WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing mobile work

  1. Mobility Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    We posit the concept of Mobility Work to describe efforts of moving about people and things as part of accomplishing tasks. Mobility work can be seen as a spatial parallel to the concept of articulation work proposed by the sociologist Anselm Strauss. Articulation work describes efforts...... of coordination necessary in cooperative work, but focuses, we argue, mainly on the temporal aspects of cooperative work. As a supplement, the concept of mobility work focuses on the spatial aspects of cooperative work. Whereas actors seek to diminish the amount of articulation work needed in collaboration...... by constructing Standard Operation Procedures (SOPs), actors minimise mobility work by constructing Standard Operation Configurations (SOCs). We apply the concept of mobility work to the ethnography of hospital work, and argue that mobility arises because of the need to get access to people, places, knowledge and...

  2. Ethnic differences in breast cancer prevention information-seeking among rural women: will provider mobile messages work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Wilson, Susan

    2014-09-01

    Although growing research supports cancer survivor information-seeking, little is known about breast cancer prevention information-seeking among women. The purpose of the study was to examine differences in breast cancer risk factor knowledge, information sources, and desired mobile messages among Hispanic and non-Hispanic rural women. Women were recruited to complete a survey at an imaging center during a mammography screening visit. A total of 156 women (mean age = 61, SD = 12.07) completed the survey. Breast cancer risk factor knowledge was significantly higher for non-Hispanic women compared to Hispanic women (p = .035). Television, magazines, and Internet were the most frequent information sources. Providers were the most frequent interpersonal information source. Nearly 87 % used cell phones and 47 % used texting. Hispanic women were more likely to desire breast cancer prevention cell voice messages (p Health educators and clinicians must promote mobile messages for Hispanics and non-Hispanics for mammography adherence, breast cancer prevention education, and best practices to manage screening appointments.

  3. Mobile work: Ergonomics in a rapidly changing work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honan, Meg

    2015-01-01

    Places of work have been completely transformed by innovations in mobile work tools and ever-present access to internet data. This article characterizes use patterns and provides preliminary considerations for productive and comfortable use of common mobile devices. Two surveys described trends in mobile work. In the first, ergonomics professionals who oversee programs reported common mobile devices, their users and what data is accessed. The second, an end user survey, explored common activities performed on mobile devices, duration of use and locations where mobile work is common. The survey results provide a baseline data point for the status of mobile work in early 2014. Research indicates that additional risks have been introduced to the neck, thumbs and hands when using mobile devices. Possible trends regarding device use and work locations emerge. Intervention studies provide some direction for the practitioner. Practical strategies are outlined to reduce exposure intensity and duration. Contemporary mobile work presents tremendous change and opportunity for ergonomists and researchers to keep pace with fitting the changing models of work to the person. Continued research is needed on current mobile device use patterns to better understand ergonomic risk exposure in this rapidly changing realm.

  4. Mobile Applications for Mental Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganstein, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets have fundamentally changed the ways in which we interact with information. Far more than communication devices, smartphones and tablets are now indispensable tools in the pocket of healthcare providers. Mobile mental health applications (apps) provide instant access to up-to-date information on prevention, assessment and treatment. Self-help apps allow patients to take greater ownership of their own health and well-being. The past decade has seen an extraordinarily rapid proliferation of mobile medical apps. Though thousands of apps now exist, the challenge for healthcare providers and consumers alike has become sorting through mobile apps for those which provide accurate content delivered in the most user-friendly format. This article will review six mobile apps that can assist healthcare providers and consumers interested in enhancing mental health.

  5. Providing Secure Web Services for Mobile Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kivisaari, Tero

    2015-01-01

    Changing consumer behavior drives the demand for convenient and easy-to-use mobile applications across industries. This also impacts the financial sector. Banks are eager to offer their services as mobile applications to match the modern consumer needs. The mobile applications are not independently able to provide the required functionality; they interact with the existing core business functions by consuming secure Web Services over the Internet. The thesis analyses th...

  6. Oregon's mobility needs : social service provider survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    In 1998, the Oregon Department of Transportation undertook the Social Services Provider Survey as part of an investigation of the transportation needs of mobility impaired individuals in Oregon. This survey was designed to gain information about the ...

  7. Work environments of people with mobility impairments and limitations: Mobility Device User Work Survey (MWS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Kerri A; Gottlieb, Meghan; Hollingsworth, Holly H; Gray, David B

    2014-01-01

    Few studies of employed people who use wheelchairs, canes, crutches or walkers have been reported in the literature. One reason for this paucity of research reports is that surveys are most often made of unemployed individuals with disabilities a defined broadly. Understanding the work site of successfully employed people who use mobility devices requires the development of as survey that can be used to examine the important features of worksite from employees who use mobility devices at their worksites. This article describes the development and psychometrics of a survey on currently employed people with lower limb impairments and mobility limitations who use mobility devices. The items in the Mobility Device User Work Survey (MWS) were based on interviews and survey items pilot tested on employed mobility device users. A sample of 183 employed people who use mobility devices including wheelchairs, canes, crutches or walkers was recruited using internet postings on disability-related organizations. The average age of the sample was 46.3, most were college educated, 72% used wheelchairs and the average number of years of employment was 24. The MWS was completed by 183 people who met the inclusion criteria. The survey was sent to these same people a second time and 132 of them returned the second survey. The MWS consists of 106 questions on demographic, work and worksite characteristics and 58 subjective evaluation items that were organized into five scales. The internal consistencies (Cronbach's alpha) of the five scales were moderate (0.72) to good (0.93). Stability values of the five scales were calculated using correlations between forms and ranged from 0.70 to 0.80. The evaluative scales were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis. The MWS provides a tool for studying the variables that influence employed people who use mobility devices. Future studies of unemployed people who use mobility devices may benefit from using the results of the MWS to plan

  8. Maintenance work on CERN mobile phone services

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Maintenance work on the CERN GSM services will be carried out by our mobile operator, Sunrise, from 8.00 p.m. on 25 June to 1 a.m. on 26 June. External calls from CERN mobile phones using the 333 prefix may be disrupted for 30 minutes during this time. Other type of calls, e.g. mobile to mobile or mobile to CERN fixed phones, will not be affected. Should you have any questions regarding this maintenance operation, please contact the switchboard by phone (76111) or e-mail (standard.telephone@cern.ch) Telecom Section IT/CS

  9. Design of Mobile Gateway for Implementation of Smart Work System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Young Oh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the development of new technologies based on mobile system, there is a growing interest as a fundamental technology. In particular, in order to realize a mobile office and mobile phones, conferencing remote document is a technique that can realize smart network services solutions with enhanced real-time communication, real-time information sharing, and collaboration. Therefore, in this paper, the design meets the diverse needs of customers and the smart work platform mobile-based fast and conveniently it is trying to develop. For this reason, I have developed a mobile gateway that is based on the communication server construction OPEN API development, management of mobile ID, protocol design, and design of SSL/TLS security tunnel. Also, we developed a smart work platform that you apply this, you are trying to provide information systems environment of mobile company.

  10. Providing producer mobility support in NDN through proactive data replication

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann, Matheus; Barcellos, Marinho; Mauthe, Andreas Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Email Print Request Permissions Named Data Networking (NDN) is a novel architecture expected to overcome limitations of the current Internet. User mobility is one of the most relevant limitations to be addressed. NDN supports consumer mobility by design but fails to offer the same level of support for producer mobility. Existing approaches to extend NDN are host-centric, which conflicts with NDN principles, and provide limited support for producer mobility. This paper proposes a content-centr...

  11. Mobile emergency simulation training for rural health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Douglas; Bekiaris, Brent; Hansen, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Mobile emergency simulation offers innovative continuing medical educational support to regions that may lack access to such opportunities. Furthermore, satisfaction is a critical element for active learning. Together, the authors evaluated Canadian rural healthcare providers' satisfaction from high fidelity emergency simulation training using a modified motorhome as a mobile education unit (MEU). Over a 5-month period, data was collected during 14 educational sessions in nine different southern Manitoban communities. Groups of up to five rural healthcare providers managed emergency simulation cases including polytrauma, severe sepsis, and inferior myocardial infarction with right ventricular involvement, followed by a debrief. Participants anonymously completed a feedback form that contained 11 questions on a five-point Likert scale and six short-answer questions. Data from 131 respondents were analyzed, for a response rate of 75.6%. Respondents included nurses (27.5%), medical residents (26.7%), medical first responders (16.0%), and physicians (12.2%). The median response was 5 for overall quality of learning, development of clinical reasoning skills and decision-making ability, recognition of patient deterioration, and self-reflection. The post-simulation debrief median response was also 5 for summarizing important issues, constructive criticism, and feedback to learn. Respondents also reported that the MEU provided a believable working environment (87.0%, n=114), they had limited or no previous access to high fidelity mannequins (82.7%, n=107), and they had no specific training in crisis resource management or were unfamiliar with the term (92%, n=118). A high level of satisfaction was reported in rural health providers with mobile emergency simulation. Access to and experience with high fidelity mannequins was limited, suggesting areas for potential educational growth.

