WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing oral health

  1. Providing oral health to the little ones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Charles; Hale, Kevin J

    The dental profession has achieved successes in reducing the incidence of tooth decay and periodontal disease in adults and teens. The same cannot be said of Early Childhood Caries, which is the most prevalent chronic childhood disease and the greatest unmet healthcare need among youngsters, particularly those from underserved populations. The authors elucidate the infectious, transmissible disease process underlying ECC, the milestones at which preventive intervention is vital to successful treatment of infant patients, and protocols for preventive treatment. The concept of the "Dental Home," its critical role in the dental health of families with young children, and the best-practice timeline for its establishment, are delineated. The authors offer guidelines for caries risk assessment, specific treatment recommendations for the prevention of infant caries, and strategies to facilitate pediatric practice.

  2. Immunizations: An Evolving Paradigm for Oral Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Leslie R; Mouton, Charles

    2017-04-01

    Oral health care professionals are at risk for the transmission of bacterial and viral microorganisms. Providers need to be knowledgeable about the exposure/transmission of life-threatening infections and options for prevention. This article is designed to increase the oral health care provider's awareness of the latest assessment of vaccine-preventable diseases that pose a high risk in the dental health care setting. Specific dosing strategies are suggested for the prevention of infections based on available evidence and epidemiologic changes. This information will provide a clear understanding for prevention of vaccine-preventable diseases that pose a public health consequence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral-systemic health during pregnancy: exploring prenatal and oral health providers' information, motivation and behavioral skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamos, Cheryl A; Walsh, Margaret L; Thompson, Erika; Daley, Ellen M; Detman, Linda; DeBate, Rita

    2015-06-01

    Pregnancy is identified as a sensitive period of increased risk for poor oral health among mothers and offspring. Subsequently, both medical and dental associations have re-endorsed consolidated, inter-professional guidelines promoting oral health during pregnancy. The objective was to explore prenatal and oral health providers' information, motivation and practice behaviors related to oral health during pregnancy. Twenty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with prenatal and oral health providers based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method in NVivo 10. Providers held variable knowledge with regards to identified oral-systemic connections and implications. Most providers were unaware of the guidelines; however, some oral health providers reported avoiding specific treatment behaviors during this period. Motivation to address oral-systemic health during pregnancy included: prevention; healthy pregnancy/birth outcomes; patient's complaint/question as cue to action; comprehensive, patient-centered, and family-centered care; ethical duty; and professional governing body. Oral health providers reported assessing, educating, and communicating with patients about oral health issues; whereas prenatal providers rarely addressed oral health but reported signing approval forms to receive such care. A few oral health providers highlighted lifecourse implications and the need for family-centered care when addressing poor oral health among pregnant patients. Findings suggest gaps in oral health prevention information and behaviors among prenatal and oral health providers. Future efforts should examine effective dissemination and implementation strategies that translate evidence-based guidelines into clinical practice, with the ultimate goal of improve oral-systemic health among women and their offspring across the lifecourse.

  4. Role of community pharmacists in providing oral health advice in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamad Al-Saleh

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: Community pharmacists are approached frequently for oral healthcare advices. Majority of them had no oral health training. Almost all of them were willing to provide oral health information in the community. It is essential to provide continuous oral health education to the pharmacists to better serve oral health needs of the community.

  5. Human trafficking: Role of oral health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzolese, E

    2014-11-30

    Trafficking in human beings is a modern form of slavery and is a well-known phenomenon throughout the European Union and beyond. After drug dealing and the weapons industry, human trafficking is the second largest criminal activity in the world today and it is a growing crime. The aim of governmental and non-governmental agencies, which are either directly or indirectly involved in combating trafficking in human beings, is the identification and referral of victims of trafficking and also to encourage self-referrals. Identification is the most important step to provide protection and assistance to victims of trafficking. Victims often have a variety of physical and mental health needs, including psychological trauma, injuries from violence, head and neck trauma, sexually transmitted infections and other gynaecological problems, dental/oral problems and have poor nutrition. The author's experience in the field of community dentistry in presented within. Volunteer dental services are offered to non-European Union patients held in a centre for asylum seekers in Bari (Italy). Dental professionals can, in fact, contribute to the identification, assistance and protection of trafficked persons, as well as offering forensic services to assist the police investigation in order to identify crimes and find the criminal organizations behind them. As for domestic violence and child abuse cases, there are ethical concerns involved in the identification and protection of the trafficked persons, as well as the need for interdisciplinary work and awareness. Adequate training in behavioural science and intercultural learning is paramount in order to avoid misunderstandings and increase sensitivity.

  6. Oral and craniofacial manifestations of multiple sclerosis: implications for the oral health care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G-Q; Meng, Y

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex neurological condition affecting sensory and motor nerve transmission. Its progression and symptoms are unpredictable and vary from person to person as well as over time. Symptoms of orofacial pain, trigeminal neuralgia, spasticity, spasms, tremor, fatigue, depression and progressive disability, impact on the individual's ability to maintain oral health, cope with dental treatment and access dental services. Also, many of the medications used in the symptomatic management of the condition have the potential to cause dry mouth and associated oral disease. There is no cure for multiple sclerosis, and treatment focuses on prevention of disability and maintenance of quality of life. The oral health care team plays an essential role in ensuring that oral health impacts positively on general health. This review highlights the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, oral and craniofacial manifestations and their management, and oral health care considerations in patients with MS.

  7. Health literacy in the "oral exchange": an important element of patient-provider communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Sarah S; Rudd, Rima E

    2015-05-01

    Oral communication between health care providers and patients--the "oral exchange"--greatly impacts patient health outcomes; however, only recently have health literacy inquiries been incorporated into this field. This review examines the intersection between oral and aural literacy and the oral exchange. A systematic literature search was carried out. Papers published in English since 2003 that specifically examine oral/aural literacy and oral patient-provider communication were included. The search yielded 999 articles, 12 of which were included in this review. Three tools have been developed to measure either patient or provider oral/aural literacy. There is a discrepancy between patient and provider oral/aural literacy levels, and high literacy demand is associated with reduced patient learning. Low patient oral/aural literacy is associated with poor health outcomes. Two interventions have been developed to reduce literacy demand. This review demonstrates the critical role of oral and aural literacy in the oral exchange, the importance of reducing literacy demand, and the need for future research in this field. Recommendations include the use of plain language and teach-back by providers, as well as incorporation of awareness of oral and aural literacy into community programs and health care provider education and training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The teeth and faces of twins: providing insights into dentofacial development and oral health for practising oral health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, T E; Townsend, G C; Pinkerton, S K; Bockmann, M R; Seow, W K; Brook, A H; Richards, L C; Mihailidis, S; Ranjitkar, S; Lekkas, D

    2014-06-01

    The continuing studies of the teeth and faces of Australian twins and their families in the Craniofacial Biology Research Group in the School of Dentistry at the University of Adelaide began 30 years ago. Three main cohorts of twins have been recruited, enabling various objectives and specific hypotheses to be addressed about the roles of genetic, epigenetic and environmental influences on human dentofacial growth and development, as well as oral health. This paper highlights some key findings arising from these studies, emphasizing those of direct relevance to practising oral health professionals. We also draw on published literature to review the significant developments in relation to the use of precision 2D and 3D imaging equipment, the application of modern molecular techniques, and the development of sophisticated computer software for analysing genetic relationships and comparing complex shapes. Such developments are valuable for current and future work. Apart from the classical or traditional twin model, there are several other twin models that can be used in research to clarify the relative contributions of genetic, epigenetic and environmental contributions to phenotypic variation. The monozygotic (MZ) co-twin model is one particularly valuable method, given that examination of only one pair of MZ twins can provide considerable insights into underlying causes of observed variation. This model can be used in a dental practice environment, with oral health professionals having the opportunity to explore differences in orofacial structures between MZ co-twins who are attending as patients. As researchers have become more aware of the complexities of the interactions between the genome, the epigenome and the environment during development, there is the need to collect more phenotypic data and define new phenotypes that will better characterize variations in growth processes and health status. When coupled with powerful new genetic approaches, including genome

  9. Interprofessional Oral Health Education Improves Knowledge, Confidence, and Practice for Pediatric Healthcare Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Devon; Kim, JungSoo; Duderstadt, Karen; Stewart, Ray; Lin, Brent; Alkon, Abbey

    2017-01-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic childhood disease in the United States. Dental caries affects the health of 60-90% of school-aged children worldwide. The prevalence of untreated early childhood dental caries is 19% for children 2-5 years of age in the U.S. Some factors that contribute to the progression of dental caries include socioeconomic status, access to dental care, and lack of anticipatory guidance. The prevalence of dental caries remains highest for children from specific ethnic or racial groups, especially those living in underserved areas where there may be limited access to a dentist. Although researchers have acknowledged the various links between oral health and overall systemic health, oral health care is not usually a component of pediatric primary health care. To address this public health crisis and oral health disparity in children, new collaborative efforts among health professionals is critical for dental disease prevention and optimal oral health. This evaluation study focused on a 10-week interprofessional practice and education (IPE) course on children's oral health involving dental, osteopathic medical, and nurse practitioner students at the University of California, San Francisco. This study's objective was to evaluate changes in knowledge, confidence, attitude, and clinical practice in children's oral health of the students completed the course. Thirty-one students participated in the IPE and completed demographic questionnaires and four questionnaires before and after the IPE course: (1) course content knowledge, (2) confidence, (3) attitudes, and (4) clinical practice. Results showed a statistically significant improvement in the overall knowledge of children's oral health topics, confidence in their ability to provide oral health services, and clinical practice. There was no statistically significant difference in attitude, but there was an upward trend toward positivity. To conclude, this IPE evaluation showed that

  10. Interprofessional Oral Health Education Improves Knowledge, Confidence, and Practice for Pediatric Healthcare Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon Cooper

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic childhood disease in the United States. Dental caries affects the health of 60–90% of school-aged children worldwide. The prevalence of untreated early childhood dental caries is 19% for children 2–5 years of age in the U.S. Some factors that contribute to the progression of dental caries include socioeconomic status, access to dental care, and lack of anticipatory guidance. The prevalence of dental caries remains highest for children from specific ethnic or racial groups, especially those living in underserved areas where there may be limited access to a dentist. Although researchers have acknowledged the various links between oral health and overall systemic health, oral health care is not usually a component of pediatric primary health care. To address this public health crisis and oral health disparity in children, new collaborative efforts among health professionals is critical for dental disease prevention and optimal oral health. This evaluation study focused on a 10-week interprofessional practice and education (IPE course on children’s oral health involving dental, osteopathic medical, and nurse practitioner students at the University of California, San Francisco. This study’s objective was to evaluate changes in knowledge, confidence, attitude, and clinical practice in children’s oral health of the students completed the course. Thirty-one students participated in the IPE and completed demographic questionnaires and four questionnaires before and after the IPE course: (1 course content knowledge, (2 confidence, (3 attitudes, and (4 clinical practice. Results showed a statistically significant improvement in the overall knowledge of children’s oral health topics, confidence in their ability to provide oral health services, and clinical practice. There was no statistically significant difference in attitude, but there was an upward trend toward positivity. To conclude, this IPE

  11. Knowledge, attitude, willingness and readiness of primary health care providers to provide oral health services to children in Niagara, Ontario: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Sonica; Figueiredo, Rafael; Dupuis, Sandy; Skellet, Rachel; Wincott, Tara; Dyer, Carolyn; Feller, Andrea; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Most children are exposed to medical, but not dental, care at an early age, making primary health care providers an important player in the reduction of tooth decay. The goal of this research was to understand the feasibility of using primary health care providers in promoting oral health by assessing their knowledge, attitude, willingness and readiness in this regard. Using the Dillman method, a mail-in cross-sectional survey was conducted among all family physicians and pediatricians in the Niagara region of Ontario who have primary contact with children. A descriptive analysis was performed. Close to 70% (181/265) of providers responded. More than 90% know that untreated tooth decay could affect the general health of a child. More than 80% examine the oral cavity for more than 50% of their child patients. However, more than 50% are not aware that white spots or lines on the tooth surface are the first signs of tooth decay. Lack of clinical time was the top reason for not performing oral disease prevention measures. Overall, survey responses show a positive attitude and willingness to engage in the oral health of children. To capitalize on this, there is a need to identify mechanisms of providing preventive oral health care services by primary health care providers; including improving their knowledge of oral health and addressing other potential barriers.

  12. Utilisation of oral health services provided by non-dental health practitioners in developed countries: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, T; Hoang, Ha; Stuart, J; Crocombe, L; Bell, E

    2014-12-01

    People who have limited access to dental care may present to non-dental health practitioners for dental treatment and advice. This review synthesised the available evidence regarding the use of non-dental health practitioners for oral health problems and the services provided by non-dental health practitioners to manage such presentations. PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched using key search terms to identify all relevant quantitative and qualitative English-language studies published between 1990 and March 2014. Snowballing techniques were then applied whereby the reference lists of retrieved articles were searched for other relevant citations. Grey literature was searched via Google using the same search terms to identify unpublished work and government reports. Of the 43 papers which met the review criteria, 25 papers reported on the use of non-dental health practitioners for oral health problems and 18 on dental care education and training for non-dental health practitioners. Four reports were located from the grey literature on the involvement of non-dental health practitioners in the management of oral health care. The review of literature showed that both children and adults utilise non-dental health practitioners for oral health problems. Despite this, Emergency Department medical staff, medical practitioners and pharmacists generally lacked training and knowledge in the maragement of oral health. Services from non-dental health practitioners mainly focussed on children. The literature on education and training for non-dental health practitioners was limited.

  13. Non-dental primary care providers' views on challenges in providing oral health services and strategies to improve oral health in Australian rural and remote communities: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Tony; Hoang, Ha; Stuart, Jackie; Crocombe, Len

    2015-10-29

    To investigate the challenges of providing oral health advice/treatment as experienced by non-dental primary care providers in rural and remote areas with no resident dentist, and their views on ways in which oral health and oral health services could be improved for their communities. Qualitative study with semistructured interviews and thematic analysis. Four remote communities in outback Queensland, Australia. 35 primary care providers who had experience in providing oral health advice to patients and four dental care providers who had provided oral health services to patients from the four communities. In the absence of a resident dentist, rural and remote residents did present to non-dental primary care providers with oral health problems such as toothache, abscess, oral/gum infection and sore mouth for treatment and advice. Themes emerged from the interview data around communication challenges and strategies to improve oral health. Although, non-dental care providers commonly advised patients to see a dentist, they rarely communicated with the dentist in the nearest regional town. Participants proposed that oral health could be improved by: enabling access to dental practitioners, educating communities on preventive oral healthcare, and building the skills and knowledge base of non-dental primary care providers in the field of oral health. Prevention is a cornerstone to better oral health in rural and remote communities as well as in more urbanised communities. Strategies to improve the provision of dental services by either visiting or resident dental practitioners should include scope to provide community-based oral health promotion activities, and to engage more closely with other primary care service providers in these small communities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Non-dental primary care providers? views on challenges in providing oral health services and strategies to improve oral health in Australian rural and remote communities: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Barnett, Tony; Hoang, Ha; Stuart, Jackie; Crocombe, Len

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the challenges of providing oral health advice/treatment as experienced by non-dental primary care providers in rural and remote areas with no resident dentist, and their views on ways in which oral health and oral health services could be improved for their communities. Design Qualitative study with semistructured interviews and thematic analysis. Setting Four remote communities in outback Queensland, Australia. Participants 35 primary care providers who had experie...

  15. Discovery of a patient with strongly suspected bullous pemphigoid in a ward by oral health care providers

    OpenAIRE

    Kanda, N; SOGA, Y; Meguro, M.; Tanabe, A; Yagi, Y; Himuro, Y; Fujiwara, Y.; Takashiba, S; Kobayashi, N.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Oral health care providers may discover systemic diseases incidentally from signs observed in the oral cavity. Here, we report a case in which oral health care providers in a hospital discovered a patient with strongly suspected bullous pemphigoid (BP), which is a relatively rare but important disease, in a ward. Methods: The patient was a 78-year-old Japanese woman admitted to our hospital because of severe Alzheimer's disease. We discovered recurrent ulcers in the oral mucosa an...

  16. Comparing the risk identification and management behaviors between oral health providers for patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efurd, Mitzi G; Bray, Kimberly Krust; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando; Williams, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Evidence supporting the link between periodontal disease and systemic disease continues to grow. To date, little is known about how dental professionals incorporate this information into managing diabetic patients. This study examines the risk identification and practice behaviors regarding diabetic patients among dentists, hygienists and specialists. Responses were received from 383 currently practicing oral health professionals in Arkansas. The electronic survey consisted of 35 open and closed-ended or Likert-type items. Principal components factor analysis using varimax rotation was used to explore underlying dimensions of the questionnaire in order to provide a more parsimonious view of the outcomes. Logistic models were fitted to determine best practice outcome as a function of knowledge and professional and social norms. Neither knowledge about diabetes (pdental hygienist. Results indicate oral health professionals in Arkansas need to improve the treatment and management of patients with diabetes and periodontal disease.

  17. Current practice and knowledge of oral care for cancer patients: a survey of supportive health care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, Gerry J.; Epstein, Joel B.; Williams, Karen B.; Gorsky, Meir; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.

    2005-01-01

    The Oral Care Study Section of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) and the International Society for Oral Oncology (ISOO) conducted a survey on clinical practices of oral/dental management of cancer patients among supportive health care providers. The main purpose was

  18. The Role of Oral Health Care Professionals in Providing Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Michael; Greenberg, Barbara L

    2017-08-01

    Integration of oral health care professionals (OHCPs) into medical care could advance efforts to control increasingly prevalent conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, human immunodeficiency virus infection, and hepatitis C infection, each of which is associated with significant morbidity and health care costs. Prevention and early intervention are effective for reducing the incidence and severity of these diseases, while increasing cost of health care may drive the need for nontraditional models of health education and delivery. Studies have suggested that a dental office is a suitable setting for the purpose of screening and referrals for these conditions and may result in medical expenditure savings. Such innovations would challenge the current dental educational model and the education and training of faculty. Implementing this change would require recognizing opportunities and challenges for the profession and the need for new competencies in dental curricula. Challenges and opportunities are described, including reimbursement models and integration of OHCPs into emerging health care delivery models. Ideas for curricular change are presented, including the need for added emphasis on biological sciences and the introduction of new courses to address systems thinking and forces driving preventive behavior. To embrace the evolving health care arena and be a part of the future interprofessional health care delivery dynamic, dental curricula should also include substantive interprofessional education opportunities. Such opportunities would provide the basic skills and training to recognize and appreciate patients' oral health issues in the broader context of their overall health and well-being. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  19. Does different wording of a global oral health question provide different results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekbäck, Gunnar; Ordell, Sven

    2015-05-01

    Focusing on 70-year-old adults in Sweden and guided by the conceptual framework of International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (ICIDH), the purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which socio-demographic characteristics, self-reported oral disease and social/psychological/physical oral health outcome variables are associated with two global measures of self-assessed satisfaction with oral health in Swedish 70-year-olds and if there is a degree of discordance between these global questions. It has become an important task to create a simple way to measure self-perceived oral health. In these attempts to find practical ways to measure health, the 'global oral health question' is a possible tool to measure self-rated oral health, but there is limited knowledge about how important the wording of this question is. In 2012, a questionnaire was mailed to all persons born in 1942 in two Swedish counties, Örebro (T) and Östergötland (E). The total population of 70-year-olds amounted to 7889. Bivariate analyses were conducted by cross-tabulation and Chi-square statistics. Multivariate analyses were conducted using binary multiple logistic regression. The two global oral health question of 70-year-olds in Sweden was mainly explained by the number of teeth (OR=5.6 and 5.2), chewing capacity (OR=6.9 and 4.2), satisfaction with dental appearance (OR=19.8 and 17.3) and Oral Impact on Daily Performance (OIDP) (OR=3.5 and 3.9). Regardless of the wording, it seems that the concept of a global oral health question has the same main determinants.

  20. Dental Provider Attitudes Are a Barrier to Expanded Oral Health Care for Children ≤3 Years of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Clark MPH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the perspectives of general dentists regarding oral health care for children ≤3 years. Methods. Mailed survey of 444 general dentists in Michigan. Results. Although most dentists were aware of recommendations for early dental visits, only 36% recommended their own patients begin dental visits by 1 year of age. Only 37% dentists felt that screening for oral health problems can be done by medical providers, whereas 34% agreed administration of fluoride varnish by medical providers would be effective in preventing dental problems in young children. Conclusions. Dentists’ failure to recommend 1-year dental visits is due neither to lack of awareness nor to capacity problems. The limited enthusiasm for involving children’s medical providers in oral health promotion signals attitudinal barriers that must be overcome to improve children’s oral health. Primary care providers should identify and refer to dentists in their community who are willing to see young children.

  1. Influence of perceived provider performance on satisfaction with oral health care among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okullo, Isaac; Astrøm, Anne Nordrehaug; Haugejorden, Ola

    2004-12-01

    To investigate satisfaction with dental care received at the last dental appointment among adolescents and to analyse factors influencing their satisfaction scores. A total of 1146 subjects (mean age 15.8 years) attending secondary schools in Kampala (urban, n = 591) and Lira (rural, n = 555) completed structured questionnaires at school in 2001. A total of 63% and 75% of Kampala and Lira students, respectively, reported attendance to dental clinics during the previous 2 years. The corresponding rates of students who confirmed satisfaction with oral health care services received were 73 and 77. In a logistic regression model, the students of Kampala who attended a dentist more than once, had no painful experience at the visit, evaluated their oral condition positively, were satisfied with the dentist's communication and dentist's information, were more likely to be satisfied with the oral health services received (OR = 1.7, 2.2, 4.1, 2.9 and 4.9, respectively). Regarding rural students, being satisfied with oral condition, dentist's communication and dentist's information were associated with higher odds of being satisfied with oral health care services (OR = 2.9, 1.9 and 2.3, respectively). Inter-personal interaction with the dentist is a key determinant in establishing satisfaction with dental care among urban as well as rural adolescents.

  2. The knowledge, efficacy, and practices instrument for oral health providers: a validity study with dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Garvan, Cyndi W; Moore, Thomas E; Catalanotto, Frank A

    2013-08-01

    Valid and reliable instruments to measure and assess cultural competence for oral health care providers are scarce in the literature, and most published scales have been contested due to a lack of item analysis and internal estimates of reliability. The purposes of this study were, first, to develop a standardized instrument to measure dental students' knowledge of diversity, skills in culturally competent patient-centered communication, and use of culture-centered practices in patient care and, second, to provide preliminary validity support for this instrument. The initial instrument used in this study was a thirty-six-item Likert-scale survey entitled the Knowledge, Efficacy, and Practices Instrument for Oral Health Providers (KEPI-OHP). This instrument is an adaption of an initially thirty-three-item version of the Multicultural Awareness, Knowledge, and Skills Scale-Counselor Edition (MAKSS-CE), a scale that assesses factors related to social justice, cultural differences among clients, and cross-cultural client management. After the authors conducted cognitive and expert interviews, focus groups, pilot testing, and item analysis, their initial instrument was reduced to twenty-eight items. The KEPI-OHP was then distributed to 916 dental students (response rate=48.6 percent) across the United States to measure its reliability and assess its validity. Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to test the scale's validity. The modification of the survey into a sensible instrument with a relatively clear factor structure using factor analysis resulted in twenty items. A scree test suggested three expressive factors, which were retained for rotation. Bentler's comparative fit and Bentler and Bonnett's non-normed indices were 0.95 and 0.92, respectively. A three-factor solution, including efficacy of assessment, knowledge of diversity, and culture-centered practice subscales, comprised of twenty-items was identified. The KEPI-OHP was found to

  3. Oral anticoagulant dosing, administration, and storage: a cross-sectional survey of Canadian health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piran, Siavash; Schulman, Sam; Panju, Mohamed; Pai, Menaka

    2017-11-23

    Direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) use is increasing worldwide. However, if not taken or prescribed correctly, DOACs have serious side effects. It is crucial that healthcare providers (HCPs) offer patients accurate information and counselling around DOACs, to optimize safe and effective use. To assess knowledge around oral anticoagulant indication, dosing, storage, and administration, an electronic survey was distributed to HCPs across Canada from June to August 2017, with 18 questions on the practical use of oral anticoagulants. A total of 191 responses were received: 100 from nurse practitioners, 42 from pharmacists, 27 from Hematologists, 5 from Thrombosis specialists, 4 from internists, 9 from residents and fellows, and 2 each from family physicians and registered nurses. Only 51 (26.7%) of the respondents correctly identified all the approved indications for warfarin and 4 DOACs. Only 101 (52.9%) correctly identified that DOACs are not approved for treatment of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, cerebral sinus venous thrombosis, or mechanical prosthetic valves. 112 (58.6%) felt comfortable or very comfortable prescribing oral anticoagulants. Half of the respondents knew that dabigatran should not be crushed, however only 85 (44.5%) knew that it should not be exposed to moisture. 94 (49%) knew that higher dose rivaroxaban should be taken with food. The results of our study demonstrate that there are important knowledge gaps around HCPs' practical understanding of oral anticoagulants. Future research should focus on educational interventions to improve HCPs' knowledge around indications, dosing, storage, and administration, with the goal of enhancing patient safety.

  4. Disparities in Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2020: Oral Health Objectives Site Map Disparities in Oral Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Oral health ... to get and keep dental insurance. Disparities in Oral Health Some of the oral health disparities that exist ...

  5. Non-dental primary care providers’ views on challenges in providing oral health services and strategies to improve oral health in Australian rural and remote communities: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Tony; Hoang, Ha; Stuart, Jackie; Crocombe, Len

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the challenges of providing oral health advice/treatment as experienced by non-dental primary care providers in rural and remote areas with no resident dentist, and their views on ways in which oral health and oral health services could be improved for their communities. Design Qualitative study with semistructured interviews and thematic analysis. Setting Four remote communities in outback Queensland, Australia. Participants 35 primary care providers who had experience in providing oral health advice to patients and four dental care providers who had provided oral health services to patients from the four communities. Results In the absence of a resident dentist, rural and remote residents did present to non-dental primary care providers with oral health problems such as toothache, abscess, oral/gum infection and sore mouth for treatment and advice. Themes emerged from the interview data around communication challenges and strategies to improve oral health. Although, non-dental care providers commonly advised patients to see a dentist, they rarely communicated with the dentist in the nearest regional town. Participants proposed that oral health could be improved by: enabling access to dental practitioners, educating communities on preventive oral healthcare, and building the skills and knowledge base of non-dental primary care providers in the field of oral health. Conclusions Prevention is a cornerstone to better oral health in rural and remote communities as well as in more urbanised communities. Strategies to improve the provision of dental services by either visiting or resident dental practitioners should include scope to provide community-based oral health promotion activities, and to engage more closely with other primary care service providers in these small communities. PMID:26515687

  6. Cervical, anal and oral HPV in an adolescent inner-city health clinic providing free vaccinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas F Schlecht

    Full Text Available Published human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine trials indicate efficacy is strongest for those naive to the vaccine-types. However, few high-risk young women have been followed and cervical HPV has been the predominant outcome measure.We collected cervical and anal swabs, as well as oral rinse specimens from 645 sexually active inner-city young females attending a large adolescent health-clinic in New York City that offers free care and HPV vaccination. Specimens were tested for HPV-DNA using a MY09/MY11-PCR system. Type-specific prevalence of HPV at each anatomic site was compared for individuals by vaccination dose using generalized estimating equation logistic regression models.The majority of subjects reported being of non-Caucasian (92% and/or Hispanic ethnicity (61%. Median age was 18 years (range:14-20. All had practiced vaginal sex, a third (33% practiced anal sex, and most (77% had also engaged in oral sex. At enrollment, 21% had not received the vaccine and 51% had received three doses. Prevalent HPV infection at enrollment was detected in 54% of cervical, 42% of anal and 20% of oral specimens, with vaccine types present in 7%, 6% and 1% of specimens, respectively. Comparing prevalence for vaccine types, the detection of HPV in the cervix of vaccinated compared to unvaccinated adolescents was significantly reduced: HPV6/11 (odds ratio [OR] = 0.19, 95%CI:0.06-0.75, HPV16 (OR = 0.31, 95%CI:0.11-0.88 and HPV18 (OR = 0.14, 95%CI:0.03-0.75. For anal HPV, the risk of detecting vaccine types HPV6/11 (OR = 0.27, 95%CI:0.10-0.72 and HPV18(OR = 0.12, 95%CI:0.01-1.16 were significantly reduced for vaccinated adolescents however, the risk for HPV16 was not significantly decreased (OR = 0.63, 95%CI:0.18-2.20.HPV Prevalence is extremely high in inner-city female adolescents. Administration of the HPV vaccine reduced the risk for cervical HPV; however continued follow-up is required to assess the protection for HPV at all sites

  7. Oral Health and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table of Contents Jerrold ... they may need. Read More "Oral Health and Aging" Articles Oral Health and Aging / 4 Myths About ...

  8. Care Provided by Students in Community-Based Dental Education: Helping Meet Oral Health Needs in Underserved Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Keith A; Maguire, Meghan

    2018-01-01

    Since 2000, reports have documented the challenges faced by many Americans in receiving oral health care and the consequences of inadequate care such as high levels of dental caries among many U.S. children. To help address this problem, many dental schools now include community-based dental education (CBDE) in their curricula, placing students in extramural clinics where they provide care in underserved communities. CBDE is intended to both broaden the education of future oral health professionals and expand care for patients in community clinics. The aim of this study was to develop a three-year profile of the patients seen and the care provided by students at extramural clinics associated with one U.S. dental school. Three student cohorts participated in the rotations: final-year students in the Doctor of Dental Surgery, Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene, and Master of Dental Therapy programs. The study was a retrospective analysis of data retrieved from the school's database for three consecutive academic years. The data included patients' demographics and special health care needs status (based on information collected by students from their patients) and procedures students performed while on rotations. For the three-year period, the results showed a total of 43,128 patients were treated by 418 student providers. Approximately 25% of all encounters were with pediatric patients. Students completed 5,908 child prophylaxis, 5,386 topical fluoride varnish, and 7,678 sealant procedures on pediatric patients. Annually, 7% of the total patients treated had special health care needs. The results show that these students in CBDE rotations provided a substantial amount of oral health care at extramural sites and gained additional experience in caring for a diverse population of patients and performing a wide range of procedures.

  9. Strengthening of oral health systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    Around the globe many people are suffering from oral pain and other problems of the mouth or teeth. This public health problem is growing rapidly in developing countries where oral health services are limited. Significant proportions of people are underserved; insufficient oral health care...... is either due to low availability and accessibility of oral health care or because oral health care is costly. In all countries, the poor and disadvantaged population groups are heavily affected by a high burden of oral disease compared to well-off people. Promotion of oral health and prevention of oral...... diseases must be provided through financially fair primary health care and public health intervention. Integrated approaches are the most cost-effective and realistic way to close the gap in oral health between rich and poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Programme will work...

  10. Oral Health and Oral Health Promotion

    OpenAIRE

    Artnik, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    World Health Organization recognizes oral health as an important component of general health, and furthermore, oral health is essential for well-being. The majority of oral diseases is related to lifestyles and reducing these mostly chronic diseases relies much on changing behaviour. Changes for the better in behaviour can and do occur, but require commitment and expertise within health promotion. Customs, practices and lifestyle issues play a role in the oral health of a community and should...

  11. An ethnographic study of Latino preschool children's oral health in rural California: Intersections among family, community, provider and regulatory sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horton Sarah B

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Latino children experience a higher prevalence of caries than do children in any other racial/ethnic group in the US. This paper examines the intersections among four societal sectors or contexts of care which contribute to oral health disparities for low-income, preschool Latino1 children in rural California. Methods Findings are reported from an ethnographic investigation, conducted in 2005–2006, of family, community, professional/dental and policy/regulatory sectors or contexts of care that play central roles in creating or sustaining low income, rural children's poor oral health status. The study community of around 9,000 people, predominantly of Mexican-American origin, was located in California's agricultural Central Valley. Observations in homes, community facilities, and dental offices within the region were supplemented by in-depth interviews with 30 key informants (such as dental professionals, health educators, child welfare agents, clinic administrators and regulatory agents and 47 primary caregivers (mothers of children at least one of whom was under 6 years of age. Results Caregivers did not always recognize visible signs of caries among their children, nor respond quickly unless children also complained of pain. Fluctuating seasonal eligibility for public health insurance intersected with limited community infrastructure and civic amenities, including lack of public transportation, to create difficulties in access to care. The non-fluoridated municipal water supply is not widely consumed because of fears about pesticide pollution. If the dentist brought children into the clinic for multiple visits, this caused the accompanying parent hardship and occasionally resulted in the loss of his or her job. Few general dentists had received specific training in how to handle young patients. Children's dental fear and poor provider-parent communication were exacerbated by a scarcity of dentists willing to serve rural

  12. Health care provider communicator style and patient comprehension of oral contraceptive use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, E L; Schrader, D C

    2001-02-01

    To explore reasons for the incorrect usage of oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) by examining the relationship between patients' abilities to comprehend and/or recall information presented to them by nurse practitioners (NPs) and the communicator style of their NP. A convenience sample of 46 OCP users completed an instrument designed to test their comprehension of OCP use and an instrument designed to measure the communicator style of their NP. A multiple stepwise regression revealed that attentive and friendly communicator styles were positive predictors and the communicator image and dramatic styles were negative predictors of comprehension. Unwanted pregnancies that result from non-compliance with OCP regimens can have significant social and financial effects. A lack of understanding of proper OCP use may depend on the style of communication a NP uses to convey crucial information regarding the regimen.

  13. Oral Health Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health How Do I Care for My Child's Baby ... news feeds delivered directly to your desktop! more... Oral Health Glossary Article Chapters Oral Health Glossary print full ...

  14. Refugee child oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, E; Rajan, S; Casey, S; Kilpatrick, N

    2017-04-01

    The number of people forced to flee their homes and move around the world is increasing rapidly. Such refugee populations are not only more likely to have poor physical, mental and social health outcomes but also to experience difficulties accessing health services in their new country. In particular, children from refugee backgrounds are at increased risk of poor oral health which in time is associated with poor adult oral health and impacts on child health (e.g. growth and development) and well-being. To date, there is little evidence about the nature and extent of their oral health problems nor interventions to improve their oral health status. This article summarises the evidence surrounding the oral health status of children from refugee backgrounds. In addition, a systematic review of the international literature over the past 10 years is presented which identifies interventions to improve the oral health of these vulnerable paediatric populations. Based on this evidence, potential strategies available to dental service providers to optimise provision of responsive dental care are discussed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Knowledge and Antibiotics Prescription Pattern among Ugandan Oral Health Care Providers: A Cross-sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriane Kamulegeya

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Irrational prescription of antibiotics by clinicians might lead to drug resistance. Clinicians do prescribe antibiotics for either prophylactic or therapeutic reasons. The decision of when and what to prescribe leaves room for misuse and therefore it is imperative to continuously monitor knowledge and pattern of prescription. The aim of the present study was to determine the knowledge of antibiotic use and the prescription pattern among dental health care practitioners in Uganda. Materials and methods. A structured and pretested questionnaire was sent to 350 dental health care practitioners by post or physical delivery. All the questionnaires were sent with self-addressed and prepaid postage envelopes to enable respondents to mail back the filled questionnaires. Chi-squared test was used to test for any significant differences between groups of respondents based on qualitative variables. Results. The response rate was 40.3% (n=140. Of these 52.9 % were public health dental officers (PHDOs and 47.1% were dental surgeons. The males constituted 74.3% of the respondents. There were statistically significant differences between dental surgeons and (PHDOs in knowledge on prophylactic antibiotic use (P = 0.001 and patient influence on prescription (P = 0.001. Amoxicillin, in combination with metronidazole, was the most common combination of antibiotics used followed by co-trimoxazole with metronidazole. Conclusion. The knowledge of dental health care practitioners in antibiotic use in this study was generally low. A combination of amoxicillin with metronidazole was the most commonly prescribed antibiotics subsequent to different dental procedures.

  16. Oral Health in the US: Key Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Policy Oral Health in the U.S.: Key Facts Oral Health in the U.S.: Key Facts Published: Jun 01, ... Email Print This fact sheet provides data on oral health care coverage and access for children, nonelderly adults ...

  17. Towards understanding oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaura, E.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term ‘oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain

  18. Attitudes, subjective norms, and intention to perform routine oral examination for oropharyngeal candidiasis as perceived by primary health-care providers in Nairobi Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyio, Lucina N; Kikwilu, Emil; Mulder, Jan; Frencken, Jo E

    2013-01-01

    To assess attitudes, subjective norms, and intentions of primary health-care (PHC) providers in performing routine oral examination for oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) during outpatient consultations. A 47-item Theory of Planned Behaviour-based questionnaire was developed and administered, in a cross-sectional survey, to 216 PHC providers (clinical officers and nurses) working in 54 clinics, dispensaries, and health centers in Nairobi Province in January 2010. The constructs - attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control (dependent variables) - and their individual indirect (direct) items were analyzed for scores, internal validity, independent variables (district, gender, years of service, profession, and age), and contribution to intentions. Perceived behavioral control had low construct validity and was therefore removed from subsequent analyses. The questionnaire was completed by 195 participants (90 percent response rate). PHC provider's attitudes, subjective norms, and intentions to perform an oral examination during outpatient consultations were highly positive, with mean scores of 6.30 (0.82), 6.06 (1.07), and 5.6 (1.33), respectively, regardless of sociodemographic characteristics. Indirect attitude and subjective norms were strongly correlated to their individual items (r=0.63-0.79, Psubjective norms (P<0.0001) were both predictive of intentions. PHC providers were willing to integrate patients' oral health care into their routine medical consultations. Emphasizing the importance of detecting other oral problems and of the fact that routine oral examination for OPC is likely to give patients' fulfillment will enhance PHC providers' morale in performing routine oral examinations. Winning support from policy makers, their supervisors, specialists, and colleagues is important for motivating PHC providers to perform routine oral examinations for OPC at their workplaces. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  19. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    The discovery during the fi rst half of the 20th century of the link between natural fl uoride, adjusted fl uoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fl uoride in improving oral health. Epidemiolog......The discovery during the fi rst half of the 20th century of the link between natural fl uoride, adjusted fl uoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fl uoride in improving oral health...... including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fl uorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision...... of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fi elds of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fl uorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fl uoride...

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Web-Based Training Program for Oral Health Care Providers on Secondary Prevention of Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBate, Rita D.; Severson, Herbert; Zwald, Marissa L.; Shaw, Tracy; Christiansen, Steve; Koerber, Anne; Tomar, Scott; Brown, Kelli McCormack; Tedesco, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Although oral health care providers (OHP) are key in the secondary prevention of eating disorders (ED), the majority are not engaged in assessment, referral, and case management. This innovative pilot project developed and evaluated a web-based training program for dental and dental hygiene students and providers on the secondary prevention of ED. The intervention combined didactic and skill-based objectives to train OHP on ED and its oral health effects, OHP roles, skills in identifying the oral signs of ED, communication, treatment, and referral. Using a convenience sample of OHP (n=66), a pre-/post-test evaluated short-term outcomes and user satisfaction. Results revealed statistically significant improvements in self-efficacy (p<.001); knowledge of oral manifestations from restrictive behaviors (p<.001) and purging behaviors (p<.001); knowledge of oral treatment options (p<.001); and attitudes towards the secondary prevention of ED (p<.001). Most participants strongly agreed or agreed that the program provided more information (89 percent) and resources (89 percent) about the secondary prevention of ED than were currently available; 91 percent strongly agreed or agreed that they would access this program for information regarding the secondary prevention of ED. This pilot project provides unique training in the clinical evaluation, patient approach, referral, and oral treatment that takes a multidisciplinary approach to address ED. PMID:19491349

  1. Oral Health in Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide Rural Health Topics & States Topics View more Oral Health in Rural Communities Adequate access to oral healthcare ... about oral health programs in my area? What oral health disparities are present in rural America? According to ...

  2. Barriers and facilitators in providing oral health care to nursing home residents, from the perspective of care aides-a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoben, Matthias; Hu, Huimin; Xiong, Tianyuan; Kent, Angelle; Kobagi, Nadia; Yoon, Minn N

    2016-04-07

    Unregulated care aides provide up to 80 % of direct resident care in nursing homes. They have little formal training, manage high workloads, frequently experience responsive behaviours from residents, and are at high risk for burnout. This affects quality of resident care, including quality of oral health care. Poor quality of oral health care in nursing homes has severe consequences for residents and the health care system. Improving quality of oral health care requires tailoring interventions to identified barriers and facilitators if these interventions are to be effective. Identifying barriers and facilitators from the care aide's perspective is crucial. We will systematically search the databases MEDLINE, Embase, Evidence Based Reviews-Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, and Web of Science. We will include qualitative and quantitative research studies and systematic reviews published in English that assess barriers and facilitators, as perceived by care aides, to providing oral health care to nursing home residents. Two reviewers will independently screen studies for eligibility. We will also search by hand the contents of key journals, publications of key authors, and reference lists of all the studies included. Two reviewers will independently assess the methodological quality of the studies included using four validated checklists appropriate for different research designs. Discrepancies at any stage of review will be resolved by consensus. We will conduct a thematic analysis of barriers and facilitators using all studies included. If quantitative studies are sufficiently homogeneous, we will conduct random-effects meta-analyses of the associations of barriers and facilitators with each other, with care aide practices in resident oral health care, and with residents' oral health. If quantitative study results cannot be pooled, we will present a narrative synthesis of the results. Finally, we will compare quantitative findings to

  3. [Nutrition and oral health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardina, Giuseppe Alessandro; Messina, Pietro

    2008-02-01

    Diet plays a key role in oral disease prevention. The aims of this report were to review the causes and consequences of a poor diet and its interrelationship with oral health. The first signs of micronutrient deficiencies are often manifest in the oral tissues. Consequently, the dentist has a considerable role in the early diagnosis of malnutrition. Furthermore, optimizing oral health is important in maximizing functional capacity to consume a healthful and varied diet. A varied diet is, otherwise, fundamental to save oral health.

  4. Attitudes, subjective norms, and intention to perform routine oral examination for oropharyngeal candidiasis as perceived by primary health-care providers in Nairobi Province

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koyio, L.N.; Kikwilu, E.N.; Mulder, J.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess attitudes, subjective norms, and intentions of primary health-care (PHC) providers in performing routine oral examination for oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) during outpatient consultations. Methods: A 47-item Theory of Planned Behaviour-based questionnaire was developed and

  5. Improving oral health and oral health care delivery for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crall, James J

    2011-02-01

    National and state-level evidence has documented ongoing disparities in children's health and utilization of oral health care services, prompting a re-examination of factors associated with poor oral health and low use of oral health services. These efforts have yielded a wide array of proposals for improving children's oral health and oral health care delivery. This paper offers a perspective on the current context of efforts to improve children's oral health and oral health care delivery.

  6. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  7. Towards understanding oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term 'oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain microbial community stability in health. However, the oral ecosystem itself is not stable: throughout life an individual undergoes multiple physiological changes while progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Recent discussions on the definition of general health have led to the proposal that health is the ability of the individual to adapt to physiological changes, a condition known as allostasis. In this paper the allostasis principle is applied to the oral ecosystem. The multidimensionality of the host factors contributing to allostasis in the oral cavity is illustrated with an example on changes occurring in puberty. The complex phenomenon of oral health and the processes that prevent the ecosystem from collapsing during allostatic changes in the entire body are far from being understood. As yet individual components (e.g. hard tissues, microbiome, saliva, host response) have been investigated, while only by consolidating these and assessing their multidimensional interactions should we be able to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem, which in turn could serve to develop rational schemes to maintain health. Adapting such a 'system approach' comes with major practical challenges for the entire research field and will require vast resources and large-scale multidisciplinary collaborations. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Oral health in patients with liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard Grønkjær, Lea; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the oral care habits and self-perceived oral health in patients with liver cirrhosis, as well as to evaluate the impact of oral health on well-being and the relation to nutritional status. Participants and methods: From October 2012 to May 2013, we...... carried out a prospective study on patients with liver cirrhosis. Questions on oral care habits and self-perceived oral health were answered, and the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-14) provided information on oral conditions. The findings were compared with The Danish Institute for Health...

  9. Oral health information systems--towards measuring progress in oral health promotion and disease prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Bratthall, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the essential components of oral health information systems for the analysis of trends in oral disease and the evaluation of oral health programmes at the country, regional and global levels. Standard methodology for the collection of epidemiological data on oral health has...... been designed by WHO and used by countries worldwide for the surveillance of oral disease and health. Global, regional and national oral health databanks have highlighted the changing patterns of oral disease which primarily reflect changing risk profiles and the implementation of oral health...... programmes oriented towards disease prevention and health promotion. The WHO Oral Health Country/Area Profile Programme (CAPP) provides data on oral health from countries, as well as programme experiences and ideas targeted to oral health professionals, policy-makers, health planners, researchers...

  10. Oral Health and Swallowing Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Furuta, Michiko; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Oral health impacts systemic health. Therefore, oral care is an important consideration in maintaining quality of life (QOL). Previously, maintenance and improvement of oral hygiene was considered essential for achieving oral health. In addition to oral hygiene, oral care in terms of oral function is now considered to maintain QOL. Ingestion of exogenous nutrients via the oral cavity is fundamental to the function of all higher animals, not only human beings. Chewing and swallowing processes ...

  11. Oral Health and Bone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you Breadcrumb Home Oral Health and Bone Disease Oral Health and Bone Disease Osteoporosis and tooth loss are ... or loose dentures. Effects of Osteoporosis Treatments on Oral Health It is not known whether osteoporosis treatments have ...

  12. Probiotics and oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Rastogi, Pavitra; Saini, Himani; Dixit, Jaya; Singhal, Rameshwari

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics utilize the naturally occurring bacteria to confer health benefits. Traditionally, probiotics have been associated with gut health, and are being mainly utilized for prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal infections and disease; however, recently, several studies have suggested the use of probiotics for oral health purposes. The aim of this review is to understand the potential mechanism of action of probiotic bacteria in the oral cavity and summarize their observed effects wi...

  13. Oral Health and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-12

    This women's health podcast focuses on the importance of maintaining good oral health during pregnancy.  Created: 5/12/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/12/2009.

  14. Multicultural Issues in Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Raul I.; Cadoret, Cindy; Henshaw, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Demographic changes over the coming decades will heighten the challenges to the dental profession and to the nation. The expected growth in the numbers of racial and ethnic minorities, and the concomitant growth of immigrant populations are likely to lead to worsening of oral health disparities. Their consequences are becoming increasingly evident as the profession strives to improve the oral health of all Americans. The increasing diversity of the population, together with the importance of cultural beliefs and behaviors that affect health outcomes, will require ways to enhance provider-patient communications and oral health literacy. We discuss the nature and challenges presented by multicultural patient populations. One important means by which to promote oral health in diverse populations is to develop a dental workforce that is both culturally and linguistically competent, as well as one that is as culturally diverse as the American population. PMID:18329446

  15. Elite athletes and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, S; McLaughlin, K; Morgaine, K; Drummond, B

    2011-09-01

    Elite athletes follow demanding training regimes to achieve optimal performance. Training incorporates strategies which coincide with risk factors for dental caries and erosion. The important role of a disease-free oral cavity for peak performance is often overlooked and oral health may be compromised. This initial exploratory study aimed to identify risk factors for dental caries and erosion in elite triathletes. Questionnaires regarding training, diet and oral health were distributed to a sample of elite triathletes in New Zealand. A further sample of 10 athletes was randomly selected from the Dunedin triathlon club to participate in a clinical oral examination. Sports drinks were consumed by 83.9% of the triathletes while training; for 48.4% consumption of both sports drinks and water was described as 'little sips often, from a bottle'. Eating during training sessions was reported by 93.5% of participants; of those 62.1% ate only during cycling training. Only 3.2% perceived training as high risk to oral health. All clinical examination cases were assessed as high risk for developing caries. The diet of elite triathletes is consistent with a high risk profile for caries and erosion. Future research should be aimed at oral health promotion programs for the athletes, coaches and oral-health providers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  17. Oral sex, oral health and orogenital infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Rajiv; Saini, Santosh; Sharma, Sugandha

    2010-01-01

    Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active male-female and same-gender couples of various ages, including adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus and analingus. Oral sex is infrequently examined in research on adolescents; oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital pathogens. Oral health has a direct impact on the transmission of infection; a cut in your mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of infection. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection and safer sex precautions. There are various methods of preventing infection during oral sex such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues and oral hygiene and dental issues. The lesions or unhealthy periodontal status of oral cavity accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  18. Strengthening of Oral Health Systems: Oral Health through Primary Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-01

    Around the globe many people are suffering from oral pain and other problems of the mouth or teeth. This public health problem is growing rapidly in developing countries where oral health services are limited. Significant proportions of people are underserved; insufficient oral health care is either due to low availability and accessibility of oral health care or because oral health care is costly. In all countries, the poor and disadvantaged population groups are heavily affected by a high burden of oral disease compared to well-off people. Promotion of oral health and prevention of oral diseases must be provided through financially fair primary health care and public health intervention. Integrated approaches are the most cost-effective and realistic way to close the gap in oral health between rich and poor. The World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Programme will work with the newly established WHO Collaborating Centre, Kuwait University, to strengthen the development of appropriate models for primary oral health care. PMID:24525450

  19. Probiotics and Oral Health

    OpenAIRE

    Vishnu, Harini Priya

    2012-01-01

    The number of products containing probiotics, viable bacteria with proven health benefits, entering the market is increasing. Traditionally, probiotics have been associated with gut health, and most clinical interest has been focused on their use for prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal infections and diseases; however, during the last decade several investigators have also suggested the use of probiotics for oral health purposes. The aim of this review is to examine potential mechanis...

  20. Older Adults (and Oral Health)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Sorted by ... > OlderAdults Older Adults and Oral Health Main Content ​ Is dry mouth a natural part ... from fiction by reading this web page about oral health and growing older. Having the right information can ...

  1. Oral health correlates of captivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Varsha; Antonelli, Tyler; Parkinson, Jennifer A; Hartstone-Rose, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The predominant diet fed to captive carnivores in North America consists of ground meat formulated to provide full nutritional requirements. However, this ground meat diet completely lacks the mechanical properties (i.e., toughness and hardness) of the foods these animals would consume in the wild. The goal of this study is to evaluate the effect of captivity on oral health by comparing the prevalence of periodontal disease and dental calculus accumulation in wild and captive lions and tigers (Panthera leo and Panthera tigris), and to also correlate oral health with cranial morphology in these specimens. To achieve this, 34 adult lion and 29 adult tiger skulls were scored for the presence and extent of dental calculus and periodontal disease. These oral health scores were also compared to cranial deformations examined in a previous study. We found that the occurrence and severity of calculus buildup and periodontal disease was significantly higher in captive felids compared to their wild counterparts. Further, higher calculus accumulation occurred on the posterior teeth when compared to the anterior teeth, while an opposite trend for periodontal disease was observed. We also found a significant correlation between oral health and cranial morphology of lions and tigers. The results suggest that food mechanical properties are significant factors contributing to oral health in felids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Probiotics and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzini, Bernard; Pizzo, Giuseppe; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Nuzzo, Domenico; Vasto, Sonya

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics are living microorganisms (e.g., bacteria) that are either the same as or similar to organisms found naturally in the human body and may be beneficial to health. Current researches have shown that the balance between beneficial and pathogenic bacteria is essential in order to maintain the oral health. Therefore, oral cavity has recently been suggested as a relevant target for probiotic applications. Dental caries can be seen as a microbial imbalance where the oral microbiota shift towards community dominance which produces acidogenic and acid-tolerant gram positive bacteria. Similarly, the accumulation of bacteria within the biofilm, facilitated by poor oral hygiene, predisposes to allogenic shifts in the microbial community, leading to the onset of periodontal inflammation. Probiotic bacteria belonging to the genus of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Streptococcus have been proven effective for preventing caries by reducing the number of cariogenic bacteria in saliva after a short period of consuming the probiotic. In contrast, the effect of probiotics on improving gingivitis and periodontitis has been less investigated. The currently available studies on the effect of probiotics on periodontal pathogens and clinical periodontal parameters showed differing results depending on the strains used and the endpoints analyzed. Many of the clinical studies are pilot in nature and with low quality, therefore, properly conducted clinical trials, using probiotic strains with in vitro proven periodontal probiotic effects, are needed. The putative beneficial effects of probiotics on oral malodour have also been evaluated, but further evidence is needed to fully explore the potential of probiotics for preventing malodour.

