WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing news updates

  1. NEWS: Post-16 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Peter

    2000-07-01

    post16.gif As a teacher of physics it is very easy to become preoccupied with particulars of courses, or topics or even single concepts. Concerned with imminent student audiences and desired learning outcomes, the daily challenge is to summon satisfactory teaching approaches and resources for the job at hand. For the conscientious teacher, assessment outcomes may too often seem a judgment on our own efforts rather than those of our students. From time to time we may step back and think bigger, for example while planning a recruitment event, or while away from work on holiday. We may be successful locally. But why, at a time when books and television documentaries popularizing science have a large following, has physics education been facing declining numbers? Many recognize that physics has an essential contribution to make to the training of science or engineering specialists, but we know that it is also important for the skilled worker, the informed citizen and, in fact, for anyone trying to make sense of the world. So what are the best ways forward for post-16 physics? To make any impact on the bigger picture requires organization, thinking and meeting time among people in diverse roles: teachers and curriculum managers; university lecturers; employers and professional bodies; unitary awarding bodies; regulatory and funding agencies; and even Government. For the past few years, the Institute of Physics post-16 Initiative has created an unrivalled opportunity to address the wider issues. Its Shaping the Future booklets series was designed to stimulate informed discussion and debate, by providing background information and analysis. Taken together, the booklets should help all those concerned with physics education to understand where we are now, and why. Literally dozens of people have contributed to a review and analysis of physics education. Each booklet is a 48-page smorgasbord in A4 landscape format, containing many examples of good practice, basic but

  2. News and Features Updates from USA.gov

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — Stay on top of important government news and information with the USA.gov Updates: News and Features RSS feed. We'll update this feed when we add news and featured...

  3. An industry update: the latest news in therapeutic delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Elaine

    2017-11-01

    The present industry update covers the period 1-31 July 2017. Information was sourced primarily from company press releases, regulatory and patent agencies, scientific literature and various news websites. There was positive approval news this month for GlaxoSmithKline for its new self-injecting treatment for systemic lupus erythematosus but less positive news for Ocular Therapeutix, a new drug application for its treatment for postoperative ocular pain, DEXTENZA™ was rejected for a second time. Endo Pharmaceuticals agreed to withdraw its opioid formulation Opana®Er due to abuse concerns. Collaborations for novel therapeutic delivery research were announced this month by Takeda and BioSurfaces, Catelent and Rutgers University, Lilly and Purdue University and Titan Pharmaceuticals with Walter Reed and the Southwest Research Institute. A number of companies announced significant financing deals to allow for the clinical development of products with enhanced delivery options including Sebacia and Diasome.

  4. Lodging Update: Providence, Rhode Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragel Roginsky

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Each quarter, Pinnacle Advisory Group prepares an analysis of the New England lodging industry, which provides a regional summary and then focuses in depth on a particular market. These reviews look at recent and proposed supply changes, factors affecting demand and growth rates, and the effects of interactions between such supply and demand trends. In this issue, the authors spotlight the lodging market in Providence, Rhode Island.

  5. Research News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News & Progress Research News Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Research News Research News Quarterly Updates Research Call Archive ... best way to stay up to date on research and important advancements in MS is to sign up for email updates. Get Email Updates Get Email Updates Colophon ... Connection About the Society ...

  6. Does the Certainty of Information Influence the Updating Process? Evidence from the Reading of News Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Nathalie; Stiegler-Balfour, Jennifer J.; O'Brien, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    Participants read a series of news articles, each containing a target event followed by 2 causes. To study the ease with which readers update their mental representation as they proceed through the text, the certainty of the first cause was manipulated: It was presented as either a certain explanation of the subsequent target event or as a…

  7. News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No news have been published. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about ...

  8. Dilemmas of telling bad news: Paediatric palliative care providers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. In general, the principles of palliative care suggest that, at some stage, patients should be given 'bad news' about poor illness prognosis. e information is oen important for care planning, especially when it involves disclosure to children. Although there are ongoing debates about whether to tell or not to tell ...

  9. Intimate partner violence and health provider training and screening in the news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganello, Jennifer A; Webster, Daniel; Campbell, Jacquelyn C

    2006-01-01

    Intimate partner violence is a significant women's health issue. Since the news media can play a role in policy development, it is important to understand how newspapers have portrayed training and screening. The purpose of this study was to describe the frequency and nature of print news coverage of health issues related to partner violence, specifically, provider training and screening by health providers. We conducted a content analysis on articles obtained from major city and state capital daily newspapers from 20 states. News articles and editorials mentioning intimate partner violence and provider training and screening were examined for the years 1994 through 2001 (N = 188). Results showed that print news coverage was limited and received low levels of attention, indicating little potential to influence either policy or individual behavior. However, when the issue was covered, little debate or controversy was present, and a broad discussion of the issue was generally provided. News coverage of training and screening could be improved by increasing dissemination of research results, illustrating the policy implications of these issues, and offering resource information to women experiencing violence.

  10. An industry update: what is the latest news in therapeutic delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Iain

    2017-07-01

    This Industry Update covers the period from 1 through 30 April 2017, and is based on information sourced from company press releases, scientific literature, patents and various news websites. Biogen expanded its portfolio of developmental drugs targeting neurological diseases by licensing a drug from Bristol-Myers Squibb which is currently under investigation for the treatment of progressive supranuclear palsy. Takeda announced a deal with NuBiyota focused on developing treatments for gastrointestinal disorders, based on the manipulation of microbes living in the gut. Novartis announced an expansion of its neuroscience collaboration with Amgen as well as licensing of a developmental compound to treat dry eye. EmulateBio announced a collaboration with the US FDA to explore and evaluate its organs-on-chip technology in toxicological testing of food products, but which has wider opportunities in drug development. In the treatment of pulmonary hypertension, Vectura announced the commercial launch of its Fox nebulizer technology to deliver a Bayer drug and Respira announced a deal in which it exclusively licensed an inhaled drug-device product to United Therapeutics. Published research suggested that the benefit of pumps over multiple injections in the treatment of diabetes maybe more due to training than technology, and a group from the University of Pennsylvania showed that electrical stimulation of the brain can improve memory function but only when applied at the right time. Alzheon published work that explains the mechanism behind its developmental Alzheimer's drug.

  11. News on Viral Hepatitis in HIV: Update from the 2016 GEHEP Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Eva; Puoti, Massimo; García-Deltoro, Miguel; Pineda, Juan A; Téllez, Francisco; Granados, Rafael; Morano, Luis; García, Federico

    2017-01-01

    The II Conference of the Group for the Study of Viral Hepatitis (GEHEP) (29 September-1 October, Spain) updated epidemiological, diagnostic and treatment aspects on viral hepatitis. The conference was mostly focused on the latest news related to HCV infection, including the successes achieved since the implementation of direct-acting antiviral agents for HCV therapy, but also in the new, future challenges for a real HCV eradication. The scenario for chronic HCV infection has dramatically changed in the last two years and most patients have been cured after 12 weeks of therapy with minimal side effects. However, as the experience of treatment increases, new challenges have emerged for the maximum optimization and success of therapy. Moreover, different issues need to be resolved for a real HCV eradication (i.e. unmasking HCV infection, prevention and diagnosis of HCV reinfections, diagnostic tools for treatment optimization). The latest advances in the knowledge on these topics were presented and discussed at this conference. Also, some interesting studies related to viral hepatitis E were addressed. This review summarizes some of the major findings reported and discussed during the GEHEP Conference.

  12. NEWS: Post-16 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    (post16) Making physics connect Doesn't Melvyn Bragg do a wonderful job, engaging both scientists and artists in sensitive discussion on Radio 4 about their methods and their purposes? But every week teachers have the chance to show their students that physics is a way of seeing the world that is well-connected with other aspects of knowledge and culture. The stakes are high: students who fail to appreciate this generally choose not to study the subject beyond GCSE. Most students find our preoccupation with technical detail off-putting. Accepting that we have a syllabus to cover, it's still a question of balance. In our teaching we should aim for variety in order to find ways to connect with every student's interests. Also, we can show that we (the nearest embodiment of a physicist some students will experience) are multidimensional and so fully human. Most important, teachers need flexibility to both encourage and respond to student comment and questions. The first booklet in the discussion series Shaping the Future takes up these themes. Rich in ideas for both immediate use and the longer term, it aims to stimulate debate and improve teaching. Copies cost £5.50 including postage and are available from Ingrid Ebeyer, Post-16 Initiative, Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH. How far is it? This question is asked in many family cars and school minibuses at the start of a journey, and answered by most in terms of hours and minutes rather than miles. What a good idea for introducing a social and historical perspective to a lesson on distance, velocity and time. How far can you actually get in a day? What is the range of human activity? Walking for eight hours will get many people about 25 miles. A pack horse will progress at much the same rate, but fast riding or a coach and team of horses will get further. Motorway driving (when the cones are on holiday) would take you nearly 500 miles. The 05.15 am train from Penzance arrives in Inverness at 7.15 pm. Twelve hours travel by air will reach the other side of the world. Given such a change in the range of human activity, is it surprising that society has changed and adapted, and some historical incidents and lifestyles hardly make sense? The journals of Dorothy Wordsworth describe a life spent at walking pace. Jane Austen's novels take place at horse speed. Many modern novels are of the jet age, and world travel is part of the plot. Reading accounts of warfare, we must remember that an army perhaps moved 15 miles a day if it hurried (and arrived exhausted). It becomes very clear why Britain could be several independent kingdoms. Turning to another area of physics, we might even speculate how easy life for Romeo and Juliet would have been with a mobile phone each.

  13. No news is good news?

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Schmid

    I'm retired and living back home in Austria. But I am still excited about ATLAS and I try to follow the progress of the project as closely as I can. The ATLAS e-news are an excellent source of information. Appearing now every month they provide a broad, solid view of what is going on. But I'm greedy; I'd love to be "on-line". When the first End-Cap Toroid moved from hall 180 to the pit I was frustrated. I knew that it was happening but I could only get first pictures and reports a few days later. In the meantime the ECT was lowered into the cavern; no information on this available nowhere up to the this issue of the e-news. Here is my dream: an "ATLAS news ticker", i.e. a web page with the news appearing on the day they happen; just one line of information, possibly with a reference to a picture, a person or a report. My idea isn't new. On the ATLAS web-site for the public we have a window "latest news". But I was disappointed when, until a week ago, the latest news dated from December 2006 !!! Can't we do...

  14. PERCEPTIONS OF INDONESIAN PRACTICAL NURSES TOWARDS UPDATING CAPABILITY TO PROVIDE CARE: A QUALITATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Arofiati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Capability to provide care can be recognized as the combination of nursing knowledge, skills, and attitude of care which is dynamic. Objective: This study aims to explore the perceptions of practical nurses towards updating capability to provide care. Methods: A descriptive qualitative study was conducted to explore the deep understanding of practical nurses towards updating capability to provide care. Data were gathered using in-depth interview with 25 practical nurses from different areas of practices, three times focus group discussion (FGD and participant-observation. Qualitative content analysis model was applied to anaylze the data. Result: There were two themes emerged from data: 1 Internal perceptions of updating capacity to provide care, with three subthemes: Having great expectation, Being confidence as a professional nurse, and Developing Self-Initiation, 2 External contexts driving perception of practicing nurses, with two subthemes: Giving best care and Acquiring requirement. Conclusions: The findings indicated that updating capacity to provide care supports practical nurses to provide better nursing services to patients and meet the regulation of nursing professionalism.

  15. Is the Internet Bad News? The Online News Era and the Market for High-Quality News

    OpenAIRE

    Frijters, Paul; Velamuri, Malathi

    2009-01-01

    We review and model the impact of the internet on the production and uptake of high- quality news. Our review of trends in the market for news suggests 3 stylized facts: i) particular quality news markets are dominated by merely a few providers, ii) demand for quality news appears stable, but provision of news has become specialized; mainstream news is decoupled from quality news, and iii) the dominant business model of internet news mirrors that of radio, television, and newsp...

  16. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    , and at the University of Maryland, College Park, October 14-17, 2001. NEW: Update, is a partnership involving industry, government, and education. It will have a program of Experiments and Demonstrations, Mini Workshops, and Plenary Sessions. For registration information, contact Jim Jacobs, NEW: Update 2001, School of Science and Technology, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA 23504-8060; phone: 757/823-8109/9072; fax: 757/823-8215; dplaclaire@nsu.edu. The latest information about the workshop will be at http://MST-Online.nsu.edu/new. Chemistry Is in the News Conference Chemistry Is in the News-Teaching Organic Chemistry in the Context of Real World Issues, will be held at the University of Missouri-Columbia September 21-23, 2001. Funding from the Dreyfus Foundation will support 18 participants and will offer some partial travel grants. The conference will instruct faculty about the philosophy, pedagogy, implementation, and assessment of the project, doing so in small collaborative groups. It will focus on facilitating news-media-based authentic learning activities aimed at connecting real-world social, economic, and political issues to the teaching of organic chemistry and the development of student-assisted collaborative learning groups. The conference organizers are Rainer Glaser and James Groccia. Those interested should contact Rainer Glaser, University of Missouri, Department of Chemistry, Columbia, MO 65211; phone: 573/882-0331; fax: 573/882-2754; GlaserR@missouri.edu. ChemNet-Chemistry Lecture on the Internet A multimedia chemistry lecture, developed by R. Demuth, S. Nick, K. Rabe, L. Lensment, S. Schanze, J. Andresen, and W. Bensch of the University of Kiel, Germany, is being provided without charge over the Internet. The lecture is directed at students of chemistry, agricultural science, medicine, biology, and engineering and other interested persons. The lecture is in German but an English version is planned. With the aid of ChemNet the group plans to

  17. NEWS: Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Affairs Department of the Institute is working on a series of Technical Briefs to broaden the provision of physics information to Members. The first title in the series, `Nanotechnology', is due to be published last month. The aim of this new series is to provide technical updates on current applications of physics, targeted at the nonspecialist scientist and engineer. The emphasis will be on burgeoning areas of physics with potential application across several or many fields. `Nanotechnology', for example, will sketch the background to the field, indicate the current state of the art and give a realistic view on future developments. The target readers are Institute of Physics Members in general, not specialists in nanotechnology or related topics and, in this respect, the Briefs could be of great interest to teachers. They are free of charge to Members but £7.50 for non-members. To obtain a copy, contact Emma Woods on 020 7470 4927 or by e-mail (emma.woods@iop.org). Courses Physics Update: 8-10 July, University of York The information leaflet/booking form for this course was sent to schools and colleges at the beginning of this term. Lecture topics include Ultrasonic imaging, Chaos, and The search for extra-terrestrial intelligent life. There will be workshops on New activities from Salters Horners physics, Computer modelling in A2 physics and Misconceptions in the learning of forces. Further information and booking forms are available from Leila Solomon. The venues and dates of subsequent Update courses are: 8-10 December, Oxford University 31 March-2 April 2001, Malvern College 7-9 July 2001, Royal Holloway College, London Teaching Physics INSET Days Following successful pilot runs in the summer term last year and at IOP Congress, the Education Department is organizing four (possibly five) INSET days for those teaching physics at KS3 without a strong background in the subject. The recent dates in June were all fully booked. The programme will be basically same for

  18. News on Inflation and the Epidemiology of Inflation Expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfajfar, Damjan; Santoro, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the nexus between news coverage on inflation and households’ inflation expectations. In doing so, we test the epidemiological foundations of the sticky information model (Carroll ). We use both aggregate and household-level data from the Survey Research Center at the University...... of Michigan. We highlight a fundamental disconnection among news on inflation, consumers’ frequency of expectation updating, and the accuracy of their expectations. Our evidence provides at best weak support to the epidemiological framework, as most of the consumers who update their expectations do not revise...

  19. Automatic Detection of Fake News

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Rosas, Verónica; Kleinberg, Bennett; Lefevre, Alexandra; Mihalcea, Rada

    2017-01-01

    The proliferation of misleading information in everyday access media outlets such as social media feeds, news blogs, and online newspapers have made it challenging to identify trustworthy news sources, thus increasing the need for computational tools able to provide insights into the reliability of online content. In this paper, we focus on the automatic identification of fake content in online news. Our contribution is twofold. First, we introduce two novel datasets for the task of fake news...

  20. NEWS: Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    -March onwards include Guildford, Brighton, Gosport, Leeds, Loughborough, Oakham, Wolverhampton, Framlingham (Suffolk), Hatfield and London. Further details from Catherine Wilson (catherine.wilson@iop.org ). Courses and conferences Physics Update courses will be held in four locations this year. Details of the Malvern course (1 - 3 April) have already been circulated to schools and colleges. Details of the York course (8 - 10 July) will be circulated early next term. An Update course for teachers in Scotland will be held at Stirling University on 9 - 10 June and the final Update of the year will be held at Oxford University on 8 - 10 December. Further details are available from Leila Solomon (leila.solomon@iop.org ). Entitled `Hands on, minds on: raising standards by sharing good practice', the Education Group's Annual Conference 2000 will be held at the University of Durham on 7 - 8 July. Further details can be obtained from Jasmina Bolfek-Radovani (jasmina.bolfek-radovani@iop.org ) in the Institute's Conference Department. Other dates: * Schools Physics Group annual one-day meeting, 8 June 2000, Rugby School. * Scottish Branch one-day meeting for physics teachers, 8 June 2000, Stirling University. Posters A set of four full-colour A2 posters has recently been produced, with another set of four in preparation. The aim is to get across the message `Physics at the heart of everything' by means of eye-catching images - and to brighten up school and college labs and corridors in the process. Further explanations of the physics depicted are printed on the back of the posters. Sets of the first four posters are being circulated to all schools but additional copies will be available on request from schools.education@iop.org . And finally ... The Institute's Schools and Colleges Affiliation Scheme is to be relaunched later this year, as a free scheme for all schools and colleges which will provide low-cost items on a regular basis. There will also be a second, subscription tier giving

  1. BRAZILIAN NEWS PORTALS CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloiza G. Herckovitz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A content analysis of four Brazilian news media portals found that economic news dominated the top headlines with little attention paid to education, the environment and welfare. Other trends included a focus on local events and national news sources, reliance on few sources, mostly official ones, and a low percentage of news that fitted the concept of newsworthiness (a combination of both social significance and deviance concepts. Other findings of a study of 432 top news stories published by UOL, Estadão, iG and Terra during a 15-day period between February and March 2008 indicate that the top portions of the portals’ front pages carry news that lacks story depth, editorial branding, and multimedia applications. The results suggest that online news portals are in their infancy although Brazil has the largest online population of Latin America. This study hopes to shed light on the gatekeeping process in Brazilian news portals. Brazilian media portals have yet to become a significant editorial force able to provide knowledge about social issues and public affairs in a socially responsible fashione.

  2. CERN NEWS : HIGGS UPDATE 2011

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN video productions

    2011-01-01

    In a seminar held at CERN today, the ATLAS and CMS experiments presented the status of their searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson. Their results are based on the analysis of considerably more data than those presented at the summer conferences, sufficient to make significant progress in the search for the Higgs boson, but not enough to make any conclusive statement on the existence or non-existence of the elusive Higgs. The main conclusion is that the Standard Model Higgs boson, if it exists, is most likely to have a mass constrained to the range 116-130 GeV by the ATLAS experiment, and 115-127 GeV by CMS. Tantalising hints have been seen by both experiments in this mass region, but these are not yet strong enough to claim a discovery.

  3. Vulture News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vulture News is the journal of the IUCN Vulture Specialist Group. It was originally the journal of the Vulture Study Group, which was formed in 1973 in southern Africa. The journal has been published since 1979 and is a venue for research, news, information and reports on vultures in all parts of the word where they occur.

  4. News comments: exploring, modeling, and online prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsagkias, M.; Weerkamp, W.; de Rijke, M.

    2010-01-01

    Online news agents provide commenting facilities for their readers to express their opinions or sentiments with regards to news stories. The number of user supplied comments on a news article may be indicative of its importance, interestingness, or impact. We explore the news comments space, and

  5. Breaking News as Radicalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    The aim of the paper is to make explicit how the different categories are applied in the online newsroom and thus how new categories can be seen as positioning strategies in the form of radicalisations of already existing categories. Thus field theory provides us with tools to analyse how online...... journalists are using the categorisations to create hierarchies within the journalistic field in order to position themselves as specialists in what Tuchman has called developing news, aiming and striving for what today is know as breaking news and the “exclusive scoop,” as the trademark of online journalism...... in a media environment where immediacy rules (Domingo 2008a). Following this research the primary focus of this paper is the category breaking news and Tuchmans developing news, but as they are all connected the analysis will also draw upon the other categories in Tuchmans typology. The theoretical framework...

  6. Updated CDC recommendations for the management of hepatitis B virus-infected health-care providers and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    This report updates the 1991 CDC recommendations for the management of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected health-care providers and students to reduce risk for transmitting HBV to patients during the conduct of exposure-prone invasive procedures (CDC. Recommendations for preventing transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus to patients during exposure-prone invasive procedures. MMWR 1991;40[No. RR-8]). This update reflects changes in the epidemiology of HBV infection in the United States and advances in the medical management of chronic HBV infection and policy directives issued by health authorities since 1991. The primary goal of this report is to promote patient safety while providing risk management and practice guidance to HBV-infected health-care providers and students, particularly those performing exposure-prone procedures such as certain types of surgery. Because percutaneous injuries sustained by health-care personnel during certain surgical, obstetrical, and dental procedures provide a potential route of HBV transmission to patients as well as providers, this report emphasizes prevention of operator injuries and blood exposures during exposure-prone surgical, obstetrical, and dental procedures. These updated recommendations reaffirm the 1991 CDC recommendation that HBV infection alone should not disqualify infected persons from the practice or study of surgery, dentistry, medicine, or allied health fields. The previous recommendations have been updated to include the following changes: no prenotification of patients of a health-care provider's or student's HBV status; use of HBV DNA serum levels rather than hepatitis B e-antigen status to monitor infectivity; and, for those health-care professionals requiring oversight, specific suggestions for composition of expert review panels and threshold value of serum HBV DNA considered "safe" for practice (<1,000 IU/ml). These recommendations also explicitly address the issue of medical and

  7. Providing web servers and training in Bioinformatics: 2010 update on the Bioinformatics Links Directory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazas, Michelle D; Yamada, Joseph T; Ouellette, B F Francis

    2010-07-01

    The Links Directory at Bioinformatics.ca continues its collaboration with Nucleic Acids Research to jointly publish and compile a freely accessible, online collection of tools, databases and resource materials for bioinformatics and molecular biology research. The July 2010 Web Server issue of Nucleic Acids Research adds an additional 115 web server tools and 7 updates to the directory at http://bioinformatics.ca/links_directory/, bringing the total number of servers listed close to an impressive 1500 links. The Bioinformatics Links Directory represents an excellent community resource for locating bioinformatic tools and databases to aid one's research, and in this context bioinformatic education needs and initiatives are discussed. A complete list of all links featured in this Nucleic Acids Research 2010 Web Server issue can be accessed online at http://bioinformatics.ca/links_directory/narweb2010/. The 2010 update of the Bioinformatics Links Directory, which includes the Web Server list and summaries, is also available online at the Nucleic Acids Research website, http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/.

  8. Engineering News

    OpenAIRE

    Nystrom, Lynn; Haugh, Lindsey; Simpkins, David

    2014-01-01

    Engineering News is the College of Engineering's annual newsletter sent to all alumni of the college. Virginia Tech leaders, along with counterparts in New Jersey, welcomed a late December approval by the Federal Aviation Administration to operate a test site to integrate unmanned aircraft into the national airspace.

  9. Fake News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Linda

    2017-01-01

    In a politically and digitally polarized environment, identifying and evaluating fake news is more difficult than ever before. Librarians who have been teaching information and media literacy skills for decades understand the role we can and must play in this environment.

  10. AJOL NEWS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No announcements have been published. ISSN: 2073-073X. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals ...

  11. Sadhana| News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sadh/028/06/1047-1055. Sadhana. Current Issue : Vol. 42, Issue 8. Current Issue Volume 42 | Issue 8. August 2017. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Search · Editorial Board · Information for Authors · Subscription. Sadhana | News.

  12. Online news

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig; Kammer, Aske Søndergaard

    2015-01-01

    decades, these features have come under pressure due to – among other things – the spread of digital media. In this article, we explore two current structural economic challenges to legacy newspaper organizations in Denmark. The first challenge regards the implementation of subscription on news websites...

  13. Emotional Mining: Tagging Emoticons to Online News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinathan, Vinothini; Mustapha, Aida; Zhi Yong, Lee; Aida Zamnah, Z. A.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an emotion mining system, which assigns emoticons to newspaper articles into a pre-defined emotion category based on the underlying emotion in the news. Next, the system makes recommendation to the reader by tagging the news headline with the respective emoticons. Users are then able to decide whether to read the news based on the emoticons provided. The system also provides a filter for the users to choose the category of news to read following the emoticons.

  14. Dow Jones News/Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, James C.

    1979-01-01

    Provides an overview of the Dow Jones News/Retrieval Database, describing its scope, users, history and development, foreign news categories, problems, and searching hints. Also included are an example of a typical search, a tabulated searchguide, and the database specifications. (JD)

  15. Update in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology: providing alternative for Sciences and Biology Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Silva

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the goals of the Coordination of Education and Dissemination of CBME is to contribute for the dissemination and the learning in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology in  all the educational levels. Thus, composing one of our actions in 2007, a course of update in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology directed to 21 teachers of Sciences and Biology of São Carlos (SP, Brazil was carried through, totalizing 24 hours. In one of the meetings, we presented the techniques involving restriction enzymes, gel electrophoresis and its applications, followed of an experimental activity. Also we constructed and  considered the use, for the teachers, of a macroscopic model of a gel box that would represent the displacement of DNA fragments. After that a written questionnaire was used to evaluate the importance attributed for the teachers to the subject, the possibilities of didactic transposition, as well as their interests for other activities that would deal this thematic at great length. From this,  we registered that the 93% of the teachers showed interest in the subject, considering it important and also, 79% of them affirmed to have possibility of didactic transposition of this subject after they have experienced the course. On the other hand, 86% of the teachers did not work the subject in their classes , amongst which 50% for the lack of time or not enough preparation. Therefore, the data suggest that the course had an impact on the vision of the teachers concerning the alternatives to include the subject Molecular Biology and Biotechnology in their curricular planning.

  16. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    . Works well. Activity:CD Light: An Introduction to Spectroscopy. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 1568A (December 1998). Workshop?yes Booth?yes, with colored plastic onlynot solutions Notes:Can be difficult to measure and cut cardboard for spectroscope. Pre-made spectroscopes and partially constructed ones to show method could be provided. Needs good light source to work well. Activity:Cleaning Up with Chemistry: Investigating the Action of Zeolite in Laundry Detergent. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 1461A (October 1999). Workshop?yes Booth?could demonstrate tubes of soapy water with and without zeolite Notes:Need access to water. Quick and easy. More information about JCE Classroom Activities is available on JCE Online at: http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/AboutJCE/Features/JCE_CA/. Here you will find the notes described above and a list of all published Classroom Activities. The site is updated regularly. Awards Announced United Nations Environment Program The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) has selected Mario J. Molina, professor of earth, atmosphere, and planetary sciences at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as the winner of the 1999 UNEP Sasakawa Environment Prize. The prize, worth $200,000, is for his outstanding global contributions in the field of atmospheric chemistry. ACS Northeastern Section The Northeastern Section of the American Chemical Society has awarded the Henry A. Hill Award to Morton Z. Hoffman, professor of chemistry at Boston University. The award is given annually to a member of the section for outstanding service. Award Deadlines Mettler-Toledo Thermal Analysis Education Grant Mettler-Toledo has established a grant to honor Edith A. Turi of the Polymer Research Institute, Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY, for her lifelong contribution to the cause of thermal analysis education. The grant will be awarded on an annual basis to not-for-profit organizations in North America that confer degrees up to the Ph. D. level and provide or intend to provide

  17. READERS AS GATEKEEPERS OF ONLINE NEWS: Brazil, China, and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuli Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The popularity of online news items is calculated by news sites as afunction of reader behaviors, such as clicking on or reading articles,emailing them to others, commenting on or discussing them, andeven linking to them in blogs. Online news sites often provide rankorderedlists of popular articles that are updated throughout theday. Popularity reflects not only the interest of individuals, butit also can represent communication from an individual reader toother people. In the case of emailed articles, recipients may befriends, family or colleagues. When readers add comments belowan article, they may reach anyone on the internet. When readerscommunicate with other readers, they extend the usual gatekeepingprocess but their selections may not reflect the news values of thejournalists who put the sites together. This study compares thenews values of readers in Brazil, China and the United States.

  18. Googling the news

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørmen, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Search engines provide a window into the changing association between websites and keywords across cultures and countries and over time. As such, they offer journalism and news researchers an opportunity to study how search engines, in this case Google, mediate news events and stories online...... case study, ways to work with the influence of endogenous factors (keywords, language settings, geo-location, Web history and clicking behaviour) and mitigate the effects of the exogenous factors (experimentation and randomisation) are suggested. Then, a new approach to studying search results is put...... forward, which builds on purposeful sampling of real-world participants or constructed research profiles. Finally, perspectives for news and journalism scholars in studying algorithmically generated content in a broader context are offered....

  19. New Bulletin: Latest News

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The paper version of the CERN Bulletin will be published twice a month with effect from 18 April 2005. The electronic version will be updated weekly. This year will see many changes in the Bulletin, designed to make it more economical, more compact and more attractive. From 18 April the paper version of the Bulletin will be published twice monthly, so we shall have to stop calling it the "Weekly". The purpose of this change in publication frequency is to redistribute the resources of the Publications Section of the Communications Group so that it can produce new brochures for the general public. However, so as not to compromise on topicality and communication of information, the Official News and General Information sections, the Pension Fund and training announcements and the seminar schedule will continue to be updated weekly. If you have signed up to be informed of the updates, you will continue to receive a weekly e-mail reminding you that the electronic version of the Bulletin has been updated. Offici...

  20. Yeti News

    OpenAIRE

    Hervera González, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Yeti.News és una aplicació de notícies creades i consumides pels usuaris. L'objectiu és que l'usuari normalment és el primer en topar-se amb la notícia i serà el que podrà donar més informació i imatges del succés. L'usuari pujarà imatges/vídeos del succés i en farà un petit reportatge per poder publicar la notícia. La resta d'usuaris podran llegir-la i votar-la per donar credibilitat al succés. Yeti.News es una aplicación de noticias creadas y consumidas por los usuarios. El objetivo es q...

  1. Linking online news and social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsagkias, M.; de Rijke, M.; Weerkamp, W.

    2011-01-01

    Much of what is discussed in social media is inspired by events in the news and, vice versa, social media provide us with a handle on the impact of news events. We address the following linking task: given a news article, find social media utterances that implicitly reference it. We follow a

  2. Fight or flight: Affective news framing effects

    OpenAIRE

    Feinholdt, A.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation investigates how emotions shape and are shaped by news framing and how this interplay leads to a number of affective news framing effects. My work reveals that emotions do not only function as mechanisms but also as channels strengthening or weakening framing effects. In addition, I show that issue characteristics and the selected news frame can determine whether and how emotions are elicited. Further, I provide evidence that affective news framing effects can arise as the r...

  3. Providing Doctors With High-Quality Information: An Updated Evaluation of Web-Based Point-of-Care Information Summaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwag, Koren Hyogene; González-Lorenzo, Marien; Banzi, Rita; Bonovas, Stefanos; Moja, Lorenzo

    2016-01-19

    The complexity of modern practice requires health professionals to be active information-seekers. Our aim was to review the quality and progress of point-of-care information summaries-Web-based medical compendia that are specifically designed to deliver pre-digested, rapidly accessible, comprehensive, and periodically updated information to health care providers. We aimed to evaluate product claims of being evidence-based. We updated our previous evaluations by searching Medline, Google, librarian association websites, and conference proceedings from August 2012 to December 2014. We included Web-based, regularly updated point-of-care information summaries with claims of being evidence-based. We extracted data on the general characteristics and content presentation of products, and we quantitatively assessed their breadth of disease coverage, editorial quality, and evidence-based methodology. We assessed potential relationships between these dimensions and compared them with our 2008 assessment. We screened 58 products; 26 met our inclusion criteria. Nearly a quarter (6/26, 23%) were newly identified in 2014. We accessed and analyzed 23 products for content presentation and quantitative dimensions. Most summaries were developed by major publishers in the United States and the United Kingdom; no products derived from low- and middle-income countries. The main target audience remained physicians, although nurses and physiotherapists were increasingly represented. Best Practice, Dynamed, and UptoDate scored the highest across all dimensions. The majority of products did not excel across all dimensions: we found only a moderate positive correlation between editorial quality and evidence-based methodology (r=.41, P=.0496). However, all dimensions improved from 2008: editorial quality (P=.01), evidence-based methodology (P=.015), and volume of diseases and medical conditions (PUptoDate scored the highest across all dimensions, while others that were marketed as evidence

  4. Anxiety in adolescents: Update on its diagnosis and treatment for primary care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegel RS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca S Siegel, Daniel P DicksteinPediatric Mood, Imaging, and NeuroDevelopment Program, EP Bradley Hospital, East Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health concern facing adolescents today, yet they are largely undertreated. This is especially concerning given that there are fairly good data to support an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety, and also that untreated, these problems can continue into adulthood, growing in severity. Thus, knowing how to recognize and respond to anxiety in adolescents is of the utmost importance in primary care settings. To that end, this article provides an up-to-date review of the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety disorders geared towards professionals in primary care settings. Topics covered include subtypes, clinical presentation, the etiology and biology, effective screening instruments, evidence-based treatments (both medication and therapy, and the long-term prognosis for adolescents with anxiety. Importantly, we focus on the most common types of anxiety disorders, often known as phobias, which include generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety/social phobia, separation anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and specific phobias. In summary, anxiety is a common psychiatric problem for adolescents, but armed with the right tools, primary care providers can make a major impact.Keywords: anxiety disorders, adolescents, presentation, etiology, assessment, treatment, primary care

  5. Anxiety in adolescents: Update on its diagnosis and treatment for primary care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Rebecca S; Dickstein, Daniel P

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health concern facing adolescents today, yet they are largely undertreated. This is especially concerning given that there are fairly good data to support an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety, and also that untreated, these problems can continue into adulthood, growing in severity. Thus, knowing how to recognize and respond to anxiety in adolescents is of the utmost importance in primary care settings. To that end, this article provides an up-to-date review of the diagnosis and treatment of anxiety disorders geared towards professionals in primary care settings. Topics covered include subtypes, clinical presentation, the etiology and biology, effective screening instruments, evidence-based treatments (both medication and therapy), and the long-term prognosis for adolescents with anxiety. Importantly, we focus on the most common types of anxiety disorders, often known as phobias, which include generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety/social phobia, separation anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and specific phobias. In summary, anxiety is a common psychiatric problem for adolescents, but armed with the right tools, primary care providers can make a major impact. PMID:24600282

  6. Rectal cancer: An evidence-based update for primary care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Wolfgang B; Kwaan, Mary R; Madoff, Robert D; Melton, Genevieve B

    2015-01-01

    Rectal adenocarcinoma is an important cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and key anatomic differences between the rectum and the colon have significant implications for management of rectal cancer. Many advances have been made in the diagnosis and management of rectal cancer. These include clinical staging with imaging studies such as endorectal ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, operative approaches such as transanal endoscopic microsurgery and laparoscopic and robotic assisted proctectomy, as well as refined neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies. For stage II and III rectal cancers, combined chemoradiotherapy offers the lowest rates of local and distant relapse, and is delivered neoadjuvantly to improve tolerability and optimize surgical outcomes, particularly when sphincter-sparing surgery is an endpoint. The goal in rectal cancer treatment is to optimize disease-free and overall survival while minimizing the risk of local recurrence and toxicity from both radiation and systemic therapy. Optimal patient outcomes depend on multidisciplinary involvement for tailored therapy. The successful management of rectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach, with the involvement of enterostomal nurses, gastroenterologists, medical and radiation oncologists, radiologists, pathologists and surgeons. The identification of patients who are candidates for combined modality treatment is particularly useful to optimize outcomes. This article provides an overview of the diagnosis, staging and multimodal therapy of patients with rectal cancer for primary care providers. PMID:26167068

  7. FAKE NEWS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Vestergaard, Mads

    Politik og medier oversvømmes af fordrejninger, fortielser, forglemmelser og forvanskninger af sandheden. Vi invaderes af populistiske fortællinger, “alternative kendsgerninger” og “fake news”. Det er nu et faktum, at misinformation er noget man aktivt må forholde sig til som politiker, som...... for virkelige udfordringer, vi står over for. FAKE NEWS giver et første sammenhængende billede af hvordan opmærksomhedsøkonomien kan ende i det postfaktuelle demokrati: Eventyrlige fortællinger erstatter kendsgerninger som grundlag for politisk meningsdannelse, debat og lovgivning. Et monster, som de færreste...

  8. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    News from Journal House Perspective on JCE Online Recently a reader asked us for a perspective on JCE Onlinehow the chemical education community is receiving it and how the Journal staff itself views it. We share our responses below. Subscriber Numbers How many people subscribe to JCE Online+? As of June 1, 1999, our records show that 13% of individual JCE subscriptions in the USA include JCE Online+. This percentage has increased significantly during the past year- in June 1998 it was approximately 4% and December 1998 about 7%. Almost all subscribers to JCE Online subscribe to print as well. Since JCE Online has only very recently been made available to institutional subscribers, there are no numbers to report. There has been considerable interest in online from libraries. Given that JCE Online+ is a fairly recent subscriber option and that many subscribers have a wait-and-see approach to any new option, we feel that the numbers above are quite high. The steady growth is encouraging. Online Usage How many people visit our Web site? Statistics for the period January 1, 1999, through May 31, 1999, that may be of interest include: Total Pages Served 361,115 Total Visits 138,377 Total Unique Visitors 51,744 Total Repeat Visitors 11,536 Average Visit Length 03:05 Average Requests/Visit 10.8 Average Pages/Visit 2.6 Average Daily Visits 916 Online Rationale and Expectations JCE Online is a very important part of the whole Journal, but we do not expect it to supplant print: online and print are very different media. Usage of JCE Online is growing steadily; our subscribers are realizing what we have learned: it is not possible to deliver the Journal in the print medium alone- print is no longer adequate to accomplish our mission. Examples of things not possible in print include: ·JCE Index to all 76 years of Journal issues, available all the time with responses within seconds. ·Supplementary materials that are important to only a limited number of our subscribers

  9. Ethical and practical challenges in providing noninvasive prenatal testing for chromosome abnormalities: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Peter; Chapman, Audrey R

    2016-04-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) through the analysis of cell-free DNA in maternal plasma has rapidly changed screening for fetal chromosome abnormalities. We review practical and ethical challenges associated with the transition, progress in their resolution, and identify new emerging difficulties. NIPT is an advanced screening test for trisomies 21, 18, and 13 that was initially limited to women at high risk for an affected pregnancy. It is now recognized as suitable for all women. The testing has been expanded to include sex chromosome abnormalities and some microdeletion syndromes. Some ethicists are concerned about inclusion of disorders that have less severe phenotypes. Clinical providers have experienced difficulty in maintaining an up-to-date knowledge about the scope of NIPT, differences between tests, who should be offered the testing, performance of tests, reasons for false-positive results, and optimal patient management following positive results. Some of the practical difficulties associated with the introduction can be attributed to this knowledge gap. There remain some important ethical issues associated with NIPT. We believe that the same ethical and legal principles that were considered in the justification of conventional prenatal screening can be used to assess the appropriateness of additional NIPT applications.