  12. Visual interfaces as an approach for providing mobile services and mobile content to low literate users in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Matyila, M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available in the related mobile applications. Exploring typical challenges experienced by low literate users and adapting these mobile applications using visual interfaces can provide low literate users with usable access to mobile services and mobile content....

  13. Mobile Communication and Work Practices in Knowledge-based Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertti Hurme

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the role of mobile communication, mobile tools and work practices in the context of organizations, especially knowledge-based organizations. Today, organizations are highly complex and diverse. Not surprisingly, various solutions to incorporating mobile tools and mobile communication in organizations have been devised. Challenges to technological development and research on mobile communication are presented.

  14. Mobile phone in Africa: providing services to the masses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2010-08-31

    Full Text Available and operational considerations associated with creating a middleware platform for mobile services. The platform should be able to support different mobile paradigms (voice, text, multimedia, mobile web, applications) using a variety of communications protocols...

  15. Women's Occupational Mobility After Work Interruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi Omori

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The basic tenents human capital theory suggest that women who leave occupations whith high atrophy rates will be those most likely to experience downward occupational mobility upon labor force renentry. The theory is confirmed. However, the impact on occupational mobility of an actual childbirth may opeerate indirectly through the length of time a woman is out of the labor force.

  16. The future of work : increasing reach through mobile technology

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, Laura; Mamic, Ivanka

    2015-01-01

    The world of work is changing. A major factor contributing to this is the proliferation of information and communication technologies, with mobile technology playing a central role. More and more people are able to access the Internet through their mobile devices. This has empowered them to work from anywhere but it has also led to the decline of traditional forms of employment. In the broader development context, mobile technology has been used extensively to reach beneficiaries and target a...

  17. The mobile phone in Africa: Providing services to the masses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2010-08-31

    Full Text Available The story of mobile telecommunications in Africa and the developing world is a remarkable one. Africa's mobile cellular growth rate has been the highest of any region over the past 5 years, averaging close to 60% year on year. Large cellular...

  18. NIOSH Mobile Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Work Environment Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIOSH Mobile Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Work Environment Laboratory is a 2005 Wheeled Coach Type III ambulance mounted on a Ford E-450 cut-away van chassis....

  19. Impacts of mobile tablet computing on provider productivity, communications, and the process of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooley, Benjamin; Walczak, Steven; Hikmet, Neset; Patel, Nitin

    2016-04-01

    well as on time spent on order submission, note completion time, overall workload, patient satisfaction with care experience and patient outcomes. Gender, number of years in practice, practice type (general practitioner vs. specialist), and service type (inpatient/outpatient) were found to have a significant effect on perceptions of patient satisfaction, care process, and provider productivity. Providers found positive gains from utilizing mobile devices in overall productivity, improved communications with their patients, the process of care, and technology efficiencies when used in combination with EHR and other health information resources. Demographic and health care work environment play a role in how mobile technologies are integrated into practice by providers. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Mobile in vivo camera robots provide sole visual feedback for abdominal exploration and cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentschler, M E; Dumpert, J; Platt, S R; Ahmed, S I; Farritor, S M; Oleynikov, D

    2006-01-01

    The use of small incisions in laparoscopy reduces patient trauma, but also limits the surgeon's ability to view and touch the surgical environment directly. These limitations generally restrict the application of laparoscopy to procedures less complex than those performed during open surgery. Although current robot-assisted laparoscopy improves the surgeon's ability to manipulate and visualize the target organs, the instruments and cameras remain fundamentally constrained by the entry incisions. This limits tool tip orientation and optimal camera placement. The current work focuses on developing a new miniature mobile in vivo adjustable-focus camera robot to provide sole visual feedback to surgeons during laparoscopic surgery. A miniature mobile camera robot was inserted through a trocar into the insufflated abdominal cavity of an anesthetized pig. The mobile robot allowed the surgeon to explore the abdominal cavity remotely and view trocar and tool insertion and placement without entry incision constraints. The surgeon then performed a cholecystectomy using the robot camera alone for visual feedback. This successful trial has demonstrated that miniature in vivo mobile robots can provide surgeons with sufficient visual feedback to perform common procedures while reducing patient trauma.

  1. Pilot Project Technology Business Case: Mobile Work Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ken [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lawrie, Sean [ScottMadden, Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States); Niedermuller, Josef [ScottMadden, Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Performance advantages of the new pilot project technologies are widely acknowledged, but it has proven difficult for utilities to derive business cases for justifying investment in these new capabilities. Lack of a business case is often cited by utilities as a barrier to pursuing wide-scale application of digital technologies to nuclear plant work activities. The decision to move forward with funding usually hinges on demonstrating actual cost reductions that can be credited to budgets and thereby truly reduce O&M or capital costs. Technology enhancements, while enhancing work methods and making work more efficient, often fail to eliminate workload such that it changes overall staffing and material cost requirements. It is critical to demonstrate cost reductions or impacts on non-cost performance objectives in order for the business case to justify investment by nuclear operators. The Business Case Methodology (BCM) was developed in September of 2015 to frame the benefit side of II&C technologies to address the “benefit” side of the analysis—as opposed to the cost side—and how the organization evaluates discretionary projects (net present value (NPV), accounting effects of taxes, discount rates, etc.). The cost and analysis side is not particularly difficult for the organization and can usually be determined with a fair amount of precision (not withstanding implementation project cost overruns). It is in determining the “benefits” side of the analysis that utilities have more difficulty in technology projects and that is the focus of this methodology. The methodology is presented in the context of the entire process, but the tool provided is limited to determining the organizational benefits only. This report describes a the use of the BCM in building a business case for mobile work packages, which includes computer-based procedures and other automated elements of a work package. Key to those impacts will be identifying where the savings are

  2. Childcare Providers: Work Stress and Personal Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Monica; Gerstenblatt, Paula; Lee, Ahyoung; Vallejo, Viana; Travis, Dnika

    2016-01-01

    Childcare providers face multiple work-related stressors. Small studies of childcare providers have suggested that providers have high levels of depression compared to the general population. However, unlike other caregiving professions, the research examining childcare providers is sparse, and there is little information to inform practices and…

  3. Building websites with HTML5 to work with mobile phones

    CERN Document Server

    David, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this ebook is to introduce you to mobile Web development. In many ways it is very similar to desktop Web site development - HTML5 is HTML5 no matter what device you install it on.What is different is how you use and interface with the device. Smartphones and tablets like the iPad, iPhone, and android devices are just very different than laptops and desktops. Find out how to work within mobile versions of popular web browsers while maximizing your design with HTML5 and CSS3 basics. Discover how to place items, work with fonts, and control color detail as well

  4. Working Memory Capacity and Mobile Multimedia Learning Environments: Individual Differences in Learning While Mobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Peter E.; Mariano, Gina J.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC) on learning from an historical inquiry multimedia tutorial in stationary versus mobile learning environments using a portable digital media player (i.e., iPod). Students with low (n = 44) and high (n = 40) working memory capacity, as measured by the…

  5. Structural equation modelling of determinants of customer satisfaction of mobile network providers: Case of Kolkata, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibashish Chakraborty

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Indian market of mobile network providers is growing rapidly. India is the second largest market of mobile network providers in the world and there is intense competition among existing players. In such a competitive market, customer satisfaction becomes a key issue. The objective of this paper is to develop a customer satisfaction model of mobile network providers in Kolkata. The results indicate that generic requirements (an aggregation of output quality and perceived value, flexibility, and price are the determinants of customer satisfaction. This study offers insights for mobile network providers to understand the determinants of customer satisfaction.

  6. ANALYSIS AND OPTIMISATION OF DYNAMIC STABILITY OF MOBILE WORKING MACHINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter BIGOŠ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an investigation of the dynamic stability, which is specified for the mobile working machines. There are presented the basic theoretical principles of the stability theory together with an introduction of two illustrative examples of the dynamic stability analysis.

  7. Person factors and work environments of workers who use mobility devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David B; Morgan, Kerri A; Gottlieb, Meghan; Hollingsworth, Holly H

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 25% of people with mobility impairments and limitations who are of working age are employed, yet few studies have examined their perspectives on their jobs or work environments required to complete job tasks. The purpose of this study was to describe the factors that contribute to successful employment for those who use mobility devices. A convenience sample of 132 workers who use power wheelchairs, manual wheelchairs, canes, crutches or walkers. Participants completed an online version of the Mobility Device User Work Survey (MWS). A multivariate analysis and a two-step multiple linear regression analysis were used. Study participants had few secondary health conditions that influenced their work. Employee satisfactoriness to their employers was high. Accessibility of worksites was high. Assistive technologies were inexpensive, and personal assistance was used infrequently and usually was unpaid. Co-worker communications were very positive. Flexible work rules and supportive managers were highly valued. Job satisfaction positively correlated with accessibility, work tasks, co-worker communication and work support. The description of work environments of successfully employed mobility device users can provide some useful guidance to employers, vocational rehabilitation (VR) counselors and unemployed mobility device users to balance employee abilities and preferences with the needs of employers.

