WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing myelinating oligodendrocytes

  1. Oligodendrocytes: Myelination and Axonal Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Mikael; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2016-01-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers have evolved to enable fast and efficient transduction of electrical signals in the nervous system. To act as an electric insulator, the myelin sheath is formed as a multilamellar membrane structure by the spiral wrapping and subsequent compaction of the oligodendroglial plasma membrane around central nervous system (CNS) axons. Current evidence indicates that the myelin sheath is more than an inert insulating membrane structure. Oligodendrocytes are metabolically active and functionally connected to the subjacent axon via cytoplasmic-rich myelinic channels for movement of macromolecules to and from the internodal periaxonal space under the myelin sheath. This review summarizes our current understanding of how myelin is generated and also the role of oligodendrocytes in supporting the long-term integrity of myelinated axons. PMID:26101081

  2. Alterations in hippocampal myelin and oligodendrocyte precursor cells during epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuanyuan; Hu, Qiao; Zhang, Qian; Hong, Siqi; Tang, Xiaoju; Cheng, Li; Jiang, Li

    2015-11-19

    Recent reports have described damage to myelinated fibers in the central nervous system (CNS) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and animal models. However, only limited data are available on the dynamic changes that occur in myelinated fibers, oligodendrocytes (which are myelin-forming cells), and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), which are a reservoir of new oligodendrocytes, in the hippocampus throughout epileptogenesis. The current study was designed to examine this issue using a rat model of lithium-pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Electroencephalography (EEG), immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis showed that the loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes in the rat hippocampus began during the acute stage of epileptogenesis, and the severity of this loss increased throughout epileptogenesis. Accompanying this loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes, OPCs in the rat hippocampus became activated and their populations increased during several phases of epileptogenesis (the acute, latent and chronic phases). The transcription factors olig1 and olig2, which play crucial roles in regulating OPC proliferation, differentiation and remyelination, were up-regulated during the early phases (the acute and latent phases) followed by a sharp decline in their expression during the chronic and late chronic phases. This study is the first to confirm the loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes during lithium-pilocarpine-induced epileptogenesis accompanied by a transient increase in the number of OPCs. Prevention of the loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes may provide a novel treatment strategy for epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. CNS Myelin Sheath Lengths Are an Intrinsic Property of Oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechler, Marie E; Byrne, Lauren; Ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2015-09-21

    Since Río-Hortega's description of oligodendrocyte morphologies nearly a century ago, many studies have observed myelin sheath-length diversity between CNS regions. Myelin sheath length directly impacts axonal conduction velocity by influencing the spacing between nodes of Ranvier. Such differences likely affect neural signal coordination and synchronization. What accounts for regional differences in myelin sheath lengths is unknown; are myelin sheath lengths determined solely by axons or do intrinsic properties of different oligodendrocyte precursor cell populations affect length? The prevailing view is that axons provide molecular cues necessary for oligodendrocyte myelination and appropriate sheath lengths. This view is based upon the observation that axon diameters correlate with myelin sheath length, as well as reports that PNS axonal neuregulin-1 type III regulates the initiation and properties of Schwann cell myelin sheaths. However, in the CNS, no such instructive molecules have been shown to be required, and increasing in vitro evidence supports an oligodendrocyte-driven, neuron-independent ability to differentiate and form initial sheaths. We test this alternative signal-independent hypothesis--that variation in internode lengths reflects regional oligodendrocyte-intrinsic properties. Using microfibers, we find that oligodendrocytes have a remarkable ability to self-regulate the formation of compact, multilamellar myelin and generate sheaths of physiological length. Our results show that oligodendrocytes respond to fiber diameters and that spinal cord oligodendrocytes generate longer sheaths than cortical oligodendrocytes on fibers, co-cultures, and explants, revealing that oligodendrocytes have regional identity and generate different sheath lengths that mirror internodes in vivo. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. LINGO-1 negatively regulates myelination by oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Sha; Miller, Robert H; Lee, Xinhua; Scott, Martin L; Shulag-Morskaya, Svetlane; Shao, Zhaohui; Chang, Jufang; Thill, Greg; Levesque, Melissa; Zhang, Mingdi; Hession, Cathy; Sah, Dinah; Trapp, Bruce; He, Zhigang; Jung, Vincent; McCoy, John M; Pepinsky, R Blake

    2005-06-01

    The control of myelination by oligodendrocytes in the CNS is poorly understood. Here we show that LINGO-1 is an important negative regulator of this critical process. LINGO-1 is expressed in oligodendrocytes. Attenuation of its function by dominant-negative LINGO-1, LINGO-1 RNA-mediated interference (RNAi) or soluble human LINGO-1 (LINGO-1-Fc) leads to differentiation and increased myelination competence. Attenuation of LINGO-1 results in downregulation of RhoA activity, which has been implicated in oligodendrocyte differentiation. Conversely, overexpression of LINGO-1 leads to activation of RhoA and inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Treatment of oligodendrocyte and neuron cocultures with LINGO-1-Fc resulted in highly developed myelinated axons that have internodes and well-defined nodes of Ranvier. The contribution of LINGO-1 to myelination was verified in vivo through the analysis of LINGO-1 knockout mice. The ability to recapitulate CNS myelination in vitro using LINGO-1 antagonists and the in vivo effects seen in the LINGO-1 knockout indicate that LINGO-1 signaling may be critical for CNS myelination.

  5. Remarkable Stability of Myelinating Oligodendrocytes in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa B. Tripathi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available New myelin-forming oligodendrocytes (OLs are generated in the mouse central nervous system during adulthood. These adult-born OLs might augment the existing population, contributing to neural plasticity, or else replace OLs that die in use (turnover. To distinguish between these alternatives, we induced genetic labeling of mature myelinating OLs in young adult mice and tracked their subsequent survival. OL survival rates were region dependent, being higher in corpus callosum (∼90% survival over 20 months and motor cortex (∼70% survival than in corticospinal tract or optic nerve (50%–60% survival. Survival rates over the first 8 months were 90%–100% in all regions except the optic nerve. In the corpus callosum, new OLs accumulate during young adulthood and are therefore likely to participate in adaptive myelination. We also found that the number of myelin internodes maintained by individual cortical OLs is stable for at least 8 months but declines ∼12% in the following year.

  6. Polarity development in oligodendrocytes : Sorting and trafficking of myelin components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, Olaf; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    In vertebrates, myelination is required for the saltatory signal conductance along the axon. At the onset of myelination, the myelinating cells, i.e., oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, are heavily engaged in the biogenesis of membranes

  7. Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein: Deciphering a Target in Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Peschl

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG, a member of the immunoglobulin (Ig superfamily, is a myelin protein solely expressed at the outermost surface of myelin sheaths and oligodendrocyte membranes. This makes MOG a potential target of cellular and humoral immune responses in inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Due to its late postnatal developmental expression, MOG is an important marker for oligodendrocyte maturation. Discovered about 30 years ago, it is one of the best-studied autoantigens for experimental autoimmune models for multiple sclerosis (MS. Human studies, however, have yielded controversial results on the role of MOG, especially MOG antibodies (Abs, as a biomarker in MS. But with improved detection methods using different expression systems to detect Abs in patients’ samples, this is meanwhile no longer the case. Using cell-based assays with recombinant full-length, conformationally intact MOG, several recent studies have revealed that MOG Abs can be found in a subset of predominantly pediatric patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM, aquaporin-4 (AQP4 seronegative neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD, monophasic or recurrent isolated optic neuritis (ON, or transverse myelitis, in atypical MS and in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-encephalitis with overlapping demyelinating syndromes. Whereas MOG Abs are only transiently observed in monophasic diseases such as ADEM and their decline is associated with a favorable outcome, they are persistent in multiphasic ADEM, NMOSD, recurrent ON, or myelitis. Due to distinct clinical features within these diseases it is controversially disputed to classify MOG Ab-positive cases as a new disease entity. Neuropathologically, the presence of MOG Abs is characterized by MS-typical demyelination and oligodendrocyte pathology associated with Abs and complement. However, it remains unclear whether MOG Abs are a mere inflammatory bystander effect or truly pathogenetic

  8. Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein: Deciphering a Target in Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschl, Patrick; Bradl, Monika; Höftberger, Romana; Berger, Thomas; Reindl, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily, is a myelin protein solely expressed at the outermost surface of myelin sheaths and oligodendrocyte membranes. This makes MOG a potential target of cellular and humoral immune responses in inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Due to its late postnatal developmental expression, MOG is an important marker for oligodendrocyte maturation. Discovered about 30 years ago, it is one of the best-studied autoantigens for experimental autoimmune models for multiple sclerosis (MS). Human studies, however, have yielded controversial results on the role of MOG, especially MOG antibodies (Abs), as a biomarker in MS. But with improved detection methods using different expression systems to detect Abs in patients’ samples, this is meanwhile no longer the case. Using cell-based assays with recombinant full-length, conformationally intact MOG, several recent studies have revealed that MOG Abs can be found in a subset of predominantly pediatric patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), aquaporin-4 (AQP4) seronegative neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD), monophasic or recurrent isolated optic neuritis (ON), or transverse myelitis, in atypical MS and in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-encephalitis with overlapping demyelinating syndromes. Whereas MOG Abs are only transiently observed in monophasic diseases such as ADEM and their decline is associated with a favorable outcome, they are persistent in multiphasic ADEM, NMOSD, recurrent ON, or myelitis. Due to distinct clinical features within these diseases it is controversially disputed to classify MOG Ab-positive cases as a new disease entity. Neuropathologically, the presence of MOG Abs is characterized by MS-typical demyelination and oligodendrocyte pathology associated with Abs and complement. However, it remains unclear whether MOG Abs are a mere inflammatory bystander effect or truly pathogenetic. This article

  9. Synaptic vesicle release regulates myelin sheath number of individual oligodendrocytes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensch, Sigrid; Baraban, Marion; Almeida, Rafael; Czopka, Tim; Ausborn, Jessica; El Manira, Abdeljabbar; Lyons, David A

    2015-05-01

    The myelination of axons by oligodendrocytes markedly affects CNS function, but how this is regulated by neuronal activity in vivo is not known. We found that blocking synaptic vesicle release impaired CNS myelination by reducing the number of myelin sheaths made by individual oligodendrocytes during their short period of formation. We also found that stimulating neuronal activity increased myelin sheath formation by individual oligodendrocytes. These data indicate that neuronal activity regulates the myelinating capacity of single oligodendrocytes.

  10. Live-imaging in the CNS: New insights on oligodendrocytes, myelination, and their responses to inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassul, Sayed Muhammed; Neely, Robert K; Fulton, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    The formation and repair of myelin involves alterations in the molecular and physical properties of oligodendrocytes, and highly coordinated interactions with their target axons. Characterising the nature and timing of these events at the molecular and cellular levels illuminates the fundamental events underlying myelin formation, and provides opportunities for the development of therapies to replace myelin lost through traumatic injury and inflammation. The dynamic nature of these events requires that live-imaging methods be used to capture this information accurately and completely. Developments in imaging technologies, and model systems suitable for their application to myelination, have advanced the study of myelin formation, injury and repair. Similarly, new techniques for single molecule imaging, and novel imaging probes, are providing opportunities to resolve the dynamics of myelin proteins during myelination. Here, we explore these developments in the context of myelin formation and injury, identify unmet needs within the field where progress can be advanced through live-imaging approaches, identify technical challenges that are limiting this progress, and highlight practical applications for these approaches that could lead to therapies for the protection of oligodendrocytes and myelin from injury, and restore myelin lost through injury and disease. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Oligodendrocytes in Health and Disease'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Movement and structure of mitochondria in oligodendrocytes and their myelin sheaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinholm, Johanne E; Vervaeke, Koen; Tadross, Michael R; Tkachuk, Ariana N; Kopek, Benjamin G; Brown, Timothy A; Bergersen, Linda H; Clayton, David A

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria play several crucial roles in the life of oligodendrocytes. During development of the myelin sheath they are essential providers of carbon skeletons and energy for lipid synthesis. During normal brain function their consumption of pyruvate will be a key determinant of how much lactate is available for oligodendrocytes to export to power axonal function. Finally, during calcium-overload induced pathology, as occurs in ischemia, mitochondria may buffer calcium or induce apoptosis. Despite their important functions, very little is known of the properties of oligodendrocyte mitochondria, and mitochondria have never been observed in the myelin sheaths. We have now used targeted expression of fluorescent mitochondrial markers to characterize the location and movement of mitochondria within oligodendrocytes. We show for the first time that mitochondria are able to enter and move within the myelin sheath. Within the myelin sheath the highest number of mitochondria was in the cytoplasmic ridges along the sheath. Mitochondria moved more slowly than in neurons and, in contrast to their behavior in neurons and astrocytes, their movement was increased rather than inhibited by glutamate activating NMDA receptors. By electron microscopy we show that myelin sheath mitochondria have a low surface area of cristae, which suggests a low ATP production. These data specify fundamental properties of the oxidative phosphorylation system in oligodendrocytes, the glial cells that enhance cognition by speeding action potential propagation and provide metabolic support to axons. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Inhibition of myelin membrane sheath formation by oligodendrocyte-derived exosome-like vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhti, Mostafa; Winter, Christine; Simons, Mikael

    2011-01-07

    Myelin formation is a multistep process that is controlled by a number of different extracellular factors. During the development of the central nervous system (CNS), oligodendrocyte progenitor cells differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes that start to enwrap axons with myelin membrane sheaths after receiving the appropriate signal(s) from the axon or its microenvironment. The signals required to initiate this process are unknown. Here, we show that oligodendrocytes secrete small membrane vesicles, exosome-like vesicles, into the extracellular space that inhibit both the morphological differentiation of oligodendrocytes and myelin formation. The inhibitory effects of exosome-like vesicles were prevented by treatment with inhibitors of actomyosin contractility. Importantly, secretion of exosome-like vesicles from oligodendrocytes was dramatically reduced when cells were incubated by conditioned neuronal medium. In conclusion, our results provide new evidence for small and diffusible oligodendroglial-derived vesicular carriers within the extracellular space that have inhibitory properties on cellular growth. We propose that neurons control the secretion of autoinhibitory oligodendroglial-derived exosomes to coordinate myelin membrane biogenesis.

  13. Individual Oligodendrocytes Have Only a Few Hours in which to Generate New Myelin Sheaths In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czopka, Tim; ffrench-Constant, Charles; Lyons, David A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The number of myelin sheaths made by individual oligodendrocytes regulates the extent of myelination, which profoundly affects central nervous system function. It remains unknown when, during their life, individual oligodendrocytes can regulate myelin sheath number in vivo. We show, using live imaging in zebrafish, that oligodendrocytes make new myelin sheaths during a period of just 5 hr, with regulation of sheath number after this time limited to occasional retractions. We also show that activation and reduction of Fyn kinase in oligodendrocytes increases and decreases sheath number per cell, respectively. Interestingly, these oligodendrocytes also generate their new myelin sheaths within the same period, despite having vastly different extents of myelination. Our data demonstrate a restricted time window relative to the lifetime of the individual oligodendrocyte, during which myelin sheath formation occurs and the number of sheaths is determined. PMID:23806617

  14. CNS myelin sheath is stochastically built by homotypic fusion of myelin membranes within the bounds of an oligodendrocyte process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuchet, Sara; Nielsen, Lauren L; Domowicz, Miriam S; Austin, Jotham R; Arvanitis, Dimitrios L

    2015-04-01

    Myelin - the multilayer membrane that envelops axons - is a facilitator of rapid nerve conduction. Oligodendrocytes form CNS myelin; the prevailing hypothesis being that they do it by extending a process that circumnavigates the axon. It is pertinent to ask how myelin is built because oligodendrocyte plasma membrane and myelin are compositionally different. To this end, we examined oligodendrocyte cultures and embryonic avian optic nerves by electron microscopy, immuno-electron microscopy and three-dimensional electron tomography. The results support three novel concepts. Myelin membranes are synthesized as tubules and packaged into "myelinophore organelles" in the oligodendrocyte perikaryon. Myelin membranes are matured in and transported by myelinophore organelles within an oligodendrocyte process. The myelin sheath is generated by myelin membrane fusion inside an oligodendrocyte process. These findings abrogate the dogma of myelin resulting from a wrapping motion of an oligodendrocyte process and open up new avenues in the quest for understanding myelination in health and disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ERK1/ERK2 MAPK signaling is required to increase myelin thickness independent of oligodendrocyte differentiation and initiation of myelination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, A.; Fyffe-Maricich, S.L.; Furusho, M.; Miller, R.H.; Bansal, R.

    2012-01-01

    Wrapping of the myelin sheath around axons by oligodendrocytes is critical for the rapid conduction of electrical signals, required for the normal functioning of the central nervous system (CNS). Myelination is a multistep process where oligodendrocytes progress through a well-coordinated differentiation program regulated by multiple extracellular growth and differentiation signals. The intracellular-transduction of the extracellular signals that regulate myelination is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate a critical role for two important signaling molecules, extracelluar-signal-regulated-kinases-1 and -2 (ERK1/ERK2), downstream mediators of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), in the control of CNS myelin thickness. We generated and analyzed two lines of mice lacking both ERK1/ERK2 function specifically in oligodendrocyte-lineage cells. In the absence of ERK1/ERK2 signaling oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) proliferated and differentiated on schedule. Mutant oligodendrocytes also ensheathed axons normally and made a few wraps of compact myelin. However, the subsequent increase in myelination that correlated myelin thickness in proportion to the axon caliber failed to occur. Furthermore, although the numbers of differentiated oligodendrocytes in the adult mutants were unchanged, they showed an inability to upregulate the transcription of major myelin genes that normally occurs during active myelination. Similarly, in vitro ERK1/ERK2 deficient NG2+ oligodendrocytes differentiated normally but failed to form typical myelin-like membrane sheets. None of these effects were observed in single ERK1 or ERK2 mutants. These studies suggest that the predominant role of ERK1/ERK2 signaling in vivo is in promoting rapid myelin growth to increase its thickness, subsequent to oligodendrocyte differentiation and the initiation of myelination. PMID:22745486

  16. Cytoskeletal Linker Protein Dystonin Is Not Critical to Terminal Oligodendrocyte Differentiation or CNS Myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha F Kornfeld

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte differentiation and central nervous system myelination require massive reorganization of the oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton. Loss of specific actin- and tubulin-organizing factors can lead to impaired morphological and/or molecular differentiation of oligodendrocytes, resulting in a subsequent loss of myelination. Dystonin is a cytoskeletal linker protein with both actin- and tubulin-binding domains. Loss of function of this protein results in a sensory neuropathy called Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy VI in humans and dystonia musculorum in mice. This disease presents with severe ataxia, dystonic muscle and is ultimately fatal early in life. While loss of the neuronal isoforms of dystonin primarily leads to sensory neuron degeneration, it has also been shown that peripheral myelination is compromised due to intrinsic Schwann cell differentiation abnormalities. The role of this cytoskeletal linker in oligodendrocytes, however, remains unclear. We sought to determine the effects of the loss of neuronal dystonin on oligodendrocyte differentiation and central myelination. To address this, primary oligodendrocytes were isolated from a severe model of dystonia musculorum, Dstdt-27J, and assessed for morphological and molecular differentiation capacity. No defects could be discerned in the differentiation of Dstdt-27J oligodendrocytes relative to oligodendrocytes from wild-type littermates. Survival was also compared between Dstdt-27J and wild-type oligodendrocytes, revealing no significant difference. Using a recently developed migration assay, we further analysed the ability of primary oligodendrocyte progenitor cell motility, and found that Dstdt-27J oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were able to migrate normally. Finally, in vivo analysis of oligodendrocyte myelination was done in phenotype-stage optic nerve, cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The density of myelinated axons and g-ratios of Dstdt-27J optic nerves was normal, as

  17. On the biogenesis of the myelin sheath : Cognate polarized trafficking pathways in oligodendrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, H; Hoekstra, D

    2000-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the central nervous system, are capable of transporting vast quantities of proteins and of lipids, In particular galactosphingolipids, to the myelin sheath. The sheath is continuous with the plasma membrane of the oligodendrocyte, but the composition of

  18. A zinc finger protein that regulates oligodendrocyte specification, migration and myelination in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidik, Harwin; Talbot, William S

    2015-12-01

    Precise control of oligodendrocyte migration and development is crucial for myelination of axons in the central nervous system (CNS), but important questions remain unanswered about the mechanisms controlling these processes. In a zebrafish screen for myelination mutants, we identified a mutation in zinc finger protein 16-like (znf16l). znf16l mutant larvae have reduced myelin basic protein (mbp) expression and reduced CNS myelin. Marker, time-lapse and ultrastructural studies indicated that oligodendrocyte specification, migration and myelination are disrupted in znf16l mutants. Transgenic studies indicated that znf16l acts autonomously in oligodendrocytes. Expression of Zfp488 from mouse rescued mbp expression in znf16l mutants, indicating that these homologs have overlapping functions. Our results defined the function of a new zinc finger protein with specific function in oligodendrocyte specification, migration and myelination in the developing CNS. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR TYPE 1 RECEPTOR SIGNALING IN THE CELLS OF OLIGODENDROCYTE LINEAGE IS REQUIRED FOR NORMAL IN VIVO OLIGODENDROCYTE DEVELOPMENT AND MYELINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeger, Martha; Popken, Greg; Zhang, Jihui; Xuan, Shouhong; Lu, Q. Richard; Schwab, Markus H.; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Rowitch, David; D’Ercole, A. Joseph; Ye, Ping

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) has been shown to be a potent agent in promoting the growth and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursors, and in stimulating myelination during development and following injury. To definitively determine whether IGF-I acts directly on the cells of oligodendrocyte lineage, we generated lines of mice in which the type 1 IGF receptor gene (igf1r) was conditionally ablated either in Olig1 or proteolipid protein expressing cells (termed IGF1Rpre-oligo-ko and IGF1Roligo-ko mice, respectively). Compared to wild type mice, IGF1Rpre-oligo-ko mice had a decreased volume (by 35% to 55 %) and cell number (by 54% to 70%) in the corpus callosum (CC) and anterior commissure at 2 and 6 weeks of age, respectively. IGF1Roligo-ko mice by 25 weeks of age also showed reductions, albeit less marked, in CC volume and cell number. Unlike astrocytes, the percentage of NG2+ oligodendrocyte precursors was decreased by ~13% in 2-week-old IGF1Rpre-oligo-ko mice, while the percentage of CC1+ mature oligodendrocytes was decreased by ~24% in 6-week-old IGF1Rpre-oligo-ko mice and ~25% in 25-week-old IGF1Roligo-ko mice. The reduction in these cells is apparently a result of decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. These results indicate that IGF-I directly affects oligodendrocytes and myelination in vivo via IGF1R, and that IGF1R signaling in the cells of oligodendrocyte lineage is required for normal oligodendrocyte development and myelination. These data also provide a fundamental basis for developing strategies with the potential to target IGF-IGF1R signaling pathways in oligodendrocyte lineage cells for the treatment of demyelinating disorders. PMID:17186502

  20. Pathogenesis of myelin/oligodendrocyte damage in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhib-Jalbut, Suhayl

    2007-05-29

    Substantial evidence supports autoimmune activity as the etiologic mechanism underlying multiple sclerosis (MS). Both the innate and the adaptive arms of the immune system are involved in the aberrant response to several antigens associated with the myelin sheath and oligodendrocytes (OGCs) after the activation of immune cells by self- or cross-reactive microbial pathogens. The CD4(+) Th1 cell, in particular, has been implicated, but it is abetted by a variety of other cell types (CD8(+) cells, B cells, macrophages, and microglia) and soluble products (proteases, cytokines, and nitric oxide [NO]) that act both outside of and within the CNS. This review describes recent and salient findings from animal models and human clinical studies that have established our current understanding of the distinct steps in the development of immune autoreactivity that culminates in the CNS lesions associated with MS.

  1. Recombinant Human Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Promoter Drives Selective AAV-Mediated Transgene Expression in Oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Jonquieres, Georg; Fröhlich, Dominik; Klugmann, Claudia B; Wen, Xin; Harasta, Anne E; Ramkumar, Roshini; Spencer, Ziggy H T; Housley, Gary D; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are hereditary central white matter disorders caused by oligodendrocyte dysfunction. Recent clinical trials for some of these devastating neurological conditions have employed an ex vivo gene therapy approach that showed improved endpoints because cross-correction of affected myelin-forming cells occurred following secretion of therapeutic proteins by transduced autologous grafts. However, direct gene transfer to oligodendrocytes is required for the majority of leukodystrophies with underlying mutations in genes encoding non-secreted oligodendroglial proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are versatile tools for gene transfer to the central nervous system (CNS) and proof-of-concept studies in rodents have shown that the use of cellular promoters is sufficient to target AAV-mediated transgene expression to glia. The potential of this strategy has not been exploited. The major caveat of the AAV system is its limited packaging capacity of ~5 kb, providing the rationale for identifying small yet selective recombinant promoters. Here, we characterize the human myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) promoter for reliable targeting of AAV-mediated transgene expression to oligodendrocytes in vivo. A homology screen revealed highly conserved genomic regions among mammalian species upstream of the transcription start site. Recombinant AAV expression cassettes carrying the cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by truncated versions of the recombinant MAG promoter (2.2, 1.5 and 0.3 kb in size) were packaged as cy5 vectors and delivered into the dorsal striatum of mice. At 3 weeks post-injection, oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes expressing the reporter were quantified by immunohistochemical staining. Our results revealed that both 2.2 and 1.5 kb MAG promoters targeted more than 95% of transgene expression to oligodendrocytes. Even the short 0.3 kb fragment conveyed high oligodendroglial specific transgene

  2. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in oligodendrocytes regulates myelin sheath thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusho, Miki; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Bansal, Rashmi

    2012-05-09

    Formation of the CNS white matter is developmentally tightly regulated, but the molecules and mechanisms of myelination control in the postnatal CNS are poorly understood. Here, we show that myelin growth is controlled by fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, originally identified as a proliferative signal for oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) in vitro. We created two lines of mice lacking both FGF receptor 1 (Fgfr1) and Fgfr2 in oligodendrocyte-lineage cells but found that in these mice OPC proliferation and differentiation were unaffected. In addition, axonal ensheathment and the initiation of myelination were on time. However, the rapid growth of CNS myelin, normally occurring in the second postnatal week, was strongly inhibited. Throughout adulthood, the myelin sheath remained disproportionately thin relative to the axon caliber. In adult mice, mutant oligodendrocytes were normal in number, whereas the transcription of major myelin genes was reduced. This FGF receptor-mediated stimulation of mature oligodendrocytes could also be modeled in vitro, demonstrating that enhanced expansion of oligodendroglial processes requires signaling by extracellular signal regulated kinase-1 and -2 (Erk1/2), downstream mediators of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In vivo, Erk1/2-MAPK activity was reduced in the hypomyelinated CNS of Fgfr1/Fgfr2 mutant mice. These studies reveal a previously unrecognized function of FGF receptor signaling in oligodendrocytes that contributes to the regulation of myelin sheath thickness and that uncouples the initiation of ensheathment from the later phase of continued myelin growth.

  3. Transcriptional Expression of Myelin Basic Protein in Oligodendrocytes Depends on Functional Syntaxin 4 : a Potential Correlation with Autocrine Signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlard, Marjolein; Klunder, Lammert; de Jonge, Jenny C.; Nomden, Anita; Tyagi, Sanjay; de Vries, Hans; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    Myelination of axons by oligodendrocytes is essential for saltatory nerve conduction. To form myelin membranes, a coordinated synthesis and subsequent polarized transport of myelin components are necessary. Here, we show that as part of the mechanism to establish membrane polarity, oligodendrocytes

  4. Nanofibers Support Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cell Growth and Function as a Neuron-Free Model for Myelination Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongchao; Ceylan, Muhammet; Shrestha, Bikesh; Wang, Haibo; Lu, Q.Richard; Asmatulu, Ramazan; Yao, Li

    2014-01-01

    Nanofiber-based scaffolds may simultaneously provide immediate contact guidance for neural regeneration and act as a vehicle for therapeutic cell delivery to enhance axonal myelination. Additionally, nanofibers can serve as a neuron-free model to study myelination of oligodendrocytes. In this study, we fabricated nanofibers using a polycaprolactone and gelatin co-polymer. The ratio of the gelatin component in the fibers was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The addition of gelatin to the polycaprolactone (PCL) for nanofiber fabrication decreased the contact angle of the electrospun fibers. We showed that both polycaprolactone nanofibers as well as polycaprolactone and gelatin co-polymer nanofibers can support oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) growth and differentiation. OPCs maintained their phenotype and viability on nanofibers and were induced to differentiate into oligodendrocytes. The differentiated oligodendrocytes extend their processes along the nanofibers and ensheathed the nanofibers. Oligodendrocytes formed significantly more myelinated segments on the PCL and gelatin co3polymer nanofibers than those on PCL nanofibers alone. PMID:24304204

  5. Regulation of developing myelin sheath elongation by oligodendrocyte calcium transients in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnow, Anna M; Ford, Marc C; Valdivia, Leonardo E; Wilson, Stephen W; Attwell, David

    2018-01-01

    How action potentials regulate myelination by oligodendrocytes is uncertain. We show that neuronal activity raises [Ca 2+ ] i in developing oligodendrocytes in vivo and that myelin sheath elongation is promoted by a high frequency of [Ca 2+ ] i transients and prevented by [Ca 2+ ] i buffering. Sheath elongation occurs ~1 h after [Ca 2+ ] i elevation. Sheath shortening is associated with a low frequency of [Ca 2+ ] i transients but with longer duration [Ca 2+ ] i bursts. Thus, [Ca 2+ ] i controls myelin sheath development.

  6. BCAS1 expression defines a population of early myelinating oligodendrocytes in multiple sclerosis lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fard, Maryam K; van der Meer, Franziska; Sánchez, Paula; Cantuti-Castelvetri, Ludovico; Mandad, Sunit; Jäkel, Sarah; Fornasiero, Eugenio F; Schmitt, Sebastian; Ehrlich, Marc; Starost, Laura; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Sergiou, Christina; Schultz, Verena; Wrzos, Claudia; Brück, Wolfgang; Urlaub, Henning; Dimou, Leda; Stadelmann, Christine; Simons, Mikael

    2017-12-06

    Investigations into brain function and disease depend on the precise classification of neural cell types. Cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage differ greatly in their morphology, but accurate identification has thus far only been possible for oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and mature oligodendrocytes in humans. We find that breast carcinoma amplified sequence 1 (BCAS1) expression identifies an oligodendroglial subpopulation in the mouse and human brain. These cells are newly formed, myelinating oligodendrocytes that segregate from oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and mature oligodendrocytes and mark regions of active myelin formation in development and in the adult. We find that BCAS1 + oligodendrocytes are restricted to the fetal and early postnatal human white matter but remain in the cortical gray matter until old age. BCAS1 + oligodendrocytes are reformed after experimental demyelination and found in a proportion of chronic white matter lesions of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) even in a subset of patients with advanced disease. Our work identifies a means to map ongoing myelin formation in health and disease and presents a potential cellular target for remyelination therapies in MS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  7. Alterations of myelin morphology and oligodendrocyte development in early stage of Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Ma, Yuanlin; Liu, Zhuo; Geng, Qi; Chen, Zexin; Zhang, Yan

    2017-03-06

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause to dementia and predicted to influence about 35 million people by the end of 2050. In this study, we discover alterations of myelin morphology in hippocampus tissues of 2-month-old APP/PS1 mouse. Myelin sheath is thicker and internodal distance is shorter in APP/PS1 mouse. Oligodendrocytes, differentiated from oligodendrocytes progenitor cells (OPCs), are responsible for formation and maintenance of myelin sheath in central nervous system (CNS). Our current results demonstrate that the oligodendrocytes development is disordered in 2-month-old APP/PS1 mouse. Neuregulin-1 type III, which is critical for both oligodendrocytes development and CNS myelination, is found up-regulated in hippocampus tissues of APP/PS1 mouse by western blots. Furthermore, we find active-caspase-6 can cleave neuregulin-1 type III at the cytoplasmic region. Given together, this study indicates the alterations of myelin morphology and oligodendrocytes development in 2-month-old APP/PS1 mouse, and the alterations might be highly associated with neuregulin-1 type III and active-caspase-6. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Knockdown of Lingo1b protein promotes myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wu; Hu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Demyelinating diseases include multiple sclerosis, which is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by immune attacks on the central nervous system (CNS), resulting in myelin sheath damage and axonal loss. Leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobulin domain-containing neurite outgrowth inhibitory protein (Nogo) receptor-interacting protein-1 (LINGO-1) have been identified as a negative regulator of oligodendrocytes differentiation. Targeted LINGO-1 inhibition promotes neuron survival, axon regeneration, oligodendrocyte differentiation, and remyelination in diverse animal models. Although studies in rodent models have extended our understanding of LINGO-1, its roles in neural development and myelination in zebrafish (Danio rerio) are not yet clear. In this study, we cloned the zebrafish homolog of the human LINGO-1 and found that lingo1b regulated myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation. The expression of lingo1b started 1 (mRNA) and 2 (protein) days post-fertilization (dpf) in the CNS. Morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown of lingo1b resulted in developmental abnormalities, including less dark pigment, small eyes, and a curly spinal cord. The lack of lingo1b enhanced myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation during embryogenesis. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry and movement analysis showed that lingo1b was involved in the axon development of primary motor neurons. These results suggested that Lingo1b protein functions as a negative regulator of myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation during zebrafish development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Myelin and oligodendrocyte lineage cells in white matter pathology and plasticity after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Regina C; Mierzwa, Amanda J; Sullivan, Genevieve M; Sanchez, Maria A

    2016-11-01

    Impact to the head or rapid head acceleration-deceleration can cause traumatic brain injury (TBI) with a characteristic pathology of traumatic axonal injury (TAI) and secondary damage in white matter tracts. Myelin and oligodendrocyte lineage cells have significant roles in the progression of white matter pathology after TBI and in the potential for plasticity and subsequent recovery. The myelination pattern of specific brain regions, such as frontal cortex, may also increase susceptibility to neurodegeneration and psychiatric symptoms after TBI. White matter pathology after TBI depends on the extent and distribution of axon damage, microhemorrhages and/or neuroinflammation. TAI occurs in a pattern of damaged axons dispersed among intact axons in white matter tracts. TAI accompanied by bleeding and/or inflammation produces focal regions of overt tissue destruction, resulting in loss of both axons and myelin. White matter regions with TAI may also exhibit demyelination of intact axons. Demyelinated axons that remain viable have the potential for remyelination and recovery of function. Indeed, animal models of TBI have demonstrated demyelination that is associated with evidence of remyelination, including oligodendrocyte progenitor cell proliferation, generation of new oligodendrocytes, and formation of thinner myelin. Changes in neuronal activity that accompany TBI may also involve myelin remodeling, which modifies conduction efficiency along intact myelinated fibers. Thus, effective remyelination and myelin remodeling may be neurobiological substrates of plasticity in neuronal circuits that require long-distance communication. This perspective integrates findings from multiple contexts to propose a model of myelin and oligodendrocyte lineage cell relevance in white matter injury after TBI. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Oligodendrocytes in Health and Disease'. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. IKAP deficiency in an FD mouse model and in oligodendrocyte precursor cells results in downregulation of genes involved in oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheishvili, David; Dietrich, Paula; Maayan, Channa; Even, Aviel; Weil, Miguel; Dragatsis, Ioannis; Razin, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    The splice site mutation in the IKBKAP gene coding for IKAP protein leads to the tissue-specific skipping of exon 20, with concomitant reduction in IKAP protein production. This causes the neurodevelopmental, autosomal-recessive genetic disorder - Familial Dysautonomia (FD). The molecular hallmark of FD is the severe reduction of IKAP protein in the nervous system that is believed to be the main reason for the devastating symptoms of this disease. Our recent studies showed that in the brain of two FD patients, genes linked to oligodendrocyte differentiation and/or myelin formation are significantly downregulated, implicating IKAP in the process of myelination. However, due to the scarcity of FD patient tissues, these results awaited further validation in other models. Recently, two FD mouse models that faithfully recapitulate FD were generated, with two types of mutations resulting in severely low levels of IKAP expression. Here we demonstrate that IKAP deficiency in these FD mouse models affects a similar set of genes as in FD patients' brains. In addition, we identified two new IKAP target genes involved in oligodendrocyte cells differentiation and myelination, further underscoring the essential role of IKAP in this process. We also provide proof that IKAP expression is needed cell-autonomously for the regulation of expression of genes involved in myelin formation since knockdown of IKAP in the Oli-neu oligodendrocyte precursor cell line results in similar deficiencies. Further analyses of these two experimental models will compensate for the lack of human postmortem tissues and will advance our understanding of the role of IKAP in myelination and the disease pathology.

  11. The Multiple Roles of Myelin Protein Genes During the Development of the Oligodendrocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fulton

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available It has become clear that the products of several of the earliest identified myelin protein genes perform functions that extend beyond the myelin sheath. Interestingly, these myelin proteins, which comprise proteolipid protein, 2′, 3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase and the classic and golli MBPs (myelin basic proteins, play important roles during different stages of oligodendroglial development. These non-myelin-related functions are varied and include roles in the regulation of process outgrowth, migration, RNA transport, oligodendrocyte survival and ion channel modulation. However, despite the wide variety of cellular functions performed by the different myelin genes, the route by which they achieve these many functions seems to converge upon a common mechanism involving Ca2+ regulation, cytoskeletal rearrangements and signal transduction. In the present review, the newly emerging functions of these myelin proteins will be described, and these will then be discussed in the context of their contribution to oligodendroglial development.

  12. Oligodendrocyte Development and Myelination in Neurodevelopment: Molecular Mechanisms in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barateiro, Andreia; Brites, Dora; Fernandes, Adelaide

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the central nervous system that constitute about 5 to 10% of the total glial population. These cells are responsible for myelin sheath production, which is essential not only for the rapid and efficient conduction of the electrical impulses along the axons, but also for preserving axonal integrity. Oligodendrocytes arise from oligodendrocyte progenitor cells that proliferate and differentiate just before and after birth, under a highly-regulated program. Both oligodendrocytes and their precursors are very susceptible to injury by several mechanisms, including excitotoxic damage, oxidative stress and inflammatory events. In this review, we will cover not only several important aspects of oligodendrocyte development and regulatory mechanisms involved in this process, but also some of the most important pathways of injury associated to oligodendrogenesis. Moreover, we will also address some neurological disorders along life journey that present impairment in oligodendrocyte function and in myelination during neurodevelopment, such as periventricular leukomalacia, hypoxia/ischemia and hyperbilirubinemia that in turn can potentiate the emergence of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases like schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type z negatively regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Kuboyama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fyn tyrosine kinase-mediated down-regulation of Rho activity through activation of p190RhoGAP is crucial for oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Therefore, the loss of function of its counterpart protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP may enhance myelination during development and remyelination in demyelinating diseases. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether Ptprz, a receptor-like PTP (RPTP expressed abuntantly in oligodendrocyte lineage cells, is involved in this process, because we recently revealed that p190RhoGAP is a physiological substrate for Ptprz. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found an early onset of the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP, a major protein of the myelin sheath, and early initiation of myelination in vivo during development of the Ptprz-deficient mouse, as compared with the wild-type. In addition, oligodendrocytes appeared earlier in primary cultures from Ptprz-deficient mice than wild-type mice. Furthermore, adult Ptprz-deficient mice were less susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE induced by active immunization with myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG peptide than were wild-type mice. After EAE was induced, the tyrosine phosphorylation of p190RhoGAP increased significantly, and the EAE-induced loss of MBP was markedly suppressed in the white matter of the spinal cord in Ptprz-deficient mice. Here, the number of T-cells and macrophages/microglia infiltrating into the spinal cord did not differ between the two genotypes after MOG immunization. All these findings strongly support the validity of our hypothesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ptprz plays a negative role in oligodendrocyte differentiation in early central nervous system (CNS development and remyelination in demyelinating CNS diseases, through the dephosphorylation of substrates such as p190RhoGAP.

  14. RGD-containing peptides inhibit the synthesis of myelin-like membrane by cultured oligodendrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A synthetic peptide derived from the fibronectin cell-binding domain, GRGDSP, inhibits the adhesion of rat oligodendrocytes to a number of substrates. However, while GRGDSP inhibited the adhesion of cells in a short term adhesion assay, the presence of the peptide did not prevent cells from adhering and thriving in longer term culture. The morphological characteristics of individual cells cultured with 0.1 mg/ml GRGDSP were similar to untreated cultures; small rounded cell bodies radiating numerous fine processes. Peptide-treated cultures were inhibited in their ability to produce myelin specific components. The characteristic developmental peak in sulfolipid synthesis which occurs both in vivo and in vitro was completely inhibited when cells were cultured with GRGDSP. In addition, the synthesis of myelin basic protein was inhibited. Ultrastructurally, cells treated with GRGDSP showed a greatly reduced number of multilamellar myelin-like membrane figures than cells grown without peptide or those grown with GRADSP. Cultured oligodendrocytes did not become sensitive to inhibition of sulfolipid synthesis by GRGDSP until a period immediately preceding the peak in sulfolipid biosynthesis. The effects of pretreatment with peptide for 5 d before this time were completely reversible. Pretreatment which extended into the time of peak myelin synthesis resulted in permanent impairment in the cell's ability to synthesize sulfolipid. The oligodendrocyte's ability to synthesize a myelin-like membrane in culture is, in part, inherent since it occurs in the absence of neurons. The present results indicate that myelin membrane production is also subject to external control since it appears that occupancy of an RGD-dependent cell surface receptor during a critical period of in vitro development is required for the oligodendrocyte to produce myelin-like membrane. PMID:2459132

  15. Down Syndrome Developmental Brain Transcriptome Reveals Defective Oligodendrocyte Differentiation and Myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos-Serrano, Jose Luis; Kang, Hyo Jung; Tyler, William A; Silbereis, John C; Cheng, Feng; Zhu, Ying; Pletikos, Mihovil; Jankovic-Rapan, Lucija; Cramer, Nathan P; Galdzicki, Zygmunt; Goodliffe, Joseph; Peters, Alan; Sethares, Claire; Delalle, Ivana; Golden, Jeffrey A; Haydar, Tarik F; Sestan, Nenad

    2016-03-16

    Trisomy 21, or Down syndrome (DS), is the most common genetic cause of developmental delay and intellectual disability. To gain insight into the underlying molecular and cellular pathogenesis, we conducted a multi-region transcriptome analysis of DS and euploid control brains spanning from mid-fetal development to adulthood. We found genome-wide alterations in the expression of a large number of genes, many of which exhibited temporal and spatial specificity and were associated with distinct biological processes. In particular, we uncovered co-dysregulation of genes associated with oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination that were validated via cross-species comparison to Ts65Dn trisomy mice. Furthermore, we show that hypomyelination present in Ts65Dn mice is in part due to cell-autonomous effects of trisomy on oligodendrocyte differentiation and results in slower neocortical action potential transmission. Together, these results identify defects in white matter development and function in DS, and they provide a transcriptional framework for further investigating DS neuropathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Damage to Myelin and Oligodendrocytes: A Role in Chronic Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, William L.

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence in the experimental and clinical traumatic brain injury (TBI) literature that loss of central myelinated nerve fibers continues over the chronic post-traumatic phase after injury. However, the biomechanism(s) of continued loss of axons is obscure. Stretch-injury to optic nerve fibers in adult guinea-pigs was used to test the hypothesis that damage to the myelin sheath and oligodendrocytes of the optic nerve fibers may contribute to, or facilitate, the continuance of axonal loss. Myelin dislocations occur within internodal myelin of larger axons within 1–2 h of TBI. The myelin dislocations contain elevated levels of free calcium. The volume of myelin dislocations increase with greater survival and are associated with disruption of the axonal cytoskeleton leading to secondary axotomy. Waves of Ca2+ depolarization or spreading depression extend from the initial locus injury for perhaps hundreds of microns after TBI. As astrocytes and oligodendrocytes are connected via gap junctions, it is hypothesized that spreading depression results in depolarization of central glia, disrupt axonal ionic homeostasis, injure axonal mitochondria and allow the onset of axonal degeneration throughout an increasing volume of brain tissue; and contribute toward post-traumatic continued loss of white matter. PMID:24961533

  17. Damage to myelin and oligodendrocytes: a role in chronic outcomes following traumatic brain injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, William L

    2013-09-16

    There is increasing evidence in the experimental and clinical traumatic brain injury (TBI) literature that loss of central myelinated nerve fibers continues over the chronic post-traumatic phase after injury. However, the biomechanism(s) of continued loss of axons is obscure. Stretch-injury to optic nerve fibers in adult guinea-pigs was used to test the hypothesis that damage to the myelin sheath and oligodendrocytes of the optic nerve fibers may contribute to, or facilitate, the continuance of axonal loss. Myelin dislocations occur within internodal myelin of larger axons within 1-2 h of TBI. The myelin dislocations contain elevated levels of free calcium. The volume of myelin dislocations increase with greater survival and are associated with disruption of the axonal cytoskeleton leading to secondary axotomy. Waves of Ca2+ depolarization or spreading depression extend from the initial locus injury for perhaps hundreds of microns after TBI. As astrocytes and oligodendrocytes are connected via gap junctions, it is hypothesized that spreading depression results in depolarization of central glia, disrupt axonal ionic homeostasis, injure axonal mitochondria and allow the onset of axonal degeneration throughout an increasing volume of brain tissue; and contribute toward post-traumatic continued loss of white matter.

  18. Damage to Myelin and Oligodendrocytes: A Role in Chronic Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L. Maxwell

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence in the experimental and clinical traumatic brain injury (TBI literature that loss of central myelinated nerve fibers continues over the chronic post-traumatic phase after injury. However, the biomechanism(s of continued loss of axons is obscure. Stretch-injury to optic nerve fibers in adult guinea-pigs was used to test the hypothesis that damage to the myelin sheath and oligodendrocytes of the optic nerve fibers may contribute to, or facilitate, the continuance of axonal loss. Myelin dislocations occur within internodal myelin of larger axons within 1–2 h of TBI. The myelin dislocations contain elevated levels of free calcium. The volume of myelin dislocations increase with greater survival and are associated with disruption of the axonal cytoskeleton leading to secondary axotomy. Waves of Ca2+ depolarization or spreading depression extend from the initial locus injury for perhaps hundreds of microns after TBI. As astrocytes and oligodendrocytes are connected via gap junctions, it is hypothesized that spreading depression results in depolarization of central glia, disrupt axonal ionic homeostasis, injure axonal mitochondria and allow the onset of axonal degeneration throughout an increasing volume of brain tissue; and contribute toward post-traumatic continued loss of white matter.

  19. Myocilin is involved in NgR1/Lingo-1-mediated oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination of the optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Heung Sun; Nakaya, Naoki; Abu-Asab, Mones; Kim, Hong Sug; Tomarev, Stanislav I

    2014-04-16

    Myocilin is a secreted glycoprotein that belongs to a family of olfactomedin domain-containing proteins. Although myocilin is detected in several ocular and nonocular tissues, the only reported human pathology related to mutations in the MYOCILIN gene is primary open-angle glaucoma. Functions of myocilin are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that myocilin is a mediator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and is involved in the myelination of the optic nerve in mice. Myocilin is expressed and secreted by optic nerve astrocytes. Differentiation of optic nerve oligodendrocytes is delayed in Myocilin-null mice. Optic nerves of Myocilin-null mice contain reduced levels of several myelin-associated proteins including myelin basic protein, myelin proteolipid protein, and 2'3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase compared with those of wild-type littermates. This leads to reduced myelin sheath thickness of optic nerve axons in Myocilin-null mice compared with wild-type littermates, and this difference is more pronounced at early postnatal stages compared with adult mice. Myocilin also affects differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursors in vitro. Its addition to primary cultures of differentiating oligodendrocyte precursors increases levels of tested markers of oligodendrocyte differentiation and stimulates elongation of oligodendrocyte processes. Myocilin stimulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation occurs through the NgR1/Lingo-1 receptor complex. Myocilin physically interacts with Lingo-1 and may be considered as a Lingo-1 ligand. Myocilin-induced elongation of oligodendrocyte processes may be mediated by activation of FYN and suppression of RhoA GTPase.

  20. NGF regulates the expression of axonal LINGO-1 to inhibit oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Xinhua; Yang, Zhongshu; Shao, Zhaohui; Rosenberg, Sheila S; Levesque, Melissa; Pepinsky, R Blake; Qiu, Mengsheng; Miller, Robert H; Chan, Jonah R; Mi, Sha

    2007-01-03

    Neurons and glia share a mutual dependence in establishing a functional relationship, and none is more evident than the process by which axons control myelination. Here, we identify LRR and Ig domain-containing, Nogo receptor-interacting protein (LINGO-1) as a potent axonal inhibitor of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination that is regulated by nerve growth factor and its cognate receptor TrkA in a dose-dependent manner. Whereas LINGO-1 expressed by oligodendrocyte progenitor cells was previously identified as an inhibitor of differentiation, we demonstrate that axonal expression of LINGO-1 inhibits differentiation with equal potency. Disruption of LINGO-1 on either cell type is sufficient to overcome the inhibitory action and promote differentiation and myelination, independent of axon diameter. Furthermore, these results were recapitulated in transgenic mice overexpressing the full length LINGO-1 under the neuronal promoter synapsin. Myelination was greatly inhibited in the presence of enforced axonal LINGO-1. The implications of these results relate specifically to the development of potential therapeutics targeting extrinsic growth factors that may regulate the axonal expression of modulators of oligodendrocyte development.

  1. LINGO-1, a transmembrane signaling protein, inhibits oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination through intercellular self-interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, Scott; Vought, Bryan; Gross, Christian H; Gan, Lu; Austen, Douglas; Frantz, J Daniel; Zwahlen, Jacque; Lowe, Derek; Markland, William; Krauss, Raul

    2012-06-22

    Overcoming remyelination failure is a major goal of new therapies for demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis. LINGO-1, a key negative regulator of myelination, is a transmembrane signaling protein expressed in both neurons and oligodendrocytes. In neurons, LINGO-1 is an integral component of the Nogo receptor complex, which inhibits axonal growth via RhoA. Because the only ligand-binding subunit of this complex, the Nogo receptor, is absent in oligodendrocytes, the extracellular signals that inhibit myelination through a LINGO-1-mediated mechanism are unknown. Here we show that LINGO-1 inhibits oligodendrocyte terminal differentiation through intercellular interactions and is capable of a self-association in trans. Consistent with previous reports, overexpression of full-length LINGO-1 inhibited differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). Unexpectedly, treatment with a soluble recombinant LINGO-1 ectodomain also had an inhibitory effect on OPCs and decreased myelinated axonal segments in cocultures with neurons from dorsal root ganglia. We demonstrated LINGO-1-mediated inhibition of OPCs through intercellular signaling by using a surface-bound LINGO-1 construct expressed ectopically in astrocytes. Further investigation showed that the soluble LINGO-1 ectodomain can interact with itself in trans by binding to CHO cells expressing full-length LINGO-1. Finally, we observed that soluble LINGO-1 could activate RhoA in OPCs. We propose that LINGO-1 acts as both a ligand and a receptor and that the mechanism by which it negatively regulates OPC differentiation and myelination is mediated by a homophilic intercellular interaction. Disruption of this protein-protein interaction could lead to a decrease of LINGO-1 inhibition and an increase in myelination.

  2. Ciliary neurotrophic factor role in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein expression in Cuprizone-induced multiple sclerosis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Zivar; Hadiyan, Sara Pishgah; Navidi, Reza

    2013-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that leads to loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes and damage to axons. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a minor component of the myelin sheath, but is an important autoantigen linked to the pathogenesis of MS. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been shown to enhance the generation, maturation, and survival of oligodendrocytes in culture medium. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of CNTF on MOG expression in the cerebral cortex of Cuprizone-induced MS mice. The mice were treated by Cuprizone for five weeks in order to induce MS. The mice were then divided into 3 groups. The first group was injected subcutaneously (SC) by CNTF in the amount of 250 μg/kg BW per day. The second group (SHAM) was injected SC by normal saline and the third group was left without injection as the control group. After four weeks the mice were killed and the cerebral cortex was harvested and the expression of MOG was studied by Western blotting. The data from this study show that the MOG expression was significantly increased in the CNTF-injected group as compared to the other groups. It is concluded that CNTF increases the MOG expression and may be important in the pathophysiology of MS. It is also concluded that CNTF may play a role in the process of remyelination by inducing the MOG expression.

  3. How big is the myelinating orchestra? Cellular diversity within the oligodendrocyte lineage: facts and hypotheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio eSrubek Tomassy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since monumental studies from scientists like His, Ramón y Cajal, Lorente de Nó and many others have put down roots for modern neuroscience, the scientific community has spent a considerable amount of time, and money, investigating any aspect of the evolution, development and function of neurons. Today, the complexity and diversity of myriads of neuronal populations is still focus of extensive studies in hundreds of laboratories around the world. However, our prevalent neuron-centric perspective has dampened the efforts in understanding glial cells, even though their active participation in the brain physiology and pathophysiology has been increasingly recognized over the years. Among all glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS, oligodendrocytes (OLs are a particularly specialized type of cells that provide fundamental support to neuronal activity by producing the myelin sheath. Despite their functional relevance, the developmental mechanisms regulating the generation of OLs are still poorly understood. In particular, it is still not known whether these cells share the same degree of heterogeneity of their neuronal companions and whether multiple subtypes exist within the lineage. Here, we will review and discuss current knowledge about OL development and function in the brain and spinal cord. We will try to address some specific questions: do multiple OL subtypes exist in the CNS? What is the evidence for their existence and those against them? What are the functional features that define an oligodendrocyte? We will end our journey by reviewing recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell differentiation towards OLs. This exciting field is still at its earliest days, but it is quickly evolving with improved protocols to generate functional OLs from different spatial origins. As stem cells constitute now an unprecedented source of human OLs, we believe that they will become an increasingly valuable tool for deciphering the complexity

  4. Overcoming Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 (MCT8-Deficiency to Promote Human Oligodendrocyte Differentiation and Myelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Young Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell membrane thyroid hormone (TH transport can be facilitated by the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8, encoded by the solute carrier family 16 member 2 (SLC16A2 gene. Human mutations of the gene, SLC16A2, result in the X-linked-inherited psychomotor retardation and hypomyelination disorder, Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS. We posited that abrogating MCT8-dependent TH transport limits oligodendrogenesis and myelination. We show that human oligodendrocytes (OL, derived from the NKX2.1-GFP human embryonic stem cell (hESC reporter line, express MCT8. Moreover, treatment of these cultures with DITPA (an MCT8-independent TH analog, up-regulates OL differentiation transcription factors and myelin gene expression. DITPA promotes hESC-derived OL myelination of retinal ganglion axons in co-culture. Pharmacological and genetic blockade of MCT8 induces significant OL apoptosis, impairing myelination. DITPA treatment limits OL apoptosis mediated by SLC16A2 down-regulation primarily signaling through AKT phosphorylation, driving myelination. Our results highlight the potential role of MCT8 in TH transport for human OL development and may implicate DITPA as a promising treatment for developmentally-regulated myelination in AHDS.

  5. Oligodendrocyte Nf1 Controls Aberrant Notch Activation and Regulates Myelin Structure and Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro López-Juárez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The RASopathy neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 is one of the most common autosomal dominant genetic disorders. In NF1 patients, neurological issues may result from damaged myelin, and mice with a neurofibromin gene (Nf1 mutation show white matter (WM defects including myelin decompaction. Using mouse genetics, we find that altered Nf1 gene-dose in mature oligodendrocytes results in progressive myelin defects and behavioral abnormalities mediated by aberrant Notch activation. Blocking Notch, upstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, or nitric oxide signaling rescues myelin defects in hemizygous Nf1 mutants, and pharmacological gamma secretase inhibition rescues aberrant behavior with no effects in wild-type (WT mice. Concomitant pathway inhibition rescues myelin abnormalities in homozygous mutants. Notch activation is also observed in Nf1+/− mouse brains, and cells containing active Notch are increased in NF1 patient WM. We thus identify Notch as an Nf1 effector regulating myelin structure and behavior in a RASopathy and suggest that inhibition of Notch signaling may be a therapeutic strategy for NF1.

  6. Myelin-mediated inhibition of oligodendrocyte precursor differentiation can be overcome by pharmacological modulation of Fyn-RhoA and protein kinase C signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Alexandra S; Syed, Yasir A; Kang, Sung Ung; Mitteregger, Dieter; Vig, Raluca; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Franklin, Robin J M; Altmann, Friedrich; Lubec, Gert; Kotter, Mark R

    2009-02-01

    Failure of oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) differentiation contributes significantly to failed myelin sheath regeneration (remyelination) in chronic demyelinating diseases. Although the reasons for this failure are not completely understood, several lines of evidence point to factors present following demyelination that specifically inhibit differentiation of cells capable of generating remyelinating oligodendrocytes. We have previously demonstrated that myelin debris generated by demyelination inhibits remyelination by inhibiting OPC differentiation and that the inhibitory effects are associated with myelin proteins. In the present study, we narrow down the spectrum of potential protein candidates by proteomic analysis of inhibitory protein fractions prepared by CM and HighQ column chromatography followed by BN/SDS/SDS-PAGE gel separation using Nano-HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry. We show that the inhibitory effects on OPC differentiation mediated by myelin are regulated by Fyn-RhoA-ROCK signalling as well as by modulation of protein kinase C (PKC) signalling. We demonstrate that pharmacological or siRNA-mediated inhibition of RhoA-ROCK-II and/or PKC signalling can induce OPC differentiation in the presence of myelin. Our results, which provide a mechanistic link between myelin, a mediator of OPC differentiation inhibition associated with demyelinating pathologies and specific signalling pathways amenable to pharmacological manipulation, are therefore of significant potential value for future strategies aimed at enhancing CNS remyelination.

  7. Depletion of autoreactive B-lymphocytes by a recombinant myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-based immunotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachreiner, Thomas; Kampmeier, Florian; Thepen, Theo; Fischer, Rainer; Barth, Stefan; Stöcker, Michael

    2008-03-01

    We report the construction of a fusion protein comprising the extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and a truncated version of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (ETA'). The chimeric immunotoxin targeted MOG-reactive B-lymphocytes by binding selectively to the appropriate receptors, leading to internalization and apoptosis of the target cells. The functionality of the immunotoxin was tested on a MOG-sensitive murine hybridoma cell line and ex vivo on freshly isolated splenocytes from transgenic IgH(MOG) mice. These data demonstrate, for the first time, the specific cytotoxicity of a MOG-containing recombinant immunotoxin expressed in bacteria towards MOG-reactive B-lymphocytes.

  8. Translation of myelin basic protein mRNA in oligodendrocytes is regulated by integrin activation and hnRNP-K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lisbeth Schmidt; Chan, Colin W; ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2011-01-01

    of protein synthesis represents one mechanism used to control the different requirements for myelin sheath at each axo–glia interaction. Prior work has established that β1-integrins are involved in the axoglial interactions that initiate myelination. Here, we show that integrin activation regulates...... translation of a key sheath protein, myelin basic protein (MBP), by reversing the inhibitory effect of the mRNA 3′UTR. During oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination α6β1-integrin interacts with hnRNP-K, an mRNA-binding protein, which binds to MBP mRNA and translocates from the nucleus to the myelin...... sheath. Furthermore, knockdown of hnRNP-K inhibits MBP protein synthesis during myelination. Together, these results identify a novel pathway by which axoglial adhesion molecules coordinate MBP synthesis with myelin sheath formation...

  9. Differential roles of astrocyte and microglia in supporting oligodendrocyte development and myelination in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yi; Fan, Lir-Wan; Tien, Lu-Tai; Dai, Xuemei; Zheng, Baoying; Cai, Zhengwei; Lin, Rick C S; Bhatt, Abhay

    2013-09-01

    Oligodendrocyte (OL) development relies on many extracellular cues, most of which are secreted cytokines from neighboring neural cells. Although it is generally accepted that both astrocytes and microglia are beneficial for OL development, there is a lack of understanding regarding whether astrocytes and microglia play similar or distinct roles. The current study examined the effects of astrocytes and microglia on OL developmental phenotypes including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and myelination in vitro. Our data reveal that, although both astrocytes- and microglia-conditioned medium (ACDM and MCDM, respectively) protect OL progenitor cells (OPCs) against growth factor withdrawal-induced apoptosis, ACDM is significantly more effective than MCDM in supporting long-term OL survival. In contrast, MCDM preferentially promotes OL differentiation and myelination. These differential effects of ACDM and MCDM on OL development are highlighted by distinct pattern of cytokine/growth factors in the conditioned medium, which correlates with differentially activated intracellular signaling pathways in OPCs upon exposure to the conditioned medium.

  10. Acetaldehyde, not ethanol, impairs myelin formation and viability in primary mouse oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, David J C; Harrison, Neil L

    2015-03-01

    Excessive ethanol (EtOH) drinking is associated with white matter loss in the brain at all stages of life. Myelin-forming oligodendrocytes (OLs) are a major component of white matter, but their involvement in EtOH-mediated white matter loss is unclear. Myelination continues throughout the life with highest rates during fetal development and adolescence. However, little is known about the effects of EtOH and its principal metabolite acetaldehyde (ACD) on OLs at the cellular level. We compared the responses to different concentrations of EtOH or ACD by primary OLs in culture. EtOH did not cause significant cell death at concentrations lower than 120 mM, even after 24 hours. In comparison, ACD was highly lethal at doses above 50 μM. High concentrations of EtOH (120 mM) and ACD (500 μM) for 24 hours did not reduce myelin in mature OLs. Myelin production and OL differentiation were significantly impaired by 7 days exposure to 500 or 50 μM ACD but not 120 mM EtOH. This study shows that OLs are relatively resistant to EtOH, even at a concentration more than 4 times the typical blood EtOH concentrations associated with social drinking (10 to 30 mM). In contrast, OLs are much more sensitive to ACD than EtOH, particularly with long-term exposure. This suggests that part of white matter loss in response to EtOH, especially during high rates of myelin formation, may be due in part to the effects of its principal metabolite ACD. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  11. Anosmin-1 over-expression regulates oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation, migration and myelin sheath thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcia-Belmonte, Verónica; Esteban, Pedro F; Martínez-Hernández, José; Gruart, Agnès; Luján, Rafael; Delgado-García, José María; de Castro, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    During development of the central nervous system, anosmin-1 (A1) works as a chemotropic cue contributing to axonal outgrowth and collateralization, as well as modulating the migration of different cell types, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) being the main receptor involved in all these events. To further understand the role of A1 during development, we have analysed the over-expression of human A1 in a transgenic mouse line. Compared with control mice during development and in early adulthood, A1 over-expressing transgenic mice showed an enhanced oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) proliferation and a higher number of OPCs in the subventricular zone and in the corpus callosum (CC). The migratory capacity of OPCs from the transgenic mice is increased in vitro due to a higher basal activation of ERK1/2 mediated through FGFR1 and they also produced more myelin basic protein (MBP). In vivo, the over-expression of A1 resulted in an elevated number of mature oligodendrocytes with higher levels of MBP mRNA and protein, as well as increased levels of activation of the ERK1/2 proteins, while electron microscopy revealed thicker myelin sheaths around the axons of the CC in adulthood. Also in the mature CC, the nodes of Ranvier were significantly longer and the conduction velocity of the nerve impulse in vivo was significantly increased in the CC of A1 over-expressing transgenic mice. Altogether, these data confirmed the involvement of A1 in oligodendrogliogenesis and its relevance for myelination.

  12. Human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived oligodendrocyte precursor-like cells for axon and myelin sheath regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Zhijun; Zhang, Hongtian

    2013-04-05

    Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells from Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord were induced to differentiate into oligodendrocyte precursor-like cells in vitro. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells were transplanted into contused rat spinal cords. Immunofluorescence double staining indicated that transplanted cells survived in injured spinal cord, and differentiated into mature and immature oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Biotinylated dextran amine tracing results showed that cell transplantation promoted a higher density of the corticospinal tract in the central and caudal parts of the injured spinal cord. Luxol fast blue and toluidine blue staining showed that the volume of residual myelin was significantly increased at 1 and 2 mm rostral and caudal to the lesion epicenter after cell transplantation. Furthermore, immunofluorescence staining verified that the newly regenerated myelin sheath was derived from the central nervous system. Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan testing showed an evident behavioral recovery. These results suggest that human umbilical mesenchymal stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte precursor cells promote the regeneration of spinal axons and myelin sheaths.

  13. Fibronectin impedes "myelin" sheet-directed flow in oligodendrocytes : A role for a beta 1 integrin-mediated PKC signaling pathway in vesicular trafficking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siskova, Zuzana; Baron, Wia; de Vries, H; Hoekstra, Dick

    2006-01-01

    Differentiation of oligodendrocytes results in the formation of the myelin sheath, a dramatic morphological alteration that accompanies cell specialization. Here, we demonstrate that changes in the extracellular micro environment may regulate these morphological changes by altering intracellular

  14. Human antibodies against the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein can cause complement-dependent demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschl, Patrick; Schanda, Kathrin; Zeka, Bleranda; Given, Katherine; Böhm, Denise; Ruprecht, Klemens; Saiz, Albert; Lutterotti, Andreas; Rostásy, Kevin; Höftberger, Romana; Berger, Thomas; Macklin, Wendy; Lassmann, Hans; Bradl, Monika; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Reindl, Markus

    2017-10-25

    Antibodies to the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) are associated with a subset of inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system such as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders. However, whether human MOG antibodies are pathogenic or an epiphenomenon is still not completely clear. Although MOG is highly conserved within mammals, previous findings showed that not all human MOG antibodies bind to rodent MOG. We therefore hypothesized that human MOG antibody-mediated pathology in animal models may only be evident using species-specific MOG antibodies. We screened 80 human MOG antibody-positive samples for their reactivity to mouse and rat MOG using either a live cell-based assay or immunohistochemistry on murine, rat, and human brain tissue. Selected samples reactive to either human MOG or rodent MOG were subsequently tested for their ability to induce complement-mediated damage in murine organotypic brain slices or enhance demyelination in an experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) model in Lewis rats. The MOG monoclonal antibody 8-18-C5 was used as a positive control. Overall, we found that only a subset of human MOG antibodies are reactive to mouse (48/80, 60%) or rat (14/80, 18%) MOG. Purified serum antibodies from 10 human MOG antibody-positive patients (8/10 reactive to mouse MOG, 6/10 reactive to rat MOG), 3 human MOG-negative patients, and 3 healthy controls were tested on murine organotypic brain slices. Purified IgG from one patient with high titers of anti-human, mouse, and rat MOG antibodies and robust binding to myelin tissue produced significant, complement-mediated myelin loss in organotypic brain slices, but not in the EAE model. Monoclonal 8-18-C5 MOG antibody caused complement-mediated demyelination in both the organotypic brain slice model and in EAE. This study shows that a subset of human MOG antibodies can induce complement-dependent pathogenic effects in a murine ex vivo

  15. Nf1 Loss and Ras Hyperactivation in Oligodendrocytes Induce NOS-Driven Defects in Myelin and Vasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A. Mayes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 and Costello syndrome Rasopathy have behavioral deficits. In NF1 patients, these may correlate with white matter enlargement and aberrant myelin. To model these features, we induced Nf1 loss or HRas hyperactivation in mouse oligodendrocytes. Enlarged brain white matter tracts correlated with myelin decompaction, downregulation of claudin-11, and mislocalization of connexin-32. Surprisingly, non-cell-autonomous defects in perivascular astrocytes and the blood-brain barrier (BBB developed, implicating a soluble mediator. Nitric oxide (NO can disrupt tight junctions and gap junctions, and NO and NO synthases (NOS1–NOS3 were upregulated in mutant white matter. Treating mice with the NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine corrected cellular phenotypes. CNP-HRasG12V mice also displayed locomotor hyperactivity, which could be rescued by antioxidant treatment. We conclude that Nf1/Ras regulates oligodendrocyte NOS and that dysregulated NO signaling in oligodendrocytes can alter the surrounding vasculature. The data suggest that antioxidants may improve some behavioral deficits in Rasopathy patients.

  16. Infectious Mononucleosis Triggers Generation of IgG Auto-Antibodies against Native Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakalacheva, Kristina; Regenass, Stephan; Wiesmayr, Silke; Azzi, Tarik; Berger, Christoph; Dale, Russell C; Brilot, Fabienne; Münz, Christian; Rostasy, Kevin; Nadal, David; Lünemann, Jan D

    2016-02-12

    A history of infectious mononucleosis (IM), symptomatic primary infection with the Epstein Barr virus, is associated with the development of autoimmune diseases and increases the risk to develop multiple sclerosis. Here, we hypothesized that immune activation during IM triggers autoreactive immune responses. Antibody responses towards cellular antigens using a HEp-2 based indirect immunofluorescence assay and native myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) using a flow cytometry-based assay were determined in 35 patients with IM and in 23 control subjects. We detected frequent immunoglobulin M (IgM) reactivity to vimentin, a major constituent of the intermediate filament family of proteins, in IM patients (27/35; 77%) but rarely in control subjects (2/23; 9%). IgG autoantibodies binding to HEp-2 cells were absent in both groups. In contrast, IgG responses to native MOG, present in up to 40% of children with inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), were detectable in 7/35 (20%) patients with IM but not in control subjects. Normalization of anti-vimentin IgM levels to increased total IgM concentrations during IM resulted in loss of significant differences for anti-vimentin IgM titers. Anti-MOG specific IgG responses were still detectable in a subset of three out of 35 patients with IM (9%), even after normalization to increased total IgG levels. Vimentin-specific IgM and MOG-specific IgG responses decreased following clinical resolution of acute IM symptoms. We conclude from our data that MOG-specific memory B cells are activated in subset of patients with IM.

