighttime LED inter-lighting increased photosynthetic capacity in both winter and summer, and yield increased by 24% in winter and 12% in summer. In addition, nighttime LED inter-lighting in winter significantly increased the total soluble solids and ascorbic acid content of the tomato fruits, by 20 and 25%, respectively. Use of nighttime LED inter-lighting was also

  3. Outdoor unit construction for an electric heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Robert; Lackey, Robert S.

    1984-01-01

    The outdoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided with an upper portion 10 containing propeller fan means 14 for drawing air through the lower portion 12 containing refrigerant coil means 16 in the form of four discrete coils connected together in a subassembly forming a W shape, the unit being provided with four adjustable legs 64 which are retracted in shipment, and are adjusted on site to elevate the unit to a particular height suitable for the particular location in which the unit is installed.

  4. Chronotype variation drives night-time sentinel-like behaviour in hunter-gatherers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, David R; Crittenden, Alyssa N; Mabulla, Ibrahim A; Mabulla, Audax Z P; Nunn, Charles L

    2017-07-12

    Sleep is essential for survival, yet it also represents a time of extreme vulnerability to predation, hostile conspecifics and environmental dangers. To reduce the risks of sleeping, the sentinel hypothesis proposes that group-living animals share the task of vigilance during sleep, with some individuals sleeping while others are awake. To investigate sentinel-like behaviour in sleeping humans, we investigated activity patterns at night among Hadza hunter-gatherers of Tanzania. Using actigraphy, we discovered that all subjects were simultaneously scored as asleep for only 18 min in total over 20 days of observation, with a median of eight individuals awake throughout the night-time period; thus, one or more individuals was awake (or in light stages of sleep) during 99.8% of sampled epochs between when the first person went to sleep and the last person awoke. We show that this asynchrony in activity levels is produced by chronotype variation, and that chronotype covaries with age. Thus, asynchronous periods of wakefulness provide an opportunity for vigilance when sleeping in groups. We propose that throughout human evolution, sleeping groups composed of mixed age classes provided a form of vigilance. Chronotype variation and human sleep architecture (including nocturnal awakenings) in modern populations may therefore represent a legacy of natural selection acting in the past to reduce the dangers of sleep. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Estimating global per-capita carbon emissions with VIIRS nighttime lights satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmin, T.; Desai, A. R.; Pierce, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    With the launch of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite in November 2011, we now have nighttime lights remote sensing capability vastly improved over the predecessor Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), owing to improved spatial and radiometric resolution provided by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day Night Band (DNB) along with technology improvements in data transfer, processing, and storage. This development opens doors for improving novel scientific applications utilizing remotely sensed low-level visible light, for purposes ranging from estimating population to inferring factors relating to economic development. For example, the success of future international agreements to reduce greenhouse gas emissions will be dependent on mechanisms to monitor remotely for compliance. Here, we discuss implementation and evaluation of the VRCE system (VIIRS Remote Carbon Estimates), developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, which provides monthly independent, unbiased estimates of per-capita carbon emissions. Cloud-free global composites of Earth nocturnal lighting are generated from VIIRS DNB at full spatial resolution (750 meter). A population equation is derived from a linear regression of DNB radiance sums at state level to U.S. Census data. CO2 emissions are derived from a linear regression of VIIRS DNB radiance sums to U.S. Department of Energy emission estimates. Regional coefficients for factors such as percentage of energy use from renewable sources are factored in, and together these equations are used to generate per-capita CO2 emission estimates at the country level.

  6. Bioluminescence in a complex coastal environment: 1. Temporal dynamics of nighttime water-leaving radiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moline, Mark A.; Oliver, Matthew J.; Mobley, Curtis D.; Sundman, Lydia; Bensky, Thomas; Bergmann, Trisha; Bissett, W. Paul; Case, James; Raymond, Erika H.; Schofield, Oscar M. E.

    2007-11-01

    Nighttime water-leaving radiance is a function of the depth-dependent distribution of both the in situ bioluminescence emissions and the absorption and scattering properties of the water. The vertical distributions of these parameters were used as inputs for a modified one-dimensional radiative transfer model to solve for spectral bioluminescence water-leaving radiance from prescribed depths of the water column. Variation in the water-leaving radiance was consistent with local episodic physical forcing events, with tidal forcing, terrestrial runoff, particulate accumulation, and biological responses influencing the shorter timescale dynamics. There was a >90 nm shift in the peak water-leaving radiance from blue (˜474 nm) to green as light propagated to the surface. In addition to clues in ecosystem responses to physical forcing, the temporal dynamics in intensity and spectral quality of water-leaving radiance provide suitable ranges for assessing detection. This may provide the information needed to estimate the depth of internal light sources in the ocean, which is discussed in part 2 of this paper.

  7. Artificial nighttime light changes aphid-parasitoid population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Dirk; Kehoe, Rachel; Tiley, Katie; Bennie, Jonathan; Cruse, Dave; Davies, Thomas W; Frank van Veen, F J; Gaston, Kevin J

    2015-10-16

    Artificial light at night (ALAN) is recognized as a widespread and increasingly important anthropogenic environmental pressure on wild species and their interactions. Understanding of how these impacts translate into changes in population dynamics of communities with multiple trophic levels is, however, severely lacking. In an outdoor mesocosm experiment we tested the effect of ALAN on the population dynamics of a plant-aphid-parasitoid community with one plant species, three aphid species and their specialist parasitoids. The light treatment reduced the abundance of two aphid species by 20% over five generations, most likely as a consequence of bottom-up effects, with reductions in bean plant biomass being observed. For the aphid Megoura viciae this effect was reversed under autumn conditions with the light treatment promoting continuous reproduction through asexuals. All three parasitoid species were negatively affected by the light treatment, through reduced host numbers and we discuss induced possible behavioural changes. These results suggest that, in addition to direct impacts on species behaviour, the impacts of ALAN can cascade through food webs with potentially far reaching effects on the wider ecosystem.

  8. Circadian phase and its relationship to nighttime sleep in toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBourgeois, Monique K; Carskadon, Mary A; Akacem, Lameese D; Simpkin, Charles T; Wright, Kenneth P; Achermann, Peter; Jenni, Oskar G

    2013-10-01

    Circadian phase and its relation to sleep are increasingly recognized as fundamental factors influencing human physiology and behavior. Dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) is a reliable marker of the timing of the circadian clock, which has been used in experimental, clinical, and descriptive studies in the past few decades. Although DLMO and its relationship to sleep have been well documented in school-aged children, adolescents, and adults, very little is known about these processes in early childhood. The purpose of this study was 1) to describe circadian phase and phase angles of entrainment in toddlers and 2) to examine associations between DLMO and actigraphic measures of children's nighttime sleep. Participants were 45 healthy toddlers aged 30 to 36 months (33.5 ± 2.2 months; 21 females). After sleeping on a parent-selected schedule for 5 days (assessed with actigraphy and diaries), children participated in an in-home DLMO assessment involving the collection of saliva samples every 30 minutes for 6 hours. Average bedtime was 2015 ± 0036 h, average sleep onset time was 2043 ± 0043 h, average midsleep time was 0143 ± 0038 h, and average wake time was 0644 ± 0042 h. Average DLMO was 1929 ± 0051 h, with a 3.5-hour range. DLMO was normally distributed; however, the distribution of the bedtime, sleep onset time, and midsleep phase angles of entrainment were skewed. On average, DLMO occurred 47.8 ± 47.6 minutes (median = 39.4 minutes) before bedtime, 74.6 ± 48.0 minutes (median = 65.4 minutes) before sleep onset time, 6.2 ± 0.7 hours (median = 6.1 hours) before midsleep time, and 11.3 ± 0.7 hours before wake time. Toddlers with later DLMOs had later bedtimes (r = 0.46), sleep onset times (r = 0.51), midsleep times (r = 0.66), and wake times (r = 0.65) (all p < 0.001). Interindividual differences in toddlers' circadian phase are large and associated with their sleep timing. The early DLMOs of toddlers indicate a maturational delay in the circadian timing

  9. Quantitative Estimation of the Velocity of Urbanization in China Using Nighttime Luminosity Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid urbanization with sizeable enhancements of urban population and built-up land in China creates challenging planning and management issues due to the complexity of both the urban development and the socioeconomic drivers of environmental change. Improved understanding of spatio-temporal characteristics of urbanization processes are increasingly important for investigating urban expansion and environmental responses to corresponding socioeconomic and landscape dynamics. In this study, we present an artificial luminosity-derived index of the velocity of urbanization, defined as the ratio of temporal trend and spatial gradient of mean annual stable nighttime brightness, to estimate the pace of urbanization and consequent changes in land cover in China for the period of 2000–2010. Using the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program–derived time series of nighttime light data and corresponding satellite-based land cover maps, our results show that the geometric mean velocity of urban dispersal at the country level was 0.21 km·yr−1 across 88.58 × 103 km2 urbanizing areas, in which ~23% of areas originally made of natural and cultivated lands were converted to artificial surfaces between 2000 and 2010. The speed of urbanization varies among urban agglomerations and cities with different development stages and urban forms. Particularly, the Yangtze River Delta conurbation shows the fastest (0.39 km·yr−1 and most extensive (16.12 × 103 km2 urban growth in China over the 10-year period. Moreover, if the current velocity holds, our estimates suggest that an additional 13.29 × 103 km2 in land area will be converted to human-built features while high density socioeconomic activities across the current urbanizing regions and urbanized areas will greatly increase from 52.44 × 103 km2 in 2010 to 62.73 × 103 km2 in China’s mainland during the next several decades. Our findings may provide potential insights into the pace of urbanization in

  10. Improvements in Night-Time Low Cloud Detection and MODIS-Style Cloud Optical Properties from MSG SEVIRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind, Galina (Gala); Platnick, Steven; Riedi, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    The MODIS cloud optical properties algorithm (MOD06IMYD06 for Terra and Aqua MODIS, respectively) slated for production in Data Collection 6 has been adapted to execute using available channels on MSG SEVIRI. Available MODIS-style retrievals include IR Window-derived cloud top properties, using the new Collection 6 cloud top properties algorithm, cloud optical thickness from VISINIR bands, cloud effective radius from 1.6 and 3.7Jlm and cloud ice/water path. We also provide pixel-level uncertainty estimate for successful retrievals. It was found that at nighttime the SEVIRI cloud mask tends to report unnaturally low cloud fraction for marine stratocumulus clouds. A correction algorithm that improves detection of such clouds has been developed. We will discuss the improvements to nighttime low cloud detection for SEVIRI and show examples and comparisons with MODIS and CALIPSO. We will also show examples of MODIS-style pixel-level (Level-2) cloud retrievals for SEVIRI with comparisons to MODIS.

  11. Participatory Research to Design a Novel Telehealth System to Support the Night-Time Needs of People with Dementia: NOCTURNAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Martin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Strategies to support people living with dementia are broad in scope, proposing both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions as part of the care pathway. Assistive technologies form part of this offering as both stand-alone devices to support particular tasks and the more complex offering of the “smart home” to underpin ambient assisted living. This paper presents a technology-based system, which expands on the smart home architecture, orientated to support people with daily living. The system, NOCTURNAL, was developed by working directly with people who had dementia, and their carers using qualitative research methods. The research focused primarily on the nighttime needs of people living with dementia in real home settings. Eight people with dementia had the final prototype system installed for a three month evaluation at home. Disturbed sleep patterns, night-time wandering were a focus of this research not only in terms of detection by commercially available technology but also exploring if automated music, light and visual personalized photographs would be soothing to participants during the hours of darkness. The NOCTURNAL platform and associated services was informed by strong user engagement of people with dementia and the service providers who care for them. NOCTURNAL emerged as a holistic service offering a personalised therapeutic aspect with interactive capabilities.

  12. Nighttime assaults: using a national emergency department monitoring system to predict occurrence, target prevention and plan services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellis, Mark A; Leckenby, Nicola; Hughes, Karen; Luke, Chris; Wyke, Sacha; Quigg, Zara

    2012-09-06

    Emergency department (ED) data have the potential to provide critical intelligence on when violence is most likely to occur and the characteristics of those who suffer the greatest health impacts. We use a national experimental ED monitoring system to examine how it could target violence prevention interventions towards at risk communities and optimise acute responses to calendar, holiday and other celebration-related changes in nighttime assaults. A cross-sectional examination of nighttime assault presentations (6.01 pm to 6.00 am; n = 330,172) over a three-year period (31st March 2008 to 30th March 2011) to English EDs analysing changes by weekday, month, holidays, major sporting events, and demographics of those presenting. Males are at greater risk of assault presentation (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.14, 95% confidence intervals [CIs] 3.11-3.16; P football matches are associated with nearly a three times increase in midweek assault presentation. Other football and rugby events examined show no impact. The 2008 Olympics saw assaults fall. The overall calendar model strongly predicts observed presentations (R2 = 0.918; P violence prevention and optimising frontline resources. National ED data are critical for fully engaging health services in the prevention of violence.

  13. Nighttime assaults: using a national emergency department monitoring system to predict occurrence, target prevention and plan services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellis Mark A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency department (ED data have the potential to provide critical intelligence on when violence is most likely to occur and the characteristics of those who suffer the greatest health impacts. We use a national experimental ED monitoring system to examine how it could target violence prevention interventions towards at risk communities and optimise acute responses to calendar, holiday and other celebration-related changes in nighttime assaults. Methods A cross-sectional examination of nighttime assault presentations (6.01 pm to 6.00 am; n = 330,172 over a three-year period (31st March 2008 to 30th March 2011 to English EDs analysing changes by weekday, month, holidays, major sporting events, and demographics of those presenting. Results Males are at greater risk of assault presentation (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.14, 95% confidence intervals [CIs] 3.11-3.16; P 2 = 0.918; P  Conclusions To date, the role of ED data has focused on helping target nightlife police activity. Its utility is much greater; capable of targeting and evaluating multi-agency life course approaches to violence prevention and optimising frontline resources. National ED data are critical for fully engaging health services in the prevention of violence.

  14. Remote sensing as a source of data for outdoor recreation planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, W. E.; Goodell, H. G.; Emmitt, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Specific data needs for outdoor recreation planning and the ability of tested remote sensors to provide sources for these data are examined. Data needs, remote sensor capabilities, availability of imagery, and advantages and problems of incorporating remote sensing data sources into ongoing planning data collection programs are discussed in detail. Examples of the use of imagery to derive data for a range of common planning analyses are provided. A selected bibliography indicates specific uses of data in planning, basic background materials on remote sensing technology, and sources of information on environmental information systems expected to use remote sensing to provide new environmental data of use in outdoor recreation planning.

  15. Improving nighttime mobility in persons with night blindness caused by retinitis pigmentosa: A comparison of two low-vision mobility devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancil, Rickilyn M; Mancil, Gary L; King, Ellis; Legault, Claudine; Munday, Julie; Alfieri, Salvatore; Nowakowski, Rod; Blasch, Bruce B

    2005-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of the ITT Night Vision Viewer with the Wide Angle Mobility Lamp (WAML) as low-vision mobility devices for people experiencing night blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Both engineering bench testing and functional evaluations were used in the assessments. Engineering evaluations were conducted for (1) consistency of the manufacturer's specifications, (2) ergonomic characteristics, (3) modifications of devices, and (4) pedestrian safety issues. Twenty-seven patients with RP conducted rehabilitation evaluations with each device that included both clinical and functional tests. Both devices improved nighttime travel for people with night blindness as compared with nighttime travel with no device. Overall, the WAML provided better travel efficiency-equivalent to that measured in daytime. Recommendations have been developed on ergonomic factors for both devices. Although some participants preferred the ITT Night Vision Viewer, overall most participants performed better with the WAML.

  16. Turismo Activo y Outdoor Training: Metodología. (Adventure Sport Tourism and Outdoor Training: Methodology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Gómez Encinas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available ResumenUno de los aspectos más atractivos que tiene el outdoor training es su supuesta capacidad para conseguir que los aprendizajes obtenidos a través de sus actividades sean transferidos a otros ámbitos de la vida personal y profesional de sus participantes. En este sentido, la clave está en la metodología empleada. Este artículo profundiza en las fases que estructuran el proceso formativo del outdoor training describiendo: 1 las bases folosóficas que lo apoyan y que están expresadas en la teoría de la “educación a través de la experiencia” y 2 las diferentes fases que estructuran el proceso de formación de un outdoor, haciendo una descripción en profundidad de cada una de ellas: a Pre-Outdoor (Análisis y valoración de las necesidades, diseño de la actividad y reunión previa a la actividad, b Outdoor, c Post-outdoor (Reflexión y transferencia, y d Seguimiento posterior.AbstractOne of the most attractive aspects that has the outdoor training is their supposed capacity to get that the learnings obtained through their activities are transferred to other environments of the personal life and their participants' professional. In this sense, the key is in the used methodology. This article deepens in the phases that structure the formative process of the outdoor training describing: 1 the philosophy´s bases that support this process and that are expressed in the theory of experiential education, and 2 the different phases that structure the process of formation of an outdoor, making a description in depth of each one of them: to Pre-Outdoor (Analysis and valuation of the necessities, design of the activity and previous meeting to the activity, b Outdoor, c Post-outdoor (Reflection and transfer, and d Later Pursuit.

  17. Prediction of Land Use Change in Long Island Sound Watersheds Using Nighttime Light Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiting Zhai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Long Island Sound Watersheds (LISW are experiencing significant land use/cover change (LUCC, which affects the environment and ecosystems in the watersheds through water pollution, carbon emissions, and loss of wildlife. LUCC modeling is an important approach to understanding what has happened in the landscape and what may change in the future. Moreover, prospective modeling can provide sustainable and efficient decision support for land planning and environmental management. This paper modeled the LUCCs between 1996, 2001 and 2006 in the LISW in the New England region, which experienced an increase in developed area and a decrease of forest. The low-density development pattern played an important role in the loss of forest and the expansion of urban areas. The key driving forces were distance to developed areas, distance to roads, and social-economic drivers, such as nighttime light intensity and population density. In addition, this paper compared and evaluated two integrated LUCC models—the logistic regression–Markov chain model and the multi-layer perception–Markov chain (MLP–MC model. Both models achieved high accuracy in prediction, but the MLP–MC model performed slightly better. Finally, a land use map for 2026 was predicted by using the MLP–MC model, and it indicates the continued loss of forest and increase of developed area.

  18. Numerical simulation for a vortex street near the poleward boundary of the nighttime auroral oval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, T.

    2012-02-01

    The formation of a vortex street is numerically studied as an aftermath of a transient (≈1 min) depression of the energy density of injected particles. It is basically assumed that the kinetic energies of auroral particles are substantially provided by nonadiabatic acceleration in the tail current sheet. One of the causes of such energy density depression is an outward (away from the Earth) movement of the neutral line because in such situation, a particle passes the acceleration zone for a shorter time interval while it is inwardly transported in the current sheet. The numerical simulation shows that a long chain of many (≥5) vortices can be formed in the nighttime high-latitude auroral oval as a result of the hybrid Kelvin-Helmholtz/Rayleigh-Taylor (KH/RT) instability. The main characteristics of long vortex chains in the simulation such as the short lifetime (≲2 min) and the correlation between wavelength, λ, and arc system width, A, compare well with those of the periodic auroral distortions observed primarily in the high-latitude auroral oval. Specifically, either λ-A relationship from simulation or observation shows a positive correlation between λ and A but with considerable dispersion in λ. Since auroral vortices arising from the hybrid KH/RT instability are not accompanied by significant rotational motions, the magnetic shear instability caused by undulations in the field-aligned current (FAC) sheet could turn the vortices into spirals which wind or unwind in response to increase or decrease of FACs, respectively.

  19. Nighttime Chemistry and Morning Isoprene Can Drive Urban Ozone Downwind of a Major Deciduous Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Dylan B; Baasandorj, Munkhbayar; Hu, Lu; Mitroo, Dhruv; Turner, Jay; Williams, Brent J

    2016-04-19

    Isoprene is the predominant non-methane volatile organic compound emitted to the atmosphere and shapes tropospheric composition and biogeochemistry through its effects on ozone, other oxidants, aerosols, and the nitrogen cycle. Isoprene is emitted naturally by vegetation during daytime, when its photo-oxidation is rapid, and in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NOx) produces ozone and degrades air quality in polluted regions. Here, we show for a city downwind of an isoprene-emitting forest (St. Louis, MO) that isoprene actually peaks at night; ambient levels then endure, owing to low nighttime OH radical concentrations. Nocturnal chemistry controls the fate of that isoprene and the likelihood of a high-ozone episode the following day. When nitrate (NO3) radicals are suppressed, high isoprene persists through the night, providing photochemical fuel upon daybreak and leading to a dramatic late-morning ozone peak. On nights with significant NO3, isoprene is removed before dawn; days with low morning isoprene then have lower ozone with a more typical afternoon peak. This biogenic-anthropogenic coupling expands the daily high-ozone window and likely has an opposite O3-NOx response to what would otherwise be expected, with implications for exposure and air-quality management in cities that, like St. Louis, are downwind of major isoprene-emitting forests.

  20. Night-time lights as a proxy of human pressure on freshwater resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceola, Serena; Montanari, Alberto; Laio, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    The presence and availability of freshwater resources at the global scale control the dynamics and the biodiversity of river ecosystems, as well as the human development and the security of people and economies. The increasing human pressure on freshwater is known to potentially drive significant alterations on both ecohydrological and social dynamics. To date, a spatially-detailed snapshot (i.e. single in time) analysis of human water security and river biodiversity threats revealed that the majority of the world's population and river ecosystems are exposed to high levels of endangerment. However, the temporal evolution of these effects at the global scale is still unexplored. To this aim, moving from the recent progress on remote sensing techniques, we employed yearly averaged night-time light images available from 1992 to 2013 as a proxy of anthropogenic presence and activity and we investigated how threats to human water security and river biodiversity evolved in time in 405 major river basins. Our results show a consistent correlation between nightlights and ecohydrological and threats, providing innovative support for freshwater resources management.

  1. Pedestrian intention prediction based on dynamic fuzzy automata for vehicle driving at nighttime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Joon-Young; Ko, Byoung Chul; Nam, Jae-Yeal

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm that can predict a pedestrian's intention using images captured by a far-infrared thermal camera mounted on a moving car at nighttime. To predict a pedestrian's intention in consecutive sequences, we use the dynamic fuzzy automata (DFA) method, which not only provides a systemic approach for handling uncertainty but also is able to handle continuous spaces. As the spatio-temporal features, the distance between the curbs and the pedestrian and the pedestrian's velocity and head orientation are used. In this study, we define four intention states of the pedestrian: Standing-Sidewalk (S-SW), Walking-Sidewalk (W-SW), Walking-Crossing (W-Cro), and Running-Crossing (R-Cro). In every frame, the proposed system determines the final intention of the pedestrian as 'Stop' if the pedestrian's intention state is S-SW or W-SW. In contrast, the proposed system determines the final intention of a pedestrian as 'Cross' if the pedestrian's intention state is W-Cro or R-Cro. A performance comparison with other related methods shows that the performance of the proposed algorithm is better than that of other related methods. The proposed algorithm was successfully applied to our dataset, which includes complex environments with many pedestrians.

  2. Bud break responds more strongly to daytime than night-time temperature under asymmetric experimental warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Sergio; Isabel, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Global warming is diurnally asymmetric, leading to a less cold, rather than warmer, climate. We investigated the effects of asymmetric experimental warming on plant phenology by testing the hypothesis that daytime warming is more effective in advancing bud break than night-time warming. Bud break was monitored daily in Picea mariana seedlings belonging to 20 provenances from Eastern Canada and subjected to daytime and night-time warming in growth chambers at temperatures varying between 8 and 16 °C. The higher advancements of bud break and shorter times required to complete the phenological phases occurred with daytime warming. Seedlings responded to night-time warming, but still with less advancement of bud break than under daytime warming. No advancement was observed when night-time warming was associated with a daytime cooling. The effect of the treatments was uniform across provenances. Our observations realized under controlled conditions allowed to experimentally demonstrate that bud break can advance under night-time warming, but to a lesser extent than under daytime warming. Prediction models using daily timescales could neglect the diverging influence of asymmetric warming and should be recalibrated for higher temporal resolutions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Unusual Fluctuations of the Nighttime VLF Signal Amplitude before Seismic Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta; Mondal, Sushanta Kumar

    2012-07-01

    We present the results of an analysis of yearlong (2007) monitoring of nighttime data of the VLF signal amplitude. We use the VLF signals, transmitted from the Indian Navy station VTX (latitude 8.43° N, longitude 77.73° E) at 18.2 kHz and received at the Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata (latitude 22.5° N, 87.5° E). We analyzed this data to find out the correlation between night time amplitude fluctuation and seismic events. We found, analyzing individual earthquakes (with magnitudes greater than 5) as well as from statistical analysis (of all the events with effective magnitudes greater than 3.5), that nighttime fluctuation of the signal amplitude has the highest probability to be beyond the 2σ levels about three days prior to the seismic events. Recently an earthquake of magnitude 7.4 occurred at Southwestern Pakistan (latitude 28.9° N, longitude 64° E). We analyze the nighttime VLF signals for two weeks around this earthquake day to see if there were any precursory effects of this earthquake. We find that the amplitude of the nighttime VLF signals anomalously fluctuated four days before this earthquake. Thus, the nighttime fluctuation could be considered as a precursor to enhanced seismic activities.

  4. Diuretic drugs benefit patients with hypertension more with night-time dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeahialam, Basil N; Ohihoin, Esther N; Ajuluchukwu, Jayne Na

    2012-12-01

    Night-time chronotherapy in antihypertensive drugs has been shown to produce better blood pressure control and protect from cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. To date, this has been proven for several drug classes excluding thiazides diuretics. Given the peculiar response of blood pressure to thiazides in black people we sought to determine whether night-time chronotherapy with thiazides produces better control as already shown with other drug classes. A subanalysis of a larger chronotherapy study with antihypertensive drugs in Nigerian Africans was done. The subpopulation of those whose disease was controlled after 12 weeks of diuretic monotherapy was analysed. Those who received drugs in the morning and at night were compared along control lines and some cardiac indices. Both groups were similar on all scores at baseline. After 12 weeks of monotherapy patients who received drugs at night had significantly lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure though control was achieved with both morning and night-time dosing. Also the left ventricular posterior and septal walls regressed better as well as left ventricular mass in the night-time group. Though equally effective in reducing blood pressure and cardiac indices related to hypertension, patients taking their drugs at night recorded better values. This makes diuretics equally amenable to night-time chronotherapy as other drug classes. This effect should be explored to reduce the morbidity and mortality consequences of hypertension.

  5. Context-specific outdoor time and physical activity among school-children across gender and age: using accelerometers and GPS to advance methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinker, Charlotte Demant; Schipperijn, Jasper; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Being outdoors has a positive influence on health among children. Evidence in this area is limited and many studies have used self-reported measures. Objective context-specific assessment of physical activity patterns and correlates, such as outdoor time, may progress this field. Aims......-specific measures for outdoor time, outdoor MVPA, and overall daily MVPA. In addition, 4 domains (leisure, school, transport, and home) and 11 subdomains (e.g., urban green space and sports facilities) were created and assessed. Multilevel analyses provided results on age and gender differences and the association...