  8. Development of a Mobile App for Family Planning Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsall, Viannella; Rogers, Jennifer; Witt, Jacki; Song, Sejun; Nguyen, Hoang Duc Huy; Kelly, Patricia

    To provide an overview of lessons learned during the development process of an app for iOS and Android based on national recommendations for providing quality family planning services. After a review of existing apps was conducted to determine whether an app of clinical recommendations for family planning existed, a team of clinicians, training specialists, and app developers created a resource app by first drafting a comprehensive content map. A prototype of the app was then pilot tested using smart tablets by a volunteer convenience sample of women's healthcare professionals. Outcomes measured included usability, acceptability, download analytics, and satisfaction by clinicians as reported through an investigator-developed tool. Sixty-nine professionals tested a prototype of the app, and completed a user satisfaction tool. Overall, user feedback was positive, and a zoom function was added to the final version as a result of the pilot test. Within 3 months of being publicly available, the app was downloaded 677 times, with 97% of downloads occurring on smart phones, 76% downloads occurring on iOS devices, and 24% on Android devices. This trend persisted throughout the following 3 months. Clinicians with an interest in developing an app should consider a team approach to development, pilot test the app prior to wider distribution, and develop a web-based version of the app to be used by clinicians who are unable to access smart devices in their practice setting.

  9. Predictors Of Customer Loyalty To Mobile Service Provider In South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Chinomona; Maxwell Sandada

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the increasing research on consumer behaviour, there is a dearth of studies that have investigated the influence of mobile provider service quality in customer satisfaction regarding customer trust and loyalty in the African mobile communication context. Therefore, this study examines the relationships using a data set of 151 mobile service clients in Gauteng Province of South Africa. All the posited five hypotheses are supported. The results indicate that the relationships betwee...

  10. Romanians’ attitudes towards mobility for work from a gendered perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andra-Bertha SĂNDULEASA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Employment strategies in the European Union laid stress on the importance and on the need to increase the participation of women on labour market. On the other hand, evidence shows that international migration has been feminised in Europe and that, in the past decades, geopolitical conflicts and economic restructuring in Eastern Europe and the Third World generated new patterns of female migration. This article explores Romanians’ attitudes towards mobility for work from a gendered perspective. Based on the Special Euro-barometer 337 – Geographical and labour market mobility – conducted in 2009 on behalf of the European Commission, the main findings of the article are that gender is an important aspect in analysing people’s economic behaviour. The research argues that in order to increase women’s participation on labour market, a deeper understanding of the situation of females on labour market is required.

  11. 23 CFR 630.1006 - Work zone safety and mobility policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Work zone safety and mobility policy. 630.1006 Section... OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Work Zone Safety and Mobility § 630.1006 Work zone safety and mobility policy. Each State shall implement a policy for the systematic consideration and management of work zone...

  12. Non-work-related use of personal mobile phones by hospital registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Deborah L; LeVasseur, Sandra A; Li, Dongmei

    2015-01-13

    Personal mobile phones and other personal communication devices (smartphones and tablet computers) provide users with an ever-increasing number and diversity of non-work-related activities while at work. In hospitals, where the vigilance of health care workers is essential for patient care, the potential distraction of these devices could be hazardous to patients. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of non-work-related use of personal mobile phones and other personal communication devices among hospital registered nurses. In March 2014, a previously validated 30-question survey was emailed to the 10,978 members of the Academy of Medical Surgical Nurses. There were 825 respondents who met the inclusion criteria. The use of a personal mobile phone or other personal communication device while working (excluding meal times and breaks) was reported by 78.1% (644/825) of respondents. Nurses reported regularly (sometimes, often, or always) sending personal emails and text messages (38.6%, 318/825), reading news (25.7%, 212/825), checking/posting on social networking sites (20.8%, 172/825), shopping (9.6%, 79/825), and playing games (6.5%, 54/825) while working. This study found that hospital nurses frequently use their personal mobile phones or other personal communication devices for non-work-related activities at work. The primary activity reported was to send personal emails and text messages to family and friends.

  13. Work, family and daily mobility: a new approach to the problem through a mobility survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabarria, Marta; Pérez, Katherine; Santamariña-Rubio, Elena; Aragay, Josep Maria; Capdet, Mayte; Peiró, Rosana; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Artazcoz, Lucía; Borrell, Carme

    2013-01-01

    To analyze gender inequalities in socioeconomic factors affecting the amount of time spent travelling for work-related and home-related reasons among working individuals aged between 30 and 44 years old during a weekday in Catalonia (Spain). A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data were obtained from employed individuals aged between 30 and 44 years of age who reported travelling on the day prior to the interview in the Catalan Mobility Survey 2006 (N = 23,424). Multivariate logistic regression models were adjusted to determine the factors associated with longer time spent travelling according to the reason for travelling (work- or home-related journeys). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals are presented. A higher proportion of men travelled and spent more time travelling for work-related reasons, while a higher proportion of women travelled and spend more time travelling for home-related reasons. A higher educational level was associated with greater time spent travelling for work-related reasons in both men and women but was related to an increase in travelling time for home-related reasons only in men. In women, a larger household was associated with greater travel time for home-related reasons and with less travel time for work-related reasons. This study confirms the different mobility patterns in men and women, related to their distinct positions in the occupational, family and domestic spheres. Gender inequalities in mobility within the working population are largely determined by the greater responsibility of women in the domestic and family sphere. This finding should be taken into account in the design of future transport policies. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Dual mobility cups provide biomechanical advantages in situations at risk for dislocation: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Alexandre; Latypova, Adeliya; Guillemin, Maika; Parvex, Valérie; Guyen, Olivier

    2017-03-01

    Constrained devices, standard implants with large heads, and dual mobility systems have become popular options to manage instability after total hip arthroplasty (THA). Clinical results with these options have shown variable success rates and significant higher rates of aseptic loosening and mechanical failures with constrained implants. Literature suggests potential advantages of dual mobility, however little is known about its biomechanics. We present a comparative biomechanical study of a standard implant, a constrained implant, and a dual mobility system. A finite element analysis was developed to assess and compare these acetabular options with regard to the range of motion (ROM) to impingement, the angle of dislocation, the resistive torque, the volume of polyethylene (PE) with a stress above 80% of the elastic limit, and the interfacial cup/bone stress. Dual mobility implants provided the greatest ROM to impingement and allowed delaying subluxation and dislocation when compared to standard and constrained implants. Dual mobility also demonstrated the lowest resistive torque at subluxation while the constrained implant provided the greatest one. The lowest critical PE volume was observed with the dual mobility implant, and the highest stress at the interfaces was observed with the constrained implant. This study highlights the biomechanical advantages of dual mobility systems over constrained and standard implants, and is supported by the clinical results reported. Therefore, the use of dual mobility systems in situations at risk for instability should be advocated and constrained implants should be restricted to salvage situations.

  15. The Effect of Advertisement and Promotion on Brand Switching Behavior of Mobile Phone Providers in Manado

    OpenAIRE

    Tumewu, Ferdinand; Runturambi, Fallonia

    2014-01-01

    Companies should pay attention to advertisement and promotion of its brand in order to attract consumers, so, it will influence the brand switching behavior of consumers in choosing mobile phone provider. The aim of this research is to analyze the effect of advertisement and promotion on brand switching behavior. To achieve the objectives, the research method used is associative with multiple regression analysis. The population observed is people who are users of mobile phone providers in Man...

  16. Procurement risk management practices and supply chain performance among mobile phone service providers in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Adhiambo Okonjo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between procurement risk management practices and supply chain performance among mobile phone service providers in Kenya. The study specifically set out to establish the extent to which mobile phone service providers have implemented procurement risk management practices and to determine the relationship between procurement risk management practices and supply chain performance. The study adopted a descriptive study design by collecting data from the four (4 mobile telecommunication companies in Kenya using a self-administered questionnaire. Means, standard deviation, and regression analysis were used to analyze the data collected. The study established that most of the mobile phone service providers in Kenya had implemented procurement risk management practices. It was also clear that there was a very significant relationship between procurement risk management practices and supply chain performance.

  17. Working Virtually: Transforming the Mobile Workplace. 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefling, Trina

    2017-01-01

    Remote working is the new reality, and transactional work--provided by freelancers, contract employees or consultants--has increased exponentially. It is forecast that as much as half the labor force will be working independently and virtually by 2020. Most organizations are still grappling with how to effectively manage their virtual staff and…

  18. 75 FR 22338 - Reexamination of Roaming Obligations of Commercial Mobile Radio Service Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... have on the terms of retail service provided to consumers, how such impacts differ from those resulting... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 20 Reexamination of Roaming Obligations of Commercial Mobile Radio Service Providers... to data services that are provided without interconnection to the public switched network--including...