  3. What do antenatal care providers understand and do about oral health care during pregnancy: a cross-sectional survey in New South Wales, Australia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    George, Ajesh; Dahlen, Hannah G; Reath, Jennifer; Ajwani, Shilpi; Bhole, Sameer; Korda, Andrew; Chok, Harrison Ng; Miranda, Charmaine; Villarosa, Amy; Johnson, Maree

    2016-01-01

    ... oral health on their baby's health. Even when they are aware that they have dental problems, only a third of pregnant women in Australia consult a dentist during pregnancy [7, 8]. The use of dental services by pregnant women is consistently low internationally, including the United States of America (USA) (23-49%), United Kingdom (UK) (3...

  4. Child, neglect and oral health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lourenço, Caroline Barbosa; Saintrain, Maria Vieira de Lima; Vieira, Anya Pimentel Gomes Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Despite advancements in oral health policies, dental caries still a problem. The lack of parents/caregiver's care regarding child's oral health, which characterizes neglect, may lead to a high prevalence of caries...

  5. Relationship between oral health knowledge, practices and oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Studies have shown that strong knowledge on oral health demonstrates better oral care practice and an association between increased knowledge and better oral health exists. Aim: To assess the influence of oral health knowledge and oral care practices to oral health status of secondary school students in ...

  6. Physicians' oral health education in Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Wanda C; Skelton, Judith; Smith, Tim; Hardison, David; Ferretti, Gerald

    2004-09-01

    The Physicians' Oral Health Education in Kentucky (POHEK) curriculum was developed to teach family medicine residents to (1) perform oral health screening and risk assessment and (2) recognize and manage common oral conditions for children ages 5 years and under. Family medicine residents in urban and rural settings received didactics and hands-on experience providing oral screening, risk assessments, and counseling for their pediatric patients. Residents were evaluated by comparing pretest and posttest means of surveys that assessed attitudes and knowledge. Chart audits were also performed. Residents' knowledge and attitudes improved in the oral health care of their pediatric patients.

  7. Oral health policies in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Alfredo Pucca Junior

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Since Oral Health policies in Brazil have been constructed according to circumstances and possibilities, they should be understood within a given context. The present analysis contextualizes several issues of the Brazilian Oral Health Policy, called "Smiling Brazil", and describes its present stage of development. Today it involves re-organizing basic oral health care by deploying Oral Health Teams within the Family Health strategy, setting up Centers of Dental Specialists within an Oral Health network as a secondary care measure, setting up Regional Laboratories of Dental Prosthesis and a more extensive fluoridation of the public water supply.

  8. BETTER ORAL HEALTH TO ALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Murtomaa

    2016-12-01

    The behavioral science experts are of opinion that only comprehensive and integrated common-risk-factor-based health promotion activities can enhance oral health and its equity as a part of general health. Are health professionals ready to assume their responsibility for promoting better oral health?

  9. Oral health: equity and social determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwan, Stella; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    This book chapter discusses the social determinants of oral health, and identifies interventions that have been, or can be, used in addressing oral health inequities (e.g. oral health promotion, education programmes, improving access to oral health care)....

  10. African Journal of Oral Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Oral Health Sciences is devoted to research into oral diseases and encourages a multidisciplinary approach. Emphasis is on oral pathology, oral microbiology, oral medicine, oral physiology and biochemistry and related clinical sciences.

  11. The health production function of oral health services systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlad, R.S.; Petersen, P.E.

    2000-01-01

    Attitudes, dental status, socioeconomic factors, oral health care, production of oral health, health status, quality of life......Attitudes, dental status, socioeconomic factors, oral health care, production of oral health, health status, quality of life...

  12. Good Oral Health and Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Scardina, G. A.; P Messina

    2012-01-01

    An unhealthy diet has been implicated as risk factors for several chronic diseases that are known to be associated with oral diseases. Studies investigating the relationship between oral diseases and diet are limited. Therefore, this study was conducted to describe the relationship between healthy eating habits and oral health status. The dentistry has an important role in the diagnosis of oral diseases correlated with diet. Consistent nutrition guidelines are essential to improve health. A p...

  13. Chapter Oral Health Advocates: A Nationwide Model for Pediatrician Peer Education and Advocacy about Oral Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte W. Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. (1 To describe an innovative program training US pediatricians to be Chapter Oral Health Advocates (COHAs. (2 To provide insight into COHAs’ experiences disseminating oral health knowledge to fellow pediatricians. Patients and Methods. Interviews with 40 COHAs who responded to an email request, from a total of 64 (62% response. Transcripts were analyzed for common themes about COHA activities, facilitators, and barriers. Results. COHAs reported positive experiences at the AAP oral health training program. A subset of academic COHAs focused on legislative activity and another on resident education about oral health. Residents had an easier time adopting oral health activities while practicing pediatricians cited time constraints. COHAs provided insights into policy, barriers, and facilitators for incorporating oral health into practice. Conclusions. This report identifies factors influencing pediatricians’ adoption of oral health care into practice. COHAs reported successes in training peers on integrating oral health into pediatric practice, identified opportunities and challenges to oral health implementation in primary care, and reported issues about the state of children’s oral health in their communities. With ongoing support, the COHA program has a potential to improve access to preventive oral health services in the Medical Home and to increase referrals to a Dental Home.

  14. Oral health in frail elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Ageing points towards increasing health problems and rising costs for the society. One of these health problems is the deteriorating oral health in care dependent elderly. The latter is related to the high need for care on many levels in these elderly. The lack of attention for oral care can be

  15. Good oral health and diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardina, G A; Messina, P

    2012-01-01

    An unhealthy diet has been implicated as risk factors for several chronic diseases that are known to be associated with oral diseases. Studies investigating the relationship between oral diseases and diet are limited. Therefore, this study was conducted to describe the relationship between healthy eating habits and oral health status. The dentistry has an important role in the diagnosis of oral diseases correlated with diet. Consistent nutrition guidelines are essential to improve health. A poor diet was significantly associated with increased odds of oral disease. Dietary advice for the prevention of oral diseases has to be a part of routine patient education practices. Inconsistencies in dietary advice may be linked to inadequate training of professionals. Literature suggests that the nutrition training of dentists and oral health training of dietitians and nutritionists is limited.

  16. Quality Improvement: Indigenous Influence in Oral Health Policy, Process, and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowharemahihi, Charrissa; Wall, Justin; Keay, Greg; Britton, Cheryl; McGibbon, Minnie; LeGeyt, Patrick; Maipi, Joyce; Signal, Virginia

    2016-02-01

    A Quality Improvement Group for Māori oral health providers [Indigenous New Zealand oral health services] has been an effective and necessary mechanism for engaging Indigenous oral health expertise in decision-making for Indigenous oral health policy and sector developments to reduce oral health inequalities and improve Indigenous oral health outcomes.

  17. Comparison of the Effectiveness of a Mobile Phone-based Education Program in Educating Mothers as Oral Health Providers in Two Regions of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKlayb, Saleh Ali; Assery, Mansour K; AlQahtani, AlJohara; AlAnazi, Madawy; Pani, Sharat Chandra

    2017-01-01

    The penetration of mobile phone devices is widespread across the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Recently, there has been evidence of the success of phone-based applications in the provision of preventive oral health care to children and their parents. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a mobile phone-based application in educating mothers of children aged below 6 years of age in preventive dental care. A mobile phone-based application (iTeethey™) was developed for iPhone and Android and made freely available on Google Play and App Store. The application was then distributed to 3879 mothers of children below 6 years of age (1989 in Riyadh Region and 1890 in Najran region). The mothers were subjected to a standardized knowledge attitude and practice of oral hygiene questionnaire before being asked to download the application. A total of 1055 mothers who downloaded the application completed 3-month recall process. Significant improvement in the knowledge of the mothers was reported after the use of the application from both regions. The mothers from Najran showed significantly greater improvement in knowledge when compared to the mothers from Riyadh region. The application was also more effective in mothers with more than one child when compared to first-time mothers. Within the limitations of this study, we can state that the mobile phone application used in this study significantly improves the knowledge of mothers toward their child's oral health.

  18. Child, neglect and oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Louren?o, Caroline Barbosa; Saintrain, Maria Vieira de Lima; Vieira, Anya Pimentel Gomes Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite advancements in oral health policies, dental caries still a problem. The lack of parents/caregiver?s care regarding child?s oral health, which characterizes neglect, may lead to a high prevalence of caries. Therefore, the objective of this study was to analyze the relation between dental caries and neglect in five year-old children. Methods Quantitative study performed in two different moments. First, the children underwent oral examinations and physical inspection. Then, a...

  19. Types of health care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Types of health care providers URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001933.htm Types of health care providers To ...

  20. Global oral health of older people--call for public health action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, P E; Kandelman, D; Arpin, S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this report is (1) to provide a global overview of oral health conditions in older people, use of oral health services, and self care practices; (2) to explore what types of oral health services are available to older people, and (3) to identify some major barriers to and opportunities...... for the establishment of oral health services and health promotion programmes....

  1. Oral health promotion at worksites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L

    1989-01-01

    Many workplace-based health promotion programmes have been reported but only a few include or focus specifically on oral health. Although certain obstacles to oral health promotion in the workplace exist from the management side, from the dental profession and from the employees, these seem...... is at present sparse and there are few guidelines to actual strategies for effective oral health promotion. However, elements of strategies that have been successful in various geographical and economic environments include: active involvement of the work force, the use of dental auxiliaries, voluntary daily...... mouthrinsing, screening activities, use of mass media, oral hygiene instruction and prophylaxis and paraprofessional training. It is recommended that future research concentrates on these elements to build up a meaningful and relevant data base upon which effective oral health promotion programmes can...

  2. National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State Offices Search the Organizations Database Center for Oral Health Systems Integration and Improvement (COHSII) COHSII is a ... needs of the MCH population. Brush Up on Oral Health This monthly newsletter provides Head Start staff with ...

  3. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  4. The New Definition of Oral Health and Relationship between Oral Health and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hescot, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    FDI World Dental Federation, which has 200 dental association members in some 130 countries, is the official representative body and voice of more than 1 million clinicians worldwide. It set itself the task of creating a new definition for oral health as a baseline to develop tools to measure oral health and related indicators. The definition allows FDI to position oral health within the global health agenda in areas such as quality of life and wellbeing and the challenge of an ageing population worldwide. Furthermore, it provides an impetus for FDI activities in favour of worldwide periodontal health.

  5. EAMJ-MArch Oral health

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iMac User

    2008-03-01

    Mar 1, 2008 ... PhD, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied. Sciences, P. O. Box 65014, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and F. Scheutz, DDS, PhD, Department of Community Oral Health and Paediatric Dentistry, Dental School, Faculty of Health Sciences, ...

  6. Oral Health and Older Adults

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-27

    This podcast discusses the importance of older adults maintaing good oral health habits. It is primarily targeted to public health and aging services professionals.  Created: 10/27/2008 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/27/2008.

  7. Babesiosis for Health Care Providers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-25

    This podcast will educate health care providers on diagnosing babesiosis and providing patients at risk with tick bite prevention messages.  Created: 4/25/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria.   Date Released: 4/25/2012.

  8. Why Is Oral Health Important for Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health How Do I Care for My Child's Baby ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... Why Is Oral Health Important for Women? Article Chapters Why Is Oral ...

  9. Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health How Do I Care for My Child's Baby ... your desktop! more... Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health Article Chapters Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral ...

  10. Nutrition and Oral Health: Experiences in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Zohre Sadat Sangsefidi; Amin Salehi-Abargouei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Oral health is a crucial factor for overall well-being and there is a mutual relationship between nutrition and oral health. The aim of this study was to review the publications which have examined the association between nutrition or diet and oral health status or oral disease in Iran. Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, Scopus, Google scholar, scientific information database (SID), and Magiran were searched using key words of diet, nutrition, oral health, oral disease, ...

  11. Relationship between oral health literacy and oral health behaviors and clinical status in Japanese adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Ueno

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Our findings indicate that oral health literacy is associated with differences in oral health behaviors and clinical oral health status. An understanding of participants’ oral health literacy levels is crucial for designing effective health educational materials and creating intervention programs to promote oral health.

  12. Oral sex and oral health: An enigma in itself.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Tarun; Puri, Gagan; Aravinda, Konidena; Arora, Neha; Patil, Deepa; Gupta, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active couples of various age groups, including male-female and same-gender adolescents. The various type of oral sex practices are fellatio, cunnilingus, and analingus. Oral sex can transmit oral, respiratory, and genital infections from one site in body to the other. Oral health has a direct correlation on the transmission of infection; a cut in the mouth, bleeding gums, lip sores or broken skin increases chances of life-threatening infections. Although oral sex is considered a low risk activity, it is important to use protection such as physical barriers, health and medical issues, ethical issues, and oral hygiene and dental issues. The ulcerations or unhealthy periodontium in mouth accelerates the phenomenon of transmission of infections into the circulation. Thus, consequences of unhealthy or painful oral cavity are significant and oral health should be given paramount importance for the practice of oral sex.

  13. [Oral health among the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siukosaari, Päivi; Nihtilä, Annamari

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of our population is ageing with own teeth in the mouth. Good oral health and an adequate number of teeth improve the functional capacity of an elderly person. Oral diseases are, however, becoming more common among the elderly population with the accumulation of risk factors such as insufficient self-care, cariogenic diet, reduced salivation, smoking and systemic diseases. Dryness of the mouth due to the adverse effects of drugs or systemic diseases makes eating and cleaning of the mouth more difficult. Prevention of oral diseases with good self-care and regular dental examinations is essential.

  14. Impact of inhalation therapy on oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Godara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation therapy has been employed as the mainstay of the treatment in chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Beta-2 agonists, anticholinergic bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, and sodium cromoglycate are often used alone or in combination in an inhaled form. Studies have shown that inhaled drugs used in the treatment have some adverse effects on the oral health based on their dosage, frequency, and duration of use. Several oral conditions such as xerostomia, dental caries, candidiasis, ulceration, gingivitis, periodontitis, and taste changes have been associated with inhalation therapy. Since the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases is rising, it is important to provide optimal oral care to the individuals receiving inhalation therapy. This article will review the influence of inhaled drugs on the oral health of individuals and adequate management and prevention of the same.

  15. Impact of inhalation therapy on oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godara, Navneet; Godara, Ramya; Khullar, Megha

    2011-10-01

    Inhalation therapy has been employed as the mainstay of the treatment in chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Beta-2 agonists, anticholinergic bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, and sodium cromoglycate are often used alone or in combination in an inhaled form. Studies have shown that inhaled drugs used in the treatment have some adverse effects on the oral health based on their dosage, frequency, and duration of use. Several oral conditions such as xerostomia, dental caries, candidiasis, ulceration, gingivitis, periodontitis, and taste changes have been associated with inhalation therapy. Since the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases is rising, it is important to provide optimal oral care to the individuals receiving inhalation therapy. This article will review the influence of inhaled drugs on the oral health of individuals and adequate management and prevention of the same.

  16. Oral and General Health Promotion for Children: A Holistic Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cinar, Ayse Basak

    of Oral and General Health Promotion, Health Behavior Theories and Children'.This book provides further evidence that children's general and oral health are interrelated by common lifestyle and family factors, and both should be supported by holistic health promotion strategies and empowerment of families......Inequalities in oral and general health have been rising globally; WHO calls for adoption of an integrated approach to their promotion as both share common risk factors. However, research about this issue among children is scarce. Based on the associations of such a research found in common for all...... Turkish and Finnish children, this book underlies that oral health is turning out to be part of the global health culture, regardless of cultural differences and different oral health care systems. The book, further, by most recent literature, provides a review of 'Significance of Oral Health, Concept...

  17. Child, neglect and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Caroline Barbosa; Saintrain, Maria Vieira de Lima; Vieira, Anya Pimentel Gomes Fernandes

    2013-11-18

    Despite advancements in oral health policies, dental caries still a problem. The lack of parents/caregiver's care regarding child's oral health, which characterizes neglect, may lead to a high prevalence of caries. Therefore, the objective of this study was to analyze the relation between dental caries and neglect in five year-old children. Quantitative study performed in two different moments. First, the children underwent oral examinations and physical inspection. Then, a semi-structured interview was performed with parents of children with high and low caries rate. In all, 149 physical inspections and oral exams were performed. The number of decayed, missing and filled teeth - dmf-t was 2.75 (SD 2.83); 16 children had extremely high values (dmf-t ≥ 7), 85 intermediate values (1 ≤ dmf-t ≥ 6) and 48 extremely low (dmf-t = 0). Nearly all caregivers were female (96.7%; n = 29), mostly mothers (93.3%; n = 28). Associations were found between caries experience and reason of the last consultation (p = 0.011), decayed teeth and child's oral health perception (p = 0.001). There was a trend towards a significant association between general health and decayed teeth (p = 0.079), general hygiene and caries experience (p = 0.083), and caries experience and number of times the child brushes the teeth (p = 0.086). There's a relation between caries experience and children's oral health perception by caregivers, as well as between caries experience and children's access to dental care. There is a trend towards association between caries experience and risk factors suggestive of neglect.

  18. Probiotics and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejavathy Nagaraj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics, bacterial cultures or living microorganisms, upon ingestion in certain quantity promote and enhance health benefits. An International Life Science Institute Europe consensus document proposed a simple and widely accepted definition of probiotics as ′viable microbial food supplements which beneficially influence the health of human′. These bacteria should also adhere to the interstinal mucosa and finally should have the ability to inhibit the gut pathogens.

  19. Oral health promotion at worksites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L

    1989-01-01

    of services and less restraint from fee payment structures and physical environments. The immediate benefit to the employees is easy access to dental services. In addition, work-related dental hazards can be compensated for or prevented and screening activities can be more easily organized. The literature...... is at present sparse and there are few guidelines to actual strategies for effective oral health promotion. However, elements of strategies that have been successful in various geographical and economic environments include: active involvement of the work force, the use of dental auxiliaries, voluntary daily...... mouthrinsing, screening activities, use of mass media, oral hygiene instruction and prophylaxis and paraprofessional training. It is recommended that future research concentrates on these elements to build up a meaningful and relevant data base upon which effective oral health promotion programmes can...

  20. African Journal of Oral Health

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    b) Letters relating to materials previously published in AJOH or to topical issues relevant to the practice of dentistry. c) Update articles surveying the present state of knowledge in selected fields of Dentistry and oral health. d) Critical or analytical reviews in the area of theory, policy, or research in Dentistry. e) Reviews of ...

  1. Social Capital and Oral Health

    OpenAIRE

    Batra,Manu; Tangade, Pradeep; Rajwar, Yogesh Chand; Dany, Subha Soumya; Rajput, Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Social determinants have always been an important element of the oral health. It has been seen that social aspects like the organizations and relations influence the health of population. A new domain named social capital has come up into limelight which refers to “features of social organization, such as trust, norms and networks that can improve the efficacy of society by facilitating coordinated actions”. The bonds between individuals, both in intimate relationships and in voluntary associ...

  2. Oral Health Literacy and Behavior of Health Sciences University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuti N Mohd-Dom

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine the level of oral health literacy and behavior among health sciences. Methods: The method used descriptive cross-sectional survey involving 609 students from Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences in the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. Oral health literacy level and behaviour was assessed with a validated and pretested self-administered questionnaire using the Newest Vital Sign (NVS tool and modified Oral Health Adult Literacy Questionnaire (OHL-AQ. Results: A total of 509 participants involved in the study (83.6%. The overall mean oral health literacy score was 10.27 (95% CI 7.92, 12.62, which found dental students showing statistically significant higher scores (mean=11.36, 95% CI 9.70, 13.02 compared to medical (mean=10.72, 95% CI 8.67, 12.77, allied health sciences (mean=9.89, 95% CI 7.34, 12.44 and pharmacy (mean=9.55, 95% CI 7.23, 11.87. Almost all respondents are non-smokers (99.8% and non-drinkers (97.2%. Only 19.1% pay regular dental visits every 6-12 months while 51.1% visit dentist only when they have dental pain. Conclusion: There appears to be a positive relationship between oral health literacy and oral health behavior. Health science university students should be provided substantial dental health education in their curriculum as they show good potential as strategic partners in oral health.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v22i2.404

  3. Informing the debate on oral health care for older people: a qualitative study of older people's views on oral health and oral health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borreani, E; Jones, K; Scambler, S; Gallagher, J E

    2010-03-01

    Older people represent a growing and diverse section of the population. As age increases, people are more likely to experience health and mobility problems and be at higher risk of developing oral disease. Nevertheless, few older people utilise primary oral healthcare services. It is therefore important to understand the value older people place on oral health and dental services to inform providers and planners of oral health care. This research was conducted as part of a study to identify potential ways of minimising barriers to oral health care in older people. To explore perceptions of oral health and oral healthcare services amongst older people living in a socially deprived inner city area and how these are related to service utilisation. A qualitative approach was utilised to explore the range of issues related to older people's perceptions of oral health and their views on health care. This involved a combination of focus groups and semi-structured individual interviews with older people and their carers. Data analysis was conducted using the Framework approach. * Thirty-nine older people and/or their carers participated in focus groups. * Oral health perception: Oral health was associated with the presence of natural teeth, the absence of pain, practical/social functioning, preferably supported by positive assessment by a dentist. * Oral health life-course: Older people have a long and complex dental history. Past negative experiences with oral health care, especially in childhood, strongly influenced present attitudes towards dentistry and dental personnel. * Citizenship and right to health care: There was a strong perception that, as 'British citizens', older people should have a right to free health care and that the National Health Service (NHS) should support them in this phase of their life. The oral health life-course of older people is an important influence on their perceptions of oral health and dental attendance. They consider oral health of

  4. Oral Health Promotion During Well Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguino, Sandra M; Dhepyasuwan, Niramol; Church, Annamaria; Dabrow, Sharon; Serwint, Janet R; Bernstein, Henry H

    2017-09-01

    Training pediatric residents in Bright Futures and oral health concepts is critical to improving oral health. This study's objective was to determine the skill level of pediatric residents in integrating oral health promotion during health supervision visits of 12- to 35-month-old children. One hundred forty-three pediatric residents participated in an evaluation of the effectiveness of a Bright Futures oral health curriculum. Competencies assessed preintervention included partnership building, communication, and integration of oral health concepts. Pediatric residents' abilities to integrate oral health promotion into health supervision visits varied considerably. Residents demonstrated greater skill in communication and partnership building compared with oral health promotion behaviors and performance of an oral examination. Further education is needed at a national level if we are to meet Healthy People 2020 goals.

  5. Oral health of foreign domestic workers: exploring the social determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoli; Chan, Chi Wai; Mak, Siu Lun; Ng, Zevon; Kwong, Wai Hang; Kot, Ching Ching Shirley

    2014-10-01

    Foreign domestic helpers constitute a significant proportion of migrant workers worldwide. This population subgroup provides an opportunity for understanding social determinants of oral health in immigrant community. A random sample of 122 Indonesian domestic helpers in Hong Kong completed a questionnaire on their demographic background, social characteristics (competency in local languages, immigration history, living condition, social connections, and leisure activities) and oral health behaviours (knowledge, attitudes, practice and self-efficacy). Their tooth status and periodontal health were assessed. Participants tended to start flossing after settling in Hong Kong. Favourable oral health knowledge was found in more acculturated participants, as indicated by proficiency in local languages and immigration history. Engagement in social and/or religious activities and decent living condition provided by employers were associated with favourable oral health behaviours and/or better oral health. Social determinants explained 13.2 % of variance in caries severity. Our findings support the significant impact of social circumstances on oral health of domestic workers.

  6. Advancing oral health in physician assistant education: evaluation of an innovative interprofessional oral health curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowser, Jonathan; Sivahop, Jacqueline; Glicken, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The impact of an oral health curriculum was evaluated by measuring increases in knowledge about oral health topics and implementation of oral health skills in the clinical year. A 3-year, longitudinal oral health curriculum was developed and implemented. Student knowledge of oral health concepts was evaluated before and 2 years after the curriculum was implemented. Student performance of oral health skills was evaluated in the clinical year by electronic patient logging. Students demonstrated significant and persistent gains in knowledge following the initiation of the curriculum. Students used oral health skills in the clinical year, particularly in the area of patient education about oral health. Incorporation of an oral health curriculum can lead to lasting knowledge about basic oral health concepts and increased performance of oral health skills in the clinical year.

  7. Oral health and oral health behaviour among 11-13-year-olds in Bhopal, India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Petersen, Poul Erik; Bhambal, Ajay

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of dental caries, to describe the periodontal conditions, and to assess the level of attitude, knowledge and practice in relation to oral health and oral health behaviour among 11-13 year-old children in Bhopal, India. The data would aim to provide a baseline...... for planning and evaluation of oral health education programmes for children in the region. BASIC RESEARCH DESIGN AND OUTCOME MEASURES: A cross sectional study of 599 children 11-13 years was conducted. Random sampling procedures were used to obtain representative samples of children in rural (n = 181......) and urban areas (n = 277). In urban slum areas convenience sampling was applied (n = 141). The data were collected through clinical examinations by means of WHO standard method, and a sub-sample completed a self-administered questionnaire on oral health behaviour, knowledge, and attitude. RESULTS...

  8. FastStats: Oral and Dental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Oral and Dental Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... in Adults in the United States, 2011–2012 Oral Health Disparities as Determined by Selected Healthy People ...

  9. Improving the oral health of older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    and oral precancer/cancer. The negative impact of poor oral conditions on the quality of life of older adults is an important public health issue, which must be addressed by policy-makers. The means for strengthening oral health programme implementation are available; the major challenge is therefore...... changing burden of chronic diseases in old age. Chronic disease and most oral diseases share common risk factors. Globally, poor oral health amongst older people has been particularly evident in high levels of tooth loss, dental caries experience, and the prevalence rates of periodontal disease, xerostomia...... to translate knowledge into action programmes for the oral health of older people. The World Health Organization recommends that countries adopt certain strategies for improving the oral health of the elderly. National health authorities should develop policies and measurable goals and targets for oral health...

  10. ABCs of Oral Health: Nutrition - Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... primary teeth by age 3. More ABCs of Oral Health A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | ... Children Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | Newsroom | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | ...

  11. Why Is Oral Health Important for Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... oral health, statistics show that the average man brushes his teeth 1.9 times a day and will lose ... oral health, it is important to floss daily, brush your teeth with fluoride toothpaste twice daily and visit your ...

  12. Eating disorder professionals' perceptions of oral health knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L B; Boyd, L D; Rainchuso, L; Rothman, A; Mayer, B

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the oral health knowledge among professionals who specialize in treating eating disorders, and identify to what extent their education, and training addresses oral health care delivery, and recommendations for individuals with eating disorders. Participants for this study were licensed behavioural and medical providers specializing in eating disorder treatment (n = 107), and recruited through professional eating disorder organizations. Participants completed an anonymous, online questionnaire (33 items) assessing level of oral health-related education, knowledge and treatment recommendations within the participant's respective eating disorder discipline. The majority of respondents (85%) were formally trained in eating disorders, and of those trained, 64.4% were not satisfied with the level of oral health education during formal education, and 19.5% report no oral health education. Respondents consider their knowledge of risk of oral disease for their clients/patients as average or above (84%), and ranked tooth erosion as the greatest reason for oral care (63%) while dry mouth led in the rankings for least significant reason for oral care (33%). Referral for oral care was found to be more common after reports of complication (55%). According to these findings, eating disorder professionals regard oral health care for their clients as significant, and may be unaware of associated oral risk factors, current oral care standards and long-term oral effects of disordered eating apart from enamel erosion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kobus

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is the most common autoimmune inflammatory disease of connective tissue in children. It is characterized by progressive joint destruction which causes preserved changes in the musculoskeletal system. The literature describes fully clinical symptoms and radiological images in different subtypes of JIA. However, there is still a limited number of studies reporting on the medical condition of the oral cavity of ill children. JIA can affect hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity by: the general condition of the child’s health, arthritis of the upper limbs, as the result of the pharmacotherapy, changes in secretion and composition of saliva, inflammation of the temporomandibular joint and facial deformity.The study summarizes the available literature on the condition of the teeth and periodontal and oral hygiene in the course of JIA. The presence of diverse factors that modify the oral cavity, such as facial growth, functioning of salivary glands, or the supervision and care provided by adults, prevents clear identification if JIA leads to severe dental caries and periodontal disease. Despite conflicting results in studies concerning the clinical oral status, individuals with JIA require special attention regarding disease prevention and maintenance of oral health.

  14. Influence of family environment on children's oral health: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rogéria Freire de Castilho

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Parents’ dental health habits influence their children's oral health. Oral health education programs aimed at preventive actions are needed to provide children not only with adequate oral health, but better quality of life. Special attention should be given to the entire family, concerning their lifestyle and oral health habits.

  15. Oral health and obesity indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Östberg Anna-Lena

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In western Sweden, the aim was to study the associations between oral health variables and total and central adiposity, respectively, and to investigate the influence of socio-economic factors (SES, lifestyle, dental anxiety and co-morbidity. Methods The subjects constituted a randomised sample from the 1992 data collection in the Prospective Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden (n = 999, 38- > =78 yrs. The study comprised a clinical and radiographic examination, together with a self-administered questionnaire. Obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI > =30 kg/m2, waist-hip ratio (WHR > =0.80, and waist circumference >0.88 m. Associations were estimated using logistic regression including adjustments for possible confounders. Results The mean BMI value was 25.96 kg/m2, the mean WHR 0.83, and the mean waist circumference 0.83 m. The number of teeth, the number of restored teeth, xerostomia, dental visiting habits and self-perceived health were associated with both total and central adiposity, independent of age and SES. For instance, there were statistically significant associations between a small number of teeth ( Conclusions Associations were found between oral health and obesity. The choice of obesity measure in oral health studies should be carefully considered.

  16. Tips for Good Oral Health during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tips for Good Oral Health During Pregnancy B elow are tips for taking care of your oral health while you are pregnant. Getting ... Dental Association. http: / / www. ada. org/ 993. aspx. Good Oral Health for Two (handout) produced by the Northeast Center ...

  17. Oral health in Florida nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, P E; Ede-Nichols, D; Garcia-Godoy, F

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the oral health and hygiene status among 265 South Florida nursing home residents aged between 45 and 98 years. The oral health and hygiene status of the residents were assessed by noting the presence of calculus, caries, gingivitis, cheilitis, apthous ulcer, dry mouth and red or white lesions. The incidence of nursing home residents with calculus was 79.6% and the remaining 20.4% were edentulous. More than half of residents had oral problems (50.6%) the commonest was gingivitis (36.6%), followed by caries (26%) and tooth fracture (15.9%). Almost half the residents wore dentures (47.2%). Statistical analysis was conducted using analysis of variance (P-values). Ageing of the residents was statistically correlated to a worsening of oral hygiene status (Pneglect affects almost all of the nursing home residents. Care providers should receive education and training from dental hygienists to improve the standard of oral hygiene and health of the elderly.

  18. Maintaining the oral health of splinted teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syme, S E; Fried, J L

    1999-01-01

    The combined and concerted efforts of patients and providers in poststabilization maintenance promote long-term health for the dental splint and its surrounding and supporting soft and hard tissues. Dental splints that are properly placed and contoured enable effective patient self-care and contribute to a positive prognosis. The provider's role in fabrication, placement, and oral hygiene instruction cannot be overemphasized. Professional follow-up concerning periodontal and caries risk assessment, periodontal débridement, and needed preventive interventions are critical to splint longevity. Continued success cannot occur without scrupulous patient self-care. The professional team must provide patients with comprehensive oral care instruction. A host of home care aids are available to assist patients in effective home care practices. With the combination of proficient clinical skill, appropriate dental material selection, good communication, and comprehensive health education, both providers and patients can benefit from esthetic, functional, and healthy dental splints.

  19. The World Oral Health Report 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2003-01-01

    of alcohol. In addition to socio-environmental determinants, oral disease is highly related to these lifestyle factors, which are risks to most chronic diseases as well as protective factors such as appropriate exposure to fluoride and good oral hygiene. Oral diseases qualify as major public health problems...... is a new strategy for managing prevention and control of oral diseases. The WHO Oral Health Programme has also strengthened its work for improved oral health globally through links with other technical programmes within the Department for Noncommunicable Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. The current...... oral health situation and development trends at global level are described and WHO strategies and approaches for better oral health in the 21st century are outlined....

  20. Need for Oral Health Policy in India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dental diseases are a significant public health burden in India as well as across the globe. WHO recognizes the oral health as an integral part of general health. The consequences of widespread poor oral health can be seen on the personal, population, and health systems level, as caries and periodontal disease ...

  1. Associations between Indigenous Australian oral health literacy and self-reported oral health outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Jamieson Lisa M; Parker Eleanor J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives To determine oral health literacy (REALD-30) and oral health literacy-related outcome associations, and to calculate if oral health literacy-related outcomes are risk indicators for poor self-reported oral health among rural-dwelling Indigenous Australians. Methods 468 participants (aged 17-72 years, 63% female) completed a self-report questionnaire. REALD-30 and oral health literacy-related outcome associations were determined through bivariate analysis. Multivariate mode...

  2. African Journal of Oral Health Sciences: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The African Journal of Oral Health Sciences is devoted to research into oral diseases and encourages a multidisciplinary approach. Emphasis is on oral pathology, oral microbiology, oral medicine, oral physiology and biochemistry and related clinical sciences.

  3. [Principles of oral health care for children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerkamp, J S J; van Amerongen, W E; Blanksma, N G; Krikken, J B; Lansen, P C; Merkus, T J M; Olderaan, F J; Parree, J W F; Stel, G

    2010-06-01

    In this article the principles of child oral health care in the Netherlands and the consequences of cariological principals of oral health care delivery to children are described. First of all the age of the child plays a very significant role in decisions concerning prevention and restoration. In addition, the combination of a positive attitude on the part of the dentist and a pain-free treatment can prevent fear of treatment and avoidance behaviour of the children. In the treatment of carious lesions, moreover, the oral health care provider should consider to what extent the problem is related to behaviour and fits in the multi-factorial caries model. Restorative treatments should be considered as supporting prevention, reducing caries activity and eliminating the effects of neglected oral health care. Prevention has to be seen as an essential element of the treatment model and it should start early from the standpoint of habit formation and the rapid demineralization process in the deciduous dentition which results from failed preventive care.

  4. Nutrition and Oral Health: Experiences in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohre Sadat Sangsefidi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral health is a crucial factor for overall well-being and there is a mutual relationship between nutrition and oral health. The aim of this study was to review the publications which have examined the association between nutrition or diet and oral health status or oral disease in Iran. Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, Scopus, Google scholar, scientific information database (SID, and Magiran were searched using key words of diet, nutrition, oral health, oral disease, and Iran to reach the related articles published up to 2016. The English and Persian articles with cross-sectional, clinical trial, prospective, and case-control designs were selected. The Persian studies were then translated into English. The animal studies were not investigated. Results: The findings showed that nutrition and diet were associated with oral health. However, the majority of studies focused on evaluation of the relation between nutrition and dental caries. Further, a few studies were conducted on the association between nutrition and other oral problems such as periodontal disease or oral cancer. Moreover, the limited nutritional or dietary factors were investigated in the literature. Conclusions: Nutrition and diet are related to oral health and prevention of oral disease. Further studies are therefore recommended to evaluate the association between nutrition and oral health with considering various dietary or nutritional factors and different types of oral problems in Iran.

  5. Diabetes mellitus and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Radhika

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by abnormal secretion and metabolic action of insulin. Hyperglycemia, the key feature of this endocrine disorder causes multisystem damage leading to untoward effects in various tissues collectively referred to as "Diabetic complications". Diabetes alters the oral health to a great extent. Indeed, periodontitis has been reported as the sixth complication of this disease. This article gives an overview of the oral effects of diabetes with an emphasis on periodontal disease and its relationship with cardiovascular disorders and pre-term birth. Dental considerations for management of these patients and recent advances in the dental field with respect to diabetes are also highlighted.

  6. [Medicines and oral healthcare 1. What oral healthcare providers need to know about medicines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissink, A.; Baat, C. de

    2016-01-01

    Many patients who visit a dentist, oral hygienist or other oral healthcare provider use medicines. As a result of the ageing of the Dutch population, the number of patients using medicines will further increase, including the number of patients who are using more than one medicine. In addition to

  7. Reflexions on oral health in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anya Pimentel Gomes Fernandes Vieira

    2014-09-01

    circumstances. The evaluation of health services can be regarded as a means to promote the continuous improvement in care, providing the user a quality service(8. In this context, evaluating these actions is an essential factor to determine their performance, efficacy and behavior in oral health services and, based on the references produced, meet the needs for public policies that generate oral health promotion in primary care. In the current issue of the Revista Brasileira em Promoção da Saúde - RBPS (Brazilian Journal in Health Promotion, two papers discuss the evaluation of actions aimed at promotion and prevention in oral health. One of them verifies the habits of oral hygiene and the oral hygiene index in schoolchildren, while the other evaluates the efficacy of oral hygiene instructions, particularly in the control of dental biofilm. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p451

  8. Oral health of female prisoners in HMP Holloway: implications for oral health promotion in UK prisons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rouxel, P; Duijster, D; Tsakos, G; Watt, R.G

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study describes the oral health status and associated risk factors in a sample of female prisoners and compares their oral health to that of the female population from the 2009 Adult Dental Health Survey...

  9. Current stress and poor oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliou, A; Shankardass, K; Nisenbaum, R; Quiñonez, C

    2016-09-02

    Psychological stress appears to contribute to poor oral health systemically in combination with other chronic diseases. Few studies directly examine this relationship. Data from a cross-sectional study of 2,412 participants between the ages of 25-64 years old living in the City of Toronto between 2009 and 2012 were used to examine the relationship between current stress and two self-rated oral health outcomes (general oral health and oral pain). Dental care utilization and access to dental insurance were examined as effect modifiers. A positive relationship between current stress and poor oral health was observed for both outcomes (oral pain coefficient 0.32, 95 % CI 0.26-0.38; general oral health coefficient 0.28, 95 % CI 0.19-0.36). Effects on oral pain were stronger for the uninsured, while effects on general oral health were stronger with decreasing socioeconomic position. Our findings suggest that individuals with greater perceived stress also report poorer oral health, and that this relationship is modified by dental insurance and socioeconomic position. These findings warrant a greater focus on the role of psychological stress in the development of oral disease, including how perceived stress contributes to health inequities in self-reported oral health status. Patients experiencing stressful lives may differentially require closer monitoring and more vigilant maintenance of their oral health, above and beyond that which is needed to achieve a state of health in the oral environment of less stressed individuals. There may be health promoting effects of addressing psychosocial concerns related to dental care - particularly for the poor and uninsured.

  10. Reflexions on oral health in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anya Pimentel Gomes Fernandes Vieira Meyer

    2013-12-01

    circumstances. The evaluation of health services can be regarded as a means to promote the continuous improvement in care, providing the user a quality service(8. In this context, evaluating these actions is an essential factor to determine their performance, efficacy and behavior in oral health services and, based on the references produced, meet the needs for public policies that generate oral health promotion in primary care. In the current issue of the Revista Brasileira em Promoção da Saúde - RBPS (Brazilian Journal in Health Promotion, two papers discuss the evaluation of actions aimed at promotion and prevention in oral health. One of them verifies the habits of oral hygiene and the oral hygiene index in schoolchildren, while the other evaluates the efficacy of oral hygiene instructions, particularly in the control of dental biofilm. REFERENCES 1. Benjamin RM. Oral health: the silent epidemic. Public Health Rep. 2010;125(2:158-9. 2. Narvai PC, Frazão P, Roncalli AG, Antunes JL. Cárie dentária no Brasil: declínio, polarização, iniqüidade e exclusão social. Rev Panam Salud Pública. 2006;19(6:385–93. 3. World Health Organization, Organização Mundial de Saúde. Oral Health: Media Centre [acesso em 2013 Fev 28]. (Fact sheet n° 318, Abril 2012. Disponível em: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs318/en/ index.html. 4. Petersen PE, Bourgeois D, Ogawa H, Estupinan- Day S, Ndiaye C. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health. Bull World Health Organ. 2005;83(9:661-9. 5. Ministério da Saúde (BR, Secretaria de Atenção à Saúde, Secretaria de Vigilância em Saúde. SBBrasil 2010: Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde Bucal: resultados principais. Brasília; 2011. 6. Valença AMG, Senna MAA, Faria LCM. Paradigmas do Atendimento de Crianças no Contexto da Saúde Pública Brasileira. In: Maia LC, Primo LG. Odontologia Integrada na Infância. São Paulo: Santos; 2011. p. 11- 22. 7. Vieira-da-Silva LM. Conceitos, abordagens e estratégias para a

  11. Promotion of oral health by community nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garry, Brendan; Boran, Sue

    2017-10-02

    To explore the enablers and barriers perceived by community nurses in the promotion of oral health in an adult community trust directorate. Oral health care promotion in community care settings is being neglected. England and Wales have witnessed marked improvements in periodontal disease; however, no improvements have been seen in older people. A qualitative methodology was employed, where eight nurses from Band 5 to 7 were interviewed using a semi-structured approach. The data was analysed thematically. Data analysis was organised into four themes: professional self-concept and the development of knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary in the promotion of oral health; the impact an organisation has on the promotion of oral health and an exploration of the enablers and barriers identified by the community nurses while delivering care; the relationships between the nurse and patient and the potential impact on oral health promotion; the concept of self-regard in relation to the promotion of oral health and its overall impact. A commitment to improving oral health and requests for additional educational input were apparent. Organisational enablers and barriers were identified, alongside the crucial role a positive self-regard for oral health care may play in the promotion of oral health. Nurses need relevant education, organisational support, adequate resources and support from a multidisciplinary team to deliver optimal oral health promotion.

  12. The challenge to delivering oral health services in rural America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Susan M; Doescher, Mark P; Mouradian, Wendy E; Brunson, Diane K

    2010-06-01

    This review identifies the challenges to oral health in rural America and describes areas of innovation in prevention, delivery of dental services, and workforce development that may improve oral health for rural populations. This descriptive article is based on literature reviews and personal communications. Rural populations have lower dental care utilization, higher rates of dental caries, lower rates of insurance, higher rates of poverty, less water fluoridation, fewer dentists per population, and greater distances to travel to access care than urban populations. Improving the oral health of rural populations requires practical and flexible approaches to expand and better distribute the rural oral health workforce, including approaches tailored to remote areas. Solutions that involve mass prevention/public health interventions include increasing water fluoridation, providing timely oral health education, caries risk assessment and referral, preventive services, and offering behavioral interventions such as smoking and tobacco cessation programs. Solutions that train more providers prepared to work in rural areas include recruiting students from rural areas, training students in rural locations, and providing loan repayment and scholarships. Increasing the flexibility and capacity of the oral health workforce for rural areas could be achieved by creating new roles for and new types of providers. Solutions that overcome distance barriers include mobile clinics and telehealth technology. Rural areas need flexibility and resources to develop innovative solutions that meet their specific needs. Prevention needs to be at the front line of rural oral health care, with systematic approaches that cross health professions and health sectors.

  13. Oral hygiene practices and oral health care seeking behaviours ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine the oral hygiene practices and oral health care seeking behaviours among primary school teachers. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional descriptive study was conducted among primary school teachers from public schools in Ndola district, Zambia.The primary schools were selected using stratified ...

  14. Addressing Geriatric Oral Health Concerns through National Oral Health Policy in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an escalating demand for geriatric oral healthcare in all developed and developing countries including India. Two-thirds of the world’s elderly live in developing countries. This is a huge population that must receive attention from policy-makers who will be challenged by the changing demands for social and health services including oral health services. Resources are limited thus rather than being aspirational in wanting to provide all treatment needed for everybody, this critique presents a road map of how we might answer the present and future geriatric oral health concerns in a most efficient manner in a developing country. Viewing the recent Indian demographic profile and the trends in oral health, pertinent policy subjects have been discussed concerning the oral health needs of the elderly and also the associated challenges which include strategies to improve quality of life, strategies to train and educate the dental workforce and above all the role of healthcare systems towards realization of better aged society in India and other developing countries

  15. Effectiveness of oral health education programs: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakre, Priya Devadas; Harikiran, A G

    2013-07-01

    In recent years, attention has been drawn toward assessing the effectiveness of oral health education programs. This is in line with demand for evidence based research and will help to inform policy makers on how to allocate resources. (1) Collect and collate all information on oral health education programs. (2) Assess the programs based on various coding criteria. (3) Assess effectiveness of oral health education programs on oral health status and knowledge, attitude and practice. A search of all published articles in Medline was done using the keywords "oral health education, dental health education, oral health promotion". The resulting titles and abstracts provided the basis for initial decisions and selection of articles. Out of the primary list of articles, a total number of 40 articles were selected as they fulfilled the following inclusion criteria: (1). Articles on oral health programs with an oral health education component (2). Articles published after the year 1990 (3). Articles published in English. The full text of the articles was then obtained from either the internet or libraries of dental research colleges and hospitals in and around Bangalore. A set of important variables were identified and grouped under five headings to make them amenable for coding. The coding variables were then described under various subheadings to allow us to compare the chosen articles. Oral health education is effective in improving the knowledge attitude and practice of oral health and in reducing plaque, bleeding on probing of the gingiva and caries increment. This study identifies a few important variables which contribute to the effectiveness of the programs. There is an indication in this review that the most successful oral health programs are labor intensive, involve significant others and has received funding and additional support. A balance between inputs and outputs and health care resources available will determine if the program can be recommended for

  16. Evaluating student learning outcomes in oral health knowledge and skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Adrienne; Edwards, Suzanne; Whiting, Glenda; Donnelly, Frank

    2017-09-22

    To evaluate whether a set of oral health resources designed for workforce training was relevant for students undertaking an entry-level nursing or aged care qualification. Oral health is one of the most neglected aspects of nursing care experienced by older people. Despite efforts to improve aged care worker oral health knowledge and skills, one-off training and rapid staff turnover have hindered the success of workplace programmes. Inadequate oral health content in entry-level nursing and aged care qualifications has perpetuated this. Kirkpatrick's training and evaluation model was used to evaluate the resources developed by a project called Building Better Oral Health Communities. Students used them as prescribed study materials and completed pre- and postintervention questionnaires. Educators were interviewed to obtain their feedback. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Qualitative data were collated according to relevance to learning, presentation style and interest. Evaluation showed high levels of student and educator satisfaction. Student learning outcomes demonstrated consistently positive attitudes and significant self-reported improvements in oral health knowledge and skills. Irrespective of course type, students gained similar levels of oral health knowledge and skills following use of the resources. Nurses and care workers must be able to provide consistent standards of oral health care as a fundamental part of caring for patients. Validated as an effective learning and teaching package, it is recommended that these resources be used to strengthen the oral health content of entry-level nursing and aged care qualifications. Building the oral health capacity of nurses and care workers is one way of reversing oral health neglect and improving the quality of care provided to older people. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Assessment of relationship between oral health behavior, oral hygiene and gingival status of dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Afsheen; Dasar, Pralhad L; Sandesh, N; Mishra, Prashant; Kumar, Sandeep; Balsaraf, Swati

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of oral health providers toward their own oral health reflects their understanding of the importance of preventive dental procedures and of improving the oral health of their target population. This study was done with an aim to assess the relationship between oral health behavior, oral hygiene and gingival status of third and final year dental students from a Dental College in Indore City, India. A total of 137 dental students participated in the study. The students were invited to complete the Hiroshima University-Dental Behavioral Inventory (HU-DBI) questionnaire. The HU-DBI questionnaire consisted of twenty polar responses (agree/disagree) regarding oral health-related behavior. In addition, two further questions about the frequency of brushing and flossing were included. Subsequently, oral health examination was conducted to assess plaque and gingival status. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test, Independent sample t-test, and Pearson's correlation. The significance level was set at P ≤ 0.05. The results showed that about 66.6% of the students checked their teeth in the mirror after brushing. Only 20.1% of the students reported bleeding from gums. The mean oral heath behavior score (HU-DBI) was 6.47 ± 2.0. A negative correlation of HU-DBI scores with plaque (r = -0.501) and gingival scores (r = -0.580) was observed. Thus, it is concluded that there is a significant relationship between the oral health behavior, oral hygiene, and gingival status of dental students. Dental students with better self-reported oral health behavior had lower plaque and gingival scores indicating a better attitude toward oral health.

  18. Personal Responsibility in Oral Health: Ethical Considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    oral health. These factors affect people’s oral health and their ability to take care of it. Both the conceptual and practical issues at stake are not reasons to abandon the idea of personal responsibility in oral health, but they do affect what the notion means and when it is reasonable to hold people...... responsible by introducing measures that decrease their share of available resources. Introducing personal responsibility in oral health also has limitations of a more practical nature. Knowledge, social status and other diseases affect the degree to which people can be said to be responsible for their poor...

  19. Polyelectrolyte biomaterial interactions provide nanoparticulate carrier for oral insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Catarina Pinto; Ribeiro, António J; Veiga, Francisco; Neufeld, Ronald J; Damgé, Christiane

    2008-02-01

    Nanospheres are being developed for the oral delivery of peptide-based drugs such as insulin. Mucoadhesive, biodegradable, biocompatible, and acid-protective biomaterials are described using a combination of natural polyelectrolytes, with particles formulated through nanoemulsion dispersion followed by triggered in situ gel complexation. Biomaterials meeting these criteria include alginate, dextran, chitosan, and albumin in which alginate/dextran forms the core matrix complexed with chitosan and albumin coat. Smaller size and higher albumin-based acid-protective formulation was orally administered to diabetic rats and glucose reduction and physiological response analyzed. Insulin encapsulation efficiency was 90, 82, and 66% for uncoated, chitosan-coated, and albumin-chitosan-coated alginate nanospheres, respectively. The choice of coating polymer seems to influence insulin release profile and to be crucial to prevent peptic digestion. Physiological response following oral delivery showed that insulin albumin-chitosan-coated alginate nanospheres reduced glycemia approximately 72% of basal values. Albumin serves as an important enteric coating providing acid- and protease protection enabling uptake of active drug following oral dosage.

  20. Clinical trial registration in oral health journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaïl-Faugeron, V; Fron-Chabouis, H; Durieux, P

    2015-03-01

    Prospective registration of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) represents the best solution to reporting bias. The extent to which oral health journals have endorsed and complied with RCT registration is unknown. We identified journals publishing RCTs in dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine in the Journal Citation Reports. We classified journals into 3 groups: journals requiring or recommending trial registration, journals referring indirectly to registration, and journals providing no reference to registration. For the 5 journals with the highest 2012 impact factors in each group, we assessed whether RCTs with results published in 2013 had been registered. Of 78 journals examined, 32 (41%) required or recommended trial registration, 19 (24%) referred indirectly to registration, and 27 (35%) provided no reference to registration. We identified 317 RCTs with results published in the 15 selected journals in 2013. Overall, 73 (23%) were registered in a trial registry. Among those, 91% were registered retrospectively and 32% did not report trial registration in the published article. The proportion of trials registered was not significantly associated with editorial policies: 29% with results in journals that required or recommended registration, 15% in those that referred indirectly to registration, and 21% in those providing no reference to registration (P = 0.05). Less than one-quarter of RCTs with results published in a sample of oral health journals were registered with a public registry. Improvements are needed with respect to how journals inform and require their authors to register their trials. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  1. Oral Health Knowledge of Pregnant Women on Pregnancy Gingivitis and Children's Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, C; Ma, K N; Wong, Y S; So, Y; Lee, P C; Yang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy gingivitis and early childhood caries remain prevalent in Hong Kong. The aim of this study was to assess pregnant women's knowledge and beliefs related to pregnancy gingivitis and children's oral health. An outreach survey was carried out in a clinic that provided antenatal examination. A written oral health questionnaire related to pregnancy gingivitis and early childhood caries was administered to pregnant women. Of the 106 pregnant women who enrolled in the study, 100 completed the questionnaires. Among the 100 subjects, only 39% correctly identified that hormonal changes contribute to pregnancy gingivitis. Only 36% identified red and swollen gums as signs of gingivitis. Furthermore, 53% of the surveyed pregnant women were not sure about the amount of toothpaste to administer to a child aged 18 months to 5 years. Almost 50% assumed that a replanted avulsed tooth would probably not survive within a short extra-alveolar period of less than 60 minutes. Prenatal women generally lack knowledge of a common oral disease that occurs during pregnancy and of what constitutes adequate oral health care for children. Oral health care education should be implemented as part of a prenatal care program.