  6. Outdoor air dominates burden of disease from indoor exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hänninen, O.; Asikainen, A.; Carrer, P.

    2014-01-01

    Both indoor and outdoor sources of air pollution have significant public health impacts in Europe. Based on quantitative modelling of the burden of disease the outdoor sources dominate the impacts by a clear margin.......Both indoor and outdoor sources of air pollution have significant public health impacts in Europe. Based on quantitative modelling of the burden of disease the outdoor sources dominate the impacts by a clear margin....

  7. Sub-Surface Windscreen for Outdoor Measurement of Infrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A windscreen is configured for measuring outdoor infrasonic sound. The windscreen includes a container and a microphone. The container defines a chamber. The microphone is disposed in the chamber and can be operatively supported by the floor. The microphone is configured for detecting infrasonic sound. The container is advantageously formed from material that exhibits an acoustic impedance of between 0 and approximately 3150 times the acoustic impedance of air. A reflector plate may be disposed in the container. The reflector plate operatively can support the microphone and provides a doubling effect of infrasonic pressure at the microphone.

  8. Ozone exposure among Mexico City outdoor workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Marie S; Ramirez-Aguilar, Matiana; Meneses-Gonzalez, Fernando; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio; Geyh, Alison S; Sienra-Monge, Juan José; Romieu, Isabelle

    2003-03-01

    In researching health effects of air pollution, pollutant levels from fixed-site monitors are commonly assigned to the subjects. However, these concentrations may not reflect the exposure these individuals actually experience. A previous study of ozone (O3) exposure and lung function among shoe-cleaners working in central Mexico City used fixed-site measurements from a monitoring station near the outdoor work sites as surrogates for personal exposure. The present study assesses the degree to which these estimates represented individual exposures. In 1996, personal O3 exposures of 39 shoe-cleaners working outdoors were measured using an active integrated personal sampler. Using mixed models, we assessed the relationship between measured personal O3 exposure and ambient O3 measurements from the fixed-site monitoring station. Ambient concentrations were approximately 50 parts per billion higher, on average, than personal exposures. The association between personal and ambient O3 was highly significant (mixed model slope p < 0.0001). The personal/ambient ratio was not constant, so use of the outdoor monitor would not be appropriate to rank O3 exposure and evaluate health effects between workers. However, the strong within-worker longitudinal association validates previous findings associating day-to-day changes in fixed-site O3 levels with adverse health effects among these shoe-cleaners and suggests fixed-site O3 monitors may adequately estimate exposure for other repeated-measure health studies of outdoor workers.

  9. 76 FR 32857 - Great Outdoors Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... rural landscapes, including working farms and ranches; develop the next generation of urban parks and... States of America A Proclamation For generations, America's great outdoors have ignited our imaginations... across our country with a stake in the health of our environment and natural places. Our conversations...

  10. Sustainability in outdoor recreation and tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Winter; Kelly Bricker; Jeremy. Schultz

    2013-01-01

    Outdoor recreation and tourism represents a major service by which the public identifies with and better understands natural resources, even to the extent that it can foster environmental stewardship (for example, see Winter and Chavez 2008). Yet, myriad threats to recreation and tourism exist which need to be addressed. Addressing these threats can be...

  11. 9 CFR 3.103 - Facilities, outdoor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... effective natural barrier that restricts the marine mammals to the facility and restricts entry by animals... free of solid ice to allow for entry and exit of the animals. (2) The water surface of pools in outdoor... defined by low tide to the other end of the natural seawater facility shoreline defined by low tide. A...

  12. Playing with Power: An Outdoor Classroom Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood-Bird, Eden

    2017-01-01

    In this ethnographic research, discovery of how preschool-aged children use play to wield their individual power in the outdoors is documented in a single classroom. Embedded as a participant-researcher and working from constructivist and critical theory orientations, the researcher seeks to understand how children use their play to construct the…

  13. Children's Outdoor Environment in Icelandic Educational Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norðdahl, Kristín; Jóhannesson, Ingólfur Ásgeir

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate what characterizes the discourse on the role of the outdoor environment in young children's learning in educational policy documents in Iceland. Policy documents, laws and regulations, national curriculum guides for pre- and compulsory school levels, and documents from municipalities were analyzed. A…

  14. THE CHILD IN THE OUTDOOR CLASSROOM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M:.Jseums are joining the field in using the outdoors as a class- room and the experience of the Hout Bay Museum has proved this to be a worthwhile and effective way of teaching environmental conservation. Observation of children during lessons has shown that they often reveal an intuitive understanding of natural.

  15. Staging History Outdoors: Audiences: The Secret Ingredient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Mark

    1975-01-01

    Traces the development of outdoor historical drama from 1937 through the present. Possible directions for future growth are noted. Available from: Theatre Crafts, 33 East Minor Street, Emmaus, Pa. 18049. Subscription Rates: $8.00 per year, $1.50 single copy, $1.50 additional Foreign. (MH)

  16. Indoorising the outdoors: Lifestyle sports revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salome, L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Since the early nineties, lifestyle sports such as surfing, snowboarding and skydiving are on a large scale offered in artificial sport environments. In snow domes, on artificial white water courses, in climbing halls and in wind tunnels, these alternative outdoor sports are accessible for a broad

  17. Installation in Outdoor Advertising Designs: Engagement with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conventional outdoor platform came into existence in Nigeria since 1929, but from 1980s, optional site specifics were located in vintage positions in form of Installations. The 3D sculptural art form as a reminder medium, positions popular brands such as Star lager beer, Guinness and Milo beverage. Dictates of globalization ...

  18. Converging social trends - emerging outdoor recreation issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl H. Reidel

    1980-01-01

    I can't recall when I have attended a national conference with a more clearly defined objective than this one. We are here to document outdoor recreation trends and explore their meaning for the future. The word "trend" appears no less than 45 times in the conference brochure, and the symposium organizers are determined that the proceedings will be...

  19. Outdoor Recreation in the Northern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; Carter J. Betz; Shela H. Mou; Dale D. Gormanson

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, the North's population grew at a considerably slower rate than the Nation as a whole. Nevertheless, this region's population is large and in all likelihood will continue to grow. This means greater development of land and water resources at the same time that there is growth in demand for outdoor recreation. This report looks at...

  20. Projections of outdoor recreation participation to 2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Michael Bowker; Donald B.K. English; H. Ken Cordell

    1999-01-01

    The authors project future outdoor recreation participation and consumption, in days and trips, well into the next century, as mandated by the Renewable Resources Planning Act (RPA). The chapter begins with a brief description of the data and methods used. They report indexed projections of future recreation participation (by millions of participants aged 16 and over)...

  1. Trends in outdoor recreation activity conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    John J. Lindsay

    1980-01-01

    Conflict caused by outdoor recreation activity groups competing for the same physical and psychological space has given rise to recreation resource planning, allocation and management problems. Research has shown recreation managers can expect certain types of users to be involved in significant conflict about 25 percent of their occupancy time. Well planned and...

  2. Outdoor Recreation in Two European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, James M.

    1987-01-01

    Questionnaires completed by older adults in Luxembourg (N=138) and in France (N=100) revealed a high extent of participation in outdoor recreation (a demonstrated predictor of successful aging) in the two countries. Identified similarities and differences in socioeconomic characteristics, attitudes, and environmental factors associated with…

  3. Monitoring Outdoor Alcohol Advertising in Developing Countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Findings illustrate the innovative ways in which the alcohol industry attempts to reach their market despite existing alcohol marketing regulations and cultural boundaries. Legal measures could be a policy instrument to protect against harmful exposure. Key Words: alcohol marketing, outdoor advertising, Africa, alcohol ...

  4. Mapping Global Urban Dynamics from Nighttime Lights - 1992 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanhua

    Accurate, up-to-date, and consistent information of urban extent is indispensable for numerous applications central to urban planning, ecosystem management, and environmental assessment and monitoring. However, current large-scale urban extent products are not uniform with respect to urban definition, spatial resolution, thematic representation, and temporal frequency. To fill this gap, this study proposed a method to update and backdate global urban extent from currently available urban maps by using nighttime light (NTL) as the main indicator. The method followed three steps: (1) exploring the spatiotemporal variation of NTL thresholds for mapping urban dynamics from NTL time series and developing an object-based thresholding method (i.e., NTL-OUT method, Xie & Weng, 2016b); (2) spatiotemporally enhancing time-series Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) NTL data for detecting broad-scale urban changes (Xie & Weng, 2017); and (3) detecting global urban dynamics during the period between 1992 and 2012 (i.e., 1992, 1997, 2002, 2007, and 2012) from enhanced OLS NTL time series by using the NTL-OUT method. The results show that global urban extent almost doubled during the period from 1992 to 2012, increasing from 0.52 million to 0.98 million km 2, which accounts for 0.39% and 0.72% of the total global land area, respectively. Regionally, the urbanization level varies by continent, with Europe being the most urbanized, followed by North America, Asia, South America, Africa, and Australia-Oceania. In 1992, the urban extent varied from only 0.1% of total continental land area in Australia-Oceania and Africa to 1.18% in Europe. While the proportion of urban extent in North America increased slightly from 1992 to 2002 (i.e., 0.07%), urban extent increased 0.1% for both Asia and South America. In 2012, over 0.7% of the total land was covered by the human built environment, with 0.2% in Africa and Australia-Oceania and around 0

  5. Physical Education & Outdoor Education: Complementary but Discrete Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Peter; McCullagh, John

    2011-01-01

    The Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation (ACHPER) includes Outdoor Education (OE) as a component of Physical Education (PE). Yet Outdoor Education is clearly thought of by many as a discrete discipline separate from Physical Education. Outdoor Education has a body of knowledge that differs from that of Physical…

  6. Seeking Resilience and Sustainability: Outdoor Education in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Peter; Ho, Susanna

    2009-01-01

    Outdoor education is not a universal value. Rather, outdoor education's contributions need to be grounded in time, place and culture. In this paper we describe the historical and cultural milieu that has enabled the emergence of outdoor education in Singapore and report on exploratory survey research into Singaporean teachers' conceptions of…

  7. America's Outdoor Recreation Areas--Playgrounds for the Affluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, John D.

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the societal benefits of outdoor recreation and to determine the relationship of social stratification to utilization of outdoor recreation facilities. Conclusions are that many of America's outdoor recreation sites are located at considerable distances from population concentrations and require substantial…

  8. The Hidden Costs of Outdoor Education/Recreation Academic Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Christian

    Academic training programs in the field of outdoor education and recreation have increased considerably in the past few decades, but their true costs are often hidden. A survey of 15 outdoor college programs in the United States and Canada examined special fees associated with outdoor courses. The cost of necessary personal equipment and clothing…

  9. Split-second recognition: what makes outdoor advertising work?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meurs, A.; Aristoff, M.

    2009-01-01

    CBS Outdoor used a tachistoscope to determine how long it takes to recognize the brand/product advertised in 187 outdoor posters in the Netherlands. Additionally, CBS Outdoor measured the creative appeal of these advertisements. Using 80 content and format variables, an explanatory model was

  10. Cultivating lived-body consciousness: Enhancing cognition and emotion through outdoor learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorburn Malcolm

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Through using school-based outdoor learning as the research context, the paper analyses the connections between bodily experiences and the embodied mind. Recent theorizing in outdoor learning, in reflecting phenomenology and Deweyian influences, has teased out how the relationships between the self, others and nature (environment can be extended to include embodied experiences. This would, it is argued, add something extra to either the intrinsic pursuit of enjoying practical experiences or the instrumental quest for subject knowledge gains via cognitive- informed analytical cycles of action and reflection. While generally sympathetic to this critique, we consider there is a cognitive and emotional need for embodied experiences to demonstrate that they can be suitably contemplative as well. Through drawing upon Tiberius (2008 naturalist-informed theorizing, the paper reviews the part bodily experiences in outdoor learning can play in cultivating stable values and in developing reasoning practices that provide insights into how personal responsibility can be exercised in relation to how we live. Through referencing the Scottish policy context, the paper exemplifies how learning outdoors can flourish on the basis of a joint body-mind focus; where pupils review their relations with others and nature, as well as valuing times when they are absorbed in experiences which fully engage their personal interests, skills and capacities. To enhance the prospects of these learning gains occurring we provide a self-check set of questions for teachers to review to as part of appraisal of learning and teaching outdoors

  11. Uptilted Macros as an Outdoor Solution for Indoor Users in High Rise Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, Maria Laura Luque; Vejlgaard, Benny; Mogensen, Preben

    2015-01-01

    With an expected broadband traffic volume growth of 1000x in the coming years, the need to provide coverage and capacity to the high rise buildings scenarios becomes a challenge for operators. Due to the difficulties in deploying their networks inside buildings, an outdoor alternative is needed....... This paper investigates the usage of Long Term Evolution-Advanced (LTEA) uptilted macros pointing to the upper floors, as an outdoor solution to provide coverage and capacity to high rise buildings. This solution, in combination with the existing downtilted macro and street level micro networks, is able...

  12. Shadow Detection Based on Regions of Light Sources for Object Extraction in Nighttime Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gil-Beom; Lee, Myeong-Jin; Lee, Woo-Kyung; Park, Joo-Heon; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2017-03-22

    Intelligent video surveillance systems detect pre-configured surveillance events through background modeling, foreground and object extraction, object tracking, and event detection. Shadow regions inside video frames sometimes appear as foreground objects, interfere with ensuing processes, and finally degrade the event detection performance of the systems. Conventional studies have mostly used intensity, color, texture, and geometric information to perform shadow detection in daytime video, but these methods lack the capability of removing shadows in nighttime video. In this paper, a novel shadow detection algorithm for nighttime video is proposed; this algorithm partitions each foreground object based on the object's vertical histogram and screens out shadow objects by validating their orientations heading toward regions of light sources. From the experimental results, it can be seen that the proposed algorithm shows more than 93.8% shadow removal and 89.9% object extraction rates for nighttime video sequences, and the algorithm outperforms conventional shadow removal algorithms designed for daytime videos.

  13. Nighttime exposure to electromagnetic fields and childhood leukemia: an extended pooled analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schüz, Joachim; Svendsen, Anne Louise; Linet, Martha S

    2007-01-01

    analysis of case-control studies on ELF EMF exposure and risk of childhood leukemia to examine nighttime residential exposures. Data from four countries (Canada, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States) were included in the analysis, comprising 1,842 children diagnosed with leukemia and 3......It has been hypothesized that nighttime bedroom measurements of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMF) may represent a more accurate reflection of exposure and have greater biologic relevance than previously used 24-/48-hour measurements. Accordingly, the authors extended a pooled......,099 controls (diagnosis dates ranged from 1988 to 1996). The odds ratios for nighttime ELF EMF exposure for categories of 0.1-or=0.4 microT as compared with

  14. Obese children and adolescents have elevated nighttime blood pressure independent of insulin resistance and arterial stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, Kristian N; Olsen, Michael H; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance has been related to elevated blood pressure (BP) in obese children and may adversely affect the vasculature by arterial stiffening. The objective was to investigate whether daytime and nighttime BP were elevated and related to insulin resistance and arterial stiffness...... in obese children and adolescents. METHODS: Ninety-two obese patients aged 10-18 years were compared with 49 healthy control individuals. Insulin resistance was measured as the homeostatic assessment model (HOMA), and arterial stiffness was measured as carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV). RESULTS...... analyses, the higher nighttime BP in the obese group was independent of logHOMA and cfPWV. CONCLUSIONS: Obese children had a higher nighttime BP when compared with the control group independently of insulin resistance and arterial stiffness. No relationship was found between insulin resistance and arterial...

  15. A thermodynamic geography: night-time satellite imagery as a proxy measure of emergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscieme, Luca; Pulselli, Federico M; Bastianoni, Simone; Elvidge, Christopher D; Anderson, Sharolyn; Sutton, Paul C

    2014-11-01

    Night-time satellite imagery enables the measurement, visualization, and mapping of energy consumption in an area. In this paper, an index of the "sum of lights" as observed by night-time satellite imagery within national boundaries is compared with the emergy of the nations. Emergy is a measure of the solar energy equivalent used, directly or indirectly, to support the processes that characterize the economic activity in a country. Emergy has renewable and non-renewable components. Our results show that the non-renewable component of national emergy use is positively correlated with night-time satellite imagery. This relationship can be used to produce emergy density maps which enable the incorporation of spatially explicit representations of emergy in geographic information systems. The region of Abruzzo (Italy) is used to demonstrate this relationship as a spatially disaggregate case.

  16. Precursory effects in the nighttime VLF signal amplitude for the 18th January, 2011 Pakistan earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Sasmal, S.

    2012-02-01

    We have presented the result of the analysis of the nighttime VLF signals transmitted from the Indian Navy station VTX (latitude 8.43°N, longitude 77.73°E) at 19.2 kHz and received at Kolkata (latitude 22.57°N, longitude 88.24°E). On 18th January, 2011 an earthquake of magnitude 7.4 occurred at Southwestern Pakistan (latitude 28.9°N, longitude 64°E). We have analyzed the nighttime VLF signals for 2 weeks around 18th of January, 2011 to see if there have been any precursory effects of this earthquake. We have found that the amplitude of the nighttime VLF signals anomalously fluctuated 4 days before the earthquake. This agrees well with our previous findings based on the analysis of 1 year of earthquake data.

  17. Updated outdoor recreation use values on national forests and other public lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John. Loomis

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes more than 30 years of the literature on net economic value of outdoor recreation on public lands. The report provides average net willingness to pay or consumer surplus per day for 30 recreation activities at the national level. Values per day by recreation activity are also presented by census region of the United States. Detailed tables provide...

  18. Host outdoor exposure variability affects the transmission and spread of Zika virus: Insights for epidemic control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ajelli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus transmission dynamics in urban environments follow a complex spatiotemporal pattern that appears unpredictable and barely related to high mosquito density areas. In this context, human activity patterns likely have a major role in Zika transmission dynamics. This paper examines the effect of host variability in the amount of time spent outdoors on Zika epidemiology in an urban environment.First, we performed a survey on time spent outdoors by residents of Miami-Dade County, Florida. Second, we analyzed both the survey and previously published national data on outdoors time in the U.S. to provide estimates of the distribution of the time spent outdoors. Third, we performed a computational modeling evaluation of Zika transmission dynamics, based on the time spent outdoors by each person. Our analysis reveals a strong heterogeneity of the host population in terms of time spent outdoors-data are well captured by skewed gamma distributions. Our model-based evaluation shows that in a heterogeneous population, Zika would cause a lower number of infections than in a more homogenous host population (up to 4-fold differences, but, at the same time, the epidemic would spread much faster. We estimated that in highly heterogeneous host populations the timing of the implementation of vector control measures is the major factor for limiting the number of Zika infections.Our findings highlight the need of considering host variability in exposure time for managing mosquito-borne infections and call for the revision of the triggers for vector control strategies, which should integrate mosquito density data and human outdoor activity patterns in specific areas.

  19. Indoor and outdoor biomonitoring using lichens at urban and rural primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canha, N; Almeida, S M; Freitas, M C; Wolterbeek, H T

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring particulate matter (PM) and its chemical constituents in classrooms is a subject of special concern within the scientific community in order to control and minimize child exposure. Regulatory sampling methods have presented several limitations in their application to larger number of classrooms due to operational and financial constraints. Consequently, passive sampling methodologies using filters were developed for indoor sampling. However, such methodologies could not provide parallel information for outdoors, which is important to identify pollution sources and assess outdoor contribution to the indoors. Therefore, biomonitoring with transplanted lichens, a technique usually applied for outdoor studies, was used both indoor and outdoor of classrooms. Three main objectives were proposed, to (i) characterize simultaneously indoor and outdoor of classrooms regarding inorganic air pollutants, (ii) investigate spatial patterns of lichen conductivity, and (iii) assess pollution sources that contribute to a poor indoor air quality in schools. Lichens Flavoparmelia caperata were transplanted to indoor and outdoor of classrooms for 59 d. After exposure, electric conductivity of lichens leachate was measured to evaluate lichen vitality and cell damage. Outdoors lichen conductivity was higher near the main highways, and indoors there was great variability in levels, which indicates different emissions sources and different ventilation patterns. Chemical content of lichens was assessed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), and As, Br, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Sr, Ta, Th, Yb, and Zn were determined. Element accumulation, crustal enrichment factors, and spatial variability of elements were analyzed and contaminants from anthropogenic sources, such as traffic (As, Sb, and Zn) and indoor chalk (Ca) found. Classrooms with potential indoor air quality problems were identified by presenting higher accumulations of

  20. Nighttime Insomnia Symptoms and Perceived Health in the America Insomnia Survey (AIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, James K.; Coulouvrat, Catherine; Hajak, Goeran; Lakoma, Matthew D.; Petukhova, Maria; Roth, Thomas; Sampson, Nancy A.; Shahly, Victoria; Shillington, Alicia; Stephenson, Judith J.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To explore the distribution of the 4 cardinal nighttime symptoms of insomnia—difficulty initiating sleep (DIS), difficulty maintaining sleep (DMS), early morning awakening (EMA), and nonrestorative sleep (NRS)—in a national sample of health plan members and the associations of these nighttime symptoms with sociodemographics, comorbidity, and perceived health. Design/Setting/Participants: Cross-sectional telephone survey of 6,791 adult respondents. Intervention: None. Measurements/Results: Current insomnia was assessed using the Brief Insomnia Questionnaire (BIQ)—a fully structured validated scale generating diagnoses of insomnia using DSM-IV-TR, ICD-10, and RDC/ICSD-2 inclusion criteria. DMS (61.0%) and EMA (52.2%) were more prevalent than DIS (37.7%) and NRS (25.2%) among respondents with insomnia. Sociodemographic correlates varied significantly across the 4 symptoms. All 4 nighttime symptoms were significantly related to a wide range of comorbid physical and mental conditions. All 4 also significantly predicted decrements in perceived health both in the total sample and among respondents with insomnia after adjusting for comorbid physical and mental conditions. Joint associations of the 4 symptoms predicting perceived health were additive and related to daytime distress/impairment. Individual-level associations were strongest for NRS. At the societal level, though, where both prevalence and strength of individual-level associations were taken into consideration, DMS had the strongest associations. Conclusions: The extent to which nighttime insomnia symptoms are stable over time requires future long-term longitudinal study. Within the context of this limitation, the results suggest that core nighttime symptoms are associated with different patterns of risk and perceived health and that symptom-based subtyping might have value. Citation: Walsh JK; Coulouvrat C; Hajak G; Lakoma MD; Petukhova M; Roth T; Sampson NA; Shahly V; Shillington A

  1. Canopy uptake dominates nighttime carbonyl sulfide fluxes in a boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijmans, Linda M. J.; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Seibt, Ulli; Sun, Wu; Vesala, Timo; Mammarella, Ivan; Kolari, Pasi; Aalto, Juho; Franchin, Alessandro; Vecchi, Roberta; Valli, Gianluigi; Chen, Huilin

    2017-09-01

    Nighttime vegetative uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS) can exist due to the incomplete closure of stomata and the light independence of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase, which complicates the use of COS as a tracer for gross primary productivity (GPP). In this study we derived nighttime COS fluxes in a boreal forest (the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, Finland; 61°51' N, 24°17' E; 181 m a.s.l.) from June to November 2015 using two different methods: eddy-covariance (EC) measurements (FCOS-EC) and the radon-tracer method (FCOS-Rn). The total nighttime COS fluxes averaged over the whole measurement period were -6.8 ± 2.2 and -7.9 ± 3.8 pmol m-2 s-1 for FCOS-Rn and FCOS-EC, respectively, which is 33-38 % of the average daytime fluxes and 21 % of the total daily COS uptake. The correlation of 222Rn (of which the source is the soil) with COS (average R2 = 0.58) was lower than with CO2 (0.70), suggesting that the main sink of COS is not located at the ground. These observations are supported by soil chamber measurements that show that soil contributes to only 34-40 % of the total nighttime COS uptake. We found a decrease in COS uptake with decreasing nighttime stomatal conductance and increasing vapor-pressure deficit and air temperature, driven by stomatal closure in response to a warm and dry period in August. We also discuss the effect that canopy layer mixing can have on the radon-tracer method and the sensitivity of (FCOS-EC) to atmospheric turbulence. Our results suggest that the nighttime uptake of COS is mainly driven by the tree foliage and is significant in a boreal forest, such that it needs to be taken into account when using COS as a tracer for GPP.

  2. Shortened nighttime sleep duration in early life and subsequent childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Janice F; Zimmerman, Frederick J

    2010-09-01

    To test associations between daytime and nighttime sleep duration and subsequent obesity in children and adolescents. Prospective cohort. Panel Survey of Income Dynamics Child Development Supplements (1997 and 2002) from US children. Subjects aged 0 to 13 years (n = 1930) at baseline (1997). Binary indicators of short daytime and nighttime sleep duration (sleep scores) at baseline. Body mass index at follow-up (2002) was converted to age- and sex-specific z scores and trichotomized (normal weight, overweight, obese) using established cut points. Ordered logistic regression was used to model body mass index classification as a function of short daytime and nighttime sleep at baseline and follow-up, and important covariates included socioeconomic status, parents' body mass index, and, for children older than 4 years, body mass index at baseline. For younger children (aged 0-4 years at baseline), short duration of nighttime sleep at baseline was strongly associated with increased risk of subsequent overweight or obesity (odds ratio = 1.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-2.80). For older children (aged 5-13 years), baseline sleep was not associated with subsequent weight status; however, contemporaneous sleep was inversely associated. Daytime sleep had little effect on subsequent obesity in either group. Shortened sleep duration in early life is a modifiable risk factor with important implications for obesity prevention and treatment. Insufficient nighttime sleep among infants and preschool-aged children may be a lasting risk factor for subsequent obesity. Napping does not appear to be a substitute for nighttime sleep in terms of obesity prevention.