  19. Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    to social networks, personal identities, and our relationship to the built environment. The omnipresence of mobilities within everyday life, high politics, technology, and tourism (to mention but a few) all point to a key insight harnessed by the ‘mobilities turn’. Namely that mobilities is much more than...... and environmental degradation. The spaces and territories marked by mobilities as well as the sites marked by the bypassing of such are explored. Moreover, the architectural and technological dimensions to infrastructures and sites of mobilities will be included as well as the issues of power, social exclusion......, consumption, surveillance and mobilities history to mention some of the many themes covered by this reference work. This new title will focus on the academic contributions to this understanding by primarily focusing on works and publications in the aftermath of the seminal book and landmark text ‘Sociology...

  20. Mobile Work Platform - A Fluor Fernald innovative dismantlement technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark S. Peters; Paul R. Cromer; Robert Danner

    2000-06-16

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Focus Area, led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory, has been charged with finding new and innovative D&D technologies and then validating through field demonstration that the technologies are safer, faster and/or more cost-effective. The D&D Focus Area's approach to verifying the benefits of the improved D&D technologies is to use them at DOE sites in large-scale demonstration and deployment (LSDD) projects. The DOE's Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), near Cincinnati Ohio, was host for a LSDD Project overseen by the D&D Focus Area. The FEMP was formerly engaged in the production of high quality uranium metal; and is now currently undergoing active environmental restoration, including removal of major process facilities. As observed during the D&D of Fernald's Plant 1, the baseline method for removing piping required laborers to work above the floor on ladders, scaffolding, ardor man-lifts with hand-held power tools. The pipe must first be rigged to prevent falling when cut. After cutting, the pipe is manually lowered to the ground and placed in a storage/disposal container. The Mobile Work Platform (MWP) consists of a mobile chassis, telescoping arm and a dual crimper/shear ''end-effecter''. It has the capability to grab and hold a pipe, crimp and shear the pipe (up to a ten-foot section) on either side of where it is being held and then lower and place the pipe section into a storage/disposal container. The MWP can crimp/shear up to a 6-inch diameter, schedule 401, carbon steel pipe. A single operator using a radio remote control operates the MWP. The paper will describe the results (productivity, safety advantages and lessons learned) during the Mobile Work Platform demonstration at Fernald.

  1. Making Sense of Mobile Technology: The Integration of Work and Private Life

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pauleen, David; Campbell, John; Harmer, Brian; Intezari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies have facilitated a radical shift in work and private life. In this article, we seek to better understand how individual mobile technology users have made sense of these changes and adapted...

  2. Considerations for the Development of Work Zone Mobility Performance Measures and Thresholds for Virginia Freeways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    "The Federal Highway Administration has been encouraging states to improve their monitoring and tracking of the : mobility impacts of work zones. The use of mobility performance measures will enable agencies to assess better the : contribution of wor...

  3. Providing varying degrees of guidance for Work-Integrated Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindstaedt, S.N.; Kump, B.; Beham, G.; Pammer, V.; Ley, T.; Dotan, A.; de Hoog, Robert; Wolpers, M.; Kirschner, P.A.; Scheffel, M.; Lindstaedt, S.; Dimitrova, V.

    2010-01-01

    We present a work-integrated learning (WIL) concept which aims at empowering employees to learn while performing their work tasks. Within three usage scenarios we introduce the APOSDLE environment which embodies the WIL concept and helps knowledge workers move fluidly along the whole spectrum of WIL

  4. A mobile communication device adapted to provide a dynamic display arrangement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The invention relates to a mobile communication device comprising a light projector adapted to project a multi-coloured image onto a surface; a hinged mirror comprising a first mirror part adapted to be tilted around the hinge into the light path of the light projector; wherein the first mirror...... part comprises means for correcting a skew angle in the multi-coloured image projected onto a surface. Thereby is achieved that the mobile communication device is able to provide RGB full colour dynamic image projection which is preferred over monochromatic laser projection because it is a speckle free...... and eye-friendly projection....

  5. Making Mobile Learning Work: Student Perceptions and Implementation Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon W. Tabor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices are the constant companions of technology users of all ages. Studies show, however, that making calls is a minimal part of our engagement with today’s smart phones and that even texting has fallen off, leaving web browsing, gaming, and social media as top uses. A cross-disciplinary group of faculty at our university came together in the mLearning Scholars group to study the potential for using mobile devices for student learning. The group met bi-weekly throughout a semester and shared thoughts, ideas, resources, and examples, while experimenting with mobile learning activities in individual classes. This paper summarizes student perceptions and adoption intent for using mobile devices for learning, and discusses implementation issues for faculty in adding mobile learning to a college course. Outcomes reflect that mobile learning adoption is not a given, and students need help in using and understanding the value in using personal devices for learning activities.

  6. Community Mobilization and Awareness Creation for Orofacial Cleft Services: A Survey of Nigerian Cleft Service Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebola, Raphael A; Bamgbose, Babatunde O; Adeoye, Joshua B

    2014-01-01

    Background. The opportunity to provide free surgical care for orofacial clefts has opened a new vista and is enhanced by well-informed communities who are aware of the free surgical services available to them. It is the responsibility of cleft care providers to adequately inform these communities via a combination of community mobilization and awareness creation. Methods. This was a nationwide, cross-sectional descriptive study of all orofacial cleft service providers in Nigeria using a structured, self-administered questionnaire. Results. A total of 4648 clefts have been repaired, 50.8% by the ten government-owned and 49.2% by the five nongovernment-owned organizations included in the study. The nongovernment-owned institutions seemed to be more aggressive about community mobilization and awareness creation than government-owned ones, and this was reflected in their patient turnout. Most of the organizations studied would prefer a separate, independent body to handle their awareness campaign. Conclusion. Community mobilization requires skill and dedication and may require formal training or dedicated budgets by government-owned and nongovernment-owned institutions alike. Organizations involved in cleft care provision must take community mobilization and awareness seriously if the largely unmet needs of orofacial cleft patients in Nigeria are to be tackled.

  7. Using Technology in Social Work Practice: The mDad (Mobile Device Assisted Dad Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawna J. Lee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobile technology presents an exciting opportunity for social workers to reach populations that are typically underserved by interventions and services. We present one application of technology that is particularly relevant to social work practice. The mDad (Mobile Device Assisted Dad app was developed to augment existing social work practices by providing a father-friendly tool to help new fathers learn about and engage with their infants and toddlers. We discuss the process of developing the app content and conducting usability testing of the mDad app. We conclude with a discussion of the lessons learned from the mDad project, and the challenges of implementation and dissemination of technology-based interventions in community contexts.

  8. Costs of multidisciplinary parenteral nutrition care provided at a distance via mobile tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heejung; Spaulding, Ryan; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Yadrich, Donna; Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Gilroy, Richard; Smith, Carol E

    2014-11-01

    Determining the costs of healthcare delivery is a key step for providing efficient nutrition-based care. This analysis tabulates the costs of delivering home parenteral nutrition (HPN) interventions and clinical assessments through encrypted mobile technologies to increase patients' access to healthcare providers, reduce their travel expenses, and allow early detection of infection and other complications. A traditional cost-accounting method was used to tabulate all expenses related to mobile distance HPN clinic appointments, including (1) personnel time of multidisciplinary healthcare professionals, (2) supply of HPN intervention materials, and (3) equipment, connection, and delivery expenses. A total of 20 mobile distance clinic appointments were conducted for an average of 56 minutes each with 45 patients who required HPN infusion care. The initial setup costs included mobile tablet devices, 4G data plans, and personnel's time as well as intervention materials. The initial costs were on average $916.64 per patient, while the follow-up clinic appointments required $361.63 a month, with these costs continuing to decline as the equipment was used by multiple patients more frequently over time. Patients reported high levels of satisfaction with cost savings in travel expenses and rated the quality of care comparable to traditional in-person examinations. This study provides important aspects of the initial cost tabulation for visual assessment for HPN appointments. These findings will be used to generate a decision algorithm for scheduling mobile distance clinic appointments intermittent with in-person visits to determine how to lower costs of nutrition assessments. To maximize the cost benefits, clinical trials must continue to collect clinical outcomes. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  9. Mobile phone-based clinical guidance for rural health providers in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautham, Meenakshi; Iyengar, M Sriram; Johnson, Craig W

    2015-12-01

    There are few tried and tested mobile technology applications to enhance and standardize the quality of health care by frontline rural health providers in low-resource settings. We developed a media-rich, mobile phone-based clinical guidance system for management of fevers, diarrhoeas and respiratory problems by rural health providers. Using a randomized control design, we field tested this application with 16 rural health providers and 128 patients at two rural/tribal sites in Tamil Nadu, Southern India. Protocol compliance for both groups, phone usability, acceptability and patient feedback for the experimental group were evaluated. Linear mixed-model analyses showed statistically significant improvements in protocol compliance in the experimental group. Usability and acceptability among patients and rural health providers were very high. Our results indicate that mobile phone-based, media-rich procedural guidance applications have significant potential for achieving consistently standardized quality of care by diverse frontline rural health providers, with patient acceptance. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Providing support to doctors working in intensive care

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, JFA

    2012-05-01

    ‘Jading’ is a process of exhaustion in which apathy and cynicism replace the drive to be responsive and caring. ‘Burnout’ a term first coined in the psychology literature in 1974 was based on Graham Greene’s novel ‘A Burnt-Out Case1. It is the umbrella description for disengagement in the workplace setting characterised by withdrawal, denial and inefficiency. There is an alienation from the pressures of work. Marshall and Kasman2 defined it as ‘the loss of motivation for creative thought’. It is the opposite of engagement which is associated with energy and optimism. People who experience all 3 symptoms- emotional exhaustion, negative attitude towards patients, reduced sense of personal accomplishment- have the greatest degree of burnout. It doesn’t get better by being ignored. These processes have serious consequences for the individual involved and the hospital that they work in. The doctor underperforms and the Unit becomes dysfunctional There is decreased quality of care, increased absenteeism, and high staff turnover. There is an inability to make decisions and a failure to set priorities.