  2. [The relationship between the infant nursing bottle caries and the feeding patterns, oral health behavior and parents' oral health information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhao-qi

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between the infant nursing bottle caries in city community and the feeding patterns, oral health behavior, parents' oral health information, and to provide scientific basis for future infant nursing bottle caries prevention. Three hundred infants aged 6, 7, 12, 18 months in April 2009 in Bai Guan Street Community Hospital Shangyu City were enrolled in this study, nursing bottle caries were examined and recorded. Questionnaires on infant basic data, feeding patterns, oral health behavior, parents' oral health information were asked and recorded in these 300 parents. The relationship was analyzed between the infant nursing bottle caries and the questionnaires by Chi-square test with the SPSS14.0 software package. The infant nursing bottle caries correlated obviously with the habit of sleeping with the nursing bottle or mammary papilla in mouth, and did not correlate with the breast or artificial feeding patterns. The occurrence rate of infant nursing bottle caries was significantly lower in the infants with oral health behavior than those without oral health behavior. After feeding food, more parents feed the infants with little plain boiled water than clean the infant oral cavity with finger cap wet carbasus. 56.7% of parents had no acknowledge of danger of infant nursing bottle caries. There is some correlation between the infant nursing bottle caries and the feeding patterns, oral health behavior, parents' oral health information.

  3. Health Care Provider Initiative Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Environmental Education & Training Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document lays out the strategy for achieving the goals and objectives of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative." The goal of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative" is to incorporate environmental health into health professionals' education and practice in order to improve health care and public health, with a special emphasis on…

  4. 78 FR 14034 - Health Insurance Providers Fee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 57 RIN 1545-BL20 Health Insurance Providers Fee AGENCY: Internal... covered entities engaged in the business of providing health insurance for United States health risks... regulations affect persons engaged in the business of providing health insurance for United States health...

  5. Domestic Violence and its Effect on Oral Health Behaviour and Oral Health Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    P, Basavaraj; Singla, Ashish; Kote, Sunder; Singh, Shilpi; Jain, Swati; Singh, Khushboo; Vashishtha, Vaibhav

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Violence against women is one of the major public health and human rights problem in the world today. Hence, the present study was conducted with the aim to assess the effect of domestic violence on oral health behavior and oral health status of females attending community outreach programmes in and around Modinagar. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted through the community outreach programmes organized in Modinagar. A structured questionnaire was used to illicit information regarding socio demographic characteristics, oral health behavior and domestic violence. The dental health examination was done to record dental health status, intraoral and extraoral soft tissue injury, tooth fracture and tooth avulsion due to the injury. Results: Out of the total 304 women, 204(67.1%) reported positive domestic violence. Psychological violence was found to be severe whereas sexual violence was found to be mild in most of the cases. Significant difference was found between oral hygiene aids used , frequency of tooth brushing, periodontal status, missing teeth, intraoral soft tissue injuries and fractures between both the groups (pdental professionals also should make an attempt to help victims gain access to support and referral services and to provide adequate treatment to them so as to make a positive difference in their lives. PMID:25584297

  6. Oral health and erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijendra P Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ample evidence strongly supports the fact that periodontal disease is a major risk factor for various systemic diseases namely cardio-vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, etc. Recently, investigators focussed on exploring the link between chronic periodontitis (CP and erectile dysfunction (ED by contributing to the endothelial dysfunction. Both the diseases share common risk factors. Various studies conducted in different parts of the world in recent years reported the evidence linking this relationship as well as improvement in ED with periodontal treatment. Systemic exposure to the periodontal pathogen and periodontal infection-induced systemic inflammation was thought to associate with these conditions. The objective of this review was to highlight the evidence of the link between CP and ED and the importance of oral health in preventing the systemic conditions.

  7. Health Provider Networks, Quality and Costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.; Schottmuller, C.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a modeling framework to think about selective contracting in the health care sector. Two health care providers differ in quality and costs. When buying health insurance, consumers observe neither provider quality nor costs. We derive an equilibrium where health insurers signal provider

  8. Health provider networks, quality and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, Jan; Schottmuller, C.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a modeling framework to think about selective contracting in the health care sector. Two health care providers differ in quality and costs. When buying health insurance, consumers observe neither provider quality nor costs. We derive an equilibrium where health insurers signal provider

  9. Seeing Your Health Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reduce Font Size 100% Increase Font Size Positive Spin Basics Federal Response Digital Tools Events Blog Home ... that may assist you. Be on time. Most healthcare providers have full appointment schedules—if you are ...

  10. Salt fluoridation and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Marthaler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the cariesprotective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich, and several other cantons followed suit. Studies initiated in the early seventies showed that fluoride, when added to salt, inhibits dental caries. The addition of fluoride to salt for human consumption was officially authorized in 1980-82. In Switzerland 85% of domestic salt consumed is fluoridated and 67% in Germany. Salt fluoridation schemes are reaching more than one hundred million in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Cuba. The cost of salt fluoridation is very low, within 0.02 and 0.05 € per year and capita. Children and adults of the low socio-economic strata tend to have substantially more untreated caries than higher strata. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method for improving oral health. Conclusions. Salt fluoridation has cariostatic potential like water fluoridation (caries reductions up to 50%. In Europe, meaningful percentages of users have been attained only in Germany (67% and Switzerland (85%. In Latin America, there are more than 100 million users, and several countries have arrived at coverage of 90 to 99%. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method of caries prevention, and billions of people throughout the world could benefit from this method.

  11. Occupational Health for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health care workers are exposed to many job hazards. These can include Infections Needle injuries Back injuries ... prevention practices. They can reduce your risk of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, ...

  12. Oral health in children with asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Marković Dejan; Perić Tamara; Sovtić Aleksandar; Minić Predrag; Petrović Vanja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. It has been suggested that asthmatic patients may have a higher risk for oral diseases, both as a result of the medical condition and effects of medications. Objective. The aim of the study was to determine the oral health status of children with asthma and to evaluate the oral health parameters according to the medications and severity of the disease. Methods. The study group consisted of 158 children with asthma and 100 healthy control subje...

  13. African Journal of Oral Health: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    c) Update articles surveying the present state of knowledge in selected fields of Dentistry and oral health. d) Critical or analytical reviews in the area of theory, policy, or research in Dentistry. e) Reviews of recently published books or group of books which would be of relevance to the improvement of oral health in Africa.

  14. Archives: African Journal of Oral Health

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 6 of 6 ... Archives: African Journal of Oral Health. Journal Home > Archives: African Journal of Oral Health. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 6 of 6 Items ...

  15. Oral health effects associated with narghile use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemiss, Mehdi; Rouatbi, Sonia; Berrezouga, Latifa; Ben Saad, Helmi

    2016-07-01

    Background - As dentists are certain to encounter narghile-smokers amongst their patients, it is important to inform them of the possible detrimental impacts of narghile-use on oral-health. Objective - To review the literature on the oral-health effects of narghile-use. Methods - Data Sources - We made a search on pubmed until June 30th, 2015 for the chronic oral-health effects of narghile-use using the terms "oral-lesions" or "oral-cancer" or "dry-socket" or "periodontium" and 'narghile' or its different synonyms. Study selection - Only original studies and case reports or series focusing on clinical human studies were included. Sixteen studies met the selection criteria and 14 were retained. Data extraction - Data were abstracted by two authors and summarized into tables. Abstracted data, including study type and results, were analyzed jointly by four authors. Results - Data synthesis. Narghile-use has harmful effects on oral-cavity including periodontal diseases, dry-sockets and oral-mucosa lesions. Conclusion - Narghile-use is associated with a variety of adverse long-term oral-health effects that should reinforce the need for stronger regulation. Key-words - Tobacco - Oral lesions - Oral cancer - Periodontium - Dry-socket.

  16. Association between psychosocial disorders and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a fact that mind and body share an intimate relationship. There are many ways in which mental and physical health impact each other. Psychosocial factors play a part in the pathogenesis of physical health, and oral health is no exception. Chronic and painful oral symptoms lead to psychosocial disorder and at the same time, some patients with psychosocial disorders experience painful oral and facial symptoms. Several investigators have concluded that psychosocial factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of an array of oral problems, ranging from poor oral hygiene to chronic pain disorders, such as temporomandibular joint disorders, burning mouth syndrome, and atypical pain. This review aims at the in-depth analysis of the correlation between psychosocial disorders and various oral symptoms.

  17. Global oral health of older people--call for public health action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, P E; Kandelman, D; Arpin, S; Ogawa, H

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this report is (1) to provide a global overview of oral health conditions in older people, use of oral health services, and self care practices; (2) to explore what types of oral health services are available to older people, and (3) to identify some major barriers to and opportunities for the establishment of oral health services and health promotion programmes. A postal questionnaire designed by the World Health Organization (WHO) was distributed worldwide to the Chief Dental Officers or country oral health focal points at ministries of health. WHO received 46 questionnaires from countries (39% response rate). In addition, systematic data were collected from the WHO Global Oral Health Data Bank and the World Health Survey in order to include oral health information on the remaining countries. In total, the data base covers 136 out 193 countries, i.e., 71% of all WHO Member States. Dental caries and periodontal disease comprise a considerable public health problem in the majority of countries. Significant disparities within and between regions are observed in epidemiologic indicators of oral disease. The prevalence rates of tooth loss and experience of oral problems vary substantially by WHO Region and national income. Experience of oral problems among older people is high in low income countries; meanwhile, access to health care is poor, in particular in rural areas. Although tooth brushing is the most popular oral hygiene practice across the world, regular tooth brushing appears less common among older people than the population at large. In particular, this practice is less frequent in low income countries; in contrast, traditional oral self-care is prevalent in several countries of Africa and Asia. While fluoridated toothpaste is widely used in developed countries, it is extremely infrequent in most developing countries. Oral health services are available in developed countries; however, the use of such services is low among the older people. Lack

  18. Linking oral health, general health, and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieffer, J.M.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the association among oral health, general health, and quality of life (QoL). The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-49) and the RAND-36 were distributed amongst 118 psychology freshmen. Additionally, two single items self-rated general health (SRGH) and self-rated

  19. Oral health promotion efficiency in the control of oral biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nélio Jorge Veiga

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the efficacy of oral health instructions, particularly in the control of dental plaque, as well as assess the effectiveness of the reinforcement of the same instructions. Methods: A quasi-experimental study was conducted at the University Clinic of the Portuguese Catholic University (UCP in Viseu-Portugal from January to June 2012. Three different assessments were performed with 30 participants using the O’Leary Plaque Index and a questionnaire on oral health behavior, with a one-month interval between each assessment. In the first assessment, all participants received the same instructions of oral hygiene and the O’Leary Plaque Index registration and the application of the questionnaire were performed; in the second assessment, a new registration of the O’Leary Index was made, but only the experimental group (n=16 received the reinforcement of oral health instructions, and in the third assessment, a new registration of the O’Leary Plaque Index was made for all the individuals (n=30. Results: Both control and experimental groups showed a decrease in the O’Leary Plaque Index, but the latter showed a more significant decrease in the last assessment: 38.19% (n=16 vs. 69.57% (n=14, p <0.05. Regarding the frequency of toothbrushing, in the experimental group, 68.8% (n=11 brushed the teeth at least twice a day, while in the control group only 57.1% (n=8 performed the same frequency of toothbrushing. In this case, statistically significant differences were found between the two groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: Oral health promotion through oral hygiene instruction was effective in improving oral health behaviors, and, consequentely, the control of dental biofilm. doi:10.5020/18061230.2014.p117

  20. Oral health promotion by the oral health products industry: unrecognised and unappreciated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, M L

    2008-03-01

    There is often ambivalence in the way dentists view the oral health care industry. On the one hand, there are the skeptics who view corporate activities as suspect, calling into question the validity of industry-sponsored research and considering all promotional activities as self-serving. On the other hand, there are those who will evaluate research, whether industry sponsored or not, on its merits and appreciate corporate philanthropy that aims to give something back to the profession, although at times the expectations of the amount of financial support available are markedly in excess of the actual amount based on dental product sales. (Yes--and don't let your young children see this!--the tooth fairy who goes around dispensing endless number of dollars or pounds or euros does not actually exist!) Recognizing that, of necessity, corporations exist to make a profit, I would submit that the relationship of responsible companies to the profession can often be looked at as a partnership in which both sides benefit. Ultimately, all have as a goal the improvement of the oral health of our patients (or consumers) which is facilitated by the availability of effective products. In addition to marketing products, the oral care industry plays a large, though oftentimes unnoticed, role in oral health promotion. For the most part, this involves targeted financial support or contributions of products that serve to enhance patients' understanding of oral diseases and the need for good oral care, and/or provide access to care for underserved groups. In the following sections, I will give some examples of industry-supported health promotion activities, most of which will be activities in the United States with which I am most familiar. These are examples only--the list is not intended to be exhaustive and a company's name will be included in only the few instances in which it is an integral part of the programme title.

  1. Plant polyphenols and oral health: old phytochemicals for new fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varoni, E M; Lodi, G; Sardella, A; Carrassi, A; Iriti, M

    2012-01-01

    Despite the protective role of diets rich in fruit plant polyphenols against some cancers and chronic degenerative and inflammatory diseases, insufficient emphasis has been placed on oral health. Numerous studies have aimed to ascertain the role of polyphenols in the prevention and treatment of oral diseases; however, even when in vitro evidence appears convincing, the same is not true for in vivo studies, and thus there is a general paucity of solid evidence based on animal and clinical trials. To the best of our knowledge, only two reviews of polyphenols and oral health have been published; however, neither considered the potential role of whole plant extracts, which contain mixtures of many polyphenols that are often not completely identified. In the present study, our main aim was to review the current state of knowledge (search period: January 1965 to March 2011) on the effects of plant extracts/polyphenols on oral health. We found data on grapes, berries, tea, cocoa, coffee, myrtle, chamomile, honey/propolis, aloe extracts and the three main groups of polyphenols (stilbenes, flavonoids and proanthocyanidins). Their effects on caries, gingivitis, periodontal disease, candidiasis, oral aphtae, oral mucositis, oral lichen planus, leukoplakia and oral cancer were investigated. The data suggest that there is a lack of strong evidence, in particular regarding randomized clinical trials. However, a fascinating starting point has been provided by pre-clinical studies that have shown interesting activities of polyphenols against the most common oral diseases (caries, periodontitis and candidiasis), as well as in oral cancer prevention.

  2. Diabetes mellitus and oral health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Đorđević, N; Ajduković, Z; Šehalić, M; Marjanović, D; Mitić, A; Dragojević, I; Ilić, A

    2015-01-01

    .... The most common oral manifestations in diabetic patients include higher prevalence of periodontal desease, burning mouth syndrome, disruption in salivary flow, opportunistic infections, higher...

  3. Impact of oral health status on oral health-related quality of life in Chinese hospitalised geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Doris S F; Lee, Diana T F; Hong, Athena W L; Lau, Tak Yin; Leung, Edward M F

    2008-04-01

    To examine the oral health status of Chinese hospitalised geriatric patients and identify its impacts on their oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Cross-sectional correlational study. Geriatric wards of a regional hospital in Hong Kong. A consecutive sample of Chinese hospitalised geriatric patients (N = 155) aged >or= 65 years who were communicable. The Brief Oral Health Status Examination (BOHSE) was used to evaluate oral status. The General Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) was used to assess OHRQoL. The oral health status of the Chinese hospitalised geriatric patients was fair, with the more prominent problems being decayed teeth, lack of occluded teeth, coated tongue, excessive tartar, dry and rough red oral tissue and diseased gum. The GOHAI score indicated their compromised OHRQoL. By using hierarchical regression analysis, fewer than eight pairs of occluding teeth (beta = -0.33, P geriatric patients. This study suggests that routine screening for dental and gum problems, providing adequate adaptation of denture prosthesis and reducing oral dryness of geriatric patients may be important care to optimise the OHRQoL of Chinese hospitalised geriatric patients. The study needs to be replicated in larger-scale multicentre settings and incorporate the use of more-comprehensive oral assessment indices.

  4. Do current sports nutrition guidelines conflict with good oral health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, Elizabeth M; Rye, Leslie A

    2015-01-01

    For optimal athletic performance, an athlete requires good oral health to reduce the risk of oral pain, inflammation, and infection and thereby minimize the use of analgesics and antimicrobial agents. Increased intake, frequency, and dental contact time of carbohydrate-rich foods, sports nutrition products, and acidic carbohydrate-containing sports and energy drinks may contribute to risks of dental erosion, caries, and inflammatory periodontal conditions in the athlete, especially when he or she also exhibits dehydration and poor oral hygiene habits. Examining the athlete before he or she begins participating in a sport allows the dental care provider to determine the patient's existing oral health, hygiene, and susceptibility to risk factors for erosion, caries, and inflammatory periodontal disease. This oral profile, in conjunction with the individual athlete's dietary needs, can be used to establish a treatment and preventive program, including oral health education. Good oral hygiene practices and application of topical fluoride, especially via fluoridated toothpastes and topical fluoride varnishes, must be available to the athlete. Rinsing with water or a neutral beverage after exposure to carbohydrates or acidic sports nutrition products may reduce carbohydrate contact time and bring oral pH levels back to neutral more quickly, reducing the risk of caries and erosion. Finally, the dentist should encourage the athlete to consult with an experienced sports dietitian to ensure that principles of sports nutrition are being appropriately applied for the type, frequency, and duration of exercise in consideration of the individual's oral health needs.

  5. Oral health knowledge among elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuistan, Michelle R; Qasim, Assad; Shao, Chong; Straub-Morarend, Cheryl L; Macek, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of oral health knowledge among patients 65 years or older to identify areas in which knowledge gaps exist. The authors administered the Comprehensive Measure of Oral Health Knowledge questionnaire to patients 65 years or older at a university-based dental clinic and examined associations between oral health knowledge scores and participants' demographic and dental characteristics. Most participants were familiar with basic dental disease prevention and treatment; however, many participants were unfamiliar with concepts pertaining to periodontal disease, oral cancer, and children's oral health. Advocates for geriatric oral health should educate elderly populations about the risk factors associated with periodontal disease and oral cancer, especially as they become more at risk of experiencing these diseases. Educational messages aimed at both routine and nonroutine users of dental care should be developed on the basis of universal health literacy principles to facilitate understanding among elderly adults, who have varying literacy levels. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Oral health benefits of chewing gum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades sugar-free chewing gum has developed in an oral healthcare product, next to the conventional products such as the toothbrush and mouthrinses. In this thesis we investigate the oral health benefits of chewing gum and the effects of additives to chewing gum, such as antimicrobials.

  7. Diabetes mellitus and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common non-communicable chronic diseases, which is the combined action of genetic factors, environmental factors and lifestyle. Specific conditions occur in the oral cavity in the course of diabetes that cause changes in all oral tissues with different symptoms and signs. Increased salivary glucose level is followed by increased accumulation of dental plaque and decreased resistance to noxious agents. The most common oral manifestations in diabetic patients include higher prevalence of periodontal desease, burning mouth syndrome, disruption in salivary flow, opportunistic infections, higher prevalence of denture stomatitis, oral lichen planus, fissured tongue, angular cheilitis etc. Dental interventions in patients with well-controlled diabetes are not different from those applied to nondiabetic patients. Regular monitoring of these patients is required because of the complications that can occur.

  8. World Health Organization global policy for improvement of oral health--World Health Assembly 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2008-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Global Oral Health Programme has worked hard over the past five years to increase the awareness of oral health worldwide as an important component of general health and quality of life. Meanwhile, oral disease is still a major public health problem in high income...... countries and the burden of oral disease is growing in many low- and middle income countries. In the World Oral Health Report 2003, the WHO Global Oral Health Programme formulated the policies and the necessary actions for the improvement of oral health. The strategy is that oral disease prevention...... and the promotion of oral health needs to be integrated with chronic disease prevention and general health promotion as the risks to health are linked. The World Health Assembly (WHA) and the Executive Board (EB) are supreme governance bodies of WHO and for the first time in 25 years oral health was subject...

  9. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for providing oral care. NIDCR > OralHealth > Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam Video Oral Cancer Exam Video This video shows what happens during an oral cancer examination. Quick and painless, the exam can detect ...

  10. Dental Visits Mediate the Impact of Smoking on Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Amber S; Parish, Alice; Logan, Henrietta L; Dodd, Virginia J; Zheng, Dong; Guo, Yi

    2018-01-01

    We explored the mediational relationships among smoking, dental visits, and oral health in a longitudinal study. We selected a sample of adult residents of rural communities of North Central Florida and followed them for 3 years (final N = 1170). We examined the impact of smoking on oral health across time and conducted mediation analysis to quantify the effect of dental visits on the relationship between smoking and poor oral health. Our results showed that oral health declined across time for smokers but not for nonsmokers. The mediation analysis found that 18.3% of the difference in followup oral health between smokers and non-smokers was explained by smokers not having any dental visits in the last year. Our findings suggest that, given the low success rate of quitting smoking, promoting dental visits can help limit the negative effects of smoking on oral health. Future community prevention studies could encourage dental visits among smokers and provide educational materials that aim to increase knowledge of oral self-care.

  11. Evidence-Based Health Promotion in Nursing Homes: A Pilot Intervention to Improve Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadet, Tamara J.; Berrett-Abebe, Julie; Burke, Shanna L.; Bakk, Louanne; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Maramaldi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nursing home residents over the age of 65 years are at high risk for poor oral health and related complications such as pneumonia and adverse diabetes outcomes. A preliminary study found that Massachusetts' nursing homes generally lack the training and resources needed to provide adequate oral health care to residents. In this study, an…

  12. Changing oral health status and oral health behaviour of schoolchildren in Poland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicka, Maria; Petersen, Poul Erik; Szatko, Franciszek

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the occurrence of dental caries over time in Polish schoolchildren, to analyse the oral health behaviour of children and mothers, and to compare the levels of dental knowledge and attitudes of mothers and schoolteachers. DESIGN: Cross-sectional oral health surveys of children...... aged 6 and 12 years were carried out in 1995, 1997, 1999 and 2000; questionnaire surveys of a sample of mothers and schoolteachers were conducted in 1999. SETTING: The surveys in schools intended to aid planning and evaluation of the revitalised school oral health programme in Poland. SUBJECTS...... conditions in children and wanted to become involved in oral health education. In conclusion, the need for oral health education of children and mothers was shown and the continuous implementation of school oral health programmes is most relevant....

  13. Islamic fasting and oral health and diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Javadzadeh Blouri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fasting is a religious obligation, which can be challenging for individuals with oral conditions due to its stringent code of conduct. Moreover, food abstinence during fasting can restrict oral feeding even further in patients whose nutrition has been already compromised. Previous research has mainly concentrated on oral hygiene and gum health, disregarding orodental conditions and diseases. This highlights the importance of further research in this regard. In this paper, we intended to clarify the correlation between fasting and oral injections, bleeding following tooth extraction, and brushing to overcome common misconceptions which indicate the breach of religious disciplines under such circumstances. We also aimed to determine the grave effects of fasting on health in case of severe immunological deficiencies, chronic oral ulcers and certain drug administration protocols for those with rigid religious beliefs.

  14. Reflexions on oral health in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Anya Pimentel Gomes Fernandes Vieira; Maria Vieira de Lima Saintrain

    2014-01-01

    In the last century, numerous advances in biomedical researches and technology in the dentistry field have been responsible for improvements in health and wellbeing of populations(1). However, despite major achievements in the context of oral health, many problems still remain, such as dental caries, the most common of oral diseases. The prevalence of dental caries showed a downward trend over the last three decades of the XX century and in early twenty-first century, especially in developed ...

  15. Reflexions on oral health in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Anya Pimentel Gomes Fernandes Vieira Meyer; Maria Vieira de Lima Saintrain

    2013-01-01

    In the last century, numerous advances in biomedical researches and technology in the dentistry field have been responsible for improvements in health and wellbeing of populations(1). However, despite major achievements in the context of oral health, many problems still remain, such as dental caries, the most common of oral diseases. The prevalence of dental caries showed a downward trend over the last three decades of the XX century and in early twenty-first century, especially in developed ...

  16. Happiness, subjective and objective oral health status, and oral health behaviors among Korean elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun-Seo; Kim, Hae-Young; Patton, Lauren L; Chun, Jin-Ho; Bae, Kwang-Hak; Lee, Mi-Ok

    2013-10-01

    This study aims to comprehensively assess the association of subjective and objective oral health status and oral health behaviors with happiness, under consideration of demographic, socioeconomic, and general health-related factors. This study also aims to test whether subjective oral health outcomes are better predictors of happiness compared with objective oral health outcomes. The data were collected from 479 community-dwelling elders aged 65 years or over selected by a cluster sampling method. A questionnaire and an oral examination were implemented. A multiple regression method was conducted to assess associations with happiness index (HI). The mean age of the elders was 74.6 years. Mean (standard deviation, SD) HI, EuroQol-visual analog scale (EQ-VAS) and 14-item oral health impact profile (OHIP-14) index were 5.7 (SD 2.3), 59.8 (SD 21.1), and 16.3 (SD 13.1). In the final model, a significant association with HI of the OHIP-14 index (P = 0.091) among all the participants and significant associations of oral symptoms (P = 0.038), wearing a removable denture (P = 0.039), and of the oral health behavior of daily toothbrushing (P = 0.007) among poorer oral health QoL group were confirmed under consideration of other related factors. While correlations of HI to subjective measures of health, EQ-VAS and OHIP-14 score were moderate to weak, those to objective measures of health were only weak or insignificant. Oral impacts which might persistently affect one's daily life need to be considered in designing and delivering public services aimed to promote people's happiness. With oral health impacts and behaviors accounting for 10% of happiness among elders, public and community services for the elderly that support oral health and daily toothbrushing for the dentate are critical for the well-being of our elders. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Oral health of female prisoners in HMP Holloway: implications for oral health promotion in UK prisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouxel, P.; Duijster, D.; Tsakos, G.; Watt, R.G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study describes the oral health status and associated risk factors in a sample of female prisoners and compares their oral health to that of the female population from the 2009 Adult Dental Health Survey. Method A random sample of prisoners was selected from HMP Holloway, London.

  18. Global oral health inequalities: task group--implementation and delivery of oral health strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheiham, A; Alexander, D; Cohen, L

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the shortcomings of present approaches to reduce oral diseases and inequalities, details the importance of social determinants, and links that to research needs and policies on implementation of strategies to reduce oral health inequalities. Inequalities in health...... their environment. There is a dearth of oral health research on social determinants that cause health-compromising behaviors and on risk factors common to some chronic diseases. The gap between what is known and implemented by other health disciplines and the dental fraternity needs addressing. To re-orient oral...... health research, practice, and policy toward a 'social determinants' model, a closer collaboration between and integration of dental and general health research is needed. Here, we suggest a research agenda that should lead to reductions in global inequalities in oral health....

  19. [Anthropology and oral health projects in developing countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasveld, A E

    2016-01-01

    The mouth and teeth play an important role in social interactions around the world. The way people deal with their teeth and mouth, however, is determined culturally. When oral healthcare projects are being carried out in developing countries, differing cultural worldviews can cause misunderstandings between oral healthcare providers and their patients. The oral healthcare volunteer often has to try to understand the local assumptions about teeth and oral hygiene first, before he or she can bring about a change of behaviour, increase therapy compliance and make the oral healthcare project sustainable. Anthropology can be helpful in this respect. In 2014, in a pilot project commissioned by the Dutch Dental Care Foundation, in which oral healthcare was provided in combination with anthropological research, an oral healthcare project in Kwale (Kenia) was evaluated. The study identified 6 primary themes that indicate the most important factors influencing the oral health of school children in Kwale. Research into the local culture by oral healthcare providers would appear to be an important prerequisite to meaningful work in developing countries.

  20. Oral health in children with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. It has been suggested that asthmatic patients may have a higher risk for oral diseases, both as a result of the medical condition and effects of medications. Objective. The aim of the study was to determine the oral health status of children with asthma and to evaluate the oral health parameters according to the medications and severity of the disease. Methods. The study group consisted of 158 children with asthma and 100 healthy control subjects aged 2-18 years. The diagnosis of dental caries was performed using the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT/dmft criteria. The oral hygiene, periodontal status and gingival health were assessed with the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (Greene-Vermillion, Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs and Gingival Index (Löe-Silness, respectively. Results. Thirty (19% patients with asthma and 43 (43% healthy children were caries-free (p<0.001. There were no significant differences between asthmatic and control children in caries experience (for children with asthma mean DMFT=2.1±1.8, mean dmft=4.2±3.3; for healthy children mean DMFT=2.5±0.9, mean dmft=5.2±1.3. Level of asthma control did not have influence on dental health, while dose of inhaled corticosteroid had impact on primary dentition. Periodontal status and gingival health did not differ between asthmatic and control children. However, children with asthma had poorer oral hygiene (p<0.001. Conclusion. Results of the study do not show a relationship between asthma and oral diseases. However, further improvement could be made in educating children and parents on the importance of good oral hygiene and prevention of oral diseases.

  1. [Oral Health in Children with Asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Dejan; Perić, Tamara; Sovtić, Aleksandar; Minić, Predrag; Petrović, Vanja

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that asthmatic patients may have a higher risk for oral diseases, both as a result of the medical condition and effects of medications. The aim of the study was to determine the oral health status of children with asthma and to evaluate the oral health parameters according to the medications and severity of the disease. The study group consisted of 158 children with asthma and 100 healthy control subjects aged 2-18 years. The diagnosis of dental caries was performed using the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT/dmft) criteria. The oral hygiene, periodontal status and gingival health were assessed with the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (Greene-Vermillion), Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs and Gingival Index (Löe-Silness), respectively. Thirty (19%) patients with asthma and 43 (43%) healthy children were caries-free (pcaries experience (for children with asthma mean DMFT=2.1±1.8, mean dmft=4.2±3.3; for healthy children mean DMFT=2.5±0.9, mean dmft=5.2±1.3). Level of asthma control did not have influence on dental health, while dose of inhaled corticosteroid had impact on primary dentition. Periodontal status and gingival health did not differ between asthmatic and control children. However, children with asthma had poorer oral hygiene (pasthma and oral diseases. However, further improvement could be made in educating children and parents on the importance of good oral hygiene and prevention of oral diseases.

  2. Does maternal oral health predict child oral health-related quality of life in adulthood?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broadbent Jonathan M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A parental/family history of poor oral health may influence the oral-health-related quality of life (OHRQOL of adults. Objectives To determine whether the oral health of mothers of young children can predict the OHRQOL of those same children when they reach adulthood. Methods Oral examination and interview data from the Dunedin Study's age-32 assessment, as well as maternal self-rated oral health data from the age-5 assessment were used. The main outcome measure was study members' short-form Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14 at age 32. Analyses involved 827 individuals (81.5% of the surviving cohort dentally examined at both ages, who also completed the OHIP-14 questionnaire at age 32, and whose mothers were interviewed at the age-5 assessment. Results There was a consistent gradient of relative risk across the categories of maternal self-rated oral health status at the age-5 assessment for having one or more impacts in the overall OHIP-14 scale, whereby risk was greatest among the study members whose mothers rated their oral health as "poor/edentulous", and lowest among those with an "excellent/fairly good" rating. In addition, there was a gradient in the age-32 mean OHIP-14 score, and in the mean number of OHIP-14 impacts at age 32 across the categories of maternal self-rated oral health status. The higher risk of having one or more impacts in the psychological discomfort subscale, when mother rated her oral health as "poor/edentulous", was statistically significant. Conclusions These data suggest that maternal self-rated oral health when a child is young has a bearing on that child's OHRQOL almost three decades later. The adult offspring of mothers with poor self-rated oral health had poorer OHRQOL outcomes, particularly in the psychological discomfort subscale.

  3. [Ecstasy use and oral health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, H S; Dun, S N; van Nieuw Amerongen, A

    2007-02-01

    Ecstacy is a frequently used drug, especially by young adults in the big cities.Therefore, it is likely that dentists might be confronted with individuals that use XTC. This review of the literature describes the systemic and oral effects of XTC. Life-threatening complications include hyperthermia, hyponatreaemia and liver failure. In addition, psychotic episodes, depression, panic disorders and impulsive behaviour have been reported. Oral effects include mucosal changes, xerostomia and an increased risk of developing dental erosion and bruxism. Finally, the potential use of saliva for detection of XTC is discussed.

  4. Who continues to stock oral artemisinin monotherapy? Results of a provider survey in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein, Si Thu; Sudhinaraset, May; Khin, Hnin Su Su; McFarland, Willi; Aung, Tin

    2016-06-22

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is a key strategy for global malaria elimination efforts. However, the development of artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites threatens progress and continued usage of oral artemisinin monotherapies (AMT) predisposes the selection of drug resistant strains. This is particularly a problem along the Myanmar/Thailand border. The artemisinin monotherapy replacement programme (AMTR) was established in 2012 to remove oral AMT from stocks in Myanmar, specifically by replacing oral AMT with quality-assured ACT and conducting behavioural change communication activities to the outlets dispensing anti-malarial medications. This study attempts to quantify the characteristics of outlet providers who continue to stock oral AMT despite these concerted efforts. A cross-sectional survey of all types of private sector outlets that were stocking anti-malarial drugs in 13 townships of Eastern Myanmar was implemented from July to August 2014. A total of 573 outlets were included. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regressions were conducted to assess outlet and provider-level characteristics associated with stocking oral AMT. In total, 2939 outlets in Eastern Myanmar were screened for presence of any anti-malarial drugs in August 2014. The study found that 573 (19.5 %) had some kind of oral anti-malarial drug in stock at the time of survey and among them, 96 (16.8 %) stocked oral AMT. In bivariate analyses, compared to health care facilities, itinerant drug vendors, retailers and health workers were less likely to stock oral AMT (33.3 vs 12.9, 10.0, 8.1 %, OR = 0.30, 0.22, 0.18, respectively). Providers who cut blister pack or sell partial courses (40.6 vs 11.7 %, OR 5.18, CI 3.18-8.44) and those who based their stock decision on consumer demand (32.8 vs 12.1 %, OR 3.54, CI 2.21-5.63) were more likely to stock oAMT. Multivariate logistic regressions produced similar significant associations. Private healthcare facilities and drug

  5. Asthma and oral health: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M S; Parolia, A; Kundabala, M; Vikram, M

    2010-06-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory condition that causes the airways to constrict and produce excess mucus, making breathing difficult. It is characterized by the obstruction of airflow which is variable over a short period of time. This condition is reversible, either spontaneously or can be controlled with the help of drugs. Asthma medication comprises bronchodilators, corticosteroids and anticholinergic drugs. Most of these drugs are inhaled using various forms of inhalers or nebulizers. The effect of these drugs on oral health is the subject of debate among dental practitioners. Patients taking asthma medication may be at risk of dental caries, dental erosion, periodontal diseases and oral candidiasis. Hence, patients with bronchial asthma on medication should receive special prophylactic attention. This article reviews the correlation between asthma and oral health, and suggests various measures to counter possible oral health problems related to asthma.

  6. Probiotics in oral health--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yadav; Lingamneni, Benhur; Reddy, Deepika

    2012-01-01

    Probiotics are dietary supplements containing potentially beneficial bacteria or yeasts. Probiotics are live microorganisms thought to be beneficial to the host organism and, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria are the most common types of microbes used as probiotics. Probiotics strengthen the immune system to combat allergies, stress, exposure to toxic substances and other diseases. There are reports of beneficial use in HIV infections and cancers.These products help in stimulating oral health promoting flora, and suppress the pathologic colonization and disease spread. Probiotics can be bacteria, molds and yeast, but most probiotics are bacteria. In recent years, there has been a lot of interest in the use of probiotics in maintaining good oral health and treating oral infections. Their use in premalignant and malignant oral disorders is yet to be probed.

  7. Knowledge and attitude on infant oral health among graduating medical students in Kerala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari N

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Providing dental and oral health care to all children in Kerala remains a thorny challenge. Lack of community water fluoridation, dental workforce shortages and geographical barriers all aggravate oral health and access problems. Children from low-income and minority families and children with special needs are at particular risk. Family centered disease prevention strategies are needed to reduce oral health disparities in children. Oral health promotion can take place in a primary care practitioner′s office, but medical providers often lack relevant training. Present study was conducted to evaluate knowledge and attitude of graduating medical students towards infant oral health qualitative methods were used to evaluate the program.

  8. Associations between indigenous Australian oral health literacy and self-reported oral health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Eleanor J; Jamieson, Lisa M

    2010-03-26

    To determine oral health literacy (REALD-30) and oral health literacy-related outcome associations, and to calculate if oral health literacy-related outcomes are risk indicators for poor self-reported oral health among rural-dwelling Indigenous Australians. 468 participants (aged 17-72 years, 63% female) completed a self-report questionnaire. REALD-30 and oral health literacy-related outcome associations were determined through bivariate analysis. Multivariate modelling was used to calculate risk indicators for poor self-reported oral health. REALD-30 scores were lower among those who believed teeth should be infrequently brushed, believed cordial was good for teeth, did not own a toothbrush or owned a toothbrush but brushed irregularly. Tooth removal risk indicators included being older, problem-based dental attendance and believing cordial was good for teeth. Poor self-rated oral health risk indicators included being older, healthcare card ownership, difficulty paying dental bills, problem-based dental attendance, believing teeth should be brushed infrequently and irregular brushing. Perceived need for dental care risk indicators included being female and problem-based dental attendance. Perceived gum disease risk indicators included being older and irregular brushing. Feeling uncomfortable about oro-facial appearance risk indicators included problem-based dental attendance and irregular brushing. Food avoidance risk indicators were being female, difficulty paying dental bills, problem-based dental attendance and irregular brushing. Poor oral health-related quality of life risk indicators included difficulty paying dental bills and problem-based dental attendance. REALD-30 was significantly associated with oral health literacy-related outcomes. Oral health literacy-related outcomes were risk indicators for each of the poor self-reported oral health domains among this marginalised population.

  9. Associations between Indigenous Australian oral health literacy and self-reported oral health outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamieson Lisa M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To determine oral health literacy (REALD-30 and oral health literacy-related outcome associations, and to calculate if oral health literacy-related outcomes are risk indicators for poor self-reported oral health among rural-dwelling Indigenous Australians. Methods 468 participants (aged 17-72 years, 63% female completed a self-report questionnaire. REALD-30 and oral health literacy-related outcome associations were determined through bivariate analysis. Multivariate modelling was used to calculate risk indicators for poor self-reported oral health. Results REALD-30 scores were lower among those who believed teeth should be infrequently brushed, believed cordial was good for teeth, did not own a toothbrush or owned a toothbrush but brushed irregularly. Tooth removal risk indicators included being older, problem-based dental attendance and believing cordial was good for teeth. Poor self-rated oral health risk indicators included being older, healthcare card ownership, difficulty paying dental bills, problem-based dental attendance, believing teeth should be brushed infrequently and irregular brushing. Perceived need for dental care risk indicators included being female and problem-based dental attendance. Perceived gum disease risk indicators included being older and irregular brushing. Feeling uncomfortable about oro-facial appearance risk indicators included problem-based dental attendance and irregular brushing. Food avoidance risk indicators were being female, difficulty paying dental bills, problem-based dental attendance and irregular brushing. Poor oral health-related quality of life risk indicators included difficulty paying dental bills and problem-based dental attendance. Conclusions REALD-30 was significantly associated with oral health literacy-related outcomes. Oral health literacy-related outcomes were risk indicators for each of the poor self-reported oral health domains among this marginalised population.

  10. Utilisation of oral health services among adolescent girls | Enabulele ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    When oral health services are not obtained, adolescent girls may be omitting vital preventive oral health screening and education. The adolescent girl is a future mother, so evaluating her utilization of oral health services could help to design programs that promote oral health awareness and encourage routine dental visits.

  11. Oral health status and treatment needs among Tanzanians of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A national oral health survey is a collection of standardized information on oral health from a specific national population or some sample. Basic oral health surveys are used to collect information about the oral health status and treatment needs of a population and subsequently to monitor changes in levels and patterns of ...

  12. Perceived oral health status and treatment needs of dental auxiliaries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-15

    Mar 15, 2010 ... health and the likelihood of seeking oral care to achieve optimal oral health status. Oral health problems can impact quality of life in several ways. Poor oral health may prevent children from expressing positive emotions, which can impact their social interactions and the way they feel about themselves. (7).

  13. Capitated contracting of integrated health provider organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzoli, G J; Dynan, L; Burns, L R

    This paper examines global capitation of integrated health provider organizations that link physicians and hospitals, such as physician-hospital organizations and management service organizations. These organizations have proliferated in recent years, but their contracting activity has not been studied. We develop a conceptual model to understand the capitated contracting bargaining process. Exploratory multivariate analysis suggests that global capitation of these organizations is more common in markets with high health maintenance organization (HMO) market share, greater numbers of HMOs, and fewer physician group practices. Additionally, health provider organizations with more complex case mix, nonprofit status, more affiliated physicians, health system affiliations, and diversity in physician organizational arrangements are more likely to have global capitation. Finally, state regulation of provider contracting with self-insured employers appears to have spillover effects on health plan risk contracting with health providers.

  14. The Oral Microbiome of Children: Development, Disease and Implications Beyond Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Andres; Nelson, Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    In the era of applied meta-omics and personalized medicine, the oral microbiome is a valuable asset. From biomarker discovery to being a powerful source of therapeutic targets, and to presenting an opportunity for developing non-invasive approaches to health care, it has become clear that oral microbes may hold the answer for understanding disease, even beyond the oral cavity. Although our understanding of oral microbiome diversity has come a long way in the past 50 years, there are still many areas that need to be fine-tuned for better risk assessment and diagnosis, especially in early developmental stages of human life. Here, we discuss the factors that impact development of the oral microbiome, and explore oral markers of disease, with a focus on the early oral cavity. Our ultimate goal is to put different experimental and methodological views into perspective for better assessment of early oral and systemic disease at an early age, and discuss how oral microbiomes- at the community level, could provide improved assessment in individuals, and populations at risk. PMID:27628595

  15. The Oral Microbiome of Children: Development, Disease, and Implications Beyond Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Andres; Nelson, Karen E

    2017-02-01

    In the era of applied meta-omics and personalized medicine, the oral microbiome is a valuable asset. From biomarker discovery to being a powerful source of therapeutic targets and to presenting an opportunity for developing non-invasive approaches to health care, it has become clear that oral microbes may hold the answer for understanding disease, even beyond the oral cavity. Although our understanding of oral microbiome diversity has come a long way in the past 50 years, there are still many areas that need to be fine-tuned for better risk assessment and diagnosis, especially in early developmental stages of human life. Here, we discuss the factors that impact development of the oral microbiome and explore oral markers of disease, with a focus on the early oral cavity. Our ultimate goal is to put different experimental and methodological views into perspective for better assessment of early oral and systemic disease at an early age and discuss how oral microbiomes-at the community level-could provide improved assessment in individuals and populations at risk.

  16. Self-rated oral health and oral health-related factors: the role of social inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, G; Armfield, J M; Jamieson, L M

    2014-06-01

    The reasons why social inequality is associated with oral health outcomes is poorly understood. This study investigated whether stratification by different measures of socio-economic status (SES) helped elucidate these associations. Cross-sectional survey data were used from Australia's 2004-06 National Survey of Adult Oral Health. The outcome variable was poor self-rated oral health. Explanatory variables comprised five domains: demographic, economic, general health behaviour, oral health-related quality of life and perceived need for dental care. These explanatory variables were each stratified by three measures of SES: education, income and occupation. The overall proportion of adults reporting fair or poor oral health was 17.0% (95% CI 16.1, 18.0). Of these, a higher proportion were older, Indigenous, non-Australian born, poorly educated, annual income care, smoked tobacco, avoided food in the last 12 months, experienced discomfort with their dental appearance, experienced toothache or reported a need for dental care. In stratified analyses, a greater number of differences persisted in the oral health impairment and perceived need for dental care domains. Irrespective of the SES measure used, more associations between self-rated oral health and dental-specific factors were observed than associations between self-rated oral health and general factors. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  17. A school-based public health model to reduce oral health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudovitz, Rebecca N; Valiente, Jonathan E; Espinosa, Gloria; Yepes, Claudia; Padilla, Cesar; Puffer, Maryjane; Slavkin, Harold C; Chung, Paul J

    2017-05-03

    Although dental decay is preventable, it remains the most common pediatric chronic disease. We describe a public health approach to implementing a scalable and sustainable school-based oral health program for low-income urban children. The Los Angeles Trust for Children's Health, a nonprofit affiliated with the Los Angeles Unified School District, applied a public health model and developed a broad-based community-coalition to a) establish a District Oral Health Nurse position to coordinate oral health services, and b) implement a universal school-based oral health screening and fluoride varnishing program, with referral to a dental home. Key informant interviews and focus groups informed program development. Parent surveys assessed preventative oral health behaviors and access to oral health services. Results from screening exams, program costs and rates of reimbursement were recorded. From 2012 to 2015, six elementary schools and three dental provider groups participated. Four hundred ninety-one parents received oral health education and 89 served as community oral health volunteers; 3,399 screenings and fluoride applications were performed on 2,776 children. Sixty-six percent of children had active dental disease, 27 percent had visible tooth decay, and 6 percent required emergent care. Of the 623 students who participated for two consecutive years, 56 percent had fewer or no visible caries at follow-up, while only 17 percent had additional disease. Annual program cost was $69.57 per child. Using a broad based, oral health coalition, a school-based universal screening and fluoride varnishing program can improve the oral health of children with a high burden of untreated dental diseases. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  18. A competency matrix for global oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzian, Habib; Greenspan, John S; Barrow, Jane; Hutter, Jeffrey W; Loomer, Peter M; Stauf, Nicole; Perry, Dorothy A

    2015-04-01

    The Lancet Commission on Education of Health Professionals for the 21(st) Century calls for enhancing health education for the needs and challenges of the 21st century to improve health status globally. To complement the Lancet report, this article makes recommendations for including core global health competencies in the education of health care professionals and specific groups of the public who are relevant to oral health in a global context in order to tackle the burden of oral diseases. Experts from various professional backgrounds developed global oral health competencies for four target groups: Group 1 was defined as dental students, residents/trainee specialists (or equivalent), and dentists; Group 2 was community health workers, dental hygienists, and dental therapists (or the equivalent); Group 3 was health professionals such as physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists; and Group 4 was non-health professionals in the public arena such as parents, teachers, decision makers, key opinion leaders, and health and consumer advocates. Key competencies for members of each of the four target groups are presented in a matrix. The suggested competency matrix shows that many other health professions and groups in society have potentially crucial roles in the prevention, control, and management of oral diseases globally. Workforce models including a wider range of professionals working together as a team will be needed to tackle the burden of oral diseases in an integrated way in the broader context of non-communicable diseases. Further discussion and research should be conducted to validate or improve the competencies proposed here with regard to their relevance, appropriateness, and completeness.

  19. Combined oral contraceptives: health benefits beyond contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, D; Ralli, E; Matteucci, E; Bordi, G; Mallozzi, M; Moscarini, M

    2014-09-01

    It has been recognized for over 50 years that combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are also capable of offering health benefits beyond contraception through the treatment and prevention of several gynaecological and medical disorders. During the last years a constant attention was given to the adverse effects of COCs, whereas their non-contraceptive benefits were underestimated. To date, most women are still unaware of the therapeutic uses of hormonal contraceptives, while on the contrary there is an extensive and constantly increasing of these non-contraceptive health benefits. This review summarizes the conditions of special interest for physicians, including dysmenorrhoea, menorrhagia, hyperandrogenism (acne, hirsutism, polycystic ovary syndrome), functional ovarian cysts, endometriosis, premenstrual syndrome, myomas, pelvic inflammatory disease, bone mineral density, benign breast disease and endometrial/ovarian and colorectal cancer. The benefits of COCs in rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, menstrual migraine and in perimenopause have also been treated for more comprehensive information. Using COCs specifically for non-contraceptive indications is still outside the product licence in the majority of cases. We strongly believe that these aspects are not of minor relevance and they deserve a special consideration by health providers and by the mass media, which have the main responsibility in the diffusion of scientific information. Thus, counseling and education are necessary to help women make well-informed health-care decisions and it is also crucial to increase awareness among general practitioners and gynaecologists.

  20. Assessment of relationship between oral health behavior, oral hygiene and gingival status of dental students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsheen Lalani

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Thus, it is concluded that there is a significant relationship between the oral health behavior, oral hygiene, and gingival status of dental students. Dental students with better self-reported oral health behavior had lower plaque and gingival scores indicating a better attitude toward oral health.

  1. Need for Oral Health Policy in India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and periodontal disease deteriorates the individual health ... that a number of individual, professional, and community preventive measures are effective in preventing most oral diseases. In developing countries, there is a ... Dental diseases are a significant public health menace having a substantial impact on the quality.

  2. Prebiotics and Probiotics and Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurman, J. H.

    The first part of this chapter describes the unique characteristics of the mouth with special emphasis on the oral microbiota. Next, the highly prevalent dental diseases are briefly described together with more rare but still important diseases and symptoms of the mouth. Prevention and treatment of oral and dental diseases are also discussed focusing on aspects considered important with respect to the potential application of prebiotics and probiotics. The second part of the chapter then concentrates on research data on prebiotics and probiotics in the oral health perspective, ending up with conclusions and visions for future research.

  3. Knowledge and Attitude of Medical Nurses toward Oral Health and Oral Health Care of Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Suzana; Saddki, Norkhafizah; Yusoff, Azizah

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the knowledge and attitudes of medical nurses regarding oral health and oral health care of pregnant women. This cross sectional study of 133 nurses in the district of Tumpat, Kelantan (Malaysia) used self-administered questionnaires. Most nurses knew that dental plaque is associated with periodontal disease (97.7%). However, most nurses erroneously believed that tooth decay (86.5%) and excessive sugar consumption (87.2%) led to periodontal disease. About half of the nurses knew about the relationship between periodontal disease of pregnant women and low birth weight (43.6%) and preterm birth (48.9%). Many nurses had the misconception that the developing foetus draws calcium from the mothers' teeth (78.2%). Most nurses had good attitudes toward improving their oral health knowledge (97.0%) and agreed they should help to deliver oral health education to pregnant women (94.0%). Age, length of service as a nurse, and length of service in antenatal care had no effect on the scores for the nurses' knowledge and attitude regarding oral health and oral health care of pregnant women. Medical nurses had limited knowledge about oral health of pregnant women and had some misunderstandings about oral health, although they had good attitudes. Age, length of service as a nurse, and length service in antenatal care had no effect on the knowledge and attitude scores of the nurses.

  4. Impact of inhalation therapy on oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Navneet Godara; Ramya Godara; Megha Khullar

    2011-01-01

    Inhalation therapy has been employed as the mainstay of the treatment in chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Beta-2 agonists, anticholinergic bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, and sodium cromoglycate are often used alone or in combination in an inhaled form. Studies have shown that inhaled drugs used in the treatment have some adverse effects on the oral health based on their dosage, frequency, and duration of use. Several oral...

  5. Self-Esteem, Oral Health Behaviours, and Clinical Oral Health Status in Chinese Adults: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Luzy Siu-Hei; Chan, Joanne Chung-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This is an exploratory study to examine the relations among self-esteem, oral health behaviours and clinical oral health status in Chinese adults. In addition, gender differences in clinical oral health status and oral health behaviours were explored. Methods: Participants were 192 patients from a private dental clinic in Hong Kong…

  6. Global policy for improvement of oral health in the 21st century--implications to oral health research of World Health Assembly 2007, World Health Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik

    2009-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Global Oral Health Programme has worked hard over the past 5 years to increase the awareness of oral health worldwide as oral health is important component of general health and quality of life. Meanwhile, oral disease is still a major public health problem...... in high income countries and the burden of oral disease is growing in many low- and middle income countries. In the World Oral Health Report 2003, the WHO Global Oral Health Programme formulated the policies and necessary actions to the continuous improvement of oral health. The strategy is that oral...... disease prevention and the promotion of oral health needs to be integrated with chronic disease prevention and general health promotion as the risks to health are linked. The World Health Assembly (WHA) and the Executive Board (EB) are supreme governance bodies of WHO and for the first time in 25 years...