  3. Ethical complexities in standard of care randomized trials: A case study of morning versus nighttime dosing of blood pressure drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Scott Y H; Miller, Franklin G

    2015-12-01

    Pragmatic trials comparing "standard of care" treatments provide comparative effectiveness data to make practice of medicine more evidence-based. With electronic health records, recruiting and conducting such trials can be relatively inexpensive. But some worry that the traditional research ethics framework poses unnecessary obstacles and is not appropriate for evaluating such clinical trials. This concern is based on the view (which we call the "Standard of Care Principle") that such research is similar to usual clinical practice and therefore does not raise significant ethical issues since everyone in the research study will receive an accepted standard of care treatment. A case study of a pragmatic randomized clinical trial (Blood Pressure Medication Timing study) comparing morning versus nighttime dosing of antihypertensive medications. The Blood Pressure Medication Timing study has been proposed as a paradigm example of why the Standard of Care Principle obviates the need for traditional levels of ethical scrutiny and how the current regulatory framework poses unnecessary obstacles to research. We provide an ethical analysis of the Blood Pressure Medication Timing study, drawing on the empirical literature as well as on normative analysis. The Standard of Care Principle is the main ethical rationale given by commentators for asserting that the Blood Pressure Medication Timing study does not require "significant ethical debate" and by investigators for the assertion that the Blood Pressure Medication Timing study is minimal risk and thus eligible for lessened regulatory requirements. However, the Blood Pressure Medication Timing study raises important ethical issues, including whether it is even necessary, given the considerable randomized clinical trial evidence in support of nighttime dosing, a much larger (N≈17,000) confirmatory randomized clinical trial already in progress, evidence for safety of nighttime dosing, and the cost-free availability of the

  4. Assessing Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Urbanization Dynamics in Southeast Asia Using Time Series of DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraregional spatial variations of satellite-derived anthropogenic nighttime light signals are gradually applied to identify different lighting areas with various socioeconomic activity and urbanization levels when characterizing urbanization dynamics. However, most previous partitioning approaches are carried out at local scales, easily leading to multi-standards of the extracted results from local areas, and this inevitably hinders the comparative analysis on the urbanization dynamics of the large region. Therefore, a partitioning approach considering the characteristics of nighttime light signals at both local and regional scales is necessary for studying spatiotemporal characteristics of urbanization dynamics across the large region using nighttime light imagery. Based on the quadratic relationships between the pixel-level nighttime light brightness and the corresponding spatial gradient for individual cities, we here proposed an improved partitioning approach to quickly identify different types of nighttime lighting areas for the entire region of Southeast Asia. Using the calibrated Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Line-scan System (DMSP/OLS data with greater comparability, continuity, and intra-urban variability, the annual nighttime light imagery spanning years 1992–2013 were divided into four types of nighttime lighting areas: low, medium, high, and extremely high, associated with different intensity of anthropogenic activity. The results suggest that Southeast Asia has experienced a rapid and diverse urbanization process from 1992 to 2013. Areas with moderate or low anthropogenic activity show a faster growth rate for the spatial expansion than the developed areas with intense anthropogenic activity. Transitions between different nighttime lighting types potentially depict the trajectory of urban development, the darker areas are gradually transitioning to areas with higher lighting, indicating conspicuous trends

  5. Temperatures on europa from galileo photopolarimeter-radiometer: nighttime thermal anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer; Tamppari; Martin; Travis

    1999-05-28

    Galileo observations of Europa's thermal emission show low-latitude diurnal brightness temperatures in the range of 86 to 132 kelvin. Nighttime temperatures form an unexpected pattern, with high temperatures on the bright ejecta blanket of the crater Pwyll and an equatorial minimum in temperatures after sunset, uncorrelated with surface albedo or geology. The nighttime anomalies may be due to regional thermal inertia variations of an unknown origin, which are equivalent to a two- to threefold variation in thermal conductivity, or to endogenic heat fluxes locally reaching 1 watt per square meter. Endogenic heat flow at this high level, although consistent with some geological evidence, is theoretically unlikely.

  6. School Forest - An Outdoor Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Linda Lee

    1972-01-01

    Describes a one or two night camping trip for fifth graders that is part of the Madison, Wisconsin forest program, created to give students a concentrated study of nature and provide the experiences of group living. (RB)

  7. Understanding the information content of night-time light satellite data for modelling socio-economic dimensions of global change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Christopher Nicholas Hideo

    This thesis explores the ways in which Earth Observation data can be used to provide information about the human dimensions of global change. After setting out the key themes in global change research, attention is focused on the contribution data from satellite remote sensing systems can make to the detection of human impacts on the Earth's surface. Data sources include night-time light imagery from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS), radar interferometry and new data products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), part of the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's Earth Observing System. Night-time light imagery was analysed with respect to its capability to provide information on population, economic activity (via the Gross Domestic Product - GDP) and carbon dioxide emissions. Using different levels of sub-national economic data from the European Commission's statistical organisation Eurostat, relationships between radiance and GDP were established. This introduced issues concerning the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem and the Ecological Fallacy, which have been discussed in relation to the problem. These correlations were very high and anomalies could be categorized into three different types. Disaggregated maps of economic activity at 5km resolution have been produced for 11 countries in the European Union as well as for the conterminous United States using these relationships. The results gained from this exercise are highly encouraging with most countries being mapped to within 5% of the published national GDP figure. This thesis provides a timely contribution to the debate on the human dimensions of global change at a time when international organisations are in the process of identifying the best ways to proceed with the monitoring and modelling of its impacts. The results and recommendations offer a great deal of encouragement for further research and sets the scene for the

  8. Evaluation of the thermal insulation of clothing of infants sleeping outdoors in Northern winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourula, Marjo; Fukazawa, Takako; Isola, Arja; Hassi, Juhani; Tochihara, Yutaka; Rintamäki, Hannu

    2011-04-01

    It is a common practice in Northern countries that children aged about 2 weeks to 2 years take their daytime sleep outdoors in prams in winter. The aim was to evaluate the thermal insulation of clothing of infants sleeping outdoors in winter. Clothing data of infants aged 3.5 months was collected, and sleep duration, skin and microclimate temperatures, humidity inside middle wear, air temperature and velocity of the outdoor environment were recorded during sleep taken outdoors (n = 34) and indoors (n = 33) in families' homes. The insulation of clothing ensembles was measured by using a baby-size thermal manikin, and the values were used for defining clothing insulation of the observed infants. Required clothing insulation for each condition was estimated according to ISO 11079. Clothing insulation did not correlate with ambient air temperature. The observed and required insulation of the study group was equal at about -5 °C, but overdressing existed in warmer and deficiency in thermal insulation in colder temperatures (r (s) 0.739, p insulation increased, the cooling rate of T (sk) increased linearly (r (s) 0.605, p thermal insulation for outdoor sleeping infants during northern winter. Therefore, the necessity for guidelines is obvious. The study provides information for adequate cold protection of infants sleeping in cold conditions.

  9. Crime, physical activity and outdoor recreation among Latino adolescents in Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinew, Kimberly J; Stodolska, Monika; Roman, Caterina G; Yahner, Jennifer

    2013-11-01

    The purpose was to examine how fear of crime, crime victimization, and perceived level of community incivilities are related to physical activity participation and outdoor recreation among Latino adolescents. The study utilized a mixed methods approach that included 25 qualitative interviews and 390 school-based surveys collected from youth across three schools in Little Village, Chicago, Illinois. Results showed that Latino adolescents who expressed greater fear of crime also engaged in less physical activity and outdoor recreation. There was no association between crime victimization and physical activity and outdoor recreation. Those who perceived greater levels of community incivilities also engaged in less outdoor recreation, but perception of incivilities had no significant association with physical activity levels. Interview data revealed most of the children believed crime was a serious problem in their neighborhood and it impacted their ability to be physically active and play outside. Fear of crime was related to lower physical activity and outdoor recreation. It is imperative that communities provide safe environments for children to be active. Increasing police and adult presence in parks and school grounds is recommended. Moreover, efforts must be made to reduce the gang problems in Latino communities. © 2013.

  10. Detecting indoor and outdoor environments using the ActiGraph GT3X+ light sensor in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jennifer I; Coe, Dawn P; Larsen, Chelsea A; Rider, Brian C; Conger, Scott A; Bassett, David R

    2014-01-01

    Experts recommend children spend more time playing outdoors. The ambient light sensor of the ActiGraph GT3X+ provides lux measurements. A lux is the International System's unit of illumination, equivalent to 1 lm·m. Few studies have established a lux threshold for determining whether a child is indoors or outdoors. This study aimed 1) to assess the reliability of the ActiGraph GT3X+ ambient light sensor, 2) to identify a lux threshold to accurately discriminate between indoor and outdoor activities in children, and 3) to test the accuracy of the lux threshold in a free-living environment. In part 1, a series of reliability tests were performed using 20 ActiGraph GT3X+ monitors under different environmental conditions. Cronbach's alpha was used to determine interinstrument reliability. In part 2, 18 children performed 11 different activities (five indoors and six outdoors) for 6 min each. The optimal threshold for detecting indoor/outdoor activity was determined using a receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. In part 3, 18 children at a preschool wore the monitor during a school day. Percent accuracy was determined for all conditions. In part 1, the devices had Cronbach's alpha values of 0.992 and 1.000 for indoor and outdoor conditions, respectively, indicating high interinstrument reliability. In part 2, the optimal lux threshold was determined to be 240 lux (sensitivity = 0.92, specificity = 0.88, area under the curve = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.951-0.970). In part 3, results of the school-day validation demonstrated the monitor was 97.0% accurate for overall detection of indoor and outdoor conditions (outdoor = 88.9%, indoor = 99.1%). The results demonstrate that an ActiGraph GT3X+ lux threshold of 240 can accurately assess indoor and outdoor conditions of preschool children in a free-living environment.

  11. Experimental Investigation of the Influence of Obstacle in the Room on Passive Night-Time Cooling using Displacement Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pomianowski, Michal Zbigniew; Khalegi, Farzad; Domarks, Giedrius

    2011-01-01

    Night-time ventilation is a promising approach for reducing the energy needed for cooling buildings without reducing thermal comfort. The objective of this paper is to determine how an internal obstacle, such as a table, will influence the heat transfer in the room and the efficiency of night-tim...

  12. Low-Income Mothers' Nighttime and Weekend Work: Daily Associations with Child Behavior, Mother-Child Interactions, and Mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassman-Pines, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated low-income mothers' daily nighttime and weekend work and family outcomes. Sixty-one mothers of preschool-aged children reported daily on work hours, mood, mother-child interaction, and child behavior for two weeks (N = 724 person-days). Although nighttime and weekend work are both nonstandard schedules, results showed…

  13. Nearby outdoor environments and seniors physical activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available More than 60% of older Americans have sedentary lifestyles1 1 According to DHHS (1996. and are recommended more physical activities for health benefit. Nearby outdoor environments on residential sites may impact older inhabitants׳ physical activities there (defined as walking, gardening, yard work, and other outdoor physical activities on residential sites. This study surveyed 110 assisted-living residents in Houston, Texas, regarding their previous residential sites before moving to a retirement community and physical activities there. Twelve environmental features were studied under four categories (typology, motivators, function, and safety. Based on data availability, a subset of 57 sample sites was analyzed in Geographic Information Systems. Hierarchical linear modeling was applied to estimate physical activities as a function of the environments. Higher levels of physical activity were found to be positively related with four environmental features (transitional-areas, connecting-paths, walk-ability, and less paving.

  14. Metrology for fire experiments in outdoor conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Silvani, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Natural fires can be considered as scale-dependant, non-linear processes of mass, momentum and heat transport, resulting from a turbulent reactive and radiative fluid medium flowing over a complex medium, the vegetal fuel. In natural outdoor conditions, the experimental study of natural fires at real scale needs the development of an original metrology, one able to capture the large range of time and length scales involved in its dynamic nature and also able to resist the thermal, mechanical and chemical aggression of flames on devices. Robust, accurate and poorly intrusive tools must be carefully set-up and used for gaining very fluctuating data over long periods. These signals also need the development of original post-processing tools that take into account the non-steady nature of their stochastic components. Metrology for Fire Experiments in Outdoor Conditions closely analyzes these features, and also describes measurements techniques, the thermal insulation of fragile electronic systems, data acquisitio...

  15. Spatial Resilience of Outdoor Domestic Space in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Felicio Veríssimo

    2012-07-01

    ensure collective self-reliance. Shaping a green and ruralised urbanisation at the margins of the Mozambican post-colonial dualistic city, which I call the Agrocity, the Outdoor Domestic Space is resilient because it is able to adjust domestic space as a strategy to secure livelihoods, provide urban food, commerce and services, maintain vital kinship relationships and produce a comfortable and clean microclimate across the spontaneous neighbourhoods. This spatial resilience is the feature underlying the self-organisation of neighbourhoods with a new way of overcoming alienation from nature, which suggest the continuance of an innate relationship between society, the human habitat and nature.

  16. Outdoor management training z pohledu psychologie

    OpenAIRE

    Šulc, Marek

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is focused on a description of educational methods for outdoor management training managers. This method bears in its basis on the pedagogy of experience, feelings and learning, so that it is possible to find a detailed description of these psychological constructs in this work. The author took heed of a global process of training and education of adults, also to a problem of basis criteria needed for a succesfull realisation of this educational method. There are real, reali...

  17. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiumin; Wang, Kehong; Song, Lihong; Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Donghui

    2017-03-20

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatment significantly decreased soil nematodes density, and night-time warming treatment marginally affected the density. The response of bacterivorous nematode and fungivorous nematode to experimental warming showed the same trend with the total density. Redundancy analysis revealed an opposite effect of soil moisture and soil temperature, and the most important of soil moisture and temperature in night-time among the measured environment factors, affecting soil nematode community. Our findings suggested that daily minimum temperature and warming induced drying are most important factors affecting soil nematode community under the current global asymmetric warming.

  18. Daytime warming has stronger negative effects on soil nematodes than night-time warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiumin; Wang, Kehong; Song, Lihong; Wang, Xuefeng; Wu, Donghui

    2017-03-07

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, that is, stronger warming during night-time than during daytime. Here we focus on how soil nematodes respond to the current asymmetric warming. A field infrared heating experiment was performed in the western of the Songnen Plain, Northeast China. Three warming modes, i.e. daytime warming, night-time warming and diurnal warming, were taken to perform the asymmetric warming condition. Our results showed that the daytime and diurnal warming treatment significantly decreased soil nematodes density, and night-time warming treatment marginally affected the density. The response of bacterivorous nematode and fungivorous nematode to experimental warming showed the same trend with the total density. Redundancy analysis revealed an opposite effect of soil moisture and soil temperature, and the most important of soil moisture and temperature in night-time among the measured environment factors, affecting soil nematode community. Our findings suggested that daily minimum temperature and warming induced drying are most important factors affecting soil nematode community under the current global asymmetric warming.

  19. High day- and night-time temperatures affect grain growth dynamics in contrasting rice genotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Wanju; Yin, Xinyou; Struik, Paul C.; Solis, Celymar; Xie, Fangming; Schmidt, Ralf C.; Huang, Min; Zou, Yingbin; Ye, Changrong; Jagadish, S.V.K.

    2017-01-01

    Rice grain yield and quality are predicted to be highly vulnerable to global warming. Five genotypes including heat-tolerant and susceptible checks, a heat-tolerant near-isogenic line and two hybrids were exposed to control (31 °C/23 °C, day/night), high night-time temperature (HNT; 31 °C/30 °C),

  20. Grain yield and quality responses of tropical hybrid rice to high night-time temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, W.; Yin, X.; Struik, P.C.; Xie, F.; Schmidt, R.C.; Jagadish, K.S.V.

    2016-01-01

    High temperature has a pronounced effect on grain yield and quality in rice. Climate change has increased night temperature more than day temperature in many parts of the world. How rice responds to high night-time temperature (HNT) is largely unknown. This study presents the first effort to assess

  1. The Value of Darkness : A Moral Framework for Urban Nighttime Lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, T.W.

    2017-01-01

    The adverse effects of artificial nighttime lighting, known as light pollution, are emerging as an important environmental issue. To address these effects, current scientific research focuses mainly on identifying what is bad or undesirable about certain types and uses of lighting at night. This

  2. Novel approaches to study climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems: drought and passive nighttime warming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beier, J.C.; Emmett, B.; Gundersen, P.; Tietema, A.; Peñuelas, J.; Estiarte, M.; Gordon, C.; Gorissen, A.; Llorens, L.; Roda, F.; Williams, D.G.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes new approaches for manipulation of temperature and water input in the field. Nighttime warming was created by reflection of infrared radiation. Automatically operated reflective curtains covered the vegetation at night to reduce heat loss to the atmosphere. This approach

  3. Ionospheric storm effects in the nighttime E region caused by neutralized ring current particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bauske

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available During magnetic storms an anomalous increase in the ionization density of the nighttime E region is observed at low and middle latitudes. It has been suggested that this effect is caused by the precipitation of neutralized ring current particles. Here a coupled ring current decay-ionosphere model is used to confirm the validity of this explanation.

  4. Dissonance Between Parent-Selected Bedtimes and Young Children's Circadian Physiology Influences Nighttime Settling Difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebourgeois, Monique K; Wright, Kenneth P; Lebourgeois, Hannah B; Jenni, Oskar G

    2013-12-01

    Nighttime settling difficulties (i.e., bedtime resistance, sleep-onset delay) occur in about 25% of young children and are associated with attentional, behavioral, and emotional problems. We examined whether the timing of internal (endogenous) circadian melatonin phase (i.e., dim light melatonin onset; DLMO) and its relationship with parent-selected bedtimes were related to nighttime settling behaviors. Fourteen regularly napping preschoolers (8 females; 30-36 months) participated in a 6-day protocol (parent-report of nighttime settling, actigraphic assessment of sleep onset latency, evening salivary DLMO). Average DLMO clock time was 07:40 p.m. ± 00:48 minutes, occurring 29 minutes ± 32 minutes prior to bedtime (lights-out). Children with later DLMOs had longer sleep-onset latencies (r = .62) and poorer success in falling asleep (r = -.59). Children whose bedtimes were closer to their DLMO had longer sleep-onset latencies (r = .72) and increased bedtime resistance (r = -.54). We conclude that dissonance between parent-selected bedtimes and children's circadian physiology may contribute to the development of nighttime settling difficulties in early childhood.

  5. Fast and true-to-life application of daytime colours to night-time imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, M.A.; Toet, A.

    2007-01-01

    We developed a fast and efficient method to derive and apply a natural colour mapping for night-time imagery from multi-band sensors. The colour mapping is derived from the combination of a multi-band image and a corresponding natural colour reference image. The mapping optimizes the match between

  6. Safety, surveillance and policing in the night-time economy: a visitor perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, J.

    2014-01-01

    The current doctoral thesis takes particular interest in the city-centre night-time economy (NTE), against a background of literatures that link economic vitality of city-centres, consumption and safety to greater need for surveillance and policing. Increasingly, nightlife is being problematized in

  7. Decreased nighttime heart rate variability is associated with increased stroke risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binici, Zeynep; Mouridsen, Mette Rauhe; Køber, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of stroke in healthy individuals is challenging and there is a diurnal variation of stroke onset. We hypothesized that heart rate variability with a focus on nighttime heart rate variability will predict the risk of stroke in apparently healthy middle-age and elderly subjects....

  8. Rythms of the night: spatiotemporal inequalities in the night-time economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwanen, T.; Aalst, I. van; Brands, J.; Timan, T.

    2012-01-01

    The authors seek to extend the literature on inequalities and exclusion in the nighttime economy through a rhythmic analysis of visitor presence in public space in nightlife districts in the city centres of the Dutch cities of Groningen, Utrecht, and Rotterdam. Substantial inequalities in visitor

  9. Patterns of Developmental Change in Infants' Nighttime Sleep Awakenings from 6 through 36 Months of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinraub, Marsha; Bender, Randall H.; Friedman, Sarah L.; Susman, Elizabeth J.; Knoke, Bonnie; Bradley, Robert; Houts, Renate; Williams, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Nighttime sleep awakenings and infant and family characteristics were measured longitudinally in more than 1,200 infants when the infants were 6, 15, 24, and 36 months old. By 6 months of age, the majority of children slept through the night, awakening their mothers only about once or twice per week. However, not all children followed this…

  10. When thinking impairs sleep : Trait, daytime and nighttime repetitive thinking in insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancee, J.; Eisma, M.C.; van Zanten, K.B.; Topper, M.

    2017-01-01

    We performed two studies in individuals with sleep problems to investigate trait, daytime, and nighttime repetitive thinking as risk factors for insomnia. In Study 1, 139 participants completed questionnaires on worry, rumination, insomnia, anxiety, depression, and a sleep diary. Trait rumination

  11. National estimates of outdoor recreational injuries treated in emergency departments, United States, 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Adrian H; Haileyesus, Tadesse; Greenspan, Arlene I

    2008-01-01

    To provide national estimates of nonfatal outdoor recreational injuries treated in US emergency departments (EDs). Outdoor recreational injuries from January 2004 through December 2005 were identified using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program, a nationally representative sample of ED visits. National estimates of outdoor recreational injuries were calculated, and activities leading to injury, demographic characteristics, principal diagnoses, and primary body parts affected were described. From January 2004 through December 2005, an estimated 212 708 (95% CI = 113 808- 311 608) persons were treated each year in US EDs for outdoor recreational injuries. The annual rate of injuries was 72.1 per 100 000 population (95% CI = 38.6-105.6). Males accounted for 68.2% of the injuries. The lower limb (27%), upper limb (25%), and head and neck region (23.3%) were the most commonly injured body regions. Fractures (27.4%) and sprains or strains (23.9%) were the most common diagnoses. Traumatic brain injuries were diagnosed in 6.5% of injuries, and 5% of injuries resulted in hospitalization or transfer to another hospital. The results of this study provide a starting point for further research into the epidemiology of outdoor and wilderness injury. The results reinforce many common perceptions about the nature of these injuries while highlighting the potential severity and long-term consequences of the injuries. The general recommendations of proper planning, preparation, and problem anticipation for outdoor and wilderness injury prevention should be followed to reduce both the number and severity of injuries.

  12. Oxidation of carboxylic acids regenerates hydroxyl radicals in the unpolluted and nighttime troposphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gabriel

    2010-07-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) controls the removal of organic compounds from the troposphere. Atmospheric chemistry models significantly under-predict OH levels in unpolluted environments, implying that they are regenerated via some unknown mechanism(s). This work uses computational chemistry to demonstrate that the photochemical oxidation of alkyl carboxylic acids can efficiently regenerate the hydroxyl radical via unimolecular decomposition of alpha-carboxyalkylperoxy radicals. For acetic acid and propanoic acid the proposed mechanism is predicted to dominate in the unpolluted lower troposphere, and it may also operate to some extent in the mid to upper troposphere. Alkyl carboxylic acids are also predicted to act as a new source of nighttime OH throughout the planetary boundary layer, where OH levels are also under-predicted. The thermodynamic requirements for reactions of this class are discussed, and some candidate OH-reforming molecules particularly relevant to aromatic photooxidation are identified. Adopting a broader perspective, the alpha-carboxyalkyl radical precursors that react with O(2) to form the unstable alpha-carboxyalkylperoxy type radicals are also expected to form during combustion, in the interstellar medium, and from the gamma-irradiation of glycine and related amino acids, and the potential importance of this new chemistry in these environments is discussed. Master equation simulations suggest that alpha-carboxyalkyl + O(2) reactions provide a prompt OH source during the autoignition and combustion of biodiesel and other oxygenated biofuels, where carboxylic acids are formed as early stage oxidation products. Ketene combustion is also thought to proceed via these OH-reforming alpha-carboxyalkyl radicals. The in vivo formation of alpha-carboxyalkylperoxy radicals followed by oxidation to the highly reactive OH radical may induce oxidative stress in the human body, in a process initiated by gamma-rays. Finally, the reaction of ketenes with OH to

  13. Comparison of insect species associated with decomposing remains recovered inside dwellings and outdoors on the island of Oahu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, M L

    1991-05-01

    A comparison of insects collected from 35 cases of decomposing remains on the island of Oahu, Hawaiian Islands (14 from indoor situations and 21 from outdoors), yielded a total of 22 species of insects in 3 orders and 12 families. Of these, five species were recovered in both indoor and outdoor situations. Remains recovered indoors had a greater variety of Diptera larvae associated with them, while remains discovered outdoors had a greater variety of Coleoptera species present. Some species of insects were restricted to remains discovered indoors, while others were found only associated with remains in outdoor situations. Knowledge of the species of insects associated with different habitats may serve to provide information concerning the history of the remains.

  14. Initial evaluation of nighttime restlessness in a naturally occurring canine model of osteoarthritis pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knazovicky, David; Tomas, Andrea; Motsinger-Reif, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain due to osteoarthritis (OA) can lead to significant disruption of sleep and increased restlessness. Our objective was to assess whether naturally occurring canine OA is associated with nighttime restlessness and so has potential as a model of OA-associated sleep disturbance. The study was designed as a two-part prospective masked, placebo-controlled study using client-owned dogs (Part A n = 60; Part B n = 19). Inclusion criteria consisted of OA-associated joint pain and mobility impairment. The primary outcome measure for both parts was nighttime accelerometry. In Part B, quality of sleep was assessed using a clinical metrology instrument (Sleep and Night Time Restlessness Evaluation Score, SNoRE). Part A included dogs receiving two weeks of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) preceded with two weeks of no treatment. Part B was a crossover study, with NSAID/placebo administered for two weeks followed by a washout period of one week and another two weeks of NSAID/placebo. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to assess differences between baseline and treatment. There were no significant changes in accelerometry-measured nighttime activity as a result of NSAID administration. SNoRE measures indicated significant improvements in aspects of the quality of nighttime sleep that did not involve obvious movement. These results reflect the few similar studies in human OA patients. Although accelerometry does not appear to be useful, this model has potential to model the human pain-related nighttime sleep disturbance, and other outcome measures should be explored in this model. PMID:25722957

  15. It's Never Too Late to Dare: Outdoor Adventure Programming for the Age Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    The population pyramid is being turned upside down. Baby boomers are beginning to flood the market for goods and services. It is never too late to encourage people of all ages to "dare" to be active through outdoor adventure activities. This article provides readers with a general understanding of older adults' needs and interests as they relate…

  16. Factors Related to Rural Young Adolescents' Participation in Outdoor, Noncompetitive Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiana, Richard W.; Davis, Marsha; Wilson, Mark G.; McCarty, Frances A.; Green, Gary T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Young adolescents who have little interest in participating in competitive team sports are at an increased risk for physical inactivity. Noncompetitive outdoor physical activity can provide young adolescents with increased opportunities to participate in physical activities that appeal to them and have positive health effects. The purpose…

  17. Graduate Pathways: A Longitudinal Study of Graduates in Outdoor Studies in the U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Heather

    2005-01-01

    A longitudinal study provides a more detailed analysis of the career pathways of graduates than the First Destination Survey can achieve. This survey of 41% of graduates from a BSc (Honours) Outdoor Studies degree also examines the importance of named skills to their careers and the success of the degree in developing each skill. Two thirds of…

  18. Positive Motivational Experience over a Three-Day Outdoor Adventure Trek in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houge Mackenzie, Susan; Kerr, John H.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the motivational and emotional experience of an experienced outdoor activity participant during a three-day guided adventure trek in Colca Canyon, Peru. The research adopted a qualitative autoethnographic approach which provided unique data in the form of diary entries, experiential diagrams, field notes and email content.…

  19. Linking People to the Outdoors: Connections for Healthy Lands, People and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rene Dahl

    2004-01-01

    I greatly appreciate you inviting me to provide the welcome address at this important conference. The following are a few observations I have made regarding the symposium topic and the presentations to be made. There is widespread public recognition of the positive contributions to the quality of life resulting from participation in outdoor recreation. The general...

  20. Modelling of horn-type loudspeakers for outdoor sound reinforcement systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuhmacher, Andreas; Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1999-01-01

    -type loudspeakers is made. The agreement between measured and calculated results is very good provided that a sufficient number of modes is included in the simulation. Simulation models of this kind represent one of the first steps towards a CAD tool for outdoor sound reinforcement systems....

  1. Outdoor Education, a Selected Bibliography (with ERIC Abstracts). ERIC/CRESS Supplement No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools, Las Cruces, NM.