  10. Update in pain medicine for primary care providers: a narrative review, 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Joseph W; Bair, Matthew J; Becker, William C; Krebs, Erin E; Liebschutz, Jane M; Alford, Daniel P

    2014-03-01

    This manuscript reviews peer-reviewed literature published from 2010-2012 relevant to the management of chronic pain in the primary care setting. Narrative review of peer-reviewed literature. We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, and reference lists and queried expert contacts for English-language studies related to the management of chronic noncancer pain in adult patients in primary care settings. One investigator reviewed all eligible studies for relevance, and 47 studies were reviewed by all authors and rated according to their impact on 1) primary care clinical practice, 2) policy, 3) research, and 4) quality of study methods. Through iterative discussion, nine articles were selected for detailed review and discussion. We present articles in six topic areas: interventional pain management; opioid dose and risk of overdose death; neuropathic pain; yoga for chronic low back pain; cognitive behavioral therapy; and systematic approaches to treating back pain. We discuss implications for pain management in primary care. There is growing evidence for the risks, benefits, and limitations of the multiple modalities available to primary care providers for the management of chronic pain. The dissemination and implementation of the evidence from these studies as well as novel system-level interventions warrant additional study and support from clinicians, educators, and policy makers. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Disease Outbreak News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Biorisk reduction Disease outbreak news Disease Outbreak News (DONs) Latest DONs Rift Valley fever – Gambia ... Disease outbreaks by country RSS feeds Disease outbreak news Related links Ebola virus disease - website Avian influenza ...

  12. National Cancer Institute News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and events from NCI-funded research and programs News & Events Featured News High-Fat Diet Linked to Prostate Cancer Metastasis ... Scientific Meetings and Lectures Conferences Social Media Events News Archive 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 National ...

  13. Learned news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1997-01-01

    Mr. D. Filer (OFI-Oxford) visited FRIM between 29 October and 13 November 1995 to conduct a workshop on the application of the updated version of the Botanical Research and Herbarium Management System (BRAHMS). It was attended by 10 participants. A short course on ‘Herbarium Techniques’ was

  14. Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Alone Update Past Issues / Summer 2006 ... hormone therapy does not increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to an updated analysis ...

  15. Predicting the volume of comments on online news stories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsagkias, M.; Weerkamp, W.; de Rijke, M.; Cheung, D.; Song, I.-Y.; Chu, W.; Hu, X.; Lin, J.; Li, J.; Peng, Z.

    2009-01-01

    On-line news agents provide commenting facilities for readers to express their views with regard to news stories. The number of user supplied comments on a news article may be indicative of its importance or impact. We report on exploratory work that predicts the comment volume of news articles

  16. Alternative Fuel News: Vol. 3, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NREL

    2000-01-10

    This final issue of the Alternative Fuel News (AFN) for the 20th century provides updates on specific Clean Cities Program progress and provide a glimpse of what is in store for the future. A national nonprofit organization has been part of the Clean Cities vision for some time, and now it is a reality as National Clean Cities, Inc. (NCC). While Clean Cities coalitions have had some success in securing local private foundation funds for alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) projects in their regions, now with the help of NCC, they can tap into the dollars available from large, national foundations. The Clean Cities Game Plan 2000, which is the highlight of the cover story, outlines the strategy for the next year.

  17. Measuring News Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  18. Novae news

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    As announced in the previous Bulletin, Novae has opened a new snack bar on the Flagstaff car park, just a few metres from CERN's reception area (Building 33).   Just a few metres from the CERN Reception, the new Novae snack point welcomes visitors and CERNois. Opening hours Currently: Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. From September: Monday to Friday, 7:45 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The snack bar selection includes breakfast, starting at 2.70 CHF, cold dishes from 5 CHF, and hot dishes from 6 CHF.   Novae has also installed a 24-hour-a-day food vending machine in the CERN hostel (Building 39) and in Building 13. You can buy pasta and cooked dishes for 6.50 CHF to 8 CHF. In addition, a groceries vending machine has been installed in the main building, just across from the news kiosk. Nearly 60 different items are available around the clock. Finally, Novae has introduced a new payment system in several buildings on the Meyrin site. It accepts credit ca...

  19. Physics News

    CERN Multimedia

    Gianotti, F.

    In spite of the fact that real data will only come in the year 2006, this is a very busy and interesting time for Physics-related activities. A very short overview of these activities is given in this issue of the ATLAS News Letter, while the various topics will be described in more detail in the next issues. The Physics and Combined Performance groups are working in four main areas: 1) Assess the ATLAS potential for physics, with emphasis on new channels and ideas. Recent examples are Extra-dimensions, invisible Higgs decays, heavy ion physics, the expected potential of a "Super-LHC" running at a luminosity of 10^35, etc.. 2) Improve the understanding of the detector performance and optimise the reconstruction algorithms. Examples of issues in the pipeline are: can we tag charm-jet ? What can we gain in the jet energy resolution by combining the calorimeter and tracker information to reconstruct the jet energy ? 3) Follow detector changes and detector-related issues and monitor the impact on the perform...

  20. Boolean queries for news monitoring: Suggesting new query terms to expert users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, S.; Wabeke, T.; Kaptein, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate query suggestion for Boolean queries in a news monitoring system. Users of this system receive news articles that match their running query on a daily basis. Because the news for a topic continuously changes, the queries need regular updating. We first investigated the

  1. Who Makes The News?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørndrup, Hanne; Bentsen, Martine

    -running and most extensive research on gender in the news media. It began in 1995 when volunteers in 71 countries around the world monitored women’s presence in their national radio, television and print news. The research revealed that only 17% of news subjects – the people who are interviewed or whom the news...... media. In 2010 women made up 31 % of the news subjects compared to the global average of 24 % women. This year the share of women in news has declined to 25% so Denmark is almost on level with the global average....

  2. 77 FR 24941 - Vantage Wind Energy LLC; Order Accepting Updated Market Power Analysis and Providing Direction on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Vantage Wind Energy LLC; Order Accepting Updated Market Power Analysis and... vertical market power.\\10\\ As discussed ] below, we find that Vantage Wind satisfies the Commission's... its power to its power purchasers. Vantage Wind further states that none of Polsky Energy, Invenergy...

  3. Market News Price Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Real-time price data collected by the Boston Market News Reporter. The NOAA Fisheries' "Fishery Market News" began operations in New York City on February 14, 1938....

  4. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  5. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    sheet that comes in your Journal plastic mailing bag, the one with your mailing label on it. **************************FIRM 53706 99990 Z Mar 2000 Z0142 Jane L. Doe Premier School and College Avogadro Avenue Anywhere, USA Point your Web browser to http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu. When asked for your name, enter your name exactly as it appears on the mailing label of your Journal issueeven if it is incorrect! Name: Jane L Doe Whenever asked for your password, enter your subscriber number, the first (5-digit) number on the second line of the label. Password: 99990 New IP-Address Option for Libraries While standard username/password access (where all users share the same access information) may be fine for some libraries, others find this system too limited and therefore unworkable. Such institutions have requested access by IP address, with no prompting for UserName and Password. We believe that this is just the tip of the iceberg and that many, if not most, library and institutional subscribers will want this type of access in the near future. Therefore we have added an IP-Address subscription option for libraries and institutions. With this option, the library or institution provides us with a list of all IP numbers that will receive access. Any desktop computer using one of these IP numbers will have immediate access, without the prompt for name and password. Because this requires considerably more administrative work on our end, there is a somewhat larger (but reasonable) fee. Please make your librarian aware of this new option that will provide you and all your colleagues with desktop access to JCE. Immediate Access to Online At present new subscribers are not able to get immediate access to JCE Onlinea limitation for subscribers who order over the telephone using a credit card. We now have an arrangement with our subscription fulfillment agent to give new subscribers immediate access to JCE Online by a guest account. The temporary guest account information will be

  6. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    News from Journal House Guidelines for Submission The Journal's current Guide to Submissions can be found on pages 29-30 of this issue. They have been streamlined a bit and also include a handy check list. This information is also available on JCE Online at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/. Wanted: Demo Checkers The Tested Demonstrations column needs people who like to try out demos. Column editor Ed Vitz is looking for additional volunteers to serve as "checkers" for manuscripts that have been submitted to the Journal for possible publication as Tested Demonstrations. A checker is expected to perform two functions: to review the manuscript for accuracy and novelty, and to attempt to perform the demonstration according to the procedure supplied by the author. Checkers may suggest important improvements in demonstration procedures, and for their efforts they are cited in the byline when the manuscript is published. For instance, the demo showing the yellow cascading precipitates (lead iodide) made from potassium iodide and lead nitrate was submitted by Wobbe de Vos and checked by Kim Kostka. The (yellow) cascading precipitates are from "Using Large Glass Cylinders To Demonstrate Chemical Reactions" that appeared in the April 1999 issue of JCE. We prefer that checkers begin the review process (which may in some cases involve procuring supplies) very soon after being contacted so that their review can be completed in the timely manner that authors deserve. Checkers are usually teachers who routinely present lecture demonstrations in their classes in either high school or colleges. We try not to call on checkers more often than once a year, which is one of the reasons for this request. Another is that we lose many highly valued, experienced checkers to retirement or other endeavors. Prospective checkers may want to look at a copy of the JCE Tested Demonstration Evaluation Form. It can be found on the Web at http://www.kutztown.edu/ vitz

  7. Media Literacy, News Literacy, or News Appreciation? A Case Study of the News Literacy Program at Stony Brook University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This case study provides practical and theoretical insights into the Stony Brook news literacy program, which is one of the most ambitious and well-funded curricular experiments in modern journalism education and media literacy. Analysis of document, interview, and observation data indicates that news literacy educators sought to teach students…

  8. Figuring Out Health News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stones Brain and Nervous System Figuring Out Health News KidsHealth > For Teens > Figuring Out Health News Print A A A What's in this article? ... on teens and suicide. She came across a news article about how some antidepressants increase the chances ...

  9. Creating Reality: How TV News Distorts Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altheide, David L.

    A three-year research project, including more than one year in a network affiliate station, provided the material for an analysis of current practices in television news programming. Based on the thesis that the organization of news encourages the oversimplification of events, this analysis traces the foundation of the bias called the "news…

  10. Spaces and Places of News Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris

    2016-01-01

    of geographic scale, mobile news use, and everyday life practices. Considering spatiotemporal transformations in everyday life provides a useful starting point for thinking about the changing places news is available, and the remainder of the chapter explores some prominent examples, namely the home, workplace...

  11. Updates Technologies of Media Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Whether as status notifications in news feeds or interactive prompts in online video services, updates punctuate the background routines of media by bringing a variety of changes to the attention of users. In this dissertation I argue that updates rationalize media change by making previously obscure actions of users and movements of technologies…

  12. News from Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With this message I would like to share with you some highlights of this week’s Council meetings.   A major topic was the approval of CERN’s Medium Term Plan (MTP) 2017-2021, along with the budget for 2017. In approving the document, Council expressed its very strong support for the research programme the MTP outlines for the coming years.  Another important topic this week was the formal approval of the High Luminosity LHC project, HL-LHC. This comes as extremely good news not only for CERN, but also for particle physics globally. HL-LHC is the top priority of the European Strategy for Particle Physics in its 2013 update, and is part of the 2016 roadmap of the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures, ESFRI. It was also identified as a priority in the US P5 strategy process, and in Japan’s strategic vision for the field. It secures CERN’s future until 2035, and ensures that we will achieve the maximum scientific return on the investment...

  13. The news Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ralf

    The News Engine How a new experiment in newsrooms can change process, product and people.   By Ralf Andersson   In fall 2012, the news department of the Danish Broadcasting Corporation,decided to implement a new workflow called ”The News Engine” - in order to workfaster, more freely, flexible...... and with fewer resources. This was done to raisethe productivity. The fundamental principle was that all stories should fit all platforms(content sharing) - and that no one did their own story anymore. DR News introduced 8-10 mobile live teams who are responsible for doinginterviews, record pictures and sound...... platforms. It discusses challengesof new practices of news production, cross-media reporting and mediaconvergence, resulting from DR’s new experiment, the news engine – with differentaspects: Product: The main news program 6:30 has fewer stories, but each one has moreelements. It’s not just one single pre...

  14. VIdeo News Release : Higgs Update 2011

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN video productions

    2011-01-01

    A seminar held at CERN on 13 December at which the ATLAS experiment, represented by its spokesperson Fabiola Gianotti, and the CMS experiment, represented by its spokesperson Guido Tonelli, will present the status of their searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson.

  15. Video News Release : Higgs update 2011

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN video productions

    2011-01-01

    Seminar held at CERN on 13 December at which the ATLAS experiment, represented by its spokesperson Fabiola Gianotti, and the CMS experiment, represented by its spokesperson Guido Tonelli, will present the status of their searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson.

  16. Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  17. How to Spot Fake News?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çev.: Fatih Canata

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Critical thinking is a key skill in media and information literacy, and the mission of libraries is to educate and advocate its importance. Discussions about fake news has led to a new focus on media literacy more broadly, and the role of libraries and other education institutions in providing this. When Oxford Dictionaries announce post-truth is Word of the Year 2016, as librarians realise action is needed to educate and advocate for critical thinking – a crucial skill when navigating the information society, an infographic with eight simple steps have been prepared by IFLA to discover the verifiability of a given news-piece in front of you.

  18. Working with the News Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordovensky, Pat; Marx, Gary

    This booklet provides advice on how schools can forge useful working relationships with the news media. Nineteen ground rules for working with print or broadcast media are outlined. The most important rule for all occasions is to make sure that your information is true. Strategies are described for using various tools of the trade, such as the…

  19. Science News for the U.S. Hispanic Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-02-01

    A science and health news service targeted toward the U.S. Hispanic community was launched on 23 January. ConCiencia, billed as the first Spanish-language science newswire service in the United States, provides free weekly news feeds to media targeting the U.S. Hispanic population. The news feeds, available to Spanish-language newspapers and radio stations, include newspaper features, radio segments, and online news content.

  20. Mining Sequential Update Summarization with Hierarchical Text Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of unexpected news events such as large human accident or natural disaster brings about a new information access problem where traditional approaches fail. Mostly, news of these events shows characteristics that are early sparse and later redundant. Hence, it is very important to get updates and provide individuals with timely and important information of these incidents during their development, especially when being applied in wireless and mobile Internet of Things (IoT. In this paper, we define the problem of sequential update summarization extraction and present a new hierarchical update mining system which can broadcast with useful, new, and timely sentence-length updates about a developing event. The new system proposes a novel method, which incorporates techniques from topic-level and sentence-level summarization. To evaluate the performance of the proposed system, we apply it to the task of sequential update summarization of temporal summarization (TS track at Text Retrieval Conference (TREC 2013 to compute four measurements of the update mining system: the expected gain, expected latency gain, comprehensiveness, and latency comprehensiveness. Experimental results show that our proposed method has good performance.

  1. Update: Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Women of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure--United States, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Emily E; Polen, Kara N D; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Ellington, Sascha R; Oduyebo, Titilope; Cohn, Amanda; Oster, Alexandra M; Russell, Kate; Kawwass, Jennifer F; Karwowski, Mateusz P; Powers, Ann M; Bertolli, Jeanne; Brooks, John T; Kissin, Dmitry; Villanueva, Julie; Muñoz-Jordan, Jorge; Kuehnert, Matthew; Olson, Christine K; Honein, Margaret A; Rivera, Maria; Jamieson, Denise J; Rasmussen, Sonja A

    2016-04-01

    CDC has updated its interim guidance for U.S. health care providers caring for women of reproductive age with possible Zika virus exposure to include recommendations on counseling women and men with possible Zika virus exposure who are interested in conceiving. This guidance is based on limited available data on persistence of Zika virus RNA in blood and semen. Women who have Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after symptom onset to attempt conception, and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least 6 months after symptom onset to attempt conception. Women and men with possible exposure to Zika virus but without clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease should wait at least 8 weeks after exposure to attempt conception. Possible exposure to Zika virus is defined as travel to or residence in an area of active Zika virus transmission ( http://www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/active-countries.html), or sex (vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, or fellatio) without a condom with a man who traveled to or resided in an area of active transmission. Women and men who reside in areas of active Zika virus transmission should talk with their health care provider about attempting conception. This guidance also provides updated recommendations on testing of pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure. These recommendations will be updated when additional data become available.

  2. Library news

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2010-01-01

    The CERN Library has been providing electronic access to the "Techniques de l'Ingénieur" database for the past 8 months. As a reminder, this is a multidisciplinary database of over 4000 technical and scientific articles in French, covering a broad range of topics such as mechanical engineering, safety, electronics and the environment. In a few simple steps, you can create your own account, select the types of documents you are interested in and configure your settings so as to receive alerts when articles in your field of activity are published. You can now access this resource from outside CERN using the "remote access to electronic resources" service. Further information is available here. Direct access to the database. Remote access to electronic resources. If you have any questions or comments, don't hesitate to contact us at: library.desk@cern.ch.

  3. Nuclear voices in the news : A comparison of source, news agency and newspaper content about nuclear energy over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, J.W.; Vliegenthart, R.; Boomgaarden, H.G.

    While news media are frequently criticized for their alleged increasing reliance on ‘subsidized content’ provided by sources and news agencies, this claim is seldom empirically verified. Based on insights from computer science, this study proposes an approach to quantitatively compare source, news

  4. Journal news

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, M.J.; Samuel, M.D.; White, Joanne C.

    1995-01-01

    Statistical power (and conversely, Type II error) is often ignored by biologists. Power is important to consider in the design of studies, to ensure that sufficient resources are allocated to address a hypothesis under examination. Deter- mining appropriate sample size when designing experiments or calculating power for a statistical test requires an investigator to consider the importance of making incorrect conclusions about the experimental hypothesis and the biological importance of the alternative hypothesis (or the biological effect size researchers are attempting to measure). Poorly designed studies frequently provide results that are at best equivocal, and do little to advance science or assist in decision making. Completed studies that fail to reject Ho should consider power and the related probability of a Type II error in the interpretation of results, particularly when implicit or explicit acceptance of Ho is used to support a biological hypothesis or management decision. Investigators must consider the biological question they wish to answer (Tacha et al. 1982) and assess power on the basis of biologically significant differences (Taylor and Gerrodette 1993). Power calculations are somewhat subjective, because the author must specify either f or the minimum difference that is biologically important. Biologists may have different ideas about what values are appropriate. While determining biological significance is of central importance in power analysis, it is also an issue of importance in wildlife science. Procedures, references, and computer software to compute power are accessible; therefore, authors should consider power. We welcome comments or suggestions on this subject.

  5. Climate Science News 2.0 at NSIDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitzell, K.; Meier, W.; Serreze, M. C.; Stroeve, J. C.; Scambos, T. A.

    2011-12-01

    How does a small science and data center step into new media? We do not have a lot of time to blog daily, maintain multiple social media accounts, monitor comments, or to constantly buff our image in the fast-changing world of social media. At the same time, the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC)'s news announcements and updates on Arctic sea ice reach a huge audience. We have answers to the questions about Arctic climate change that many people are asking, and we want to share that information with people who get their news from non-traditional sources. How can we take advantage of new technologies to help our information reach the largest number of people, without overwhelming our limited resources? So far our approach has been to continue offering innovative, insightful content that in some ways sells itself. We use social media as a tool to share this popular content, emphasizing quality over quantity (We do not tweet every day, but when we do, people listen). We also use social media as a research and "buzz-monitoring" tool to learn more about and to interact with our diverse audience. Even before NSIDC ventured onto Twitter and Facebook, people were using these tools to share our content. Social media allowed us to passively enjoy their benefits, as our regular readers shared updates with their friends and colleagues. The news, analysis, and data we provide were unique, and that made them attractive to a broad readership. By dipping a toe into social media, however, we found that we could start sharing our content with more control, and that a little effort goes a long way in spreading the word. In this presentation/poster we will show how NSIDC is using Twitter, Facebook, and the new Icelights Web site, to communicate with the public about changing sea ice and climate.

  6. Routinizing Breaking News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    2011-01-01

    This chapter revisits seminal theoretical categorizations of news proposed three decades earlier by US sociologist Gaye Tuchman. By exploring the definition of ”breaking news” in the contemporary online newsrooms of three Danish news organisations, the author offers us a long overdue re......-theorization of journalistic practice in the online context and helpfully explores well-evidenced limitations to online news production, such as the relationship between original reporting and the use of ”shovelware.”...

  7. With News Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Holly

    2005-01-01

    Although there are many news search engines on the Web, finding the news items one wants can be challenging. Choosing appropriate search terms is one of the biggest challenges. Unless one has seen the article that one is seeking, it is often difficult to select words that were used in the headline or text of the article. The limited archives of…

  8. Archives: Vulture News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 11 of 11 ... Archives: Vulture News. Journal Home > Archives: Vulture News. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 11 of 11 Items. 2015. Vol 68, No 1 (2015) ...

  9. Archives: Zimbabwe Science News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 10 of 10 ... Archives: Zimbabwe Science News. Journal Home > Archives: Zimbabwe Science News. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 10 of 10 Items. 2002 ...

  10. Vulture News: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Vulture News is the journal of the IUCN Vulture Specialist Group. It was originally the journal of the Vulture Study Group, which was formed in 1973 in southern Africa. The journal has been published since 1979 and is a venue for research, news, information and reports on vultures in all parts of the word ...

  11. Good Friends, Bad News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Arvidsson, Adam; Nielsen, Finn Årup

    the NY Times finds a strong link between positive affect and virality, and, based on psychological theories it is concluded that this relation is universally valid. The conclusion appears to be in contrast with classic theory of diffusion in news media emphasizing negative affect as promoting propagation....... In this paper we explore the apparent paradox in a quantitative analysis of information diffusion on Twitter. Twitter is interesting in this context as it has been shown to present both the characteristics social and news media. The basic measure of virality in Twitter is the probability of retweet. Twitter...... is different from email in that retweeting does not depend on pre-existing social relations, but often occur among strangers, thus in this respect Twitter may be more similar to traditional news media. We therefore hypothesize that negative news content is more likely to be retweeted, while for non-news tweets...

  12. Teachable Moments in the News - an Online Resource Solar System Science News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhala, H. A. T.; Miller, E. A.; Goldstein, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    Teachable Moments in the News (www.challenger.org/tmn/) is an online resource developed at Challenger Center for Space Science Education that takes recent news stories related to Solar System science and places them in a context relevant to the grades K-12 science curriculum. Using stories such as the launch of the MESSENGER spacecraft to Mercury, Teachable Moments in the News is meant to provide a seamless pathway from the news desk to the classroom. For each news item, an overview of the story is provided, along with high-quality inquiry-based, standards-driven lessons and links to more in-depth articles. Teachable Moments in the News is also a great tool for scientists who wish to stay informed of the recent events in Solar System exploration. The archived back issues of the quarterly published Web digest allow for a quick refresher on the most important news stories over the past several months. The very accessible nature of the stories makes the resource valuable for college students, and even the general public, as a means to keep up-to-date about current developments in planetary astronomy. Furthermore, college and university teachers can easily adapt many of the lessons to fit into the curriculum of an undergraduate astronomy course. During the poster session, we welcome suggestions from the scientific community on ways to enhance the usefulness of Teachable Moments in the News. For example, researchers could form partnerships with Teachable Moments in the News to provide news stories on their current research to be featured on the Web site. We invite researchers interested in this education and public outreach tool to visit the poster and provide suggestions on how to make the resource work as effectively as possible.

  13. Anatomy of news consumption on Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ana Lucía; Zollo, Fabiana; Del Vicario, Michela; Bessi, Alessandro; Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2017-03-21

    The advent of social media and microblogging platforms has radically changed the way we consume information and form opinions. In this paper, we explore the anatomy of the information space on Facebook by characterizing on a global scale the news consumption patterns of 376 million users over a time span of 6 y (January 2010 to December 2015). We find that users tend to focus on a limited set of pages, producing a sharp community structure among news outlets. We also find that the preferences of users and news providers differ. By tracking how Facebook pages "like" each other and examining their geolocation, we find that news providers are more geographically confined than users. We devise a simple model of selective exposure that reproduces the observed connectivity patterns.

  14. Tweeting News Articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Toledo Bastos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we investigate the impact of social media readership to the editorial profile of newspapers. We analyze tweets containing links to news articles from eight of the largest national newspapers in the United States, United Kingdom, Spain, Brazil, and Germany. The data collection follows the first two weeks of October 2012 and includes 2,842,699 tweets with links to news articles. Twitter-shortened links were resolved using a three-pass routine and assigned to 1 of the 21 newspaper sections. We found the concentration of links to news articles posted by top users to be lower than reported in the literature and the strategy of relaying headlines on Twitter via automatic news aggregators (feeds to be inefficient. The results of this investigation show which sections of a newspaper are the most and least read by readers in different parts of the world, with German readers placing greater emphasis on Politics and Economy; Brazilians on Sports and Arts; Spaniards on Local and National news; Britons and Americans on Opinion and World news. We also found that German and Spanish readers are more likely to read multiple national newspapers, while British readers more often resort to foreign sources of news. The results confirm that feedback to news items from a large user base is pivotal for the replication of content and that newspapers and news items can be clustered according to the editorial profile and principles of newsworthiness inherited from legacy media. The results of this investigation shed light onto the networked architecture of journalism that increasingly depends on readership agency.

  15. Hot news recommendation system from heterogeneous websites based on bayesian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhengyou; Xu, Shengwu; Liu, Ningzhong; Zhao, Zhengkang

    2014-01-01

    The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs). In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results.

  16. Hot News Recommendation System from Heterogeneous Websites Based on Bayesian Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyou Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs. In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results.

  17. Hot News Recommendation System from Heterogeneous Websites Based on Bayesian Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhengyou; Xu, Shengwu; Liu, Ningzhong; Zhao, Zhengkang

    2014-01-01

    The most current news recommendations are suitable for news which comes from a single news website, not for news from different heterogeneous news websites. Previous researches about news recommender systems based on different strategies have been proposed to provide news personalization services for online news readers. However, little research work has been reported on utilizing hundreds of heterogeneous news websites to provide top hot news services for group customers (e.g., government staffs). In this paper, we propose a hot news recommendation model based on Bayesian model, which is from hundreds of different news websites. In the model, we determine whether the news is hot news by calculating the joint probability of the news. We evaluate and compare our proposed recommendation model with the results of human experts on the real data sets. Experimental results demonstrate the reliability and effectiveness of our method. We also implement this model in hot news recommendation system of Hangzhou city government in year 2013, which achieves very good results. PMID:25093207

  18. Cascading Corruption News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads

    2018-01-01

    Through a content analysis of 8,800 news items and six months of front pages in three Brazilian newspapers, all dealing with corruption and political transgression, this article documents the remarkable skew of media attention to corruption scandals. The bias is examined as an information...... phenomenon, arising from systemic and commercial factors of Brazil’s news media: An information cascade of news on corruption formed, destabilizing the governing coalition and legitimizing the impeachment process of Dilma Rousseff. As this process gained momentum, questions of accountability were disregarded...

  19. Is Crime News Coverage Excessive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Doris A.

    1979-01-01

    Reports on the frequency and manner in which various crime and noncrime news topics were presented in selected newspapers and television newscasts in 1976. Examines news flow data to determine whether news output was inflexible, and whether crime news coverage distorted the amount of real-life crime. (PD)

  20. News and Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    The latest news from the Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research and the Alliance, as well as upcoming and past events attended by the Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research staff, and relevant upcoming scientific meetings.

  1. Turning News into Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Nick; Stelmach, Majorie

    1987-01-01

    Suggests young people can respond to news stories and political issues they feel strongly about through poetry, and presents one student's effective use of satire which lets his emotions "leak through" to the reader. (NH)

  2. CCG - News & Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) has been widely recognized for its research efforts to facilitiate advances in cancer genomic research and improve patient outcomes. Find the latest news about and events featuring CCG.

  3. Multimodal news framing effects

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, T.E.

    2017-01-01

    Visuals in news media play a vital role in framing citizens’ political preferences. Yet, compared to the written word, visual images are undervalued in political communication research. Using framing theory, this thesis redresses the balance by studying the combined, or multimodal, effects of visual and verbal media. Three experimental studies using international affairs news – a ready source of compelling visuals – address the following questions: (a) what is the individual and combined cont...

  4. News values on social media: News organizations' Facebook use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    This study examines the news selection practices followed by news organizations through investigating the news posted on social networking sites and, in particular, the Facebook pages of four foreign Arabic language TV stations: The Iranian Al-Alam TV, Russia Today, Deutsche Welle, and BBC. A total of 15,589 news stories are analyzed in order to examine the prominence of references to countries and political actors. The study reveals that social significance and proximity as well as the news organizations' ideological agenda are the most important elements that dictate the news selection process.

  5. News values on social media: News organizations’ Facebook use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the news selection practices followed by news organizations through investigating the news posted on social networking sites and, in particular, the Facebook pages of four foreign Arabic language TV stations: The Iranian Al-Alam TV, Russia Today, Deutsche Welle, and BBC. A total of 15,589 news stories are analyzed in order to examine the prominence of references to countries and political actors. The study reveals that social significance and proximity as well as the news organizations’ ideological agenda are the most important elements that dictate the news selection process. PMID:29278253

  6. CSI: A Hybrid Deep Model for Fake News Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Ruchansky, Natali; Seo, Sungyong; Liu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    The topic of fake news has drawn attention both from the public and the academic communities. Such misinformation has the potential of affecting public opinion, providing an opportunity for malicious parties to manipulate the outcomes of public events such as elections. Because such high stakes are at play, automatically detecting fake news is an important, yet challenging problem that is not yet well understood. Nevertheless, there are three generally agreed upon characteristics of fake news...

  7. Ahok in Virtual News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novian Anata Putra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Every society is flooded by Information in the Internet era. News sites as one of the sources of information are now numerous. However, do these bits of information worth to be trusted fully? Through quantitative content analysis, the researcher tried to examine one of the news sites based on religion (Islamic hardliners, VOA-Islam, in reporting Basuki Tjahaja Purnama a.k.a Ahok, which incidentally is a non-Muslim Chinese descent. Using Jurgen Westerstahl’s objectivity approach (1983, found the fact that the news presented by VOA-Islam does not contain elements of balance, even most of it shows a negative tendency, cornered Ahok as a central figure in DKI Jakarta. In fact, from the dimensions of relevance, the percentage of news from VOA-Islam, which has a significant effect to the activity of community life and proximity to the topic of the public, are quite high. In addition to the large amount of news that contains racial issues, it becomes worrisome because it could lead to the disintegration of the nation.

  8. Which physical examination tests provide clinicians with the most value when examining the shoulder? Update of a systematic review with meta-analysis of individual tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedus, Eric J; Goode, Adam P; Cook, Chad E; Michener, Lori; Myer, Cortney A; Myer, Daniel M; Wright, Alexis A

    2012-11-01

    rule in a SLAP lesion when positive. A sensitive test (sensitivity >80%, LR- ≤ 0.20) of note is the shoulder shrug sign, for stiffness-related disorders (osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis) as well as rotator cuff tendinopathy. There are six additional tests with higher sensitivities, specificities, or both but caution is urged since all of these tests have been studied only once and more than one ShPE test (ie, active compression, biceps load II) has been introduced with great diagnostic statistics only to have further research fail to replicate the results of the original authors. The belly-off and modified belly press tests for subscapularis tendinopathy, bony apprehension test for bony instability, olecranon-manubrium percussion test for bony abnormality, passive compression for a SLAP lesion, and the lateral Jobe test for rotator cuff tear give reason for optimism since they demonstrated both high sensitivities and specificities reported in low bias studies. Finally, one additional test was studied in two separate papers. The dynamic labral shear may be sensitive for SLAP lesions but, when modified, be diagnostic of labral tears generally. Based on data from the original 2008 review and this update, the use of any single ShPE test to make a pathognomonic diagnosis cannot be unequivocally recommended. There exist some promising tests but their properties must be confirmed in more than one study. Combinations of ShPE tests provide better accuracy, but marginally so. These findings seem to provide support for stressing a comprehensive clinical examination including history and physical examination. However, there is a great need for large, prospective, well-designed studies that examine the diagnostic accuracy of the many aspects of the clinical examination and what combinations of these aspects are useful in differentially diagnosing pathologies of the shoulder.

  9. Breaking Bad News in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Bonnie McCracken; Feeley, Thomas Hugh

    2017-06-16

    The patient-provider relationship in the context of veterinary medicine represents a unique opportunity for studying how bad news is communicated to pet owners by conducting structured interviews with veterinarians. A sample of 44 veterinarians' responses was recorded and content-analyzed in an effort to identify themes among providers in their clinical experience of breaking bad news (BBN). Two coders revealed several themes in the data that were organized by three overarching areas: (1) breaking bad news in general, (2) euthanasia, and (3) social support. The findings from interviews indicated the COMFORT model (Villagran, Goldsmith, Wittenberg-Lyles, & Baldwin, 2010) in medical education provided a useful framework to organize the communication of BBN in veterinary medicine. Results were discussed in relation to future research in patient-provider communication and COMFORT's potential value for training students in veterinarian education.

  10. When Sound Bites Become the News: a Case Study on Manufacturing News in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tena Perišin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Media environment is rapidly changing and facing a widespread crisis in journalism. It is followed by the decline of audience trust and increasing market pressures. The main goal is to win the audience’s attention, very often by creating drama and producing ‘conflict’. The news is not based on something that really happened and that is relevant, but it is more often manufactured or artificially produced. In this case study we explore the curious life cycle of a sound bite from a passing remark by the then Croatian Prime Minister Zoran Milanović’s to the headlines, discussions and extensive reports which developed over the course of several days. This example shows how news could be manufactured and content blurred when it is built around a fragment without providing the context, in this case a political quote. For several days, politicians, experts, war veterans, but also ordinary citizens were involved in the manufactured news story without making a reference to the context. Consequently, the democratic debate was avoided. Drawing on a discussion of news fragmentation as isolation from context, we show that in this case, news values (what news is are increasingly blurred, preventing the news from becoming the source of information and discussion of the country’s key issues.

  11. Sharing good NEWS across the world: developing comparable scores across 12 countries for the neighborhood environment walkability scale (NEWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The IPEN (International Physical Activity and Environment Network) Adult project seeks to conduct pooled analyses of associations of perceived neighborhood environment, as measured by the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS) and its abbreviated version (NEWS-A), with physical activity using data from 12 countries. As IPEN countries used adapted versions of the NEWS/NEWS-A, this paper aimed to develop scoring protocols that maximize cross-country comparability in responses. This information is also highly relevant to non-IPEN studies employing the NEWS/NEWS-A, which is one of the most popular measures of perceived environment globally. Methods The following countries participated in the IPEN Adult study: Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Colombia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Hong Kong, Mexico, New Zealand, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Participants (N = 14,305) were recruited from neighborhoods varying in walkability and socio-economic status. Countries collected data on the perceived environment using a self- or interviewer-administered version of the NEWS/NEWS-A. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was used to derive comparable country-specific measurement models of the NEWS/NEWS-A. The level of correspondence between standard and alternative versions of the NEWS/NEWS-A factor-analyzable subscales was determined by estimating the correlations and mean standardized difference (Cohen’s d) between them using data from countries that had included items from both standard and alternative versions of the subscales. Results Final country-specific measurement models of the NEWS/NEWS-A provided acceptable levels of fit to the data and shared the same factorial structure with six latent factors and two single items. The correspondence between the standard and alternative versions of subscales of Land use mix – access, Infrastructure and safety for walking/cycling, and Aesthetics was high. The Brazilian version of the Traffic safety

  12. Insight4News: Connecting News to Relevant Social Conversations

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Bichen; Ifrim, Georgiana; Hurley, Neil J.

    2014-01-01

    We present the Insight4News system that connects news articles to social conversations, as echoed in microblogs such as Twitter. Insight4News tracks feeds from mainstream media, e.g., BBC, Irish Times, and extracts relevant topics that summarize the tweet activity around each article, recommends relevant hashtags, and presents complementary views and statistics on the tweet activity, related news articles, and timeline of the story with regard to Twitter reaction. The user can track their own...

  13. Global news production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lisbeth

    Events around the world are broadcast by giant media players such as CNN, BBC and NHK amongst others. Consumers of news media receive the final message without knowing the processes that the images, the text and the sound have gone through. The media players can be considered as professional...... generators of national news, who manipulate presentations according to professional standards as well as local needs that are culturally based. This book explores how powerful political and economic agendas in the national media environment influence the production processes. It shows how the outcome...

  14. News from Afar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Peter

    News filtering through about the changing fortunes of the Axis had a direct impact on public opinion in occupied Europe during the war years, not only affecting morale but also at times triggering mass popular action. For example, a wave of protests against the German occupation broke out....... This paper describes the way a number of Danish news outlets reported on three key battles in the Pacific: the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, the battle of Midway in June 1942, and the battle of Iwo Jima in the spring of 1945, held against examples of the importance attributed to the Pacific...

  15. Making news about medicines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trigt, Anna Maria van

    1995-01-01

    People are very interested in information about health and illness. Studies show that they are more interested in new medical discoveries than in sport in the news. Mass media channels (e.g. newspapers, television) do pay attention to information about health and illness. Both patients, health

  16. CERN television news

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN events brought right to your desktop by the new video bulletin.   CERN now has its very own news broadcast , or rather 'webcast', with a host of special reports and even a star presenter. From today onwards, just go to the Bulletin's web page, click on the 'video news' link and sit back and enjoy the latest news about CERN, presented in images by Wendy Korda. The ten-minute newscast in both French and English, the Organization's two official languages, presents interviews, pictures of experiments and computer-generated graphics, bringing you right up to date with some of the Laboratory's latest stories. The show concludes with a selection of the best snapshots taken by the CERN Photo Lab. So every one or two months CERN's Audio-Video Service (ETT/DH) will be putting together a video news report that you can watch on your own desktop computer. Daniel Boileau, Patrick Gilbert de Vautibault and Jacques Fichet, the Service's three technicians, came up with the idea of producing this regular feat...

  17. Multimodal news framing effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, T.E.

    2017-01-01

    Visuals in news media play a vital role in framing citizens’ political preferences. Yet, compared to the written word, visual images are undervalued in political communication research. Using framing theory, this thesis redresses the balance by studying the combined, or multimodal, effects of visual

  18. News of the Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Lifer, Evan; Olson, Renee; Milliot, Jim; Bing, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    Reviews library news for 1997. Highlights public library budgets, examined by number of patrons served; Internet filters and censorship; librarians and the media; private and government funding sources; outsourcing; expectations for growth in the publishing industry, emphasizing the Asian economic crisis; and new ideas from the next generation of…

  19. Television News Without Pictures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Doris A.

    1987-01-01

    Describes "gestalt" coding procedures that concentrate on the meanings conveyed by audio-visual messages rather than on coding individual pictorial elements shown in a news story. Discusses the totality of meaning that results from the interaction of verbal and visual story elements, external settings, and the decoding proclivities of…

  20. Vulture News: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Vulture News publishes original articles, reports, literature reviews and other material relevant to the field of vulture and condor biology, research and conservation. The journal has three sections for contributors: - The Articles section accepts manuscripts that will be sent to at least two referees for peer ...