  7. Asthma and Its Impacts on Oral Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Keleş

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and reversible airflow obstruction. Genetic factors and environmental factors may play a role in the etiology of asthma. An approximately 300 million people worldwide have been diagnosed with asthma and there may be an additional 100 million diagnosis by 2025. Studies conducted in Turkey reported a prevalence between 1.5% and 9.4%. In the literature, there are many studies investigating the impacts of the medications used for asthma, which has a tendency to increase in our country and in the world, on oral health. However, no consensus has yet been established regarding whether these medications affect oral health. It is important to have knowledge about the impacts of asthma medications on oral and dental health and to take the necessary precautions in order to maintain oral and dental health. In this review, in addition to investigation of the impact of asthma medications on oral health, possible measures that can be taken were also evaluated.

  8. Autism spectrum disorders: an update on oral health management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Roopa P; Klein, Ulrich

    2014-06-01

    Dental professionals caring for patients with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) will need to provide oral health care based on a family-centered approach that involves a comprehensive understanding of parental concerns and preferences, as well as the unique medical management, behaviors, and needs of the individual patient. With the rising prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), oral health providers will find themselves increasingly likely to care for these patients in their daily practice. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive update on the medical and oral health management of patients with autism spectrum disorders. The authors conducted a literature review by searching for relevant articles written in English in the PubMed database pertaining to the medical and oral health management of autism, including caries status, preventive, behavioral, trauma, and restorative considerations. A detailed family centered approach based on parental preferences and concerns, the patient's challenging behaviors, and related comorbidities can serve to improve the treatment planning and oral health management of dental patients with ASD. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  9. Effectiveness of oral health education among primary health care workers at the primary health center in Nellore district, Andhra Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthyala Pavana Sandhya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary dental care can be a way of achieving good oral health for the community. This can be achieved by integration of oral health care with the existing primary health care activities through training of primary health care workers on aspects of oral health. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of oral health education among primary health care workers at the primary health center (PHC in Nellore district, Andhra Pradesh. Materials and Methods: Descriptive longitudinal study was conducted from June 2010 to August 2010 at a PHC. Knowledge about oral health among primary health care workers was pretested using a self-administered questionnaire prepared in local language (Telugu. Later after a month health education was provided to the health workers, and pamphlets with information on oral health were distributed. Posttest assessment was done 1-month after providing health education using the same questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS 12.0 software, Student′s t-test was used to compare knowledge scores between pre and posttests. Results: A total of 118 Primary Health Care Workers with the majority in the 20-30 years age group participated in the study. Posttest assessment showed a change in knowledge level with an overall increase in knowledge level of primary health care workers with a mean difference of 12.56 ± 3.23, which was highly significant (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The knowledge about oral health was poor, and it improved after providing health education to primary health care workers. Change in knowledge was appreciable and may play a key role in oral health promotion of the vast majority of the rural population.

  10. Oral health status among 12 and 15 year old children from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The assessment of oral health status of children in government and private schools provide data on the oral health status of children from different socio‑economic background. Aim: The aim of the following study is to assess and to compare the oral hygiene status, gingival status and caries experience between ...

  11. Probiotics for oral health: myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifait, Laetitia; Chandad, Fatiha; Grenier, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    For some decades now, bacteria known as probiotics have been added to various foods because of their beneficial effects for human health. The mechanism of action of probiotics is related to their ability to compete with pathogenic microorganisms for adhesion sites, to antagonize these pathogens or to modulate the host"s immune response. The potential application of probiotics for oral health has recently attracted the attention of several teams of researchers. Although only a few clinical studies have been conducted so far, the results to date suggest that probiotics could be useful in preventing and treating oral infections, including dental caries, periodontal disease and halitosis. This article summarizes the currently available data on the potential benefits of probiotics for oral health.

  12. Powered versus manual toothbrushing for oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaacob, Munirah; Worthington, Helen V; Deacon, Scott A; Deery, Chris; Walmsley, A Damien; Robinson, Peter G; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2014-06-17

    Removing dental plaque may play a key role maintaining oral health. There is conflicting evidence for the relative merits of manual and powered toothbrushing in achieving this. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2003, and previously updated in 2005. To compare manual and powered toothbrushes in everyday use, by people of any age, in relation to the removal of plaque, the health of the gingivae, staining and calculus, dependability, adverse effects and cost. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 23 January 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 23 January 2014), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 23 January 2014) and CINAHL via EBSCO (1980 to 23 January 2014). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials of at least four weeks of unsupervised powered toothbrushing versus manual toothbrushing for oral health in children and adults. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Random-effects models were used provided there were four or more studies included in the meta-analysis, otherwise fixed-effect models were used. Data were classed as short term (one to three months) and long term (greater than three months). Fifty-six trials met the inclusion criteria; 51 trials involving 4624 participants provided data for meta-analysis. Five trials were at low risk of bias, five at high and 46 at unclear risk of bias.There is moderate quality evidence that powered toothbrushes provide a statistically significant benefit compared with manual toothbrushes with regard to the reduction of plaque in both the short term (standardised mean difference (SMD) -0

  13. Oral health status of school children in Mbarara, Uganda | Batwala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The oral hygiene of school children was poor with high plaque prevalence demonstrating a lack of established oral hygiene practices. A comprehensive community-focused oral health care intervention that includes oral health education in homes and the strengthening of school health programme is needed to ...

  14. Perception of Iranian Mothers about Oral Health of Their School-Children: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Momeni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Oral health is an important aspect of general health and well-being for children. Understanding the viewpoint of mothers about children's oral health provides a basis for the development of interventions to improve oral care and disease prevention. The purpose of this study was to explore the perception of Iranian mothers regarding the oral health of their children.Materials and Methods: This descriptive qualitative study was the first phase of an exploratory mixed method design and collected data from April to May 2015 in Tehran, Iran. The qualitative data were collected through seven focus group discussions and three semi-structured interviews. The participants were 58 Iranian women who had a first grader. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis.Results: The main themes identified from the data were: (I the definition of oral health, (II the importance of maintaining oral health and dental treatment, (III the effect of nutrition on children’s oral health, (IV the role of oral health behaviors, (V the causes of dental caries and malocclusion/crowding, (VI the symptoms and causes of gum disease, (VII the causes of halitosis.Conclusions: According to the mothers' perception, the main factors influencing children's oral health were: nutrition and oral health behaviors such as daily tooth brushing and flossing. The results of this study can be used to develop a model of oral health education and a prevention program for improving oral health among Iranian school-children.

  15. Perception of Iranian Mothers About Oral Health of Their School-Children: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Zahra; Yazdani, Reza; Sighaldeh, Shirin Shahbazi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Oral health is an important aspect of general health and well-being for children. Understanding the viewpoint of mothers about children’s oral health provides a basis for the development of interventions to improve oral care and disease prevention. The purpose of this study was to explore the perception of Iranian mothers regarding the oral health of their children. Materials and Methods: This descriptive qualitative study was the first phase of an exploratory mixed method design and collected data from April to May 2015 in Tehran, Iran. The qualitative data were collected through seven focus group discussions and three semi-structured interviews. The participants were 58 Iranian women who had a first grader. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Results: The main themes identified from the data were: (I) the definition of oral health, (II) the importance of maintaining oral health and dental treatment, (III) the effect of nutrition on children’s oral health, (IV) the role of oral health behaviors, (V) the causes of dental caries and malocclusion/crowding, (VI) the symptoms and causes of gum disease, (VII) the causes of halitosis. Conclusions: According to the mothers’ perception, the main factors influencing children’s oral health were: nutrition and oral health behaviors such as daily tooth brushing and flossing. The results of this study can be used to develop a model of oral health education and a prevention program for improving oral health among Iranian school-children. PMID:29285028

  16. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health.

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Estupinan-Day, Saskia; Ndiaye, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions and oropha...

  17. Improving Oral Health Status of Children in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad D. Baghdadi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This comprehensive community health intervention aimed to improve the oral health and reduce the incidence of dental caries in Tabuk schoolchildren. The program supports the public health pyramid that provides a framework to improve health and included creating and evaluating a school oral health surveillance system, applying fluoride varnish and dental sealants on high- and medium-caries risk children, and providing treatment for existing diseases. In a pilot phase, 48 children (26 males 22 females; mean age 6.42; dmft 9.33, Decayed, Missing, or Filled Primary and Permanent Teeth (DMFT 3.27 received the dental services, both treatment and prevention. Three hundred seventy-eight composite resin or resin-modified light-cured glass ionomer restorations were placed. One-hundred and eighteen teeth received pulp therapy (pulpotomy or pulpectomy, ten of which received stainless steel crowns. A total of 72 teeth were extracted due to caries. To understand the effects of dental disease on children, as perceived by parents, an oral health-related quality of life survey was completed and analyzed. Results found an underestimation of the role the teeth play, particularly primary teeth, in the general health and wellbeing of the child. The program’s main evaluation effort focused on the process and outcome objectives, including the number of children received care, number of teeth received restorations and sealants, and number of children received fluoride varnish, etc. Analyzing the effect of the program on oral hygiene revealed an improvement in oral health, as a direct result of oral health educational sessions and one-to-one counseling. There is an urgent need to expand the program to include all primary schools.

  18. Oral 30% glucose provides sufficient sedation in newborns during MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eker, H Evren; Cok, Oya Yalcin; Çetinkaya, Bilin; Aribogan, Anis

    2017-04-01

    Newborns are often sedated during MRI but sedation itself creates adverse events and management is more challenging in this environment. Oral glucose/sucrose administration has been studied in newborns during painful procedures; however, its effectiveness in keeping newborns sleepy and motionlessness during painless procedures has not been demonstrated. The objective of this study was to describe effectiveness of oral 30% glucose administration by comparing with intravenous midazolam sedation for newborns during MRI. One hundred twelve ASA II-III newborns who required care in the ICU and were scheduled for MRI with sedation were included. Group I received 30% glucose solution orally with 0.5-1 ml increments up to 2 ml/3 kg doses and group II received intravenous 0.1 mg/kg midazolam with 0.05 mg/kg repetition. The procedure was considered satisfactory when MRI images were not disturbed by patient movement after oral glucose or intravenous midazolam administration. The efficiency of the techniques, additional dose and rescue sedation requirements, blood glucose levels following oral 30% glucose suckling and presence of adverse events were recorded. Demographic data was similar between groups. The efficiency of the procedures were similar between groups (78.9%, in group I and 66.1%, in group II). The blood glucose levels were within normal range in group I whereas transient desaturation and apnea occurred in 8 neonates in group II (p = 0.006). Oral 30% glucose administration for newborns during MRI is as effective as standard sedation protocol with midazolam. Thereby, we recommend and support the integration of this safe and reliable technique into routine practice for newborns during MRI.

  19. Ethics and leadership in children's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouradian, Wendy E

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews key ethical precepts in health care for children, and explores how interpretations of justice predict different and sometimes conflicting approaches to children's dental needs. Ethics is a core competency for health professionals because of their special responsibilities toward patients and the public. Ethical principles guiding health professionals include: (1) beneficence; (2) nonmaleficence; (3) respect for autonomy; and (4) justice. Different theories of justice lead to different responses toward public needs, such as access to dental care. The most frequently encountered response in the dental community is volunteerism, consistent with the libertarian perspective on justice. Though desirable, volunteerism alone will never solve dental access issues because such efforts do not address the problems systematically. A policy statement of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) explicitly recognizes that children have a right to oral health care. Children's unique characteristics--their vulnerability, dependence, and developmental processes-call for special arrangements to address their health needs. Given the importance of children to society, it is critical that all health sectors work together to address children's health and well-being. However, those with the greatest knowledge of children's oral health needs-pediatric dentists-must take a leadership role in creating and supporting solutions to these needs. The AAPD has an opportunity to support systemic solutions at the state and national level to ensure that all children have access to oral health care. One example of a systemic solution is the Access to Baby and Child Dentistry (ABCD) program in Washington State.

  20. Seafaring: a risk for seamen's oral health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holttinen, T; Saarni, H; Murtomaa, H; Pentti, J; Alvesalo, I

    1995-10-01

    Information about the oral status and dental health behavior and the working history of 369 Finnish seamen on different types of ships was gathered by means of a questionnaire. A control group of workers on shore was formed for sailors 35-44 years of age. Removable dentures were worn by 16% of the seamen. Oral disorders during the week before the study were reported by one-third. During the previous 2 years 14% of the sailors had had at least one episode of oral troubles, 15% twice and 9% three or even more times. One-third of seamen with oral trouble had needed pain-killing tablets or antibiotics. Sick leave days had been needed by 3% of respondents during the previous 2 years because of oral disorder (mean length of sick leave period was 1.4 days). The control group reported gum bleeding more often than the seafarers. Even though there were no signs of poorer dental condition in sailors than in the controls on shore, the possibility that the seafaring could constitute a risk for the oral health of seamen in other age groups cannot be excluded.

  1. Subjective oral health in Dutch adults

    OpenAIRE

    Verrips, G.H.W.; Schuller, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether the subjective oral health (SOH) of the Dutch adult population was associated with clinical and demographic variables. Methods: A clinical examination was conducted in a sample of 1,018 people from the Dutch city of ‘s-Hertogenbosch. SOH was measured using the Dutch translation of the short form of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-NL14). Results: The average score on the OHIP-NL14 was 2.8 ± 5.9 and 51% of the respondents had a score of 0. Dental status was the mo...

  2. Oral health care systems in developing and developed countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandelman, Daniel; Arpin, Sophie; Baez, Ramon J

    2012-01-01

    and illness in the future can be identified, and further, how controlling such factors can contribute to maintain a good quality of life. In developed countries, clinics or hospitals may be supported by health professionals from various specialties that allow their cooperation to benefit the patient...... programmes in order to improve oral health conditions and particularly periodontal status in the majority of countries around the world is evident. Unfortunately, in many countries, the human, financial and material resources are still insufficient to meet the need for oral health care services...... and to provide universal access, especially in disadvantaged communities, in both developing and developed countries. Moreover, even though the most widespread illnesses are avoidable, not all population groups are well informed about or able to take advantage of the proper measures for oral health promotion...

  3. Oral Health, Nutritional Choices, and Dental Fear and Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R. Beaudette

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral health is an integral part of overall health. Poor oral health can lead to an increased risk of chronic diseases including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and some types of cancer. The etiology of these diseases could be linked to the individual’s inability to eat a healthy diet when their dentition is compromised. While periodontal or implant surgery may be necessary to reconstruct tissue around natural teeth or replace missing teeth, respectively, some individuals avoid such interventions because of their associated fear and anxiety. Thus, while the relationship between poor oral health, compromised nutritional choices and fear and anxiety regarding periodontal procedures is not entirely new, this review provides an up-to-date summary of literature addressing aspects of this complex relationship. This review also identifies potential strategies for clinicians to help their patients overcome their fear and anxiety associated with dental treatment, and allow them to seek the care they need.

  4. Oral health promotion for institutionalised elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L; Wight, C; Clemson, N

    1989-01-01

    ; 2) active involvement of residents only; 3) active involvement of both residents and staff. The programme comprised three 1-h sessions at monthly intervals in groups of five to six residents or members of staff. The analysis of the results showed poor oral health and oral hygiene, high objective......The purpose of the present study was to develop and evaluate educational approaches specifically for improvement of oral hygiene behaviour amongst institutionalised elderly. A sample of 201 residents, 48-99 yr of age (mean age 82 yr), was selected from four different institutions in Lothian...... need for oral care but low perceived need. The programme had little impact on most of the included variables and only about half of the participants remembered the programme 2 months after its termination. The implications of the study are that groups of elderly need to be differentiated further so...

  5. ASTDD Synopses of State Oral Health Programs - Selected indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2011-2017. The ASTDD Synopses of State Oral Health Programs contain information useful in tracking states’ efforts to improve oral health and contributions to...

  6. The influence of epigenetics in relation to oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lod, S; Johansson, T; Abrahamsson, K H; Larsson, L

    2014-02-01

    The immune response is influenced by genetic and epigenetic factors, as well as disease and environmental factors. The term 'epigenetics' describes changes in the genome that influence the gene expression without altering the DNA sequence. In contrast to genetic changes in the DNA, epigenetic changes are reversible and are influenced by environmental factors. The aim of this study is to review the literature on epigenetic modifications with respect to oral health and inflammatory conditions in the oral cavity and to discuss the potential use of this new research field for the dental hygienists' and/or dentists' clinical work. Relevant publications were identified using the PubMed database without limits. The searches were conducted during January to March 2012 and resulted in articles published between 1912 and 2012. Key factors such as environment, diet, smoking, bacteria and inflammation were identified to be relevant to oral health. The result of this review article shows that there is a void in the research on epigenetics in relation to oral health. Identification of epigenetic modifications correlating with oral health may not only present a link between the influence of genetics and that of the environment on oral diseases but also provide new treatment models and tools for the dental professionals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Oral health literacy and oral health outcomes in an adult population in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Jesus Batista

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the association between critical and communicative oral health literacy (OHL and oral health outcomes (status, oral health-related quality of life and practices in adults. Methods This cross-sectional study examined a household probability sample of 248 adults, representing 149,635 residents (20–64 years old in Piracicaba-SP, Brazil. Clinical oral health and socioeconomic and demographic data, as well as data on oral health-related quality of life (OHIP-14 and health practices were collected. The oral examinations were carried out in the participants’ homes, using the World Health Organization criteria for oral diseases. The critical and communicative OHL instrument was the primary independent variable, and it was measured using five Likert items that were dichotomized as ‘high’ (‘agree’ and ‘strongly agree’ responses for the 5 items and ‘low’ OHL. Binary and multinomial logistic regressions were performed on each outcome (oral health status and practices, controlling for age, sex and socioeconomic status (SES. Results Approximately 71.5% presented low OHL. When adjusted for age and sex (first model low OHL was associated with untreated caries (Odds Ratio = 1.92, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.07–3.45, tooth brushing <3 times a day (OR = 2.00, 1.11–3.62 and irregular tooth flossing (OR = 2.17, 1.24–3.80. After SES inclusion in the first model, significant associations were found for low OHL when the outcomes were: presence of biofilm (OR = 1.83, 1.08–3.33, dental care for emergency only (OR = 2.24, 1.24–4.04 and prevalence of oral health impact on quality of life (OR = 2.06, 1.15–3.69. Conclusion Adjusting for age, sex and SES, OHL is related to a risk factor (biofilm and a consequence of poor oral health (emergency dental visits and can interfere with the impact of oral diseases on quality of life. As low OHL can be modified, the results support oral health promotion

  8. Mobile Applications for Mental Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganstein, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets have fundamentally changed the ways in which we interact with information. Far more than communication devices, smartphones and tablets are now indispensable tools in the pocket of healthcare providers. Mobile mental health applications (apps) provide instant access to up-to-date information on prevention, assessment and treatment. Self-help apps allow patients to take greater ownership of their own health and well-being. The past decade has seen an extraordinarily rapid proliferation of mobile medical apps. Though thousands of apps now exist, the challenge for healthcare providers and consumers alike has become sorting through mobile apps for those which provide accurate content delivered in the most user-friendly format. This article will review six mobile apps that can assist healthcare providers and consumers interested in enhancing mental health.

  9. Nursing students' practice in providing oral hygiene for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Ann

    To explore and identify precedent factors that may influence nursing students' oral hygiene practice in hospitalised patients, by using an adaptation of the Precede Model. A quantitative approach with a descriptive design was adopted in this pilot study. A questionnaire was designed and implemented as a self-report method of data collection. A convenience sample of 37 second-year diploma nursing students in an Irish teaching hospital participated in the study. The clinical area and the practices within it are influential factors in the provision of oral hygiene. Students are exposed to and influenced by outdated and non-research-based practices. Role modelling is an effective means of motivating and reinforcing student practices. However, qualified nurses' practices need to be critically reviewed before assuming that they can act as role models in assisting students to implement research-based oral hygiene. Formal education, current practices, socialisation and role modelling may influence students' behaviour in relation to oral hygiene. The results should be tentatively reviewed by clinical staff as an indication of current practices.

  10. [A PhD completed. Oral health care and oral health-related quality of life of frail and care-dependent older people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesten, D

    2017-11-01

    When older people become frail, they often give up making dental visits, while their oral health care and oral health deteriorate. Open interviews and questionnaires were used to explore why frail older people change their oral health care behaviour and which (frailty-related) factors contribute to this change. These are mainly motivation-related factors. There seems to be a turning point where frail older people discontinue their oral health care routines and stop caring whether or not they loose teeth, because the perceived efforts no longer outweigh the perceived benefits of making dental visits and upkeep of oral hygiene. The use of standard questionnaires such as the validated Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index-NL to measure oral health-related quality of life is limited, because they do not provide personal context required to interpret the outcomes. From a pre-frail stage (oral) care providers should monitor specific factors that might negatively affect oral health and oral health care behaviour, like chronic pain or diminished mobility, dexterity, cognition, will to live, energy and social support.

  11. Oral health in the agenda of priorities in public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Leopoldo Ferreira Antunes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study describes the scientific production on oral health diffused in Revista de Saúde Pública, in the 50 years of its publication. A narrative review study was carried out using PubMed, as it is the search database that indexes all issues of the journal. From 1967 to 2015, 162 manuscripts specifically focused on oral health themes were published. This theme was present in all volumes of the journal, with increasing participation over the years. Dental caries was the most studied theme, constantly present in the journal since its first issue. Periodontal disease, fluorosis, malocclusions, and other themes emerged even before the decline of dental caries indicators. Oral health policy is the most recurring theme in the last two decades. Revista de Saúde Pública has been an important vehicle for dissemination, communication, and reflection on oral health, contributing in a relevant way to the technical-scientific interaction between professionals in this field.

  12. The impact of home-prepared diets and home oral hygiene on oral health in cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Catherine; Colyer, Alison; Skrzywanek, Michal; Jodkowska, Katarzyna; Kurski, Grzegorz; Gawor, Jerzy; Ceregrzyn, Michal

    2011-10-01

    Many factors influence the oral health status of cats and dogs. The present study aimed to elucidate the influence of feeding home-prepared (HP) food v. commercial pet food on oral health parameters in these animals and to investigate the effect of home oral hygiene on oral health. The study surveyed 17,184 dogs and 6371 cats visiting over 700 Polish veterinary surgeries in 2006-7 during a Pet Smile activity organised by the Polish Small Animal Veterinary Association. All animals underwent conscious examinations to assess dental deposits, size of mandibular lymph nodes and gingival health. An oral health index (OHI) ranging from 0 to 8 was calculated for each animal by combining examination scores, where 0 indicates good oral health and 8 indicates poorest oral health. Information was collected on age, diet and home oral hygiene regimens. There was a significant effect of diet on the OHI (P diet increased the probability of an oral health problem in both cats and dogs. There was a significant beneficial effect of feeding only commercial pet food compared with the HP diet when at least part of the diet was composed of dry pet food. Daily tooth brushing or the offering of daily dental treats were both effective in significantly reducing the OHI in both cats and dogs compared with those receiving sporadic or no home oral hygiene. Feeding only a dry diet was beneficial for oral health in cats and dogs. Tooth brushing and the offering of dental treats were very effective in maintaining oral health, provided they were practised daily.

  13. [Focus on the recent state policy for oral health in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X N; Gao, X J; Guo, C B; Yu, G Y

    2017-06-09

    President Xi presented an important address in the National Health and Wellness Conference and the high strategic priority for promoting people's health in China was emphasized. Thereafter, a number of documents of state policy on health and wellness were issued successively. These documents covered important contents on oral health, which had great significance as a milestone. This article reviewed the documentation process and analyzed the key points on oral health. The release of these series of government documents had provided policy support for integrating oral health into significant health policies, building the first barrier for oral health, preventing and treating oral diseases based on strategies for common risk factors, adopting strategies to combine both the whole population and high-risk groups, and developing health-centered oral massive health industry, etc.

  14. Adult Dental Health Survey 2009: implications of findings for clinical practice and oral health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, R G; Steele, J G; Treasure, E T; White, D A; Pitts, N B; Murray, J J

    2013-01-01

    This is the final paper in a series reporting on the results of the 2009 Adult Dental Health Survey. Since 1968 national adult surveys have been repeated every decade with broadly similar methods providing a unique overview of trends in oral health over a 40-year period. This paper aims to explore the implications for dentists and oral health policy of the key results from the Adult Dental Health Survey 2009. Although repeat, cross-sectional, epidemiological surveys provide very valuable data on trends in disease patterns, they do not provide answers to test causal relationships and therefore cannot identify the causes for the significant improvements in oral health over the last 40 years. Evidence would indicate, however, that broad societal shifts in population norms and behaviours, combined with changes in clinical diagnostic criteria, treatment planning and clinical procedures are the main reasons for the changes that have taken place. Key implications of the survey results include the need to monitor, support and maintain the good state of oral health of the increasing proportion of younger adults with relatively simple treatment needs. A smaller number of young and middle aged adults but a significant proportion of older adults will have far more complex treatment needs requiring advanced restorative and periodontal care. Future oral health policy will need to address oral health inequalities, encourage skill mix and promote and facilitate the dental profession to deliver appropriate and high quality care relevant to the needs of their local population.

  15. The oral cavity as a guide for the application of low level laser energy and its direct effect on the autonomic nervous system providing true energy healing for all health practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolin, Herbert S.

    2008-03-01

    This manuscript is intended to demonstrate the important role that dentistry plays in regulating the balance of the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) through the proprioceptive feedback of the posterior teeth to the brain. An old paradigm called Dental Distress Syndrome, relatively unknown in dentistry today, has at its core, the importance of the height of the posterior (back) teeth and its impact on total body health which is greatly aided by low level laser energy. The rationale behind the belief that the alteration of the posterior teeth affects the ANS begins with basic concepts in embryology. The functioning of the ANS will support the fact of Dental Distress Syndrome. Health practitioners of all disciplines can learn to recognize Dental Distress Syndrome and initiate non-invasive treatment and team with a trained dentist to enhance the wellness and health of the patient if they so desire. A synopsis of my oral paper presented to the Academy of Laser Dentistry demonstrating temporary balancing of the Autonomic Nervous System with three minutes of cold laser energy, as well as my rationale as to why results vary with different cold lasers will be discussed. Clinical case studies will be presented.

  16. An oral health literacy intervention for Indigenous adults in a rural setting in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Eleanor J; Misan, Gary; Chong, Alwin; Mills, Helen; Roberts-Thomson, Kaye; Horowitz, Alice M; Jamieson, Lisa M

    2012-06-20

    health literacy intervention to improve oral health literacy-related outcomes amongst rural-dwelling Indigenous adults. Outcomes of this study will have implications for policy and planning by providing evidence for the effectiveness of such interventions as well as provide a model for working with Indigenous communities.

  17. An oral health literacy intervention for Indigenous adults in a rural setting in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Eleanor J

    2012-06-01

    . Discussion This study uses a functional, context-specific oral health literacy intervention to improve oral health literacy-related outcomes amongst rural-dwelling Indigenous adults. Outcomes of this study will have implications for policy and planning by providing evidence for the effectiveness of such interventions as well as provide a model for working with Indigenous communities.

  18. Polyelectrolyte Biomaterial Interactions Provide Nanoparticulate Carrier for Oral Insulin Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Catarina Pinto; Ribeiro, António J.; Veiga, Francisco; Neufeld, Ronald J.; Damgé, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Nanospheres are being developed for the oral delivery of peptide-based drugs such as insulin. Mucoadhesive, biodegradable, biocompatible, and acid-protective biomaterials are described using a combination of natural polyelectrolytes, with particles formulated through nanoemulsion dispersion followed by triggered in situgel complexation. Biomaterials meeting these criteria include alginate, dextran, chitosan, and albumin in which alginate/dextran forms the core matrix complexed with chitosan a...

  19. Adoption of oral health curriculum by physician assistant education programs in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelier, Margaret H; Glicken, Anita Duhl; Surdu, Simona

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe inclusion of didactic and clinical instruction in oral health in physician assistant (PA) education programs in 2014. A previous study in 2008 found that PA education program directors generally understood the importance of teaching about the linkage of oral health with systemic health; yet, few programs had actually integrated oral health instruction into the PA curriculum. This study was undertaken to ascertain the number of PA programs teaching oral health topics and to evaluate the content of instruction and implementation strategies. The study used a Web-based survey using a skip logic design that branched respondents based on inclusion or the absence of an oral health curriculum in the PA education program. The questions included predefined response options with the opportunity for narrative responses and comments. Analysis of survey data was completed using SPSS (IBM) and SAS (SAS Institute, Inc) and consisted mainly of frequencies and cross tabulations. There was greater inclusion of oral health curriculum in 2014 than in 2008 with most PA programs now providing didactic and clinical training in oral health. Stakeholders' efforts to engage PA program faculty with integration of oral health subject matter into core curriculum have resulted in wider availability of training for PA students in oral health promotion and prevention services. Efforts to equip PA faculty to teach oral health topics and clinical skills should continue as past efforts have resulted in wider integration of oral health subject matter into core PA curriculum.

  20. Probiotics and oral health effects in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Probiotics are living micro-organisms added to food which beneficially affect the host by improving its intestinal microbial balance. OBJECTIVE: This paper aims to present a general background on probiotics and its health effects in children, and to examine the evidence for oral colon...

  1. Impact of rare diseases in oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-García, A; Castellanos-Cosano, L; Machuca-Portillo, G; Posada-de la Paz, M

    2016-09-01

    Rare diseases (RD) are those that present a lower prevalence than 5 cases per 10.000 population. The main objective of this review was to study the effect on oral health in rare diseases, while the secondary objective of the study is theme upgrade. Comparative observational case-control studies were analysed and a systematic review was conducted in PubMed. Each rare disease listed on the statistical data record of the Health Portal of the Ministry of Equality, Health and Social Policies Board of Andalusia was associated with "oral health". The variables studied included dental, oral mucosa and occlusion alterations, oral pathologies (caries, periodontal disease) and other alterations (mouth breathing, parafunctional habits, etc). A bias analysis of the variable caries was conducted. Six RD were selected through our inclusion and exclusion criteria (hypogammaglobulinemia, Rett syndrome, Marfan syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, cystic fibrosis and Cri du chat syndrome) in a total of 8 publications, of which four trials were classified as high risk of bias and one of them as medium risk. There were not trials with low risk of bias. The main statistically significant differences found by Syndrome compared to a control group were in Hypogammaglobulinemia with a greater tendency to enamel hypoplasia and dry mouth. The Rett syndrome had, as well, a greater tendency to an anterior open bite, ogival palate, bruxism, mouth breathing and tongue thrusting. Prader-Willi syndrome had a tendency of dental erosion, and Cri du chat syndrome showed a higher association to Tannerella forsythia.

  2. Probiotics and oral health: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, K; Kuttappa, M A; Prasana, K R

    2014-02-01

    Probiotics are micro-organisms, principally bacteria, which, when ingested, confer health benefits beyond basic nutrition. Probiotics have been extensively studied for their health promoting effects. The main feld of research has been focussed on the gastro-intestinal tract. However, in the past few years probiotics have also been investigated from an oral health perspective and their use has shown promising results with respect to control of chronic conditions, such as dental caries, periodontitis, halitosis and candidial infections. Despite the immense potential of probiotics, hardly any randomised, controlled trials have been conducted on their action and application and studies on their effects on oral health are still in early stages. Hence, more research is needed before any evidence-based conclusions can be drawn. This paper considers some recent literature and insights on which further investigations could be based.

  3. Page 1 Provisional of Oral Health Services Provision of oral health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From 2003 annual meetings for DDOS have been restarted to discuss achievements and constraints in the implementation of OHC activities in. CCHPS. Priority areas for operational research in oral health have been identified (2004) and a research protocol has been prepared and submitted for funding. Evaluation of oral ...

  4. Relationship between receiving a workplace oral health examination including oral health instruction and oral health status in the Japanese adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikohji, Tadaaki; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Shinagawa, Takashi; Fukui, Nao; Akifusa, Sumio; Hirata, Yukio; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2011-01-01

    Dental caries and periodontal disease are highly prevalent in the Japanese adult population. Oral examination is an effective method to find various oral health problems in their early stages. However, workplace oral examination is not common in Japan. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between receiving workplace oral health examination, including oral health instruction, and oral health status in the Japanese adult population. This study was performed using data from 4,484 Japanese employees aged 35-74 yr. The proportion of teeth with a probing depth (PD) ≥4 mm and the number of decayed teeth were used for periodontal disease and dental caries parameters. The subjects were asked by questionnaire about past experiences with workplace oral health examination. The subjects who received a workplace oral health examination every year had better periodontal health status than those receiving an examination for the first time. The odds ratio for having ≥10% of teeth with PD ≥4 mm in the subjects who received workplace oral health examination every year was 0.63 (phealth examination and number of decayed teeth. These results suggest that workplace oral health examination accompanied by oral health instruction may be effective for maintenance of periodontal health.

  5. Oral Cancer Exam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care for People With Developmental Disabilities – This booklet presents ... developmental disabilities and offers strategies for providing oral care. NIDCR > OralHealth > Topics > Oral Cancer > Oral Cancer Exam ...

  6. To assess the self-reported oral health practices, behaviour and oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-03

    Oct 3, 2017 ... Keywords: oral health practices, oral health status, pregnant women, traditional birth attendant clinics ... only when there is pain or discomfort and thereby resort to more ..... factors associated with gingivitis among pregnant. 25.

  7. effectiveness of an oral health care training workshop for school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a large number of children thereby play major role in the planning and implementation of oral health ... for the poor oral hygiene among them and their students. Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of an oral ... teachers who attended a two day oral health training workshop at. Eruwa, headquarters of Ibarapa East Local ...

  8. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Oral Health in the African Region: Progress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ogunbodede

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Oral Health in the African Region: Progress and perspectives of the Regional Strategy. Charlotte Faty Ndiaye. ... public health problem worldwide. However, oral health is seen as a very low priority in the .... management information systems;. • begun to carry out essential research on oral health priority ...

  9. Oral health in adults with serious mental illness: needs for and perspectives on care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibbin, Christine L; Kitchen-Andren, Katherine A; Lee, Aaron A; Wykes, Thomas L; Bourassa, Katelynn A

    2015-02-01

    This study used qualitative methods to investigate barriers to and facilitators of oral health care among 25 adult community mental health outpatients with serious mental illness (SMI). Participants completed 30- to 60-min, semi-structured interviews that were recorded and transcribed. Qualitative analysis was used to characterize common themes. Results showed that lack of awareness of dental problems, poverty, and dental care access were key barriers to oral health care. When oral health care was accessed, fear of stigma was associated with missed opportunities to educate about the intersection of mental and oral health. Community mental health providers were viewed as trusted and important sources of advocacy and support for obtaining oral health care when needed. Oral health may be improved for persons with SMI by implementing education in points of frequent service contact, such as community mental health.

  10. Psychometric properties of a Turkish version of the oral health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze and evaluate a Turkish translation of the oral health impact profile‑14 (OHIP‑14) in a Turkish population to provide an objective standard for future studies. Methods: This cross‑sectional research study consisted of three independent studies. Data were collected utilizing a ...

  11. [Collaboration patients-health care providers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grezet-Bento de Carvalho, Angela; Griesser, Anne-Claude; Hertz, Silvana; Constantin, Michèle; Forni, Michel; Blagojevic, Stina; Bouchardy, Christine; Vlastos, Georges

    2007-10-24

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Daily suffering of patients and their relatives is often ignored or underestimated. Scientific advances focus on medical treatments and survival and very little on the psychosocial impact of the disease. The shared expertise between breast cancer patients and health care providers is an innovative and promising approach aiming to provide better quality of life and care. The participation of patients permits to bring together professionals around common goals and to promote multidisciplinary disease management, networking and global care. Focusing on very concrete problems highlighted from patients' expertise also improves research, medical training, and health policy standards.

  12. The use of complementary and integrative practices in oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila da Silva Gonçalo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization recognizes the medical practices derived from the culture of each country, as Traditional Medicine, but all over the world, there has been no consensus about the denomination of these practices. InBrazil, the Ministry of Health recognizes the use of the following, as Complementary and Integrative Practices (CIP: Acupuncture, Homeopathy, Medicinal Plants/Phytotherapy, Thermal Water/Crenotherapy, Anthroposophic Medicine. Based on the therapies recognized by the Ministry of Health, the Brazilian Federal Council of Dentistry regulated the use of CIP in oral health: Acupuncture, Homeopathy, Phytotherapy, Laser Therapy, Flower Therapy and Hypnosis. This article presents the results of a systematic review about positive and negative evidence of the use of PIC in oral health. We analyzed 91 papers published between 2000 and 2010. Laser therapy and Phytotherapy were the CIP most tested. Laser therapy studies reported more negative results, while the Phytotherapy studies reported more positive results. Papers on Flower Therapy were not included because we found no RCT about this CIP. We found more positive than negative outcomes for the use of CIP in oral health and analysis of the papers showed that only a few authors reported the clinical outcomes. Due to the holistic perspective of CIP, we believe it is possible to show more consistent results of use of these practices in oral health, provided that a broader view (beyond quantitative parameters is incorporated from the planning to analysis of studies in this area.

  13. An online alcohol and oral health curriculum for dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Peter M; Ravenel, Michele C; Mauldin, Mary P; Sulkowski, Stanley; Lowndes, Arden; Thomas, Suzanne E

    2014-01-01

    Regular heavy alcohol use can cause or worsen several oral health disorders and is associated with complications during and after dental procedures. Dental student education should provide detailed knowledge of these issues together with skills needed to detect and counsel patients with unhealthy drinking patterns. This project was designed to develop and evaluate a five-module, online program to teach dental students about alcohol and oral health, systemic and oral biological effects of heavy drinking, required changes to treatment protocols for heavy drinkers, reliable methods of alcohol screening, and ways to provide heavy drinkers with brief interventions. Results indicated that the online program resulted in significant changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behavior. This online format could easily be incorporated into an already crowded dental school curriculum, with students learning the material at their own pace and in their own available time.

  14. Promoting oral health during pregnancy: current evidence and implications for Australian midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ajesh; Johnson, Maree; Blinkhorn, Anthony; Ellis, Sharon; Bhole, Sameer; Ajwani, Shilpi

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine current evidence supporting the promotion of oral health during pregnancy and proffer aspects of a potential role for Australian midwives. Research continues to show that poor oral health during pregnancy can have an impact on the health outcomes of the mother and baby. Poor maternal oral health increases the chances of infants developing early caries and is strongly associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm and low birth-weight babies. Unfortunately in Australia, no preventive strategies exist to maintain the oral health of pregnant women. Systematic review. This review examines all literature on oral health during pregnancy published to date in the English language and focuses on whether preventive oral health strategies during the prenatal period are warranted in Australia and if so, how they could be provided. Maintaining oral health is important during pregnancy and many developed countries have implemented preventive strategies to address this issue using non-dental professionals such as prenatal care providers. However, despite the positive international evidence, limited importance is being given to the oral health of pregnant women in Australia. It is also evident that the unique potential of prenatal care providers such as midwives to assess and improve maternal oral heath is not being thoroughly utilised. Compounding the issue in Australia, especially for pregnant women from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds, is the limited access to public dental services and the high cost of private dental treatment. Promoting and maintaining oral health during pregnancy is crucial, and preventive prenatal oral health services are needed in Australia to achieve this. Midwives have an excellent opportunity to offer preventive oral health services by providing oral health assessments, education and referrals for pregnant women attending antenatal clinics. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. General and oral health implications of cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, C M; Hirsch, R; Johnstone, S

    2005-06-01

    Cannabis, commonly known as marijuana, is the most frequently used illicit drug in Australia. Therefore, oral health care providers are likely to encounter patients who are regular users. An upward trend in cannabis use is occurring in Australia, with 40 per cent of the population aged 14 and above having used the drug. There are three main forms of cannabis: marijuana, hash and hash oil, all of which contain the main psychoactive constituent delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabis is most commonly smoked, however it can be added to foods. THC from cannabis enters the bloodstream and exerts its effects on the body via interaction with endogenous receptors. Cannabis affects almost every system of the body, particularly the cardiovascular, respiratory and immune systems. It also has acute and chronic effects on the mental health of some users. Therefore, chronic abuse is a concern because of its negative effects on general physical and mental health. Cannabis abusers generally have poorer oral health than non-users, with an increased risk of dental caries and periodontal diseases. Cannabis smoke acts as a carcinogen and is associated with dysplastic changes and pre-malignant lesions within the oral mucosa. Users are also prone to oral infections, possibly due to the immunosuppressive effects. Dental treatment on patients intoxicated on cannabis can result in the patient experiencing acute anxiety, dysphoria and psychotic-like paranoiac thoughts. The use of local anaesthetic containing epinephrine may seriously prolong tachycardia already induced by an acute dose of cannabis. Oral health care providers should be aware of the diverse adverse effects of cannabis on general and oral health and incorporate questions about patients' patterns of use in the medical history.

  16. Improving oral health for older people in the home care setting: An exploratory implementation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Adrienne; Kitson, Alison; Harvey, Gill

    2016-12-01

    To explore how home care providers can support older people to maintain good oral health through implementing a model called Better Oral Health in Home Care (BOHHC). A mixed method, pre- to post-implementation design was used. The Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework informed the model's implementation process. High levels of dental need were identified at pre-implementation. Older people self-reported significant oral health improvements following the introduction of tailored home care strategies by care workers, who in turn reported a better understanding and knowledge of the importance of oral care for older people. The BOHHC Model provided an evidence-based approach for community-based prevention and early detection of oral health problems. Improving oral health for older people in the home care setting has significant practice and policy implications which require ongoing intersectoral facilitation involving aged care, vocational health education and dental sectors. © 2016 AJA Inc.

  17. Oral health care availability in health centers of Mangalore taluk, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K Simon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-oriented oral health programs are seldom found in India. When primary health care systems were in the 1980s, dentistry was not adequately included. This has left oral health far behind other health services. Objectives: To find the availability of dental professionals, infrastructure, equipment, and treatments provided in health centers of Mangalore taluk. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among medical officers and dentists working in all the health centers of Mangalore taluk, using an interview schedule, the oral health care availability inventory (ORAI. Results: Among 23 health centers of Mangalore taluk, dental services were available at six health centers (26% [two community health centers (CHCs and four primary health centers (PHCs]. Mouth mirrors, dental explorers, and extraction instruments were available at six health centers [two CHCs (100% and four PHCs (19%]. No health centers provided orthodontic tooth corrections, removal of impacted teeth, oral biopsies, and fabrication of removable dentures. Conclusions: Availability of dental services was limited in the health centers, and a vast majority of the rural population in Mangalore taluk did not have access to dental care.

  18. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: oral health and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touger-Decker, Riva; Mobley, Connie

    2013-05-01

    It is the position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics that nutrition is an integral component of oral health. The Academy supports integration of oral health with nutrition services, education, and research. Collaboration between dietetics practitioners and oral health care professionals is recommended for oral health promotion and disease prevention and intervention. Scientific and epidemiological data suggest a lifelong synergy between diet, nutrition, and integrity of the oral cavity in health and disease. Oral health and nutrition have a multifaceted relationship. Oral infectious diseases, as well as acute, chronic, and systemic diseases with oral manifestations, impact an individual's functional ability to eat and their nutrition status. Likewise, nutrition and diet can affect the development and integrity of the oral cavity and progression of oral diseases. As knowledge of the link between oral and nutrition health increases, dietetics practitioners and oral health care professionals must learn to provide screening, education, and referrals as part of comprehensive client/patient care. The provision of medical nutrition therapy, including oral and overall health, is incorporated into the Standards of Practice for registered dietitians and dietetic technicians, registered. Inclusion of didactic and clinical practice concepts that illustrate the role of nutrition in oral health is essential in education programs for both professional groups. Collaborative endeavors between dietetics, dentistry, medicine, and allied health professionals in research, education, and delineation of practice roles are needed to ensure comprehensive health care. The multifaceted interactions between diet, nutrition, and oral health in practice, education, and research in both dietetics and dentistry merit continued, detailed delineation. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of rare diseases in oral health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-García, Ana; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Posada-de la Paz, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Rare diseases (RD) are those that present a lower prevalence than 5 cases per 10.000 population. The main objective of this review was to study the effect on oral health in rare diseases, while the secondary objective of the study is theme upgrade. Material and Methods Comparative observational case-control studies were analysed and a systematic review was conducted in PubMed. Each rare disease listed on the statistical data record of the Health Portal of the Ministry of Equality, Health and Social Policies Board of Andalusia was associated with “oral health”. The variables studied included dental, oral mucosa and occlusion alterations, oral pathologies (caries, periodontal disease) and other alterations (mouth breathing, parafunctional habits, etc). A bias analysis of the variable caries was conducted. Results Six RD were selected through our inclusion and exclusion criteria (hypogammaglobulinemia, Rett syndrome, Marfan syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, cystic fibrosis and Cri du chat syndrome) in a total of 8 publications, of which four trials were classified as high risk of bias and one of them as medium risk. There were not trials with low risk of bias. Conclusions The main statistically significant differences found by Syndrome compared to a control group were in Hypogammaglobulinemia with a greater tendency to enamel hypoplasia and dry mouth. The Rett syndrome had, as well, a greater tendency to an anterior open bite, ogival palate, bruxism, mouth breathing and tongue thrusting. Prader-Willi syndrome had a tendency of dental erosion, and Cri du chat syndrome showed a higher association to Tannerella forsythia. Key words:Rare diseases, oral health. PMID:27475682

  20. Integration of oral health-related quality of life instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Mike T; Reissmann, Daniel R; Čelebić, Asja; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Kende, Dóra; Larsson, Pernilla; Rener-Sitar, Ksenija

    2016-10-01

    To integrate items from two widely used oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) questionnaires, the General Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) and the Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP), as well as culturally-specific items of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) into a four-dimensional OHRQoL model consisting of Oral Function, Orofacial Pain, Orofacial Appearance, and Psychosocial Impact. Subjects came from an ancillary study of the Dimensions of Oral Health-Related Quality of Life Project (N=267 patients, mean age±SD: 54.0±17.2years, 58% women.) Patients filled in the original 49 items of OHIP and 22 additional OHRQoL items in a cross-sectional study. These additional items consisted of 7 culturally specific OHIP items and 15 GOHAI or OIDP items with unique content not covered in OHIP-49. Before data collection, three experts hypothesized to which of the four OHRQoL dimensions these items belong. Hypotheses were tested in correlation analyses between the 22 items and the four dimension scores that were derived from OHIP-49. Five of the 22 items did not provide sufficient information to which dimension they belong. In 16 of the remaining 17 items, the pattern of correlation coefficients fitted experts' a priori hypotheses. Acceptance of 16 of the 17 hypotheses was interpreted as evidence that additional (not in OHIP-49 contained) OHRQoL items can be assigned to Oral Function, Orofacial Pain, Orofacial Appearance, and Psychosocial Impact. Items of three OHRQoL instruments can be integrated into a dimensional OHRQoL model consisting of Oral Function, Orofacial Pain, Orofacial Appearance, and Psychosocial Impact. Oral Function, Orofacial Pain, Orofacial Appearance, and Psychosocial Impact can serve as a simple and clinically appealing set of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) dimensions and therefore provide an opportunity for simpler, but psychometrically improved OHRQoL measurement in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  1. An existential model of oral health from evolving views on health, function and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEntee, Michael I

    2006-03-01

    This study explores the evolution of conceptual frameworks and models of health and disability to construct an explanatory model of oral health. The International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities, and Handicaps adopted by the WHO is based largely on social role theory and a utilitarian tradition portraying disablement as a negative and socially unacceptable consequence of impairment. It has been the major conceptual influence on the construction of psychometric tools for dentistry. However current views of chronic disease are refocused on the influence of coping strategies used by people to prevent or limit disability and handicap. Consequently, the WHO adopted the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as an alternative description of health and health-related states based on an existentialist view of the body, the person and society. In addition, an ethnographic exploration has identified three major domains of oral health--oral hygiene, comfort and general health--that dominate the opinions of people with oral impairments. Application of the framework and language of the ICF to the major domains of oral health provides the basis for a new biopsychosocial model of oral health, function and disablement.

  2. The oral microbiome in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, William G

    2013-03-01

    The human mouth harbours one of the most diverse microbiomes in the human body, including viruses, fungi, protozoa, archaea and bacteria. The bacteria are responsible for the two commonest bacterial diseases of man: dental caries (tooth decay) and the periodontal (gum) diseases. Archaea are restricted to a small number of species of methanogens while around 1000 bacterial species have been found, with representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, Synergistetes and Tenericutes and the uncultured divisions GN02, SR1 and TM7. Around half of oral bacteria are as yet uncultured and culture-independent methods have been successfully used to comprehensively describe the oral bacterial community. The human oral microbiome database (HOMD, www.homd.org) provides a comprehensive resource consisting of descriptions of oral bacterial taxa, a 16S rRNA identification tool and a repository of oral bacterial genome sequences. Individuals' oral microbiomes are highly specific at the species level, although overall the human oral microbiome shows few geographical differences. Although caries and periodontitis are clearly bacterial diseases, they are not infectious diseases in the classical sense because they result from a complex interaction between the commensal microbiota, host susceptibility and environmental factors such as diet and smoking. Periodontitis, in particular, appears to result from an inappropriate inflammatory reaction to the normal microbiota, exacerbated by the presence of some disease-associated bacterial species. In functional terms, there appears to considerable redundancy among the oral microbiota and a focus on functional rather than phylogenetic diversity may be required in order to fully understand host-microbiome interactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral Health Status of the Veddas-Sri Lankan Indigenous People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayashantha, Pradeep; Johnson, Newell W

    2016-01-01

    Sri Lanka's Veddas/Vanniya-laeto, are a small Indigenous group today with little information on their oral health status. This report is to provide an overview on oral health status of Veddas. Oral health status was recorded by the principal investigator after obtaining consent, using World Health Organization criteria, at an initial screening point before sending the person for any necessary treatment. Total participants were 194: 78% were males>35 years. Mean decayed, missing, filled teeth was 0.9 and 3% had pockets <3.5mm. Three had oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs), while three were treated for oral cancer. While the prevalence of dental caries and periodontal conditions was low, oral cancer and OPMDs is a serious concern. The Veddas have a culturally specific health system based on herbal medicinal knowledge. Thus, it is challenging to introduce and implement a preventive and curative oral health care system that would be culturally acceptable to this community.

  4. Oral Health Status of the Veddas--Sri Lankan Indigenous People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayashantha, Pradeep; Johnson, Newell W

    2016-02-01

    Sri Lanka's Veddas/Vanniya-laeto, are a small Indigenous group today with little information on their oral health status. This report is to provide an overview on oral health status of Veddas. Oral health status was recorded by the principal investigator after obtaining consent, using World Health Organization criteria, at an initial screening point before sending the person for any necessary treatment. Total participants were 194: 78% were males>35 years. Mean decayed, missing, filled teeth was 0.9 and 3% had pockets <3.5mm. Three had oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMDs), while three were treated for oral cancer. While the prevalence of dental caries and periodontal conditions was low, oral cancer and OPMDs is a serious concern. The Veddas have a culturally specific health system based on herbal medicinal knowledge. Thus, it is challenging to introduce and implement a preventive and curative oral health care system that would be culturally acceptable to this community.