  11. Interviews with employed people with mobility impairments and limitations: environmental supports impacting work acquisition and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lindsey C; Gottlieb, Meghan; Morgan, Kerri A; Gray, David B

    2014-01-01

    Less than 40% of people with disabilities work. Many studies have detailed the barriers to employment but few have examined the work experiences of those who are employed. A description of work conditions valued by a specific segment of employed people with disabilities is provided. Videotaped interviews of 33 successfully employed people with mobility impairments and limitations (PWMIL) were transcribed and analyzed to gather their perspectives on their work social and physical environments. Finding work was facilitated by family, friends and other social networks, vocational services, and prior education. Doing volunteer work, spending time at a paid and unpaid internship, and part-time work experiences were important aspects of job acquisition. Exterior and interior physical features were or had been made accessible. Expensive assistive technologies were paid for by the employee and their health insurance. Almost all personal assistance was provided by family, friends and co-workers. Work satisfaction included having a supportive employer, supportive co-workers, and flexible worksite policies. The interviews of employed PWMIL provide prospective employers and employees information on important social and physical work features that are needed to improve the possibilities for hiring people with disabilities and facilitating their successful careers.

  12. An evaluation of contraception mobile applications for providers of family planning services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Rachel; Lunde, Britt; Chen, Katherine T

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to identify mobile applications (apps) about contraception and to evaluate those targeted toward providers of family planning services in order to assess their quality and comprehensiveness. We systematically searched the Apple iTunes Store using contraception search terms. We created a master list of relevant and unique apps and divided the apps into categories and subcategories according to intended audience and purpose. We then checked availability of contraception apps for providers in the Google Play Store. We scored apps on objective and subjective components using the APPLICATIONS scoring system, a tool developed to evaluate health-related mobile apps with a maximum score of 17 points. From a total of 1218 apps found using 41 contraception search terms, 113 were unique and relevant to contraception. We determined that six apps (5.3%) were potentially useful for providers of family planning services and evaluated them. Four apps received 12 points, one received 11 points and one received 8 points. The two free apps were among those with the highest scores. Three of these apps were also available in the Google Play Store. A small number of contraception apps are targeted toward providers of family planning services. Available apps are variable in quality and comprehensiveness. There is potential for further mobile resource development in the area of contraception, given the limited number and inconsistent quality of available apps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mobilizing Senior Citizens in Co-design Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmborg, Lone; Werner, Katharina; Gronvall, Erik

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses methodological considerations of participation in design for ageing. Based on the notions of design culture, communities of everyday practice and situated elderliness we present accounts from two settings and discuss methodological issues related to mobilizing senior citizens...

  14. Characteristics of Adults Seeking Health Care Provider Support Facilitated by Mobile Technology: Secondary Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosak, Kelly; Park, Shin Hye

    2017-12-21

    Mobile health technology is rapidly evolving with the potential to transform health care. Self-management of health facilitated by mobile technology can maximize long-term health trajectories of adults. Little is known about the characteristics of adults seeking Web-based support from health care providers facilitated by mobile technology. This study aimed to examine the following: (1) the characteristics of adults who seek human support from health care providers for health concerns using mobile technology rather than from family members and friends or others with similar health conditions and (2) the use of mobile health technology among adults with chronic health conditions. Findings of this study were interpreted in the context of the Efficiency Model of Support. We first described characteristics of adults seeking Web-based support from health care providers. Using chi-square tests for categorical variables and t test for the continuous variable of age, we compared adults seeking Web-based and conventional support by demographics. The primary aim was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression to examine whether chronic health conditions and demographic factors (eg, sex, income, employment status, race, ethnicity, education, and age) were associated with seeking Web-based support from health care providers. The sample included adults (N=1453), the majority of whom were female 57.60% (837/1453), white 75.02% (1090/1453), and non-Hispanic 89.13% (1295/1453). The age of the participants ranged from 18 to 92 years (mean 48.6, standard deviation [SD] 16.8). The majority 76.05% (1105/1453) of participants reported college or higher level of education. A disparity was found in access to health care providers via mobile technology based on socioeconomic status. Adults with annual income of US $30,000 to US $100,000 were 1.72 times more likely to use Web-based methods to contact a health care provider, and adults with an annual income above US $100,000 were 2.41 to

  15. Psychosocial factors at work and the development of mobility limitations among adults in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Darsø, Lilie; Manty, Minna

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Psychosocial factors in the working environment have been shown to be associated with mobility limitations, but this has not yet been confirmed in a Danish population. We aimed to examine how psychosocial factors at work are related to developing mobility limitations in Denmark. Methods......: This study is based on data from 2952 middle-aged men and women without mobility limitations in 2000. Results: We found increased risk of incident mobility limitations during 6-year follow up among men who often perceived high work pace (OR 5.45, 95% CI 1.21-24.52) vs. never, who only sometimes or...

  16. Interrupted Trajectories: The Impact of Academic Failure on the Social Mobility of Working-Class Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrom, Tina; Lightfoot, Nic

    2013-01-01

    Higher education (HE) is often viewed as a conduit for social mobility through which working-class students can secure improved life-chances. However, the link between HE and social mobility is largely viewed as unproblematic. Little research has explored the possible impact of academic failure (in HE) on the trajectories of working-class students…

  17. Reflections on Distributive Leadership for Work-Based Mobile Learning of Canadian Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlman, Dorothy

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquity, flexibility, and accessibility of mobile devices can transform how registered nurses in Canada learn beyond the confines of traditional education/training boundaries in their work settings. Many Canadian registered nurses have actively embraced mobile technologies for their work-based learning to meet their competency requirements…

  18. An Evaluation of Mobile Applications for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaia, Kathryn L; Farag, Sara; Chyjek, Kathy; Knopman, Jaime; Chen, Katherine T

    2017-03-01

    To identify and rate reproductive endocrinology and infertility (REI) mobile applications (apps) targeted toward REI providers. A list of REI apps was found in both the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores using the following seven MeSH terms: reproductive endocrinology, REI, infertility, fertility, In Vitro Fertilization, IVF, and embryology. Patient-centered apps were excluded. The remaining apps were then evaluated for accuracy using reliable references. Mobile technology. None. Accurate apps were evaluated for comprehensiveness (the extent of the ability to aid in clinical decision-making) and rated with objective and subjective components using the APPLICATIONS scoring system. Using the seven REI-related MeSH terms, 985 apps and 1,194 apps were identified in the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores, respectively. Of these unique apps, only 20 remained after excluding patient-centered apps. Upon further review for applicability to REI specifically and content accuracy, only seven apps remained. These seven apps were then rated using the APPLICATIONS scoring system. Only 0.32% of 2,179 apps reviewed for this study were useful to REI providers. There is potential for further mobile resource development in the area of REI, given the limited number and varying comprehensiveness and quality of available apps.

  19. Early mobilization after uncomplicated medial subtalar dislocation provides successful functional results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasanianos, Nikolaos G; Lyras, Dimitrios N; Mouzopoulos, George; Tsutseos, Nikolaos; Garnavos, Christos

    2011-03-01

    Subtalar dislocation is a rare injury, with the medial type occurring in the majority of cases. The period of postreduction immobilization is a matter of controversy. Most studies set the period of immobilization between 4 and 8 weeks. The hypothesis in this study is that a period of 2-3 weeks of immobilization in a cast, followed by early mobilization, could provide better functional results than longer periods of immobilization. During a period of 4 years, eight patients (six men, two women) with mean age of 37.2 years and uncomplicated medial subtalar dislocation were treated in our institution. Immediate reduction under sedation and cast immobilization was provided in all cases. Our rehabilitation protocol consisted of two completed weeks of immobilization and thereafter ankle range-of-motion exercises and partial weight-bearing mobilization. Patients were followed up for a mean period of 3 years. Clinical results were evaluated using the AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot scale. All patients achieved almost normal ankle range of motion and good clinical outcome (mean AOFAS score 92.25). No radiographic evidence of arthritis or avascular necrosis of the talus was detected. Two patients complained of mild pain of the hindfoot. All patients returned to daily routine activities in about 2 months from injury. Immediate reduction and early mobilization could be key factors for uneventful recovery of uncomplicated medial subtalar dislocation. Multicenter clinical trials are needed for further validation of our initial results. III, prospective clinical series study.