    A supplement to 5 previous bibliographies, this bibliography provides access to some of the latest resource material, research findings, and/or developments in outdoor education. Part I contains 143 citations and abstracts which appeared in "Resources in Education" (RIE) from the January 1975 issue through the December 1975 issue. Part…

  2. Outdoor Adventure Education in East Asia: Interpreting Data from Outward Bound Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibthorp, Jim; Funnell, Aaron; Riley, Mike; Chan, Bacon; Meerts-Brandsma, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Outdoor adventure education (OAE) is philosophically rooted in Western values, yet it has been implemented in non-Western cultures, such as East Asia. This paper examines how OAE functions in East Asia, through data from Hong Kong. Although some cultural differences are clear, there is no compelling evidence that OAE cannot provide benefits in…

  3. Recreation economic values for estimating outdoor recreation economic benefits from the National Forest System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall S. Rosenberger; Eric M. White; Jeffrey D. Kline; Claire. Cvitanovich

    2017-01-01

    Natural resource professionals are often tasked with weighing the benefits and costs of changes in ecosystem services associated with land management alternatives and decisions. In many cases, federal regulations even require land managers and planners to account for these values explicitly. Outdoor recreation is a key ecosystem service provided by national forests and...

  4. Climate change and outdoor recreation participation in the Southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.M. Bowker; Ashley E. Askew; Neelam Poudyal; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Lynne Seymour; H. Ken Cordell

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter we begin to assess the potential effects of climate change on future outdoor recreation in the South, a region spanning 13 states from Virginia to Texas (Chapter 1). Our goal is to provide some useful insights about future natural resource-based recreation-an important nontimber product derived from southern forests-in the face of climate change. We...

  5. The Interplay of Space, Place and Identity: Transforming Our Learning Experiences in an Outdoor Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Alice L. E. V.; Wright, W. Alan; Strean, William B.; Watson, Gavan P. L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we use a day-long professional development workshop for higher education faculty conducted in an outdoor setting as the starting point for an examination of the value of such activities. We explore the potential benefits, in terms of learning and holistic well-being, of educational activities designed to provide participants with…

  6. Injury and illness in college outdoor education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudio, Flavio G; Greenwald, Peter W; Holton, Mark

    2010-12-01

    Many colleges offer outdoor education courses such as rock climbing, kayaking, and mountain biking. Since these sports may be perceived as dangerous, we describe the prevalence of injuries and illnesses in a large, university-based outdoor education program. We also compare composite incident rates from this outdoor program to those of traditional college sports. Cohort of college students participating in either Cornell Outdoor Education (COE) or National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) sports and comparison of incident rates. COE data were prospectively collected in the field; and NCAA data were prospectively collected through the Association's Injury Surveillance System. By definition, a COE injury or illness required follow-up care, prescription medication, or limited course participation. Similarly, a NCAA injury limited further practice or play. Incident rates were calculated as injuries and illnesses per 1000 participant-days (COE) or injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures (NCAA). Included COE courses during 2002-2007 totaled 74 005 participant-days. There were 111 injuries and illnesses, rate = 1.50/1000 participant-days (95% CI 1.24-1.81). The NCAA reported 32 646 899 athlete-exposures during 1988-2004 and 181 476 injuries, rate = 5.56/1000 athlete-exposures (95% CI 5.53-5.58). Compared to COE, the relative risk of injury in NCAA sports was 3.7 (95% CI 3.1-4.5) overall and 3.3 (95% CI 2.8-4.0) after excluding the high-contact sports of football, ice hockey, and wrestling. For COE, mountain biking had the highest incident rate (7.5/1000), which was significantly lower than game injury rates in NCAA football and soccer. The most common injuries for both NCAA and COE were soft-tissue injuries such as sprains and strains. Outdoor education at this university-sponsored program was at least as safe as traditional college sports. Overall, college students were less likely to be injured while participating in COE courses than while participating in NCAA sports

  7. Geometric and Colour Data Fusion for Outdoor 3D Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchán, Pilar; Adán, Antonio; Salamanca, Santiago; Domínguez, Vicente; Chacón, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the generation of accurate, dense and coloured 3D models of outdoor scenarios from scanners. This is a challenging research field in which several problems still remain unsolved. In particular, the process of 3D model creation in outdoor scenes may be inefficient if the scene is digitalized under unsuitable technical (specific scanner on-board camera) and environmental (rain, dampness, changing illumination) conditions. We address our research towards the integration of images and range data to produce photorealistic models. Our proposal is based on decoupling the colour integration and geometry reconstruction stages, making them independent and controlled processes. This issue is approached from two different viewpoints. On the one hand, given a complete model (geometry plus texture), we propose a method to modify the original texture provided by the scanner on-board camera with the colour information extracted from external images taken at given moments and under specific environmental conditions. On the other hand, we propose an algorithm to directly assign external images onto the complete geometric model, thus avoiding tedious on-line calibration processes. We present the work conducted on two large Roman archaeological sites dating from the first century A.D., namely, the Theatre of Segobriga and the Fori Porticus of Emerita Augusta, both in Spain. The results obtained demonstrate that our approach could be useful in the digitalization and 3D modelling fields. PMID:22969327

  8. The LED outdoor lighting revolution : Opportunities, threats and mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aube, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The presence of artificial light at night (ALAN) in environment is now known to have non negligible consequences on the night sky, the fauna, the flora and the human health. A real revolution is undergoing in the outdoor lighting industry threatens the night integrity. This revolution is driven by the advent of the cost-effective Light-Emitting Diode (LED) technology into the outdoor lighting industry. The LEDs provides many opportunities: they are long lasting, easily controlled, and generally allow a more efficient photometric design which, in term, may result in energy savings.After explaining the complex and non-linear behaviour of the propagation of the ALAN into the nocturnal environment, we will outline the potential impact of the ALAN on the human health and on the night sky, and we will introduce some dedicated indicators for its evaluation. We will focus on the role of the blue content of the ALAN in the evaluation of its impact. More specifically we will show how white LED technology, that often shows increased blue light content, compares to the traditional High Pressure Sodium technology. Finally, we will identify the possible mitigations to restrict the adverse impacts of the white LEDs in the urban and rural environment.

  9. Teachers as Designers of Technology-Enhanced Outdoor Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren Sarah Levy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Implementing inquiry in the outdoors introduces many challenges for teachers, some of which can be dealt with using mobile technologies. For productive use of these technologies, teachers should be provided with the opportunity to develop relevant knowledge and practices. In a professional development (PD program in this design-based research, 24 teachers were involved in adaptation of a learning environment supporting inquiry in the outdoors that included the use of mobile technologies. They first experienced the learning environment as learners, then adapted it for their own use, and finally, enacted the adapted environment with peers. We examined the scope and character of teacher involvement in adaptation, and the consequent professional growth, by analyzing observations, questionnaires, interviews and the adapted learning-environments. Findings indicate that all teachers demonstrated change processes, including changes in knowledge and practice, but the coherence of the learning environments decreased when substantial adaptations were made. Some teachers demonstrated professional growth, as reflected by their implementation of ideas learned in the PD program in their daily practice, long after the PD program had ended. This study demonstrates how the Teachers as Designers approach can support teacher learning and illustrates productive use of scaffolds for teacher growth and professional development.

  10. Geometric and colour data fusion for outdoor 3D models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchán, Pilar; Adán, Antonio; Salamanca, Santiago; Domínguez, Vicente; Chacón, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the generation of accurate, dense and coloured 3D models of outdoor scenarios from scanners. This is a challenging research field in which several problems still remain unsolved. In particular, the process of 3D model creation in outdoor scenes may be inefficient if the scene is digitalized under unsuitable technical (specific scanner on-board camera) and environmental (rain, dampness, changing illumination) conditions. We address our research towards the integration of images and range data to produce photorealistic models. Our proposal is based on decoupling the colour integration and geometry reconstruction stages, making them independent and controlled processes. This issue is approached from two different viewpoints. On the one hand, given a complete model (geometry plus texture), we propose a method to modify the original texture provided by the scanner on-board camera with the colour information extracted from external images taken at given moments and under specific environmental conditions. On the other hand, we propose an algorithm to directly assign external images onto the complete geometric model, thus avoiding tedious on-line calibration processes. We present the work conducted on two large Roman archaeological sites dating from the first century A.D., namely, the Theatre of Segobriga and the Fori Porticus of Emerita Augusta, both in Spain. The results obtained demonstrate that our approach could be useful in the digitalization and 3D modelling fields.

  11. Geometric and Colour Data Fusion for Outdoor 3D Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Chacón

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the generation of accurate, dense and coloured 3D models of outdoor scenarios from scanners. This is a challenging research field in which several problems still remain unsolved. In particular, the process of 3D model creation in outdoor scenes may be inefficient if the scene is digitalized under unsuitable technical (specific scanner on-board camera and environmental (rain, dampness, changing illumination conditions. We address our research towards the integration of images and range data to produce photorealistic models. Our proposal is based on decoupling the colour integration and geometry reconstruction stages, making them independent and controlled processes. This issue is approached from two different viewpoints. On the one hand, given a complete model (geometry plus texture, we propose a method to modify the original texture provided by the scanner on-board camera with the colour information extracted from external images taken at given moments and under specific environmental conditions. On the other hand, we propose an algorithm to directly assign external images onto the complete geometric model, thus avoiding tedious on-line calibration processes. We present the work conducted on two large Roman archaeological sites dating from the first century A.D., namely, the Theatre of Segobriga and the Fori Porticus of Emerita Augusta, both in Spain. The results obtained demonstrate that our approach could be useful in the digitalization and 3D modelling fields.

  12. Outdoor Air Quality Level Inference via Surveillance Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is a universal problem confronted by many developing countries. Because there are very few air quality monitoring stations in cities, it is difficult for people to know the exact air quality level anytime and anywhere. Fortunately, large amount of surveillance cameras have been deployed in the cities and can capture image densely and conveniently in the cities. In this case, this provides the possibility to utilize surveillance cameras as sensors to obtain data and predict the air quality level. To this end, we present a novel air quality level inference approach based on outdoor images. Firstly, we explore several features extracted from images as the robust representation for air quality prediction. Then, to effectively fuse these heterogeneous and complementary features, we adopt multikernel learning to learn an adaptive classifier for air quality level inference. In addition, to facilitate the research, we construct an Outdoor Air Quality Image Set (OAQIS dataset, which contains high quality registered and calibrated images with rich labels, that is, concentration of particles mass (PM, weather, temperature, humidity, and wind. Extensive experiments on the OAQIS dataset demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  13. Investigation of natural radioactivity levels using gamma dosimetry outdoors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Josineide M.N.; Santos Júnior, José A.; Amaral, Romilton S.; Silva, Arykerne N.C.; Santos Junior, Otávio P.; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Fernández, Zahily H.; Rojas, Lino A.V., E-mail: josineide.santos@ufpe.br, E-mail: jaraujo@ufpe.br, E-mail: romilton@ufpe.br, E-mail: ary_casado@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: zahily.herrerofernandez@ufpe.br, E-mail: lino.valcarcel@ufpe.br, E-mail: otavio.santos@vitoria.ifpe.edu.br [Center for Applied Technology and Nuclear Development, Havana (Cuba)

    2017-07-01

    Radiometric studies have been increasingly needed as an alternative to evaluate possible effects of natural radioactivity in humans, considering that the responses to health problems, in the main, depart from the environment of individuals, survival practices and human development. The present study aimed at the realization of the outdoor radiometry in the municipality of Paraíba, Brazil, to determine a value that can express and guide a reference for radiometry local, making it possible to describe some impact on the health of the population. The results were obtained by 'in situ' measurements using a gamma detector, calibrated to measure the dosimetric quantity of the effective environmental dose rate. Monitoring data ranged from 0.06 to 0.38 mSv/y, with a mean and deviation of 0.20 ± 0.04 mSv/y, whose trend measurement can be assumed to be representative of the effective dose rate of the environment outdoor, characterizing the area as low background radiation, whose parameter dosimetric and means evaluated, did not provide justification to impact on the increase in the occurrences of diseases in the local population. (author)

  14. Evaluating Nighttime CALIOP 0.532 micron Aerosol Optical Depth and Extinction Coefficient Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. R.; Tackett, J. L.; Reid, J. S.; Zhang, J.; Curtis, C. A.; Hyer, E. J.; Sessions, W. R.; Westphal, D. L.; Prospero, J. M.; Welton, E. J.; hide

    2012-01-01

    NASA Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) Version 3.01 5-km nighttime 0.532 micron aerosol optical depth (AOD) datasets from 2007 are screened, averaged and evaluated at 1 deg X 1 deg resolution versus corresponding/co-incident 0.550 micron AOD derived using the US Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS), featuring two-dimensional variational assimilation of quality-assured NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) AOD. In the absence of sunlight, since passive radiometric AOD retrievals rely overwhelmingly on scattered radiances, the model represents one of the few practical global estimates available from which to attempt such a validation. Daytime comparisons, though, provide useful context. Regional-mean CALIOP vertical profiles of night/day 0.532 micron extinction coefficient are compared with 0.523/0.532 micron ground-based lidar measurements to investigate representativeness and diurnal variability. In this analysis, mean nighttime CALIOP AOD are mostly lower than daytime (0.121 vs. 0.126 for all aggregated data points, and 0.099 vs. 0.102 when averaged globally per normalised 1 deg. X 1 deg. bin), though the relationship is reversed over land and coastal regions when the data are averaged per normalised bin (0.134/0.108 vs. 0140/0.112, respectively). Offsets assessed within single bins alone approach +/- 20 %. CALIOP AOD, both day and night, are higher than NAAPS over land (0.137 vs. 0.124) and equal over water (0.082 vs. 0.083) when averaged globally per normalised bin. However, for all data points inclusive, NAAPS exceeds CALIOP over land, coast and ocean, both day and night. Again, differences assessed within single bins approach 50% in extreme cases. Correlation between CALIOP and NAAPS AOD is comparable during both day and night. Higher correlation is found nearest the equator, both as a function of sample size and relative signal magnitudes inherent at

  15. Mapping Urban Areas with Integration of DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light and MODIS Data Using Machine Learning Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlong Jing

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mapping urban areas at global and regional scales is an urgent and crucial task for detecting urbanization and human activities throughout the world and is useful for discerning the influence of urban expansion upon the ecosystem and the surrounding environment. DMSP-OLS stable nighttime lights have provided an effective way to monitor human activities on a global scale. Threshold-based algorithms have been widely used for extracting urban areas and estimating urban expansion, but the accuracy can decrease because of the empirical and subjective selection of threshold values. This paper proposes an approach for extracting urban areas with the integration of DMSP-OLS stable nighttime lights and MODIS data utilizing training sample datasets selected from DMSP-OLS and MODIS NDVI based on several simple strategies. Four classification algorithms were implemented for comparison: the classification and regression tree (CART, k-nearest-neighbors (k-NN, support vector machine (SVM, and random forests (RF. A case study was carried out on the eastern part of China, covering 99 cities and 1,027,700 km2. The classification results were validated using an independent land cover dataset, and then compared with an existing contextual classification method. The results showed that the new method can achieve results with comparable accuracies, and is easier to implement and less sensitive to the initial thresholds than the contextual method. Among the four classifiers implemented, RF achieved the most stable results and the highest average Kappa. Meanwhile CART produced highly overestimated results compared to the other three classifiers. Although k-NN and SVM tended to produce similar accuracy, less-bright areas around the urban cores seemed to be ignored when using SVM, which led to the underestimation of urban areas. Furthermore, quantity assessment showed that the results produced by k-NN, SVM, and RFs exhibited better agreement in larger cities and low

  16. An Artificial Neural Network for Analyzing Overall Uniformity in Outdoor Lighting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio del Corte-Valiente

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Street lighting installations are an essential service for modern life due to their capability of creating a welcoming feeling at nighttime. Nevertheless, several studies have highlighted that it is possible to improve the quality of the light significantly improving the uniformity of the illuminance. The main difficulty arises when trying to improve some of the installation’s characteristics based only on statistical analysis of the light distribution. This paper presents a new algorithm that is able to obtain the overall illuminance uniformity in order to improve this sort of installations. To develop this algorithm it was necessary to perform a detailed study of all the elements which are part of street lighting installations. Because classification is one of the most important tasks in the application areas of artificial neural networks, we compared the performances of six types of training algorithms in a feed forward neural network for analyzing the overall uniformity in outdoor lighting systems. We found that the best algorithm that minimizes the error is “Levenberg-Marquardt back-propagation”, which approximates the desired output of the training pattern. By means of this kind of algorithm, it is possible to help to lighting professionals optimize the quality of street lighting installations.

  17. Influences of Green Outdoors versus Indoors Environmental Settings on Psychological and Social Outcomes of Controlled Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogerson, Mike; Gladwell, Valerie F; Gallagher, Daniel J; Barton, Jo L

    2016-03-25

    This study addressed a methodological gap by comparing psychological and social outcomes of exercise in green outdoors versus built indoors settings, whilst rigorously controlling exercise mode and intensity. The hypotheses were that greater improvements or more desirable values for directed attention, mood, perceived exertion, social interaction time, intention for future exercise behaviour and enjoyment would be associated with outdoors compared to indoors exercise. Following a baseline session, paired participants completed two conditions of 15 min of cycling on an ergometer placed outside in a natural environment and inside in a laboratory setting in a randomized, counter-balanced order. At pre- and post-exercise, directed attention was measured with the digit span backwards task, and mood was assessed with the Profile of Mood States. During the exercise session, visual and verbal interactions were recorded by means of experimenter observations. After each exercise session, participants provided self-reports of their enjoyment of the exercise, perceived exertion and intention for future exercise in the same environment. Social interaction time was significantly greater during outdoors exercise versus indoors; on average, participants engaged in three minutes more social interaction during exercise outdoors compared to indoors. Social interaction time significantly predicted intention for future exercise in the outdoors condition, but did not in the indoor condition. There was a significant time by condition interaction for directed attention. Scores worsened in the indoors condition, but improved in the outdoors condition. There was no statistically-significant time by condition interaction for mood and no significant difference between conditions for either perceived exertion or intention. Taken together, these findings show that exercise in a natural environment may promote directed attention and social interactions, which may positively influence future

  18. Outdoor stocking density in free-range laying hens: effects on behaviour and welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D L M; Hinch, G N; Downing, J A; Lee, C

    2017-06-01

    Free-range laying hen systems are increasing within Australia and research is needed to determine optimal outdoor stocking densities. Six small (n=150 hens) experimental flocks of ISA Brown laying hens were housed with access to ranges simulating one of three outdoor stocking densities with two pen replicates per density: 2000 hens/ha, 10 000 hens/ha or 20 000 hens/ha. Birds were provided daily range access from 21 to 36 weeks of age and the range usage of 50% of hens was tracked using radio-frequency identification technology. Throughout the study, basic external health assessments following a modified version of the Welfare Quality® protocol showed most birds were in visibly good condition (although keel damage was increasingly present with age) with few differences between stocking densities. Toenail length at 36 weeks of age was negatively correlated with hours spent ranging for all pens of birds (all r⩾-0.23, P⩽0.04). At 23 weeks of age, there were no differences between outdoor stocking densities in albumen corticosterone concentrations (P=0.44). At 35 weeks of age, density effects were significant (Pdensity showed the highest albumen corticosterone concentrations, although eggs from hens in the 10 000 hens/ha density showed the lowest concentrations (Pdensities showed the least foraging on the range but the most resting outdoors, with hens from the 20 000 hens/ha densities showing the least amount of resting outdoors (all Pdensities (P=0.08). For each of the health and behavioural measures there were differences between pen replicates within stocking densities. These data show outdoor stocking density has some effects on hen welfare, and it appears that consideration of both individual and group-level behaviour is necessary when developing optimal stocking density guidelines and free-range system management practices.

  19. Greenhouse gas emissions from the grassy outdoor run of organic broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Meda

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O, methane (CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2 fluxes over the grassy outdoor run of organically grown broilers were monitored using static chambers over two production batches in contrasted seasons. Measured N2O and CH4 fluxes were extremely variable in time and space for both batches, with fluxes ranging from a small uptake by soil to large emissions peaks, the latter of which always occurred in the chambers located closest to the broiler house. In general, fluxes decreased with increasing distance to the broiler house, demonstrating that the foraging of broilers and the amount of excreted nutrients (carbon, nitrogen largely control the spatial variability of emissions. Spatial integration by kriging methods was carried out to provide representative fluxes on the outdoor run for each measurement day. Mechanistic relationships between plot-scale estimates and environmental conditions (soil temperature and water content were calibrated in order to fill gaps between measurement days. Flux integration over the year 2010 showed that around 3 ± 1 kg N2O-N ha−1 were emitted on the outdoor run, equivalent to 0.9% of outdoor N excretion and substantially lower than the IPCC default emission factor of 2%. By contrast, the outdoor run was found to be a net CH4 sink of about −0.56 kg CH4-C ha−1, though this sink compensated less than 1.5% (in CO2 equivalents of N2O emissions. The net greenhouse gas (GHG budget of the outdoor run is explored, based on measured GHG fluxes and short-term (1.5 yr variations in soil organic carbon.

  20. The relationship between perceived health and physical activity indoors, outdoors in built environments, and outdoors in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasanen, Tytti P; Tyrväinen, Liisa; Korpela, Kalevi M

    2014-11-01

    A body of evidence shows that both physical activity and exposure to nature are connected to improved general and mental health. Experimental studies have consistently found short term positive effects of physical activity in nature compared with built environments. This study explores whether these benefits are also evident in everyday life, perceived over repeated contact with nature. The topic is important from the perspectives of city planning, individual well-being, and public health. National survey data (n = 2,070) from Finland was analysed using structural regression analyses. Perceived general health, emotional well-being, and sleep quality were regressed on the weekly frequency of physical activity indoors, outdoors in built environments, and in nature. Socioeconomic factors and other plausible confounders were controlled for. Emotional well-being showed the most consistent positive connection to physical activity in nature, whereas general health was positively associated with physical activity in both built and natural outdoor settings. Better sleep quality was weakly connected to frequent physical activity in nature, but the connection was outweighed by other factors. The results indicate that nature provides an added value to the known benefits of physical activity. Repeated exercise in nature is, in particular, connected to better emotional well-being. © 2014 The Authors. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  1. Pengaruh Outdoor Learning Terhadap Kemampuan Berpikir Kritis Matematis Siswa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prima Cristi Crismono

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui pengaruh Outdoor Learning terhadap kemampuan berpikir kritis matematis siswa. Hipotesis pada penelitian ini adalah Outdoor Learning berpengaruh dalam meningkatkan kemampuan berpikir kritis matematis siswa. Mengacu pada teori perkembangan kognitifnya penggunaan Outdoor Learning dengan memanfaatkan lingkungan sekitar pada media pembelajaran dan semua aktifitas belajar yang dilakukan oleh siswa di bawah pengawasan dan bimbingan guru. Penggunaan sumber belajar yang bersifat kontektual mampu mengembangkan kemampuan berpikir kritis matematis siswa. Data penelitian dapat diperoleh dengan menggunakan tes yang terdiri dari seperangkat soal uraian untuk mengukur dan mengetahui  kemampuan  awal  matematika  berupa  kemampuan  berpikir  kritis siswa. Hasil analisis pengaruh penerapan metode Outdoor Learning terhadap kemampuan berpikir kritis matematis siswa yang telah dilakukan diketahui bahwa terdapat pengaruh positif penerapan metode Outdoor Learning terhadap kemampuan berpikir kritis matematis siswa. Kesimpulan dari peneitian ini adalah metode Outdoor learning berpengaruh terhadap kemampuan berpikir kritis matematis siswa.

  2. Academic Teachers' Perceptions and Experiences of Outdoor Education

    OpenAIRE

    Oikonomou, Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Outdoor education constitutes an alternative teaching approach that is characterized by authentic experiences and activities in outdoor natural and cultural landscapes. As a relatively new and progressive teaching method, it tries to find and consolidate its place within the existing educational system. The current thesis explores Greek academic teachers’ perceptions and experiences in the field of outdoor education. More specifically, eight academic teachers from a Greek university express t...

  3. Integrating nap and night-time sleep into sleep patterns reveals differential links to health-relevant outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Jaime K; Wolf, Jutta M

    2016-04-01

    Both night-time sleep and nap behaviour have been linked consistently to health outcomes. Although reasons for napping are usually tied to night-time sleep, the majority of studies assess their effects independently. The current study thus aimed to examine the health relevance of patterns of sleep behaviour that take into account both night-time and daytime sleep habits. Night-time sleep, recorded during 7 days via actigraphy from 313 participants (aged 34-82 years) of the Midlife in the United States II Biomarker study, was assessed. Blood and urine specimens were assayed for noradrenaline, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein. Participants self-reported nap behaviour, depressive symptoms, perceived chronic stress and the presence of medical symptoms and conditions. Overall, nappers (n = 208) showed elevated waist-hip ratios, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels compared to non-nappers and reported more physiological symptoms and conditions (all P ≤ 0.019). Within nappers, cluster analysis revealed three patterns of sleep behaviour-infrequent nappers with good night-time sleep, frequent nappers with good night-time sleep and nappers with poor night-time sleep. Nappers with poor night-time sleep thereby exhibited elevated noradrenaline levels, depressive symptoms and perceived stress scores compared to other groups (all P ≤ 0.041). These findings support the idea that nap-health relationships are complex, in that frequency of napping and accumulation of nap sleep is not related linearly to health consequences. Assessing nap behaviour in conjunction with night-time sleep behaviour appeared crucial to elucidate further the health relevance of napping, particularly in terms of psychological health outcomes, including chronic stress and depressive symptoms. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  4. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in indoor and outdoor air in a community in Guangzhou, a megacity of southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Nan; Wang, Tao; Chen, She-Jun; Yu, Mei; Zhu, Zhi-Cheng; Tian, Mi; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2016-05-01

    Indoor environments contribute a significant portion of human exposure to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) because of their extensive use in various household products. This study investigates the occurrence of a number of BFRs in the indoor and outdoor air in a megacity in southern China, in which little information on indoor BFRs contamination is available. The estimated total PBDE concentrations ranged from 1.43 to 57 pg/m(3) indoors and from 1.21 to 1522 pg/m(3) outdoors. The indoor concentrations of lower brominated PBDEs that are mainly derived from the technical penta- and octa-BDE mixtures were higher than or comparable to the outdoors, while the indoor levels of DecaBDEs and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) were apparently lower than the outdoors. The seasonal variations of BFR concentrations indicated that evaporation from old indoor products is the primary source of Penta- and OctaBDEs in the air, whereas most DecaBDEs and DBDPE concentrations showing weak temperature-dependence are largely released from industrial activities. The PBDE congener profiles in the air were generally similar, which were dominated by BDE209, 28, and 47; whereas the appreciable indoor-outdoor differences in the compositions are possibly due to emission sources, photochemical degradation, or congener-specific transport of BFRs in the indoor and outdoor air. Significant correlations between the indoor and outdoor BFRs were observed suggesting the exchange of BFRs between the two compartments, which are more noticeable for PentaBDEs and DecaBDEs with strong indoor and outdoor emission sources, respectively. This study provides significant insights into the sources of BFRs in urban air in China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Indoor-outdoor relationships of airborne particles and nitrogen dioxide inside Parisian buses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molle, Romain; Mazoué, Sophie; Géhin, Évelyne; Ionescu, Anda

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluated passengers' exposure to traffic air pollution inside the articulated buses of the line 91 in Paris during 10 working days in May, 2010. Twenty articulated buses were studied on 32 routes in order to determine the influence of the sampling position on the pollutant concentrations. This parameter is still poorly known for the rigid buses and is even less known for the articulated ones. However this parameter must be studied for articulated buses because the greater length may cause a pollutant concentration gradient in the cabin. Portable devices were used to measure pollutants in the presence of passengers from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. and from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., time periods corresponding to the peak traffic and travellers. PM2.5 mass concentration, particle number concentration between 0.3 and 20 μm and nitrogen dioxide concentration were simultaneously measured on three positions inside the buses (front, middle and rear) in order to study the spatial distribution of these compounds. These measurements inside the buses were compared to the outdoor concentrations at the same moment of the day provided by the Parisian air quality monitoring network; they were also compared to the results of a previous monitoring campaign performed in 2008. The results obtained during the 2010 campaign revealed that in-cabin NO2 mean concentrations were 1.5-3.5 times higher than the outside concentration levels; a maximum concentration of 234 ± 40 μg m-3 was found in the rear position (location of the engine and exhaust gas). Mean in-cabin PM2.5 mass concentrations varied from one week to another one, but they were globally the same at the three positions inside the instrumented buses. In order to determine the impact of outdoor levels, correlations have been calculated between the results measured inside the buses and those measured by the outdoor air monitoring stations. The highest Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.29 for NO2 data whereas the highest Pearson

  6. Space and place in Outdoor Education in New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Søren

    2010-01-01

    The article draws on a doctoral study of young peoples’ participation in organised friluftsliv and outdoor education in Denmark and New Zealand. The research questions concentrate on views of nature, values and general characteristics in friluftsliv and outdoor education. The results are based...... on a qualitative approach using case study design with interviews and observations. For the analysis, ethnological cultural analysis was employed combined with configuration analysis to conceptualise the data. Theories and concepts of space and place in outdoor education in New Zealand are discussed. Results from...... the empirical studies on outdoor education in New Zealand are discussed and compared to the cultural perspective of friluftsliv in Denmark....