  17. Complement activating antibodies to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in neuromyelitis optica and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Simone; Gredler, Viktoria; Schanda, Kathrin; Rostasy, Kevin; Dujmovic, Irena; Pfaller, Kristian; Lutterotti, Andreas; Jarius, Sven; Di Pauli, Franziska; Kuenz, Bettina; Ehling, Rainer; Hegen, Harald; Deisenhammer, Florian; Aboul-Enein, Fahmy; Storch, Maria K; Koson, Peter; Drulovic, Jelena; Kristoferitsch, Wolfgang; Berger, Thomas; Reindl, Markus

    2011-12-28

    Serum autoantibodies against the water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) are important diagnostic biomarkers and pathogenic factors for neuromyelitis optica (NMO). However, AQP4-IgG are absent in 5-40% of all NMO patients and the target of the autoimmune response in these patients is unknown. Since recent studies indicate that autoimmune responses to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) can induce an NMO-like disease in experimental animal models, we speculate that MOG might be an autoantigen in AQP4-IgG seronegative NMO. Although high-titer autoantibodies to human native MOG were mainly detected in a subgroup of pediatric acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, their role in NMO and High-risk NMO (HR-NMO; recurrent optic neuritis-rON or longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis-LETM) remains unresolved. We analyzed patients with definite NMO (n = 45), HR-NMO (n = 53), ADEM (n = 33), clinically isolated syndromes presenting with myelitis or optic neuritis (CIS, n = 32), MS (n = 71) and controls (n = 101; 24 other neurological diseases-OND, 27 systemic lupus erythematosus-SLE and 50 healthy subjects) for serum IgG to MOG and AQP4. Furthermore, we investigated whether these antibodies can mediate complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). AQP4-IgG was found in patients with NMO (n = 43, 96%), HR-NMO (n = 32, 60%) and in one CIS patient (3%), but was absent in ADEM, MS and controls. High-titer MOG-IgG was found in patients with ADEM (n = 14, 42%), NMO (n = 3, 7%), HR-NMO (n = 7, 13%, 5 rON and 2 LETM), CIS (n = 2, 6%), MS (n = 2, 3%) and controls (n = 3, 3%, two SLE and one OND). Two of the three MOG-IgG positive NMO patients and all seven MOG-IgG positive HR-NMO patients were negative for AQP4-IgG. Thus, MOG-IgG were found in both AQP4-IgG seronegative NMO patients and seven of 21 (33%) AQP4-IgG negative HR-NMO patients. Antibodies to MOG and AQP4 were predominantly of the IgG1 subtype, and were able to mediate CDC at high

  18. Complement activating antibodies to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in neuromyelitis optica and related disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mader Simone

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serum autoantibodies against the water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4 are important diagnostic biomarkers and pathogenic factors for neuromyelitis optica (NMO. However, AQP4-IgG are absent in 5-40% of all NMO patients and the target of the autoimmune response in these patients is unknown. Since recent studies indicate that autoimmune responses to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG can induce an NMO-like disease in experimental animal models, we speculate that MOG might be an autoantigen in AQP4-IgG seronegative NMO. Although high-titer autoantibodies to human native MOG were mainly detected in a subgroup of pediatric acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM and multiple sclerosis (MS patients, their role in NMO and High-risk NMO (HR-NMO; recurrent optic neuritis-rON or longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis-LETM remains unresolved. Results We analyzed patients with definite NMO (n = 45, HR-NMO (n = 53, ADEM (n = 33, clinically isolated syndromes presenting with myelitis or optic neuritis (CIS, n = 32, MS (n = 71 and controls (n = 101; 24 other neurological diseases-OND, 27 systemic lupus erythematosus-SLE and 50 healthy subjects for serum IgG to MOG and AQP4. Furthermore, we investigated whether these antibodies can mediate complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC. AQP4-IgG was found in patients with NMO (n = 43, 96%, HR-NMO (n = 32, 60% and in one CIS patient (3%, but was absent in ADEM, MS and controls. High-titer MOG-IgG was found in patients with ADEM (n = 14, 42%, NMO (n = 3, 7%, HR-NMO (n = 7, 13%, 5 rON and 2 LETM, CIS (n = 2, 6%, MS (n = 2, 3% and controls (n = 3, 3%, two SLE and one OND. Two of the three MOG-IgG positive NMO patients and all seven MOG-IgG positive HR-NMO patients were negative for AQP4-IgG. Thus, MOG-IgG were found in both AQP4-IgG seronegative NMO patients and seven of 21 (33% AQP4-IgG negative HR-NMO patients. Antibodies to MOG and AQP4 were predominantly of the IgG1 subtype, and were able

  19. Sorting and trafficking of proteins in oligodendrocytes during myelin membrane biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, Lammert

    2007-01-01

    During myelin formation OLGs may utilize basic mechanisms of epithelial membrane trafficking, as described and summarized in the introductory chapter (Chapter 1). However, whether specific transport pathways, unique to myelin biogenesis are involved and how such pathways might be regulated in

  20. Arg deficiency does not influence the course of Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein (MOG35-55)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Freja Aksel; Hulst, Camilla; Bäckström, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    extensively studied in immune activation, roles for Arg are incompletely characterized. To investigate the role for Arg in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we studied disease development in Arg-/- mice. Methods: Arg-/- and Arg+/+ mice were generated from breeding of Arg+/- mice on the C57BL/6...... background. Mice were immunized with the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide and disease development recorded. Lymphocyte phenotypes of wild type Arg+/+ and Arg-/- mice were studied by in vitro stimulation assays and flow cytometry. Results: The breeding of Arg+/+ and Arg-/- mice showed......Background: Inhibition of Abl kinases has an ameliorating effect on the rodent model for multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and arrests lymphocyte activation. The family of Abl kinases consists of the Abl1/Abl and Abl2/Arg tyrosine kinases. While the Abl kinase has been...

  1. Administration of vitamin D 3 induces CNPase and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein expression in the cerebral cortex of the murine model of cuprizone-induced demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Mashayekhi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the central nervous system (CNS the main proteins of myelin are proteolipid protein (PLP, myelin basic protein (MBP, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG and CNPase. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein is a minor component of the myelin sheath, but is an important autoantigen linked to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS. CNPase is expressed exclusively by oligodendrocytes in the CNS, and the appearance of CNPase seems to be one of the earliest events of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. In this study the effects of vitamin D on total protein concentration, CNPase and MOG expression in the cerebral cortex of the murine model of cuprizone-induced demyelination was investigated. The mice were treated by cuprizone for five weeks in order to induce demyelination. The mice were then divided into 3 groups. The first group was injected intraperitoneally (IP with vitamin D diluted in olive oil in the amount of 5 µg/kg/daily body weight. The second group (SHAM was injected IP with olive oil and the third group was left without any injection as the control group (n = 11 for each group. After five weeks the mice were killed and the cerebral cortex was collected and the expression of CNPase and MOG was studied by Western blot. Total protein concentration in the vitamin D injected, SHAM and control groups were 0.918 ± 0.003, 0917 ± 0.004 and 0.916 ± 0.004 g/l, respectively (p > 0.05. However, a significant increase in the MOG and CNPase expression was seen in vitamin D injected group as compared to SHAM and control groups. It is concluded that vitamin D plays a role in the process of remyelination by increasing MOG and CNPase expression in the cortex.

  2. Cyclosporin A increases recovery after spinal cord injury but does not improve myelination by oligodendrocyte progenitor cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Feng-Chao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transplantation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs is an attractive therapy for demyelinating diseases. Cyclosporin A (CsA is one of the foremost immunosuppressive agents and has widespread use in tissue and cell transplantation. However, whether CsA affects survival and differentiation of engrafted OPCs in vivo is unknown. In this study, the effect of CsA on morphological, functional and immunological aspects, as well as survival and differentiation of engrafted OPCs in injured spinal cord was explored. Results We transplanted green fluorescent protein (GFP expressed OPCs (GFP-OPCs into injured spinal cords of rats treated with or without CsA (10 mg/kg. Two weeks after cell transplantation, more GFP-positive cells were found in CsA-treated rats than that in vehicle-treated ones. However, the engrafted cells mostly differentiated into astrocytes, but not oligodendrocytes in both groups. In the CsA-treated group, a significant decrease in spinal cord lesion volume along with increase in spared myelin and neurons were found compared to the control group. Such histological improvement correlated well with an increase in behavioral recovery. Further study suggested that CsA treatment could inhibit infiltration of T cells and activation of resident microglia and/or macrophages derived from infiltrating monocytes in injured spinal cords, which contributes to the survival of engrafted OPCs and repair of spinal cord injury (SCI. Conclusions These results collectively indicate that CsA can promote the survival of engrafted OPCs in injured spinal cords, but has no effect on their differentiation. The engrafted cells mostly differentiated into astrocytes, but not oligodendrocytes. The beneficial effect of CsA on SCI and the survival of engrafted cells may be attributed to its neuroprotective effect.

  3. The adhesion molecule Necl-3/SynCAM-2 localizes to myelinated axons, binds to oligodendrocytes and promotes cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballivet Marc

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell adhesion molecules are plasma membrane proteins specialized in cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Two related adhesion molecules, Necl-1 and Necl-2/SynCAM, were recently described and shown to fulfill important functions in the central nervous system. The purpose of the work was to investigate the distribution, and the properties of Necl-3/SynCAM-2, a previously uncharacterized member of the Necl family with which it shares a conserved modular organization and extensive sequence homology. Results We show that Necl-3/SynCAM-2 is a plasma membrane protein that accumulates in several tissues, including those of the central and peripheral nervous system. There, Necl-3/SynCAM-2 is expressed in ependymal cells and in myelinated axons, and sits at the interface between the axon shaft and the myelin sheath. Several independent assays demonstrate that Necl-3/SynCAM-2 functionally and selectively interacts with oligodendrocytes. We finally prove that Necl-3/SynCAM-2 is a bona fide adhesion molecule that engages in homo- and heterophilic interactions with the other Necl family members, leading to cell aggregation. Conclusion Collectively, our manuscripts and the works on Necl-1 and SynCAM/Necl-2 reveal a complex set of interactions engaged in by the Necl proteins in the nervous system. Our work also support the notion that the family of Necl proteins fulfils key adhesion and recognition functions in the nervous system, in particular between different cell types.

  4. Myelin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... made up of protein and fatty substances. This myelin sheath allows electrical impulses to transmit quickly and efficiently along the nerve cells. If myelin is damaged, these impulses slow down. This can ...

  5. Transmission disequilibrium study of an oligodendrocyte and myelin glycoprotein gene allele in 431 families with an autistic proband.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Isabelle; Gauthier, Julie; D'Amelio, Marcello; Védrine, Sylviane; Vourc'h, Patrick; Rouleau, Guy A; Persico, Antonio M; Andres, Christian R

    2007-12-01

    Autistic disorder is a neurodevelopmental disorder where genetic factors play an important role. We previously described an association between a subgroup of French autistic patients and an allele of a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (nsSNP: OMGP62 G>A or rs11080149) in the gene coding for the oligodendrocyte and myelin glycoprotein (OMG), located at 7Mb from the marker D17S250, linked to autism in two independent genome scan studies. We report a study on 431 families with 1 affected child from different origins: French Canada (n=262), Italy (n=123) and United States (n=46). We analyzed the transmission of the rs11080149 alleles from parents to their affected children. There was a preferential transmission of the G allele from parents to affected children (p=0.0017) in the overall sample. Paternal and maternal transmission rates were both skewed. Taking into account our previous results obtained in a French group of patients, where we observed an association with allele A, a direct role of this polymorphism is improbable in autism. The associations observed in Japanese and French patients, the linkage studies and the present work speak in favor of the existence of a susceptibility gene for autism in the NF1 locus.

  6. Memory B cells from a subset of treatment-naïve relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients elicit CD4(+) T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production in response to myelin basic protein and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harp, Christopher T; Ireland, Sara; Davis, Laurie S; Remington, Gina; Cassidy, Bonnie; Cravens, Petra D; Stuve, Olaf; Lovett-Racke, Amy E; Eagar, Todd N; Greenberg, Benjamin M; Racke, Michael K; Cowell, Lindsay G; Karandikar, Nitin J; Frohman, Elliot M; Monson, Nancy L

    2010-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that B- and T-cell interactions may be paramount in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) disease pathogenesis. We hypothesized that memory B-cell pools from RRMS patients may specifically harbor a subset of potent neuro-APC that support neuro-Ag reactive T-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion. To test this hypothesis, we compared CD80 and HLA-DR expression, IL-10 and lymphotoxin-α secretion, neuro-Ag binding capacity, and neuro-Ag presentation by memory B cells from RRMS patients to naïve B cells from RRMS patients and to memory and naïve B cells from healthy donors (HD). We identified memory B cells from some RRMS patients that elicited CD4(+) T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in response to myelin basic protein and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. Notwithstanding the fact that the phenotypic parameters that promote efficient Ag presentation were observed to be similar between RRMS and HD memory B cells, a corresponding capability to elicit CD4(+) T-cell proliferation in response to myelin basic protein and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein was not observed in HD memory B cells. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the memory B-cell pool in RRMS harbors neuro-Ag specific B cells that can activate T cells.

  7. Inherited and acquired disorders of myelin: the underling myelin pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Ian D.; Radcliff, Abigail B.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is a major therapeutic goal in human myelin disorders, serving to restore function to demyelinated axons and providing neuroprotection. The target disorders that might be amenable to the promotion of this repair process are diverse and increasing in number. They range primarily from those of genetic, inflammatory to toxic origin. In order to apply remyelinating strategies to these disorders, it is essential to know whether the myelin damage results from a primary attack on myelin or the oligodendrocyte or both, and whether indeed these lead to myelin breakdown and demyelination. In some disorders, myelin sheath abnormalities are prominent but demyelination does not occur. This review explores the range of human and animal disorders where myelin pathology exists and focusses on defining the myelin changes in each and their cause, to help define whether they are targets for myelin repair therapy. PMID:27068622

  8. Inherited and acquired disorders of myelin: The underlying myelin pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Ian D; Radcliff, Abigail B

    2016-09-01

    Remyelination is a major therapeutic goal in human myelin disorders, serving to restore function to demyelinated axons and providing neuroprotection. The target disorders that might be amenable to the promotion of this repair process are diverse and increasing in number. They range primarily from those of genetic, inflammatory to toxic origin. In order to apply remyelinating strategies to these disorders, it is essential to know whether the myelin damage results from a primary attack on myelin or the oligodendrocyte or both, and whether indeed these lead to myelin breakdown and demyelination. In some disorders, myelin sheath abnormalities are prominent but demyelination does not occur. This review explores the range of human and animal disorders where myelin pathology exists and focusses on defining the myelin changes in each and their cause, to help define whether they are targets for myelin repair therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein elicits atypical experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in rat and Macaque species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan D Curtis

    Full Text Available Atypical models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE are advantageous in that the heterogeneity of clinical signs appears more reflective of those in multiple sclerosis (MS. Conversely, models of classical EAE feature stereotypic progression of an ascending flaccid paralysis that is not a characteristic of MS. The study of atypical EAE however has been limited due to the relative lack of suitable models that feature reliable disease incidence and severity, excepting mice deficient in gamma-interferon signaling pathways. In this study, atypical EAE was induced in Lewis rats, and a related approach was effective for induction of an unusual neurologic syndrome in a cynomolgus macaque. Lewis rats were immunized with the rat immunoglobulin variable (IgV-related extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (IgV-MOG in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA followed by one or more injections of rat IgV-MOG in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA. The resulting disease was marked by torticollis, unilateral rigid paralysis, forelimb weakness, and high titers of anti-MOG antibody against conformational epitopes of MOG, as well as other signs of atypical EAE. A similar strategy elicited a distinct atypical form of EAE in a cynomolgus macaque. By day 36 in the monkey, titers of IgG against conformational epitopes of extracellular MOG were evident, and on day 201, the macaque had an abrupt onset of an unusual form of EAE that included a pronounced arousal-dependent, transient myotonia. The disease persisted for 6-7 weeks and was marked by a gradual, consistent improvement and an eventual full recovery without recurrence. These data indicate that one or more boosters of IgV-MOG in IFA represent a key variable for induction of atypical or unusual forms of EAE in rat and Macaca species. These studies also reveal a close correlation between humoral immunity against conformational epitopes of MOG, extended confluent demyelinating plaques in

  10. The Extracellular Domain of Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein Elicits Atypical Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Rat and Macaque Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Alan D.; Taslim, Najla; Reece, Shaun P.; Grebenciucova, Elena; Ray, Richard H.; Rosenbaum, Matthew D.; Wardle, Robert L.; Van Scott, Michael R.; Mannie, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) are advantageous in that the heterogeneity of clinical signs appears more reflective of those in multiple sclerosis (MS). Conversely, models of classical EAE feature stereotypic progression of an ascending flaccid paralysis that is not a characteristic of MS. The study of atypical EAE however has been limited due to the relative lack of suitable models that feature reliable disease incidence and severity, excepting mice deficient in gamma-interferon signaling pathways. In this study, atypical EAE was induced in Lewis rats, and a related approach was effective for induction of an unusual neurologic syndrome in a cynomolgus macaque. Lewis rats were immunized with the rat immunoglobulin variable (IgV)-related extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (IgV-MOG) in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) followed by one or more injections of rat IgV-MOG in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA). The resulting disease was marked by torticollis, unilateral rigid paralysis, forelimb weakness, and high titers of anti-MOG antibody against conformational epitopes of MOG, as well as other signs of atypical EAE. A similar strategy elicited a distinct atypical form of EAE in a cynomolgus macaque. By day 36 in the monkey, titers of IgG against conformational epitopes of extracellular MOG were evident, and on day 201, the macaque had an abrupt onset of an unusual form of EAE that included a pronounced arousal-dependent, transient myotonia. The disease persisted for 6–7 weeks and was marked by a gradual, consistent improvement and an eventual full recovery without recurrence. These data indicate that one or more boosters of IgV-MOG in IFA represent a key variable for induction of atypical or unusual forms of EAE in rat and Macaca species. These studies also reveal a close correlation between humoral immunity against conformational epitopes of MOG, extended confluent demyelinating plaques in spinal cord

  11. How to make an oligodendrocyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldman, Steven A.; Kuypers, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes produce myelin, an insulating sheath required for the saltatory conduction of electrical impulses along axons. Oligodendrocyte loss results in demyelination, which leads to impaired neurological function in a broad array of diseases ranging from pediatric leukodystrophies...

  12. An Adult Case of Anti-Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein (MOG) Antibody-associated Multiphasic Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis at 33-year Intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numa, Soichiro; Kasai, Takashi; Kondo, Takayuki; Kushimura, Yukie; Kimura, Ayaka; Takahashi, Hisashi; Morita, Kanako; Tanaka, Akihiro; Noto, Yu-Ichi; Ohara, Tomoyuki; Nakagawa, Masanori; Mizuno, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) followed by optic neuritis (ON) has been reported as a distinct phenotype associated with anti-myelin oligodendrocyte protein (MOG) antibody. We herein report the case of a 37-year-old woman who was diagnosed with ADEM at 4 years old of age and who subsequently developed ON followed by recurrent ADEM 33 years after the initial onset. A serum analysis showed anti-MOG antibody positivity. This phenotype has only previously been reported in pediatric cases. Neurologists thus need to be aware that the phenotype may occur in adult patients, in whom it may be assumed to be atypical multiple sclerosis.

  13. Increased interleukin-6 correlates with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies in pediatric monophasic demyelinating diseases and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horellou, Philippe; Wang, Min; Keo, Vixra; Chrétien, Pascale; Serguera, Ché; Waters, Patrick; Deiva, Kumaran

    2015-12-15

    Acquired demyelinating syndromes (ADS) in children evolve either as a monophasic disease diagnosed as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM), transverse myelitis (TM) or optic neuritis (ON), or a multiphasic one with several relapses most often leading to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) or neuromyelitis optica (NMO). These neuroinflammatory disorders are increasingly associated with autoantibodies against proteins such as aquaporin-4 in rare instances, and more frequently against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Recently, in adult NMO patients, C5a levels were shown to be elevated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during acute exacerbation. We investigated the CSF levels of anaphylatoxins and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and plasma MOG antibodies in onset samples from children with ADS. Thirty four children presenting with a first episode of ADS, 17 with monophasic ADS (9 with ADEM, 4 with TM and 4 with ON) and 17 with MS, who had paired blood and CSF samples at onset were included and compared to 12 patients with other non-inflammatory neurological disorders (OND). Cytokines and anaphylatoxins in CSF were measured by Cytometric Bead Array immunoassay. MOG antibody titers in plasma were tested by flow cytometry using a stable cell line expressing full-length human MOG. We found a significant increase in C5a levels in the CSF of patients with monophasic ADS (n=17) compared to OND (n=12, p=0.0036) and to MS (n=17, p=0.0371). The C5a levels in MS were higher than in OND without reaching significance (p=0.2). CSF IL-6 levels were significantly increased in monophasic ADS compared to OND (p=0.0027) and to MS (p=0.0046). MOG antibody plasma levels were significantly higher in monophasic ADS (p<0.0001) and, to a lesser extent, in MS compared to OND (p=0.0023). Plasma MOG antibodies and CSF IL-6 levels were significantly correlated (r=0.51, p=0.018). CSF C5a and IL-6 levels are increased in monophasic ADS but not in MS when compared to OND, suggesting

  14. Myelinosome formation represents an early stage of oligodendrocyte damage in multiple sclerosis and its animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, Elisa; Merkler, Doron; Mezydlo, Aleksandra; Weil, Marie-Theres; Weber, Martin S.; Nikić, Ivana; Potz, Stephanie; Meinl, Edgar; Matznick, Florian E. H.; Kreutzfeldt, Mario; Ghanem, Alexander; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Metz, Imke; Brück, Wolfgang; Routh, Matthew; Simons, Mikael; Bishop, Derron; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte damage is a central event in the pathogenesis of the common neuroinflammatory condition, multiple sclerosis (MS). Where and how oligodendrocyte damage is initiated in MS is not completely understood. Here, we use a combination of light and electron microscopy techniques to provide a dynamic and highly resolved view of oligodendrocyte damage in neuroinflammatory lesions. We show that both in MS and in its animal model structural damage is initiated at the myelin sheaths and only later spreads to the oligodendrocyte cell body. Early myelin damage itself is characterized by the formation of local myelin out-foldings—‘myelinosomes'—, which are surrounded by phagocyte processes and promoted in their formation by anti-myelin antibodies and complement. The presence of myelinosomes in actively demyelinating MS lesions suggests that oligodendrocyte damage follows a similar pattern in the human disease, where targeting demyelination by therapeutic interventions remains a major open challenge. PMID:27848954

  15. Severe Convulsions and Dysmyelination in Both Jimpy and Cx32/47-/-Mice may Associate Astrocytic L-Channel Function with Myelination and Oligodendrocytic Connexins with Internodal KvChannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Y H Gerald; Chen, Ye; Hertz, Elna; Hertz, Leif

    2017-06-01

    The Jimpy mouse illustrates the importance of interactions between astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. It has a mutation in Plp coding for proteolipid protein and DM20. Its behavior is normal at birth but from the age of ~2 weeks it shows severe convulsions associated with oligodendrocyte/myelination deficits and early death. A normally occurring increase in oxygen consumption by highly elevated K + concentrations is absent in Jimpy brain slices and cultured astrocytes, reflecting that Plp at early embryonic stages affects common precursors as also shown by the ability of conditioned medium from normal astrocytes to counteract histological abnormalities. This metabolic response is now known to reflect opening of L-channels for Ca 2+ . The resulting deficiency in Ca 2+ entry has many consequences, including lack of K + -stimulated glycogenolysis and release of gliotransmitter ATP. Lack of purinergic stimulation compromises oligodendrocyte survival and myelination and affects connexins and K + channels. Mice lacking the oligodendrocytic connexins Cx32 and 47 show similar neurological dysfunction as Jimpy. This possibly reflects that K + released by intermodal axonal K v channels is transported underneath a loosened myelin sheath instead of reaching the extracellular space via connexin-mediated transport to oligodendrocytes, followed by release and astrocytic Na + ,K + -ATPase-driven uptake with subsequent Kir4.1-facilitated release and neuronal uptake.

  16. Oligodendrocytes: biology and pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Bradl, Monika; Lassmann, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the central nervous system (CNS). They are the end product of a cell lineage which has to undergo a complex and precisely timed program of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and myelination to finally produce the insulating sheath of axons. Due to this complex differentiation program, and due to their unique metabolism/physiology, oligodendrocytes count among the most vulnerable cells of the CNS. In this review, we first describe the diffe...

  17. A zebrafish model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy recapitulates key disease features and demonstrates a developmental requirement for abcd1 in oligodendrocyte patterning and myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Lauren R; Stevenson, Tamara J; Freshner, Briana; Keefe, Matthew D; Miranda Bowles, D; Bonkowsky, Joshua L

    2017-09-15

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a devastating inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by defects in the ABCD1 gene and affecting peripheral and central nervous system myelin. ABCD1 encodes a peroxisomal transmembrane protein required for very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) metabolism. We show that zebrafish (Danio rerio) Abcd1 is highly conserved at the amino acid level with human ABCD1, and during development is expressed in homologous regions including the central nervous system and adrenal glands. We used TALENs to generate five zebrafish abcd1 mutant allele lines introducing premature stop codons in exon 1, as well as obtained an abcd1 allele from the Zebrafish Mutation Project carrying a point mutation in a splice donor site. Similar to patients with ALD, zebrafish abcd1 mutants have elevated VLCFA levels. Interestingly, we found that CNS development of the abcd1 mutants is disrupted, with hypomyelination in the spinal cord, abnormal patterning and decreased numbers of oligodendrocytes, and increased cell death. By day of life five abcd1 mutants demonstrate impaired motor function, and overall survival to adulthood of heterozygous and homozygous mutants is decreased. Expression of human ABCD1 in oligodendrocytes rescued apoptosis in the abcd1 mutant. In summary, we have established a zebrafish model of ALD that recapitulates key features of human disease pathology and which reveals novel features of underlying disease pathogenesis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Oligodendrocytes in a Nutshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, John-Paul; Kothary, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the central nervous system (CNS). While the phrase is oft repeated and holds true, the last few years have borne witness to radical change in our understanding of this unique cell type. Once considered static glue, oligodendrocytes are now seen as plastic and adaptive, capable of reacting to a changing CNS. This review is intended as a primer and guide, exploring how the past 5 years have fundamentally altered our appreciation of oligodendrocyte development and CNS myelination.

  19. Oligodendrocytes in a nutshell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John-Paul eMichalski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the central nervous system (CNS. While the phrase is oft repeated and holds true, the last few years have borne witness to radical change in our understanding of this unique cell type. Once considered static glue, oligodendrocytes are now seen as plastic and adaptive, capable of reacting to a changing CNS. This review is intended as a primer and guide, exploring how the past five years have fundamentally altered our appreciation of oligodendrocyte development and CNS myelination.

  20. Rational design and synthesis of altered peptide ligands based on human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 epitope: inhibition of chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselios, Theodore; Aggelidakis, Mihalis; Tapeinou, Anthi; Tseveleki, Vivian; Kanistras, Ioannis; Gatos, Dimitrios; Matsoukas, John

    2014-11-04

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and is an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Although the etiology of MS remains unclear, there is evidence T-cell recognition of immunodominant epitopes of myelin proteins, such as the 35-55 epitope of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), plays a pathogenic role in the induction of chronic EAE. Cyclization of peptides is of great interest since the limited stability of linear peptides restricts their potential use as therapeutic agents. Herein, we have designed and synthesized a number of linear and cyclic peptides by mutating crucial T cell receptor (TCR) contact residues of the human MOG35-55 epitope. In particular, we have designed and synthesized cyclic altered peptide ligands (APLs) by mutating Arg41 with Ala or Arg41 and Arg46 with Ala. The peptides were synthesized in solid phase on 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin (CLTR-Cl) using the Fmoc/t-Bu methodology. The purity of final products was verified by RP-HPLC and their identification was achieved by ESI-MS. It was found that the substitutions of Arg at positions 41 and 46 with Ala results in peptide analogues that reduce the severity of MOG-induced EAE clinical symptoms in C57BL/6 mice when co-administered with mouse MOG35-55 peptide at the time of immunization.

  1. Oligodendrocytes: Development, Physiology and Glucose Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Ana I; Tavares, Joana M; Sonnewald, Ursula; Kotter, Mark R N

    2016-01-01

    The glutamate-glutamine cycle is an outstanding example of how essential neuronal-glial interactions are for brain function. For several decades, this and other metabolic cycles in the brain have only included neurons and astrocytes but not oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Recent data revealed that oligodendrocytes are highly metabolically active cells in the brain and, therefore, should not be ignored. Using 13C-labelled glucose in combination with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and/or mass spectrometry (MS) it is possible to characterize metabolic functions in primary oligodendrocyte cultures. Mature rat oligodendrocytes avidly metabolize glucose in the cytosol and pyruvate derived from glucose in mitochondria. Moreover, they seem to have the ability of performing anaplerosis from pyruvate, which might enable them to synthesize metabolites de novo and transfer them to neighbouring cells. All these original findings highlight the importance of investigating oligodendrocyte metabolism separately from that of astrocytes and neurons to be able to discern the roles played by the individual partners. This is of particular importance in the white matter where the number of oligodendrocytes is considerable. The present book chapter provides some background on oligodendrocyte biology and physiology and summarizes the not very extensive information published on glucose metabolism in oligodendrocytes.

  2. Mutation of pescadillo disrupts oligodendrocyte formation in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Simmons

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, the myelin sheath is essential for efficient propagation of action potentials along the axon shaft. Oligodendrocytes are the cells of the central nervous system that create myelin sheaths. During embryogenesis, ventral neural tube precursors give rise to oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, which divide and migrate throughout the central nervous system. This study aimed to investigate mechanisms that regulate oligodendrocyte progenitor cell formation.By conducting a mutagenesis screen in transgenic zebrafish, we identified a mutation, designated vu166, by an apparent reduction in the number of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in the dorsal spinal cord. We subsequently determined that vu166 is an allele of pescadillo, a gene known to play a role in ribosome biogenesis and cell proliferation. We found that pescadillo function is required for both the proper number of oligodendrocyte progenitors to form, by regulating cell cycle progression, and for normal levels of myelin gene expression.Our data provide evidence that neural precursors require pes function to progress through the cell cycle and produce oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and for oligodendrocyte differentiation.

  3. Myelin plasticity in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purger, David; Gibson, Erin M; Monje, Michelle

    2016-11-01

    Myelin sheaths, specialized segments of oligodendrocyte (OL) plasma membranes in the central nervous system (CNS), facilitate fast, saltatory conduction of action potentials down axons. Changes to the fine structure of myelin in a neural circuit, including sheath thickness and internode length (length of myelin segments between nodes of Ranvier), are expected to affect conduction velocity of action potentials. Myelination of the mammalian CNS occurs in a stereotyped, progressive pattern and continues well into adulthood in humans. Recent evidence from zebrafish, rodents, non-human primates, and humans suggests that myelination may be sensitive to experiences during development and adulthood, and that varying levels of neuronal activity may underlie these experience-dependent changes in myelin and myelin-forming cells. Several cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms have been investigated as contributors to myelin plasticity. A deeper understanding of myelin plasticity and its underlying mechanisms may provide insights into diseases involving myelin damage or dysregulation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Oligodendrocytes in Health and Disease'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dimethyl fumarate modulates antioxidant and lipid metabolism in oligodendrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress contributes to pathology associated with inflammatory brain disorders and therapies that upregulate antioxidant pathways may be neuroprotective in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Dimethyl fumarate, a small molecule therapeutic for multiple sclerosis, activates cellular antioxidant signaling pathways and may promote myelin preservation. However, it is still unclear what mechanisms may underlie this neuroprotection and whether dimethyl fumarate affects oligodendrocyte responses to oxidative stress. Here, we examine metabolic alterations in oligodendrocytes treated with dimethyl fumarate by using a global metabolomic platform that employs both hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and shotgun lipidomics. Prolonged treatment of oligodendrocytes with dimethyl fumarate induces changes in citric acid cycle intermediates, glutathione, and lipids, indicating that this compound can directly impact oligodendrocyte metabolism. These metabolic alterations are also associated with protection from oxidant challenge. This study provides insight into the mechanisms by which dimethyl fumarate could preserve myelin integrity in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  5. Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein-Independent Rubella Infection of Keratinocytes and Resistance of First-Trimester Trophoblast Cells to Rubella Virus In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quang Duy Trinh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rubella virus (RuV, which belongs to the family Togaviridae and genus Rubivirus, causes systemic infection in children and young adults and congenital rubella syndrome in developing fetuses if the infection occurs during pregnancy. The mechanisms of fetal infection by RuV are not completely understood. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG is reported to be a cellular receptor for RuV; however, it is mainly expressed in the central nervous system. Therefore, it is thought that other receptors are also responsible for virus entry into susceptible cells. In this study, we found that first-trimester trophoblast cells were resistant to RuV. In addition, we showed that HaCaT cells (an immortalized keratinocyte cell line that did not express MOG on their surface were infected with RuV. This finding is one of the first demonstrations of MOG-independent RuV infection of susceptible host cells and suggests that it is important to continue searching for alternative RuV receptors. In addition, this study reports the resistance of first-trimester trophoblast cells to RuV and suggests that utilizing an epithelial–mesenchymal transition approach to study the mechanisms of transplacental vertical RuV infection.

  6. Towards resolving the transcription factor network controlling myelin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Debra L; Denarier, Eric; Friedman, Hana C; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Peterson, Alan C

    2011-10-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), myelin is produced from spirally-wrapped oligodendrocyte plasma membrane and, as exemplified by the debilitating effects of inherited or acquired myelin abnormalities in diseases such as multiple sclerosis, it plays a critical role in nervous system function. Myelin sheath production coincides with rapid up-regulation of numerous genes. The complexity of their subsequent expression patterns, along with recently recognized heterogeneity within the oligodendrocyte lineage, suggest that the regulatory networks controlling such genes drive multiple context-specific transcriptional programs. Conferring this nuanced level of control likely involves a large repertoire of interacting transcription factors (TFs). Here, we combined novel strategies of computational sequence analyses with in vivo functional analysis to establish a TF network model of coordinate myelin-associated gene transcription. Notably, the network model captures regulatory DNA elements and TFs known to regulate oligodendrocyte myelin gene transcription and/or oligodendrocyte development, thereby validating our approach. Further, it links to numerous TFs with previously unsuspected roles in CNS myelination and suggests collaborative relationships amongst both known and novel TFs, thus providing deeper insight into the myelin gene transcriptional network.

  7. Dendritic cells, engineered to overexpress 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase and pulsed with a myelin antigen, provide myelin-specific suppression of ongoing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chih-Huang; Zhang, Jintao; Baylink, David J; Wang, Xiaohua; Goparaju, Naga Bharani; Xu, Yi; Wasnik, Samiksha; Cheng, Yanmei; Berumen, Edmundo Carreon; Qin, Xuezhong; Lau, Kin-Hing William; Tang, Xiaolei

    2017-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is caused by immune-mediated damage of myelin sheath. Current therapies aim to block such immune responses. However, this blocking is not sufficiently specific and hence compromises immunity, leading to severe side effects. In addition, blocking medications usually provide transient effects and require frequent administration, which further increases the chance to compromise immunity. In this regard, myelin-specific therapy may provide the desired specificity and a long-lasting therapeutic effect by inducing myelin-specific regulatory T (T reg ) cells. Tolerogenic dendritic cells (TolDCs) are one such therapy. However, ex vivo generated TolDCs may be converted into immunogenic DCs in a proinflammatory environment. In this study, we identified a potential novel myelin-specific therapy that works with immunogenic DCs, hence without the in vivo conversion concern. We showed that immunization with DCs, engineered to overexpress 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase for de novo synthesis of a focally high 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentration in the peripheral lymphoid tissues, induced T reg cells. In addition, such engineered DCs, when pulsed with a myelin antigen, led to myelin-specific suppression of ongoing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (an MS animal model), and the disease suppression depended on forkhead-box-protein-P3(foxp3) + T reg cells. Our data support a novel concept that immunogenic DCs can be engineered for myelin-specific therapy for MS.-Li, C.-H., Zhang, J., Baylink, D. J., Wang, X., Goparaju, N. B., Xu, Y., Wasnik, S., Cheng, Y., Berumen, E. C., Qin, X., Lau, K.-H. W., Tang, X. Dendritic cells, engineered to overexpress 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase and pulsed with a myelin antigen, provide myelin-specific suppression of ongoing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. © The Author(s).

  8. Dynamics of oligodendrocyte responses to anterograde axonal (Wallerian) and terminal degeneration in normal and TNF-transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drøjdahl, Nina; Fenger, Christina; Nielsen, Helle H

    2004-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF) can both induce oligodendrocyte and myelin pathology and promote proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and remyelination. We have compared the response of the oligodendrocyte lineage to anterograde axonal (Wallerian) and terminal ...

  9. Leukemia inhibitory factor is produced by myelin-reactive T cells from multiple sclerosis patients and protects against tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced oligodendrocyte apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderlocht, J; Hellings, N; Hendriks, JJA; Vandenabeele, F; Moreels, M; Buntinx, M; Hoekstra, D; Antel, JP; Stinissen, P

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), damage to oligodendrocytes is believed to be caused by an aberrant immune response initiated by autoreactive T cells. Increasing evidence indicates that these T cells are not exclusively detrimental but might also exert protective effects. We report for the first time

  10. Dynamic regulation of integrin activation by intracellular and extracellular signals controls oligodendrocyte morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen Inger

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myelination requires precise control of oligodendrocyte morphology and myelin generation at each of the axons contacted by an individual cell. This control must involve the integration of extracellular cues, such as those on the axon surface, with intrinsic developmental programmes. We asked whether integrins represent one class of oligodendrocyte cell-surface receptors able to provide this integration. Results Integrins signal via a process of activation, a conformational change that can be induced either by "outside-in" signals comprising physiological extracellular matrix ligands (mimicked by the pharmacological use of the divalent cation manganese or "inside-out" signalling molecules such as R-Ras. Increasing levels of outside-in signalling via the laminin receptor α6β1 integrin were found to promote oligodendrocyte processing and myelin sheet formation in culture. Similar results were obtained when inside-out signalling was increased by the expression of a constitutively-active R-Ras. Inhibiting inside-out signalling by using dominant-negative R-Ras reduces processes and myelin sheets; importantly, this can be partially rescued by the co-stimulation of outside-in signalling using manganese. Conclusion The balance of the equilibrium between active and inactive integrins regulates oligodendrocyte morphology, which is itself regulated by extrinsic and intrinsic cues so providing a mechanism of signal integration. As laminins capable of providing outside-in signals are present on axons at the time of myelination, a mechanism exists by which morphology and myelin generation might be regulated independently in each oligodendrocyte process.

  11. Oligodendrocyte plasticity with an intact cell body in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Makinodan

    Full Text Available Demyelination is generally regarded as a consequence of oligodendrocytic cell death. Oligodendrocyte processes that form myelin sheaths may, however, degenerate and regenerate independently of the cell body, in which case cell death does not necessarily occur. We provide here the first evidence of retraction and regeneration of oligodendrocyte processes with no cell death in vitro, using time-lapse imaging. When processes were severed mechanically in vitro, the cells did not undergo cell death and the processes regenerated in 36 h. In a separate experiment, moderate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA stimuli caused process retraction without apparent cell death, and the processes regained their elaborate morphology after NMDA was removed from the culture medium. These results strongly suggest that demyelination and remyelination can take place without concomitant cell death, at least in vitro. Process regeneration may therefore become a target for future therapy of demyelinating disorders.

  12. Myelination and myelin disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaap, M.S. van der.

    1991-05-28

    The first part of this thesis contains the results of a study into the capabilities of MR in the assessment of normal cerebral development. The process of normal myelination under the age of 1 year is divided into stages with specific MRI characteristics. An indication of normal age limits for each stage is given. The relationships between changes in signal intensities and biochemical background, and between progress of myelination and psychomotor development are discussed. The latter in the light of a study performed in hydrocephalic children, prior to and repeatedly after shunt implantation. Normal changes in {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P spectra of the brain in infants and children are described. The relationship between observed spectral changes and cerebral maturational processes is discussed. The second part deals with assessment of myelin disorders with MRI. Basic information about demyelinating disorders and biochemical background are reviewed. A new classification of myelin disorders, underlying the development of an MRI pattern recognition scheme, is proposed based on the most recent scientific developments. Common histological characteristics are described for all main categories of myelin disorders. Extensive information is presented about MRI patterns of abnormalities in patients in whom the disease is predominantly or exclusively located in the white matter. On the basis of the data of these patients a global MRI pattern recognition scheme has been developed covering all white matter disorders that were encountered. Also an example of an in-depth pattern recognition in a circumscribed category of disorders is presented. Finally a study of MRS in demyelinating disorders as opposed to neuronal disorders is described. While MRI provides information about the extent of the process of demyelination and about the disease category, MRS turns out to provide information about the severity of the demyelination and of the concomitant neuronal damage.

  13. Embracing oligodendrocyte diversity in the context of perinatal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Newville

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence is fueling a new appreciation of oligodendrocyte diversity that is overturning the traditional view that oligodendrocytes are a homogenous cell population. Oligodendrocytes of distinct origins, maturational stages, and regional locations may differ in their functional capacity or susceptibility to injury. One of the most unique qualities of the oligodendrocyte is its ability to produce myelin. Myelin abnormalities have been ascribed to a remarkable array of perinatal brain injuries, with concomitant oligodendrocyte dysregulation. Within this review, we discuss new insights into the diversity of the oligodendrocyte lineage and highlight their relevance in paradigms of perinatal brain injury. Future therapeutic development will be informed by comprehensive knowledge of oligodendrocyte pathophysiology that considers the particular facets of heterogeneity that this lineage exhibits.

  14. Dietary triheptanoin rescues oligodendrocyte loss, dysmyelination and motor function in the nur7 mouse model of Canavan disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Jeremy S; Markov, Vladimir; Leone, Paola

    2014-05-01

    The inherited pediatric leukodystrophy Canavan disease is characterized by dysmyelination and severe spongiform degeneration, and is currently refractory to treatment. A definitive understanding of core disease mechanisms is lacking, but pathology is believed to result at least in part compromised fatty acid synthesis during myelination. Recent evidence generated in an animal model suggests that the breakdown of N-acetylaspartate metabolism in CD results in a heightened coupling of fatty acid synthesis to oligodendrocyte oxidative metabolism during the early stages of myelination, thereby causing acute oxidative stress. We present here the results of a dietary intervention designed to support oxidative integrity during developmental myelination in the nur7 mouse model of Canavan disease. Provision of the odd carbon triglyceride triheptanoin to neonatal nur7 mice reduced oxidative stress, promoted long-term oligodendrocyte survival, and increased myelin in the brain. Improvements in oligodendrocyte survival and myelination were associated with a highly significant reduction in spongiform degeneration and improved motor function in triheptanoin treated mice. Initiation of triheptanoin treatment in older animals resulted in markedly more modest effects on these same pathological indices, indicating a window of therapeutic intervention that corresponds with developmental myelination. These results support the targeting of oxidative integrity at early stages of Canavan disease, and provide a foundation for the clinical development of a non-invasive dietary triheptanoin treatment regimen.

  15. Overexpression of Polysialylated Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Improves the Migration Capacity of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Oligodendrocyte Precursors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czepiel, Marcin; Leicher, Lasse; Becker, Katja; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    Cell replacement therapy aiming at the compensation of lost oligodendrocytes and restoration of myelination in acquired or congenital demyelination disorders has gained considerable interest since the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Patient-derived iPSCs provide an inexhaustible

  16. CNS myelin induces regulatory functions of DC-SIGN-expressing, antigen-presenting cells via cognate interaction with MOG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Vallejo, J.J.; Ilarregui, J.M.; Kalay, H.; Chamorro, S.; Koning, N.; Unger, W.W.J.; Ambrosini, M.; Montserrat, V.; Fernandes, R.J.; Bruijns, S.C.M.; van Weering, J.R.T.; Paauw, N.J.; O'Toole, T.G.; van Horssen, J.; van der Valk, P.; Nazmi, K.; Bolscher, J.G.; Bajramovic, J.; Dijkstra, C.D.; 't Hart, B.A.; van Kooyk, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a constituent of central nervous system myelin, is an important autoantigen in the neuroinflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS). However, its function remains unknown. Here, we show that, in healthy human myelin, MOG is decorated with fucosylated

  17. Mechanical Strain Promotes Oligodendrocyte Differentiation by Global Changes of Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyn J. Van Vliet

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC to oligodendrocytes and subsequent axon myelination are critical steps in vertebrate central nervous system (CNS development and regeneration. Growing evidence supports the significance of mechanical factors in oligodendrocyte biology. Here, we explore the effect of mechanical strains within physiological range on OPC proliferation and differentiation, and strain-associated changes in chromatin structure, epigenetics, and gene expression. Sustained tensile strain of 10–15% inhibited OPC proliferation and promoted differentiation into oligodendrocytes. This response to strain required specific interactions of OPCs with extracellular matrix ligands. Applied strain induced changes in nuclear shape, chromatin organization, and resulted in enhanced histone deacetylation, consistent with increased oligodendrocyte differentiation. This response was concurrent with increased mRNA levels of the epigenetic modifier histone deacetylase Hdac11. Inhibition of HDAC proteins eliminated the strain-mediated increase of OPC differentiation, demonstrating a role of HDACs in mechanotransduction of strain to chromatin. RNA sequencing revealed global changes in gene expression associated with strain. Specifically, expression of multiple genes associated with oligodendrocyte differentiation and axon-oligodendrocyte interactions was increased, including cell surface ligands (Ncam, ephrins, cyto- and nucleo-skeleton genes (Fyn, actinins, myosin, nesprin, Sun1, transcription factors (Sox10, Zfp191, Nkx2.2, and myelin genes (Cnp, Plp, Mag. These findings show how mechanical strain can be transmitted to the nucleus to promote oligodendrocyte differentiation, and identify the global landscape of signaling pathways involved in mechanotransduction. These data provide a source of potential new therapeutic avenues to enhance OPC differentiation in vivo.

  18. Mechanical Strain Promotes Oligodendrocyte Differentiation by Global Changes of Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielska, Anna; Lowe, Alexis L; Makhija, Ekta; Wroblewska, Liliana; Guck, Jochen; Franklin, Robin J M; Shivashankar, G V; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) to oligodendrocytes and subsequent axon myelination are critical steps in vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) development and regeneration. Growing evidence supports the significance of mechanical factors in oligodendrocyte biology. Here, we explore the effect of mechanical strains within physiological range on OPC proliferation and differentiation, and strain-associated changes in chromatin structure, epigenetics, and gene expression. Sustained tensile strain of 10-15% inhibited OPC proliferation and promoted differentiation into oligodendrocytes. This response to strain required specific interactions of OPCs with extracellular matrix ligands. Applied strain induced changes in nuclear shape, chromatin organization, and resulted in enhanced histone deacetylation, consistent with increased oligodendrocyte differentiation. This response was concurrent with increased mRNA levels of the epigenetic modifier histone deacetylase Hdac11. Inhibition of HDAC proteins eliminated the strain-mediated increase of OPC differentiation, demonstrating a role of HDACs in mechanotransduction of strain to chromatin. RNA sequencing revealed global changes in gene expression associated with strain. Specifically, expression of multiple genes associated with oligodendrocyte differentiation and axon-oligodendrocyte interactions was increased, including cell surface ligands (Ncam, ephrins), cyto- and nucleo-skeleton genes (Fyn, actinins, myosin, nesprin, Sun1), transcription factors (Sox10, Zfp191, Nkx2.2), and myelin genes (Cnp, Plp, Mag). These findings show how mechanical strain can be transmitted to the nucleus to promote oligodendrocyte differentiation, and identify the global landscape of signaling pathways involved in mechanotransduction. These data provide a source of potential new therapeutic avenues to enhance OPC differentiation in vivo.

  19. Stimulation of adult oligodendrogenesis by myelin-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted Nielsen, Helle; Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke

    2011-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), myelin-specific T cells are normally associated with destruction of myelin and axonal damage. However, in acute MS plaque, remyelination occurs concurrent with T-cell infiltration, which raises the question of whether T cells might stimulate myelin repair. We...... investigated the effect of myelin-specific T cells on oligodendrocyte formation at sites of axonal damage in the mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus. Infiltrating T cells specific for myelin proteolipid protein stimulated proliferation of chondroitin sulfate NG2-expressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells early...... after induction via axonal transection, resulting in a 25% increase in the numbers of oligodendrocytes. In contrast, T cells specific for ovalbumin did not stimulate the formation of new oligodendrocytes. In addition, infiltration of myelin-specific T cells enhanced the sprouting response...

  20. Differentiation of Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells from Sox10-Venus Mice to Oligodendrocytes and Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Nobuharu; Sekimoto, Kaori; Hayashi, Chikako; Mabuchi, Yo; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2017-10-26

    Oligodendrocytes are well known as myelin-forming cells in the central nervous system (CNS). However, detailed mechanisms of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination are poorly understood, particularly due to the difficulty of the purification of murine oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). We have recently established a transgenic mouse line that expresses a fluorescent protein Venus under the promoter of Sox10, whose expression is restricted to OPCs and oligodendrocytes in the CNS. Here, we have characterized Venus-positive cells from the Sox10-Venus mouse brain for analyzing oligodendrocyte differentiation. We first purified Venus-positive cells from the postnatal day 0-2 brain by flow cytometry. Most of the Venus-positive cells expressed NG2, an OPC marker. After induction of differentiation, an increased population of galactocerebroside-positive oligodendrocytes and decrease of OPCs were observed in the Venus-positive culture. Furthermore, a time-lapse analysis showed that Venus-positive oligodendrocytes dynamically changed their morphology with highly branched cell processes during differentiation. In addition, we found that Venus-positive OPCs were able to differentiate to type II astrocytes. In vivo, OPCs and oligodendrocytes express Venus, and some of astrocytes were positive for Venus in the ventral cortex. Taken together, the Sox10-Venus mouse system is useful for analyzing differentiation and multipotency of murine OPCs.

  1. Signaling through ERK1/2 controls myelin thickness during myelin repair in the adult central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyffe-Maricich, Sharyl L; Schott, Alexandra; Karl, Molly; Krasno, Janet; Miller, Robert H

    2013-11-20

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells of the CNS, exquisitely tailor the thickness of individual myelin sheaths to the diameter of their target axons to maximize the speed of action potential propagation, thus ensuring proper neuronal connectivity and function. Following demyelinating injuries to the adult CNS, newly formed oligodendrocytes frequently generate new myelin sheaths. Following episodes of demyelination such as those that occur in patients with multiple sclerosis, however, the matching of myelin thickness to axon diameter fails leaving remyelinated axons with thin myelin sheaths potentially compromising function and leaving axons vulnerable to damage. How oligodendrocytes determine the appropriate thickness of myelin for an axon of defined size during repair is unknown and identifying the signals that regulate myelin thickness has obvious therapeutic implications. Here, we show that sustained activation of extracellular-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in oligodendrocyte lineage cells results in accelerated myelin repair after injury, and is sufficient for the generation of thick myelin sheaths around remyelinated axons in the adult mouse spinal cord. Our findings suggest a model where ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling acts as a myelin thickness rheostat that instructs oligodendrocytes to generate axon-appropriate quantities of myelin.

  2. Myelin Damage and Repair in Pathologic CNS: Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsalan eAlizadeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Injury to the central nervous system (CNS results in oligodendrocyte cell death and progressive demyelination. Demyelinated axons undergo considerable physiological changes and molecular reorganizations that collectively result in axonal dysfunction, degeneration and loss of sensory and motor functions. Endogenous adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs and neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs contribute to the replacement of oligodendrocytes, however, the extent and quality of endogenous remyelination is suboptimal. Emerging evidence indicates that optimal remyelination is restricted by multiple factors including (i low levels of factors that promote oligodendrogenesis; (ii cell death among newly generated oligodendrocytes, (iii inhibitory factors in the post-injury milieu that impede remyelination, and (iv deficient expression of key growth factors essential for proper re-construction of a highly organized myelin sheath. Considering these challenges, over the past several years, a number of cell-based strategies have been developed to optimize remyelination therapeutically. Outcomes of these basic and preclinical discoveries are promising and signify the importance of remyelination as a mechanism for improving functions in CNS injuries. In this review, we provide an overview on: 1 the precise organization of myelinated axons and the reciprocal axo-myelin interactions that warrant properly balanced physiological activities within the CNS; 2 underlying cause of demyelination and the structural and functional consequences of demyelination in axons following injury and disease; 3 the endogenous mechanisms of oligodendrocyte replacement; 4 the modulatory role of reactive astrocytes and inflammatory cells in remyelination; and 5 the current status of cell-based therapies for promoting remyelination. Careful elucidation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of demyelination in the pathologic CNS is a key to better understanding the impact of

  3. Myelin damage and repair in pathologic CNS: challenges and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Arsalan; Dyck, Scott M.; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) results in oligodendrocyte cell death and progressive demyelination. Demyelinated axons undergo considerable physiological changes and molecular reorganizations that collectively result in axonal dysfunction, degeneration and loss of sensory and motor functions. Endogenous adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells and neural stem/progenitor cells contribute to the replacement of oligodendrocytes, however, the extent and quality of endogenous remyelination is suboptimal. Emerging evidence indicates that optimal remyelination is restricted by multiple factors including (i) low levels of factors that promote oligodendrogenesis; (ii) cell death among newly generated oligodendrocytes, (iii) inhibitory factors in the post-injury milieu that impede remyelination, and (iv) deficient expression of key growth factors essential for proper re-construction of a highly organized myelin sheath. Considering these challenges, over the past several years, a number of cell-based strategies have been developed to optimize remyelination therapeutically. Outcomes of these basic and preclinical discoveries are promising and signify the importance of remyelination as a mechanism for improving functions in CNS injuries. In this review, we provide an overview on: (1) the precise organization of myelinated axons and the reciprocal axo-myelin interactions that warrant properly balanced physiological activities within the CNS; (2) underlying cause of demyelination and the structural and functional consequences of demyelination in axons following injury and disease; (3) the endogenous mechanisms of oligodendrocyte replacement; (4) the modulatory role of reactive astrocytes and inflammatory cells in remyelination; and (5) the current status of cell-based therapies for promoting remyelination. Careful elucidation of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of demyelination in the pathologic CNS is a key to better understanding the impact of remyelination for

  4. The relationship between the occurrence of intractable epilepsy with glial cells and myelin sheath - an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X; Wang, J-Y; Gu, R; Qu, H; Li, M; Chen, L; Liu, R; Yuan, P

    2016-11-01

    The occurrence of epilepsy is associated with myelin sheath injury; oligodendrocyte (OL) is the main cell of myelin sheath; In this study, we observed the changes of OL, demyelination, and myelin associated protein in different stages of intractable epilepsy (IE) at the epileptic foci of patients, and provide useful information for the pathophysiology of IE. IE patients who received epileptogenic focus resection were recruited as the experimental group, their medical records were collected and postoperative follow-up was performed. The brain tissues from10 cases with non-brain disorders were obtained as controls. Immunofluorescence double staining was used to observe OL expression. The demyelination in epileptic foci was observed by luxol fast blue (LFB) staining method. Real-time fluorescent quantitative (RT) PCR, Western blot methods were used to detect the expressions of myelin-related proteins. We observed increased OL precursor cells, former OL and decreased mature OL in experimental group when compared with controls (both p myelin basic protein (MBP), oligodendrocytes myelin glycoprotein (OMgp), myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) and other MAG associated proteins-Nogo receptors (NgRs) and GD1α (p myelin associated protein are related to the occurrence of IE.

  5. MYRF is a membrane-associated transcription factor that autoproteolytically cleaves to directly activate myelin genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Bujalka

    Full Text Available The myelination of axons is a crucial step during vertebrate central nervous system (CNS development, allowing for rapid and energy efficient saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Accordingly, the differentiation of oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS, and their expression of myelin genes are under tight transcriptional control. We previously identified a putative transcription factor, Myelin Regulatory Factor (Myrf, as being vital for CNS myelination. Myrf is required for the generation of CNS myelination during development and also for its maintenance in the adult. It has been controversial, however, whether Myrf directly regulates transcription, with reports of a transmembrane domain and lack of nuclear localization. Here we show that Myrf is a membrane-associated transcription factor that undergoes an activating proteolytic cleavage to separate its transmembrane domain-containing C-terminal region from a nuclear-targeted N-terminal region. Unexpectedly, this cleavage event occurs via a protein domain related to the autoproteolytic intramolecular chaperone domain of the bacteriophage tail spike proteins, the first time this domain has been found to play a role in eukaryotic proteins. Using ChIP-Seq we show that the N-terminal cleavage product directly binds the enhancer regions of oligodendrocyte-specific and myelin genes. This binding occurs via a defined DNA-binding consensus sequence and strongly promotes the expression of target genes. These findings identify Myrf as a novel example of a membrane-associated transcription factor and provide a direct molecular mechanism for its regulation of oligodendrocyte differentiation and CNS myelination.

  6. Studying the Effects of Semaphorins on Oligodendrocyte Lineage Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Yasir Ahmed; Abdulla, Sarah Ali; Kotter, Mark R N

    2017-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the central nervous system. The role of oligodendrocytes in health and disease has been considerably enhanced by the development of methods to isolate and culture oligodendrocytes from central nervous system tissue. The cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in oligodendrocyte differentiation can be identified by challenging oligodendrocyte progenitors cells (OPCs) by altering their extracellular environment and intrinsic differentiation pathways. To address these issues, it is imperative to develop an in vitro protocol where pure OPCs are isolated and cultured in the presence of inhibitory developmental and differentiation cues like Semaphorin 3A. In this chapter, we describe methods to isolate and culture OPCs from neonatal rat brain tissue and further characterise their differentiation into oligodendrocytes. The described protocol is relatively simple in comparison to existing protocols and can be used to study the effect of lesion-associated inhibitors like Semaphorin 3A on oligodendrocyte differentiation.

  7. Ca2+activity signatures of myelin sheath formation and growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraban, Marion; Koudelka, Sigrid; Lyons, David A

    2018-01-01

    During myelination, individual oligodendrocytes initially over-produce short myelin sheaths, which are either retracted or stabilized. By live-imaging oligodendrocyte Ca 2+ activity in vivo, we find that high-amplitude, long-duration Ca 2+ transients in sheaths prefigure retractions, mediated by calpain. Following stabilization, myelin sheaths grow along axons, and we find that higher-frequency Ca 2+ transient activity in sheaths precedes faster elongation. Our data implicate local Ca 2+ signaling in regulating distinct stages of myelination.

  8. Multicolor analysis of oligodendrocyte morphology, interactions, and development with Brainbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Laura; Heitz-Marchaland, Céline; Fouquet, Stephane; Suter, Ueli; Livet, Jean; Moreau-Fauvarque, Caroline; Chédotal, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating cells of the central nervous system. Multiple markers are available to analyze the populations of oligodendroglial cells and their precursors during development and in pathological conditions. However, the behavior of oligodendrocytes remains poorly characterized in vivo, especially at the level of individual cells. Studying this aspect has been impaired so far by the lack of suitable methods for visualizing single oligodendrocytes, their processes, and their interactions during myelination. Here, we have used multicolor labeling technology to single-out simultaneously many individual oligodendrocytes in the postnatal mouse optic nerve. This method is based on Brainbow, a transgenic system for stochastic expression of multiple fluorescent protein genes through Cre-lox recombination, previously used for visualizing axons and neurons. We used tamoxifen-inducible recombination in myelinating cells of Brainbow transgenic mice to obtain multicolor labeling of oligodendrocytes. We show that the palette of colors expressed by labeled oligodendrocytes is tamoxifen dependent, with the highest doses producing the densest and most colorful labeling. At low doses of tamoxifen, the morphology of single or small clusters of fluorescent oligodendrocytes can be studied during postnatal development and in adult. Internodes are labeled to their extremities, revealing nodes of Ranvier. The new mouse model presented here opens new possibilities to explore the organization and development of the oligodendrocyte network with single-cell resolution. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Fluoxetine prevents oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Y; Kang, So R; Yune, Tae Y

    2015-05-01

    Oligodendrocyte cell death and axon demyelination after spinal cord injury (SCI) are known to be important secondary injuries contributing to permanent neurological disability. Thus, blocking oligodendrocyte cell death should be considered for therapeutic intervention after SCI. Here, we demonstrated that fluoxetine, an antidepressant drug, alleviates oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation after SCI. After injury at the T9 level with a Precision Systems and Instrumentation (Lexington, KY) device, fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) was administered once a day for the indicated time points. Immunostaining with CD11b (OX-42) antibody and quantification analysis showed that microglia activation was significantly inhibited by fluoxetine at 5 days after injury. Fluoxetine also significantly inhibited activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) and expression of pro-nerve growth factor (pro-NGF), which is known to mediate oligodendrocyte cell death through the p75 neurotrophin receptor after SCI. In addition, fluoxetine attenuated activation of Ras homolog gene family member A and decreased the level of phosphorylated c-Jun and, ultimately, alleviated caspase-3 activation and significantly reduced cell death of oligodendrocytes at 5 days after SCI. Further, the decrease of myelin basic protein, myelin loss, and axon loss in white matter was also significantly blocked by fluoxetine, as compared to vehicle control. These results suggest that fluoxetine inhibits oligodendrocyte cell death by inhibiting microglia activation and p38-MAPK activation, followed by pro-NGF production after SCI, and provide a potential usage of fluoxetine for a therapeutic agent after acute SCI in humans.

  10. mTOR: A Link from the Extracellular Milieu to Transcriptional Regulation of Oligodendrocyte Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa L. Wood

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte development is controlled by numerous extracellular signals that regulate a series of transcription factors that promote the differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells to myelinating cells in the central nervous system. A major element of this regulatory system that has only recently been studied is the intracellular signalling from surface receptors to transcription factors to down-regulate inhibitors and up-regulate inducers of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. The current review focuses on one such pathway: the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, which integrates signals in many cell systems and induces cell responses including cell proliferation and cell differentiation. This review describes the known functions of mTOR as they relate to oligodendrocyte development, and its recently discovered impact on oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. A potential model for its role in oligodendrocyte development is proposed.

  11. Differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from dissociated monolayer and feeder-free cultured pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Tomoko; Miyamoto, Yuki; Bando, Yoshio; Ono, Takashi; Kobayashi, Sakurako; Doi, Ayano; Araki, Toshihiro; Kato, Yosuke; Shirakawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Yutaka; Yamauchi, Junji; Yoshida, Shigetaka; Sato, Naoya

    2017-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes myelinate axons and form myelin sheaths in the central nervous system. The development of therapies for demyelinating diseases, including multiple sclerosis and leukodystrophies, is a challenge because the pathogenic mechanisms of disease remain poorly understood. Primate pluripotent stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes are expected to help elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of these diseases. Oligodendrocytes have been successfully differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells. However, it is challenging to prepare large amounts of oligodendrocytes over a short amount of time because of manipulation difficulties under conventional primate pluripotent stem cell culture methods. We developed a proprietary dissociated monolayer and feeder-free culture system to handle pluripotent stem cell cultures. Because the dissociated monolayer and feeder-free culture system improves the quality and growth of primate pluripotent stem cells, these cells could potentially be differentiated into any desired functional cells and consistently cultured in large-scale conditions. In the current study, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and mature oligodendrocytes were generated within three months from monkey embryonic stem cells. The embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocytes exhibited in vitro myelinogenic potency with rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. Additionally, the transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitor cells differentiated into myelin basic protein-positive mature oligodendrocytes in the mouse corpus callosum. This preparative method was used for human induced pluripotent stem cells, which were also successfully differentiated into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and mature oligodendrocytes that were capable of myelinating rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. Moreover, it was possible to freeze, thaw, and successfully re-culture the differentiating cells. These results showed that embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells maintained in a

  12. Fibroblast growth factor signaling in oligodendrocyte-lineage cells facilitates recovery of chronically demyelinated lesions but is redundant in acute lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusho, Miki; Roulois, Aude J; Franklin, Robin J M; Bansal, Rashmi

    2015-10-01

    Remyelination is a potent regenerative process in demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, the effective therapeutic promotion of which will fill an unmet clinical need. The development of proregenerative therapies requires the identification of key regulatory targets that are likely to be involved in the integration of multiple signaling mechanisms. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling system, which comprises multiple ligands and receptors, potentially provides one such target. Since the FGF/FGF receptor (FGFR) interactions are complex and regulate multiple diverse functions of oligodendrocyte lineage cells, it is difficult to predict their overall therapeutic potential in the regeneration of oligodendrocytes and myelin. Therefore, to assess the integrated effects of FGFR signaling on this process, we simultaneously inactivated both FGFR1 and FGFR2 in oligodendrocytes and their precursors using two Cre-driver mouse lines. Acute and chronic cuprizone-induced or lysolecithin-induced demyelination was established in Fgfr1/Fgfr2 double knockout mice (dKO). We found that in the acute cuprizone model, there was normal differentiation of oligodendrocytes and recovery of myelin in the corpus callosum of both control and dKO mice. Similarly, in the spinal cord, lysolecithin-induced demyelinated lesions regenerated similarly in the dKO and control mice. In contrast, in the chronic cuprizone model, fewer differentiated oligodendrocytes and less efficient myelin recovery were observed in the dKO compared to control mice. These data suggest that while cell-autonomous FGF signaling is redundant during recovery of acute demyelinated lesions, it facilitates regenerative processes in chronic demyelination. Thus, FGF-based therapies have potential value in stimulating oligodendrocyte and myelin regeneration in late-stage disease. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Investigation of sequential growth factor delivery during cuprizone challenge in mice aimed to enhance oligodendrogliogenesis and myelin repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K Sabo

    Full Text Available Repair in multiple sclerosis involves remyelination, a process in which axons are provided with a new myelin sheath by new oligodendrocytes. Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs are a family of growth factors that have been shown to influence the response of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs in vivo during demyelination and remyelination in the adult brain. We have previously shown that BMP4 infusion increases numbers of OPCs during cuprizone-induced demyelination, while infusion of Noggin, an endogenous antagonist of BMP4 increases numbers of mature oligodendrocytes and remyelinated axons following recovery. Additional studies have shown that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 promotes the survival of OPCs during cuprizone-induced demyelination. Based on these data, we investigated whether myelin repair could be further enhanced by sequential infusion of these agents firstly, BMP4 to increase OPC numbers, followed by either Noggin or IGF-1 to increase the differentiation and survival of the newly generated OPCs. We identified that sequential delivery of BMP4 and IGF-1 during cuprizone challenge increased the number of mature oligodendrocytes and decreased astrocyte numbers following recovery compared with vehicle infused mice, but did not alter remyelination. However, sequential delivery of BMP4 and Noggin during cuprizone challenge did not alter numbers of oligodendrocytes or astrocytes in the corpus callosum compared with vehicle infused mice. Furthermore, electron microscopy analysis revealed no change in average myelin thickness in the corpus callosum between vehicle infused and BMP4-Noggin infused mice. Our results suggest that while single delivery of Noggin or IGF-1 increased the production of mature oligodendrocytes in vivo in the context of demyelination, only Noggin infusion promoted remyelination. Thus, sequential delivery of BMP4 and Noggin or IGF-1 does not further enhance myelin repair above what occurs with delivery of Noggin

  14. Clemastine Enhances Myelination in the Prefrontal Cortex and Rescues Behavioral Changes in Socially Isolated Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Gacias, Mar; Frawley, Rebecca; Sikder, Tamjeed; Naik, Payal; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2016-01-20

    Altered myelin structure and oligodendrocyte function have been shown to correlate with cognitive and motor dysfunction and deficits in social behavior. We and others have previously demonstrated that social isolation in mice induced behavioral, transcriptional, and ultrastructural changes in oligodendrocytes of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, whether enhancing myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation could be beneficial in reversing such changes remains unexplored. To test this hypothesis, we orally administered clemastine, an antimuscarinic compound that has been shown to enhance oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in vitro, for 2 weeks in adult mice following social isolation. Clemastine successfully reversed social avoidance behavior in mice undergoing prolonged social isolation. Impaired myelination was rescued by oral clemastine treatment, and was associated with enhanced oligodendrocyte progenitor differentiation and epigenetic changes. Clemastine induced higher levels of repressive histone methylation (H3K9me3), a marker for heterochromatin, in oligodendrocytes, but not neurons, of the PFC. This was consistent with the capability of clemastine in elevating H3K9 histone methyltransferases activity in cultured primary mouse oligodendrocytes, an effect that could be antagonized by cotreatment with muscarine. Our data suggest that promoting adult myelination is a potential strategy for reversing depressive-like social behavior. Significance statement: Oligodendrocyte development and myelination are highly dynamic processes influenced by experience and neuronal activity. However, whether enhancing myelination and oligodendrocyte differentiation is beneficial to treat depressive-like behavior has been unexplored. Mice undergoing prolonged social isolation display impaired myelination in the prefrontal cortex. Clemastine, a Food and Drug Administration-approved antimuscarinic compound that has been shown to enhance myelination under

  15. Preliminary Evidence of Increased Hippocampal Myelin Content in Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda L Chao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings suggest the formation of myelin in the central nervous system by oligodendrocytes is a continuous process that can be modified with experience. For example, a recent study showed that immobilization stress increased oligodendrogensis in the dentate gyrus of adult rat hippocampus. Because changes in myelination represents an adaptive form of brain plasticity that has a greater reach in the adult brain than other forms of plasticity (e.g., neurogenesis, the objective of this proof of concept study was to examine whether there are differences in myelination in the hippocampi of humans with and without posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. We used the ratio of T1-weighted/T2-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI intensity to estimate the degree of hippocampal myelination in 19 male veterans with PTSD and 19 matched trauma-exposed male veterans without PTSD (mean age: 43 +12 years. We found that veterans with PTSD had significantly more hippocampal myelin than trauma-exposed controls. There was also found a positive correlation between estimates of hippocampal myelination and PTSD and depressive symptom severity. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine hippocampal myelination in humans with PTSD. These results provide preliminary evidence for stress-induced hippocampal myelin formation as a potential mechanism underlying the brain abnormalities associated with vulnerability to stress.