  1. Zimbabwe Science News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Zimbabwe Science News has ceased publication. Vol 33, No 1 (1999). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Table of Contents. Articles. Science-based economic development: The Eureka Factor · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  2. Crime News Coverage in Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Doris A.

    According to one sociological model, news is a product of socially determined notions of who and what is important and the organizational structures that result for routinizing news collection; events that deviate from these notions are ignored. This report describes a study of crime news coverage in the media that used this model to examine the…

  3. Patterns in television news use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konig, R.P.; Renckstorf, K.; Wester, F.P.J.F.

    2001-01-01

    In this study we explore patterns of television news use, using data from a national survey on Media Use in the Netherlands conducted in 1994 (n = 969). Results indicate that people are much more likely to prefer watching television news selectively and attentively than watching the news while

  4. Astronomy, New Instrumentation, and the News Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maran, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    Reporting of astronomical discoveries and events in the news media continues to expand to satisfy a seemingly voracious public interest. New telescopes, instruments, and facilities both up in space and on the ground, provide unique opportunities for media outreach on what scientists are accomplishing. And, new media such as website news providers, high-definition television, and video news walls help to fuel the growing activity. Ever since Tycho Brahe operated his own printing press, astronomers have striven to document their accomplishments for the wider world. In recent years, astronomers' media outreach has been successful in reaching the mass television audience through successful efforts at animation and scientific visualization, and through dramatic images acquired by some facilities, such as the solar physics satellites and ground observatories.

  5. Blended news delivery in healthcare: a framework for injecting good news into bad news conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Angela M; Sweeny, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Clinicians often inject good news into bad news delivery, and they do so for a variety of reasons. We present a framework that draws from research in the fields of health and social psychology to shed light on situations in which clinicians add superfluous good news into bad news conversations in an effort to ease the conversation or mitigate patients' distress, a broad strategy we refer to as blended news delivery. Our framework includes predictors of clinicians' use of blended news delivery, characteristics of blended news and outcomes of this strategy for both patients and clinicians. This framework addresses a common aspect of health communication and can direct future research on ideal strategies for and likely consequences of blended news delivery and communication more broadly.

  6. BBC VERSUS EURO NEWS: DISCOURSE AND IDEOLOGY IN NEWS TRANSLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini, F.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to compare discursive strategies employed by two international news agencies including Euro News and BBC. Van Dijk’s (2004 model of CDA was adopted. Thirty pieces of news about internal affairs of Iran together with their Persian translations were downloaded from the corresponding website, i.e. 30 pieces of English news and their corresponding Persian translations from the Euro News website and 30 pieces of English news with their corresponding translations from the BBC website. The frequency of lexical items was observed to not differ significantly. Two sets of translations were compared to their source texts based on four discursive strategies of hyperbole, polarization, vagueness and euphemism. An independent-samples t-test was conducted to compare the frequency of strategies applied by the two news agencies. Results revealed no significant difference between the two agencies except for the discursive strategy of vagueness.

  7. News for a Teen Market: The Lessons of Channel One.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoynes, William

    1998-01-01

    Describes the types of stories that Channel One covers and the characteristics and configuration of its news sources. Focusing mostly on anchor personalities and politicians, Channel One news serves as a promotional vehicle for itself and youth culture, providing a friendly environment for controversial product advertisements. Such dramatic and…

  8. A special broadcast of CERN's Video news

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A special edition of CERN's video news giving a complete update on the LHC project is to be broadcast in the Main Auditorium. After your lunch make a small detour to the Main Auditorium, where you see the big picture. On 14, 15 and 16 May, between 12:30 and 14:00, a special edition of CERN's video news bulletin will be broadcast in the Main Auditorium. You will have the chance get up-to-date on the LHC project and its experiments. With four years to go before the first collisions in the LHC, the LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans will present a status report on the construction of the accelerator. The spokesmen of the five LHC experiments (ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and TOTEM) will explain how the work is going and what the state of play will be in four years' time. This special video news broadcast is the result of collaboration between the CERN Audiovisual Service, the Photo Service and the External communication section. The broadcast will begin with a brand-new programme title sequence. And just as in the real c...

  9. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Improving the flu vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health: NLM update Transcript Improving the flu vaccine : 11/13/2017 To use the sharing features ... are committed to developing a more effective flu vaccine, explains an interesting news article recently published in ...

  10. Exploring the New Narrative of Internet News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Hui Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates that digital tools provide opportunities for new storytelling techniques. To take full advantage of the new media resources and to establish an innovative news narrative structure, the existing research limit and the relationship between narrative and the media were examined. This paper progresses from a discussion on the narrative structure to how the plot of a story is influenced by its discourse, and then to how different media characteristics can change the structure and voice of the involved narrative. A new narrative structure that can be used to explore the hypertext and interactivity of Internet news is described. Finally, this paper discusses the cultivation of news storytelling in the digital age.

  11. Swisster – a news website for Anglophones

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Employees of CERN can now sign up for a free account at Swisster.ch, an English language website devoted to Swiss news and current affairs. « prev next » The website, which is aimed at English speakers in Switzerland, normally requires an annual subscription of 300 CHF, but has teamed up with sponsors to offer a free subscription for CERN employees. The service provides a daily newsletter containing the main news and other information sent to subscribers every working day. The Swisster website also offers a variety of services such as health, education and food forums called "corners", as well as weather & snow forecasts, blogs and even a TV guide for Anglophones. The editorial team of English-speaking journalists is based in Lausanne, Geneva, Zurich and Neuchatel and covers news for expatriates and English speakers living and working in Switzerland. Swisster.ch also has a Saturday morning radio show from 08:30 to 09:30, on Radio Cit�...

  12. Sensing the News: User Experiences when Reading Locative News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjetil Vaage Øie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on user experiences on reading location-aware news on the mobile platform and aims to explore what experiences this kind of locative journalism generates and how such experiences change the users’ social interaction with news. We produced a specially designed mobile application and tailored news stories specific to this project called LocaNews in order to explore participants’ relation to the content in this journalistic format. The result is generated through a field study and a questionnaire of 32 people to find out how they experience the news presented in this format. The user participants’ responses are analyzed based on their news experiences, contextualizing places and their social interaction with the news within this form of journalism. Results showed that the local, semi-local and non-local user approaches the locative news in a different manner, but that the average user found this kind of news more interesting and more informative than ordinary news. The participants also have a problem identifying this as journalism, rather than an information service.

  13. NetWorking News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    with adults or children. However there is a need for new methods to support communication and collaboration between designers and children. This article proposes a new method for understandings children’s appropriation of new technology in an interactive workshop setting. The method, which we call...... the Networking News workshop, offers an opportunity to make first hand studies of children’s IT supported social activities in an informal classroom setting....

  14. Vulture News: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home · Journals · Vulture News · About · Log In · Register · Advanced Search · By Author · By Title. Issues. Current Issue · Archives · Open Journal Systems · Help. ISSN: 1606-7479. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's ...

  15. NetWorking News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Dindler, Christian

    For many years cooperative design was primarily concerned with the development of IT supported systems for professional users. However, the cooperative design approach can embrace other social practices such as children’s everyday life. At a methodological level there is no difference in designin...... the Networking News workshop, offers an opportunity to make first hand studies of children’s IT supported social activities in an informal classroom setting....

  16. NEWS AGENCIES AND NEWS SOURCES IN KYRGYZSTAN IN THE CONTEXT OF INTERNATIONAL NEWS FLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topcugul NARMAMATOVA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of communication eliminated the time and space limit, which at the same time brought the acceleration of exchange of information between countries and societies, and made it possible for society's people to be immediately informed of the news in the world. Capitalist countries, which have wisdom and technology in the world, have become dominant over other developing countries. Whereat with the aid of communication and technological infrastructure they have been able to manage these countries economically-politically, or culturally and ideologically. The superior countries in international news distribution dominate other undeveloped or developing countries and with international media outlets they consolidate and maintain this superiority. These international media holdings, which are used as heart’s-blood of the media organizations in developing countries, in order to influence or disinterest public opinion determine news choices according to some political, economic and diplomatic criteria. Besides, when events in the developing countries adhered to "super-capitalist forces", they will be transformed into a news by international media organizations. Thus, the news of international news agencies reflect neither the interests nor the social reality of the developing countries like Kyrgyzstan.In this study were examined foreign news which published in news agencies in Kyrgyzstan in the context of international news flow and by the way there were attempted to explain how the news agencies were influenced by the one-way news flow. In this research were used literature review and content analysis.

  17. Contact: Releasing the news

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  18. Volume, Volatility and Public News Announcements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Li, Jia; Xue, Yuan

    We provide new empirical evidence for the way in which financial markets process information. Our results are based on high-frequency intraday data along with new econometric techniques for making inference on the relationship between trading intensity and spot volatility around public news...

  19. The Best of Chem 13 News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Kathy

    1999-07-01

    This column is designed to give JCE readers a few highlights from Chem 13 News, a monthly publication for chemistry educators from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, and provides annotations describing a particular activity or a variety of sources from which new and creative ideas can be extracted.

  20. The Caribbean News Agency: Third World Model. Journalism Monographs Number 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, Marlene

    This monograph is a history of the Caribbean News Agency (CANA), which is jointly owned by private and public mass media of its region and independent of both governments and foreign news agencies. It is proposed that CANA may provide a unique model of an independent, regional third-world news agency. Sections of the monograph examine (1) CANA's…

  1. Displaying fairness while delivering bad news: Testing the effectiveness of organizational bad news training in the layoff context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Manuela; König, Cornelius J; Koppermann, Christopher; Schilling, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Although giving bad news at work is a stressful experience, managers are often underprepared for this challenging task. As a solution, we introduce organizational bad news training that integrates (a) principles of delivering bad news from the context of health care (i.e., bad news delivery component), and (b) principles of organizational justice theory (i.e., fairness component). We argue that both the formal and fair delivery of bad news at work can be enhanced with the help of training to mitigate distress both for the messenger and the recipient. We tested the effectiveness of training for the delivery of a layoff as a typical bad news event at work. In 2 studies, we compared the performance of a training group (receiving both components of training) with that of a control group (Study 1, Study 2) and a basics group (receiving the bad news delivery component only; Study 2) during a simulated dismissal notification meeting. In general, the results supported our hypotheses: Training improved the formal delivery of bad news and predicted indicators of procedural fairness during the conversation in both studies. In Study 2, we also considered layoff victims' negativity after the layoff and found that training significantly reduced negative responses. This relationship was fully mediated by layoff victims' fairness perceptions. Despite preparation, however, giving bad news remained a challenging task in both studies. In summary, we recommend that organizations provide managers with organizational bad news training in order to promote professional and fair bad news conversations at work. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Networks in the news media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro, Peter

    When news reporters connect people in a single news story or in a series of coherent news stories they essentially construct networks in the news media. Networks through which social actors are aligned symbolically in written, visible or audible form. These socio-symbolic networks not only copy...... more formal types of social networks, but also complement or even substitute social networking elsewhere, and as such this particular type of social network offers people both inside and outside the news room new potentials - and problems. This article describe the basic vision of networks in the news...... media and discuss the importance of this analytical framework when it comes to understanding prevailing forms and norms in contemporary journalism....

  3. News for assimilation or integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Amanda; Deuze, Mark

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates the functions of news media in shaping acculturation experiences of new economic and refugee immigrants in the Netherlands and Spain. Focus group data revealed that consumption of host country news media was mainly connected to immigrants' deliberate strategies to assimilate the culture, politics and language of the host society, while exposure to transnational news was viewed in terms of strategies of integration in both countries. We also observed that participants' educational background and language skills combined with their perceptions of the host country's news have an impact on the use they make of news for assimilating and/or integrating into the host society. Finally, important sociopolitical conditions of the context influenced the ways participants use the news media in their process of acculturation.

  4. Principles of Multimedia News Systems for Business Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan I. ANDONE

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years considerable demand for business oriented multimedia information systems has developed. A multimedia information system is one that can create, import, integrate, store, retrieve, edit, and delete two or more types of media materials in digital form, such as audio, image, full-motion video, and text information. Multimedia information systems play a central role in many business activities. They represent a very special class complex computing systems. This paper surveys a special type of multimedia information systems: multimedia news systems. Multimedia news systems deal with architectures to manage complex multimedia news databases, online presentation and distribution services or the integration of several existing services to meta-services using intelligent news retrieval engines. The leading presentation platform in multimedia news presentation is news networks providing television services and Internet content distribution. The primary focus is on advanced multimedia news systems infrastructure, document standards, application architecture and principles for multimedia news on the Web that suggest long-term trends in this increasingly important area.

  5. Cross-validation of the factorial structure of the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS) and its abbreviated form (NEWS-A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerin, Ester; Conway, Terry L; Saelens, Brian E; Frank, Lawrence D; Sallis, James F

    2009-06-09

    The Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS) and its abbreviated form (NEWS-A) assess perceived environmental attributes believed to influence physical activity. A multilevel confirmatory factor analysis (MCFA) conducted on a sample from Seattle, WA showed that, at the respondent level, the factor-analyzable items of the NEWS and NEWS-A measured 11 and 10 constructs of perceived neighborhood environment, respectively. At the census blockgroup (used by the US Census Bureau as a subunit of census tracts) level, the MCFA yielded five factors for both NEWS and NEWS-A. The aim of this study was to cross-validate the individual- and blockgroup-level measurement models of the NEWS and NEWS-A in a geographical location and population different from those used in the original validation study. A sample of 912 adults was recruited from 16 selected neighborhoods (116 census blockgroups) in the Baltimore, MD region. Neighborhoods were stratified according to their socio-economic status and transport-related walkability level measured using Geographic Information Systems. Participants self-completed the NEWS. MCFA was used to cross-validate the individual- and blockgroup-level measurement models of the NEWS and NEWS-A. The data provided sufficient support for the factorial validity of the original individual-level measurement models, which consisted of 11 (NEWS) and 10 (NEWS-A) correlated factors. The original blockgroup-level measurement model of the NEWS and NEWS-A showed poor fit to the data and required substantial modifications. These included the combining of aspects of building aesthetics with safety from crime into one factor; the separation of natural aesthetics and building aesthetics into two factors; and for the NEWS-A, the separation of presence of sidewalks/walking routes from other infrastructure for walking. This study provided support for the generalizability of the individual-level measurement models of the NEWS and NEWS-A to different urban

  6. Cross-validation of the factorial structure of the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS and its abbreviated form (NEWS-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerin Ester

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS and its abbreviated form (NEWS-A assess perceived environmental attributes believed to influence physical activity. A multilevel confirmatory factor analysis (MCFA conducted on a sample from Seattle, WA showed that, at the respondent level, the factor-analyzable items of the NEWS and NEWS-A measured 11 and 10 constructs of perceived neighborhood environment, respectively. At the census blockgroup (used by the US Census Bureau as a subunit of census tracts level, the MCFA yielded five factors for both NEWS and NEWS-A. The aim of this study was to cross-validate the individual- and blockgroup-level measurement models of the NEWS and NEWS-A in a geographical location and population different from those used in the original validation study. Methods A sample of 912 adults was recruited from 16 selected neighborhoods (116 census blockgroups in the Baltimore, MD region. Neighborhoods were stratified according to their socio-economic status and transport-related walkability level measured using Geographic Information Systems. Participants self-completed the NEWS. MCFA was used to cross-validate the individual- and blockgroup-level measurement models of the NEWS and NEWS-A. Results The data provided sufficient support for the factorial validity of the original individual-level measurement models, which consisted of 11 (NEWS and 10 (NEWS-A correlated factors. The original blockgroup-level measurement model of the NEWS and NEWS-A showed poor fit to the data and required substantial modifications. These included the combining of aspects of building aesthetics with safety from crime into one factor; the separation of natural aesthetics and building aesthetics into two factors; and for the NEWS-A, the separation of presence of sidewalks/walking routes from other infrastructure for walking. Conclusion This study provided support for the generalizability of the individual

  7. A short guide to giving bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jeffrey T

    2008-01-01

    Approaching an individual or a family with bad news, but without an appropriate plan to present the information in a structured manner, is almost a guarantee of greater emotional pain and disruption for the recipients of the news. Crisis interveners must develop a strategic plan for the announcement of bad news. That plan should entail a lead-up phase, a transmission phase, and a followup phase. The lead-up phase encompasses the gathering of accurate, verifiable information and the clear identification of the targets of the information. The transmission phase includes immediate preparation for the presentation of the information, the actual announcement, and the presentation of additional details as questions arise. The follow-up phase includes a range of supportive interventions to assist people in the immediate crisis reaction. It also includes a system of referrals for people who might benefit from additional professional care. This article provides practical guidelines for providing bad news to the loved ones of injured, ill, or deceased people.

  8. Including limitations in news coverage of cancer research: effects of news hedging on fatalism, medical skepticism, patient trust, and backlash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jakob D; Carcioppolo, Nick; King, Andy J; Bernat, Jennifer K; Davis, LaShara; Yale, Robert; Smith, Jessica

    2011-05-01

    Past research has demonstrated that news coverage of cancer research, and scientific research generally, rarely contains discourse-based hedging, including caveats, limitations, and uncertainties. In a multiple message experiment (k = 4 news stories, N = 1082), the authors examined whether hedging shaped the perceptions of news consumers. The results revealed that participants were significantly less fatalistic about cancer (p = .039) and marginally less prone to nutritional backlash (p = .056) after exposure to hedged articles. Participants exposed to articles mentioning a second researcher (unaffiliated with the present study) exhibited greater trust in medical professions (p = .001). The findings provide additional support for the inclusion of discourse-based hedging in cancer news coverage and suggest that news consumers will use scientific uncertainty in illness representations.

  9. Internet Archaeology News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cèsar Carreras Monfort

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available La revista Internet Archaeology News s'adreça a un públic restringit, especialitzat en arqueologia i sobretot en aplicacions de caràcter informàtic i noves metodologies de treball. El fet que la revista neixi amb la voluntat d'ésser innovadora en el seu camp i molt especialitzada no treu que el nivell de les col·laboracions sigui de força qualitat gràcies a la política del equip editorial.

  10. CERN Video News

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    From Monday you can see on the web the new edition of CERN's Video News. Thanks to a collaboration between the audiovisual teams at CERN and Fermilab, you can see a report made by the American laboratory. The clip concerns the LHC magnets that are being constructed at Fermilab. Also in the programme: the spectacular rotation of one of the ATLAS coils, the arrival at CERN of the first American magnet made at Brookhaven, the story of the discovery 20 years ago of the W and Z bosons at CERN. http://www.cern.ch/video or Bulletin web page.

  11. PUSHED NEWS: When the news comes to the cellphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fidalgo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Combining two findings of recent surveys on the Internet whichstate that 1 “the Internet will soon surpass all other media as a main source for national and international news” and 2 “the mobile device will be the primary connection tool to the Internet in 2020” leads us to the conclusion that smartphones will soon be the primary source for news access. But if so, how will news come to the Internetconnected cellphones? In accordance with the distinction, already drawn in 1997, between push and pull technologies as two different forms of how content is delivered to the end users, cellphones are characterized as push devices (passive reception, in opposition to computers, classified as pull devices (active reception. The news items that fit cellphones are pushed news. And they will be pushed as SMS, e-mails, tweets and through news aggregators.

  12. Pushed news: when the news comes to the cellphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fidalgo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Combining two findings of recent surveys on the Internet which state that 1 “the Internet will soon surpass all other media as a main source for national and international news” and 2 “the mobile device will be the primary connection tool to the Internet in 2020” leads us to the conclusion that smartphones will soon be the primary source for news access. But if so, how will news come to the Internetconnected cellphones? In accordance with the distinction, already drawn in 1997, between push and pull technologies as two different forms of how content is delivered to the end users, cellphones are characterized as push devices (passive reception, in opposition to computers, classified as pull devices (active reception. The news items that fit cellphones are pushed news. And they will be pushed as SMS, e-mails, tweets and through news aggregators.

  13. Incremental visual text analytics of news story development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstajic, Milos; Najm-Araghi, Mohammad; Mansmann, Florian; Keim, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Online news sources produce thousands of news articles every day, reporting on local and global real-world events. New information quickly replaces the old, making it difficult for readers to put current events in the context of the past. Additionally, the stories have very complex relationships and characteristics that are difficult to model: they can be weakly or strongly connected, or they can merge or split over time. In this paper, we present a visual analytics system for exploration of news topics in dynamic information streams, which combines interactive visualization and text mining techniques to facilitate the analysis of similar topics that split and merge over time. We employ text clustering techniques to automatically extract stories from online news streams and present a visualization that: 1) shows temporal characteristics of stories in different time frames with different level of detail; 2) allows incremental updates of the display without recalculating the visual features of the past data; 3) sorts the stories by minimizing clutter and overlap from edge crossings. By using interaction, stories can be filtered based on their duration and characteristics in order to be explored in full detail with details on demand. To demonstrate the usefulness of our system, case studies with real news data are presented and show the capabilities for detailed dynamic text stream exploration.

  14. NEWS: Web's wonders!

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Introducing this month's collection of useful websites for physics teachers. If you have any suggestions for this column then please send them to us at ped@ioppublishing.co.uk Dave Pickersgill has drawn our attention to the following: www.sheffcol.ac.uk/links/ which has annotated, classified and searchable links to over 1700 educational sites. Included are around 500 science links. Members of the American Association of Physics Teachers were recently informed of a website for those hoping to arouse interest and knowledge of astronomy in their students. Space.com, a comprehensive space news website, had launched `spaceKids', a new channel specifically targeted at children complete with a gallery of space images, space and science news, stories, a space question and answer section hosted by a team of science teachers, interactive games, weekly polls and competitions. The website can be found at www.spacekids.com Those fascinated by all aspects of nuclear fusion should take a look at the General Atomics educational site: FusionEd.gat.com as well as the national site fusion.gat.com/PlasmaOutreach

  15. Agenda-Setting by Electronic Text News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeter, Carrie; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examines the agenda-setting impacts of electronic text news (ETN) and reactions to ETN as a news medium. Finds that electronic news viewers have nearly the same agenda as do users of traditional media. (MM)

  16. Is macroeconomic announcement news priced?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goeij, Peter; Hu, Jiehui; Werker, Bas

    2016-01-01

    We test whether news contained in macroeconomic announcements (MEAs) is priced in the cross-section of stock returns. When including news on a set of widely followed individual macroeconomic fundamentals in the cross-section of stock returns, estimates of their prices of risk are consistent with the

  17. CERN Video News on line

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The latest CERN video news is on line. In this issue : an interview with the Director General and reports on the new home for the DELPHI barrel and the CERN firemen's spectacular training programme. There's also a vintage video news clip from 1954. See: www.cern.ch/video or Bulletin web page

  18. A CENTURY OF NEWS DISCOURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Bell

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces the development of news discourse across the 20th century ihrough a case study ofthe coverage of three expeditions to the South Pole: Captain Scott in 1912, Sir Edmund Hillary in 1958, and Peter Hillary in 1999. The way the news about the three expeditions reached New Zealand media serves as a framework and an illustration to examine three related issues: how technology has changed the time and place dimensions of news delivery; the consequent and concomitant shifts in news presentation; and associated changes in how humans have understood time and place. News values remain the same at a broad level across the century, but different in detail. Nationalism is obtrusive, but its focus shifts. In news practice, the deadline and the scoop drive the news in al1 three periods, but the scooping medium shifts from press to radio to television. The lapse between an event and its reporting shrinks exponentially from months to hours to minutes. The design of newspaper front pages changes radically, and news language compresses. There are social impacts, with newsworthy figures receiving closer exposure and the audience being cast in a more voyeuristic role.

  19. A Generic News Crawler and Extractor

    OpenAIRE

    Hamborg, Felix; Meuschke, Norman; Breitinger, Corinna; Gipp, Bela

    2017-01-01

    The amount of news published and read online has increased tremendously in recent years, making news data an interesting resource for many research disciplines, such as the social sciences and linguistics. However, large scale collection of news data is cumbersome due to a lack of generic tools for crawling and extracting such data. We present news-please, a generic, multilanguage, open-source crawler and extractor for news that works out-of-thebox for a large variety of news websites. ...

  20. New Bulletin: Latest News

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The paper version of the CERN Bulletin will be published twice a month with effect from 18 April 2005. The electronic version will be updated weekly. This year will see many changes in the Bulletin, designed to make it more economical, more compact and more attractive.

  1. Climate News Across Media Platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskjær, Mikkel Fugl

    2015-01-01

    In a changing media landscape marked by technological, institutional and cultural convergence, comparative and cross-media content analysis represents a valuable analytical tool in mapping the diverse channels of climate change communication. This paper presents a comparative study of climate...... quantitative and qualitative content analysis the paper documents and explores the extent and character of climate change news across different media platforms. The study aims at contributing to the on-going assessment of how news media are addressing climate change at a time when old and new media...... change news on five different media platforms: newspapers, television, radio, web-news and mobile news. It investigates the themes and actors represented in public climate change communication as well as the diverse possibilities of participating in public debates and information sharing. By combining...

  2. News media old and new

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Kim Christian

    2014-01-01

    This article presents and discusses three different approaches to the exploration of the cross-media challenges facing news audiences, as they seek access to, navigate in and make sense of the multitude of news sources across print, broadcasting, online and mobile media platforms. From a modernized...... uses and gratifications perspective, based on the notion of “worthwhileness” as the determinant of people's everyday selections from the “supermarket of news”, the article first reports from a longitudinal survey study in Denmark in which the author's foundational mapping of cross-media news...... and mobile devices. Secondly, the article summarizes the findings of a qualitative study of citizens' news repertoires, which was fortified with a quantitative factor analysis in order to find patterns in people's news consumption. Thirdly, findings are presented from a 2013 study that explored ubiquitous...

  3. Parasocial Interaction and Local TV News: Perceptions of News Teams and News Personalities in Denver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Craig M.

    To measure Denver viewers' parasocial tendencies (inclinations to establish vicarious relationships) with TV news personalities, a study conducted a telephone survey in the Denver metropolitan area in October and November, 1987. The study examined viewer reactions to four local stations'"news teams" and individual news…

  4. Investigating people’s news diets: how online news users use offline news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, D.; Schoenbach, K.

    2015-01-01

    The question how offline media use is related to online media use has been heavily debated in the last decades. If they are functionally equivalent, then advantages like low costs, rapid publication cycles, and easy access to online news could lead to them displacing offline news. Data from a

  5. Valence-Dependent Belief Updating: Computational Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Kuzmanovic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available People tend to update beliefs about their future outcomes in a valence-dependent way: they are likely to incorporate good news and to neglect bad news. However, belief formation is a complex process which depends not only on motivational factors such as the desire for favorable conclusions, but also on multiple cognitive variables such as prior beliefs, knowledge about personal vulnerabilities and resources, and the size of the probabilities and estimation errors. Thus, we applied computational modeling in order to test for valence-induced biases in updating while formally controlling for relevant cognitive factors. We compared biased and unbiased Bayesian models of belief updating, and specified alternative models based on reinforcement learning. The experiment consisted of 80 trials with 80 different adverse future life events. In each trial, participants estimated the base rate of one of these events and estimated their own risk of experiencing the event before and after being confronted with the actual base rate. Belief updates corresponded to the difference between the two self-risk estimates. Valence-dependent updating was assessed by comparing trials with good news (better-than-expected base rates with trials with bad news (worse-than-expected base rates. After receiving bad relative to good news, participants' updates were smaller and deviated more strongly from rational Bayesian predictions, indicating a valence-induced bias. Model comparison revealed that the biased (i.e., optimistic Bayesian model of belief updating better accounted for data than the unbiased (i.e., rational Bayesian model, confirming that the valence of the new information influenced the amount of updating. Moreover, alternative computational modeling based on reinforcement learning demonstrated higher learning rates for good than for bad news, as well as a moderating role of personal knowledge. Finally, in this specific experimental context, the approach based on

  6. Invasive Species Science Update (No. 8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean Pearson; Yvette Ortega; Jack Butler

    2015-01-01

    Invasive Species Science Updates are designed to keep managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, as well as highlight breaking news related to invasive species issues. The newsletter is produced by the RMRS Invasive Species Working Group (ISWG), which is a core group of scientists who volunteer to coordinate...

  7. Invasive Species Science Update (No. 6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula Fornwalt

    2013-01-01

    The sixth issue of the Rocky Mountain Research Station's (RMRS) Invasive Species Science Update is now complete. Published approximately once per year, this newsletter keeps managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, and covers breaking news related to invasive species issues. The newsletter is produced by...

  8. Invasive Species Science Update (No. 7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean Pearson; Yvette Ortega; Jack Butler

    2014-01-01

    Invasive Species Science Updates are designed to keep managers and other users up-to-date with recently completed and ongoing research by RMRS scientists, as well as highlight breaking news related to invasive species issues. The newsletter is produced by the RMRS Invasive Species Working Group (ISWG), which is a core group of scientists who volunteer to coordinate...

  9. News at Six: Hepatitis C Special

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Thursz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This Bristol Myers Squibb-sponsored symposium was chaired by Mark Thursz, who oversaw a novel news bulletin-themed symposium with sessions provided by a distinguished, international team of roving reporters; Charles Gore from the World Hepatitis Alliance, Jean-Michel Pawlotsky from France, Alessandra Mangia from Italy, Ashley Brown and Graham Foster from London, Heiner Wedemeyer from Germany, and Rafael Esteban from Spain.

  10. News from the Biological Stain Commission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O; Kiernan, J A

    2008-01-01

    of the International Standards Organization (ISO/TC 212) and its working groups, WG 1, WG 2 and WG 3. In this issue of News from the BSC, H.O. Lyon provides information from the annual meeting of ISO/TC 212 that took place June 2-4, 2008 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. In addition, under the heading...... of "Certification," J.A. Kiernan examines the certification procedure for thionine used by the BSC laboratory in Rochester, NY....

  11. News Consumption Across Conventional Mass Media and the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Rusadi, Udi

    2014-01-01

    The development of communication and information technology has provided the audience a new alternative in news consumption, which is not only limited to conventional media e.g. newspaper, television and radio but also includes the internet based media. In order to access the mentioned internet based media, one needs the opportunity and capability to access the internet. The objective of this research is to describe the patterns of the society in terms of consuming news from conventional medi...

  12. Are they multiperspectival?: The news of news agencies

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Suhyeon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this master thesis is to examine the coverage pattern of major international news agencies, Reuters, AP, and AFP with an emphasis on speakers and quotes, especially when they cover political issues in particular countries. This master thesis builds the premise that today’s journalism can be improved in terms of the press performance and one way to pursue this is seeking and trying out various alternatives. The research picks one alternative, multiperspectival news among others in o...

  13. Young Adolescents' Intentional Use of Science News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Ying; Chang, Wen-Hua; Chen, Sufen; Chang, Huey-Por

    2014-01-01

    Profiling adolescent students' intentional use of science news reports can inform science news-infused instruction. This study reports on the development and validation of a Views of Science News Instruction Questionnaire (VSNIQ) designed to explore Grade 7 (12-13 years old) students' views of reasoning with respect to science news. Forty items…

  14. 7 CFR 28.904 - Market news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Market news. 28.904 Section 28.904 Agriculture..., TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Classification and Market News Service for Producers Classification and Market News Services § 28.904 Market news. The Director shall cause to be distributed to producers of...

  15. Diverse artikelen in Gay Amsterdam News

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekma, G.

    2002-01-01

    Vernedering, in: Gay Amsterdam News 125 (jan 2002), pp. 20-21; Webseks, zaad, zweetseks, in: Gay Amsterdam News 126 (feb 2002), pp. 30-31; Wurgseks, in: Gay Amsterdam News 127 (mrt 2002), pp. 30-31; Wijnandus Johannes Sengers (1927-2002), in: Gay Amsterdam News 133 (sept 2002), pp. 49.

  16. Creative Cycling of News Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Gynnild, PhD.

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The theory of creative cycling emerged from my PhD study of news professionals in Norway. The study was carried out according to classic grounded theory principles (Glaser and Strauss 1967, Glaser 1978, 1998, 2001, 2005, and the area of interest was the performance of news journalism in the multimedia age. The theory runs counter to widespread tendencies of industrial age thinking in news media. It emphasizes news professionals’ search for meaning in their daily work, and suggests that their main concern is self-fulfillment through original contribution. The dilemma and resolution, creative cycling, is a basic social process continuously going within inner and outer framings. It consists of three interrelated dimensions: productive processing, breaks and shifts and inspirational looping.

  17. RHYTHM STRUCTURE IN NEWS READING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Mas Manchón

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhythm is central to news reading in radio and television programs. This paper proposes a three level structure for rhythm in news discourse. It gives a comprehensive definition of rhythm and types of rhythm. Firstly, the Base Rhythm Structure consists of semantic and pragmatic rhythmic accents, coincident with very specific words. Secondly, these accents are grouped together according to type, frequency and order, thereby configuring three types of “rhythmic units” (the Internal Rhythm Structure: starting, main and end units. A last structure level presents four discursive factors that are very important in integrating the overall time structure of news announcing (the Melodic Rhythm Structure. This integral structure for news announcing rhythm should be further tested in acoustic-experimental studies under the criterion of information transmission efficacy.

  18. Rhythm structure in news reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Mas Manchón

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhythm is central to news reading in radio and television programs. This paper proposes a three level structure for rhythm in news discourse. It gives a comprehensive definition of rhythm and types of rhythm. Firstly, the Base Rhythm Structure consists of semantic and pragmatic rhythmic accents, coincident with very specific words. Secondly, these accents are grouped together according to type, frequency and order, thereby configuring three types of “rhythmic units” (the Internal Rhythm Structure: starting, main and end units. A last structure level presents four discursive factors that are very important in integrating the overall time structure of news announcing (the Melodic Rhythm Structure. This integral structure for news announcing rhythm should be further tested in acoustic-experimental studies under the criterion of information transmission efficacy.

  19. Quantifying the relationship between financial news and the stock market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanyali, Merve; Moat, Helen Susannah; Preis, Tobias

    2013-12-20

    The complex behavior of financial markets emerges from decisions made by many traders. Here, we exploit a large corpus of daily print issues of the Financial Times from 2(nd) January 2007 until 31(st) December 2012 to quantify the relationship between decisions taken in financial markets and developments in financial news. We find a positive correlation between the daily number of mentions of a company in the Financial Times and the daily transaction volume of a company's stock both on the day before the news is released, and on the same day as the news is released. Our results provide quantitative support for the suggestion that movements in financial markets and movements in financial news are intrinsically interlinked.

  20. Subprime Loans and Fake News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella

    2017-01-01

    Could the market fundamentalism that ruled the pre-crisis financial markets of the 2000s hold lessons for how we should approach the unregulated information and news market in the digital age?......Could the market fundamentalism that ruled the pre-crisis financial markets of the 2000s hold lessons for how we should approach the unregulated information and news market in the digital age?...

  1. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    News from Journal House Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Many readers are trying to modify the way they teach and in so doing are trying to write new types of questions and problems. The Journal has a new online resource, the JCE Internet Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Web site, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEWWW/Resources/CQandChP/index.html . The site is a source of questions and problems that can be used in teaching and assessing conceptual understanding and problem solving in chemistry. Here you can find a library of free-response and multiple-choice conceptual questions and challenge problems, tips for writing these questions and problems, and a discussion of types of concept questions. This site is intended to be a means of sharing conceptual questions and challenge problems among chemical educators. It will be as inclusive as possible, and to achieve this readers need to share their questions and alert the authors to references or Web sites. The screen captures shown below should provide a feeling for what you will find when you visit the site. The authors, William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, welcome additions to the library of conceptual questions or other comments or suggestions. Contact them by email, fax, or regular mail. William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393. Bill: phone: 765/494-5453; fax: 765/494-0239; email: wrrobin@purdue.edu. Sue: phone: 765/494-0823; fax: 765/494-0239; email: nurrenbe@purdue.edu. fax: 765/494-0239. 1998 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Research Council has announced the recipients of the 1998 fellowships for minority scholars. Three categories of fellowships were awarded: 50 to beginning graduate students, 33 to students writing their dissertations, and 28 to recent Ph.D. recipients. There were about 1,000 applicants. For information about the next competition contact the Fellowship Office of the National

  2. [Influence of the news media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarena Luna, R

    1991-01-01

    Newspapers, in addition to news, also cover topics of permanent interest to their readers. One such topic is sexuality. The appearance of the incurable sexually transmitted disease AIDS obliges a reconsideration of the complex and contradictory concept of sexuality. Sexuality is not often spoken of openly; rather, it is secret, hidden, and referred to obliquely. Sexuality is the manifestation and satisfaction of the sexual impulses common to all individuals. Sexuality is determined by anatomic and physiologic aspects and also by the knowledge, experiences, values, and norms internalized by the individual living in a social group. Messages about sexual conduct are constantly being received. This social part of sexuality supported by customs and morals is the part that is directly influenced by communications media. An important objective of the media is to create awareness and mold opinions. Mexico's large national circulation newspapers present different points of view about sexuality. Newspapers that continually critique homosexual practices and those that demonstrate implicit approval of pornographic videos by advertising them both present attitudes without providing opportunities to reason, compare, or support opinions. Sexuality is usually referred to indirectly and superficially in the press. Sex education may be mentioned but not the erotic implications of sexuality, and acceptance or opposition to use of condoms may be discussed without mention of psychological barriers to their use. The national press is not prepared to propose new attitudes toward sexuality in the age of AIDS. Only 1 national newspaper in Mexico regularly provides information on AIDS including aspects related to sexual pleasure and responsibility and safer sex. The majority continue with their pre-AIDS coverage of sexuality, using it to arouse interest but providing little depth. Newspapers should provide more extensive coverage on sexuality and its modifications due to AIDS, a reality

  3. Can Self-Censorship in News Media be Detected Algorithmically? A Case Study in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Rongrong; Zhou, Baojian; Chen, Feng; Liu, Naifeng; Mares, David; Butler, Patrick; Ramakrishnan, Naren

    2016-01-01

    Censorship in social media has been well studied and provides insight into how governments stifle freedom of expression online. Comparatively less (or no) attention has been paid to detecting (self) censorship in traditional media (e.g., news) using social media as a bellweather. We present a novel unsupervised approach that views social media as a sensor to detect censorship in news media wherein statistically significant differences between information published in the news media and the co...

  4. USDA Gin Lab Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation provides an update to ginning industry stakeholders on current research efforts ongoing at the three USDA ARS ginning laboratories in Lubbock, TX, Stoneville, MS, and Mesilla Park, NM....