  7. Social inequalities in young children's sports participation and outdoor play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijtzes, Anne I; Jansen, Wilma; Bouthoorn, Selma H; Pot, Niek; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Raat, Hein

    2014-12-16

    Research on social inequalities in sports participation and unstructured physical activity among young children is scarce. This study aimed to assess the associations of family socioeconomic position (SEP) and ethnic background with children's sports participation and outdoor play. We analyzed data from 4726 ethnically diverse 6-year-old children participating in the Generation R Study. Variables were assessed by parent-reported questionnaires when the child was 6 years old. Low level of outdoor play was defined as outdoor play p p p p p research, including qualitative studies, is needed to explore more in detail the pathways relating family SEP and ethnic background to children's sports participation and outdoor play.

  8. Patterns of GPS measured time outdoors after school and objective physical activity in English children: the PEACH project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griew Pippa

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observational studies have shown a positive association between time outdoors and physical activity in children. Time outdoors may be a feasible intervention target to increase the physical activity of youth, but methods are required to accurately measure time spent outdoors in a range of locations and over a sustained period. The Global Positioning System (GPS provides precise location data and can be used to identify when an individual is outdoors. The aim of this study was to investigate whether GPS data recorded outdoors were associated with objectively measured physical activity. Methods Participants were 1010 children (11.0 ± 0.4 years recruited from 23 urban primary schools in South West England, measured between September 2006 and July 2008. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry (Actigraph GT1M and children wore a GPS receiver (Garmin Foretrex 201 after school on four weekdays to record time outdoors. Accelerometer and GPS data were recorded at 10 second epochs and were combined to describe patterns of physical activity when both a GPS and accelerometer record were present (outdoors and when there was accelerometer data only (indoors. ANOVA was used to investigate gender and seasonal differences in the patterns of outdoor and indoor physical activity, and linear regression was used to examine the cross-sectional associations between GPS-measured time outdoors and physical activity. Results GPS-measured time outdoors was a significant independent predictor of children's physical activity after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Physical activity was more than 2.5 fold higher outdoors than indoors (1345.8 ± 907.3 vs 508.9 ± 282.9 counts per minute; F = 783.2, p Conclusions Duration of GPS recording is positively associated with objectively measured physical activity and is sensitive to seasonal differences. Minute by minute patterning of GPS and physical activity data is feasible and may be a

  9. Renovation of the CERN outdoor lighting

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    Due to the renovation of the CERN outdoor lighting, traffic will be limited to one way along “Route Gregory” from the E entrance (France) up to “Route Fermi” just before the water tower between 12th and 23rd July 2010. Disruption can also be expected in the car parks “Les Erables” and “Les Tilleuls” close to building 30 and also the car park in front of building 377, between 19th and 30th July 2010. Thanks for your understanding. SEM Group

  10. Outdoor air pollution and asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzivian, Lilian

    2011-06-01

    Asthma, a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, is associated with reversible airway obstruction and hyperresponsiveness to triggers; clinical symptoms include wheezing, episodic cough, shortness of breath, and increased mucous production. Ambient or outdoor environmental exposure to ozone, particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides has been well documented to exacerbate asthma. Children appear to be most vulnerable to the harmful effects of ambient air pollutants. As their lungs are not completely developed, children may experience greater exposure to environmental pollutants than adults and the higher doses of varied composition may remain in their lungs for a greater duration. Altogether, the negative effects of air pollutants on pulmonary function place children at a greater risk of air pollutant-induced exacerbation of asthma for the duration of their lives. The aim of this review was to assess recently published literature regarding the influence of air pollution on asthma in children. For this work, we reviewed articles found in PubMed using the key words "outdoor air pollution, asthma, and children" which were published between 2006 and 2009. Only those articles that had a full version available in PubMed were analyzed. We reviewed studies published between 2006 and 2009 examining the effect of outdoor air pollution on asthma in children. In total, we evaluated 25 articles; of these, 9 were published in 2006, 3 in 2007, 8 in 2008, and 5 in 2009. Of these 25 studies, 1 was a clinical trial, 6 were cross-sectional, 4 were case-control (2 with a case-crossover design), 12 were cohort prospective, and 2 were cohort retrospective studies with varied follow-up times ranging from 10 days to 7 years. The ages of children also differed, ranging from birth to 18 years of age. All studies reviewed in this work indicate that outdoor air pollution affects the appearance and exacerbation of asthma in children. Although these findings are of great

  11. Extended overview techniques for outdoor augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veas, Eduardo; Grasset, Raphaël; Kruijff, Ernst; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we explore techniques that aim to improve site understanding for outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) applications. While the first person perspective in AR is a direct way of filtering and zooming on a portion of the data set, it severely narrows overview of the situation, particularly over large areas. We present two interactive techniques to overcome this problem: multi-view AR and variable perspective view. We describe in details the conceptual, visualization and interaction aspects of these techniques and their evaluation through a comparative user study. The results we have obtained strengthen the validity of our approach and the applicability of our methods to a large range of application domains.

  12. TOP Outdoors: Outdoor and Adventurous Activities for Every Teacher and Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, David; Perry, Frank

    1999-01-01

    The Youth Sport Trust developed a package of activities to support the teaching of outdoor and adventurous activities, integrated into the British national curriculum through physical education programs for preschool through secondary school age. Activity categories are physical challenges, trails, and orienteering. Teaching resources and their…

  13. THERMAL ADAPTATION, CAMPUS GREENING AND OUTDOOR USE IN LAUTECH CAMPUS, OGBOMOSO, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Adeniran ADEDEJI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The interwoven relationship between the use of indoors and outdoors in the tropics as means of thermal adaptation has long been recognized. In the case of outdoors, this is achieved by green intervention of shading trees as adaptive mechanisms through behavioural thermoregulation. Unfortunately, the indoor academic spaces of LAUTECH campus was not provided with necessary outdoor academic learning environment in the general site planning of the campus for use at peak indoor thermal dissatisfaction period considering the tropical climatic setting of the university. The students’ departmental and faculty associations tried to provide parks for themselves as alternatives which on casual observation are of substandard quality and poorly maintained because of lack of institutional coordination and low funding. This study examined the quality and use of these parks for thermal comfort through behavioral adjustment from subjective field evidence with the goal of improvement. To achieve this, twelve parks were selected within the campus. Questionnaires containing use and quality variables were administered randomly upon 160 users of these parks. The data obtained was subjected to descriptive statistical analysis. Results show that the quality of the parks, weather condition, period of the day, and personal psychological reasons of users has great influence on the use of the parks. The study concludes with policy recommendations on improvement of the quality of the parks and the campus outdoors and greenery in general.

  14. Parameter study on performance of building cooling by night-time ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai; Manz, H.; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    of different parameters such as building construction, heat gains, air change rates, heat transfer coefficients and climatic conditions including annual variations on the number of overheating degree hours (operative room temperature >26 °C) was evaluated. Climatic conditions and air flow rate during night......Especially for commercial buildings in moderate climates, night-time ventilation seems to be a simple and energy-efficient approach to improve thermal comfort in summer. However, due to uncertainties in the prediction of thermal comfort in buildings with night-time ventilation, architects...... and engineers are still hesitant to apply this technique. In order to reduce the uncertainties, the most important parameters affecting night ventilation performance need to be identified. A typical office room was therefore modelled using a building energy simulation programme (HELIOS), and the effect...

  15. Night-time lighting alters the composition of marine epifaunal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Thomas W; Coleman, Matthew; Griffith, Katherine M; Jenkins, Stuart R

    2015-04-01

    Marine benthic communities face multiple anthropogenic pressures that compromise the future of some of the most biodiverse and functionally important ecosystems in the world. Yet one of the pressures these ecosystems face, night-time lighting, remains unstudied. Light is an important cue in guiding the settlement of invertebrate larvae, and altering natural regimes of nocturnal illumination could modify patterns of recruitment among sessile epifauna. We present the first evidence of night-time lighting changing the composition of temperate epifaunal marine invertebrate communities. Illuminating settlement surfaces with white light-emitting diode lighting at night, to levels experienced by these communities locally, both inhibited and encouraged the colonization of 39% of the taxa analysed, including three sessile and two mobile species. Our results indicate that ecological light pollution from coastal development, shipping and offshore infrastructure could be changing the composition of marine epifaunal communities. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Ozone chemical equilibrium in the extended mesopause under the nighttime conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikovich, M. V.; Kulikov, M. Yu.; Grygalashvyly, M.; Sonnemann, G. R.; Ermakova, T. S.; Nechaev, A. A.; Feigin, A. M.

    2018-01-01

    For retrieval of atomic oxygen and atomic hydrogen via ozone observations in the extended mesopause region (∼70-100 km) under nighttime conditions, an assumption on photochemical equilibrium of ozone is often used in research. In this work, an assumption on chemical equilibrium of ozone near mesopause region during nighttime is proofed. We examine 3D chemistry-transport model (CTM) annual calculations and determine the ratio between the correct (modeled) distributions of the O3 density and its equilibrium values depending on the altitude, latitude, and season. The results show that the retrieval of atomic oxygen and atomic hydrogen distributions using an assumption on ozone chemical equilibrium may lead to large errors below ∼81-87 km. We give simple and clear semi-empirical criterion for practical utilization of the lower boundary of the area with ozone's chemical equilibrium near mesopause.

  17. Reading at Bedtime Associated With Longer Nighttime Sleep in Latino Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott J; Rhee, Kyung E; Gahagan, Sheila

    2016-06-01

    Objective To characterize bedtime routines (BR) and associations between reading at bedtime and sleep behaviors in a sample of Latino preschoolers. A convenience sample of Latino parents of a 4-year-old child completed standardized questionnaires assessing BRs, bedtime reading frequency and other sleep variables. Family demographics and home environment were also assessed. Results Parents of 62 children completed questionnaires. A consistent BR was reported by 48%. Frequent reading at bedtime was reported in 42%. After controlling for key confounders, reading at bedtime was significantly associated with longer total nighttime sleep (P < .01), but not with other sleep behaviors. Conclusion Reading at bedtime was significantly associated with longer total nighttime sleep duration. This, together with the relatively low frequency of reading found in this sample, suggests that interventions aimed at increasing reading at bedtime among Latino preschoolers may improve overall sleep health. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. A natural-color mapping for single-band night-time image based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yilun; Qian, Yunsheng

    2018-01-01

    A natural-color mapping for single-band night-time image method based on FPGA can transmit the color of the reference image to single-band night-time image, which is consistent with human visual habits and can help observers identify the target. This paper introduces the processing of the natural-color mapping algorithm based on FPGA. Firstly, the image can be transformed based on histogram equalization, and the intensity features and standard deviation features of reference image are stored in SRAM. Then, the real-time digital images' intensity features and standard deviation features are calculated by FPGA. At last, FPGA completes the color mapping through matching pixels between images using the features in luminance channel.

  19. Nighttime dissolution in a temperate coastal ocean ecosystem increases under acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Lester; Gaylord, Brian; Hill, Tessa; Hosfelt, Jessica; Kroeker, Kristy J; Nebuchina, Yana; Ninokawa, Aaron; Russell, Ann D; Rivest, Emily B; Sesboüé, Marine; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-03-18

    Anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) are causing ocean acidification, lowering seawater aragonite (CaCO3) saturation state (Ω arag), with potentially substantial impacts on marine ecosystems over the 21(st) Century. Calcifying organisms have exhibited reduced calcification under lower saturation state conditions in aquaria. However, the in situ sensitivity of calcifying ecosystems to future ocean acidification remains unknown. Here we assess the community level sensitivity of calcification to local CO2-induced acidification caused by natural respiration in an unperturbed, biodiverse, temperate intertidal ecosystem. We find that on hourly timescales nighttime community calcification is strongly influenced by Ω arag, with greater net calcium carbonate dissolution under more acidic conditions. Daytime calcification however, is not detectably affected by Ω arag. If the short-term sensitivity of community calcification to Ω arag is representative of the long-term sensitivity to ocean acidification, nighttime dissolution in these intertidal ecosystems could more than double by 2050, with significant ecological and economic consequences.

  20. Nighttime sleep, daytime napping, and labor outcomes in healthy pregnant women in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shao-Yu; Lin, Jou-Wei; Kuo, Lu-Ting; Lee, Chien-Nan; Landis, Carol A

    2013-12-01

    We prospectively examined the associations of nighttime and daytime sleep during the third trimester of pregnancy with labor duration and risk of cesarean deliveries in a convenience sample of 120 nulliparous women who completed sleep-related questionnaires and wore wrist actigraphs for up to 7 days. Nap duration and 24-hour sleep duration were inversely associated with labor duration in women with vaginal delivery. Neither actigraphy-derived nor self-reported sleep variables were associated with type of delivery (e.g., vaginal, cesarean). Results showed a beneficial effect of sleep on labor duration and suggest that studies of sleep duration effects on labor and pregnancy outcomes require a consideration of the amount of both daytime and nighttime sleep. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Nighttime observation and chemistry of HOx in the Pearl River Delta and Beijing in summer 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, K. D.; Rohrer, F.; Holland, F.; Fuchs, H.; Brauers, T.; Oebel, A.; Dlugi, R.; Hu, M.; Li, X.; Lou, S. R.; Shao, M.; Zhu, T.; Wahner, A.; Zhang, Y. H.; Hofzumahaus, A.

    2014-05-01

    Nighttime HOx chemistry was investigated in two ground-based field campaigns (PRIDE-PRD2006 and CAREBEIJING2006) in summer 2006 in China by comparison of measured and modeled concentration data of OH and HO2. The measurement sites were located in a rural environment in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) under urban influence and in a suburban area close to Beijing, respectively. In both locations, significant nighttime concentrations of radicals were observed under conditions with high total OH reactivities of about 40-50 s-1 in PRD and 25 s-1 near Beijing. For OH, the nocturnal concentrations were within the range of (0.5-3) × 106 cm-3, implying a significant nighttime oxidation rate of pollutants on the order of several ppb per hour. The measured nighttime concentration of HO2 was about (0.2-5) × 108 cm-3, containing a significant, model-estimated contribution from RO2 as an interference. A chemical box model based on an established chemical mechanism is capable of reproducing the measured nighttime values of the measured peroxy radicals and kOH, but underestimates in both field campaigns the observed OH by about 1 order of magnitude. Sensitivity studies with the box model demonstrate that the OH discrepancy between measured and modeled nighttime OH can be resolved, if an additional ROx production process (about 1 ppb h-1) and additional recycling (RO2 → HO2 → OH) with an efficiency equivalent to 1 ppb NO is assumed. The additional recycling mechanism was also needed to reproduce the OH observations at the same locations during daytime for conditions with NO mixing ratios below 1 ppb. This could be an indication that the same missing process operates at day and night. In principle, the required primary ROx source can be explained by ozonolysis of terpenoids, which react faster with ozone than with OH in the nighttime atmosphere. However, the amount of these highly reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) would require a strong local source, for which

  2. Cost benefit analysis of the night-time ventilative cooling in office building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David

    2003-06-01

    The indoor temperature can be controlled with different levels of accuracy depending on the building and its HVAC system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential productivity benefits of improved temperature control, and to apply the information for a cost-benefit analyses of night-time ventilative cooling, which is a very energy efficient method of reducing indoor daytime temperatures. We analyzed the literature relating work performance with temperature, and found a general decrement in work performance when temperatures exceeded those associated with thermal neutrality. These studies included physiological modelling, performance of various tasks in laboratory experiments and measured productivity at work in real buildings. The studies indicate an average 2% decrement in work performance per degree C temperature rise, when the temperature is above 25 C. When we use this relationship to evaluate night-time ventilative cooling, the resulting benefit to cost ratio varies from 32 to 120.

  3. Nighttime Infrared radiative cooling and opacity inferred by REMS Ground Temperature Sensor Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Torres, Javier; Paz Zorzano, María; Pla-García, Jorge; Rafkin, Scot; Lepinette, Alain; Sebastián, Eduardo; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; REMS Team

    2013-04-01

    Due to the low density of the Martian atmosphere, the temperature of the surface is controlled primarily by solar heating, and infrared cooling to the atmosphere and space, rather than heat exchange with the atmosphere. In the absence of solar radiation the infrared (IR) cooling, and then the nighttime surface temperatures, are directly controlled by soil termal inertia and atmospheric optical thickness (τ) at infrared wavelengths. Under non-wind conditions, and assuming no processes involving latent heat changes in the surface, for a particular site where the rover stands the main parameter controlling the IR cooling will be τ. The minimal ground temperature values at a fixed position may thus be used to detect local variations in the total dust/aerosols/cloud tickness. The Ground Temperature Sensor (GTS) and Air Temperature Sensor (ATS) in the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover provides hourly ground and air temperature measurements respectively. During the first 100 sols of operation of the rover, within the area of low thermal inertia, the minimal nightime ground temperatures reached values between 180 K and 190 K. For this season the expected frost point temperature is 200 K. Variations of up to 10 K have been observed associated with dust loading at Gale at the onset of the dust season. We will use these measurements together with line-by-line radiative transfer simulations using the Full Transfer By Optimized LINe-by-line (FUTBOLIN) code [Martín-Torres and Mlynczak, 2005] to estimate the IR atmospheric opacity and then dust/cloud coverage over the rover during the course of the MSL mission. Monitoring the dust loading and IR nightime cooling evolution during the dust season will allow for a better understanding of the influence of the atmosphere on the ground temperature and provide ground truth to models and orbiter measurements. References Martín-Torres, F. J. and M. G. Mlynczak

  4. [Prehospital treatment at large outdoor music festivals. Economic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, J B; Larsen, C F

    1994-01-01

    An emergency facility was provided at the Midtfyn Rock Music Festival in 1990 (comprising 7,000 musicians and ancillaries and an overall public attendance of 60,000). A total of 329 patients were treated at the facility during the four and a half days that the festival lasted. The numbers of diseases and injuries were recorded, and the economic aspects are discussed in the article. In 74 per cent of cases, treatment was completed at the emergency facility, and the patients could be discharged. In terms of staff costs and the saving in patient transport costs alone, the economic gain to the community was estimated to be about 25,000 DKR. Thus, the provision of an emergency facility was cost-effective, and is recommended at such mass outdoor gatherings as cultural and sports events.

  5. Analysis of Daytime and Nighttime Ground Level Ozone Concentrations Using Boosted Regression Tree Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Zaitun Yahaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the use of boosted regression trees (BRTs to draw an inference about daytime and nighttime ozone formation in a coastal environment. Hourly ground-level ozone data for a full calendar year in 2010 were obtained from the Kemaman (CA 002 air quality monitoring station. A BRT model was developed using hourly ozone data as a response variable and nitric oxide (NO, Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2 and Nitrogen Dioxide (NOx and meteorological parameters as explanatory variables. The ozone BRT algorithm model was constructed from multiple regression models, and the 'best iteration' of BRT model was performed by optimizing prediction performance. Sensitivity testing of the BRT model was conducted to determine the best parameters and good explanatory variables. Using the number of trees between 2,500-3,500, learning rate of 0.01, and interaction depth of 5 were found to be the best setting for developing the ozone boosting model. The performance of the O3 boosting models were assessed, and the fraction of predictions within two factor (FAC2, coefficient of determination (R2 and the index of agreement (IOA of the model developed for day and nighttime are 0.93, 0.69 and 0.73 for daytime and 0.79, 0.55 and 0.69 for nighttime respectively. Results showed that the model developed was within the acceptable range and could be used to understand ozone formation and identify potential sources of ozone for estimating O3 concentrations during daytime and nighttime. Results indicated that the wind speed, wind direction, relative humidity, and temperature were the most dominant variables in terms of influencing ozone formation. Finally, empirical evidence of the production of a high ozone level by wind blowing from coastal areas towards the interior region, especially from industrial areas, was obtained.

  6. Measuring nighttime spawning behavior of chum salmon using a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffan, K.F.; Rondorf, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    The striking body coloration and morphology that Pacific salmon display during spawning coupled with elaborate courtship behaviors suggest that visual cues are important during their reproductive period. To date, virtually all existing information on chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) spawning behavior has been derived from studies conducted during the daytime, and has contributed to the assumption that salmon do not spawn at night. We tested this assumption using a new technology - a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) - to describe and measure nighttime spawning behavior of wild chum salmon in the Columbia River. The DIDSON produces detailed, video-like images using sound, which enabled us to collect behavioral information at night in complete darkness. The display of DIDSON images enabled fish movements and behaviors to be spatially quantified. We collected continuous observational data on 14 pairs of chum salmon in a natural spawning channel during the daytime and nighttime. Spawners of both genders were observed chasing intruders during nighttime and daytime as nests were constructed. Regardless of diel period, females were engaged in digging to both construct nests and cover eggs, and courting males exhibited the pre-spawning behavior of tail crossing. We observed a total of 13 spawning events, of which nine occurred at night and four occurred during the day. The behaviors we observed at night suggest the assumption that chum salmon do not spawn at night is false. Once chum salmon begin nest construction, visual cues are apparently not required for courtship, nest defense, and spawning. We speculate that non-visual cues (e.g. tactile and auditory) enable chum salmon to carry out most spawning behaviors at night. Our findings have implications for how nighttime flows from hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River are managed for power production and protection of imperiled salmon stocks.

  7. Estimation of Mexico’s Informal Economy and Remittances Using Nighttime Imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Sutton, Paul C.; Christopher D. Elvidge; Rebecca L. Powell L. Powell; Sharolyn Anderson; Tilottama Ghosh

    2009-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the magnitude and spatial distribution of both formal and informal economic activity have many useful applications. Developing alternative methods for making estimates of these economic activities may prove to be useful when other measures are of suspect accuracy or unavailable. This research explores the potential for estimating the formal and informal economy for Mexico using known relationships between the spatial patterns of nighttime satellite imagery and economic a...

  8. Shadow Detection Based on Regions of Light Sources for Object Extraction in Nighttime Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil-beom Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent video surveillance systems detect pre-configured surveillance events through background modeling, foreground and object extraction, object tracking, and event detection. Shadow regions inside video frames sometimes appear as foreground objects, interfere with ensuing processes, and finally degrade the event detection performance of the systems. Conventional studies have mostly used intensity, color, texture, and geometric information to perform shadow detection in daytime video, but these methods lack the capability of removing shadows in nighttime video. In this paper, a novel shadow detection algorithm for nighttime video is proposed; this algorithm partitions each foreground object based on the object’s vertical histogram and screens out shadow objects by validating their orientations heading toward regions of light sources. From the experimental results, it can be seen that the proposed algorithm shows more than 93.8% shadow removal and 89.9% object extraction rates for nighttime video sequences, and the algorithm outperforms conventional shadow removal algorithms designed for daytime videos.

  9. Soil nitrogen limitation does not impact nighttime water loss in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Ava R; Donovan, Lisa A

    2010-01-01

    Nighttime transpirational water loss from C(3) trees occurs without carbon gain and is both common and substantial. However, the magnitude of this water loss varies and a better understanding of the environmental factors driving this variation is needed. We investigated the response of nighttime conductance (g(night)) and transpiration (E(night)) to soil nitrogen limitation. We used instantaneous gas exchange measurements in greenhouse studies of Populus angustifolia James (narrowleaf cottonwood) and Populus balsamifera L. spp. trichocarpa (Torr. & A. Gray ex Hook.) Brayshaw (black cottonwood). g(night) for sufficiently watered plants ranged from 0.045 to 0.308 mol m(-2) s(-1) for P. balsamifera and 0.037 to 0.188 mol m(-2) s(-1) for P. angustifolia, which was much larger than minimum leaf conductance (g(min); up to 0.005 mol m(-2) s(-1) in the dark). Long-term nitrogen limitation sufficient to substantially reduce biomass did not affect g(night) or E(night) when potentially confounding water stress effects were eliminated. We conclude that nighttime water loss from two Populus species is large and although it is under stomatal control is not regulated at night in response to soil nitrogen availability.

  10. Napping, nighttime sleep, and cardiovascular risk factors in mid-life adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jane F; Buysse, Daniel J; Hall, Martica; Kamarck, Thomas W; Lee, Laisze; Strollo, Patrick J; Reis, Steven E; Matthews, Karen A

    2010-08-15

    To evaluate the relations between sleep characteristics and cardiovascular risk factors and napping behavior, and to assess whether daytime napping leads to subsequent better or worse sleep. The sample consisted of 224 (African American, Caucasian, and Asian) middle-aged men and women. Sleep measures included nine nights of actigraphy and sleep diaries, sleep questionnaires, and one night of polysomnography to measure sleep disordered breathing. More frequent napping was associated with shorter nighttime sleep duration averaged across the nine nights of actigraphy (especially among African Americans), more daytime sleepiness, more pain and fatigue by diary, and increased body mass index and waist circumference. Shorter nighttime sleep duration was associated with taking a nap during the next day and taking a nap was associated with less efficient sleep the next night. Napping in middle-aged men and women is associated with overall less nighttime sleep in African Americans and lower sleep efficiency as measured by actigraphy, and increased BMI and central adiposity. These findings point to the importance of measuring of napping in understanding associations of sleep with cardiovascular risk.