  16. Behaviour of oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells in an experimental model of toxic demyelination of the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Dominguita Lühers Graça; Eduardo Fernandes Bondan; Luis Antonio Violin Dias Pereira; Cristina Gevehr Fernandes; Paulo César Maiorka

    2001-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells are engaged in myelin production, maintenance and repairing respectively in the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Whereas oligodendrocytes act only within the CNS, Schwann cells are able to invade the CNS in order to make new myelin sheaths around demyelinated axons. Both cells have some limitations in their activities, i.e. oligodendrocytes are post-mitotic cells and Schwann cells only get into the CNS in the absence of a...

  17. Creatine Enhances Mitochondrial-Mediated Oligodendrocyte Survival After Demyelinating Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Kelly A; Chapey, Kristen S; Nanescu, Sonia E; Huang, Jeffrey K

    2017-02-08

    Chronic oligodendrocyte loss, which occurs in the demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS), contributes to axonal dysfunction and neurodegeneration. Current therapies are able to reduce MS severity, but do not prevent transition into the progressive phase of the disease, which is characterized by chronic neurodegeneration. Therefore, pharmacological compounds that promote oligodendrocyte survival could be beneficial for neuroprotection in MS. Here, we investigated the role of creatine, an organic acid involved in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) buffering, in oligodendrocyte function. We found that creatine increased mitochondrial ATP production directly in oligodendrocyte lineage cell cultures and exerted robust protection on oligodendrocytes by preventing cell death in both naive and lipopolysaccharide-treated mixed glia. Moreover, lysolecithin-mediated demyelination in mice deficient in the creatine-synthesizing enzyme guanidinoacetate-methyltransferase (Gamt) did not affect oligodendrocyte precursor cell recruitment, but resulted in exacerbated apoptosis of regenerated oligodendrocytes in central nervous system (CNS) lesions. Remarkably, creatine administration into Gamt-deficient and wild-type mice with demyelinating injury reduced oligodendrocyte apoptosis, thereby increasing oligodendrocyte density and myelin basic protein staining in CNS lesions. We found that creatine did not affect the recruitment of macrophages/microglia into lesions, suggesting that creatine affects oligodendrocyte survival independently of inflammation. Together, our results demonstrate a novel function for creatine in promoting oligodendrocyte viability during CNS remyelination.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We report that creatine enhances oligodendrocyte mitochondrial function and protects against caspase-dependent oligodendrocyte apoptosis during CNS remyelination. This work has important implications for the development of therapeutic targets for diseases characterized by

  18. The deterioration seen in myelin related morphophysiology in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oligodendrocyte development and myelination occurs vigorously during the early post natal period which coincides with the period of peak mobilization of iron. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are easily disturbed by any agent that affects iron homeostasis and its assimilation into these cells. Environmental ...

  19. LINGO-1 Regulates Oligodendrocyte Differentiation through the Cytoplasmic Gelsolin Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhaohui; Lee, Xinhua; Huang, Guanrong; Sheng, Guoqing; Henderson, Christopher E; Louvard, Daniel; Sohn, Jiho; Pepinsky, Blake; Mi, Sha

    2017-03-22

    Differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) involve the assembly and disassembly of actin microfilaments. However, how actin dynamics are regulated during this process remains poorly understood. Leucine-rich repeat and Ig-like domain-containing Nogo receptor interacting protein 1 (LINGO-1) is a negative regulator of OPC differentiation. We discovered that anti-LINGO-1 antibody-promoted OPC differentiation was accompanied by upregulation of cytoplasmic gelsolin (cGSN), an abundant actin-severing protein involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments. Treating rat OPCs with cGSN siRNA reduced OPC differentiation, whereas overexpression of cGSN promoted OPC differentiation in vitro and remyelination in vivo Furthermore, coexpression of cGSN and LINGO-1 blocked the inhibitory effect of LINGO-1. Our study demonstrates that cGSN works downstream of LINGO-1 signaling pathway, which enhances actin dynamics and is essential for OPC morphogenesis and differentiation. This finding may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS).SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Myelin loss and subsequent axon degeneration contributes to a variety of neurological diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Understanding the regulation of myelination by oligodendrocytes is therefore critical for developing therapies for the treatment of MS. We previously demonstrated that leucine-rich repeat and Ig-like domain-containing Nogo receptor interacting protein 1 (LINGO-1) is a negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and that anti-LINGO-1 promotes remyelination in preclinical animal models for MS and in a phase II acute optic neuritis clinical trial (RENEW). The mechanism by which LINGO-1 regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that LINGO-1 regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation through the cytoplasmic gelsolin signaling pathway, providing new

  20. High Yield of Adult Oligodendrocyte Lineage Cells Obtained from Meningeal Biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sissi Dolci

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte loss can lead to cognitive and motor deficits. Current remyelinating therapeutic strategies imply either modulation of endogenous oligodendrocyte precursors or transplantation of in vitro expanded oligodendrocytes. Cell therapy, however, still lacks identification of an adequate source of oligodendrocyte present in adulthood and able to efficiently produce transplantable cells. Recently, a neural stem cell-like population has been identified in meninges. We developed a protocol to obtain high yield of oligodendrocyte lineage cells from one single biopsy of adult rat meningeal tissue. From 1 cm2 of adult rat spinal cord meninges, we efficiently expanded a homogenous culture of 10 millions of meningeal-derived oligodendrocyte lineage cells in a short period of time (approximately 4 weeks. Meningeal-derived oligodendrocyte lineage cells show typical mature oligodendrocyte morphology and express specific oligodendrocyte markers, such as galactosylceramidase and myelin basic protein. Moreover, when transplanted in a chemically demyelinated spinal cord model, meningeal-derived oligodendrocyte lineage cells display in vivo-remyelinating potential. This oligodendrocyte lineage cell population derives from an accessible and adult source, being therefore a promising candidate for autologous cell therapy of demyelinating diseases. In addition, the described method to differentiate meningeal-derived neural stem cells into oligodendrocyte lineage cells may represent a valid in vitro model to dissect oligodendrocyte differentiation and to screen for drugs capable to promote oligodendrocyte regeneration.

  1. Myelin plasticity, neural activity, and traumatic neural injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondiles, Bethany R; Horner, Philip J

    2018-02-01

    The possibility that adult organisms exhibit myelin plasticity has recently become a topic of great interest. Many researchers are exploring the role of myelin growth and adaptation in daily functions such as memory and motor learning. Here we consider evidence for three different potential categories of myelin plasticity: the myelination of previously bare axons, remodeling of existing sheaths, and the removal of a sheath with replacement by a new internode. We also review evidence that points to the importance of neural activity as a mechanism by which oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are cued to differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes, which may potentially be an important component of myelin plasticity. Finally, we discuss demyelination in the context of traumatic neural injury and present an argument for altering neural activity as a potential therapeutic target for remyelination following injury. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 78: 108-122, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The progeroid gene BubR1 regulates axon myelination and motor function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, C.I.; Yoo, K.H.; Hussaini, S.M.; Jeon, B.T.; Welby, J.; Gan, H.; Scarisbrick, I.A.; Zhang, Z.; Baker, D.J.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Rodriguez, M.; Jang, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Myelination, the process by which oligodendrocytes form the myelin sheath around axons, is key to axonal signal transduction and related motor function in the central nervous system (CNS). Aging is characterized by degenerative changes in the myelin sheath, although the molecular underpinnings of

  3. Myelin down-regulates myelin phagocytosis by microglia and macrophages through interactions between CD47 on myelin and SIRPα (signal regulatory protein-α on phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reichert Fanny

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic injury to axons produces breakdown of axons and myelin at the site of the lesion and then further distal to this where Wallerian degeneration develops. The rapid removal of degenerated myelin by phagocytosis is advantageous for repair since molecules in myelin impede regeneration of severed axons. Thus, revealing mechanisms that regulate myelin phagocytosis by macrophages and microglia is important. We hypothesize that myelin regulates its own phagocytosis by simultaneous activation and down-regulation of microglial and macrophage responses. Activation follows myelin binding to receptors that mediate its phagocytosis (e.g. complement receptor-3, which has been previously studied. Down-regulation, which we test here, follows binding of myelin CD47 to the immune inhibitory receptor SIRPα (signal regulatory protein-α on macrophages and microglia. Methods CD47 and SIRPα expression was studied by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, and myelin phagocytosis by ELISA. Results We first document that myelin, oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells express CD47 without SIRPα and further confirm that microglia and macrophages express both CD47 and SIRPα. Thus, CD47 on myelin can bind to and subsequently activate SIRPα on phagocytes, a prerequisite for CD47/SIRPα-dependent down-regulation of CD47+/+ myelin phagocytosis by itself. We then demonstrate that phagocytosis of CD47+/+ myelin is augmented when binding between myelin CD47 and SIRPα on phagocytes is blocked by mAbs against CD47 and SIRPα, indicating that down-regulation of phagocytosis indeed depends on CD47-SIRPα binding. Further, phagocytosis in serum-free medium of CD47+/+ myelin is augmented after knocking down SIRPα levels (SIRPα-KD in phagocytes by lentiviral infection with SIRPα-shRNA, whereas phagocytosis of myelin that lacks CD47 (CD47-/- is not. Thus, myelin CD47 produces SIRPα-dependent down-regulation of CD47+/+ myelin phagocytosis in phagocytes

  4. Axonal degeneration stimulates the formation of NG2+ cells and oligodendrocytes in the mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helle Hvilsted; Ladeby, Rune; Drøjdahl, Nina

    2006-01-01

    Proliferation of the adult NG2-expressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells has traditionally been viewed as a remyelination response ensuing from destruction of myelin and oligodendrocytes, and not to the axonal pathology that is also a characteristic of demyelinating disease. To better understand...... the response of the NG2+ cells to the different components of demyelinating pathology, we investigated the response of adult NG2+ cells to axonal degeneration in the absence of primary myelin or oligodendrocyte pathology. Axonal degeneration was induced in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult mice...

  5. Local delivery of thyroid hormone enhances oligodendrogenesis and myelination after spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Robert B.; Wang, Zhicheng; Nong, Jia; Zhang, Zhiling; Zhong, Yinghui

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes apoptosis of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes (OLs) and demyelination of surviving axons, resulting in conduction failure. Remyelination of surviving denuded axons provides a promising therapeutic target for spinal cord repair. While cell transplantation has demonstrated efficacy in promoting remyelination and functional recovery, the lack of ideal cell sources presents a major obstacle to clinical application. The adult spinal cord contains oligodendrocyte precursor cells and multipotent neural stem/progenitor cells that have the capacity to differentiate into mature, myelinating OLs. However, endogenous oligodendrogenesis and remyelination processes are limited by the upregulation of remyelination-inhibitory molecules in the post-injury microenvironment. Multiple growth factors/molecules have been shown to promote OL differentiation and myelination. Approach. In this study we screened these therapeutics and found that 3, 3‧, 5-triiodothyronine (T3) is the most effective in promoting oligodendrogenesis and OL maturation in vitro. However, systemic administration of T3 to achieve therapeutic doses in the injured spinal cord is likely to induce hyperthyroidism, resulting in serious side effects. Main results. In this study we developed a novel hydrogel-based drug delivery system for local delivery of T3 to the injury site without eliciting systemic toxicity. Significance. Using a clinically relevant cervical contusion injury model, we demonstrate that local delivery of T3 at doses comparable to safe human doses promoted new mature OL formation and myelination after SCI.

  6. IGF binding protein alterations on periplaque oligodendrocytes in multiple sclerosis : Implications for remyelination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilczak, Nadine; Chesik, Daniel; Hoekstra, Dick; De Keyser, Jacques

    Why myelin repair greatly fails in multiple sclerosis (MS) is unclear. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system plays vital roles in oligodendrocyte development, survival, and myelin synthesis. We used immunohistochemistry to study IGF-I, IGF-I receptors and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) 1-6 on

  7. Functional delay of myelination of auditory delay lines in the nucleus laminaris of the barn owl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shih-Min; Carr, Catherine E

    2007-12-01

    In the barn owl, maps of interaural time difference (ITD) are created in the nucleus laminaris (NL) by interdigitating axons that act as delay lines. Adult delay line axons are myelinated, and this myelination is timely, coinciding with the attainment of adult head size, and stable ITD cues. The proximal portions of the axons become myelinated in late embryonic life, but the delay line portions of the axon in NL remain unmyelinated until the first postnatal week. Myelination of the delay lines peaks at the third week posthatch, and myelinating oligodendrocyte density approaches adult levels by one month, when the head reaches its adult width. Migration of oligodendrocyte progenitors into NL and the subsequent onset of myelination may be restricted by a glial barrier in late embryonic stages and the first posthatch week, since the loss of tenascin-C immunoreactivity in NL is correlated with oligodendrocyte progenitor migration into NL.

  8. Differentiation of human olfactory bulb-derived neural stem cells toward oligodendrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marei, Hany E; Shouman, Zeinab; Althani, Asma; Afifi, Nahla; A, Abd-Elmaksoud; Lashen, Samah; Hasan, Anwarul; Caceci, Thomas; Rizzi, Roberto; Cenciarelli, Carlo; Casalbore, Patrizia

    2018-02-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), oligodendrocytes are the glial element in charge of myelin formation. Obtaining an overall presence of oligodendrocyte precursor cells/oligodendrocytes (OPCs/OLs) in culture from different sources of NSCs is an important research area, because OPCs/OLs may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for diseases affecting myelination of axons. The present study was designed to differentiate human olfactory bulb NSCs (OBNSCs) into OPCs/OLs and using expression profiling (RT-qPCR) gene, immunocytochemistry, and specific protein expression to highlight molecular mechanism(s) underlying differentiation of human OBNSCs into OPCs/OLs. The differentiation of OBNSCs was characterized by a simultaneous appearance of neurons and glial cells. The differentiation medium, containing cAMP, PDGFA, T3, and all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), promotes OBNSCs to generate mostly oligodendrocytes (OLs) displaying morphological changes, and appearance of long cytoplasmic processes. OBNSCs showed, after 5 days in OLs differentiation medium, a considerable decrease in the number of nestin positive cells, which was associated with a concomitant increase of NG2 immunoreactive cells and few O4(+)-OPCs. In addition, a significant up regulation in gene and protein expression profile of stage specific cell markers for OPCs/OLs (CNPase, Galc, NG2, MOG, OLIG1, OLIG2, MBP), neurons, and astrocytes (MAP2, β-TubulinIII, GFAP) and concomitant decrease of OBNSCs pluripotency markers (Oct4, Sox2, Nestin), was demonstrated following induction of OBNSCs differentiation. Taken together, the present study demonstrate the marked ability of a cocktail of factors containing PDGFA, T3, cAMP, and ATRA, to induce OBNSCs differentiation into OPCs/OLs and shed light on the key genes and pathological pathways involved in this process. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Zika virus tropism and interactions in myelinating neural cell cultures: CNS cells and myelin are preferentially affected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumberworth, Stephanie L; Barrie, Jennifer A; Cunningham, Madeleine E; de Figueiredo, Daniely Paulino Gomes; Schultz, Verena; Wilder-Smith, Adrian J; Brennan, Benjamin; Pena, Lindomar J; Freitas de Oliveira França, Rafael; Linington, Christopher; Barnett, Susan C; Willison, Hugh J; Kohl, Alain; Edgar, Julia M

    2017-06-23

    The recent global outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection has been linked to severe neurological disorders affecting the peripheral and central nervous systems (PNS and CNS, respectively). The pathobiology underlying these diverse clinical phenotypes are the subject of intense research; however, even the principal neural cell types vulnerable to productive Zika infection remain poorly characterised. Here we used CNS and PNS myelinating cultures from wild type and Ifnar1 knockout mice to examine neuronal and glial tropism and short-term consequences of direct infection with a Brazilian variant of ZIKV. Cell cultures were infected pre- or post-myelination for various intervals, then stained with cell-type and ZIKV-specific antibodies. In bypassing systemic immunity using ex vivo culture, and the type I interferon response in Ifnar1 deficient cells, we were able to evaluate the intrinsic infectivity of neural cells. Through systematic quantification of ZIKV infected cells in myelinating cultures, we found that ZIKV infection is enhanced in the absence of the type I interferon responses and that CNS cells are considerably more susceptible to infection than PNS cells. In particular, we demonstrate that CNS axons and myelinating oligodendrocytes are especially vulnerable to injury. These results have implications for understanding the pathobiology of neurological symptoms associated with ZIKV infection. Furthermore, we provide a quantifiable ex vivo infection model that can be used for fundamental and therapeutic studies on viral neuroinvasion and its consequences.

  10. Oligodendrocyte Injury and Pathogenesis of HIV-1-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocytes wrap neuronal axons to form myelin, an insulating sheath which is essential for nervous impulse conduction along axons. Axonal myelination is highly regulated by neuronal and astrocytic signals and the maintenance of myelin sheaths is a very complex process. Oligodendrocyte damage can cause axonal demyelination and neuronal injury, leading to neurological disorders. Demyelination in the cerebrum may produce cognitive impairment in a variety of neurological disorders, including human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND. Although the combined antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of HIV-1-associated dementia, a severe form of HAND, milder forms of HAND remain prevalent even when the peripheral viral load is well controlled. HAND manifests as a subcortical dementia with damage in the brain white matter (e.g., corpus callosum, which consists of myelinated axonal fibers. How HIV-1 brain infection causes myelin injury and resultant white matter damage is an interesting area of current HIV research. In this review, we tentatively address recent progress on oligodendrocyte dysregulation and HAND pathogenesis.

  11. Extracellular acidic pH inhibits oligodendrocyte precursor viability, migration, and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jagielska

    Full Text Available Axon remyelination in the central nervous system requires oligodendrocytes that produce myelin. Failure of this repair process is characteristic of neurodegeneration in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis, and it remains unclear how the lesion microenvironment contributes to decreased remyelination potential of oligodendrocytes. Here, we show that acidic extracellular pH, which is characteristic of demyelinating lesions, decreases the migration, proliferation, and survival of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs, and reduces their differentiation into oligodendrocytes. Further, OPCs exhibit directional migration along pH gradients toward acidic pH. These in vitro findings support a possible in vivo scenario whereby pH gradients attract OPCs toward acidic lesions, but resulting reduction in OPC survival and motility in acid decreases progress toward demyelinated axons and is further compounded by decreased differentiation into myelin-producing oligodendrocytes. As these processes are integral to OPC response to nerve demyelination, our results suggest that lesion acidity could contribute to decreased remyelination.

  12. Astrocytes in oligodendrocyte lineage development and white matter pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiasi eLi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available White matter is primarily composed of myelin and myelinated axons. Structural and functional completeness of myelin is critical for the reliable and efficient transmission of information. White matter injury has been associated with the development of many demyelinating diseases. Despite a variety of scientific advances aimed at promoting re-myelination, their benefit has proven at best to be marginal. Research suggests that the failure of the re-myelination process may be the result of an unfavorable microenvironment. Astrocytes, are the most ample and diverse type of glial cells in central nervous system which display multiple functions for the cells of the oligodendrocytes lineage. As such, much attention has recently been drawn to astrocyte function in terms of white matter myelin repair. They are different in white matter from those in grey matter in specific regards to development, morphology, location, protein expression and other supportive functions. During the process of demyelination and re-myelination, the functions of astrocytes are dynamic in that they are able to change functions in accordance to different time points, triggers or reactive pathways resulting in vastly different biologic effects. They have pivotal effects on oligodendrocytes and other cell types in the oligodendrocyte lineage by serving as an energy supplier, a participant of immunological and inflammatory functions, a source of trophic factors and iron and a sustainer of homeostasis. Astrocytic impairment has been shown to be directly linked to the development of neuromyelities optica. In addition, astroctyes have also been implicated in other white matter conditions such as psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Inhibiting specifically detrimental signaling pathways in astrocytes while preserving their beneficial functions may be a promising approach for

  13. Karyopherin Alpha Proteins Regulate Oligodendrocyte Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Laitman

    Full Text Available Proper regulation of the coordinated transcriptional program that drives oligodendrocyte (OL differentiation is essential for central nervous system myelin formation and repair. Nuclear import, mediated in part by a group of karyopherin alpha (Kpna proteins, regulates transcription factor access to the genome. Understanding how canonical nuclear import functions to control genomic access in OL differentiation may aid in the creation of novel therapeutics to stimulate myelination and remyelination. Here, we show that members of the Kpna family regulate OL differentiation, and may play distinct roles downstream of different pro-myelinating stimuli. Multiple family members are expressed in OLs, and their pharmacologic inactivation dose-dependently decreases the rate of differentiation. Additionally, upon differentiation, the three major Kpna subtypes (P/α2, Q/α3, S/α1 display differential responses to the pro-myelinating cues T3 and CNTF. Most notably, the Q/α3 karyopherin Kpna4 is strongly upregulated by CNTF treatment both compared with T3 treatment and other Kpna responses. Kpna4 inactivation results in inhibition of CNTF-induced OL differentiation, in the absence of changes in proliferation or viability. Collectively, these findings suggest that canonical nuclear import is an integral component of OL differentiation, and that specific Kpnas may serve vital and distinct functions downstream of different pro-myelinating cues.

  14. Transplantation of human neural stem cells transduced with Olig2 transcription factor improves locomotor recovery and enhances myelination in the white matter of rat spinal cord following contusive injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suh-Kim Haeyoung

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contusive spinal cord injury is complicated by a delayed loss of oligodendrocytes, resulting in chronic progressive demyelination. Therefore, transplantation strategies to provide oligodendrocyte lineage cells and to enhance the extent of myelination appear to be justified for spinal cord repair. The present study investigated whether transplantation of human neural stem cells (NSCs genetically modified to express Olig2 transcription factor, an essential regulator of oligodendrocyte development, can improve locomotor recovery and enhance myelination in a rat contusive spinal cord injury model. Results HB1.F3 (F3 immortalized human NSC line was transduced with a retroviral vector encoding Olig2, an essential regulator of oligodendrocyte development. Overexpression of Olig2 in human NSCs (F3.Olig2 induced activation of NKX2.2 and directed differentiation of NSCs into oligodendrocyte lineage cells in vitro. Introduction of Olig2 conferred higher proliferative activity, and a much larger number of F3.Olig2 NSCs were detected by 7 weeks after transplantation into contused spinal cord than that of parental F3 NSCs. F3.Olig2 NSCs exhibited frequent migration towards the white matter, whereas F3 NSCs were mostly confined to the gray matter or around the lesion cavities. Most of F3.Olig2 NSCs occupying the spared white matter differentiated into mature oligodendrocytes. Transplantation of F3.Olig2 NSCs increased the volume of spared white matter and reduced the cavity volume. Moreover, F3.Olig2 grafts significantly increased the thickness of myelin sheath around the axons in the spared white matter. Finally, animals with F3.Olig2 grafts showed an improvement in the quality of hindlimbs locomotion. Conclusion Transplantation of NSCs genetically modified to differentiate into an oligodendrocytic lineage may be an effective strategy to improve functional outcomes following spinal cord trauma. The present study suggests that molecular

  15. Transplantation of human neural stem cells transduced with Olig2 transcription factor improves locomotor recovery and enhances myelination in the white matter of rat spinal cord following contusive injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Dong H; Kim, Byung G; Kim, Eun J; Lee, Seung I; Joo, In S; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung; Sohn, Seonghyang; Kim, Seung U

    2009-01-01

    Background Contusive spinal cord injury is complicated by a delayed loss of oligodendrocytes, resulting in chronic progressive demyelination. Therefore, transplantation strategies to provide oligodendrocyte lineage cells and to enhance the extent of myelination appear to be justified for spinal cord repair. The present study investigated whether transplantation of human neural stem cells (NSCs) genetically modified to express Olig2 transcription factor, an essential regulator of oligodendrocyte development, can improve locomotor recovery and enhance myelination in a rat contusive spinal cord injury model. Results HB1.F3 (F3) immortalized human NSC line was transduced with a retroviral vector encoding Olig2, an essential regulator of oligodendrocyte development. Overexpression of Olig2 in human NSCs (F3.Olig2) induced activation of NKX2.2 and directed differentiation of NSCs into oligodendrocyte lineage cells in vitro. Introduction of Olig2 conferred higher proliferative activity, and a much larger number of F3.Olig2 NSCs were detected by 7 weeks after transplantation into contused spinal cord than that of parental F3 NSCs. F3.Olig2 NSCs exhibited frequent migration towards the white matter, whereas F3 NSCs were mostly confined to the gray matter or around the lesion cavities. Most of F3.Olig2 NSCs occupying the spared white matter differentiated into mature oligodendrocytes. Transplantation of F3.Olig2 NSCs increased the volume of spared white matter and reduced the cavity volume. Moreover, F3.Olig2 grafts significantly increased the thickness of myelin sheath around the axons in the spared white matter. Finally, animals with F3.Olig2 grafts showed an improvement in the quality of hindlimbs locomotion. Conclusion Transplantation of NSCs genetically modified to differentiate into an oligodendrocytic lineage may be an effective strategy to improve functional outcomes following spinal cord trauma. The present study suggests that molecular factors governing cell fate

  16. The Autotaxin–Lysophosphatidic Acid Axis Modulates Histone Acetylation and Gene Expression during Oligodendrocyte Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Natalie A.; Lister, James A.

    2015-01-01

    During development, oligodendrocytes (OLGs), the myelinating cells of the CNS, undergo a stepwise progression during which OLG progenitors, specified from neural stem/progenitor cells, differentiate into fully mature myelinating OLGs. This progression along the OLG lineage is characterized by well synchronized changes in morphology and gene expression patterns. The latter have been found to be particularly critical during the early stages of the lineage, and they have been well described to be regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, especially by the activity of the histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC2. The data presented here identify the extracellular factor autotaxin (ATX) as a novel upstream signal modulating HDAC1/2 activity and gene expression in cells of the OLG lineage. Using the zebrafish as an in vivo model system as well as rodent primary OLG cultures, this functional property of ATX was found to be mediated by its lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, which has been well characterized to generate the lipid signaling molecule lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). More specifically, the lysoPLD activity of ATX was found to modulate HDAC1/2 regulated gene expression during a time window coinciding with the transition from OLG progenitor to early differentiating OLG. In contrast, HDAC1/2 regulated gene expression during the transition from neural stem/progenitor to OLG progenitor appeared unaffected by ATX and its lysoPLD activity. Thus, together, our data suggest that an ATX–LPA–HDAC1/2 axis regulates OLG differentiation specifically during the transition from OLG progenitor to early differentiating OLG and via a molecular mechanism that is evolutionarily conserved from at least zebrafish to rodent. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The formation of the axon insulating and supporting myelin sheath by differentiating oligodendrocytes (OLGs) in the CNS is considered an essential step during vertebrate development. In addition, loss and/or dysfunction of the myelin sheath has

  17. Structural properties of proteins specific to the myelin sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursula, P

    2008-02-01

    The myelin sheath is an insulating membrane layer surrounding myelinated axons in vertebrates, which is formed when the plasma membrane of an oligodendrocyte or a Schwann cell wraps itself around the axon. A large fraction of the total protein in this membrane layer is comprised of only a small number of individual proteins, which have certain intriguing structural properties. The myelin proteins are implicated in a number of neurological diseases, including, for example, autoimmune diseases and peripheral neuropathies. In this review, the structural properties of a number of myelin-specific proteins are described.

  18. Focal cerebral ischemia induces increased myelin basic protein and growth-associated protein-43 gene transcription in peri-infarct areas in the rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, R; Christensen, Thomas; Lehrmann, E

    2001-01-01

    Although oligodendrocytes are vulnerable to focal cerebral ischemia, remyelination of denuded or regenerating axons in the peri-infarct area has been observed in the central nervous system. We studied the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), a major component of central nervous system myelin...... messenger RNA (mRNA) had disappeared by 24 h, whereas myelin protein, identified by MBP and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) immunohistochemistry, appeared structurally intact until day 3. Peri-infarct oligodendrocytes increased their expression of MBP mRNA from 24 h to maximal levels at day 7...... showed that increased expression of GAP-43 mRNA in neurons was concomitant to MBP mRNA upregulation in oligodendrocytes. While the mechanisms regulating oligodendrocyte survival and myelination signals are not clear at this point, axonal sprouting could putatively serve as a stimulus for the upregulation...

  19. Convergent functional genomics of oligodendrocyte differentiation identifies multiple autoinhibitory signaling circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobert, Rosanna Pescini; Joubert, Lara; Curchod, Marie-Laure; Salvat, Catherine; Foucault, Isabelle; Jorand-Lebrun, Catherine; Lamarine, Marc; Peixoto, Hélène; Vignaud, Chloé; Frémaux, Christèle; Jomotte, Thérèse; Françon, Bernard; Alliod, Chantal; Bernasconi, Lilia; Abderrahim, Hadi; Perrin, Dominique; Bombrun, Agnes; Zanoguera, Francisca; Rommel, Christian; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob

    2009-03-01

    Inadequate remyelination of brain white matter lesions has been associated with a failure of oligodendrocyte precursors to differentiate into mature, myelin-producing cells. In order to better understand which genes play a critical role in oligodendrocyte differentiation, we performed time-dependent, genome-wide gene expression studies of mouse Oli-neu cells as they differentiate into process-forming and myelin basic protein-producing cells, following treatment with three different agents. Our data indicate that different inducers activate distinct pathways that ultimately converge into the completely differentiated state, where regulated gene sets overlap maximally. In order to also gain insight into the functional role of genes that are regulated in this process, we silenced 88 of these genes using small interfering RNA and identified multiple repressors of spontaneous differentiation of Oli-neu, most of which were confirmed in rat primary oligodendrocyte precursors cells. Among these repressors were CNP, a well-known myelin constituent, and three phosphatases, each known to negatively control mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades. We show that a novel inhibitor for one of the identified genes, dual-specificity phosphatase DUSP10/MKP5, was also capable of inducing oligodendrocyte differentiation in primary oligodendrocyte precursors. Oligodendrocytic differentiation feedback loops may therefore yield pharmacological targets to treat disease related to dysfunctional myelin deposition.

  20. Donepezil promotes differentiation of neural stem cells into mature oligodendrocytes at the expense of astrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Osamu; Arai, Masaaki; Dateki, Minori; Takishima, Kunio

    2017-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system. Oligodendrocyte loss and failure of myelin development result in serious human disorders, including multiple sclerosis. Previously, using oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, we have shown that donepezil, which is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, stimulates myelin gene expression and oligodendrocyte differentiation. Here, we aimed to analyze the effects of donepezil on primary mouse embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs). Donepezil treatment led to impaired self-renewal ability and increased apoptosis. These effects appeared to be mediated through the Akt/Bad signaling pathway. Using neurosphere differentiation analysis, we observed that donepezil leads to reduced numbers of astrocytes and increased numbers of oligodendrocytes and neurons. Consistent with this finding, mRNA and protein levels for the oligodendrocyte markers myelin-associated glycoprotein, 2', 3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase), and myelin basic protein, as well as the neuronal marker β-tubulin type III (Tuj1) were up-regulated. In contrast, the expression of the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was down-regulated by donepezil in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, donepezil increased oligodendrocyte differentiation, resulting in a reduction in the differentiation of NSCs into astrocytes, by suppressing the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), SMAD1/5/9, and the downstream target gene GFAP, even under astrocyte-inducing conditions. These results suggest that efficient differentiation of NSCs into oligodendrocytes by donepezil may indicate a novel therapeutic role for this drug in promoting repair in demyelinated lesions in addition to its role in preventing astrogenesis. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  1. Epigenetic modifiers are necessary but not sufficient for reprogramming non-myelinating cells into myelin gene-expressing cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Modifications on specific histone residues and DNA methylation play an essential role in lineage choice and cellular reprogramming. We have previously shown that histone modifications or combinatorial codes of transcription factors (TFs are critical for the differentiation of multipotential progenitors into myelinating oligodendrocytes. In this study we asked whether combining global manipulation of DNA methylation and histone acetylation together with the expression of oligodendrocyte-specific TFs, was sufficient to switch the identity of fibroblasts into myelin gene-expressing cells.Transfection of six oligodendrocyte-specific TFs (Olig1, Olig2, Sox10, Mash1, E47 and Nkx2.2 into NIH3T3 fibroblasts was capable of inducing expression of myelin gene promoter-driven reporters, but did not activate endogenous myelin gene expression. These results suggested the existence of a transcriptionally incompetent chromatin conformation in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis, we compared the histone code on the conserved regions of myelin genes (i.e. Mbp and Mag in differentiating oligodendrocyte progenitors and NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Chromatin at myelin gene loci was characterized by the presence of repressive histone modifications (me3K9H3 and me3K27H3 in NIH3T3 fibroblasts and active histone marks (me3K4H3 and AcH3 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells. To induce a transcriptionally competent chromatin signature, NIH3T3 fibroblasts were treated with 5-azadeoxy-citidine (5-AzaC to decrease DNA methylation, and trichostatin A (TSA or sirtinol, to favor histone acetylation. Treatment with 5-AzaC/TSA but not sirtinol, resulted in the detection of endogenous myelin gene transcripts in fibroblasts, although not to the levels detected in myelinating cells. Transfection of oligodendrocyte-specific TFs after 5-AzaC/TSA treatment did not further increase myelin gene expression, nor did it reprogram the transcriptional network of NIH3T3

  2. Unravelling crucial biomechanical resilience of myelinated peripheral nerve fibres provided by the Schwann cell basal lamina and PMP22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Gonzalo; Liashkovich, Ivan; Gess, Burkhard; Young, Peter; Kun, Alejandra; Shahin, Victor

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for the research of the close and enigmatic relationship between nerve biomechanics and the development of neuropathies. Here we present a research strategy based on the application atomic force and confocal microscopy for simultaneous nerve biomechanics and integrity investigations. Using wild-type and hereditary neuropathy mouse models, we reveal surprising mechanical protection of peripheral nerves. Myelinated peripheral wild-type fibres promptly and fully recover from acute enormous local mechanical compression while maintaining functional and structural integrity. The basal lamina which enwraps each myelinated fibre separately is identified as the major contributor to the striking fibre's resilience and integrity. In contrast, neuropathic fibres lacking the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22), which is closely connected with several hereditary human neuropathies, fail to recover from light compression. Interestingly, the structural arrangement of the basal lamina of Pmp22−/− fibres is significantly altered compared to wild-type fibres. In conclusion, the basal lamina and PMP22 act in concert to contribute to a resilience and integrity of peripheral nerves at the single fibre level. Our findings and the presented technology set the stage for a comprehensive research of the links between nerve biomechanics and neuropathies. PMID:25446378

  3. Intracellular Protein Shuttling: A Mechanism Relevant for Myelin Repair in Multiple Sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttle, Peter; Küry, Patrick

    2015-07-03

    A prominent feature of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) is the degeneration and loss of previously established functional myelin sheaths, which results in impaired signal propagation and axonal damage. However, at least in early disease stages, partial replacement of lost oligodendrocytes and thus remyelination occur as a result of resident oligodendroglial precursor cell (OPC) activation. These cells represent a widespread cell population within the adult central nervous system (CNS) that can differentiate into functional myelinating glial cells to restore axonal functions. Nevertheless, the spontaneous remyelination capacity in the adult CNS is inefficient because OPCs often fail to generate new oligodendrocytes due to the lack of stimulatory cues and the presence of inhibitory factors. Recent studies have provided evidence that regulated intracellular protein shuttling is functionally involved in oligodendroglial differentiation and remyelination activities. In this review we shed light on the role of the subcellular localization of differentiation-associated factors within oligodendroglial cells and show that regulation of intracellular localization of regulatory factors represents a crucial process to modulate oligodendroglial maturation and myelin repair in the CNS.

  4. Distinct age and differentiation-state dependent metabolic profiles of oligodendrocytes under optimal and stress conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayaraghava T S Rao

    Full Text Available Within the microenvironment of multiple sclerosis lesions, oligodendrocytes are subject to metabolic stress reflecting effects of focal ischemia and inflammation. Previous studies have shown that under optimal conditions in vitro, the respiratory activity of human adult brain-derived oligodendrocytes is lower and more predominantly glycolytic compared to oligodendrocytes differentiated in vitro from post natal rat brain oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. In response to sub-lethal metabolic stress, adult human oligodendrocytes reduce overall energy production rate impacting the capacity to maintain myelination. Here, we directly compare the metabolic profiles of oligodendrocytes derived from adult rat brain with oligodendrocytes newly differentiated in vitro from oligodendrocyte progenitor cells obtained from the post natal rat brain, under both optimal culture and metabolic stress (low/no glucose conditions. Oxygen consumption and extracellular acidification rates were measured using a Seahorse extracellular flux analyzer. Our findings indicate that under optimal conditions, adult rat oligodendrocytes preferentially use glycolysis whereas newly differentiated post natal rat oligodendrocytes, and the oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from which they are derived, mainly utilize oxidative phosphorylation to produce ATP. Metabolic stress increases the rate of ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation and significantly reduces glycolysis in adult oligodendrocytes. The rate of ATP production was relatively unchanged in newly differentiated post natal oligodendrocytes under these stress conditions, while it was significantly reduced in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Our study indicates that both age and maturation influence the metabolic profile under optimal and stressed conditions, emphasizing the need to consider these variables for in vitro studies that aim to model adult human disease.

  5. The polarity protein Scribble regulates myelination and remyelination in the central nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A Jarjour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The development and regeneration of myelin by oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system (CNS, requires profound changes in cell shape that lead to myelin sheath initiation and formation. Here, we demonstrate a requirement for the basal polarity complex protein Scribble in CNS myelination and remyelination. Scribble is expressed throughout oligodendroglial development and is up-regulated in mature oligodendrocytes where it is localised to both developing and mature CNS myelin sheaths. Knockdown of Scribble expression in cultured oligodendroglia results in disrupted morphology and myelination initiation. When Scribble expression is conditionally eliminated in the myelinating glia of transgenic mice, myelin initiation in CNS is disrupted, both during development and following focal demyelination, and longitudinal extension of the myelin sheath is disrupted. At later stages of myelination, Scribble acts to negatively regulate myelin thickness whilst suppressing the extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase pathway, and localises to non-compact myelin flanking the node of Ranvier where it is required for paranodal axo-glial adhesion. These findings demonstrate an essential role for the evolutionarily-conserved regulators of intracellular polarity in myelination and remyelination.

  6. Castration attenuates myelin repair following lysolecithin induced demyelination in rat optic chiasm: an evaluation using visual evoked potential, marker genes expression and myelin staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherafat, Mohammad Amin; Javan, Mohammad; Mozafari, Sabah; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2011-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease that affects the central nervous system. MS is the most common neurological disorder in young adults with a greater incidence among females. Male gonadal hormones have a protective effect on neural system development and myelin maturation. In this study, we investigate the effect of castration on lysolecithin-induced demyelination and remyelination processes using visual evoked potentials, in addition to measuring the expressions of Olig2, MBP, Nogo-A and GFAP mRNAs as oligodendrocyte or astrocyte markers; and histological assessments by myelin-specific staining. We observed more expanded demyelination with delayed repair process in castrated rats. Expression levels of the aforementioned marker genes confirmed histological and electrophysiological observations. Our results showed a pivotal role for endogenous male hormones in the context of demyelinating insults. It may also account for the different prognosis of MS between male and female genders and provide new insights for therapeutic treatments.

  7. Signaling by FGF Receptor 2, Not FGF Receptor 1, Regulates Myelin Thickness through Activation of ERK1/2-MAPK, Which Promotes mTORC1 Activity in an Akt-Independent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusho, Miki; Ishii, Akihiro; Bansal, Rashmi

    2017-03-15

    axons. However, the axonal signals, the receptors on myelin, and the integration of intracellular signaling pathways emanating downstream from these receptors that drive the growth of the myelin sheath remain poorly understood in the CNS. This study brings up the intriguing possibility that FGF receptor 2, in the oligodendrocyte/myelin compartment, may be one such signal. Importantly, it provides compelling evidence linking FGFR2 with the ERK1/2-MAPK pathway, which converges with the PI3K/Akt/mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway at the level of mTORC1 and also regulates the transcription factor Myrf, together providing a mechanistic framework for regulating both the transcriptional and translational machinery required for the proper growth of the myelin sheath. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/372931-16$15.00/0.

  8. Early intervention for spinal cord injury with human induced pluripotent stem cells oligodendrocyte progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo H All

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are at the forefront of research in regenerative medicine and are envisaged as a source for personalized tissue repair and cell replacement therapy. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPs can be derived from iPS cells generated using either an episomal, non-integrating plasmid approach or standard integrating retroviruses that survive and differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes after early transplantation into the injured spinal cord. The efficiency of OP differentiation in all 3 lines tested ranged from 40% to 60% of total cells, comparable to those derived from human embryonic stem cells. iPS cell lines derived using episomal vectors or retroviruses generated a similar number of early neural progenitors and glial progenitors while the episomal plasmid-derived iPS line generated more OPs expressing late markers O1 and RIP. Moreover, we discovered that iPS-derived OPs (iPS-OPs engrafted 24 hours following a moderate contusive spinal cord injury (SCI in rats survived for approximately two months and that more than 70% of the transplanted cells differentiated into mature oligodendrocytes that expressed myelin associated proteins. Transplanted OPs resulted in a significant increase in the number of myelinated axons in animals that received a transplantation 24 h after injury. In addition, nearly a 5-fold reduction in cavity size and reduced glial scarring was seen in iPS-treated groups compared to the control group, which was injected with heat-killed iPS-OPs. Although further investigation is needed to understand the mechanisms involved, these results provide evidence that patient-specific, iPS-derived OPs can survive for three months and improve behavioral assessment (BBB after acute transplantation into SCI. This is significant as determining the time in which stem cells are injected after SCI may influence their survival and differentiation capacity.

  9. Sorting signals and regulation of cognate basolateral trafficking in myelin biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, Bert; Baron, Wia; Schrage, Cobi; de Jonge, Jenny; de Vries, H; Hoekstra, Dick

    A detailed understanding of trafficking pathways in mature oligodendrocytes is essential for addressing issues aimed at controlling (re)myelination by modulating myelin-directed transport. Previously, we have shown that viral marker proteins HA and VSV G, on reaching the apical and basolateral

  10. MAL Is a Regulator of the Recruitment of Myelin Protein PLP to Membrane Microdomains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlard, Marjolein; de Jonge, Jenny C.; Klunder, Bert; Nomden, Anita; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    2016-01-01

    In oligodendrocytes (OLGs), an indirect, transcytotic pathway is mediating transport of de novo synthesized PLP, a major myelin specific protein, from the apical-like plasma membrane to the specialized basolateral-like myelin membrane to prevent its premature compaction. MAL is a well-known

  11. Chemical inducers and transcriptional markers of oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Lara; Foucault, Isabelle; Sagot, Yves; Bernasconi, Lilia; Duval, François; Alliod, Chantal; Frossard, Marie-José; Pescini Gobert, Rosanna; Curchod, Marie-Laure; Salvat, Catherine; Nichols, Anthony; Pouly, Sandrine; Rommel, Christian; Roach, Arthur; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob

    2010-09-01

    Oligodendrocytes generate and maintain myelin, which is essential for axonal function and protection of the mammalian central nervous system. To advance our molecular understanding of differentiation by these cells, we screened libraries of pharmacologically active compounds and identified inducers of differentiation of Oli-neu, a stable cell line of mouse oligodendrocyte precursors (OPCs). We identified four broad classes of inducers, namely, forskolin/cAMP (protein kinase A activators), steroids (glucocorticoids and retinoic acid), ErbB2 inhibitors, and nucleoside analogs, and confirmed the activity of these compounds on rat primary oligodendrocyte precursors and mixed cortical cultures. We also analyzed transcriptional responses in the chemically induced mouse and rat OPC differentiation processes and compared these with earlier studies. We confirm the view that ErbB2 is a natural signaling component that is required for OPC proliferation, whereas ErbB2 inhibition or genetic knockdown results in OPC differentiation.

  12. Role of ERK1/2 MAPK Signaling in the Maintenance of Myelin and Axonal Integrity in the Adult CNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Akihiro; Furusho, Miki; Dupree, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes form myelin during postnatal development and then maintain a functional myelin sheath throughout adult life. While many regulators of developmental myelination have been identified, the signal transduction mechanisms that regulate oligodendrocyte functions in adulthood are not well understood. The extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1 and -2 (ERK1/2), downstream mediators of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), have emerged as prominent regulators of myelin formation. Here, we investigated whether these signaling molecules are also required for myelin maintenance in the adult CNS. Inducible conditional ablation of Erk1/2 in oligodendrocytes of the adult CNS resulted in a downregulation of myelin gene expression. Although myelin thickness was reduced and some axons were demyelinated, the majority of axons were wrapped by intact myelin sheaths that appeared structurally normal. However, late onset of progressive axonal degeneration, accompanied by astrogliosis, microglial activation, partial loss of oligodendrocytes, and functional impairment, occurred in the adult mice lacking ERK1/2 activity. Conditional ablation of Fibroblast Growth Factor receptors-1 and -2 (FGFR1/2) in oligodendrocytes also resulted in downregulation of myelin gene expression and development of axonal degeneration as the mice aged. Further, the level of the key transcription factor myelin gene regulatory factor (Myrf) was downregulated or upregulated in mice with genetic loss or gain of ERK1/2 function, respectively. Together, our studies demonstrate that ERK1/2-MAPK signaling is required for the long-term maintenance of myelin and axonal integrity in the adult CNS and suggest that FGFR1/2 and Myrf may, in part, contribute to signaling upstream and downstream of ERK1/2 in maintaining these oligodendrocyte functions during adulthood. PMID:25429144

  13. Axon-glia interaction and membrane traffic in myelin formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin eWhite

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate nervous systems myelination of neuronal axons has evolved to increase conduction velocity of electrical impulses with minimal space and energy requirements. Myelin is formed by specialised glial cells which ensheath axons with a lipid-rich insulating membrane. Myelination is a multi-step process initiated by axon-glia recognition triggering glial polarisation followed by targeted myelin membrane expansion and compaction. Thereby, a myelin sheath of complex subdomain structure is established. Continuous communication between neurons and glial cells is essential for myelin maintenance and axonal integrity. A diverse group of diseases, from multiple sclerosis to schizophrenia, have been linked to malfunction of myelinating cells reflecting the physiological importance of the axon-glial unit. This review describes the mechanisms of axonal signal integration by oligodendrocytes emphasising the central role of the Src-family kinase Fyn during CNS myelination. Furthermore, we discuss myelin membrane trafficking with particular focus on endocytic recycling and the control of PLP (proteolipid protein transport by SNARE proteins. Finally, PLP mistrafficking is considered in the context of myelin diseases.

  14. Making Myelin Basic Protein -from mRNA transport to localized translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina eMüller

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the central nervous system (CNS of most vertebrates, oligodendrocytes enwrap neuronal axons with extensions of their plasma membrane to form the myelin sheath. Several proteins are characteristically found in myelin of which Myelin Basic Protein (MBP is the second most abundant one after Proteolipid Protein (PLP. The lack of functional MBP in rodents results in a severe hypomyelinated phenotype in the CNS demonstrating its importance for myelin synthesis. Mbp mRNA is transported from the nucleus to the plasma membrane and is translated locally at the axon-glial contact site. Axonal properties such as diameter or electrical activity influence the degree of myelination. As oligodendrocytes can myelinate many axonal segments with varying properties, localized MBP translation represents an important part of a rapid and axon-tailored synthesis machinery. MBP’s ability to compact cellular membranes may be problematic for the integrity of intracellular membranous organelles and can also explain why MBP is transported in oligodendrocytes in the form of an mRNA rather than as a protein. Here we review the recent findings regarding intracellular transport and signalling mechanisms leading to localized translation of Mbp mRNA in oligodendrocytes. More detailed insights into the MBP synthesis pathway are important for a better understanding of the myelination process and may foster the development of remyelination therapies for demyelinating diseases.

  15. The lysosomal sialic acid transporter sialin is required for normal CNS myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolo, Laura M; Vogel, Hannes; Reimer, Richard J

    2009-12-09

    Salla disease and infantile sialic acid storage disease are autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorders caused by mutations in the gene encoding sialin, a membrane protein that transports free sialic acid out of the lysosome after it is cleaved from sialoglycoconjugates undergoing degradation. Accumulation of sialic acid in lysosomes defines these disorders, and the clinical phenotype is characterized by neurodevelopmental defects, including severe CNS hypomyelination. In this study, we used a sialin-deficient mouse to address how loss of sialin leads to the defect in myelination. Behavioral analysis of the sialin(-/-) mouse demonstrates poor coordination, seizures, and premature death. Analysis by histology, electron microscopy, and Western blotting reveals a decrease in myelination of the CNS but normal neuronal cytoarchitecture and normal myelination of the PNS. To investigate potential mechanisms underlying CNS hypomyelination, we studied myelination and oligodendrocyte development in optic nerves. We found reduced numbers of myelinated axons in optic nerves from sialin(-/-) mice, but the myelin that was present appeared grossly normal. Migration and density of oligodendrocyte precursor cells were normal; however, a marked decrease in the number of postmitotic oligodendrocytes and an associated increase in the number of apoptotic cells during the later stages of myelinogenesis were observed. These findings suggest that a defect in maturation of cells in the oligodendrocyte lineage leads to increased apoptosis and underlies the myelination defect associated with sialin loss.

  16. Myelin damage of hippocampus and cerebral cortex in rat pentylenetetrazol model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu; Bai, Hui; Wang, Chao; Chen, Liang-Wei; Liu, Bei; Zhang, Hua; Gao, Guo-Dong

    2011-03-24

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures, which also occur in demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) with a higher prevalence. Meanwhile, demyelination occurrings have been occasionally observed in CNS of epilepsy patients, indicating an association between demyelination and epileptic seizures by an unknown mechanism. However, no confirmative experimental evidence has yet been given. Thus, by using a rat pentylenetetrazol model, electroencephalogram (EEG), Western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry, the present study provided direct evidence that myelin sheath damage in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex started in the early stage of epileptic seizures induction and lasted with no further increase in severity in the development of epileptic seizures. It was illustrated that myelin sheath damage was not the result of oligodendrocyte destruction, but the autoantibodies against myelin basic protein (MBP) produced in peripheral circulation accompanied by increased permeability of blood-brain barrier (BBB) formed in the development of epileptic seizures. This study firstly provided experimental evidence for myelin sheath damage in PTZ-induced rat's epileptic seizures and further demonstrated that its possible cause was autoimmunoreaction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Clobetasol and Halcinonide Act as Smoothened Agonists to Promote Myelin Gene Expression and RxRγ Receptor Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampiero Porcu

    Full Text Available One of the causes of permanent disability in chronic multiple sclerosis patients is the inability of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs to terminate their maturation program at lesions. To identify key regulators of myelin gene expression acting at the last stages of OPC maturation we developed a drug repositioning strategy based on the mouse immortalized oligodendrocyte (OL cell line Oli-neu brought to the premyelination stage by stably expressing a key factor regulating the last stages of OL maturation. The Prestwick Chemical Library of 1,200 FDA-approved compound(s was repositioned at three dosages based on the induction of Myelin Basic Protein (MBP expression. Drug hits were further validated using dosage-dependent reproducibility tests and biochemical assays. The glucocorticoid class of compounds was the most highly represented and we found that they can be divided in three groups according to their efficacy on MBP up-regulation. Since target identification is crucial before bringing compounds to the clinic, we searched for common targets of the primary screen hits based on their known chemical-target interactomes, and the pathways predicted by top ranking compounds were validated using specific inhibitors. Two of the top ranking compounds, Halcinonide and Clobetasol, act as Smoothened (Smo agonists to up-regulate myelin gene expression in the Oli-neuM cell line. Further, RxRγ activation is required for MBP expression upon Halcinonide and Clobetasol treatment. These data indicate Clobetasol and Halcinonide as potential promyelinating drugs and also provide a mechanistic understanding of their mode of action in the pathway leading to myelination in OPCs. Furthermore, our classification of glucocorticoids with respect to MBP expression provides important novel insights into their effects in the CNS and a rational criteria for their choice in combinatorial therapies in de-myelinating diseases.

  18. Remodeling myelination: implications for mechanisms of neural plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kae-Jiun; Redmond, Stephanie A; Chan, Jonah R

    2016-02-01

    One of the most significant paradigm shifts in membrane remodeling is the emerging view that membrane transformation is not exclusively controlled by cytoskeletal rearrangement, but also by biophysical constraints, adhesive forces, membrane curvature and compaction. One of the most exquisite examples of membrane remodeling is myelination. The advent of myelin was instrumental in advancing the nervous system during vertebrate evolution. With more rapid and efficient communication between neurons, faster and more complex computations could be performed in a given time and space. Our knowledge of how myelin-forming oligodendrocytes select and wrap axons has been limited by insufficient spatial and temporal resolution. By virtue of recent technological advances, progress has clarified longstanding controversies in the field. Here we review insights into myelination, from target selection to axon wrapping and membrane compaction, and discuss how understanding these processes has unexpectedly opened new avenues of insight into myelination-centered mechanisms of neural plasticity.

  19. NMDA receptors mediate calcium accumulation in myelin during chemical ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micu, I; Jiang, Q; Coderre, E; Ridsdale, A; Zhang, L; Woulfe, J; Yin, X; Trapp, B D; McRory, J E; Rehak, R; Zamponi, G W; Wang, W; Stys, P K

    2006-02-23

    Central nervous system myelin is a specialized structure produced by oligodendrocytes that ensheaths axons, allowing rapid and efficient saltatory conduction of action potentials. Many disorders promote damage to and eventual loss of the myelin sheath, which often results in significant neurological morbidity. However, little is known about the fundamental mechanisms that initiate myelin damage, with the assumption being that its fate follows that of the parent oligodendrocyte. Here we show that NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) glutamate receptors mediate Ca2+ accumulation in central myelin in response to chemical ischaemia in vitro. Using two-photon microscopy, we imaged fluorescence of the Ca2+ indicator X-rhod-1 loaded into oligodendrocytes and the cytoplasmic compartment of the myelin sheath in adult rat optic nerves. The AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid)/kainate receptor antagonist NBQX completely blocked the ischaemic Ca2+ increase in oligodendroglial cell bodies, but only modestly reduced the Ca2+ increase in myelin. In contrast, the Ca2+ increase in myelin was abolished by broad-spectrum NMDA receptor antagonists (MK-801, 7-chlorokynurenic acid, d-AP5), but not by more selective blockers of NR2A and NR2B subunit-containing receptors (NVP-AAM077 and ifenprodil). In vitro ischaemia causes ultrastructural damage to both axon cylinders and myelin. NMDA receptor antagonism greatly reduced the damage to myelin. NR1, NR2 and NR3 subunits were detected in myelin by immunohistochemistry and immunoprecipitation, indicating that all necessary subunits are present for the formation of functional NMDA receptors. Our data show that the mature myelin sheath can respond independently to injurious stimuli. Given that axons are known to release glutamate, our finding that the Ca2+ increase was mediated in large part by activation of myelinic NMDA receptors suggests a new mechanism of axo-myelinic signalling. Such a mechanism may represent a

  20. Alterations of Hippocampal Myelin Sheath and Axon Sprouting by Status Convulsion and Regulating Lingo-1 Expression with RNA Interference in Immature and Adult Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-Jie; Han, Wei; He, Rong; Li, Tian-Yi; Xie, Ling-Ling; Cheng, Li; Chen, Heng-Sheng; Jiang, Li

    2018-01-27

    Seizure-induced brain damage is age-dependent, as evidenced by the different alterations of neural physiopathology in developing and mature brains. However, little is known about the age-dependent characteristics of myelinated fiber injury induced by seizures. Considering the critical functions of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) in myelination and Lingo-1 signaling in regulating OPCs' differentiation, the present study aimed to explore the effects of Lingo-1 on myelin and axon in immature and adult rats after status convulsion (SC) induced by lithium-pilocarpine, and the differences between immature and adult brains. Dynamic variations in electrophysiological activity and spontaneous recurrent seizures were recorded by electroencephalogram monitoring after SC. The impaired microstructures of myelin sheaths and decrease in myelin basic protein caused by SC were observed through transmission electron microscopy and western blot analysis respectively, which became more severe in adult rats, but improved gradually in immature rats. Aberrant axon sprouting occurred in adult rats, which was more prominent than in immature rats, as shown by a Timm stain. This damage was improved or negatively affected after down or upregulating Lingo-1 expression. These results demonstrated that in both immature and adult brains, Lingo-1 signaling plays important roles in seizure-induced damage to myelin sheaths and axon growth. The plasticity of the developing brain may provide a potential window of opportunity to prevent the brain from damage.

  1. Myelination deficit in a phencyclidine-induced neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiguo; He, Jue; Zhu, Shenghua; Zhang, Handi; Wang, Hongxing; Adilijiang, Abulimiti; Kong, Lynda; Wang, Junhui; Kong, Jiming; Tan, Qingrong; Li, Xin-Min

    2012-08-21

    Increasing evidence supports an important role of oligodendrocytes and myelination in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Oligodendrocytes are the myelin-producing cells in the central nervous system. To test the myelination dysfunction hypothesis of schizophrenia, possible myelination dysfunction was evaluated in a phencyclidine (PCP)-induced neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. On postnatal day (PND) 2, rat pups were treated with a total 14 subcutaneous daily injections of PCP (10mg/kg) or saline. PCP-injected rats showed schizophrenia-like behaviors including hyper-locomotor activity on PND 30 and prepulse inhibition deficit on PND 31. Cerebral myelination was measured by the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), and cerebral mature oligodendrocytes were measured by the expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST)-π in rats. The results indicate that the expressions of MBP on PND 16, 22 and 32 and GST-π on PND 22 decreased in the frontal cortex of PCP-injected rats. Our results suggest that there was myelination impairment in the phencyclidine-induced schizophrenia animal model, and indicate that myelination may play an important role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of myelin in Theiler's virus persistence in the central nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Roussarie

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Theiler's virus, a picornavirus, persists for life in the central nervous system of mouse and causes a demyelinating disease that is a model for multiple sclerosis. The virus infects neurons first but persists in white matter glial cells, mainly oligodendrocytes and macrophages. The mechanism, by which the virus traffics from neurons to glial cells, and the respective roles of oligodendrocytes and macrophages in persistence are poorly understood. We took advantage of our previous finding that the shiverer mouse, a mutant with a deletion in the myelin basic protein gene (Mbp, is resistant to persistent infection to examine the role of myelin in persistence. Using immune chimeras, we show that resistance is not mediated by immune responses or by an efficient recruitment of inflammatory cells into the central nervous system. With both in vivo and in vitro experiments, we show that the mutation does not impair the permissiveness of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and macrophages to the virus. We demonstrate that viral antigens are present in cytoplasmic channels of myelin during persistent infection of wild-type mice. Using the optic nerve as a model, we show that the virus traffics from the axons of retinal ganglion cells to the cytoplasmic channels of myelin, and that this traffic is impaired by the shiverer mutation. These results uncover an unsuspected axon to myelin traffic of Theiler's virus and the essential role played by the infection of myelin/oligodendrocyte in persistence.

  3. Myelin Recovery in Multiple Sclerosis: The Challenge of Remyelination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podbielska, Maria; Banik, Naren L.; Kurowska, Ewa; Hogan, Edward L.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common demyelinating and an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by immune-mediated myelin and axonal damage, and chronic axonal loss attributable to the absence of myelin sheaths. T cell subsets (Th1, Th2, Th17, CD8+, NKT, CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells) and B cells are involved in this disorder, thus new MS therapies seek damage prevention by resetting multiple components of the immune system. The currently approved therapies are immunoregulatory and reduce the number and rate of lesion formation but are only partially effective. This review summarizes current understanding of the processes at issue: myelination, demyelination and remyelination—with emphasis upon myelin composition/architecture and oligodendrocyte maturation and differentiation. The translational options target oligodendrocyte protection and myelin repair in animal models and assess their relevance in human. Remyelination may be enhanced by signals that promote myelin formation and repair. The crucial question of why remyelination fails is approached is several ways by examining the role in remyelination of available MS medications and avenues being actively pursued to promote remyelination including: (i) cytokine-based immune-intervention (targeting calpain inhibition), (ii) antigen-based immunomodulation (targeting glycolipid-reactive iNKT cells and sphingoid mediated inflammation) and (iii) recombinant monoclonal antibodies-induced remyelination. PMID:24961530

  4. Myelin Recovery in Multiple Sclerosis: The Challenge of Remyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward L. Hogan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most common demyelinating and an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by immune-mediated myelin and axonal damage, and chronic axonal loss attributable to the absence of myelin sheaths. T cell subsets (Th1, Th2, Th17, CD8+, NKT, CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells and B cells are involved in this disorder, thus new MS therapies seek damage prevention by resetting multiple components of the immune system. The currently approved therapies are immunoregulatory and reduce the number and rate of lesion formation but are only partially effective. This review summarizes current understanding of the processes at issue: myelination, demyelination and remyelination—with emphasis upon myelin composition/ architecture and oligodendrocyte maturation and differentiation. The translational options target oligodendrocyte protection and myelin repair in animal models and assess their relevance in human. Remyelination may be enhanced by signals that promote myelin formation and repair. The crucial question of why remyelination fails is approached is several ways by examining the role in remyelination of available MS medications and avenues being actively pursued to promote remyelination including: (i cytokine-based immune-intervention (targeting calpain inhibition, (ii antigen-based immunomodulation (targeting glycolipid-reactive iNKT cells and sphingoid mediated inflammation and (iii recombinant monoclonal antibodies-induced remyelination.

  5. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells synthesize neuromodulatory factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Sakry

    Full Text Available NG2 protein-expressing oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC are a persisting and major glial cell population in the adult mammalian brain. Direct synaptic innervation of OPC by neurons throughout the brain together with their ability to sense neuronal network activity raises the question of additional physiological roles of OPC, supplementary to generating myelinating oligodendrocytes. In this study we investigated whether OPC express neuromodulatory factors, typically synthesized by other CNS cell types. Our results show that OPC express two well-characterized neuromodulatory proteins: Prostaglandin D2 synthase (PTGDS and neuronal Pentraxin 2 (Nptx2/Narp. Expression levels of the enzyme PTGDS are influenced in cultured OPC by the NG2 intracellular region which can be released by cleavage and localizes to glial nuclei upon transfection. Furthermore PTGDS mRNA levels are reduced in OPC from NG2-KO mouse brain compared to WT cells after isolation by cell sorting and direct analysis. These results show that OPC can contribute to the expression of these proteins within the CNS and suggest PTGDS expression as a downstream target of NG2 signaling.

  6. Cdc42 and Rac1 signaling are both required for and act synergistically in the correct formation of myelin sheaths in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thurnherr, Tina; Benninger, Yves; Wu, Xunwei

    2006-01-01

    The formation of myelin sheaths in the CNS is the result of a complex series of events involving oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) proliferation, directed migration, and the morphological changes associated with axon ensheathment and myelination. To examine the role of Rho GTPases...... in oligodendrocyte biology, we have used a conditional tissue-specific gene-targeting approach. Ablation of Cdc42 in cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage did not affect OPC proliferation, directed migration, or in vitro differentiation, but it led to the formation of a unique and stage-specific myelination phenotype....... This was characterized by the extraordinary enlargement of the inner tongue of the oligodendrocyte process and concomitant formation of a myelin outfolding as a result of abnormal accumulation of cytoplasm in this region. Ablation of Rac1 also resulted in the abnormal accumulation of cytoplasm in the inner tongue...

  7. Axonal plasticity elicits long-term changes in oligodendroglia and myelinated fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drøjdahl, Nina; Nielsen, Helle Hvilsted; Gardi, Jonathan E

    2010-01-01

    Axons are linked to induction of myelination during development and to the maintenance of myelin and myelinated tracts in the adult CNS. Currently, it is unknown whether and how axonal plasticity in adult CNS impacts the myelinating cells and their precursors. In this article, we report that newly...... formed axonal sprouts are able to induce a protracted myelination response in adult CNS. We show that newly formed axonal sprouts, induced by lesion of the entorhino-hippocampal perforant pathway, have the ability to induce a myelination response in stratum radiatum and lucidum CA3. The lesion resulted...... in significant recruitment of newly formed myelinating cells, documented by incorporation of the proliferation marker bromodeoxyuridine into chondroitin sulphate NG2 expressing cells in stratum radiatum and lucidum CA3 early after lesion, and the occurrence of a 28% increase in the number of oligodendrocytes...

  8. Systemic 5-fluorouracil treatment causes a syndrome of delayed myelin destruction in the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ruolan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer treatment with a variety of chemotherapeutic agents often is associated with delayed adverse neurological consequences. Despite their clinical importance, almost nothing is known about the basis for such effects. It is not even known whether the occurrence of delayed adverse effects requires exposure to multiple chemotherapeutic agents, the presence of both chemotherapeutic agents and the body's own response to cancer, prolonged damage to the blood-brain barrier, inflammation or other such changes. Nor are there any animal models that could enable the study of this important problem. Results We found that clinically relevant concentrations of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; a widely used chemotherapeutic agent were toxic for both central nervous system (CNS progenitor cells and non-dividing oligodendrocytes in vitro and in vivo. Short-term systemic administration of 5-FU caused both acute CNS damage and a syndrome of progressively worsening delayed damage to myelinated tracts of the CNS associated with altered transcriptional regulation in oligodendrocytes and extensive myelin pathology. Functional analysis also provided the first demonstration of delayed effects of chemotherapy on the latency of impulse conduction in the auditory system, offering the possibility of non-invasive analysis of myelin damage associated with cancer treatment. Conclusions Our studies demonstrate that systemic treatment with a single chemotherapeutic agent, 5-FU, is sufficient to cause a syndrome of delayed CNS damage and provide the first animal model of delayed damage to white-matter tracts of individuals treated with systemic chemotherapy. Unlike that caused by local irradiation, the degeneration caused by 5-FU treatment did not correlate with either chronic inflammation or extensive vascular damage and appears to represent a new class of delayed degenerative damage in the CNS.

  9. Axo-Glia Interaction Preceding CNS Myelination Is Regulated by Bidirectional Eph-Ephrin Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilie Linneberg

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the central nervous system, myelination of axons is required to ensure fast saltatory conduction and for survival of neurons. However, not all axons are myelinated, and the molecular mechanisms involved in guiding the oligodendrocyte processes toward the axons to be myelinated are not well understood. Only a few negative or positive guidance clues that are involved in regulating axo-glia interaction prior to myelination have been identified. One example is laminin, known to be required for early axo-glia interaction, which functions through α6β1 integrin. Here, we identify the Eph-ephrin family of guidance receptors as novel regulators of the initial axo-glia interaction, preceding myelination. We demonstrate that so-called forward and reverse signaling, mediated by members of both Eph and ephrin subfamilies, has distinct and opposing effects on processes extension and myelin sheet formation. EphA forward signaling inhibits oligodendrocyte process extension and myelin sheet formation, and blocking of bidirectional signaling through this receptor enhances myelination. Similarly, EphB forward signaling also reduces myelin membrane formation, but in contrast to EphA forward signaling, this occurs in an integrin-dependent manner, which can be reversed by overexpression of a constitutive active β1-integrin. Furthermore, ephrin-B reverse signaling induced by EphA4 or EphB1 enhances myelin sheet formation. Combined, this suggests that the Eph-ephrin receptors are important mediators of bidirectional signaling between axons and oligodendrocytes. It further implies that balancing Eph-ephrin forward and reverse signaling is important in the selection process of axons to be myelinated.