  5. News on pediatric urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Masnata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric urology is a pediatric speciality dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of congenital and acquired genitourinary tract diseases. It is a speciality that is rapidly changing, thanks to the technological development that has been emerging in recent years. There have been important diagnostic and therapeutic news.Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract (CAKUT include various entities of structural malformations that result from defects in their morphogenesis. Clinical research and genetic studies on the origins of CAKUT are quickly evolving, with significant growth of high-quality research.Management goals of CAKUT include prevention of febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs in newborns and toddles and renal injury, while minimizing the morbidity of treatment and follow-up. Treatment options include observation with or without continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP and surgical correction. Now, randomized controlled studies show that children with normal urinary tracts or low-grade vesicoureteral reflux (VUR do not benefit from prophylaxis.All children with known mechanical or functional obstructions of the urinary tract are considered to have UTI. Functional obstruction often results from lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD of either neurogenic or non-neurogenic origin and dilating VUR.The role of bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD in children with UTI and the long-term risk of renal scarring have shed new light on treatment strategies. Often it is BBD, rather than reflux, that causes UTI in children older than 2 years.Pediatric urology has evolved in recent years, with a greater focus on bladder and renal function, minimally invasive treatment, evidence-based interventions, and guideline adherence. Other topics in pediatric urology include urinary incontinence in children with special needs and the use of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS in children, with advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery

  6. Language Guardian BBC? Investigating the BBC's Language Advice in Its 2003 "News Styleguide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the BBC's stance on English language use is investigated by analysing its language guidelines provided in the 2003 BBC "News Styleguide." Before the analysis is tackled, a brief discussion of the use of language and style guides in the media is given to illustrate its complexities and effects on news providers. In order to…

  7. Bias in Cable News: Persuasion and Polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Gregory J; Ali Yurukoglu

    2014-01-01

    We measure the persuasive effects of slanted news and tastes for like-minded news, exploiting cable channel positions as exogenous shifters of cable news viewership. Channel positions do not correlate with demographics that predict viewership and voting, nor with local satellite viewership. We estimate that Fox News increases Republican vote shares by 0.3 points among viewers induced into watching 2.5 additional minutes per week by variation in position. We then estimate a model of voters who...

  8. Implementation of news module for news client based on ApiCloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Xin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of new media technology, news client has become the main battlefield of news browsing. Based on the ApiCloud hybrid development platform, this paper uses HTML, JavaScript and other technologies to develop the mobile client news module, and uses WAMP integrated development environment to build a news publishing system on the server side.

  9. Arousing news characteristics in Dutch television news 1990-2004: an exploration of competitive strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks Vettehen, P.; Beentjes, J.; Nuijten, K.; Peeters, A.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the processes by which competition in the television news market might promote the presence of arousing characteristics in television news. A total of 3,024 news stories from six Dutch television news programs over the period 1990 to 2004 were investigated through content

  10. News from the biological stain commission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiernan, J.A.; Lyon, Hans Oluf

    2008-01-01

    of the International Standards Organization (ISO/TC 212) and its working groups, WG 1, WG 2 and WG 3. In this issue of News from the BSC, H.O. Lyon provides information from the annual meeting of ISO/TC 212 that took place June 2-4, 2008 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. In addition, under the heading...... of "Certification," J.A. Kiernan examines the certification procedure for thionine used by the BSC laboratory in Rochester, NY Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12...

  11. Exploiting Tri-Relationship for Fake News Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Kai; Wang, Suhang; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Social media for news consumption is becoming popular nowadays. The low cost, easy access and rapid information dissemination of social media bring benefits for people to seek out news timely. However, it also causes the widespread of fake news, i.e., low-quality news pieces that are intentionally fabricated. The fake news brings about several negative effects on individual consumers, news ecosystem, and even society trust. Previous fake news detection methods mainly focus on news contents fo...

  12. Vulture News: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · Journal Quality.

  13. How to Tell Bad News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Therapists, physicians, police officers, and emergency staff often are the messengers of bad news. They have to tell a patient, a parent, or a loved one about a death, an accident, a school shooting, a life-threatening diagnosis, a terrorist attack, or a suicide. Usually the messenger bears a heavy responsibility but has little training and seeks…

  14. Myth, Method and International News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lule, Jack

    Defining myth as a cultural narrative in symbolic form that articulates a world view and offers consensus with that view, this paper uses a brief "New York Times" report on the Soviet shooting down of South Korean airline flight 007 as the basis for comparison of international news and myth. Following a review of the literature on myth…

  15. School Violence and the News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... schools safer is greater awareness of problems like bullying and discrimination. Many schools now have programs to fight these problems, and teachers and administrators know more about protecting students from violence. Tips for Parents Know where your kids get news and information, ...

  16. Zimbabwe Science News: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Zimbabwe Scientific Association was founded in Bulawayo in 1899 to promote the study and advancement of science in Zimbabwe and to facilitate the acquisition and dissemination of scientific knowledge. The Zimbabwe Science News was first published in 1967 and is now in its thirty-third volume.

  17. The Dutch and the news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annemarie Wennekers; Jos de Haan

    2017-01-01

    Original title: Nederlanders en nieuws For a long time, the television and newspapers were the most prominent news sources in the Netherlands, but digitalisation and the rise of new media have caused major shifts in the media landscape. Based on a time use survey focusing on media (Media:Tijd

  18. news interview talk: Organisational properties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    practitioners in the domain of English for Specific Purposes (ESP) to generate communicative and meta-communicative .... Adopting a discourse-based approach places this research article in the realm of qualitative research (cf. ..... design language activities for South African business-news interviewer trainees. Adopting ...

  19. Product Differentiation in Local Television News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, Tony

    A study was conducted to investigate the extent to which local television stations exhibited diversity in newscast content within three midwest broadcast markets. A second objective was to describe the nature of the news content characteristic of local news stories that were broadcast by only one station within a market (or unique news stories). A…

  20. Wordplay in English Online News Headlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsefi, Roya; Mahadi, Tengku Sepora Tengku

    2016-01-01

    Within the endless stream of information available on the news media market, news headline language is characterised by several linguistic, pragmatic, rhetorical and functional features that distinguish it from other varieties of language that are not specialised. In the present study, the rhetorical features of English news headlines, through…

  1. Semantic Analysis of FBI News Reports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present our work on semantic analysis of FBI News reports. In the paper we have considered the News which are of the immense significance for the analyst who want to analyze the News of specific area. With this definite analysis we are able to extract critical events or concepts...

  2. Daily Market News Sentiment and Stock Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); M.J. McAleer (Michael); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years there has been a tremendous growth in the influx of news related to traded assets in international financial markets. This financial news is now available via print media but also through real-time online sources such as internet news and social media sources. The

  3. The Places and Spaces of News Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    on-demand. Day-by-day, month-by-month, year-by-year, technology moves forward, impacting more than just the ways in which we get news. These fundamental shifts change what news ‘is’. This book expands our understanding of contemporary news audiences and explores how the different places and spaces...

  4. How to Break Bad News: Physicians’ and Nurses’ Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali-Akbar Nejatisafa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: Bad news disclosure is one of the most complex tasks of physicians. Recent evidences indicate that patients' and physicians' attitude toward breaking bad news has been changed since few years ago. The evidence of breaking bad news is different across cultures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the attitude of medical staff toward breaking bad news to provide a clinical guideline in Iran."nMethods: A descriptive study was conducted during 2008-2009 on a sample of 100 medical staff (50 physicians and 50 nurses at Cancer Institute of Imam Khomeini hospital. The subjects' demographic characteristics and their attitudes toward the manner of revealing the diagnosis were registered in a questionnaire."nResults: The majority of the physicians (86%, n=43 and nurses (74%, n=37 , mostly the older and more experienced, tended to reveal the diagnosis to patients . Only a few physicians (8%, n=4 had been trained how to disclose bad news, which discloused diagnosis more than non trained ones."nPhysicians and nurses preferred to inform the patients about the diagnosis when either the patients were alone or in the presence of their spouse respectively .Only a few physicians (14% and nurses (24% agreed to explain life expectancy to patients."nConclusion: Compared to past, physicians and nurses are more willing to share cancer diagnosis with patients. However, lack of adequate communication skills in caregivers, and their concerns about managing patients' emotional reactions reduce their tendency to disclose bad news to the patients. Therefore, training physicians and nurses to expose bad news to the patients seems to be necessary.

  5. Reducing patients' anxiety and uncertainty, and improving recall in bad news consultations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osch, M. van; Sep, M.; Vliet, L.M. van; Dulmen, S. van; Bensing, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients' recall of provided information during bad news consultations is poor. According to the attentional narrowing hypothesis, the emotional arousal caused by the bad news might be responsible for this hampered information processing. Because affective communication has proven to be

  6. Reducing patients’ anxiety and uncertainty, and improving recall in bad news consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osch, M. van; Sep, M.; Vliet, L.M. van; Dulmen, S. van; Bensing, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Patients’ recall of provided information during bad news consultations is poor. According to the attentional narrowing hypothesis, the emotional arousal caused by the bad news might be responsible for this hampered information processing. Because affective communication has proven to be

  7. Of sports and politics: Predicting category-specific retention of news events from demographic variables.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeter, M.; Ochtman, D.J.C.; Janssen, S.M.J.; Murre, J.M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Many tests of retrograde amnesia consist of questions on news events. It is therefore important to know how such questions are answered by normal adults. We analysed the retention of news events in a sample of 12,913 participants, who provided basic demographic information and subsequently answered

  8. Of sports and politics: Predicting category-specific retention of news events from demographic variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeter, M.; Ochtman, D.J.C.; Janssen, S.M.J.; Murre, J.M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Many tests of retrograde amnesia consist of questions on news events. It is therefore important to know how such questions are answered by normal adults. We analysed the retention of news events in a sample of 12,913 participants, who provided basic demographic information and subsequently answered

  9. Machine News and Volatility: The Dow Jones Industrial Average and the TRNA Sentiment Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This paper features an analysis of the relationship between the volatility of the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) Index and a sentiment news series using daily data obtained from the Thomson Reuters News Analytics (TRNA) provided by SIRCA (The Securities Industry

  10. Still "Live at the Scene": An Exploration of Timely Television News Broadcasts Repurposed as Online Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Jennifer Marie

    2012-01-01

    Technology has afforded journalists a myriad of new opportunities to promote and publish content online. This project provides an overview of many of the new practices that have become standard operating procedures for digital media news creation and examines how the heavy imprint of traditional media news values are not contextualized within the…

  11. CLEF NewsREEL 2017 Overview : Offline and Online Evaluation of Stream-based News Recommender Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kille, Benjamin; Lommatzsch, Andreas; Hopfgartner, Frank; Larson, M.A.; Brodt, Torben; Cappellato, Linda; Ferro, Nicola; Goeuriot, Lorraine; Mandl, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The CLEF NewsREEL challenge allows researchers to evaluate news recommendation algorithms both online (NewsREEL Live) and offline (News-REEL Replay). Compared with the previous year NewsREEL challenged participants with a higher volume of messages and new news portals. In the 2017 edition of the

  12. Competing Discourses about Youth Sexual Exploitation in Canadian News Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saewyc, Elizabeth M; Miller, Bonnie B; Rivers, Robert; Matthews, Jennifer; Hilario, Carla; Hirakata, Pam

    2013-10-01

    Media holds the power to create, maintain, or break down stigmatizing attitudes, which affect policies, funding, and services. To understand how Canadian news media depicts the commercial sexual exploitation of children and youth, we examined 835 Canadian newspaper articles from 1989-2008 using a mixed methods critical discourse analysis approach, comparing representations to existing research about sexually exploited youth. Despite research evidence that equal rates of boys and girls experience exploitation, Canadian news media depicted exploited youth predominantly as heterosexual girls, and described them alternately as victims or workers in a trade, often both in the same story. News media mentioned exploiters far less often than victims, and portrayed them almost exclusively as male, most often called 'customers' or 'consumers,' and occasionally 'predators'; in contrast, research has documented the majority of sexually exploited boys report female exploiters. Few news stories over the past two decades portrayed the diversity of victims, perpetrators, and venues of exploitation reported in research. The focus on victims but not exploiters helps perpetuate stereotypes of sexual exploitation as business or a 'victimless crime,' maintains the status quo, and blurs responsibility for protecting youth under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Health care providers and researchers can be advocates for accuracy in media coverage about sexual exploitation; news reporters and editors should focus on exploiters more than victims, draw on existing research evidence to avoid perpetuating stereotypes, and use accurate terms, such as commercial sexual exploitation, rather than terms related to business or trade.

  13. Types of Journalistic News Selection or Media Tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVIA BRANEA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to answer to the following question: How do the TV news and the online media platforms reflect reality from Romania and from outside of Romania? The subjective response to this question will be given based on an audiovisual and online monitoring conducted in the week 2-8 May 2011. The main core of our analysis consists of data obtained through monitoring of programs at four local Romanian TV stations (TVR 2, B1TV, Realitatea TV and Antena 3 for one week at the beginning of May, 2011. We also used information provided by two news websites: hotnews.ro and realitatea.ro.The research starts from two assumptions: 1. The news presented by all four TV networks will focus on events in the proximity, on the one hand and on human interest, on the other hand. 2. Online news websites will be more interested in political and social news, both in the region and in more distant areas. From the methodological point of view, the analysis of documents (the audiovisual tracks and the online ones is based on the communicational approach and on hermeneutic analysis.

  14. TYPES OF JOURNALISTIC NEWS SELECTION OR MEDIA TRACKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVIA BRANEA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to answer to the following question: How do the TV news and the online media platforms reflect reality from Romania and from outside of Romania? The subjective response to this question will be given based on an audiovisual and online monitoring conducted in the week 2−8 May 2011. The main core of our analysis consists of data obtained through monitoring of programs at four local Romanian TV stations (TVR 2, B1TV, Realitatea TV and Antena 3 for one week at the beginning of May, 2011. We also used information provided by two news websites: hotnews.ro and realitatea.ro. The research starts from two assumptions: 1. The news presented by all four TV networks will focus on events in the proximity, on the one hand and on human interest, on the other hand. 2. Online news websites will be more interested in political and social news, both in the region and in more distant areas. From the methodological point of view, the analysis of documents (the audiovisual tracks and the online ones is based on the communicational approach and on hermeneutic analysis

  15. The effects of colour and valence on news evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Kai; Grümmer, Melanie; Kießler, Antje; Neuß, Celina; Schröter, Franziska

    2017-12-01

    Research across different fields of psychology has reported effects of colour cues on a variety of cognitive processes. Especially, the colour red has been shown to have striking influences. In the context of media reception, however, colour effects have been widely neglected so far. This study made a first step in this direction by investigating the effects of the colour red (compared with blue and grey) on the way news articles are evaluated. Two types of news were framed by a coloured border while the valence of the news content additionally varied. Based on 369 participants who read and evaluated the news articles online, we observed effects for colour cues and news valence in the absence of an interaction effect, indicating that the colour red induced approach motivation. However, only the contrast between red and grey reached statistical significance, indicating that chromatic and achromatic colours may differ in their perceived visual saliency. Overall, these results provide an important complement to previous studies and have practical implications for media researchers and producers. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  16. Exploring Digital News Publishing Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindskow, Kasper

    . In order to do so, a theoretical model is developed that is suited for the analysis of the strategic design of business models, including the production networks that support them, in the sectors of the economy that are affected by networked informatization in general and in digital news publishing...... of the traditional business models poses an existential threat to news publishing and has given rise to a continuing struggle among news publishers to design digital business models that will be sustainable in the future. This dissertation argues that a central and underresearched aspect of digital news publishing...... business models concerns the production networks that support the co-production of digital news offerings. To fill this knowledge gap, this dissertation explores the strategic design of the digital news publishing production networks that are associated with HTML-based news offerings on the open Web...

  17. Navigating cross-media news use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swart, Joëlle; Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    The current news media landscape is characterized by an abundance of digital outlets and increased opportunities for users to navigate news themselves. Yet, it is still unclear how people negotiate this fluctuating environment to decide which news media to select or ignore, how they assemble...... distinctive cross-media repertoires, and what makes these compositions meaningful. This article analyzes the value of different platforms, genres and practices in everyday life by mapping patterns of cross-media news use. Combining Q methodology with think-aloud protocols and day-in-the-life-interviews, five...... distinct news media repertoires are identified: 1) regionally-oriented 2) background-oriented 3) digital 4) laid-back and 5) nationally-oriented news use. Our findings indicate that users do not always use what they prefer, nor do they prefer what they use. Moreover, the boundaries they draw between news...

  18. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    1998 ACS Meeting in Boston he suffered a serious fall following a stroke, from which he never recovered. One of his last photographs, taken the previous day at a Journal luncheon, appears on page 1360 of the November 1998 issue. His commentary on his long career in chemistry and education appears on page 1520 of the December 1998 issue. Seaborg was a Nobel laureate, discoverer of elements, scientific advisor to presidents, former chancellor of the University of California, former chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, chairman of the steering committee of the CHEM Study project, founder of Lawrence Hall of Science, , the list goes on and on. He was at the same time a passionate supporter of education. Seaborg published fourteen articles in the Journal between 1951 and 1998. He was interviewed in 1975 by David Ridgway as part of the Impact series (JCE 1975, 52, 70), and that interview is highly recommended reading (see supplement to this article). He received the 1994 ACS George C. Pimentel Award in Chemical Education; his award address was published in the ACS Division of Chemical Education's CHED Newsletter, Fall 1995. Memorial articles with details of his life and his scientific contributions have appeared in The New York Times (Saturday, February 27, 1999, page 1) and Chemical & Engineering News (March 8, 1999, page 29). But there is also the spirit of the man, what he believed in, what he tried to do, what he hoped he had accomplished. A sense of that can be gained from the excerpts that are reprinted below, taken first from the Impact interview and then from the award address. Ridgway: On reflection, now, out of your many contributions to chemistry, is there one that you feel has had more of an impact than others? Seaborg: The discovery of plutonium would answer that question. The impact there is probably nearly as great as any single chemical discovery. Ridgway: What was the state of the "art" in your field when you first decided to bend your energies in this

  19. News from CHIS

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    New contract between CERN and UNIQA Following a competitive call for tender, the consortium UNIQA Switzerland and UNIQA Austria has been awarded the contract for providing third-party administrative services for CERN’s Health Insurance Scheme. The contract will enter into force on 1 January 2015 for an initial period of five years, renewable by CERN for a further period of five years. This means that the Third-Party Administrator of the CHIS remains the same as before. While the services remain essentially the same, certain improvements are foreseen under this new contract.  Some of these will impact the members directly and positively, while others will improve the supervision of the Scheme by CERN’s administration. More details will be provided in the next CHIS Bulletin. Approved Hospitals in Geneva: new in 2014 In 2014, CERN has concluded new agreements with the following care providers in Geneva: ·     &a...

  20. Website updates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Updates to Website: (Please add new items at the top of this description with the date of the website change) May 9, 2012: Uploaded experimental data in matlab...

  1. Circular Updates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Circular Updates are periodic sequentially numbered instructions to debriefing staff and observers informing them of changes or additions to scientific and specimen...

  2. Cybersecurity Update

    CERN Document Server

    Heagerty, Denise

    2008-01-01

    An update on recent security issues and vulnerabilities affecting Windows, Linux and Mac platforms. This talk is based on contributions and input from a range of colleagues both within and outside CERN. It covers clients, servers and control systems.

  3. Agency and civic involvement in news production via Facebook commentary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eberholst, Mads Kæmsgaard; Hartley, Jannie Møller

    over influencing news making and in turn increases civic agency. Employing a content analy-sis of readers’ comments the study examines whether the commenters assume any of the core journalistic functions regarding news production, in terms of setting the agen-da, providing original information......Social media services such as Facebook, Twitter and Youtube, where users create and share content, has become a large part of most peoples everyday digital life and equally media companies has realised that these services plays a great role in peoples news con-sumption pattern. On these services...... users can contribute to the publication process, in theory broadening the diversity of public debate. This paper explores user involvement on the Facebook pages of Danish mainstream online newspapers in November 2012 and investigate the hypothesises that user interactivity gives audiences greater power...

  4. News from the Biological Stain Commission No. 11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O; Horobin, R W

    2012-01-01

    of Regulatory Affairs, the Biological Stain Commission's International Affairs Committee presents information from the opening session of the meeting of the International Standards Organization ISO/TC 212 Clinical laboratory testing and in vitro diagnostic test systems held on 2-4 June 2010 in Seoul, Republic......The 11th issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) provides our first impressions of the REACH and ECHA programs. We intend to give a more thorough account of what these important programs actually mean in later editions of News from the Biological Stain Commission. Under the heading...

  5. News and Trading Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    indexes or small groups of forex series. Although I use a shorter time period – five years for the work on technical analysis and machine learning, only...products. (“Indus International to Provide Transocean Sedco Forex With Robust Enterprise Asset Management Solution”, IINT, 3/7/2001) – Industry Group

  6. Golden News Nuggets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article provides snapshots of recent events and programs at colleges and universities in the state of California: (1) A graduate student in kinesiology at California State University, Chico, is talking the talk and walking the walk to promote physical fitness; (2) First-generation Latino students enrolled in nutrition science and health…

  7. Misunderstanding International News in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Wainberg

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the nature of the Brazilian public comprehension of international news by revealing the quality of such reception with regard to a sample of 170 subjects randomly selected in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. A questionnaire was created taking as a basis the directives of Bloom et al(1972. Evaluated in it are the cognitive and aff ective dimensions of thought. In the fi rst case, questions were formulated that allowed the establishment of the level of knowledge of individuals, as well as their comprehension abilities, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of a wide range of international news topics. For the aff ective dimension the following abilities were evaluated: attention, response, valorization, organization and the structuring of a value scale.

  8. Asia Research News features IDRC-funded projects | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    18 juin 2014 ... From combating chronic malnutrition to improving health care for women, exploring the causes of violence in cities, or understanding the needs of small and medium enterprises, the 2014 edition of Asia Research News provides a snapshot of IDRC-funded research in Asia.

  9. News from the Biological Stain Commission No. 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O; Dapson, R W

    2009-01-01

    In this fifth issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC), under the heading of Regulatory Affairs, the BSC's International Affairs Committee provides more information from the meeting of the International Standards Organization ISO/TC 212 Committee that took place on June 2-4, 2008 ...

  10. Asia Research News features IDRC-funded projects | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-06-18

    Jun 18, 2014 ... From combating chronic malnutrition to improving health care for women, exploring the causes of violence in cities, or understanding the needs of small and medium enterprises, the 2014 edition of Asia Research News provides a snapshot of IDRC-funded research in Asia.

  11. Asia Research News 2015 features IDRC-funded projects | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    From adapting to climate change in the Himalayas to improving maternal health care for women in Vietnam, exploring how to defuse violence in Pakistani cities, or building new skills for better jobs in Bangladesh, the 2015 edition of Asia Research News provides a snapshot of IDRC-funded research in Asia.

  12. NEWS for Africa: adaptation and reliability of a built environment ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Adewale L. Oyeyemi

    International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the ..... of the NEWS-Africa items and computed scales, intraclass correlation coefficients. (ICCs) were computed using SPSS Version 21.

  13. ASC Weekly News Notes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Womble, David E.

    2016-05-01

    Unified collision operator demonstrated for both radiation transport and PIC-DSMC. A side-by-side comparison between the DSMC method and the radiation transport method was conducted for photon attenuation in the atmosphere over 2 kilometers in physical distance with a reduction of photon density of six orders of magnitude. Both DSMC and traditional radiation transport agreed with theory to two digits. This indicates that PIC-DSMC operators can be unified with the radiation transport collision operators into a single code base and that physics kernels can remain unique to the actual collision pairs. This simulation example provides an initial validation of the unified collision theory approach that will later be implemented into EMPIRE.

  14. For Video Games, Bad News Is Good News: News Reporting of Violent Video Game Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, Allen; Mitrofan, Oana; Ferguson, Christopher J

    2017-12-01

    News coverage of video game violence studies has been critiqued for focusing mainly on studies supporting negative effects and failing to report studies that did not find evidence for such effects. These concerns were tested in a sample of 68 published studies using child and adolescent samples. Contrary to our hypotheses, study effect size was not a predictor of either newspaper coverage or publication in journals with a high-impact factor. However, a relationship between poorer study quality and newspaper coverage approached significance. High-impact journals were not found to publish studies with higher quality. Poorer quality studies, which tended to highlight negative findings, also received more citations in scholarly sources. Our findings suggest that negative effects of violent video games exposure in children and adolescents, rather than large effect size or high methodological quality, increase the likelihood of a study being cited in other academic publications and subsequently receiving news media coverage.

  15. Software and Computing News

    CERN Multimedia

    Barberis, D

    The last several months have been very busy ones for the ATLAS software developers. They've been trying to cope with the competing demands of multiple software stress tests and testbeds. These include Data Challenge Two (DC2), the Combined Testbeam (CTB), preparations for the Physics Workshop to be held in Rome in June 2005, and other testbeds, primarily one for the High-Level Trigger. Data Challenge 2 (DC2) The primary goal of this was to validate the computing model and to provide a test of simulating a day's worth of ATLAS data (10 million events) and of fully processing it and making it available to the physicists within 10 days (i.e. a 10% scale test). DC2 consists of three parts - the generation, simulation, and mixing of a representative sample of physics events with background events; the reconstruction of the mixed samples with initial classification into the different physics signatures; and the distribution of the data to multiple remote sites (Tier-1 centers) for analysis by physicists. Figu...

  16. High quality topic extraction from business news explains abnormal financial market volatility

    CERN Document Server

    Hisano, Ryohei; Mizuno, Takayuki; Ohnishi, Takaaki; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationships between information flows and social activity in society today is one of the cornerstones of the social sciences. In financial economics, the key issue in this regard is understanding and quantifying how news of all possible types (geopolitical, environmental, social, financial, economic, etc.) affect trading and the pricing of firms in organized stock markets. In this paper we seek to address this issue by performing an analysis of more than 24 million news records provided by Thompson Reuters and of their relationship with trading activity for 205 major stocks in the S&P US stock index. We show that the whole landscape of news that affect stock price movements can be automatically summarized via simple regularized regressions between trading activity and news information pieces decomposed, with the help of simple topic modeling techniques, into their "thematic" features. Using these methods, we are able to estimate and quantify the impacts of news on trading. We in...

  17. ['Walkability' and physical activity - results of empirical studies based on the 'Neighbourhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS)'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottmann, M; Mielck, A

    2014-02-01

    'Walkability' is mainly assessed by the NEWS questionnaire (Neighbourhood Environment Walkability Scale); in Germany this questionnaire is widely unknown. We now try to fill this gap by providing a systematic overview of empirical studies based on the NEWS. A systematic review was conducted concerning original papers including empirical analyses based on the NEWS. The results are summarised and presented in tables. Altogether 31 publications could be identified. Most of them focus on associations with the variable 'physical activity', and they often report significant associations with at least some of the scales included in the NEWS. Due to methodological differences between the studies it is difficult to compare the results. The concept of 'walkability' should also be established in the German public health discussion. A number of methodological challenges remain to be solved, such as the identification of those scales and items in the NEWS that show the strongest associations with individual health behaviours. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Framework for Urdu News Headlines Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashif AHMED

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Automatic text classification has great significance in the field of text mining and plays a pivotal role in areas such as spam filtering, news classification, noise reduction etc. It is evident from the literature that there is ample of research conducted for classifying text documents e.g. English news classification, Persian text classification etc. but there is no copious amount of work related to short Urdu text or Urdu news headlines classification. Therefore, after examining various existing news classification methodologies we propose an SVM based framework in this paper for classification of Urdu news headlines. This approach classifies Urdu news based on headlines in their respective pre-defined categories by utilizing their feature vector’s maximum indexes. This proposed system is compared with existing state-of-the art techniques.

  19. Implicit Operational Definitions of Economic News Literacy in the Printed News Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSickle, Ronald L.

    1981-01-01

    Describes study which focused on the economic vocabulary used in national and international news magazines and papers. Compares findings with definitions of economic literacy proposed by economists and suggests that economics courses include economic news literacy. (KC)

  20. News with an attitude: assessing the mechanisms underlying the effects of opinionated news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boukes, M.; Boomgaarden, H.G.; Moorman, M.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2014-01-01

    Opinionated news targets communities of likeminded viewers, relies on dramaturgical storytelling techniques, and shares characteristics with political satire. Accordingly, opinionated news should be understood as a specific form of political entertainment. We have investigated the mechanisms

  1. NEWS: TRUMP resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinbank, Elizabeth

    2000-05-01

    Support for astronomy in A-level physics aslogo Help is at hand for teachers and students choosing astronomy as part of A-level physics. The Teaching Resources Unit for Modern Physics (TRUMP) has produced a resource package covering all the astronomical options in the Edexcel, OCR and AQA (NEAB) syllabuses. The forerunner to TRUMP was the project that produced the highly successful Particle Physics Pack, sponsored by the Institute of Physics, which was instrumental in introducing particle physics into A-level syllabuses. The TRUMP Astrophysics Resource Package fills a gap between the colourful stimulus of popular materials on the one hand, and professional texts on the other. But this is not just another A-level textbook; the six-part resource pack has a similar structure and purpose to the Particle Physics Pack. It provides over 400 pages of comprehensive information for teachers, building on their existing subject knowledge and bringing them up to date as well as giving suggestions for teaching and notes on syllabus coverage. The package includes nearly 40 photocopiable sheets for students. The emphasis is on the physics that underpins the astronomy. There are details of student activities requiring no specialist equipment beyond that normally found in A-level labs, exercises using authentic data, and plenty of questions (all with worked solutions). The development of the TRUMP Astrophysics Package was funded by the Nuffield Foundation, the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, the Institute of Physics and York University. The package is available by mail order, price £48 (inc. UK p&p) from the TRUMP Project, Science Education Group, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD. Some parts may be purchased separately; for details contact the project's director, Elizabeth Swinbank (tel: 01904 434537, fax: 01904 434078, e-mail: es14@york.ac.uk) or consult the web page www.york.ac.uk/org/seg/trump. The BaBar experiment balogo In the spring of 1999

  2. World news; Actualite international

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2005-06-01

    The 21. of April 2005, was held in Paris the 6. international petroleum meeting whose main theme was: the supply and demand. The participants of this summit have in majority argued for a greater opening of the productive countries to the international investments which are indispensable to face with a world demand of oil in full expansion. Total has announced the approval by the British authorities of the development of the gas and condensates deposit of north Forvie, located at about 440 km at the nord-east of Aberdeen. Technip and Kerr-McGee Oil and Gas Corp., have received the prestigious price of the Offshore Technology Conference 2005. The Norway and the United Kingdom have signed a cooperation treaty for stimulating the development of petroleum and natural gas deposits in North sea. The petroleum groups Royal Dutch Shell and ExxonMobil think to sale their shares in three fields in the North sea. Total and Lubrifin, one of the main manufacturers and distributors of lubricants and greases on the Romanian market, have just finalize an agreement for the establishment of a common firm: Total Lubrifin. The IEA has published a study for the governments to rapidly reduce the petroleum consumption in transports in the case of crisis or breakdown of the supply. In order to avoid an accident risk which could have disastrous environmental consequences, by the important transit in the Bosphore pass, a plan (dating from 1995) provides that the petroleum of the Caspian sea transiting by the Russian harbour of Novorossiisk, on North sea, be conveyed by sea way to the Bulgarian harbour of Bourgas, to be transported by pipeline on 320 km to the Alexandroupolis harbour. Vladimir Poutine has received last April to the Kremlin John Browne, general director of the British firm BP, came ask for its investment in Russia in the common firm: TNK-BP. The Algerian petroleum firm Sonatrach is in the 12. world place among the hundred first petroleum firms in the world. Shell Ivory Coast

  3. NEWS: AAPT Summer Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellema, Steve

    2000-11-01

    and thought-provoking. Often these presentations have evolved, and at each stage their goal is to be able to accomplish the same demonstration with ever-simpler equipment. Given that we all live under financial constraints, the `third eye' refers to the ability to look around and find a useful piece of a demonstration apparatus amongst what others might perceive to be junk. All in all, it was a very stimulating and interesting presentation, and one can easily see why this group tours China to the rave reviews of the students there. As is true every year, the wealth of interesting and valuable work shared in the parallel sessions of contributed papers was astounding. As always, I found myself running from building to building in an attempt to hear as many talks as I could possibly attend. Often a colleague and I would split up to hear different talks, and then share what we'd learned over a meal later in the day. What follows are a few highlights of what we heard and saw in some of those sessions. As one would expect given the trend of recent years, there were many interesting talks about the incorporation of computers and instructional media in introductory physics teaching. Paris Naik from the University of Illinois presented a paper on their web-based Interactive Examples. These are very well thought-out homework problems that provide interactive help in the spirit of a Socratic dialogue. They can be viewed at webug.physics.uiuc.edu/courses/ie.html. Mario Belloni and Wolfgang Christian, both from Davidson College, each gave a talk on the use of Physlets, scriptable Java-based interactive physics problems. These can be sampled at webphysics.davidson.edu/physletprob. Ruth Chabay from Carnegie Mellon University presented the Visual Python real-time, three-dimensional graphics environment in which their first-year students are programming their own visualization of physical phenomena. Its power, ease of use and freeware usage make it a must-see at cil

  4. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    the innovations and integration of technology in the world of science education. The lectures, discussions, and workshops that formed the conference involved Ontario public and private schools and took place at Appleby College, Oakville, Ontario, in February 1999. Speakers were chosen to compliment the specific theme of technology in the classroom. STEP provided the opportunity for all the schools in Ontario to become one large community working toward a better future in teaching methods. Although the conference is over for this year, communication is still strong. A bigger and better STEP is planned for Friday, February 4, 2000. For more details please contact B. O'Leary, Head, Science and Technology Department, Appleby College, Oakville, Ontario L6K 3P1, Canada; boleary@appleby.on.ca. ACS Division of Chemical Education: 1999 Election of Officers Candidates for the 1999 annual election of Division officers for 2000 are listed below. Ballots will be mailed for arrival in late August or early September. Ballots must be received by the Secretary by October 1, 1999. Both ACS and affiliate members of the Division may vote for the offices of Chair-Elect and Treasurer in this election as a result of a recent change in the bylaws, approved in the 1997 election. Only ACS members may vote for Councilor/Alternate Councilor, since this is an ACS as well as a DivCHED office. For Chair-Elect (Chair in 2001) Arlene Russell, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA Conrad Stanitski, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR Treasurer Frank Torre, Springfield College, Springfield, MA Anna Wilson, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Councilor/Alternate Councilor Craig Bowen, Clemson University, Clemson, SC Mark Freilich, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN Marcy Towns, Ball State University, Muncie, IN Carol White, Athens Area Technical Institute, Athens, GA

  5. Information and Records Management (IRM News Portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Taş

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available IRM News; by continuously following, information technologies, social media, visual and print press, not only it watches the improvements of our field but also it tries to audit any kind of information/records which are newsworthy, in this point of view, it creates the aims in this perspective; “Information and Records Management (IRM News Portal; has the target that; to present and archive the news which are about Centre of Archive, Documentation and Information, published in both national press and electronic space, and also IRMNews Portal aims to ensure reaching all these news from one point. ”

  6. New format for ATLAS e-news

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    ATLAS e-news got a new look! As of November 30, 2007, we have a new format for ATLAS e-news. Please go to: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/index.html . ATLAS e-news will now be published on a weekly basis. If you are not an ATLAS colaboration member but still want to know how the ATLAS experiment is doing, we will soon have a version of ATLAS e-news intended for the general public. Information will be sent out in due time.

  7. The News Media as a Political Institution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsten, Mark; Allern, Sigurd

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of Scandinavian journalism research this article discusses the changing political roles of news organizations and journalists after the fall of the party press and the dissolution of broadcasting as a state-controlled monopoly. Given these institutional changes, we ask the following......: what new roles, if any, are news organizations and journalists playing in the political system? What are the characteristics of these new roles, and how do news organizations use their newfound political power? We address these questions in the context of an institutional approach to the news coupled...... with Hallin and Mancini's analysis of media systems....

  8. The shifting cross-media news landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Kim Christian; Steeg Larsen, Bent

    2010-01-01

    The article offers new insights for democracy and for news producers by mapping the use and users of today’s cross-media news landscape, as the everyday consumption of news across the range of available news media and formats is shifting as a result of transformations of technology, culture...... and lifestyles. Theoretically the study is anchored in Habermas’s notion of the public sphere, and its recent reconceptualizations in theories of ‘cultural citizenship’, 'civic agency' and 'public connection'. The project operationalizes these theories through the concept of users' perceived “worthwhileness...

  9. News: Good chemical manufacturing process criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    This news column covers topics relating to manufacturing criteria, machine to machine technology, novel process windows, green chemistry indices, business resilience, immobilized enzymes, and Bt crops.

  10. Perceiving the future news: Evidence for retrocausation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Dale E.; Cyrus, Patricia S.

    2017-05-01

    Thirty-three exploratory psi investigations were recently performed using Conscious State Psi and Dream State Psi protocols for photographic material that did not exist at the time of the psi sessions. Results would provide evidence for retrocausation if the future photographs had influenced the sessions' data. The psi targets were Associated Press (AP) news photographs published in a Reading, PA area newspaper on a specific page three days in the future. These photographs were taken one day after the psi sessions. Following each psi session, and prior to the photograph's existence, perceptions were recorded in project records and email transmitted for date validation. Feedback was provided when the photograph was published. There were two phases: Phase I was an informal investigation performed by the principle author to evaluate project feasibility. Phase II was a formal investigation with a colleague 1,000 miles from the principle author and the area newspaper location. All data were evaluated by direct comparison to the intended photographs using numerical assessment scales and noting unique features. Data from 21 of the 33 sessions (64%) yielded sketches and narratives with medium and high degrees of correlations with the future news photographs. A subsequent binary analysis using control photographs yielded p = 0.040. Visual informational content of these future newspaper photographs had interacted with the brain's cognitive processes in a retrocausal sense. The future photographs affected the sessions' data. A subconscious interaction between the future and the present or past may be an on-going feature of the mental and physical universe. Suggestions for follow-on investigations into retrocausation are provided.

  11. Tailor-Made News: Meeting the demands of news users on mobile and social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot Kormelink, T.; Costera Meijer, I.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the technological possibilities for portable, personalized, and participatory news use, the public has not turned en masse from passive receivers who consume news on the producers' terms, into active users who tailor news to fit their personal preferences and practices. Unmistakably, some

  12. [Exaggerated health news: association between exaggeration in university press releases and exaggeration in news media coverage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schat, J; Bossema, F G; Numans, M E; Smeets, I; Burger, P

    2018-01-01

    To determine how often press releases and news articles contain exaggeration and to locate its origin in the trajectory from research paper to news article. Retrospective quantitative content analysis. We analysed press releases on health-related research published by Dutch universities and university medical centres in 2015 (n = 129) as well as news media articles related to those press releases (n = 185). 20% of press releases and 29% of news articles exaggerated the conclusion or causal claim. Explicit health advice was, when present, exaggerated in 7% of press releases and 10% of news articles. When press releases exaggerated the conclusion or causal claim, 92% of associated news articles contained the same exaggeration. When the conclusion was not exaggerated in the press release, 6% of the news articles was exaggerated. The relative chance for exaggerated news associated with exaggerated press releases was 16.08 (95% CI: 7.35-35.18). Exaggerated press releases were associated with news articles more frequently. The relative chance for news articles to be associated with exaggerated press releases vs. a non-exaggerated press release was 1.45 (95% CI: 1.02-2.04). Exaggeration in health-related news is strongly correlated with exaggeration in the original press release and occurs in more than 1 in 5 articles. Monitoring and, if necessary, improving the accuracy and correctness of academic press releases seem to be important measures to improve the quality of health related news.