  11. Impacts of nighttime post-anthesis warming on rice productivity and grain quality in East China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Dong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of nighttime post-anthesis warming on rice productivity and grain quality in East China were evaluated for two cultivars, II You 128, an indica rice, and Wuyunjing 7, a japonica rice. Warming by 3.0 °C stimulated the nighttime respiration rate and decreased the photosynthesis rate, resulting in significant decreases of 21.2% and 24.9% in aboveground biomass accumulation for II You 128 and Wuyunjing 7, respectively. Warming significantly reduced the rates of seed setting and grain filling, especially of inferior kernels (those lower in panicles, while the filling rate of superior kernels remained almost unchanged. As a result, 1000-grain weight and grain yield were respectively 3.7% and 30.0% lower for II You 128 and 12.8% and 34.3% for Wuyunjing 7 in warmed plots than in the unwarmed control. Nighttime warming also significantly reduced the grain milling and appearance quality of both varieties. More negative effects of warming on inferior than on superior kernels were found. The above results have important implications for rice variety cultivation in East China.

  12. Adaptation to climate change: Using nighttime lights satellite data to explore human response to flood events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mård, Johanna; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano

    2017-04-01

    To better understand the impact of climate change, we need to uncover how (and to what extent) societies respond and adapt to it. Yet the dynamics resulting from two-way feedbacks between nature and society remain largely unknown. Here we present an interdisciplinary study aiming to uncover one of the least quantified aspects of human-nature interactions, the spatial-temporal distribution of demographic changes following the occurrence of extreme events. To this end, we use nighttime light satellite data in four contrasting case studies in both low- and high-income countries (Lower Limpopo River in Mozambique, Mekong River in Vietnam and Cambodia, Brisbane River in Australia and Mississippi River at St. Louis in USA), and explore the interplay between flooding events and changes in population distribution in the period 1992-2013. Our study shows the challenges and opportunities of nighttime lights in unraveling the way humans adapt to climate change. Specific results show that population distribution of societies that strongly rely on structural measures ("fighting floods" policies) is not significantly affected by the occurrence of flood events. Conversely, learning dynamics emerge in societies that mainly rely on non-structural measures ("living with floods" policies) in terms of relative population in floodplain areas, i.e. reduced human proximity to rivers. Lastly, we propose the development of a novel approach to exploit the growing availability of worldwide information, such as nighttime lights satellite data, to uncover human adaptation to climate change across scales and along gradients of social and natural conditions.

  13. Nighttime sleep duration and risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: the Dongfeng-Tongji prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Zhong, Rong; Lou, Jiao; Pan, An; Tang, Yuhan; Chang, Jiang; Ke, Juntao; Li, Jiaoyuan; Yuan, Jing; Wang, Youjie; Chen, Weihong; Guo, Huan; Wei, Sheng; Liang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaomin; He, Meian; Hu, Frank B; Wu, Tangchun; Yao, Ping; Miao, Xiaoping

    2016-09-01

    To examine the association between self-reported nighttime sleep duration and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) risk by comparing the incidence rates of NAFLD among healthy subjects with different sleep duration during the 5 years follow-up. 8965 eligible NAFLD-free subjects with a mean age of 61.6 years (males, 43.4%) from Dongfeng-Tongji cohort study at baseline were enrolled in the study. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association between sleep duration and incident NAFLD with potential confounders adjusted. Sleep duration was categorized into five groups: sleep, the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) were 1.21 (1.07-1.38) for those who sleep 8-9 h/day, and 1.31 (1.13-1.52) for those who sleep over 9 h/day. However, no significant association was found with short nightly sleep duration (sleep duration was associated with a modestly increased risk of NAFLD in a middle-aged and elderly Chinese population. Key messages Long nighttime sleep duration was associated with a modestly increased risk of NAFLD in a middle-aged and elderly Chinese population. The effect of long nighttime sleep on the risk of incident NAFLD was attenuated greatly by body mass index (BMI) in men.

  14. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Nighttime Cloud Optical Microphysical Properties (NCOMP) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains a high quality Environmental Data Record (EDR) of nighttime cloud optical and microphysical properties (NCOMP) from the Visible Infrared...

  15. Impact of night-time symptoms in COPD: a real-world study in five European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price D

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available David Price,1 Mark Small,2 Gary Milligan,2 Victoria Higgins,2 Esther Garcia Gil,3 Jordi Estruch3 1Centre of Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; 2Adelphi Real World, Adelphi Mill, Bollington, UK; 3Almirall S.A., Barcelona, Spain Background: Sleep quality is often poor in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. A cross-sectional European survey investigated the prevalence of night-time symptoms in COPD to evaluate the level of disconnect between physician and patient perceptions of the presence of night-time symptoms, and to compare the characteristics of patients with and without night-time symptoms. Methods: A total of 251 primary care physicians and 251 respiratory specialists completed record forms on 2,807 patients with COPD. The forms captured information on patient demographics, lung function, COPD severity, and symptoms. Patients completed questionnaires on the time of day when their COPD symptoms bothered them, and the impact of COPD on their ability to get up in the morning and on sleep. Data were compared between groups (those with and without night-time symptoms using t-tests or Wilcoxon signed rank tests. The kappa statistic was used to assess the level of disconnect between physician and patient perceptions of the impact of night-time symptoms. Results: Most patients (78% reported night-time disturbance. Patients with night-time symptoms experienced more daytime breathlessness (mean modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale score 2.4 versus 1.1 and exacerbations in the previous 12 months (mean 1.7 versus 0.4, and received more maintenance therapy (mean of 2.8 versus 2.3 products than those without. Concordance between the frequency of physician-reported (67.9% of patients and patient-reported (68.5% of patients night-time symptoms was good. Physicians significantly underestimated the impact of COPD on the patient's ability to get up in the morning and on sleep (fair

  16. UV-B radiation and photosynthetic irradiance acclimate eggplant for outdoor exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, J. G.; Mitchell, C. A.; Mitchell, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of greenhouse-grown eggplant (Solanum melongena L. var. esculentum Nees. 'Burpee's Black Beauty') seedlings with supplemental photosynthetically active radiation from cool-white fluorescent lamps increased growth of plants subsequently transferred outdoors relative to growth of plants that received no supplemental radiation or were shaded to 45% of solar irradiation in the greenhouse before transfer outdoors. Eggplant seedlings transferred outdoors were placed under plastic tarps either to provide relative protection from solar ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation (280-315 nm) using Mylar film or to allow exposure to UV-B using cellulose acetate. Protection of seedlings from UV-B radiation resulted in greater leaf expansion than for UV-B-exposed seedlings, but no change in leaf or shoot dry weight occurred after 9 days of treatment. Specific leaf weight increased in response to UV-B exposure outdoors. Exposure of eggplant to UV-B radiation from fluorescent sunlamps in the greenhouse also decreased leaf expansion and leaf and shoot dry weight gain after 5 days of treatment. However, there were no differences in leaf or shoot dry weight relative to control plants after 12 days of UV-B treatment, indicating that UV-B treated plants had acclimated to the treatment and actually had caught up with non-UV-B-irradiated plants in terms of growth.

  17. Investigating the motivational behavior of pupils during outdoor science teaching within self-determination theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettweiler, Ulrich; Ünlü, Ali; Lauterbach, Gabriele; Becker, Christoph; Gschrey, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents data from a mixed-method pilot study (n = 84) searching into learning psychological aspects of an outdoor science teaching program. We use data from qualitative explorations into the pupils' learning motivation during field observation, a group interview, and open questionnaires, in order to understand quantitative measures from the Self-Determination Index (SDI), and the Practical Orientation (PO) of the program. Our data suggest that lower self-regulated pupils in "normal" science classes show a significantly higher self-regulated learning motivational behavior in the outdoor educational setting (p < 10(-4)), and that the outdoor-teaching has generally been perceived as more practical than teaching at the normal school context (p < 10(-4)), irrespective of gender or school culture. We are going to provide in-depth analyses of all quantitative findings with our qualitative data and thus explain the findings logically, with respect to the direction of the statistical interpretation, and substantially, with respect to the meaning of the discoveries. We conclude that outdoor programming appears to be a suitable tool to trigger interest in science in youngsters, especially for less motivated pupils.

  18. Relationship Between Air Quality and Outdoor Exercise Behavior in China: a Novel Mobile-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang; Zhu, Li; Xu, Yaping; Lyu, Jiaying; Imm, Kellie; Yang, Lin

    2017-08-01

    Based on data collected from an exercise app, the study aims to provide empirical evidence on the relationship between air quality and patterns of outdoor exercise in China. Objective outdoor exercise data spanning 160 days were collected from 153 users of an exercise app, Tulipsport in China. Each exercise mode (running, biking, and walking, respectively) was organized into five air quality categories based on Air Quality Index (AQI): excellent, good, mild pollution, moderate pollution, and serious pollution. Key parameters of each app user were calculated and analyzed: the total number of exercise bouts, the average duration, and the average distance of each exercise mode in each air quality category. Multivariate analyses of variance indicate that the users were less likely to participate in outdoor running, biking, and walking (F = 24.16, p air pollution increased. However, there is no difference in terms of average distance and duration of exercise across different air pollution categories. People's participation in outdoor exercise is impeded by air pollution severity, but they stick to their exercise routines once exercise is initiated. Although people should protect themselves from health damages caused by exercising under pollution, the decreases in physical activity associated with air pollution may also pose an indirect risk to public health. The interactive relationship between air quality, exercise, and health warrants more empirical and interdisciplinary explorations.

  19. Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunden, Melissa M.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Hering, Susanne V.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2007-06-25

    A field study was conducted in an unoccupied single story residence in Clovis, California to provide data to address issues important to assess the indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin. Measurements of black and organic carbonaceous aerosols were performed using a variety of methods, resulting in both near real-time measurements as well as integrated filter based measurements. Comparisons of the different measurement methods show that it is crucial to account for gas phase adsorption artifacts when measuring organic carbon (OC). Measured concentrations affected by the emissions of organic compounds sorbed to indoor surfaces imply a higher degree of infiltration of outdoor organic carbon aerosols into the indoor environment for our unoccupied house. Analysis of the indoor and outdoor data for black carbon (BC) aerosols show that, on average, the indoor concentration of black carbon aerosols behaves in a similar manner to sulfate aerosols. In contrast, organic carbon aerosols are subject to chemical transformations indoors that, for our unoccupied home, resulted in lower indoor OC concentrations than would be expected by physical loss mechanisms alone. These results show that gas to particle partitioning of organic compounds, as well as gas to surface interactions within the residence, are an important process governing the indoor concentration to OC aerosols of outdoor origin.

  20. Playing with Nature: Supporting Preschoolers' Creativity in Natural Outdoor Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiewra, Christine; Veselack, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Conducted at two separate natural outdoor classrooms with preschool-aged children from three to five years old, this qualitative research study investigated how outdoor environments supported children's creativity and imagination. Although many studies have explored the development of creative arts in the young children, few have focused on…

  1. Characteristics of wilderness users in outdoor recreation assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan E. Watson; H. Ken Cordell; Lawrence A. Hartmann

    1989-01-01

    Wilderness use is often subsumed under outdoor recreation participation in large-scale assessments. Participation monitoring has indicated, however, that wilderness use has been increasing faster than outdoor recreation use in general. In a sample of Forest Service wilderness and nonwildemess users during the summer of 1985, detailed expenditure, activity, and travel...

  2. Outdoor weathering of sol-gel-treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandla A Tshabalala; Ryan Libert; Nancy Ross Sutherland

    2009-01-01

    Outdoor weathering of wood specimens treated with sol-gel formulations based on methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMOS), hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDTMOS), and ferric-zirconia-titania (Fe-Zr-Ti) sol was evaluated. The sol-gel process allowed deposition of a thin film of hybrid inorganic-organic networks (gel) in the wood cell wall that resulted in improved outdoor weathering...

  3. Outdoor Leadership Considerations with Women Survivors of Sexual Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, Denise; Dutton, Rosalind

    1993-01-01

    Emphasizes the importance of leader awareness of the discomfort and need for emotional safety that may surface for women survivors of sexual abuse during an outdoor experience. Discusses survivor's self-perception and how this affects the outdoor experience; the impact of natural elements on survivors; and how to help survivors develop coping…

  4. Outdoor activity and myopia in Singapore teenage children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirani, M; Tong, L; Gazzard, G; Zhang, X; Chia, A; Young, T L; Rose, K A; Mitchell, P; Saw, S-M

    2009-08-01

    To investigate the relationship of outdoor activities and myopia in Singapore teenage children. Teenage children (1249 participants), examined in the Singapore Cohort study Of Risk factors for Myopia (SCORM), during 2006 were included in analyses. Participants completed questionnaires that quantified total outdoor activity, and underwent an eye examination. The mean total time spent on outdoor activity was 3.24 h/day. The total outdoor activity (h/day) was significantly associated with myopia, odds ratio 0.90 (95% CI 0.84 to 0.96) (p = 0.004), after adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, school type, books read per week, height, parental myopia, parental education and intelligence quotient. In addition, the total time spent outdoors was associated with significantly less myopic refraction (regression coefficient = 0.17; CI 0.10 to 0.25, psports was also significantly negatively associated with myopia (p = 0.008) but not indoor sports (p = 0.16). Participants who spent more time outdoors were less likely to be myopic. Thus, outdoor activity may protect against development of myopia in children, supporting recent Australian data. As near work did not predict outdoor activity, this can be viewed as an independent factor and not merely the reciprocal of near work.

  5. Neighborhood Poverty and Maternal Fears of Children's Outdoor Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbro, Rachel Tolbert; Schachter, Ariela

    2011-01-01

    Investigating children's outdoor play unites scholarship on neighborhoods, parental perceptions of safety, and children's health. Utilizing the Fragile Families and Child Well-being Study (N = 3,448), we examine mothers' fear of their 5-year-old children playing outdoors, testing associations with neighborhood social characteristics, city-level…

  6. RPA Assessment of Outdoor Recreation: Past, Current, and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    John C. Bergstrom; H. Ken Cordell; Linda Langner

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the outdoor recreation sections of the Renewable Resource Planning Act (RPA) Assessments conducted to date are reviewed. Current policy and mangement applications of the outsdoor recreation results published in 1989 Assessment are discussed also. The paper concludes with suggestions for the assemssment of outdoor recreation in future RPA Assessements...

  7. The Management of Nature and Socialization to Outdoor Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahle, Borge

    2001-01-01

    A Norwegian study of socialization into friluftsliv (traditional open-air life) found that factors affecting lifelong interest included parents' and friends' relationship to friluftsliv, proximity to suitable areas, outdoor hobbies, access to a summer home, and owning a dog. Educational experiences outdoors were collectively about as influential…

  8. Tenuous Affair: Environmental and Outdoor Education in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, David; Straker, Jo

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between outdoor education and environmental education in Aotearoa New Zealand has undergone many changes since formal education began in early colonial times. Discussion draws from qualitative doctoral research undertaken by the authors that investigated education for sustainability in outdoor education and how meaning is ascribed…

  9. The effect of outdoor learning activities on the development of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty-five preschool children living in disadvantageous districts in İzmir, Turkey, and not being able to get education, were offered ten-week preschool education involving outdoor activities. This research was designed according to one group pre-test and post-test model. The results show that outdoor activities improved ...

  10. Informal Outdoor Education: Part 3. Issues and Conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffany, Graeme

    1996-01-01

    Discusses issues in informal outdoor education offered by youth programs and social agencies: redefining the outdoors, need for follow-up and continuity, need for interpersonal skills and knowledge of group dynamics as well as technical training, benefits of a team approach, and benefits of engaging in other activities with clients. Contains 29…

  11. Methodology in Outdoor Research: Approaches from an Alternative Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Powerful, dominant discourses surrounding neo-Hahnian theory (as discussed by Brookes in 2003) and effectiveness (as discussed by Hargreaves and Fullan in 1998, for example) have influenced both practice and research in outdoor adventure education. This has led to a concentration of research that focuses on the impact of outdoor programmes. It has…

  12. Saskatchewan's Trek School and the Greenall Outdoor School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notenboom, Rob; Moore, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Trek School is an outdoor school program for any Grade 11 students in Regina, Saskatchewan. During the program, students engage in a series of classroom, outdoor, and experiential activities. The various courses are taught through these experiences. The program is designed to help students develop in the areas of independent learning, critical and…

  13. Women of Color in the Outdoors: Culture and Meanings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nina S.; Henderson, Karla A.

    1997-01-01

    A total of 24 self-identified women of color took part in focus groups and interviews concerned with attitudes toward the outdoors and involvement in outdoor activities. Analysis focuses on social support for participation, family influence, peer influence, role models, perceived isolation, sociocultural influences, discomfort and fear, personal…

  14. Evaluating cyclic fatigue of sealants during outdoor testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Sam Williams; Steven Lacher; Corey Halpin; Christopher White

    2009-01-01

    A computer-controlled test apparatus (CCTA) and other instrumentation for subjecting sealant specimens to cyclic fatigue during outdoor exposure was developed. The CCTA enables us to use weather-induced conditions to cyclic fatigue specimens and to conduct controlled tests in-situ during the outdoor exposure. Thermally induced dimensional changes of an aluminum bar...

  15. Motivations, attitudes, preferences, and satisfactions among outdoor recreationists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Tarrant; Alan D. Bright; Erin Smith; H. Ken Cordell

    1999-01-01

    This chapter is presented in two sections. The first by Bright and Tarrant describes visitor preferences and examines users' perceptions of encountering other visitors in outdoor recreation settings. The second by Tarrant and others reviews visitor preferences for, and satisfactions with, outdoor recreation experiences.

  16. Indoor-Outdoor Air Pollution Relationship: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Ferris B.; And Others

    While extensive measurements have been and are being made of outdoor pollution, relatively few data have been gathered on indoor pollution. The data that are available are compiled and analyzed in the report. Based on a review of the literature, it was possible to infer relationships between indoor and outdoor pollution and to identify factors…

  17. The Implementation of Mobile Learning in Outdoor Education: Application of

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hsin-Chih; Chang, Chun-Yen; Li, Wen-Shiane; Fan, Yu-Lin; Wu, Ying-Tien

    2013-01-01

    This study presents an m-learning method that incorporates Integrated Quick Response (QR) codes. This learning method not only achieves the objectives of outdoor education, but it also increases applications of Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (CTML) (Mayer, 2001) in m-learning for practical use in a diverse range of outdoor locations. When…

  18. Outdoor Adventure & Eating Disorders: A Personal Perspective to Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kaye

    1999-01-01

    A female outdoor educator who had recovered from anorexia nervosa reflects on the boundaries between her personal and professional identity as she anticipates taking on a research role in adventure-therapy programs. Gender issues in outdoor education are discussed in relation to women's body image and eating disorders. (SV)

  19. Diversity: Including People with Disabilities in Outdoor Adventure Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugerman, Deb

    1996-01-01

    Organizations that offer outdoor adventure activities can integrate programs to include individuals with disabilities. The paper describes how one organization includes diverse groups of people with and without disabilities in its outdoor activities, focusing on each member's strengths and encouraging cooperation. (SM)

  20. Water-Based Outdoor Recreation and Persons with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jo-Ellen

    People with disabilities have long been hindered from participating in outdoor recreation activities such as fishing and boating because of structural and social barriers. Within the past decade, significant progress has been made toward including people with disabilities in outdoor recreation programs and improving access to related facilities…

  1. The Future of Outdoor Recreation. What the Trends Tell Us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Gina

    1986-01-01

    The author looked at trend data presented at the 1985 National Outdoor Recreation Trends Symposium and synthesized the results to offer insights into the future of outdoor recreation. Discussed are social, activity, private sector recreational, economic, tourism, and policy trends. (MT)

  2. Outdoor Recreation in America. Trends, Problems, and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Clayne R.

    Containing 14 chapters of information about agencies, programs, problems, and trends related to outdoor recreation, this book is designed to cover the field of study and (1) to interpret the present and future significance of outdoor recreation, (2) to describe the responsibilities of the numerous agencies and organizations involved, (3) to cover…

  3. Outdoor recreation trend research: making the possible probable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffery Godbey

    1980-01-01

    Outdoor recreation research has largely ignored the fundamental requirement of science that findings be replicative. "The only way to establish replicability, of course, is to replicate." Because of this, we know practically nothing about outdoor recreation trends. "Trends, in statistics, (is) a steady change in a variable or set of related variables in...

  4. Out, out, and Away! Collection Development: Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, John

    2009-01-01

    Summer is fast approaching, and it will soon be time to climb the mountains to get their good tidings, as naturalist John Muir put it. In other words, librarians must now prepare for the influx of patrons making weekend recreational and summer vacation plans by stocking up on books and other resources on the great outdoors. Outdoor recreational…

  5. Increasing Outdoor Recreation Participation through the Schools: A Critical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Claude

    1989-01-01

    This article examines the rationale for increasing outdoor recreation participation through schools; it attempts to demonstrate that very little is known about the intensity of participation in schools, and opportunities for such participation seem limited; finally, it suggests strategies to increase youth participation in outdoor recreation. (IAH)

  6. Outdoor recreation by Alaskans: projections for 2000 through 2020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Michael. Bowker

    2001-01-01

    Outdoor recreation participation and consumption by Alaska residents are analyzed and projected to 2020. Both the rate of participation and the intensity of participation in nearly all outdoor recreation activities are higher among Alaskans than for residents of other states. Projections based on economic and demographic trends indicate that current patterns are likely...

  7. Outdoor Recreation Participation: Blacks, Whites, Hispanics, and Asians in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    John F. Dwyer

    1992-01-01

    Blacks, Whites, Hispanics, and Asians in Illinois attach a high level of significance to outdoor recreation. However, there are important differences in the outdoor recreation participation patterns of these four groups, including the activities participated in and where they participate, that have important implications for recreation resource planning and research....

  8. Research for planning of outdoor recreation facilities in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lier, van H.N.

    1975-01-01

    In the Netherlands the planning and management of outdoor recreation projects is becoming more and more important. This is caused on the one hand by a rapidly growing demand for such projects and on the other hand by the relationship that exists between outdoor recreation activities and

  9. Constraining the chlorine monoxide (ClO)/chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl) equilibrium constant from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder measurements of nighttime ClO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santee, Michelle L; Sander, Stanley P; Livesey, Nathaniel J; Froidevaux, Lucien

    2010-04-13

    The primary ozone loss process in the cold polar lower stratosphere hinges on chlorine monoxide (ClO) and one of its dimers, chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl). Recently, analyses of atmospheric observations have suggested that the equilibrium constant, K(eq), governing the balance between ClOOCl formation and thermal decomposition in darkness is lower than that in the current evaluation of kinetics data. Measurements of ClO at night, when ClOOCl is unaffected by photolysis, provide a useful means of testing quantitative understanding of the ClO/ClOOCl relationship. Here we analyze nighttime ClO measurements from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) to infer an expression for K(eq). Although the observed temperature dependence of the nighttime ClO is in line with the theoretical ClO/ClOOCl equilibrium relationship, none of the previously published expressions for K(eq) consistently produces ClO abundances that match the MLS observations well under all conditions. Employing a standard expression for K(eq), A x exp(B/T), we constrain the parameter A to currently recommended values and estimate B using a nonlinear weighted least squares analysis of nighttime MLS ClO data. ClO measurements at multiple pressure levels throughout the periods of peak chlorine activation in three Arctic and four Antarctic winters are used to estimate B. Our derived B leads to values of K(eq) that are approximately 1.4 times smaller at stratospherically relevant temperatures than currently recommended, consistent with earlier studies. Our results are in better agreement with the newly updated (2009) kinetics evaluation than with the previous (2006) recommendation.

  10. Outdoor Exposure to Solar Ultraviolet Radiation and Legislation in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Abel A

    2016-06-01

    The total ozone column of 265 ± 11 Dobson Units in the tropical-equatorial zones and 283 ± 16 Dobson Units in the subtropics of Brazil are among the lowest on Earth, and as a result, the prevalence of skin cancer due to solar ultraviolet radiation is among the highest. Daily erythemal doses in Brazil can be over 7,500 J m. Erythemal dose rates on cloudless days of winter and summer are typically about 0.147 W m and 0.332 W m, respectively. However, radiation enhancement events yielded by clouds have been reported with erythemal dose rates of 0.486 W m. Daily doses of the diffuse component of erythemal radiation have been determined with values of 5,053 J m and diffuse erythemal dose rates of 0.312 W m. Unfortunately, Brazilians still behave in ways that lead to overexposure to the sun. The annual personal ultraviolet radiation ambient dose among Brazilian youths can be about 5.3%. Skin cancer in Brazil is prevalent, with annual rates of 31.6% (non-melanoma) and 1.0% (melanoma). Governmental and non-governmental initiatives have been taken to increase public awareness of photoprotection behaviors. Resolution #56 by the Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária has banned tanning devices in Brazil. In addition, Projects of Law (PL), like PL 3730/2004, propose that the Sistema Único de Saúde should distribute sunscreen to members of the public, while PL 4027/2012 proposes that employers should provide outdoor workers with sunscreen during professional outdoor activities. Similar laws have already been passed in some municipalities. These are presented and discussed in this study.

  11. Modeling of Electric Demand for Sustainable Energy and Management in India Using Spatio-Temporal DMSP-OLS Night-Time Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Bismay Ranjan; Sajjad, Haroon; Elvidge, Christopher D; Ting, Yu; Pandey, Prem Chandra; Rani, Meenu; Kumar, Pavan

    2017-12-27

    Changes in the pattern of electric power consumption in India have influenced energy utilization processes and socio-economic development to greater extent during the last few decades. Assessment of spatial distribution of electricity consumption is, thus, essential for projecting availability of energy resource and planning its infrastructure. This paper makes an attempt to model the future electricity demand for sustainable energy and its management in India. The nighttime light database provides a good approximation of availability of energy. We utilized defense meteorological satellite program-operational line-scan system (DMSP-OLS) nighttime satellite data, electricity consumption (1993-2013), gross domestic product (GDP) and population growth to construct the model. We also attempted to examine the sensitiveness of electricity consumption to GDP and population growth. The results revealed that the calibrated DMSP and model has provided realistic information on the electric demand with respect to GDP and population, with a better accuracy of r 2  = 0.91. The electric demand was found to be more sensitive to GDP (r = 0.96) than population growth (r = 0.76) as envisaged through correlation analysis. Hence, the model proved to be useful tool in predicting electric demand for its sustainable use and management.