  10. Quantitative analysis of lipid debris accumulation caused by cuprizone induced myelin degradation in different CNS areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsvár, Attila; Szipőcs, Róbert; Ozsvár, Zoltán; Baka, Judith; Barzó, Pál; Tamás, Gábor; Molnár, Gábor

    2018-01-08

    Degradation of myelin sheath is thought to be the cause of neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), but definitive agreement on mechanism of how myelin is lost is currently lacking. Autoimmune initiation of MS has been recently questioned by proposing that the immune response is a consequence of oligodendrocyte degeneration. To study the process of myelin breakdown, we induced demyelination with cuprizone and applied coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, a non-destructive label-free method to image lipid structures in living tissue. We confirmed earlier results showing a brain region dependent myelin destructive effect of cuprizone. In addition, high resolution in situ CARS imaging revealed myelin debris forming lipid droplets alongside myelinated axon fibers. Quantification of lipid debris with a custom-made software for segmentation and three dimensional reconstruction revealed brain region dependent accumulation of lipid drops inversely correlated to the thickness of myelin sheaths. Finally, we confirmed that in situ CARS imaging is applicable to living human brain tissue in brain slices derived from a patient. Thus, CARS microscopy is potent tool for quantitative monitoring of myelin degradation at unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution during oligodendrocyte damage. We think that accumulation of lipid drops around degrading myelin might be instrumental in triggering subsequent inflammatory processes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pericytes Stimulate Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Differentiation during CNS Remyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alerie Guzman De La Fuente

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of the neurovascular niche in CNS myelin regeneration is incompletely understood. Here, we show that, upon demyelination, CNS-resident pericytes (PCs proliferate, and parenchymal non-vessel-associated PC-like cells (PLCs rapidly develop. During remyelination, mature oligodendrocytes were found in close proximity to PCs. In Pdgfbret/ret mice, which have reduced PC numbers, oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC differentiation was delayed, although remyelination proceeded to completion. PC-conditioned medium accelerated and enhanced OPC differentiation in vitro and increased the rate of remyelination in an ex vivo cerebellar slice model of demyelination. We identified Lama2 as a PC-derived factor that promotes OPC differentiation. Thus, the functional role of PCs is not restricted to vascular homeostasis but includes the modulation of adult CNS progenitor cells involved in regeneration.

  12. Early loss of oligodendrocytes in human and experimental neuromyelitis optica lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzos, Claudia; Winkler, Anne; Metz, Imke; Kayser, Dieter M; Thal, Dietmar R; Wegner, Christiane; Brück, Wolfgang; Nessler, Stefan; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Stadelmann, Christine

    2014-04-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a chronic, mostly relapsing inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS characterized by serum anti-aquaporin 4 (AQP4) antibodies in the majority of patients. Anti-AQP4 antibodies derived from NMO patients target and deplete astrocytes in experimental models when co-injected with complement. However, the time course and mechanisms of oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination and the fate of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) have not been examined in detail. Also, no studies regarding astrocyte repopulation of experimental NMO lesions have been reported. We utilized two rat models using either systemic transfer or focal intracerebral injection of recombinant human anti-AQP4 antibodies to generate NMO-like lesions. Time-course experiments were performed to examine oligodendroglial and astroglial damage and repair. In addition, oligodendrocyte pathology was studied in early human NMO lesions. Apart from early complement-mediated astrocyte destruction, we observed a prominent, very early loss of oligodendrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) as well as a delayed loss of myelin. Astrocyte repopulation of focal NMO lesions was already substantial after 1 week. Olig2-positive OPCs reappeared before NogoA-positive, mature oligodendrocytes. Thus, using two experimental models that closely mimic the human disease, our study demonstrates that oligodendrocyte and OPC loss is an extremely early feature in the formation of human and experimental NMO lesions and leads to subsequent, delayed demyelination, highlighting an important difference in the pathogenesis of MS and NMO.

  13. Schwann cell myelination requires Dynein function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langworthy Melissa M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interaction of Schwann cells with axons triggers signal transduction that drives expression of Pou3f1 and Egr2 transcription factors, which in turn promote myelination. Signal transduction appears to be mediated, at least in part, by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP because elevation of cAMP levels can stimulate myelination in the absence of axon contact. The mechanisms by which the myelinating signal is conveyed remain unclear. Results By analyzing mutations that disrupt myelination in zebrafish, we learned that Dynein cytoplasmic 1 heavy chain 1 (Dync1h1, which functions as a motor for intracellular molecular trafficking, is required for peripheral myelination. In dync1h1 mutants, Schwann cell progenitors migrated to peripheral nerves but then failed to express Pou3f1 and Egr2 or make myelin membrane. Genetic mosaic experiments revealed that robust Myelin Basic Protein expression required Dync1h1 function within both Schwann cells and axons. Finally, treatment of dync1h1 mutants with a drug to elevate cAMP levels stimulated myelin gene expression. Conclusion Dync1h1 is required for retrograde transport in axons and mutations of Dync1h1 have been implicated in axon disease. Our data now provide evidence that Dync1h1 is also required for efficient myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells, perhaps by facilitating signal transduction necessary for myelination.

  14. The neural androgen receptor: a therapeutic target for myelin repair in chronic demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Rashad; Ghoumari, Abdel M; Bielecki, Bartosz; Steibel, Jérôme; Boehm, Nelly; Liere, Philippe; Macklin, Wendy B; Kumar, Narender; Habert, René; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina; Tronche, François; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Schumacher, Michael; Ghandour, M Said

    2013-01-01

    Myelin regeneration is a major therapeutic goal in demyelinating diseases, and the failure to remyelinate rapidly has profound consequences for the health of axons and for brain function. However, there is no efficient treatment for stimulating myelin repair, and current therapies are limited to anti-inflammatory agents. Males are less likely to develop multiple sclerosis than females, but often have a more severe disease course and reach disability milestones at an earlier age than females, and these observations have spurred interest in the potential protective effects of androgens. Here, we demonstrate that testosterone treatment efficiently stimulates the formation of new myelin and reverses myelin damage in chronic demyelinated brain lesions, resulting from the long-term administration of cuprizone, which is toxic for oligodendrocytes. In addition to the strong effect of testosterone on myelin repair, the number of activated astrocytes and microglial cells returned to low control levels, indicating a reduction of neuroinflammatory responses. We also identify the neural androgen receptor as a novel therapeutic target for myelin recovery. After the acute demyelination of cerebellar slices in organotypic culture, the remyelinating actions of testosterone could be mimicked by 5α-dihydrotestosterone, a metabolite that is not converted to oestrogens, and blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide. Testosterone treatment also failed to promote remyelination after chronic cuprizone-induced demyelination in mice with a non-functional androgen receptor. Importantly, testosterone did not stimulate the formation of new myelin sheaths after specific knockout of the androgen receptor in neurons and macroglial cells. Thus, the neural brain androgen receptor is required for the remyelination effect of testosterone, whereas the presence of the receptor in microglia and in peripheral tissues is not sufficient to enhance remyelination. The potent synthetic

  15. Schwann cell expression of an oligodendrocyte-like remyelinating pattern after ethidium bromide injection in the rat spinal cord

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Fernandes Bondan; Maria Anete Lallo; Maria de Fátima Monteiro Martins; Dominguita Luhers Graça

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells are recognized by their capacity of producing single internodes of myelin around axons of the peripheral nervous system. In the ethidium bromide (EB) model of primary demyelination in the brainstem, it is observed the entry of Schwann cells into the central nervous system in order to contribute to the myelin repair performed by the oligodendrocytes that survived to the EB gliotoxic action, being able to even remyelinate more than one axon at the same time, in a pattern of repair...

  16. Axonal selection and myelin sheath generation in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Mikael; Lyons, David A

    2013-08-01

    The formation of myelin in the central nervous system is a multi-step process that involves coordinated cell-cell interactions and dramatic changes in plasma membrane architecture. First, oligodendrocytes send our numerous highly ramified processes to sample the axonal environment and decide which axon(s) to select for myelination. After this decision is made and individual axon to oligodendrocyte contact has been established, the exploratory process of the oligodendrocyte is converted into a flat sheath that spreads and winds along and around its associated axon to generate a multilayered membrane stack. By compaction of the opposing extracellular layers of membrane and extrusion of almost all cytoplasm from the intracellular domain of the sheath, the characteristic membrane-rich multi-lamellar structure of myelin is formed. Here we highlight recent advances in identifying biophysical and signalling based mechanisms that are involved in axonal selection and myelin sheath generation by oligodendrocytes. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying these events is a prerequisite for the design of novel myelin repair strategies in demyelinating and dysmyelinating diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Claudin k is specifically expressed in cells that form myelin during development of the nervous system and regeneration of the optic nerve in adult zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzel, Eva Jolanda; Schaefer, Karin; Obirei, Barbara; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Burton, Edward A; Kuscha, Veronika; Becker, Catherina G; Brösamle, Christian; Williams, Anna; Becker, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    The zebrafish has become an important model organism to study myelination during development and after a lesion of the adult central nervous system (CNS). Here, we identify Claudin k as a myelin-associated protein in zebrafish and determine its localization during development and adult optic nerve regeneration. We find Claudin k in subcellular compartments consistent with location in autotypic tight junctions of oligodendrocytes and myelinating Schwann cells. Expression starts in the hindbrain at 2 days (mRNA) and 3 days (protein) postfertilization and is maintained in adults. A newly generated claudin k:green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter line allowed us to characterize oligodendrocytes in the adult retina that express Claudin k and olig2, but not P0 and uniquely only form loose wraps of membrane around axons. After a crush of the adult optic nerve, Claudin k protein levels were first reduced and then recovered within 4 weeks postlesion, concomitant with optic nerve myelin de- and regeneration. During optic nerve regeneration, oligodendrocytes, many of which were newly generated, repopulated the lesion site and exhibited increasing morphological complexity over time. Thus, Claudin k is a novel myelin-associated protein expressed by oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells from early stages of wrapping and myelin formation in zebrafish development and adult regeneration, suggesting important functions of the gene for myelin formation and maintenance. Our Claudin k antibodies and claudin k:GFP reporter line represent excellent ways to visualize oligodendrocyte and Schwann cell differentiation in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Genetic evidence that Nkx2.2 and Pdgfra are major determinants of the timing of oligodendrocyte differentiation in the developing CNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qiang; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Kang; Li, Hong; Huang, Hao; Zhang, Zunyi; Mastracci, Teresa; Wegner, Michael; Chen, Yiping; Sussel, Lori; Qiu, Mengsheng

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), oligodendrocyte maturation and axonal myelination occur on a predictable schedule, but the underlying timing mechanisms are largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that Nkx2.2 homeodomain transcription factor is a key regulator for the timing of oligodendrocyte differentiation during development. Whereas induced expression of Nkx2.2 in early oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) causes precocious differentiation of oligodendrocytes, conditional ablation of Nkx2.2 temporally delays oligodendrocyte maturation. Moreover, Nkx2.2 can directly bind to the promoter of platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (Pdgfra) and repress its gene expression. Genetic ablation of Pdgfra mimics the effect of Nkx2.2 overexpression in accelerating OPC differentiation in the developing spinal cord. Together, our findings strongly suggest that Nkx2.2 functions as a major ‘switch’ to turn off Pdgfra signaling in OPCs and initiate the intrinsic program for oligodendrocyte differentiation. PMID:24449836

  19. Restoration of oligodendrocyte pools in a mouse model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie McQueen

    Full Text Available Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, a sustained modest reduction in cerebral blood flow, is associated with damage to myelinated axons and cognitive decline with ageing. Oligodendrocytes (the myelin producing cells and their precursor cells (OPCs may be vulnerable to the effects of hypoperfusion and in some forms of injury OPCs have the potential to respond and repair damage by increased proliferation and differentiation. Using a mouse model of cerebral hypoperfusion we have characterised the acute and long term responses of oligodendrocytes and OPCs to hypoperfusion in the corpus callosum. Following 3 days of hypoperfusion, numbers of OPCs and mature oligodendrocytes were significantly decreased compared to controls. However following 1 month of hypoperfusion, the OPC pool was restored and increased numbers of oligodendrocytes were observed. Assessment of proliferation using PCNA showed no significant differences between groups at either time point but showed reduced numbers of proliferating oligodendroglia at 3 days consistent with the loss of OPCs. Cumulative BrdU labelling experiments revealed higher numbers of proliferating cells in hypoperfused animals compared to controls and showed a proportion of these newly generated cells had differentiated into oligodendrocytes in a subset of animals. Expression of GPR17, a receptor important for the regulation of OPC differentiation following injury, was decreased following short term hypoperfusion. Despite changes to oligodendrocyte numbers there were no changes to the myelin sheath as revealed by ultrastructural assessment and fluoromyelin however axon-glial integrity was disrupted after both 3 days and 1 month hypoperfusion. Taken together, our results demonstrate the initial vulnerability of oligodendroglial pools to modest reductions in blood flow and highlight the regenerative capacity of these cells.

  20. Restoration of Oligodendrocyte Pools in a Mouse Model of Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Jamie; Reimer, Michell M.; Holland, Philip R.; Manso, Yasmina; McLaughlin, Mark; Fowler, Jill H.; Horsburgh, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, a sustained modest reduction in cerebral blood flow, is associated with damage to myelinated axons and cognitive decline with ageing. Oligodendrocytes (the myelin producing cells) and their precursor cells (OPCs) may be vulnerable to the effects of hypoperfusion and in some forms of injury OPCs have the potential to respond and repair damage by increased proliferation and differentiation. Using a mouse model of cerebral hypoperfusion we have characterised the acute and long term responses of oligodendrocytes and OPCs to hypoperfusion in the corpus callosum. Following 3 days of hypoperfusion, numbers of OPCs and mature oligodendrocytes were significantly decreased compared to controls. However following 1 month of hypoperfusion, the OPC pool was restored and increased numbers of oligodendrocytes were observed. Assessment of proliferation using PCNA showed no significant differences between groups at either time point but showed reduced numbers of proliferating oligodendroglia at 3 days consistent with the loss of OPCs. Cumulative BrdU labelling experiments revealed higher numbers of proliferating cells in hypoperfused animals compared to controls and showed a proportion of these newly generated cells had differentiated into oligodendrocytes in a subset of animals. Expression of GPR17, a receptor important for the regulation of OPC differentiation following injury, was decreased following short term hypoperfusion. Despite changes to oligodendrocyte numbers there were no changes to the myelin sheath as revealed by ultrastructural assessment and fluoromyelin however axon-glial integrity was disrupted after both 3 days and 1 month hypoperfusion. Taken together, our results demonstrate the initial vulnerability of oligodendroglial pools to modest reductions in blood flow and highlight the regenerative capacity of these cells. PMID:24498301

  1. Toll-like receptor 4 participates in the myelin disruptions associated with chronic alcohol abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-Loeches, Silvia; Pascual, Maria; Gómez-Pinedo, Ulises; Pascual-Lucas, Maya; Renau-Piqueras, Jaime; Guerri, Consuelo

    2012-05-01

    Alcohol abuse and alcoholism can cause brain damage, loss of white matter, myelin fiber disruption, and even neuronal injury. The underlying mechanisms of these alterations remain elusive. We have shown that chronic ethanol intake, by activating glial toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) receptors, triggers the production of inflammatory mediators and can cause brain damage. Because neuroinflammation may be associated with demyelination and neuronal damage, we evaluate whether the ethanol-induced TLR4-dependent proinflammatory environment in the brain could be involved in the myelin disruptions observed in alcoholics. Using brains from wild-type (WT) and TLR4 knockout (KO, TLR4(-/-) ) mice, we demonstrate that chronic ethanol treatment downregulated proteins involved in myelination [proteolipid protein (PLP), myelin basic protein (MBP), myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, 2,3-cyclic-nucleotide-3-phosphodiesterase, and myelin-associated glycoprotein], while increased chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan NG2 (NG2)-proteoglycan in several brain regions of ethanol-treated WT mice. The immunohistochemistry analysis also revealed that ethanol-treatment-altered myelin morphology reduced the number of MBP-positive fibers and caused oligodendrocyte death, as demonstrated by an increase in caspase-3-positive oligodendrocytes. The in vivo imaging system further confirmed that chronic ethanol intake markedly reduced the PLP in WT mice. Most myelin alterations were not observed in brains from ethanol-treated TLR4(-/-) mice. Electron microscopy studies revealed that although 41-47% of axons showed myelin sheath disarrangements in the cerebral cortex and corpus callosum of WT ethanol-treated mice, respectively, small focal fiber disruptions were noticed in these brain areas of ethanol-treated TLR4(-/-) mice. In summary, the present results suggest that ethanol-induced neuroinflammation might be involved in myelin disruptions and white matter loss observed in human alcoholics. Copyright

  2. Myelin repair by Schwann cells in the regenerating goldfish visual pathway: regional patterns revealed by X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nona, S.N.; Stafford, C.A.; Cronly-Dillon, J.R. (Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. of Science and Technology); Duncan, A. (Guy' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Anatomy); Scholes, J. (University Coll., London (United Kingdom))

    1994-07-01

    In the regenerating goldfish optic nerves, Schwann cells of unknown origin reliably infiltrate the lesion site forming a band of peripheral-type myelinating tissue by 1-2 months, sharply demarcated form the adjacent new CNS myelin. To investigate this effect, we have interfered with cell proliferation by locally X-irradiating the fish visual pathway 24 h after the lesion. As assayed by immunohistochemistry and EM, irradiation retards until 6 months formation of new myelin by Schwann cells at the lesion site, and virtually abolishes oligodendrocyte myelination distally, but has little or no effect on nerve fibre regrowth. Optic nerve astrocyte processes normally fail to re-infiltrate the lesion, but re-occupy it after irradiation, suggesting that they are normally excluded by early cell proliferation at this site. Moreover, scattered myelinating Schwann cells also appear in the oligodendrocyte-depleted distal optic nerve after irradiation, although only as far as the optic tract. (Author).

  3. Enhanced microglial clearance of myelin debris in T cell-infiltrated central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helle Hvilsted; Ladeby, Rune; Fenger, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Acute multiple sclerosis lesions are characterized by accumulation of T cells and macrophages, destruction of myelin and oligodendrocytes, and axonal damage. There is, however, limited information on neuroimmune interactions distal to sites of axonal damage in the T cell-infiltrated central nervous...... system. We investigated T-cell infiltration, myelin clearance, microglial activation, and phagocytic activity distal to sites of axonal transection through analysis of the perforant pathway deafferented dentate gyrus in SJL mice that had received T cells specific for myelin basic protein (TMBP...... with TMBP but not TOVA enhanced the microglial response to axonal transection and microglial phagocytosis of myelin debris associated with the degenerating axons. Because myelin antigen-specific immune responses may provoke protective immunity, increased phagocytosis of myelin debris might enhance...

  4. Resistance of subventricular neural stem cells to chronic hypoxemia despite structural disorganization of the germinal center and impairment of neuronal and oligodendrocyte survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    d’Anglemont de Tassigny, Xavier; Sirerol-Piquer, M Salomé; Gómez-Pinedo, Ulises; Pardal, Ricardo; Bonilla, Sonia; Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; López-López, Ivette; De la Torre-Laviana, Francisco Javier; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; López-Barneo, José

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hypoxemia, as evidenced in de-acclimatized high-altitude residents or in patients with chronic obstructive respiratory disorders, is a common medical condition that can produce serious neurological alterations. However, the pathogenesis of this phenomenon is unknown. We have found that adult rodents exposed for several days/weeks to hypoxia, with an arterial oxygen tension similar to that of chronically hypoxemic patients, manifest a partially irreversible structural disarrangement of the subventricular neurogenic niche (subventricular zone) characterized by displacement of neurons and myelinated axons, flattening of the ependymal cell layer, and thinning of capillary walls. Despite these abnormalities, the number of neuronal and oligodendrocyte progenitors, neuroblasts, and neurosphere-forming cells as well as the proliferative activity in subventricular zone was unchanged. These results suggest that neural stem cells and their undifferentiated progeny are resistant to hypoxia. However, in vivo and in vitro experiments indicate that severe chronic hypoxia decreases the survival of newly generated neurons and oligodendrocytes, with damage of myelin sheaths. These findings help explain the effects of hypoxia on adult neurogenesis and provide new perspectives on brain responsiveness to persistent hypoxemia. PMID:27774479

  5. Formation of compact myelin is required for maturation of the axonal cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, S. T.; Witt, A. S.; Kirkpatrick, L. L.; de Waegh, S. M.; Readhead, C.; Tu, P. H.; Lee, V. M.

    1999-01-01

    Although traditional roles ascribed to myelinating glial cells are structural and supportive, the importance of compact myelin for proper functioning of the nervous system can be inferred from mutations in myelin proteins and neuropathologies associated with loss of myelin. Myelinating Schwann cells are known to affect local properties of peripheral axons (de Waegh et al., 1992), but little is known about effects of oligodendrocytes on CNS axons. The shiverer mutant mouse has a deletion in the myelin basic protein gene that eliminates compact myelin in the CNS. In shiverer mice, both local axonal features like phosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins and neuronal perikaryon functions like cytoskeletal gene expression are altered. This leads to changes in the organization and composition of the axonal cytoskeleton in shiverer unmyelinated axons relative to age-matched wild-type myelinated fibers, although connectivity and patterns of neuronal activity are comparable. Remarkably, transgenic shiverer mice with thin myelin sheaths display an intermediate phenotype indicating that CNS neurons are sensitive to myelin sheath thickness. These results indicate that formation of a normal compact myelin sheath is required for normal maturation of the neuronal cytoskeleton in large CNS neurons.

  6. Functional analysis in vivo of the double mutant mouse deficient in both proteolipid protein (PLP) and myelin basic protein (MBP) in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, W; Boison, D; Büssow, H

    1997-08-01

    Myelination is an important developmental process of the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). To unravel the functions of the two dominant myelin proteins in the CNS, proteolipid protein (PLP) and myelin basic protein (MBP), we generated and characterized the homozygous double mutant mouse line (plp-/-, mbp-/-), which is viable and fertile. Plasma membrane processes of oligodendrocytes deficient in PLP and MBP, but not in myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), spirally wrap large diameter axons, tightly adhering at their extracytosolic surfaces and forming a pseudo-compacted myelin. Neuromotor activity and coordination are considerably improved compared to the shiverer trait.

  7. Autotaxin/ENPP2 Regulates Oligodendrocyte Differentiation in vivo in the Developing Zebrafish Hindbrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuelling, Larra W.; Waggener, Christopher T.; Afshari, Fatemah S.; Lister, James A.; Fuss, Babette

    2012-01-01

    During development, progenitors that are committed to differentiate into oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the central nervous system (CNS), are generated within discrete regions of the neuroepithelium. More specifically, within the developing spinal cord and hindbrain ventrally located progenitor cells that are characterized by the expression of the transcription factor olig2 give temporally rise to first motor neurons and then oligodendrocyte progenitors. The regulation of this temporal neuron-glial switch has been found complex and little is known about the extrinsic factors regulating it. Our studies described here identified a zebrafish ortholog to mammalian atx, which displays evolutionarily conserved expression pattern characteristics. Most interestingly, atx was found to be expressed by cells of the cephalic floor plate during a time period when ventrally-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors arise in the developing hindbrain of the zebrafish. Knock-down of atx expression resulted in a delay and/or inhibition of the timely appearance of oligodendrocyte progenitors and subsequent developmental stages of the oligodendrocyte lineage. This effect of atx knock-down was not accompanied by changes in the number of olig2-positive progenitor cells, the overall morphology of the axonal network or the number of somatic abducens motor neurons. Thus, our studies identified Atx as an extrinsic factor that is likely secreted by cells from the floor plate and that is involved in regulating specifically the progression of olig2-positive progenitor cells into lineage committed oligodendrocyte progenitors. PMID:22821873

  8. A Cyclic Altered Peptide Analogue Based on Myelin Basic Protein 87–99 Provides Lasting Prophylactic and Therapeutic Protection Against Acute Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Emmanouil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, amide-linked cyclic peptide analogues of the 87–99 myelin basic protein (MBP epitope, a candidate autoantigen in multiple sclerosis (MS, are tested for therapeutic efficacy in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Cyclic altered peptide analogues of MBP87–99 with substitutions at positions 91 and/or 96 were tested for protective effects when administered using prophylactic or early therapeutic protocols in MBP72–85-induced EAE in Lewis rats. The Lys91 and Pro96 of MBP87–99 are crucial T-cell receptor (TCR anchors and participate in the formation of trimolecular complex between the TCR-antigen (peptide-MHC (major histocompability complex for the stimulation of encephalitogenic T cells that are necessary for EAE induction and are implicated in MS. The cyclic peptides were synthesized using Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis (SPPS applied on the 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarboxyl/tert-butyl Fmoc/tBu methodology and combined with the 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin (CLTR-Cl. Cyclo(91–99[Ala96]MBP87–99, cyclo(87–99[Ala91,96]MBP87–99 and cyclo(87–99[Arg91, Ala96]MBP87–99, but not wild-type linear MBP87–99, strongly inhibited MBP72–85-induced EAE in Lewis rats when administered using prophylactic and early therapeutic vaccination protocols. In particular, cyclo(87–99[Arg91, Ala96]MBP87–99 was highly effective in preventing the onset and development of clinical symptoms and spinal cord pathology and providing lasting protection against EAE induction.

  9. On the biogenesis of myelin membranes : Sorting, trafficking and cell polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baron, Wia; Hoekstra, Dick

    2010-01-01

    In the central nervous system, a multilayered membrane layer known as the myelin sheath enwraps axons, and is required for optimal saltatory signal conductance. The sheath develops from membrane processes that extend from the plasma membrane of oligodendrocytes and displays a unique lipid and

  10. Gas6 Promotes Oligodendrogenesis and Myelination in the Adult Central Nervous System and After Lysolecithin-Induced Demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Goudarzi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A key aim of therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS is to promote the regeneration of oligodendrocytes and remyelination in the central nervous system (CNS. The present study provides evidence that the vitamin K-dependent protein growth arrest specific 6 (Gas6 promotes such repair in in vitro cultures of mouse optic nerve and cerebellum. We first determined expression of Gas6 and TAM (Tyro3, Axl, Mer receptors in the mouse CNS, with all three TAM receptors increasing in expression through postnatal development, reaching maximal levels in the adult. Treatment of cultured mouse optic nerves with Gas6 resulted in significant increases in oligodendrocyte numbers as well as expression of myelin basic protein (MBP. Gas6 stimulation also resulted in activation of STAT3 in optic nerves as well as downregulation of multiple genes involved in MS development, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9, which may decrease the integrity of the blood–brain barrier and is found upregulated in MS lesions. The cytoprotective effects of Gas6 were examined in in vitro mouse cerebellar slice cultures, where lysolecithin was used to induce demyelination. Cotreatment of cerebellar slices with Gas6 significantly attenuated demyelination as determined by MBP immunostaining, and Gas6 activated Tyro3 receptor through its phosphorylation. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that Gas6/TAM signaling stimulates the generation of oligodendrocytes and increased myelin production via Tyro3 receptor in the adult CNS, including repair after demyelinating injury. Furthermore, the effects of Gas6 on STAT3 signaling and matrix MMP9 downregulation indicate potential glial cell repair and immunoregulatory roles for Gas6, indicating that Gas6-TAM signaling could be a potential therapeutic target in MS and other neuropathologies.

  11. Secretome analysis of human oligodendrocytes derived from neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Kyung Kim

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the secretome of human oligodendrocytes (F3.Olig2 cells generated from human neural stem cells by transduction with the gene encoding the Olig2 transcription factor. Using mRNA sequencing and protein cytokine arrays, we identified a number of biologically important secretory proteins whose expression has not been previously reported in oligodendrocytes. We found that F3.Olig2 cells secrete IL-6, PDGF-AA, GRO, GM-CSF, and M-CSF, and showed prominent expression of their corresponding receptors. Co-expression of ligands and receptors suggests that autocrine signaling loops may play important roles in both differentiation and maintenance of oligodendrocytes. We also found that F3.Olig2 cells secrete matrix metalloproteinases and matrix metalloproteinase-associated proteins associated with functional competence of oligodendrocytes. The results of our secretome analysis provide insights into the functional and molecular details of human oligodendrocytes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic analysis of the secretome of oligodendrocytes.

  12. Recent achievements in stem cell-mediated myelin repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadasz, Janusz Joachim; Lubetzki, Catherine; Zalc, Bernard; Stankoff, Bruno; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Küry, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Following the establishment of a number of successful immunomodulatory treatments for multiple sclerosis, current research focuses on the repair of existing damage. Promotion of regeneration is particularly important for demyelinated areas with degenerated or functionally impaired axons of the central nervous system's white and gray matter. As the protection and generation of new oligodendrocytes is a key to the re-establishment of functional connections, adult oligodendrogenesis and myelin reconstitution processes are of primary interest. Moreover, understanding, supporting and promoting endogenous repair activities such as mediated by resident oligodendroglial precursor or adult neural stem cells are currently thought to be a promising approach toward the development of novel regenerative therapies. This review summarizes recent developments and findings related to pharmacological myelin repair as well as to the modulation/application of stem cells with the aim to restore defective myelin sheaths.

  13. Sox2 Is Essential for Oligodendroglial Proliferation and Differentiation during Postnatal Brain Myelination and CNS Remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Gui, Xuehong; Croteau, Christopher; Song, Lanying; Xu, Jie; Wang, Aijun; Bannerman, Peter; Guo, Fuzheng

    2018-02-14

    In the CNS, myelination and remyelination depend on the successful progression and maturation of oligodendroglial lineage cells, including proliferation and differentiation of oligodendroglial progenitor cells (OPCs). Previous studies have reported that Sox2 transiently regulates oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation in the embryonic and perinatal spinal cord and appears dispensable for myelination in the postnatal spinal cord. However, the role of Sox2 in OL development in the brain has yet to be defined. We now report that Sox2 is an essential positive regulator of developmental myelination in the postnatal murine brain of both sexes. Stage-specific paradigms of genetic disruption demonstrated that Sox2 regulated brain myelination by coordinating upstream OPC population supply and downstream OL differentiation. Transcriptomic analyses further supported a crucial role of Sox2 in brain developmental myelination. Consistently, oligodendroglial Sox2-deficient mice developed severe tremors and ataxia, typical phenotypes indicative of hypomyelination, and displayed severe impairment of motor function and prominent deficits of brain OL differentiation and myelination persisting into the later CNS developmental stages. We also found that Sox2 was required for efficient OPC proliferation and expansion and OL regeneration during remyelination in the adult brain and spinal cord. Together, our genetic evidence reveals an essential role of Sox2 in brain myelination and CNS remyelination, and suggests that manipulation of Sox2 and/or Sox2-mediated downstream pathways may be therapeutic in promoting CNS myelin repair. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Promoting myelin formation and repair has translational significance in treating myelin-related neurological disorders, such as periventricular leukomalacia and multiple sclerosis in which brain developmental myelin formation and myelin repair are severely affected, respectively. In this report, analyses of a series of genetic conditional

  14. Organization of myelin in the mouse somatosensory barrel cortex and the effects of sensory deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Kyrstle; Chu, Philip; Abramowitz, Jason; Steger, Robert; Ramos, Raddy L; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2013-04-01

    In rodents, the barrel cortex is a specialized area within the somatosensory cortex that processes signals from the mystacial whiskers. We investigated the normal development of myelination in the barrel cortex of mice, as well as the effects of sensory deprivation on this pattern. Deprivation was achieved by trimming the whiskers on one side of the face every other day from birth. In control mice, myelin was not present until postnatal day 14 and did not show prominence until postnatal day 30; adult levels of myelination were reached by the end of the second postnatal month. Unbiased stereology was used to estimate axon density in the interbarrel septal region and barrel walls as well as the barrel centers. Myelin was significantly more concentrated in the interbarrel septa/barrel walls than in the barrel centers in both control and sensory-deprived conditions. Sensory deprivation did not impact the onset of myelination but resulted in a significant decrease in myelinated axons in the barrel region and decreased the amount of myelin ensheathing each axon. Visualization of the oligodendrocyte nuclear marker Olig2 revealed a similar pattern of myelin as seen using histochemistry, but with no significant changes in Olig2+ nuclei following sensory deprivation. Consistent with the anatomical results showing less myelination, local field potentials revealed slower rise times following trimming. Our results suggest that myelination develops relatively late and can be influenced by sensory experience. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Dynamics of myelin content decrease in the rat stroke model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisel, A.; Khodanovich, M.; Atochin, D.; Mustafina, L.; Yarnykh, V.

    2017-08-01

    The majority of studies were usually focused on neuronal death after brain ischemia; however, stroke affects all cell types including oligodendrocytes that form myelin sheath in the CNS. Our study is focused on the changes of myelin content in the ischemic core and neighbor structures in early terms (1, 3 and 10 days) after stroke. Stroke was modeled with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) in 15 male rats that were divided into three groups by time points after operation. Brain sections were histologically stained with Luxol Fast Blue (LFB) for myelin quantification. The significant demyelination was found in the ischemic core, corpus callosum, anterior commissure, whereas myelin content was increased in caudoputamen, internal capsule and piriform cortex compared with the contralateral hemisphere. The motor cortex showed a significant increase of myelin content on the 1st day and a significant decrease on the 3rd and 10th days after MCAo. These results suggest that stroke influences myelination not only in the ischemic core but also in distant structures.

  16. Immune mediated protection in multiple sclerosis: A role for neurokines in oligodendrocyte survival and macrophage modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Hellings, Niels; Hendriks, Jerome; CARMANS, Sofie; Slaets, Leen; Dumont, Debora; Vanderlocht, Joris; Stinissen, Piet

    2007-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), immune mediated destruction of the myelin sheath, oligodendrocytes and axons leads to irreversible neurological deficits. Recent data show that immune responses in the central nervous system (CNS) may also confer protective effects. We recently demonstrated that autoreactive T cells and macrophages produce leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a member of the IL-6 family of neurokines. CD4+ T cells from relapsing remitting MS-patients show a reduced LIF production. Sti...

  17. In vivo labeling of peroxisomes by photoconvertible mEos2 in myelinating glia of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richert, Sarah; Kleinecke, Sandra; Günther, Jenniffer; Schaumburg, Florian; Edgar, Julia; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Kassmann, Celia M

    2014-03-01

    Mutations of several genes encoding peroxisomal proteins have been associated with human diseases. Some of these display specific white matter abnormalities in the brain, although the affected proteins are ubiquitously expressed. To better understand the etiology of peroxisomal myelin diseases, we aimed to label these organelles in vivo and in a cell type specific fashion. We had previously shown that in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells numerous peroxisomes reside in the cytoplasmic channels of "non-compacted" myelin. These organelles are smaller and biochemically distinct from non-myelin peroxisomes. Targeting peroxisomal functions in various cell types of the brain has demonstrated that oligodendroglial peroxisomes are specifically important for long-term integrity of the CNS. To visualize myelin peroxisomes in intact cells and tissues by live imaging, we have generated a novel line of transgenic mice for the expression of fluorescently tagged peroxisomes specifically in myelinating glia. This was achieved by modifying the gene for a photoconvertible mEos2 with a peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) and generating a fusion gene with the myelin-specific Cnp1 promoter. In the brain of resulting transgenic mice, peroxisomes are selectively labeled in oligodendrocytes. In this novel genetic tool, photoconversion of single peroxisomes from green to red fluorescence can be used to monitor the fate of single organelles and to determine the dynamics of PTS1-mediated protein import in the context of myelin diseases that affect peroxisomal functions. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  18. Erythropoietin promotes oligodendrogenesis and myelin repair following lysolecithin-induced injury in spinal cord slice culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yun Kyung; Kim, Gunha; Park, Serah; Sim, Ju Hee; Won, You Jin [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Chang Ho [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 290-3 Jeonha-dong, Dong-gu, Ulsan 682-714 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jong Yoon, E-mail: jyyoo@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Hea Nam, E-mail: hnhong@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lysolecithin-induced demyelination elevated EpoR expression in OPCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In association with elevated EpoR, EPO increased OPCs proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPO enhanced the oligodendrogenesis via activation of JAK2 pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPO promoted myelin repair following lysolecithin-induced demyelination. -- Abstract: Here, we sought to delineate the effect of EPO on the remyelination processes using an in vitro model of demyelination. We report that lysolecithin-induced demyelination elevated EPO receptor (EpoR) expression in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), facilitating the beneficial effect of EPO on the formation of oligodendrocytes (oligodendrogenesis). In the absence of EPO, the resultant remyelination was insufficient, possibly due to a limiting number of oligodendrocytes rather than their progenitors, which proliferate in response to lysolecithin-induced injury. By EPO treatment, lysolecithin-induced proliferation of OPCs was accelerated and the number of myelinating oligodendrocytes and myelin recovery was increased. EPO also enhanced the differentiation of neural progenitor cells expressing EpoR at high level toward the oligodendrocyte-lineage cells through activation of cyclin E and Janus kinase 2 pathways. Induction of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes by high dose of EPO implies that EPO might be the key factor influencing the final differentiation of OPCs. Taken together, our data suggest that EPO treatment could be an effective way to enhance remyelination by promoting oligodendrogenesis in association with elevated EpoR expression in spinal cord slice culture after lysolecithin-induced demyelination.

  19. Myelin membrane wrapping of CNS axons by PI(3,4,5)P3-dependent polarized growth at the inner tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snaidero, Nicolas; Möbius, Wiebke; Czopka, Tim; Hekking, Liesbeth H.P.; Mathisen, Cliff; Verkleij, Dick; Goebbels, Sandra; Edgar, Julia; Merkler, Doron; Lyons, David A.; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Simons, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Summary Central nervous system myelin is a multilayered membrane sheath generated by oligodendrocytes for rapid impulse propagation. However, the underlying mechanisms of myelin wrapping have remained unclear. Using an integrative approach of live imaging, electron microscopy and genetics, we show that new myelin membranes are incorporated adjacent to the axon at the innermost tongue. Simultaneously, newly formed layers extend laterally ultimately leading to the formation of a set of closely apposed paranodal loops. An elaborated system of cytoplasmic channels within the growing myelin sheath enables membrane trafficking to the leading edge. Most of these channels are closing with ongoing development, but can be re-opened in adult by experimentally raising phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5)-triphosphate levels, which reinitiates myelin growth. Our model can explain assembly of myelin as a multilayered structure, abnormal myelin outfoldings in neurological disease, and plasticity of myelin biogenesis observed in adult life. PMID:24439382

  20. Serum autoantibodies to myelin peptides distinguish acute disseminated encephalomyelitis from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Haren, Keith; Tomooka, Beren H; Kidd, Brian A; Banwell, Brenda; Bar-Or, Amit; Chitnis, Tanuja; Tenembaum, Silvia N; Pohl, Daniela; Rostasy, Kevin; Dale, Russell C; O'Connor, Kevin C; Hafler, David A; Steinman, Lawrence; Robinson, William H

    2013-11-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) share overlapping clinical, radiologic and laboratory features at onset. Because autoantibodies may contribute to the pathogenesis of both diseases, we sought to identify autoantibody biomarkers that are capable of distinguishing them. We used custom antigen arrays to profile anti-myelin-peptide autoantibodies in sera derived from individuals with pediatric ADEM (n = 15), pediatric multiple sclerosis (Ped MS; n = 11) and adult MS (n = 15). Using isotype-specific secondary antibodies, we profiled both IgG and IgM reactivities. We used Statistical Analysis of Microarrays software to confirm the differences in autoantibody reactivity profiles between ADEM and MS samples. We used Prediction Analysis of Microarrays software to generate and validate prediction algorithms, based on the autoantibody reactivity profiles. ADEM was characterized by IgG autoantibodies targeting epitopes derived from myelin basic protein, proteolipid protein, myelin-associated oligodendrocyte basic glycoprotein, and alpha-B-crystallin. In contrast, MS was characterized by IgM autoantibodies targeting myelin basic protein, proteolipid protein, myelin-associated oligodendrocyte basic glycoprotein and oligodendrocyte-specific protein. We generated and validated prediction algorithms that distinguish ADEM serum (sensitivity 62-86%; specificity 56-79%) from MS serum (sensitivity 40-87%; specificity 62-86%) on the basis of combined IgG and IgM anti-myelin autoantibody reactivity to a small number of myelin peptides. Combined profiles of serum IgG and IgM autoantibodies identified myelin antigens that may be useful for distinguishing MS from ADEM. Further studies are required to establish clinical utility. Further biological assays are required to delineate the pathogenic potential of these antibodies.

  1. The Nogo-66 receptor homolog NgR2 is a sialic acid-dependent receptor selective for myelin-associated glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Karthik; Chivatakarn, Onanong; Lee, Hakjoo; Joshi, Pushkar S; Kantor, David B; Newman, Barbara A; Mage, Rose; Rader, Christoph; Giger, Roman J

    2005-01-26

    The Nogo-66 receptor (NgR1) is a promiscuous receptor for the myelin inhibitory proteins Nogo/Nogo-66, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), and oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein (OMgp). NgR1, an axonal glycoprotein, is the founding member of a protein family composed of the structurally related molecules NgR1, NgR2, and NgR3. Here we show that NgR2 is a novel receptor for MAG and acts selectively to mediate MAG inhibitory responses. MAG binds NgR2 directly and with greater affinity than NgR1. In neurons NgR1 and NgR2 support MAG binding in a sialic acid-dependent Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase-sensitive manner. Forced expression of NgR2 is sufficient to impart MAG inhibition to neonatal sensory neurons. Soluble NgR2 has MAG antagonistic capacity and promotes neuronal growth on MAG and CNS myelin substrate in vitro. Structural studies have revealed that the NgR2 leucine-rich repeat cluster and the NgR2 "unique" domain are necessary for high-affinity MAG binding. Consistent with its role as a neuronal MAG receptor, NgR2 is an axonassociated glycoprotein. In postnatal brain NgR1 and NgR2 are strongly enriched in Triton X-100-insoluble lipid rafts. Neural expression studies of NgR1 and NgR2 have revealed broad and overlapping, yet distinct, distribution in the mature CNS. Taken together, our studies identify NgRs as a family of receptors (or components of receptors) for myelin inhibitors and provide insights into how interactions between MAG and members of the Nogo receptor family function to coordinate myelin inhibitory responses.

  2. Effects of experimental hypothyroidism on myelin sheath structural organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Andréa A; Nazário, José C; Pereira, Mário J S; Azevedo, Neide L; Barradas, Penha C

    2004-03-01

    A previous study using the 2'3'cyclic nucleotide 3'phosphodiesterase (CNPase), an oligodendroglial marker that also stain ensheathed fibers, showed a decrease in the number of immunoreactive fibers and a change in the pattern of CNPase immunoreactivity (CNPase+) in hypothyroid animals. CNPase+ fibers, in mature hypothyroid animals, showed a continuous pattern of staining in contrast with a discontinuous one in controls. As CNPase, in adult animals, can be found only in regions in which oligodendrocyte cytoplasm remains as internal, external and paranodal loops, it was suggested that the reduction of thyroid hormone levels leads to a failure in myelin compaction. Previous data showed a higher frequency of some abnormalities in myelin sheath as multiple cytoplasmic loops and redundant myelin profiles in mutant animals that present a failure in myelin compaction. The increase in the frequency of these abnormalities (multiple internal and external loops and redundant myelin) indicates a failure in the interrelations between the axons and the oligodendroglial processes. To verify if the thyroid hormone deficiency during CNS development disturbs these interrelations, we evaluated the frequency of the morphological abnormalities (multiple internal and external loops and redundant myelin) in myelin sheath of corpus callosum (cc) in experimental hypothyroidism. Randomic fields were kept by electron microscopy and the analysis of the frequency of morphological abnormalities showed a significant difference in hypothyroid animals at 60-day-old (PND60), with no significant differences at 90-day-old (PND90) animals. The frequency of multiple internal loops is higher in hypothyroid animals at PND60 that indicates a disturbance in the wrapping by the oligodendroglial process. These findings showed that thyroid hormone might modulate the axon-oligodendroglial relationships that are important for the adequate temporal sequence of events that occur during myelinogenesis, with

  3. Exportability of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation machinery into myelin sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Alessandro; Ravera, Silvia; Calzia, Daniela; Panfoli, Isabella

    2011-01-01

    White matter comprises over half of the brain, and its role in axonal survival is being reconsidered, consistently with the observation that axonal degeneration follows demyelination. The recent evidence of an extra-mitochondrial aerobic ATP production in isolated myelin vesicles, thanks to the expression therein of the mitochondrial Oxydative Phosphorylation (OXPHOS) machinery, stands in for myelin playing a functional bioenergetic role in ATP supply for the axon. The observation that subunits of the OXPHOS encoded by the mitochondrial genome are expressed in myelin, suggests that they can be the same as those of the inner mitochondrial membrane. This would mean that the OXPHOS is exportable. Here the hypothesis is exposed that the mitochondrion is the unique site of the assembly of the OXPHOS, so that this is exported to those sub cellular districts displaying high energy demand, such as myelin sheath. There the OXPHOS would display a higher efficiency in oxidative ATP production than inside the mitochondrion itself In this respect, the role of the glia in the nervous conduction is shed new light and the oligodendrocyte mitochondrial OXPHOS are hypothesized to be delivered to nascent myelin.

  4. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-2/megalin is expressed in oligodendrocytes in the mouse spinal cord white matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wicher, Grzegorz; Larsson, Mårten; Svenningsen, Åsa Fex

    2006-01-01

    studies have shown megalin expression in ependymal cells and choroid plexus. We have investigated megalin expression in the spinal cord of postnatal mice with immunohistochemistry and immunoblot. Antibodies recognizing either the cytoplasmic tail (MM6) or the extracellular domain (E11) of megalin labeled...... oligodendrocytes in the spinal cord white matter, in parallel with myelination. MM6 antibodies, predominantly labeled the nuclei, whereas E11 antibodies labeled the cytoplasm of these cells. MM6 antibodies labeled also nuclei of oligodendrocytes cultured from embryonic mouse spinal cord. Immunoblots of spinal cord...

  5. Transplanting oligodendrocyte progenitors into the adult CNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin, R.J.M.; Blakemore, W.F. [Medical Research Council, Cambridge (United Kingdom)]|[Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Clinical Veterinary Medicine

    1997-01-01

    This review covers a number of aspects of the behaviour of oligodendrocyte progenitors following transplantation into the adult CNS. First, an account is given of the ability of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors, grown in tissue culture in the presence of PDGF and bFGF, to extensively remyelinate focal areas of persistent demyelination. Secondly, we describe how transplanted clonal cell lines of oligodendrocyte progenitors will differentiate in to astrocytes as will oligodendrocytes following transplantation into pathological environments in which both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are absent, thereby manifesting the bipotentially demonstrable in vitro but not during development. Finally, a series of studies examining the migratory behaviour of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors (modelled using the oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line CG4) are described. (author).

  6. Nonenzymatic glycosylation of bovine myelin basic protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitz, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    In the CNS myelin sheath the nonenzymatic glycosylation reaction (at the early stage of the Amadori product) occurs only with the myelin basic protein and not with the other myelin proteins. This was observed in isolated bovine myelin by in vitro incubation with (/sup 14/C)-galactose and (/sup 14/C)-glucose. The respective in-vitro incorporation rates for purified bovine myelin basic protein with D-galactose, D-glucose and D-mannose were 7.2, 2.4 and 2.4 mmoles/mole myelin basic protein per day at 37/sup 0/C. A more rapid, HPLC method was devised and characterized to specifically analyze for the Amadori product. The HPLC method was correlated to the (/sup 14/C)-sugar incorporation method for myelin basic protein under a set of standard reaction conditions using (/sup 14/C)-glucose and (/sup 14/C)-mannose with HPLC values at 1/6 and 1/5 of the (/sup 14/C)-sugar incorporation method. A novel myelin basic protein purification step has been developed that yields a relativity proteolytic free preparation that is easy to work with, being totally soluble at a neutral pH. Nine new spots appear for a trypsinized glycosylated MBP in the paper peptide map of which eight correspond to positions of the (/sup 3/H)-labeled Amadori product in affinity isolated peptides. These studies provide a general characterization of and a structural basis for investigations on nonenzymatically glycosylated MBP as well as identifying MBP as the only nonenzymatically glycosylated protein in the CNS myelin sheath which may accumulate during aging, diabetes, and demyelinating diseases in general.

  7. Myelin as longitudinal conductor: a multi-layered model of the myelinated human motor nerve fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanova, D I

    2001-04-01

    The myelin sheath is normally regarded as an electrical insulator. Low values of radial conductance and capacitance have been measured, and in electrical models of myelinated axons the contribution of longitudinal conduction within the sheath has been ignored. According to X-ray diffraction studies, however, myelin sheaths comprise alternate lipid and aqueous layers, and the latter may be expected to have a low resistivity. We propose a new model of myelinated axons in which the aqueous layers within the myelin provide appreciable longitudinal and radial conductance, the latter via a spiral pathway. We have investigated the likely contribution of these conductive paths within the myelin to the electrical properties of a human motor nerve fibre by computer simulation, representing the myelin sheath as a series of interconnecting parallel lamellae. With this new model, action potential conduction has been simulated along a 20-node cable, and the electrotonic responses to 100-ms depolarizing and hyperpolarizing current pulses have been simulated for a uniformly polarized fibre. We have found that the hypothesis of a longitudinally conducting myelin sheath improves our previous model in two ways: it is no longer necessary to make implausible assumptions about the resistivity or width of the periaxonal space to simulate realistic electrotonus, and the conduction velocity is appreciably faster (by 8.6%).

  8. Delayed myelination in an intrauterine growth retardation model is mediated by oxidative stress upregulating bone morphogenetic protein 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Mary V; Murray, Kaitlin A; Marsh, Eric D; Golden, Jeffrey A; Simmons, Rebecca A; Grinspan, Judith B

    2012-07-01

    Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is associated with neurological deficits including cerebral palsy and cognitive and behavioral disabilities. The pathogenesis involves oxidative stress that leads to periventricular white matter injury with a paucity of mature oligodendrocytes and hypomyelination. The molecular mechanisms underlying this damage remain poorly understood. We used a rat model of IUGR created by bilateral ligation of the uterine artery at embryonic Day 19 that results in fetal growth retardation and oxidative stress in the developing brain. The IUGR rat pups showed significant delays in oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination that resolved by 8 weeks. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), which inhibits oligodendrocyte maturation, was elevated in IUGR brains at postnatal time points and returned to near normal by adulthood. Despite the apparent recovery, behavioral deficiencies were found in 8-week-old female animals, suggesting that the early transient myelination defects have permanent effects. In support of these in vivo data, oligodendrocyte precursor cells cultured from postnatal IUGR rats retained increased BMP4 expression and impaired differentiation that was reversed with the BMP inhibitor noggin. Oxidants in oligodendrocyte cultures increased BMP expression, which decreased differentiation; however, abrogating BMP signaling with noggin in vitro and in BMP-deficient mice prevented these effects. Together, these findings suggest that IUGR results in delayed myelination through the generation of oxidative stress that leads to BMP4 upregulation.

  9. Polysialic acid modification of the synaptic cell adhesion molecule SynCAM 1 in human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneburg, Sebastian; Buettner, Falk F R; Mühlenhoff, Martina; Hildebrandt, Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are the progenitors of myelinating oligodendrocytes in brain development and repair. Successful myelination depends on the control of adhesiveness during OPC migration and axon contact formation. The decoration of cell surface proteins with the glycan polysialic acid (polySia) is a key regulatory element of OPC interactions during development and under pathological conditions. By far the major protein carrier of polySia is the neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM, but recently, polysialylation of the synaptic cell adhesion molecule SynCAM 1 has been detected in the developing mouse brain. In mice, polySia-SynCAM 1 is associated with cells expressing NG2, a marker of a heterogeneous precursor cell population, which is the primary source for oligodendrocytes in development and myelin repair but can also give rise to astrocytes and possibly neurons. It is not yet clear if polySia-SynCAM 1 is expressed by OPCs and its occurrence in humans is elusive. By generating uniform human embryonic stem cell-derived OPC cultures, we demonstrate that polySia is present on human OPCs but down-regulated during differentiation into myelin basic protein-positive oligodendrocytes. PolySia on NCAM resides on the isoforms NCAM-180 and NCAM-140, and SynCAM 1 is identified as a novel polySia acceptor in human OPCs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Oligodendrocytes in the Mouse Corpus Callosum Maintain Axonal Function by Delivery of Glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Meyer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the optic nerve, oligodendrocytes maintain axonal function by supplying lactate as an energy substrate. Here, we report that, in acute brain slices of the mouse corpus callosum, exogenous glucose deprivation (EGD abolished compound action potentials (CAPs, which neither lactate nor pyruvate could prevent. Loading an oligodendrocyte with 20 mM glucose using a patch pipette prevented EGD-mediated CAP reduction in about 70% of experiments. Loading oligodendrocytes with lactate rescued CAPs less efficiently than glucose. In mice lacking connexin 47, oligodendrocyte filling with glucose did not prevent CAP loss, emphasizing the importance of glial networks for axonal energy supply. Compared with the optic nerve, the astrocyte network in the corpus callosum was less dense, and loading astrocytes with glucose did not prevent CAP loss during EGD. We suggest that callosal oligodendrocyte networks provide energy to sustain axonal function predominantly by glucose delivery, and mechanisms of metabolic support vary across different white matter regions.

  11. Protandim Protects Oligodendrocytes against an Oxidative Insult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie L. Lim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte damage and loss are key features of multiple sclerosis (MS pathology. Oligodendrocytes appear to be particularly vulnerable to reactive oxygen species (ROS and cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF, which induce cell death and prevent the differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs. Here, we investigated the efficacy of sulforaphane (SFN, monomethyl fumarate (MMF and Protandim to induce Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme expression, and protect oligodendrocytes against ROS-induced cell death and ROS-and TNF-mediated inhibition of OPC differentiation. OLN-93 cells and primary rat oligodendrocytes were treated with SFN, MMF or Protandim resulting in significant induction of Nrf2-driven (antioxidant proteins heme oygenase-1, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH: quinone oxidoreductase-1 and p62/SQSTM1, as analysed by Western blotting. After incubation with the compounds, oligodendrocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Protandim most potently promoted oligodendrocyte cell survival as measured by live/death viability assay. Moreover, OPCs were treated with Protandim or vehicle control prior to exposing them to TNF or hydrogen peroxide for five days, which inhibited OPC differentiation. Protandim significantly promoted OPC differentiation under influence of ROS, but not TNF. Protandim, a combination of five herbal ingredients, potently induces antioxidants in oligodendrocytes and is able to protect oligodendrocytes against oxidative stress by preventing ROS-induced cell death and promoting OPC differentiation.

  12. Altered Translational Control of Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein on Myelin Proteins in Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Se Jin; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Bahn, Geon Ho

    2017-05-01

    Myelin is a specialized structure of the nervous system that both enhances electrical conductance and insulates neurons from external risk factors. In the central nervous system, polarized oligodendrocytes form myelin by wrapping processes in a spiral pattern around neuronal axons through myelin-related gene regulation. Since these events occur at a distance from the cell body, post-transcriptional control of gene expression has strategic advantage to fine-tune the overall regulation of protein contents in situ. Therefore, many research interests have been focused to identify RNA binding proteins and their regulatory mechanism in myelinating compartments. Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is one such RNA binding protein, regulating its target expression by translational control. Although the majority of works on FMRP have been performed in neurons, it is also found in the developing or mature glial cells including oligodendrocytes, where its function is not well understood. Here, we will review evidences suggesting abnormal translational regulation of myelin proteins with accompanying white matter problem and neurological deficits in fragile X syndrome, which can have wider mechanistic and pathological implication in many other neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  13. Alexander Disease Mutations Produce Cells with Coexpression of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and NG2 in Neurosphere Cultures and Inhibit Differentiation into Mature Oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pinedo, Ulises; Sirerol-Piquer, Maria Salomé; Durán-Moreno, María; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Matias-Guiu, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is a rare disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The disease is characterized by presence of GFAP aggregates in the cytoplasm of astrocytes and loss of myelin. Determine the effect of AxD-related mutations on adult neurogenesis. We transfected different types of mutant GFAP into neurospheres using the nucleofection technique. We find that mutations may cause coexpression of GFAP and NG2 in neurosphere cultures, which would inhibit the differentiation of precursors into oligodendrocytes and thus explain the myelin loss occurring in the disease. Transfection produces cells that differentiate into new cells marked simultaneously by GFAP and NG2 and whose percentage increased over days of differentiation. Increased expression of GFAP is due to a protein with an anomalous structure that forms aggregates throughout the cytoplasm of new cells. These cells display down-expression of vimentin and nestin. Up-expression of cathepsin D and caspase-3 in the first days of differentiation suggest that apoptosis as a lysosomal response may be at work. HSP27, a protein found in Rosenthal bodies, is expressed less at the beginning of the process although its presence increases in later stages. Our findings seem to suggest that the mechanism of development of AxD may not be due to a function gain due to increase of GFAP, but to failure in the differentiation process may occur at the stage in which precursor cells transform into oligodendrocytes, and that possibility may provide the best explanation for the clinical and radiological images described in AxD.

  14. Alexander Disease Mutations Produce Cells with Coexpression of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein and NG2 in Neurosphere Cultures and Inhibit Differentiation into Mature Oligodendrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises Gómez-Pinedo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlexander disease (AxD is a rare disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. The disease is characterized by presence of GFAP aggregates in the cytoplasm of astrocytes and loss of myelin.ObjectivesDetermine the effect of AxD-related mutations on adult neurogenesis.MethodsWe transfected different types of mutant GFAP into neurospheres using the nucleofection technique.ResultsWe find that mutations may cause coexpression of GFAP and NG2 in neurosphere cultures, which would inhibit the differentiation of precursors into oligodendrocytes and thus explain the myelin loss occurring in the disease. Transfection produces cells that differentiate into new cells marked simultaneously by GFAP and NG2 and whose percentage increased over days of differentiation. Increased expression of GFAP is due to a protein with an anomalous structure that forms aggregates throughout the cytoplasm of new cells. These cells display down-expression of vimentin and nestin. Up-expression of cathepsin D and caspase-3 in the first days of differentiation suggest that apoptosis as a lysosomal response may be at work. HSP27, a protein found in Rosenthal bodies, is expressed less at the beginning of the process although its presence increases in later stages.ConclusionOur findings seem to suggest that the mechanism of development of AxD may not be due to a function gain due to increase of GFAP, but to failure in the differentiation process may occur at the stage in which precursor cells transform into oligodendrocytes, and that possibility may provide the best explanation for the clinical and radiological images described in AxD.

  15. NG2 glia generate new oligodendrocytes but few astrocytes in a murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model of demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Richa B; Rivers, Leanne E; Young, Kaylene M; Jamen, Francoise; Richardson, William D

    2010-12-01

    The adult mammalian brain and spinal cord contain glial precursors that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α subunit (PDGFRA) and the NG2 proteoglycan. These "NG2 cells" descend from oligodendrocyte precursors in the perinatal CNS and continue to generate myelinating oligodendrocytes in the gray and white matter of the postnatal brain. It has been proposed that NG2 cells can also generate reactive astrocytes at sites of CNS injury or demyelination. To test this we examined the fates of PDGFRA/NG2 cells in the mouse spinal cord during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)--a demyelinating condition that models some aspects of multiple sclerosis in humans. We administered tamoxifen to Pdgfra-CreER(T2):Rosa26R-YFP mice to induce yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) expression in PDGFRA/NG2 cells and their differentiated progeny. We subsequently induced EAE and observed a large (>4-fold) increase in the local density of YFP(+) cells, >90% of which were oligodendrocyte lineage cells. Many of these became CC1-positive, NG2-negative differentiated oligodendrocytes that expressed myelin markers CNP and Tmem10/Opalin. PDGFRA/NG2 cells generated very few GFAP(+)-reactive astrocytes (1-2% of all YFP(+) cells) or NeuN(+) neurons (demyelinated spinal cord.

  16. An in vitro study on the involvement of LINGO-1 and Rho GTPases in Nogo-A regulated differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiang-Hui; Jin, Wei-Lin; Ju, Gong

    2007-10-01

    Nogo-A has been considered as one of the most important myelin-associated axonal regeneration inhibitors in the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated various additional physiological roles of Nogo family members. To understand the possible effect of Nogo-A on the differentiation of oligodendrocytes, antibodies against distinct extracellular domains of Nogo-A were applied in cell cultures. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells from P2 rat cortex were grown in the presence of monoclonal antibody against the N-terminal inhibitory domain of Nogo-A or the C-terminal 66 amino acid loop of Nogo-A for 3 days, and the antibody treatment resulted in stunted process extension and inhibited differentiation of oligodendrocytes. Concomitant with morphology changes, Rho GTPases activity was greatly increased upon the antibody treatment and the expression level of LINGO-1, which was recently shown to be a negative regulator for the oligodendrocyte maturation, was upregulated in the process of antibody treatment. These results indicate that endogenous Nogo-A expressed in oligodendrocyte may act though Rho GTPase and LINGO-1 to influence the morphological differentiation of oligodendrocytes and will help us to understand the physiology role of Nogo-A in oligodendrocyte biology.

  17. Protandim Protects Oligodendrocytes against an Oxidative Insult

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, Jamie L; van der Pol, Susanne M A; Baron, Wia; McCord, Joe M; de Vries, Helga E; van Horssen, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte damage and loss are key features of multiple sclerosis (MS) pathology. Oligodendrocytes appear to be particularly vulnerable to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), which induce cell death and prevent the differentiation of

  18. Long-term impact of radiation on the stem cell and oligodendrocyte precursors in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Panagiotakos

    Full Text Available The cellular basis of long term radiation damage in the brain is not fully understood.We administered a dose of 25Gy to adult rat brains while shielding the olfactory bulbs. Quantitative analyses were serially performed on different brain regions over 15 months. Our data reveal an immediate and permanent suppression of SVZ proliferation and neurogenesis. The olfactory bulb demonstrates a transient but remarkable SVZ-independent ability for compensation and maintenance of the calretinin interneuron population. The oligodendrocyte compartment exhibits a complex pattern of limited proliferation of NG2 progenitors but steady loss of the oligodendroglial antigen O4. As of nine months post radiation, diffuse demyelination starts in all irradiated brains. Counts of capillary segments and length demonstrate significant loss one day post radiation but swift and persistent recovery of the vasculature up to 15 months post XRT. MRI imaging confirms loss of volume of the corpus callosum and early signs of demyelination at 12 months. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrates progressive degradation of myelin sheaths with axonal preservation. Areas of focal necrosis appear beyond 15 months and are preceded by widespread demyelination. Human white matter specimens obtained post-radiation confirm early loss of oligodendrocyte progenitors and delayed onset of myelin sheath fragmentation with preserved capillaries.This study demonstrates that long term radiation injury is associated with irreversible damage to the neural stem cell compartment in the rodent SVZ and loss of oligodendrocyte precursor cells in both rodent and human brain. Delayed onset demyelination precedes focal necrosis and is likely due to the loss of oligodendrocyte precursors and the inability of the stem cell compartment to compensate for this loss.

  19. Biophysical studies on the structure and function of molecules from the vertebrate myelin sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaozhan; Myllykoski, Matti; Kursula, Petri

    2010-11-01

    The myelin sheath is a crucial structure for the proper functioning of the vertebrate nervous system. We employ diverse methods to study the structure, function, and dynamics of the molecules specifically present in myelin. Eventually, we hope to better understand the details of the tightly packed myelin structure and the etiology of myelin-related diseases. The paper will provide background into the molecular structure of myelin, and recent results from our laboratory, dealing with the structure and function of selected myelin proteins, will be highlighted.

  20. The molecular physiology of the axo-myelinic synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micu, Ileana; Plemel, Jason R; Lachance, Celia; Proft, Juliane; Jansen, Andrew J; Cummins, Karen; van Minnen, Jan; Stys, Peter K

    2016-02-01

    Myelinated axons efficiently transmit information over long distances. The apposed myelin sheath confers favorable electrical properties, but restricts access of the axon to its extracellular milieu. Therefore, axonal metabolic support may require specific axo-myelinic communication. Here we explored activity-dependent glutamate-mediated signaling from axon to myelin. 2-Photon microscopy was used to image Ca(2+) changes in myelin in response to electrical stimulation of optic nerve axons ex vivo. We show that optic nerve myelin responds to axonal action potentials by a rise in Ca(2+) levels mediated by GluN2D and GluN3A-containing NMDA receptors. Glutamate is released from axons in a vesicular manner that is tetanus toxin-sensitive. The Ca(2+) source for vesicular fusion is provided by ryanodine receptors on axonal Ca(2+) stores, controlled by L-type Ca(2+) channels that sense depolarization of the internodal axolemma. Genetic ablation of GluN2D and GluN3A subunits results in greater lability of the compact myelin. Our results support the existence of a novel synapse between the axon and its myelin, suggesting a means by which traversing action potentials can signal the overlying myelin sheath. This may be an important physiological mechanism by which an axon can signal companion glia for metabolic support or adjust properties of its myelin in a dynamic manner. The axo-myelinic synapse may contribute to learning, while its disturbances may play a role in the pathophysiology of central nervous system disorders such as schizophrenia, where subtle abnormalities of myelinated white matter tracts have been shown in the human, or to frank demyelinating disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Proton-gated Ca(2+)-permeable TRP channels damage myelin in conditions mimicking ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nicola B; Kolodziejczyk, Karolina; Kougioumtzidou, Eleni; Attwell, David

    2016-01-28

    The myelin sheaths wrapped around axons by oligodendrocytes are crucial for brain function. In ischaemia myelin is damaged in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, abolishing action potential propagation. This has been attributed to glutamate release activating Ca(2+)-permeable N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Surprisingly, we now show that NMDA does not raise the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in mature oligodendrocytes and that, although ischaemia evokes a glutamate-triggered membrane current, this is generated by a rise of extracellular [K(+)] and decrease of membrane K(+) conductance. Nevertheless, ischaemia raises oligodendrocyte [Ca(2+)]i, [Mg(2+)]i and [H(+)]i, and buffering intracellular pH reduces the [Ca(2+)]i and [Mg(2+)]i increases, showing that these are evoked by the rise of [H(+)]i. The H(+)-gated [Ca(2+)]i elevation is mediated by channels with characteristics of TRPA1, being inhibited by ruthenium red, isopentenyl pyrophosphate, HC-030031, A967079 or TRPA1 knockout. TRPA1 block reduces myelin damage in ischaemia. These data suggest that TRPA1-containing ion channels could be a therapeutic target in white matter ischaemia.

  2. Plasmalogen phospholipids protect internodal myelin from oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, Adrienne M; Kuo, Fonghsu; Cakici, Ozgur; Crowther, Michelle N; Denninger, Andrew R; Avila, Robin L; Brites, Pedro; Kirschner, Daniel A

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in a range of degenerative conditions, including aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and neurological disorders. Myelin is a lipid-rich multilamellar sheath that facilitates rapid nerve conduction in vertebrates. Given the high energetic demands and low antioxidant capacity of the cells that elaborate the sheaths, myelin is considered intrinsically vulnerable to oxidative damage, raising the question whether additional mechanisms prevent structural damage. We characterized the structural and biochemical basis of ROS-mediated myelin damage in murine tissues from both central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). To determine whether ROS can cause structural damage to the internodal myelin, whole sciatic and optic nerves were incubated ex vivo with a hydroxyl radical-generating system consisting of copper (Cu), hydrogen peroxide (HP), and ortho-phenanthroline (OP). Quantitative assessment of unfixed tissue by X-ray diffraction revealed irreversible compaction of myelin membrane stacking in both sciatic and optic nerves. Incubation in the presence of the hydroxyl radical scavenger sodium formate prevented this damage, implicating hydroxyl radical species. Myelin membranes are particularly enriched in plasmalogens, a class of ether-linked phospholipids proposed to have antioxidant properties. Myelin in sciatic nerve from plasmalogen-deficient (Pex7 knockout) mice was significantly more vulnerable to Cu/OP/HP-mediated ROS-induced compaction than myelin from WT mice. Our results directly support the role of plasmalogens as endogenous antioxidants providing a defense that protects ROS-vulnerable myelin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulate Myelination in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhei Nishimura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS, and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs. Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation

  4. MAL Is a Regulator of the Recruitment of Myelin Protein PLP to Membrane Microdomains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein Bijlard

    Full Text Available In oligodendrocytes (OLGs, an indirect, transcytotic pathway is mediating transport of de novo synthesized PLP, a major myelin specific protein, from the apical-like plasma membrane to the specialized basolateral-like myelin membrane to prevent its premature compaction. MAL is a well-known regulator of polarized trafficking in epithelial cells, and given its presence in OLGs it was therefore of interest to investigate whether MAL played a similar role in PLP transport in OLGs, taking into account its timely expression in these cells. Our data revealed that premature expression of mCherry-MAL in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells interfered with terminal OLG differentiation, although myelin membrane formation per se was not impaired. In fact, also PLP transport to myelin membranes via the cell body plasma membrane was unaffected. However, the typical shift of PLP from TX-100-insoluble membrane domains to CHAPS-resistant, but TX-100-soluble membrane domains, seen in the absence of MAL expression, is substantially reduced upon expression of the MAL protein. Interestingly, not only in vitro, but also in developing brain a strongly diminished shift from TX-100 resistant to TX-100 soluble domains was observed. Consistently, the MAL-expression mediated annihilation of the typical membrane microdomain shift of PLP is also reflected by a loss of the characteristic surface expression profile of conformation-sensitive anti-PLP antibodies. Hence, these findings suggest that MAL is not involved in vesicular PLP trafficking to either the plasma membrane and/or the myelin membrane as such. Rather, we propose that MAL may regulate PLP's distribution into distinct membrane microdomains that allow for lateral diffusion of PLP, directly from the plasma membrane to the myelin membrane once the myelin sheath has been assembled.