  13. News and the overloaded consumer: factors influencing information overload among news consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Avery E; Chyi, Hsiang Iris

    2012-11-01

    News producers continue to increase their volume of production and delivery platforms in an effort to reach and maintain news consumers. However, consumers may not necessarily find more news desirable. Previous studies have suggested that information surplus can lead to negative outcomes for consumers, but research of outcomes related to news production and consumption has been scant. This study explores novel areas of news surplus and overload, empirically examining factors associated with the degree of perceived overload across a broad spectrum of news delivery platforms. The findings reveal that the majority of today's news consumers feel overloaded with the amount of news they are confronted with. Gender, news interest, and the use of specific news platforms and outlets predict the degree of that overload. News access through platforms and outlets such as computers, e-readers, and Facebook is positively associated with overload, whereas other platforms such as television and the iPhone are negatively associated with overload. Implications for media psychology and news consumption are discussed.

  14. The Usefulness of a News Media Literacy Measure in Evaluating a News Literacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie; Ashley, Seth; Miller, Dean

    2017-01-01

    A survey of college students showed those who had taken a news literacy course had significantly higher levels of news media literacy, greater knowledge of current events, and higher motivation to consume news, compared with students who had not taken the course. The effect of taking the course did not diminish over time. Results validate the News…

  15. Young people’s news orientations and uses of traditional and new media for news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cauwenberge, A.; d'Haenens, L.; Beentjes, H.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on Flemish college students’ news orientations and their uses of traditional and new media for news within a public service media environment. We used five homogeneous focus groups that covered variation in news media use. The analysis of the focus groups revealed major

  16. Status Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Arelis

    2010-01-01

    This article offers some updates on the share of the higher education institutions in the billion-worth stimulus package and how institutions were assisted through this funding. Since the $787 billion stimulus package, formally known as the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA), was signed into law in 2009, an estimated $50 billion to $75…

  17. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Schools lecture: Institute of Physics roadshow is a lecture series with a difference Rugby Meeting: 17th Annual Meeting for Teachers of Physics boasts an impressive schedule Courses: Year-12 pupils go to Open University Camera Competition: Enter now to win a new camera! Conference: Teachers invited to CERN in September New Zealand: Royal Society of New Zealand tackles fear of physics Bulgaria: Fairies, witches and extraterrestrials: how to teach science using theatre Schools lecture: Institute seeks speaker for its annual lecture series Competition: Critical thinking is encouraged by global warming competition Scotland: Two good reasons to visit Scotland this summer Competition: Test your knowledge Free Event: June IOP conference Conference: Also in Liverpool…

  18. News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    SHAP Awards: SHAP students come out on top APECS Seminar: Able Pupils Experience Challenging Science project gets support SHAP Awards : Teachers get awards too Institute Awards: Musical squares: musical pair continue to share their adventures in sound Meeting: Rugby School hosts Schools’ Physics Group Meeting Germany: German didactics group puts on a full programme for spring meeting Radio Communication: GB4FUN: mobile radio shack hits the airwaves and is a hit with schools Saturn: Cassini Huygens mission: Saturn here we come! World Year of Physics: Conference continues with its preparations for 2005 Resources: New resources on radioactive materials available JG was supported by KBN grant no 2 P03A 020 24.

  19. Outsourcing the news? An empirical assessment of the role of sources and news agencies in the contemporary news landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Journalists are increasingly accused of uncritically recycling subsidized material in the form of press releases and news agency copy. This practice has been labeled churnalism and is believed to compromise journalism’s autonomy and threaten news quality. While the context - rampant competition,

  20. Impact of Political News: Evidence from Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodin Sergey Nikolayevich

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent times political events started to exert more and more significant impact on national financial systems due to sharpening of political problems in various countries. Undoubtedly, their influence can be followed in price dynamics of stocks which are trading in the securities market. The need to understand political news impact on the market as a whole and its separate industries is faced by investors and market agents for proper orientation in market environment. Since this issue provides rather controversial results in different studies, the authors set the aim to investigate the Russian market with the use of GARCH models. Such approach allowed determining precisely the political events’ influence on return and volatility of market assets as well as leverage and clusterization effects. The obtained results may be beneficial for investors, operating in the Russian stock market, other market agents and specialists in the field of financial science.

  1. A tale of two news reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. On Wednesday, February 25, 2015 two new stories aired, one on National Public Radio (NPR that I heard riding home that afternoon and the other later in the evening on the CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley. Both stories were on the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA but I was struck by the contrasting style of the two reports. The first story was an NPR report on back injuries in nurses (1. According to the report nurses suffer more back injuries than almost any other occupation — and they get those injuries mainly from doing the everyday tasks of lifting and moving patients. The report stated that the VA has invested over $200 million in protecting nurses predominately by providing lifts and other devices for moving patients. VA hospitals across the country have reduced nursing injuries from moving patients by an average of 40 percent since the program started. The reduction ...

  2. Between authority and media actor. The municipality as a news actor on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Bock Segaard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    The article illuminates how local authorities as news actors fill their websites with content. This is done through a study of how active the local authorities are as news actors on the Internet, what kinds of electronic news dissemination they do in practice, and to what degree they experience dilemmas in electronic news dissemination. The analytic point of departure is the tension between a journalistic ideal of news mediation relates to democratic values and a strategic ideal of communication related to branding. Empirically the analysis is based on data from several Danish and Norwegian municipalities which are considered as particularly active on the Internet. Finally the article discusses municipal news mediation on the Internet in the light of the municipality as a public authority as well as a market actor, a service provider, and as a democratic actor. The question is in what way municipal news dissemination on the Internet is a democratic gain. The article shows that the work with news dissemination on the Internet to some degree is characterized by professionalization, centralization, and bureaucratization. The democratic gain of municipal news dissemination is an empirical question and related to the criteria of news selection (in practice. Furthermore the article shows that some municipalities have a more strategic focus while others have a more journalistic focus but one focus does not rule out the other.

  3. Determinants of Network News Coverage of the Oil Industry during the Late 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfle, Stephen; McMillan, Henry

    1989-01-01

    Examines which firms and products best predict media coverage of the oil industry. Reports that price variations in testing oil and gasoline correlate with the extent of news coverage provided by network television. (MM)

  4. The Interaction of Production and Consumption in the News Media Social Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Gary; Kerrigan, Finola; Mehmood, Rashid; Rahman, Mustafizur

    Newspapers are operating in increasingly competitive and fragmented markets for audiences and advertising revenues, government media policy and changing audience requirements for news and the ways in which it is presented and delivered. A growing army of bloggers and amateur citizen journalists now delivers - but rarely edits - content for all media platforms, while new media technologies, combined with the changing structure of global news industries, are radically changing the ways in which newspapers and media business functions and struggles for profitability. Our research sought to answer the question of how the internet is impacting on producer/consumer value activities in the news media supply chain. To answer this question initial descriptive statistical analysis was performed on 51 newspapers. This was followed by a focus group undertaken with London-based news media organizations and bloggers. The findings showed that in spite of initial fear and rejection, the internet is now firmly embedded in news media supply chain operations. Firms are now using the internet as an operant resource and working proactively with consumers to develop various forms of relationship value. We highlight the role of consumers in the creation of news (editorial) content and consumer-driven moves toward a merged media platform of distribution (including television, online, mobile and printed forms). Regional news media organizations will probably continue to survive if they are able to supply a highly specialized and 'hyper local' community service. This will be in the form of 'hybrid' content: analysis, interpretation and investigative reporting in a print product that appears less than daily combined with constant updating and reader interaction on the web.

  5. The NEWS Water Cycle Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Matthew; Beaudoing, Hiroko Kato; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; William, Olson

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) program fosters collaborative research towards improved quantification and prediction of water and energy cycle consequences of climate change. In order to measure change, it is first necessary to describe current conditions. The goal of the first phase of the NEWS Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. The project was a multi-institutional collaboration with more than 20 active contributors. This presentation will describe the results of the water cycle component of the first phase of the project, which include seasonal (monthly) climatologies of water fluxes over land, ocean, and atmosphere at continental and ocean basin scales. The requirement of closure of the water budget (i.e., mass conservation) at various scales was exploited to constrain the flux estimates via an optimization approach that will also be described. Further, error assessments were included with the input datasets, and we examine these in relation to inferred uncertainty in the optimized flux estimates in order to gauge our current ability to close the water budget within an expected uncertainty range.

  6. News from Council - September 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    I would like to inform you of the main news from the Council this week. First of all, the Council congratulated CERN and the Collaborations on the superb performance of the accelerator complex and experiments. It has been a great year so far, with important physics results across the whole spectrum of the CERN research programme.   Looking forward, one of the main accomplishments from this week’s meetings is that the Council has approved the opening of a credit facility with the European Investment Bank (EIB) to cover the cash shortage during the peak years of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) construction. This is very good news since it will allow us to carry out the work necessary for the HL-LHC without compromising the rest of the Laboratory’s scientific programme. Turning to the scientific and geographical enlargement, the Council approved the admission of India as an Associate Member State, and I very much hope that the agreement can be signed in the near future so that Indi...

  7. East-West News Flow "Imbalance": Qualifying the Quantifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Duc, Don R.

    1981-01-01

    A study of Eurovision-Intervision news exchange patterns suggests that any global explanation for imbalance will be premature until the news item values in each exchange are understood as clearly as its news item volume. (PD)

  8. TERRA NEWS: Sensationalism and Fait-divers on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Golembiewski

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of the news program Jornal do Terra (Terra News shown on the Terra website. The study involved two aspects: forms of news presentations on TV, based on studies by Pedro Maciel, and criteria of news value, based on Mário Erbolatto’s view. In addition, we used Luis Arthur Ferraretto’s studies of the news formats used specifically on the radio. The objective of this work was to verify what kind of news is transmitted by the news program Terra News, and to compare it with the traditional news program we watch on TV. The study confirmed that Terra News utilizes conventional formats of news presentation and makes a selection of sensationalist news about fait-divers.

  9. Terra News: sensationalism and fait-divers on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Golembiewski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of the news program Jornal do Terra (Terra News shown on the Terra website. The study involved two aspects: forms of news presentations on TV, based on studies by Pedro Maciel, and criteria of news value, based on Mário Erbolatto’s view. In addition, we used Luis Arthur Ferraretto’s studies of the news formats used specifically on the radio. The objective of this work was to verify what kind of news is transmitted by the news program Terra News, and to compare it with the traditional news program we watch on TV. The study confirmed that Terra News utilizes conventional formats of news presentation and makes a selection of sensationalist news about fait-divers.

  10. News Paper | Women in Science | Initiatives | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    News Paper. News and Articles from Newspapers/Magazines. Level-playing field for women scientists - The Hindu. News item on Women's Day Conference by the National Task Force (DST) for Women in Science. More ...

  11. Address Points, County wide address points derived from parcel layer and updated and amended by Address Coordinator through plat and maintenance processes., Published in Not Provided, Durham City/County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Address Points dataset current as of unknown. County wide address points derived from parcel layer and updated and amended by Address Coordinator through plat and...

  12. BreakingNews: Article Annotation by Image and Text Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramisa, Arnau; Yan, Fei; Moreno-Noguer, Francesc; Mikolajczyk, Krystian

    2017-06-30

    Current approaches lying in the intersection of computer vision and NLP have achieved unprecedented breakthroughs in tasks like automatic captioning or image retrieval. Most of these methods, though, rely on training sets of images associated with annotations that specifically describe the visual content. This paper proposes going a step further and explores more complex cases where textual descriptions are loosely related to images. We focus on the particular domain of News. We introduce new deep learning methods that address source and popularity prediction, article illustration, and article geolocation. An adaptive CNN is proposed, that shares most of the structure for all tasks, and is suitable for multitask and transfer learning. Deep CCA is deployed for article illustration, and a new loss function based on Great Circle Distance is proposed for geolocation. Furthermore, we present BreakingNews, a novel dataset with approximately 100K news articles including images, text, captions, and enriched with heterogeneous meta-data. BreakingNews allows exploring all aforementioned problems, for which we provide baseline performances using various CNN architectures, and different representations of the textual and visual features. We report promising results and bring to light several limitations of current state-of-the-art, which we hope will help spur progress in the field.

  13. [Optimistic perspectives in communicating difficult news on fetal development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Ana Cristina; Frezza, Minéia; Rosa, Rafael Machado

    2017-08-21

    Communicating diagnostic news in health contexts is a potentially difficult event for all parties involved. However, despite this task's presence in the physician-patient context, it is rarely addressed during clinical training. The current study thus aimed to describe and evaluate how difficult news can be toned down during genetic counseling sessions involving cases of fetal syndromes and/or malformations. The study analyzed 33 naturalistic interactions (i.e. real situations), taped and transcribed, according to the theoretical and methodological perspective of Conversation Analysis, with an ethnomethodological basis. These interactions consisted of sessions in clinical genetics with pregnant women seen at the fetal medicine service of a reference hospital for maternal and child health in the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS). The analysis showed that communicating difficult news can be accompanied by optimistic perspectives that are scaled-up according to each situation's severity. In the absence of a positive diagnosis, the appointments can conclude with positive aspects such as recommendations for palliative care, so that the patient always leaves the appointment with some kind of recommendation. This study proposes to innovate and expand the scope of studies on communicating difficult news in the physician-patient relationship in Brazil, precisely by developing an analysis of real interactions in genetic counseling and thus providing interactional backing for training health professionals that deal with this challenge in their routine work.

  14. Detecting Terrorism Incidence Type from News Summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the experiments to detect terrorism incidence type from news summary data. We have applied classification techniques on news summary data to analyze the incidence and detect the type of incidence. A number of experiments are conducted using various classification algorithms...

  15. News Research for Better Newspapers, Volume Five.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Chilton R., Comp.

    The findings of research studies that come from a variety of sources and concern newspapers, some aspects of television news, and news media audiences are summarized briefly. Among the topics are audience characteristics, content of stories, readership, headlines and makeup, editorial policy, and editorial administration and personnel. Most of the…

  16. Mass News: Practices, Controversies, and Alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, David J., Ed.; Sterling, Christopher H., Ed.

    This selection of readings, primarily intended for a college journalism course, discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the major sources of the public news--the wire services, newspapers, and television. The first part of the book deals with the context of mass news and serves as an introduction to some of the crucial ideas shaping thinking…

  17. Science News and the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Using "Science News" as a teaching tool promotes writing about science, talking about science, and broadening students' views about what science is. This article describes an ongoing assignment in which students choose one article from "Science News" each week and write a brief summary and explanation of why they picked that article. (Contains 1…

  18. Predicting User Views in Online News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardt, Daniel; Rambow, Owen

    2017-01-01

    We analyze user viewing behavior on anonline news site. We collect data from64,000 news articles, and use text featuresto predict frequency of user views.We compare predictiveness of the headlineand “teaser” (viewed before clicking) andthe body (viewed after clicking). Both arepredictive of click...

  19. Data Exchanges in Mobile News Apps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer, Aske; Wallberg, Filip

    This paper maps the flows of data to and from third-party actors when users access content in mobile news apps. This way, it analyzes the strategic networks of collaboration and data exchange that news organizations engage in in the digital economy, expanding the traditional two-sided model...

  20. News Analytics for Financial Decision Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Milea (Viorel)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis PhD thesis contributes to the newly emerged, growing body of scientific work on the use of News Analytics in Finance. Regarded as the next significant development in Automated Trading, News Analytics extends trading algorithms to incorporate information extracted from textual

  1. Fight or flight: Affective news framing effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feinholdt, A.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation investigates how emotions shape and are shaped by news framing and how this interplay leads to a number of affective news framing effects. My work reveals that emotions do not only function as mechanisms but also as channels strengthening or weakening framing effects. In addition,

  2. Developing a News Media Literacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Seth; Maksl, Adam; Craft, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Using a framework previously applied to other areas of media literacy, this study developed and assessed a measurement scale focused specifically on critical news media literacy. Our scale appears to successfully measure news media literacy as we have conceptualized it based on previous research, demonstrated through assessments of content,…

  3. CSIR eNews: Built environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info CSIR e-NewsBE4_2008.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 108 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name CSIR e-NewsBE4_2008.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 /var...

  4. Automatic Amharic text news classification: Aneural networks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study is on classification of Amharic news automatically using neural networks approach. Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) algorithm is employed to classify new instance of Amharic news based on classifier developed using training dataset. Two weighting schemes, Term Frequency (TF) and Term Frequency by ...

  5. The difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare staff involved in the process of breaking bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Clare; Buchanan, Jean; Tod, Angela Mary

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare professionals when engaging in the process of breaking bad news. The challenges faced by staff when breaking bad news have previously been researched in relation to particular settings or participants. This study involved staff from diverse settings and roles to develop broader insights into the range of difficulties experienced in clinical practice. The study used a descriptive survey design involving self-reported written accounts and framework analysis. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire containing a free text section that asked participants to describe a difficult experience they had encountered when involved in the process of breaking bad news. Data were collected from healthcare staff from hospital, community, hospice and care home settings attending training days on breaking bad news between April 2011 and April 2014. Multiple inter-related factors presented challenges to staff engaging in activities associated with breaking bad news. Traditional subjects such as diagnostic and treatment information were described but additional topics were identified such as the impact of illness and care at the end of life. A descriptive framework was developed that summarizes the factors that contribute to creating difficult experiences for staff when breaking bad news. The framework provides insights into the scope of the challenges faced by staff when they engage in the process of breaking bad news. This provides the foundation for developing interventions to support staff that more closely matches their experiences in clinical practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. USDA-ARS Quartlerly News

    Science.gov (United States)

    This quarterly article is an update of research going on at The USDA-ARS Thad Cochran Southern Horticultural Laboratory in Poplarville, MS to be published in the Louisiana Nursery and Landscape Associations (LANLA) quarterly newsletter. This is one of three publications that I am sending out to the ...

  7. Written Evidence Submitted to the House of Commons-Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee’s Inquiry on Fake News

    OpenAIRE

    Fuchs, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Executive Summary This submission provides evidence on four aspects: 1. What do we know about fake news, fake profiles/accounts, and fake attention on social media? 2. What are the causes of fake news, political bots and fake social media accounts? 3. What are the problems and impacts of fake news, political bots and fake accounts? 4. What can be done against fake news culture? This submission gives special attention to the role of online advertising in fake news culture. (§§1.1-1.16) Reports...

  8. Portrayal of complementary and alternative medicine for cancer by top online news sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alexandra; Grann, Victor R

    2012-05-01

    Medical research news provided through the World Wide Web is easily accessible to the general public. Thus, it is necessary to understand how research findings released from online news sources are portrayed. The sample includes articles (n=205) published between January 1, 2010 and June 18, 2010 in top online news sites with competitive traffic rankings in the United States as determined by Alexa.com. Google Reader was used to find health-related news articles corresponding to the relevant news sources. Data analysis was performed using SPSS with two-tailed significance values of the χ(2) statistic. A content analysis (n=205 stories) revealed that the majority of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities for cancer discussed in top online news sources are classified as nutritional therapeutics, and the cancer topic that appeared most frequently was that of prevention. General oncology was the most frequently cited cancer type that was discussed with regard to CAM. Medical journals were the most frequently cited source in CAM/cancer news articles. The majority of news stories on CAM/cancer were neutral in tone, and the relationship between tone and evidence type reported was statistically significant. Observational studies rather than randomized controlled trials were the predominant form of evidence provided for research findings. Overall, the quality of how online news sources report research findings on complementary and alternative medicine therapies for cancer is fairly high. However, certain top online media sources are more reliable and informative than others when it comes to reporting about CAM remedies for cancer.

  9. The Nation in the News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabech, Sidsel Grøn

    In my paper media texts are analysed in order to find places in everyday discourse, where identity constructions are constructed and contested. I explore the role that old and new media play in the construction and distribution of national identity constructions. Media like television, newspaper...... aim to discuss how news media establish themselves as representatives of a certain national identity and narrative and are positioned in the national media landscape according to this. This paper raises the questions: Do national identity constructions need their “own” national media in order...... to settle and gain importance? And how do rather stable and traditional identity landscapes react to the new media? What possibilities do new media bring for especially alternative identity constructions? To answer these questions I focus on Austrian national identity. Due to the cultural and political...

  10. Breaking Bad News: An Evidence-Based Review of Communication Models for Oncology Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumb, Meridith; Keefe, Joanna; Miller, Lindsay; Overcash, Janine

    2017-10-01

    A diagnosis of cancer is a stressful, difficult, and life-altering event. Breaking bad news is distressing to patients and families and is often uncomfortable for the nurse delivering it. Evidence-based communication models have been developed and adapted for use in clinical practice to assist nurses with breaking bad news.

. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview on breaking bad news and to review the utility of the SPIKES and PEWTER evidence-based communication models for oncology nurses.
. Perceptions of breaking bad news from the nurse and patient perspectives, as well as barriers and consequences to effective communication, will be presented. Clinical examples of possible situations of breaking bad news will demonstrate how to use the SPIKES and PEWTER models of communication when disclosing bad news to patients and their families.
. By using the evidence-based communication strategies depicted in this article, oncology nurses can support the delivery of bad news and maintain communication with their patients and their patients' families in an effective and productive manner.

  11. Local Television News Coverage of the Affordable Care Act: Emphasizing Politics Over Consumer Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollust, Sarah E; Baum, Laura M; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Barry, Colleen L; Fowler, Erika Franklin

    2017-05-01

    To examine the public health and policy-relevant messages conveyed through local television news during the first stage of Affordable Care Act (ACA) implementation, when about 10 million Americans gained insurance. We conducted a content analysis of 1569 ACA-related local evening television news stories, obtained from sampling local news aired between October 1, 2013, and April 19, 2014. Coders systematically collected data using a coding instrument tracking major messages and information sources cited in the news. Overall, only half of all ACA-related news coverage focused on health insurance products, whereas the remainder discussed political disagreements over the law. Major policy tools of the ACA-the Medicaid expansion and subsidies available-were cited in less than 10% of news stories. Number of enrollees (27%) and Web site glitches (33%) were more common features of coverage. Sources with a political affiliation were by far the most common source of information (> 40%), whereas research was cited in less than 4% of stories. The most common source of news for Americans provided little public health-relevant substance about the ACA during its early implementation, favoring political strategy in coverage.

  12. Estimation of Cross-Lingual News Similarities Using Text-Mining Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouhao Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, two estimation algorithms for extracting cross-lingual news pairs based on machine learning from financial news articles have been proposed. Every second, innumerable text data, including all kinds news, reports, messages, reviews, comments, and tweets are generated on the Internet, and these are written not only in English but also in other languages such as Chinese, Japanese, French, etc. By taking advantage of multi-lingual text resources provided by Thomson Reuters News, we developed two estimation algorithms for extracting cross-lingual news pairs from multilingual text resources. In our first method, we propose a novel structure that uses the word information and the machine learning method effectively in this task. Simultaneously, we developed a bidirectional Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM based method to calculate cross-lingual semantic text similarity for long text and short text, respectively. Thus, when an important news article is published, users can read similar news articles that are written in their native language using our method.

  13. Tech Transfer News. Volume 6, No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Megan E.

    2014-01-01

    On October 28, 2011, the White House released a Presidential Memorandum entitled: Accelerating Technology Transfer and Commercialization of Federal Research in Support of High-Growth Businesses. With this memo, the President challenged all federal agencies conducting R&D to accelerate technology transfer and commercialization of federally developed technology to help stimulate the national economy. The NASA Technology Transfer Program responded by asking the center technology transfer offices to reach out to - and work more closely with - their regional economic development organizations to promote the transfer of NASA technologies to the local private sector for use in the marketplace. Toward that effort, the KSC Technology Transfer Office teamed with the Florida Space Coast Economic Development Commission (EDC) to host a technology transfer forum designed to increase our business community's awareness of available KSC technologies for transfer. In addition, the forum provided opportunities for commercial businesses to collaborate with KSC in technology development. (see article on page 12) The forum, held on September 12, 2013, focused on KSC technology transfer and partnership opportunities within the Robotics, Sustainability, Information Technology and Environmental Remediation technology areas. The event was well attended with over 120 business leaders from the community. KSC Center Director Robert Cabana and the Center Chief Technologist Karen Thompson provided remarks, and several KSC lead researchers presented technical information and answered questions, which were not in short supply. Florida Today and the Orlando Sentinel ran news stories on the forum and both NASA TV and Channel 6 News filmed portions of the event. Given the reaction by the media and local business to the forum, it is evident the community is recognizing the opportunities that NASA-developed technologies can provide to aspiring entrepreneurs and existing companies to bring new

  14. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Update (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, S.; Keller, J.; Glinsky, C.

    2013-10-01

    This presentation was given at the Sandia Reliability Workshop in August 2013 and provides information on current statistics, a status update, next steps, and other reliability research and development activities related to the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative.

  15. Breaking bad news in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Konstantis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In a regional hospital, many patients are newly diagnosed with cancer. Breaking the bad news in these patients and their relatives is a tough task. Many doctors are not experienced in talking to patients about death or death-related diseases. In recent years, there have been great efforts to change the current situation. The aim of this study was to investigate the experience and education of medical personnel in breaking bad news in a secondary hospital. Materials and Methods: 59 doctors from General Hospital of Komotini, Greece were included in the study. All the doctors were in clinical specialties that treated cancer patients. A brief questionnaire was developed based on current guidelines such as Baile/SPIKES framework and the ABCDE mnemonic. Results: Residents are involved in delivering bad news less frequently than specialists. Only 21 doctors (35.59% had specific training on breaking bad news. 20 doctors (33.90% were aware of the available techniques and protocols on breaking bad news. 47 doctors (79.66% had a consistent plan for breaking bad news. 57 (96.61% delivered bad news in a quiet place, 53 (89.83% ensured no interruptions and enough time, 53 (89.83% used simple words and 54 (91.53% checked for understanding and did not rush through the news. 46 doctors (77.97% allowed relatives to determine patient′s knowledge about the disease. Conclusions: There were low rates of specific training in breaking bad news. However, the selected location, the physician′s speech and their plan were according to current guidelines.

  16. Consumption, labor income uncertainty, and economic news coverage

    OpenAIRE

    Garz, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, weak household consumption was an important reason for low rates of overall economic growth in Germany. Many explanations for the weakness have been provided and investigated in previous studies, but the role of media-driven uncertainty has not been addressed. Therefore, this study examines the link between economic news coverage and aggregate consumption. Consumption, information-processing, and decision-making theory all serve to derive hypotheses, which are evaluated us...

  17. The news machine hacking, the untold story

    CERN Document Server

    Hanning, James

    2014-01-01

    There is one mystery figure at the heart of ?Hackergate' ? Glenn Mulcaire, the News of the World's top private investigator. The former AFC Wimbledon footballer has never spoken publicly or in court about his work investigating and backing up front-page news stories (such as the News of the World's award-winning David Beckham scoop). Mulcaire's arrest in 2006 for intercepting royal-household phone messages barely registered at the time. Yet his work has continued to generate headlines and embarrassment for the establishment ? with a Prime Minister on the back foot after his former aide Andy

  18. News search, blogs and feeds a toolkit

    CERN Document Server

    Vage, Lars

    2010-01-01

    This book is about news search and monitoring. Aimed at professionals with a strategic need of monitoring the surrounding world, users with a need to find the best news sources, monitoring services and news search strategies and techniques will benefit from reading this book. The main purpose is to present a practical handbook with an analysis of readily available tools, blending with passages of a theoretical nature. It is also useful for students at LIS programmes and related information programmes and for librarians and information professionals. The authors aim to aid the reader in reachin

  19. Engaging and Disengaging with Political News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørmen, Jacob; Linaa Jensen, Jakob

    with political news if often portrayed as both a requirement for a well-functioning democracy (Walsh, 2004) and as a source of increased civic participation (Norris, 2012). Furthermore, the consumption and discussion of political news can be seen as an essential part of the ongoing opinion formation (Gamson...... level, we further investigate the differences between users that only consume political news and users that also talk about politics with others. And on the tertiary level, we identify the most widespread communicative practices (e.g. sharing content on social network sites, writing comments on blogs...

  20. News Conference: Bloodhound races into history Competition: School launches weather balloon Course: Update weekends inspire teachers Conference: Finland hosts GIREP conference Astronomy: AstroSchools sets up schools network to share astronomy knowledge Teaching: Delegates praise science events in Wales Resources: ELI goes from strength to strength International: South Sudan teachers receive training Workshop: Delegates experience universality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Conference: Bloodhound races into history Competition: School launches weather balloon Course: Update weekends inspire teachers Conference: Finland hosts GIREP conference Astronomy: AstroSchools sets up schools network to share astronomy knowledge Teaching: Delegates praise science events in Wales Resources: ELI goes from strength to strength International: South Sudan teachers receive training Workshop: Delegates experience universality

  1. Chess endgame update

    OpenAIRE

    Haworth, Guy McCrossan

    2009-01-01

    This is a review of progress in the Chess Endgame field. It includes news of the promulgation of Endgame Tables, their use, non-use and potential runtime creation. It includes news of data-mining achievements related to 7-man chess and to the field of Chess Studies. It includes news of an algorithm to create Endgame Tables for variants of the normal game of chess.

  2. The Role of Audiovisual Mass Media News in Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Taher; Sim, Tam Shu

    2011-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the role of audio/visual mass media news in language learning. In this regard, the two important issues regarding the selection and preparation of TV news for language learning are the content of the news and the linguistic difficulty. Content is described as whether the news is specialized or universal. Universal…

  3. 16 CFR 1012.6 - The news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The news media. 1012.6 Section 1012.6... PERSONNEL AND OUTSIDE PARTIES § 1012.6 The news media. The Agency recognizes that the news media occupy a... inherently public nature of the news media allows their activities to be exempt from the requirements of this...

  4. The U.S. Online News Coverage of Mammography Based on a Google News Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Lin, Leng Leng; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2017-12-01

    To characterize online news coverage relating to mammography, including articles' stance toward screening mammography. Google News was used to search U.S. news sites over a 9-year period (2006-2015) based on the search terms "mammography" and "mammogram." The top 100 search results were recorded. Identified articles were manually reviewed. The top 100 news articles were from the following sources: local news outlet (50%), national news outlet (24%), nonimaging medical source (13%), entertainment or culture news outlet (6%), business news outlet (4%), peer-reviewed journal (1%), and radiology news outlet (1%). Most common major themes were the screening mammography controversy (29%), description of a new breast imaging technology (23%), dense breasts (11%), and promotion of a public screening initiative (11%). For the most recent year, article stance toward screening mammography was 59%, favorable; 16%, unfavorable; and 25%, neutral. After 2010, there was an abrupt shift in articles' stances from neutral to both favorable and unfavorable. A wide range of online news sources addressed a range of issues related to mammography. National, rather than local, news sites were more likely to focus on the screening controversy and more likely to take an unfavorable view. The controversial United States Preventive Services Task Force guidelines may have influenced articles to take a stance on screening mammography. As such online news may impact public perception of the topic and thus potentially impact guideline adherence, radiologists are encouraged to maintain awareness of this online coverage and to support the online dissemination of reliable and accurate information. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Terra News: sensationalism and fait-divers on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Golembiewski; Diógenes Pandini

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the news program Jornal do Terra (Terra News) shown on the Terra website. The study involved two aspects: forms of news presentations on TV, based on studies by Pedro Maciel, and criteria of news value, based on Mário Erbolatto’s view. In addition, we used Luis Arthur Ferraretto’s studies of the news formats used specifically on the radio. The objective of this work was to verify what kind of news is transmitted by the news p...

  6. Alternative Fuel News, Vol. 3 No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-23

    This special issue of Alternative Fuel News highlights the Fifth National Clean Cities Conference held in Louisville, Kentucky. The momentum for the program is stronger than ever and the coalitions are working to propel the alternative fuel industry forward.

  7. Alternative Fuel News, Volume 4, Number 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ficker, C.

    2000-11-14

    This issue of Alternative Fuel News focuses on transit buses and refuse haulers. Many transit agencies and waste management companies are investigating alternatives to traditional diesel buses and refuse haulers.

  8. News Media Framing of Negative Campaigning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2014-01-01

    News media coverage of election campaigns is often characterized by use of the strategic game frame and a focus on politicians’ use of negative campaigning. However, the exact relationship between these two characteristics of news coverage is largely unexplored. This article theorizes that consumer...... demand and norms of journalistic independence might induce the news media outlets to cover negative campaigning with a strategic game frame. A comprehensive content analysis based on several newspaper types, several election campaigns, and several different measurements of media framing confirms...... that news coverage of negative campaigning does apply the strategic game frame to a significantly larger degree than articles covering positive campaigning. This finding has significant implications for campaigning politicians and for scholars studying campaign and media effects....

  9. Communicating Uncertain News in Cancer Consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alby, Francesca; Zucchermaglio, Cristina; Fatigante, Marilena

    2017-12-01

    In cancer communication, most of the literature is in the realm of delivering bad news while much less attention has been given to the communication of uncertain news around the diagnosis and the possible outcomes of the illness. Drawing on video-recorded cancer consultations collected in two Italian hospitals, this article analyzes three communication practices used by oncologists to interactionally manage the uncertainty during the visit: alternating between uncertain bad news and certain good news, anticipating scenarios, and guessing test results. Both diagnostic and personal uncertainties are not hidden to the patient, yet they are reduced through these practices. Such communication practices are present in 32 % of the visits in the data set, indicating that the interactional management of uncertainty is a relevant phenomenon in oncological encounters. Further studies are needed to improve both its understanding and its teaching.

  10. The Electronic Archiving of Arab News Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifa Ayub Gigawy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This Research aims to present the electronic archives of Arab news agency websites and their methods of searching for and retrieving information. Also, its aim is to examine all their methods in order to find out which are the best and most practically useful ones. The research refers to the news agencies and the Internet, through the methods that users encounter in these inquires and links which present information. It concentrates on practical ways of searching for news items in both texts and pictures. The research contains tables showing the results. It presents a brief summery for each of Arab news agencies.The research comes to the conclusion that there are many things which need to be considered, and also some suggestions as to how the search for and retrieval of information might be improved

  11. Broadcast News: The Absence of Native Storytellers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mark Trahant

    2005-01-01

      Trahant explores the consequences of Native Indians not being among those journalists who report for TV or radio stations and says improvement won't happen "until TV news recognizes the depth of the problem...

  12. Uncovering the skewness news impact curve

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anatolyev, Stanislav; Petukhov, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2016), s. 746-771 ISSN 1479-8409 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : conditional skewness * news impact curve * stock returns Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.800, year: 2016

  13. Uncovering the skewness news impact curve

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anatolyev, Stanislav; Petukhov, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2016), s. 746-771 ISSN 1479-8409 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : conditional skewness * news impact curve * stock returns Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.800, year: 2016

  14. News media consumption among immigrants in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Connie Carøe

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, especially with the advent of Digital Broadcasting Technology, transnational media has become central in the consumption of news by immigrant populations. This has received some attention as a factor associated with lack of integration into their new societies. The present article...... demonstrates that diaspora as an analytic term is indeed relevant for immigrants, leaving room for questions of multiple belonging with implications for everyday life. According to recent data, people with migrant experience tend to seek news very broadly. Extensive news media consumption, desire for more...... international news than is currently the national television channels, are also part of the picture. A diaspora perspective transforms the prospect presented by observers and journalists, worried about integration processes, and prompts considerations that immigrants are also emigrants....

  15. Invisible giants in broadcast journalism: news agencies and the global news ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cleidejane Esperidião

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Key actors of the global informational web, the international television news agencies are not often covered in the communications field in Brazil. This paper aims to understand the dynamics established between these transnational companies and their subscribers (world television stations. It attempts to clarify how these western-led news agency companies operate within the flow of communication. It intends to identify production processes (assessment, collection, treatment and radial distribution for the Associated Press Television News (APTN and Reuters Television News (Reuters TV.

  16. INVISIBLE GIANTS IN BROADCAST JOURNALISM: news agencies and the global news ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cleidejane Esperidião

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Key actors of the global informational web, the international television news agencies are not often covered in the communications field in Brazil. This paper aims to understand the dynamics established between these transnational companies and their subscribers (world television stations. It attempts to clarify how these western-led news agency companies operate within the flow of communication. It intends to identify production processes (assessment, collection, treatment and radial distribution for the Associated Press Television News (APTN and Reuters Television News (Reuters TV.

  17. Incorporating popularity in a personalized news recommender system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Jonnalagedda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Online news reading has become a widely popular way to read news articles from news sources around the globe. With the enormous amount of news articles available, users are easily overwhelmed by information of little interest to them. News recommender systems help users manage this flood by recommending articles based on user interests rather than presenting articles in order of their occurrence. We present our research on developing personalized news recommendation system with the help of a popular micro-blogging service, “Twitter.” News articles are ranked based on the popularity of the article identified from Twitter’s public timeline. In addition, users construct profiles based on their interests and news articles are also ranked based on their match to the user profile. By integrating these two approaches, we present a hybrid news recommendation model that recommends interesting news articles to the user based on their popularity as well as their relevance to the user profile.

  18. CERN Video News, 2nd edition

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This week you will be able to watch on the web the second edition of CERN's video news (see Bulletin n°45/2002, p.3). On this news reel: the ATRAP experiment's latest achievements, superconducting cable production for CMS, the CAST experiment and the European digital conferencing project InDiCo. Go to : www.cern.ch/video, or Bulletin web page.

  19. Top medical news stories 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Here is our list of the top seven medical news stories for 2015 with special emphasis on the Southwest. 7. Wearable health devices: A wave of wearable computing devices such as Fitbit and UP wristbands have people keeping track of how much they sit, stand, walk, climb stairs and calories they consume (1. These fitness-tracking devices herald a series of devices that will detect and monitor serious diseases. However, these so-called medical-grade wearables require approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a regulatory hurdle avoided by the fitness-tracking devices which will likely slow their introduction. 6. Caitlyn Jenner: Caitlyn Jenner became the most famous transgender woman in the world following an interview published in Vanity Fair (2. The Vanity Fair website saw 11.6 million visits curious about the former Olympic athlete. Though Jenner publicly shared her gender identity, many transgender Americans do not-12% of gender non-conforming adults said they ...

  20. A test of rivaling approaches to explain news effects: A multi-wave panel study of agenda setting, social and economic conditions, the tone of the news, and horse race news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinnijenhuis, J.; van Hoof, A.M.J.; Oegema, D.; de Ridder, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Different "paradigmatic" approaches to explain news effects on voting may supplement each other, because their starting points are based on different news types in political campaign news: news on issue positions of parties, news on real-world developments, news on support or criticism for parties,

  1. Focal Points on Constructing News Stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Yuryevna Ilyinova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The issues stated in the article line with the current interest to pragmatic value of news releases in modern media. The news is thought to be a verbalized focal reflection of some event that was chosen by media professionals for setting the current information agenda. Having generated the opinions on the newsworthiness the authors present a set of values that may be used for measurement of relevance and clarity of an event reflection in the news content with frequency, clarity, predictability, unexpectedness, amplitude, cultural proximity, elite nations, elite people, personification, negativity among them. The novelty of the research is that the newsworthiness is checked with the focus to lexical (thematic representation of the news in a diachronic approach: the empirical base of the research was taken from the archives of UK national and local media sources (18–20th cent. and implied comparison of lexical means that reflected an event itself and some values of human interest potential in the news stories written in defined periods. The article states the trend for dynamics in the way the event is reflected in the news stories – the information core of the story is merged with detailed reporting parts, and their content is conditioned by social and moral values.