  12. Release of silver nanoparticles from outdoor facades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaegi, Ralf; Sinnet, Brian; Zuleeg, Steffen; Hagendorfer, Harald; Mueller, Elisabeth; Vonbank, Roger; Boller, Markus; Burkhardt, Michael

    2010-09-01

    In this study we investigate the release of metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) from paints used for outdoor applications. A facade panel mounted on a model house was exposed to ambient weather conditions over a period of one year. The runoff volume of individual rain events was determined and the silver and titanium concentrations of 36 out of 65 runoff events were measured. Selected samples were prepared for electron microscopic analysis. A strong leaching of the Ag-NP was observed during the initial runoff events with a maximum concentration of 145 micro Ag/l. After a period of one year, more than 30% of the Ag-NP were released to the environment. Particles were mostly paint. Microscopic results indicate that the Ag-NP are likely transformed to considerably less toxic forms such as Ag2S. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Relationship between outdoor temperature and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halonen, Jaana I; Zanobetti, Antonella; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel S; Schwartz, Joel

    2011-04-01

    Cardiovascular mortality has been linked to changes in outdoor temperature. However, the mechanisms behind these effects are not well established. We aimed to study the effect of outdoor temperature on blood pressure, as increased blood pressure is a risk factor for cardiovascular death. The study population consisted of men aged 53-100 years living in the Boston area. We used a mixed effects model to estimate the effect of three temperature variables: ambient, apparent and dew point temperature (DPT), on repeated measures (every 3-5 years) of diastolic (DBP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP). Random intercepts for subjects and several possible confounders were used in the models, including black carbon and barometric pressure. We found modest associations between DBP and ambient and apparent temperature. In the basic models, DBP in association with a 5 °C decrease in 7-day moving averages of temperatures increased by 1.01% (95% CI -0.06% to 2.09%) and 1.55% (95% CI 0.61% to 2.49%) for ambient and apparent temperature, respectively. Excluding extreme temperatures strengthened these associations (2.13%, 95% CI 0.66% to 3.63%, and 1.65%, 95% CI 0.41% to 2.90%, for ambient and apparent temperature, respectively). Effect estimates for DPT were close to null. The effect of apparent temperature on SBP was similar (1.30% increase (95% CI 0.32% to 2.29%) for a 5 °C decrease in 7-day moving average). Cumulative exposure to decreasing ambient and apparent temperature may increase blood pressure. These findings suggest that an increase in blood pressure could be a mechanism behind cold-related, but not heat-related, cardiovascular mortality.

  14. Prediction of Indoor Air Exposure from Outdoor Air Quality Using an Artificial Neural Network Model for Inner City Commercial Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avril Challoner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available NO2 and particulate matter are the air pollutants of most concern in Ireland, with possible links to the higher respiratory and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity rates found in the country compared to the rest of Europe. Currently, air quality limits in Europe only cover outdoor environments yet the quality of indoor air is an essential determinant of a person’s well-being, especially since the average person spends more than 90% of their time indoors. The modelling conducted in this research aims to provide a framework for epidemiological studies by the use of publically available data from fixed outdoor monitoring stations to predict indoor air quality more accurately. Predictions are made using two modelling techniques, the Personal-exposure Activity Location Model (PALM, to predict outdoor air quality at a particular building, and Artificial Neural Networks, to model the indoor/outdoor relationship of the building. This joint approach has been used to predict indoor air concentrations for three inner city commercial buildings in Dublin, where parallel indoor and outdoor diurnal monitoring had been carried out on site. This modelling methodology has been shown to provide reasonable predictions of average NO2 indoor air quality compared to the monitored data, but did not perform well in the prediction of indoor PM2.5 concentrations. Hence, this approach could be used to determine NO2 exposures more rigorously of those who work and/or live in the city centre, which can then be linked to potential health impacts.

  15. Prediction of Indoor Air Exposure from Outdoor Air Quality Using an Artificial Neural Network Model for Inner City Commercial Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challoner, Avril; Pilla, Francesco; Gill, Laurence

    2015-12-01

    NO₂ and particulate matter are the air pollutants of most concern in Ireland, with possible links to the higher respiratory and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity rates found in the country compared to the rest of Europe. Currently, air quality limits in Europe only cover outdoor environments yet the quality of indoor air is an essential determinant of a person's well-being, especially since the average person spends more than 90% of their time indoors. The modelling conducted in this research aims to provide a framework for epidemiological studies by the use of publically available data from fixed outdoor monitoring stations to predict indoor air quality more accurately. Predictions are made using two modelling techniques, the Personal-exposure Activity Location Model (PALM), to predict outdoor air quality at a particular building, and Artificial Neural Networks, to model the indoor/outdoor relationship of the building. This joint approach has been used to predict indoor air concentrations for three inner city commercial buildings in Dublin, where parallel indoor and outdoor diurnal monitoring had been carried out on site. This modelling methodology has been shown to provide reasonable predictions of average NO₂ indoor air quality compared to the monitored data, but did not perform well in the prediction of indoor PM2.5 concentrations. Hence, this approach could be used to determine NO₂ exposures more rigorously of those who work and/or live in the city centre, which can then be linked to potential health impacts.

  16. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  17. Different Patterns in Daytime and Nighttime Thermal Effects of Urbanization in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Urban Agglomeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guosong Zhao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface urban heat island (SUHI in the context of urbanization has gained much attention in recent decades; however, the seasonal variations of SUHI and their drivers are still not well documented. In this study, the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH urban agglomeration, one of the most typical areas experiencing drastic urbanization in China, was selected to study the SUHI intensity (SUHII based on remotely sensed land surface temperature (LST data. Pure and unchanged urban and rural pixels from 2000 to 2010 were chosen to avoid non-concurrency between land cover data and LST data and to estimate daytime and nighttime thermal effects of urbanization. Different patterns of the seasonal variations were found in daytime and nighttime SUHIIs. Specifically, the daytime SUHII in summer (4 °C was more evident than in other seasons while a cold island phenomenon was found in winter; the nighttime SUHII was always positive and higher than the daytime one in all the seasons except summer. Moreover, we found the highest daytime SUHII in August, which is the growing peak stage of summer maize, while nighttime SUHII showed a trough in the same month. Seasonal variations of daytime SUHII showed higher significant correlations with the seasonal variations of ∆LAI (leaf area index (R2 = 0.81, r = −0.90 compared with ∆albedo (R2 = 0.61, r = −0.78 and background daytime LST (R2 = 0.69, r = 0.83; moreover, agricultural practices (double-cropping system played an important role in the seasonal variations of daytime SUHII. Seasonal variations of the nighttime SUHII did not show significant correlations with either of seasonal variations of ∆LAI, ∆albedo, and background nighttime LST, which implies different mechanisms in nighttime SUHII variation needing future studies.

  18. Spatial Recognition of the Urban-Rural Fringe of Beijing Using DMSP/OLS Nighttime Light Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Spatial identification of the urban-rural fringes is very significant for deeply understanding the development processes and regulations of urban space and guiding urban spatial development in the future. Traditionally, urban-rural fringe areas are identified using statistical analysis methods that consider indexes from single or multiple factors, such as population densities, the ratio of building land, the proportion of the non-agricultural population, and economic levels. However, these methods have limitations, for example, the statistical data are not continuous, the statistical standards are not uniform, the data is seldom available in real time, and it is difficult to avoid issues on the statistical effects from edges of administrative regions or express the internal differences of these areas. This paper proposes a convenient approach to identify the urban-rural fringe using nighttime light data of DMSP/OLS images. First, a light characteristics–combined value model was built in ArcGIS 10.3, and the combined characteristics of light intensity and the degree of light intensity fluctuation are analyzed in the urban, urban-rural fringe, and rural areas. Then, the Python programming language was used to extract the breakpoints of the characteristic combination values of the nighttime light data in 360 directions taking Tian An Men as the center. Finally, the range of the urban-rural fringe area is identified. The results show that the urban-rural fringe of Beijing is mainly located in the annular band around Tian An Men. The average inner radius is 19 km, and the outer radius is 26 km. The urban-rural fringe includes the outer portions of the four city center districts, which are the Chaoyang District, Haidian District, Fengtai District, and Shijingshan District and the part area border with Daxing District, Tongzhou District, Changping District, Mentougou District, Shunyi District, and Fangshan District. The area of the urban-rural fringe

  19. Effects of thermal mass, window size, and night-time ventilation on peak indoor air temperature in the warm-humid climate of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos-Abanyie, S; Akuffo, F O; Kutin-Sanwu, V

    2013-01-01

    Most office buildings in the warm-humid sub-Saharan countries experience high cooling load because of the predominant use of sandcrete blocks which are of low thermal mass in construction and extensive use of glazing. Relatively, low night-time temperatures are not harnessed in cooling buildings because office openings remain closed after work hours. An optimization was performed through a sensitivity analysis-based simulation, using the Energy Plus (E+) simulation software to assess the effects of thermal mass, window size, and night ventilation on peak indoor air temperature (PIAT). An experimental system was designed based on the features of the most promising simulation model, constructed and monitored, and the experimental data used to validate the simulation model. The results show that an optimization of thermal mass and window size coupled with activation of night-time ventilation provides a synergistic effect to obtain reduced peak indoor air temperature. An expression that predicts, indoor maximum temperature has been derived for models of various thermal masses.

  20. Effects of Thermal Mass, Window Size, and Night-Time Ventilation on Peak Indoor Air Temperature in the Warm-Humid Climate of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Amos-Abanyie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most office buildings in the warm-humid sub-Saharan countries experience high cooling load because of the predominant use of sandcrete blocks which are of low thermal mass in construction and extensive use of glazing. Relatively, low night-time temperatures are not harnessed in cooling buildings because office openings remain closed after work hours. An optimization was performed through a sensitivity analysis-based simulation, using the Energy Plus (E+ simulation software to assess the effects of thermal mass, window size, and night ventilation on peak indoor air temperature (PIAT. An experimental system was designed based on the features of the most promising simulation model, constructed and monitored, and the experimental data used to validate the simulation model. The results show that an optimization of thermal mass and window size coupled with activation of night-time ventilation provides a synergistic effect to obtain reduced peak indoor air temperature. An expression that predicts, indoor maximum temperature has been derived for models of various thermal masses.

  1. Coupling an Intercalibration of Radiance-Calibrated Nighttime Light Images and Land Use/Cover Data for Modeling and Analyzing the Distribution of GDP in Guangdong, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyang Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatialized GDP data is important for studying the relationships between human activities and environmental changes. Rapid and accurate acquisition of these datasets are therefore a significant area of study. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS radiance-calibrated nighttime light (RC NTL images exhibit the potential for providing superior estimates for GDP spatialization, as they are not restricted by the saturated pixels which exist in nighttime stable light (NSL images. However, the drawback of light overflow is the limited accuracy of GDP estimation, and GDP data estimations based on RC NTL images cannot be directly used for temporal analysis due to a lack of on-board calibration. This study develops an intercalibration method to address the comparability problem. Additionally, NDVI images are used to reduce the light overflow effect. In this way, the secondary and tertiary industry outputs are estimated by using intercalibrated RC NTL images. Primary industry production is estimated by using land use/cover data. Ultimately, four 1 km gridded GDP maps of Guangdong for 2000, 2004, 2006 and 2010 are generated. The verification results of the proposed intercalibration method demonstrate that this method is reasonable and can be effectively implemented. These maps can be used to analyze the distribution and spatiotemporal changes of GDP density in Guangdong.

  2. Electron density variability of nighttime D region ionosphere in Vietnamese and Japanese sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Le Minh; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Thu, Nguyen Ngoc; Ha, Tran Quoc

    2017-06-01

    Recording tweek atmospherics on geomagnetically quiet days in 2014 at Tay Nguyen University (TNU) (12.65°N, 108.02°E), Vietnam, and at Kagoshima (KAG) (31.48°N, 130.72°E), Japan, we investigated the nighttime electron density variability of the D region ionosphere between the equatorial-low-latitude Vietnamese and the low- to middle-latitude Japanese sectors. We estimated the reflection height and electron density of the D region ionosphere using the first-order mode cutoff frequency of tweek atmospherics. The results observed at both stations show that the mean electron density at the reflection height during winter season was higher than that during summer and equinox seasons. The electron density observed at TNU gradually decreased from 20:15 to 4:15 LT from winter to equinox and to summer. The electron density observed at KAG increased from 20:20 to 4:20 LT during summer and winter seasons. The mean electron density during 2014 observed at TNU (25.0 cm-3) was higher by 2.1 cm-3 than that observed at KAG (22.9 cm-3). During 2014, the nighttime electron density variations show a moderate positive correlation with the sunspot number but show weak to no correlation with the galactic cosmic rays. We suggest that the seasonal variations in the nighttime electron density could be significantly caused by the enhancement of geocoronal hydrogen Lyman α intensity and seasonal variation of nitric oxide density in the lower ionosphere.

  3. Suppression of nighttime sap flux with lower stem photosynthesis in Eucalyptus trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianguo; Zhou, Juan; Sun, Zhenwei; Niu, Junfeng; Zhou, Cuiming; Gu, Daxing; Huang, Yuqing; Zhao, Ping

    2016-04-01

    It is widely accepted that substantial nighttime sap flux ( J s,n) or transpiration ( E) occurs in most plants, but the physiological implications are poorly known. It has been hypothesized that J s,n or E serves to enhance nitrogen uptake or deliver oxygen; however, no clear evidence is currently available. In this study, sap flux ( J s) in Eucalyptus grandis × urophylla with apparent stem photosynthesis was measured, including control trees which were covered by aluminum foil (approximately 1/3 of tree height) to block stem photosynthesis. We hypothesized that the nighttime water flux would be suppressed in trees with lower stem photosynthesis. The results showed that the green tissue degraded after 3 months, demonstrating a decrease in stem photosynthesis. The daytime J s decreased by 21.47 %, while J s,n decreased by 12.03 % in covered trees as compared to that of control, and the difference was statistically significant ( P photosynthesis in covered trees. Predawn ( ψ pd) of covered trees was marginally higher than that of control while lower at predawn stomatal conductance ( g s), indicating a suppressed water flux in covered trees. There was no difference in leaf carbon content and δ13C between the two groups, while leaf nitrogen content and δ15N were significantly higher in covered trees than that of the control ( P oxygen pathway since green tissue has a higher respiration or oxygen demand than non-green tissue. Thus, this study demonstrated the physiological implications of J s,n and the possible benefits of nighttime water use or E by the tree.

  4. Monitoring Trends in Light Pollution in China Based on Nighttime Satellite Imagery

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    Pengpeng Han

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available China is the largest developing country worldwide, with rapid economic growth and the highest population. Light pollution is an environmental factor that significantly influences the quality and health of wildlife, as well as the people of any country. The objective of this study is to model the light pollution spatial pattern, and monitor changes in trends of spatial distribution from 1992 to 2012 in China using nighttime light imagery from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System. Based on the intercalibration of nighttime light imageries of the study area from 1992 to 2012, this study obtained the change trends map. This result shows an increase in light pollution of the study area; light pollution in the spatial scale increased from 2.08% in the period from 1992–1996 to 2000–2004, to 5.64% in the period from 2000–2004 to 2008–2012. However, light pollution change trends presented varying styles in different regions and times. In the 1990s, the increasing trend in light pollution regions mostly occurred in larger urban cities, which are mainly located in eastern and coastal areas, whereas the decreasing trend areas were chiefly industrial and mining cities rich in mineral resources, in addition to the central parts of large cities. Similarly, the increasing trend regions dominated urban cities of the study area, and the expanded direction changed from larger cities to small and middle-sized cities and towns in the 2000s. The percentages of regions where light pollution transformed to severe and slight were 5.64% and 0.39%, respectively. The results can inform and help identify how local economic and environmental decisions influence our global nighttime environment, and assist government agencies in creating environmental protection measures.

  5. Indoor air pollution, nighttime heart rate variability and coffee consumption among convenient store workers.

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    Chuang, Kai-Jen; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Lin, Lian-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The association between ambient air pollution and heart rate variability (HRV) has been well-documented. Little is known about the association of HRV at night with indoor air pollution and coffee consumption. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of HRV indices with indoor air pollution, working time and coffee consumption. We recruited 60 young healthy convenient store workers to monitor indoor PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 µm) exposures, coffee consumption (yes vs. no) and HRV indices during daytime (0700-1500 hours) and nighttime (2300-0700 hours). We used linear mixed effects models to assess the associations of HRV indices with indoor PM2.5 exposures and coffee consumption. We observed the inverse association between indoor PM2.5 exposures and HRV indices, with a decrease in all HRV indices with increased indoor PM2.5 exposures. However, the decrease was most pronounced during nighttime, where a 1 interquartile range (IQR) increase in indoor PM2.5 at 4-hr time-weighted moving average was associated with a change of -4.78% 5-min standard deviation (SD) of normal-to-normal intervals for 5-min segment (SDNN) and -3.23% 5-min square root of the mean squared differences of successive intervals for 5-min segment (r-MSSD). Effects of indoor PM2.5 were lowest for participants with coffee consumption during daytime. Indoor PM2.5 exposures were associated with decreased 5-min SDNN and 5-min r-MSSD, especially during nighttime. The effect of indoor PM2.5 on HRV indices may be modified by coffee consumption in young healthy convenient store workers.

  6. The effects of a nighttime nap on the error-monitoring functions during extended wakefulness.

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    Asaoka, Shoichi; Fukuda, Kazuhiko; Murphy, Timothy I; Abe, Takashi; Inoue, Yuichi

    2012-06-01

    To examine the effects of a 1-hr nighttime nap, and the associated sleep inertia, on the error-monitoring functions during extended wakefulness using the 2 event-related potential components thought to reflect error detection and emotional or motivational evaluation of the error, i.e., the error-related negativity/error-negativity (ERN/Ne) and error-positivity (Pe), respectively. Participants awakened at 07:00 the morning of the experimental day, and performed a stimulus-response compatibility (arrow-orientation) task at 21:00, 02:00, and 03:00. A cognitive task with EEG data recording was performed in a laboratory setting. Twenty young adults (mean age 21.3 ± 1.0 yr, 14 males) participated. Half of the participants took a 1-hr nap, and the others had a 1-hr awake-rest period from 01:00-02:00. Behavioral performance and amplitude of the Pe declined after midnight (i.e., 02:00 and 03:00) compared with the 21:00 task period in both groups. During the task period starting at 03:00, the participants in the awake-rest condition reported less alertness and showed fewer correct responses than those who napped. However, there were no effects of a nap on the amplitude of the ERN/Ne or Pe. Our results suggest that a 1-hr nap can alleviate the decline in subjective alertness and response accuracy during nighttime; however, error-monitoring functions, especially emotional or motivational evaluation of the error, might remain impaired by extended wakefulness even after the nap. This phenomenon could imply that night-shift workers experiencing extended wakefulness should not overestimate the positive effects of a nighttime 1-hr nap during extended wakefulness.

  7. Convolutional Neural Network-Based Human Detection in Nighttime Images Using Visible Light Camera Sensors

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    Jong Hyun Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Because intelligent surveillance systems have recently undergone rapid growth, research on accurately detecting humans in videos captured at a long distance is growing in importance. The existing research using visible light cameras has mainly focused on methods of human detection for daytime hours when there is outside light, but human detection during nighttime hours when there is no outside light is difficult. Thus, methods that employ additional near-infrared (NIR illuminators and NIR cameras or thermal cameras have been used. However, in the case of NIR illuminators, there are limitations in terms of the illumination angle and distance. There are also difficulties because the illuminator power must be adaptively adjusted depending on whether the object is close or far away. In the case of thermal cameras, their cost is still high, which makes it difficult to install and use them in a variety of places. Because of this, research has been conducted on nighttime human detection using visible light cameras, but this has focused on objects at a short distance in an indoor environment or the use of video-based methods to capture multiple images and process them, which causes problems related to the increase in the processing time. To resolve these problems, this paper presents a method that uses a single image captured at night on a visible light camera to detect humans in a variety of environments based on a convolutional neural network. Experimental results using a self-constructed Dongguk night-time human detection database (DNHD-DB1 and two open databases (Korea advanced institute of science and technology (KAIST and computer vision center (CVC databases, as well as high-accuracy human detection in a variety of environments, show that the method has excellent performance compared to existing methods.

  8. Convolutional Neural Network-Based Human Detection in Nighttime Images Using Visible Light Camera Sensors.

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    Kim, Jong Hyun; Hong, Hyung Gil; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2017-05-08

    Because intelligent surveillance systems have recently undergone rapid growth, research on accurately detecting humans in videos captured at a long distance is growing in importance. The existing research using visible light cameras has mainly focused on methods of human detection for daytime hours when there is outside light, but human detection during nighttime hours when there is no outside light is difficult. Thus, methods that employ additional near-infrared (NIR) illuminators and NIR cameras or thermal cameras have been used. However, in the case of NIR illuminators, there are limitations in terms of the illumination angle and distance. There are also difficulties because the illuminator power must be adaptively adjusted depending on whether the object is close or far away. In the case of thermal cameras, their cost is still high, which makes it difficult to install and use them in a variety of places. Because of this, research has been conducted on nighttime human detection using visible light cameras, but this has focused on objects at a short distance in an indoor environment or the use of video-based methods to capture multiple images and process them, which causes problems related to the increase in the processing time. To resolve these problems, this paper presents a method that uses a single image captured at night on a visible light camera to detect humans in a variety of environments based on a convolutional neural network. Experimental results using a self-constructed Dongguk night-time human detection database (DNHD-DB1) and two open databases (Korea advanced institute of science and technology (KAIST) and computer vision center (CVC) databases), as well as high-accuracy human detection in a variety of environments, show that the method has excellent performance compared to existing methods.

  9. Substitution of PFAS chemistry in outdoor apparel and the impact on repellency performance.

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    Hill, Philippa J; Taylor, Mark; Goswami, Parikshit; Blackburn, Richard S

    2017-08-01

    Intensifying legislation and increased research on the toxicological and persistent nature of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have recently influenced the direction of liquid repellent chemistry use; environmental, social, and sustainability responsibilities are at the crux. Without PFAS chemistry, it is challenging to meet current textile industry liquid repellency requirements, which is a highly desirable property, particularly in outdoor apparel where the technology helps to provide the wearer with essential protection from adverse environmental conditions. Herein, complexities between required functionality, legislation and sustainability within outdoor apparel are discussed, and fundamental technical performance of commercially available long-chain (C8) PFASs, shorter-chain (C6) PFASs, and non-fluorinated repellent chemistries finishes are evaluated comparatively. Non-fluorinated finishes provided no oil repellency, and were clearly inferior in this property to PFAS-finished fabrics that demonstrated good oil-resistance. However, water repellency ratings were similar across the range of all finished fabrics tested, all demonstrating a high level of resistance to wetting, and several non-fluorinated repellent fabrics provide similar water repellency to long-chain (C8) PFAS or shorter-chain (C6) PFAS finished fabrics. The primary repellency function required in outdoor apparel is water repellency, and we would propose that the use of PFAS chemistry for such garments is over-engineering, providing oil repellency that is in excess of user requirements. Accordingly, significant environmental and toxicological benefits could be achieved by switching outdoor apparel to non-fluorinated finishes without a significant reduction in garment water-repellency performance. These conclusions are being supported by further research into the effect of laundering, abrasion and ageing of these fabrics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of coffee and napping on nighttime highway driving: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Pierre; Taillard, Jacques; Moore, Nicholas; Delord, Sandrine; Valtat, Cédric; Sagaspe, Patricia; Bioulac, Bernard

    2006-06-06

    Sleep-related accidents often involve healthy young persons who are driving at night. Coffee and napping restore alertness, but no study has compared their effects on real nighttime driving performances. To test the effects of 125 mL of coffee (half a cup) containing 200 mg of caffeine, placebo (decaffeinated coffee containing 15 mg of caffeine), or a 30-minute nap (at 1:00 a.m.) in a car on nighttime driving performance. Double-blind, randomized, crossover study. Sleep laboratory and open highway. 12 young men (mean age, 21.3 years [SD, 1.8]). Self-rated fatigue and sleepiness, inappropriate line crossings from video recordings during highway driving, and polysomnographic recordings during the nap and subsequent sleep. Participants drove 200 km (125 miles) between 6:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. (daytime reference condition) or between 2:00 a.m. and 3:30 a.m. (coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or nap condition). After intervention, participants returned to the laboratory to sleep. Nighttime driving performance was similar to daytime performance (0 to 1 line crossing) for 75% of participants after coffee (0 or 1 line crossing), for 66% after the nap (P = 0.66 vs. coffee), and for only 13% after placebo (P = 0.041 vs. nap; P = 0.014 vs. coffee). The incidence rate ratios for having a line crossing after placebo were 3.7 (95% CI, 1.2 to 11.0; P = 0.001) compared with coffee and 2.9 (CI, 1.7 to 5.1; P = 0.021) compared with nap. A statistically significant interindividual variability was observed in response to sleep deprivation and countermeasures. Sleep latencies and efficiency during sleep after nighttime driving were similar in the 3 conditions. Only 1 dose of coffee and 1 nap duration were tested. Effects may differ in other patient or age groups. Drinking coffee or napping at night statistically significantly reduces driving impairment without altering subsequent sleep.

  11. FPI observations of nighttime mesospheric and thermospheric winds in China and their comparisons with HWM07

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    W. Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the nighttime horizontal neutral winds in the middle atmosphere (~ 87 and ~ 98 km and thermosphere (~ 250 km derived from a Fabry–Perot interferometer (FPI, which was installed at Xinglong station (40.2° N, 117.4° E in central China. The wind data covered the period from April 2010 to July 2012. We studied the annual, semiannual and terannual variations of the midnight winds at ~ 87 km, ~ 98 km and ~ 250 km for the first time and compared them with Horizontal Wind Model 2007 (HWM07. Our results show the following: (1 at ~ 87 km, both the observed and model zonal winds have similar phases in the annual and semiannual variations. However, the HWM07 amplitudes are much larger. (2 At ~ 98 km, the model shows strong eastward wind in the summer solstice, resulting in a large annual variation, while the observed strongest component is semiannual. The observation and model midnight meridional winds agree well. Both are equatorward throughout the year and have small amplitudes in the annual and semiannual variations. (3 There are large discrepancies between the observed and HWM07 winds at ~ 250 km. This discrepancy is largely due to the strong semiannual zonal wind in the model and the phase difference in the annual variation of the meridional wind. The FPI annual variation coincides with the results from Arecibo, which has similar geomagnetic latitude as Xinglong station. In General, the consistency of FPI winds with model winds is better at ~ 87 and ~ 98 km than that at ~ 250 km. We also studied the seasonally and monthly averaged nighttime winds. The most salient features include the following: (1 the seasonally averaged zonal winds at ~ 87 and ~ 98 km typically have small variations throughout the night. (2 The model zonal and meridional nighttime wind variations are typically much larger than those of observations at ~ 87 km and ~ 98 km. (3 At ~ 250 km, model zonal wind compares well with the observation in the winter. For spring and

  12. Receiving shadows: governance and liminality in the night-time economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, D; Lister, S; Hadfield, P; Winlow, S; Hall, S

    2000-12-01

    This paper focuses upon the emergence of the night-time economy both materially and culturally as a powerful manifestation of post-industrial society. This emergence features two key processes: firstly a shift in economic development from the industrial to the post-industrial; secondly a significant orientation of urban governance involving a move away from the traditional managerial functions of local service provision, towards an entrepreneurial stance primarily focused on the facilitation of economic growth. Central to this new economic era is the identification and promotion of liminality. The State's apparent inability to control these new leisure zones constitutes the creation of an urban frontier that is governed by commercial imperatives.

  13. Time course of sleep inertia after nighttime and daytime sleep episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achermann, P; Werth, E; Dijk, D J; Borbely, A A

    1995-12-01

    Sleep inertia refers to the period of reduced vigilance following upon awakening from sleep. To investigate the time course of sleep inertia, self-ratings of alertness and reaction time in a memory task were repeatedly assessed after nighttime and daytime sleep episodes in healthy young men. Alertness gradually increased and reaction time gradually decreased within the first hour after awakening. Their time course could be described by exponential functions with time constants of 0.45 h and 0.3 h, respectively. The data demonstrate that sleep inertia is a robust, quantifiable process that can be incorporated in models of sleep and vigilance.