  5. Components of myelin damage and repair in the progression of white matter pathology after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzwa, Amanda J; Marion, Christina M; Sullivan, Genevieve M; McDaniel, Dennis P; Armstrong, Regina C

    2015-03-01

    White matter tracts are highly vulnerable to damage from impact-acceleration forces of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Mild TBI is characterized by a low density of traumatic axonal injury, whereas associated myelin pathology is relatively unexplored. We examined the progression of white matter pathology in mice after mild TBI with traumatic axonal injury localized in the corpus callosum. Adult mice received a closed-skull impact and were analyzed from 3 days to 6 weeks post-TBI/sham surgery. At all times post-TBI, electron microscopy revealed degenerating axons distributed among intact fibers in the corpus callosum. Intact axons exhibited significant demyelination at 3 days followed by evidence of remyelination at 1 week. Accordingly, bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase labeling demonstrated the generation of new oligodendrocytes, identified by myelin proteolipid protein messenger RNA expression, at 3 days post-TBI. Overall oligodendrocyte populations, identified by immunohistochemical staining for CC1 and/or glutathione S-transferase pi, were similar between TBI and sham mice by 2 weeks. Excessively long myelin figures, similar to redundant myelin sheaths, were a significant feature at all post-TBI time points. At 6 weeks post-TBI, microglial activation and astrogliosis were localized to areas of axon and myelin pathology. These studies show that demyelination, remyelination, and excessive myelin are components of white matter degeneration and recovery in mild TBI with traumatic axonal injury.

  6. Modulation of FGF receptor signaling as an intervention and potential therapy for myelin breakdown in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-Su; Yao, Zhong-Xiang

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease and oligodendrocyte degeneration and white matter damage play a critical role in the pathogenesis of AD. FGF/FGF receptor signaling have been implicated in diverse cellular processes including cell apoptosis, survival, adhesion, migration, differentiation, and proliferation, as well as key regulators of the development of the central nervous system (including in axon guidance and synaptogenesis) via multiple signal pathways. It has been demonstrated that FGF infusion or gene transfer restores neurogenesis in subventricular zone and hippocampal functions in aged mice and mouse models of AD and has therapeutic implications for neurocognitive disorders. Besides, FGF receptor signaling in oligodendrocytes regulates myelin sheath thickness via Erk1/2 MAPK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, which sequentially regulates progression through distinct stages of oligodendrocyte differentiation. The effect could be effectively antagonized by the potent, selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor of FGF receptor activity. We therefore propose that modulation of FGF receptor signaling will suppress the development of oligodendrocyte degeneration and myelin breakdown or white matter damage in mouse models or patients of AD and improve or restore the pathological and clinical symptoms of cognitive decline, and FGF receptor signaling with its inhibitors and/or gene transfer would serve as an intervention and potential therapy for myelin breakdown and cognitive decline in AD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Resistance of subventricular neural stem cells to chronic hypoxemia despite structural disorganization of the germinal center and impairment of neuronal and oligodendrocyte survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    d’Anglemont de Tassigny X

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Xavier d'Anglemont de Tassigny,1,* M Salomé Sirerol-Piquer,2,3,* Ulises Gómez-Pinedo,4 Ricardo Pardal,1 Sonia Bonilla,1 Vivian Capilla-Gonzalez,2 Ivette López-López,1 Francisco Javier De la Torre-Laviana,1 José Manuel García-Verdugo,2,3 José López-Barneo1,3 1Medical Physiology and Biophysics Department, Institute of Biomedicine of Seville (IBiS, Virgen del Rocío University Hospital/CSIC/University of Seville, Seville, Spain; 2Cavanilles Institute of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain; 3Network Center of Biomedical Research on Neurodegenerative Diseases (CIBERNED, Spain; 4Laboratory of Regenerative Medicine, San Carlos Institute of Health Investigation, Madrid, Spain *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Chronic hypoxemia, as evidenced in de-acclimatized high-altitude residents or in patients with chronic obstructive respiratory disorders, is a common medical condition that can produce serious neurological alterations. However, the pathogenesis of this phenomenon is unknown. We have found that adult rodents exposed for several days/weeks to hypoxia, with an arterial oxygen tension similar to that of chronically hypoxemic patients, manifest a partially irreversible structural disarrangement of the subventricular neurogenic niche (subventricular zone characterized by displacement of neurons and myelinated axons, flattening of the ependymal cell layer, and thinning of capillary walls. Despite these abnormalities, the number of neuronal and oligodendrocyte progenitors, neuroblasts, and neurosphere-forming cells as well as the proliferative activity in subventricular zone was unchanged. These results suggest that neural stem cells and their undifferentiated progeny are resistant to hypoxia. However, in vivo and in vitro experiments indicate that severe chronic hypoxia decreases the survival of newly generated neurons and oligodendrocytes, with damage of myelin sheaths. These

  8. Evidence for Myelin Sheath Remodeling in the CNS Revealed by In Vivo Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Franziska; Vagionitis, Stavros; Czopka, Tim

    2018-02-19

    The length of myelin sheaths affects conduction speed along axons and information propagation. It has recently become clear that myelin may be adaptively modified to modulate circuit function, implying that length remodeling of myelin sheaths should occur. However, direct evidence for such events is lacking. We have investigated how myelination patterns are formed, maintained, and remodeled using long-term imaging and myelin ablation in zebrafish. We demonstrate that length differences between myelin sheaths are established by rapid and variable growth within 3 days after their formation, independently of their time of formation, and even along discontinuously myelinated axons. Afterward, sheaths continue extending at similar rates to compensate for overall animal growth. In consequence, once axon myelination patterns are established, they are maintained over long periods of time. We tested whether mature myelin sheaths can remodel by removing individual sheaths from single axons by targeted ablation. Remarkably, extensive changes in sheath length and number occurred, which frequently restored the original myelination pattern. Our results show that axons can control myelin growth and remodeling, and we provide evidence for a homeostatic control of axon myelination patterns by maintenance and remodeling of myelin sheath length, with implications for circuit development, function, and repair. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Myosin II has distinct functions in PNS and CNS myelin sheath formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Tewari, Ambika; Einheber, Steven; Salzer, James L; Melendez-Vasquez, Carmen V

    2008-09-22

    The myelin sheath forms by the spiral wrapping of a glial membrane around the axon. The mechanisms responsible for this process are unknown but are likely to involve coordinated changes in the glial cell cytoskeleton. We have found that inhibition of myosin II, a key regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics, has remarkably opposite effects on myelin formation by Schwann cells (SC) and oligodendrocytes (OL). Myosin II is necessary for initial interactions between SC and axons, and its inhibition or down-regulation impairs their ability to segregate axons and elongate along them, preventing the formation of a 1:1 relationship, which is critical for peripheral nervous system myelination. In contrast, OL branching, differentiation, and myelin formation are potentiated by inhibition of myosin II. Thus, by controlling the spatial and localized activation of actin polymerization, myosin II regulates SC polarization and OL branching, and by extension their ability to form myelin. Our data indicate that the mechanisms regulating myelination in the peripheral and central nervous systems are distinct.

  10. Cortical maturation and myelination in healthy toddlers and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoni, Sean C L; Dean, Douglas C; Remer, Justin; Dirks, Holly; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan

    2015-07-15

    The maturation of cortical structures, and the establishment of their connectivity, are critical neurodevelopmental processes that support and enable cognitive and behavioral functioning. Measures of cortical development, including thickness, curvature, and gyrification have been extensively studied in older children, adolescents, and adults, revealing regional associations with cognitive performance, and alterations with disease or pathology. In addition to these gross morphometric measures, increased attention has recently focused on quantifying more specific indices of cortical structure, in particular intracortical myelination, and their relationship to cognitive skills, including IQ, executive functioning, and language performance. Here we analyze the progression of cortical myelination across early childhood, from 1 to 6 years of age, in vivo for the first time. Using two quantitative imaging techniques, namely T1 relaxation time and myelin water fraction (MWF) imaging, we characterize myelination throughout the cortex, examine developmental trends, and investigate hemispheric and gender-based differences. We present a pattern of cortical myelination that broadly mirrors established histological timelines, with somatosensory, motor and visual cortices myelinating by 1 year of age; and frontal and temporal cortices exhibiting more protracted myelination. Developmental trajectories, defined by logarithmic functions (increasing for MWF, decreasing for T1), were characterized for each of 68 cortical regions. Comparisons of trajectories between hemispheres and gender revealed no significant differences. Results illustrate the ability to quantitatively map cortical myelination throughout early neurodevelopment, and may provide an important new tool for investigating typical and atypical development. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Impaired myelination and reduced brain ferric iron in the mouse model of mucolipidosis IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Grishchuk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV is a lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal transient receptor potential ion channel mucolipin-1 (TRPML1. MLIV causes impaired motor and cognitive development, progressive loss of vision and gastric achlorhydria. How loss of TRPML1 leads to severe psychomotor retardation is currently unknown, and there is no therapy for MLIV. White matter abnormalities and a hypoplastic corpus callosum are the major hallmarks of MLIV brain pathology. Here, we report that loss of TRPML1 in mice results in developmental aberrations of brain myelination as a result of deficient maturation and loss of oligodendrocytes. Defective myelination is evident in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10, an active stage of postnatal myelination in the mouse brain. Expression of mature oligodendrocyte markers is reduced in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10 and remains lower throughout the course of the disease. We observed reduced Perls' staining in Mcoln1−/− brain, indicating lower levels of ferric iron. Total iron content in unperfused brain is not significantly different between Mcoln1−/− and wild-type littermate mice, suggesting that the observed maturation delay or loss of oligodendrocytes might be caused by impaired iron handling, rather than by global iron deficiency. Overall, these data emphasize a developmental rather than a degenerative disease course in MLIV, and suggest that there should be a stronger focus on oligodendrocyte maturation and survival to better understand MLIV pathogenesis and aid treatment development.

  12. Identification of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein-1 interactome in central nervous system myelin suggests a role in the clearance of necrotic cell debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Castaneda, Anthony; Arandjelovic, Sanja; Stiles, Travis L; Schlobach, Ryan K; Mowen, Kerri A; Gonias, Steven L; Gaultier, Alban

    2013-02-15

    In the central nervous system (CNS), fast neuronal signals are facilitated by the oligodendrocyte-produced myelin sheath. Oligodendrocyte turnover or injury generates myelin debris that is usually promptly cleared by phagocytic cells. Failure to remove dying oligodendrocytes leads to accumulation of degraded myelin, which, if recognized by the immune system, may contribute to the development of autoimmunity in diseases such as multiple sclerosis. We recently identified low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) as a novel phagocytic receptor for myelin debris. Here, we report characterization of the LRP1 interactome in CNS myelin. Fusion proteins were designed corresponding to the extracellular ligand-binding domains of LRP1. LRP1 partners were isolated by affinity purification and characterized by mass spectrometry. We report that LRP1 binds intracellular proteins via its extracellular domain and functions as a receptor for necrotic cells. Peptidyl arginine deiminase-2 and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase are novel LRP1 ligands identified in our screen, which interact with full-length LRP1. Furthermore, the extracellular domain of LRP1 is a target of peptidyl arginine deiminase-2-mediated deimination in vitro. We propose that LRP1 functions as a receptor for endocytosis of intracellular components released during cellular damage and necrosis.

  13. Regeneration of myelin sheaths of normal length and thickness in the zebrafish CNS correlates with growth of axons in caliber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karttunen, Marja J.; Czopka, Tim; Goedhart, Marieke; Early, Jason J.

    2017-01-01

    Demyelination is observed in numerous diseases of the central nervous system, including multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the endogenous regenerative process of remyelination can replace myelin lost in disease, and in various animal models. Unfortunately, the process of remyelination often fails, particularly with ageing. Even when remyelination occurs, it is characterised by the regeneration of myelin sheaths that are abnormally thin and short. This imperfect remyelination is likely to have implications for the restoration of normal circuit function and possibly the optimal metabolic support of axons. Here we describe a larval zebrafish model of demyelination and remyelination. We employ a drug-inducible cell ablation system with which we can consistently ablate 2/3rds of oligodendrocytes in the larval zebrafish spinal cord. This leads to a concomitant demyelination of 2/3rds of axons in the spinal cord, and an innate immune response over the same time period. We find restoration of the normal number of oligodendrocytes and robust remyelination approximately two weeks after induction of cell ablation, whereby myelinated axon number is restored to control levels. Remarkably, we find that myelin sheaths of normal length and thickness are regenerated during this time. Interestingly, we find that axons grow significantly in caliber during this period of remyelination. This suggests the possibility that the active growth of axons may stimulate the regeneration of myelin sheaths of normal dimensions. PMID:28542521

  14. CNS myelin induces regulatory functions of DC-SIGN–expressing, antigen-presenting cells via cognate interaction with MOG

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vallejo, J.J.; Ilarregui, J.M.; Kalay, H.; Chamorro, S.; Koning, N.; Unger, W.W.; Ambrosini, M.; Montserrat, V.; Fernandes, R.J.; Bruijns, S.C.M.; van Weering, J.R.T.; Paauw, N.J.; O’Toole, T.; van Horssen, J.; van der Valk, P.; Nazmi, K.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Bajramovic, J.; Dijkstra, C.D.; ’t Hart, B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a constituent of central nervous system myelin, is an important autoantigen in the neuroinflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS). However, its function remains unknown. Here, we show that, in healthy human myelin, MOG is decorated with fucosylated N-glycans that support recognition by the C-type lectin receptor (CLR) DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3–grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) on microglia and DCs. The interaction of MOG with DC-SIGN in the context of simultaneous TLR4 activation resulted in enhanced IL-10 secretion and decreased T cell proliferation in a DC-SIGN-, glycosylation-, and Raf1-dependent manner. Exposure of oligodendrocytes to proinflammatory factors resulted in the down-regulation of fucosyltransferase expression, reflected by altered glycosylation at the MS lesion site. Indeed, removal of fucose on myelin reduced DC-SIGN–dependent homeostatic control, and resulted in inflammasome activation, increased T cell proliferation, and differentiation toward a Th17-prone phenotype. These data demonstrate a new role for myelin glycosylation in the control of immune homeostasis in the healthy human brain through the MOG–DC-SIGN homeostatic regulatory axis, which is comprised by inflammatory insults that affect glycosylation. This phenomenon should be considered as a basis to restore immune tolerance in MS. PMID:24935259

  15. High-content phenotypic screening and triaging strategy to identify small molecules driving oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppard, Jane V; Rugg, Catherine A; Smicker, Matthew A; Powers, Elaine; Harnish, Erica; Prisco, Joy; Cirovic, Dragan; Wright, Paul S; August, Paul R; Chandross, Karen J

    2015-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis is a demyelinating disease of the CNS and the primary cause of neurological disability in young adults. Loss of myelinating oligodendrocytes leads to neuronal dysfunction and death and is an important contributing factor to this disease. Endogenous oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), which on differentiation are responsible for replacing myelin, are present in the adult CNS. As such, therapeutic agents that can stimulate OPCs to differentiate and remyelinate demyelinated axons under pathologic conditions may improve neuronal function and clinical outcome. We describe the details of an automated, cell-based, morphometric-based, high-content screen that is used to identify small molecules eliciting the differentiation of OPCs after 3 days. Primary screening was performed using rat CG-4 cells maintained in culture conditions that normally support a progenitor cell-like state. From a library of 73,000 diverse small molecules within the Sanofi collection, 342 compounds were identified that increased OPC morphological complexity as an indicator of oligodendrocyte maturation. Subsequent to the primary high-content screen, a suite of cellular assays was established that identified 22 nontoxic compounds that selectively stimulated primary rat OPCs but not C2C12 muscle cell differentiation. This rigorous triaging yielded several chemical series for further expansion and bio- or cheminformatics studies, and their compelling biological activity merits further investigation. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  16. Dimethyl fumarate ameliorates myoclonus stemming from protein misfolding in oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwood, Cherie M; Garshott, Danielle M; Richardson, Chelsea R; Seraji-Bozorgzad, Navid; Fribley, Andrew M; Gow, Alexander

    2017-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered a primary autoimmune disease; however, this view is increasingly being challenged in basic and clinical science arenas because of the growing body of clinical trials' data showing that exclusion of immune cells from the CNS only modestly slows disease progression to disability. Accordingly, there is significant need for expanding the scope of potential disease mechanisms to understand the etiology of MS. Concomitantly, the use of a broader range of pre-clinical animal models for characterizing existing efficacious clinical treatments may elucidate additional or unexpected mechanisms of action for these drugs that augment insight into MS etiology. Herein, we explore the in vivo mechanism of action of dimethyl fumarate, which has been shown to suppress oxidative stress and immune cell responses in psoriasis and MS. Rather than studying this compound in the context of an experimental autoimmune-induced attack on the CNS, we have used a genetic model of hypomyelination, male rumpshaker (rsh) mice, which exhibit oligodendrocyte metabolic stress and startle-induced subcortical myoclonus during development and into adulthood. We find that myoclonus is reduced 30-50% in treated mutants but we do not detect substantial changes in metabolic or oxidative stress response pathways, cytokine modulation, or myelin thickness (assessed by anova). All procedures involving vertebrate animals in this study were reviewed and approved by the IACUC committee at Wayne State University. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Comparative Effects of Human Neural Stem Cells and Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells on the Neurobehavioral Disorders of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Kwon Bae

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since multiple sclerosis (MS is featured with widespread demyelination caused by autoimmune response, we investigated the recovery effects of F3.olig2 progenitors, established by transducing human neural stem cells (F3 NSCs with Olig2 transcription factor, in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein- (MOG- induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model mice. Six days after EAE induction, F3 or F3.olig2 cells (1 × 106/mouse were intravenously transplanted. MOG-injected mice displayed severe neurobehavioral deficits which were remarkably attenuated and restored by cell transplantation, in which F3.olig2 cells were superior to its parental F3 cells. Transplanted cells migrated to the injured spinal cord, matured to oligodendrocytes, and produced myelin basic proteins (MBP. The F3.olig2 cells expressed growth and neurotrophic factors including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, nerve growth factor (NGF, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF. In addition, the transplanted cells markedly attenuated inflammatory cell infiltration, reduced cytokine levels in the spinal cord and lymph nodes, and protected host myelins. The results indicate that F3.olig2 cells restore neurobehavioral symptoms of EAE mice by regulating autoimmune inflammatory responses as well as by stimulating remyelination and that F3.olig2 progenitors could be a candidate for the cell therapy of demyelinating diseases including MS.

  18. Dynamic glucocorticoid-dependent regulation of Sgk1 expression in oligodendrocytes of adult male rat brain by acute stress and time of day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Laura R; Chun, Lauren E; Woodruff, Elizabeth R; Christensen, Jennifer A; Hartsock, Matthew J; Spencer, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies support plasticity in adult brain white matter structure and myelination in response to various experiential factors. One possible contributor to this plasticity may be activity-dependent modulation of serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (Sgk1) expression in oligodendrocytes. We examined whether Sgk1 expression in adult rat brain white matter is increased by acute stress-induced elevations in endogenous corticosterone and whether it fluctuates with diurnal variations in corticosterone. We observed rapid increases (within 30 min) in Sgk1 mRNA in the corpus callosum in response to acute stress, as well as large increases at the beginning of the rat's active period (the time of peak corticosterone secretion). These increases were absent in adrenalectomized rats. Corticosterone treatment of adrenalectomized rats also rapidly increased corpus callosum Sgk1 mRNA. The majority of Sgk1 mRNA in corpus callosum was co-localized with myelin basic protein mRNA, suggesting that mature oligodendrocytes respond dynamically to acute stress and circadian rhythms. The regulation of Sgk1 expression by acute stress and time of day was selective for white matter, with limited alteration of Sgk1 expression by these factors in hippocampus and somatosensory cortex. These results indicate a unique sensitivity of oligodendrocyte Sgk1 expression to activity-dependent fluctuations in corticosterone hormone secretion, and raises the prospect that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation or glucocorticoid pharmacotherapy may compromise the normal activity-dependent interactions between oligodendrocytes and neurons.

  19. In vitro analysis of the oligodendrocyte lineage in mice during demyelination and remyelination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, R.; Friedrich, V.L. Jr.; Holmes, K.V.; Dubois-Dalcq, M. (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-09-01

    A demyelinating disease induced in C57B1/6N mice by intracranial injection of a coronavirus (murine hepatitis virus strain A59) is followed by functional recovery and efficient CNS myelin repair. To study the biological properties of the cells involved in this repair process, glial cells were isolated and cultured from spinal cords of these young adult mice during demyelination and remyelination. Using three-color immunofluorescence combined with (3H)thymidine autoradiography, we have analyzed the antigenic phenotype and mitotic potential of individual glial cells. We identified oligodendrocytes with an antibody to galactocerebroside, astrocytes with an antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein, and oligodendrocyte-type 2 astrocyte (O-2A) progenitor cells with the O4 antibody. Cultures from demyelinated tissue differed in several ways from those of age-matched controls: first, the total number of O-2A lineage cells was strikingly increased; second, the O-2A population consisted of a higher proportion of O4-positive astrocytes and cells of mixed oligodendrocyte-astrocyte phenotype; and third, all the cell types within the O-2A lineage showed enhanced proliferation. This proliferation was not further enhanced by adding PDGF, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to the defined medium. However, bFGF and IGF-I seemed to influence the fate of O-2A lineage cells in cultures of demyelinated tissue. Basic FGF decreased the percentage of cells expressing galactocerebroside. In contrast, IGF-I increased the relative proportion of oligodendrocytes. Thus, O-2A lineage cells from adult mice display greater phenotypic plasticity and enhanced mitotic potential in response to an episode of demyelination. These properties may be linked to the efficient remyelination achieved in this demyelinating disease.

  20. Oligodendrocyte differentiation and implantation : new insights for remyelinating cell therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sher, Falak; Balasubramaniyan, Veerakumar; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review Recent research on oligodendrocyte development has yielded new insights on the involvement of morphogens and differentiation factors in oligodendrogenesis. This knowledge has improved strategies to control neural stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte differentiation and functional

  1. Regulation of myelin genes implicated in psychiatric disorders by functional activity in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip R Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Myelination is a highly dynamic process that continues well into adulthood in humans. Several recent gene expression studies have found abnormal expression of genes involved in myelination in the prefrontal cortex of brains from patients with schizophrenia and other psychiatric illnesses. Defects in myelination could contribute to the pathophysiology of psychiatric illness by impairing information processing as a consequence of altered impulse conduction velocity and synchrony between cortical regions carrying out higher level cognitive functions. Myelination can be altered by impulse activity in axons and by environmental experience. Psychiatric illness is treated by psychotherapy, behavioral modification, and drugs affecting neurotransmission, raising the possibility that myelinating glia may not only contribute to such disorders, but that activity-dependent effects on myelinating glia could provide one of the cellular mechanisms contributing to the therapeutic effects of these treatments. This review examines evidence showing that genes and gene networks important for myelination can be regulated by functional activity in axons.

  2. Actin filament turnover drives leading edge growth during myelin sheath formation in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Schanila; Sánchez, Paula; Schmitt, Sebastian; Snaidero, Nicolas; Mitkovski, Mišo; Velte, Caroline; Brückner, Bastian R; Alexopoulos, Ioannis; Czopka, Tim; Jung, Sang Y; Rhee, Jeong S; Janshoff, Andreas; Witke, Walter; Schaap, Iwan A T; Lyons, David A; Simons, Mikael

    2015-07-27

    During CNS development, oligodendrocytes wrap their plasma membrane around axons to generate multilamellar myelin sheaths. To drive growth at the leading edge of myelin at the interface with the axon, mechanical forces are necessary, but the underlying mechanisms are not known. Using an interdisciplinary approach that combines morphological, genetic, and biophysical analyses, we identified a key role for actin filament network turnover in myelin growth. At the onset of myelin biogenesis, F-actin is redistributed to the leading edge, where its polymerization-based forces push out non-adhesive and motile protrusions. F-actin disassembly converts protrusions into sheets by reducing surface tension and in turn inducing membrane spreading and adhesion. We identified the actin depolymerizing factor ADF/cofilin1, which mediates high F-actin turnover rates, as an essential factor in this process. We propose that F-actin turnover is the driving force in myelin wrapping by regulating repetitive cycles of leading edge protrusion and spreading. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Taking Advantage of Nature's Gift: Can Endogenous Neural Stem Cells Improve Myelin Regeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkermann, Rainer; Jadasz, Janusz Joachim; Azim, Kasum; Küry, Patrick

    2016-11-14

    Irreversible functional deficits in multiple sclerosis (MS) are directly correlated to axonal damage and loss. Neurodegeneration results from immune-mediated destruction of myelin sheaths and subsequent axonal demyelination. Importantly, oligodendrocytes, the myelinating glial cells of the central nervous system, can be replaced to some extent to generate new myelin sheaths. This endogenous regeneration capacity has so far mainly been attributed to the activation and recruitment of resident oligodendroglial precursor cells. As this self-repair process is limited and increasingly fails while MS progresses, much interest has evolved regarding the development of remyelination-promoting strategies and the presence of alternative cell types, which can also contribute to the restoration of myelin sheaths. The adult brain comprises at least two neurogenic niches harboring life-long adult neural stem cells (NSCs). An increasing number of investigations are beginning to shed light on these cells under pathological conditions and revealed a significant potential of NSCs to contribute to myelin repair activities. In this review, these emerging investigations are discussed with respect to the importance of stimulating endogenous repair mechanisms from germinal sources. Moreover, we present key findings of NSC-derived oligodendroglial progeny, including a comprehensive overview of factors and mechanisms involved in this process.

  4. Autoimmune T-Cell Reactivity to Myelin Proteolipids and Glycolipids in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith M. Greer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS myelin, the likely major target of autoimmune attack in multiple sclerosis (MS, contains a number of unique components that are potential targets of the attack. Two classes of molecules that are greatly enriched in CNS myelin compared to other parts of the body are certain types of proteolipids and glycolipids. Due to the hydrophobic nature of both of these classes of molecules, they present challenges for use in immunological assays and have therefore been somewhat neglected in studies of T-cell reactivity in MS compared to more soluble molecules such as the myelin basic proteins and the extracellular domain of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. This review firstly looks at the makeup of CNS myelin, with an emphasis on proteolipids and glycolipids. Next, a retrospective of what is known of T-cell reactivity directed against proteolipids and glycolipids in patients with MS is presented, and the implications of the findings are discussed. Finally, this review considers the question of what would be required to prove a definite role for autoreactivity against proteolipids and glycolipids in the pathogenesis of MS.

  5. Taking Advantage of Nature’s Gift: Can Endogenous Neural Stem Cells Improve Myelin Regeneration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Akkermann

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Irreversible functional deficits in multiple sclerosis (MS are directly correlated to axonal damage and loss. Neurodegeneration results from immune-mediated destruction of myelin sheaths and subsequent axonal demyelination. Importantly, oligodendrocytes, the myelinating glial cells of the central nervous system, can be replaced to some extent to generate new myelin sheaths. This endogenous regeneration capacity has so far mainly been attributed to the activation and recruitment of resident oligodendroglial precursor cells. As this self-repair process is limited and increasingly fails while MS progresses, much interest has evolved regarding the development of remyelination-promoting strategies and the presence of alternative cell types, which can also contribute to the restoration of myelin sheaths. The adult brain comprises at least two neurogenic niches harboring life-long adult neural stem cells (NSCs. An increasing number of investigations are beginning to shed light on these cells under pathological conditions and revealed a significant potential of NSCs to contribute to myelin repair activities. In this review, these emerging investigations are discussed with respect to the importance of stimulating endogenous repair mechanisms from germinal sources. Moreover, we present key findings of NSC-derived oligodendroglial progeny, including a comprehensive overview of factors and mechanisms involved in this process.

  6. Salvianolic acid B protects the myelin sheath around injured spinal cord axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Salvianolic acid B, an active pharmaceutical compound present in Salvia miltiorrhiza, exerts a neuroprotective effect in animal models of brain and spinal cord injury. Salvianolic acid B can promote recovery of neurological function; however, its protective effect on the myelin sheath after spinal cord injury remains poorly understood. Thus, in this study, in vitro tests showed that salvianolic acid B contributed to oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation, and the most effective dose was 20 μg/mL. For in vivo investigation, rats with spinal cord injury were intraperitoneally injected with 20 mg/kg salvianolic acid B for 8 weeks. The amount of myelin sheath and the number of regenerating axons increased, neurological function recovered, and caspase-3 expression was decreased in the spinal cord of salvianolic acid B-treated animals compared with untreated control rats. These results indicate that salvianolic acid B can protect axons and the myelin sheath, and can promote the recovery of neurological function. Its mechanism of action is likely to be associated with inhibiting apoptosis and promoting the differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

  7. Salvianolic acid B protects the myelin sheath around injured spinal cord axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhe; Ding, Lu; Qiu, Wen-Feng; Wu, Hong-Fu; Li, Rui

    2016-03-01

    Salvianolic acid B, an active pharmaceutical compound present in Salvia miltiorrhiza, exerts a neuroprotective effect in animal models of brain and spinal cord injury. Salvianolic acid B can promote recovery of neurological function; however, its protective effect on the myelin sheath after spinal cord injury remains poorly understood. Thus, in this study, in vitro tests showed that salvianolic acid B contributed to oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation, and the most effective dose was 20 μg/mL. For in vivo investigation, rats with spinal cord injury were intraperitoneally injected with 20 mg/kg salvianolic acid B for 8 weeks. The amount of myelin sheath and the number of regenerating axons increased, neurological function recovered, and caspase-3 expression was decreased in the spinal cord of salvianolic acid B-treated animals compared with untreated control rats. These results indicate that salvianolic acid B can protect axons and the myelin sheath, and can promote the recovery of neurological function. Its mechanism of action is likely to be associated with inhibiting apoptosis and promoting the differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

  8. Classic and Golli Myelin Basic Protein have distinct developmental trajectories in human visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin R Siu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally myelin is viewed as insulation around axons however more recent studies have shown it plays an important role in plasticity, axonal metabolism and neuroimmune signalling. Myelin is a complex multi-protein structure composed of hundreds of proteins, with Myelin Basic Protein (MBP being the most studied. MBP has two families: Classic-MBP that is necessary for activity driven compaction of myelin around axons, and Golli-MBP that is found in neurons, oligodendrocytes, and T cells, and has been called a 'molecular link' between the nervous and immune systems. In visual cortex myelin proteins interact with immune processes to affect experience-dependent plasticity. We studied myelin in human visual cortex using Western blotting to quantify Classic- and Golli-MBP expression in post-mortem tissue samples ranging in age from 20 days to 80 years. We found that Classic- and Golli-MBP have different patterns of change across the lifespan: Classic-MBP gradually increases to 42 years and then declines into aging; Golli-MBP has changes that are coincident with milestones in visual system sensitive period, before gradually increasing into aging. There are 3 stages in the balance between Classic- and Golli-MBP expression, with Golli-MBP dominating early, then shifting to Classic-MBP, and back to Golli-MBP in aging. Also Golli-MBP has a wave of high inter-individual variability during childhood. These results about cortical MBP expression are timely because they compliment recent advances in MRI techniques that produce high resolution maps of cortical myelin in normal and diseased brain. In addition the unique pattern of Golli-MBP expression across the lifespan suggests that it supports high levels of neuroimmune interaction in cortical development and in aging.

  9. Fractionation Spares Mice From Radiation-Induced Reductions in Weight Gain But Does Not Prevent Late Oligodendrocyte Lineage Side Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begolly, Sage [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Shrager, Peter G. [Department of Neuroscience, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Olschowka, John A. [Department of Neuroscience, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Williams, Jacqueline P. [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); O' Banion, M. Kerry, E-mail: Kerry_OBanion@URMC.Rochester.edu [Department of Neuroscience, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Neurology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the late effects of fractionated versus single-dose cranial radiation on murine white matter. Methods and Materials: Mice were exposed to 0 Gy, 6 × 6 Gy, or 1 × 20 Gy cranial irradiation at 10 to 12 weeks of age. Endpoints were assessed through 18 months from exposure using immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and electrophysiology. Results: Weight gain was temporarily reduced after irradiation; greater loss was seen after single versus fractionated doses. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were reduced early and late after both single and fractionated irradiation. Both protocols also increased myelin g-ratio, reduced the number of nodes of Ranvier, and promoted a shift in the proportion of small, unmyelinated versus large, myelinated axon fibers. Conclusions: Fractionation does not adequately spare normal white matter from late radiation side effects.

  10. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in oligodendrocytes increases sensitivity to excitotoxic death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas Monica A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously found that cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2 was expressed in dying oligodendrocytes at the onset of demyelination in the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD model of multiple sclerosis (MS (Carlson et al. J.Neuroimmunology 2006, 149:40. This suggests that COX-2 may contribute to death of oligodendrocytes. Objective The goal of this study was to examine whether COX-2 contributes to excitotoxic death of oligodendrocytes and potentially contributes to demyelination. Methods The potential link between COX-2 and oligodendrocyte death was approached using histopathology of MS lesions to examine whether COX-2 was expressed in dying oligodendrocytes. COX-2 inhibitors were examined for their ability to limit demyelination in the TMEV-IDD model of MS and to limit excitotoxic death of oligodendrocytes in vitro. Genetic manipulation of COX-2 expression was used to determine whether COX-2 contributes to excitotoxic death of oligodendrocytes. A transgenic mouse line was generated that overexpressed COX-2 in oligodendrocytes. Oligodendrocyte cultures derived from these transgenic mice were used to examine whether increased expression of COX-2 enhanced the vulnerability of oligodendrocytes to excitotoxic death. Oligodendrocytes derived from COX-2 knockout mice were evaluated to determine if decreased COX-2 expression promotes a greater resistance to excitotoxic death. Results COX-2 was expressed in dying oligodendrocytes in MS lesions. COX-2 inhibitors limited demyelination in the TMEV-IDD model of MS and protected oligodendrocytes against excitotoxic death in vitro. COX-2 expression was increased in wild-type oligodendrocytes following treatment with Kainic acid (KA. Overexpression of COX-2 in oligodendrocytes increased the sensitivity of oligodendrocytes to KA-induced excitotoxic death eight-fold compared to wild-type. Conversely, oligodendrocytes prepared from COX-2 knockout mice showed a

  11. Cross-Reactive Myelin Antibody Induces Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lisa K.; Masaki, Takahisa; Wheelwright, Steven R.; Tsunoda, Ikuo; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Previously, we reported renal immunoglobulin (Ig) deposition in mice with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG92-106) induced progressive-EAE and naïve mice injected with MOG92-106 hybridoma cells producing antibody that cross-reacts with various autoantigens including double-stranded DNA. To assess whether MOG92-106 antibodies actually induce kidney changes, the extent of renal Ig deposition and changes in glomerular histology and filtration were investigated. Mice with progressive-EAE exhibited Ig deposition, glomerular hypercellularity and proteinuria indicating kidney dysfunction. MOG92-106 hybridoma cell injected mice also had Ig in the kidneys and proteinuria. Therefore, sensitization with MOG92-106 and transfer of MOG92-106 antibodies can induce both central nervous system and renal pathology. The renal involvement reported in MS is believed to occur as a side effect of nephrotoxic drugs or neurogenic bladder. Our results demonstrate that an autoimmune response against myelin could induce pathologic changes in the kidney and may help explain renal changes reported in patients with progressive MS. PMID:18608179

  12. Cross-reactive myelin antibody induces renal pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lisa K; Masaki, Takahisa; Wheelwright, Steven R; Tsunoda, Ikuo; Fujinami, Robert S

    2008-11-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Previously, we reported renal immunoglobulin (Ig) deposition in mice with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(92-106))-induced progressive EAE and naive mice injected with MOG(92-106) hybridoma cells producing antibody that cross-reacts with various autoantigens including double-stranded DNA. To assess whether MOG(92-106) antibodies actually induce kidney changes, the extent of renal Ig deposition and changes in glomerular histology and filtration were investigated. Mice with progressive EAE exhibited Ig deposition, glomerular hypercellularity and proteinuria indicating kidney dysfunction. MOG(92-106) hybridoma cell injected mice also had Ig deposition and proteinuria. Therefore, sensitization with MOG(92-106) and transfer of MOG(92-106) antibodies can induce both central nervous system and renal pathology. The renal involvement reported in MS is believed to occur as a side effect of nephrotoxic drugs or neurogenic bladder. Our results demonstrate that an autoimmune response against myelin could induce pathologic changes in the kidney and may help explain renal changes reported in patients with progressive MS.

  13. A protein involved in central nervous system myelination: localization in the extracellular matrix and induction in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notterpek, L M; Rome, L H

    1994-01-01

    G21.3, a monoclonal antibody previously shown to block central nervous system (CNS) myelination, is now demonstrated to recognize an extracellular matrix (ECM) component. The antigen is present on the surface of neurons but not oligodendrocytes and is highly abundant in the white matter of the adult rat brain; however, it is not found in isolated myelin. Double immunostaining studies indicate a neuronal and ependymal cell source of the G21.3 antigen and a developmental expression pattern distinct from known markers of CNS myelination. The antigen is found at low levels in non-neuronal tissue and is mainly localized to basement membranes. G21.3 immunoreactive proteins are upregulated by retinoic acid-induced differentiation of SK-N-SHF neuroblastoma cells. These results suggest that the G21.3 antigen is an axolemma-associated ECM component with roles in postnatal CNS development and cell-matrix interactions during morphological differentiation of neuroblastoma cells.

  14. Optimal myelin elongation relies on YAP activation by axonal growth and inhibition by Crb3/Hippo pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Ruani N.; Cotter, Laurent; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Berthelot, Jade; Bartolami, Sylvain; Pereira, Jorge A.; Gonzalez, Sergio; Suter, Ueli; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Fast nerve conduction relies on successive myelin segments that electrically isolate axons. Segment geometry—diameter and length—is critical for the optimization of nerve conduction and the molecular mechanisms allowing this optimized geometry are partially known. We show here that peripheral myelin elongation is dynamically regulated by stimulation of YAP (Yes-associated protein) transcription cofactor activity during axonal elongation and limited by inhibition of YAP activity via the Hippo pathway. YAP promotes myelin and non-myelin genes transcription while the polarity protein Crb3, localized at the tips of the myelin sheath, activates the Hippo pathway to temper YAP activity, therefore allowing for optimal myelin growth. Dystrophic Dy2j/2j mice mimicking human peripheral neuropathy with reduced internodal lengths have decreased nuclear YAP which, when corrected, leads to longer internodes. These data show a novel mechanism controlling myelin growth and nerve conduction, and provide a molecular ground for disease with short myelin segments. PMID:27435623

  15. Metabolic aspects of Neuronal – Oligodendrocytic - Astrocytic (NOA interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I Amaral

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Whereas astrocytes have been in the limelight on the metabolic glucose interaction scene for a while, oligodendrocytes are still waiting for a place. We would like to call oligodendrocyte interaction with astrocytes and neurons: NOA (neuron – oligodendrocyte – astrocyte interactions. One of the reasons to find out more about oligodendrocyte interaction with neurons and astrocytes is to detect markers of healthy oligodendrocyte metabolism, to be used in diagnosis and treatment assessment in diseases such as Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and multiple sclerosis in which oligodendrocyte function is impaired, possibly due to glutamate toxicity. Glutamate receptors are expressed in oligodendrocytes and also vesicular glutamate release in the white matter has received considerable attention. It is also important to establish if the glial precursor cells recruited to damaged areas are developing oligodendrocyte characteristics or those of astrocytes. Thus, it is important to study astrocytes and oligodendrocytes separately to be able to differentiate between them. This is of particular importance in the white matter where the number of oligodendrocytes is considerable. The present review summarizes the not very extensive information published on glucose metabolism in oligodendrocytes in an attempt to stimulate research into this important field.

  16. Decreased Oligodendrocyte and Neuron Number in Anterior Hippocampal Areas and the Entire Hippocampus in Schizophrenia: A Stereological Postmortem Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkai, Peter; Malchow, Berend; Wetzestein, Katharina; Nowastowski, Verena; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Steiner, Johann; Schneider-Axmann, Thomas; Kraus, Theo; Hasan, Alkomiet; Bogerts, Bernhard; Schmitz, Christoph; Schmitt, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    The hippocampus is involved in cognition as well as emotion, with deficits in both domains consistently described in schizophrenia. Moreover, the whole volumes of both the anterior and posterior region have been reported to be decreased in schizophrenia patients. While fewer oligodendrocyte numbers in the left and right cornu ammonis CA4 subregion of the posterior part of the hippocampus have been reported, the aim of this stereological study was to investigate cell numbers in either the dentate gyrus (DG) or subregions of the anterior hippocampus. In this design-based stereological study of the anterior part of the hippocampus comparing 10 patients with schizophrenia to 10 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were examined. Patients showed a decreased number of oligodendrocytes in the left CA4, fewer neurons in the left DG and smaller volumes in both the left CA4 and DG, which correlated with oligodendrocyte and neuron numbers, respectively. When exploring the total hippocampus, keeping previously published own results from the posterior part of the same brains in mind, both decreased oligodendrocyte numbers in the left CA4 and reduced volume remained significant. The decreased oligodendrocyte number speaks for a deficit in myelination and connectivity in schizophrenia which may originate from disturbed maturational processes. The reduced neuron number of the DG in the anterior hippocampus may well point to a reduced capacity of this region to produce new neurons up to adulthood. Both mechanisms may be involved in cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Gliogenesis and myelination in the optic nerve of trisomy 19 mice. A quantitative electron-microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorke, D E; Lauer, M

    1990-01-01

    Trisomy 19 (ts19) of the mouse permits detailed studies on the influence of an extra autosome upon the postnatal development of the central nervous system. To examine gliogenesis and myelinogenesis, the optic nerves of 19 ts19 pugs aged 1-15 days have been examined by light and electron microscopy and compared to those of litter-mate controls. Differentiation of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, myelinogenesis as well as the opening of the eyes are each delayed by about 2 days. Myelin sheaths are normally structured in ts19. There is a decrease in the percentage of myelinated fibres. The cross-sectional area of the ts19 optic nerve is reduced. The fibre density, which decreases with age both in ts19 and control mice, is higher in ts19 mice. Both with ts19 and control animals, the distribution of fibre diameters of myelinated axons overlaps with that of promyelinated and unmyelinated fibres, but myelinated axons cannot be observed below a diameter of 0.3 micron, and unmyelinated axons are always smaller than 1 micron. The mean diameter of promyelinated axons is identical in ts19 and control animals. Myelination is therefore not severely disturbed in the ts19 optic nerve. As retinal differentiation in ts19 is delayed by 2 days as well, reports on an asynchronous development of neurons and myelin sheaths cannot be confirmed for the visual system.

  18. Prolonged Subdural Infusion of Kynurenic Acid Is Associated with Dose-Dependent Myelin Damage in the Rat Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, Wojciech; Kwiecien, Jacek M; Rola, Radoslaw; Klapec, Michal; Stanisz, Greg J; Kotlinska-Hasiec, Edyta; Oakden, Wendy; Janik, Rafal; Coote, Margaret; Frey, Benicio N; Turski, Waldemar A

    2015-01-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is the end stage metabolite of tryptophan produced mainly by astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). It has neuroprotective activities but can be elevated in the neuropsychiatric disorders. Toxic effects of KYNA in the CNS are unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the subdural KYNA infusion on the spinal cord in adult rats. A total of 42 healthy adult rats were randomly assigned into six groups and were infused for 7 days with PBS (control) or 0.0002 pmol/min, 0.01 nmol/min, 0.1 nmol/min, 1 nmol/min, and 10 nmol/min of KYNA per 7 days. The effect of KYNA on spinal cord was determined using histological and electron microscopy examination. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was measured in the blood serum to assess a degree of myelin damage. In all rats continuous long-lasting subdural KYNA infusion was associated with myelin damage and myelin loss that was increasingly widespread in a dose-depended fashion in peripheral, sub-pial areas. Damage to myelin sheaths was uniquely related to the separation of lamellae at the intraperiod line. The damaged myelin sheaths and areas with complete loss of myelin were associated with limited loss of scattered axons while vast majority of axons in affected areas were morphologically intact. The myelin loss-causing effect of KYNA occurred with no necrosis of oligodendrocytes, with locally severe astrogliosis and no cellular inflammatory response. Additionally, subdural KYNA infusion increased blood MOG concentration. Moreover, the rats infused with the highest doses of KYNA (1 and 10 nmol/min) demonstrated adverse neurological signs including weakness and quadriplegia. We suggest, that subdural infusion of high dose of KYNA can be used as an experimental tool for the study of mechanisms of myelin damage and regeneration. On the other hand, the administration of low, physiologically relevant doses of KYNA may help to discover the role of KYNA in control of physiological

  19. Lovastatin Induces the Formation of Abnormal Myelin-Like Membrane Sheets in Primary Oligodendrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, Olaf; De Jonge, Jenny; Nomden, Anita; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    Statins, well-known inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis and protein isoprenylation, have been proposed as therapeutic drugs for multiple sclerosis (MS). As lovastatin and simvastatin, which are currently tested for their use in MS, can cross the blood-brain barrier, they may affect cellular

  20. STEREOLOGICAL EVIDENCE FOR DE/RE-GENERATION OF MYELIN SHEATHS IN AGED BRAIN WHITE MATTER OF FEMALE RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies have provided qualitative evidence of de-myelination and re-myelination in aged brain white matter. However, there have been no quantitative evidences of degeneration and regeneration of myelin sheaths in white matter. The present study was designed to investigate the quantitative changes in myelin sheaths using unbiased stereological techniques and qualitative changes using electron microscopy in aged brain white matter. Results obtained showed that in brain white matter, the total volume of myelin sheaths of old-age female rats was not significantly different from that of young female rats, but the total length of myelinated fibers in old female rats was significantly decreased by 46.1% when compared with that of young female rats. Myelin sheath volume per unit length of myelinated fibers of old female rats was significantly increased by 43.4% compared with that of young female rats. The mean thickness of myelin sheaths in the white matter of the old rats was significantly increased by 33.3%, when compared with that of young female rats. In age-related loss of myelinated fibers, most fibers had diameters less than 1.4 μm, and myelin sheath thicknesses less than 0.14 μm, but the length of myelinated fibers with diameters more than 0.6 μm and myelin sheath thicknesses more than 0.22 μm increased with age. Myelinated fibers with ratios of myelin sheath thicknesses to myelinated fiber external diameter less than 0.21 were significantly lower in elderly rats than in young rats. However, the total length of myelinated fibers with ratios of myelin sheath thicknesses to myelinated fiber external diameter more than 0.23 was higher in aged rats than in young rats. About 6.58% of myelin sheaths showed degenerative alterations, while 0.88% myelin sheaths showed regenerative alterations. This study provides stereological evidence not only for degeneration but also regeneration of myelin sheaths in aged white matter.

  1. Rôle de Ascl1(Mash1) et Olig2 dans la différentiation des oligodendrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Clavairoly, Adrien

    2014-01-01

    Our project aims to provide a new molecular understanding of the transcription program involved in neural stem cells differentiation into oligodendrocytes. The rational of this work relies on previous studies demonstrating that the bHLH transcription factors Olig2 and Ascl1 work in synergy to specify OPCs, the oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. One central goal of this work was to understand at a genomic and transcriptomic level, how Ascl1 and Olig2 work together to specify OPCs. We followed a...

  2. Association of Amyloid Pathology With Myelin Alteration in Preclinical Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Douglas C; Hurley, Samuel A; Kecskemeti, Steven R; O'Grady, J Patrick; Canda, Cristybelle; Davenport-Sis, Nancy J; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Asthana, Sanjay; Sager, Mark A; Johnson, Sterling C; Alexander, Andrew L; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of aggregated β-amyloid and tau proteins into plaques and tangles is a central feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). While plaque and tangle accumulation likely contributes to neuron and synapse loss, disease-related changes to oligodendrocytes and myelin are also suspected of playing a role in development of AD dementia. Still, to our knowledge, little is known about AD-related myelin changes, and even when present, they are often regarded as secondary to concomitant arteriosclerosis or related to aging. To assess associations between hallmark AD pathology and novel quantitative neuroimaging markers while being sensitive to white matter myelin content. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at an academic research neuroimaging center on a cohort of 71 cognitively asymptomatic adults enriched for AD risk. Lumbar punctures were performed and assayed for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD pathology, including β-amyloid 42, total tau protein, phosphorylated tau 181, and soluble amyloid precursor protein. We measured whole-brain longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates as well as the myelin water fraction from each of these individuals. Automated brain mapping algorithms and statistical models were used to evaluate the relationships between age, CSF biomarkers of AD pathology, and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging relaxometry measures, including the longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and the myelin water fraction. The mean (SD) age for the 19 male participants and 52 female participants in the study was 61.6 (6.4) years. Widespread age-related changes to myelin were observed across the brain, particularly in late myelinating brain regions such as frontal white matter and the genu of the corpus callosum. Quantitative relaxometry measures were negatively associated with levels of CSF biomarkers across brain white matter and in areas preferentially affected in AD. Furthermore, significant age-by-biomarker interactions were

  3. Integrin-linked kinase regulates oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton, growth cone, and adhesion dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, John-Paul; Cummings, Sarah E; O'Meara, Ryan W; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-02-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK), a focal adhesion protein, brokers the link between cytoskeleton, cell membrane, and extracellular environment. Here, we demonstrate a role for ILK in laminin-2-mediated adhesion in primary murine oligodendrocytes (OLs) - with ILK loss leading to severe defects in process branching and outgrowth. These defects were partially recovered when the ILK-depleted OLs were instead grown on the non-integrin-activating substrate poly-l-lysine. Intriguingly, ILK loss on the neutral poly-l-lysine substrate led to swelling at the tips of OL processes, which we identified as enlarged growth cones. Employing the bloated ILK-depleted growth cones as template, we demonstrate the appearance of distinct cytoskeletal domains within OL growth cones bearing classic neuronal growth cone architecture. Further, microtubule organization was severely perturbed following ILK loss, with centripetal microtubule looping and failure to bundle occurring in a laminin-2-independent manner. Together, our work highlights differences in specific aspects of OL biology as driven by laminin-2-dependent or independent ILK governed mechanisms. We also reinforce the idea of OLs as growth cone bearing cells and describe the neuronal-like cytoskeleton therein. Finally, we demonstrate a role for ILK in OL growth cone maturation through microtubule regulation, the loss of which translates to decreased process length and myelin production capacity. We describe herein how different substrates fundamentally alter the oligodendrocyte's response to loss of integrin-linked kinase (ILK). On laminin-2 (Ln-2), ILK-depleted oligodendrocytes appear stunted and malformed, while on the non-integrin-activating substrate PLL branching and membrane formation are restored. We also reinforce the idea of oligodendrocytes as growth cone-bearing cells, detailing the growth cone's cytoskeletal architecture. Strikingly, loss of ILK on poly-l-lysine leads to growth cone swelling, the structure's size and

  4. Different patterns of neuronal activity trigger distinct responses of oligodendrocyte precursor cells in the corpus callosum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balint Nagy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the developing and adult brain, oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs are influenced by neuronal activity: they are involved in synaptic signaling with neurons, and their proliferation and differentiation into myelinating glia can be altered by transient changes in neuronal firing. An important question that has been unanswered is whether OPCs can discriminate different patterns of neuronal activity and respond to them in a distinct way. Here, we demonstrate in brain slices that the pattern of neuronal activity determines the functional changes triggered at synapses between axons and OPCs. Furthermore, we show that stimulation of the corpus callosum at different frequencies in vivo affects proliferation and differentiation of OPCs in a dissimilar way. Our findings suggest that neurons do not influence OPCs in "all-or-none" fashion but use their firing pattern to tune the response and behavior of these nonneuronal cells.

  5. Diseases of connexins expressed in myelinating glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Charles K

    2017-05-23

    Connexins are a family of integral membrane proteins most of which form gap junctions and many of which form hemichannels as well. Mutations in at least 9 of the 21 genes encoding human connexin proteins cause human diseases. Mutations in GJB1 (Cx32), expressed in both Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes, cause both a form of inherited peripheral neuropathy and a variety of CNS symptoms. Mutations in GJC2 (Cx47), expressed in oligodendrocytes cause three disorders: a severe early onset dysmyelinating disorder, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-Like disease (PMLD1 or HLD2); hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG44), which has a milder phenotype and later onset; and a subclinical leukodystrophy. The clinical phenotypes and genetics associated with each disorder will be reviewed, focusing on features which may provide clues to pathogenesis. In vitro and animal model data which may shed light on these phenotypes will then be discussed along with recent work which may impact on therapeutic approaches for these disorders. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. beta1-integrin mediates myelin-associated glycoprotein signaling in neuronal growth cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goh Eyleen LK

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several myelin-associated factors that inhibit axon growth of mature neurons, including Nogo66, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG and oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein (OMgp, can associate with a common GPI-linked protein Nogo-66 receptor (NgR. Accumulating evidence suggests that myelin inhibitors also signal through unknown NgR-independent mechanisms. Here we show that MAG, a RGD tri-peptide containing protein, forms a complex with β1-integrin to mediate axonal growth cone turning responses of several neuronal types. Mutations that alter the RGD motif in MAG or inhibition of β1-integrin function, but not removal of NgRs, abolish these MAG-dependent events. In contrast, OMgp-induced repulsion is not affected by inhibition of b1-integrin function. We further show that MAG stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK, which in turn is required for MAG-induced growth cone turning. These studies identify β1-integrin as a specific mediator for MAG in growth cone turning responses, acting through FAK activation.

  7. LINGO-1 antibody ameliorates myelin impairment and spatial memory deficits in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun-Jun; Ren, Qing-Guo; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2015-09-18

    More than 50% of multiple sclerosis patients develop cognitive impairment. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear, and there is no effective treatment. LINGO-1 (LRR and Ig domain containing NOGO receptor interacting protein 1) has been identified as an inhibitor of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model, we assessed cognitive function at early and late stages of EAE, determined brain expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and investigated whether the LINGO-1 antibody could restore deficits in learning and memory and ameliorate any loss of MBP. We found that deficits in learning and memory occurred in late EAE and identified decreased expression of MBP in the parahippocampal cortex (PHC) and fimbria-fornix. Moreover, the LINGO-1 antibody significantly improved learning and memory in EAE and partially restored MBP in PHC. Furthermore, the LINGO-1 antibody activated the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway regulating myelin growth. Our results suggest that demyelination in the PHC and fimbria-fornix might contribute to cognitive deficits and the LINGO-1 antibody could ameliorate these deficits by promoting myelin growth in the PHC. Our research demonstrates that LINGO-1 antagonism may be an effective approach to the treatment of the cognitive impairment of multiple sclerosis patients.

  8. Transplantation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells improves locomotion deficits in rats with spinal cord irradiation injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Sun

    Full Text Available Demyelination contributes to the functional impairment of irradiation injured spinal cord. One potential therapeutic strategy involves replacing the myelin-forming cells. Here, we asked whether transplantation of Olig2(+-GFP(+-oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs, which are derived from Olig2-GFP-mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs, could enhance remyelination and functional recovery after spinal cord irradiation injury. We differentiated Olig2-GFP-mESCs into purified Olig2(+-GFP(+-OPCs and transplanted them into the rats' cervical 4-5 dorsal spinal cord level at 4 months after irradiation injury. Eight weeks after transplantation, the Olig2(+-GFP(+-OPCs survived and integrated into the injured spinal cord. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that the grafted Olig2(+-GFP(+-OPCs primarily differentiated into adenomatous polyposis coli (APC(+ oligodendrocytes (54.6±10.5%. The staining with luxol fast blue, hematoxylin & eosin (LFB/H&E and electron microscopy demonstrated that the engrafted Olig2(+-GFP(+-OPCs attenuated the demyelination resulted from the irradiation. More importantly, the recovery of forelimb locomotor function was enhanced in animals receiving grafts of Olig2(+-GFP(+-OPCs. We concluded that OPC transplantation is a feasible therapy to repair the irradiated lesions in the central nervous system (CNS.

  9. TLR3 Agonist Poly-IC Induces IL-33 and Promotes Myelin Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandramohan Natarajan

    Full Text Available Impaired remyelination of demyelinated axons is a major cause of neurological disability. In inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS, although remyelination does happen, it is often incomplete, resulting in poor clinical recovery. Poly-IC a known TLR3 agonist and IL-33, a cytokine which is induced by poly-IC are known to influence recovery and promote repair in experimental models of CNS demyelination.We examined the effect of addition of poly-IC and IL-33 on the differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC cultured in vitro. Both Poly-IC and IL-33 induced transcription of myelin genes and the differentiation of OPC to mature myelin forming cells. Poly-IC induced IL-33 in OPC and addition of IL-33 to in vitro cultures, amplified further, IL-33 expression suggesting an autocrine regulation of IL-33. Poly-IC and IL-33 also induced phosphorylation of p38MAPK, a signaling molecule involved in myelination. Following the induction of gliotoxic injury with lysolecithin to the corpus callosum (CC, treatment of animals with poly-IC resulted in greater recruitment of OPC and increased staining for myelin in areas of demyelination. Also, poly-IC treated animals showed greater expression of IL-33 and higher expression of M2 phenotype macrophages in the CC.Our studies suggest that poly-IC and IL-33 play a role in myelin repair by enhancing expression of myelin genes and are therefore attractive therapeutic agents for use as remyelinating agents in human demyelinating disease.

  10. Correction of Brain Oligodendrocytes by AAVrh.10 Intracerebral Gene Therapy in Metachromatic Leukodystrophy Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piguet, Françoise; Sondhi, Dolan; Piraud, Monique; Fouquet, Françoise; Hackett, Neil R.; Ahouansou, Ornella; Vanier, Marie-Thérèse; Bieche, Ivan; Aubourg, Patrick; Crystal, Ronald G.; Cartier, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by accumulation of sulfatides in glial cells and neurons, the result of an inherited deficiency of arylsulfatase A (ARSA; EC 3.1.6.8) and myelin degeneration in the central and peripheral nervous systems. No effective treatment is currently available for the most frequent late infantile (LI) form of MLD, which results in rapid neurological degradation and early death after the onset of clinical manifestations. To potentially arrest or reverse disease progression, ARSA enzyme must be rapidly delivered to brain oligodendrocytes of patients with LI MLD. We previously showed that brain gene therapy with adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) driving the expression of human ARSA cDNA under the control of the murine phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter alleviated most long-term disease manifestations in MLD mice. Herein, we evaluated the short-term effects of AAVrh.10 driving the expression of human ARSA cDNA under the control of the cytomegalovirus/β-actin hybrid (CAG/cu) promoter in 8-month-old MLD mice that already show marked sulfatide accumulation and brain pathology. Within 2 months, and in contrast to results with the AAV5-PGK-ARSA vector, a single intrastriatal injection of AAVrh.10cuARSA resulted in correction of brain sulfatide storage, accumulation of specific sulfatide species in oligodendrocytes, and associated brain pathology in the injected hemisphere. Better potency of the AAVrh.10cuARSA vector was mediated by higher neuronal and oligodendrocyte transduction, axonal transport of the AAVrh.10 vector and ARSA enzyme, as well as higher CAG/cu promoter driven expression of ARSA enzyme. These results strongly support the use of AAVrh.10cuARSA vector for intracerebral gene therapy in rapidly progressing early-onset forms of MLD. PMID:22642214

  11. The evolution of vertebrate and invertebrate myelin: a theoretical computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelfranco, Ann M; Hartline, Daniel K

    2015-06-01

    Multilayered, lipid-rich myelin increases nerve impulse conduction velocity, contributes to compact nervous systems, and reduces metabolic costs of neural activity. Based on the hypothesis that increased impulse conduction velocity provides a selective advantage that drives the evolution of myelin, we simulated a sequence of plausible intermediate stages of myelin evolution, each of which providing an enhancement of conduction speed. We started with the expansion of insulating glial coverage, which led first to a single layer of myelin surrounding the axon and then to multiple myelin wraps with well-organized nodes. The myelinated fiber was modeled at three levels of complexity as the hypothesized evolutionary progression became more quantitatively exacting: 1) representing the fiber as a mathematically-tractable uniform active cylinder with the effect of myelination approximated by changing its specific capacitance (C(m)); 2) representing it as a chain of simple, cable-model compartments having alternating nodal and internodal parameters subject to optimization, and 3) representing it in a double cable model with the axon and myelin sheath treated separately. Conduction velocity was optimized at each stage. To maintain optimal conduction velocities, increased myelin coverage of axonal surface must be accompanied by an increase in channel density at the evolving nodes, but along with increases in myelin thickness, a reduction in overall average channel density must occur. Leakage under the myelin sheath becomes more of a problem with smaller fiber diameters, which may help explain the tendency for myelin to occur preferentially in larger nerve fibers in both vertebrates and invertebrates.

  12. Myelin-reactive antibodies initiate T cell-mediated CNS autoimmune disease by opsonization of endogenous antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Silke; Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Torke, Sebastian; Häusler, Darius; Winkler, Anne; Stadelmann, Christine; Payne, Natalie; Feldmann, Linda; Saiz, Albert; Reindl, Markus; Lalive, Patrice H; Bernard, Claude C; Brück, Wolfgang; Weber, Martin S

    2016-07-01

    In the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disorders, antigen-specific B cells are implicated to act as potent antigen-presenting cells (APC), eliciting waves of inflammatory CNS infiltration. Here, we provide the first evidence that CNS-reactive antibodies (Ab) are similarly capable of initiating an encephalitogenic immune response by targeting endogenous CNS antigen to otherwise inert myeloid APC. In a transgenic mouse model, constitutive production of Ab against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was sufficient to promote spontaneous experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the absence of B cells, when mice endogenously contained MOG-recognizing T cells. Adoptive transfer studies corroborated that anti-MOG Ab triggered activation and expansion of peripheral MOG-specific T cells in an Fc-dependent manner, subsequently causing EAE. To evaluate the underlying mechanism, anti-MOG Ab were added to a co-culture of myeloid APC and MOG-specific T cells. At otherwise undetected concentrations, anti-MOG Ab enabled Fc-mediated APC recognition of intact MOG; internalized, processed and presented MOG activated naïve T cells to differentiate in an encephalitogenic manner. In a series of translational experiments, anti-MOG Ab from two patients with an acute flare of CNS inflammation likewise facilitated detection of human MOG. Jointly, these observations highlight Ab-mediated opsonization of endogenous CNS auto-antigen as a novel disease- and/or relapse-triggering mechanism in CNS demyelinating disorders.

  13. SncRNA715 Inhibits Schwann Cell Myelin Basic Protein Synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Müller

    Full Text Available Myelin basic proteins (MBP are major constituents of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral nervous system (PNS. In the CNS Mbp translation occurs locally at the axon-glial contact site in a neuronal activity-dependent manner. Recently we identified the small non-coding RNA 715 (sncRNA715 as a key inhibitor of Mbp translation during transport in oligodendrocytes. Mbp mRNA localization in Schwann cells has been observed, but has not been investigated in much detail. Here we could confirm translational repression of Mbp mRNA in Schwann cells. We show that sncRNA715 is expressed and its levels correlate inversely with MBP in cultured Schwann cells and in the sciatic nerve in vivo. Furthermore we could reduce MBP protein levels in cultured Schwann cells by increasing the levels of the inhibitory sncRNA715. Our findings suggest similarities in sncRNA715-mediated translational repression of Mbp mRNA in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells.

  14. What is the potential of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells to successfully treat human spinal cord injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung Trevor M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal cord injury is a serious and debilitating condition, affecting millions of people worldwide. Long seen as a permanent injury, recent advances in stem cell research have brought closer the possibility of repairing the spinal cord. One such approach involves injecting oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, derived from human embryonic stem cells, into the injured spinal cord in the hope that they will initiate repair. A phase I clinical trial of this therapy was started in mid 2010 and is currently underway. Discussion The theory underlying this approach is that these myelinating progenitors will phenotypically replace myelin lost during injury whilst helping to promote a repair environment in the lesion. However, the importance of demyelination in the pathogenesis of human spinal cord injury is a contentious issue and a body of literature suggests that it is only a minor factor in the overall injury process. Summary This review examines the validity of the theory underpinning the on-going clinical trial as well as analysing published data from animal models and finally discussing issues surrounding safety and purity in order to assess the potential of this approach to successfully treat acute human spinal cord injury.

  15. Subtle changes in myelination due to childhood experiences: label-free microscopy to infer nerve fibers morphology and myelination in brain (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasecka, Alicja; Tanti, Arnaud; Lutz, Pierre-Eric; Mechawar, Naguib; Cote, Daniel C.

    2017-02-01

    Adverse childhood experiences have lasting detrimental effects on mental health and are strongly associated with impaired cognition and increased risk of developing psychopathologies. Preclinical and neuroimaging studies have suggested that traumatic events during brain development can affect cerebral myelination particularly in areas and tracts implicated in mood and emotion. Although current neuroimaging techniques are quite powerful, they lack the resolution to infer myelin integrity at the cellular level. Recently demonstrated coherent Raman microscopy has accomplished cellular level imaging of myelin sheaths in the nervous system. However, a quantitative morphometric analysis of nerve fibers still remains a challenge. In particular, in brain, where fibres exhibit small diameters and varying local orientation. In this work, we developed an automated myelin identification and analysis method that is capable of providing a complete picture of axonal myelination and morphology in brain samples. This method performs three main procedures 1) detects molecular anisotropy of membrane phospholipids based on polarization resolved coherent Raman microscopy, 2) identifies regions of different molecular organization, 3) calculates morphometric features of myelinated axons (e.g. myelin thickness, g-ratio). We applied this method to monitor white matter areas from suicides adults that suffered from early live adversity and depression compared to depressed suicides adults and psychiatrically healthy controls. We demonstrate that our method allows for the rapid acquisition and automated analysis of neuronal networks morphology and myelination. This is especially useful for clinical and comparative studies, and may greatly enhance the understanding of processes underlying the neurobiological and psychopathological consequences of child abuse.

  16. Myelin changes in Alexander disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pinedo, U; Duran-Moreno, M; Sirerol-Piquer, S; Matias-Guiu, J

    2017-03-22

    Alexander disease (AxD) is a type of leukodystrophy. Its pathological basis, along with myelin loss, is the appearance of Rosenthal bodies, which are cytoplasmic inclusions in astrocytes. Mutations in the gene coding for GFAP have been identified as a genetic basis for AxD. However, the mechanism by which these variants produce the disease is not understood. The most widespread hypothesis is that AxD develops when a gain of function mutation causes an increase in GFAP. However, this mechanism does not explain myelin loss, given that experimental models in which GFAP expression is normal or mutated do not exhibit myelin disorders. This review analyses other possibilities that may explain this alteration, such as epigenetic or inflammatory alterations, presence of NG2 (+) - GFAP (+) cells, or post-translational modifications in GFAP that are unrelated to increased expression. The different hypotheses analysed here may explain the myelin alteration affecting these patients, and multiple mechanisms may coexist. These theories raise the possibility of designing therapies based on these mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Involvement of ER Stress in Dysmyelination of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease with PLP1 Missense Mutations Shown by iPSC-Derived Oligodendrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Numasawa-Kuroiwa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD is a form of X-linked leukodystrophy caused by mutations in the proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1 gene. Although PLP1 proteins with missense mutations have been shown to accumulate in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER in disease model animals and cell lines transfected with mutant PLP1 genes, the exact pathogenetic mechanism of PMD has not previously been clarified. In this study, we established induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from two PMD patients carrying missense mutation and differentiated them into oligodendrocytes in vitro. In the PMD iPSC-derived oligodendrocytes, mislocalization of mutant PLP1 proteins to the ER and an association between increased susceptibility to ER stress and increased numbers of apoptotic oligodendrocytes were observed. Moreover, electron microscopic analysis demonstrated drastically reduced myelin formation accompanied by abnormal ER morphology. Thus, this study demonstrates the involvement of ER stress in pathogenic dysmyelination in the oligodendrocytes of PMD patients with the PLP1 missense mutation.

  18. Effect of skilled reaching training and enriched environment on generation of oligodendrocytes in the adult sensorimotor cortex and corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiner, Silke; Niv, Fanny; Neumann, Susanne; Steinbach, Tanja; Schmeer, Christian; Hornung, Katrin; Schlenker, Yvonne; Förster, Martin; Witte, Otto W; Redecker, Christoph

    2017-03-09

    Increased motor activity or social interactions through enriched environment are strong stimulators of grey and white matter plasticity in the adult rodent brain. In the present study we evaluated whether specific reaching training of the dominant forelimb (RT) and stimulation of unspecific motor activity through enriched environment (EE) influence the generation of distinct oligodendrocyte subpopulations in the sensorimotor cortex and corpus callosum of the adult rat brain. Animals were placed in three different housing conditions: one group was transferred to an EE, a second group received daily RT, whereas a third group remained in the standard cage. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was applied at days 2-6 after start of experiments and animals were allowed to survive for 10 and 42 days. Enriched environment and daily reaching training of the dominant forelimb significantly increased the number of newly differentiated GSTπ+ oligodendrocytes at day 10 and newly differentiated CNPase+ oligodendrocytes in the sensorimotor cortex at day 42. The myelin level as measured by CNPase expression was increased in the frontal cortex at day 42. Distribution of newly differentiated NG2+ subpopulations changed between 10 and 42 days with an increase of GSTπ+ subtypes and a decrease of NG2+ cells in the sensorimotor cortex and corpus callosum. Analysis of neuronal marker doublecortin (DCX) showed that more than half of NG2+ cells express DCX in the cortex. The number of new DCX+NG2+ cells was reduced by EE at day 10. Our results indicate for the first time that specific and unspecific motor training conditions differentially alter the process of differentiation from oligodendrocyte subpopulations, in particular NG2+DCX+ cells, in the sensorimotor cortex and corpus callosum.