  5. The effects of an oral health intervention on caregivers of Head Start children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Audrey P; Kameka, Michelle; Young-Whiting, Chanadra

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an oral health educational intervention on knowledge and behavior-specific cognitions and affect in caregivers of children from 2 to 5 years of age. This was a descriptive study, with a convenience sample of 425 Head Start caregivers who attended one of 18 oral health educational programs throughout Miami-Dade County. Four research questions addressed the relationship between the oral health educational intervention and prior related behavior, personal factors, behavior-specific cognitions and affect, knowledge, and intent. The educational program was found to have a significant effect on caregivers' knowledge, cognition, affect, and intent to provide oral healthcare to their children. Educational programs have a positive impact on caregivers to increase oral health knowledge and intent to perform preventive oral health-promoting behaviors in this underserved population. Effective educational interventions are necessary in order to increase overall health in children and to decrease oral disease.

  6. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions and oropharyngeal cancers, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related oral......This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly...... disease and orodental trauma are major public health problems worldwide and poor oral health has a profound effect on general health and quality of life. The diversity in oral disease patterns and development trends across countries and regions reflects distinct risk profiles and the establishment...

  7. [Violent acts against health care providers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irinyi, Tamás; Németh, Anikó

    2016-07-01

    Violence against health care providers is getting more awareness nowadays. These are usually deliberate actions committed by patients or family members of them resulting in short and long term physical or psychological debilitating harm in the staff members. The causes of the violent acts are usually rooted in patient-related factors, although some characteristics of the professionals and of the workplace may also play some role. The present article presents different definitions of violence and possible reasons for violence against health care providers based on relevant international and national literature. The paper discusses the different forms and frequency of violence, furthermore, details about the effects, consequences and some options for prevention in health care settings are also included. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(28), 1105-1109.

  8. Dentist Should Advise Vegetarians on Good Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your desktop! more... Dentist Should Advise Vegetarians on Good Oral Health Article Chapters Dentist Should Advise Vegetarians on Good Oral Health print full article print this chapter email this ...

  9. How Does What I Eat Affect My Oral Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About | Contact InfoBites Quick Reference Learn more Children's Oral Health How Do I Care for My Child's Baby ... more... How Does What I Eat Affect My Oral Health? Article Chapters How Does What I Eat Affect ...

  10. Children's school performance: impact of general and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenshine, Stephanie L; Vann, William F; Gizlice, Ziya; Lee, Jessica Y

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine: a) the sociodemographic and health factors associated with poor school performance among North Carolina children; and b) the impact of poor oral health status on school performance while controlling for other health and sociodemographic factors. We used data from the 2005 Child Health Assessment and Monitoring Program, a follow-back telephone survey to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System involving parents/guardians of children 0 to 17. This project includes sections on oral health and school performance. Our principal outcome variable was school performance and our major explanatory variable was children's oral health status, based upon parental report. Our sample consisted of 2,871 school children, weighted to reflect the North Carolina census. Bivariate analysis revealed that sex, race, parental education, low socioeconomic status, poor general health, poor oral health, and the interaction of poor oral health and general health were significantly related to school performance (P effects of poor oral health and general health on school performance. Children with both poor oral health and general health were 2.3 times more likely to report poor school performance. Children with either poor oral health or general health were only 1.4 times more likely to report poor school performance. Our results show that children who have both poor oral health and general health are more likely to have poor school performance. Our findings suggest that the improvement of children's oral health may be a vehicle to improve their educational experience.

  11. Electronic health records: eliciting behavioral health providers' beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shank, Nancy; Willborn, Elizabeth; Pytlikzillig, Lisa; Noel, Harmonijoie

    2012-04-01

    Interviews with 32 community behavioral health providers elicited perceived benefits and barriers of using electronic health records. Themes identified were (a) quality of care, (b) privacy and security, and (c) delivery of services. Benefits to quality of care were mentioned by 100% of the providers, and barriers by 59% of providers. Barriers involving privacy and security concerns were mentioned by 100% of providers, and benefits by 22%. Barriers to delivery of services were mentioned by 97% of providers, and benefits by 66%. Most providers (81%) expressed overall positive support for electronic behavioral health records.

  12. Do public health nurses in Norway promote information on oral health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espelid Ivar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background (i to describe oral health counselling in Norway to parents with infants and toddlers, ii to assess existing collaboration and routines in oral health matters between nurses and personnel in the PDS, iii to evaluate to what extent oral health was integrated in the basic educational curriculum of public health nurses. Methods This study was based on two separate surveys: the sample of Study I was 98 randomly selected child health clinics. A questionnaire covering oral health promotion counselling of parents with young children was returned by 259 nurses. Study II was a telephone survey addressing teachers of public health nurses at the eight educational institutions in Norway. Results The response rate in Study I was 45%. Nutrition (breast feeding, diet was the health subject most often prioritized in the counselling targeting parents of young children (by 60% of the nurses. Oral health was not among the first priority counselling subjects. The subject was seldom spontaneously mentioned by parents. Seventy percent of respondents reported (agreed or totally agreed that they managed to provide information parents needed and 72% believed that the information they gave influenced parents' health behaviours. Seven nurses (5.2% responded that they agreed with the statement that the information they gave only slightly influenced parents' health behaviour. Lack of time was mentioned as being a problem. Approximately half of the nurses (48% had regular contact with the PDS for the 0-3 year-old children, but only a quarter of the nurses claimed that children's teeth were routinely examined at the child clinics. Some forms of previously established contact with the PDS enhanced the likelihood of nurses' referrals. Oral health was a minor part of the educational curriculum for public health nurses; at three institutions, the subject was totally absent. Conclusion Collaboration between nurses and the PDS in Norway could be improved. Oral

  13. Knowledge about preventive dentistry versus self-reported competence in providing preventive oral healthcare - a study among Nepalese dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Madhu; Acharya, Ganesh; Basnet, Purusotam; Trovik, Tordis A

    2017-04-12

    Dentists' and dental healthcare providers' professional knowledge and attitude towards the prevention of oral diseases may have an impact on the oral health of the general population. The aim of this study was to describe Nepalese dentists' competency in giving preventive education and treatment to their patients, and to assess their level of knowledge about preventive dental health. This was a cross-sectional study of 195 dentists (71 males and 124 females). Knowledge of preventive oral healthcare and self-reported aspects of preventive oral healthcare were assessed using a close-ended multiple-choice questionnaire. Statistical evaluation was done using chi-squared test, independent sample t-test and factor analysis as appropriate. More than 90% of dentists self-reported to be competent in providing preventive treatment and oral hygiene education to their patients. Female dentists reported being more competent in giving oral hygiene education than their male counterparts (p = 0.045). Dentists scored a mean of 24.06 ± 3.8 [range (15-33)] out of 56 on knowledge based on self-reported awareness of seven different aspects of preventive dentistry. More than 70% of the dentists had relatively good knowledge regarding the use of fluoride, whereas the preventive knowledge in other aspects of dental health such as frequency of sugar consumption, xylitol use, dental visits, sealant, gingival health, dental and general health was found to be limited. The majority of participating dentists reported a high level of general competency in providing preventive treatment and oral health education to their patients, whereas their knowledge was found to be limited in some aspects of preventive dentistry.

  14. Oral health and cardiovascular care: Perceptions of people with cardiovascular disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Sanchez

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the perception of patients with cardiovascular disease towards oral health and the potential for cardiac care clinicians to promote oral health.A needs assessment was undertaken with twelve patients with cardiovascular disease attending cardiac rehabilitation between 2015 and 2016, in three metropolitan hospitals in Sydney, Australia. These patients participated in face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data was analysed using thematic analysis.Results suggested that while oral health was considered relevant there was high prevalence of poor oral health among participants, especially those from socioeconomic disadvantaged background. Awareness regarding the importance of oral health care its impact on cardiovascular outcomes was poor among participants. Oral health issues were rarely discussed in the cardiac setting. Main barriers deterring participants from seeking oral health care included lack of awareness, high cost of dental care and difficulties in accessing the public dental service. Findings also revealed that participants were interested in receiving further information about oral health and suggested various mediums for information delivery. The concept of cardiac care clinicians, especially nurses providing education, assessment and referrals to ongoing dental care was well received by participants who felt the post-acute period was the most appropriate time to receive oral health care advice. The issues of oral health training for non-dental clinicians and how to address existing barriers were highlighted by participants.The lack of oral health education being provided to patients with cardiovascular disease offers an opportunity to improve care and potentially, outcomes. In view of the evidence linking poor oral health with cardiovascular disease, cardiac care clinicians, especially nurses, should be appropriately trained to promote oral health in their practice. Affordable and accessible

  15. Oral health and cardiovascular care: Perceptions of people with cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonson, Yenna; Ajwani, Shilpi; Bhole, Sameer; Bishop, Joshua; Lintern, Karen; Nolan, Samantha; Rajaratnam, Rohan; Redfern, Julie; Sheehan, Maria; Skarligos, Fiona; Spencer, Lissa; Srinivas, Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Main objective The aim of this study was to explore the perception of patients with cardiovascular disease towards oral health and the potential for cardiac care clinicians to promote oral health. Method A needs assessment was undertaken with twelve patients with cardiovascular disease attending cardiac rehabilitation between 2015 and 2016, in three metropolitan hospitals in Sydney, Australia. These patients participated in face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data was analysed using thematic analysis. Results Results suggested that while oral health was considered relevant there was high prevalence of poor oral health among participants, especially those from socioeconomic disadvantaged background. Awareness regarding the importance of oral health care its impact on cardiovascular outcomes was poor among participants. Oral health issues were rarely discussed in the cardiac setting. Main barriers deterring participants from seeking oral health care included lack of awareness, high cost of dental care and difficulties in accessing the public dental service. Findings also revealed that participants were interested in receiving further information about oral health and suggested various mediums for information delivery. The concept of cardiac care clinicians, especially nurses providing education, assessment and referrals to ongoing dental care was well received by participants who felt the post-acute period was the most appropriate time to receive oral health care advice. The issues of oral health training for non-dental clinicians and how to address existing barriers were highlighted by participants. Relevance to clinical practice The lack of oral health education being provided to patients with cardiovascular disease offers an opportunity to improve care and potentially, outcomes. In view of the evidence linking poor oral health with cardiovascular disease, cardiac care clinicians, especially nurses, should be appropriately trained to promote oral health in

  16. Oral health and cardiovascular care: Perceptions of people with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Paula; Everett, Bronwyn; Salamonson, Yenna; Ajwani, Shilpi; Bhole, Sameer; Bishop, Joshua; Lintern, Karen; Nolan, Samantha; Rajaratnam, Rohan; Redfern, Julie; Sheehan, Maria; Skarligos, Fiona; Spencer, Lissa; Srinivas, Ravi; George, Ajesh

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the perception of patients with cardiovascular disease towards oral health and the potential for cardiac care clinicians to promote oral health. A needs assessment was undertaken with twelve patients with cardiovascular disease attending cardiac rehabilitation between 2015 and 2016, in three metropolitan hospitals in Sydney, Australia. These patients participated in face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data was analysed using thematic analysis. Results suggested that while oral health was considered relevant there was high prevalence of poor oral health among participants, especially those from socioeconomic disadvantaged background. Awareness regarding the importance of oral health care its impact on cardiovascular outcomes was poor among participants. Oral health issues were rarely discussed in the cardiac setting. Main barriers deterring participants from seeking oral health care included lack of awareness, high cost of dental care and difficulties in accessing the public dental service. Findings also revealed that participants were interested in receiving further information about oral health and suggested various mediums for information delivery. The concept of cardiac care clinicians, especially nurses providing education, assessment and referrals to ongoing dental care was well received by participants who felt the post-acute period was the most appropriate time to receive oral health care advice. The issues of oral health training for non-dental clinicians and how to address existing barriers were highlighted by participants. The lack of oral health education being provided to patients with cardiovascular disease offers an opportunity to improve care and potentially, outcomes. In view of the evidence linking poor oral health with cardiovascular disease, cardiac care clinicians, especially nurses, should be appropriately trained to promote oral health in their practice. Affordable and accessible dental care services

  17. Financing national policy on oral health in Brazil in the context of the Unified Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Alfredo Pucca Junior

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the model of oral health care implemented in the Unified Health System of Brazil in the last decade. This model was conceived as a sub-sector policy that, over the years, has sought to improve the quality of life of the Brazilian population. Through a chronological line, the study presents the National Policy on Oral Health as a counter-hegemonic patient care model for the dentistry practices existing in the country before this policy was implemented. The reorganization of the levels of oral health care, the creation of reference facilities for secondary and tertiary care, through Centers of Dental Specialties and Regional Dental Prosthesis Laboratories, and the differential funding and decentralized management of financial resources were able to expand the actions of oral health for more than 90 million inhabitants. The evolution shown after the deployment of the National Oral Health Policy, as of 2004, demonstrates the greater integration of oral health care under the Unified Health System and provides feedback information to help this policy to continue to be prioritized by the Federal Government and receive more support from the state and local levels in the coming years.

  18. Oral Health Status, Treatment Needs and Knowledge, Attitude and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Health care workers (HCWs) from an important component of the health care system of any nation. Adequate knowledge regarding oral health is also mandatory as it is directly related to general health. Aim: The present study was undertaken to assess oral health status and treatment needs of the health ...

  19. Filling the gap: equity and access to oral health services for minorities and the underserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, M A; Chen, D W; Duffy, R E

    1998-03-01

    Family physicians and other primary care providers play a pivotal role in preventing oral disease, especially among minority and underserved populations who have limited access to dental services and poorer oral health status. Oral diseases/conditions, such as caries, baby bottle tooth decay, gingivitis, periodontitis, oral pharyngeal malignancies, and orofacial trauma, are prevalent and costly, yet largely preventable. Given their role in promoting and protecting overall health and their historical role in serving minority and underserved families, family physicians occupy a unique position to assure equity, access, and improvement in oral health for all Americans.

  20. Do oral health conditions adversely impact young adults?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, J.C.; Mestrinho, H.D.; Stevens, S.; van Wijk, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the extent to which clinically measured oral health conditions, adjusted for sociodemographic and oral health behavior determinants, impact adversely on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in a sample of Belgian young adults. The null hypothesis was that, among young

  1. Oral health awareness, practices and status of patients with diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Despite the reported increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, very few studies have documented report on oral health awareness and oral health conditions of individuals with diabetes mellitus from our environment. Thus this study aimed at assessing the oral health awareness, practices and status of ...

  2. Oral Health Disparities as Determined by Selected Healthy People 2020 Oral Health Objectives for the United States, ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order from the National Technical Information Service NCHS Oral Health Disparities as Determined by Selected Healthy People 2020 Oral Health Objectives for the United States, 2009–2010 Recommend ...

  3. Integrating oral health into professional nursing practice: an interprofessional faculty tool kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, Maria C

    2014-01-01

    Millions of children and adults in the United States have unmet oral health care needs, and professional nurses can play a central role in reducing oral health disparities and expanding access to care. Interprofessional education is requisite to improving oral health care outcomes. Baccalaureate nursing programs need to prepare collaborative practice-ready professional nurses to improve oral health care especially for vulnerable and underserved individuals, communities, and populations. This article presents an interprofessional faculty tool kit that builds upon The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice as a framework for preparing professional nurses with basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes in oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention across the life cycle. Expectations for professional nursing practice are described within the context of The Essentials and contemporary oral health care issues. Exemplars of interprofessional teaching-learning strategies are provided to assist nurse faculty with integrating oral health into baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Nurse educators are called to prioritize oral health as an essential component of overall health and well-being, increase the visibility of evidence-based oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention in baccalaureate nursing curricula, and support interprofessional oral health education and collaborative care. © 2013.

  4. Oral health in the family health strategy: a change of practices or semantics diversionism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Antonio Carlos; Moysés, Simone Tetu; Bisinelli, Julio Cesar; Moysés, Samuel Jorge

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate public health dentistry practices of two different family health models. Qualitative study conducted with data obtained from focus groups consisting of 58 dentists working in the Family Health Strategy for at least three years between August-October, 2006. The Paideia Family Health Approach was used in the city of Campinas and the Oral Health Initiative as part of the Family Health Strategy was implemented in the city of Curitiba, Southeastern and Southern Brazil, respectively. Data was analyzed using the hermeneutic-dialectic method. Analysis indicators were employed to indicate backwardness, stagnation or progress in oral health practices effective from the implementation of the strategies referred. The indicators used were: work process; interdisciplinary approach; territorialization; capacity building of human resources; health promotion practices; and responsiveness to users' demands. There was progress in user access to services, humanization of health care, patient welcoming and patient-provider relationship. The results related to health promotion practices, territorialization, interdisciplinary approach and resource capacity building indicated a need for technical and operational enhancements in both cities. Both models have brought about important advances in terms of increased access to services and humanization of health care. Universal access to oral health at all levels of complexity was not achieved in both cities studied. Local health managers and oral health program coordinators must bring more weight to bear in the arena that defines public policy priorities.

  5. Child abuse: concerns for oral health practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayman, Salim; Dincer, Elvir; Almas, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Child abuse and neglect are prevalent issues that permeate all ethnic, cultural and socioeconomic segments of society. Parents of abused children frequently change physicians in order to prevent detection, but they are more likely to continue to visit the child's dentist. Most states recognize four major types of maltreatment: neglect; physical abuse; psychological maltreatment; and sexual abuse. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry defines dental neglect as "the willful failure of parent or guardian to seek and follow through with treatment necessary to ensure a level of oral health essential for adequate function and freedom from pain and infection." The oral health practitioner must uphold his or her legal and ethical responsibility if there is suspicion, record and report the incidence. It may help save a child from further abuse.

  6. Subjective Oral Health in Dutch Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gijsbert H.W. Verrips

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine whether the subjective oral health (SOH of the Dutch adult population was associated with clinical and demographic variables. Methods: A clinical examination was conducted in a sample of 1,018 people from the Dutch city of ‘s-Hertogenbosch. SOH was measured using the Dutch translation of the short form of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-NL14. Results: The average score on the OHIP-NL14 was 2.8 ± 5.9 and 51% of the respondents had a score of 0. Dental status was the most important predictor of SOH. Conclusions:  The SOH in the Dutch adult population was much better than in groups of adults in Australia, the United Kingdom and New Zealand. Nevertheless, there were important variations in SOH related to dental and socio-economic status.

  7. Visits to physicians for oral health-related complaints in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPlante, Nancy C; Singhal, Sonica; Maund, Jacquie; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2015-03-12

    Canada's national system of health insurance facilitates equitable access to health care; however, since dental care is generally privately financed and delivered, access to oral health care remains uneven and inequitable. To avoid the upfront costs, many argue that socially marginalized groups should seek oral health care from medical providers. This study therefore explored the rates and numbers of visits to physicians for oral health-related diagnoses in Ontario, Canada's most populated province. A retrospective secondary data analysis of health system utilization in Ontario was conducted for visits to physicians for oral health-related diagnoses. Data for all Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP) approved billing claims were accessed over 11 fiscal years (2001-2011). Age- and sex-adjusted rates were calculated. Approximately 208,375 visits per year, with an average of 1,298/100,000 persons, were made to physicians for oral health-related diagnoses. Women, irrespective of the year, made more visits, and there was an increasing trend in visits made by elderly people. The number of people visiting physicians for oral health reasons is arguably high. The public health system is being billed for services for oral health issues that the provider is not appropriately trained to treat. Provision of timely and accessible oral health care for socially marginalized populations needs to be prioritized in health care policy.

  8. Challenges of improving oral health for adults in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Victoria

    2017-08-31

    In 2016 the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published a guideline on oral health for adults in care homes in England. The author was a co-opted member of the NICE oral health for adults in care homes public health advisory committee. This article reviews the NICE guideline as it applies to care homes, and relates it to the results of a survey of oral care practice undertaken in a large care home organisation and the available research literature from the past 20 years. The literature and survey results suggest that, if translated into practice, the NICE guideline could do much to improve oral health for adults in care homes. The survey highlighted that 85% of residents required support from carers to undertake mouth care. It also found that care homes experienced significant difficulties in accessing dental services for residents. The author concludes that providers need to equip staff with the necessary knowledge and skills to undertake mouth care and to give this area of personal care greater priority. Finally, the author suggests that the Care Quality Commission could ensure that the NICE guideline is translated into practice in care homes.

  9. Stress, oral health behaviour and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinzer, Renate; Granrath, Nicole; Spahl, Manuela; Linz, Sandra; Waschul, Bernd; Herforth, Armin

    2005-05-01

    Several studies indicate that stress adversely affects various health behaviours. Oral hygiene behaviour, however, has been rarely studied in this context. The present study thus aims to assess the effects of stress on oral hygiene behaviour and clinical outcome. In a prospective matched controlled design 12 pairs of medical students, each consisting of 1 student participating in a major academic exam and 1 student not participating in any exams (control) were studied. A professional tooth cleaning was performed 4 weeks prior to exams to obtain plaque levels of 0 at all sites. Immediately prior to professional tooth cleaning and 4 weeks after exams plaque levels (as indicator of oral hygiene behaviour) and bleeding on probing (an indicator of gingivitis) were assessed. No group differences were observed at the beginning of the exam period; after exams significant higher rates of plaque (p=.0005, d=1.74) and gingivitis (p=.016, d=1.01) were observed in exam students as compared with controls. The study illustrates the clinical significance of stress effects on health behaviour. Stress should be included as a factor in models of patient compliance and health behaviour.

  10. Residential age care and domiciliary oral health services: Reach-OHT-The development of a metropolitan oral health programme in Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, F A Clive; Law, Garry; Chu, Steven K-Y; Cullen, John S; Le Couteur, David G

    2017-12-01

    To describe an oral health care programme for older people in Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs) to improve access to care and support facilities. Different models of residential care have been proposed, but few have been comprehensive (providing on-site health promotion and service delivery) or sustainable. A partnership model of oral health care, with dental services plus oral health education, was integrated into the community outreach services of a metropolitan hospital department of aged care. The programme provided annual oral health education and training to staff, and on-site dental care to 10 (RACFs). None of the RACFs had received organised education or on-site dental service care prior to the programme. At the completion of the third year of the programme, 607 residents (75% of the total bed capacity for the 10 RACFs) had received an annual oral health assessment, and 271 (46.5%) had received on-site dental care. More than 120 nursing and allied health staff had received education and training in oral health support to residents. Oral cleanliness, the proportion not experiencing dental pain and referral for additional care decreased significantly over the period, but dental caries experience and periodontal conditions remained a concern. Sustainable domiciliary oral health services and oral health education are feasible and practical using a partnership model within the Australian health system. Adaptability, continuity and the use of oral health therapists/dental hygienists in the coordination and management of the programme further contribute to viability. © 2017 The Authors. Gerodontology published by The Gerodontology Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. THE IMPORTANCE OF ORAL HEALTH BEHAVIOUR OF CHILDREN FOR THEIR ORAL HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelić Ivana

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Caries or tooth decay regardless of the good knowledge of the nature of the disease and the possibility of its effective prevention is still the most widespread disease in our population. It also very often threatens the functions of organs and even the entire organism. Health culture is an integral part of general culture and health education plays an important role in maintaining health of individuals. Aim. The main objective of this study is to determine the influence of oral health behaviour of schoolchildren aged 12 to 14 on their oral health. The schoolchildren attended the seventh and eight grade at Drago Milovic Elementary School in Tivat. Method. The survey was conducted during the period from the end of January to April 2015 at Drago Milovic Elementary School in Tivat. It comprised all seventh and eight-graders that were at school those days. The survey instrument was a questionnaire specially designed for this study and it consisted of 36 closed-ended questions. Clinical examination of oral health in children was used as an additional research instrument. Assessment of oral health was carried out under natural light with dental mirror and probe according to WHO recommendations. The parameter used to assess the state of oral health was DMFT index — the number of carious, extracted and filled teeth. In addition, the assessment of oral hygiene was conducted using soft debris index according to Green-Vermillion which determines absence or presence, quantity and distribution of dental plaque and other soft deposits. Results. The majority of students stated that they lack knowledge regarding the effectiveness of fluoride toothpaste (69.4%. It was found that the lowest incidence of caries occurred among those students who think that teeth should be brushed after every meal, and the highest incidence of this diagnosis occurred in respondents who think that teeth should be brushed once a day. Half of the surveyed students

  12. Providing oral care in haematological oncology patients: nurses' knowledge and skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potting, Carin M J; Mank, Arno; Blijlevens, Nicole M A; Donnelly, J Peter; van Achterberg, Theo

    2008-09-01

    In the international literature, the most commonly recommended intervention for managing oral mucositis is good oral care, assuming that nurses have sufficient knowledge and skills to perform oral care correctly. The aim of the present study was to investigate if knowledge and skills about oral care improve when education in oral care is provided to nurses in charge of patients who are at risk of oral mucositis. This intervention study consists of a baseline test on the knowledge and skills of nurses of the haematology wards of two different hospitals. Oral care education sessions were given in one hospital and follow-up tests were performed in both hospitals. Nursing records were examined and observations of nurses performing oral care were made at baseline as well as at follow-up. The results show significant differences in the scores for knowledge and skills before and after the education, whereas there was no difference in scores at the two points in time for the comparison hospital, where no education had taken place. The records test showed no differences at baseline or follow-up for the two groups. Observations showed that nurses who followed the education session implemented the oral care protocol considerably better than those who did not attended. Education in oral care has a positive influence on the knowledge and skills of nurses who care for patient at risk of oral mucositis, but not on the quality of oral care documentation.

  13. Perceived oral health, oral self-care habits and dental attendance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess the perceived oral health, oral self-care habits, dental visit and self-reported oral health problems among pregnant women in Benin-City, Nigeria. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among pregnant women attending antenatal clinic of University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria.

  14. Oral and dental health issues in people with mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torales, Julio; Barrios, Iván; González, Israel

    2017-09-21

    Patients with mental disorders are subject to a greater number of risk factors for oral and dental disease than the general population. This is mostly caused by the side effects of the medications that they receive, lack of self-care, difficulty to access health services, a negative attitude towards healthcare providers, and patients’ lack of cooperation in dental treatments. The most common psychiatric disorders in our population are depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and dementia. In disorders such as anxiety and depression, the main issue is the loss of interest in self-care, which results in a poor hygiene. The most frequent oral and dental diseases in these patients are dental cavities and periodontal disease. The purpose of this brief review is to provide up-to-date information about the management of oral and dental diseases of patients with mental disorders.

  15. [The influence of smoking on oral health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelbauskas, Eduardas; Kelbauskiene, Solveiga; Nedzelskiene, Irena

    2005-01-01

    Smoking is a serious risk factor for many diseases. The determining of smoking as a harmful habit among young people is very important. We examined 618 (mean age 21+/-2.9 years) young Lithuanian men. The findings of our research showed that 70% of young men smoked. The analysis of the research findings showed that smoking had a negative effect on oral hygiene. Young men who smoke daily had significantly higher oral hygiene index than those who do not smoke (Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S)=2.9(1.0) and OHI-S=2.2(1.2), respectively; pSmoking is especially harmful to the periodontal tissues. The periodontal lesions were more prevalent and severe among young men who smoke. It is confirmed by the fact that smokers had significantly higher Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) than nonsmokers (CPITN=1.5(0.7) and CPITN=1.2(0.8), respectively; psmoking increased the possibility of having decayed untreated teeth and this shows young men's careless attitude to their oral health. There was no difference in the prevalence of smoking among men who live in the countryside and those who live in the city. However, the men with poorer education smoked more frequently.

  16. Oral health and oral health-related behaviour in preschool children: evidence for a social gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Branden, S; Van den Broucke, S; Leroy, R; Declerck, D; Hoppenbrouwers, K

    2013-02-01

    This study aims to investigate the social gradient in the reported oral health-related behaviour and oral health status of preschool children. Participants were 1,057 children born between October 2003 and July 2004 in Flanders, Belgium. Oral health examinations were performed by trained dentists when the children were 3 and 5 years old (respectively, in 2007 and 2009); data on dietary habits, oral hygiene habits and dental attendance of the children were obtained through structured questionnaires completed by the parents. Maternal educational level, measured in four categories, was used as a proxy of socio-economic status. Logistic and ordinal regressions showed a social gradient for the oral health-related behaviours: a lower educational level of the mother was related to a higher consumption of sugared drinks between meals and to a lower brushing frequency and dental attendance of the child. Children from low-educated mothers also had seven times more chance to present with caries experience than children from mothers with a bachelor degree. Contrary to the expectations, there was a deviation from the gradient in 3-year-olds from the highest educational group showing an increased risk for caries experience (OR = 3.84, 95 % CI = 1.08-13.65). Conclusion. Already in very young children, a graded relationship is observed between socio-economic position, oral health and related behaviours. The results suggest that different approaches are required to promote oral health during early childhood depending on the mother's educational background. As children from the highest social group also have an increased caries risk, specific techniques may be needed.

  17. Promoting Oral Health Using Social Media Platforms: Seeking Arabic Online Oral Health Related Information (OHRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaiman, Sarah; Bahkali, Salwa; Alabdulatif, Norah; Bahkaly, Ahlam; Al-Surimi, Khaled; Househ, Mowafa

    2016-01-01

    Access to oral health care services around the world is limited by a lack of universal coverage. The internet and social media can be an important source for patients to access supplementary oral health related information (OHRI). Online OHRI presents an opportunity to enhance dental public health education about innumerable oral health issues and promote dental self-care. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of social media users among the Saudi population and identify the preferred social media platform for seeking Arabic OHRI and its impact on seekers' knowledge, attitude, and behavior. A total of 2652 Twitter followers were surveyed, using a web-based self-administered questionnaire to collect data on demographic characteristics and online OHRI seeking behavior More than two thirds, 67.7% (n= 1796), of the participants reported they were seeking Arabic online OHRI, while 41.1% of the participants reported they had no preference for using a specific social media platform. These results emphasize the need and importance of supporting the content of social media with trusted and high quality online OHRI resources to promote a high level of public awareness about oral health and dental health services. Further studies in this regard are highly recommended on a larger scale of nationalities to explore the role of social media platform preference in promoting health promotion and dental public health awareness.

  18. [Application of participatory teaching mode in oral health education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, Xiang-ke; Zhao, Yu-hong; Wan, Li; Xiong, Wei; Wang, Yu-jiang; Ou, Xiao-yan

    2013-06-01

    To apply participatory teaching mode in oral health education, and to assess its role in cultivating comprehensive stomatological professionals suitable for the development of modern medicine. Sixty undergraduate students from grade 2005 in Stomatological College of Nanchang University were selected. Among those students, oral health education course was carried out by traditional teaching mode, while 120 undergraduate students from grades 2006 to 2007 received participatory teaching approach, which paid attention to practice in oral health education practice course. After the course, a survey and evaluation of teaching effectiveness was conducted. Questionnaire survey showed that participatory teaching mode could significantly improve the students' capabilities and provide much more help to their study. Application of participatory teaching mode in oral health education course for undergraduates is feasible. It can improve students' comprehensive ability and cultivate their cultural literacy and scientific literacy. It also meets the training goal of stomatological professionals and the development trend of education reform. Supported by Higher School Teaching Reform Research Subject of Jiangxi Province(JXJG-10-1-42).

  19. Paediatricians' views on dental and oral health and treatment needs in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Raghavendra M; Dixit, Uma B

    2011-01-01

    To assess paediatricians' knowledge, attitude and awareness towards dental and oral health and treatment needs of their patients. Eighty-four paediatricians practicing in four cities of North Karnataka, India, were randomly selected for the study and were requested to fill out an objective questionnaire without providing any oral health information. The present study shows that paediatricians who were surveyed had poor knowledge regarding dental and oral health and treatment needs in children. Paediatricians need to update themselves on recent recommendations regarding dental and oral health so as to ensure that all their patients receive timely preventive and restorative dental care.

  20. Role of Salvadora persica chewing stick (miswak): A natural toothbrush for holistic oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Fayez; Naseem, Mustafa; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zafar, Muhammad S; Almas, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    From an ancient tool to a modern way of improving oral health, miswak (chewing stick) has proven to be an effective tool for oral health. The miswak removes the bacterial plaque by mechanical and chemical actions. It provides a cheap and easily accessible way of improving oral health of the individuals and populations. The use of miswak was promoted centuries ago by Prophet Muhammad (Peace be Upon Him). In the modern era, the beneficial role of using miswak such as antiseptic, antimicrobial, anticariogenic and analgesic effects have been proven scientifically. This article reviews the various oral health benefits of miswak in the light of religious, scientific and social evidences.

  1. A Global Oral Health Survey of professional opinion using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougall, Alison; Molina, Gustavo F; Eschevins, Caroline; Faulks, Denise

    2015-06-01

    The concept of oral health is frequently reduced to the absence of disease, despite existing conceptual models exploring the wider determinants of oral health and quality of life. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) (WHO) is designed to qualify functional, social and environmental aspects of health. This survey aimed to reach a consensual description of adult oral health, derived from the ICF using international professional opinion. The Global Oral Health Survey involved a two-round, online survey concerning factors related to oral health including functioning, participation and social environment. Four hundred eighty-six oral health professionals from 74 countries registered online. Professionals were pooled into 18 groups of six WHO world regions and three professional groups. In a randomised stratification process, eight professionals from each pool (n=144) completed the survey. The first round consisted of eight open-ended questions. Open expression replies were analysed for meaningful concepts and linked using established rules to the ICF. In Round 2, items were rated for their relevance to oral health (88% response rate). Eighty-nine ICF items and 30 other factors were considered relevant by at least 80% of participants. International professionals reached consensus on a holistic description of oral health, which could be qualified and quantified using the ICF. These results represent the first step towards developing an ICF Core Set in Oral Health, which would provide a practical tool for reporting outcome measures in clinical practice, for research and epidemiology, and for the improvement of interdisciplinary communication regarding oral health. Professional consensus reached in this survey is the foundation stone for developing an ICF Core Set in Oral Health, allowing the holistic aspects of oral health to be qualified and quantified. This tool is necessary to widen our approach to clinical decision making

  2. Network science and oral health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupome, Gerardo; McCranie, Ann

    2015-01-01

    The present overview of research methods describes a scientific enquiry paradigm that is well established in other disciplines, including health research, but that is fairly new to oral health research. Social networks analysis (SNA) or network science research is a set of relational methods purporting to identify and characterize the connections between members of a system or network, as well as the structure of the network. Persons and communities making up the members of networks have commonly been the focus of SNA studies but corporations or living organisms might just as well be organized in networks. SNA is grounded in both graphic imagery and computational models. SNA is based on the assumptions that features and structure of networks are amenable to characterization, that such information sheds light on the ways members of the network relate to each other (sharing information, diseases, norms, and so on), and that through these connections between members the overall network structure and characteristics are shaped. The overview resorts to examples specific to oral health themes and proposes a few general avenues for population-based research. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  3. Nutrition And Oral Health | Ehizele | Benin Journal of Postgraduate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is an interdependent relationship between nutrition and health of oral tissues. The well-being of the oral tissues, the quantity and quality of saliva and the dimension of taste depend on the intake of nutrients. Oral health determines the type of food consumed and ultimately the nutritional level. A review of literature

  4. Self Rating of Oral Health Status by Students Dental Surgeon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Individuals, generally, in this environment are known to rate their oral health status favourably despite the presence of oral diseases and conditions, probably due to sub optimal awareness level about oral health, however it is not known if this is the case with members of the dental team especially those who ...

  5. Review of the Evidence for Oral Health Promotion Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satur, Julie G.; Gussy, Mark G.; Morgan, Michael V.; Calache, Hanny; Wright, Clive

    2010-01-01

    Dental caries, periodontal diseases, tooth loss and oral cancers have significant burden of disease effects, quality of life and cost implications for the Australian community. Oral health promotion is a key approach to addressing these conditions endorsed as part of the National Oral Health Plan. Understanding the evidence for effectiveness of…

  6. Oral health status and treatment needs of children with congenital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The children had poor oral hygiene. Conclusion: The oral health of these children needs urgent attention. Parents/caregivers should be educated on the high standard of dental care. Keywords: Congenital heart disease, oral health status, caries, periodontitis, treatment needs. Tanzania Dental Journal Vol. 14 (2) 2007: pp.

  7. Aging and oral health: effects in hard and soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiglia, R; Musciotto, A; Compilato, D; Procaccini, M; Lo Russo, L; Ciavarella, D; Lo Muzio, L; Cannone, V; Pepe, I; D'Angelo, M; Campisi, G

    2010-01-01

    Changing demographics, including an increase in life expectancy and the growing numbers of elderly has recently focused attention on the need for geriatric dental care. Ageing affects oral tissues in addition to other parts of the human body, and oral health (including oral mucosa, lips, teeth and associated structures, and their functional activity) is an integral component of general health; indeed, oral disease can cause pain, difficulty in speaking, mastication, swallowing, maintaining a balanced diet, not to mention aesthetical considerations and facial alterations leading to anxiety and depression. The World Health Organization recommends the adoption of certain strategies for improving the oral health of the elderly, including the management and maintenance of oral conditions which are necessary for re-establishing effective masticatory function. Oral health is often neglected in the elderly, and oral diseases associated with aging are complex, adversely affecting the quality of life. Although oral health problems are not usually associated with death, oral cancers result in nearly 8,000 deaths each year, and more than half of these occur at an age of 65 years plus. This report, which is dedicated to geriatric physicians, geriatric dentistry and specialists in oral medicine reviews age-related oral changes in elderly patients and efforts to summarize the effects of aging in hard and soft oral tissues.

  8. Health Worker Opinion/Perception of Health Services provided to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seventy one percent of the health service providers indicated that their patients suffered from body weakness, 86 % indicated that they had patients who suffered from recent loss of body weight, and another 86 % pointed out that their patients had influenza/common cold. Other health complaints reported included unusual ...

  9. The oral health status of adults with a visual impairment, their dental care and oral health information needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, E K; Moles, D R; Kumar, N; Porter, S R

    2010-04-24

    AIM There is little information available concerning the impact of visual impairment upon oral health. The present study sought to identify the oral health and experiences of adults with a visual impairment together with the nature, source and access to oral health information. In addition the study evaluated the oral health status of a group of individuals with a visual impairment with respect to oral health markers, treatment choice and attendance patterns in comparison to a reference group from the general population in the United Kingdom. METHOD One hundred adults with a visual impairment were examined and completed a questionnaire concerning their experience of oral health care and available information sources. The information collected was directly compared with data from the Adult Dental Health Survey 1998 for the south region of England. RESULTS The present group of individuals with a visual impairment had better oral hygiene practices, and similar levels of oral hygiene and hard tissue disease to those of a comparable group of the Adult Dental Health Survey 1998 (ADHS 1998). However 24% of those with a visual impairment were not registered with a dentist and 26% of the patients wished for appropriate information concerning oral health care. CONCLUSIONS There is a need to develop oral health promotion that ensures patients with a visual impairment have appropriate information regarding oral health care and its provision.

  10. Access to oral health care in the Georgia prison system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Kandyce J; Collins, Marie

    2013-10-01

    The Eighth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution establishes the basis for inmates' rights to health care and includes both routine and emergency medical, dental and psychiatric treatment. According to Georgia's Correctional Standards of Health Care, inmates should receive a dental examination within 30 days of incarceration, instructions in oral hygiene and other care by a dentist when medically necessary. The July, August and September 2011 Georgia Department of Corrections' profiles of active inmates in the Georgia prison system reveal a need for both dental and dental hygiene services. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the access to oral health care of inmates in the Georgia prison system. Potential barriers to dental and dental hygiene services are identified and suggestions are offered to improve access to care for inmates.

  11. Oral health information from the dentist to the diabetologist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahdi, Mohamed; Teeuw, Wijnand J.; Meeuwissen, Hedvig G. T. A.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; Gerdes, Victor E. A.; Loos, Bruno G.; Meesters, Eelco W.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes care includes annual evaluation of micro- and macrovascular complications, however, oral pathologies are not included. We studied retrieving oral health information, in particular periodontal disease, from the dentist and studied the association between the reported periodontal condition

  12. Oral health information from the dentist to the diabetologist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahdi, M.; Teeuw, W.J.; Meeuwissen, H.G.T.A.; Hoekstra, J.B.L.; Gerdes, V.E.A.; Loos, B.G.; Meesters, E.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes care includes annual evaluation of micro- and macrovascular complications, however, oral pathologies are not included. We studied retrieving oral health information, in particular periodontal disease, from the dentist and studied the association between the reported periodontal

  13. A content analysis of oral health messages in Australian mass media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelly; Merrick, Jessica; Beasley, Christine

    2015-01-27

    Social analysis regarding oral health and oral health promotion are almost non-existent in the Australian context. The usefulness of such exploration lies in framing and informing research methodologies and health promotion initiatives and can improve our understanding of oral health behaviours and their social contexts. We conducted a systematic content analysis of a random sample of popular Australian magazines, newspapers and television shows from May to September 2012. Our sample included the top three best-selling magazines, six weekly newspapers, one from each available Australian state; and the four highest-ranked Australian prime-time television shows and their associated commercials. Data comprised of 72 hours of prime-time television and 14,628 pages of hardcopy media. 71 oral health related media 'incidents' were counted during a five month period. Only 1.5% of incidents referenced fluoride and only two made dietary references. Women were represented almost six times more than men and the majority of oral health related incidents conveyed no social context (63%). Oral health messages conveyed in Australian media fail to provide a social context for preventative or health-promoting behaviours. In light of increased levels of oral disease and retention of natural teeth, more community-based oral health promotion and support for oral health literacy would be prudent in the Australian context. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Provision of oral health care services in Tanzania: implementation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oral health is integral to general health. Those with ill health are at greater risk of oral diseases that, in turn further complicate their overall health. The experience of pain, endurance of dental abscesses, problems with eating and chewing, embarrassment about the shape or missing of teeth, discoloured or damaged teeth ...

  15. Oral health with fixed appliances orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konta, Brigitte

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment represents an important fraction in dental interventions. According to other medical methods the question for scientific evidence for the effectiveness of these treatments arises. The question of the effectiveness is connected with the question what is understood as an effect. In principle, the effect of the intervention is understood on the basis of the occlusion or dental health, what disregards further functions of oral health. The generalization to oral health is therefore a necessary consideration in science now. If one appreciates this further development, then there is no one single randomised study available which examines the long-term effect of the orthodontic intervention or for the effects on the oral health. The question, whether the application of a fixed appliance in an orthodontic treatment causes a long-term improvement in oral health, cannot be answered at the present time. The scientific status is the definition of oral health at present. Also the question, whether in the long run the dental health can be improved by fixed appliances cannot be answered with a quality usually achieved by evidence-based medicine. Whether correction of a dental malposition is an effective prerequisite for the preservation of the natural teeth, cannot be answered. There is no generalizing study with sufficient scientific background for Europe or Germany to this topic. The risk for caries cannot be quantified. Caries is identified as a central topic in general but due to numerous factors influencing the risk it is not quantified. The question of the indications is completely open from the scientific literature. For the question of the therapy need or therapy priority some indexes were developed, which lead to a quantification. These indices however are fundamentally criticised by recent research in their meaning and the empirical relevance. There is an impression that there exists a big gap between the practical application

  16. Risk factors for dental problems: Recommendations for oral health in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Yvonne; Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha

    2017-11-01

    Primary care providers, gynaecologists and paediatricians have to be aware of the importance of oral health in infancy and possible consequences for child's development, growth, health and quality of life. Oral diseases, particularly dental caries, developmental defects of the dental tissues and periodontal or orthodontic issues have a complex and interrelated aetiology with common, primarily behavioral based risk factors. A sugar-rich diet is the key risk factor with detrimental consequences for general and oral health, particularly in combination with an insufficient oral hygiene. Therefore, daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and reducing of sugar intake are the key pillars to prevent oral diseases, including a positive effect on numerous chronic diseases. Future preventive approaches should focus on pregnant women and mothers of infants with a common vision of health and a shared responsibility for children's oral health care to promote healthy lifestyles and self-care practices in families. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. School dental screening programmes for oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ankita; Khattri, Shivi; Ismail, Noorliza Mastura; Kumbargere Nagraj, Sumanth; Prashanti, Eachempati

    2017-12-21

    School dental screening refers to visual inspection of children's oral cavity in a school setting followed by making parents aware of their child's current oral health status and treatment needs. Screening at school intends to identify children at an earlier stage than symptomatic disease presentation, hence prompting preventive and therapeutic oral health care for the children. This review evaluates the effectiveness of school dental screening in improving oral health status. To assess the effectiveness of school dental screening programmes on overall oral health status and use of dental services. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 15 March 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, the Cochrane Register of Studies, to 15 March 2017), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 15 March 2017), and Embase Ovid (15 September 2016 to 15 March 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on language or publication status when searching the electronic databases; however, the search of Embase was restricted to the last six months due to the Cochrane Centralised Search Project to identify all clinical trials and add them to CENTRAL. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) (cluster or parallel) that evaluated school dental screening compared with no intervention or with one type of screening compared with another. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included six trials (four were cluster-RCTs) with 19,498 children who were 4 to 15 years of age. Four trials were conducted in the UK and two were based in India. We assessed two trials to be at low risk of bias, one trial to be at high risk of bias and three trials to be at unclear risk of bias.None of the six trials

  18. Oral health related quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández, Javier de la Fuente; Vilchis, Fátima del Carmen Aguilar Díaz and María del Carmen Villanueva

    2013-01-01

    Diseases and disorders that damage the mouth and face can disturb well-being and his self-esteem. Oral health-related quality of life (OHRQOL) is a relatively new but rapidly growing notion. The concept of OHRQOL can become a tool to understand and shape not only the state of clinical practice, dental research and dental education but also that of community at large. There are different approaches to measure OHRQOL; the most popular one is multiple item questionnaires. OHRQOL should be the ba...

  19. Interprofessional oral health initiative in a nondental, American Indian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kate L; Larsson, Laura S

    2017-12-01

    Tooth decay is the most common chronic childhood disease and American Indian (AI) children are at increased risk. Pediatric primary care providers are in an opportune position to reduce tooth decay. The purpose of this study was to integrate and evaluate a pediatric oral health project in an AI, pediatric primary care setting. The intervention set included caregiver education, caries risk assessment, and a same-day dental home referral. All caregiver/child dyads age birth to 5 years presenting to the pediatric clinic were eligible (n = 47). Most children (n = 35, 91.1%) were scored as high risk for caries development. Of those with first tooth eruption (n = 36), ten had healthy teeth (27.8%) and seven had seen a dentist in the past 3 months (19.4%). All others were referred to a dentist (n = 29) and 21 families (72.4%) completed the referral. In fewer than 5 min per appointment (x = 4.73 min), the primary care provider integrated oral health screening, education, and referral into the well-child visit. Oral health is part of total health, and thus should be incorporated into routine well-child visits. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  20. Current status of oral health research in Africa: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoute, Aïda; Faye, Daouda; Bourgeois, Denis

    2012-12-01

    Research in oral health contributes effectively to decisions and strategies aimed at improving the oral health of populations. Further contributions to enhance current knowledge of oral health in Africa are required. The principal objective of this study was to produce an analysis of oral health research published from different subregions of Africa and to estimate bilateral and multilateral international cooperation in oral health research during the period 2005-2010. The PubMed database was searched for published articles on topics related to oral health in Africa. A total of 935 oral health-related articles were retrieved during April and May 2011. Publications emanating from Nigeria and South Africa accounted for a striking 68% of all oral health-related material published from Africa during the study period. Researchers from 30 different countries had participated in collaboration on at least one published article. A total of 262 journals had published at least one item examining oral health in Africa, but only 29 journals had published more than seven articles. These 29 journals accounted for 66% of all published material and induced non-African reviews (26%) and African reviews (40%). This study shows strong variation among countries in the production of articles on oral health whereby rich countries produce greater quantities of published research and poorer nations more frequently develop research partnerships with other countries. © 2012 FDI World Dental Federation.

  1. Application of metagenomics in understanding oral health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ping; Gunsolley, John

    2014-01-01

    Oral diseases including periodontal disease and caries are some of the most prevalent infectious diseases in humans. Different microbial species cohabitate and form a polymicrobial biofilm called dental plaque in the oral cavity. Metagenomics using next generation sequencing technologies has produced bacterial profiles and genomic profiles to study the relationships between microbial diversity, genetic variation, and oral diseases. Several oral metagenomic studies have examined the oral microbiome of periodontal disease and caries. Gene annotations in these studies support the association of specific genes or metabolic pathways with oral health and with specific diseases. The roles of pathogenic species and functions of specific genes in oral disease development have been recognized by metagenomic analysis. A model is proposed in which three levels of interactions occur in the oral microbiome that determines oral health or disease. PMID:24642489

  2. Does enhancing personal care assistants' own oral health influence their attitudes and practices towards oral care for residents - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knevel, Rjm; Foley, J; Gussy, M; Karimi, L

    2016-11-01

    To investigate whether, within a residential care facility, increasing personal care assistants' (PCAs) awareness of their own oral health status and self-care skills would alter existing attitudes and behavioural intentions related to the oral health care of residents. PCAs (n = 15) in the dementia care unit of a residential care facility in Melbourne, Australia, were invited to participate in a small research project that appeared to test the effectiveness of a work-place oral health educational programme in enhancing their own oral health whilst masking the actual outcome of interest, namely its effect on PCAs oral healthcare attitudes and practices towards the residents. Post-intervention, the self-reported confidence of the PCAs to identify their personal risk for oral health problems, identifying common oral health conditions and determining the factors contributing to their personal oral health was increased significantly (P personal care assistants' (PCAs) awareness of their own oral health status and self-care skills increased the confidence of the carers to identify oral health risks in the residents, as well as increasing their self-reported confidence in providing oral care to residents. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Access to Oral Health Care: A National Crisis and Call for Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersell, Catherine H

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: According to the report Healthy People 2020, oral health is integral to overall health and access to dental services is essential to promoting and maintaining good oral health. Yet, those who need dental care the most are often the least likely to receive it. The dental hygiene profession is poised to play a pivotal role in the resolution of oral health disparities. The purpose of this manuscript is to examine the critical issue of access to oral health care in the United States from various perspectives and consider potential implications for dental professionals and the oral health care system. This report focuses on major underserved and vulnerable populations and highlights several barriers that significantly affect the ability to access and navigate the oral health care system. These include low socioeconomic status; the shortage and maldistribution of dentists; a lack of professional training regarding current evidence-based oral health guidelines; deficient continuity of care due to inadequate interdisciplinary collaboration; low oral health literacy; and patient perceptions and misconceptions about preventive dental care. This report also contains an update on provider participation in Medicaid; the state of children's oral health; and emerging workforce models, state initiatives, and legislative reforms. Recommendations increasing access to care require local, state, and federal stakeholders to combine forces that take advantage of the existing dental hygiene workforce, utilize innovative delivery models, improve license reciprocity, reduce prohibitive supervision, and expand the dental hygiene scope of practice. The major focus of future research will be on the implementation of mid-level oral health care providers. Dental hygienists are an integral part of the access to care solution and have a great opportunity to lead the call to action and fulfill the American Dental Hygienists' Association's mandate that oral health care is the right of all

  4. Periodontal health status, oral mucosal lesions and adverse oral habits among sea food industry employees of Bhubaneswar, Odisha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Industrial employees are often readily available and constitute a well-defined population group although not representing nationwide samples. Aim: To assess the periodontal status, prevalence of oral mucosal lesions, and adverse oral habits among seafood industry employees of Bhubaneswar. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted among 21–60 years old 790 seafood industry employees. The questionnaire was designed to record demographic details, routine oral hygiene habits, adverse oral habits, community periodontal index, and prevalence of oral mucosal lesions. One-way analysis of variance and t-test analysis were used. Results: The majority of the subjects (72.6% used toothbrush and toothpaste to clean their teeth. Smoking and pan chewing was recorded among 130 (16.5% and 188 (23.8% subjects, respectively. The prevalence of periodontal disease was 86.1% among the study population. The prevalence of calculus among the age group 39–48 years was statistically significant across the age groups. Females as compared to males had lower attachment loss levels. About 56 (7% subjects had leukoplakia and 7 (0.8% subjects had acute necrotizing gingivitis. Conclusions: The findings of this study provided an insight into the periodontal health status, adverse oral habits, routine oral hygiene practices, and the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions of sea food industry employees, which may be useful in designing and planning oral health promotion programs.