  2. New York Times Current News Physics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cise, John

    2010-03-01

    Since 2007 I have been using NYTimes current News articles rich in graphics and physics variables for developing edited one page web (http://CisePhysics.homestead.com/files/NYT.htm) physics questions based on current events in the news. The NYTimes home page listed above contains currently ten pages with about 40 one page current edited News related physics articles per page containing: rich graphics, graphic editions by the author, edited articles, introduction to a question, questions, and answers. I use these web pages to introduce new physics concepts to students with current applications of concepts in the news. I also use these one page physics applications as pop quizzes and extra credit for students. As news happens(e.g. the 2010 Vancouver Olympics) I find the physics applications in the NYTimes articles and generate applications and questions. These new one page applications with questions are added to the home page: http://CisePhysics.homestead.com/files/NYT.htm The newest pages start with page 10 and work back in time to 9, 8, etc. The ten web pages with about 40 news articles per page are arranged in the traditional manner: vectors, kinematics, projectiles, Newton, Work & Energy, properties of matter, fluids, temperature, heat, waves, and sound. This site is listed as a resource in AAPT's Compadre site.

  3. Communicative competence in the delivery of bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillotti, Cathy; Thompson, Teresa; McNeilis, Kelly

    2002-04-01

    Grounded in the Cegala and Waldron (Communication Studies 43 (1992) 105) model of communicative competence, the present study applied the McNeilis (Health Communication 13 (2001) 5) provider-patient coding scheme to video tapes of 3rd year medical students delivering bad news to a standardized patient. The goal of the study was to understand the specific communicative moves that are associated with perceptions of competence during bad news delivery. The coding scheme assesses Content, Acknowledgment Tokens, Interruptions, Alignment, and Function of the message. Naïve observers also evaluated the tapes on several items, assessing empathy and communicative effectiveness. Nonmedical talk was the most common type of content, followed by discussion of the current health problem. Neither acknowledgment tokens nor interruptions were frequent. The most common function of a message was a closed question, followed by explanations, assertions, and open questions. Summing across the functions indicated that information giving was the nost common behavior. The perceivers' data showed fairly neutral assessments of the medical students--they were generally not evaluated very positively, although they were not disliked. Regression analyses indicated numerous specific communicative behaviors that were associated with judgments of competence. Statements falling into the Nonspecific Content category were associated with more positive perceptions, while relational statements, moderately closed questions, solicited answers, expansions, restatements, assertions, explanations, open questions, bracketing, and small talk as well as information verifying, seeking, and giving (summed functions) led to more negative perceptions. The results indicate that the delivery of bad news requires communicative moves that differ from other kinds of medical communication. Depending on the results of future analyses of this topic health are providers may be well advised to focus little of their

  4. High quality topic extraction from business news explains abnormal financial market volatility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisano, Ryohei; Sornette, Didier; Mizuno, Takayuki; Ohnishi, Takaaki; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationships between information flows and social activity in society today is one of the cornerstones of the social sciences. In financial economics, the key issue in this regard is understanding and quantifying how news of all possible types (geopolitical, environmental, social, financial, economic, etc.) affects trading and the pricing of firms in organized stock markets. In this article, we seek to address this issue by performing an analysis of more than 24 million news records provided by Thompson Reuters and of their relationship with trading activity for 206 major stocks in the S&P US stock index. We show that the whole landscape of news that affects stock price movements can be automatically summarized via simple regularized regressions between trading activity and news information pieces decomposed, with the help of simple topic modeling techniques, into their "thematic" features. Using these methods, we are able to estimate and quantify the impacts of news on trading. We introduce network-based visualization techniques to represent the whole landscape of news information associated with a basket of stocks. The examination of the words that are representative of the topic distributions confirms that our method is able to extract the significant pieces of information influencing the stock market. Our results show that one of the most puzzling stylized facts in financial economies, namely that at certain times trading volumes appear to be "abnormally large," can be partially explained by the flow of news. In this sense, our results prove that there is no "excess trading," when restricting to times when news is genuinely novel and provides relevant financial information.

  5. News from Online: Industrial Chemicals and Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney Judd, Carolyn

    1999-02-01

    of the American Chemical Society Divisions of Polymer Chemistry and Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering and General Electric Corporation. The POLYED site, http:/ /chemdept.uwsp.edu/polyed/index.htm, is hosted by the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point. This National Center for Polymer Education is another good place to go for information. More education is available at the Ziegler Research Group Home Page at http://www.chem.ucalgary.ca/groups/ziegler/index.html . Go to Metallocene as Olefin Polymerization Catalysis: An Introduction ( http://www.chem.ucalgary.ca/groups/ziegler/met_intro.html ) for historical accounts of metallocene and Ziegler-Natta catalysts. Movies are available here too. This Canadian site is well-documented and educational. Back at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, The Why Files site at http://whyfiles.news.wisc.edu helps bring important chemical and technology news to the public. Go to the archived files of October 1997 ( http://whyfiles.news.wisc.edu/shorties/catalyst.html ) to find information about the importance of low-temperature metallocene catalysts. The Why Files received funding from the National Science Foundation. Go here for science information in an easy-to-read format. One of the driving forces toward better catalysis is the attempt to reach 100% product, combining efficiency with lowered pollution. Companies can look to the Environmental Protection Agency for information: Environsense at http://es.epa.gov/ is pledged to offer "Common Sense Solutions to Environmental Problems". So where can we get these polymers? The American Chemical Society can help. Go to Chemcylopedia at http://pubs.acs.org/chemcy99/ for great information. Both purchasers and users of chemicals can benefit from this site. Searches can be made on the chemical or on the supplier. Information provided includes CAS Registry Numbers and special shipping requirements as well as potential applications. Do you remember that we started with paper? Let

  6. The New News Media: Democratic implications of undergraduate education and news consumption over social and traditional media

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Communication students at Simon Fraser University were surveyed and interviewed to deduce perceptions and behaviour of news consumption over social and traditional media. Both social media and traditional media are used to consume news with traditional media acting as the primary news source and as more accessible and reliable than social media. News stories considered important or having various perspectives were verified the most, especially world news. Extent of accessibility of sources an...

  7. When good news is bad news: explicating the moderated mediation dynamic behind the reversed mobilization effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuck, A.R.T.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the mobilizing potential of positive news framing on opponents of a referendum proposal. On the basis of an experiment (N = 470), using bootstrapping as a method to assess conditional indirect effects, mediation analysis showed that positive news framing—endorsing a

  8. The Role of News Teasers in Processing TV News and Commercials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Glen T.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Explores the role of news teasers on memory and attention for commercials in evening newscasts. Finds that they enhance moderately the primacy-recency pattern found in visual and verbal memory scores. Finds that news teasers appear to have an effect on processing strategies employed by viewers. (SR)

  9. Interest in news and politics - or situational determinants? Why people watch the news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wonneberger, A.; Schoenbach, K.; van Meurs, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared and integrated the influence of motivational and situational determinants on news viewing behavior. Individual people-meter data allowed the unobtrusive study of news viewing situations. The finding is that the viewing context is much more important than motivations. However,

  10. Survivors on Cancer: the portrayal of survivors in print news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromm, Elizabeth Edsall; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Singer, Rachel Friedman

    2007-12-01

    This study examines the types of news stories that include comments by everyday cancer survivors and the messages or information these individuals provide. Even though these non-celebrity survivors increasingly serve on the front lines of cancer prevention and advocacy efforts and often engage with media, the role they play in the media discourse on cancer has not been a focus of research. We conducted a thematic content analysis of print news articles of non-celebrity cancer survivors in 15 leading national daily newspapers for four consecutive months starting in June 2005 to identify the issues or events that included a survivor perspective and the messages or information conveyed by the everyday survivors. Journalists included survivor commentary primarily when covering cancer fundraising events and when focusing on individual survivorship stories. In overall news coverage involving survivors, breast and prostate cancers received the greatest attention, followed by blood and lung cancers. Survivors spoke mainly about the diagnosis experience and life post-cancer. Our analysis of survivors' comments revealed that discussions of the diagnosis experience often convey fear and a lack of confidence in cancer screening practices, while cancer is portrayed as a positive life event. While evidence of a positive and hopeful portrayal of survivorship is an encouraging finding for continued efforts to decrease stigma associated with a cancer diagnosis and for the public understanding of the disease, it is important to consider potential negative implications of an idealized and restricted media discourse on survivorship. The increasing size and capacity of the survivor community offers opportunities for the cancer advocacy community to consider how news media portrayal of cancer and survivorship may contribute in both positive and potentially detrimental ways to public understanding of this disease, its survivors and life after cancer.

  11. [News in angiology and hemostasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehlen, Françoise; Blondon, Marc; Fontana, Pierre

    2016-01-13

    This update describes contemporary studies of clinical relevance in angiology and hemostasis. We discuss newer developments for the treatment of haemophilia, with a focus on drugs with longer-half lives. Direct anticoagulants (DOAC: rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban and dabigatran) and their approved prescription in Switzerland are summarized, with a description of antidotes that will be available in the near future. We will present new data on the utility of cancer screening at the diagnosis of idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE) and on the evaluation of DOAC in patients with cancer-related VTE. Finally, new studies evaluating the clinical risk-benefit of anticoagulation bridging for patients with vitamin K antagonists undergoing procedures do not support the use of such bridging in the majority of patients.

  12. Updating Recursive XML Views of Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Byron; Cong, Gao; Fan, Wenfei

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the view update problem for XML views published from relational data. We consider XML views defined in terms of mappings directed by possibly recursive DTDs compressed into DAGs and stored in relations. We provide new techniques to efficiently support XML view updates...... specified in terms of XPath expressions with recursion and complex filters. The interaction between XPath recursion and DAG compression of XML views makes the analysis of the XML view update problem rather intriguing. Furthermore, many issues are still open even for relational view updates, and need...... to be explored. In response to these, on the XML side, we revise the notion of side effects and update semantics based on the semantics of XML views, and present effecient algorithms to translate XML updates to relational view updates. On the relational side, we propose a mild condition on SPJ views, and show...

  13. A news media analysis of economic sanction effects on access to medicine in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirandish, Mehrnaz; Rashidian, Arash; Bigdeli, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In the past decades economic sanctions have been used by different countries or international organizations in order to deprive target countries of some transactions. While the sanctions do not target health care systems or public health structures, they may, in fact, affect the availability of health care in target countries. In this study, we used media analysis to assess the impacts of recent sanctions imposed by the Central Bank of Iran in 2012 on access to medicines in Iran. Methods: We searched different sources of written news media including a database of nonspecialized weeklies and magazines, online news sources, web pages of daily newspapers and healthcare oriented weeklies from 2011 to 2013. We searched the sources using the general term “medicine” to reduce the chances of missing relevant items. The identified news media were read, and categorized under three groups of items announcing “shortage of medicines,” “medicines related issues” and “no shortage.” We conducted trend analyzes to see whether the news media related to access to medicines were affected by the economic sanctions. Findings: A total number of 371 relevant news media were collected. The number of news media related to medicines substantially increased in the study period: 30 (8%), 161 (43%) and 180 (49%) were published in 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively. While 145 (39%) of media items referred to the shortage of medicines, 97 (26%) reported no shortage or alleviating of concerns. Conclusion: Media analysis suggests a clear increase in the number of news media reporting a shortage in Iran after the sanctions. In 2013, there were accompanying increases in the number of news media reporting alleviation of the shortages of medicines. Our analysis provides evidence of negative effects of the sanctions on access to medicines in Iran. PMID:26645026

  14. A news media analysis of economic sanction effects on access to medicine in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirandish, Mehrnaz; Rashidian, Arash; Bigdeli, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades economic sanctions have been used by different countries or international organizations in order to deprive target countries of some transactions. While the sanctions do not target health care systems or public health structures, they may, in fact, affect the availability of health care in target countries. In this study, we used media analysis to assess the impacts of recent sanctions imposed by the Central Bank of Iran in 2012 on access to medicines in Iran. We searched different sources of written news media including a database of nonspecialized weeklies and magazines, online news sources, web pages of daily newspapers and healthcare oriented weeklies from 2011 to 2013. We searched the sources using the general term "medicine" to reduce the chances of missing relevant items. The identified news media were read, and categorized under three groups of items announcing "shortage of medicines," "medicines related issues" and "no shortage." We conducted trend analyzes to see whether the news media related to access to medicines were affected by the economic sanctions. A total number of 371 relevant news media were collected. The number of news media related to medicines substantially increased in the study period: 30 (8%), 161 (43%) and 180 (49%) were published in 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively. While 145 (39%) of media items referred to the shortage of medicines, 97 (26%) reported no shortage or alleviating of concerns. Media analysis suggests a clear increase in the number of news media reporting a shortage in Iran after the sanctions. In 2013, there were accompanying increases in the number of news media reporting alleviation of the shortages of medicines. Our analysis provides evidence of negative effects of the sanctions on access to medicines in Iran.

  15. Injury news coverage, relative concern, and support for alcohol-control policies: an impersonal impact explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Michael D; Hayes, Andrew F; Chung, Adrienne H

    2015-01-01

    Research on the impersonal impact hypothesis suggests that news (especially print) coverage of health and safety risks primarily influences perceptions of risk as a societal issue, and not perceptions of personal risk. The authors propose that the impersonal impact of news-impact primarily on concerns about social-level risks-will mediate effects of news stories on support for public health policies; such effects substantively matter as evidence suggests health policies, in turn, have important effects on protective behaviors and health outcomes. In an experiment using 60 randomly selected violent crime and accident news stories manipulated to contain or not contain reference to alcohol use as a causative factor, the authors find that the effect of stories that mention alcohol as a causative factor on support for alcohol-control policies is mediated by social-level concern and not by personal-level concern. In so doing, the authors provide a theoretical explanation as well as empirical evidence regarding the potential for news coverage-including breaking or episodic news-to influence health-related public policy.

  16. Comparing "insider" and "outsider" news coverage of the 2014 Ebola outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Brittany; Radice, Martha; Lauzier, Sophie

    2017-11-09

    Information provided by news media during an infectious disease outbreak can affect the actions taken to safeguard public health. There has been little evaluation of how the content of news published during an outbreak varies by location of the news outlet. This study analyzes coverage of the 2014 Ebola outbreak by one news outlet operating within a country affected by the outbreak and one country not directly affected. A qualitative content analysis was conducted of articles published in two national news outlets, The Globe and Mail (Canada) and the Vanguard (Nigeria), between January 1 and December 31, 2014. Articles available through LexisNexis Academic were sorted by date and sampled using a stratified sampling method (The Globe and Mail n = 100; Vanguard n = 105). A coding scheme was developed and modified to incorporate emerging themes until saturation was achieved. There were substantial differences in outbreak coverage in terms of the topic and content of the articles, as well as the sources consulted. The Globe and Mail framed the outbreak in terms of national security and national interests, as well as presenting it as an international humanitarian crisis. In contrast, the Vanguard framed the outbreak almost exclusively in terms of public health. Our findings highlight how different geographic contexts can shape reporting on the same event. Further research is required to investigate how the political, social or economic situations of a country shape its news media, potentially influencing actions taken to control disease outbreaks.

  17. News Authorship and News Sources: Impacts on Environmental Coverage in The Nigerian Press

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogadimma C. Emenyeonu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the impacts of news authorship and news sources on environmental coverage in the Nigerian press to shed light on the roles they play in news construction. The study finds that journalists in conjunction with policy makers are the catalyst for environmental information, whereas citizens who are pivotal in creating relevant public opinion on environmental issues are left behind. The study reveals that investigative reporting lacks in environmental coverage because most coverage are events driven which explains why environmental news is reported as straight news and as such journalists rely heavily on official sources rather than subsidiary sources. The study opines that for proper environmental coverage, journalists must choose sources from both main and subsidiary actors and revert to proactive, investigative and interpretive reporting so as to make environmental stories relatable to the intended audiences.

  18. Getting the Public Excited about Science through News Stories about Global Sporting Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufoe, A.

    2014-12-01

    News is all about opportunity, and no topic can pull an audience together across ages and countries better than international sports competitions. Sports news excites people, generating conversations at work and at home throughout the duration of the competition. The popularity of these sporting events engages the general public through print and video channels, but it also offers the opportunity for news beyond the competition results - specifically, how science and scientific principles and properties tie in to the sport. Take the Olympics and the World Cup, for example. News sites were more motivated to write and run stories about the aerodynamics of a soccer ball or science behind Olympic bobsleds because these topics are timely: timeliness is one of the most important reasons news stories get written and published. And analysis of even a small sample of news stories and the language used will show why the news organization posted the story. Since the science content is being translated for the general public, the topics can provide a more general explanation of the science behind sporting events, equipment and the act of doing the sport. But beyond international sporting events, even the opening day of baseball, first night of ice hockey, the start of football and the beginning of basketball season provide opportunities for news organizations to provide science news to the public. Scientists need to get ready to collaborate with journalists to tap into the next big sporting event - Super Bowl XLIX. Although it has not been determined which teams are playing yet, scientists can start preparing content-rich stories on the physics of a football, the climate of Phoenix, Arizona, and the green mission of the University of Phoenix Stadium (the location of Super Bowl 2015). This is an opportunity for scientists and media outlets to add science content knowledge to the hype of the event. After the Super Bowl comes the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio, which has already

  19. News exposure predicts anti-Muslim prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, John H; Sibley, Chris G; Osborne, Danny; Bulbulia, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    News coverage of Islamic extremism is reigniting debates about the media's role in promoting prejudice toward Muslims. Psychological theories of media-induced prejudice date to the 1950's, and find support from controlled experiments. However, national-scale studies of media effects on Muslim prejudice are lacking. Orthogonal research investigating media-induced prejudice toward immigrants has failed to establish any link. Moreover, it has been found that people interpret the news in ways that confirm pre-existing attitudes, suggesting that media induced Muslim prejudice in liberal democracies is unlikely. Here, we test the association between news exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice in a diverse national sample from one of the world's most tolerant societies, where media effects are least likely to hold (N = 16,584, New Zealand). In support of media-induced Islamophobia, results show that greater news exposure is associated with both increased anger and reduced warmth toward Muslims. Additionally, the relationship between media exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice does not reliably vary with political ideology, supporting claims that it is widespread representations of Muslims in the news, rather than partisan media biases, that drives anti-Muslim prejudice.

  20. News exposure predicts anti-Muslim prejudice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H Shaver

    Full Text Available News coverage of Islamic extremism is reigniting debates about the media's role in promoting prejudice toward Muslims. Psychological theories of media-induced prejudice date to the 1950's, and find support from controlled experiments. However, national-scale studies of media effects on Muslim prejudice are lacking. Orthogonal research investigating media-induced prejudice toward immigrants has failed to establish any link. Moreover, it has been found that people interpret the news in ways that confirm pre-existing attitudes, suggesting that media induced Muslim prejudice in liberal democracies is unlikely. Here, we test the association between news exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice in a diverse national sample from one of the world's most tolerant societies, where media effects are least likely to hold (N = 16,584, New Zealand. In support of media-induced Islamophobia, results show that greater news exposure is associated with both increased anger and reduced warmth toward Muslims. Additionally, the relationship between media exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice does not reliably vary with political ideology, supporting claims that it is widespread representations of Muslims in the news, rather than partisan media biases, that drives anti-Muslim prejudice.

  1. Modeling news dissemination on nuclear issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis Junior, Jose S.B.; Barroso, Antonio C.O.; Menezes, Mario O., E-mail: jsbrj@ime.usp.b, E-mail: barroso@ipen.b, E-mail: mario@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Using a modified epidemiological model, the dissemination of news by media agents after the occurrence of large scale disasters was studied. A modified compartmented model was developed in a previous paper presented at INAC 2007. There it used to study to the Chernobyl's nuclear accident (1986) and the Concorde airplane crash (2000). Now the model has been applied to a larger and more diverse group of events - nuclear, non-nuclear and naturally caused disasters. To be comprehensive, old and recent events from various regions of the world were selected. A more robust news repository was used, and improved search techniques were developed to ensure that the scripts would not count false positive news. The same model was used but with improved non-linear embedded simulation optimization algorithms to generate the parameters of interest for our model. Individual parameters and some specific combination of them allow some interesting perceptions on how the nature of the accident / disaster gives rise to different profiles of growth and decay of the news. In our studies events involving nuclear causes generate news repercussion with more explosive / robust surge profiles and longer decaying tails than those of other natures. As a consequence of these differences, public opinion and policy makers are also much more sensitive to some issues than to others. The model, through its epidemiological parameters, shows in quantitative manner how 'nervous' the media content generators are with respect to nuclear installations and how resilient this negative feelings about nuclear is. (author)

  2. Measuring the Interestingness of News Articles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pon, R K; Cardenas, A F; Buttler, D J

    2007-09-24

    An explosive growth of online news has taken place. Users are inundated with thousands of news articles, only some of which are interesting. A system to filter out uninteresting articles would aid users that need to read and analyze many articles daily, such as financial analysts and government officials. The most obvious approach for reducing the amount of information overload is to learn keywords of interest for a user (Carreira et al., 2004). Although filtering articles based on keywords removes many irrelevant articles, there are still many uninteresting articles that are highly relevant to keyword searches. A relevant article may not be interesting for various reasons, such as the article's age or if it discusses an event that the user has already read about in other articles. Although it has been shown that collaborative filtering can aid in personalized recommendation systems (Wang et al., 2006), a large number of users is needed. In a limited user environment, such as a small group of analysts monitoring news events, collaborative filtering would be ineffective. The definition of what makes an article interesting--or its 'interestingness'--varies from user to user and is continually evolving, calling for adaptable user personalization. Furthermore, due to the nature of news, most articles are uninteresting since many are similar or report events outside the scope of an individual's concerns. There has been much work in news recommendation systems, but none have yet addressed the question of what makes an article interesting.

  3. News exposure predicts anti-Muslim prejudice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Chris G.; Osborne, Danny; Bulbulia, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    News coverage of Islamic extremism is reigniting debates about the media’s role in promoting prejudice toward Muslims. Psychological theories of media-induced prejudice date to the 1950’s, and find support from controlled experiments. However, national-scale studies of media effects on Muslim prejudice are lacking. Orthogonal research investigating media-induced prejudice toward immigrants has failed to establish any link. Moreover, it has been found that people interpret the news in ways that confirm pre-existing attitudes, suggesting that media induced Muslim prejudice in liberal democracies is unlikely. Here, we test the association between news exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice in a diverse national sample from one of the world’s most tolerant societies, where media effects are least likely to hold (N = 16,584, New Zealand). In support of media-induced Islamophobia, results show that greater news exposure is associated with both increased anger and reduced warmth toward Muslims. Additionally, the relationship between media exposure and anti-Muslim prejudice does not reliably vary with political ideology, supporting claims that it is widespread representations of Muslims in the news, rather than partisan media biases, that drives anti-Muslim prejudice. PMID:28362823

  4. Fake News Detection on Social Media: A Data Mining Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Shu, Kai; Sliva, Amy; Wang, Suhang; Tang, Jiliang; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    Social media for news consumption is a double-edged sword. On the one hand, its low cost, easy access, and rapid dissemination of information lead people to seek out and consume news from social media. On the other hand, it enables the wide spread of "fake news", i.e., low quality news with intentionally false information. The extensive spread of fake news has the potential for extremely negative impacts on individuals and society. Therefore, fake news detection on social media has recently b...

  5. Thrilling News Revisited: The Role of Suspense for the Enjoyment of News Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Kai; Zimmermann, Daniel; Wilbers, Anne-Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on news perception has been dominated by a cognitively oriented perspective on reception processes, whereas emotions have been widely neglected. Consequently, it has remained open which features of a news story might elicit affective responses and hence modulate news perception, shifting the focus to the emotional potential of the narrative. According to the affective-disposition theory, the experience of suspense is the striving force of immersion in fictional dramas. Thereby, a positive affective disposition toward the protagonist of a story and a high likelihood of a bad ending should increase suspense that, in turn, should positively influence reading appreciation and lingering interest in the story. We investigated whether suspense and its determinants also play such a key role in the context of news stories. Study 1 ( n = 263) successfully replicated results of an earlier study, whereas Studies 2 ( n = 255) and 3 ( n = 599) challenged the generalizability of some effects related to manipulated characteristics of a news story. In contrast, correlational relationships between perceived news characteristics and news evaluation were relatively stable. In particular, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending were positively associated with suspense, reading appreciation, and lingering interest. This result indicates a preference for happy endings and contradicts the notion that likely negative outcomes are beneficial for suspense and the enjoyment of news stories, as postulated by the affective-disposition theory in the context of fictional dramas. Moreover, experienced suspense reliably mediated the correlations between, on the one hand, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending and, on the other hand, reading appreciation and lingering interest. The news story's personal relevance was less influential than expected. Further, we observed a large absence of

  6. Thrilling News Revisited: The Role of Suspense for the Enjoyment of News Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Kai; Zimmermann, Daniel; Wilbers, Anne-Kathrin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on news perception has been dominated by a cognitively oriented perspective on reception processes, whereas emotions have been widely neglected. Consequently, it has remained open which features of a news story might elicit affective responses and hence modulate news perception, shifting the focus to the emotional potential of the narrative. According to the affective-disposition theory, the experience of suspense is the striving force of immersion in fictional dramas. Thereby, a positive affective disposition toward the protagonist of a story and a high likelihood of a bad ending should increase suspense that, in turn, should positively influence reading appreciation and lingering interest in the story. We investigated whether suspense and its determinants also play such a key role in the context of news stories. Study 1 (n = 263) successfully replicated results of an earlier study, whereas Studies 2 (n = 255) and 3 (n = 599) challenged the generalizability of some effects related to manipulated characteristics of a news story. In contrast, correlational relationships between perceived news characteristics and news evaluation were relatively stable. In particular, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending were positively associated with suspense, reading appreciation, and lingering interest. This result indicates a preference for happy endings and contradicts the notion that likely negative outcomes are beneficial for suspense and the enjoyment of news stories, as postulated by the affective-disposition theory in the context of fictional dramas. Moreover, experienced suspense reliably mediated the correlations between, on the one hand, participants' liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending and, on the other hand, reading appreciation and lingering interest. The news story's personal relevance was less influential than expected. Further, we observed a large absence of

  7. Tipping news in information accumulation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J. K.

    2010-05-01

    As a continuous opinion dynamics model, the information accumulation system (IAS) includes three basic mechanisms of the news, the inheritance and the diffusion as contributing to the information accumulation process of a system. A system is composed of agents who diffuse information through internal interaction, while each of them has incomplete memory or inheritance rate. The news comes from external sources of information, such as mass media. Previously the model IAS was studied only for the small news problems. In this study, a tipping news problem is considered. A key question of the problem is: what is the minimum strength of advertisement that can tip the minority opinion to a majority one? Dynamics of the IAS is briefly revisited with a special interest on nonlinear behavior of the model. In particular, it is shown that a discrete map of the IAS for a single color problem can be transformed into a logistic map, from which the dynamics of the IAS can be better understood. To show the applicability of the IAS model, the result is applied to explain the concept of the critical population size, which claims that there is a minimum population size for a social knowledge system to be continuously inherited without being lost. And critical size of the tipping news is found analytically in terms of IAS parameters. Some of the key results from the present study are compared in detail with the results from the Brownian particle model, which is believed to be the most similar model to the IAS. The concept of tipping news is used to show that a traditional society can tip at an exceptionally low inter-community exposure. Finally, the result was applied to the language competition problem.

  8. Bad news: The influence of news coverage and Google searches on Gardasil adverse event reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faasse, Kate; Porsius, Jarry T; Faasse, Jonathan; Martin, Leslie R

    2017-12-14

    Human papilloma virus vaccines are a safe and effective tool for reducing HPV infections that can cause cervical cancer. However, uptake of these vaccines has been suboptimal, with many people holding negative beliefs and misconceptions. Such beliefs have been linked with the experience of unpleasant side effects following medical treatment, and media coverage may heighten such concerns. The present study sought to assess the influence of news coverage (number of news articles per month) on adverse event reporting in response to Gardasil vaccination in New Zealand over a 7.5-year period, and whether the influence of news coverage was mediated by internet search activity (Google search volumes). Multiple linear regression analyses and simple mediation analyses were used, controlling for year and number of vaccinations delivered. News coverage in the previous month, and Google search volumes in the same month, were significant predictors of adverse event reporting, after accounting for vaccination rates and year. Concurrent Google search volumes partially mediated the effect of prior news coverage. The results suggest that some of the adverse events reported were not related to the vaccination itself, but to news coverage and internet search volumes, which may have contributed to public concerns about potentially unpleasant or harmful outcomes. These findings have implications for the importance of psychological and social factors in adverse event reporting, and the role of the news media in disseminating health information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A shower of good news

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    It never rains but it pours. So the saying goes, and it was literally true in Brussels this week as well as figuratively, seen from a CERN perspective. I am in Brussels for the special meeting of the European Strategy Session of Council, which yesterday approved the updated European Strategy for Particle Physics. This is the first time that the Council has met in Brussels, and we used the opportunity to meet people whose opinions matter on science in Europe.   From a working lunch with MEPs in the European Parliament on Wednesday, we moved across town to the European Commission, our host for the Council meeting. The day was rounded off with a very stimulating panel discussion on the value of basic research, attended by many Brussels-based opinion leaders, as well as a number of European science research ministers, which brings me to the main reason for our being in Brussels this week. The timing of the CERN Council meeting was fixed to coincide with that of the European Competitiveness Coun...

  10. The interaction of financial news between mass media and new media: Evidence from news on Chinese stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongjie; Zhang, Zuochao; Liu, Lanbiao; Shen, Dehua

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate both the contemporaneous and the lead-lag relationships between the mass media news and the new media news of the financial news on the constitute stocks of the CSI 300. The empirical results show that: (1) there exists a strong correlation between these two types of news; (2) the granger causality direction from new media news to mass media news is increasingly obvious, while the reverse direction has a downward trend; (3) new media is playing a increasingly important role in the stock market and exhibits a trend to substitutes the mass media.

  11. The shifting temporalities of online news

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Henrik; Brügger, Niels

    2018-01-01

    how the temporalities of online news have developed since the first news sites in the mid-1990s. The analytical starting point for this is that such temporalities must be understood as a complex interplay between textual elements on different and overlapping levels of the webpage. This article...... to the present retrieved from the Internet Archive (www.archive. org). The shifting constitutions of time that emerge through these analyses point towards how journalistic practices have interacted with and adopted the possibilities of the digital. Due to an inbuilt instability between textual elements on stored...

  12. Welcome to the Era of Fake News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Albright

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available For the news industry, information is used to tell stories, which have traditionally been organized around “facts”. A growing problem, however, is that fact-based evidence is not relevant to a growing segment of the populace. Journalists need facts to tell stories, but they need data to understand how to engage audiences with this accurate information. The implementation of data is part of the solution to countering the erosion of trust and the decay of social discourse across networked spaces. Rather than following “trends”, news organizations should establish the groundwork to make facts “matter” by shaping the narrative instead of following deceptive statements.

  13. ILRS Website Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Carey E.; Torrence, Mark H.; Pollack, Nathan H.; Tyahla, Lori J.

    2013-01-01

    The ILRS website, http://ilrs.gsfc.nasa.gov, is the central source of information for all aspects of the service. The website provides information on the organization and operation of the ILRS and descriptions of ILRS components data, and products. Furthermore, the website provides an entry point to the archive of these data products available through the data centers. Links are provided to extensive information on the ILRS network stations including performance assesments and data quality evaluations. Descriptions of suported satellite missions (current, future, and past) are provided to aid in station acquisition and data analysis. The website was reently redesigned. Content was reviewed during the update process, ensuring information is current and useful. This poster will provide specific examples of key sections, applicaitons, and webpages.

  14. Thrilling news revisited: The role of suspense for the enjoyment of news stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Kaspar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on news perception has been dominated by a cognitively oriented perspective on reception processes, whereas emotions have been widely neglected. Consequently, it has remained open which features of a news story might elicit affective responses and hence modulate news perception, shifting the focus to the emotional potential of the narrative. According to the affective-disposition theory, the experience of suspense is the striving force of immersion in fictional dramas. Thereby, a positive affective disposition toward the protagonist of a story and a high likelihood of a bad ending should increase suspense that, in turn, should positively influence reading appreciation and lingering interest in the story. We investigated whether suspense and its determinants also play such a key role in the context of news stories. Study 1 (n = 263 successfully replicated results of an earlier study, whereas Studies 2 (n = 255 and 3 (n = 599 challenged the generalizability of some effects related to manipulated characteristics of a news story. In contrast, correlational relationships between perceived news characteristics were relatively stable. In particular, a higher liking of the protagonist and a higher perceived likelihood of a good versus bad ending were positively associated with suspense, reading appreciation, and lingering interest. This result indicates a preference for happy endings and it contradicts the notion that likely negative outcomes are beneficial for suspense and the enjoyment of news stories, as postulated by the affective-disposition theory in the context of fictional dramas. Moreover, experienced suspense reliably mediated the correlations between, on the one hand, participants’ liking of the protagonist and the perceived likelihood of a good ending and, on the other hand, reading appreciation and lingering interest. The news story’s personal relevance was less influential than expected. Further, we observed a large

  15. Race, Nation, and News in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hemant

    1995-01-01

    Argues that racial ideology structures news coverage of race. Illustrates how two manifestations of racial ideology, namely racial hierarchy and temporal distancing, operate in news articles to help create racialized criteria for being an "American." (SR)

  16. Television News Uses: A Cross-National Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Mark R.

    1978-01-01

    Reports that a classification of television news uses and gratifications based on research in Leeds, England, did not adequately encompass the functions of television news for a United States audience. (GW)

  17. Urban Stories : Producing news for urban youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Joke Hermes; Christa de Graaf

    2015-01-01

    This paper will query whether a dedicated news platform can attune to young people’s civic needs? That is to ask: can this be a space that follows a social media logic of conversation and ‘give and take’ – with producers and consumers changing roles or even losing the distinction? How could and

  18. Publicity, news content, and cultural debate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard Kristensen, Nete; From, Unni

    2015-01-01

    Forever (1995) and Sex and the City (2008). The article argues that blockbusters are not only predestined media coverage due to increasingly professional com-munication strategies. Blockbusters also carry both ‘publicist’ and media commercial news value – for many of the same reasons: These movies may...

  19. Effects of popular exemplars in television news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefevere, J.; De Swert, K.; Walgrave, S.

    2012-01-01

    Common people that are apparently randomly selected by journalists to illustrate a news story (popular exemplars) have a substantial effect on what the audience think about the issue. This effect may be partly due to the mere fact that popular exemplars attract attention and act as attention

  20. Product Differentiation in Local TV News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, Tony

    1984-01-01

    Investigates whether size of broadcast market is associated with the variety of information broadcast by television stations in a community and describes what each station within a market contributes to a community's information with respect to unique news stories. Concludes that the larger the market, the more unique stories broadcast. (FL)

  1. Social News Sites as Democratic Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, András

    This thesis presents an empirical analysis and normative theoretical evaluation of Reddit, a social news website, focusing on its coverage of the 2012 US presidential election campaign. It explores the site's structural features and organization, and evaluates its coverage by standards derived from...

  2. Nitrix Oxide, the Gas in the News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 4. Nitrix Oxide, the Gas in the News. T Ramasarma. General Article Volume 4 Issue 4 April 1999 pp 31-41. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/04/0031-0041. Author Affiliations.

  3. Assessing User Behaviour in News Video Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollink, L.; Nguyen, G.; Koelma, D.; Schreiber, A.T.; Worring, M.

    2005-01-01

    The results of a study are presented, in which people queried a news archive using an interactive video retrieval system. 242 search sessions by 39 participants on 24 topics were assessed. Before, during and after the study, participants filled in questionnaires about their expectations of a search.

  4. Predicting Controversial News Using Facebook Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basile, Angelo; Caselli, Tommaso; Nissim, Malvina

    2017-01-01

    Different events and their re- ception in different reader communities may give rise to controversy. We pro- pose a distant supervised entropy-based model that uses Facebook reactions as proxies for predicting news controversy. We prove the validity of this approach by running within- and

  5. The Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Digital News Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris

    2016-01-01

    these interrelated changes in the media ecology if we want to grasp the newfound complexity of media consumption. Specifically, it outlines how audience engagement with news and different spatiotemporal configurations made possible by digital technology are trends that complement and reinforce one another in terms...

  6. Alternative Fuel News, Vol. 2, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, K.; Riley, C.; Raye, M.

    1998-11-30

    This issue of Alternative Fuel News highlights the accomplishments of the Clean Cities coalitions during the past 5 years. Now Clean Cities advocates in city after city across the US are building stations and driving alternative fuel vehicles, in addition to enhancing public awareness.

  7. News Agencies and Global Communication: Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is fundamentally, an overview of western news agencies and the roles they play in international communication. It argues that most of these roles have some consequences undesirable to the Third World Nations. Instead of facilitating the development of the poor nations of the world, the study reveals that the ...

  8. News Values and the Vividness of Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennamer, J. David

    1988-01-01

    Claims that the long list of traditionally accepted news values can be replaced with a single concept, vividness, and that vivid information may not be the best information. Blames much of the alleged deficiencies associated with journalistic practice such as sensationalism and preoccupation with conflict on the journalistic practice of writing to…

  9. Fake news threatens a climate literate world

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    As the challenges and environmental consequences of climate change manifest, the need for a society of science-literate citizens is becoming increasingly apparent. Achieving this, however, is no easy task, particularly given the proliferation of fake news and the seeds of confusion it can sow

  10. Zimbabwe Science News: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · Journal Quality.

  11. News Agencies and Global Communication: Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    they play in international communication. It argues that most of these roles have some consequences undesirable to the Third World Nations. Instead of facilitating the development of the poor nations of the world, the study reveals that the major news agencies by their worldwide operations are impeding the development of ...

  12. News Writing, Poetry, Speech Share Universal Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braddock, Clayton

    1990-01-01

    Maintains that journalism skills courses must also impart to students a sense of the splendid power of language and the artisanship of molding clear ideas with words. Points out that it is up to the teacher of news writing to remind future journalists of their rich language heritage. (SR)

  13. Olfaction in Accipitrid vultures | Gilbert | Vulture News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract. Vulture News Vol. 55, 2006: 6-7. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and ...

  14. Breaking Bad News for Patients with Gastro-Intestinal Malignancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No patient was told about the prognosis and the chances of cure. Conclusion: Sympathy over-ride empathy in communicating bad news to Sudanese patients suffering of cancer. Patient education and training in breaking the bad news is needed. Key words: Communication skills, breaking bad news, truth telling, Sudan.

  15. Network Television Evening News Coverage of Infectious Disease Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Michael; Wartenberg, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Examines coverage of several infectious diseases and teenage suicide to see whether television news favors covering illness where it clusters or when it occurs near major news centers where it is easier to cover. Finds that television news did go to where the illness broke out but tended to favor reporting urban over rural suicides. (RS)

  16. 7 CFR 500.9 - Photographs for news or advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Photographs for news or advertising. 500.9 Section 500..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL ARBORETUM Conduct on U.S. National Arboreturm Property § 500.9 Photographs for news or advertising. Photographs for news purposes may be taken at the USNA without prior...