  19. Motor Skill Acquisition Promotes Human Brain Myelin Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimal Lakhani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Experience-dependent structural changes are widely evident in gray matter. Using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, the neuroplastic effect of motor training on white matter in the brain has been demonstrated. However, in humans it is not known whether specific features of white matter relate to motor skill acquisition or if these structural changes are associated to functional network connectivity. Myelin can be objectively quantified in vivo and used to index specific experience-dependent change. In the current study, seventeen healthy young adults completed ten sessions of visuomotor skill training (10,000 total movements using the right arm. Multicomponent relaxation imaging was performed before and after training. Significant increases in myelin water fraction, a quantitative measure of myelin, were observed in task dependent brain regions (left intraparietal sulcus [IPS] and left parieto-occipital sulcus. In addition, the rate of motor skill acquisition and overall change in myelin water fraction in the left IPS were negatively related, suggesting that a slower rate of learning resulted in greater neuroplastic change. This study provides the first evidence for experience-dependent changes in myelin that are associated with changes in skilled movements in healthy young adults.

  20. Combining Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping with Automatic Zero Reference (QSM0) and Myelin Water Fraction Imaging to Quantify Iron-Related Myelin Damage in Chronic Active MS Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Y; Nguyen, T D; Pandya, S; Zhang, Y; Hurtado Rúa, S; Kovanlikaya, I; Kuceyeski, A; Liu, Z; Wang, Y; Gauthier, S A

    2018-02-01

    A hyperintense rim on susceptibility in chronic MS lesions is consistent with iron deposition, and the purpose of this study was to quantify iron-related myelin damage within these lesions as compared with those without rim. Forty-six patients had 2 longitudinal quantitative susceptibility mapping with automatic zero reference scans with a mean interval of 28.9 ± 11.4 months. Myelin water fraction mapping by using fast acquisition with spiral trajectory and T2 prep was obtained at the second time point to measure myelin damage. Mixed-effects models were used to assess lesion quantitative susceptibility mapping and myelin water fraction values. Quantitative susceptibility mapping scans were on average 6.8 parts per billion higher in 116 rim-positive lesions compared with 441 rim-negative lesions ( P quantitative susceptibility mapping values of both the rim and core regions ( P Quantitative susceptibility mapping scans and myelin water fraction in rim-positive lesions decreased from rim to core, which is consistent with rim iron deposition. Whole lesion myelin water fractions for rim-positive and rim-negative lesions were 0.055 ± 0.07 and 0.066 ± 0.04, respectively. In the mixed-effects model, rim-positive lesions had on average 0.01 lower myelin water fraction compared with rim-negative lesions ( P quantitative susceptibility mapping scan was negatively associated with follow-up myelin water fraction ( P Quantitative susceptibility mapping rim-positive lesions maintained a hyperintense rim, increased in susceptibility, and had more myelin damage compared with rim-negative lesions. Our results are consistent with the identification of chronic active MS lesions and may provide a target for therapeutic interventions to reduce myelin damage. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  1. Exploration of protective strategies against oligodendrocyte cell death in Krabbe disease models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Arboleda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Krabbe disease (KD patients accumulate psychosine (galactosylsphingosine, a cytotoxic metabolite for oligodendrocytes, inducing early demyelination. Apoptosis has been suggested that plays an important role in psychosine-induced oligodendrocytes cell death in culture and in brains of Krabbe patients and an animal model of the disease (twitcher mouse. However, the molecular mechanism that triggers the activation of the apoptotic pathway, and hence the development/progression of the disease, still is not well understood. Here we report that silencing GALC gene expression induces cell death of the human derived oligodendrocyte cell line MO3.13. The induction of cell death is associated with the activation of caspase 3 and increase in Bax expression, suggesting that mitochondria is compromise, and decrease in cell survival signaling pathways such as PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK and AMPK, as observed by western blot analysis, 2 days after silencing. The data suggests an important psychosine-induced deregulation in apoptotic and anti-apoptotic cellular pathways. Moreover, pre-treatment with insuline-like growth factor (IGF-1 and PPARalfa agonist (WY 14643, significantly provides protection against the psychosine-induced changes described. Our data indicates that oligodendrocytes have a marked susceptibility to endogenous accumulation of psychosine and identified potential compounds that may offer protection against psychosine-induced apoptosis in vivo.

  2. Potential molecular mimicry between the human endogenous retrovirus W family envelope proteins and myelin proteins in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Ranjan; Joseph, Blessy; Whittall, Trevor

    2017-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease caused by the destruction of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system. The major target molecules for the immune response are the myelin basic protein, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein and proteolipid protein but the aetiology of the disease is as yet poorly understood. The HLA Class II allele DRB1*1501 in particular as well as DRB5*0101 and the expression of human endogenous retroviral envelope proteins have been linked to multiple sclerosis but the molecular mechanisms relating these remain to be elucidated. We hypothesised that cross-reactive peptide epitopes in retroviral envelope proteins and myelin proteins that can be presented by the two Class II DR molecules may play a role in initiating multiple sclerosis. Sequence homologies between retroviral envelope and myelin proteins and in silico predictions of peptides derived from them that are able to bind to the two Class II alleles were examined to test the hypothesis. The results support the hypothesis that molecular mimicry in peptide epitopes from envelope proteins of the HERV-W family of endogenous retroviruses and myelin proteins is possible and could potentially trigger multiple sclerosis. Mimicry between syncytin-1, a HERV-W envelope protein that is expressed during placentation, and myelin proteins may also explain the higher prevalence of multiple sclerosis in women. Experiments to test the ability of the identified peptide epitopes to activate T H cells are required to confirm the present findings. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Appearance of Myelin proteins during vertebrate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waehneldt, T V; Matthieu, J M; Jeserich, G

    1986-01-01

    Myelin, defined as an arrangement of spirally fused unit membranes, is an acquisition of vertebrates and first appeared during evolution in Gnathostomata. In all species studied PNS and CNS myelins contain the myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and the myelin basic protein (MBP). Throughout phylogeny PNS myelin is characterized by the major P(0) glycoprotein which is called IP in fishes. The PNS myelin proteins did not evolve further except for the addition of P(2) protein from reptiles onward. In Elasmobranchii and Chondrostei, PNS and CNS myelin proteins are similar. CNS myelin of actinopterygian fishes possesses a 36,000 Da protein (36K) in addition to P(0)-like IP glycoproteins. In tetrapod CNS myelin, P(0) is replaced by the proteolipid protein (PLP) and the Wolfgram protein (WP). Of particular interest in a transitional phylogenetic sense are the lungfish Protopterus, carrying glycosylated PLP (g-PLP) but no P(0), 36K or WP, and the bichir Polypterus, showing simultaneous presence of P(0), 36K and PLP. These results indicate that myelin proteins could be valuable molecular markers in establishing vertebrate phylogenetic relationships and in reconstructing the fish-tetrapod transition.

  4. Absence of 2-hydroxylated sphingolipids is compatible with normal neural development but causes late-onset axon and myelin sheath degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöller, Inge; Meixner, Marion; Hartmann, Dieter; Büssow, Heinrich; Meyer, Rainer; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Eckhardt, Matthias

    2008-09-24

    Sphingolipids containing 2-hydroxylated fatty acids are among the most abundant lipid components of the myelin sheath and therefore are thought to play an important role in formation and function of myelin. To prove this hypothesis, we generated mice lacking a functional fatty acid 2-hydroxylase (FA2H) gene. FA2H-deficient (FA2H(-/-)) mice lacked 2-hydroxylated sphingolipids in the brain and in peripheral nerves. In contrast, nonhydroxylated galactosylceramide was increased in FA2H(-/-) mice. However, oligodendrocyte differentiation examined by in situ hybridization with cRNA probes for proteolipid protein and PDGFalpha receptor and the time course of myelin formation were not altered in FA2H(-/-) mice compared with wild-type littermates. Nerve conduction velocity measurements of sciatic nerves revealed no significant differences between FA2H(-/-) and wild-type mice. Moreover, myelin of FA2H(-/-) mice up to 5 months of age appeared normal at the ultrastructural level, in the CNS and peripheral nervous system. Myelin thickness and g-ratios were normal in FA2H(-/-) mice. Aged (18-month-old) FA2H(-/-) mice, however, exhibited scattered axonal and myelin sheath degeneration in the spinal cord and an even more pronounced loss of stainability of myelin sheaths in sciatic nerves. These results show that structurally and functionally normal myelin can be formed in the absence of 2-hydroxylated sphingolipids but that its long-term maintenance is strikingly impaired. Because axon degeneration appear to start rather early with respect to myelin degenerations, these lipids might be required for glial support of axon function.

  5. Myelin-associated glycoprotein and myelin basic protein are present in central and peripheral nerve myelin throughout phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthieu, J M; Waehneldt, T V; Eschmann, N

    1986-01-01

    This phylogenetic study of central and peripheral nervous system myelin proteins demonstrates that important changes occur in the composition of certain myelin proteins during evolution. Only two components, myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) are present in all Gnathostomata representatives investigated. While MBP components varied considerably even among the representatives of a given order, the apparent molecular weight of MAG showed little variation indicating that the conservation of the molecular structure could be important for the function of MAG in glia axon interactions.

  6. Assessing white matter ischemic damage in dementia patients by measurement of myelin proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Rachel; Wellington, Dannielle; Esiri, Margaret M; Love, Seth

    2013-07-01

    White matter ischemia is difficult to quantify histologically. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) is highly susceptible to ischemia, being expressed only adaxonally, far from the oligodendrocyte cell body. Myelin-basic protein (MBP) and proteolipid protein (PLP) are expressed throughout the myelin sheath. We compared MAG, MBP, and PLP levels in parietal white matter homogenates from 17 vascular dementia (VaD), 49 Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 33 control brains, after assessing the post-mortem stability of these proteins. Small vessel disease (SVD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) severity had been assessed in paraffin sections. The concentration of MAG remained stable post-mortem, declined with increasing SVD, and was significantly lower in VaD than controls. The concentration of MBP fell progressively post-mortem, limiting its diagnostic utility in this context. Proteolipid protein was stable post-mortem and increased significantly with SVD severity. The MAG/PLP ratio declined significantly with SVD and CAA severity. The MAG and PLP levels and MAG/PLP did not differ significantly between AD and control brains. We validated the utility of MAG and MAG/PLP measurements on analysis of 74 frontal white matter samples from an Oxford cohort in which SVD had previously been scored. MAG concentration and the MAG/PLP ratio are useful post-mortem measures of ante-mortem white matter ischemia.

  7. MRI assessment of myelination: an age standardization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staudt, M. (Kinderklinik Dritter Orden, Passau (Germany)); Schropp, C. (Kinderklinik Dritter Orden, Passau (Germany)); Staudt, F. (Kinderklinik Dritter Orden, Passau (Germany)); Obletter, N. (Radiologische Praxis, Klinikum Ingolstadt (Germany)); Bise, K. (Neuropathologisches Inst., Muenchen Univ. (Germany)); Breit, A. (MR Tomographie, Klinikum Passau (Germany)); Weinmann, H.M. (Kinderklinik Schwabing, Muenchen (Germany))

    1994-04-01

    777 cerebral MRI examinations of children aged 3 days to 14 years were staged for myelination to establish an age standardization. Staging was performed using a system proposed in a previous paper, separately ranking 10 different regions of the brain. Interpretation of the results led to the identification of foue clinical diagnoses that are frequently associated with delays in myelination: West syndrome, cerebral palsy, developmental retardation, and congenital anomalies. In addition, it was found that assessment of myelination in children with head injuries was not practical as alterations in MRI signal can simulate earlier stages of myelination. Age limits were therefore calculated from the case material after excluding all children with these conditions. When simplifications of the definition of the stages are applied, these age limits for the various stages of myelination of each of the 10 regions of the brain make the staging system applicable for routine assessment of myelination. (orig.)

  8. Loss of Myelin Basic Protein Function Triggers Myelin Breakdown in Models of Demyelinating Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Marie-Theres; Möbius, Wiebke; Winkler, Anne; Ruhwedel, Torben; Wrzos, Claudia; Romanelli, Elisa; Bennett, Jeffrey L; Enz, Lukas; Goebels, Norbert; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Stadelmann, Christine; Simons, Mikael

    2016-07-12

    Breakdown of myelin sheaths is a pathological hallmark of several autoimmune diseases of the nervous system. We employed autoantibody-mediated animal models of demyelinating diseases, including a rat model of neuromyelitis optica (NMO), to target myelin and found that myelin lamellae are broken down into vesicular structures at the innermost region of the myelin sheath. We demonstrated that myelin basic proteins (MBP), which form a polymer in between the myelin membrane layers, are targeted in these models. Elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) levels resulted in MBP network disassembly and myelin vesiculation. We propose that the aberrant phase transition of MBP molecules from their cohesive to soluble and non-adhesive state is a mechanism triggering myelin breakdown in NMO and possibly in other demyelinating diseases. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Loss of Myelin Basic Protein Function Triggers Myelin Breakdown in Models of Demyelinating Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Theres Weil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Breakdown of myelin sheaths is a pathological hallmark of several autoimmune diseases of the nervous system. We employed autoantibody-mediated animal models of demyelinating diseases, including a rat model of neuromyelitis optica (NMO, to target myelin and found that myelin lamellae are broken down into vesicular structures at the innermost region of the myelin sheath. We demonstrated that myelin basic proteins (MBP, which form a polymer in between the myelin membrane layers, are targeted in these models. Elevation of intracellular Ca2+ levels resulted in MBP network disassembly and myelin vesiculation. We propose that the aberrant phase transition of MBP molecules from their cohesive to soluble and non-adhesive state is a mechanism triggering myelin breakdown in NMO and possibly in other demyelinating diseases.

  10. Dynamic changes in Ezh2 gene occupancy underlie its involvement in neural stem cell self-renewal and differentiation towards oligodendrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falak Sher

    Full Text Available The polycomb group protein Ezh2 is an epigenetic repressor of transcription originally found to prevent untimely differentiation of pluripotent embryonic stem cells. We previously demonstrated that Ezh2 is also expressed in multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs. We showed that Ezh2 expression is downregulated during NSC differentiation into astrocytes or neurons. However, high levels of Ezh2 remained present in differentiating oligodendrocytes until myelinating. This study aimed to elucidate the target genes of Ezh2 in NSCs and in premyelinating oligodendrocytes (pOLs.We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing to detect the target genes of Ezh2 in NSCs and pOLs. We found 1532 target genes of Ezh2 in NSCs. During NSC differentiation, the occupancy of these genes by Ezh2 was alleviated. However, when the NSCs differentiated into oligodendrocytes, 393 of these genes remained targets of Ezh2. Analysis of the target genes indicated that the repressive activity of Ezh2 in NSCs concerns genes involved in stem cell maintenance, in cell cycle control and in preventing neural differentiation. Among the genes in pOLs that were still repressed by Ezh2 were most prominently those associated with neuronal and astrocytic committed cell lineages. Suppression of Ezh2 activity in NSCs caused loss of stem cell characteristics, blocked their proliferation and ultimately induced apoptosis. Suppression of Ezh2 activity in pOLs resulted in derangement of the oligodendrocytic phenotype, due to re-expression of neuronal and astrocytic genes, and ultimately in apoptosis.Our data indicate that the epigenetic repressor Ezh2 in NSCs is crucial for proliferative activity and maintenance of neural stemness. During differentiation towards oligodendrocytes, Ezh2 repression continues particularly to suppress other neural fate choices. Ezh2 is completely downregulated during differentiation towards neurons and astrocytes allowing transcription

  11. Loss of the receptor tyrosine kinase Axl leads to enhanced inflammation in the CNS and delayed removal of myelin debris during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prieto Anne L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Axl, together with Tyro3 and Mer, constitute the TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases. In the nervous system, Axl and its ligand Growth-arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6 are expressed on multiple cell types. Axl functions in dampening the immune response, regulating cytokine secretion, clearing apoptotic cells and debris, and maintaining cell survival. Axl is upregulated in various disease states, such as in the cuprizone toxicity-induced model of demyelination and in multiple sclerosis (MS lesions, suggesting that it plays a role in disease pathogenesis. To test for this, we studied the susceptibility of Axl-/- mice to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model for multiple sclerosis. Methods WT and Axl-/- mice were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35-55 peptide emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant and injected with pertussis toxin on day 0 and day 2. Mice were monitored daily for clinical signs of disease and analyzed for pathology during the acute phase of disease. Immunological responses were monitored by flow cytometry, cytokine analysis and proliferation assays. Results Axl-/- mice had a significantly more severe acute phase of EAE than WT mice. Axl-/- mice had more spinal cord lesions with larger inflammatory cuffs, more demyelination, and more axonal damage than WT mice during EAE. Strikingly, lesions in Axl-/- mice had more intense Oil-Red-O staining indicative of inefficient clearance of myelin debris. Fewer activated microglia/macrophages (Iba1+ were found in and/or surrounding lesions in Axl-/- mice relative to WT mice. In contrast, no significant differences were noted in immune cell responses between naïve and sensitized animals. Conclusions These data show that Axl alleviates EAE disease progression and suggests that in EAE Axl functions in the recruitment of microglia/macrophages and in the clearance of debris following demyelination. In addition, these data

  12. GM1 improves neurofascin155 association with lipid rafts and prevents rat brain myelin injury after hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y P; Huang, Q L; Zhao, C M; Tang, J L; Wang, Y L

    2011-06-01

    White matter injury characterized by damage to myelin is an important process in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD). Because the oligodendrocyte-specific isoform of neurofascin, neurofascin 155 (NF155), and its association with lipid rafts are essential for the establishment and stabilization of the paranodal junction, which is required for tight interaction between myelin and axons, we analyzed the effect of monosialotetrahexosyl ganglioside (GM1) on NF155 expression and its association with lipid rafts after HIBD in Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 12-15 g, on day 7 post-partum (P7; N = 20 per group). HIBD was induced on P7 and the rats were divided into two groups: one group received an intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg GM1 three times and the other group an injection of saline. There was also a group of 20 sham-operated rats. After sacrifice, the brains of the rats were removed on P30 and studied by immunochemistry, SDS-PAGE, Western blot analysis, and electron microscopy. Staining showed that the saline group had definite rarefaction and fragmentation of brain myelin sheaths, whereas the GM1 group had no obvious structural changes. The GM1 group had 1.9-2.9-fold more GM1 in lipid rafts than the saline group (fraction 3-6; all P myelin sheath damage, suggesting a novel mechanism for its neuroprotective properties.

  13. Epigenetic Mechanisms Facilitating Oligodendrocyte Development, Maturation, and Aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copray, Sjef; Huynh, Jimmy Long; Sher, Falak; Casaccia-Bonnefil, Patrizia; Boddeke, Erik

    2009-01-01

    The process of oligodendrocyte differentiation is regulated by a dynamic interaction between a genetic and an epigenetic program. Recent studies, addressing nucleosomal histone modifications have considerably increased our knowledge regarding epigenetic regulation of gene expression during

  14. Solubilization of myelin membranes by detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveldaño, M I; Díaz, R S; Regueiro, P; Monreal, J

    1991-07-01

    The major proteins of myelin have classically been extracted in organic solvents. Here we investigated some of the characteristics of brain myelin solubilization in aqueous detergent solutions. At comparable molar concentrations, two nonionic detergents, i.e., octyl glucoside and Lubrol PX, proved relatively better myelin solubilizers than the detergents related to the bile salts, i.e., cholate and CHAPS. The two former detergents solubilized more protein than lipid and the two latter ones more lipid than protein from myelin membranes. All four detergents solubilized the phospholipid more efficiently than the cholesterol component of myelin. The detergent concentrations required for myelin solubilization were reduced substantially if the temperature and the salt concentration of the media were increased. As much as 3 mg of lyophilized myelin (about 1 mg of protein) were solubilized readily per milliliter of a solution containing 30 mM octyl glucoside and 0.1 M sodium sulfate in 0.1 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.7. Each of the detergents studied, including the above four, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Triton X-100, and Zwittergent 3-14, had its own advantages and drawbacks as myelin protein extractors. The nonionic amphiphiles and CHAPS left a small residue mainly composed of proteins of the Wolfgram fraction, as revealed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Octyl glucoside was preferred, given its versatility as solubilizer, ultraviolet transparency, and high critical micellar concentration. Observations on possible difficulties that may be encountered are also included.

  15. Prolonged myelination in human neocortical evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel J; Duka, Tetyana; Stimpson, Cheryl D; Schapiro, Steven J; Baze, Wallace B; McArthur, Mark J; Fobbs, Archibald J; Sousa, André M M; Sestan, Nenad; Wildman, Derek E; Lipovich, Leonard; Kuzawa, Christopher W; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C

    2012-10-09

    Nerve myelination facilitates saltatory action potential conduction and exhibits spatiotemporal variation during development associated with the acquisition of behavioral and cognitive maturity. Although human cognitive development is unique, it is not known whether the ontogenetic progression of myelination in the human neocortex is evolutionarily exceptional. In this study, we quantified myelinated axon fiber length density and the expression of myelin-related proteins throughout postnatal life in the somatosensory (areas 3b/3a/1/2), motor (area 4), frontopolar (prefrontal area 10), and visual (areas 17/18) neocortex of chimpanzees (N = 20) and humans (N = 33). Our examination revealed that neocortical myelination is developmentally protracted in humans compared with chimpanzees. In chimpanzees, the density of myelinated axons increased steadily until adult-like levels were achieved at approximately the time of sexual maturity. In contrast, humans displayed slower myelination during childhood, characterized by a delayed period of maturation that extended beyond late adolescence. This comparative research contributes evidence crucial to understanding the evolution of human cognition and behavior, which arises from the unfolding of nervous system development within the context of an enriched cultural environment. Perturbations of normal developmental processes and the decreased expression of myelin-related molecules have been related to psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Thus, these species differences suggest that the human-specific shift in the timing of cortical maturation during adolescence may have implications for vulnerability to certain psychiatric disorders.

  16. An Extract of Chinpi, the Dried Peel of the Citrus Fruit Unshiu, Enhances Axonal Remyelination via Promoting the Proliferation of Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Tokunaga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aging-induced decrease in axonal myelination/remyelination is due to impaired recruitment and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs. Our previous studies have shown that a monoclonal antibody to DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp box polypeptide 54 (Ddx54, a member of the DEAD box family of RNA helicases, (1 specifically labels oligodendrocyte lineages, (2 binds to mRNA and protein isoforms of myelin basic proteins (MBP, and (3 regulates migration of OPCs from ventricular zone to corpus callosum in mice. It has also been demonstrated that specific loss of a 21.5 kDa MBP isoform (MBP21.5 reflects demyelination status, and oral administration of an extract of Chinpi, citrus unshiu peel, reversed the aging-induced demyelination. Here, we report that Chinpi treatment induced a specific increase in the MBP21.5, led to the reappearance of Ddx54-expressing cells in ventricular-subventricular zone and corpus callosum of aged mice, and promoted remyelination. Treatment of in vitro OPC cultures with Chinpi constituents, hesperidin plus narirutin, led to an increase in 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation in Ddx54-expressing OPCs, but not in NG2- or Olig2-expressing cell populations. The present study suggests that Ddx54 plays crucial role in remyelination. Furthermore, Chinpi and Chinpi-containing herbal medicines may be a therapeutic option for the aging-induced demyelination diseases.

  17. Defined and Scalable Differentiation of Human Oligodendrocyte Precursors from Pluripotent Stem Cells in a 3D Culture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalo M.C. Rodrigues

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs offer considerable potential for the treatment of demyelinating diseases and injuries of the CNS. However, generating large quantities of high-quality OPCs remains a substantial challenge that impedes their therapeutic application. Here, we show that OPCs can be generated from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs in a three-dimensional (3D, scalable, and fully defined thermoresponsive biomaterial system. We used CRISPR/Cas9 to create a NKX2.2-EGFP human embryonic stem cell reporter line that enabled fine-tuning of early OPC specification and identification of conditions that markedly increased the number of OLIG2+ and NKX2.2+ cells generated from hPSCs. Transplantation of 50-day-old OPCs into the brains of NOD/SCID mice revealed that progenitors generated in 3D without cell selection or purification subsequently engrafted, migrated, and matured into myelinating oligodendrocytes in vivo. These results demonstrate the potential of harnessing lineage reporter lines to develop 3D platforms for rapid and large-scale production of OPCs.

  18. Neuroinflammation, myelin and behavior: Temporal patterns following mild traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toufik Taib

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI results in white matter injury (WMI that is associated with neurological deficits. Neuroinflammation originating from microglial activation may participate in WMI and associated disorders. To date, there is little information on the time courses of these events after mild TBI. Therefore we investigated (i neuroinflammation, (ii WMI and (iii behavioral disorders between 6 hours and 3 months after mild TBI. For that purpose, we used experimental mild TBI in mice induced by a controlled cortical impact. (i For neuroinflammation, IL-1b protein as well as microglial phenotypes, by gene expression for 12 microglial activation markers on isolated CD11b+ cells from brains, were studied after TBI. IL-1b protein was increased at 6 hours and 1 day. TBI induced a mixed population of microglial phenotypes with both pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory markers from 6 hours to 3 days post-injury. At 7 days, microglial activation was completely resolved. (ii Three myelin proteins were assessed after TBI on ipsi- and contralateral corpus callosum, as this structure is enriched in white matter. TBI led to an increase in 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, a marker of immature and mature oligodendrocyte, at 2 days post-injury; a bilateral demyelination, evaluated by myelin basic protein, from 7 days to 3 months post-injury; and an increase in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein at 6 hours and 3 days post-injury. Transmission electron microscopy study revealed various myelin sheath abnormalities within the corpus callosum at 3 months post-TBI. (iii TBI led to sensorimotor deficits at 3 days post-TBI, and late cognitive flexibility disorder evidenced by the reversal learning task of the Barnes maze 3 months after injury. These data give an overall invaluable overview of time course of neuroinflammation that could be involved in demyelination and late cognitive disorder over a time-scale of 3 months in a model

  19. Neuroinflammation, myelin and behavior: Temporal patterns following mild traumatic brain injury in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taib, Toufik; Leconte, Claire; Van Steenwinckel, Juliette; Cho, Angelo H.; Palmier, Bruno; Torsello, Egle; Lai Kuen, Rene; Onyeomah, Somfieme; Ecomard, Karine; Benedetto, Chiara; Coqueran, Bérard; Novak, Anne-Catherine; Deou, Edwige; Plotkine, Michel; Gressens, Pierre; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in white matter injury (WMI) that is associated with neurological deficits. Neuroinflammation originating from microglial activation may participate in WMI and associated disorders. To date, there is little information on the time courses of these events after mild TBI. Therefore we investigated (i) neuroinflammation, (ii) WMI and (iii) behavioral disorders between 6 hours and 3 months after mild TBI. For that purpose, we used experimental mild TBI in mice induced by a controlled cortical impact. (i) For neuroinflammation, IL-1b protein as well as microglial phenotypes, by gene expression for 12 microglial activation markers on isolated CD11b+ cells from brains, were studied after TBI. IL-1b protein was increased at 6 hours and 1 day. TBI induced a mixed population of microglial phenotypes with both pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory markers from 6 hours to 3 days post-injury. At 7 days, microglial activation was completely resolved. (ii) Three myelin proteins were assessed after TBI on ipsi- and contralateral corpus callosum, as this structure is enriched in white matter. TBI led to an increase in 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, a marker of immature and mature oligodendrocyte, at 2 days post-injury; a bilateral demyelination, evaluated by myelin basic protein, from 7 days to 3 months post-injury; and an increase in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein at 6 hours and 3 days post-injury. Transmission electron microscopy study revealed various myelin sheath abnormalities within the corpus callosum at 3 months post-TBI. (iii) TBI led to sensorimotor deficits at 3 days post-TBI, and late cognitive flexibility disorder evidenced by the reversal learning task of the Barnes maze 3 months after injury. These data give an overall invaluable overview of time course of neuroinflammation that could be involved in demyelination and late cognitive disorder over a time-scale of 3 months in a model of mild TBI

  20. LINGO-1-mediated inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation does not require the leucine-rich repeats and is reversed by p75(NTR) antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourikas, Dimitris; Mir, Anis; Walmsley, Adrian Robert

    2010-12-01

    LINGO-1 is a potent negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and hence may play a pivotal restrictive role during remyelination in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. However, little is known as to which stages of oligodendrocyte differentiation are inhibited by LINGO-1, which domains of the protein are involved and whether accessory proteins are required. Here, we show that LINGO-1 expression in the human oligodendroglial cell line MO3.13 inhibited process extension and this was reversed by an anti-LINGO-1 antibody or the antagonist LINGO-1-Fc. LINGO-1 expression was also found to inhibit myelin basic protein transcription in the rat oligodendroglial cell line CG4. Both of these inhibitory actions of LINGO-1 were abrogated by deletion of the entire ectodomain or cytoplasmic domains but, surprisingly, were unaffected by deletion of the leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). As in neurons, LINGO-1 physically associated with endogenous p75(NTR) in MO3.13 cells and, correspondingly, its inhibition of process extension was reversed by antagonists of p75(NTR). Thus, LINGO-1 inhibits multiple aspects of oligodendrocyte differentiation independently of the LRRs via a process that requires p75(NTR) signalling. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of myelin proteins on the structure and dynamics of a model membrane with emphasis on the low temperature regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, W.; Peters, J.; Kursula, P.; Gerelli, Y.; Natali, F.

    2014-11-01

    Myelin is an insulating, multi-lamellar membrane structure wrapped around selected nerve axons. Increasing the speed of nerve impulses, it is crucial for the proper functioning of the vertebrate nervous system. Human neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, are linked to damage to the myelin sheath through demyelination. Myelin exhibits a well defined subset of myelin-specific proteins, whose influence on membrane dynamics, i.e., myelin flexibility and stability, has not yet been explored in detail. In a first paper [W. Knoll, J. Peters, P. Kursula, Y. Gerelli, J. Ollivier, B. Demé, M. Telling, E. Kemner, and F. Natali, Soft Matter 10, 519 (2014)] we were able to spotlight, through neutron scattering experiments, the role of peripheral nervous system myelin proteins on membrane stability at room temperature. In particular, the myelin basic protein and peripheral myelin protein 2 were found to synergistically influence the membrane structure while keeping almost unchanged the membrane mobility. Further insight is provided by this work, in which we particularly address the investigation of the membrane flexibility in the low temperature regime. We evidence a different behavior suggesting that the proton dynamics is reduced by the addition of the myelin basic protein accompanied by negligible membrane structural changes. Moreover, we address the importance of correct sample preparation and characterization for the success of the experiment and for the reliability of the obtained results.

  2. Influence of myelin proteins on the structure and dynamics of a model membrane with emphasis on the low temperature regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, W. [University Joseph Fourier, UFR PhiTEM, Grenoble (France); Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France); Peters, J. [University Joseph Fourier, UFR PhiTEM, Grenoble (France); Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France); Institut de Biologie Structurale, Grenoble (France); Kursula, P. [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); CSSB–HZI, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Gerelli, Y. [Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France); Natali, F., E-mail: natali@ill.fr [Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France); CNR–IOM–OGG, c/o Institut Laue–Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    2014-11-28

    Myelin is an insulating, multi-lamellar membrane structure wrapped around selected nerve axons. Increasing the speed of nerve impulses, it is crucial for the proper functioning of the vertebrate nervous system. Human neurodegenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, are linked to damage to the myelin sheath through demyelination. Myelin exhibits a well defined subset of myelin-specific proteins, whose influence on membrane dynamics, i.e., myelin flexibility and stability, has not yet been explored in detail. In a first paper [W. Knoll, J. Peters, P. Kursula, Y. Gerelli, J. Ollivier, B. Demé, M. Telling, E. Kemner, and F. Natali, Soft Matter 10, 519 (2014)] we were able to spotlight, through neutron scattering experiments, the role of peripheral nervous system myelin proteins on membrane stability at room temperature. In particular, the myelin basic protein and peripheral myelin protein 2 were found to synergistically influence the membrane structure while keeping almost unchanged the membrane mobility. Further insight is provided by this work, in which we particularly address the investigation of the membrane flexibility in the low temperature regime. We evidence a different behavior suggesting that the proton dynamics is reduced by the addition of the myelin basic protein accompanied by negligible membrane structural changes. Moreover, we address the importance of correct sample preparation and characterization for the success of the experiment and for the reliability of the obtained results.

  3. Single myelin fiber imaging in living rodents without labeling by deep optical coherence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Arous, Juliette; Binding, Jonas; Léger, Jean-François; Casado, Mariano; Topilko, Piotr; Gigan, Sylvain; Boccara, A Claude; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2011-11-01

    Myelin sheath disruption is responsible for multiple neuropathies in the central and peripheral nervous system. Myelin imaging has thus become an important diagnosis tool. However, in vivo imaging has been limited to either low-resolution techniques unable to resolve individual fibers or to low-penetration imaging of single fibers, which cannot provide quantitative information about large volumes of tissue, as required for diagnostic purposes. Here, we perform myelin imaging without labeling and at micron-scale resolution with >300-μm penetration depth on living rodents. This was achieved with a prototype [termed deep optical coherence microscopy (deep-OCM)] of a high-numerical aperture infrared full-field optical coherence microscope, which includes aberration correction for the compensation of refractive index mismatch and high-frame-rate interferometric measurements. We were able to measure the density of individual myelinated fibers in the rat cortex over a large volume of gray matter. In the peripheral nervous system, deep-OCM allows, after minor surgery, in situ imaging of single myelinated fibers over a large fraction of the sciatic nerve. This allows quantitative comparison of normal and Krox20 mutant mice, in which myelination in the peripheral nervous system is impaired. This opens promising perspectives for myelin chronic imaging in demyelinating diseases and for minimally invasive medical diagnosis.

  4. Accelerated longitudinal gray/white matter contrast decline in aging in lightly myelinated cortical regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Piñeiro, Didac; Walhovd, Kristine B; Storsve, Andreas B; Grydeland, Håkon; Rohani, Darius A; Fjell, Anders M

    2016-10-01

    Highly myelinated cortical regions seem to develop early and are more robust to age-related decline. By use of different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures such as contrast between T1- and T2-weighted MRI scans (T1w/T2w) it is now possible to assess correlates of myelin content in vivo. Further, previous studies indicate that gray/white matter contrast (GWC) become blurred as individuals' age, apparently reflecting age-related changes in myelin structure. Here we address whether longitudinal changes in GWC are dependent on initial myelin content within tissue as defined by baseline T1w/T2w contrast, and hypothesize that lightly myelinated regions undergo more decline longitudinally. A sample of 207 healthy adult participants (range: 20-84 years) was scanned twice (interscan interval: 3.6 years). Results showed widespread longitudinal reductions of GWC throughout the cortical surface, especially in the frontal cortices, mainly driven by intensity decay in the white matter. Annual rate of GWC blurring showed acceleration with age in temporal and medial prefrontal regions. Moreover, the anatomical distribution of increased rate of GWC decline with advancing age was strongly related to baseline levels of intracortical myelin. This study provides a first evidence of accelerated regional GWC blurring with advancing age, relates GWC patterns to cortical myeloarchitectonics and supports the hypothesis of increased age-related vulnerability of lightly myelinated areas. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3669-3684, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Intravenously Infused F3.Olig2 Improves Memory Deficits via Restoring Myelination in the Aged Hippocampus Following Experimental Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich Na; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Jae Chul; Tae, Hyun Jin; Lee, Yun Lyul; Lee, Jaesuk; Byun, Kyunghee; Jeong, Goo-Bo; Lee, Bonghee; Kim, Seung U; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho; Choi, Soo Young

    2016-12-13

    Oligodendrocytes play a crucial role in creating the myelin sheath that is an important component in neural transmission. In an animal model of transient cerebral ischemia, application of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) has not yet been reported. In this study, the effects of F3.Olig2 transplantation on memory and cognitive dysfunction were investigated in the aged gerbil in which ischemic stroke was induced. To investigate the possible mechanisms underlying repair, changes in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), oligodendrocyte-specific protein (OSP), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were examined. Experimental ischemic stroke was induced by occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries in aged gerbils. Gerbils (n=31 per group) were randomly divided into three groups: (1) vehicle sham group, (2) vehicle ischemia group, and (3) F3.Olig2 ischemia group. After 1, 3, and 7 days of ischemiareperfusion (I-R), saline or F3.Olig2 cells (1106 cells in 100 l) were injected into the gerbils intravenously. The gerbils were sacrificed 10 days after I-R for identification of grafted F3.Olig2 cells, and 15 and 30 days after I-R for tissue analysis after conducting passive avoidance and novel object recognition test. Injected F3.Olig2 cells and MBP, OSP, and BDNF were detected by specific antibodies using immunohistochemistry and/or Western blots. Memory and cognition were significantly increased in the F3.Olig2 ischemia group compared with the vehicle ischemia group. In the F3.Olig2 ischemia group, the neurons were not protected from ischemic damage; however, MBP, OSP, and BDNF expressions were significantly increased. Our results show that injection of F3.Olig2 cells significantly improved impaired memory and cognition, which might be related to increased MBP expression via increasing OSP and BDNF expression in the aged gerbil hippocampus following transient cerebral ischemia.

  6. Myelinating Schwann Cell Polarity and Mechanically-Driven Myelin Sheath Elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricaud, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Myelin sheath geometry, encompassing myelin sheath thickness relative to internodal length, is critical to optimize nerve conduction velocity and these parameters are carefully adjusted by the myelinating cells in mammals. In the central nervous system these adjustments could regulate neuronal activities while in the peripheral nervous system they lead to the optimization and the reliability of the nerve conduction velocity. However, the physiological and cellular mechanisms that underlie myelin sheath geometry regulation are not yet fully elucidated. In peripheral nerves the myelinating Schwann cell uses several molecular mechanisms to reach and maintain the correct myelin sheath geometry, such that myelin sheath thickness and internodal length are regulated independently. One of these mechanisms is the epithelial-like cell polarization process that occurs during the early phases of the myelin biogenesis. Epithelial cell polarization factors are known to control cell size and morphology in invertebrates and mammals making these processes critical in the organogenesis. Correlative data indicate that internodal length is regulated by postnatal body growth that elongates peripheral nerves in mammals. In addition, the mechanical stretching of peripheral nerves in adult animals shows that myelin sheath length can be increased by mechanical cues. Recent results describe the important role of YAP/TAZ co-transcription factors during Schwann cell myelination and their functions have linked to the mechanotransduction through the HIPPO pathway and the epithelial polarity factor Crb3. In this review the molecular mechanisms that govern mechanically-driven myelin sheath elongation and how a Schwann cell can modulate internodal myelin sheath length, independent of internodal thickness, will be discussed regarding these recent data. In addition, the potential relevance of these mechanosensitive mechanisms in peripheral pathologies will be highlighted.

  7. Human intraretinal myelination: Axon diameters and axon/myelin thickness ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas FitzGibbon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Human intraretinal myelination of ganglion cell axons occurs in about 1% of the population. We examined myelin thickness and axon diameter in human retinal specimens containing myelinated retinal ganglion cell axons. Materials and Methods: Two eyes containing myelinated patches were prepared for electron microscopy. Two areas were examined in one retina and five in the second retina. Measurements were compared to normal retinal and optic nerve samples and the rabbit retina, which normally contains myelinated axons. Measurements were made using a graphics tablet. Results: Mean axon diameter of myelinated axons at all locations were significantly larger than unmyelinated axons (P ≤ 0.01. Myelinated axons within the patches were significantly larger than axons within the optic nerve (P < 0.01. The relationship between axon diameter/fiber diameter (the G-ratio seen in the retinal sites differed from that in the nerve. G-ratios were higher and myelin thickness was positively correlated to axon diameter (P < 0.01 in the retina but negatively correlated to axon diameter in the nerve (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Intraretinally myelinated axons are larger than non-myelinated axons from the same population and suggests that glial cells can induce diameter changes in retinal axons that are not normally myelinated. This effect is more dramatic on intraretinal axons compared with the normal transition zone as axons enter the optic nerve and these changes are abnormal. Whether intraretinal myelin alters axonal conduction velocity or blocks axonal conduction remains to be clarified and these issues may have different clinical outcomes.

  8. Developmental stage of oligodendrocytes determines their response to activated microglia in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bresnahan Jacqueline C

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs and mature oligodendrocytes are both lost in central nervous system injury and disease. Activated microglia may play a role in OPC and oligodendrocyte loss or replacement, but it is not clear how the responses of OPCs and oligodendrocytes to activated microglia differ. Methods OPCs and microglia were isolated from rat cortex. OPCs were induced to differentiate into oligodendrocytes with thyroid hormone in defined medium. For selected experiments, microglia were added to OPC or oligodendrocyte cultures. Lipopolysaccharide was used to activate microglia and microglial activation was confirmed by TNFα ELISA. Cell survival was assessed with immunocytochemistry and cell counts. OPC proliferation and oligodendrocyte apoptosis were also assessed. Results OPCs and oligodendrocytes displayed phenotypes representative of immature and mature oligodendrocytes, respectively. Activated microglia reduced OPC survival, but increased survival and reduced apoptosis of mature oligodendrocytes. Activated microglia also underwent cell death themselves. Conclusion Activated microglia may have divergent effects on OPCs and mature oligodendrocytes, reducing OPC survival and increasing mature oligodendrocyte survival. This may be of importance because activated microglia are present in several disease states where both OPCs and mature oligodendrocytes are also reacting to injury. Activated microglia may simultaneously have deleterious and helpful effects on different cells after central nervous system injury.

  9. Lack of aspartoacylase activity disrupts survival and differentiation of neural progenitors and oligodendrocytes in a mouse model of Canavan disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shalini; Biancotti, Juan Carlos; Matalon, Reuben; de Vellis, Jean

    2009-11-15

    Loss of the oligodendrocyte (OL)-specific enzyme aspartoacylase (ASPA) from gene mutation results in the sponginess and loss of white matter (WM) in Canavan disease (CD). This study addresses the fate of OLs during the pathophysiology of CD in an adult ASPA knockout (KO) mouse strain. Massive arrays of neural stem/progenitor cells, immunopositive for PSA-NCAM, nestin, vimentin, and NG2, were observed within the severely affected spongy WM of the KO mouse brain. In these mice, G1-->S cell cycle progression was confirmed by an increase in cdk2-kinase activity, a reduction in mitotic inhibitors p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1), and an increase in bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Highly acetylated nuclear histones H2B and H3 were detected in adult KO mouse WM, suggesting the existence of noncompact chromatin as seen during early development. Costaining for BrdU- or Ki67-positive cells with markers for neural progenitors confirmed a continuous generation of OL lineage cells in KO WM. We observed a severe reduction in 21.5- and 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein and PLP/DM20 proteolipid proteins combined with a decrease in myelinated fibers and a perinuclear retention of myelin protein staining, indicating impairment in protein trafficking. Death of OLs, neurons, and astrocytes was identified in every region of the KO brain. Immature OLs constituted the largest population of dying cells, particularly in WM. We also report an early expression of full-length ASPA mRNA in normal mouse brain at embryonic day 12.5, when OL progenitors first appear during development. These findings support involvement of ASPA in CNS development and function.

  10. Ephaptic coupling of myelinated nerve fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binczak, S.; Eilbeck, J. C.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical predictions of a simple myelinated nerve fiber model are compared with theoretical results in the continuum and discrete limits, clarifying the nature of the conduction process on an isolated nerve axon. Since myelinated nerve fibers are often arranged in bundles, this model is used...... to study ephaptic (nonsynaptic) interactions between impulses on parallel fibers, which may play a functional role in neural processing. (C) 2001 Published by Elsevier Science B.V....

  11. Signals to promote myelin formation and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveggia, Carla; Feltri, Maria Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence

    2010-05-01

    The myelin sheath wraps large axons in both the CNS and the PNS, and is a key determinant of efficient axonal function and health. Myelin is targeted in a series of diseases, notably multiple sclerosis (MS). In MS, demyelination is associated with progressive axonal damage, which determines the level of patient disability. The few treatments that are available for combating myelin damage in MS and related disorders, which largely comprise anti-inflammatory drugs, only show limited efficacy in subsets of patients. More-effective treatment of myelin disorders will probably be accomplished by early intervention with combinatorial therapies that target inflammation and other processes-for example, signaling pathways that promote remyelination. Indeed, evidence suggests that such pathways might be impaired in pathology and, hence, contribute to the failure of remyelination in such diseases. In this article, we review the molecular basis of signaling pathways that regulate myelination in the CNS and PNS, with a focus on signals that affect differentiation of myelinating glia. We also discuss factors such as extracellular molecules that act as modulators of these pathways. Finally, we consider the few preclinical and clinical trials of agents that augment this signaling.

  12. Antibody-mediated neutralization of myelin-associated EphrinB3 accelerates CNS remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Yasir A; Zhao, Chao; Mahad, Don; Möbius, Wiebke; Altmann, Friedrich; Foss, Franziska; González, G A; Sentürk, Aycan; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Lubec, Gert; Lilley, Kathryn; Franklin, Robin J M; Nave, Klaus-A; Kotter, Mark R N

    2016-02-01

    Remyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions often remains incomplete despite the presence of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Amongst other factors, successful remyelination depends on the phagocytic clearance of myelin debris. However, the proteins in myelin debris that act as potent and selective inhibitors on OPC differentiation and inhibit CNS remyelination remain unknown. Here, we identify the transmembrane signalling protein EphrinB3 as important mediator of this inhibition, using a protein analytical approach in combination with a primary rodent OPC assay. In the presence of EphrinB3, OPCs fail to differentiate. In a rat model of remyelination, infusion of EphrinB3 inhibits remyelination. In contrast, masking EphrinB3 epitopes using antibodies promotes remyelination. Finally, we identify EphrinB3 in MS lesions and demonstrate that MS lesion extracts inhibit OPC differentiation while antibody-mediated masking of EphrinB3 epitopes promotes it. Our findings suggest that EphrinB3 could be a target for therapies aiming at promoting remyelination in demyelinating disease.

  13. Feasibility of Imaging Myelin Lesions in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I. Zavodszky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to provide a feasibility assessment for PET imaging of multiple sclerosis (MS lesions based on their decreased myelin content relative to the surrounding normal-appearing brain tissue. The imaging agent evaluated for this purpose is a molecule that binds strongly and specifically to myelin basic protein. Physiology-based pharmacokinetic modeling combined with PET image simulation applied to a brain model was used to examine whether such an agent would allow the differentiation of artificial lesions 4–10 mm in diameter from the surrounding normal-looking white and gray matter. Furthermore, we examined how changes in agent properties, model parameters, and experimental conditions can influence imageability, identifying a set of conditions under which imaging of MS lesions might be feasible. Based on our results, we concluded that PET imaging has the potential to become a useful complementary method to MRI for MS diagnosis and therapy monitoring.

  14. Oligodendrocyte ablation as a tool to study demyelinating diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahdeah Pajoohesh-Ganji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune mediated neurodegenerative disease characterized by demyelination and oligodendrocyte (OL loss in the central nervous system and accompanied by local inflammation and infiltration of peripheral immune cells. Although many risk factors and symptoms have been identified in MS, the pathology is complicated and the cause remains unknown. It is also unclear whether OL apoptosis precedes the inflammation or whether the local inflammation is the cause of OL death and demyelination. This review briefly discusses several models that have been developed to specifically ablate oligodendrocytes in an effort to separate the effects of demyelination from inflammation.

  15. Autoantibodies against myelin sheath and S100β are associated with cognitive dysfunction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Talita Siara Almeida; Petersen, Laura Esteves; Molina, Julia K; de Nardi, Tatiana; Wieck, Andréa; do Prado, Aline; Piovesan, Deise Marcela; Keisermann, Mauro; Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Bauer, Moisés Evandro

    2017-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been associated with cognitive impairment and peripheral production of autoantibodies. Autoantibodies against central nervous system (CNS) proteins and S100 calcium-binding β (S100β) were found increased in diseases characterized by cognitive impairment like Alzheimer disease and Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (NPSLE). The aim of this study was to investigate the plasma levels of autoantibodies against myelin basic protein (anti-MBP), myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (anti-MOG) and S100β, and their relationships with cognitive performance in RA patients. Twenty patients with active rheumatoid arthritis and 19 age-, sex-, and schooling-matched healthy controls were recruited. Multiple dimensions of cognitive function were evaluated by structured clinical questionnaires. Autoantibodies and S100β levels were assessed by ELISAs. Patients had significantly higher levels of anti-MBP IgG (17.51 ± 1.36 vs. 5.24 ± 0.53 ng/mL), anti-MOG IgG (5.68 ± 1.34 vs. 0.51 ± 0.49 ng/mL), and S100β protein (2.24 ± 0.50 vs. 0.47 ± 0.06) than controls (all p myelin integrity to cognition, our data indicate that these autoantibodies may be harmful to proper cognitive function.

  16. Assessing White Matter Microstructure in Brain Regions with Different Myelin Architecture Using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeschel, Samuel; Hagberg, Gisela E; Schultz, Thomas; Balla, Dávid Z; Klose, Uwe; Hauser, Till-Karsten; Nägele, Thomas; Bieri, Oliver; Prasloski, Thomas; MacKay, Alex L; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Scheffler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how known differences in myelin architecture between regions along the cortico-spinal tract and frontal white matter (WM) in 19 healthy adolescents are reflected in several quantitative MRI parameters that have been proposed to non-invasively probe WM microstructure. In a clinically feasible scan time, both conventional imaging sequences as well as microstructural MRI parameters were assessed in order to quantitatively characterise WM regions that are known to differ in the thickness of their myelin sheaths, and in the presence of crossing or parallel fibre organisation. We found that diffusion imaging, MR spectroscopy (MRS), myelin water fraction (MWF), Magnetization Transfer Imaging, and Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping were myelin-sensitive in different ways, giving complementary information for characterising WM microstructure with different underlying fibre architecture. From the diffusion parameters, neurite density (NODDI) was found to be more sensitive than fractional anisotropy (FA), underlining the limitation of FA in WM crossing fibre regions. In terms of sensitivity to different myelin content, we found that MWF, the mean diffusivity and chemical-shift imaging based MRS yielded the best discrimination between areas. Multimodal assessment of WM microstructure was possible within clinically feasible scan times using a broad combination of quantitative microstructural MRI sequences. By assessing new microstructural WM parameters we were able to provide normative data and discuss their interpretation in regions with different myelin architecture, as well as their possible application as biomarker for WM disorders.

  17. A suspended carbon fiber culture to model myelination by human Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merolli, Antonio; Mao, Yong; Kohn, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Understanding of myelination/remyelination process is essential to guide tissue engineering for nerve regeneration. In vitro models currently used are limited to cell population studies and cannot easily identify individual cell contribution to the process. We established a novel model to study the contribution of human Schwann cells to the myelination process. The model avoids the presence of neurons in culture; Schwann cells respond solely to the biophysical properties of an artificial axon. The model uses a single carbon fiber suspended in culture media far from the floor of the well. The fiber provides an elongated structure of defined diameter with 360-degree of surface available for human Schwann cells to wrap around. This model enabled us to spatially and temporally track the myelination by individual Schwann cells along the fiber. We observed cell attachment, elongation and wrapping over a period of 9 days. Cells remained alive and expressed Myelin Basic Protein and Myelin Associated Glycoprotein as expected. Natural and artificial molecules, and external physical factors (e.g., p atterned electrical impulses), may be tested with this model as possible regulators of myelination.

  18. Phosphorylation of myelin basic proteins and its relevance to myelin biogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Age-related differences in the in vivo incorporation of (32-P) into mouse myelin basic proteins (MBPs) of the central nervous system were observed. The resulting specific radioactivity (S.A.) of the MBPs appeared to be related to the S.A. of the acid-soluble pool of phosphates of myelin. In development, MBPs were phosphorylated in vivo prior to the onset of myelination in the brain, indicating that MBPs are phosphorylated prior to their deposition in the myelin sheath. The incorporation of (32-P) into MBPs and the turnover rates of MBP phosphates were studied in vivo in developmentally-related myelin compartments. The results suggest that there are two separate events in MBP phosphorylation and that the turnover rates of the MBP phosphates derived from these two events are different. A model for MBP phosphorylation, that could explain in these observations, is postulated and discussed in the light of existing information.

  19. Transcriptional Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) by Methyl CpG Binding Protein 2 (MeCP2): a Novel Mechanism for Re-Myelination and/or Myelin Repair Involved in the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    KhorshidAhmad, Tina; Acosta, Crystal; Cortes, Claudia; Lakowski, Ted M; Gangadaran, Surendiran; Namaka, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive, neurological disease characterized by the targeted immune system-mediated destruction of central nervous system (CNS) myelin. Autoreactive CD4+ T helper cells have a key role in orchestrating MS-induced myelin damage. Once activated, circulating Th1-cells secrete a variety of inflammatory cytokines that foster the breakdown of blood-brain barrier (BBB) eventually infiltrating into the CNS. Inside the CNS, they become reactivated upon exposure to the myelin structural proteins and continue to produce inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) that leads to direct activation of antibodies and macrophages that are involved in the phagocytosis of myelin. Proliferating oligodendrocyte precursors (OPs) migrating to the lesion sites are capable of acute remyelination but unable to completely repair or restore the immune system-mediated myelin damage. This results in various permanent clinical neurological disabilities such as cognitive dysfunction, fatigue, bowel/bladder abnormalities, and neuropathic pain. At present, there is no cure for MS. Recent remyelination and/or myelin repair strategies have focused on the role of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its upstream transcriptional repressor methyl CpG binding protein (MeCP2). Research in the field of epigenetic therapeutics involving histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and lysine acetyl transferase (KAT) inhibitors is being explored to repress the detrimental effects of MeCP2. This review will address the role of MeCP2 and BDNF in remyelination and/or myelin repair and the potential of HDAC and KAT inhibitors as novel therapeutic interventions for MS.

  20. Decreased Frequency of Circulating Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein B Lymphocytes in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Elong Ngono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there is no evidence for a role of anti-MOG antibodies in adult MS, no information on B lymphocytes with MOG-committed BCR is available. We report here on the frequency of anti-MOG B cells forming rosettes with polystyrene beads (BBR covalently bound to the extracellular domain of rhMOG in 38 relapsing-remitting patients (RRMS and 50 healthy individuals (HI. We show a substantial proportion of circulating anti-MOG-BBR in both RRMS and HI. Strikingly, MOG-specific B cells frequencies were lower in MS than in HI. Anti-MOG antibodies measured by a cell-based assay were not different between MS patients and controls, suggesting a specific alteration of anti-MOG B cells in MS. Although anti-MOG-BBR were higher in CNS fluid than in blood, no difference was observed between MS and controls. Lower frequency of MOG-BBR in MS was not explained by an increased apoptosis, but a trend for lower proliferative capacity was noted. Despite an efficient B cell transmigration across brain derived endothelial cells, total and anti-MOG B cells transmigration was similar between MS and HI. The striking alteration in MOG-specific B cells, independent of anti-MOG antibody titers, challenges our view on the role of MOG-specific B cells in MS.

  1. Could myelin damage from radiofrequency electromagnetic field exposure help explain the functional impairment electrohypersensitivity? A review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmayne, Mary; Johansson, Olle

    2014-01-01

    Myelin provides the electrical insulation for the central and peripheral nervous system and develops rapidly in the first years of life, but continues into mid-life or later. Myelin integrity is vital to healthy nervous system development and functioning. This review outlines the development of myelin through life, and then considers the evidence for an association between myelin integrity and exposure to low-intensity radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) typical in the modern world. In RF-EMF peer-reviewed literature examining relevant impacts such as myelin sheath, multiple sclerosis, and other myelin-related diseases, cellular examination was included. There are surprisingly little data available in each area, but considered together a picture begins to emerge in RF-EMF-exposed cases: (1) significant morphological lesions in the myelin sheath of rats; (2) a greater risk of multiple sclerosis in a study subgroup; (3) effects in proteins related to myelin production; and (4) physical symptoms in individuals with functional impairment electrohypersensitivity, many of which are the same as if myelin were affected by RF-EMF exposure, giving rise to symptoms of demyelination. In the latter, there are exceptions; headache is common only in electrohypersensitivity, while ataxia is typical of demyelination but infrequently found in the former group. Overall, evidence from in vivo and in vitro and epidemiological studies suggests an association between RF-EMF exposure and either myelin deterioration or a direct impact on neuronal conduction, which may account for many electrohypersensitivity symptoms. The most vulnerable are likely to be those in utero through to at least mid-teen years, as well as ill and elderly individuals.

  2. N-Acetylaspartate Synthase Deficiency Corrects the Myelin Phenotype in a Canavan Disease Mouse Model But Does Not Affect Survival Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Helena; Wang-Eckhardt, Lihua; Hartmann, Dieter; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Eckhardt, Matthias

    2015-10-28

    Canavan disease (CD) is a severe, lethal leukodystrophy caused by deficiency in aspartoacylase (ASPA), which hydrolyzes N-acetylaspartate (NAA). In the brains of CD patients, NAA accumulates to high millimolar concentrations. The pathology of the disease is characterized by loss of oligodendrocytes and spongy myelin degeneration in the CNS. Whether accumulating NAA, absence of NAA-derived acetate, or absence of any unknown functions of the ASPA enzyme is responsible for the pathology of the disease is not fully understood. We generated ASPA-deficient (Aspa(nur7/nur7)) mice that are also deficient for NAA synthase Nat8L (Nat8L(-/-)/Aspa(nur7/nur7)). These mice have no detectable NAA. Nevertheless, they exhibited normal myelin content, myelin sphingolipid composition, and full reversal of spongy myelin and axonal degeneration. Surprisingly, although pathology was fully reversed, the survival time of the mice was not prolonged. In contrast, Aspa(nur7/nur7) mice with only one intact Nat8L allele accumulated less NAA, developed a less severe pathology, phenotypic improvements, and, importantly, an almost normal survival time. Therefore, inhibition of NAA synthase is a promising therapeutic option for CD. The reduced survival rate of Nat8L(-/-)/Aspa(nur7/nur7) mice, however, indicates that complete inhibition of NAA synthase may bear unforeseeable risks for the patient. Furthermore, we demonstrate that acetate derived from NAA is not essential for myelin lipid synthesis and that loss of NAA-derived acetate does not cause the myelin phenotype of Aspa(nur7/nur7) mice. Our data clearly support the hypothesis that NAA accumulation is the major factor in the development of CD. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3514501-16$15.00/0.

  3. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketty Bacallao

    Full Text Available Isolated Schwann cells (SCs respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1. To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC, a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the

  4. Differentially Severe Cognitive Effects of Compromised Cerebral Blood Flow in Aged Mice: Association with Myelin Degradation and Microglia Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilly Wolf

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral common carotid artery stenosis (BCAS models the effects of compromised cerebral blood flow on brain structure and function in mice. We compared the effects of BCAS in aged (21 month and young adult (3 month female mice, anticipating a differentially more severe effect in the older mice. Four weeks after surgery there was a significant age by time by treatment interaction on the radial-arm water maze (RAWM; p = 0.014: on the first day of the test, latencies of old mice were longer compared to the latencies of young adult mice, independent of BCAS. However, on the second day of the test, latencies of old BCAS mice were significantly longer than old control mice (p = 0.049, while latencies of old controls were similar to those of the young adult mice, indicating more severe impairment of hippocampal dependent learning and working memory by BCAS in the older mice. Fluorescence staining of myelin basic protein (MBP showed that old age and BCAS both induced a significant decrease in fluorescence intensity. Evaluation of the number oligodendrocyte precursor cells demonstrated augmented myelin replacement in old BCAS mice (p < 0.05 compared with young adult BCAS and old control mice. While microglia morphology was assessed as normal in young adult control and young adult BCAS mice, microglia of old BCAS mice exhibited striking activation in the area of degraded myelin compared to young adult BCAS (p < 0.01 and old control mice (p < 0.05. These findings show a differentially more severe effect of cerebral hypoperfusion on cognitive function, myelin integrity and inflammatory processes in aged mice. Hypoperfusion may exacerbate degradation initiated by aging, which may induce more severe neuronal and cognitive phenotypes.

  5. GM1 improves neurofascin155 association with lipid rafts and prevents rat brain myelin injury after hypoxia-ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.P. Zhang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available White matter injury characterized by damage to myelin is an important process in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD. Because the oligodendrocyte-specific isoform of neurofascin, neurofascin 155 (NF155, and its association with lipid rafts are essential for the establishment and stabilization of the paranodal junction, which is required for tight interaction between myelin and axons, we analyzed the effect of monosialotetrahexosyl ganglioside (GM1 on NF155 expression and its association with lipid rafts after HIBD in Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 12-15 g, on day 7 post-partum (P7; N = 20 per group. HIBD was induced on P7 and the rats were divided into two groups: one group received an intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg GM1 three times and the other group an injection of saline. There was also a group of 20 sham-operated rats. After sacrifice, the brains of the rats were removed on P30 and studied by immunochemistry, SDS-PAGE, Western blot analysis, and electron microscopy. Staining showed that the saline group had definite rarefaction and fragmentation of brain myelin sheaths, whereas the GM1 group had no obvious structural changes. The GM1 group had 1.9-2.9-fold more GM1 in lipid rafts than the saline group (fraction 3-6; all P < 0.05 and 0.5-2.4-fold higher expression of NF155 in lipid rafts (fraction 3-5; all P < 0.05. Injection of GM1 increased the content of GM1 in lipid rafts as well as NF155 expression and its lipid raft association in HIBD rat brains. GM1 may repair the structure of lipid rafts, promote the association of NF155 (or other important proteins with lipid rafts, stabilize the structure of paranodes, and eventually prevent myelin sheath damage, suggesting a novel mechanism for its neuroprotective properties.

  6. Transplantation of ciliary neurotrophic factor-expressing adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells promotes remyelination and functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qilin; He, Qian; Wang, Yaping; Cheng, Xiaoxin; Howard, Russell M; Zhang, Yiping; DeVries, William H; Shields, Christopher B; Magnuson, David S K; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Kim, Dong H; Whittemore, Scott R

    2010-02-24

    Demyelination contributes to the dysfunction after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). We explored whether the combination of neurotrophic factors and transplantation of adult rat spinal cord oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) could enhance remyelination and functional recovery after SCI. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was the most effective neurotrophic factor to promote oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation and survival of OPCs in vitro. OPCs were infected with retroviruses expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or CNTF and transplanted into the contused adult thoracic spinal cord 9 d after injury. Seven weeks after transplantation, the grafted OPCs survived and integrated into the injured spinal cord. The survival of grafted CNTF-OPCs increased fourfold compared with EGFP-OPCs. The grafted OPCs differentiated into adenomatus polyposis coli (APC(+)) OLs, and CNTF significantly increased the percentage of APC(+) OLs from grafted OPCs. Immunofluorescent and immunoelectron microscopic analyses showed that the grafted OPCs formed central myelin sheaths around the axons in the injured spinal cord. The number of OL-remyelinated axons in ventrolateral funiculus (VLF) or lateral funiculus (LF) at the injured epicenter was significantly increased in animals that received CNTF-OPC grafts compared with all other groups. Importantly, 75% of rats receiving CNTF-OPC grafts recovered transcranial magnetic motor-evoked potential and magnetic interenlargement reflex responses, indicating that conduction through the demyelinated axons in VLF or LF, respectively, was partially restored. More importantly, recovery of hindlimb locomotor function was significantly enhanced in animals receiving grafts of CNTF-OPCs. Thus, combined treatment with OPC grafts expressing CNTF can enhance remyelination and facilitate functional recovery after traumatic SCI.

  7. Transplantation of CNTF-expressing adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells promotes remyelination and functional recovery after spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qilin; He, Qian; Wang, Yaping; Cheng, Xiaoxin; Howard, Russell M.; Zhang, Yiping; DeVries, William H.; Shields, Christopher B.; Magnuson, David S.K.; Xu, Xiaoming; Kim, Dong H.; Whittemore, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    Demyelination contributes to the dysfunction after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). We explored whether the combination of neurotrophic factors and transplantation of adult rat spinal cord oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) could enhance remyelination and functional recovery after SCI. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was the most effective neurotrophic factor to promote oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation and survival of OPCs in vitro. OPCs were infected with retroviruses expressing EGFP or CNTF and transplanted into the contused adult thoracic spinal cord 9 days post-injury. Seven weeks after transplantation, the grafted OPCs survived and integrated into the injured spinal cord. The survival of grafted CNTF-OPCs increased 4-fold compared to EGFP-OPCs. The grafted OPCs differentiated into adenomatus polyposis coli (APC+) OLs and CNTF significantly increased the percentage of APC+ OLs from grafted OPCs. Immunofluoresent and immuno-electron microscopic analyses showed that the grafted OPCs formed central myelin sheaths around the axons in the injured spinal cord. The number of OL-remyelinated axons in ventrolateral funiculus (VLF) or lateral funiculus (LF) at the injured epiecenter was significantly increased in animals that received CNTF-OPC grafts compared to all other groups. Importantly, 75% of rats receiving CNTF-OPC grafts recovered transcranial magnetic motor-evoked potential (tcMMEP) and magnetic inter-englargement reflex (MIER) responses, indicating that conduction through the demyelinated axons in VLF or LF, respectively, was partially restored. More importantly, recovery of hindlimb locomotor function was significantly enhanced in animals receiving grafts of CNTF-OPCs. Thus, combined treatment with OPC grafts expressing CNTF can enhance remyelination and facilitate functional recovery after traumatic SCI. PMID:20181596

  8. Human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors aid in functional recovery of sensory pathways following contusive spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo H All

    Full Text Available Transplantations of human stem cell derivatives have been widely investigated in rodent models for the potential restoration of function of neural pathways after spinal cord injury (SCI. Studies have already demonstrated cells survival following transplantation in SCI. We sought to evaluate survival and potential therapeutic effects of transplanted human embryonic stem (hES cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs in a contusive injury in rats. Bioluminescence imaging was utilized to verify survivability of cells up to 4 weeks, and somatosensory evoked potential (SSEPs were recorded at the cortex to monitor function of sensory pathways throughout the 6-week recovery period.hES cells were transduced with the firefly luciferase gene and differentiated into OPCs. OPCs were transplanted into the lesion epicenter of rat spinal cords 2 hours after inducing a moderate contusive SCI. The hES-treatment group showed improved SSEPs, including increased amplitude and decreased latencies, compared to the control group. The bioluminescence of transplanted OPCs decreased by 97% in the injured spinal cord compared to only 80% when injected into an uninjured spinal cord. Bioluminescence increased in both experimental groups such that by week 3, no statistical difference was detected, signifying that the cells survived and proliferated independent of injury. Post-mortem histology of the spinal cords showed integration of human cells expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers and myelin basic protein without the expression of markers for astrocytes (GFAP or pluripotent cells (OCT4.hES-derived OPCs transplanted 2 hours after contusive SCI survive and differentiate into OLs that produce MBP. Treated rats demonstrated functional improvements in SSEP amplitudes and latencies compared to controls as early as 1 week post-injury. Finally, the hostile injury microenvironment at 2 hours post-injury initially caused increased cell death but did not affect the long

  9. Dynamic Changes in Ezh2 Gene Occupancy Underlie Its Involvement in Neural Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Differentiation towards Oligodendrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Falak; Boddeke, Erik; Olah, Marta; Copray, Sjef

    2012-01-01

    Background The polycomb group protein Ezh2 is an epigenetic repressor of transcription originally found to prevent untimely differentiation of pluripotent embryonic stem cells. We previously demonstrated that Ezh2 is also expressed in multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs). We showed that Ezh2 expression is downregulated during NSC differentiation into astrocytes or neurons. However, high levels of Ezh2 remained present in differentiating oligodendrocytes until myelinating. This study aimed to elucidate the target genes of Ezh2 in NSCs and in premyelinating oligodendrocytes (pOLs). Methodology/Principal Findings We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing to detect the target genes of Ezh2 in NSCs and pOLs. We found 1532 target genes of Ezh2 in NSCs. During NSC differentiation, the occupancy of these genes by Ezh2 was alleviated. However, when the NSCs differentiated into oligodendrocytes, 393 of these genes remained targets of Ezh2. Analysis of the target genes indicated that the repressive activity of Ezh2 in NSCs concerns genes involved in stem cell maintenance, in cell cycle control and in preventing neural differentiation. Among the genes in pOLs that were still repressed by Ezh2 were most prominently those associated with neuronal and astrocytic committed cell lineages. Suppression of Ezh2 activity in NSCs caused loss of stem cell characteristics, blocked their proliferation and ultimately induced apoptosis. Suppression of Ezh2 activity in pOLs resulted in derangement of the oligodendrocytic phenotype, due to re-expression of neuronal and astrocytic genes, and ultimately in apoptosis. Conclusions/Significance Our data indicate that the epigenetic repressor Ezh2 in NSCs is crucial for proliferative activity and maintenance of neural stemness. During differentiation towards oligodendrocytes, Ezh2 repression continues particularly to suppress other neural fate choices. Ezh2 is completely downregulated during differentiation

  10. Relevance of anti-myelin antibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breij, E.C.W.

    2005-01-01

    Antibodies directed against myelin antigens have been described in multiple sclerosis (MS). Although anti-myelin antibodies have been implicated in central nervous system (CNS) demyelination, it is unclear to what extent anti-myelin antibodies contribute to MS pathogenesis. In this dissertation,

  11. Focal necrosis and disturbed myelination in the white matter of newborn infants: A tale of too much or too little oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven eWellmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available White matter disease in preterm infants comes along with focal destructions or with diffuse myelination disturbance. Recent experimental work with transgenic mice paves the way for a unifying molecular model for both types of brain injury, placing oxygen sensing by oligodendrocyte precursor cells at the center stage. Mice genetically altered to mimic high local oxygen tension in oligodendroglia lineage cells (via deletion of hypoxia-inducible factor, HIF develop white matter disease resembling cystic periventricular leukomalacia (cPVL within the first 7 days of life. Mice in which local hypoxia is mimicked in oligodendroglial cells (via genetic inhibition of HIF decay display arrested oligodendrocyte precursor cell maturation and subsequent hypomyelination, reminiscent of the diffuse white matter disease (dWMD observed in preterm infants and infants with congenital heart disease. These recent experimental findings on oxygen sensing and myelination are awaiting integration into a clinical framework. Gene regulation in response to hyperoxia or hypoxia, rather than oxidative stress, may be an important mechanism underlying neonatal white matter disease.