  20. Exploring mental health providers' interest in using web and mobile-based tools in their practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Schueller

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of Internet sites and mobile applications are being developed intended for use in clinical practice. However, during the development process (e.g., creating features and determining use cases, the needs and interests of providers are often overlooked. We explored providers' interests using a mixed-methods approach incorporating both qualitative and quantitative research methods. A first study used an interview approach to identify the challenges providers faced, tools they used, and any use of computers and apps specifically. Fifteen providers from both the United States and Canada completed the interview and recordings were transcribed and analyzed using a constructivist grounded theory approach. Four primary themes were identified including challenges, potential tools, access and usability. A second study used a brief survey completed by 132 providers at a large healthcare system to explore current use of and potential interest in Internet and mobile technologies. Although many providers (80.9% reported recommending some form of technology to patients, these were mostly Internet websites that were predominantly informational/psychoeducational in nature. Overall, these studies combine to suggest a strong interest in websites and apps for use in clinical settings while highlighting potential areas (ease of use, patient security and privacy that should be considered in the design and deployment of these tools.

  1. An Empirical Investigation of Factors Determining the Consumers’ Choice of Mobile Service Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Gautam

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available After the implementation of government policies on globalization and liberalization, the consumers have become more critical about the selection of service providers. Consumers are now very much aware of the alternatives available in relation to services and the provider organizations. Expectations of consumers are rising and the provider organizations should be aware of these expectations. The objective of the present study is to examine the factors responsible for helping the consumers to choose mobile telecommunication service provider among the competitors in the market. The primary statistical techniques used in the study are Exploratory Factor Analysis, and Structural Equation Modeling. The data was collected with the help of structured questionnaire consisting of different questions related to demographics, service quality, product quality and availability, promotion and price in order to study perceptions of consumers. In order to examine these above mentioned variables and to derive meaningful conclusions, use of structural equation modelling was imperative. AMOS (Analysis of Moment Structure version 16.0 was employed in the research to test the underlying hypotheses of the study. Results showed that the paths are significantly related to the casual processes. Price was found to be the most important factor followed by product quality and availability, service quality, and promotion in determining perceptions of customers towards mobile telecommunication services. It is expected that the findings of the study may provide meaningful insights to the service providers and contribute in improving their strategies and marketing operations.

  2. ICT-Platform to Transform Car Dealerships to Regional Providers of Sustainable Mobility Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Wagner vom Berg

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: The topic of this study is the ICT-enabled transformation of car dealerships to regional providers of sustainable mobility (e.g., car sharing. Background: Car dealerships offer specific conditions that enable a sustainable mobility offer, based on individual motorized transport like car sharing. This is especially useful in small towns or rural areas where people’s mobility is strongly dominated by private cars, and public transport coverage is limited. However, these new mobility services are combined services with the need of a deep integration of information systems, and these services are not yet related to car dealerships and customer acquisition has to be supported. Methodology: An empirical study with an inductive approach was chosen. The study consists of interviews with three focus groups of different stakeholders of car dealerships. Within the frame of the research project, “ReCaB – Regional Car-Balancing” a qualitative research approach was chosen. Within a design science approach the existing SusCRM architecture was adapted based on the elaborated requirements. Contribution: A software architecture is proposed, where Customer Relationship Management (CRM components to market new sustainable mobility offers are vital parts and existing information systems of car dealerships are integrated. Findings: The basic feasibility of the establishment and customer acceptance has been demonstrated, at least in the area of car sharing within ReCaB. The execution in the car sharing field has already started and a number of car dealerships are already bringing their own offers to market. Major findings for the SusCRM architecture have been elaborated in a design science approach in the national German research project “Showcase for electro mobility”. Recommendations for Practitioners: There is still no fully functional prototype developed for this specific use case and evaluated in the car dealership environment. An

  3. The Network of International Student Mobility (Working Title)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voegtle, E.; Windzio, M.

    2016-07-01

    In a previous paper (see Vögtle and Windzio 2016) we investigated the impact of membership in the Bologna Process on patterns and driving forces of cross-national student mobility. Student exchange flows were analysed for almost all Bologna Process member states and nonBologna OECD members over a ten-year period (from 2000 to 2009). We applied a Social Network Approach focusing on outbound diploma-mobility to identify positions of countries in the network of cross-national student exchange. Based on social network analyses, we first visualized the exchange patterns between sampled countries. In doing so, we analysed the student exchange linkages to gain descriptive insights into the development of the network (see Figure 1). Second, we used Exponential Random Graph Models (ERGM) to test which factors determine patterns of transnational student mobility. The results of this network analyses reveal that cross-national student exchange networks are stable over time. At the core of these networks are the United States, Great Britain, France, and Germany; they attract the highest shares of students from the remaining countries in our sample. Moreover, the results of the ERGM demonstrate that homophily between countries determines student exchange patterns. The most relevant ties exist between bordering countries. Moreover, membership in the Bologna Process impacts on mobility patterns, and the effect size increases over the periods investigated. (Author)

  4. Making Mobile Learning Work: Student Perceptions and Implementation Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Sharon W.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices are the constant companions of technology users of all ages. Studies show, how-ever, that making calls is a minimal part of our engagement with today's smart phones and that even texting has fallen off, leaving web browsing, gaming, and social media as top uses. A cross-disciplinary group of faculty at our university came together…

  5. Integrate WeChat with Moodle to Provide a Mobile Learning Environment for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigao; Fan, Yibo; Jiao, Jianli

    2016-01-01

    In the information age, learning has become ubiquitous, and mobile learning enabled by mobile technologies is expected to play a significant role in various educational settings. Currently, there exist some limitations on mobile learning from the perspective of technology. The implementation of mobile learning usually depends on the development of…

  6. "Right Here is the Gateway": Mobility, Sex Work Entry and HIV Risk Along the Mexico-U.S. Border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Sm; Silverman, Js; Engstrom, D; Bojorquez-Chapela, I; Strathdee, Sa

    2014-08-01

    Women comprise an increasing proportion of migrants. Many voluntarily migrate for sex work or practice survival sex, while others may be trafficked for sexual exploitation. To investigate how the context of mobility shapes sex work entry and HIV risk, we conducted in-depth interviews with formerly trafficked women currently engaged in sex work (n=31) in Tijuana, Mexico and their service providers (n=7) in Tijuana and San Diego, USA from 2010-2011. Women's experiences of coerced and deceptive migration, deportation as forced migration, voluntary mobility, and migration to a risk environment illustrate that circumstances driving and resulting from migration shape vulnerability to sex trafficking, voluntary sex work entry, and HIV risk. Findings suggest an urgent need for public health and immigration policies that provide integrated support for deported and/or recently arrived female migrants. Policies to prevent sex trafficking and assist trafficked females must also consider the varying levels of personal agency involved in migration and sex work entry.

  7. Primary care providers' perceptions of mobile store-and-forward teledermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, John S; Nelson, Caroline A; Bream, Kent D; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2015-08-15

    Although teledermatology offers promise as a tool to increase access to care, adoption has been limited. Understanding the perspectives and experiences of key stakeholders, such as primary care providers (PCPs) and patients, is important to identify opportunities to reduce barriers to adoption and to improve teledermatology programs. Although many studies have examined patients' experiences and satisfaction with teledermatology, few have examined referring PCPs' perspectives. To identify PCPs' perceptions on the strengths and limitations of teledermatology in order to identify opportunities to improve teledermatology programs. We distributed an anonymous, web-based survey to 30 PCPs involved in a two-year study evaluating a mobile app-based teledermatology platform. 100% (18/18) agreed or strongly agreed that teledermatology increases access to dermatologic care, improves patient care, and is acceptable to patients. 100% (18/18) agreed or strongly agreed that teledermatology provides educational benefit to the PCP. Only 6% (1/18) agreed that teledermatology increases medical liability and 11% (2/18) agreed that it increases risk of a breach in privacy or confidentiality. Our findings highlight that PCPs are highly satisfied with mobile app-based, store-and-forward teledermatology and that they believe teledermatology offers synergistic educational benefit. We hope these results will help guide the development of teledermatology programs to increase access to timely, cost-effective care.