  17. News and corporate reputation: Empirical findings from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, M.M.; Kleinnijenhuis, J.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the influence of business news on corporate reputation. A panel survey was used to measure the reputations of six companies and two professional sectors. Media coverage was analyzed by focusing on the tone of two different types of news. News about the successes of the

  18. Affective priming during the processing of news articles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgartner, S.E.; Wirth, W.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the role of affective priming during the processing of news articles. It is assumed that the valence of the affective response to a news article will influence the processing of subsequent news articles. More specifically, it is hypothesized that participants who read

  19. A Predictive Framework for Determining How Journalists Determine News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudino, James L.

    To determine how to articulate a concrete definition of the substance of the journalist's occupation, this paper offers a propositional framework of news value based on Kurt Lewin's gatekeeper model. First, the paper follows the established suggestion that news decisions are best studied from a gatekeeping perspective or that "news is…

  20. Dow Jones News/Retrieval--An IndepthBxook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Tim

    1984-01-01

    This introduction to the nonbibliographic databases offered by the Dow Jones News/Retrieval Service describes file content and search strategies in four groups: Dow Jones Business and Economic News; Dow Jones Quotes (market prices for stocks and other securities); Financial and Investment Services; General News and Information Services. Examples…

  1. News and events | Page 7 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Fostering urban resilience: IDRC at the IPCC Cities and Climate Change Science Conference · Skyline of Nairobi. Mutua Matheka. Event. Think Tank Initiative to host African Evidence Informed Policy Forum · News at IDRC logo. News. IDRC invests in research and knowledge to empower women in India. Search news and ...

  2. College Students' News Gratifications, Media Use, and Current Events Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Richard C.; Basil, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Results of testing uses and gratifications theory with college students show students' media use and surveillance needs increase college year. Demographic differences and gratifications sought drive news media use. Surveillance needs result in increased use of all news media, whereas entertainment needs result in television news and CNN viewing.…

  3. Are news media substitutes? Gratifications, contents, and uses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wurff, R.

    2011-01-01

    Internet is generally expected to have one of two effects on traditional news media: It displaces them, or it forces them into distinct market niches. A shared assumption underlying both expectations is that news media displacement, or substitution, is a function of the degree to which news media

  4. Comprehending News Videotexts: The Influence of the Visual Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Informed by dual coding theory, this study explores the role of the visual content in L2 listeners' comprehension of news videotexts. L1 research into the visual characteristics and comprehension of news videotexts is outlined, subsequently informing the quantitative analysis of audiovisual correspondence in the news videotexts used. In each of…

  5. 32 CFR 516.53 - News media and other inquiries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true News media and other inquiries. 516.53 Section... Litigation in Which the United States Has An Interest § 516.53 News media and other inquiries. News media... clearance. Local public affairs officers will refer press inquiries to HQDA (SAPA), WASH DC 20310-1500, with...

  6. CSIR general news: February-December 2007 issues

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info CSIR e-News1_2007.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 1704 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name CSIR e-News1_2007.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 CSIR General News Term...

  7. News for the '90s: A Question of Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Rosalind, Ed.; Thoman, Elizabeth, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This special issue of "Media & Values" gives a perspective on how news is changing, what is missing in the news, and how to spot bias and misinformation in news coverage, both print and electronic. Articles examine the impact of computer imaging on the credibility of photographs and the issue of privacy--just how far should journalists go to get a…

  8. The impact of firm specific news on implied volatilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W.M. Donders (Monique); A.C.F. Vorst (Ton)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractWe study the implied volatility behavior of call options around scheduled news announcement days. Implied volatilities increase significantly during the pre-event period and reach a maximum on the eve of the news announcement. After the news release, implied volatility drops sharply and

  9. Comparing local TV news with national TV news in cancer coverage: an exploratory content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul-Joo; Long, Marilee; Slater, Michael D; Song, Wen

    2014-12-01

    The authors compared local TV news with national TV news in terms of cancer coverage using a nationally representative sample of local nightly TV and national network TV (i.e., ABC, CBS, NBC, and CNN) cancer news stories that aired during 2002 and 2003. Compared with national TV news, local TV cancer stories were (a) much shorter in length, (b) less likely to report on cancer prevention (i.e., preventive behaviors and screening tests), and (c) less likely to reference national organizations (i.e., National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Food and Drug Administration) that have made clear recommendations about ways to prevent cancer. The implications of these findings for health communication research and cancer education were discussed.

  10. [Diagnostic Services Case Update : Chase Lake National Wildlife Refuge : 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This record contains two Diagnostic Services Case Updates, one from 8/7/2015 and one from 8/10/2015. The updates provide information about recent bird mortality...

  11. Cancer Clusters in Delaware? How One Newspaper Turned Official Statistics into News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor W. Perez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The flagship newspaper for the state of Delaware, the News Journal, has been instrumental in disseminating information from state-generated reports of cancer clusters to its readers over the past 7 years. The stories provide colorful maps of census tracts designated as clusters, often on the front page, and detail the types of elevated cancers found in these tracts and the purported relationship of elevated cancer rates to local industry pollution. Though the News Journal also provided its readers with advice about interpreting these data with caution, it uncritically presented these data. Using the state’s unusual definition and measurement of elevated cancer incidence as cancer clusters, it transformed questionable statistics into an alarming public issue. This article critically examines these news reports and the state-generated reports they utilized.

  12. Conference Calls: an Empirical Analysis of Information Content and the Type of Disclosed News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Cardoso Moreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes whether the type of news and the earnings persistence influence the amount of in formation that is voluntarily disclosed by the companies. As a proxy for voluntary disclosure we use the information content of the conference calls of the companies listed on the BM&F Bovespa from 2008 to 2015. The results indicate that the companies with bad news provide more information during the conference call (presentation section and questions & answers section than the companies with good news. Moreover, were found evidence that the companies with less persistent positive earnings provide a larger amount of information than the companies with more persistent positive earnings. Regarding companies with negative earnings we did not find any relation between persistence and the informational content.

  13. A Goal Programming Model for Selection and Scheduling of Advertisements on Online News Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manik, Prerna; Gupta, Anshu; Jha, P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Digital revolution has resulted in a paradigm shift in the field of marketing with online advertising becoming increasingly popular as it offers the reach, range, scale and interactivity to organizations to influence their target customers. Moreover, web advertisement is the primary revenue stream...... for several websites that provide free services to internet users. The website management team needs to do a lot of planning and optimally schedule various advertisements (ads) to maximize revenue, taking care of advertisers' needs under system constraints. In this paper, we have considered the case of news...... websites that provide news to its viewers for free with ads as the primary source of their revenue. The considered news website consists of many webpages with different banners for advertisement. Each banner consists of different number of partitions and cost per partition varies for different rectangular...

  14. News in an age of competition: The case of sensationalism in Dutch television news, 1995-2001

    OpenAIRE

    Hendriks Vettehen, P.G.J.; Nuijten, C.M.; Beentjes, J.W.J.

    2005-01-01

    Trends in sensationalism in Dutch television news were investigated through a content analysis of 3 Dutch TV news programs in 1995 and 2001, a period when the competition between Dutch TV news programs increased. Indicators of sensationalism were derived from 4 categories: tabloid packaging, basic needs content, concreteness, and proximity. Results showed a trend toward the use of more sensational production techniques in Dutch TV news. However, these increases were not found on all indicator...

  15. A website for astronomical news in Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gil, A.

    2008-06-01

    Noticias del Cosmos is a collection of web pages within the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Valencia's website where we publish short daily summaries of astronomical press releases. Most, if not all of, the releases are originally written in English, and often Spanish readers may find them difficult to understand because not many people are familiar with the scientific language employed in these releases. Noticias del Cosmos has two principal aims. First, we want to communicate the latest astronomical news on a daily basis to a wide Spanish-speaking public who would otherwise not be able to read them because of the language barrier. Second, daily news can be used as a tool to introduce the astronomical topics of the school curriculum in a more immediate and relevant way. Most of the students at school have not yet reached a good enough level in their knowledge of English to fully understand a press release, and Noticias del Cosmos offers them and their teachers this news in their mother tongue. During the regular programme of school visits at the Observatory we use the news as a means of showing that there is still a lot to be discovered. So far the visits to the website have been growing steadily. Between June 2003 and June 2007 we had more than 30,000 visits (excluding 2006). More than 50% of the visits come from Spain, followed by visitors from South and Central America. The feedback we have received from teachers so far has been very positive, showing the usefulness of news items in the classroom when teaching astronomy.

  16. A synthesis of the literature on breaking bad news or truth telling: potential for research in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martis, Lawrence; Westhues, Anne

    2013-01-01

    The high incidence of fatal diseases, inequitable access to health care, and socioeconomic disparities in India generate plentiful clinical bad news including diagnosis of a life-limiting disease, poor prognosis, treatment failure, and impending death. These contexts compel health care professionals to become the messengers of bad news to patients and their families. In global literature on breaking bad news, there is very little about such complex clinical interactions occurring in India or guiding health care providers to do it well. The purpose of this article is to identify the issues for future research that would contribute to the volume, comprehensiveness, and quality of empirical literature on breaking bad news in clinical settings across India. Towards this end, we have synthesized the studies done across the globe on breaking bad news, under four themes: (a) deciding the amount of bad news to deliver; (b) attending to cultural and ethical issues; (c) managing psychological distress; and (d) producing competent messengers of bad news. We believe that robust research is inevitable to build an indigenous knowledge base, enhance communicative competence among health care professionals, and thereby to improve the quality of clinical interactions in India.

  17. News in an age of competition: The case of sensationalism in Dutch television news, 1995-2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks Vettehen, P.G.J.; Nuijten, C.M.; Beentjes, J.W.J.

    2005-01-01

    Trends in sensationalism in Dutch television news were investigated through a content analysis of 3 Dutch TV news programs in 1995 and 2001, a period when the competition between Dutch TV news programs increased. Indicators of sensationalism were derived from 4 categories: tabloid packaging, basic

  18. Is the internet about to take over? How using online news is related to offline news consumption patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, D.; Schönbach, K.

    2011-01-01

    In the ongoing debate on the role of the Internet in public discourse, it is often assumed that online news fundamentally changes mass communication. But is there a relationship between online news use and a differentiation in overall news consumption patterns? The results of a large-scale survey

  19. Audiovisual infotainment in European news: a comparative content analysis of Dutch, Spanish and Irish television news programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alencar, A.; Kruikemeier, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates to what extent audiovisual infotainment features can be found in the narrative structure of television news in three European countries news. Content analysis included a sample of 639 news reports (or reporter packages) aired in the first three weeks of September 2013, in six

  20. Keeping Updated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reading, David; Botjes, Erna; Nørhede, Pia

    2013-01-01

    . The best way to stay up to date is via the Internet. There are numerous websites that fulfill this function, including those run by regulatory bodies, scientific organizations, and groups whose specific objective is to provide industry with helpful information to assist with the assessment and management...... of risk. This chapter guides food companies to the most important web links....

  1. The effects of human interest and conflict news frames on the dynamics of political knowledge gains: evidence from a cross-national study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jebril, N.; de Vreese, C.H.; van Dalen, A.; Albaek, E.

    2013-01-01

    A well-functioning democracy needs the news media to provide information to its citizens. It is therefore essential to understand what kinds of news contents contribute to gains in citizens' political knowledge and for whom this takes place. Extant research is divergent on this matter, especially

  2. Experimental Measures of News Personalization in Google News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozza, Vittoria; Hoang, Van Tien; Petrocchi, Marinella

    2016-01-01

    Search engines and social media keep trace of profile- and behavioral-based distinct signals of their users, to provide them personalized and recommended content. Here, we focus on the level of web search personalization, to estimate the risk of trapping the user into so called Filter Bubbles. Our...

  3. Children and Terrorism-Related News: Training Parents in Coping and Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Furr, Jami M.; Beidas, Rinad S.; Weiner, Courtney L.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined associations between televised news regarding risk for future terrorism and youth outcomes and investigated the effects of training mothers in an empirically based approach to addressing such news with children. This approach—Coping and Media Literacy (CML)—emphasized modeling, media literacy, and contingent reinforcement and was compared via randomized design to Discussion as Usual (DAU). Ninety community youth (aged 7−13 years) and their mothers viewed a televised news clip about the risk of future terrorism, and threat perceptions and state anxiety were assessed preclip, postclip, and postdiscussion. Children responded to the clip with elevated threat perceptions and anxiety. Children of CML-trained mothers exhibited lower threat perceptions than DAU youth at postclip and at postdiscussion. Additionally, CML-trained mothers exhibited lower threat perceptions and state anxiety at postclip and postdiscussion than did DAU mothers. Moreover, older youth responded to the clip with greater societal threat perception than did younger youth. Findings document associations between terrorism-related news, threat perceptions, and anxiety and support the utility of providing parents with strategies for addressing news with children. Implications and research suggestions are discussed. PMID:18665686

  4. KONSEP PENULISAN JURNALISTIK MASA DEPAN DAN DESAIN STORYBOARD UNTUK ONLINE NEWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ido Priyana Hadi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Entering this 21st century%2C press (on newspapers and magazines no longer count on physical printed edition to meet the readers demand on actual news. Press are required to provide online information in term of minutes or even seconds as soon as an event is occuring. Thus%2C speed has become an essential factor in journalism. News is associated to new-ness. Newspapers and magazines are competing one another to serve news fresh from the oven. Journalism has proceeds to an outstanding speed and dynamics which transforms its operation pattern%2C affiliated with the boost of information technology and communication especially the internet. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Memasuki trend abad ke 21 pers cetak (koran dan majalah sekarang tidak saja mengandalkan edisi fisik cetak untuk menjumpai para pembaca setianya dengan sajian berita-berita aktualnya. Tetapi dituntut mampu memberikan sajian informasi online yang seketika%2C dalam hitungan menit atau bahkan detik atas peristiwa atau kejadian disuatu tempat. Karenanya unsur kecepatan (speed menjadi sesuatu yang esensial dalam jurnalistik. News yang berarti berita terkandung didalamnya makna kebaruan. Surat kabar dan majalah dengan sendirinya berkompetisi dalam menyampaikan kebaruan tersebut. Karenanya kehidupan jurnalistik mengalami percepatan serta dinamika yang luar biasa%2C yang pada akhirnya mengubah pola pengerjaan jurnalistik seiring dengan kemajuan di bidang teknologi informasi dan komunikasi khususnya internet. Writing%2C Journalism%2C Online News%2C Storyboard Design.

  5. What Does Not Kill You Makes You Stronger. Legal Evolutionism and the Unusual Cases of Google News

    OpenAIRE

    Granieri, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Google News is an unusual case where the dominant firm of the market for searches allegedly abuses its position by using news which publishers consider as subject to their copyright. Publishers claim that there is an antitrust violation and Google’s service diverts users on its sites, reducing traffic for competitors. All such allegations hinge on the issue of snippets as really works of authorship, as such protected. Several interpretations of copyright laws are possible to provide an answer...

  6. Cohesiveness in financial news and its relation to market volatility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piškorec, Matija; Antulov-Fantulin, Nino; Novak, Petra Kralj; Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha; Vodenska, Irena; Smuc, Tomislav

    2014-05-22

    Motivated by recent financial crises, significant research efforts have been put into studying contagion effects and herding behaviour in financial markets. Much less has been said regarding the influence of financial news on financial markets. We propose a novel measure of collective behaviour based on financial news on the Web, the News Cohesiveness Index (NCI), and we demonstrate that the index can be used as a financial market volatility indicator. We evaluate the NCI using financial documents from large Web news sources on a daily basis from October 2011 to July 2013 and analyse the interplay between financial markets and finance-related news. We hypothesise that strong cohesion in financial news reflects movements in the financial markets. Our results indicate that cohesiveness in financial news is highly correlated with and driven by volatility in financial markets.

  7. Cohesiveness in Financial News and its Relation to Market Volatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piškorec, Matija; Antulov-Fantulin, Nino; Novak, Petra Kralj; Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha; Vodenska, Irena; Šmuc, Tomislav

    2014-05-01

    Motivated by recent financial crises, significant research efforts have been put into studying contagion effects and herding behaviour in financial markets. Much less has been said regarding the influence of financial news on financial markets. We propose a novel measure of collective behaviour based on financial news on the Web, the News Cohesiveness Index (NCI), and we demonstrate that the index can be used as a financial market volatility indicator. We evaluate the NCI using financial documents from large Web news sources on a daily basis from October 2011 to July 2013 and analyse the interplay between financial markets and finance-related news. We hypothesise that strong cohesion in financial news reflects movements in the financial markets. Our results indicate that cohesiveness in financial news is highly correlated with and driven by volatility in financial markets.

  8. Science versus News: On the Cutting Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, A. L.; French, V.; Villard, R.; Maran, S. P.

    1998-12-01

    This session is to aid communication between scientists and journalists, to motivate astronomers to be active in communicating their science to the public via the press, and to help both astronomers and journalists to understand the constraints under which the other group is operating. The session consists of two talks of about 20 minutes, followed by a panel discussion. The first talk is "What Makes a Topic News?" This segment, by Miles O'Brien of CNN News, takes the AAS audiences behind the scenes in the world of producing science news stories. --- What drives selection of assignments? How does the science reporter convince their editor to cover a story? What factors about television producing help and also hurt getting science subjects across to the public? The second talk is "Public Knowledge on Science: The Growing Gap Between Scientists and the Taxpayer." This presentation by Jon Miller, a public opinion expert will emphasize the problems scientists and society, face in communicating to the public. --- What does the public know about science and scientific method? How much translation is required to communicate with the public to engage their interest without unacceptable compromise of scientific accuracy? The final segment is a panel of both science journalists and astronomers moderated by Steve Maran. Together they will tackle a question that gets to the heart of the Science-Vs-News controversies, "When Should Results Go Public?" Published too soon, science is called "hype"; Published too late, it is no longer "news." Should all results be peer reviewed first, and is that a satisfactory prerequisite? Do scientists take self-serving advantage of the public interest by making announcements before results appear in journals? How do we address the public desire to experience science unfolding and to see real-time data such as planetary science missions? The panelists are Dr. David Helfand, from Columbia University, Dr. Bruce Margon, from the University of

  9. Cardiology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the year 2014, there were certain remarkable trials that have changed the practice of cardiology and beyond that these tried to explained some long awaited unanswered questions. Like SIMPLICITY HTN-3 trial clearly explained the uselessness of renal denervation therapy in systemic hypertension. PARADIGM-HF trial provided positive data that may be useful to enrich the basket of medical treatment with a new drug LCZ 696 after a long time. Another important meta-analysis in heart failure questioned the status of beta blockers as standard therapy to improve prognosis in patients with concomitant heart failure and atrial fibrillation . In myocardial infraction , CvLPRIT trial supported the concept of complete revascularization at the time of primary PCI and TASTE trials failed to show expected benefit of thrombus aspiration in acute MI. FFR got more strength from FAME 2 trial. Another important question that was addressed in SECURITY trial was optimal duration of DAPT after second generation DES implantation. One year follow-up results of ABSORB II suggested that bioresorbable scaffolds are currently facing problem of stent thrombosis that might be taken care in near future with improvement in strut technology. Successful use of "Heart in a box" machine provided a major thrust for cardiac transplantation. SEARCH-AF evaluated the efficacy of a novel mobile health technology in the real world to screen for atrial fibrillation (now called as life style disease. A Meta-analysis provided a more comprehensive picture of the new oral anticoagulants as a therapeutic option in atrial fibrillation. Positive results for trans catheter pm-VSD closure in paediatric population were also demonstrated by a randomized controlled trial. Role of corticosteroids in tubercular pericarditis also got the answer in a trial published in 2014.

  10. TELEVISION NEWSCAST NEWS PRODUCTION: THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE NEWS PROCESS AND PROFESSIONAL ROUTINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Moratti Frazão

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Journalism dynamics have been modified due to the insertion of the audience in the production process by means of participatory journalism. In that light, it is important to ask: in what ways could the participation of the audience modify the production process of reports and the professional routines of journalists? This work focuses on a TV newscast broadcast by the RJTV (Rede Globo Rio de Janeiro, called “Parceiro do RJ” – in which pairs of young participants took part in the process of news production – and it was chosen to be the empirical object of this study. The objective of this work is to analyze the ways in which the participants act, by pointing out the differences among them in their production of the newscast reports. The theoretical background was provided by various authors in the area of genre studies, participatory journalism, and quality. The empirical object was analyzed by means of videos based on the method of “Addressing Modes” (GOMES, 2011, as well as interviews performed with newscast representatives during a visit to the Brazilian television organization’s headquarters. 

  11. THE REPRESENTATION OF EGYPTIAN PEOPLE’S VOICE IN THE JAKARTA GLOBE NEWS PHOTOGRAPHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fini Fitriani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: As a product of mass media, news photograph is an image which provides the viewers with a valuable source of information and news story. All events captured in photographs turn into a news photo. Besides covering the news with fact, news photographs do not only have surface meanings, but also deeper meanings to be interpreted by each viewer. The phenomenon of demonstration, particularly the massive demonstration in Egypt in 2011, offers a good chance to discover how visual messages have been presented to guide interpretation of foreign news events. Principally, demonstration is an expression of the people’s voices, and thus, their voices are related closely with their demands, grievances and wishes related to the new government. Here, the photographs are able to portray and reflect the people’s voices through the compositions and contents (meanings involved in the photos. This study is aimed at discovering the portrayal of the voice of the people (the protesters in the news photographs of the Indonesian online newspaper, The Jakarta Globe. The data consist of 15 news photographs taken from The Jakarta Globe online newspaper published in January – October 2011. The study employs qualitative method framed with semiotic analysis using Roland Barthes’ theory of orders of signification and photographic message. The results of the study show that The Jakarta Globe visually constructs this event (demonstration by focusing on the human action (the protesters. Thus, the voice of the people is portrayed in the photo subjects (the protesters and the included objects of the photo. Meanwhile, the technical aspects of the photos play a meaningful role in emerging the portrayal of the people’s voice. There are four voices revealed by the people in the 15 photographs, namely the voice of freedom, the voice of peace, the voice of justice and the voice of human rights. The photo text including headlines and captions also interact with

  12. Violence and suffering in television news: toward a broader conception of harmful television content for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walma van der Molen, Juliette H

    2004-06-01

    Traditionally, the public and professional debate about the inappropriateness of media violence for children focuses mainly on the negative effects of violence in entertainment programming. However, since the terrorist attacks on September 11th and the recent coverage of the war in Iraq, the suitability of real-life news violence for children may be doubted more than ever. To draw attention to the potential harmful effects of violence presented in news programs, it is argued in the present article that health care professionals should advocate a broader conception of media violence than thus far has been used. On the basis of recent research, potential effects of violent news content, such as fear, aggression, and desensitization, are discussed and recommendations are provided on how to abate these outcomes.

  13. Networked Intermedia Agenda Setting: The Geography of a Hyperlinked Scandinavian News Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøvaag, Helle; Stavelin, Eirik; Karlsson, Michael

    How does agenda setting work within the hyperlinked Scandinavian news ecology? This paper investigates intermedia agenda setting within and between the local, regional, national and supra-national levels in Sweden, Denmark and Norway; analyses the center/periphery dimensions of hyperlink connecti......How does agenda setting work within the hyperlinked Scandinavian news ecology? This paper investigates intermedia agenda setting within and between the local, regional, national and supra-national levels in Sweden, Denmark and Norway; analyses the center/periphery dimensions of hyperlink...... between news agendas in the three countries, and c) the connectedness enabled by size, resources and central location in the Scandinavian hyperlinked information structure. The network analysis provides new insights into the relationship between centralized political structures, media ownership dispersal...

  14. Character of Diction of Headline News in West Sumatra Mass Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elly Delfia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Diction headline mass media is important because it describes the overall news content. The mass media has a moral responsibility to provide learning for the reader about the correct use of language. That's called character diction. Diction character or character choice of words used in the title of the news media can influence the character speaking readers for diction has meaning and soul. Diction used in the mass media headlines West Sumatra, including euphimisme, sarcasm, regional language (language Minangkabau, foreign language (English, idioms, abbreviations and acronyms, Indonesian non standard, and nicknames

  15. Kind News Mini Edition, Jrs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children & Animals, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Contains suggestions for students regarding making up nicknames for animals based on their observations. Also includes information about the overpopulation of pets and urges students to write letters to their newspaper editors about this problem. A sample letter is provided. (TW)

  16. Do People Prefer to Pass Along Good or Bad News? Valence and Relevance of News as Predictors of Transmission Propensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath

    1996-11-01

    Anecdotal evidence seems to indicate that exaggeratedly bad news may propagate in the marketplace of ideas. Three studies investigate whether people prefer to pass along pieces of bad news or good news that are equated for "surprisingness." People typically prefer to pass along central rather than extreme information (i.e., news that is less surprising rather than more surprising). However, when confronted with extreme information, the results support a preference for congruence, that is, people prefer to pass along news that is congruent with the emotional valence of the domain in question. This means that in emotionally negative domains, contrary to some theoretical predictions, people are willing to pass along bad news even when it is exaggeratedly bad. At the same time, however, people transmit exaggeratedly good news in emotionally positive domains. The general discussion indicates how these results may inform research on word of mouth for consumer products and social relations in organizations.

  17. Recommendations for how to communicate bad news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Villa López

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The communication, along with the control of the symptoms and the emotional support are the basic instruments that are used in the daily development of our profession. To be little capable at the time of notifying bad news can generate an added suffering unnecessary in the person who receives the new and a deterioration in the relation professional-patient.In many occasions, at the time of approaching these situations, the professional of the health usually feels anguish, fear and restlessness, this is because during is scared and restlessness this happens because during his stage of studies in the faculty the student has received a formation based on the binomial health-disease from a totally biological perspective forgetting the abilities communication.Supported in different bibliographical sources, this article tries to analyze the factors that influence when communicating the bad news and, to suggest some preventatives ideas on how giving them trying to prevent the burnout syndrome.

  18. Alternative Fuel News, Vol. 2, No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NREL

    1999-03-17

    The cover story in this issue of the Alternative Fuel News highlights the niche market principle; the places in which AFVs would best fit. This year's SEP funding is expected to be the springboard needed for the development of niche projects. The Clean Cities Program, by matching those needs and attributes in niches, can dramatically increase the attractiveness of AFVs and make an impact on those high-mileage, high-use fleets.

  19. Welcome to the Era of Fake News

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Albright

    2017-01-01

    For the news industry, information is used to tell stories, which have traditionally been organized around “facts”. A growing problem, however, is that fact-based evidence is not relevant to a growing segment of the populace. Journalists need facts to tell stories, but they need data to understand how to engage audiences with this accurate information. The implementation of data is part of the solution to countering the erosion of trust and the decay of social discourse across networked space...

  20. Alternative Fuel News, Vol. 2, No. 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NREL

    1999-01-06

    In this issue of the Alternative Fuel News, the authors remember what happened just 25 years ago (the energy crisis of 1973) and reiterate that foreign oil dependence is still a national issue. Highlighted are some the successes in the Clean Cities Program and the alternative fuels industry. Also featured is the Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition (NGVC) and the United States Postal Service (USPS) delivers with AFVs.

  1. What's unusual in online disease outbreak news?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collier Nigel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate and timely detection of public health events of international concern is necessary to help support risk assessment and response and save lives. Novel event-based methods that use the World Wide Web as a signal source offer potential to extend health surveillance into areas where traditional indicator networks are lacking. In this paper we address the issue of systematically evaluating online health news to support automatic alerting using daily disease-country counts text mined from real world data using BioCaster. For 18 data sets produced by BioCaster, we compare 5 aberration detection algorithms (EARS C2, C3, W2, F-statistic and EWMA for performance against expert moderated ProMED-mail postings. Results We report sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV, mean alerts/100 days and F1, at 95% confidence interval (CI for 287 ProMED-mail postings on 18 outbreaks across 14 countries over a 366 day period. Results indicate that W2 had the best F1 with a slight benefit for day of week effect over C2. In drill down analysis we indicate issues arising from the granular choice of country-level modeling, sudden drops in reporting due to day of week effects and reporting bias. Automatic alerting has been implemented in BioCaster available from http://born.nii.ac.jp. Conclusions Online health news alerts have the potential to enhance manual analytical methods by increasing throughput, timeliness and detection rates. Systematic evaluation of health news aberrations is necessary to push forward our understanding of the complex relationship between news report volumes and case numbers and to select the best performing features and algorithms.

  2. Relance du Gemini News Service | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Agence de presse basée à Londres, le Gemini News Service achetait des reportages de correspondants dans des pays en développement et les distribuait aux médias d'information partout dans le monde. La fermeture de l'agence en 2002 après trente ans d'activité s'explique en partie par les frais d'exploitation élevés ...

  3. Agenda Setting Theory and International News: A Comparative Analysis of News Articles Coverage on Iraq War in Malaysian English Newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassed Hanaa Kadum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the paper is to discuss the application of Agenda Setting Theory in the publication of news about Iraq war in - the New Straits Times press (NSTP and the Star. This study examines a longitudinal content analysis of 535 news through three periods (before, during and after the occupation of Iraq. The result of this study shows that NSTP gave more emphasis to the issue of the policy of unipolar for the United States while the Star gave more emphasis to the issue of Iraqi suffering. Thus, this study can shed some light on how Eastern country views Iraq and this perhaps could help Iraq reform its image by expanding the scope of diplomatic, business and cultural actions. This study provides support to the theoretical proposition that the media are not successful in telling the audience what to think, but it is stunningly successful in telling the audience what to think about (first level of Agenda Setting. This study also provides support to the theoretical proposition that differences in media organizations have profound impact on how the important issues are framed.

  4. Update on scleral lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Deborah S

    2008-07-01

    Scleral rigid gas-permeable lenses play an important and underappreciated role in the treatment of corneal disease. This review provides an update on scleral rigid gas-permeable lenses for the visual rehabilitation of ectasia and irregular astigmatism, and an update on scleral rigid gas-permeable lenses in the therapy of ocular surface disease. Several series and one case report present advances in the treatment of ocular surface disease with scleral rigid gas-permeable lenses. In addition, there are two reports describing one center's consecutive case experience using modern scleral lens design, predominantly in patients with ectasia and postkeratoplasty astigmatism. Finally, a comprehensive article reviewing the history and principles behind current scleral rigid gas-permeable lenses, with particular attention to the use of scleral rigid gas-permeable lenses in the management of ocular surface disorders was published. Clinicians who treat patients with ocular surface disease should be aware of scleral rigid gas-permeable lenses as a therapeutic option for their patients. Advances in lens design make scleral rigid gas-permeable lenses a practical option for an increasing number and variety of patients with corneal disease.

  5. Use of the terms "schizophrenia" and "schizophrenic" in the South Korean news media: a content analysis of newspapers and news programs in the last 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Hyun; Choi, Young-Min; Kim, Bongseog; Lee, Dong-Woo; Gim, Min-Sook

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we explored the meaning attributed to the words "jungshinbunyeolbyung" (schizophrenia) and "jungshinbunyeol" (schizophrenic) in South Korean newspapers and news programs in the last 10 years. We screened the websites of three national newspapers and the broadcasts of three nationwide television news programs from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2010. We classified a total of 490 articles and 257 news segments by category and quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed them. The articles and news segments were assigned to one of the following categories based on their use of the term "schizophrenia": 1) negative, 2) neutral or positive, 3) incidental, and 4) metaphorical. The negative viewpoint accounted for 349 incidences (46.7%), while the neutral and positive viewpoints included 225 incidences (30.1%). Incidental uses accounted for 95 incidences (12.7%), and metaphorical uses accounted for 78 incidences (10.4%). The majority of the negative uses focused on violence or dangers posed by patients (137 mentions, 37.8%), while the metaphorical uses mainly focused on the idea of splitting (51 mentions, or 65%). This study showed that the South Korean news media do not provide balanced information about schizophrenia to the public. This study also showed that no significant move has been made toward a more positive use of the term since a previous study was conducted on the subject. Although the term schizophrenia has given way to "attunement disorder," it will be difficult to establish the new term as the standard if the South Korean media continue to use the term "schizophrenic symptom." Even though the term has been changed, guidelines are necessary to encourage the mass media to provide balanced articles and reduce prejudice.

  6. Women in Television News: Analysis of Primetime News on HTV, RTL and Nova TV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svjetlana Knežević

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article assesses the particularly low level of women represented on national primetime television newscasts in Croatia. In doing so, it presents the results of a content analysis covering a random,stratified sample of HTV, Nova TV, and RTL primetime news broadcasts over the years 2009 and 2010. According to these results, women are significantly underrepresented as main characters, experts, or even persons relevant to news stories concerning issues or problems. In particular, the results are most apparent on the primetime newscast Dnevnik, broadcasted daily on Croatia’s main public television station. Ideally, this news broadcast should rank among the best in terms of gender equality, given the principles of equality stipulated throughout Croatian law (and especially where it concerns programming legislation. Concerning the analyzed content, when women serve as the main characters in a news story, their emotional response to an issue appears to be almost obligatory. Further, women are often portrayed as victims, or as a figure to galvanize a rather black and white response, i.e. they are to be praised or blamed. Adding to this gender discrepancy, statistics show that more women than men have earned BA and MA degrees, which not only highlights the unbalanced representation of women on television news, but also distorts the actual level of female participation in society, particularly where it regards sociopolitical fields.

  7. News of Hurricane Andrew: The Agenda of Sources and the Sources' Agendas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salwen, Michael B.

    1995-01-01

    Studies quotations in newspaper coverage of Hurricane Andrew, showing that individuals who were not affiliated with government or business were quoted most often. Shows that most sources were quoted as experts, with individuals represented as suffering victims, providing the news media with human interest quotations. Notes that most sources…

  8. The Kurt Cobain Suicide Crisis: Perspectives from Research, Public Health, and the News Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobes, David A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Provides a brief overview of musician Kurt Cobain's life and one community's response to his suicide. Comments on the apparent lack of possible copycat suicides following the suicide. Presents two perspectives, drawn from public health and the news media, regarding the role of media influence on copycat suicides. (RJM)

  9. The Unexpected Education: What We Can Learn from Disaster News Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Ana C.

    A study explored the safety education provided by six newspapers, using the 1988 crash of Delta Flight 1141 as a case study. A total of 351 "Delta 1141" news stories were analyzed for five key areas: overall story category, passenger safety theme, flight personnel safety theme, plane safety theme, and rescue safety. Of the stories…

  10. Using Critical Thinking to Identify Bias in the News Media: The Art of Critical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Richard W.; Adamson, Kenneth R.

    1990-01-01

    Urges social studies teachers to help students understand and identify sociocentric, national bias in the news media. Illustrates how the media fosters "us versus them" thinking and how word choice often reflects bias. Outlines activities to help students recognize bias. Provides weak and strong examples of students' analyses of bias in news…

  11. Gasoline taxes : an examination of news media discourse related to gas tax funding in six states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Why is it that some state legislatures approved gasoline tax increases while others did not? : In this analysis we examine gasoline tax issue frames in the print news media to see if these : frames provide clues to the eventual policy outcomes. : We ...

  12. Framing CSR fit: How corporate social responsibility activities are covered by news media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunenberg, Katharina; Gosselt, Jordi Franciscus; de Jong, Menno D.T.

    2016-01-01

    This research provides a basis for understanding how the contents of media coverage about CSR activities relates to the fit between these CSR activities and the organizations’ core activities. In two steps, 513 news articles about organizations’ CSR activities were analyzed. First, an expert review

  13. The sting of death: a case report of breaking bad news with maternal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sting of death: a case report of breaking bad news with maternal death. A Kihara, RJ Kosgei, EJ Cheserem, S Mueke, P Owende, NM Ojanga, JG Karanja. Abstract. Maternal death stings core deep for the relatives and the service providers in an obstetric unit where they had anticipated a joyful experience from childbirth ...

  14. News Media Databases for Content Selection and Relevance in Introductory Geoscience Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervato, Cinzia; Ridky, Robert; Jach, Joan

    2009-01-01

    A systematic assessment of media-based coverage of geoscience topics relative to those found in textbooks is presented here. The specific question addressed is to what extent fully indexed media and print news sources can provide a useful model for course development. Whereas the improvement of students' scientific literacy cannot be achieved…

  15. The PEWTER Study: Breaking Bad News Communication Skills Training for Counseling Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe-Cooperman, Kathleen; Savitsky, Devyn; Koshel, Walter; Bhat, Varsha; Cooperman, Jessica

    2018-01-01

    The efficacy of teaching communication skills for breaking bad news in graduate-level counseling programs was examined. A structured model, PEWTER (Prepare, Evaluate, Warning, Telling, Emotional Response, Regrouping; Keefe-Cooperman and Nardi 2004), provides a method for this difficult task. Prior to training in using the model, students reported…

  16. “It’s Only a Pastime, Really”: Young People’s Experiences of Social Media as a Source of News about Public Affairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Sveningsson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Western democracies have seen a decreased participation in activities traditionally associated with political participation. One aspect of participating politically is to keep up-to-date with what happens in society, for example, by following the news. Here, youth have been found to be less active than older generations. The decline in young people’s consumption of news media does not necessarily mean that they are disinterested in news or politics; they may get their information from other sources, for example, social media. Using a qualitative multi-method approach, this article investigates how young people who are interested in civic and political issues, and who regularly access news from various sources, experience and understand, specifically, Facebook and Twitter as sources of news about public affairs. The participants appreciated the immediateness of social media news, and felt that it could provide insights into new perspectives and make news stories feel more relevant. However, it was also experienced as one-sided, fragmented, and subjective, giving a biased, or even false, image of what happens in society. The consumption of news was strongly related to the idea of being a “good” citizen. However, since the participants did not regard social media news as “real news,” their image of themselves as citizens suffered. If young people in general resemble our participants in this respect, research that asks about their news consumption runs a risk of getting answers that underestimate it, thus reinforcing the idea that young people are less interested and informed about public affairs than is actually the case.

  17. News Portrayal of Cancer: Content Analysis of Threat and Efficacy by Cancer Type and Comparison with Incidence and Mortality in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Minsun; Kim, Yong-Chan; Kye, Su Yeon; Park, Keeho

    2016-08-01

    How the news media cover cancer may have profound significance for cancer prevention and control; however, little is known about the actual content of cancer news coverage in Korea. This research thus aimed to examine news portrayal of specific cancer types with respect to threat and efficacy, and to investigate whether news portrayal corresponds to actual cancer statistics. A content analysis of 1,138 cancer news stories was conducted, using a representative sample from 23 news outlets (television, newspapers, and other news media) in Korea over a 5-year period from 2008 to 2012. Cancer incidence and mortality rates were obtained from the Korean Statistical Information Service. Results suggest that threat was most prominent in news stories on pancreatic cancer (with 87% of the articles containing threat information with specific details), followed by liver (80%) and lung cancers (70%), and least in stomach cancer (41%). Efficacy information with details was conveyed most often in articles on colorectal (54%), skin (54%), and liver (50%) cancers, and least in thyroid cancer (17%). In terms of discrepancies between news portrayal and actual statistics, the threat of pancreatic and liver cancers was overreported, whereas the threat of stomach and prostate cancers was underreported. Efficacy information regarding cervical and colorectal cancers was overrepresented in the news relative to cancer statistics; efficacy of lung and thyroid cancers was underreported. Findings provide important implications for medical professionals to understand news information about particular cancers as a basis for public (mis)perception, and to communicate effectively about cancer risk with the public and patients.