  12. notch3 is essential for oligodendrocyte development and vascular integrity in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Zaucker

    2013-09-01

    Mutations in the human NOTCH3 gene cause CADASIL syndrome (cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy. CADASIL is an inherited small vessel disease characterized by diverse clinical manifestations including vasculopathy, neurodegeneration and dementia. Here we report two mutations in the zebrafish notch3 gene, one identified in a previous screen for mutations with reduced expression of myelin basic protein (mbp and another caused by a retroviral insertion. Reduced mbp expression in notch3 mutant embryos is associated with fewer oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs. Despite an early neurogenic phenotype, mbp expression recovered at later developmental stages and some notch3 homozygous mutants survived to adulthood. These mutants, as well as adult zebrafish carrying both mutant alleles together, displayed a striking stress-associated accumulation of blood in the head and fins. Histological analysis of mutant vessels revealed vasculopathy, including: an enlargement (dilation of vessels in the telencephalon and fin, disorganization of the normal stereotyped arrangement of vessels in the fin, and an apparent loss of arterial morphological structure. Expression of hey1, a well-known transcriptional target of Notch signaling, was greatly reduced in notch3 mutant fins, suggesting that Notch3 acts via a canonical Notch signaling pathway to promote normal vessel structure. Ultrastructural analysis confirmed the presence of dilated vessels in notch3 mutant fins and revealed that the vessel walls of presumed arteries showed signs of deterioration. Gaps in the arterial wall and the presence of blood cells outside of vessels in mutants indicated that compromised vessel structure led to hemorrhage. In notch3 heterozygotes, we found elevated expression of both notch3 itself and target genes, indicating that specific alterations in gene expression due to partial loss of Notch3 function might contribute to the abnormalities observed

  13. Adult myelination: wrapping up neuronal plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    O’Rourke, Megan; Gasperini, Robert; Young, Kaylene M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we outline the major neural plasticity mechanisms that have been identified in the adult central nervous system (CNS), and offer a perspective on how they regulate CNS function. In particular we examine how myelin plasticity can operate alongside neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity to influence information processing and transfer in the mature CNS.

  14. Olig2-lineage cells preferentially differentiate into oligodendrocytes but their processes degenerate at the chronic demyelinating stage of proteolipid protein-overexpressing mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Tanaka, Kenji F; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Higashi, Mikito; Wisesmith, Wilaiwan; Ono, Katsuhiko; Hitoshi, Seiji; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro

    2013-02-01

    In chronic demyelinating lesions of the central nervous system, insufficient generation of oligodendrocytes (OLs) is not due to a lack of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), because the accumulation of OPCs and premyelinating OLs can be observed within these lesions. Here we sought to identify the basis for the failure of OLs to achieve terminal differentiation in chronic demyelinating lesions through the utilization of plp1-overexpressing (Plp(tg/-)) mice. These mice are characterized by progressive demyelination in young adults and chronic demyelinating lesions at more mature stages. We show that neural stem cells, which are the precursors of OL-lineage cells, are present in the Plp(tg/-) mouse brain and that their multipotentiality and ability to self-renew are comparable to those of wild-type adults in culture. Lineage-tracing experiments using a transgenic mouse line, in which an inducible Cre recombinase is knocked in at the Olig2 locus, revealed that Olig2-lineage cells preferentially differentiated into OPCs and premyelinating OLs, but not into astrocytes, in the Plp(tg/-) mouse brain. These Olig2-lineage cells matured to express myelin basic protein but after that their processes degenerated in the chronic demyelinating lesions of the Plp(tg/-) brain. These results indicate that in chronic demyelinated lesions more OL-lineage cells are produced as part of the repair process, but their processes degenerate after maturation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Attenuation of 7-ketocholesterol-induced overproduction of reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and autophagy by dimethyl fumarate on 158N murine oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrouk, Amira; Nury, Thomas; Karym, El-Mostafa; Vejux, Anne; Sghaier, Randa; Gondcaille, Catherine; Andreoletti, Pierre; Trompier, Doriane; Savary, Stéphane; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha; Debbabi, Meryam; Fromont, Agnès; Riedinger, Jean-Marc; Moreau, Thibault; Lizard, Gérard

    2017-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress are involved in several non demyelinating or demyelinating neurodegenerative diseases. Some of them, including multiple sclerosis (MS), are associated with lipid peroxidation processes leading to increased levels of 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). So, the eventual protective effect of dimethylfumarate (DMF), which is used for the treatment of MS, was evaluated on 7KC-treated oligodendrocytes, which are myelin synthesizing cells. To this end, murine oligodendrocytes 158N were exposed to 7KC (25, 50μM) for 24h without or with DMF (1, 25, 50μM). The biological activities of DMF associated or not with 7KC were evaluated by phase contrast microscopy, crystal violet and MTT tests. The impact on transmembrane mitochondrial potential (ΔYm), O 2 - and H 2 O 2 production, apoptosis and autophagy was measured by microscopical and flow cytometric methods by staining with DiOC 6 (3), dihydroethidine and dihydrorhodamine 123, Hoechst 33342, and by Western blotting with the use of specific antibodies raised against uncleaved and cleaved caspase-3 and PARP, and LC3-I/II. DMF attenuates the different effects of 7KC, namely: cell growth inhibition and/or loss of cell adhesion, decrease of ΔΨm, O 2 - and H 2 O 2 overproduction, PARP and caspase-3 cleavage, nuclear condensation and fragmentation, and activation of LC3-I into LC3-II. The ability of DMF to attenuate 7KC-induced reactive oxygen species overproduction, apoptosis, and autophagy on oligodendrocytes reinforces the interest for this molecule for the treatment of MS or other demyelinating diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mapping human cortical areas in vivo based on myelin content as revealed by T1- and T2-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, Matthew F; Van Essen, David C

    2011-08-10

    Noninvasively mapping the layout of cortical areas in humans is a continuing challenge for neuroscience. We present a new method of mapping cortical areas based on myelin content as revealed by T1-weighted (T1w) and T2-weighted (T2w) MRI. The method is generalizable across different 3T scanners and pulse sequences. We use the ratio of T1w/T2w image intensities to eliminate the MR-related image intensity bias and enhance the contrast to noise ratio for myelin. Data from each subject were mapped to the cortical surface and aligned across individuals using surface-based registration. The spatial gradient of the group average myelin map provides an observer-independent measure of sharp transitions in myelin content across the surface--i.e., putative cortical areal borders. We found excellent agreement between the gradients of the myelin maps and the gradients of published probabilistic cytoarchitectonically defined cortical areas that were registered to the same surface-based atlas. For other cortical regions, we used published anatomical and functional information to make putative identifications of dozens of cortical areas or candidate areas. In general, primary and early unimodal association cortices are heavily myelinated and higher, multimodal, association cortices are more lightly myelinated, but there are notable exceptions in the literature that are confirmed by our results. The overall pattern in the myelin maps also has important correlations with the developmental onset of subcortical white matter myelination, evolutionary cortical areal expansion in humans compared with macaques, postnatal cortical expansion in humans, and maps of neuronal density in non-human primates.

  17. Subependymal Zone-Derived Oligodendroblasts Respond to Focal Demyelination but Fail to Generate Myelin in Young and Aged Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias Kazanis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Two populations of oligodendrogenic progenitors co-exist within the corpus callosum (CC of the adult mouse. Local, parenchymal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (pOPCs and progenitors generated in the subependymal zone (SEZ cytogenic niche. pOPCs are committed perinatally and retain their numbers through self-renewing divisions, while SEZ-derived cells are relatively “young,” being constantly born from neural stem cells. We compared the behavior of these populations, labeling SEZ-derived cells using hGFAP:CreErt2 mice, within the homeostatic and regenerating CC of the young-adult and aging brain. We found that SEZ-derived oligodendroglial progenitors have limited self-renewing potential and are therefore not bona fide OPCs but rather “oligodendroblasts” more similar to the neuroblasts of the neurogenic output of the SEZ. In the aged CC their mitotic activity is much reduced, although they still act as a “fast-response element” to focal demyelination. In contrast to pOPCs, they fail to generate mature myelinating oligodendrocytes at all ages studied.

  18. Modeling the Mutational and Phenotypic Landscapes of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease with Human iPSC-Derived Oligodendrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevin, Zachary S; Factor, Daniel C; Karl, Robert T

    2017-01-01

    testing of small-molecule modulators of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response, which improved both morphologic and myelination defects. Collectively, these data provide insights into the pathogeneses of a variety of PLP1 mutations and suggest that disparate etiologies of PMD could require specific...

  19. Myelination and isochronicity in neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitaka Kimura

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Our brain contains a multiplicity of neuronal networks. In many of these, information sent from presynaptic neurons travels through a variety of pathways of different distances, yet arrives at the postsynaptic cells at the same time. Such isochronicity is achieved either by changes in the conduction velocity of axons or by lengthening the axonal path to compensate for fast conduction. To regulate the conduction velocity, a change in the extent of myelination has recently been proposed in thalamocortical and other pathways. This is in addition to a change in the axonal diameter, a previously identified, more accepted mechanism. Thus, myelination is not a simple means of insulation or acceleration of impulse conduction, but it is rather an exquisite way of actively regulating the timing of communication among various neuronal connections with different length.

  20. Myelin Organization in the Nodal, Paranodal, and Juxtaparanodal Regions Revealed by Scanning X-Ray Microdiffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Lee; Palmisano, Marilena; Burghammer, Manfred; Riekel, Christian; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray diffraction has provided extensive information about the arrangement of lipids and proteins in multilamellar myelin. This information has been limited to the abundant inter-nodal regions of the sheath because these regions dominate the scattering when x-ray beams of 100 µm diameter or more are used. Here, we used a 1 µm beam, raster-scanned across a single nerve fiber, to obtain detailed information about the molecular architecture in the nodal, paranodal, and juxtaparanodal regions. Orientation of the lamellar membrane stacks and membrane periodicity varied spatially. In the juxtaparanode-internode, 198–202 Å-period membrane arrays oriented normal to the nerve fiber axis predominated, whereas in the paranode-node, 205–208 Å-period arrays oriented along the fiber direction predominated. In parts of the sheath distal to the node, multiple sets of lamellar reflections were observed at angles to one another, suggesting that the myelin multilayers are deformed at the Schmidt-Lanterman incisures. The calculated electron density of myelin in the different regions exhibited membrane bilayer profiles with varied electron densities at the polar head groups, likely due to different amounts of major myelin proteins (P0 glycoprotein and myelin basic protein). Scattering from the center of the nerve fibers, where the x-rays are incident en face (perpendicular) to the membrane planes, provided information about the lateral distribution of protein. By underscoring the heterogeneity of membrane packing, microdiffraction analysis suggests a powerful new strategy for understanding the underlying molecular foundation of a broad spectrum of myelinopathies dependent on local specializations of myelin structure in both the PNS and CNS. PMID:24984037

  1. Myelin proteomics: molecular anatomy of an insulating sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Olaf; Tenzer, Stefan; Werner, Hauke B

    2009-08-01

    Fast-transmitting vertebrate axons are electrically insulated with multiple layers of nonconductive plasma membrane of glial cell origin, termed myelin. The myelin membrane is dominated by lipids, and its protein composition has historically been viewed to be of very low complexity. In this review, we discuss an updated reference compendium of 342 proteins associated with central nervous system myelin that represents a valuable resource for analyzing myelin biogenesis and white matter homeostasis. Cataloging the myelin proteome has been made possible by technical advances in the separation and mass spectrometric detection of proteins, also referred to as proteomics. This led to the identification of a large number of novel myelin-associated proteins, many of which represent low abundant components involved in catalytic activities, the cytoskeleton, vesicular trafficking, or cell adhesion. By mass spectrometry-based quantification, proteolipid protein and myelin basic protein constitute 17% and 8% of total myelin protein, respectively, suggesting that their abundance was previously overestimated. As the biochemical profile of myelin-associated proteins is highly reproducible, differential proteome analyses can be applied to material isolated from patients or animal models of myelin-related diseases such as multiple sclerosis and leukodystrophies.

  2. Transverse Magnetic Waves in Myelinated Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    IN MYELINATED NERVES M. Mª Villapecellín-Cid1, L. Mª Roa2, and J. Reina-Tosina1 1Área de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones , E.S. de Ingeniería...y Comunicaciones , E.S. de Ingeniería, University of Seville, Seville, Spain Performing Organization Report Number Sponsoring/Monitoring Agency Name(s

  3. Co-cultures with stem cell-derived human sensory neurons reveal regulators of peripheral myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Alex J; Kaller, Malte S; Galino, Jorge; Willison, Hugh J; Rinaldi, Simon; Bennett, David L H

    2017-04-01

    See Saporta and Shy (doi:10.1093/awx048) for a scientific commentary on this article.Effective bidirectional signalling between axons and Schwann cells is essential for both the development and maintenance of peripheral nerve function. We have established conditions by which human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived sensory neurons can be cultured with rat Schwann cells, and have produced for the first time long-term and stable myelinating co-cultures with human neurons. These cultures contain the specialized domains formed by axonal interaction with myelinating Schwann cells, such as clustered voltage-gated sodium channels at the node of Ranvier and Shaker-type potassium channel (Kv1.2) at the juxtaparanode. Expression of type III neuregulin-1 (TIIINRG1) in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived sensory neurons strongly enhances myelination, while conversely pharmacological blockade of the NRG1-ErbB pathway prevents myelination, providing direct evidence for the ability of this pathway to promote the myelination of human sensory axons. The β-secretase, BACE1 is a protease needed to generate active NRG1 from the full-length form. Due to the fact that it also cleaves amyloid precursor protein, BACE1 is a therapeutic target in Alzheimer's disease, however, consistent with its role in NRG1 processing we find that BACE1 inhibition significantly impairs myelination in our co-culture system. In order to exploit co-cultures to address other clinically relevant problems, they were exposed to anti-disialosyl ganglioside antibodies, including those derived from a patient with a sensory predominant, inflammatory neuropathy with mixed axonal and demyelinating electrophysiology. The co-cultures reveal that both mouse and human disialosyl antibodies target the nodal axolemma, induce acute axonal degeneration in the presence of complement, and impair myelination. The human, neuropathy-associated IgM antibody is also shown to induce complement-independent demyelination

  4. Proteomic analysis of cortical brain tissue from the BTBR mouse model of autism: Evidence for changes in STOP and myelin-related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H; Ma, Y; Liu, J; Ding, C; Hu, F; Yu, L

    2016-01-15

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal reciprocal social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. However, the widely accepted biomarkers for autism are still lacking. In this study, we carried out a quantitative proteomic profiling study of cortical brain tissue from BTBR T(+)Itpr3(tf) (BTBR) mice, a mouse model that displays an autism-like phenotype. Using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) coupled with LC-MS/MS, a total of 3611 proteins were quantitated in mouse cortices. As compared to C57BL/6J (B6) mice, 126 differentially expressed proteins were found in the brain from BTBR mice. The functional annotation and categories of differentially expressed proteins were analyzed. Especially, the stable tubule only polypeptide (STOP) protein and myelin-related proteins down-regulated significantly in BTBR mice were confirmed by Western blotting. Furthermore, the BTBR mice displayed reduced levels of staining with ferric alum in comparison to B6 controls, indicative of myelin disruption. Finally, we propose that reduced STOP expression in the brain could be involved in the mediation of autism-like behaviors through impairments of myelination in oligodendrocytes and synaptic function in neurons. Manipulation of STOP protein could be a promising avenue for therapeutic interventions to autism. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Is myelin basic protein a potential biomarker of brain cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavialova, M G; Shevchenko, V E; Nikolaev, E N; Zgoda, V G

    2017-08-01

    Myelin basic protein is a potential biomarker for the central nervous system diseases in which the myelin sheath is destroyed. Using pseudo-selected reaction monitoring and the method of standard additions, we have measured the myelin basic protein level in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with neurotrauma (n = 6), chronic neurodegenerative diseases (n = 2) and brain cancer (n = 5). Myelin basic protein was detected only in four out of five cerebrospinal fluid samples of patients with brain cancer. The cerebrospinal fluid myelin basic protein level ranged from 3.7 to 8.8 ng ml-1. We suggest that monitoring of myelin basic protein in cerebrospinal fluid can serve as a diagnostic test for the brain cancer.

  6. Inducible and Deterministic Forward Programming of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells into Neurons, Skeletal Myocytes, and Oligodendrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Pawlowski

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The isolation or in vitro derivation of many human cell types remains challenging and inefficient. Direct conversion of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs by forced expression of transcription factors provides a potential alternative. However, deficient inducible gene expression in hPSCs has compromised efficiencies of forward programming approaches. We have systematically optimized inducible gene expression in hPSCs using a dual genomic safe harbor gene-targeting strategy. This approach provides a powerful platform for the generation of human cell types by forward programming. We report robust and deterministic reprogramming of hPSCs into neurons and functional skeletal myocytes. Finally, we present a forward programming strategy for rapid and highly efficient generation of human oligodendrocytes.

  7. Inducible and Deterministic Forward Programming of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells into Neurons, Skeletal Myocytes, and Oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Matthias; Ortmann, Daniel; Bertero, Alessandro; Tavares, Joana M; Pedersen, Roger A; Vallier, Ludovic; Kotter, Mark R N

    2017-04-11

    The isolation or in vitro derivation of many human cell types remains challenging and inefficient. Direct conversion of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) by forced expression of transcription factors provides a potential alternative. However, deficient inducible gene expression in hPSCs has compromised efficiencies of forward programming approaches. We have systematically optimized inducible gene expression in hPSCs using a dual genomic safe harbor gene-targeting strategy. This approach provides a powerful platform for the generation of human cell types by forward programming. We report robust and deterministic reprogramming of hPSCs into neurons and functional skeletal myocytes. Finally, we present a forward programming strategy for rapid and highly efficient generation of human oligodendrocytes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Accelerated Course of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in PD-1-Deficient Central Nervous System Myelin Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Antje; Schwab, Nicholas; Ip, Chi Wang; Ortler, Sonja; Göbel, Kerstin; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Mäurer, Mathias; Martini, Rudolf; Wiendl, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    It is assumed that the onset and course of autoimmune inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) disorders (eg, multiple sclerosis) are influenced by factors that afflict immune regulation as well as CNS vulnerability. We challenged this concept experimentally by investigating how genetic alterations that affect myelin (primary oligodendrocyte damage in PLPtg mice) and/or T-cell regulation (deficiency of PD-1) influence both the onset and course of an experimental autoimmune CNS inflammatory disease [MOG35-55-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)]. We observed that double pathology was associated with a significantly earlier onset of disease, a slight increase in the neurological score, an increase in the number of infiltrating cells, and enhanced axonal degeneration compared with wild-type mice and the respective, single mutant controls. Double-mutant PLPtg/PD-1−/− mice showed an increased production of interferon-γ by CNS immune cells at the peak of disease. Neither PD-1 deficiency nor oligodendropathy led to detectable spread of antigenic MHC class I- or class II-restricted epitopes during EAE. However, absence of PD-1 clearly increased the propensity of T lymphocytes to expand, and the number of clonal expansions reliably reflected the severity of the EAE disease course. Our data show that the interplay between immune dysregulation and myelinopathy results in a stable exacerbation of actively induced autoimmune CNS inflammation, suggesting that the combination of several pathological issues contributes significantly to disease susceptibility or relapses in human disease. PMID:19443704

  9. Human but Not Laboratory Borna Disease Virus Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Human Oligodendrocytes In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Lei, Yang; Deng, Jing; Zhou, Chanjuan; Zhang, Yong; Li, Wenjuan; Huang, Hua; Cheng, Shigang; Zhang, Hongzhi; Zhang, Liang; Huang, Rongzhong; Liu, Xia; Ma, Lihua; Wang, Xiao; Li, Juan; Xie, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic virus that produces neuropsychiatric dysfunction in a wide range of warm-blooded species. Several studies have associated BDV with human psychiatric illness, but the findings remain controversial. Although oligodendrocytes are a major glial component of brain white matter and play a pivotal role in neuronal cell function, BDV's effects on human oligodendrocytes have not been clarified. Here, the effects of two BDV strains, Hu-H1 (isolated from a bipolar patient) and Strain V (a laboratory strain), on the proliferation and apoptosis of human oligodendrocytes were investigated. Three experimental cell lines were constructed: Hu-H1-infected oligodendroglioma (Hu-H1) cells, Strain V-infected oligodendroglioma (Strain V) cells, and non-infected oligodendroglioma (control) cells. BDV infection was assayed by BDV nucleoprotein (p40) immunofluorescence, cell proliferation was assayed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK8), and cell cycle phases and apoptosis were assayed by flow cytometry. Expressions of the apoptosis-related proteins Bax and Bcl-2 were measured by Western blotting. p40 expression was confirmed in Hu-H1 and Strain V on and after day three post-infection. Strain V cells showed significantly greater cellular proliferation than Hu-H1 cells on and after day three post-infection. In Hu-H1 cells, Bax and Bcl-2 expression were significantly increased and decreased, respectively, on and after day three post-infection. In contrast, in Strain V cells, Bax and Bcl-2 expression were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, on and after day three post-infection. In conclusion, Hu-H1 inhibits cellular proliferation and promotes apoptosis in human oligodendrocytes via Bax upregulation and Bcl-2 downregulation. In contrast, Strain V promotes cellular proliferation and inhibits apoptosis in human oligodendrocytes via Bax downregulation and Bcl-2 upregulation. The effects of the Hu-H1 strain (isolated from a bipolar patient) are

  10. Human but Not Laboratory Borna Disease Virus Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Human Oligodendrocytes In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Li

    Full Text Available Borna disease virus (BDV is a neurotropic virus that produces neuropsychiatric dysfunction in a wide range of warm-blooded species. Several studies have associated BDV with human psychiatric illness, but the findings remain controversial. Although oligodendrocytes are a major glial component of brain white matter and play a pivotal role in neuronal cell function, BDV's effects on human oligodendrocytes have not been clarified. Here, the effects of two BDV strains, Hu-H1 (isolated from a bipolar patient and Strain V (a laboratory strain, on the proliferation and apoptosis of human oligodendrocytes were investigated. Three experimental cell lines were constructed: Hu-H1-infected oligodendroglioma (Hu-H1 cells, Strain V-infected oligodendroglioma (Strain V cells, and non-infected oligodendroglioma (control cells. BDV infection was assayed by BDV nucleoprotein (p40 immunofluorescence, cell proliferation was assayed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK8, and cell cycle phases and apoptosis were assayed by flow cytometry. Expressions of the apoptosis-related proteins Bax and Bcl-2 were measured by Western blotting. p40 expression was confirmed in Hu-H1 and Strain V on and after day three post-infection. Strain V cells showed significantly greater cellular proliferation than Hu-H1 cells on and after day three post-infection. In Hu-H1 cells, Bax and Bcl-2 expression were significantly increased and decreased, respectively, on and after day three post-infection. In contrast, in Strain V cells, Bax and Bcl-2 expression were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, on and after day three post-infection. In conclusion, Hu-H1 inhibits cellular proliferation and promotes apoptosis in human oligodendrocytes via Bax upregulation and Bcl-2 downregulation. In contrast, Strain V promotes cellular proliferation and inhibits apoptosis in human oligodendrocytes via Bax downregulation and Bcl-2 upregulation. The effects of the Hu-H1 strain (isolated from a bipolar

  11. On the Myelin-Axon Interaction : Structural Studies of Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein, Olfactomedin-1 and the Nogo Receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronker, M.F.

    2017-01-01

    In most parts of the body, nerves regenerate after injury. However, in the brain and spinal cord regeneration is very limited. One of the causes for this lack of regeneration is the presence of myelin proteins that inhibit outgrowth of neuronal projections. Three myelin-associated inhibitors of

  12. Axonal domain disorganization in Caspr1 and Caspr2 mutant myelinated axons affects neuromuscular junction integrity, leading to muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifetiarova, Julia; Liu, Xi; Taylor, Anna M; Li, Jie; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2017-07-01

    Bidirectional interactions between neurons and myelinating glial cells result in formation of axonal domains along myelinated fibers. Loss of axonal domains leads to detrimental consequences on nerve structure and function, resulting in reduced conductive properties and the diminished ability to reliably transmit signals to the targets they innervate. Thus, impairment of peripheral myelinated axons that project to the surface of muscle fibers and form neuromuscular junction (NMJ) synapses leads to muscle dysfunction. The goal of our studies was to determine how altered electrophysiological properties due to axonal domain disorganization lead to muscle pathology, which is relevant to a variety of peripheral neuropathies, demyelinating diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders. Using conventional Contactin-Associated Protein 1 (Caspr1) and Caspr2 single or double mutants with disrupted paranodal, juxtaparanodal, or both regions, respectively, in peripheral myelinated axons, we correlated defects in NMJ integrity and muscle pathology. Our data show that loss of axonal domains in Caspr1 and Caspr2 single and double mutants primarily alters distal myelinated fibers together with presynaptic terminals, eventually leading to NMJ denervation and reduction in postsynaptic endplate areas. Moreover, reduction in conductive properties of peripheral myelinated fibers together with NMJ disintegration leads to muscle atrophy in Caspr1 mutants or muscle fiber degeneration accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction in Caspr1/Caspr2 double mutants. Together, our data indicate that proper organization of axonal domains in myelinated fibers is critical for optimal propagation of electrical signals, NMJ integrity, and muscle health, and provide insights into a wide range of pathologies that result in reduced nerve conduction leading to muscle atrophy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Glutamate excitotoxicity inflicts paranodal myelin splitting and retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yan; Sun, Wenjing; Shi, Yunzhou; Shi, Riyi; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-08-20

    Paranodal myelin damage is observed in white matter injury. However the culprit for such damage remains unknown. By coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging of myelin sheath in fresh tissues with sub-micron resolution, we observed significant paranodal myelin splitting and retraction following glutamate application both ex vivo and in vivo. Multimodal multiphoton imaging further showed that glutamate application broke axo-glial junctions and exposed juxtaparanodal K+ channels, resulting in axonal conduction deficit that was demonstrated by compound action potential measurements. The use of 4-aminopyridine, a broad-spectrum K+ channel blocker, effectively recovered both the amplitude and width of compound action potentials. Using CARS imaging as a quantitative readout of nodal length to diameter ratio, the same kind of paranodal myelin retraction was observed with applications of Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Moreover, exclusion of Ca2+ from the medium or application of calpain inhibitor abolished paranodal myelin retraction during glutamate exposure. Examinations of glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists further showed that the paranodal myelin damage was mediated by NMDA and kainate receptors. These results suggest that an increased level of glutamate in diseased white matter could impair paranodal myelin through receptor-mediated Ca2+ overloading and subsequent calpain activation.

  14. Glutamate excitotoxicity inflicts paranodal myelin splitting and retraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Fu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Paranodal myelin damage is observed in white matter injury. However the culprit for such damage remains unknown. By coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging of myelin sheath in fresh tissues with sub-micron resolution, we observed significant paranodal myelin splitting and retraction following glutamate application both ex vivo and in vivo. Multimodal multiphoton imaging further showed that glutamate application broke axo-glial junctions and exposed juxtaparanodal K+ channels, resulting in axonal conduction deficit that was demonstrated by compound action potential measurements. The use of 4-aminopyridine, a broad-spectrum K+ channel blocker, effectively recovered both the amplitude and width of compound action potentials. Using CARS imaging as a quantitative readout of nodal length to diameter ratio, the same kind of paranodal myelin retraction was observed with applications of Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Moreover, exclusion of Ca2+ from the medium or application of calpain inhibitor abolished paranodal myelin retraction during glutamate exposure. Examinations of glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists further showed that the paranodal myelin damage was mediated by NMDA and kainate receptors. These results suggest that an increased level of glutamate in diseased white matter could impair paranodal myelin through receptor-mediated Ca2+ overloading and subsequent calpain activation.

  15. Rapid Simultaneous Mapping of Total and Myelin Water Content, T1 and T2* in Multiple Sclerosis

    CERN Document Server

    Arhelger, Volker; Gliedstein, Detlef; Lafontaine, Marie-Sofie; Tonkova, Vyara; Holz, Dietrich; Böer, Andreas; Schenk, Jochen; Neeb, Heiko; (,; Koblenz, University of Applied Sciences; Koblenz, Radiologisches Institut Hohenzollernstrasse; Engineering, Institute for Medical; Koblenz, Information Processing; Boeer, Neurologie Dr; Koblenz,

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging might provide a more specific insight into disease process, progression and therapeutic response of multiple sclerosis. We present an extension of a previously published approach for the simultaneous mapping of brain T1, T2* and total water content. In addition to those three parameters, the method presented in the current work allows for the measurement of myelin bound water content, a surrogate marker of tissue myelination. Myelin water was measured based on its distinct relaxation with reduced T2*, resulting in a multiexponential decay signal. However, only 10 points could be acquired on the relaxation curve within a maximum echo time of <40ms as the quantitative protocol has been adapted previously for fast acquisitions with whole brain coverage. The sparse sampling required an adaption of the optimisation approach with additional constraints necessary in order to obtain reliable results. Therefore, the corresponding pool fractions were determined using linear op...

  16. Myelin water fraction in human cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yijing; Alexander, Andrew L; Fleming, John O; Duncan, Ian D; Field, Aaron S

    2006-01-01

    The noninvasive discrimination of myelin disease from axonal loss and other pathologic confounds remains an unsolved problem in multiple sclerosis but may be possible through magnetic resonance quantitation of the intramyelinic water compartment. Technical challenges have limited the study of this approach in the spinal cord, a common site of involvement in multiple sclerosis. This technical note reports the test-retest reproducibility of a short T2-based estimate of myelin content in human spinal cord in vivo.

  17. Functional Gap Junctions in the Schwann Cell Myelin Sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balice-Gordon, Rita J.; Bone, Linda J.; Scherer, Steven S.

    1998-01-01

    The Schwann cell myelin sheath is a multilamellar structure with distinct structural domains in which different proteins are localized. Intracellular dye injection and video microscopy were used to show that functional gap junctions are present within the myelin sheath that allow small molecules to diffuse between the adaxonal and perinuclear Schwann cell cytoplasm. Gap junctions are localized to periodic interruptions in the compact myelin called Schmidt–Lanterman incisures and to paranodes; these regions contain at least one gap junction protein, connexin32 (Cx32). The radial diffusion of low molecular weight dyes across the myelin sheath was not interrupted in myelinating Schwann cells from cx32-null mice, indicating that other connexins participate in forming gap junctions in these cells. Owing to the unique geometry of myelinating Schwann cells, a gap junction-mediated radial pathway may be essential for rapid diffusion between the adaxonal and perinuclear cytoplasm, since this radial pathway is approximately one million times faster than the circumferential pathway. PMID:9722620

  18. Focal necrosis and disturbed myelination in the white matter of newborn infants: a tale of too much or too little oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmann, Sven; Bührer, Christoph; Schmitz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    White matter disease in preterm infants comes along with focal destructions or with diffuse myelination disturbance. Recent experimental work with transgenic mice paves the way for a unifying molecular model for both types of brain injury, placing oxygen sensing by oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) at the center stage. Mice genetically altered to mimic high local oxygen tension in oligodendroglia lineage cells (via deletion of hypoxia-inducible factor, HIF) develop white matter disease resembling cystic periventricular leukomalacia within the first 7 days of life. Mice in which local hypoxia is mimicked in oligodendroglial cells (via genetic inhibition of HIF decay) display arrested OPC maturation and subsequent hypomyelination, reminiscent of the diffuse white matter disease observed in preterm infants and infants with congenital heart disease. These recent experimental findings on oxygen sensing and myelination are awaiting integration into a clinical framework. Gene regulation in response to hyperoxia or hypoxia, rather than oxidative stress, may be an important mechanism underlying neonatal white matter disease.

  19. FGF-2 signal promotes proliferation of cerebellar progenitor cells and their oligodendrocytic differentiation at early postnatal stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naruse, Masae; Shibasaki, Koji; Ishizaki, Yasuki, E-mail: yasukiishizaki@gunma-u.ac.jp

    2015-08-07

    The origins and developmental regulation of cerebellar oligodendrocytes are largely unknown, although some hypotheses of embryonic origins have been suggested. Neural stem cells exist in the white matter of postnatal cerebellum, but it is unclear whether these neural stem cells generate oligodendrocytes at postnatal stages. We previously showed that cerebellar progenitor cells, including neural stem cells, widely express CD44 at around postnatal day 3. In the present study, we showed that CD44-positive cells prepared from the postnatal day 3 cerebellum gave rise to neurospheres, while CD44-negative cells prepared from the same cerebellum did not. These neurospheres differentiated mainly into oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, suggesting that CD44-positive neural stem/progenitor cells might generate oligodendrocytes in postnatal cerebellum. We cultured CD44-positive cells from the postnatal day 3 cerebellum in the presence of signaling molecules known as mitogens or inductive differentiation factors for oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Of these, only FGF-2 promoted survival and proliferation of CD44-positive cells, and these cells differentiated into O4+ oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, we examined the effect of FGF-2 on cerebellar oligodendrocyte development ex vivo. FGF-2 enhanced proliferation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and increased the number of O4+ and CC1+ oligodendrocytes in slice cultures. These results suggest that CD44-positive cells might be a source of cerebellar oligodendrocytes and that FGF-2 plays important roles in their development at an early postnatal stage. - Highlights: • CD44 is expressed in cerebellar neural stem/progenitor cells at postnatal day 3 (P3). • FGF-2 promoted proliferation of CD44-positive progenitor cells from P3 cerebellum. • FGF-2 promoted oligodendrocytic differentiation of CD44-positive progenitor cells. • FGF-2 increased the number of oligodendrocytes in P3 cerebellar slice culture.

  20. Behaviour of oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells in an experimental model of toxic demyelination of the central nervous system Comportamento de oligodendrócitos e células de Schwann em modelo experimental de desmielinização tóxica do sistema nervoso central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominguita Lühers Graça

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells are engaged in myelin production, maintenance and repairing respectively in the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral nervous system (PNS. Whereas oligodendrocytes act only within the CNS, Schwann cells are able to invade the CNS in order to make new myelin sheaths around demyelinated axons. Both cells have some limitations in their activities, i.e. oligodendrocytes are post-mitotic cells and Schwann cells only get into the CNS in the absence of astrocytes. Ethidium bromide (EB is a gliotoxic chemical that when injected locally within the CNS, induce demyelination. In the EB model of demyelination, glial cells are destroyed early after intoxication and Schwann cells are free to approach the naked central axons. In normal Wistar rats, regeneration of lost myelin sheaths can be achieved as early as thirteen days after intoxication; in Wistar rats immunosuppressed with cyclophosphamide the process is delayed and in rats administered cyclosporine it may be accelerated. Aiming the enlightening of those complex processes, all events concerning the myelinating cells in an experimental model are herein presented and discussed.Oligodendrócitos e células de Schwann realizam a produção e manutenção das bainhas de mielina, respectivamente no sistema nervoso central (SNC e periférico (SNP. As células de Schwann, à diferença dos oligodendrócitos, são capazes de invadir o SNC para remielinizar axônios desmielinizados, sempre que os astrócitos tenham sido destruídos. O brometo de etídio é uma droga gliotóxica usada para induzir desmielinização com o desaparecimento precoce de astrócitos, de modo que as células de Schwann têm liberdade para invadir o SNC. Em ratos Wistar normais, a remielinização é detectada treze dias após desmielinização; em ratos Wistar imunossuprimidos com ciclofosfamida a reparação do tecido é tardia, enquanto que em animais tratados com ciclosporina ela

  1. Replication of JC Virus DNA in the G144 Oligodendrocyte Cell Line Is Dependent Upon Akt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jesse N; Lin, Brian; Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J; Tsichlis, Philip; Schwob, James E; Bullock, Peter A

    2017-10-15

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is an often-fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. PML results when oligodendrocytes within immunocompromised individuals are infected with the human JC virus (JCV). We have identified an oligodendrocyte precursor cell line, termed G144, that supports robust levels of JCV DNA replication, a central part of the JCV life cycle. In addition, we have determined that JC virus readily infects G144 cells. Furthermore, we have determined that JCV DNA replication in G144 cells is stimulated by myristoylated (i.e., constitutively active) Akt and reduced by the Akt-specific inhibitor MK2206. Thus, this oligodendrocyte-based model system will be useful for a number of purposes, such as studies of JCV infection, establishing key pathways needed for the regulation of JCV DNA replication, and identifying inhibitors of this process.IMPORTANCE The disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by the infection of particular brain cells, termed oligodendrocytes, by the JC virus. Studies of PML, however, have been hampered by the lack of an immortalized human cell line derived from oligodendrocytes. Here, we report that the G144 oligodendrocyte cell line supports both infection by JC virus and robust levels of JCV DNA replication. Moreover, we have established that the Akt pathway regulates JCV DNA replication and that JCV DNA replication can be inhibited by MK2206, a compound that is specific for Akt. These and related findings suggest that we have established a powerful oligodendrocyte-based model system for studies of JCV-dependent PML. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Optimizing culture medium composition to improve oligodendrocyte progenitor cell yields in vitro from subventricular zone-derived neural progenitor cell neurospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Paula G; Pasquini, Juana M; Silvestroff, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells (NSC/NPC) are gathering tangible recognition for their uses in cell therapy and cell replacement therapies for human disease, as well as a model system to continue research on overall neural developmental processes in vitro. The Subventricular Zone is one of the largest NSC/NPC niches in the developing mammalian Central Nervous System, and persists through to adulthood. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) enriched cultures are usefull tools for in vitro studies as well as for cell replacement therapies for treating demyelination diseases. We used Subventricular Zone-derived NSC/NPC primary cultures from newborn mice and compared the effects of different growth factor combinations on cell proliferation and OPC yield. The Platelet Derived Growth Factor-AA and BB homodimers had a positive and significant impact on OPC generation. Furthermore, heparin addition to the culture media contributed to further increase overall culture yields. The OPC generated by this protocol were able to mature into Myelin Basic Protein-expressing cells and to interact with neurons in an in vitro co-culture system. As a whole, we describe an optimized in vitro method for increasing OPC.

  3. Lipooligosaccharide of Campylobacter jejuni prevents myelin-specific enteral tolerance to autoimmune neuritis--a potential mechanism in Guillain-Barre syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Stefan; Zimmer, Sabine; Lüneberg, Edeltraud; Frosch, Matthias; Karch, Helge; Korn, Thomas; Toyka, Klaus V

    Campylobacter jejuni-induced enteritis is the most common infection preceding Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), an immune-mediated polyradiculoneuritis. The acute autoimmune attack is thought to be based on C. jejuni antigens which may mimick antigens of the peripheral nervous system. Additional pathomechanisms, like disturbance of natural T cell immunoregulation by C. jejuni, have not been evaluated so far. In experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN), a T lymphocyte-mediated animal model of human GBS, tolerance to myelin-derived autoantigens can be induced by oral feeding of the respective antigen. Here we investigated whether the lipooligosaccharide (LOS) fraction of C. jejuni may directly alter immunologic tolerance through gastrointestinal pathways. While EAN, actively induced by immunization with bovine peripheral nerve myelin could be ameliorated by precedent feeding of myelin, feeding of C. jejuni LOS along with the myelin antigen not only prevented the tolerizing effects of oral myelin but even accelerated the onset of overt EAN and augmented the myelin-specific B cell response. These findings provide evidence that LOS of C. jejuni, as produced in the gut during C. jejuni-induced enteritis, can disturb natural tolerance to definite proteins which may be or may mimic peripheral nerve antigens. In human patients this may be one of the potential mechanisms to explain why C. jejuni enteritis is a common trigger of GBS.

  4. Nanoscale Correlated Disorder in Out-of-Equilibrium Myelin Ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campi, Gaetano; Di Gioacchino, Michael; Poccia, Nicola; Ricci, Alessandro; Burghammer, Manfred; Ciasca, Gabriele; Bianconi, Antonio

    2018-01-23

    Ultrastructural fluctuations at nanoscale are fundamental to assess properties and functionalities of advanced out-of-equilibrium materials. We have taken myelin as a model of supramolecular assembly in out-of-equilibrium living matter. Myelin sheath is a simple stable multilamellar structure of high relevance and impact in biomedicine. Although it is known that myelin has a quasi-crystalline ultrastructure, there is no information on its fluctuations at nanoscale in different states due to limitations of the available standard techniques. To overcome these limitations, we have used scanning micro X-ray diffraction, which is a unique non-invasive probe of both reciprocal and real space to visualize statistical fluctuations of myelin order of the sciatic nerve of Xenopus laevis. The results show that the ultrastructure period of the myelin is stabilized by large anticorrelated fluctuations at nanoscale, between hydrophobic and hydrophilic layers. The ratio between the total thickness of hydrophilic and hydrophobic layers defines the conformational parameter, which describes the different states of myelin. Our key result is that myelin in its out-of-equilibrium functional state fluctuates point-to-point between different conformations showing a correlated disorder described by a Levy distribution. As the system approaches the thermodynamic equilibrium in an aged state, the disorder loses its correlation degree and the structural fluctuation distribution changes to Gaussian. In a denatured state at low pH, it changes to a completely disordered stage. Our results aim to clarify the degradation mechanism in biological systems by associating these states with ultrastructural dynamic fluctuations at nanoscale.

  5. Role of CNPase in the Oligodendrocytic Extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP-Adenosine Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Jonathan D.; Jackson, Travis C.; Gillespie, Delbert G.; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Bansal, Rashmi; Goebbels, Sandra; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Jackson, Edwin K.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (3′,5′-cAMP) is an endogenous source of localized adenosine production in many organs. Recent studies suggest that extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP (positional isomer of 3′,5′-cAMP) is also a source of adenosine, particularly in the brain in vivo post-injury. Moreover, in vitro studies show that both microglia and astrocytes can convert extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP to adenosine. Here we examined the ability of primary mouse oligodendrocytes and neurons to metabolize extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP and their respective adenosine monophosphates (2′-AMP and 3′-AMP). Cells were also isolated from mice deficient in 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide-3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase). Oligodendrocytes metabolized 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP with 10-fold greater efficiency than did neurons (and also more than previously examined microglia and astrocytes); whereas, the production of 3′-AMP was minimal in both oligodendrocytes and neurons. The production of 2′-AMP from 2′,3′-cAMP was reduced by 65% in CNPase -/- versus CNPase +/+ oligodendrocytes. Oligodendrocytes also converted 2′-AMP to adenosine, and this was also attenuated in CNPase -/- oligodendrocytes. Inhibition of classic 3′,5′-cAMP-3′-phosphodiesterases with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine did not block metabolism of 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP and inhibition of classic ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) with α,β-methylene-adenosine-5′-diphosphate did not attenuate the conversion of 2′-AMP to adenosine. These studies demonstrate that oligodendrocytes express the extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP-adenosine pathway (2′,3′-cAMP → 2′-AMP → adenosine). This pathway is more robustly expressed in oligodendrocytes than in all other CNS cell types because CNPase is the predominant enzyme that metabolizes 2′,3′-cAMP to 2-AMP in CNS cells. By reducing levels of 2′,3′-cAMP (a mitochondrial toxin) and increasing levels of adenosine (a neuroprotectant

  6. Early nutrition influences developmental myelination and cognition in infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoni, Sean; Dean, Douglas; Joelson, Sarah; O'Regan, Jonathan; Schneider, Nora

    2017-12-19

    Throughout early neurodevelopment, myelination helps provide the foundation for brain connectivity and supports the emergence of cognitive and behavioural functioning. Early life nutrition is an important and modifiable factor that can shape myelination and, consequently, cognitive outcomes. Differences in the nutritional composition between human breast and formula milk may help explain the functional and cognitive disparity often observed between exclusively breast versus formula-fed children. However, past cognitive and brain imaging studies comparing breast and formula feeding are often: cross-sectional; performed in older children and adolescents relying on parental recall of infant feeding; and generally treat formula-fed children as a single group despite the variability between formula compositions. Here we address some of these weakness by examining longitudinal trajectories of brain and neurocognitive development in children who were exclusively breastfed versus formula-fed for at least 3 months. We further examine development between children who received different formula compositions. Results reveal significantly improved overall myelination in breastfed children accompanied by increased general, verbal, and non-verbal cognitive abilities compared to children who were exclusively formula-fed. These differences were found to persist into childhood even with groups matched for important socioeconomic and demographic factors. We also find significant developmental differences depending on formula composition received and that, in particular, long-chain fatty acids, iron, choline, sphingomyelin and folic acid are significantly associated with early myelination trajectories. These results add to the consensus that prolonged and exclusive breastfeeding plays an important role in early neurodevelopment and childhood cognitive outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Functional phylogenetic analysis of LGI proteins identifies an interaction motif crucial for myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Linde; Jaegle, Martine; Driegen, Siska; Aunin, Eerik; Leslie, Kris; Fukata, Yuko; Watanabe, Masahiko; Fukata, Masaki; Meijer, Dies

    2014-04-01

    The cellular interactions that drive the formation and maintenance of the insulating myelin sheath around axons are only partially understood. Leucine-rich glioma-inactivated (LGI) proteins play important roles in nervous system development and mutations in their genes have been associated with epilepsy and amyelination. Their function involves interactions with ADAM22 and ADAM23 cell surface receptors, possibly in apposing membranes, thus attenuating cellular interactions. LGI4-ADAM22 interactions are required for axonal sorting and myelination in the developing peripheral nervous system (PNS). Functional analysis revealed that, despite their high homology and affinity for ADAM22, LGI proteins are functionally distinct. To dissect the key residues in LGI proteins required for coordinating axonal sorting and myelination in the developing PNS, we adopted a phylogenetic and computational approach and demonstrate that the mechanism of action of LGI4 depends on a cluster of three amino acids on the outer surface of the LGI4 protein, thus providing a structural basis for the mechanistic differences in LGI protein function in nervous system development and evolution.

  8. Coseeded Schwann cells myelinate neurites from differentiated neural stem cells in neurotrophin-3-loaded PLGA carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yi; Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Fang, Zheng-Yu; Zeng, Cheng-Guang; Zhang, Chao; Qi, Guo-Long; Li, Man-Hui; Zhang, Wei; Quan, Da-Ping; Wan, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Biomaterials and neurotrophic factors represent promising guidance for neural repair. In this study, we combined poly-(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) conduits and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) to generate NT-3-loaded PLGA carriers in vitro. Bioactive NT-3 was released stably and constantly from PLGA conduits for up to 4 weeks. Neural stem cells (NSCs) and Schwann cells (SCs) were coseeded into an NT-releasing scaffold system and cultured for 14 days. Immunoreactivity against Map2 showed that most of the grafted cells (>80%) were differentiated toward neurons. Double-immunostaining for synaptogenesis and myelination revealed the formation of synaptic structures and myelin sheaths in the coculture, which was also observed under electron microscope. Furthermore, under depolarizing conditions, these synapses were excitable and capable of releasing synaptic vesicles labeled with FM1-43 or FM4-64. Taken together, coseeding NSCs and SCs into NT-3-loaded PLGA carriers increased the differentiation of NSCs into neurons, developed synaptic connections, exhibited synaptic activities, and myelination of neurites by the accompanying SCs. These results provide an experimental basis that supports transplantation of functional neural construction in spinal cord injury. PMID:22619535

  9. Peripheral myelin protein 22 is a constituent of intercellular junctions in epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notterpek, L; Roux, K J; Amici, S A; Yazdanpour, A; Rahner, C; Fletcher, B S

    2001-12-04

    Alterations in peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene expression are associated with a host of heritable demyelinating peripheral neuropathies, yet the function of the protein remains unknown. PMP22 expression is highest in myelinating Schwann cells of peripheral nerves; however, significant levels of PMP22 mRNAs can be detected in a variety of non-neural tissue, including epithelia. To date, PMP22 protein expression and localization in non-neural tissues have not been studied in detail. In adult rat liver and intestine, and cultured epithelial cells, we detected PMP22-like immunoreactivity associated with markers of the tight junctional complex, including zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and occludin. Upon disruption of intercellular contacts, PMP22 was internalized into vesicles that were immunoreactive for both anti-occludin and anti-PMP22 antibodies. Nonionic detergent extraction of cultured epithelial cells did not solubilize PMP22, as the majority of the protein remained in the detergent insoluble fraction, as did ZO-1 and occludin. We also observed the targeting of exogenous myc-tagged PMP22 to apical cell junctions in polarized epithelia and to anti-ZO-1 antibody immunoreactive cell contacts of L fibroblasts. These studies support a role for PMP22 at intercellular junctions of epithelia and may indicate a similar function in myelinating Schwann cells. Furthermore, our findings could provide an explanation for certain phenotypes of PMP22 neuropathy mice that cannot be accounted for by dysmyelination.

  10. Association of myelin basic protein with detergent micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R; McDonald, B J

    1979-06-13

    Equilibrium measurements of the binding of central nervous system myelin basic protein to sodium dodecyl sulphate, sodium deoxycholate and lysophosphatidylcholine have been obtained by gel permeation chromatography and dialysis. This protein associates with large amounts of each of these surfactants: the apparent saturation weight ratios (surfactant/protein) being 3.58 +/- 0.12 and 2.30 +/- 0.15 for dodecyl sulphate at ionic strengths 0.30 and 0.10, respectively 1.34 +/- 0.10 for deoxycholate (at 0.12 ionic strength) and 4.0 +/- 0.5 for lysophosphatidylcholine. Binding to the ionic surfactants increases markedly close to their critical micelle concentrations. Sedimentation analysis shows that at 0.30 ionic strenght in excess dodecyl sulphate the protein is monomeric. It becomes dimeric when the binding ratio falls below 1 at a free detergent concentration of approximately 0.25 mM: below this concentration much of the protein and deterent forms an insoluble complex. The amount of dodecyl sulphate bound at high concentrations and at both above-mentioned ionic strengths corresponds closely to that expected for interaction of a single poly-peptide with two micelles. Variability of deoxycholate micelle size on interaction with other molecules precludes a similar analysis for this surfactant. Association was observed only with single micelles of lysophosphatidylcholine. The results provide strong evidence for dual lipid-binding sites on basic protein and indicate that lipid bilayer cross-linking by this protein may be effected by single molecules.

  11. Canine spinal cord neuron and axon myelin sheath morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Francischini Carvalho, A C; Pacheco, M R; Baraldi Artoni, S M; Mateus, O

    2006-10-01

    This inedited morphometric study has been developed from healthy canine spinal cord neuron cytoplasm and nucleus, and white matter axonal myelin sheath, from cervical, thoracic and lumbar regions. For the morphometric study, the parameters were area, perimeter, maximum and minimum diameters and roundness for neurons and myelin thickness for axon. For each parameter, 300 neurons were analysed. The results revealed that lumbar neurons had the highest mean values for the analysed parameters, indicating the presence of large neurons in this region, with large axons as a result of myelin thickness, which is proportional to axon calibre. We conclude that these morphometric results can contribute for the establishment of normal patterns, for canine spinal cord cervical, thoracic and lumbar segments.

  12. OSP-Immunofluorescent remyelinating oligodendrocytes in the brainstem of toxically-demyelinated Wistar rats Oligodendrócitos remielinizantes positivos para OSP - proteína específica do oligodendrócito- no tronco encefálico de ratos Wistar desmielinizados toxicamente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Simone Viégas Sallis

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS remyelination following toxically-induced demyelination is a well known process. Oligodendrocytes constitute the bulk of the myelinating cells in the brain whereas Schwann cells overwhelm oligodendrocytes numbers in spinal cord remyelination. Despite the common knowledge of these facts, we still do not know completely the origin of both remyelinating cells. The present study investigated the participation of mature oligodendrocytes in remyelination after ethidium-bromide (EB induced demyelination in the brainstem of normal and cyclosporin A-immunosuppressed Wistar rats. Thirty adult female rats were divided into three experimental groups. In group 1 the rats received a single intracisternal injection of 10 muL of 0.1% ethidium bromide (EB in 0.9% saline (n=10; in group 2 the rats received the EB injection while immunosuppressed with cyclosporin A (n=10; in group 3 the rats received a single 10 muL injection of 0.9% saline while treated with cyclosporin A. The rats were killed at 15, 21 and 31 days after injection. Within the EB lesions, from 15 days onward many cells within the periphery of the lesions stained positive for OSP (oligodendrocyte specific protein a marker for mature oligodendrocytes and myelin. This cell marking signals that, at least, part of the process of repairing the myelin sheaths is carried out by mature cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage.A remielinização do sistema nervoso central após desmielinização tóxica é um processo bem conhecido. No encéfalo, os oligodendrócitos remielinizam uma área maior do que na medula espinhal, onde as células de Schwann são preponderantes. Embora esses fatos sejam bem conhecidos, ainda não se conhece com certeza a origem das células remielinizantes. Esta investigação foi desenhada para esclarecer a participação de oligodendrócitos maduros na reconstrução das bainhas perdidas após a desmielinização induzida por brometo de etídio (BE no

  13. Interleukin-17 impedes Schwann cell-mediated myelination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Pro-inflammatory cytokines are known to have deleterious effects on Schwann cells (SCs). Interleukin 17 (IL-17) is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine that exhibits relevant effects during inflammation in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), and IL-17-secreting cells have been reported within the endoneurium in proximity to the SCs. Methods Here, we analyzed the effects of IL-17 on myelination and the immunological properties of SCs. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) co-cultures containing neurons and SCs from BL6 mice were used to define the impact of IL-17 on myelination and on SC differentiation; primary SCs were analyzed for RNA and protein expression to define the putative immunological alignment of the SCs. Results SCs were found to functionally express the IL-17 receptors A and B. In DRG cultures, stimulation with IL-17 resulted in reduced myelin synthesis, while pro-myelin gene expression was suppressed at the mRNA level. Neuronal outgrowth and SC viability, as well as structural myelin formation, remained unaffected. Co-cultures exhibited SC-relevant pro-inflammatory markers, such as matrix metalloproteinase 9 and SCs significantly increased the expression of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I and exhibited a slight, nonsignificant increase in expression of MHCII, and a transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) II molecules relevant for antigen processing and presentation. Conclusions IL-17 may act as a myelin-suppressive mediator in the peripheral nerve, directly propagating SC-mediated demyelination, paralleled by an inflammatory alignment of the SCs. Further analyses are warranted to elucidate the role of IL-17 during inflammation in the PNS in vivo, which could be useful in the development of target therapies. PMID:24678820

  14. Immune profile of an atypical EAE model in marmoset monkeys immunized with recombinant human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in incomplete Freund's adjuvant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagessar, S. Anwar; Heijmans, Nicole; Blezer, Erwin L. A.; Bauer, Jan; Weissert, Robert; 't Hart, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Background: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) is a relevant preclinical model for translational research into immunopathogenic mechanisms operating in multiple sclerosis (MS). Prior studies showed a core pathogenic role of T and B

  15. Induction of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis With Recombinant Human Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Incomplete Freund's Adjuvant in Three Non-human Primate Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, Krista G.; Jagessar, S. Anwar; Bauchet, Anne-Laure; Doussau, Mireille; Fovet, Claire-Maelle; Heijmans, Nicole; Hofman, Sam O.; van Lubeek-Veth, Jennifer; Bajramovic, Jeffrey J.; Kap, Yolanda S.; Laman, Jon D.; Touin, Helene; Watroba, Laurent; Bauer, Jan; Lachapelle, Francois; Serguera, Che; 't Hart, Bert A.

    2013-01-01

    The experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) model is used for preclinical research into the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), mostly in inbred, specific pathogen free (SPF)-raised laboratory mice. However, the naive state of the laboratory mouse immune system is considered a major hurdle

  16. Immune profile of an atypical EAE model in marmoset monkeys immunized with recombinant human myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in incomplete Freund's adjuvant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Jagessar (Anwar); N. Heijmans (Nicole); E. Blezer (Erwin); J. Bauer; R. Weissert (Robert); B.A. 't Hart (Bert)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) is a relevant preclinical model for translational research into immunopathogenic mechanisms operating in multiple sclerosis (MS). Prior studies showed a core pathogenic role of

  17. LINGO-1 regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation by inhibiting ErbB2 translocation and activation in lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Xinhua; Shao, Zhaohui; Sheng, Guoqing; Pepinsky, Blake; Mi, Sha

    2014-05-01

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation is negatively regulated by LINGO-1 and positively regulated by the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase. In wild-type oligodendrocytes, inhibition of ErbB2 blocks differentiation, whereas activation of ErbB2 promotes differentiation. In LINGO-1(-/-) oligodendrocytes, inhibition of ErbB2 blocks oligodendrocyte differentiation; whereas activation of ErbB2 does not enhance differentiation. Biological and biochemical evidence showing that LINGO-1 can directly bind to ErbB2, block ErbB2 translocation into lipid rafts, and inhibit its phosphorylation for activation. The study demonstrates a novel regulatory mechanism of ErbB2 function whereby LINGO-1 suppresses oligodendrocyte differentiation by inhibiting ErbB2 translocation and activation in lipid rafts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Myelination Is Associated with Processing Speed in Early Childhood: Preliminary Insights

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chevalier, Nicolas; Kurth, Salome; Doucette, Margaret Rae; Wiseheart, Melody; Deoni, Sean C L; Dean, 3rd, Douglas C; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Blackwell, Katharine A; Munakata, Yuko; LeBourgeois, Monique K

    2015-01-01

    .... Myelinated white matter plays a central role in brain messaging, and likely mediates processing speed, but little is known about the relationship between myelination and processing speed in young children...

  19. [Early reactive changes of myelin sheath in the area of myelin sheath gaps (nodes of Ranvier) in nerve fibers (a supravital study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, O S; Kokurina, T N; Solov'eva, I A; Sergeeva, S S

    2011-01-01

    Using the inverted phase contrast microscope, the supravital study of structural dynamics of single myelin sheath gaps (nodes of Ranvier) of isolated frog myelin nerve fibers was performed after mechanical injury and in the medium with the decreased ion force under the conditions which induce, in electrophysiological experiments, the expression of the axolemmal K+-channels in the paranodal area. Videorecording has shown that within this area the myelin sheath stratification appeared that was associated with the swelling of Schwann cell cytoplasm enclosed in the terminal membranous loops of myelin. An increase of the degree of stratification of the lamellar myelin complexes make them invisible in the light microscope; therefore, it is not the translocation of the myelin sheath from the node cleft that is recorded, as many authors believed, but a shift of only the visible border of the compact, yet unstratified myelin sheath. Hence, the removal of myelin (demyelination) was absent, and the electrophysiological effect can be accounted for by a significant fall of electrical resistance in paranodal area as a result of swelling of terminal loops and stratification of the myelin sheath. Preparations examination also revealed a decrease of the axonal diameter in, which is proportional to swelling of the myelin sheath terminal parts. Since the outer fiber diameter did not change, it can be concluded that the process observed is the result of swelling of the Schwann cell cytoplasm due to the axoplasm water fraction which may be a peculiar process of axo-glial interactions.

  20. Association of extensive myelinated nerve fibers and high degree myopia: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Elvan Yalcın; Ozlem Balcı; Ziya Akıngol

    2013-01-01

    Unilateral extensive myelination of the peripapillary nerve fibers may be associated with anisometropic myopia, strabismus, and reduced vision. Myelination of optic nerve fibers terminate at lamina cribrosa. Yet in some patients, myelination progresses into the peripapillary retinal nerve fibers and may affect the visual acuity. In this report, we described 4 patients. All patients presented extensive peripapillary myelinated nerve fibers associated with myopic anisometropia. After routine op...

  1. Role and Specificity of LGI4-ADAM22 Interactions in Peripheral Nerve Myelination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Kegel (Linde)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn the peripheral nervous system, large caliber axons are ensheathed and myelinated by Schwann cells. Myelin is crucial for a faster signal transduction along the nerve. Hence it is not surprising that defects in this myelination process cause serious neurological disease. Despite the

  2. Analysis of the direct injury effector of oligodendroglia cells or myelin sheath in an experimental allergic encephalomyelitis model induced by the MOG35-55 peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangyu; Li, Xiaoyong; Feng, Meina; Zhang, Qi; Yang, Zhendong

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible role of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and mononuclear macrophages in the pathogenic processes of experimental animals. To construct a chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) model, an artificially synthesized myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35‑55 peptide was used to induce C57BL/6 mice. Subsequently, the experimental animals were investigated at the level of their nervous function, and histopathological, immunohistochemical and fluorescence immunohistochemical experiments were performed at different time points following immunization. The expression of immune molecules and cytokines associated with the activation of the mononuclear macrophages and CTL during the different stages was assessed by western blotting and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. As a result, the MOG35‑55 peptide was identified as being successful at inducing C57BL/6 mice for the development of the EAE model. A modest level of mononuclear macrophage and lymphocyte infiltration was observed in the central nervous system (CNS), although no infiltration of neutrophils was observed. A sporadic flaky deletion of the myelin sheath was also identified. The activation and proliferation of mononuclear macrophages, including microglia cells, was clearly demonstrated. Furthermore, the expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class I and II molecules and interleukin‑12 in the brain, which is associated with the activation and proliferation of mononuclear macrophages, increased over the duration of the experiment compared with less pronounced changes in the expression levels of interferon (IFN)‑γ, Fas and perforin in the CNS, which are associated with the function of CTL. The secretion of IFN‑γ in the spleen increased during the morbidity peak, however, any noticeable activation and proliferation of CD8+ T cells was absent. These results demonstrated that the induced

  3. The effect of DDT and dieldrin on myelinated nerve fibres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bercken, J. van den

    1972-01-01

    The effects of the chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides, DDT and dieldrin, on myelinated nerve fibres of the clawed toad, Xenopus laevis, were studied by recording compound action nerve fibres, and membrane potentials of single nodes of Ranvier. The effect of DDT (5 × 10−4 M) was found to be

  4. Focal seizure-induced premature myelination: speculation from serial MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duprez, T.; Grandin, C. [Department of Medical Imaging, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Ghariani, S.; Gadisseux, J.F.; Evrard, P. [Department of Pediatric Neurology, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Smith, A.M. [MRI Laboratory, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    1998-09-01

    Local changes in the white matter underlying a focus of cortical thickening were monitored using MRI in an epileptic 2-month-old boy. We hypothesise that these changes reflected seizure-induced premature myelination. (orig.) (orig.) With 2 figs., 10 refs.

  5. Culture of rat cerebral oligodendrocytes in a serum-free, chemically defined medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koper, J.W.; Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Romijn, H.J.; Golde, L.M.G. van

    1984-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes were isolated from the cerebra of young rats (5-10 days old) by trypsinization of the tissue followed by cell separation on Percoll gradients. The isolation was carried out in physiological, isotonic media. The cell yield was 2-4 × 10⁶ cells per brain; the plating efficiency was

  6. Apolipoprotein D is elevated in oligodendrocytes in the peri-infarct region after experimental stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Deierborg, Tomas; Patel, Shutish

    2008-01-01

    in cells identified as mature oligodendrocytes. The apoD expressing cells were conspicuously located along the rim of the infarct, suggesting a role for apoD in tissue repair. Furthermore, housing animals in an enriched environment improved sensori-motor function and increased the apoD levels. Our data...

  7. FGF8 activates proliferation and migration in mouse post-natal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Cruz-Martinez

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8 is a key molecular signal that is necessary for early embryonic development of the central nervous system, quickly disappearing past this point. It is known to be one of the primary morphogenetic signals required for cell fate and survival processes in structures such as the cerebellum, telencephalic and isthmic organizers, while its absence causes severe abnormalities in the nervous system and the embryo usually dies in early stages of development. In this work, we have observed a new possible therapeutic role for this factor in demyelinating disorders, such as leukodystrophy or multiple sclerosis. In vitro, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were cultured with differentiating medium and in the presence of FGF8. Differentiation and proliferation studies were performed by immunocytochemistry and PCR. Also, migration studies were performed in matrigel cultures, where oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were placed at a certain distance of a FGF8-soaked heparin bead. The results showed that both migration and proliferation was induced by FGF8. Furthermore, a similar effect was observed in an in vivo demyelinating mouse model, where oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were observed migrating towards the FGF8-soaked heparin beads where they were grafted. In conclusion, the results shown here demonstrate that FGF8 is a novel factor to induce oligodendrocyte progenitor cell activation, migration and proliferation in vitro, which can be extrapolated in vivo in demyelinated animal models.

  8. Transient expression of Olig1 initiates the differentiation of neural stem cells into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balasubramaniyan, [No Value; Timmer, N; Kust, B; Boddeke, E; Copray, S

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop an efficient strategy to induce the in vitro differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), NSCs were isolated from E14 mice and grown in medium containing epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor (FGF). Besides supplementing

  9. Human induced pluripotent stem cells differentiation into oligodendrocyte progenitors and transplantation in a rat model of optic chiasm demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Pouya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aims to differentiate human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs into oligodendrocyte precursors and assess their recovery potential in a demyelinated optic chiasm model in rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated a cell population of oligodendrocyte progenitors from hiPSCs by using embryoid body formation in a defined medium supplemented with a combination of factors, positive selection and mechanical enrichment. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence analyses showed that stage-specific markers, Olig2, Sox10, NG2, PDGFRα, O4, A2B5, GalC, and MBP were expressed following the differentiation procedure, and enrichment of the oligodendrocyte lineage. These results are comparable with the expression of stage-specific markers in human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte lineage cells. Transplantation of hiPSC-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors into the lysolecithin-induced demyelinated optic chiasm of the rat model resulted in recovery from symptoms, and integration and differentiation into oligodendrocytes were detected by immunohistofluorescence staining against PLP and MBP, and measurements of the visual evoked potentials. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results showed that oligodendrocyte progenitors generated efficiently from hiPSCs can be used in future biomedical studies once safety issues have been overcome.

  10. High glucocorticoid levels during gestation activate the inflammasome in hippocampal oligodendrocytes of the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Carola J; Aguirre, Adam; Sáez, Juan C

    2017-05-01

    Exposure to high levels of glucocorticoids (GCs) during early life induces long-lasting neuroinflammation. GCs induce rapid degranulation of mast cells, which release proinflammatory molecules promoting activation of microglia and astrocytes. The possible involvement of oligodendrocytes, however, remains poorly understood. It was studied whether high GC levels during gestation activates the inflammasome in hippocampal oligodendrocytes of mouse offspring. Oligodendrocytes of control pups showed expression of inflammasome components (NLRP3, ACS, and caspase-1) and their levels were increased by prenatal administration of dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic GC. These cells also showed high levels of IL-1β and TNF-α, revealing activation of the inflammasome. Moreover, they showed increased levels of the P2X 7 receptor and pannexin1, which are associated to inflammasome activation. However, levels of connexins either were not affected (Cx29) or reduced (Cx32 and Cx47). Nonetheless, the functional states of pannexin1 and connexin hemichannels were elevated and directly associated to functional P2X 7 receptors. As observed in DEX-treated brain slices, hemichannel activity first increased in hippocampal mast cells and later in microglia and macroglia. DEX-induced oligodendrocyte hemichannel activity was mimicked by urocortin-II, which is a corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor (CRHR) agonist. Response to DEX and urocortin-II was inhibited by antalarmin (a CRHR blocker) or by mast cells or microglia inhibitors. The increase in hemichannel activity persisted for several weeks after birth and cross-fostering with a control mother did not reverse this condition. It is proposed that activation of the oligodendrocyte inflammasome might be relevant in demyelinating diseases associated with early life exposure to high GC levels. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 625-642, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Excitation block in a nerve fibre model owing to potassium-dependent changes in myelin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Alexey; Maksimov, G. V.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2011-01-01

    . Uptake of potassium leads to Schwann cell swelling and myelin restructuring that impacts the electrical properties of the myelin. In order to further understand the dynamic interaction that takes place between the myelin and the axon, we have modelled submyelin potassium accumulation and related changes...... in myelin resistance during prolonged high-frequency stimulation. We predict that potassium-mediated decrease in myelin resistance leads to a functional excitation block with various patterns of altered spike trains. The patterns are found to depend on stimulation frequency and amplitude and to range from...