  8. MOSAIC roadmap for mobile collaborative work related to health and wellbeing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saranummi, Niilo; Jones, Valerie M.; Pallot, M.; Pawar, K.S.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the MOSAIC project is to accelerate innovation in Mobile Worker Support Environments. For that purpose MOSAIC develops visions and illustrative scenarios for future collaborative workspaces involving mobile and location-aware working. Analysis of the scenarios is input to the

  9. [Mobilization and traction therapy for lumbar dorsopathies in obese individuals working in sedentary conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobyshev, V A; Strepetov, O M; Gerasomenko, O N

    2014-01-01

    Obese individuals working in sedentary conditions, if having neurologic symptoms in lumbar dorsopathies, when subjected to mobilization and traction therapy in rehabilitation complex, demonstrated less pain, increased spine mobility and prospective observations proved longer clinical remission, if compared to standard treatment.

  10. Mobile technology intervention to improve care coordination between HIV and substance use treatment providers: development, training, and evaluation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claborn, Kasey; Becker, Sara; Ramsey, Susan; Rich, Josiah; Friedmann, Peter D

    2017-03-14

    People living with HIV (PLWH) with a substance use disorder (SUD) tend to receive inadequate medical care in part because of a siloed healthcare system in which HIV and substance use services are delivered separately. Ideal treatment requires an interdisciplinary, team-based coordinated care approach, but many structural and systemic barriers impede the integration of HIV and SUD services. The current protocol describes the development and preliminary evaluation of a care coordination intervention (CCI), consisting of a tablet-based mobile platform for HIV and SUD treatment providers, an interagency communication protocol, and a training protocol. We hypothesize that HIV and SUD treatment providers will find the CCI to be acceptable, and that after receipt of the CCI, providers will: exhibit higher retention in dual care among patients, report increased frequency and quality of communication, and report increased rates of relational coordination. A three phase approach is used to refine and evaluate the CCI. Phase 1 consists of in-depth qualitative interviews with 8 key stakeholders as well as clinical audits of participating HIV and SUD treatment agencies. Phase 2 contains functionality testing of the mobile platform with frontline HIV and SUD treatment providers, followed by refinement of the CCI. Phase 3 consists of a pre-, post-test trial with 30 SUD and 30 HIV treatment providers. Data will be collected at the provider, organization, and patient levels. Providers will complete assessments at baseline, immediately post-training, and at 1-, 3-, and 6-months post-training. Organizational data will be collected at baseline, 1-, 3-, and 6-months post training, while patient data will be collected at baseline and 6-months post training. This study will develop and evaluate a CCI consisting of a tablet-based mobile platform for treatment providers, an interagency communication protocol, and a training protocol as a means of improving the integration of care for PLWH

  11. BEYOND THE WORK-LIFE BALANCE: FAMILY AND INTERNATIONAL MOBILITY OF THE HIGHLY SKILLED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núria Vergés Bosch

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available International mobility of the highly skilled has become one of the cornerstones of development in the current knowledge society. Correspondingly, highly skilled personnel are impelled to move abroad in order to improve their competences and build influential professional networks. Mobility implies some advantages involving personal, social and family opportunities when movers experience handicaps in their country of origin. For movers, mobility becomes a new challenge beyond the work-family balance, particularly for women who usually take on the lion’s share of childcare and domestic tasks within the family. The literature exploring the gender dimension in relation to international mobility points to complex outcomes. Firstly, women are taking on a more active role in international mobility processes, even when they have family. Secondly, family and international mobility are interrelated both for men and for women, although family could become a hindrance, particularly for women. Thirdly, international mobility and women’s career development may interfere with family formation or modify traditional family values. Finally, families moving abroad constitute a challenge for public policy, since they present a new area of problems. We aim to analyse the relationship between international mobility and family based on in-depth interviews from a purposive sample of highly skilled personnel in science and technology. The results of our research suggest that international mobility of the highly skilled has effects on the family and vice versa; however, while international mobility and family are compatible, measures and policies to reconcile them are still insufficient.

  12. Impetus and Resistance to Changing Work-Related Mobility Patterns in Catalonia: The Role of the Social Actors and Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Àngel Cebollada Frontera

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transport accounting and accountability, in addition to traditional infrastructure costs (i.e. vehicle and service operation, now include sustainability considerations: costs in terms of the environment, society and time spent in transit. This new perspective has highlighted the elevated expense of current daily mobility models in Western society, which are based on massive use of the car. We can see a willingness in present political agendas to change this mobility model for one which would reduce these high costs. These are primarily based on positive discrimination policies towards non-motorised and collective transport models which are reinforced by territorial management policies that promote proximity to the work place and services, as well as the use of high-capacity public transport means. Mobility model studies have generally tended to approach this topic from the perspective of actions taken by public administrations (i.e. providing more public transport vehicles or alternative criteria for managing parking spaces, overlooking the many and varied contributions by representatives of non-public administration organisations that play an active role in generating daily mobility. Therefore, in this paper we look at the contributions of these organisations to this changing model. The particular focus of our analysis is the largest trade union in Catalonia, Comissions Obreres, and its role in shaping a new scenario for work-related mobility, seen as an organisation that not only makes claims and negotiates with public administrations and employers’ associations, but also propagates new mobility models among its own members.

  13. A Preliminary Assessment of Legged Mobility Provided by a Lower Limb Exoskeleton for Persons With Paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Ryan J.; Quintero, Hugo A.; Murray, Spencer A.; Ha, Kevin H.; Hartigan, Clare; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of a lower limb exoskeleton for providing legged mobility to people with paraplegia. In particular, the paper presents a single-subject case study comparing legged locomotion using the exoskeleton to locomotion using knee–ankle–foot orthoses (KAFOs) on a subject with a T10 motor and sensory complete injury. The assessment utilizes three assessment instruments to characterize legged mobility, which are the timed up-and-go test, the Ten-Meter Walk Test (10 MWT), and the Six-Minute Walk Test (6 MWT), which collectively assess the subject’s ability to stand, walk, turn, and sit. The exertion associated with each assessment instrument was assessed using the Physiological Cost Index. Results indicate that the subject was able to perform the respective assessment instruments 25%, 70%, and 80% faster with the exoskeleton relative to the KAFOs for the timed up-and-go test, the 10 MWT, and the 6 MWT, respectively. Measurements of exertion indicate that the exoskeleton requires 1.6, 5.2, and 3.2 times less exertion than the KAFOs for each respective assessment instrument. The results indicate that the enhancement in speed and reduction in exertion are more significant during walking than during gait transitions. PMID:23797285

  14. Gendered differences in emigration and mobility perspectives among European researchers working abroad

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeth Scheibelhofer

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on gendered mobilities of highly skilled researchers working abroad. It is based on an empirical qualitative study that explored the mobility aspirations of Austrian scientists who were working in the United States at the time they were interviewed. Supported by a case study, the paper demonstrates how a qualitative research strategy including graphic drawings sketched by the interviewed persons can help us gain a better understanding of the gendered importance of social re...

  15. Contextual Mobile Learning for professionals working in the “Smart City”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Chalon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose an innovative approach using the “Contextual Mobile Learning System” based on the “Electronic Performance Support System” (EPSS to support efficient just-in-time learning for professionals working in the “Smart city”. In this paper, we present the principle and the structure of our contextual mobile learning system, which uses a search engine to find appropriate learning units in relation with working activities and conditions and the user’s / worker’s profile. We further discuss the proposed system structure, supportive process and context-driven engine. Finally, we describe a scenario using our contextual mobile learning system.

  16. Targeted Evolution of Embedded Librarian Services: Providing Mobile Reference and Instruction Services Using iPads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellrecht, Elizabeth; Chiarella, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The University at Buffalo Health Sciences Library provides reference and instructional services to support research, curricular, and clinical programs of the University at Buffalo. With funding from an NN/LM MAR Technology Improvement Award, the University at Buffalo Health Sciences Library (UBHSL) purchased iPads to develop embedded reference and educational services. Usage statistics were collected over a ten-month period to measure the frequency of iPad use for mobile services. While this experiment demonstrates that the iPad can be used to meet the library user's needs outside of the physical library space, this article will also offer advice for others who are considering implementing their own program.

  17. Mobile-based blended learning for capacity building of health providers in rural Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirmizi, Syeda Nateela; Khoja, Shariq; Patten, Scott; Yousafzai, Abdul Wahab; Scott, Richard E; Durrani, Hammad; Khoja, Wafa; Husyin, Nida

    2017-01-01

    Mobile-based blended learning initiative was launched in November 2014 in Badakshan province of Afghanistan by Tech4Life Enterprises, Aga Khan Health Service, Afghanistan (AKHS, A), and the University of Calgary, Canada. The goal of this initiative was to improve knowledge of health providers related to four major mental health problems, namely depression, psychosis, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and drug abuse. This paper presents the results of quasi-experimental study conducted in 4 intervention districts in Badakshan for improvement in the knowledge among health providers about depression. The results were compared with three control districts for the change in knowledge scores. Sixty-two health providers completed pre and post module questionnaires from case district, while 31 health providers did so from the control sites. Significant change was noticed in the case districts, where overall knowledge scores changed from 45% in pre-intervention test to 63% in post-intervention test. Overall background knowledge of pre to post module test scores changed from 30% to 40%, knowledge of symptoms showed correct responses raised from 25% to 44%, knowledge related to causes of depression from overall districts showed change from 22% to 51%, and treatment knowledge of depression improved from 29% to 35%. Average gain in scores among cases was 16.06, compared to 6.8 in controls. The study confirms that a blended Learning approach with multiple learning techniques for health providers in Badakshan, Afghanistan, enhanced their knowledge and offers an effective solution to overcome challenges in continuing education. Further research is needed to confirm that the gains in knowledge reported here translate into better practice and improved mental health.