  5. Oral Health Knowledge, Past Oral Health Behaviors, and Barriers to Preventive Oral Care of Head Start Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay remains the most common chronic disease of childhood. The CincySmiles Foundation (CSF) developed an instrument to evaluate Head Start parents' knowledge of oral health care practices and to identify barriers Head Start parents face when seeking dental treatment for their children. Data from Head Start parents (n = 675) across 3…

  6. ORAL HEALTH: KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICES IN RURAL COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Diwan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Good oral health is a key for ensuring overall well-being. Dental caries and periodontitis may also be linked to different systemic diseases. Good oral health practices are the clue for preventing the diseases of the oral cavity. Objectives: To assess the oral health knowledge and oral health practice of the people in a rural community. Materials and Methods: Study was conducted in Dehradun district of Uttarakhand state. Sample population has been selected based on systematic random sampling. Study has included 798 participants above 3 years of age. Statistical Analysis Used: Percentage. Results: Study results have shown poorest oral health status amongst population below 19 years of age. Constant pain in teeth/ gums was also reported maximum in this age group. Habit of having sticky food was reported maximum in 3-10 years age group with poorest practice of brushing teeth (daily brushing was reported by only 67% population and twice a day was reported by only 2.4%.. Discussion: Study results have shown that perception of having good oral health is high in this population but oral health practices are not satisfactory. Conclusion: Study finding recommends that oral health awareness needs to be increased in the area especially focusing young children. Awareness programs should be supplemented with primary care services for better oral health and hygiene.

  7. Oral health-related quality of life of patients with oral lichen planus, oral leukoplakia, or oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbach, Julia; Al-Nawas, Bilal; Moergel, Maximilian; Daubländer, Monika

    2014-08-01

    To compare oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of patients with oral lichen planus (OLP), oral leukoplakia (OL), or oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Seventy-three patients with OLP, 44 with OL, and 37 with OSCC participated in this prospective study. The German version of the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-G 14) was used to measure OHRQoL. Descriptive statistics and multivariate analysis of clinical forms, age, gender, alcohol consumption, and smoking habits were evaluated. No association to cumulative OHIP-14 score (P = .086) among the 3 groups was found. However, patients with OLP showed a higher "physical pain" score and a lower "social disability" score (P = .026) than patients with OSCC, followed by patients with OL. Women with OLP had a lower OHRQoL than men. After differentiation of clinical forms of OLP (symptomatic vs asymptomatic), an impact on these patients' OHRQoL in the dimensions "physical pain" and "physical disability" was found. Patients with OLP or OSCC and high OHIP-G 14 scores reported physical pain, which emphasizes the need for physical therapy. For improved OHRQoL, patients with symptomatic forms of OLP would gain more from a treatment compared with those with asymptomatic forms. In contrast, patients with asymptomatic OLP or OL and thus with a minimal impact on their OHRQoL might be at risk of delayed consultation, diagnosis, and treatment of their condition. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of a Comprehensive Oral Health Curriculum on Knowledge, Behavior, and Attitude of Physician Assistant Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicely, Sara L

    2016-06-01

    Oral health assessment by the medical provider needs to be thorough and accurate. Many schools for medical providers are providing an increasing amount of oral health education to students during the didactic year. A dedicated and comprehensive oral health curriculum was developed for a physician assistant (PA) program in Virginia for the purpose of evaluating the effectiveness of the curriculum for changing students' attitudes, behavior, and knowledge. First- and fourth-semester PA students attended about 18 hours of lectures, laboratories, and clinical experiences dedicated to oral health. The change in student attitude, behavior, and knowledge of oral health and assessment was assessed using a validated precurricular and postcurricular survey. The responses to the precurricular and postcurricular surveys were compared using paired t-tests. The analysis revealed an overall significant increase (P < .001) in attitude and knowledge of oral health after the curriculum intervention. The only significant change noted in student behavior was an increase in flossing frequency. The oral health curriculum was successful in changing the attitude and knowledge of all students, regardless of their level of education in PA school. Therefore, an oral health curriculum conceivably could be added to a medical education program at any time that the course load allows for additional hours.

  9. Transcultural oral health care: 2. Developing transcultural oral health promotional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, S Y

    2000-09-01

    This paper discusses the common problems involved in developing transcultural oral health promotional materials, and describes the best ways to avoid them. Translation errors and poor illustrations are by far the most frequently encountered problems followed by cultural incompatibility, inadequate information, and text and layout mistakes.

  10. Oral health in preschool children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensson, Malin; Wendt, Lill-Kari; Koch, Göran; Oldaeus, Göran; Birkhed, Dowen

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate oral health and its determinants in 3-year-old and 6-year-old children with asthma. Caries and gingivitis were examined in 127 asthmatic (all children with asthma in a selected area and born during a specific time period) and 117 matched, healthy control children. The parents were interviewed regarding various oral-health-related factors. The mean dfs (+/- standard deviation) in the 3-year-old with asthma was 1.4 +/- 3.2 compared with 0.5 +/- 1.2 in the controls (P gingival bleeding than the healthy controls (P gingivitis in the 6-year-old children. Asthmatic children reported higher consumption of sugar-containing drinks and were more frequently mouthbreathers than healthy children (P asthma and immigrant background, the mean dfs was higher compared with immigrant children in the control group (P asthma have higher caries prevalence than healthy children. The factors discriminating for caries in asthmatic children are higher intake of sugary drinks, mouth breathing, and immigrant background.

  11. Faculty Readiness for Oral Health Integration into Health Care Professional Education: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, Maria C; Holloman, Jessica L; Goodkind, Alison B

    2016-01-01

    Despite mounting evidence of the oral-systemic link, oral health is often treated as a separate entity in health care professional education and training. Faculty attitudes and levels of knowledge and skills related to oral health have been cited as barriers to integration, though no research has reported health care faculty's oral health knowledge and skills or attitudes towards oral health curricular integration. The aim of this study was to assess the oral health knowledge, skills, and attitudes of interdisciplinary health care faculty at a large, metropolitan university. A 25-item, web-based survey was distributed to 350 faculty members across nine academic health care programs during the 2013-2014 academic year. A response rate of 13% (n=45) was achieved. Findings indicated overall positive faculty attitudes towards oral health integration, but significant gaps in faculty oral health knowledge and oral health clinical skills. A one-way ANOVA analysis revealed statistically significant differences in oral health clinical skills between faculty of different disciplines. This study is the first to assess health care faculty's oral health knowledge and skills and their attitudes towards oral health curricular integration. Findings highlight potential areas for faculty development, education, and training in oral health.

  12. [Self-rating of oral health according to the Oral Health Impact Profile and associated factors: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardo, Marilisa Carneiro Leão; Moysés, Simone Tetu; Moysés, Samuel Jorge

    2013-06-01

    To systematically evaluate the literature to investigate associations between social, demographic, economic, psychosocial, and behavioral factors and the self-perception of oral health measured using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP). In this systematic review of the literature, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews (PRISMA) were adapted for the performance of a qualitative metasummary, without meta-analysis. Articles about oral health and associated factors with implications for quality of life were selected, with a focus on the tool for self-rating of the oral health-disease process, the OHIP. Pubmed/National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the Virtual Health Library (Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde - BVS/BIREME) were searched. Articles published between 2001 and 2011 were included. The following Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) were employed: oral health, quality of life, sickness impact profile, and socioeconomic factors. Of 57 articles identified, 20 met the inclusion criteria. The metasummary revealed that a poor self-perception of oral health was associated with unfavorable social, economic, demographic, and psychosocial factors, as well as with undesirable habits and poor clinical oral conditions. There is consensus in the literature about the influence of the investigated factors on the self-perception of oral health and on quality of life. The OHIP is an important aid for determining oral health needs and for developing strategies to control/reduce disease and promote oral health, with a consequent positive impact on quality of life.

  13. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Vaginitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z Topics Bacterial Vaginosis Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Women's Health NICHD News and Spotlights Getting to Know the New NICHD Director Dr. Lisa Halvorson New Chief of Gynecologic Health and Disease Branch Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, ...

  14. Medicare Provider Payment Data - Home Health Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Home Health Agency PUF contains information on utilization, payment (Medicare payment and standard payment), and submitted charges organized by CMS Certification...

  15. Visionaries or dreamers? The story of infant oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Arthur J; Quiñonez, Rocio B

    2011-01-01

    To review the early history of the promotion of oral health for infants and toddlers, the impact of the AAPD guideline on infant oral health care and ways to maximize health outcomes. Review of the literature. Concepts on primary prevention and early intervention were reported as early as the 19th century. Progress to positively impact the oral health of children has been made. Nevertheless, the advice of early scholars and clinicians that oral care and prevention must begin early with the caregivers and the emergence of the infant's first tooth have not been fully embraced by the profession. A historical perspective on oral health care for infants and toddlers has been presented. There is a need to move away from the surgical approach of managing oral disease and embrace the concepts of primary care beginning perinatally while more broadly addressing social determinants of health.

  16. The Impact of an Interprofessional Oral Health Curriculum on Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Oren; Brisotti, Madeline F; Gascon, Leslie; Henshaw, Michelle; Kaufman, Laura B

    2017-03-01

    Despite the prevalence of oral disease, the subject of oral health historically has been absent from medical education. We have developed an interprofessional curriculum in collaboration with our school of dentistry to teach oral health in the primary care setting to physician assistant (PA) students. The goal was to create and assess the impact of a curricular model that would be adaptable to various academic settings. A blend of classroom, clinical skills lab, observations in the dental clinic, and observed structured clinical examinations was used to teach oral health to first-year (didactic year) PA students. The objectives were created in collaboration between the medical and dental faculties and included topics on general oral health, oral cancer, geriatrics, pediatrics, and fluoride varnish. A total of 12 hours of instructional time was delivered to 23 students over 3 semesters from 2014 to 2015. Pretesting and posttesting demonstrated long-term knowledge retention that was 14% better than baseline at 8 months (P history and the physical examination demonstrated that the students incorporated oral health concepts. A significant impact on trainees can occur after a short, focused amount of instructional time in oral health. Students demonstrate enthusiasm and begin using oral health skills early on. A focused interprofessional oral health curriculum can likely be successfully integrated into various academic settings with a positive effect on learning and improved patient care.

  17. Community oral health literacy: improving use of oral-health care guarantee in children aged 6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Cornejo-Ovalle

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of comprehensive oral health care for children aged 6 (GES-6years showed low utilization of this guarantee, with lower use for children from municipal public schools. The empowerment and health literacy of parents improve their role as oral-health promoters for their children. Objective: To implement and to assess a strategy of empowerment and health literacy of the community about their guaranteed health rights to increase the use of GES-6years. Methods: A mixed design. Using qualitative methodology we will design a communication tool, culturally and socially appropriate to be sent to the beneficiary community of this guarantee. Using a nonrandomized community trial, this instrument designed to empower and improve oral health literacy on GES-6 guarantee, will be sent as personalized letter (intervention signed by the mayor of the municipality with a message aimed to children beneficiaries for GES -6years and another addressed to their parents/guardians. Schools would be selected from clusters (communes of the two regions selected for convenience. Communes will be randomly selected amog those whose authorities agree to participate, and will be selected as for intervention or control. Data analysis will assess the differences in the prevalence of use of this guarantee among children from municipal schools belonging to the intervention or control arm.

  18. Factors associated with oral health perception in older Brazilians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Claudete Ivani Panizzi; Abegg, Claídes

    2008-03-01

    To investigate the self-perception of oral health in older people, aged 65-74, from the central region of southern Brazil. Cross-sectional population-based study using data from the Oral Health Conditions Survey of Southern Brazil, developed between the years 2002 and 2003, by the State Health Secretary (SHS) of Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Brazil. Socioeconomic and demographic variables, self-perception of oral health and clinical data, as well as dental pain were evaluated in 618 elderly people. Multinomial logistic regression was used to evaluate the effect of explanatory variables on the self-perception of oral health. Almost half of the elderly were edentate and rated their oral health as good or very good. With regard to dental pain, 28.8% of the people declared that they had experienced dental pain in the 6 months before the interview. There was a significant relationship between dental pain and classification of oral health, and chewing ability. Following adjustment, the need for dental prostheses remained associated with the influence of oral health on establishing relationships. Similarly, personal income remained associated with the elderly's perception of their ability to talk. Finally, the level of education remained related to the influence of oral health status in people's relationships. Dental pain and the need for dental prostheses were the main factors that affected the self-perception of oral health of elderly people from southern Brazil.

  19. The Oral Microbiome in Health and Its Implication in Oral and Systemic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio-Maia, B; Caldas, I M; Pereira, M L; Pérez-Mongiovi, D; Araujo, R

    2016-01-01

    The oral microbiome can alter the balance between health and disease, locally and systemically. Within the oral cavity, bacteria, archaea, fungi, protozoa, and viruses may all be found, each having a particular role, but strongly interacting with each other and with the host, in sickness or in health. A description on how colonization occurs and how the oral microbiome dynamically evolves throughout the host's life is given. In this chapter the authors also address oral and nonoral conditions in which oral microorganisms may play a role in the etiology and progression, presenting the up-to-date knowledge on oral dysbiosis as well as the known underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms involving oral microorganisms in each condition. In oral pathology, oral microorganisms are associated with several diseases, namely dental caries, periodontal diseases, endodontic infections, and also oral cancer. In systemic diseases, nonoral infections, adverse pregnancy outcomes, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes are among the most prevalent pathologies linked with oral cavity microorganisms. The knowledge on how colonization occurs, how oral microbiome coevolves with the host, and how oral microorganisms interact with each other may be a key factor to understand diseases etiology and progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Oral Health Status and Oral Health-related Quality of Life among Hospitalized and Nonhospitalized Geriatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlBaker, Abdulaziz M; AlBaqami, Fahad F; AlHarbi, Tariq M; AlAmri, Mohammad D; Baskaradoss, Jagan K

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the oral health status and its effect on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of hospitalized and nonhospitalized elderly patients in a single community. The null hypothesis for the study states that there is no difference in the oral health status and OHRQoL between hospitalized and nonhospitalized elderly patients. This study was conducted at the King Khalid Hospital and College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A total of 99 (43 - hospitalized and 56 - nonhospitalized) geriatric patients participated in this study. Oral health-related quality of life was estimated using the geriatric oral health assessment index questionnaire. Decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) index and plaque index were used to assess the oral health status of the study participants. The mean age of the study participants was 68.2 years; 17.2% were females and 82.8% were males. There was no significant difference between hospitalized and nonhospitalized patients in OHRQoL and DMFT index. However, the oral hygiene status was better among nonhospitalized patients as compared with hospitalized patients. There was a significant difference in the oral hygiene status between hospitalized and nonhospitalized geriatric patients. Caregivers must be sensitized to the importance of oral health for the elderly population, and oral health should be considered an integral component of general health.

  1. Oral Histories as Critical Qualitative Inquiry in Community Health Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Sarah Gabriella; Genkova, Ana; Castañeda, Yvette; Alexander, Simone; Hebert-Beirne, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Qualitative methods such as focus groups and interviews are common methodologies employed in participatory approaches to community health assessment to develop effective community health improvement plans. Oral histories are a rarely used form of qualitative inquiry that can enhance community health assessment in multiple ways. Oral histories…

  2. Oral Health Promotion in Schools: Rationale and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizito, Alex; Caitlin, Meredith; Wang, Yili; Kasangaki, Arabat; Macnab, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explain the rationale and potential for the WHO health promoting schools (HPS) to improve children's oral health, and describe validated quantitative methodologies and qualitative approaches to measure program impact. Design/Methodology/Approach: Critical discussion of the impact of poor oral health and…

  3. Oral Health Status, Treatment Needs and Knowledge, Attitude and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Dental caries, Health care workers, Knowledge, Oral health, Treatment needs. Access this ... any deleterious habits, self-perception of oral health needs etc., ..... children. J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;36:411‑5. 20. Thean H, Wong ML, Koh H. The dental awareness of nursing home staff in Singapore ‑ A pilot study.

  4. Empirical Survey of Oral Health Information Exposure to Obafemi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Television shows had the highest score. Information received from medical doctors, dentists and health talks were perceived to be most useful. Participants overall oral health risks awareness was 74%. It was discovered that oral health information received within a year was slightly low and mostly through the mass media.

  5. Oral health in Libya: addressing the future challenges | Peeran ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Libya is a vast country situated in North Africa, having a relatively better functioning economy with a scanty population. This article is the first known attempt to review the current state of oral health care in Libya and to explore the present trends and future challenges. Libyan health system, oral health care, and human ...

  6. Basic income guarantee: a review of implications for oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-An; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2017-08-03

    To: a) Familiarize readers with the concept of a basic income guarantee (BIG) and its different forms; b) Consider how BIG could improve oral health and decrease oral health disparities; c) Motivate readers to advocate for the evaluation of oral health outcomes in BIG experiments. Published articles and book chapters that have analyzed and reviewed data from past BIG pilot projects were examined for their findings on health and socioeconomic outcomes. Our findings suggest various areas and mechanisms whereby BIG can influence oral health-related outcomes, whether through impacts on work, illness and injury, education, a social multiplier effect, expenditure behavior, and/or mental illness and other health outcomes. Our findings illustrate the importance of assessing oral health-related outcomes in future BIG pilot projects. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  7. [Exploration of the oral health education experimental teaching for oral health education reform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yingying; Hu, Wenting; Zhang, Juanjuan; Sun, Yan; Gao, Yuguang

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to improve students' ability in practical and theoretical courses of oral health education and to promote students' learning interest and initiative. Fourth-year students of the oral medical profession from 2006 to 2008 at Weifang Medical University were chosen as research objects for oral health education to explore the experimental teaching reform. The students were divided into test and control groups, with the test group using the "speak out" way of teaching and the control group using the traditional teaching method. Results of after-class evaluation of the test group, as well as final examination and practice examination of the two groups, were analyzed and compared. After-class evaluation results of the test group showed that the "speak out" teaching method was recognized by the students and improved students' ability to understand oral health education. The final examination and practice examination results showed that the score of the test group was higher than that of the control group (P education, in accordance with the trend of teaching reform.

  8. Implementation of Oral Health Education to Orphan Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedekar, Mikhila; Suresh, K V; Parkar, M I; Malik, Neelima; Patil, Snehal; Taur, Swapnil; Pradhan, Debapriya

    2015-12-01

    To determine the knowledge and oral hygiene status of orphanage children in Pune and changes in them after health education. Interventional study. Centers for Orphan Children in Pune, India, from April to June 2014. A specially designed questionnaire was used to assess the dental problems and existing oral hygiene maintenance practice among children between 5 - 12 years of age (n=100) in an orphanage center. Pre- and postinterventional intra-oral examination was carried out to check their oral hygiene status which included DMFS [Decayed Missing Filled Tooth Surfaces index (for permanent teeth)], OHIS (Simplified Oral Hygiene Index) and gingival indices. Intervention was in the form of oral health education, demonstration of correct brushing technique, diet counselling and maintenance of overall oral hygiene. Present study shows that the orphans had multiple dental problems along with improper oral hygiene practices and careless attitude towards oral health. Pre- and post-interventional DMFS was compared using Wilcoxon sign rank test, which was not significant; while OHIS and gingival indices were compared by using repeat measures ANOVA(p educational intervention. Oral health education at right age can help to cultivate healthy oral hygiene practices in orphans which will benefit them for lifelong. Caretakers should be educated and trained about oral hygiene practices so that they can implement it and supervise the orphan children.

  9. Effects of nutrition on oral health | Agbelusi | Nigerian Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of nutrition on oral health. ... The effects of malnutrition can be seen in the oral structures in all stages of human growth and development from conception to old age. ... These oral lesions are painful; disturb food intake and mastication thereby further compromising the nutrition of the affected individuals. In Africa ...

  10. Oral Sexual Experience among Young Adolescents Receiving General Health Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekeloo, Bradley O.; Howard, Donna E.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed young adolescents receiving general health examinations regarding oral sex occurrence. Overall, 18 percent reported having oral sex, and of that 18 percent, 25 percent reported no vaginal sex. Few adolescents used barrier protection during oral sex. Most adolescents thought that penile-anal sex could transmit HIV, but only 68 percent…

  11. Oral Health Education for Medical Students: Malaysian and Australian Students' Perceptions of Educational Experience and Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mas S; Abuzar, Menaka A; Razak, Ishak A; Rahman, Sabariah A; Borromeo, Gelsomina L

    2017-09-01

    Education in oral health is important to prepare future medical professionals for collaborative roles in maintaining patients' oral health, an important component of general health and well-being. The aims of this study were to determine the perceptions of medical students in Malaysia and Australia of the quality of their training in oral health care and their perceptions of their professional role in maintaining the oral health of their patients. A survey was administered in the classroom with final-year Malaysian (n=527; response rate=79.3%) and Australian (n=455; response rate: 60%) medical students at selected institutions in those countries. In the results, most of these medical students reported encountering patients with oral health conditions including ulcers, halitosis, and edentulism. A majority in both countries reported believing they should advise patients to obtain regular dental check-ups and eat a healthy diet, although they reported feeling less than comfortable in managing emergency dental cases. A high percentage reported they received a good education in smoking cessation but not in managing dental trauma, detecting cancerous lesions, or providing dietary advice in oral disease prevention. They expressed support for inclusion of oral health education in medical curricula. These students' experience with and perceptions of oral health care provide valuable information for medical curriculum development in these two countries as well as increasing understanding of this aspect of interprofessional education and practice now in development around the world.

  12. Oral prophylactic procedures and gingival health among Nigerian school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sote, E O

    1991-01-01

    Various researchers have advocated the use of chewing sticks in community oral health programmes because they are readily available, cheaper than the toothbrush and paste, and are found to possess antiplaque properties. Oral health education is essential for enlightenment on good oral health maintenance. The study was thus aimed at educating children on how to maintain a good oral health (including the efficient use of various oral hygiene implements) and noting the impact on their gingival health. 120 school children with no gingival disease, aged 12 to 14 years, participated in the study. They were all examined intra-orally and their plaque scores were recorded. After two weeks of oral health education programmes, they were randomly assigned into three equal groups, each group using either the toothbrush/paste, the Massularia acuminata chewing stick or the Sorindeia warneckei chewing stick for three months. Their plaque scores and gingivitis incidence were recorded. 36.0% had gingivitis, 2.0% had periodontitis with pocketing greater than or equal to 5 mm, and about 3.0% had gingival recession. More toothbrush users than the chewing stick users in the study had gingivitis (P less than .05). The inherent danger in introducing unfamiliar oral hygiene procedures to children without close monitoring is highlighted. Whatever mode of oral hygiene is adopted for use in children, adequate supervision by knowledgeable parents and teachers, and close monitoring by oral health personnel is mandatory in order to ensure effective use.

  13. How dental care can preserve and improve oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Clemencia M; Arevalo, Oscar

    2009-07-01

    Oral health is associated with overall health, and lack of access to dental care has consequences that go far beyond aesthetics. Most oral diseases are preventable and are relatively easy and inexpensive to address at early stages. However, multiple barriers make dental care unreachable for a sizable portion of the United States population, who consequently has higher incidence and prevalence of disease. Achieving meaningful improvements in oral health status among these groups will require a revamping of the dental infrastructure, augmenting the productivity and skills of the dental workforce, and increasing the population's oral health literacy.

  14. Physician Assistant Student Perceptions of an Interprofessional, Peer-to-Peer Oral Health Curriculum Led by Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Lisa E; Eve, Elizabeth J; Dolce, Maria C; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Nalliah, Romesh P

    2017-12-01

    Physician assistants (PA) are health care team members who often work in primary care. Providing oral health education to PAs during training could improve oral health for vulnerable patients who seek treatment in the primary care setting and who are less able to access dental care. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a peer-to-peer oral health curriculum taught by dental students to their PA student colleagues. Dental students presented an interactive, case-based curriculum, followed by a hands-on oral examination training session. PA student feedback was obtained, and results were analyzed. Students found the content to be highly relevant and well presented. Conveying oral health competencies to future primary care providers may reduce oral health disparities. PA students reported improved understanding of oral health and indicated they would incorporate what they had learned into their future clinical practice.

  15. "Sorry, I'm not a dentist": perspectives of rural GPs on oral health in the bush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Tony; Hoang, Ha; Stuart, Jackie; Crocombe, Leonard

    2016-01-18

    To examine the provision of oral health and oral health service in rural areas from the perspective of general practitioners working in communities without resident dentists. A qualitative approach using face-to-face, semi-structured interviews with 30 GPs from rural Queensland, Tasmania and South Australia, conducted between October 2013 and October 2014. Four major themes emerged from the interviews: rural oral health, managing oral health presentations, barriers to patients seeing a dentist, and improving oral health. Rural GPs saw patients with a range of oral health problems, including toothache, abscesses and trauma, and observed poor oral health in their communities. Some acknowledged that they were not confident when dealing with oral health problems; they typically provided short-term pain relief, prescriptions for antibiotics, and advised patients to see a dentist. Participants noted that rural patients may not see a dentist when advised to do so because symptoms had abated, oral health was regarded as a low priority, or the costs of travelling to and seeing a dentist discouraged them. The interviewees recommended building the capacity of GPs to better care for patients with oral health problems, establishing more effective communication and referral pathways between GPs and dentists, focusing on preventive dental care, and delivering dental services in more flexible and consistent ways that better meet the needs of the communities. Rural oral health could be improved by several approaches, including additional training for GPs in oral health care, primary prevention activities in communities, and improving the access to dental services.

  16. Public policy and legislation for oral health: a convergence of opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Mary C

    2013-01-01

    The first surgeon general's report regarding oral health, Oral Health in America, called for a national effort to improve oral health among Americans and raised awareness of the importance of oral health; however, many Americans continue to experience poor oral health and are unable to access oral health care. Renewed national interest in oral health and access to oral health care through recent public policy documents and legislation presents a convergence of opportunities for the dental hygiene profession to continue to serve as a strong voice for the prevention of oral disease and the promotion of oral health for all segments of the population.

  17. Meeting the oral health needs of 12-year-olds in China: human resources for oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangyu; Bernabé, Eduardo; Liu, Xuenan; Zheng, Shuguo; Gallagher, Jennifer E

    2017-06-20

    their time in providing clinical care. The findings highlight the gap between dental workforce needs and workforce capacity in China. Significant implications for health policy and human resources for oral health in this country with a developing health system are discussed including the need for public health action.

  18. Health Worker Opinion/Perception of Health Services provided to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of Ni-Cu in the area. This investigation furthermore afforded researchers an opportunity to explore the health services that are provided in the area. The study area ..... Environmental air pollution or ingestion of contaminated phane worms, could ultimately result in allergies, asthma, bleeding tendencies and hypertension.

  19. Constructing public oral health policies in Brazil: issues for reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharina Leite Matos Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the construction of public oral health policies in Brazil by reviewing the available literature. It includes a discussion of the social responses given by the Brazilian State to oral health policies and the relationship of these responses with the ideological oral health movements that have developed globally, and that have specifically influenced oral health policies in Brazil. The influence of these movements has affected a series of hegemonic practices originating from both Market Dentistry and Preventive and Social Dentistry in Brazil. Among the state activities that have been set into motion, the following stand out: the drafting of a law to regulate the fluoridation of the public water supply, and the fluoridation of commercial toothpaste in Brazil; epidemiological surveys to analyze the status of the Brazilian population's oral health; the inclusion of oral health in the Family Health Strategy (Estratégia de Saúde da Família - ESF; the drawing up of the National Oral Health Policy, Smiling Brazil (Brasil Sorridente. From the literature consulted, the progressive expansion of state intervention in oral health policies is observed. However, there remains a preponderance of hegemonic "dental" practices reproduced in the Unified Public Health Service (Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS and the Family Health Strategy.

  20. Parental perceptions of children's oral health: The Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slade Gary D

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental disease and treatment experience can negatively affect the oral health related quality of life (OHRQL of preschool aged children and their caregivers. Currently no valid and reliable instrument is available to measure these negative influences in very young children. The objective of this research was to develop the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS to measure the OHRQL of preschool children and their families. Methods Twenty-two health professionals evaluated a pool of 45 items that assess the impact of oral health problems on 6-14-year-old children and their families. The health professionals identified 36 items as relevant to preschool children. Thirty parents rated the importance of these 36 items to preschool children; 13 (9 child and 4 family items were considered important. The 13-item ECOHIS was administered to 295 parents of 5-year-old children to assess construct validity and internal consistency reliability (using Cronbach's alpha. Test-retest reliability was evaluated among another sample of parents (N = 46 using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Results ECOHIS scores on the child and parent sections indicating worse quality of life were significantly associated with fair or poor parental ratings of their child's general and oral health, and the presence of dental disease in the child. Cronbach's alphas for the child and family sections were 0.91 and 0.95 respectively, and the ICC for test-retest reliability was 0.84. Conclusion The ECOHIS performed well in assessing OHRQL among children and their families. Studies in other populations are needed to further establish the instrument's technical properties.

  1. Oral health and access to dental care: a qualitative exploration in rural Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Elham; Wootton, John; Galarneau, Chantal; Bedos, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    We sought to explore how rural residents perceive their oral health and their access to dental care. We conducted a qualitative research study in rural Quebec. We used purposeful sampling to recruit study participants. A trained interviewer conducted audio-recorded, semistructured interviews until saturation was reached. We conducted thematic analysis to identify themes. This included interview debriefing, transcript coding, data display and interpretation. Saturation was reached after 15 interviews. Five main themes emerged from the interviews: rural idyll, perceived oral health, access to oral health care, cues to action and access to dental information. Most participants noted that they were satisfied with the rural lifestyle, and that rurality per se was not a threat to their oral health. However, they criticized the limited access to dental care in rural communities and voiced concerns about the impact on their oral health. Participants noted that motivation to seek dental care came mainly from family and friends rather than from dental care professionals. They highlighted the need for better education about oral health in rural communities. Residents' satisfaction with the rural lifestyle may be affected by unsatisfactory oral health care. Health care providers in rural communities should be engaged in tailoring strategies to improve access to oral health care.

  2. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  3. Oral health status of children with autistic disorder in Chennai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnu Rekha, C; Arangannal, P; Shahed, H

    2012-06-01

    To assess the oral health status of autistic children in Chennai. Oral health status was assessed for 483 children with autism, solicited from special education schools, autistic child centres and therapy centres. Conditions assessed were plaque accumulation, gingival health, dental caries, malocclusion, developmental anomalies, oral injuries and restorations. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests of significance were used to compare groups. Proportions test was used to compare the significance of the parameters between boys and girls. Autistic children with primary dentition showed significantly higher incidence of dental caries (24%), when compared to other oral conditions. Children with mixed dentition had more gingivitis (50%) and children with permanent dentition had more gingivitis (48.96%) and malocclusion (71.15%). All the oral conditions were seen more in boys than girls. Autistic children have significantly poor oral hygiene and higher incidence of malocclusion and dental caries when compared to other oral conditions.

  4. Oral Health Literacy and Measures of Periodontal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Jennifer S; Atchison, Kathryn A; Macek, Mark D; Markovic, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Existing evidence demonstrating a relationship between health literacy (HL) and periodontal health is insufficient to identify how providers can help patients manage periodontal disease. This study assesses associations between HL measures (word recognition, numeracy, and conceptual knowledge) and signs of periodontal disease. This study included 325 new patients at a dental school clinic and employed an oral HL (OHL) survey, full-mouth radiographs, and clinical examination. Evaluations included the relationship between each HL measure versus number of teeth, bleeding score, plaque score, and periodontal severity with linear and ordinal logistic regression models before and after adjusting for covariates. Among HL measures, the Newest Vital Sign demonstrated a significant relationship with number of teeth and the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults showed a significant association with plaque score. The short Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine and Dentistry (REALMD-20) showed participants who performed in the highest quartile had nearly two additional teeth, over 5.5% fewer bleeding sites, and nearly 9% fewer teeth with plaque after adjustment for demographic variables, smoking, and diabetes mellitus (DM). Participants who scored in the highest quartile of the Comprehensive Measure of Oral Health Knowledge (CMOHK) had nearly 9% less plaque. Two OHL instruments (REAMLD-20 and CMOHK) provided statistical associations with clinical measures of periodontal health at a level that could be considered of moderate clinical relevancy. Findings suggest dentists may wish to assess familiarity of their patients with dental terminology and knowledge of periodontal disease to provide education on oral hygiene, smoking, and DM.

  5. The Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Cohort: design, population and dental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Karen M; Holm-Pedersen, Poul; Jensen, Allan Bardow

    2011-01-01

    Gerodontology 2010; doi: 10.1111/j.1741-2358.2010.00383.x The Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Cohort: design, population and dental health Background: In order to study the way old age influence oral health, the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Cohort (COHS) has been established. Objectives: To describe...

  6. Assessment of the relationship among the oral health status, oral hygiene practices, and habits of school teachers in Mangalore city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishi Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, teachers play an important role in providing long-term health education and changes in behavior. Aim: To assess the relationship among the oral health status, oral hygiene practices, and habits of primary and middle school teachers in Mangalore city. Methodology: A cross-sectional survey was carried out for 1½ months on 241 primary and middle school teachers in Mangalore city. Oral hygiene practices and habits were assessed using a questionnaire. The oral health status of the teachers was examined using simplified oral hygiene index, gingival index, and caries experience was scored using the decayed, missing, and filled teeth index. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square were done. P < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: A total of 241 school teachers were included in the study. The majority of the males and females were in the age group of 30-39 years and 40-49 years, respectively. The increase in the gingival score in subjects was not statistically significant with the use of indigenous methods along with the brush. With respect to caries experience and oral hygiene practices, as the frequency of brushing increase, there was a decrease in the number of decayed and missing teeth and increase in the number of filled teeth (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The findings of this study highlight the importance of proper oral hygiene habits and its relationship of oral health status and recommend the continuous implementation of school-based programs to promote the oral health.

  7. Oral health promotion interventions on oral yeast in hospitalised and medically compromised patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Otto L T; Bandara, H M H N; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; McGrath, Colman; Li, Leonard S W

    2012-03-01

    Yeast are major aetiological agents of localised oral mucosal lesions, and are also leading causes of nosocomial bloodstream infections. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of oral health promotion interventions on the prevalence and incidence of these opportunistic oral pathogens in hospitalised and medically compromised patients. The PubMed, ISI Web of Science and Cochrane Library databases were searched for clinical trials assessing the effect of oral health promotion interventions on oral yeast. Chlorhexidine delivered in a variety of oral hygiene products appeared to have some effect on oral yeast, although some studies found equivocal effects. Although a wide array of other compounds have also been investigated, their clinical effectiveness remains to be substantiated. Likewise, the utility of mechanical oral hygiene interventions and other oral health promotion measures such as topical application of salivary substitute, remains unsettled. Although many chemical agents contained in oral hygiene products have proven in vitro activity against oral yeast, their clinical effectiveness and potential role as adjuncts or alternative therapies to conventional treatment remains to be confirmed by further high-quality randomised controlled trials. This is pertinent, given the recent emergence of yeast resistance to conventional antifungal agents. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Erythritol Is More Effective Than Xylitol and Sorbitol in Managing Oral Health Endpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter de Cock

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To provide a comprehensive overview of published evidence on the impact of erythritol, a noncaloric polyol bulk sweetener, on oral health. Methods. A literature review was conducted regarding the potential effects of erythritol on dental plaque (biofilm, dental caries, and periodontal therapy. The efficacy of erythritol on oral health was compared with xylitol and sorbitol. Results. Erythritol effectively decreased weight of dental plaque and adherence of common streptococcal oral bacteria to tooth surfaces, inhibited growth and activity of associated bacteria like S. mutans, decreased expression of bacterial genes involved in sucrose metabolism, reduced the overall number of dental caries, and served as a suitable matrix for subgingival air-polishing to replace traditional root scaling. Conclusions. Important differences were reported in the effect of individual polyols on oral health. The current review provides evidence demonstrating better efficacy of erythritol compared to sorbitol and xylitol to maintain and improve oral health.

  9. Primary oral health care: a missing link in public health in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basharat, S; Shaikh, B T

    2016-12-12

    In Pakistan, the limited availability of oral health care and the high level of unmet oral health care needs are well documented. The recorded prevalence of dental caries is 50-70% and that of oral cancer is among the highest in the world. Although oral health care has been declared to be part of the primary health care system, oral health disparities between rich and poor, and emerging problems of access to and use of appropriate care have never been addressed, reflecting a lack of awareness among both patients and health system decisionmakers. Oral cancer screening and atraumatic restorative treatment for tooth decay could be included in a basic package of oral care that does not require qualified dental surgeons. This article develops an argument, based on literature review and an analysis of the health system in Pakistan, for how a basic oral health programme could be an accessible, affordable and acceptable component of the primary health care system.

  10. Breastfeeding: an overview of oral and general health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salone, Lindsey Rennick; Vann, William F; Dee, Deborah L

    2013-02-01

    Breastfeeding is the reference against which alternative infant feeding models must be measured with regard to growth, development and other health outcomes. Although not a systematic review, this report provides an update for dental professionals, including an overview of general and oral health-related benefits associated with breastfeeding. The authors examined the literature regarding general health protections that breastfeeding confers to infants and mothers and explored associations between breastfeeding, occlusion in the primary dentition and early childhood caries. To accomplish these goals, they reviewed systematic reviews when available and supplemented them with comparative studies and with statements and reports from major nongovernmental and governmental organizations. When compared with health outcomes among formula-fed children, the health advantages associated with breastfeeding include a lower risk of acute otitis media, gastroenteritis and diarrhea, severe lower respiratory infections, asthma, sudden infant death syndrome, obesity and other childhood diseases and conditions. Evidence also suggests that breastfed children may develop a more favorable occlusion in the primary dentition. The results of a systematic review in which researchers examined the relationship between breastfeeding and early childhood caries were inconclusive. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, Chicago, suggests that parents gently clean infants' gums and teeth after breastfeeding. The American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove Village, Ill., recommends that breastfeeding should be exclusive for about the first six months of life and should continue, with the introduction of appropriate complementary foods, to at least age 12 months or beyond, as desired by mother and child. Dentists and staff members can take steps to ensure they are familiar with the evidence and guidelines pertaining to breastfeeding and to oral health. They are encouraged to follow the surgeon

  11. Oral Health and Experiences of Oral Care in Radiotherapy Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In spite of careful planning and modern techniques, radiotherapy inevitably involves side-effects due to exposure of surrounding normal tissues. Patients treated for head and neck cancer who experience oral symptoms do not always consider these symptoms to be related to their disease or its treatment.

  12. Parental influence on children's oral health-related behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutanen, Raija; Lahti, Satu; Tolvanen, Mimmi; Hausen, Hannu

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there are differences between oral health-related knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and behaviors of children and their parents, and to identify the family-related factors associated with children's poor or good oral health-related behavior. The data were gathered by means of questionnaires from 11-12-year-old schoolchildren and their parents who replied without having knowledge of the answers of the others. Differences between subgroups of children were analyzed by cross-tabulation, and the factors related to children's good or poor oral health-related behavior by logistic regression analyses. Parents of children who reported good oral health-related behavior had better knowledge and more favorable behaviors than those of other parents. Predictors for a child's poor oral health-related behavior were the child's poor knowledge, male gender, the parent's frequent consumption of sweets, and the parent's infrequent use of xylitol gum. When a less strict threshold for the child's poor oral health-related behavior was used, more predictors entered the model: the parent's unfavorable use of fluoride toothpaste; among girls, the parent's lack of knowledge; and among children whose mother's occupation level was high, the parent's infrequent use of xylitol gum. The parents of children whose oral health behavior was favorable were more likely to have a high level occupation and favorable oral health-related behaviors. Oral health-related knowledge of children and their parents seems to be associated with children's oral health-related behavior. Parents' behaviors, but not attitudes, were associated with children's oral health behavior.

  13. Child and adolescent perceptions of oral health over the life course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, Carl A; Marcus, Marvin; Hays, Ron D; Coulter, Ian D; Ramos-Gomez, Francisco; Lee, Steve Y; McClory, Patricia S; Van, Laura V; Wang, Yan; Shen, Jie; Cai, Li; Spolsky, Vladimir W; Crall, James J; Liu, Honghu

    2015-11-01

    To elicit perceptions of oral health in children and adolescents as an initial step in the development of oral health item banks for the Patient-Reported Oral Health Outcomes Measurement Information System project. We conducted focus groups with ethnically, socioeconomically, and geographically diverse youth (8-12, 13-17 years) to identify perceptions of oral health status. We performed content analysis, including a thematic and narrative analysis, to identify important themes. We identified three unique themes that the youth associated with their oral health status: (1) understanding the value of maintaining good oral health over the life course, with respect to longevity and quality of life in the adult years; (2) positive association between maintaining good oral health and interpersonal relationships at school, and dating, for older youth; and (3) knowledge of the benefits of orthodontic treatment to appearance and positive self-image, while holding a strong view as to the discomfort associated with braces. The results provide valuable information about core domains for the oral health item banks to be developed and generated content for new items to be developed and evaluated with cognitive interviews and in a field test.

  14. Oral health in Libya: addressing the future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeran, Syed Wali; Altaher, Omar Basheer; Peeran, Syed Ali; Alsaid, Fatma Mojtaba; Mugrabi, Marei Hamed; Ahmed, Aisha Mojtaba; Grain, Abdulgader

    2014-01-01

    Libya is a vast country situated in North Africa, having a relatively better functioning economy with a scanty population. This article is the first known attempt to review the current state of oral health care in Libya and to explore the present trends and future challenges. Libyan health system, oral health care, and human resources with the present status of dental education are reviewed comprehensively. A bibliographic study of oral health research and publications has been carried out. The results point toward a common indicator that oral health-related research is low. Strategies have to be developed to educate the medical and dental professionals, to update the current curriculum and enable the system to be competent in all aspects of oral health care management.

  15. Oral health impacts of medications used to treat mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, N; Pradhan, A; Taing, M W; Kisely, S; Ford, P J

    2017-12-01

    Many psychotropic medications affect oral health. This review identified oral side effects for antidepressant, antipsychotic, anticonvulsant, antianxiety and sedative drugs that are recommended in Australia for the management of common mental illnesses and provides recommendations to manage these side-effects. The Australian Therapeutic Guidelines and the Australian Medicines Handbook were searched for medications used to treat common mental health conditions. For each medication, the generic name, class, and drug company reported side-effects were extracted from the online Monthly Index of Medical Specialties (eMIMs) and UpToDate databases. Meyler's Side Effect of Drugs Encyclopaedia was used to identify additional oral adverse reactions to these medications. Fifty-seven drugs were identified: 23 antidepressants, 22 antipsychotics or mood stabilisers, and 12 anxiolytic or sedative medications. Xerostomia (91%) the most commonly reported side effect among all classes of medications of the 28 identified symptoms. Other commonly reported adverse effects included dysguesia (65%) for antidepressants, and tardive dyskinesia (94%) or increased salivation (78%) for antipsychotic medications. While xerostomia has often been reported as a common adverse effect of psychotropic drugs, this review has identified additional side effects including dysguesia from antidepressants and tardive dyskinesia and increased salivation from antipsychotics. Clinicians should consider oral consequences of psychotropic medication in addition to other side-effects when prescribing. For antidepressants, this would mean choosing duloxetine, agomelatine and any of the serotonin re-uptake inhibitors except sertraline. In the case of antipsychotics and mood stabilisers, atypical agents have less oral side effects than older alternatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Affordable Care Act and Health Insurance Exchanges: Advocacy Efforts for Children's Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orynich, C Ashley; Casamassimo, Paul S; Seale, N Sue; Litch, C Scott; Reggiardo, Paul

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate legislative differences in defining the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) pediatric dental benefit and the role of pediatric advocates across states with different health insurance Exchanges. Data were collected through public record investigation and confidential health policy expert interviews conducted at the state and federal level. Oral health policy change by the pediatric dental profession requires advocating for the mandatory purchase of coverage through the Exchange, tax subsidy contribution toward pediatric dental benefits, and consistent regulatory insurance standards for financial solvency, network adequacy and provider reimbursement. The pediatric dental profession is uniquely positioned to lead change in oral health policy amidst health care reform through strengthening state-level formalized networks with organized dentistry and commercial insurance carriers.

  17. Oral health service systems in Gauteng Province, South Africa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mickenautsch, S.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the provision of restorative care and dental operators' opinion about their conditions of service in a South African provincial oral health service system. DESIGN: Assessment of oral health service over a four-month period. SETTING: Gauteng Province, South Africa. SUBJECTS:

  18. Oral health related knowledge and behaviour among nursing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To investigate oral health knowledge and behaviour amongst nursing students in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. Materials and methods: The study was conducted at University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital on respondents aged 17 to 40 years, using self administered structured questionnaire. Result: From oral health ...

  19. Informed consent in oral health care | Tsotsi | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Informed consent and autonomy are the major ethical principles that define the relationship between health workers and the patient. ... Results: The majority of the students were treated in the private sector (85.0%) by male oral health workers (61.6%) and dentists (89.5%) as opposed to dental therapists or oral ...

  20. Oral health experience during pregnancy and dental service ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A substantial proportion of pregnant women reports experiencing oral health problems during pregnancy. However, most of them perceive that such problems are normal in pregnancy and hence do not seek dentist consultation. The objective of this study was to determine the prenatal oral health experience and the ...

  1. Effectiveness of an Oral Health Care Training Workshop for School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    date knowledge to pupils and students. However, most teachers in developing countries like Nigeria have poor knowledge and motivation about oral health which may be due to inadequate training in the area of oral health. This might be one of ...

  2. An oral health care guideline for institutionalised older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschere, L.M. de; Putten, Gerard van der; Vanobbergen, J.N.; Schols, J.M.; Baat, C. de

    2011-01-01

    doi: 10.1111/j.1741-2358.2010.00406.x An oral health care guideline for institutionalised older people Institutionalized older people are prone to oral health problems and their negative impact due to frailty, disabilities, multi-morbidity, and multiple medication use. Until recently, no

  3. Oral Health-Quality of Life Predictors Depend on Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk-Werkhoven, Yvonne A. B.; Dijkstra, Arie; van der Schans, Cees P.

    In the framework of the development and evaluation of oral health interventions that take into account people's oral health-related quality of life (OH-QoL), it is important to know what determinants and effects of OH-QoL are. Because the processes involved in the experience of OH-QoL may differ for

  4. oral health service systems in gauteng province, south africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-04-04

    Apr 4, 2007 ... WHO Collaborating Centre for Oral Health Care Planning and Future Scenarios, Radboud University Medical centre,. Nijmegen ... Conclusions: Restorative dental care in this public oral health service is limited, tooth extraction being the ..... Gugushe T. Compulsory community service audit for dentists in ...

  5. The health care seeking behaviours of patients diagnosed with oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patients were presenting on their index visit at the University of Zimbabwe Oral Health Centre oral and maxillofacial clinic with tumours with durations of onset varying from months to years. Oro-facial tumour is characterized by poor treatment outcomes if the patient presents for treatment late. Health care ...

  6. Oral health knowledge, hygiene practices and treatment seeking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Several behavioural studies have shown a direct correlation between oral health awareness and practices. Awareness of individuals regarding their periodontal health status when accompanied with knowledge about the periodontal disease process can help improve self oral healthcare and prevent ...

  7. Perceived oral health status and treatment needs of dental auxiliaries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-15

    %), tooth restoration. (10.3%), to extraction (1.2%). ... service serve as an important tool for oral health policy decision-making (11). .... King T. Tooth brushing and utilization of dental services in Fiji. (1998). Pac Health Dialog.

  8. How do foster carers manage the oral health of children in foster care? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Vanessa; Subramanian, Sri-Kavi; Wright, Desmond; Wong, Ferranti S L

    2017-12-01

    This qualitative study explored how the foster family environment influenced children's oral health. It also aimed to better understand foster carers' oral health knowledge, attitudes and experiences of managing foster children's oral health behaviours and oral health care. An interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) study design was used to recruit a purposive sample of foster carers in Tower Hamlets, United Kingdom, from a range of backgrounds (maximum variation sampling). Participants were aged 21 years and older and provided full-time foster care for children for a minimum of 1 year. The foster carers took part in focus groups that were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis followed a five-step IPA process, which included reading the transcripts, note taking, identifying emerging themes, connecting related themes and writing up the final themes. Iterative data gathering and analysis continued to reach thematic saturation. Three focus groups were conducted, involving a total of 12 foster carers. Eight of the 12 participants had fostered children for more than 10 years and they were currently fostering 22 children aged five to 18 years old. Four themes emerged from within the context of the supportive and nurturing foster family environment that described how foster carers' responded to and managed the oral health of their foster children. Foster carers had adopted an oral health caregiving role, "in loco parentis" responding to the poor oral health of their vulnerable foster children. They were hypervigilant about establishing and monitoring children's oral health routines and taking their children to see a dentist; these were seen as an integral part of being good foster carers. They were knowledgeable about the causes of children's oral ill health, gained from their own dental experiences and from looking after their own children. Foster carers had experienced tensions while adopting this oral health caregiving role with dentists who had

  9. Oral health in Libya: addressing the future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeran, Syed Wali; Altaher, Omar Basheer; Peeran, Syed Ali; Alsaid, Fatma Mojtaba; Mugrabi, Marei Hamed; Ahmed, Aisha Mojtaba; Grain, Abdulgader

    2014-01-01

    Libya is a vast country situated in North Africa, having a relatively better functioning economy with a scanty population. This article is the first known attempt to review the current state of oral health care in Libya and to explore the present trends and future challenges. Libyan health system, oral health care, and human resources with the present status of dental education are reviewed comprehensively. A bibliographic study of oral health research and publications has been carried out. The results point toward a common indicator that oral health–related research is low. Strategies have to be developed to educate the medical and dental professionals, to update the current curriculum and enable the system to be competent in all aspects of oral health care management. PMID:24666627

  10. Effectiveness of motivational interviewing at improving oral health: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascaes, Andreia Morales; Bielemann, Renata Moraes; Clark, Valerie Lyn; Barros, Aluísio J D

    2014-02-01

    To analyze the effectiveness of motivational interviewing (MI) at improving oral health behaviors (oral hygiene habits, sugar consumption, dental services utilization or use of fluoride) and dental clinical outcomes (dental plaque, dental caries and periodontal status). A systematic search of PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, PsyINFO, Cochrane and Google Scholar bibliographic databases was conducted looking for intervention studies that investigated MI as the main approach to improving the oral health outcomes investigated. Of the 78 articles found, ten met the inclusion criteria, all based on randomized controlled trials. Most studies (n = 8) assessed multiple outcomes. Five interventions assessed the impact of MI on oral health behaviors and nine on clinical outcomes (three on dental caries, six on dental plaque, four on gingivitis and three on periodontal pockets). Better quality of evidence was provided by studies that investigated dental caries, which also had the largest population samples. The evidence of the effect of MI on improving oral health outcomes is conflicting. Four studies reported positive effects of MI on oral health outcomes whereas another four showed null effect. In two interventions, the actual difference between groups was not reported or able to be recalculated. We found inconclusive effectiveness for most oral health outcomes. We need more and better designed and reported interventions to fully assess the impact of MI on oral health and understand the appropriate dosage for the counseling interventions.

  11. Effectiveness of motivational interviewing at improving oral health: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Morales Cascaes

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE : To analyze the effectiveness of motivational interviewing (MI at improving oral health behaviors (oral hygiene habits, sugar consumption, dental services utilization or use of fluoride and dental clinical outcomes (dental plaque, dental caries and periodontal status. METHODS : A systematic search of PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, PsyINFO, Cochrane and Google Scholar bibliographic databases was conducted looking for intervention studies that investigated MI as the main approach to improving the oral health outcomes investigated. RESULTS : Of the 78 articles found, ten met the inclusion criteria, all based on randomized controlled trials. Most studies (n = 8 assessed multiple outcomes. Five interventions assessed the impact of MI on oral health behaviors and nine on clinical outcomes (three on dental caries, six on dental plaque, four on gingivitis and three on periodontal pockets. Better quality of evidence was provided by studies that investigated dental caries, which also had the largest population samples. The evidence of the effect of MI on improving oral health outcomes is conflicting. Four studies reported positive effects of MI on oral health outcomes whereas another four showed null effect. In two interventions, the actual difference between groups was not reported or able to be recalculated. CONCLUSIONS : We found inconclusive effectiveness for most oral health outcomes. We need more and better designed and reported interventions to fully assess the impact of MI on oral health and understand the appropriate dosage for the counseling interventions.