  12. Akt Regulates Axon Wrapping and Myelin Sheath Thickness in the PNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domènech-Estévez, Enric; Baloui, Hasna; Meng, Xiaosong; Zhang, Yanqing; Deinhardt, Katrin; Dupree, Jeff L; Einheber, Steven; Chrast, Roman; Salzer, James L

    2016-04-20

    The signaling pathways that regulate myelination in the PNS remain poorly understood. Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase 1A, activated in Schwann cells by neuregulin and the extracellular matrix, has an essential role in the early events of myelination. Akt/PKB, a key effector of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase 1A, was previously implicated in CNS, but not PNS myelination. Here we demonstrate that Akt plays a crucial role in axon ensheathment and in the regulation of myelin sheath thickness in the PNS. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt in DRG neuron-Schwann cell cocultures dramatically decreased MBP and P0 levels and myelin sheath formation without affecting expression of Krox20/Egr2, a key transcriptional regulator of myelination. Conversely, expression of an activated form of Akt in purified Schwann cells increased expression of myelin proteins, but not Krox20/Egr2, and the levels of activated Rac1. Transgenic mice expressing a membrane-targeted, activated form of Akt under control of the 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase promoter, exhibited thicker PNS and CNS myelin sheaths, and PNS myelin abnormalities, such as tomacula and myelin infoldings/outfoldings, centered around the paranodes and Schmidt Lanterman incisures. These effects were corrected by rapamycin treatmentin vivo Importantly, Akt activity in the transgenic mice did not induce myelination of nonmyelinating Schwann cells in the sympathetic trunk or Remak fibers of the dorsal roots, although, in those structures, they wrapped membranes redundantly around axons. Together, our data indicate that Akt is crucial for PNS myelination driving axonal wrapping by unmyelinated and myelinated Schwann cells and enhancing myelin protein synthesis in myelinating Schwann cells. Although the role of the key serine/threonine kinase Akt in promoting CNS myelination has been demonstrated, its role in the PNS has not been established and remains uncertain. This work reveals that Akt

  13. Involvement of Notch1 inhibition in serum-stimulated glia and oligodendrocyte differentiation from human mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jang Lee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Jang Lee1, Shih-Chieh Hung2–5, Mien-Sheng Chu41Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, 3Institute of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Stem Cell Laboratory, Department of Medical Research and Education, 5Department of Orthopedics, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, TaiwanAbstract: The use of in vitro oligodendrocyte differentiation for transplantation of stem cells to treat demyelinating diseases is an important consideration. In this study, we investigated the effects of serum on glia and oligodendrocyte differentiation from human mesenchymal stem cells (KP-hMSCs. We found that serum deprivation resulted in a reversible downregulation of glial- and oligodendrocyte-specific markers. Serum stimulated expression of oligodendrocyte markers, such as galactocerebroside, as well as Notch1 and JAK1 transcripts. Inhibition of Notch1 activation by the Notch inhibitor, MG132, led to enhanced expression of a serum-stimulated oligodendrocyte marker. This marker was undetectable in serum-deprived KP-hMSCs treated with MG132, suggesting that inhibition of Notch1 function is additive to serum-stimulated oligodendrocyte differentiation. Furthermore, a dominant-negative mutant RBP-J protein also inhibited Notch1 function and led to upregulation of oligodendrocyte-specific markers. Our results demonstrate that serum-stimulated oligodendrocyte differentiation is enhanced by the inhibition of Notch1-associated functions.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, glia and oligodendrocyte differentiation, Notch1 signaling, serum deprivation

  14. Neutron scattering from myelin revisited: bilayer asymmetry and water-exchange kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denninger, Andrew R. [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Demé, Bruno; Cristiglio, Viviana [Institut Laue–Langevin (ILL), CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); LeDuc, Géraldine [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), CS 40220, F-38043 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France); Feller, W. Bruce [NOVA Scientific Inc., Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States); Kirschner, Daniel A., E-mail: kirschnd@bc.edu [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The structure of internodal myelin in the rodent central and peripheral nervous systems has been determined using neutron diffraction. The kinetics of water exchange in these tissues is also described. Rapid nerve conduction in the central and peripheral nervous systems (CNS and PNS, respectively) of higher vertebrates is brought about by the ensheathment of axons with myelin, a lipid-rich, multilamellar assembly of membranes. The ability of myelin to electrically insulate depends on the regular stacking of these plasma membranes and on the presence of a number of specialized membrane-protein assemblies in the sheath, including the radial component, Schmidt–Lanterman incisures and the axo–glial junctions of the paranodal loops. The disruption of this fine-structure is the basis for many demyelinating neuropathies in the CNS and PNS. Understanding the processes that govern myelin biogenesis, maintenance and destabilization requires knowledge of myelin structure; however, the tight packing of internodal myelin and the complexity of its junctional specializations make myelin a challenging target for comprehensive structural analysis. This paper describes an examination of myelin from the CNS and PNS using neutron diffraction. This investigation revealed the dimensions of the bilayers and aqueous spaces of myelin, asymmetry between the cytoplasmic and extracellular leaflets of the membrane, and the distribution of water and exchangeable hydrogen in internodal multilamellar myelin. It also uncovered differences between CNS and PNS myelin in their water-exchange kinetics.

  15. Effects of normal aging on myelin sheath ultrastructures in the somatic sensorimotor system of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fang; Liang, Ping; Fu, Han; Zhang, Jiu-Cong; Chen, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have presented qualitative and quantitative data regarding the morphological changes that occur peripherally in myelin sheaths and nerve fibers of rats during their lifespan. However, studies on ultrastructural features of myelinated fibers (MFs) in the central nervous system (CNS) remain limited. In the present study, morphological analyses of the somatic sensorimotor MFs in rats at time‑points between postnatal day 14 and postnatal month (PNM) 26 were conducted using electron microscopy. Significant alterations in the myelin sheath were observed in the sensorimotor system of aging and aged rats, which became aggravated with age. The ultrastructural pattern of myelin lamellae also exhibited age dependence. The transformation of the myelin intraperiod line from complete to incomplete fusion occurred after PNM 5, leading to an expansion of periodicity in myelin lamellae. These pathological changes in the myelin structure occurred very early and showed a significant correlation with age, indicating that myelin was the part of the CNS with the highest susceptibility to the influence of aging, and may be the main target of aging effects. In addition to the myelin breakdown, continued myelin production and remyelination were observed in the aging sensorimotor system, suggesting the presence of endogenous mechanisms of myelin repair.

  16. Of mothers and myelin: Aberrant myelination phenotypes in mouse model of Angelman syndrome are dependent on maternal and dietary influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Mark D; Carson, Robert P; Lagrange, Andre H

    2015-09-15

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a number of neurological problems, including developmental delay, movement disorders, and epilepsy. AS results from the loss of UBE3A (an imprinted gene) expressed from the maternal chromosome in neurons. Given the ubiquitous expression of Ube3a and the devastating nature of AS, the role of environmental and maternal effects has been largely ignored. Severe ataxia, anxiety-like behaviors and learning deficits are well-documented in patients and AS mice. More recently, clinical imaging studies of AS patients suggest myelination may be delayed or reduced. Utilizing a mouse model of AS, we found disrupted expression of cortical myelin proteins, the magnitude of which is influenced by maternal status, in that the aberrant myelination in the AS pups of AS affected mothers were more pronounced than those seen in AS pups raised by unaffected (Ube3a (m+/p-)) Carrier mothers. Furthermore, feeding the breeding mothers a higher fat (11% vs 5%) diet normalizes these myelin defects. These effects are not limited to myelin proteins. Since AS mice have abnormal stress responses, including altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression, we measured GR expression in pups from Carrier and affected AS mothers. AS pups had higher GR expression than their WT littermates. However, we also found an effect of maternal status, with reduced GR levels in pups from affected mothers compared to genotypically identical pups raised by unaffected Carrier mothers. Taken together, our findings suggest that the phenotypes observed in AS mice may be modulated by factors independent of Ube3a genotype. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Osmic acid staining of myelin sheath in normal and regenerated peripheral nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li-ping; He, Feng-chun; Chen, Xun-wen; Lu, Shi-bi; Lanzetta, Marco; De Iongh, Robbert

    2007-04-01

    To introduce a practical, economical, and time-saving method to stain (with osmic acid) the myelin sheath in normal and regenerated peripheral nerves. A total of 12 Sprague Dawley rats, weighing 250-320 g (mean equal to 276 g+/-38 g), were divided into two groups: a normal nerve group (n equal to 6) and a regenerated nerve group (n equal to 6). In the normal nerve group, the ventral and dorsal roots of L(4) to L(6) and their sciatic nerves were harvested for histological analysis. While in the regenerated nerve group, the right sciatic nerves were severed and then repaired with an epineurial microsuture method. The repaired nerves were harvested 12 weeks postoperatively. All the specimens were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and transferred to 2% osmic acid for 3-5 days. Then the specimens were kept in 75% alcohol before being embedded in paraffin. The tissues were cut into sections of 3 micromolar in thickness with a conventional microtome. Under a light microscope, myelin sheaths were clearly visible at all magnifications in both groups. They were stained in clear dark colour with a light yellow or colorless background, which provided high contrast images to allow reliable morphometric measurements. Morphological assessment was made in both normal and regenerated sciatic nerves. The ratios of the myelin area to the fibre area were 60.28%+/-7.66% in the normal nerve group and 51.67%+/-6.85% in the regenerated nerve group, respectively (P less than 0.01). Osmic acid staining is easy to perform and a very clear image for morphometrical assessment is easy to obtain. Therefore, it is a reliable technique for quantitative evaluation of nerve morphology.

  18. Modelling the presence of myelin and oedema in the brain based on multi-parametric quantitative MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel eWarntjes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to present a model that uses multi-parametric quantitative MRI to estimate the presence of myelin and oedema in the brain. The model relates simultaneous measurement of R1 and R2 relaxation rates and proton density to four partial volume compartments, consisting of myelin partial volume, cellular partial volume, free water partial volume and excess parenchymal water partial volume. The model parameters were obtained using spatially normalised brain images of a group of 20 healthy controls. The pathological brain was modelled in terms of the reduction of myelin content and presence of excess parenchymal water, which indicates the degree of oedema. The method was tested on spatially normalised brain images of a group of 20 age-matched multiple sclerosis (MS patients. Clear differences were observed with respect to the healthy controls: the MS group had a 79 mL smaller brain volume (1069 vs. 1148 mL, a 38 mL smaller myelin volume (119 vs. 157 mL and a 21 mL larger excess parenchymal water volume (78 vs. 57 mL. Template regions of interest of various brain structures indicated that the myelin partial volume in the MS group was 1.6±1.5% lower for grey matter (GM structures and 2.8±1.0% lower for white matter (WM structures. The excess parenchymal water partial volume was 9±10% larger for GM and 5±2% larger for WM. Manually placed ROIs indicated that the results using the template ROIs may have suffered from loss of anatomical detail due to the spatial normalization process. Examples of the application of the method on high-resolution images are provided for three individual subjects, a 45-year-old healthy subject, a 72-year-old healthy subject and a 45-year-old MS patient. The observed results agreed with the expected behaviour considering both age and disease. In conclusion, the proposed model may provide clinically important parameters such as the total brain volume, degree of myelination and degree of oedema, based on

  19. Neurofilament-tubulin binding site peptide NFL-TBS.40-63 increases the differentiation of oligodendrocytes in vitro and partially prevents them from lysophosphatidyl choline toxiciy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fressinaud, Catherine; Eyer, Joël

    2014-02-01

    During multiple sclerosis (MS), the main axon cystoskeleton proteins, neurofilaments (NF), are altered, and their release into the cerebrospinal fluid correlates with disease severity. The role of NF in the extraaxonal location is unknown. Therefore, we tested whether synthetic peptides corresponding to the tubulin-binding site (TBS) sequence identified on light NF chain (NFL-TBS.40-63) and keratin (KER-TBS.1-24), which could be released during MS, modulate remyelination in vitro. Biotinylated NFL-TBS.40-63, NFL-Scramble2, and KER-TBS.1-54 (1-100 μM, 24 hr) were added to rat oligodendrocyte (OL) and astrocyte (AS) cultures, grown in chemically defined medium. Proliferation and differentiation were characterized by using specific antibodies (A2B5, CNP, MBP, GFAP) and compared with untreated cultures. Lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC; 2 × 10(-5) M) was used to induce OL death and to test the effects of TBS peptides under these conditions. NFL-TBS.40-63 significantly increased OL differentiation and maturation, with more CNP(+) and MBP(+) cells characterized by numerous ramified processes, along with myelin balls. When OL were challenged with LPC, concomitant treatment with NFL-TBS.40-63 rescued more than 50% of OL compared with cultures treated with LPC only. Proliferation of OL progenitors was not affected, nor were AS proliferation and differentiation. NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide induces specific effects in vitro, increasing OL differentiation and maturation without altering AS fate. In addition, it partially protects OL from demyelinating injury. Thus release of NFL-TBS.40-63 caused by axonal damage in vivo could improve repair through increased OL differentiation, which is a prerequisite for remyelination. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The 21.5-kDa isoform of myelin basic protein has a non-traditional PY-nuclear-localization signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Graham S.T.; Seymour, Lauren V. [Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario (Canada); Boggs, Joan M. [Molecular Structure and Function, Research Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Harauz, George, E-mail: gharauz@uoguelph.ca [Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full-length 21.5-kDa MBP isoform is translocated to the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesized that the exon-II-encoded sequence contained the NLS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We mutated this sequence in RFP-tagged constructs and transfected N19-cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Abolition of two key positively-charged residues resulted in loss of nuclear-trafficking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 21.5-kDa isoform of classic MBP contains a non-traditional PY-NLS. -- Abstract: The predominant 18.5-kDa classic myelin basic protein (MBP) is mainly responsible for compaction of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system, but is multifunctional, having numerous interactions with Ca{sup 2+}-calmodulin, actin, tubulin, and SH3-domains, and can tether these proteins to a lipid membrane in vitro. The full-length 21.5-kDa MBP isoform has an additional 26 residues encoded by exon-II of the classic gene, which causes it to be trafficked to the nucleus of oligodendrocytes (OLGs). We have performed site-directed mutagenesis of selected residues within this segment in red fluorescent protein (RFP)-tagged constructs, which were then transfected into the immortalized N19-OLG cell line to view protein localization using epifluorescence microscopy. We found that 21.5-kDa MBP contains two non-traditional PY-nuclear-localization signals, and that arginine and lysine residues within these motifs were involved in subcellular trafficking of this protein to the nucleus, where it may have functional roles during myelinogenesis.

  1. Protective Effects of Berberine on Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion on Oligodendrocyte Cell Line (OLN-93

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Nadjafi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: We concluded that berberine protected OLN-93 oligodendrocyte against ischemic induced excitotoxic injury. Attenuation of intracellular Ca 2+ overload by berberine may be the key mechanism that saved OLN-93 from excitotoxicity damage.

  2. Immunodominant fragments of myelin basic protein initiate T cell-dependent pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Huaqing

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myelin sheath provides electrical insulation of mechanosensory Aβ-afferent fibers. Myelin-degrading matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs damage the myelin sheath. The resulting electrical instability of Aβ-fibers is believed to activate the nociceptive circuitry in Aβ-fibers and initiate pain from innocuous tactile stimulation (mechanical allodynia. The precise molecular mechanisms, responsible for the development of this neuropathic pain state after nerve injury (for example, chronic constriction injury, CCI, are not well understood. Methods and results Using mass spectrometry of the whole sciatic nerve proteome followed by bioinformatics analyses, we determined that the pathways, which are classified as the Infectious Disease and T-helper cell signaling, are readily activated in the nerves post-CCI. Inhibition of MMP-9/MMP-2 suppressed CCI-induced mechanical allodynia and concomitant TNF-α and IL-17A expression in nerves. MMP-9 proteolysis of myelin basic protein (MBP generated the MBP84-104 and MBP68-86 digest peptides, which are prominent immunogenic epitopes. In agreement, the endogenous MBP69-86 epitope co-localized with MHCII and MMP-9 in Schwann cells and along the nodes of Ranvier. Administration of either the MBP84-104 or MBP68-86 peptides into the naïve nerve rapidly produced robust mechanical allodynia with a concomitant increase in T cells and MHCII-reactive cell populations at the injection site. As shown by the genome-wide expression profiling, a single intraneural MBP84-104 injection stimulated the inflammatory, immune cell trafficking, and antigen presentation pathways in the injected naïve nerves and the associated spinal cords. Both MBP84-104-induced mechanical allodynia and characteristic pathway activation were remarkably less prominent in the T cell-deficient athymic nude rats. Conclusions These data implicate MBP as a novel mediator of pain. Furthermore, the action of MMPs expressed within 1

  3. Myelination and regional domain differentiation of the axon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaxton, Courtney; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2009-01-01

    During evolution, as organisms increased in complexity and function, the need for the ensheathment and insulation of axons by glia became vital for faster conductance of action potentials in nerves. Myelination, as the process is termed, facilitates the formation of discrete domains within the axolemma that are enriched in ion channels, and macromolecular complexes consisting of cell adhesion molecules and cytoskeletal regulators. While it is known that glia play a substantial role in the coordination and organization of these domains, the mechanisms involved and signals transduced between the axon and glia, as well as the proteins regulating axo-glial junction formation remain elusive. Emerging evidence has shed light on the processes regulating myelination and domain differentiation, and key molecules have been identified that are required for their assembly and maintenance. This review highlights these recent findings, and relates their significance to domain disorganization as seen in several demyelinating disorders and other neuropathies.

  4. Increasing N-acetylaspartate in the Brain during Postnatal Myelination Does Not Cause the CNS Pathologies of Canavan Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appu, Abhilash P; Moffett, John R; Arun, Peethambaran; Moran, Sean; Nambiar, Vikram; Krishnan, Jishnu K S; Puthillathu, Narayanan; Namboodiri, Aryan M A

    2017-01-01

    Canavan disease is caused by mutations in the gene encoding aspartoacylase (ASPA), a deacetylase that catabolizes N-acetylaspartate (NAA). The precise involvement of elevated NAA in the pathogenesis of Canavan disease is an ongoing debate. In the present study, we tested the effects of elevated NAA in the brain during postnatal development. Mice were administered high doses of the hydrophobic methyl ester of NAA (M-NAA) twice daily starting on day 7 after birth. This treatment increased NAA levels in the brain to those observed in the brains of Nur7 mice, an established model of Canavan disease. We evaluated various serological parameters, oxidative stress, inflammatory and neurodegeneration markers and the results showed that there were no pathological alterations in any measure with increased brain NAA levels. We examined oxidative stress markers, malondialdehyde content (indicator of lipid peroxidation), expression of NADPH oxidase and nuclear translocation of the stress-responsive transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF-2) in brain. We also examined additional pathological markers by immunohistochemistry and the expression of activated caspase-3 and interleukin-6 by Western blot. None of the markers were increased in the brains of M-NAA treated mice, and no vacuoles were observed in any brain region. These results show that ASPA expression prevents the pathologies associated with excessive NAA concentrations in the brain during postnatal myelination. We hypothesize that the pathogenesis of Canavan disease involves not only disrupted NAA metabolism, but also excessive NAA related signaling processes in oligodendrocytes that have not been fully determined and we discuss some of the potential mechanisms.

  5. Increasing N-acetylaspartate in the Brain during Postnatal Myelination Does Not Cause the CNS Pathologies of Canavan Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash P. Appu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Canavan disease is caused by mutations in the gene encoding aspartoacylase (ASPA, a deacetylase that catabolizes N-acetylaspartate (NAA. The precise involvement of elevated NAA in the pathogenesis of Canavan disease is an ongoing debate. In the present study, we tested the effects of elevated NAA in the brain during postnatal development. Mice were administered high doses of the hydrophobic methyl ester of NAA (M-NAA twice daily starting on day 7 after birth. This treatment increased NAA levels in the brain to those observed in the brains of Nur7 mice, an established model of Canavan disease. We evaluated various serological parameters, oxidative stress, inflammatory and neurodegeneration markers and the results showed that there were no pathological alterations in any measure with increased brain NAA levels. We examined oxidative stress markers, malondialdehyde content (indicator of lipid peroxidation, expression of NADPH oxidase and nuclear translocation of the stress-responsive transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (NRF-2 in brain. We also examined additional pathological markers by immunohistochemistry and the expression of activated caspase-3 and interleukin-6 by Western blot. None of the markers were increased in the brains of M-NAA treated mice, and no vacuoles were observed in any brain region. These results show that ASPA expression prevents the pathologies associated with excessive NAA concentrations in the brain during postnatal myelination. We hypothesize that the pathogenesis of Canavan disease involves not only disrupted NAA metabolism, but also excessive NAA related signaling processes in oligodendrocytes that have not been fully determined and we discuss some of the potential mechanisms.

  6. Support of Nerve Conduction by Respiring Myelin Sheath: Role of Connexons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravera, Silvia; Bartolucci, Martina; Adriano, Enrico; Garbati, Patrizia; Ferrando, Sara; Ramoino, Paola; Calzia, Daniela; Morelli, Alessandro; Balestrino, Maurizio; Panfoli, Isabella

    2016-05-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that myelin conducts an extramitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, hypothesizing a novel supportive role for myelin in favor of the axon. We have also hypothesized that the ATP produced in myelin could be transferred thought gap junctions. In this work, by biochemical, immunohistochemical, and electrophysiological techniques, the existence of a connection among myelin to the axon was evaluated, to understand how ATP could be transferred from sheath to the axoplasm. Data confirm a functional expression of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated myelin. Moreover, WB and immunohistochemistry on optic nerve slices show that connexins 32 and 43 are present in myelin and colocalize with myelin basic protein. Interestingly, addition of carbenoxolone or oleamide, two gap junction blockers, causes a decrease in oxidative metabolism in purified myelin, but not in mitochondria. Similar effects were observed on conduction speed in hippocampal Schaffer collateral, in the presence of oleamide. Confocal analysis of optic nerve slices showed that lucifer yellow (that only passes through aqueous pores) signal was found in both the sheath layers and the axoplasma. In the presence of oleamide, but not with oleic acid, signal significantly decreased in the sheath and was lost inside the axon. This suggests the existence of a link among myelin and axons. These results, while supporting the idea that ATP aerobically synthesized in myelin sheath could be transferred to the axoplasm through gap junctions, shed new light on the function of the sheath.

  7. Myelin 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase: active-site ligand binding and molecular conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Myllykoski

    Full Text Available The 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase is a highly abundant membrane-associated enzyme in the myelin sheath of the vertebrate nervous system. CNPase is a member of the 2H phosphoesterase family and catalyzes the formation of 2'-nucleotide products from 2',3'-cyclic substrates; however, its physiological substrate and function remain unknown. It is likely that CNPase participates in RNA metabolism in the myelinating cell. We solved crystal structures of the phosphodiesterase domain of mouse CNPase, showing the binding mode of nucleotide ligands in the active site. The binding mode of the product 2'-AMP provides a detailed view of the reaction mechanism. Comparisons of CNPase crystal structures highlight flexible loops, which could play roles in substrate recognition; large differences in the active-site vicinity are observed when comparing more distant members of the 2H family. We also studied the full-length CNPase, showing its N-terminal domain is involved in RNA binding and dimerization. Our results provide a detailed picture of the CNPase active site during its catalytic cycle, and suggest a specific function for the previously uncharacterized N-terminal domain.

  8. Non-viable Borrelia burgdorferi induce inflammatory mediators and apoptosis in human oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Geetha; Fevrier, Helene B; Philipp, Mario T

    2013-11-27

    In previous studies, exposure to live Borrelia burgdorferi was shown to induce inflammation and apoptosis of human oligodendrocytes. In this study we assessed the ability of non-viable bacteria (heat killed or sonicated) to induce inflammatory mediators and cell death. Both heat-killed and sonicated bacteria induced release of CCL2, IL-6, and CXCL8 from oligodendrocytes in a dose dependent manner. In addition, non-viable B. burgdorferi also induced cell death as evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and another cell viability assay. These results suggest that spirochetal residues left after bacterial demise, due to treatment or otherwise, may continue to be pathogenic to the central nervous system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Leukemia inhibitory factor protects axons in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis via an oligodendrocyte-independent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M Gresle

    Full Text Available Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF and Ciliary Neurotrophic factor (CNTF are members of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines, defined by use of the gp130 molecule as an obligate receptor. In the murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model, antagonism of LIF and genetic deletion of CNTF worsen disease. The potential mechanism of action of these cytokines in EAE is complex, as gp130 is expressed by all neural cells, and could involve immuno-modulation, reduction of oligodendrocyte injury, neuronal protection, or a combination of these actions. In this study we aim to investigate whether the beneficial effects of CNTF/LIF signalling in EAE are associated with axonal protection; and whether this requires signalling through oligodendrocytes. We induced MOG₃₅₋₅₅ EAE in CNTF, LIF and double knockout mice. On a CNTF null background, LIF knockout was associated with increased EAE severity (EAE grade 2.1±0.14 vs 2.6±0.19; P<0.05. These mice also showed increased axonal damage relative to LIF heterozygous mice, as indicated by decreased optic nerve parallel diffusivity on MRI (1540±207 µm²-/s vs 1310±175 µm²-/s; P<0.05, and optic nerve (-12.5% and spinal cord (-16% axon densities; and increased serum neurofilament-H levels (2.5 fold increase. No differences in inflammatory cell numbers or peripheral auto-immune T-cell priming were evident. Oligodendrocyte-targeted gp130 knockout mice showed that disruption of CNTF/LIF signalling in these cells has no effect on acute EAE severity. These studies demonstrate that endogenous CNTF and LIF act centrally to protect axons from acute inflammatory destruction via an oligodendrocyte-independent mechanism.

  10. The effect of cellular differentiation on HSV-1 infection of oligodendrocytic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Bello-Morales

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1 is a neurotropic virus that infects many types of cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that oligodendrocytic cells are highly susceptible to HSV-1 infection. Here we analysed HSV-1 infection of a human oligodendrocytic cell line, HOG, and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs cultured under growth or differentiation conditions. In addition to cell susceptibility, the role of the major cell receptors for viral entry was assessed. Our results revealed that OPCs and HOG cells cultured under differentiation conditions became more susceptible to HSV-1. On the other hand, viral infection induced morphological changes corresponding to differentiated cells, suggesting that HSV-1 might be inducing cell differentiation. We also observed colocalization of HVEM and nectin-1 with viral particles, suggesting that these two major HSV-1 receptors are functional in HOG cells. Finally, electron microscopy assays indicated that HSV-1 may be also entering OLs by macropinocytosis depending on their differentiation stage. In addition, vesicles containing intracellular enveloped virions observed in differentiated cells point to an endocytic mechanism of virus entry. All these data are indicative of diverse entry pathways dependent on the maturation stage of OLs.

  11. NMDA modulates oligodendrocyte differentiation of subventricular zone cells through PKC activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eCavaliere

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent cells from the juvenile subventricular zone (SVZ possess the ability to differentiate into new neural cells. Depending on local signals, SVZ can generate new neurons, astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. We previously demonstrated that activation of NMDA receptors in SVZ progenitors increases the rate of oligodendrocyte differentiation. Here we investigated the mechanisms involved in NMDA receptor-dependent differentiation. Using functional studies performed with the reporter gene luciferase we found that activation of NMDA receptor stimulates PKC. In turn, stimulation of PKC precedes the activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX as demonstrated by translocation of the p67phox subunit to the cellular membrane. We propose that NOX2 is involved in the transduction of the signal from NMDA receptors through PKC activation as the inhibitor gp91 reduced their pro-differentiation effect. In addition, our data and that from other groups suggest that signaling through the NMDA receptor/PKC/NOX2 cascade generates ROS that activate the PI3/mTOR pathway and finally leads to the generation of new oligodendrocytes.

  12. Stochastic modeling of oligodendrocyte generation in cell culture: model validation with time-lapse data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noble Mark

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this paper is two-fold. The first objective is to validate the assumptions behind a stochastic model developed earlier by these authors to describe oligodendrocyte generation in cell culture. The second is to generate time-lapse data that may help biomathematicians to build stochastic models of cell proliferation and differentiation under other experimental scenarios. Results Using time-lapse video recording it is possible to follow the individual evolutions of different cells within each clone. This experimental technique is very laborious and cannot replace model-based quantitative inference from clonal data. However, it is unrivalled in validating the structure of a stochastic model intended to describe cell proliferation and differentiation at the clonal level. In this paper, such data are reported and analyzed for oligodendrocyte precursor cells cultured in vitro. Conclusion The results strongly support the validity of the most basic assumptions underpinning the previously proposed model of oligodendrocyte development in cell culture. However, there are some discrepancies; the most important is that the contribution of progenitor cell death to cell kinetics in this experimental system has been underestimated.

  13. Schwann Cell Precursors from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Myelin Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Seop Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells play a crucial role in successful nerve repair and regeneration by supporting both axonal growth and myelination. However, the sources of human Schwann cells are limited both for studies of Schwann cell development and biology and for the development of treatments for Schwann cell-associated diseases. Here, we provide a rapid and scalable method to produce self-renewing Schwann cell precursors (SCPs from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs, using combined sequential treatment with inhibitors of the TGF-β and GSK-3 signaling pathways, and with neuregulin-1 for 18 days under chemically defined conditions. Within 1 week, hPSC-derived SCPs could be differentiated into immature Schwann cells that were functionally confirmed by their secretion of neurotrophic factors and their myelination capacity in vitro and in vivo. We propose that hPSC-derived SCPs are a promising, unlimited source of functional Schwann cells for treating demyelination disorders and injuries to the peripheral nervous system.

  14. The aqueous layers within the myelin sheath modulate the membrane properties of simulated hereditary demyelinating neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanova, D I; Krustev, S M; Daskalova, M

    2011-03-01

    To expand our studies on the mechanisms underlying the clinical decline of the nerve excitability properties in patients with hereditary demyelinating neuropathies, the contribution of myelin sheath aqueous layers on multiple membrane properties of simulated fiber demyelinations is investigated. Three progressively greater degrees of internodal systematic demyelinations (two mild and one severe termed as ISD1, ISD2 and ISD3, respectively) without/with aqueous layers are simulated using our previous multi-layered model of human motor nerve fiber. The calculated multiple membrane excitability properties are as follows: potentials (intracellular action, electrotonic), strength-duration time constants, rheobasic currents and recovery cycles. They reflect the propagating, accommodative and adaptive processes in the fibers. The results show that all membrane properties, except for the strength-duration time constants and refractoriness, worsen when the myelin lamellae and their corresponding aqueous layers are uniformly reduced along the fiber length. The effect of the aqueous layers is significantly higher on the accommodative and adaptive processes than on the propagating processes in the fibers. Our multi-layered model better approximated some of the functional deficits documented for axons of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A. The study provides new and important information on the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of hereditary demyelinating neuropathies. © Imperial College Press

  15. The myelin sheath aqueous layers improve the membrane properties of simulated chronic demyelinating neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanova, D I; Krustev, S M; Negrev, N; Daskalova, M

    2011-03-01

    Recently, patients with chronic demyelinating neuropathies have demonstrated significant abnormalities in their multiple nerve excitability properties measured by a non-invasive threshold tracking technique. In order to expand our studies on the possible mechanisms underlying these abnormalities, which are not yet well understood, we investigate the contributions of the aqueous layers within the myelin sheath on multiple membrane properties of simulated fibre demyelinations. Four degrees of systematic paranodal demyelinations (two mild demyelinations termed PSD1 and PSD2, without/with aqueous layers respectively, and two severe demyelinations termed PSD3 and PSD4, with/without aqueous layers, respectively) are simulated using our previous multi-layered model of human motor nerve fibre. We studied the following parameters of myelinated axonal function: potentials (intracellular action, electrotonic-reflecting the propagating and accommodative fibre processes, respectively) and strength-duration time constants, rheobases, recovery cycles (reflecting the adaptive fibre processes). The results show that each excitability parameter is markedly potentiated when the aqueous layers within their paranodally demyelinated sheaths are taken into account. The effect of the aqueous layers is significantly higher on the propagating processes than on the accommodative and adaptive processes in the fibres. The aqueous layers restore the action potential propagation, which is initially blocked when they are not taken into account. The study provides new and important information on the mechanisms of chronic demyelinating neuropathies, such as chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). © Imperial College Press

  16. Production, crystallization and neutron diffraction of fully deuterated human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Blakeley, Matthew P; Raasakka, Arne; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Kursula, Petri

    2015-11-01

    The molecular details of the formation of the myelin sheath, a multilayered membrane in the nervous system, are to a large extent unknown. P2 is a peripheral membrane protein from peripheral nervous system myelin, which is believed to play a role in this process. X-ray crystallographic studies and complementary experiments have provided information on the structure-function relationships in P2. In this study, a fully deuterated sample of human P2 was produced. Crystals that were large enough for neutron diffraction were grown by a ten-month procedure of feeding, and neutron diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å from a crystal of 0.09 mm(3) in volume. The neutron crystal structure will allow the positions of H atoms in P2 and its fatty-acid ligand to be visualized, as well as shedding light on the fine details of the hydrogen-bonding networks within the P2 ligand-binding cavity.

  17. Schwann Cell Precursors from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Myelin Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Seop; Lee, Jungwoon; Lee, Da Yong; Kim, Young-Dae; Kim, Jae Yun; Lim, Hyung Jin; Lim, Sungmin; Cho, Yee Sook

    2017-06-06

    Schwann cells play a crucial role in successful nerve repair and regeneration by supporting both axonal growth and myelination. However, the sources of human Schwann cells are limited both for studies of Schwann cell development and biology and for the development of treatments for Schwann cell-associated diseases. Here, we provide a rapid and scalable method to produce self-renewing Schwann cell precursors (SCPs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), using combined sequential treatment with inhibitors of the TGF-β and GSK-3 signaling pathways, and with neuregulin-1 for 18 days under chemically defined conditions. Within 1 week, hPSC-derived SCPs could be differentiated into immature Schwann cells that were functionally confirmed by their secretion of neurotrophic factors and their myelination capacity in vitro and in vivo. We propose that hPSC-derived SCPs are a promising, unlimited source of functional Schwann cells for treating demyelination disorders and injuries to the peripheral nervous system. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. White matter atrophy and myelinated fiber disruption in a rat model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Ma, Jing; Tang, Jing; Liang, Xin; Huang, Chun-Xia; Wang, San-Rong; Chen, Lin-Mu; Wang, Fei-Fei; Tan, Chuan-Xue; Chao, Feng-Lei; Zhang, Lei; Qiu, Xuan; Luo, Yan-Min; Xiao, Qian; Du, Lian; Xiao, Qian; Tang, Yong

    2017-06-01

    Brain imaging and postmortem studies have indicated that white matter abnormalities may contribute to the pathology and pathogenesis of depression. However, until now, no study has quantitatively investigated white matter changes in depression in rats. The current study used the chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) model of depression. Body weight and sucrose preference test (SPT) scores were assessed weekly. Upon successfully establishing the CUS animal model, all animals were tested using the SPT and the open field test (OFT). Then, transmission electron microscopy and unbiased stereological methods were used to investigate white matter changes in the rats. Compared with the control group, the body weight and sucrose preference of the CUS rats were significantly decreased (p matter volume, the total volume, and the total length and mean diameter of myelinated fibers in the white matter of the CUS rats were significantly decreased compared to the control rats (p = .042, p = .038, p = .035, p = .019, respectively). The results of this study suggested that white matter atrophy and disruption of myelinated fibers in the white matter may contribute to the pathophysiology underlying depression, which might provide new targets for the development of novel therapeutic interventions for depression. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the brain myelination; Mielinizacja mozgu w obrazie rezonansu magnetycznego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goraj, B. [Dzial Diagnostyki Obrazowej, Centrum Zdrowia Matki Polki, Lodz (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The variability of magnetic resonance image (MRI) of the brain during early childhood depends in great part on the progression of myelination. The sequence of human white matter myelination was discussed in the paper and MRI visualization of this process was presented and illustrated. The short characteristics of myelin sheath and factors modifying white matter signal intensity in MRI were also discussed. (author) 12 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  20. In Vivo PET Imaging of Myelin Damage and Repair in the Spinal Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    course of this work has been responsible for the generation of new compounds that selectively bind to components of the myelin sheath . Dr. Miller is a...components and result in tissue destruction and functional impairment. Specifically, T cells attack myelin sheaths resulting in a loss of axonal conduction...result of their behavioral phenotype. The central nervous system of shiverer animals contains all the elements of the CNS except compact myelin sheaths

  1. Zebrafish regenerate full thickness optic nerve myelin after demyelination, but this fails with increasing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzel, Eva Jolanda; Becker, Catherina G; Becker, Thomas; Williams, Anna

    2014-07-15

    In the human demyelinating central nervous system (CNS) disease multiple sclerosis, remyelination promotes recovery and limits neurodegeneration, but this is inefficient and always ultimately fails. Furthermore, these regenerated myelin sheaths are thinner and shorter than the original, leaving the underlying axons potentially vulnerable. In rodent models, CNS remyelination is more efficient, so that in young animals (but not old) the number of myelinated axons is efficiently restored to normal, but in both young and old rodents, regenerated myelin sheaths are still short and thin. The reasons for these differences in remyelination efficiency, the thinner remyelinated myelin sheaths compared to developmental myelin and the subsequent effect on the underlying axon are unclear. We studied CNS remyelination in the highly regenerative adult zebrafish (Danio rerio), to better understand mechanisms of what we hypothesised would be highly efficient remyelination, and to identify differences to mammalian CNS remyelination, as larval zebrafish are increasingly used for high throughput screens to identify potential drug targets to improve myelination and remyelination. We developed a novel method to induce a focal demyelinating lesion in adult zebrafish optic nerve with no discernible axonal damage, and describe the cellular changes over time. Remyelination is indeed efficient in both young and old adult zebrafish optic nerves, and at 4 weeks after demyelination, the number of myelinated axons is restored to normal, but internode lengths are short. However, unlike in rodents or in humans, in young zebrafish these regenerated myelin sheaths were of normal thickness, whereas in aged zebrafish, they were thin, and remained so even 3 months later. This inability to restore normal myelin thickness in remyelination with age was associated with a reduced macrophage/microglial response. Zebrafish are able to efficiently restore normal thickness myelin around optic nerve axons after

  2. Effects of osmolality on PLP-null myelin structure: implications re axon damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbluth, Jack; Schiff, Rolf; Lam, Pokman

    2009-02-09

    In order to test the adhesiveness of PLP-null compact myelin lamellae we soaked aldehyde-fixed CNS specimens from PLP-null and control mice overnight in distilled water, in Ringer's solution or in Ringer's solution with added 1 M sucrose. Subsequent examination of the tissue by EM showed that both PLP-null and control white matter soaked in Ringer remained largely compact. After the distilled water soak, control myelin was virtually unchanged, but PLP-null myelin showed some decompaction, i.e., separation of myelin lamellae from one another. After the sucrose/Ringer soak, normal myelin developed foci of decompaction, but the great majority of lamellae remained compact. In the PLP-null specimens, in contrast, many of the myelin sheaths became almost completely decompacted. Such sheaths became thicker overall and were comprised of lamellae widely separated from one another by irregular spaces. Thus, in normal animals, fixed CNS myelin lamellae are firmly adherent and resist separation; PLP-null myelin lamellae, in contrast, are poorly adherent and more readily separated. Mechanisms by which impaired adhesiveness of PLP-null myelin lamellae and fluctuations in osmolality in vivo might underlie slowing of conduction and axon damage are discussed.

  3. Cdc42 regulates Schwann cell radial sorting and myelin sheath folding through NF2/merlin-dependent and independent signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Moon, Chandra; Zheng, Yi; Ratner, Nancy

    2013-11-01

    The Rho family GTPase Cdc42 has been implicated in developmental Schwann cell (SC) proliferation, providing sufficient SCs for radial sorting of axons preceding SC differentiation in the peripheral nervous system. We generated Cdc42 conditional knockout (Cdc42-CKO) mice and confirmed aberrant axon sorting in Cdc42-CKO nerves. In adult Cdc42-CKO nerves, blood vessels were enlarged, and mature Remak bundles containing small axons were absent. Abnormal infoldings and outfoldings of myelin sheaths developed in Cdc42-CKO nerves, mimicking pathological features of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. The NF2/merlin tumor suppressor has been implicated up- and down-stream of Cdc42. In Cdc42-CKO;NF2-del double mutant mice, radial sorting defects seen in Cdc42-CKO nerves were rescued, while changes in myelin sheaths in Cdc42-CKO nerves were not. Phosphorylation of Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and P-GSK3β, as well as expression of β-catenin were decreased in Cdc42-CKO nerves, and these changes were rescued by NF2/merlin mutation in Cdc42-CKO;NF2-del double mutant mice. Thus, Cdc42 regulates SC radial sorting in vivo through NF2/merlin dependent signaling pathways, while Cdc42 modulation of myelin sheath folding is NF2/merlin independent. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Degradation of amyloid beta protein by purified myelin basic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Mei-Chen; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Smith, Steven O; Van Nostrand, William E

    2009-10-16

    The progressive accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) in senile plaques and in the cerebral vasculature is the hallmark of Alzheimer disease and related disorders. Impaired clearance of Abeta from the brain likely contributes to the prevalent sporadic form of Alzheimer disease. Several major pathways for Abeta clearance include receptor-mediated cellular uptake, blood-brain barrier transport, and direct proteolytic degradation. Myelin basic protein (MBP) is the major structural protein component of myelin and plays a functional role in the formation and maintenance of the myelin sheath. MBP possesses endogenous serine proteinase activity and can undergo autocatalytic cleavage liberating distinct fragments. Recently, we showed that MBP binds Abeta and inhibits Abeta fibril formation (Hoos, M. D., Ahmed, M., Smith, S. O., and Van Nostrand, W. E. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 9952-9961; Hoos, M. D., Ahmed, M., Smith, S. O., and Van Nostrand, W. E. (2009) Biochemistry 48, 4720-4727). Here we show that Abeta40 and Abeta42 peptides are degraded by purified human brain MBP and recombinant human MBP, but not an MBP fragment that lacks autolytic activity. MBP-mediated Abeta degradation is inhibited by serine proteinase inhibitors. Similarly, Cos-1 cells expressing MBP degrade exogenous Abeta40 and Abeta42. In addition, we demonstrate that purified MBP also degrades assembled fibrillar Abeta in vitro. Mass spectrometry analysis identified distinct degradation products generated from Abeta digestion by MBP. Lastly, we demonstrate in situ that purified MBP can degrade parenchymal amyloid plaques as well as cerebral vascular amyloid that form in brain tissue of Abeta precursor protein transgenic mice. Together, these findings indicate that purified MBP possesses Abeta degrading activity in vitro.

  5. Progressive leukoencephalopathy associated with aluminum deposits in myelin sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Masayuki; Suzuki, Yoshiko; Sugai, Kenji; Kozuka, Naofumi; Ozuka, Naofumi; Ohsawa, Maki; Otsuki, Taisuke; Goto, Yu-Ichi

    2008-08-01

    A 20-year-old woman with progressive leukoencephalopathy developed mental and motor disabilities and fell into a coma after suffering head trauma and febrile episodes from infancy. Brain imaging showed massive abnormal signals in the white matter. The electron spectroscopic imaging of biopsied brain tissue confirmed the electron-dense deposits to be associated with aluminum accumulation in the myelin sheath. Her brain pathology, which showed ferritin- and naphtochrome green-positive deposits, supported the imaging analysis. The clinicopathological features indicate a new form of progressive leukoencephalopathy.

  6. Altered brain myelin sheath morphology after rewarming in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrichs, E S; Lindal, S; Naesheim, T; Ingebrigtsen, T; Tveita, T

    2010-04-01

    In this study cerebral ultrastructure was examined in an in vivo rat model, after rewarming from profound hypothermia (15-13 degrees C). Animals held at 37 degrees C served as controls. After rewarming, brains were examined by electron microscope. Micrographs were taken randomly, analyzed anonymously, and quantified by morphometry. Serum analysis of the stress marker S-100beta was carried out in identical groups. The most striking findings in rewarmed animals, when compared to controls, were alterations of myelin sheaths (p<.008) and elevated S-100beta (p<.0001). This indicates that cells in the central nervous system are susceptible to injury in an experimental model of accidental hypothermia and rewarming.

  7. Regenerating CNS myelin - from mechanisms to experimental medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Robin J M; Ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2017-11-16

    Although the core concept of remyelination - based on the activation, migration, proliferation and differentiation of CNS progenitors - has not changed over the past 20 years, our understanding of the detailed mechanisms that underlie this process has developed considerably. We can now decorate the central events of remyelination with a host of pathways, molecules, mediators and cells, revealing a complex and precisely orchestrated process. These advances have led to recent drug-based and cell-based clinical trials for myelin diseases and have opened up hitherto unrecognized opportunities for drug-based approaches to therapeutically enhance remyelination.

  8. Myelin sheath decompaction, axon swelling, and functional loss during chronic secondary degeneration in rat optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Sophie C; Bartlett, Carole A; Harvey, Alan R; Dunlop, Sarah A; Fitzgerald, Melinda

    2012-09-04

    To examine chronic changes occurring at 6 months following partial optic nerve (ON) transection, assessing optic axons, myelin, and visual function. Dorsal ON axons were transected, leaving ventral optic axons vulnerable to secondary degeneration. At 3 and 6 months following partial transection, toluidine-blue stained sections were used to assess dimensions of the ON injury site. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of ventral ON were used to quantify numbers, diameter, area, and myelin thickness of optic axons. Immunohistochemistry and fluoromyelin staining were used to assess semiquantitatively myelin protein, lipids in ventral ON, and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in midventral retina. Visuomotor function was assessed using optokinetic nystagmus. Following partial ON transection, optic axons and function remained disrupted at 6 months. Although ventral ON swelling observed at 3 months (P ≤ 0.05) receded to normal by 6 months, ultrastructurally, myelinated axons remained swollen (P ≥ 0.05), and myelin thickness increased (P ≤ 0.05) due to loosening of lamellae and an increase in the number of intraperiodic lines. Axons with decompacted myelin persisted and were distinguished as having large axonal calibers and thicker myelin sheaths. Nevertheless, progressive loss of myelin lipid staining with fluoromyelin was seen at 6 months. Despite no further loss of ventral optic axons between 3 and 6 months (P ≥ 0.05), visuomotor function progressively declined at 6 months following partial transection (P ≤ 0.05). Continued decompaction of myelin, altered myelin structure, and swelling of myelinated axons are persistent features of the chronic phases of secondary degeneration and likely contribute to progressive loss of visual function.

  9. Sound-Evoked Activity Influences Myelination of Brainstem Axons in the Trapezoid Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, James L; Fischl, Matthew J; Alexandrova, Olga; Heβ, Martin; Grothe, Benedikt; Leibold, Christian; Kopp-Scheinpflug, Conny

    2017-08-23

    Plasticity of myelination represents a mechanism to tune the flow of information by balancing functional requirements with metabolic and spatial constraints. The auditory system is heavily myelinated and operates at the upper limits of action potential generation frequency and speed observed in the mammalian CNS. This study aimed to characterize the development of myelin within the trapezoid body, a central auditory fiber tract, and determine the influence sensory experience has on this process in mice of both sexes. We find that in vitro conduction speed doubles following hearing onset and the ability to support high-frequency firing increases concurrently. Also in this time, the diameter of trapezoid body axons and the thickness of myelin double, reaching mature-like thickness between 25 and 35 d of age. Earplugs were used to induce ∼50 dB elevation in auditory thresholds. If introduced at hearing onset, trapezoid body fibers developed thinner axons and myelin than age-matched controls. If plugged during adulthood, the thickest trapezoid body fibers also showed a decrease in myelin. These data demonstrate the need for sensory activity in both development and maintenance of myelin and have important implications in the study of myelin plasticity and how this could relate to sensorineural hearing loss following peripheral impairment.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The auditory system has many mechanisms to maximize the dynamic range of its afferent fibers, which operate at the physiological limit of action potential generation, precision, and speed. In this study we demonstrate for the first time that changes in peripheral activity modifies the thickness of myelin in sensory neurons, not only in development but also in mature animals. The current study suggests that changes in CNS myelination occur as a downstream mechanism following peripheral deficit. Given the required submillisecond temporal precision for binaural auditory processing, reduced myelination might augment

  10. Enhanced uptake of multiple sclerosis-derived myelin by THP-1 macrophages and primary human microglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, Debbie A E; Schuurman, Karianne G; van Draanen, Michael; Hamann, Jörg; Huitinga, I.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathological hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS) is myelin phagocytosis. It remains unclear why microglia and macrophages demyelinate axons in MS, but previously found or yet-unknown changes in the myelin of MS patients could contribute to this process. We therefore studied whether

  11. A simulation model of the electrical characteristics of human myelinated sensory nerve fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselink, W.A.; Holsheimer, J.; Sonmez, Z.; Boom, H.B.K.

    1997-01-01

    A new nerve fiber model has been developed, incorporating electrical characteristics of human myelinated sensory nerve fibers. It will be used to determine the response of myelinated somatosensory nerve fibers in the spinal cord to electrical stimulation with an epidurally placed electrode

  12. Depth-sensing nano-indentation on a myelinated axon at various stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Liao, Jiunn-Der [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chou-Ching K [Department of Neurology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Ju, Ming-Shaung, E-mail: jdliao@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2011-07-08

    A nano-mechanical characterization of a multi-layered myelin sheath structure, which enfolds an axon and plays a critical role in the transmission of nerve impulses, is conducted. Schwann cells co-cultured in vitro with PC12 cells for various co-culture times are differentiated to form a myelinated axon, which is then observed using a transmission electron microscope. Three major myelination stages, with distinct structural characteristics and thicknesses around the axon, can be produced by varying the co-culture time. A dynamic contact module and continuous depth-sensing nano-indentation are used on the myelinated structure to obtain the load-on-sample versus measured displacement curve of a multi-layered myelin sheath, which is used to determine the work required for the nano-indentation tip to penetrate the myelin sheath. By analyzing the harmonic contact stiffness versus the measured displacement profile, the results can be used to estimate the three stages of the multi-layered structure on a myelinated axon. The method can also be used to evaluate the development stages of myelination or demyelination during nerve regeneration.

  13. Alpha6beta4 integrin and dystroglycan cooperate to stabilize the myelin sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodari, Alessandro; Previtali, Stefano C; Dati, Gabriele; Occhi, Simona; Court, Felipe A; Colombelli, Cristina; Zambroni, Desirée; Dina, Giorgia; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Campbell, Kevin P; Quattrini, Angelo; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Feltri, M Laura

    2008-06-25

    Schwann cells integrate signals deriving from the axon and the basal lamina to myelinate peripheral nerves. Integrin alpha6beta4 is a laminin receptor synthesized by Schwann cells and displayed apposed to the basal lamina. alpha6beta4 integrin expression in Schwann cells is induced by axons at the onset of myelination, and rises in adulthood. The beta4 chain has a uniquely long cytoplasmic domain that interacts with intermediate filaments such as dystonin, important in peripheral myelination. Furthermore, alpha6beta4 integrin binds peripheral myelin protein 22, whose alteration causes the most common demyelinating hereditary neuropathy. All these data suggest a role for alpha6beta4 integrin in peripheral nerve myelination. Here we show that ablating alpha6beta4 integrin specifically in Schwann cells of transgenic mice does not affect peripheral nerve development, myelin formation, maturation, or regeneration. However, consistent with maximal expression in adult nerves, alpha6beta4 integrin-null myelin is more prone to abnormal folding with aging. When the laminin receptor dystroglycan is also ablated, major folding abnormalities occur, associated with acute demyelination in some peripheral nervous system districts. These data indicate that, similar to its role in skin, alpha6beta4 integrin confers stability to myelin in peripheral nerves.

  14. Lipid metabolism in myelinating glial cells: lessons from human inherited disorders and mouse models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrast, R.; Saher, G.; Nave, K.A.; Verheijen, M.H.G.

    2011-01-01

    The integrity of central and peripheral nervous system myelin is affected in numerous lipid metabolism disorders. This vulnerability was so far mostly attributed to the extraordinarily high level of lipid synthesis that is required for the formation of myelin, and to the relative autonomy in lipid

  15. Progesterone attenuates astro- and microgliosis and enhances oligodendrocyte differentiation following spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labombarda, Florencia; González, Susana; Lima, Analia; Roig, Paulina; Guennoun, Rachida; Schumacher, Michael; De Nicola, Alejandro F

    2011-09-01

    Reactive gliosis, demyelination and proliferation of NG2+ oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) are common responses to spinal cord injury (SCI). We previously reported that short-term progesterone treatment stimulates OPC proliferation whereas chronic treatment enhances OPC differentiation after SCI. Presently, we further studied the proliferation/differentiation of glial cells involved in inflammation and remyelination in male rats with SCI subjected to acute (3 days) or chronic (21 days) progesterone administration. Rats received several pulses of bromodeoyuridine (BrdU) 48 and 72 h post-SCI, and sacrificed 3 or 21 days post-SCI. Double colocalization of BrdU and specific cell markers showed that 3 days of SCI induced a strong proliferation of S100β+ astrocytes, OX-42+ microglia/macrophages and NG2+ cells. At this stage, the intense GFAP+ astrogliosis was BrdU negative. Twenty one days of SCI enhanced maturation of S100β+ cells into GFAP+ astrocytes, but decreased the number of CC1+ oligodendrocytes. Progesterone treatment inhibited astrocyte and microglia /macrophage proliferation and activation in the 3-day SCI group, and inhibited activation in the 21-day SCI group. BrdU/NG2 double labeled cells were increased by progesterone at 3 days, indicating a proliferation stimulus, but decreased them at 21 days. However, progesterone-enhancement of CC1+/BrdU+ oligodendrocyte density, suggest differentiation of OPC into mature oligondendrocytes. We conclude that progesterone effects after SCI involves: a) inhibition of astrocyte proliferation and activation; b) anti-inflammatory effects by preventing microglial activation and proliferation, and c) early proliferation of NG2+ progenitors and late remyelination. Thus, progesterone behaves as a glioactive factor favoring remyelination and inhibiting reactive gliosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. p25alpha relocalizes in oligodendroglia from myelin to cytoplasmic inclusions in multiple system atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yun Ju C; Lundvig, Ditte M S; Huang, Yue

    2007-01-01

    of myelin and a high-affinity ligand for myelin basic protein (MBP), and in situ immunohistochemistry revealed that MBP and p25alpha colocalize in myelin in normal human brains. Analysis of MSA cases reveals dramatic changes in p25alpha and MBP throughout the course of the disease. In situ...... immunohistochemistry revealed a cellular redistribution of p25alpha immunoreactivity from the myelin to the oligodendroglial cell soma, with no overall change in p25alpha protein concentration using immunoblotting. Concomitantly, an approximately 80% reduction in the concentration of full-length MBP protein...... cytoplasmic inclusions. Overall, the data indicate that changes in the cellular interactions between MBP and p25alpha occur early in MSA and contribute to abnormalities in myelin and subsequent alpha-synuclein aggregation and the ensuing neuronal degeneration that characterizes this disease....

  17. Crystallographic anomalous diffraction data for the experimental phasing of two myelin proteins, gliomedin and periaxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijong Han

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We present datasets that can be used for the experimental phasing of crystal structures of two myelin proteins. The structures were recently described in the articles “Periaxin and AHNAK nucleoprotein 2 form intertwined homodimers through domain swapping” (H. Han, P. Kursula, 2014 [1] and “The olfactomedin domain from gliomedin is a β-propeller with unique structural properties” (H. Han, P. Kursula, 2015 [2]. Crystals of periaxin were derivatized with tungsten and xenon prior to data collection, and diffraction data for these crystals are reported at 3 and 1 wavelengths, respectively. Crystallographic data for two different pressurizing times for xenon are provided. Gliomedin was derivatized with platinum, and data for single-wavelength anomalous dispersion are included. The data can be used to repeat the phasing experiments, to analyze heavy atom binding sites in proteins, as well as to optimize future derivatization experiments of protein crystals with these and other heavy-atom compounds.

  18. A possible role for inflammation in mediating apoptosis of oligodendrocytes as induced by the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Geeta

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation caused by the Lyme disease spirochete B. burgdorferi is an important factor in the pathogenesis of Lyme neuroborreliosis. Our central hypothesis is that B. burgdorferi can cause disease via the induction of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and chemokines in glial and neuronal cells. Earlier we demonstrated that interaction of B. burgdorferi with brain parenchyma induces inflammatory mediators in glial cells as well as glial (oligodendrocyte and neuronal apoptosis using ex vivo and in vivo models of experimentation. Methods In this study we evaluated the ability of live B. burgdorferi to elicit inflammation in vitro in differentiated human MO3.13 oligodendrocytes and in differentiated primary human oligodendrocytes, by measuring the concentration of immune mediators in culture supernatants using Multiplex ELISA assays. Concomitant apoptosis was quantified in these cultures by the in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay and by quantifying active caspase-3 by flow cytometry. The above phenomena were also evaluated after 48 h of stimulation with B. burgdorferi in the presence and absence of various concentrations of the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone. Results B. burgdorferi induced enhanced levels of the cytokine IL-6 and the chemokines IL-8 and CCL2 in MO3.13 cells as compared to basal levels, and IL-8 and CCL2 in primary human oligodendrocytes, in a dose-dependent manner. These cultures also showed significantly elevated levels of apoptosis when compared with medium controls. Dexamethasone reduced both the levels of immune mediators and apoptosis, also in a manner that was dose dependent. Conclusions This finding supports our hypothesis that the inflammatory response elicited by the Lyme disease spirochete in glial cells contributes to neural cell damage. As oligodendrocytes are vital for the functioning and survival of neurons, the inflammation and

  19. Effects of a 4 month enriched environment on the hippocampus and the myelinated fibers in the hippocampus of middle-aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xuan; Huang, Chun-Xia; Lu, Wei; Yang, Shu; Li, Chen; Shi, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Lin; Xiu, Yun; Yang, Jun-Qing; Tang, Yong

    2012-07-17

    An enriched environment has been shown to enhance learning and memory and to induce morphological changes in the hippocampus. In the present study, 14-month (middle-aged) female and male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into enriched environment (EE) rats and standard environment (SE) rats. EE rats were reared in an enriched environment and SE rats were reared in a standard environment for 4 months. The spatial learning capacity was assessed with Morris water maze. The hippocampus and the myelinated fibers in the rat hippocampus were quantitatively investigated with a transmission electronic microscope technique and stereological methods. The female rats housed in an enriched environment showed improved performance in the Morris water maze. There was no significant difference in the total volume of hippocampus between SE rats and EE rats. The total length and total volume of the myelinated fibers in the hippocampus of the female and male EE rats were significantly increased, respectively, when compared to the female and male SE rats. The increase of the total length of the myelinated nerve fibers in the hippocampus was mainly due to the increase of the myelinated fibers with diameters from 0.5 to 0.9 μm. Our results showed that a 4 month enriched environment had significant effects on the spatial learning capacity and the myelinated fibers in the hippocampus of middle-aged rats. The present study might provide an important theoretical basis for searching for an ethological strategy to delay the progress of brain aging in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Differential distribution of voltage-gated channels in myelinated and unmyelinated baroreceptor afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, John H; Kunze, Diana L

    2012-12-24

    Voltage gated ion channels (VGC) make possible the frequency coding of arterial pressure and the neurotransmission of this information along myelinated and unmyelinated fiber pathways. Although many of the same VGC isoforms are expressed in both fiber types, it is the relative expression of each that defines the unique discharge properties of myelinated A-type and unmyelinated C-type baroreceptors. For example, the fast inward Na⁺ current is a major determinant of the action potential threshold and the regenerative transmembrane current needed to sustain repetitive discharge. In A-type baroreceptors the TTX-sensitive Na(v)1.7 VGC contributes to the whole cell Na⁺ current. Na(v)1.7 is expressed at a lower density in C-type neurons and in conjunction with TTX-insensitive Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 VGC. As a result, action potentials of A-type neurons have firing thresholds that are 15-20 mV more negative and upstroke velocities that are 5-10 times faster than unmyelinated C-type neurons. A more depolarized threshold in conjunction with a broader complement of non-inactivating K(V) VGC subtypes produces C-type action potentials that are 3-4 times longer in duration than A-type neurons and at markedly lower levels of cell excitability. Unmyelinated baroreceptors also express KCa1.1 which provides approximately 25% of the total outward K⁺ current. KCa1.1 plays a critically important role in shaping the action potential profile of C-type neurons and strongly impacts neuronal excitability. A-type neurons do not functionally express the KCa1.1 channel despite having a whole cell Ca(V) current quite similar to that of C-type neurons. As a result, A-type neurons do not have the frequency-dependent braking forces of KCa1.1. Lack of a KCa current and only a limited complement of non-inactivating K(V) VGC in addition to a hyperpolarization activated HCN1 current that is nearly 10 times larger than in C-type neurons leads to elevated levels of discharge in A-type neurons, a

  1. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 promotes oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation and enhances CNS remyelination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Yasir A; Baer, Alexandra; Hofer, Matthias P; González, Ginez A; Rundle, Jon; Myrta, Szymon; Huang, Jeffrey K; Zhao, Chao; Rossner, Moritz J; Trotter, Matthew W B; Lubec, Gert; Franklin, Robin J M; Kotter, Mark R

    2013-01-01

    The increasing effectiveness of new disease-modifying drugs that suppress disease activity in multiple sclerosis has opened up opportunities for regenerative medicines that enhance remyelination and potentially slow disease progression. Although several new targets for therapeutic enhancement of remyelination have emerged, few lend themselves readily to conventional drug development. Here, we used transcription profiling to identify mitogen-activated protein kinase (Mapk) signalling as an important regulator involved in the differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) into oligodendrocytes. We show in tissue culture that activation of Mapk signalling by elevation of intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) using administration of either dibutyryl-cAMP or inhibitors of the cAMP-hydrolysing enzyme phosphodiesterase-4 (Pde4) enhances OPC differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate that systemic delivery of a Pde4 inhibitor leads to enhanced differentiation of OPCs within focal areas of toxin-induced demyelination and a consequent acceleration of remyelination. These data reveal a novel approach to therapeutic enhancement of remyelination amenable to pharmacological intervention and hence with significant potential for translation. PMID:24293318

  2. Directional migration and transcriptional analysis of oligodendrocyte precursors subjected to stimulation of electrical signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongchao; Wang, Xinkun; Yao, Li

    2015-10-15

    Loss of oligodendrocytes as the result of central nervous system disease causes demyelination that impairs axon function. Effective directional migration of endogenous or grafted oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) to a lesion is crucial in the neural remyelination process. In this study, the migration of OPCs in electric fields (EFs) was investigated. We found that OPCs migrated anodally in applied EFs, and the directedness and displacement of anodal migration increased significantly when the EF strength increased from 50 to 200 mV/mm. However, EFs did not significantly affect the cell migration speed. The transcriptome of OPCs subjected to EF stimulation (100 and 200 mV/mm) was analyzed using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq), and results were verified by the reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis revealed that the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway that signals cell migration was significantly upregulated in cells treated with an EF of 200 mV/mm compared with control cells. Gene ontology enrichment analysis showed the downregulation of differentially expressed genes in chemotaxis. This study suggests that an applied EF is an effective cue to guiding OPC migration in neural regeneration and that transcriptional analysis contributes to the understanding of the mechanism of EF-guided cell migration. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. The influence of retinoic acid on the human oligodendrocyte precursor cells by RNA-sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun young Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid (RA, a metabolite of vitamin A, has been found to influence regeneration in the adult central nervous system (CNS. There may be an effect of RA in the recovery/repair in multiple sclerosis (MS, an autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease of the CNS. We hypothesized that RA is a regulator of the further differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs – cells key to the remyelination process in MS. We conducted studies utilizing RNA-sequencing in human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived neural stem cells (NSCs and OPCs so as to understand the role of transcriptional regulators during transition from both ESCs to NSCs and NSCs to OPCs. We identified that expression of retinoic acid receptors β and γ (RARβ and RARγ was significantly increased following the transition from NSCs to OPCs. We also demonstrated that long term in vitro culture of hESC-derived OPC with different isoforms of RA led to the significant up-regulation of two known transcriptional inhibitors of oligodendrocyte differentiation: Hes5 following prolonged treatment with all-trans-RA, 9-cis RA and 13-cis RA; and Id4 following treatment with 13cisRA. These results suggest that long term exposure to certain RA isoforms may impact the continued differentiation of this population.

  4. Inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 promotes oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation and enhances CNS remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Yasir A; Baer, Alexandra; Hofer, Matthias P; González, Ginez A; Rundle, Jon; Myrta, Szymon; Huang, Jeffrey K; Zhao, Chao; Rossner, Moritz J; Trotter, Matthew W B; Lubec, Gert; Franklin, Robin J M; Kotter, Mark R

    2013-12-01

    The increasing effectiveness of new disease-modifying drugs that suppress disease activity in multiple sclerosis has opened up opportunities for regenerative medicines that enhance remyelination and potentially slow disease progression. Although several new targets for therapeutic enhancement of remyelination have emerged, few lend themselves readily to conventional drug development. Here, we used transcription profiling to identify mitogen-activated protein kinase (Mapk) signalling as an important regulator involved in the differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) into oligodendrocytes. We show in tissue culture that activation of Mapk signalling by elevation of intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) using administration of either dibutyryl-cAMP or inhibitors of the cAMP-hydrolysing enzyme phosphodiesterase-4 (Pde4) enhances OPC differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate that systemic delivery of a Pde4 inhibitor leads to enhanced differentiation of OPCs within focal areas of toxin-induced demyelination and a consequent acceleration of remyelination. These data reveal a novel approach to therapeutic enhancement of remyelination amenable to pharmacological intervention and hence with significant potential for translation. © 2013 The Authors. Published by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd on behalf of EMBO.

  5. Myelin basic protein immunosensor for multiple sclerosis detection based upon label-free electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkus, Burak; Emregul, Emel; Yucesan, Canan; Cebesoy Emregul, Kaan

    2013-08-15

    A novel highly sensitive impedimetric Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) immunosensor for the determination of a Multiple Sclerosis (MS) autoantibody, Anti-Myelin Basic Protein (Anti-MBP) was developed by immobilization of MBP on Gelatin and Gelatin-Titanium Dioxide (TiO₂) modified platinium electrode. Cyclic voltammetric (CV) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopic (EIS) methods were employed in determination of the electrode responses and applicability. Gelatin-MBP and gelatin-TiO₂-MBP electrodes were prepared by chemical immobilization of the substrates onto the platinium electrodes. The formal potentials of MBP confined on gelatin-MBP and gelatin-TiO₂-MBP surfaces are estimated to be 195 and 205 mV, respectively. Thus, a little more reversible electron transfer reaction occurs on the gelatin-TiO₂-MBP immunosensor surface. The peak separations of MBP (150 mV and 110 mV s(-1) at 100 mV s(-1)) and the asymmetric anodic and cathodic peak currents indicate that the electron transfer between Anti-MBP and gelatin-MBP/gelatin-TiO₂-MBP immunosensor is quasireversible. Control samples containing a nonspecific human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) antibody were also studied, and calibration curves were obtained by subtraction of the responses for specific and nonspecific antibody-based sensors. Gelatin-MBP and gelatin-TiO₂-MBP immunosensors have detection limit of 0.1528 ng ml(-1) and 0.1495 ng ml(-1) respectively. This immunosensor exhibits high sensitivity and low response times (58 s for gelatin-MBP and 46 s for gelatin-TiO₂-MBP immunosensor). The developed label-free impedimetric immunosensors also provide a simple and sensitive detection method for the specific determination of Anti-MBP in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of growth hormone on growth and myelination in the neonatal hypothyroid rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, R A; Smith, R M; Meller, D J; Dahlenburg, G W; Lineham, J D

    1988-10-01

    The possible involvement of a deficit of GH and insulin-like growth factor-I (somatomedin C) (IGF-I/SMC) in mediating the effects of propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism on body and skeletal growth and myelination was studied in the neonatal rat. Myelination (as assessed by 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphohydrolase (CNP) activity), skeletal growth (as assessed by tail length) and body weight of pups from PTU-treated mothers were significantly retarded compared with normal animals or euthyroid controls. At 20 days after birth, plasma GH in hypothyroid animals was undetectable (less than 10 micrograms/l), pituitary GH content was 1.2% of control, and plasma, liver and kidney IGF-I/SMC concentrations were 63, 68 and 50% of control values respectively. CNP activity in hypothyroid brain was 52% of normal controls but the concentration of IGF-I/SMC was 113-154% of control. Treatment of hypothyroid animals from day 1 with GH (10 mg/kg body weight per day) restored liver and plasma IGF-I/SMC concentrations at 20 days to values above those of normal animals and euthyroid controls. The concentration of IGF-I/SMC was also significantly (P less than 0.001) restored in hypothyroid kidney (79% of normal), but the concentration in brain was unaffected. These observations provide evidence that the GH treatment employed in the present experiments was adequate to restore the deficit. GH treatment had no significant effect on tail length or CNP activity, and only a small (4-24%) effect on body weight at 20 days. Only thyroxine was able fully to restore body weight and substantially restore tail length and CNP activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Effects of estrogen replacement therapy on the myelin sheath ultrastructure of myelinated fibers in the white matter of middle-aged ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qi; Luo, Yanmin; Lv, Fulin; Xiao, Qian; Chao, Fenglei; Qiu, Xuan; Zhang, Lei; Gao, Yuan; Xiu, Yun; Huang, Chunxia; Tang, Yong

    2018-04-01

    The effects of estrogen replacement therapy (ORT) on white matter and the myelin sheath ultrastructure in the white matter of middle-aged ovariectomized (OVX) rats were investigated in this study. Middle-aged rats were ovariectomized and divided into a placebo replacement (OVX + O) group and an estro