  18. Means of temporal expressions in newspaper news and press report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čutura Ilijana R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses most frequent linguistic means for expressing the temporal frame in the printed news and press reports. With structuralism as a chosen theoretical framework, the approach of the research is qualitative and stylistic. Since the study belongs to the field of functional stylistics, the primary methods used in the study were functional-stylistic and linguistic-stylistic ones. As the study focuses on two newspaper genres, comparative-stylistic method was used as well. The analysis has been conducted on concrete linguistic excerpts from Serbian daily newspapers published throughout Serbia from 2008 to 2015. The aims of the paper are to show model of expressing temporal frame in contemporary Serbian newspapers. This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of model and the types of temporal expression as well as their variations in contemporal Serbian newspapers. The paper also aims to determine the differencies between printed news and press reports by the choice of temporal expressions. It is shown that there is a tendency of changing schematized structure of these informative genres and some innovation in relation to the choice of linguistic means for expessing the meaning of temporally close events. The research is a contribution to journalism stylistics, more precisely to the Serbian language newspaper stylistics, and also contributes to the study of linguistic and stylistic characteristics of non-literary texts. The study is also relevant because it describes the use of adverbs and adverbial expressions in the journalistic style.

  19. Audiovisual Webjournalism: An analysis of news on UOL News and on TV UERJ Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Nogueira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the development of audiovisual webjournalism on the Brazilian Internet. This paper, based on the analysis of UOL News on UOL TV – pioneer format on commercial web television - and of UERJ Online TV – first on-line university television in Brazil - investigates the changes in the gathering, production and dissemination processes of audiovisual news when it starts to be transmitted through the web. Reflections of authors such as Herreros (2003, Manovich (2001 and Gosciola (2003 are used to discuss the construction of audiovisual narrative on the web. To comprehend the current changes in today’s webjournalism, we draw on the concepts developed by Fidler (1997; Bolter and Grusin (1998; Machado (2000; Mattos (2002 and Palacios (2003. We may conclude that the organization of narrative elements in cyberspace makes for the efficiency of journalistic messages, while establishing the basis of a particular language for audiovisual news on the Internet.

  20. Posts to online news message boards and public discourse surrounding DUI enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Susan M; Wesolowski, Kathryn

    2009-12-01

    This study analyzes posts to online news message boards covering driving under the influence (DUI) enforcement efforts to determine their usefulness for informing traffic safety program planning and public relations efforts aimed at mainstream drinking drivers. A series of Google searches were conducted using keywords designed to capture news stories regarding impaired driving enforcement efforts. For each search, the first 100 Web pages returned were reviewed and articles were included in analysis if they were from an independent news source and contained user comments. Coders captured data on 28 fields for each post, including tone in relation to enforcement, tone of interpersonal communication with other posters, and expressed feelings regarding drinking and driving. Fifty-six news articles covering DUI enforcement efforts met study criteria, with 615 posts. The majority of posts (57%) were neutral on DUI enforcement; 24 percent (148) took a negative tone and 19 percent (115) positive. Posts that discussed checkpoints were 2.6 times more likely to take a negative tone toward enforcement than those that did not. Twenty-one percent of anti-enforcement posts challenged the idea that driving after drinking was necessarily dangerous. Of the 321 posts involving direct communication between posters, 67 percent involved disagreement with another post. Profanity or belittling comments appeared in 10 percent of posts. Public responses to DUI enforcement news articles provide insight into the beliefs and thought processes of those who oppose enforcement efforts or view drinking and driving as no big deal. Primary objections to enforcement focused on civil and personal rights issues, skepticism regarding law enforcement's motives and objectivity, and the belief that drinking driving is not a "real" crime. Online news message boards could be useful in informing campaigns and helping program planners frame media events and press releases to best appeal to the most at

  1. A content analysis of smokeless tobacco coverage in U.S. newspapers and news wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackowski, Olivia A; Lewis, M Jane; Delnevo, Cristine D; Ling, Pamela M

    2013-07-01

    Research attention on smokeless tobacco (SLT) has focused on SLT use, health risks, harm-reduction potential, and risk perceptions, but few studies have examined mediated communications about SLT. This study aims to contribute to the literature by providing the first description of SLT coverage in the news, an important communication channel given its ability to educate and shape public opinion about tobacco issues. A content analysis was conducted on SLT-related news and opinion articles between 2006 and 2010 from top circulating national and state newspapers and select news wires. Articles were coded for the main SLT topic, SLT risk references, and slant of opinion articles. SLT was discussed in news/feature articles (n = 677) in terms of business (28%), new products, product regulation and harm reduction (19%), prevention/cessation (11.4%), taxation (10.2%), profiles/trends in use (9%), bans (8.1%), and tobacco industry promotional activities (4.9%). Health risk references (i.e., addictiveness, carcinogenicity, and specific health effects including oral cancer) were found in 40% of articles, though frequency differed by article topic. Although the majority of opinion articles (n = 176) conveyed an anti-SLT slant (64%), 25.6% were pro-SLT. SLT topics of both national and local importance are covered in the news. Public health professionals can participate in SLT coverage by sending in press releases about new study findings, events, or resources and by submitting opinion pieces to share views or respond to previous coverage. Research on SLT news should continue given its potential to shape the public's SLT knowledge and opinions.

  2. Marine genomics: News and views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ângela M; Foote, Andrew D; Kupczok, Anne; Frazão, Bárbara; Limborg, Morten T; Piñeiro, Rosalía; Abalde, Samuel; Rocha, Sara; da Fonseca, Rute R

    2017-02-01

    Marine ecosystems occupy 71% of the surface of our planet, yet we know little about their diversity. Although the inventory of species is continually increasing, as registered by the Census of Marine Life program, only about 10% of the estimated two million marine species are known. This lag between observed and estimated diversity is in part due to the elusiveness of most aquatic species and the technical difficulties of exploring extreme environments, as for instance the abyssal plains and polar waters. In the last decade, the rapid development of affordable and flexible high-throughput sequencing approaches have been helping to improve our knowledge of marine biodiversity, from the rich microbial biota that forms the base of the tree of life to a wealth of plant and animal species. In this review, we present an overview of the applications of genomics to the study of marine life, from evolutionary biology of non-model organisms to species of commercial relevance for fishing, aquaculture and biomedicine. Instead of providing an exhaustive list of available genomic data, we rather set to present contextualized examples that best represent the current status of the field of marine genomics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Stock status update of 4VWX Herring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, Rabindra; Waters, Christa; Gibson, Jamie; Bennett, Lottie

    2017-01-01

    Maritimes Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) Resource Management has requested that DFO Science provide an update on the science advice for North Atlantic Fisheries Organization Divisions 4VWX Atlantic Herring1 (Clupea harengus...

  4. Updates in ophthalmic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Pia R; Grossniklaus, Hans E

    2017-05-01

    Ophthalmic pathology has a long history and rich heritage in the field of ophthalmology. This review article highlights updates in ophthalmic pathology that have developed significantly through the years because of the efforts of committed individuals and the confluence of technology such as molecular biology and digital pathology. This is an exciting period in the history of ocular pathology, with cutting-edge techniques paving the way for new developments in diagnostics, therapeutics, and research. Collaborations between ocular oncologists and pathologists allow for improved and comprehensive patient care. Ophthalmic pathology continues to be a relevant specialty that is important in the understanding and clinical management of ocular disease, education of eye care providers, and overall advancement of the field.

  5. Updates in ophthalmic pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia R Mendoza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmic pathology has a long history and rich heritage in the field of ophthalmology. This review article highlights updates in ophthalmic pathology that have developed significantly through the years because of the efforts of committed individuals and the confluence of technology such as molecular biology and digital pathology. This is an exciting period in the history of ocular pathology, with cutting-edge techniques paving the way for new developments in diagnostics, therapeutics, and research. Collaborations between ocular oncologists and pathologists allow for improved and comprehensive patient care. Ophthalmic pathology continues to be a relevant specialty that is important in the understanding and clinical management of ocular disease, education of eye care providers, and overall advancement of the field.

  6. Coagulation concepts update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Stacy D; Taylor, Andrew J; Williams, Eliot C; Winter, Thomas C

    2009-12-01

    Since the previous comprehensive radiology review on coagulation concepts that was done in 1990, many studies have been published in the medical and surgical literature that can guide the approach of a radiology practice. The purpose of this article is to provide an analysis of these works, updating the radiologist on proper use and interpretation of coagulation assessment tools, medications that modify the hemostatic system, and the use of transfusions prior to interventions. The basic tools for coagulation assessment have not changed; however, results from subspecialty research have suggested ways in which the use of these tools can be modified and streamlined to safely reduce time and expense for the patient and the health care system.

  7. News Media and the Öresund Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkheimer, Jesper; Ørsten, Mark; Eberholst, Mads Kæmsgaard

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a first attempt to investigate the news content and news routines of Danish and Swedish news media covering the Öresund region. From a theoretical per spective, the Öresund region can be considered a possible best-case example of what is categorised as horizontal...... Europeanisation, in other words, of the potential for increased communication linkages in news media content among European Union (EU) member states. We investigate this topic by analysing news content published by selected media outlets from 2002 to 2012 and by interviewing Danish and Swedish journalists who...... cover the region. We find that most news content does not mention the Öresund region, and that one reason for this lack might be that neither Danish nor Swedish reporters consider the region to be newsworthy....

  8. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  9. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-12-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  10. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlbert, L.M.; Langston, M.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA)); Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  11. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, October 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  12. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, August 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M., Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-09-01

    This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (August 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  13. Environmental regulatory update table, March 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1989-04-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  14. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-10-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  15. Environmental regulatory update table, July 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-08-01

    This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (July 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  16. The Reaction of Stock Returns to News about Fundamentals

    OpenAIRE

    Tolga Cenesizoglu

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the reaction of stock returns to news about the state of the economy. We develop a general equilibrium asset pricing model where the investor learns about the growth rate of the economy through two sources of information, dividend realizations and regularly scheduled announcements about the state of the economy. We distinguish between dividend news and the unexpected part of the external signal and characterize the reaction of stock returns to news from these two sources o...

  17. Towards a Theory of News Management in Public Sector Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöström, Stefan; Enbom, Jesper; Öhman, Adam

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a theoretical model for analyzing institutional conditions for news management in public sector organizations. In the wide body of empirical research covering public relations and news management, the distinction between private and public sector organization is seldom made. There is little theory development that explicitly takes account of the quite different contexts in public vs. private sector organizations. What are the specific circumstances that define news manag...

  18. The impact of firm specific news on implied volatilities

    OpenAIRE

    Donders, Monique; Vorst, Ton

    1996-01-01

    textabstractWe study the implied volatility behavior of call options around scheduled news announcement days. Implied volatilities increase significantly during the pre-event period and reach a maximum on the eve of the news announcement. After the news release, implied volatility drops sharply and gradually moves back to its long-run level. Only on the event date are movements in the price of the underlying significantly larger than expected. These results confirm the theoretical results of ...

  19. Egyptian mothers’ preferences regarding how physicians break bad news about their child’s disability: A structured verbal questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmoktader Ahmed

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breaking bad news to mothers whose children has disability is an important role of physicians. There has been considerable speculation about the inevitability of parental dissatisfaction with how they are informed of their child’s disability. Egyptian mothers’ preferences for how to be told the bad news about their child’s disability has not been investigated adequately. The objective of this study was to elicit Egyptian mothers’ preferences for how to be told the bad news about their child’s disability. Methods Mothers of 100 infants recently diagnosed with Down syndrome were interviewed regarding their preferences for how to be told bad news. Mothers were recruited through outpatient clinics of the Pediatric Genetics Department at Fayoum University Hospital (located 90 km southwest of Cairo, Egypt from January to June 2011. Results and discussion Questionnaire analyses revealed nine themes of parental preferences for how to be told information difficult to hear. Mothers affirmed previously reported recommendations for conveying bad medical news to parents, including being told early, being told of others with a similar condition, and being informed of the prognosis. Conclusions Mothers affirmed communication themes previously discussed in the literature, such as being told early, and being informed of the prognosis. Although more research is needed in this important area, we hope that our findings will stimulate future search and help health care providers in different societies establish guidelines for effectively communicating bad news.

  20. News Media Framing of New York City’s Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Portion-Size Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joanna E.; Truant, Patricia L.; Rutkow, Lainie; Kanarek, Norma F.; Barry, Colleen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed news media framing of New York City’s proposed regulation to prohibit the sale of sugar-sweetened beverages greater than 16 ounces. Methods. We conducted a quantitative content analysis of print and television news from within and outside New York City media markets. We examined support for and opposition to the portion-size cap in the news coverage from its May 31, 2012, proposal through the appellate court ruling on July 31, 2013. Results. News coverage corresponded to key events in the policy’s evolution. Although most stories mentioned obesity as a problem, a larger proportion used opposing frames (84%) than pro-policy frames (36%). Mention of pro-policy frames shifted toward the policy’s effect on special populations. The debate’s most prominent frame was the opposing frame that the policy was beyond the government’s role (69%). Conclusions. News coverage within and outside the New York City media market was more likely to mention arguments in opposition to than in support of the portion-size cap. Understanding how the news media framed this issue provides important insights for advocates interested in advancing similar measures in other jurisdictions. PMID:26378853

  1. Everything I Need to Know About Science Communication, I Learned from Local Television News (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorditch, E.; O'Riordan, C.

    2010-12-01

    According to the National Science Foundation’s Science and Engineering Indicators for 2010, the general public in the USA relies on local television news more than any other medium for their science and technology news and information -- with the internet coming in as a fast-rising second. Ten years ago, the American Institute of Physics (AIP) created Discoveries and Breakthroughs Inside Science (DBIS) as a way to reach this large audience and provide them with accurate and reliable science information. DBIS is a syndicated science news service that distributes twelve 90-second news segments to local television stations throughout the USA and internationally each month. DBIS topics cover a range of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics including everything from astronomy to zoology. DBIS has created a unique pathway for science communication. Story ideas go through a rigorous process of background research and peer review to make sure that they meet not only our science criteria, but also our television criteria standards to make sure that television stations will air the segments. The program is supported by a STEM coalition of over 20 organizations- including AGU - that work together to identify research breakthroughs in diverse fields of science. We will describe the creation of this service and the fine-tuning of the editorial process. We will also highlight results from a 2003-2007 NSF grant to study the impact DBIS has on viewing audiences. The study showed us that 78% of television viewers would like to see more STEM news segments during their local news broadcast. Another important finding from the study is that there is a statistically significant difference in television viewers support for STEM in cities where DBIS segments are broadcasted compared to cities where they are not showing that DBIS is having an impact in communicating science to the general public. Finally, we will summarize what we have learned about making STEM

  2. NEWS: A trip to CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, A. D.

    2000-07-01

    the canteen. Over lunch we mixed with physicists of many different nationalities and backgrounds. Figure 1 Figure 1. In the afternoon we visited Microcosm, the CERN visitors centre, and the LEP control room and also the SPS. Here the students learned new applications for much of the physics of standing waves and resonance that they had been taught in the classroom. Later that night, we visited a bowling alley where momentum and collision theory were put into practice. The following morning we returned to CERN and visited the large magnet testing facility. Here again physics was brought to life. We saw superconducting magnets being assembled and tested and the students gained a real appreciation of the problems and principles involved. The afternoon was rounded off by a visit to a science museum in Geneva - well worth a visit, as some of us still use some of the apparatus on display. Friday was our last full day so we visited Chamonix in the northern Alps. In the morning, we ascended the Aiguille de Midi - by cable car. Twenty minutes and 3842 m later we emerged into 50 km h-1 winds and -10 °C temperature, not counting the -10 °C wind chill factor. A crisp packet provided an unusual demonstration of the effects of air pressure (figure 2). Figure 2 Figure 2. The views from the summit were very spectacular though a few people experienced mild altitude sickness. That afternoon the party went to the Mer de Glace. Being inside a 3 million year-old structure moving down a mountain at 3 cm per day was an interesting experience, as was a tot of whisky with 3 million year-old water. Once again the local scenery was very photogenic and the click and whirr of cameras was a constant background noise. Saturday morning saw an early start for the long drive home. Most students - and some staff - took the opportunity to catch up on their sleep. Thanks are due to many people without whom the trip would never have taken place. Anne Craige, Stuart Williams

  3. How to take advantage of tablet computers : Effects of news structure on recall and comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Cauwenberge, Anna; d'Haenens, Leen; Beentjes, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In light of the growing use of tablets for news reading and mobile news consumption behaviors, this study examined whether an innovative way of structuring news on the tablet that mimics mobile news behaviors reinforced attention for, and learning from, news. Specifically, it was theorized that the

  4. Language use depending on news frame and immigrant origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Itziar; Igartua, Juan-José; Moral, Félix; Palacios, Elena; Acosta, Tania; Muñoz, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of the media on individuals' specific language use in relation to a news story on immigration: the influence of the news frame and group cue. Abstraction, complexity of language use, and negative affective language were evaluated. The 523 participants were randomly distributed to each of the four experimental conditions: news frame (crime versus economic contribution) by group cue (geographical origin of the immigrants involved: Moroccans versus Latin Americans). Through content analysis of the ideas and reflections that arose after the participants read the different news stories, using the Linguistic Category Model (LCM; Semin & Fiedler, 1991) to measure abstract language and the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC; Pennebaker, Booth, & Francis, 2007) to analyze complex language and negative affective language, it emerged that abstract language and negative affective language were more frequent in the participants assigned to the news frame on crime. Complex language was more commonly used when the news frame referred to the economic contribution of immigrants. Regression analyses showed the mediating role of attitude to immigration in the effects of news frame on negative affective language. The bootstrap method was used to assess the magnitude of the indirect effect. A significant mediator effect was also found through structural equation modeling. Analyses of covariance showed one interaction between news frame and group cue: Among those who read the news story in a frame linking immigration to crime and Moroccan origin, abstract language was more characteristic. The results are discussed from the theoretical perspective of framing.

  5. Comparing European citizens' news media repertoires across nations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Damme, Kristin; Kobbernagel, Christian; Schrøder, Kim Christian

    2017-01-01

    A shift towards a more global audience culture is currently being pushed by the increasingly widespread digital, mobile and social media used for news consumption and internationalization of the news markets. However, while living in an increasingly globalized newsscape, audience members are still...... situated in a local community, and relate to a (oftentimes linguistically anchored) regional and national context for news consumption. To some extent, therefore, news consumption repertoires, can be argued to ‘territorialized’ in such a way that they come to systematically vary from country to country...

  6. The Fox News Effect: Media Bias and Voting

    OpenAIRE

    DellaVigna, Stefano; Kaplan, Ethan

    2006-01-01

    Does media bias affect voting? We address this question by looking at the entry of Fox News in cable markets and its impact on voting. Between October 1996 and November 2000, the conservative Fox News Channel was introduced in the cable programming of 20 percent of US towns. Fox News availability in 2000 appears to be largely idiosyncratic. Using a data set of voting data for 9,256 towns, we investigate if Republicans gained vote share in towns where Fox News entered the cable market by the y...

  7. An Effective News Recommendation Method for Microblog User

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanrong Gu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recommending news stories to users, based on their preferences, has long been a favourite domain for recommender systems research. Traditional systems strive to satisfy their user by tracing users' reading history and choosing the proper candidate news articles to recommend. However, most of news websites hardly require any user to register before reading news. Besides, the latent relations between news and microblog, the popularity of particular news, and the news organization are not addressed or solved efficiently in previous approaches. In order to solve these issues, we propose an effective personalized news recommendation method based on microblog user profile building and sub class popularity prediction, in which we propose a news organization method using hybrid classification and clustering, implement a sub class popularity prediction method, and construct user profile according to our actual situation. We had designed several experiments compared to the state-of-the-art approaches on a real world dataset, and the experimental results demonstrate that our system significantly improves the accuracy and diversity in mass text data.

  8. News aggregators influence on the quality of Internet-journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernetsky Petr Petrovich

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the news aggregators and their impact on the quality of journalism in the Internet. The paper gives a definition of “news aggregators”, details the most famous of them, and lists some of the major problems which news aggregators are facing today. In addition, the article proves the thesis that news aggregators have a negative impact on the quality of news online. This is primarily due to the writing of the text for robots, not people, with a focus not on the quality and depth of the study, but the speed. Another major problem - the “theft” of news by websites-competitors and each other, as well as rewriting messages of various news services with a focus on sensationalism. All this leads to a general decline in the quality of journalistic texts on the Internet - in an effort to attract additional traffic news websites often the quality of materials are put into the background. At the end of the article it is made a forecast on the future of news aggregators.

  9. Procedure for audio-assisted browsing of news video using generalized sound recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divakaran, Ajay; Radhakrishnan, Regunathan; Xiong, Ziyou; Casey, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In Casey describes a generalized sound recognition framework based on reduced rank spectra and Minimum-Entropy Priors. This approach enables successful recognition of a wide variety of sounds such as male speech, female speech, music, animal sounds etc. In this work, we apply this recognition framework to news video to enable quick video browsing. We identify speaker change positions in the broadcast news using the sound recognition framework. We combine the speaker change position with color & motion cues from video and are able to locate the beginning of each of the topics covered by the news video. We can thus skim the video by merely playing a small portion starting from each of the locations where one of the principal cast begins to speak. In combination with our motion-based video browsing approach, our technique provides simple automatic news video browsing. While similar work has been done before, our approach is simpler and faster than competing techniques, and provides a rich framework for further analysis and description of content.

  10. Predicting the Strength of Online News Frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Jakopović

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Framing theory is one of the most significant approaches to understanding media and their potential impact on publics. Leaving aside that fact, the author finds that publicity effects seem to be dispersed and difficult to catch for public relations. This article employs a specific research design, which could be applied to public relations practice, namely with a view to observing correlations between specific media frames and individual frames. The approach is based on the typology of news frames. The author attributes negative, positive and neutral determinants to the types of frames in his empirical research. Online news regarding three transport organizations and the accompanying user comments (identified as negative, positive and neutral are analysed by means of the method of content and sentiment analysis. The author recognizes user comments and reviews as individual frames that take part in the creation of online image. Furthermore, he identifies the types of media frames as well as individual frames manifested as image, and undertakes correlation research in order to establish their prediction potential. The results expose the most frequently used types of media frames concerning the transport domain. The media are keen to report through the attribution of responsibility frame, and after that, through the economic frame and the conflict frame, but, on the other hand, they tend to neglect the human interest frame and the morality frame. The results show that specific types of news frames enable better prediction of user reactions. The economic frame and the human interest frame therefore represent the most predictable types of frame.

  11. Prebiotics: an update

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Pre- biotics have become news mainly as an alternative to probiotics, which are difficult to handle in foodstuffs, but whose benefits to health in terms of prevention of diarrhoea and immunomodulation are increasingly well established and because prebiotics currently in use, especially inulin and its derivates as well as ga-.

  12. News: Synthetic biology leading to specialty chemicals ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synthetic biology can combine the disciplines of biology, engineering, and chemistry productively to form molecules of great scientific and commercial value. Recent advances in the new field are explored for their connection to new tools that have been used to elucidate production pathways to a wide variety of chemicals generated by microorganisms. The selection and enhancement of microbiological strains through the practice of strain engineering enables targets of design, construction, and optimization. This news column aspires to cover recent literature relating to the development and understanding of clean technology.

  13. Journalism and mobility: News and possibles reconfigurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Reck Figueiredo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The following article aims to discuss the way journalism presents itself in the contemporary society, through its presence on mobile technologies. First, it will present a brief contextualization about smartphones, as well as theoretical premises to its investigation. Then it will be presented an analysis based on eight news apps available for Apple’s smartphones. This analysis is focused on interactives aspects found in these softwares. This initial investigation shows that mobile media technological interactional possibilities are not fully explored.

  14. Social Media Guidelines and the News Paradigm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blumell, Lindsey; Hellmueller, Lea; Etter, Michael

    and if these guidelines challenge the news paradigm. While using social media have been a “loop-hole” of sorts to disseminating political information in countries that have strong censorship (the Arab Spring being a premiere example, Eltantawy & Wiest, 2011; Lotan, Graeff, Ananny, Gaffney, & Pearce, 2011), journalists......Social network use continues to increase in the majority of regions around the world, with a global increase of 17.6% in 2012, and another projected 12.6% in 2014 (digital.org, 2014). Social media have also been incorporated into daily routines of American journalists, with 53.8% reporting...

  15. Naval Medical R and D News

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    the Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida Under the command of Lt. Cmdr. Kenneth Knight, MSC, USN—an entomologist who had served with Dr. Sapero... pills , a hypodermic syringe or a spray gun in the hands of the right kind of doctor than by all the rocket guns and atom bombs that will ever be made...Doris Ryan Follow All Recent R&D News on the Enterprise Website 6 Internal Research Showcase During Air Force-Navy 5th Annual Open House DAYTON

  16. The shifting temporalities of online news

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Henrik; Brügger, Niels

    2018-01-01

    to the present retrieved from the Internet Archive (www.archive. org). The shifting constitutions of time that emerge through these analyses point towards how journalistic practices have interacted with and adopted the possibilities of the digital. Due to an inbuilt instability between textual elements on stored...... websites (as well as other characteristics of online archives), the construction of the empirical base stands in a complex relation to the analytical framework applied. As much as the article is a historical analysis of the temporality of online news, it, thus, also offers a range of methodological...

  17. A Blind Angle? News Sources, Gender and Ethnicity in Danish TV News

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, Christina

    (gender and ethnicity). With Peter Dahlgren’s analysis of television as a space for civic identity and agency, the paper engages in a discussion of contributions and limitations of TV news framed by some of the dimensions of civic cultures (knowledge, values, trust, practices and identities)....

  18. Work Roles, News Gathering Equipment, and Newscasts in Current U.S. Television News Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harless, James D.; Collins, Erik L.

    In the Spring of 1973, American television news editors were surveyed for data on staff size, operating budgets, work roles, camera equipment, portable VTR equipment, wire services, mobile equipment, and number of newscasts. The data obtained are reported in five levels of operating budgets with a summary of the statistics for each area of news…

  19. NewsMarket 2.0: Analysis of News for Stock Price Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barazzetti, Alessandro; Mastronardi, Rosangela

    Most of the existing financial research tools use a stock's historical price and technical indicators to predict future price trends without taking into account the impact of web news. The recent explosion of demand for information on financial investment management is driving the search for alternative methods of quantitative data analysis.

  20. 33 CFR 165.504 - Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James River, Newport News, Va.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry... Coast Guard District § 165.504 Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Shipyard, James River... the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co. at latitude 37°00′38.1″ N, longitude 76°27′05.7″ W...

  1. News from the western European invasion front

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Ribeiro

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Invasive species are one of the main threats to aquatic biodiversity, being particularly serious in regions with high number of endemic and endangered fishes. Portugal has currently one of the highest numbers of non-native fishes per area in western Europe and the rate of species arrival is increasing. In this review, an updated status of non-native fishes is provided with recent trends of leading vectors and routes. Non-native fish component represents 31% of the freshwater fish diversity existing in the country, totaling 20 established species out of 28 introduced species. In the last decade, the non-native fish detection rate (a proxy of introduction rate has been one new species in every two years. Most of the non-native fishes in Portugal are mainly from Central Europe and North America and were illegally introduced for sports fisheries. However, some recent records are also linked with the ornamental trade, from Asia, indicating an increase of this vector in fish introductions. The international drainages exhibit the highest number of non-native fishes due to prevalent invasion routes from Spain, although direct introductions to national drainages in spatially limited areas suggest new invasion routes caused by higher propagule pressure of leading vectors (fisheries and ornamental trade. Management options are presented in order to tackle this growing threat, namely risk assessment, enforcement and environmental education. Only a comprehensive and integrated approach at an Iberian level could reduce the current rate of non-native species arrival to this region and help us to preserve the Iberian freshwater fishes for future generations.

  2. JOURNALISTIC USE OF EXEMPLARS TO HUMANIZE HEALTH NEWS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnant, Amanda; Len-Ríos, María E.; Young, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Health journalists often use personal stories to put a “face” on a health issue. This research uses a sociology-of-news approach, based on data collected from 42 in-depth interviews and three surveys with health journalists and editors [national (N = 774), state (N = 55), and purposive (N = 180)], to provide a first look at how important journalists think exemplars are to their stories. Results show journalists select exemplars to inform, inspire, and/or sensationalize a health issue. Some of the strategies journalists use to locate exemplars pose ethical concerns. Further, journalists rank the use of exemplars lower in aiding audience understanding compared with the use of experts, data and statistics, and definitions of technical terms. PMID:24376370

  3. On updating problems in latent semantic indexing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, H.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Zha, H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering

    1997-11-01

    The authors develop new SVD-updating algorithms for three types of updating problems arising from Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) for information retrieval to deal with rapidly changing text document collections. They also provide theoretical justification for using a reduced-dimension representation of the original document collection in the updating process. Numerical experiments using several standard text document collections show that the new algorithms give higher (interpolated) average precisions than the existing algorithms and the retrieval accuracy is comparable to that obtained using the complete document collection.

  4. Are Forecast Updates Progressive?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMacro-economic forecasts typically involve both a model component, which is replicable, as well as intuition, which is non-replicable. Intuition is expert knowledge possessed by a forecaster. If forecast updates are progressive, forecast updates should become more accurate, on average,

  5. Are Forecast Updates Progressive?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMany macroeconomic forecasts and forecast updates like those from IMF and OECD typically involve both a model component, which is replicable, as well as intuition, which is non-replicable. Intuition is expert knowledge possessed by a forecaster. If forecast updates are progressive,

  6. Coupling a regional warning system to a semantic engine on online news for enhancing landslide prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistini, Alessandro; Rosi, Ascanio; Segoni, Samuele; Catani, Filippo; Casagli, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    Landslide inventories are basic data for large scale landslide modelling, e.g. they are needed to calibrate and validate rainfall thresholds, physically based models and early warning systems. The setting up of landslide inventories with traditional methods (e.g. remote sensing, field surveys and manual retrieval of data from technical reports and local newspapers) is time consuming. The objective of this work is to automatically set up a landslide inventory using a state-of-the art semantic engine based on data mining on online news (Battistini et al., 2013) and to evaluate if the automatically generated inventory can be used to validate a regional scale landslide warning system based on rainfall-thresholds. The semantic engine scanned internet news in real time in a 50 months test period. At the end of the process, an inventory of approximately 900 landslides was set up for the Tuscany region (23,000 km2, Italy). The inventory was compared with the outputs of the regional landslide early warning system based on rainfall thresholds, and a good correspondence was found: e.g. 84% of the events reported in the news is correctly identified by the model. In addition, the cases of not correspondence were forwarded to the rainfall threshold developers, which used these inputs to update some of the thresholds. On the basis of the results obtained, we conclude that automatic validation of landslide models using geolocalized landslide events feedback is possible. The source of data for validation can be obtained directly from the internet channel using an appropriate semantic engine. We also automated the validation procedure, which is based on a comparison between forecasts and reported events. We verified that our approach can be automatically used for a near real time validation of the warning system and for a semi-automatic update of the rainfall thresholds, which could lead to an improvement of the forecasting effectiveness of the warning system. In the near future

  7. Cinema and the communication of bad news

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel GÓMEZ CORDOBA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Breaking Bad News requires medical professionals possess a range of skills to ensure that the patient has the information required for decision?making, this process occurs without further damage and even has a therapeutic effect, and another, that the doctor is not exposed to legal risk or stress associated with the inability to cope with the feelings of the patient, their families or themselves. This article discusses the aspects of communication of bad news in the field of doctor?patient relationship will be presented. The SPIKES model and discussion of movie segments related to the subject was employed as a thread, such as Doctor, 50/50, The Barbarian Invasions, Wings of Life, Stepmom, Letters to God, Wit, The butterfly blue, The power of friendship, Life without me, Make me laugh, Knockin ‘on Heaven’s Door, My Life, A crazy Loose in Brooklyn, As suicide and not die in the attempt, A lesson of life, and The sacrifice of a mother, as a pedagogical strategy in medical training.

  8. Efficient Synthesis of Network Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-17

    specialized hardware. Because the con- troller has global visibility and full control over the entire network, SDN makes it possible to implement a wide...Pavol Černý CU Boulder pavol.cerny@colorado.edu Nate Foster Cornell University jnfoster@cs.cornell.edu Abstract Software-defined networking ( SDN ...is revolutionizing the net- working industry, but current SDN programming platforms do not provide automated mechanisms for updating global

  9. Atypical odontalgia--an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Seena B; Boros, Audrey L; Kumar, Satish K S

    2012-09-01

    Atypical odontalgia is a commonly misdiagnosed condition that frequently leads to unnecessary dental treatments such as extraction and endodontic therapy. These treatments often worsen the pain. Despite greater recognition and understanding of this condition, proper diagnosis and treatment remains a challenge. It is believed that atypical odontalgia is a neuropathic condition. This article updates the current understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of atypical odontalgia, and provides appropriate diagnostic and management approaches for this condition.

  10. [Semantic Network Analysis of Online News and Social Media Text Related to Comprehensive Nursing Care Service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minji; Choi, Mona; Youm, Yoosik

    2017-12-01

    As comprehensive nursing care service has gradually expanded, it has become necessary to explore the various opinions about it. The purpose of this study is to explore the large amount of text data regarding comprehensive nursing care service extracted from online news and social media by applying a semantic network analysis. The web pages of the Korean Nurses Association (KNA) News, major daily newspapers, and Twitter were crawled by searching the keyword 'comprehensive nursing care service' using Python. A morphological analysis was performed using KoNLPy. Nodes on a 'comprehensive nursing care service' cluster were selected, and frequency, edge weight, and degree centrality were calculated and visualized with Gephi for the semantic network. A total of 536 news pages and 464 tweets were analyzed. In the KNA News and major daily newspapers, 'nursing workforce' and 'nursing service' were highly rated in frequency, edge weight, and degree centrality. On Twitter, the most frequent nodes were 'National Health Insurance Service' and 'comprehensive nursing care service hospital.' The nodes with the highest edge weight were 'national health insurance,' 'wards without caregiver presence,' and 'caregiving costs.' 'National Health Insurance Service' was highest in degree centrality. This study provides an example of how to use atypical big data for a nursing issue through semantic network analysis to explore diverse perspectives surrounding the nursing community through various media sources. Applying semantic network analysis to online big data to gather information regarding various nursing issues would help to explore opinions for formulating and implementing nursing policies.

  11. Injury News Coverage, Relative Concern, and Support for Alcohol-Control Policies: An Impersonal Impact Explanation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Michael D.; Hayes, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Research on the impersonal impact hypothesis suggests that news (especially print) coverage of health and safety risks primarily influences perceptions of risk as a societal issue, and not perceptions of personal risk. We propose that the impersonal impact of news—impact primarily on concerns about social-level risks—will mediate effects of news stories on support for public health policies; such effects substantively matter as evidence suggests health policies in turn have important effects on protective behaviors and health outcomes. In an experiment using 60 randomly-selected violent crime and accident news stories manipulated to contain or not contain reference to alcohol use as a causative factor, we find that the effect of stories that mention alcohol as a causative factor on support for alcohol-control policies is mediated by social-level concern and not by personal-level concern. In so doing, we provide a theoretical explanation as well as empirical evidence regarding the potential for news coverage—including breaking or episodic news—to influence health-related public policy. PMID:24870830

  12. Outrage Factors in Government Press Releases of Food Risk and Their Influence on News Media Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Youngkee; Lim, Jeongsub; Shim, Minsun; You, Myoungsoon

    2015-08-01

    An appropriate level of risk perception should be a critical issue in modern "risk society." There have been many studies on the influences on risk perception. This study investigates whether risk communication scholar Dr. Peter Sandman's outrage factors intensify journalistic attention to health risks from food consumption. A content analysis of a health institution's press releases was conducted to examine 15 outrage factors of food risks conveyed in the governmental risk communication. In addition, the news stories covering the food risks informed by the press releases were calculated to evaluate the relation between outrage factors of a risk and the number of news stories covering the risk. Results showed that controllability was the most salient outrage factor, followed by trust, voluntariness, familiarity, and human origin; the greater the outrage score of a risk, the more news stories of the risk. For individual outrage factors, a risk with an implication of catastrophic potential was associated with an increase of news stories. Food providers' distrustful behaviors also influenced journalistic attention to the food risks. The implication of the findings to health message designers is discussed.

  13. An industry update: what is new in the field of therapeutic delivery this month?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    The present industry update covers the period of 1-30 November 2016, with information sourced primarily from company press releases, regulatory and patent agencies, scientific literature and various news websites. There was positive news on the clinical trials front for both EyeNovia and Glaxo SmithKline, but this month also saw Innocol release disappointing Phase IIb results for its Cogenzia product. In regulatory news, it was announced that the US FDA indicated that EyeGate may use the 510(k) De Novo Path for their device, the Ocular Bandage Gel. Also this month, Glaxo SmithKline announced that it filed a regulatory submission with the FDA for its novel triple-combination therapy product, utilizing its Ellipta ® inhaler.

  14. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  15. Incongruity in news headings. Readers’ choices and resulting cognitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerwerf, L.; Timmerman, C.; Bosschaert, A.

    2016-01-01

    In the rapidly changing news market, quality newspapers are searching for ways to combine established journalistic practices with attractive presentation of their newsprint. On internet news sites, attention-getting headlines are even more important in obtaining readership. This paper investigates

  16. Dallas zoo hunts for escaped vulture | Alanis | Vulture News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vulture News. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 56 (2007) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Dallas zoo hunts for escaped vulture. M Alanis. Abstract. No Abstract. Vulture News Vol. 56 () 2007: ...

  17. Investigating the News Seeking Behavior of Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, M. Asim; Williamson, Kirsty; Liu, Ying-Hsang; Hider, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the news-seeking and browsing behaviours of young adults, partly in the context of everyday life information seeking (ELIS), in order to explore their perceptions of and attitudes towards print and online news media. The study is significant because traditional print newspapers face a steady decline in their readership with…

  18. Polarized Discourse in the Egyptian News: Critical Discourse Analysis Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Mohammed Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate ideological structures of polarized discourse coded in the reports of two online news websites: egyptindependent and ikwanweb. The study focuses on online news reports relating to three interrelated events: the issuing of a constitutional declaration by Egyptian president, the aftermath clashes outside…

  19. Product News versus Advertising: An Exploration within a Student Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallahan, Kirk

    An exploratory survey (part of a larger study) examined the relative effectiveness of news versus advertising as sources of product information. Subjects, 140 undergraduate students enrolled in an introductory public speaking course or a course in visual communication, completed a 5-page media interest survey. Results indicated that news rates…

  20. The sequential organisation of South African business-news ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The principal aim of this research article is to explore whether the discourse features of news interview openings identified by Clayman (1991) are replicated in opening segments of South African business-news interview talk. An important justification for this discourse-based study derives from the fact that there is at present ...