  12. Effectiveness of motivational interviewing at improving oral health: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascaes, Andreia Morales; Bielemann, Renata Moraes; Clark, Valerie Lyn; Barros, Aluísio J D

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the effectiveness of motivational interviewing (MI) at improving oral health behaviors (oral hygiene habits, sugar consumption, dental services utilization or use of fluoride) and dental clinical outcomes (dental plaque, dental caries and periodontal status). METHODS A systematic search of PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, PsyINFO, Cochrane and Google Scholar bibliographic databases was conducted looking for intervention studies that investigated MI as the main approach to improving the oral health outcomes investigated. RESULTS Of the 78 articles found, ten met the inclusion criteria, all based on randomized controlled trials. Most studies (n = 8) assessed multiple outcomes. Five interventions assessed the impact of MI on oral health behaviors and nine on clinical outcomes (three on dental caries, six on dental plaque, four on gingivitis and three on periodontal pockets). Better quality of evidence was provided by studies that investigated dental caries, which also had the largest population samples. The evidence of the effect of MI on improving oral health outcomes is conflicting. Four studies reported positive effects of MI on oral health outcomes whereas another four showed null effect. In two interventions, the actual difference between groups was not reported or able to be recalculated. CONCLUSIONS We found inconclusive effectiveness for most oral health outcomes. We need more and better designed and reported interventions to fully assess the impact of MI on oral health and understand the appropriate dosage for the counseling interventions. PMID:24789647

  13. Designing an oral health module for the Bachelor of Midwifery program at an Australian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Margaret; Dahlen, Hannah G; Burns, Elaine; Priddis, Holly; Schmied, Virginia; George, Ajesh

    2017-03-01

    Maternal oral health is important yet many pregnant women are unaware of its significance. Midwives are advised to promote oral health during pregnancy and are supported to do this in Australia through the Midwifery Initiated Oral Health training program. However, limited undergraduate education is being provided to midwifery students in this area. The objective of this paper is to describe how an innovative oral health education module for an undergraduate midwifery course in Australia was designed using a multidisciplinary approach. Midwives experienced in curriculum development and key investigators from the Midwifery Initiated Oral Health program designed the module using existing literature. Constructive alignment, blended learning and scaffolding were used in the design process. The draft module was then reviewed by midwifery academics and their feedback incorporated. The final module involves 4 h of teaching and learning and contains three components incorporated into first year course units. Each component is aligned with existing learning outcomes and incorporates blended learning approaches and tutorials/class activities as well as online quizzes and personal reflection. The module details key information (current evidence; basic anatomy/physiology; common oral conditions; and guidelines during pregnancy) that could better prepare students to promote oral health in clinical practice. This is the first time such an innovative, multidisciplinary approach has been undertaken embedding oral health in an undergraduate midwifery program in Australia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Providing occupational health care in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, M

    In all areas of nursing, the concept of caring encompasses the core of our practice and is the outcome of skilled practitioners. In occupational health nursing (OHN) it is no different. 'Caring' has been described by many authors, used in theoretical models of nursing and forms the basis of much research. This paper looks at the provision of care in the OH setting within Northern Ireland, with particular reference to problems which have arisen from the troubles.

  15. Effectiveness of professional oral health care intervention on the oral health of residents with dementia in residential aged care facilities: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi Mohammadi, Joanna Jin; Franks, Kay; Hines, Sonia

    2015-10-01

    's mouth due to their own personal values of oral health or their views that residents should be looking after their own teeth or dentures. Furthermore, residents with behavioral issues associated with dementia frequently have their oral hygiene neglected as they may be resistant and violent towards receiving oral care from aged care staff. Studies have shown that residents with dementia will often refuse to open their mouth or partake in oral hygiene care by aged care staff. The aged care staff in return often do not pursue an oral care regimen for these "difficult" residents, perpetuating the cycle of oral neglect and resultant disease.Dental hygienists are qualified oral health professionals who are specifically trained to develop individualized oral health care plans and preventative programs to reduce oral health disease in the community. Residents with dementia in aged care facilities have the right to live their lives comfortably and free of oral discomfort or pain. A Victorian study conducted by Hopcraft et al. investigated the ability of a dental hygienist to undertake a dental examination/screening for residents in aged care facilities, to develop a preventative and periodontal treatment plan and to refer patients appropriately to a dentist. Results from this study demonstrated that there was an excellent agreement between the dentist and dental hygienist regarding the decision to refer residents to a dentist for treatment, demonstrating high sensitivity (99.6%) and high specificity (82.9%). Residents from 31 Victorian RACFs (n=510) were examined by a single experienced dental epidemiologist and one of four dental hygienists using a simple mouth mirror and probe. Hopcraft et al. concluded that hygienists should be utilized more widely in providing holistic oral health care to residents in aged care facilities.Recently, Lewis et al. discussed the need to develop models of care to improve access to dental care for frail and functionally dependent elderly people in

  16. Cost-income analysis of oral health units of health care centers in Yazd city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Fallahzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Increasing demands for health care's services on one hand and limited resources on the other hand brings about pressure over governments to find out a mechanism for fair and appropriate distribution of resources. Economic analysis is one of the appropriate tools for policy making on this priority. The aim of this study was to assess capital and consumption of oral health units of health care centers in Yazd city and comparing it with revenue of these centers and determining of cost effectiveness.Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross sectional study, all health care centers of Yazd city with active dentistry department were evaluated. The data has been extracted from current documents in health care center of county based issued receipts and daily information registers.Results: Expended cost for providing of oral hygiene services in second half of 2008 in 13 medical health centers of Yazd included active dentistry section was 557.887.500 Rials and revenue to cost ratio was about 34%. The most provided service was related to tooth extraction and the average of tooth restoration in each working day was 0.48.Conclusion: With attention to low tariffs of dentistry services in medical health centers and paying subsidy to target groups, expenses of oral hygiene are always more than its revenue.

  17. Effect of health education on oral health-related quality of life among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Change in psychological discomfort psychological disability,handicap and functional subscales were significantly associated with change in gingival inflammation. Conclusion: Oral health education is a viable strategy in reducing oral health related attribute, leading to improved oral health related quality of life.

  18. Oral health content of early education and child care regulations and standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Ashley M; Rozier, R Gary

    2011-01-01

    Almost two out of every three US children younger than five receive child care from someone other than their parents. Health promotion in early education and child care (EECC) programs can improve the general health of children and families, but little is known about the role of these programs in oral health. We identified U.S. EECC program guidelines and assessed their oral health recommendations for infants and toddlers. State licensing regulations were obtained from the National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care's online database. Professional standards were identified through a search of PubMed, early childhood organizations' websites, and early childhood literature. All EECC guidelines were reviewed for key terms related to oral health promotion in children and summarized by domains. Thirty-six states include oral health in their licensing regulations, but recommendations are limited and most often address the storage of toothbrushes. Eleven sets of standards were identified, four of which make recommendations about oral health. Standards from the American Academy of Pediatrics/American Public Health Association (AAP/APHA) and the Office of Head Start (OHS) provide the most comprehensive oral health recommendations regarding screening and referral, classroom activities, and education. Detailed guidelines for oral health practices exist but they exhibit large variation in number and content. States can use the comprehensive standards from the AAP/APHA and OHS to inform and strengthen the oral health content of their licensing regulations. Research is needed to determine compliance with regulations and standards, and their effect on oral health.

  19. Health Information Provided by Retail Health Food Outlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn Calder

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative health practices have become increasingly popular in recent years. Many patients visit specific complementary practitioners, while others attempt to educate themselves, trusting advice from employees at local health food stores or the Internet. Thirty-two retail health food stores were surveyed on the nature of the information provided by their staff. A research assistant visited the stores and presented as the mother of a child in whom Crohn’s disease had been diagnosed. Seventy-two per cent (23 of 32 of store employees offered advice, such as to take nutritional and herbal supplements. Of the 23 stores where recommendations were made, 15 (65% based their recommendation on a source of information. Fourteen of the 15 stores using information sources used the same reference book. This had a significant impact on the recommendations; the use of nutritional supplements was favoured. In conclusion, retail health food stores are not as inconsistent as hypothesized, although there are many variances in the types of supplements recommended for the same chronic disease.

  20. Client perspectives on an Aboriginal community led oral health service in rural Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Michelle; Gwynne, Kylie; Angell, Blake; Tennant, Marc; Blinkhorn, Anthony

    2017-06-01

    An oral health service was implemented, using a unique community development approach, for Northern NSW Australian Aboriginal communities in 2013-14. This study examined the views of children (and parents) who accessed the service, including: the extent of reported dental problems, oral health knowledge, attitudes and behaviour, accessibility of oral health services, satisfaction and cultural sensitivity of the service. A survey of the children who accessed this service was conducted between October 2014 and December 2014. A total of 49 (71%) Aboriginal children aged 4-14 (or parents of), provided responses to the survey. All agreed that healthy teeth were important (100%), but many thought oral disease leading to extraction was normal (68%). High levels of oral pain were reported (66%), half (53%) reported brushing morning and night. Access to the new dental health service was reported as 'easy' (92%). Many walked (47%) or were driven (35%) in health team (100%). The implementation of a new community led oral health service to Northern NSW Aboriginal communities was shown here to be well-utilised, respected and in an area of high need. The collaborative approach could be continued to be utilised to implement targeted, community led health promotion programs to facilitate and encourage better oral health practices for the Aboriginal children in these communities. © 2016 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  1. Hospitalisation impacts on oral hygiene: an audit of oral hygiene in a metropolitan health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danckert, Rachael; Ryan, Anna; Plummer, Virginia; Williams, Cylie

    2016-03-01

    Poor oral health has been associated with systemic diseases, morbidity and mortality. Many patients in hospital environments are physically compromised and rely upon awareness and assistance from health professionals for the maintenance or improvement of their oral health. This study aimed to identify whether common individual and environment factors associated with hospitalisation impacted on oral hygiene. Data were collected during point prevalence audits of patients in the acute and rehabilitation environments on three separate occasions. Data included demographic information, plaque score, presence of dental hygiene products, independence level and whether nurse assistance was documented in the health record. Data were collected for 199 patients. A higher plaque score was associated with not having a toothbrush (p = 0.002), being male (p = 0.007), being acutely unwell (p = 0.025) and requiring nursing assistance for oral hygiene (p = 0.002). There was fair agreement between the documentation of requiring assistance for oral care and the patient independently able to perform oral hygiene (ICC = 0.22). Oral hygiene was impacted by factors arising from hospitalisation, for those without a toothbrush and male patients of acute wards. Establishment of practices that increase awareness and promote good oral health should be prioritised. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  2. Oral health and menopouse: Problems and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanuddin Thahir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Globally, the number of life expectancy in worldwide population has increased compared with 1990. In 2014, the mean life expectancy have reached 75 years old, and even above 80 years in several developed countries. The interesting point is women have shown higher increase of live expectancy compared with men, Women have increased 6.6 years compared with men, 5.8 years. Better health welfare, economic  growth, and lifestyle modification suspected to be contributing in higher life expectancy worldwide. Despite the encouraging news that the age of population is increasing, the concern will be whether this longer age come with the better health condition, including oral and dental health. The presence of teeth inside the mouth is one of significant points to support one’s quality of life. This research involved 66 subjects, age between 35–60 years old, divided into two groups, menopause and non-menopause women. The research shown that tooth loss occurred more in non-menopause women than menopause woman, which is 37% woman has lost as many as 12 teeth, compared with post menopausal the toothloss only occurred in 19.6%. The treatment need of non-surgery periodontal care in non-menopausal woman higher by 37.9%, and surgery care is 23.2%, meanwhile in the menopause group, non surgery care is 30.3% and surgery care is only 9.1%. The conclusion is the teeth extractions mostly take place in the period before menopause compared post-menopausal. Treatment need is also higher before menopausal than after menopause. In order to that, the menopausal women need to have adequate dental care by the patient and the dentist as well

  3. Combined Use of Self-Efficacy Scale for Oral Health Behaviour and Oral Health Questionnaire: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soutome, Sakiko; Kajiwara, Kazumi; Oho, Takahiko

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether the combined use of a task-specific self-efficacy scale for oral health behaviour (SEOH) and an oral health questionnaire (OHQ) would be useful for evaluating subjects' behaviours and cognitions. Design: Questionnaires. Methods: One hundred and eighty-five students completed the SEOH and OHQ. The 30-item OHQ uses a…

  4. The promotion of oral health within Health Promoting Schools in KwaZulu-Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Reddy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oral health promotion is a cost-effective strategy that can be implemented at schools for the prevention of oral diseases. Theimportance and value of school-based interventions in children has been identified in South Africa (SA. Although oral health strategiesinclude integrated school-based interventions, there is a lack of published evidence on whether these strategies have been translated intopractice and whether these programmes have been evaluated.Objective. To assess the efficiency and sustainability of the toothbrushing programme implemented at health-promoting schools inKwaZulu-Natal Province, SA.Methods. A mixed-methods approach was used for this study, conducted at 23 health-promoting schools in KwaZulu-Natal using focusgroup discussions. Triangulation was used for evaluation.Results. The intervention implemented had created awareness of oral health for learners, educators and parents. Findings in this studyindicate that although there were benefits obtained from this school-based intervention, many challenges, such as time constraints, largeclasses and a lack of adequate resources and funding, affected the sustainability of the programme.Conclusion.The school setting has the potential to deliver integrated preventive and promotive programmes provided they are supportedby adequate funding and resources.

  5. WHAT ARE CANADIAN DENTAL PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS TAUGHT ABOUT INFANT, TODDLER AND PRENATAL ORAL HEALTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, Robert J; Quiñonez, Rocio B; Yaffe, Aaron B; Bertone, Mary F; Hardwick, Felicity K; Harrison, Rosamund L

    2015-01-01

    Establishing dental homes for children at an early age is an important step toward instilling good oral health practices and changing trajectories of oral health. The purpose of this study was to determine how accredited dental and dental hygiene programs in Canada prepare students in the areas of infant, toddler and prenatal oral health. An electronic questionnaire was sent to associate deans (academic), program directors or curriculum directors of accredited dental (n = 10) and dental hygiene (n = 39) programs. Participants were asked about infant, toddler and prenatal oral health curricula taught at their institution. Descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses were used to assess the results. A p value = 0.05 was considered significant. Representatives of 10 dental (100%) and 25 dental hygiene (64.1%) programs responded. All dental and 56% of dental hygiene programs recommend a first visit by 12 months. Infant and toddler oral health was noted as a component of most schools' curriculum. Barriers to teaching about or providing clinical experiences in infant and toddler oral health include lack of time, patients, program resources and finances. Most dental (70%) and dental hygiene (82.6%) programs include prenatal oral health as a component of their curriculum, yet only 40% of responding dental and 70% of dental hygiene programs reported having designated time in their curriculum for it. Barriers preventing programs from teaching or providing clinical experiences regarding prenatal oral health include lack of time and patients. Many, but not all dental professional programs are teaching their students about the recommended age for a first dental visit. Better adherence to national guidelines will require programs to address current barriers impeding learning about this important topic and to provide creative opportunities for students regarding prenatal and infant and toddler oral health.

  6. Oral health of indigenous children and the influence of early childhood caries on childhood health and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, Robert J; Harrison, Rosamund L; Moffatt, Michael E K

    2009-12-01

    Dental caries in Indigenous children is a child health issue that is multifactorial in origin and strongly influenced by the determinants of health. The evidence suggests that extensive dental caries has an effect on health and well-being of the young child. This article focuses on early childhood caries as an overall proxy for Indigenous childhood oral health because decay during early life sets the foundation for oral health throughout childhood and adolescence. Strategies should begin with community engagement and always include primary care providers and other community health workers.

  7. Oral health status of diabetes mellitus patients in Southwest Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissong, Mea; Azodo, C C; Agbor, M A; Nkuo-Akenji, T; Fon, P Nde

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually all tissues and organs the body including the hard and soft issues of the oral cavity, manifesting with several complications. To assess the prevalence of oral diseases in diabetics and non-diabetics and to correlate oral diseases with glycaemic control. This was an observational study involving 149 diabetic patients recruited from hospitals in Southwest Region of Cameroon and 102 non-diabetic controls drawn from the general population. The study participants were aged 18 years and above. Data were collected using questionnaires, oral examination and laboratory tests. Oral examination was conducted to assess dental plaque, calculus, dental caries, periodontitis, gingivitis and candidiasis. Glycemic status was assessed by measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels using standardized methods. Thirty five out of 149 (23.5%) diabetic patients had gingivitis; 37 (24.8%) had periodontitis; 29 (19.5%) had dental caries and 32 (21.5%) had oral candidiasis. Gingivitis, periodontitis and oral candidiasis was significantly higher in diabetics than non-diabetics (P diabetic patients presented with poor oral hygiene than non-diabetics. Poorly controlled diabetics presented more with gingivitis and candidiasis than well-controlled diabetics and this relationship was statistically significant. The prevalence of oral disease was significantly higher in diabetics than in non-diabetic controls and hyperglycaemia seemed to be a major contributor to oral health in diabetic patients in the study area. Proper management of blood sugar levels might improve on the oral health of diabetes mellitus patients.

  8. Oral health of visually impaired schoolchildren in Khartoum State, Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Tagelsir, Azza; Khogli, Ahmed Eltigani; Nurelhuda, Nazik Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    Background Although oral health care is a vital component of overall health, it remains one of the greatest unattended needs among the disabled. The aim of this study was to assess the oral health status and oral health-related quality of life (Child-OIDP in 11-13-year-old) of the visually challenged school attendants in Khartoum State, the Sudan. Methods A school-based survey was conducted in Al-Nour institute [boys (66.3%), boarders (35.9%), and children with partial visual impairment (PVI)...

  9. Knowledge, Perceived Ability and Practice Behaviors Regarding Oral Health among Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Antiana D; Iida, Hiroko; Patton, Lauren L; Wilder, Rebecca S

    2015-08-01

    Oral complications are common in children undergoing head and neck radiation and chemotherapy. The purpose of this study is to examine the knowledge, perceived ability and practice behaviors of pediatric oncology and hematology nurses in assisting with the various oral health care needs of pediatric oncology patients and to identify pediatric oncology nurses' previous training/education, practice types and other demographic characteristics that are related to their oral health competencies. A survey of a convenience sample of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology Nurses was conducted during the Association of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology Nurses' (APHON) 36(th) Annual Conference and Exhibit. Descriptive analysis and the exploratory factor analyses were performed using SAS version 9.2 (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, NC). Among the 300 surveys that were distributed, 235 surveys were completed (78% response rate) by pediatric oncology or hematology nurses who provide direct patient care in the U.S. Approximately 75% reported receiving less than 3 hours of oral health related education/training. Sixty percent did not have a clinical requirement regarding the assessment of the teeth and gums during their nursing school education. Bivariate analyses indicated that nurses who had clinical requirements regarding oral health assessment during nursing education/training presented greater overall oral health competencies including having greater confidence in examining oral complications than those who did not. Pediatric oncology nurses' knowledge, perceived ability and practice in assisting patient's oral hygiene care, preventing and managing oral complications vary by topic and might reflect their educational preparedness. This study may provide valuable information pertaining to the need and opportunity for interprofessional oral health care education and collaboration with nursing and dental professionals, in order to increase access to comprehensive oral care for pediatric

  10. Longitudinal study on oral health in subjects with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ship, J A; Puckett, S A

    1994-01-01

    To examine longitudinal oral health changes in unmedicated, generally healthy subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and compare them to age- and gender-matched healthy, unmedicated control subjects. Oral health parameters were evaluated over 2 to 3 years and the results compared between subjects with AD and controls. Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. Twenty-one community-dwelling subjects with a clinical diagnosis of AD and 21 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Neither population was being treated for any other systemic condition nor taking any prescription medications. Unstimulated and stimulated major salivary gland flow rates were measured, and gingival, periodontal, dental, and oral mucosal tissues assessed. In general, subjects with AD demonstrated decreased salivary flow rates and diminished oral health, but most longitudinal changes in oral health status were not significantly different than controls. Patients with AD are susceptible to a variety of oral health problems, and progression of AD can lead to a deterioration in oral health and function. These patients require aggressive preventive care to maintain function for as long as possible, which necessitates close cooperation among numerous health care professionals.

  11. Oral health in Brazil - Part II: Dental Specialty Centers (CEOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Pedrazzi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of health promotion, self-care and community participation emerged during the 1970s and, since then, their application has grown rapidly in the developed world, showing evidence of effectiveness. In spite of this, a major part of the population in the developing countries still has no access to specialized dental care such as endodontic treatment, dental care for patients with special needs, minor oral surgery, periodontal treatment and oral diagnosis. This review focuses on a program of the Brazilian Federal Government named CEOs (Dental Specialty Centers, which is an attempt to solve the dental care deficit of a population that is suffering from oral diseases and whose oral health care needs have not been addressed by the regular programs offered by the SUS (Unified National Health System. Literature published from 2000 to the present day, using electronic searches by Medline, Scielo, Google and hand-searching was considered. The descriptors used were Brazil, Oral health, Health policy, Health programs, and Dental Specialty Centers. There are currently 640 CEOs in Brazil, distributed in 545 municipal districts, carrying out dental procedures with major complexity. Based on this data, it was possible to conclude that public actions on oral health must involve both preventive and curative procedures aiming to minimize the oral health distortions still prevailing in developing countries like Brazil.

  12. Putting your money where your mouth is: parents' valuation of good oral health of their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaire, J H; van Exel, N J A; van Loveren, C; Brouwer, W B F

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the parental willingness to invest in good oral health for their child in terms of money and time and to relate this to oral health related knowledge and behavioral aspects. 290 parents of 6-year-old children, participating in a RCT on caries preventive strategies in The Netherlands were asked to provide information on education, oral health habits, dietary habits, knowledge on dental topics, willingness to pay and perceived resistance against investing in preventive oral health actions for their children. Despite the fact that parents overall valued oral health for their child highly, still 12% of the parents were unwilling to spend any money, nor to invest any time by brushing their children's teeth to maintain good oral health for their child. Additionally, they indicated that they were unwilling to visit the dentist for preventive measures more than once a year. These children may certainly be considered at higher risk of developing oral diseases because worse oral hygiene habits and dietary habits were found in this group. Given the results, it may be necessary to differentiate in allocating caries prevention programmes to target parents or (school-based) children directly. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Fragile X Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Print How do health care providers diagnose Fragile X syndrome? Health care providers often use a blood sample ... information helps families and providers to prepare for Fragile X syndrome and to intervene as early as possible. Possible ...

  14. Effect of oral health education and fluoridated dentifrices on the oral health status of visually impaired children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sujay; Konde, Sapna; Raj, Sunil; Agarwal, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    Visually impaired children are challenged everyday in their everyday skills. Oral hygiene practices among visually impaired children require a special approach with time and patience. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral health education and fluoridated dentifrices on the oral health status of visually impaired children. Materials and Methods: Fifty visually impaired children between 8 and 12 years of age formed the study group. Oral health education and motivation was done with the help of Braille. Modified Bass method of brushing was taught to the children and the required dental treatment was done. Subjects were randomly divided into two equal groups fluoridated and non-fluoridated. Oral hygiene index -simplified, DMFT, deft index, and Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus count were assessed at baseline, immediately after the treatment and at 3, 6, and 12 month intervals. The oral health awareness was assessed using a questionnaire at the beginning and end of the study. Results: At baseline, the mean OHI-S, DMFT and deft scores were 2.72, 0.47, and 0.51 respectively. At the end of 12 months there was a significant decrease in OHI-S scores in the fluoridated group. No significant difference was seen in DMFT and deft between the fluoridated and non-fluoridated groups at the different time interval. After the oral health education and comprehensive treatment there was a reduction in Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus counts in both groups; however, at the end of 3, 6, 12 months there was a significant decrease in fluoridated group as compared to the non-fluoridated. The oral health awareness increased significantly at the end of the study. Conclusion: The oral health education and motivation formulated for the visually impaired children was effective in improving their oral health status. Fluoridated dentifrices decreased the Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus counts and improved the oral hygiene status. PMID:23633797

  15. Effect of oral health education and fluoridated dentifrices on the oral health status of visually impaired children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Visually impaired children are challenged everyday in their everyday skills. Oral hygiene practices among visually impaired children require a special approach with time and patience. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral health education and fluoridated dentifrices on the oral health status of visually impaired children. Materials and Methods: Fifty visually impaired children between 8 and 12 years of age formed the study group. Oral health education and motivation was done with the help of Braille. Modified Bass method of brushing was taught to the children and the required dental treatment was done. Subjects were randomly divided into two equal groups fluoridated and non-fluoridated. Oral hygiene index -simplified, DMFT, deft index, and Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus count were assessed at baseline, immediately after the treatment and at 3, 6, and 12 month intervals. The oral health awareness was assessed using a questionnaire at the beginning and end of the study. Results: At baseline, the mean OHI-S, DMFT and deft scores were 2.72, 0.47, and 0.51 respectively. At the end of 12 months there was a significant decrease in OHI-S scores in the fluoridated group. No significant difference was seen in DMFT and deft between the fluoridated and non-fluoridated groups at the different time interval. After the oral health education and comprehensive treatment there was a reduction in Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus counts in both groups; however, at the end of 3, 6, 12 months there was a significant decrease in fluoridated group as compared to the non-fluoridated. The oral health awareness increased significantly at the end of the study. Conclusion: The oral health education and motivation formulated for the visually impaired children was effective in improving their oral health status. Fluoridated dentifrices decreased the Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus counts and improved the oral hygiene status.

  16. Oral health status and need for oral care of care-dependent indwelling elderly : from admission to death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, Arie R; Peters, Lilian L; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Meijer, Henny J A; Vissink, Arjan; Visser, Anita

    The objective of this study is to assess oral health and oral status of elderly patients newly admitted to a nursing home from admission until death. Oral health, oral status, need for dental care, cooperation with dental treatment, and given dental care were assessed by two geriatric dentists in

  17. Oral polymorphonuclear neutrophil characteristics in relation to oral health: A cross-sectional, observational clinical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkschroeff, P.; Jansen, I.D.C.; Weijden, F.A. van der; Keijser, B.J.F.; Loos, B.G.; Nicu, E.A.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) have a major role in the innate immune system. However, little is known about PMN contribution in relation to oral health. The objective of this study was to investigate the numbers and functional characteristics of oral PMNs (oPMNs) compared with circulatory

  18. Framing Young Childrens Oral Health: A Participatory Action Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Chimere C; Villa-Torres, Laura; Sams, Lattice D; Zeldin, Leslie P; Divaris, Kimon

    2016-01-01

    Despite the widespread acknowledgement of the importance of childhood oral health, little progress has been made in preventing early childhood caries. Limited information exists regarding specific daily-life and community-related factors that impede optimal oral hygiene, diet, care, and ultimately oral health for children. We sought to understand what parents of young children consider important and potentially modifiable factors and resources influencing their children's oral health, within the contexts of the family and the community. This qualitative study employed Photovoice among 10 English-speaking parents of infants and toddlers who were clients of an urban WIC clinic in North Carolina. The primary research question was: "What do you consider as important behaviors, as well as family and community resources to prevent cavities among young children?" Five group sessions were conducted and they were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative research methodology. Inductive analyses were based on analytical summaries, double-coding, and summary matrices and were done using Atlas.ti.7.5.9 software. Good oral health was associated with avoidance of problems or restorations for the participants. Financial constraints affected healthy food and beverage choices, as well as access to oral health care. Time constraints and occasional frustration related to children's oral hygiene emerged as additional barriers. Establishment of rules/routines and commitment to them was a successful strategy to promote their children's oral health, as well as modeling of older siblings, cooperation among caregivers and peer support. Community programs and organizations, social hubs including playgrounds, grocery stores and social media emerged as promising avenues for gaining support and sharing resources. Low-income parents of young children are faced with daily life struggles that interfere with oral health and care. Financial constraints are pervasive, but parents

  19. Geriatric oral health issues in Africa: Tanzanian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhanga, C; Ntabaye, M

    2001-06-01

    A review of oral health issues for the elderly in Tanzania is presented and conclusions drawn from the analysis are applied to the broader African situation. It must be remembered that life expectancy (at birth) in Tanzania has been below or equal to 50 years, which places adults aged 35+ years in the elderly group of citizens. Access to professional care is limited, especially in rural areas, resulting in most people seeking care only when in severe pain and often leading to extraction. People aged 40+ years, who live in rural areas, are at higher risk of destructive periodontal disease and it is recommended that oral health education, focusing on behaviour change should be initiated from childhood. Innovative training programmes for primary health workers already working in rural areas can improve both access to professional care and accurate preventive oral health messages. Health professional training programmes should emphasise the importance of good oral health to overall health. Such an emphasis will help galvanise health care workers in the delivery of services. The ultimate goal for the government, health professionals and educators should be to move the Tanzanian people toward a greater understanding of oral health and the prevention of oral diseases, a goal which might also be set elsewhere in Africa.

  20. Promoting better oral health practices among aboriginal Taiwanese adolescents: a school based oral health education intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Hsin; Sue, Rouh-Lan; Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Dasanayake, Ananda P

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of an educational program aimed at improving oral health knowledge and behaviors in junior high school students in indigenous communities in Taiwan. Two junior high schools were randomly selected. Students in the intervention school received an oral health education program. Both groups received structured questionnaires to assess their oral health practices and risk behaviors at baseline and after the intervention. The intervention group had statistically significant positive changes in their oral health knowledge (pCarefully designed health education programs delivered within schools in areas with limited access to health care can improve the students' knowledge and reduce their risk behaviors which may prove to be a mechanism that ultimately reduces health disparities.

  1. Green Tea (Camellia Sinensis): Chemistry and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zafar, Muhammad S; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Naseem, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Green tea is a widely consumed beverage worldwide. Numerous studies have suggested about the beneficial effects of green tea on oral conditions such as dental caries, periodontal diseases and halitosis. However, to date there have not been many review articles published that focus on beneficial effects of green tea on oral disease. The aim of this publication is to summarize the research conducted on the effects of green tea on oral cavity. Green tea might help reduce the bacterial activity in the oral cavity that in turn, can reduce the aforementioned oral afflictions. Furthermore, the antioxidant effect of the tea may reduce the chances of oral cancer. However, more clinical data is required to ascertain the possible benefits of green tea consumption on oral health.

  2. Data governance for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronis, Katerina; Moysey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Data governance is characterised from broader definitions of governance. These characteristics are then mapped to a framework that provides a practical representation of the concepts. This representation is further developed with operating models and roles. Several information related scenarios covering both clinical and non-clinical domains are considered in information terms and then related back to the data governance framework. This assists the reader in understanding how data governance would help address the issues or achieve a better outcome. These elements together enable the reader to gain an understanding of the data governance framework and how it applies in practice. Finally, some practical advice is offered for establishing and operating data governance as well as approaches for justifying the investment.

  3. Understanding the Research–Policy Divide for Oral Health Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Erica; Crocombe, Leonard; Campbell, Steven; Goldberg, Lynette R.; Seidel, Bastian M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: No studies exist of the congruence of research in oral health to policy. This study aimed to examine the broad congruence of oral health research to policy, and implications for developing oral health research that is more policy relevant, particularly for the wider challenge of addressing unequal oral health outcomes, rather than specific policy translation issues. Methods: Bayesian-based software was used in a multi-layered method to compare the conceptual content of 127,193 oral health research abstracts published between 2000–2012 with eight current oral health policy documents from Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. Findings: Fifty-five concepts defined the research abstracts, of which only eight were policy-relevant, and six of which were minor research concepts. Conclusions The degree of disconnection between clinical concepts and healthcare system and workforce development concepts was striking. This study shows that, far from being “lost in translation,” oral health research and policy are so different as to raise doubts about the extent to which research is policy-relevant and policy is research-based. The notion of policy relevance encompasses the lack of willingness of policy makers to embrace research, and the need for researchers to develop research that is, and is seen to be, policy-relevant. PMID:25617516

  4. Understanding the research-policy divide for oral health inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Erica; Crocombe, Leonard; Campbell, Steven; Goldberg, Lynette R; Seidel, Bastian M

    2014-11-01

    No studies exist of the congruence of research in oral health to policy. This study aimed to examine the broad congruence of oral health research to policy, and implications for developing oral health research that is more policy relevant, particularly for the wider challenge of addressing unequal oral health outcomes, rather than specific policy translation issues. Bayesian-based software was used in a multi-layered method to compare the conceptual content of 127,193 oral health research abstracts published between 2000-2012 with eight current oral health policy documents from Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. Fifty-five concepts defined the research abstracts, of which only eight were policy-relevant, and six of which were minor research concepts. The degree of disconnection between clinical concepts and healthcare system and workforce development concepts was striking. This study shows that, far from being "lost in translation," oral health research and policy are so different as to raise doubts about the extent to which research is policy-relevant and policy is research-based. The notion of policy relevance encompasses the lack of willingness of policy makers to embrace research, and the need for researchers to develop research that is, and is seen to be, policy-relevant. Copyright © 2014 Longwoods Publishing.

  5. Oral health of Hong Kong children: a historical and epidemiological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G Hm; Pang, H N; McGrath, C; Yiu, C Ky

    2016-08-01

    To provide a historical and epidemiological overview of the oral health of Hong Kong children. Literature published before 2014 related to the oral health of Hong Kong children, supplemented with information accessed from government-archived oral health reports, was sourced using electronic databases and hand searches. Dental caries experience, periodontal health, enamel defects, and malocclusion of Hong Kong children were reviewed. A decline in the prevalence and extent of dental caries was observed among Hong Kong schoolchildren and adolescents after the 1960s. Among preschool children, however, dental caries remains common and the extent appears to have increased. The periodontal health of Hong Kong children remains unsatisfactory. Recently, enamel defects/dental fluorosis have considerably reduced. Information about malocclusion in Hong Kong children is limited. Since the 1960s, following public health policies, health promotion activities, and the introduction of a School Dental Care Service, improvements in the oral health of schoolchildren are evident. Nonetheless, the oral health of preschool children remains a concern. Policies and practices to improve the oral health of preschool children in Hong Kong are required.

  6. Oral Health Beliefs, Attitudes, and Practices of Albanian Immigrants in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhihani, Blerina; Rainchuso, Lori; Smallidge, Dianne; Dominick, Christine

    2017-04-01

    Research indicates a high prevalence of oral disease among Albanians. There is a lack of evidence regarding oral health beliefs and practices among Albanian immigrants in the United States and abroad. This research seeks to better understand the oral health beliefs, attitudes, and practices among Albanian immigrants living in the United States. A descriptive study was employed with a purposive sample (n = 211) of Albanian adult immigrants. A cross-sectional validated questionnaire was provided in both English and Albanian, with a response rate of 66 %. Results revealed a high use of dental services among respondents, with 68 % reported as having a dental visit and cleaning within the past year. Although 25 % of participants stated their parents and grandparents have used folk remedies, 88 % of them stated that use of folk remedies did not influence their decision to seek professional dental care. Increasing age was inversely associated with the belief in the importance of retaining natural teeth, as older respondents were less likely to agree with the prior statement; older respondents were more likely to agree with the statement "bleeding gums are normal." Low oral health care access and utilization was not a factor among the majority of the Albanian immigrants studied. Focusing on providing age appropriate oral health education and behavioral strategies could increase oral health knowledge and potentially improve poor oral health status among this population.

  7. An aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander oral health curriculum framework: development experiences in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazen, J; Paul, D; Tennant, M

    2007-06-01

    Indigenous oral health is widely acknowledged as paralleling the significant issues faced in general health. It is recognized that as part of the process of addressing these issues, practitioners need to be aware of the complex nature of working in an Indigenous social and cultural context, including issues beyond direct health care services. It is against this backdrop that collaborators from The University of Western Australia's (UWA) Centre for Rural and Remote Oral Health (CRROH) and Centre for Aboriginal Medical and Dental Health (CAMDH) developed a comprehensive, integrated Indigenous Oral Health Curriculum Framework for the Bachelor of Dental Science (BDSc) course. This development was based on the existing framework developed by the Committee of Deans of Australian Medical Schools (CDAMS) for medical education but was tailored to the specific issues and needs of oral health. Additional consultation with the Oral Health Centre of Western Australia (OHCWA), the School of Indigenous Studies (SIS) as well as Indigenous Australian groups occurred to ensure the development process was inclusive. The inclusion of an Indigenous Oral Health Curriculum Framework in the BDSc will enable UWA dental graduates to practise dentistry in a culturally appropriate manner. The framework provides the structure for students to develop and demonstrate an understanding of Indigenous histories, cultures and social experiences and how these impact on Indigenous peoples' health. It is anticipated that this will foster more positive and culturally secure patient-practitioner interactions between UWA dental graduates and Indigenous Australians, thereby making it more likely for Indigenous Australians to present for treatment. The increased awareness of Indigenous oral health issues will hopefully encourage more graduates to become involved in the treatment of Indigenous peoples. The combination of these factors could lead to an improvement in oral health outcomes for Australia

  8. Comparison of perceived oral health in patients with temporomandibular disorders and dental anxiety using oral health-related quality of life profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierz, Oliver; John, Mike T; Reissmann, Daniel R; Mehrstedt, Mats; Szentpétery, András

    2008-08-01

    Oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) instruments provide information beyond what is represented in their summary scores. Individual item information also provides useful insight into patient-related oral health problems. Our study aim was to compare patients' perceived impact from temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and from dental anxiety on oral health using item profiles contained within the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP). We measured OHRQoL using the German version of the 14-item OHIP in 416 TMD patients, 173 dental anxiety patients, and 2,026 general population subjects. Dental anxiety patients demonstrated the highest mean OHIP summary scores, i.e., the worst OHRQoL (22.4 in anxiety patients, 14.0 in TMD patients, 4.1 in general population; P<0.001). The prevalence of frequently occurring responses of the individual items was 6-62% in dental anxiety patients, 3-40% in TMD patients, and 0.2-0.4% in the general population. The item prevalence of both patient groups was very similar for functional and pain-related OHRQoL domains. Dental anxiety patients indicated problems more frequently than TMD patients in the OHIP domains of psychological discomfort and psychological disability. This insight into patients' perceived oral health provided by OHIP item profiles may be important for patient diagnosis and outcome assessment in the clinical setting.

  9. Esomeprazole administered through a nasogastric tube provides bioavailability similar to oral dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sostek, M B; Chen, Y; Skammer, W; Winter, H; Zhao, J; Andersson, T

    2003-09-15

    To determine if nasogastric tube administration of the enteric-coated pellets from an opened esomeprazole capsule provides bioavailability similar to oral dosing with the intact capsule. A randomized, single-centre, open-label, two-period crossover pharmacokinetic study consisting of two 5-day dosing periods separated by a 7- to 14-day washout period was conducted. Healthy subjects between the ages of 18 and 50 years received esomeprazole 40 mg once daily either orally as an intact capsule, or as a suspension of the enteric-coated pellets from an opened capsule in water through a nasogastric tube. In 47 evaluable subjects, the 90% confidence intervals were 0.87-1.08 and 0.93-1.25 for the geometric mean of the ratio of nasogastric tube administration relative to administration of the intact capsule for the area under the plasma concentration-time curve and for maximum plasma concentration, respectively, on day 1, demonstrating bioequivalence. Oral and nasogastric administration also demonstrated similar bioavailabilities on day 5. Esomeprazole was well tolerated regardless of the mode of administration. Nasogastric tube administration of the enteric-coated pellets from an opened esomeprazole 40 mg capsule provides bioavailability similar to oral dosing. Administration of the contents of an opened esomeprazole 40 mg capsule in water through a nasogastric tube is a practical alternative for patients with feeding tubes who require effective gastric acid suppression, but cannot swallow an oral preparation.

  10. Dental health of Chatham Islanders: an investigation of the oral health of Chatham Islands residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Lisa M; Thomson, W Murray

    2003-12-01

    To examine the self-reported and clinical oral health of Chatham Islanders. A cross-sectional oral health survey. The Chatham Islands community. The investigation involved completion of dental self-report questionnaires by children who attended Chatham Islands schools, and adults who responded to a dental flyer. Eighty-seven children and 189 adults took part, all of whom had oral health examinations. Among the children, the prevalence of dental caries in the deciduous dentition was 67.8 percent, and the mean dfs, mean DFS and mean number of missing deciduous teeth due to caries were 5.9 (sd, 6.2), 0.5 (sd, 1.1) and 0.3 (sd, 0.8) respectively. Caries severity was higher in children who were episodic dental attenders, who had irregular brushing habits or whose dental experiences had had a negative impact on their lives. In adults, the prevalence of caries was 81.5 percent. The mean DFS and mean number of missing permanent teeth due to caries were 37.9 (sd, 13.1) and 4.7 (sd, 3.8) respectively. On average, caries severity was higher among infrequent and episodic dental attenders, irregular brushers and those for whom dental problems had had a negative life impact. While the oral health of Chatham Islands children is comparable with that of children in New Zealand, Chatham Islands adults may be dentally disadvantaged due to limited access to dental resources. The findings have important implications for the planning of dental health services for this remote area, and may provide a useful framework from which further investigations of remote community-dwellers' oral health may be developed.

  11. Association between diet, social resources and oral health related quality of life in edentulous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, P F

    2005-09-01

    To assess whether there was an association between diet, oral health related quality of life and social resources in a population of older edentulous adults, and, to assess the impact of provision of new complete replacement dentures. This study was carried out at Cork University Dental Hospital in Ireland. In this prospective clinical study, 35 edentulous adults who requested new complete dentures completed pre-treatment questionnaires which included validated oral health status, social resources and nutritional assessment questionnaires. New dentures were provided and the impact of treatment on oral health related quality of life, diet and ability to chew food was assessed. Satisfaction with dentures and oral health related quality of life improved following provision of new dentures. However, food choice remained similar to pre-treatment choice, and subjects were rated as medium risk for poor nutritional status on the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) score. Oral health related quality of life and diet were not correlated. Three quarters of the sample felt they had no nutritional problems. However, approximately 70% reported that they had changed their food choices because of dental problems and that financial cost was a barrier to dental treatment. Food selection among the group studied was not ideal, and not improved by the provision of new dentures. There was no association between diet and oral health related quality of life. Further research is needed to improve our understanding of the relationship between oral health and diet.

  12. Exploring pluralism in oral health care: Dom informal dentists in northern Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochi, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    This article describes a pluralistic regime of oral health provision in a rural part of northern Lebanon, where dental care came from two main sources: professionally trained dentists and "informal" Dom dentists with Syrian nationality. Relying on a combination of interviews and ethnography, I offer a multivocal view of oral health services that incorporates data from patients and formal and informal providers. I argue that informal dentistry constituted an interstitial and translocal mode of dental care. In the northern Lebanese Biqa Valley, close to the Syrian border, the local articulation of neoliberal health governance created opportunities for heterodox practices in oral health. The organization of informality was predicated on the presence of the open border between Syria and Lebanon, which favored patterns of flexible cross-border mobility. In this context, informal dentistry was not alternative, but supplementary and lateral in relation to official forms of oral health provision. © 2014 by the American Anthropological Association.

  13. Effect of visual impairment upon oral health care: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, E K; Kumar, N; Porter, S R

    2008-01-26

    The incidence of visual impairment is increasing globally and in the United Kingdom due to local and systemic disease, medical advances, and the increasing age of population groups. Despite there being a large number of people resident in the UK with a visual impairment, there is little information available regarding the dental health care and needs of such individuals. As reported in other groups of patients with special needs, many individuals with a visual impairment may only seek oral health care when a problem arises, such as pain. Visual impairment may have a negative effect upon oral hygiene with many blind and partially sighted individuals having worse oral hygiene than sighted peers. This review article was undertaken to examine the literature relating to visual impairment, oral health and dental care. This article will discuss the dental aspects of visual impairment, its implications for obtaining dental care, associated oral conditions and medical complications.

  14. Oral Health Care in Home Care Service – Personnels’ Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Lundqvist, Pontus; Mathson, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Elderly nowadays stay longer in their own home. This raises the standards on home care service to contribute to the maintenance of elderly’s general and oral health. Our objective is therefore to explore attitudes about how home care workers view oral health care and the importance of good oral health for elderly clients. 8 subjects (22 to 61 years of age) were selected for the study working in home care service, which all gave their informed consent. Semi-structured interviews were performed...

  15. The promotion of oral health in health-promoting schools in KwaZulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Oral health promotion is a cost-effective strategy that can be implemented at schools for the prevention of oral diseases. The importance and value of school-based interventions in children has been identified in South Africa (SA). Although oral health strategies include integrated school-based interventions, ...

  16. Do dentists have better oral health compared to general population: a study on oral health status and oral health behavior in Kathmandu, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Dentists are considered role models by the general population in regards to oral hygiene and oral health behavior. This study aimed to access the oral health status of dentists and laypersons, and compare the dentists’ practice of preventive dentistry and oral self-care behaviors to that of the laypersons. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 472 participants (195 dentists and 277 laypersons from the general population). Their oral health/hygiene behavior was assessed using a standardized close-ended multiple choice questionnaire. Oral examination was performed to assess caries using Decayed Missed Filled teeth (DMFT) index and periodontal status using Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN). Results Ninety-six percent of dentists brushed their teeth at least once daily, using fluoridated toothpaste and 80.5% twice daily. Although 94% of laypersons brushed their teeth once daily, they seldom used fluoridated toothpaste. Ten percent of participants in each group were caries free. The mean number of teeth present in the oral cavity (27.4 versus 25.4), mean number of teeth with caries (1.8 versus 3.7) and fillings (2.5 versus 0.4) were significantly different (p dentists and laypersons, respectively. Regarding the periodontal status, 82% of dentists had CPITN score of 0 whereas 71% of laypersons had the highest score 3 (p = 0.007), and 81% of the laypersons reported tooth mobility compared to 1% of dentists (p dentists had better periodontal status and better self-reported oral health behaviors than the laypersons. Despite similar prevalence of caries in the two groups, the prevalence of decayed and unfilled teeth was lower among the dentists. PMID:24655533

  17. Do dentists have better oral health compared to general population: a study on oral health status and oral health behavior in Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Madhu; Trovik, Tordis A; Basnet, Purusotam; Acharya, Ganesh

    2014-03-22

    Dentists are considered role models by the general population in regards to oral hygiene and oral health behavior. This study aimed to access the oral health status of dentists and laypersons, and compare the dentists' practice of preventive dentistry and oral self-care behaviors to that of the laypersons. This cross-sectional study recruited 472 participants (195 dentists and 277 laypersons from the general population). Their oral health/hygiene behavior was assessed using a standardized close-ended multiple choice questionnaire. Oral examination was performed to assess caries using Decayed Missed Filled teeth (DMFT) index and periodontal status using Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN). Ninety-six percent of dentists brushed their teeth at least once daily, using fluoridated toothpaste and 80.5% twice daily. Although 94% of laypersons brushed their teeth once daily, they seldom used fluoridated toothpaste. Ten percent of participants in each group were caries free. The mean number of teeth present in the oral cavity (27.4 versus 25.4), mean number of teeth with caries (1.8 versus 3.7) and fillings (2.5 versus 0.4) were significantly different (p < 0.0001) between dentists and laypersons, respectively. Regarding the periodontal status, 82% of dentists had CPITN score of 0 whereas 71% of laypersons had the highest score 3 (p = 0.007), and 81% of the laypersons reported tooth mobility compared to 1% of dentists (p < 0.0001). The participating dentists had better periodontal status and better self-reported oral health behaviors than the laypersons. Despite similar prevalence of caries in the two groups, the prevalence of decayed and unfilled teeth was lower among the dentists.

  18. 1 Socio-demographic and behavioural correlates of oral health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that address the social and psychological consequences of oral disorders have been developed to complement ... Surveys – Basic Methods was used to obtain a total of 1,759 Tanzanian adults aged 18 years and above. In ... Studies have demonstrated a gap between professionally identified and self reported oral health.

  19. Effects of professional oral health care on elderly: randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, T; Ookawa, K; Haruta, N; Hagiwara, Y; Seki, M

    2014-11-01

    To better understand the role of the professional oral health care for elderly in improving geriatric oral health, the effects of short-term professional oral health care (once per week for 1 month) on oral microbiological parameters were assessed. Parallel, open-labelled, randomize-controlled trial was undertaken in a nursing home for elderly in Shizuoka, Japan. Thirty-four dentate elderly over 74 years were randomly assigned from ID number to the intervention (17/34) and control (17/34) groups. The outcomes were changes in oral microbiological parameters (number of bacteria in unstimulated saliva; whole bacteria, Streptococcus, Fusobacterium and Prevotella: opportunistic pathogens detection: and index of oral hygiene evaluation [Dental Plaque Index, DPI]) within the intervention period. Each parameter was evaluated at before and after intervention period. Four elderly were lost from mortality (1), bone fracture (1), refused to participate (1) and multi-antibiotics usage (1). Finally, 30 elderly were analysed (14/intervention and 16/control). At baseline, no difference was found between the control and intervention groups. After the intervention period, the percentage of Streptococcus species increased significantly in the intervention group (Intervention, 86% [12/14]; Control, 50% [8/16]: Fisher's, right-tailed, P oral health care can improve oral conditions in the elderly. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Oral health knowledge, attitude and practice among orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Most of the patients (93.5%) shown oral health awareness. However, only slightly above one third (37.0%) of the patients knew that orthodontic appliances can predispose an individual with poor oral hygiene to dental caries and periodontal diseases.89.1% of the patients knew that tooth brushing could prevent ...

  1. Oral health awareness in HIV positive Nigerian adults | Taiwo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lesions commonly noticed includes; Candidiasis, Xerostomia, Herpes Stomatitis and Aphthous Ulcerations. Patient's educational level did not affect their ability to detect a change in their mouths (X2=2.932, p=0.402). Conclusion: The awareness of HIV-positive patients to their oral health is poor. As oral manifestations of ...

  2. Are oral health complaints related to smoking cessation intentions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosseel, J.P.; Hilberink, S.R.; Jacobs, J.E.; Maassen, I.M.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Smoking influences oral health in several ways (such as the occurrence of periodontitis, teeth discolouration and oral cancer); therefore, smoking behaviour should be addressed in dental care. Dentists can play a role in primary and secondary prevention of tobacco dependence. They see

  3. Validity of Self Completed Health Questionnaire among Oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective of this study is to determine the degree of validity of self completed health questionnaire among oral surgery patient at the Capitol Dental when compared with a structured oral interview. A prospective random selection method was applied using a standardized questionnaire. The cohorts are patients attending ...

  4. Proposal of a community oral health indicator - doi:10.5020/18061230.2007.p199

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vieira de Lima Saintrain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The execution of public policies, which attain the reduction of the iniquities in oral health, requires, from managers of Brazil’s Health Unified System (SUS, a planning of simplified actions with universal reach, as well as the participation of social actors who are involved in this process. The Community Oral Health Indicator – ICSB aims at consisting in “new technology” in order to obtain data in an easy and simple way that can be able to provide agility to planning organization towards the equity, as well as improving the population’s oral health condition. As a strategy, involving the community health agent (ACS from the Family Health Program (PSF, the tool (ICSB was developed to survey the data on oral health epidemiological status of the population. The methodological design consists, initially, in a training workshop with the ACS and a posterior data survey along the population. The dentists involved in the project will be the preceptors of the training workshop for the ACS, in what concerns the identification of oral health problems and their degree of severity. According to the need of treatment, the dentist will develop oral health actions based on the principle of equity.

  5. Acculturation, depression and oral health of immigrants in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huabin; Hybels, Celia F; Wu, Bei

    2017-12-21

    The objectives were to describe the oral health status of immigrants in the USA, describe the association between acculturation and oral health by accounting for the effects of depression and to explore the effects of interaction between acculturation and depression on the oral health of immigrants. Data were from the 2011-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Oral health status was assessed by both self-rated oral health and clinically diagnosed periodontitis, each coded as a binary outcome. Acculturation was operationalised as length of stay in the USA and speaking English at home. Depression was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the association of acculturation and depression status with oral health. In 2011-2012, 36.6% immigrants reported poor oral health and 53.0% were diagnosed with periodontitis. A length of stay in the USA of 30+ years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.43, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.21-0.89) reduced the odds of having periodontitis in comparison with a length of stay in the USA of fewer than 5 years. Speaking English at home (AOR = 0.64, 95% CI: 0.43-0.96) reduced the odds of having periodontitis compared with speaking other languages. Depression was negatively associated with self-reported good oral health (AOR = 0.43, 95% CI: 0.20-0.92) and positively associated with clinically diagnosed periodontitis (AOR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.18-3.04). The effects of acculturation did not differ according to depression status. A longer stay in the USA and speaking English at home were associated with less periodontitis among the immigrants. © 2017 FDI World Dental Federation.