  14. Analyzing the Velocity of Urban Dynamic Over Northeastern China Using Dmsp-Ols Night-Time Lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Stable night-time lights (NTL) data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Line-scan System (DMSPOLS) can serve as a good proxy for anthropogenic development. Here DMSP-OLS NTL data was used to detect the urban development status in northeastern China. The spatial and temporal gradients are combined to depict the velocity of urban expanding process. This velocity index represents the instantaneous local velocity along the Earth's surface needed to maintain constant NTL condition, and has a mean of 0.36 km/yr for northeastern China. The velocity change of NTL is lower in the urban center and its near regions, and the suburbs show a relatively high value. The connecting zones between satellite cities and metropolis have also a rapid rate of NTL evolution. The dynamic process of urbanization over the study area is mainly in a manner of spreading from urban cores to edges. The rank size of the velocity for the prefectures is analyzed and a long tail distribution is found. The velocity index can provide insights for the future pattern of urban sprawl.

  15. ANALYZING THE VELOCITY OF URBAN DYNAMIC OVER NORTHEASTERN CHINA USING DMSP-OLS NIGHT-TIME LIGHTS

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    Y. Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Stable night-time lights (NTL data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Line-scan System (DMSPOLS can serve as a good proxy for anthropogenic development. Here DMSP-OLS NTL data was used to detect the urban development status in northeastern China. The spatial and temporal gradients are combined to depict the velocity of urban expanding process. This velocity index represents the instantaneous local velocity along the Earth’s surface needed to maintain constant NTL condition, and has a mean of 0.36 km/yr for northeastern China. The velocity change of NTL is lower in the urban center and its near regions, and the suburbs show a relatively high value. The connecting zones between satellite cities and metropolis have also a rapid rate of NTL evolution. The dynamic process of urbanization over the study area is mainly in a manner of spreading from urban cores to edges. The rank size of the velocity for the prefectures is analyzed and a long tail distribution is found. The velocity index can provide insights for the future pattern of urban sprawl.

  16. Short range forecast verification of convective rain for a night-time event over the area of Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglione, Nazario; Gabella, Marco; Michaelides, Silas Chr.

    2008-04-01

    Night-time rain showers that occurred over the island of Cyprus and surrounding sea during the night of 11 to 12 February 2002 were investigated by means of two numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, one hydrostatic and the other one non-hydrostatic, and two kinds of radar, one ground-based located at Kykkos mountains in Cyprus and the other one on board the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. Verification of forecast precipitation was performed using a combination of radar precipitation estimates. Because of the short time used for verification and due to the mostly convective type of precipitation, it proved difficult to accurately forecast precipitation from the model. Different initial conditions were provided to the models, in an attempt to realize their impact on the prediction of precipitation. Even though skill scores of models are not very high, the non-hydrostatic model shows a better agreement with observations when the starting time of forecast is not too distant from the occurrence of the event.

  17. Observation of nighttime nitrous acid (HONO) formation at a non-urban site during PRIDE-PRD2004 in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hang; Cheng, Ya Fang; Cheng, Peng; Zhang, Yuan Hang; Dong, Shuofei; Zeng, Li Min; Wang, Xuesong; Slanina, Jacob; Shao, Min; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    Though the importance of HONO as an OH precursor has been recognized for years, its chemical formation pathway is still not well understood. This inhibited the simulations of HONO and observation-based formation rates provided an alternative for the air quality models. However, HONO formation rate derived from certain period may be significantly influenced by uncertainties in transport and emission processes. In this study the use of large sample and scaling methods were recommended in the calculation of HONO formation rate. During the Program of Regional Integrated Experiments of Air Quality over Pear River Delta (PRIDE-PRD2004), good correlations between HONO and NO2 were found supporting the involvement of NO2 in HONO formation. An average NO2-to-HONO nighttime conversion rate CHONO of 1.6%h-1 was derived at a non-urban site Xinken. This conversion rate was comparable to other field measurements and could not be explained by gas phase reactions only. If assumed that HONO was formed only on the ground surface, the observed conversion rate could be explained by the reactions of NO2 on ground surfaces only if three deposited NO2 lead to one HONO released. The emission factor of HONO and its sampling interferences during the measurements were also evaluated in this article.

  18. Representing nighttime and minimum conductance in CLM4.5: global hydrology and carbon sensitivity analysis using observational constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardozzi, Danica L.; Zeppel, Melanie J. B.; Fisher, Rosie A.; Tawfik, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    The terrestrial biosphere regulates climate through carbon, water, and energy exchanges with the atmosphere. Land-surface models estimate plant transpiration, which is actively regulated by stomatal pores, and provide projections essential for understanding Earth's carbon and water resources. Empirical evidence from 204 species suggests that significant amounts of water are lost through leaves at night, though land-surface models typically reduce stomatal conductance to nearly zero at night. Here, we test the sensitivity of carbon and water budgets in a global land-surface model, the Community Land Model (CLM) version 4.5, to three different methods of incorporating observed nighttime stomatal conductance values. We find that our modifications increase transpiration by up to 5 % globally, reduce modeled available soil moisture by up to 50 % in semi-arid regions, and increase the importance of the land surface in modulating energy fluxes. Carbon gain declines by up to ˜ 4 % globally and > 25 % in semi-arid regions. We advocate for realistic constraints of minimum stomatal conductance in future climate simulations, and widespread field observations to improve parameterizations.

  19. Estimating groundwater evapotranspiration by a subtropical pine plantation using diurnal water table fluctuations: Implications from night-time water use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Junliang; Ostergaard, Kasper T.; Guyot, Adrien; Fujiwara, Stephen; Lockington, David A.

    2016-11-01

    Exotic pine plantations have replaced large areas of the native forests for timber production in the subtropical coastal Australia. To evaluate potential impacts of changes in vegetation on local groundwater discharge, we estimated groundwater evapotranspiration (ETg) by the pine plantation using diurnal water table fluctuations for the dry season of 2012 from August 1st to December 31st. The modified White method was used to estimate the ETg, considering the night-time water use by pine trees (Tn). Depth-dependent specific yields were also determined both experimentally and numerically for estimation of ETg. Night-time water use by pine trees was comprehensively investigated using a combination of groundwater level, sap flow, tree growth, specific yield, soil matric potential and climatic variables measurements. Results reveal a constant average transpiration flux of 0.02 mm h-1 at the plot scale from 23:00 to 05:00 during the study period, which verified the presence of night-time water use. The total ETg for the period investigated was 259.0 mm with an accumulated Tn of 64.5 mm, resulting in an error of 25% on accumulated evapotranspiration from the groundwater if night-time water use was neglected. The results indicate that the development of commercial pine plantations may result in groundwater losses in these areas. It is also recommended that any future application of diurnal water table fluctuation based methods investigate the validity of the zero night-time water use assumption prior to use.

  20. EFFECTS OF NIGHTTIME NAP AND DAYTIME SLEEP ON HEART RATE AND DROWSINESS IN LONG-DISTANCE HIGHWAY BUS DRIVERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi IKEDA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a nighttime nap and daytime sleep on the heart rates of professional long-distance bus drivers and also a subjective rating of drowsiness through the use of a questionnaire survey on 58 drivers and a heart rate study on 9 drivers during both work and sleep. Of 2 bus drivers, one continued to drive for approximately 2-3 hours while another was alternately able to take a nap during nighttime in the bus cabin for a maximum of around 2 hours during their rest time. In a questionnaire survey, around 80% of 58 drivers reported that they could sleep well for at least one-half of the duration of the nap time reported. The nighttime nap showed a beneficial effect on their sleep debt which results from both night driving as well as from insufficient daytime sleep in local lodgings after duty. Concerning both the nighttime nap and daytime sleep, according to the heart rate measurements of 9 drivers during their duty time, it was found that the average heart rate had higher levels during daytime sleep than during a nighttime nap, presumably due to circadian rhythm. It was disclosed that the duration of a nap in the cabin was very short but the recovery from drowsiness could be effective.

  1. Association Between High and Very High Albuminuria and Nighttime Blood Pressure: Influence of Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Ruilope, Luis M; de la Sierra, Alex; Sarafidis, Pantelis; de la Cruz, Juan J; Gorostidi, Manuel; Segura, Julián; Vinyoles, Ernest; Banegas, José R

    2016-10-01

    Nighttime blood pressure (BP) and albuminuria are two important and independent predictors of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Here, we examined the quantitative differences in nighttime systolic BP (SBP) across albuminuria levels in patients with and without diabetes and chronic kidney disease. A total of 16,546 patients from the Spanish Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Registry cohort (mean age 59.6 years, 54.9% men) were analyzed. Patients were classified according to estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), as ≥60 or albuminuria (30-300 mg/g), or very high albuminuria (>300 mg/g). Office and 24-h BP were determined with standardized methods and conditions. High albuminuria was associated with a statistically significant and clinically substantial higher nighttime SBP (6.8 mmHg higher than with normoalbuminuria, P albuminuria among patients with diabetes and low eGFR (16.5 mmHg, P albuminuria than in those with normoalbuminuria (P albuminuria had a 6.1 mmHg greater nighttime SBP than those with high albuminuria (P Albuminuria in hypertensive patients is accompanied by quantitatively striking higher nighttime SBP, particularly in those with diabetes with very high albuminuria and low eGFR. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  2. Transition from high- to low-NOx control of night-time oxidation in the southeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, P. M.; Aikin, K. C.; Dube, W. P.; Fry, J. L.; Gilman, J. B.; de Gouw, J. A.; Graus, M. G.; Hanisco, T. F.; Holloway, J.; Hübler, G.; Kaiser, J.; Keutsch, F. N.; Lerner, B. M.; Neuman, J. A.; Parrish, D. D.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Veres, P. R.; Wolfe, G. M.; Warneke, C.; Brown, S. S.

    2017-07-01

    The influence of nitrogen oxides (NOx) on daytime atmospheric oxidation cycles is well known, with clearly defined high- and low-NOx regimes. During the day, oxidation reactions--which contribute to the formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone--are proportional to NOx at low levels, and inversely proportional to NOx at high levels. Night-time oxidation of volatile organic compounds also influences secondary pollutants but lacks a similar clear definition of high- and low-NOx regimes, even though such regimes exist. Decreases in anthropogenic NOx emissions in the US and Europe coincided with increases in Asia over the last 10 to 20 years, and have altered both daytime and nocturnal oxidation cycles. Here we present measurements of chemical species in the lower atmosphere from day- and night-time research flights over the southeast US in 1999 and 2013, supplemented by atmospheric chemistry simulations. We find that night-time oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) is NOx-limited when the ratio of NOx to BVOC is below approximately 0.5, and becomes independent of NOx at higher ratios. The night-time ratio of NOx to BVOC in 2013 averaged 0.6 aloft. We suggest that night-time oxidation in the southeast US is in transition between NOx-dominated and ozone-dominated.

  3. Gender differences in nighttime sleep and daytime napping as predictors of mortality in older adults: the Rancho Bernardo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyu-In; Song, Chan-Hee; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Many studies suggest optimal sleep duration for survival is 7-8h/night. We report the gender-specific independent association of all-cause mortality with nighttime sleep and daytime nap duration in older adults who were followed for up to 19years. Between 1984 and 1987, 2001 community-dwelling, mostly retired, adults (1112 women), age 60-96years, answered questions about health, mood, medications, life-style, daytime napping, and nighttime sleep duration. Vital status was confirmed for 96% through July 2001. At baseline, men reported significantly longer nighttime sleep and daytime napping than women. In both men and women, nighttime sleep Napping ⩾30min was associated with prevalent depressed mood, coronary heart disease, and cancer. Of the group, 61% died over the next 19years, at an average age of 85.6years. Mortality risk was lowest among those sleeping 7-7.9h/night in both men and women. Multiple-adjusted analyses showed that increased mortality was associated with nighttime sleep ⩾9h in women (HR 1.51: 95% CI=1.05-2.18), and with daytime napping ⩾30min in men (HR 1.28: 95% CI, 1.00-1.64). Mechanisms for these differences are unknown. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Modelled hydraulic redistribution by sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) matches observed data only after including night-time transpiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Rebecca B; Cardon, Zoe G; Teshera-Levye, Jennifer; Rockwell, Fulton E; Zwieniecki, Maciej A; Holbrook, N Michele

    2014-04-01

    The movement of water from moist to dry soil layers through the root systems of plants, referred to as hydraulic redistribution (HR), occurs throughout the world and is thought to influence carbon and water budgets and ecosystem functioning. The realized hydrologic, biogeochemical and ecological consequences of HR depend on the amount of redistributed water, whereas the ability to assess these impacts requires models that correctly capture HR magnitude and timing. Using several soil types and two ecotypes of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in split-pot experiments, we examined how well the widely used HR modelling formulation developed by Ryel et al. matched experimental determination of HR across a range of water potential driving gradients. H. annuus carries out extensive night-time transpiration, and although over the last decade it has become more widely recognized that night-time transpiration occurs in multiple species and many ecosystems, the original Ryel et al. formulation does not include the effect of night-time transpiration on HR. We developed and added a representation of night-time transpiration into the formulation, and only then was the model able to capture the dynamics and magnitude of HR we observed as soils dried and night-time stomatal behaviour changed, both influencing HR. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Resolving the mesospheric nighttime 4.3 µm emission puzzle: comparison of the CO2(ν3 and OH(ν emission models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Panka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the 1970s, the mechanism of vibrational energy transfer from chemically produced OH(ν in the nighttime mesosphere to the CO2(ν3 vibration, OH(ν ⇒ N2(ν ⇒ CO2(ν3, was proposed. In later studies it was shown that this "direct" mechanism for simulated nighttime 4.3 µm emissions of the mesosphere is not sufficient to explain space observations. In order to better simulate these observations, an additional enhancement is needed that would be equivalent to the production of 2.8–3 N2(1 molecules instead of one N2(1 molecule in each quenching reaction of OH(ν + N2(0. Recently a new "indirect" channel of the OH(ν energy transfer to N2(ν vibrations, OH(ν ⇒ O(1D ⇒ N2(ν, was suggested and then confirmed in a laboratory experiment, where its rate for OH(ν = 9 + O(3P was measured. We studied in detail the impact of the "direct" and "indirect" mechanisms on CO2(ν3 and OH(ν vibrational level populations and emissions. We also compared our calculations with (a the SABER/TIMED nighttime 4.3 µm CO2 and OH 1.6 and 2.0 µm limb radiances of the mesosphere–lower thermosphere (MLT and (b with ground- and space-based observations of OH(ν densities in the nighttime mesosphere. We found that the new "indirect" channel provides a strong enhancement of the 4.3 µm CO2 emission, which is comparable to that obtained with the "direct" mechanism alone but assuming an efficiency that is 3 times higher. The model based on the "indirect" channel also produces OH(ν density distributions which are in good agreement with both SABER limb OH emission observations and ground and space measurements. This is, however, not true for the model which relies on the "direct" mechanism alone. This discrepancy is caused by the lack of an efficient redistribution of the OH(ν energy from higher vibrational levels emitting at 2.0 µm to lower levels emitting at 1.6 µm. In contrast, the new  indirect  mechanism

  6. Resolving the mesospheric nighttime 4.3 µm emission puzzle: comparison of the CO2(ν3) and OH(ν) emission models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panka, Peter A.; Kutepov, Alexander A.; Kalogerakis, Konstantinos S.; Janches, Diego; Russell, James M.; Rezac, Ladislav; Feofilov, Artem G.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Yiğit, Erdal

    2017-08-01

    In the 1970s, the mechanism of vibrational energy transfer from chemically produced OH(ν) in the nighttime mesosphere to the CO2(ν3) vibration, OH(ν) ⇒ N2(ν) ⇒ CO2(ν3), was proposed. In later studies it was shown that this "direct" mechanism for simulated nighttime 4.3 µm emissions of the mesosphere is not sufficient to explain space observations. In order to better simulate these observations, an additional enhancement is needed that would be equivalent to the production of 2.8-3 N2(1) molecules instead of one N2(1) molecule in each quenching reaction of OH(ν) + N2(0). Recently a new "indirect" channel of the OH(ν) energy transfer to N2(ν) vibrations, OH(ν) ⇒ O(1D) ⇒ N2(ν), was suggested and then confirmed in a laboratory experiment, where its rate for OH(ν = 9) + O(3P) was measured. We studied in detail the impact of the "direct" and "indirect" mechanisms on CO2(ν3) and OH(ν) vibrational level populations and emissions. We also compared our calculations with (a) the SABER/TIMED nighttime 4.3 µm CO2 and OH 1.6 and 2.0 µm limb radiances of the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) and (b) with ground- and space-based observations of OH(ν) densities in the nighttime mesosphere. We found that the new "indirect" channel provides a strong enhancement of the 4.3 µm CO2 emission, which is comparable to that obtained with the "direct" mechanism alone but assuming an efficiency that is 3 times higher. The model based on the "indirect" channel also produces OH(ν) density distributions which are in good agreement with both SABER limb OH emission observations and ground and space measurements. This is, however, not true for the model which relies on the "direct" mechanism alone. This discrepancy is caused by the lack of an efficient redistribution of the OH(ν) energy from higher vibrational levels emitting at 2.0 µm to lower levels emitting at 1.6 µm. In contrast, the new  indirect  mechanism efficiently removes at least five quanta in each

  7. Achieving Next Generation Science Standards through Agricultural Contexts: A Delphi Study of Outdoor Education Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meals, Anthony; Washburn, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    A Delphi survey was conducted with 30 outdoor education experts in Kansas. Participant responses helped frame a Kansas definition of outdoor education and identified essential educational goals and outcomes, critical components for effective outdoor education programming, and barriers facing outdoor education in Kansas. The study highlights…

  8. Social inequalities in young children's sports participation and outdoor play

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijtzes, A.I.; Jansen, W.; Bouthoorn, S.H.; Pot, J.N.; Hofman, A.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Raat, H.

    2014-01-01

    Research on social inequalities in sports participation and unstructured physical activity among young children is scarce. This study aimed to assess the associations of family socioeconomic position (SEP) and ethnic background with children's sports participation and outdoor play. Methods: We

  9. Social inequalities in young children's sports participation and outdoor play

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.I. Wijtzes (Anne); W. Jansen (Wilma); S.H. Bouthoorn (Selma); N. Pot (Niek); A. Hofman (Albert); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); H. Raat (Hein)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractResearch on social inequalities in sports participation and unstructured physical activity among young children is scarce. This study aimed to assess the associations of family socioeconomic position (SEP) and ethnic background with children's sports participation and outdoor play.

  10. Using Digital Imaging in Classroom and Outdoor Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasson, Joseph R.

    2002-01-01

    Explains how to use digital cameras and related basic equipment during indoor and outdoor activities. Uses digital imaging in general botany class to identify unknown fungus samples. Explains how to select a digital camera and other necessary equipment. (YDS)

  11. Outdoor education in New Zealand: a comparative and cultural perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Søren

    2009-01-01

      This presentation takes general view of understanding outdoor education in New Zealand.  This is seen from an outsider's perspective and is compared with "friluftsliv" in Denmark and the Nordic countries. Analysing and understanding one's culture is never easy, and the main challenge is to focus......, 1992) of friluftsliv in Denmark and outdoor education in New Zealand. Friluftsliv and outdoor education are understood as socio-cultural constructs which develop and differ in time and space. The theoretical framework is based on ethnological cultural analysis (Ehn & Lofgren, 1982, 2008) combined...... with the theory and analysis of configurations (Eichberg, 2001), using interviews with leaders and participants (Kvale, 1994) and a series of observations of practise (Spradley, 1980). The study points out central cultural characteristics in outdoor education in New Zealand according to time, space, energy...

  12. Language Learning in Outdoor Environments: Perspectives of preschool staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Norling

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Language environment is highlighted as an important area in the early childhood education sector. The term language environment refers to language-promoting aspects of education, such as preschool staff’s use of verbal language in interacting with the children. There is a lack of research about language learning in outdoor environments; thus children’s language learning is mostly based on the indoor physical environment. The aim of this study is therefore to explore, analyse, and describe how preschool staff perceive language learning in outdoor environments. The data consists of focus-group interviews with 165 preschool staff members, conducted in three cities in Sweden. The study is meaningful, thus results contribute knowledge regarding preschool staffs’ understandings of language learning in outdoor environments and develop insights to help preschool staff stimulate children’s language learning in outdoor environments.

  13. Structures that Include a Semi-Outdoor Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papachristou, C.; Foteinaki, Kyriaki; Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    2016-01-01

    The thermal environment of buildings with a second "skin" and semi-outdoor space is examined in the present study. A literature review was conducted on similar structures and only a few studies were found focusing on the thermal environment. Two different building case studies were chosen...... with different building and shield geometry, different levels of insulation but same shield material; Dome of Visions (DoV) and EMBRACE. Both buildings were modelled in IDA ICE 4.6.2 simulation software in order to assess the thermal environment of the building and assess how long the semi outdoor space of each...... building can be used by the occupants. The study was based on weather data for Copenhagen. In addition to the simulations, physical measurements were performed in DoV to assess the thermal environment in the semi-outdoor space. Since existing standards are not applicable for semi-outdoor spaces...

  14. Outdoor malaria transmission in forested villages of Cambodia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Durnez, Lies; Mao, Sokny; Denis, Leen; Roelants, Patricia; Sochantha, Tho; Coosemans, Marc

    2013-01-01

    ...), targeting indoor- and late-biting malaria vectors only. The present study evaluated the vector density, early biting activity and malaria transmission of outdoor-biting malaria vectors in two forested regions in Cambodia...

  15. An outdoor adventure programme infused with olympic values in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    up interventions are recommended to ensure sustained implementation on and off the sports field. Keywords: Cultural activities; Outdoor adventure; Multicultural; Higher education institutions; Olympism; Olympic values; Team-building.

  16. Adaptive information design for outdoor augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhöfer, Jan A; Govaers, Felix; El Mokni, Hichem; Alexander, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Augmented Reality focuses on the enrichment of the user's natural field of view by consistent integration of text, symbols and interactive three-dimensional objects in real time. Placing virtual objects directly into the user's view in a natural context empowers highly dynamic applications. On the other hand, this necessitates deliberate choice of information design and density, in particular for deployment in hazardous environments like military combat scenarios. As the amount of information needed is not foreseeable and strongly depends on the individual mission, an appropriate system must offer adequate adaptation capabilities. The paper presents a prototypical, vehicle-mountable Augmented Reality vision system, designed for enhancing situation awareness in stressful urban warfare scenarios. Tracking, as one of the most crucial challenges for outdoor Augmented Reality, is accomplished by means of a Differential-GPS approach while the type of display to attach can be modified, ranging from ocular displays to standard LCD mini-screens. The overall concept also includes envisioning of own troops (blue forces), for which a multi-sensor tracking approach has been chosen. As a main feature, the system allows switching between different information categories, focusing on friendly, hostile, unidentified or neutral data. Results of an empirical study on the superiority of an in-view navigation cue approach conclude the paper.

  17. Outdoor Air Pollution and Pterygium in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Woong; Choi, Yoon Hyeong; Hwang, Sung Ha; Paik, Hae Jung; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    We investigated relationships between outdoor air pollution and pterygium in Korean adults. This study includes 23,276 adults in population-based cross-sectional data using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2011. Pterygium was assessed using slit lamp biomicroscopy. Air pollution data (humidity, particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm [PM₁₀], ozone [O₃], nitrogen dioxide [NO₂], and sulfur dioxide levels [SO₂]) for 2 years preceding the ocular examinations were acquired. Associations of multiple air pollutants with pterygium or pterygium recurrence after surgery were examined using multivariate logistic models, after adjusting for several covariates. Distributed lag models were additionally used for estimating cumulative effects of air pollution on pterygium. None of air pollution factors was significantly associated with pterygium or pterygium recurrence (each P > 0.05). Distributed lag models also showed that air pollution factors were not associated with pterygium or pterygium recurrence in 0-to-2 year lags (each P > 0.05). However, primary pterygium showed a weak association with PM10 after adjusting for covariates (odds ratio [OR] 1.23; [per 5 μg/m³ PM₁₀ increase]; P = 0.023). Aging, male sex, and greater sun exposure were associated with pterygium, while higher education level and myopia were negatively associated with pterygium (each P ≤ 0.001). Male sex and myopia were negatively associated with pterygium recurrence (each P air pollution and overall pterygium or pterygium recurrence in Korean adults.

  18. Energy Optimization for Outdoor Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Boukhechba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mobile phone is no longer only a communication device, but also a powerful environmental sensing unit that can monitor a user’s ambient context. Mobile users take their devices with them everywhere which increases the availability of persons’ traces. Extracting and analyzing knowledge from these traces represent a strong support for several applications domains, ranging from traffic management to advertisement and social studies. However, the limited battery capacity of mobile devices represents a big hurdle for context detection, no matter how useful the service may be. We present a novel approach to online recognizing users’ outdoor activities without depleting the mobile resources. We associate the places visited by individuals during their movements with meaningful human activities using a novel algorithm that clusters incrementally user’s moves into different types of activities. To optimize the battery consumption, the algorithm behaves variably on the basis of users’ behaviors and the remaining battery level. Studies using real GPS records from two big datasets demonstrate that the proposal is effective and is capable of inferring human activities without draining the phone resources.

  19. Research trends in outdoor pig production — A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Suk Park

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the industrialization of swine production in the late 1900s, swine farms in the United States, as well as in Europe, have largely become consolidated. Pig farms became larger in size but fewer in number, with 91% of market pigs being produced by large operations with 5,000 or more pigs on-site in the US, and only 3% of the total utilized agricultural land representing organic farming. Such change in the market made it difficult for small farmers to stay competitive, forcing them to find alternative ways to reduce the cost of production and increase profit using the outdoor production system. In contrast to the indoor confinement system, outdoor production system uses pasture-based units and/or deep-bedded hoop structures that promote animal welfare and environmental sustainability with a lower capital investment. In accord with the growing concern for animal and environmental welfare and food safety by the consumers, small farmers practicing an outdoor production system are seeing increased opportunities for marketing their products in the pork niche market. Unlike the general belief that the reproductive and growth performance measures of the outdoor sows and piglets are poorer in comparison with the animals reared indoors, studies showed that there was no significant difference in the performance measures, and some traits were even better in outdoor animals. Improved reproductive and production traits can increase the sustainability of outdoor farming. Present study reviewed the recent studies comparing the performance measures, meat quality and health of indoor and outdoor animals, as well as the efforts to improve the outdoor production system through changes in management such as hut types and breed of animals.

  20. Unsupervised detection of artificial objects in outdoor environments

    OpenAIRE

    Spinello, Luciano; Siegwart, Roland

    2008-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a novel unsupervised sensor fusion method to detect artificial objects in outdoor environments. We define artificial objects present in outdoor environments using structure and appearance information: an artificial object is composed of several smooth surfaces with sufficiently extended area and distinctive colors with respect to the environment. Structure information is obtained extracting smooth linked surfaces from 3D range data. Appearance infor...