  6. Oral health and medical conditions among Amish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heima, Masahiro; Harrison, Marc-Allen; Milgrom, Peter

    2017-03-01

    The Amish are a growing population who live a traditional, rural way of life, which makes them less accepting of modernism. Most Amish live in poverty and are detached from modern health care. In addition, the recent change of their lifestyle has been reported, such as consuming a nontraditional diet and the usage of electronic devices. As a result, their lifestyle change may have impacted their oral health. However, since only a single report about oral health among Amish children has been published approximately three decades ago it has not yet been updated. This study describes oral health among Amish children and their medical conditions during visits to a mobile dental unit (MDU). The dental records of all patients (N=216) who visited a mobile dental unit were reviewed, which covers 1 year from May 20, 2011, the first date of service. The following factors were taken into consideration during the review process: parental perceptions of their children's oral health care, dental care experiences, and general health information. Fifty-four (27.8%) children, ages 3 to 17, have never received dental treatment before visiting the MDU; the average number of untreated decayed teeth was 6.8. In spite of this, most parents rated their children's oral health as good or very good (87.7%). The high cost and long distance travel associated with routine, professional dental care makes it difficult for children to maintain good oral hygiene. Our analysis revealed that bleeding disorders were more prevalent among this gene pool compared to the nation at large; however, asthma was less common. There are oral and general health disparities among Amish children. There is a lack of awareness among Amish parents with regard to their children's oral health. Key words:Amish, child, dental caries, mobile health units.

  7. Pediatric Primary Care Providers' Relationships with Mental Health Care Providers: Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidano, Anne E.; Honigfeld, Lisa; Bar-Halpern, Miri; Vivian, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As many as 20 % of children have diagnosable mental health conditions and nearly all of them receive pediatric primary health care. However, most children with serious mental health concerns do not receive mental health services. This study tested hypotheses that pediatric primary care providers (PPCPs) in relationships with mental…

  8. Reducing Alaska Native paediatric oral health disparities: a systematic review of oral health interventions and a case study on multilevel strategies to reduce sugar-sweetened beverage intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L

    2013-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most common paediatric disease and there is a serious paediatric tooth decay epidemic in Alaska Native communities. When untreated, tooth decay can lead to pain, infection, systemic health problems, hospitalisations and in rare cases death, as well as school absenteeism, poor grades and low quality-of-life. The extent to which population-based oral health interventions have been conducted in Alaska Native paediatric populations is unknown. To conduct a systematic review of oral health interventions aimed at Alaska Native children below age 18 and to present a case study and conceptual model on multilevel intervention strategies aimed at reducing sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake among Alaska Native children. Based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Statement, the terms "Alaska Native", "children" and "oral health" were used to search Medline, Embase, Web of Science, GoogleScholar and health foundation websites (1970-2012) for relevant clinical trials and evaluation studies. Eighty-five studies were found in Medline, Embase and Web of Science databases and there were 663 hits in GoogleScholar. A total of 9 publications were included in the qualitative review. These publications describe 3 interventions that focused on: reducing paediatric tooth decay by educating families and communities; providing dental chemotherapeutics to pregnant women; and training mid-level dental care providers. While these approaches have the potential to improve the oral health of Alaska Native children, there are unique challenges regarding intervention acceptability, reach and sustainability. A case study and conceptual model are presented on multilevel strategies to reduce SSB intake among Alaska Native children. Few oral health interventions have been tested within Alaska Native communities. Community-centred multilevel interventions are promising approaches to improve the oral and systemic health of Alaska Native

  9. Medical students' child oral-health-related knowledge, practices and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlYousef, Y; Damiano, P; Weber-Gasparoni, K; Qian, F; Murph, J; Nothwehr, F

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluated medical interns' oral health knowledge, and other factors influencing their ability and willingness to perform oral-health-related practices for high-caries-risk children. A 15-item survey was emailed to all eligible graduating fifth-year medical students at King Khalid University Hospital to address these areas of interest. Chi-square statistics and logistic regression models were used to analyse data. One-hundred and twenty-one (49%) usable surveys were returned from two mailings. On questions regarding comfort levels when performing oral-health-related practices on children under age 3, physicians noted high levels of comfort with all specified oral health practices. Regarding satisfaction of students with medical training, the majority of respondents (87.5%) rated their medical training as fair or poor in preparing them for oral health assessments compared to only 35%, 29% and 7% of respondents giving fair or poor ratings to child abuse identification, caring for special needs patients and primary care paediatric practice, respectively. Additionally, although 90% of respondents noted that the role of primary physicians in counselling/referring children with oral health was important, 60% did not agree with the AAPD and AAP guidelines that state that all children should be referred to a dentist by 12 months of age. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed several statistically significant variables that predict the likelihood of performing various oral-health-related practices. The choice of public-health-oriented future clinical goals, the level of oral health knowledge, how interns rated their oral health training in medical school and the average number of children seen per week, all--to varying degrees--proved important predicator variables for the likelihood of performing them once in practice. More oral-health-related training of medical students seems warranted and could improve their interest in providing oral-health

  10. Methods and software for estimating health disparities: the case of children's oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Nancy F; Han, Pamela Z; Gansky, Stuart A

    2008-10-15

    The National Center for Health Statistics recently issued a monograph with 11 guidelines for reporting health disparities. However, guidelines on confidence intervals (CIs) cannot be readily implemented with the complex sample surveys often used for disease surveillance. In the United States, dental caries (decay) is the most common chronic childhood disease-5 times more common than asthma. Racial/ethnic minorities, immigrants, and persons of lower socioeconomic position (SEP) have a greater prevalence of caries. The authors provide methods for applying National Center for Health Statistics guidelines to complex sample surveys (health disparity indices and absolute and relative difference measures assessing associations of race/ethnicity and SEP to health outcomes with CIs); illustrate the application of those methods to children's untreated caries; provide relevant software; and report results from a simulation varying prevalence. They use data on untreated caries from the California Oral Health Needs Assessment of Children 2004-2005 and school percentage of participation in free/reduced-price lunch programs to illustrate the methods. Absolute and relative measures, the Slope Index of Inequality, the Relative Index of Inequality (mean and ratio), and the Health Concentration Index were estimated. Taylor series linearization and rescaling bootstrap methods were used to estimate CIs. Oral health differed significantly between White children and all non-White children and was significantly related to SEP.

  11. Heart Disease Prevention: Does Oral Health Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the American Dental Association. 2012;143:826. Brushing your teeth. American Dental Association. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/b/brushing-your-teeth. Accessed Sept. 19, 2015. Heart disease and oral ...

  12. Addressing inequalities in oral health in India: need for skill mix in the dental workforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Raj Mathur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentistry has always been an under-resourced profession. There are three main issues that dentistry is facing in the modern era. Firstly, how to rectify the widely acknowledged geographical imbalance in the demand and supply of dental personnel, secondly, how to provide access to primary dental care to maximum number of people, and thirdly, how to achieve both of these aims within the financial restraints imposed by the central and state governments. The trends of oral diseases have changed significantly in the last 20 years. The two of the most common oral diseases that affect a majority of the population worldwide, namely dental caries and periodontitis, have been proved to be entirely preventable. Even for life-threatening oral diseases like oral cancer, the best possible available treatment is prevention. There is a growing consensus that appropriate skill mix can prove very beneficial in providing these preventive dental care services to the public and aid in achieving the goal of universal oral health coverage. Professions complementary to dentistry (PCD have been found to be effective in reducing inequalities in oral health, improving access and spreading the messages of health promotion across entire spectrum of socio-economic hierarchy in various studies conducted globally. This commentary provides a review of the effectiveness of skill mix in dentistry and a reflection on how this can be beneficial in achieving universal oral health care in India.

  13. Addressing inequalities in oral health in India: need for skill mix in the dental workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Manu Raj; Singh, Ankur; Watt, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Dentistry has always been an under-resourced profession. There are three main issues that dentistry is facing in the modern era. Firstly, how to rectify the widely acknowledged geographical imbalance in the demand and supply of dental personnel, secondly, how to provide access to primary dental care to maximum number of people, and thirdly, how to achieve both of these aims within the financial restraints imposed by the central and state governments. The trends of oral diseases have changed significantly in the last 20 years. The two of the most common oral diseases that affect a majority of the population worldwide, namely dental caries and periodontitis, have been proved to be entirely preventable. Even for life-threatening oral diseases like oral cancer, the best possible available treatment is prevention. There is a growing consensus that appropriate skill mix can prove very beneficial in providing these preventive dental care services to the public and aid in achieving the goal of universal oral health coverage. Professions complementary to dentistry (PCD) have been found to be effective in reducing inequalities in oral health, improving access and spreading the messages of health promotion across entire spectrum of socio-economic hierarchy in various studies conducted globally. This commentary provides a review of the effectiveness of skill mix in dentistry and a reflection on how this can be beneficial in achieving universal oral health care in India. PMID:25949967

  14. Knowledge and beliefs regarding oral health among pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggess, Kim A; Urlaub, Diana M; Moos, Merry-K; Polinkovsky, Margaret; El-Khorazaty, Jill; Lorenz, Carol

    2011-11-01

    Racial or ethnic and economic disparities exist in terms of oral diseases among pregnant women and children. The authors hypothesized that women of a racial or ethnic minority have less oral health knowledge than do women not of a racial or ethnic minority. Therefore, the authors conducted a study to assess and compare maternal oral health knowledge and beliefs and to determine if maternal race and ethnicity or other maternal factors contributed to women's knowledge or beliefs. The authors administered a written oral health questionnaire to pregnant women. The authors calculated the participants' knowledge and belief scores on the basis of correct answers or answers supporting positive oral health behaviors. They conducted multivariable analysis of variance to assess associations between oral health knowledge and belief scores and characteristics. The authors enrolled 615 women in the study, and 599 (97.4 percent) completed the questionnaire. Of 599 participants, 573 (95.7 percent) knew that sugar intake is associated with caries. Almost one-half (295 participants [49.2 percent]) did not know that caries and periodontal disease are oral infections. Median (interquartile range) knowledge and belief scores were 6.0 (5.5-7.0) and 6.0 (5.0-7.0), respectively. Hispanic women had median (interquartile range) knowledge and belief scores significantly lower than those of white or African American women (6.0 [4.0-7.0] versus 7.0 [6.0-7.0] versus 7.0 [6.0-7.0], respectively [P education level of eighth grade or less was associated significantly with a lower belief score. Pregnant women have some oral health knowledge. Knowledge varied according to maternal race or ethnicity, and beliefs varied according to maternal education. Including oral health education as a part of prenatal care may improve knowledge regarding the importance of oral health among vulnerable pregnant women, thereby improving their oral health and that of their children. Including oral health education as

  15. Surveillance and monitoring of oral health in elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Hideo; Jones, Judith A; Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D

    2017-09-01

    Continued ageing of the global population is expected to pose significant challenges to maintaining optimum lifelong health in individuals and populations. Oral health is an essential element of general health and quality of life throughout an individual's life course, yet it is often neglected in integrated approaches to general health promotion. Surveillance and monitoring systems are essential for developing oral health policy and strategy at both national and community levels. As major oral diseases, dental caries and periodontal diseases are core indicators for surveillance at every stage of life. In addition, oral mucosal lesions and masticatory function are essential indicators, especially in an ageing population. The assessment of risk factors such as tobacco use, alcohol consumption or dietary habits (e.g., sugar intake) is also important for oral disease prevention. Although surveillance is conducted through clinical examinations (normative assessments), this method is becoming more difficult to use because of high costs and human resource shortages, even in high-income countries. Alternative and less resource-demanding approaches, such as self-reported protocols, are therefore needed at the global level. The World Health Organization's (WHO) oral health surveillance and monitoring activities have evolved into the Oral Health STEPwise approach, which includes questionnaire surveys (Step 1) and clinical examinations (Step 2). Collaboration between international organisations such as the World Dental Federation (FDI), WHO and the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) is now needed to coordinate global oral health surveillance and monitoring systems. © 2017 The authors. International Dental Journal © 2017 FDI World Dental Federation.

  16. The patient-provider discordance in patients' needs assessment: a qualitative study in breast cancer patients receiving oral chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chunlan; Nengliang, Yao; Yan, Wang; Qiong, Fang; Yuan, Changrong

    2017-01-01

    To explore the differing perspectives of patients and providers and their assessment of supportive care needs in breast cancer patients receiving oral chemotherapy. The patient-provider concordance in patients' needs assessment is critical to the effective management of cancer. Self-administered oral chemotherapy greatly shifts responsibilities for side-effect monitoring, symptom management and dose adjustments from the provider to the patient. Home-based care plans will be central to the effective management of these patients. A descriptive qualitative design was used. A purposive sample of nine breast cancer patients, four oncologists and four oncology nurses were recruited in Shanghai, China. Semi-structured and in-depth interviews were conducted to collect data. A qualitative content analysis aimed at finding manifest and latent meanings of data was applied to analyse the information. Four themes of needs emerged from the interviews with patients and providers: information/knowledge, communication, social support and symptom management, but patients and providers only agreed on the assessment of symptom and side-effects management needs. Patients want more positive encouraging information from providers, but providers think patients need more information of efficacy and safety. Patients appreciate support from other peer patients with similar experiences, but providers think the support from families and friends are readily available to them. Patients discussed their spiritual needs, while oncologists see the need to improve patient adherence to medication. Breast cancer patients differed from their providers in assessment of healthcare needs. Further investigation of the relationships between patient-provider discordance and patient outcomes may guide interventions to improve care for cancer patients receiving oral chemotherapy. Oncology nurses should develop a holistic home-based care plan by exploring and integrating the discordance of needs assessment of

  17. Equality Impact Assessment of the Oral Health Strategy (PDF 120 KB)

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health; Social Services and Public Safety

    2005-01-01

    The Health and Personal Social Services (Northern Ireland) Order 1972 requires the Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety to provide or secure the provision of health services in Northern Ireland designed to promote the physical and mental health of the community through the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of illness. This includes the provision of oral health care. åÊ åÊ

  18. oral health knowledge, hygiene practices and treatment seeking

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-10-10

    . To date the most effective way of controlling plaque accumulation is by mechanical means (8 ... establish the population's perceptions of oral health as it is from this that ..... A study in Scotland where extractions are relatively ...

  19. Framing Young Childrens Oral Health: A Participatory Action Research Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Collins, Chimere C; Villa-Torres, Laura; Sams, Lattice D; Zeldin, Leslie P; Divaris, Kimon

    2016-01-01

    .... We sought to understand what parents of young children consider important and potentially modifiable factors and resources influencing their children's oral health, within the contexts of the family and the community...

  20. Knowledge on Oral health and factors associated among older ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr.Irene Kida

    ) on dental caries and gum disease ... Key words: oral health, dental caries, gum disease, knowledge, adults, Tanzania. Introduction .... lesion. Absence of carious lesions on root tips, such as in erosion or trauma, the tooth was scored other ...

  1. Tri-Service Center for Oral Health Studies (TSCOHS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Tri-Service Center for Oral Health Studies (TSCOHS), a service of the Postgraduate Dental College, is chartered by the Department of Defense TRICARE Management...

  2. Oral Health Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Parents of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % ensured regular brushing for their children. CONCLUSION: There is urgent need for oral health education for the parents/ caregivers of children with congenital heart defects to forestall a situation where they would endanger their children/ ...

  3. Impact of Health Care Provider's Training on Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Comprehensive patient's health care provider's (HCP) communication usually increases patients' participation in their health management on childbirth. Objective: This is a quasi interventional study for assessing impact of health care providers (HCP) training on patient- provider's communication during ...

  4. Oil pulling and importance of traditional medicine in oral health maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Mustafa; Khiyani, Muhammad Faheem; Nauman, Hiba; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Shah, Altaf H; Khalil, Hesham S

    2017-01-01

    Dental diseases have detrimental effects on the functionality and quality of life of individuals. In addition, a strong relationship has been established between various oral and systemic diseases. In fact, the prevention and treatment of dental caries and periodontal disease have been shown to reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease significantly. This goes beyond the role of oral health as a means to identify early manifestations of systemic diseases in the oral cavity. It highlights the necessity of maintaining an optimal oral hygiene to significantly modify the risk factors for serious systemic diseases. The use of oil pulling can be frequently found in ancient medical text and is supported by recent studies for its efficacy and long-term use for maintaining and improving oral health. This article provides an overview on the concept of oil pulling or oil swishing, its mechanism of action and a summary of the evidence available, which highlights the role of oil pulling in specific oral diseases. The goal of this review is to highlight the ancient procedure that has the potential to be used as an adjunct to conventional chemical means of dental plaque control, such as mouth rinses. Incorporating oil swishing as a component of daily oral hygiene can significantly improve oral and general health, specifically in lower socioeconomic groups and rural communities that may have interrupted access to health-care services and dental products such as dentifrices and mouth washes due to various factors; availability and affordability being the most important.

  5. Using qualitative methodology to inform an Indigenous-owned oral health promotion initiative in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, L M; Parker, E J; Richards, L

    2008-03-01

    Indigenous Australians experience poor oral health. Oral health perceptions among a group of rural-dwelling Indigenous Australians were explored so that a culturally appropriate, community-owned oral health promotion initiative might be developed. Focus group methodology was used, with prompt questions including oral health knowledge, oral health's role in general health, how community oral health had changed in recent times, the causes of poor oral health and ways to prevent poor oral health at a community level. Some 34 participants took part; age range 21-72 years. A core category emerged from the data and was labelled 'cultural adaptation'. Five sub-categories were also identified; 'lifestyle changes', 'oral health behaviours', 'barriers to dental care', 'impact of poor oral health' and 'oral health literacy'. Participants felt that historical legacy impacted on the oral health of community members, through continued practices of being told what to do, where to live and what oral health services were available to them. Participants perceived they had little power over their oral health or oral health care decisions. Findings from the focus group discussions were used in the development of a context-specific, oral health promotion initiative, which involved construction of an audiovisual tool in Phase I and a series of interactive, context-specific seminars focused on key issues raised in the focus groups in Phase II. Oral health promotion initiatives among rural-dwelling Indigenous Australians may be more successful if perceptions of the anticipated audience are considered in the design stage of such strategies.

  6. Oral Health in Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Neglected Topic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, Brian C; Glass, Magdalena; Glass, Oliver M

    2017-03-01

    Psychiatric medications may have serious and untoward adverse effects such as blurred vision, restlessness, agranulocytosis, muscle rigidity, and tremors. When compared to medications, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is becoming a more acceptable treatment due to its efficacy, tolerability, and minimal adverse effect profile. Oral trauma can be an ECT-related adverse effect. We reviewed the published literature on oral health and dental protection in patients undergoing ECT, and found that there are deficits in all guidelines on dental protection during ECT. Dental assessment and treatment before and after ECT is warranted. Given the increased risk of poor oral health in psychiatric patients, and the continued evolution of ECT as a mainstay treatment, it is important that studies be conducted to determine the optimal method of oral protection. If adequate care can be ensured, the risks of ECT-induced oral trauma will be minimized.

  7. Oral health determinants among female addicts in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Jalal Pourhashemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Addiction results in a range of health problems especially in the oral cavity. Aims: This study assessed the oral health status among women with a history of drug abuse in Tehran, Iran. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted through structured interviews and clinical examinations of women at three rehabilitation centers in Tehran. Materials and Methods: Data on background characteristics, addiction history, knowledge, attitudes and behaviors, and oral health indices were collected. Statistical Analysis Used: We used MANOVA test and multiple logistic regression models to analyze the data. Results: We assessed 95 participants aged 37.88 ± 10.65 years. The most commonly reported drugs used prior to treatment were opiates (77.2%. The mean knowledge and attitude score among the patients was 80.83 ± 12.89 (37.5-100. Less than half of the dentate women reported tooth brushing as "rarely or never" (44.2%. Most of them (81.8% had never used dental floss and 76.1% were daily smokers. The mean score of dental caries index (decayed, missed and filled teeth of the participants was 20.2 ± 7.18 and 17 subjects were edentulous (17.9%. Factors such as age, drug type, duration of addiction, time of last dental visit, and frequency of brushing were associated with oral health status among these women. Conclusions: Women with a history of drug abuse in our study suffered from poor oral health. Although they had an acceptable level of knowledge and attitude toward oral health, their oral health, and hygiene was poor. These results call for more attention in designing and implementing oral health programs for addicts.

  8. Relationships between dental personnel and non-dental primary health care providers in rural and remote Queensland, Australia: dental perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Jackie; Hoang, Ha; Crocombe, Len; Barnett, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Background Collaboration between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers has the potential to improve oral health care for people in rural and remote communities, where access to oral health services is limited. However, there is limited research on collaboration between these professional disciplines. The purpose of this paper was to explore the relationships between dental practitioners and non-dental primary care providers from rural and remote areas of Queensland and to...

  9. Cigarette Smoking And Oral Health Among Healthcare Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The knowledge, attitudes and practices of cigarette smoking and health risks among health workers has been found to be predictive of their efficiency as agents for tobacco cessation campaigns. Objective: To describe the knowledge, attitudes and practices of cigarette smoking and oral health risks among ...

  10. Drinking water fluoridation and oral health inequities in Canadian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Lindsay; Emery, J C Herbert

    2012-02-01

    One argument made in favour of drinking water fluoridation is that it is equitable in its impact on oral health. We examined the association between exposure to fluoridation and oral health inequities among Canadian children.PARTICIPANTS, SETTING AND INTERVENTION: We analyzed data from 1,017 children aged 6-11 from Cycle 1 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey, a cross-sectional, nationally representative survey that included a clinic oral health examination and a household interview. The outcome measure was a count of the number of decayed, missing (because of caries or periodontal disease) or filled teeth, either deciduous or permanent (dmftDMFT). Data were analyzed using linear (ordinary least squares) and multinomial logistic regression; we also computed the concentration index for education-related inequity in oral health. Water fluoridation status (the intervention) was assigned on the basis of the site location of data collection. Fluoridation was associated with better oral health (fewer dmftDMFT), adjusting for socio-economic and behavioural variables, and the effect was particularly strong for more severe oral health problems (three or more dmftDMFT). The effect of fluoridation on dmftDMFT was observed across income and education categories but appeared especially pronounced in lower education and higher income adequacy households. dmftDMFT were found to be disproportionately concentrated in lower-education households, though this did not vary by fluoridation status. The robust main effect of fluoridation on dmftDMFT and the beneficial effect across socio-economic groups support fluoridation as a beneficial and justifiable population health intervention. Fluoridation was equitable in the sense that its benefits were particularly apparent in those groups with the poorest oral health profiles, though the nature of the findings prompts consideration of the values underlying the judgement of health equity.

  11. Oral Health of Lipjan Convicts: Kosovo Prison House

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luljeta Zajmi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The oral health services of the prison population are considered more complex than those of the general population. The aim of this study was to examine the oral health status (the DMFT index and OHI index and to evaluate the relation between the oral health and risk factors of inmates of this population, thus identifying the dental health status of inmates by gender, age, and the duration of their sentence. Materials and Methods. Our study has included a total number of 150 inmates, of both genders, from Lipjan prison house in Kosovo. Results. Oral health condition of inmates in Lipjan prison house is severe; the average value of DMFT is 8.44: for minors 6.22, while for adults 9.55. The assessment of DMFT index within the recruited inmates in our study shows that the mean rate of oral cure was 3.21, while the mean extraction value and caries were 3.55 and 3.58, respectively. The mean plaque test value was 1.44. Conclusion. Based on this research, we have concluded that the oral health condition of the inmates in Lipjan prison is not good, due to the presence of different risk factors among them.

  12. Oral health related quality of life in diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Rokhsareh; Taleghani, Ferial; Farhadi, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Diabetic patients display an increased risk of oral disorders, and oral health related quality of life (OHRQL) might affect their management and treatment modalities. The aim of the present study was to determine OHRQL and associated parameters in patients with diabetes. Materials and methods. In this study two hundred patients were recruited from the diabetes clinic in Mustafa Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran. OHRQL was assessed using Oral Health Impact Profile Questionnaire (OHIP-20). Also, another questionnaire was designed which contained questions regarding participants' knowledge about oral complications of diabetes and oral health behavior. OHRQL was categorized as low and good. Data were analyzed using logistic regression at P = 0.05. Results. Of the diabetic patients assessed, 77.5% were in good and 22.5% were in low categories of OHRQL. This quality was significantly associated with age (OR = 4.03, 95% CI = 1.63-11.29), knowledge about diabetes oral complications (OR = 18.17 95% CI = 4.42-158.6), educational level (OR = 26.31 95% CI = 4.2-1080.3), referred for dental visit by physician (OR = 3.16 95% CI = 1.48-6.69), frequency of brushing (OR = 10.29 95% CI = 3.96-31.2) and length of time diagnosed with diabetes (OR = 6.21 95% CI = 2.86-13.63). Conclusion. Oral health related quality of life was not negatively affected by diabetes mellitus in the assessed sample.

  13. Oral Health Research and Scholarship in 2040: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polverini, Peter J

    2017-09-01

    This executive summary for Section 6 of the "Advancing Dental Education in the 21st Century" project provides an overview of five background articles that address the role of research and scholarship in dental education in the year 2040. Beginning with a historical account of research and discovery science in dentistry's evolution as a profession, the article then reviews the role of early thought leaders and organized dentistry in establishing research as a cornerstone of dental education and dental practice. The dental research workforce faces an uncertain future fueled by a volatile funding environment and inadequate mentoring and training of research faculty. Dental schools must forge stronger academic and scientific ties to their university and academic health centers and will be challenged to develop sustainable research and patient care collaborations with other health professions. The changing health care environment will create new opportunities for oral health care providers to expand their scope of practice and focus on prevention and screening for non-communicable chronic diseases. Dental practitioners in the future are likely to place greater emphasis on managing the overall health of their patients while promoting closer integration with other health professionals. All dental schools must develop a sustainable research mission if they hope to graduate dentists who function effectively in a collaborative health care environment. The changing scientific and health care landscape will dramatically alter dental education and dental practice. Dental schools need to reconsider their research and educational priorities and clinical practice objectives. Until dental schools and the practicing community come to grips with these challenges, a persistent attitude of complacency will likely be at the dental profession's peril.

  14. A general dental practice research network: impact of oral health in general dental practice patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, E J; Ward, N; Locker, D

    2003-06-14

    To measure the subjective impact of oral health in a group of patients attending general dental practices in the North West of England and to investigate the attributes of dentists and practices in order to examine how such attributes might relate to patients' subjective perceptions of oral health. Fifteen general dental practices conducting a simultaneous survey of attending patients and 15 practitioners from these practices providing information about their attitudes to treatment, prevention and various aspects of their surgery. General dental Patient subjective impact scores. Relationships between practice and practitioner variables and patients' subjectively perceived oral health. Fifteen practitioners with diverse practice attributes provided data on 718 patients. The mean total oral health impact score was 18.4. Twenty two per cent of patients had experienced pain in the four weeks before the survey and 11% had been unable to chew some foods. Fifty five per cent of the surveyed population had, in the previous year, worried about the appearance of their mouth and 65% had worried about their oral health in general. Dentists' beliefs were related to patient impact scores but practice attributes were not significantly associated with patients' impacts. Fourteen percent of the differences in patients' subjectively perceived oral health can be attributed to dentist attitudes and attributes. Further research regarding the influence of dentists personality and professional beliefs on patients well-being needs to be undertaken.

  15. Provider and patient perception of psychiatry patient health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Opal; Vandenberg, Amy; May, Meghan E

    2017-01-01

    Inadequate health literacy in adults is a nationwide issue that is associated with worse health outcomes. There is a paucity of literacy regarding rates of inadequate health literacy in psychiatric populations. The aim of the study was to identify an existing tool that would easily identify patients who had inadequate health literacy, so that a targeted intervention could be performed. Secondarily we attempted to compare rates of inadequate health literacy with providers' perception of patients' health literacy. We assessed health literacy in a psychiatric population by administering the Brief Health Literacy Survey (BHLS). Additionally, all psychiatry residents, psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, and social workers were surveyed to assess their perception of patient health literacy. Differences between patient health literacy and provider expectations of patient health literacy were compared. Inadequate health literacy was identified in 31 out of 61 patients (50.8%) using 2 questions from the BHLS. Only 9 (29%) of patients who were identified as having inadequate health literacy were identified by both BHLS questions. In contrast, almost 100% of providers identified their patients, in general, as having inadequate health literacy. These results identify a higher rate of health literacy in a psychiatric inpatient population than in the general population. However, providers at this institution likely over-identify health literacy. This highlights the need for a health literacy tool that can easily target patients with inadequate health literacy for an intervention.

  16. Building a Pediatric Oral Health Training Curriculum for Community Health Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Molly; Frese, William; Lumsden, Christie; Sandoval, Anna

    2017-06-16

    Community health workers (CHWs) are a promising approach to oral health promotion in high-risk populations. This article describes the process of creating a pediatric oral health CHW training curriculum. Existing curricula were identified through outreach efforts to experts in the oral health and CHW fields, as well as PubMed and Google searches. After coding basic information, curricula were mapped to define oral health domains. Then group discussion was employed to determine final curriculum contents. United States. Curricula were included if they addressed oral health, were in English or Spanish, involved US populations, did not target dental clinicians, and whether sufficient data could be obtained. Curricula were evaluated for delivery format, number of hours, target audience, inclusion of CHWs, completeness, and oral health content. Eighteen unique curricula were identified; 14 (78%) were CHW specific. Pathologic factors, caries formation, toothbrushing basics, flossing, nutrition, sugar-sweetened beverages, oral health recommendations, baby bottle tooth decay, fluoride treatments, and fluoride were covered to some extent in 75% of curricula. More than half did not mention types of teeth, oral health during pregnancy, antifluoride, cultural humility, and special needs populations. After comparing CHW curricula with non-CHW curricula, the original 26 oral health domains were condensed into 10 CHW training domains. Using existing evidence and expert insight, an oral health CHW training curriculum outline was created that emphasizes behaviors, social support, and navigation assistance to promote preventive oral health behaviors in families of young children. This has implications beyond oral health. CHW programs are expanding to address the social determinants of health. The process of creating this curriculum and its basic elements can be applied to other disease areas. Clearly defined trainings that are made publicly available, such as this one, support

  17. Oral health of visually impaired schoolchildren in Khartoum State, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagelsir, Azza; Khogli, Ahmed Eltigani; Nurelhuda, Nazik Mostafa

    2013-07-17

    Although oral health care is a vital component of overall health, it remains one of the greatest unattended needs among the disabled. The aim of this study was to assess the oral health status and oral health-related quality of life (Child-OIDP in 11-13-year-old) of the visually challenged school attendants in Khartoum State, the Sudan. A school-based survey was conducted in Al-Nour institute [boys (66.3%), boarders (35.9%), and children with partial visual impairment (PVI) (44.6%)]. Two calibrated dentists examined the participants (n=79) using DMFT/dmft, Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S), dental care index, and traumatic dental injuries (TDI) index. Oral health related quality of life (C-OIDP) was administered to 82 schoolchildren. Caries experience was 46.8%. Mean DMFT (age≥12, n=33) was 0.4 ± 0.7 (SiC 1.6), mean dmft (agechildren suffered TDI (19%). Almost one third (29%) of the 11-13 year old children reported an oral impact on their daily performances. A quarter of the schoolchildren (25.3%) required an urgent treatment need. Analysis showed that children with partial visual impairment (PVI) were 6.3 times (adjusted) more likely to be diagnosed with caries compared to children with complete visual impairment (CVI), and children with caries experience were 1.3 times (unadjusted) more likely to report an oral health related impact on quality of life. Visually impaired schoolchildren are burdened with oral health problems, especially caries. Furthermore, the 11-13 year olds' burden with caries showed a significant impact on their quality of life.

  18. The community care model of the Intercountry Centre for Oral Health at Chiangmai, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anumanrajadhon, T; Rajchagool, S; Nitisiri, P; Phantumvanit, P; Songpaisan, Y; Barmes, D E; Sardo-Infirri, J; Davies, G N; Møller, I J; Pilot, T

    1996-08-01

    The Intercountry Centre for Oral Health opened in Chiangmai, Thailand, in November, 1981. In 1984, as part of its mandate to promote new approaches to the delivery of oral health care, it initiated a demonstration project known as the Community Care Model for Oral Health. Logistic, financial and organisational difficulties prevented the full implementation of the original plan. Nevertheless, consideration of the strengths and weaknesses of the Model has provided valuable suggestions for adoption by national and international health agencies interested in adopting a primary health care approach to the delivery of oral health services. Important features which could be appropriate for disadvantaged communities include: integration into the existing health service infrastructure; emphasis on health promotion and prevention; minimal clinical interventions; an in-built monitoring and evaluation system based on epidemiological principles, full community participation in planning and implementation; the establishment of specific targets and goals; the instruction of all health personnel, teachers and senior students in the basic principles of the recognition, prevention and control of oral diseases and conditions; the application of relevant principles of Performance Logic to training; and the provision of a clear career path for all health personnel.

  19. [Importance of dental care to maintain oral health of children and youth with type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuźmiuk, Anna; Marczuk-Kolada, Grażyna; Łuczaj-Cepowicz, Elżbieta; Obidzińska, Marta; Chorzewska, Ewa; Wasilczuk, Urszula; Kierklo, Anna; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2018-01-01

    Dental care for children and youth with type 1 diabetes should rely on reliable examination of the oral cavity, early treatment of dental caries and maintenance of the treatment results. This can be achieved through regular control visits consistent with the standards, and also through following the recommendations for prevention of dental caries and periodontal disease. The aim of the study was to investigate whether dental care allows to preserve good oral health of children and youth with type 1 diabetes. The study included 60 patients with type 1 diabetes, aged 7-17 years, and 30 healthy children and youth within the same age range. There were evaluated intensity of caries, the effectiveness of conservative treatment, periodontal health and oral hygiene. The results of examinations showed significantly lower caries prevalence and better periodontal health in the children and youth with type 1 diabetes. The effectiveness of conservative treatment was significantly higher among patients with mixed dentition. There was no significant difference in oral hygiene between the compared groups. Diabetes is a risk factor for oral diseases, so children and youth with type 1 diabetes should be provided with special preventive care and curative measures. The main goal of the insulin-dependent diabetes care program is to early classify them to highrisk groups to improve general oral health and thus improve the quality of life. Proper dental care for children and yuoth with type 1 diabetes is a condition to maintain oral health. Med Pr 2018;69(1):37-44.

  20. Strategies for oral health care for people with disabilities in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Li Jeng

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Oral health care for disabled patients is an important health issue in Taiwan. Disabled patients seeking dental care include those with mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, Down syndrome, autism, xerostomia, AIDS, loss of function of major organs, and neurologic diseases. Current dental health care policies do not completely address this critical oral health issue. Most of these physically or mentally disabled patients cannot find suitable or qualified dental services in local dental clinics or even hospitals. Our current health care insurance system should provide greater benefits for dental practitioners who are willing to care for such disabled patients. The Department of Health (DOH should legislate policies to provide greater financial support and equipment and encourage hospital dental clinics and dentists to join this special oral care program. Dental schools, hospitals, and the DOH can also provide curricula and special training programs for both dentists and undergraduate dental students so that they can learn about diseases and dental care of these patients. The government and DOH should cover the fees of lawsuits if dentists have medical legal problems while treating patients with disabilities. Questions on special care dentistry can possibly be included in the National Board Dental Examination. The government can establish some national oral health care centers to treat these disabled patients. Through the development of effective preventive and treatment strategies, the incidence of oral diseases in these patients can be reduced in the future.

  1. Oral Hygiene in Patients With Severe Mental Illness: A Pilot Study on the Collaboration Between Oral Hygienists and Mental Health Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mey, Langha; Çömlekçi, Ceren; de Reuver, Fione; van Waard, Ineke; van Gool, Ronald; Scheerman, Janneke F M; van Meijel, Berno

    2016-07-01

    To test (a) the effects of an educational intervention about oral hygiene on the knowledge of mental health nurses, and (b) the effects of an oral care intervention on oral health in patients with severe mental illness (SMI). We applied a pretest/posttest design to test improvements in nurses' knowledge and the oral health of SMI patients. The nursing staff's knowledge increased significantly after the educational intervention. The oral health of the patients improved significantly after the oral health intervention. Oral health of SMI patients can improve significantly with basic oral health interventions carried out by collaborating oral hygienists and mental health nurses. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Contraception services for incarcerated women: a national survey of correctional health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sufrin, Carolyn B; Creinin, Mitchell D; Chang, Judy C

    2009-12-01

    Incarcerated women have had limited access to health care prior to their arrest. Although their incarceration presents an opportunity to provide them with health care, their reproductive health needs have been overlooked. We performed a cross-sectional study of a nationally representative sample of 950 correctional health providers who are members of the Academy of Correctional Health Providers. A total of 405 surveys (43%) were returned, and 286 (30%) were eligible for analysis. Most ineligible surveys were from clinicians at male-only facilities. Of eligible respondents, 70% reported some degree of contraception counseling for women at their facilities. Only 11% provided routine counseling prior to release. Seventy percent said that their institution had no formal policy on contraception. Thirty-eight percent of clinicians provided birth control methods at their facilities. Although the most frequently counseled and prescribed method was oral contraceptive pills, only 50% of providers rated their oral contraceptive counseling ability as good or very good. Contraception counseling was associated with working at a juvenile facility, and with screening for sexually transmitted infections. Contraception does not appear to be integrated into the routine delivery of clinical services to incarcerated women. Because the correctional health care system can provide important clinical and public health interventions to traditionally marginalized populations, services for incarcerated women should include access to contraception.

  3. Oral health needs, dental care utilization, and quality of life perceptions among Oregonian seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Richie; Sehgal, Harjit S; Nelson, Sandra; Schwarz, Eli

    2017-03-01

    For a relevant planning process and advocate for improvement in oral health conditions of the senior population up-to-date data are necessary. The objective of this study was to assess the oral health status, dental care utilization and quality of life perceptions of seniors in Clackamas County in Oregon. Data were collected in a cross-sectional study on institutionalized and community dwelling older adults where participants completed a self-reported oral health survey, the short-form Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14 questionnaire) and had clinical screenings. Overall, the participants (n = 177) reported mean OHIP-14 score of 0.6 ± 1.1, with "physical pain" as the highest scored domain. Seniors who were white, had teeth, dental insurance, were having a regular dentist and living in the community were 4.2 to 33.1 times more likely to visit the dentist in the previous 12 months compared to those respondents who were nonwhite, edentulous, uninsured, not having a regular dentist and living in long-term care facility (r(2) = 0.67, p < 0.05). Clackamas county senior population has considerable oral health needs, dental utilization, and quality of life issues. Better dental insurance plans, health literacy opportunities and culturally competent dental providers may help to improve the oral health situation and reduce barriers. © 2017 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Evaluating Two Oral Health Video Interventions with Early Head Start Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn B. Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor oral health in early childhood can have long-term consequences, and parents often are unaware of the importance of preventive measures for infants and toddlers. Children in rural, low-income families suffer disproportionately from the effects of poor oral health. Participants were 91 parents of infants and toddlers enrolled in Early Head Start (EHS living in rural Hawai'i, USA. In this quasi-experimental design, EHS home visitors were assigned to use either a didactic or family-centered video with parents they served. Home visitors reviewed short segments of the assigned videos with parents over an eight-week period. Both groups showed significant prepost gains on knowledge and attitudes/behaviors relating to early oral health as well as self-reported changes in family oral health routines at a six-week followup. Controlling for pretest levels, parents in the family-centered video group showed larger changes in attitudes/behaviors at posttest and a higher number of positive changes in family oral health routines at followup. Results suggest that family-centered educational videos are a promising method for providing anticipatory guidance to parents regarding early childhood oral health. Furthermore, establishing partnerships between dental care, early childhood education, and maternal health systems offers a model that broadens potential reach with minimal cost.

  5. Effects of Oral Health Training on Dental Plaque Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M amiri

    2016-02-01

    3- oral health training (control group . Two weeks and two months after the intervention, plaque index was measured. Positive and negative changes were recorded over time, and then, the study data were analyzed using Chi-square (bonferroni adjustment, McNemar, Kruskal-Wallis  and Paired t-Test. Results: The study results revealed no significant differences between the  halitosis group and the traditional group, though both had a significant difference with the control group. Positive changes in halitosis group especially within girls were held to be more durable compared to the other groups. Conclusion: Oral health training accompanging training of oral malodor, tooth decay and periodontal disease seems to be more effective on health promotion of senior high school students in Yazd. Furthermore, oral malodor training produces more durable effects. As a result, this training style is recommended in regard with eductional programs of schools.

  6. Trend Analysis of Betel Nut-associated Oral Cancer 
and Health Burden in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan Jia; Chen, Jie; Zhong, Wai Sheng; Ling, Tian You; Jian, Xin Chun; Lu, Ruo Huang; Tang, Zhan Gui; Tao, Lin

    To forecast the future trend of betel nut-associated oral cancer and the resulting burden on health based on historical oral cancer patient data in Hunan province, China. Oral cancer patient data in five hospitals in Changsha (the capital city of Hunan province) were collected for the past 12 years. Three methods were used to analyse the data; Microsoft Excel Forecast Sheet, Excel Trendline, and the Logistic growth model. A combination of these three methods was used to forecast the future trend of betel nut-associated oral cancer and the resulting burden on health. Betel nut-associated oral cancer cases have been increasing rapidly in the past 12  years in Changsha. As of 2016, betel nuts had caused 8,222 cases of oral cancer in Changsha and close to 25,000 cases in Hunan, resulting in about ¥5 billion in accumulated financial loss. The combined trend analysis predicts that by 2030, betel nuts will cause more than 100,000 cases of oral cancer in Changsha and more than 300,000 cases in Hunan, and more than ¥64 billion in accumulated financial loss in medical expenses. The trend analysis of oral cancer patient data predicts that the growing betel nut industry in Hunan province will cause a humanitarian catastrophe with massive loss of human life and national resources. To prevent this catastrophe, China should ban betel nuts and provide early oral cancer screening for betel nut consumers as soon as possible.

  7. Estimating peer density effects on oral health for community-based older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Bibhas; Widener, Michael J; Mirzaei Salehabadi, Sedigheh; Northridge, Mary E; Kum, Susan S; Jin, Zhu; Kunzel, Carol; Palmer, Harvey D; Metcalf, Sara S

    2017-12-29

    As part of a long-standing line of research regarding how peer density affects health, researchers have sought to understand the multifaceted ways that the density of contemporaries living and interacting in proximity to one another influence social networks and knowledge diffusion, and subsequently health and well-being. This study examined peer density effects on oral health for racial/ethnic minority older adults living in northern Manhattan and the Bronx, New York, NY. Peer age-group density was estimated by smoothing US Census data with 4 kernel bandwidths ranging from 0.25 to 1.50 mile. Logistic regression models were developed using these spatial measures and data from the ElderSmile oral and general health screening program that serves predominantly racial/ethnic minority older adults at community centers in northern Manhattan and the Bronx. The oral health outcomes modeled as dependent variables were ordinal dentition status and binary self-rated oral health. After construction of kernel density surfaces and multiple imputation of missing data, logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the effects of peer density and other sociodemographic characteristics on the oral health outcomes of dentition status and self-rated oral health. Overall, higher peer density was associated with better oral health for older adults when estimated using smaller bandwidths (0.25 and 0.50 mile). That is, statistically significant relationships (p density and improved dentition status were found when peer density was measured assuming a more local social network. As with dentition status, a positive significant association was found between peer density and fair or better self-rated oral health when peer density was measured assuming a more local social network. This study provides novel evidence that the oral health of community-based older adults is affected by peer density in an urban environment. To the extent that peer density signifies the potential for

  8. Oral health knowledge, attitude and practices among health professionals in King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abdul Baseer

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Oral health knowledge among the health professionals working in KFMC, Riyadh was lower than what would be expected of these groups, which had higher literacy levels in health care, but they showed a positive attitude toward professional dental care.

  9. Self medication for oral health problems in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbor, Michael A; Azodo, Clement C

    2011-08-01

    To assess the use of self medication in oral health problems in Cameroon. This multi-regional cross-sectional survey was conducted in three towns; Bamenda, Yaounde and Buea over a 10 month period. The questionnaire elicited information on demography, oral problem for self medication, substance used for self medication, source of the substance, duration of self medication, reason for self medication, source of advice of the drugs or those products used, opinion about the substance, effect and duration. The prevalence of self medication for oral health problems was 67.8% which was significantly associated with age, marital status and location. The most frequently self medicated oral health problem was toothache (54.7%). The majority (64.5%) of the respondents used pharmaceutical products while a minority (7.7%) used dangerous substances such as petrol and vinegar for self medication. Sources of substances of self medication included pharmacy (55.6%), road side vendors (26.1%), native healers (7.8%), mobile drug vendors in buses (5.3%), and others (5.3%). The choice of substances used for self medication was mostly guided by the advice from relatives. The majority of the respondents self-medicated for oral health problems. Unmarried, urban residents, aged 21-30 years reported significantly increased self-medication for oral health problems. Evidently dangerous substances were utilised for self-medication in this study, necessitating awareness and other forms of intervention. © 2011 FDI World Dental Federation.

  10. The oral health of institutionalized older adults in Malta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santucci, Daniela; Attard, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the oral health status of institutionalized older adults are less prevalent than those of community-dwelling older adults, as institutionalized older adults tend to be frailer. Poor oral health in older adults has a negative impact on the quality of life and self-confidence of older people and potentially poses a financial burden on both the older adult and society in general. The objective of this study was to assess and compare the oral health status of state institutionalized older adults in Malta with that of their European counterparts. A total of 278 older adults with an average age of 83.6 ± 6.5 years from nine state institutions in Malta were randomly selected. Participants were clinically examined for caries, periodontal disease, oral mucosal lesions, and prosthetic status. The oral health status of state institutionalized older adults was poor, with a very low routine dental attendance (29.3%) and, consequently, a high level of treatment need (44.4% of dentate individuals required extractions and 42.1% of dentate individuals required restorations). Only 2% of dentate individuals had healthy periodontal tissues with no clinical attachment loss over 4 mm. Edentulism among state institutionalized older adults stood at 41%. Institutionalized older adults from Malta have a poor oral health status comparable to institutionalized older adults from Europe in general, which poses fiscal and cultural challenges that need to be addressed by the dental community.

  11. Community Dental Health Coordinators: Cultural "Connectors" for Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Jane

    2017-01-01

    The American Dental Association's Community Dental Health Coordinator program was designed to teach community health worker skills to dental auxiliaries. Case management, a valued skill utilized by medical providers, is largely unknown in the dental profession. When case management is incorporated into a dental professional's practice, prevention becomes amplified, leading to decreased costs and increased access. ©2017 by the North Carolina Institute of Medicine and The Duke Endowment. All rights reserved.

  12. The impact of oral health literacy on periodontal health status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehmeyer, Meggan M. H.; Corwin, Caleb L.; Guthmiller, Janet M.; Lee, Jessica Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe oral health literacy (OHL) among periodontal patients and to examine its association with periodontal health status. Methods This cross-sectional study included new and referred patients presenting to the University of North Carolina Graduate Periodontology Clinic. Sociodemographic and dental history information were collected. OHL was measured using a dental word recognition instrument, Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy-30 (REALD-30). Clinical periodontal examinations were completed. Results One hundred and twenty-eight participants enrolled and 121 completed all study examinations and instruments. Despite a high level of education among participants in our study, low levels of OHL were found in one-third (33 percent) of the study population. Thirty-one percent had moderate OHL (score of 22–25), 37 percent had high OHL (score ≥ 26). The mean REALD-30 score was 23. Fifty-three percent of participants had severe periodontitis, 29 percent had moderate periodontitis, and 18 percent had mild or no periodontitis. Bivariate analysis showed a significant association between OHL and periodontal status (P Periodontology Clinics. PMID:23121152

  13. The role of dental care providers and oral and maxillofacial surgeons in the surgical and medical management of oral cancer in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beomjune B; Kim, Dongsoo D

    2013-01-01

    Oral cancer results in significant morbidity and mortality in those afflicted. Despite modern treatments, mortality is high, with overall 5-year survival rates that approximate 50%. However, early stage disease (Stages 1 and 2) carries a significantly better prognosis than late stage disease (Stages 3 and 4), therefore, prevention and early detection continue to be important in improving oral cancer control. The role of dental care providers in routine oral cancer screenings, smoking cessation, treatment, and rehabilitation of oral cancer patients is emphasized in this article. This article also discusses the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer and the role of oral and maxillofacial surgeons in the surgical and medical management of oral cancer patients in the United States.

  14. An Analysis of Oral Health Campaigns from a Social Marketing Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    MUMCU, KÖKSAL, ŞİŞMAN, Gonca, Leyla, Nur

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to analyse oral health campaignsaccording to their use of social marketing in Turkey.Method: 35 oral health campaigns regarding oral health wereassessed according to social marketing principles including message,target group, aim, communication strategies and tactics, and mass mediatools.Results: The prominent aims of the campaigns were to facilitateawareness of oral health (24.5%, n=12), oral examination (26.5%, n=13),preventative oral healthcare and appli...

  15. Health Providers' Perception towards Safe Abortion Service at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Ethiopia, unsafe abortion accounts up to 32% of maternal deaths. The perception of health providers towards safe abortion provision at selected health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia was assessed. A stratified random sampling was used to select 431 health providers. A cross-sectional study was conducted from ...

  16. 78 FR 17612 - Health Insurance Providers Fee; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 57 RIN 1545-BL20 Health Insurance Providers Fee; Correction AGENCY... entities engaged in the business of providing health insurance for United States health risks. FOR FURTHER...

  17. Knowledge and Practices of PMTCT among Health Care Providers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adequate knowledge by health care providers of antiretroviral use and other PMTCT strategies will be required to ensure control of vertical transmission of the virus. Objective: To assess the knowledge and practice of PMTCT among health care providers in private health facilities in Ilorin, Nigeria. Method: This is a review of ...

  18. School-Based Health Education Programmes, Health-Learning Capacity and Child Oral Health--related Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Ruth; Gibson, Barry; Humphris, Gerry; Leonard, Helen; Yuan, Siyang; Whelton, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To use a model of health learning to examine the role of health-learning capacity and the effect of a school-based oral health education intervention (Winning Smiles) on the health outcome, child oral health-related quality of life (COHRQoL). Setting: Primary schools, high social deprivation, Ireland/Northern Ireland. Design: Cluster…

  19. Dental hygiene habits and oral health status of seafarers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Syed Sarosh; Sibilio, Fabio; Amenta, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This study has assessed the dental hygiene habits and problems of seafarers and their attitudes/ perceptions regarding oral hygiene using a dental hygiene/habits questionnaire. A research questionnaire on oral hygiene habits was prepared along with a summary of all the questions and sent to ships via e-mail by Centro Internazionale Radio Medico (CIRM) networks. CIRM, is the Italian Telemedical Maritime Assistance Service (TMAS), and represents the Centre with the largest number of seafarers assisted on board ships worldwide. CIRM proposed the questionnaire to all ships (n = 1,198) asking for medical advice from 1 July 2014 till 31 October 2014. Two dental professionals were involved in the development and analysis of the questionnaire. Seafarers are at risk of several dental health problems due to their oral hygiene and dietary habits, smoking and alcohol consumption, poor oral hygiene knowledge and motivation. Dietary habits during voyages were also questionable and seafarers consume food rich in fermentable carbohydrates, which is a major risk factor for dental caries. Seafarers need better oral hygiene education and care to enable them to manage their oral health in a better way. Life at the sea, under challenging circumstances is not without stress, that is why it is important that seafarers are given complete information about correct oral hygiene protocols and dental hygiene and the advantages for their health of keeping a healthy mouth.

  20. 45 CFR 162.406 - Standard unique health identifier for health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard unique health identifier for health care... for Health Care Providers § 162.406 Standard unique health identifier for health care providers. (a) Standard. The standard unique health identifier for health care providers is the National Provider...