  18. Hydraulic and electric drivelines for mobile working machines

    OpenAIRE

    Gallmeier, M.;Auernhammer, H.

    2015-01-01

    The field tests identify optimized controllability at inverter controlled electric drives because of easy closed loop control. During full load operation 17% increased efficiency by electric driveline. Further increased advantages for partial load operation. Lower load dependability of the efficiency of the electric driveline. Disadvantageous power-to-weight ratio requires further work for „mobile“ electric drives.

  19. Decentralized energy-saving hydraulic concepts for mobile working machines

    OpenAIRE

    Lodewyks, Johann; Zurbrügg, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The high price of batteries in working machines with electric drives offer a potential for investment in energy-saving hydraulic systems. The decentralized power network opens up new approaches for hydraulic- and hybrid circuits. In addition, the regeneration of energy can be used at any point of the machine. For the example of an excavator arm drive with a double cylinder two compact hydraulic circuits are presented, which relieve a central hydraulic system.

  20. A novel resource management method of providing operating system as a service for mobile transparent computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yonghua; Huang, Suzhen; Wu, Min; Zhang, Yaoxue; She, Jinhua

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for mobile transparent computing. It extends the PC transparent computing to mobile terminals. Since resources contain different kinds of operating systems and user data that are stored in a remote server, how to manage the network resources is essential. In this paper, we apply the technologies of quick emulator (QEMU) virtualization and mobile agent for mobile transparent computing (MTC) to devise a method of managing shared resources and services management (SRSM). It has three layers: a user layer, a manage layer, and a resource layer. A mobile virtual terminal in the user layer and virtual resource management in the manage layer cooperate to maintain the SRSM function accurately according to the user's requirements. An example of SRSM is used to validate this method. Experiment results show that the strategy is effective and stable.

  1. A Novel Resource Management Method of Providing Operating System as a Service for Mobile Transparent Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a framework for mobile transparent computing. It extends the PC transparent computing to mobile terminals. Since resources contain different kinds of operating systems and user data that are stored in a remote server, how to manage the network resources is essential. In this paper, we apply the technologies of quick emulator (QEMU virtualization and mobile agent for mobile transparent computing (MTC to devise a method of managing shared resources and services management (SRSM. It has three layers: a user layer, a manage layer, and a resource layer. A mobile virtual terminal in the user layer and virtual resource management in the manage layer cooperate to maintain the SRSM function accurately according to the user’s requirements. An example of SRSM is used to validate this method. Experiment results show that the strategy is effective and stable.

  2. A thought construction of working perpetuum mobile of the second kind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čápek, V.; Bok, J.

    1999-12-01

    The previously published model of the isothermal Maxwell demon as one of models of open quantum systems endowed with the faculty of selforganization is reconstructed here. It describes an open quantum system interacting with a single thermodynamic bath but otherwise not aided from outside. Its activity is given by the standard linear Liouville equation for the system and bath. Owing to its selforganization property, the model then yields cyclic conversion of heat from the bath into mechanical work without compensation. Hence, it provides an explicit thought construction of perpetuum mobile of the second kind, contradicting thus the Thomson formulation of the second law of thermodynamics. No approximation is involved as a special scaling procedure is used which makes the employed kinetic equations exact.

  3. Not Babysitting: Work Stress and Well-Being for Family Child Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstenblatt, Paula; Faulkner, Monica; Lee, Ahyoung; Doan, Linh Thy; Travis, Dnika

    2014-01-01

    Family child care providers contend with a number of work stressors related to the dual roles of operating a small business and providing child care in their home. Research has documented many sources of work related stress for family child care providers; however, research examining family child care providers' experiences outside of the…

  4. Employers' perspective: when a return to work is the objective for persons with reduced mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Klara; Svendsen, Elin

    2013-01-01

    Although the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the workforce is at the top of the policy agenda in Norway, the number of people with disabilities who return to work (RTW) is rather low. Studies have found that, in addition to disabled people's physical ability level, employers' attitudes and skills seem to be of vital importance for a positive return process. The objective of this study was therefore to examine the inclusion process from the employers' perspective, by gathering knowledge regarding the factors that employers experience as essential for positive RTW for persons with reduced mobility. Fifteen managers from six different counties, representing private, public and state-owned companies participating in the study, together with staff from local employment offices. Using an exploratory approach, the study identified key elements for a successful RTW, expressed in six focus group discussions on themes of importance for a return to work. The analyses identified three important processes in leadership: the inclusion process, the adjustment process, and the process related to costs and bureaucracy. The study indicated that a positive RTW was based on the workplace leader's communication skills, and the necessary adaptations being made at the work place. Besides the welfare benefits, the employers also called attention to the coordination of public services, and the way in which providers present their assistance, as essential for a positive work re-entry process for employees with reduced function.

  5. Upwardly Mobile Working-Class Adolescents: A Biographical Approach on Habitus Dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, Michael; Spyridakis, Manos

    2017-01-01

    Habitus dislocation is a much debatable term. By presenting life-histories of working-class adolescents, this article argues (i) that not all upwardly mobile working-class adolescents experience habitus dislocation and, (ii) that habitus dislocation has its roots in the self-initiated ruptures that face some of those who want to be upwardly mobile…

  6. Moving to get aHead: Local Mobility and Collaborative Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jacob Eyvind; Bossen, Claus

    2003-01-01

    Local mobility is a central aspect of collaborative work that is in need of close analysis. Between the face-to-face interaction of offices or control rooms and longdistance interaction facilitated through e.g. telephones, e-mail, the www or teleconferences lie a number of work-settings in which...

  7. SPEECH ACT IN ADVERTISING LANGUAGE OF 3 PROVIDER MOBILE PHONE PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhartini Syukri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is an analysis of selected commercial advertisement on product consumed relates to the 3 provider of mobile phone in Indonesian context. Consumers are generally believed to be active and skeptical users of information. Then, the speech act can contribute how successfulness the advertisers in persuading them. There are three kinds of act; they are locutionary act, illocutionary act and perlocutionary act. A perlocutionary act, the act that is produced as a consequences or effect of uttering a specific locution, what is brought about or achieved by saying something, in this case, the effects may be predictable by the conventional status of most illocutions, but may be force of their speech act. Using the qualitative method of research, the writers try to analyze the kinds of illocutionary forces and perlocutionary acts that occur in the advertisement through socio-pragmatic analysis. The result shows that the illocutionary acts commonly equal to the persuasive and informative as well as the advertisement goal, then the perlocutionary effects will be related to the hearers themselves.

  8. The quality of mobile phone services provided by Romanian operators, from consumers` perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doru Alexandru Pleşea

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The mobile services are distinguished through their quality, either we speak about the way the client is approached and placed in the centre of the operator's actions, or about the services the client benefits in his capacity as a client. The Romanian mobile operators’ services have greatly evolved from their launch in 1997. Along these times, the mobile operators brought more value to these services, due to their need to meet the consumers' expectations with services of high quality and competitiveness. Usually the Romanian consumers place the price in the forefront of their service/mobile phone services acquisition, but an objective analyze of the quality of the mobile phone services has to take into account both technical aspects of the services and the interfacing services too. Therefore, this paper takes into account technical characteristics of the services such as national telephony coverage, data transmission services coverage, the signal quality, maximum speed of data transfer as well as related services such as distribution network, sales and support sales services, after-sales services, and range of available terminals. Based on mobile services comprehensive analysis made available to consumers by the major players on the Romanian market, this paper aims to highlight the main reasons of the consumers’ satisfaction and dissatisfaction.

  9. A study on important factors influencing customer relationship management: A case study of Mobile service provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Azad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Customers are considered as essential assets in any organizations including mobile services. During the past few years, mobile industry is growing rapidly and the competitions among business owners increases steadily. In this paper, we present an empirical investigation to find important factors influencing customer relationship management. The proposed study of this paper designs a questionnaire and distributes it among 253 customers in mobile industry in city of Tehran, Iran. All questions are designed in Likert scale and Cronbach alpha is calculated as 0.816, which is relatively reliable value. There were 28 questions in this survey and the proposed study extracts five important factors including economic factors, communication skills, organizational resources, service capabilities and flexible market.

  10. Migrants and Mobile Technology Use: Gaps in the Support Provided by Current Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Carrie Demmans

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of how migrants use mobile tools to support their communication and language learning is inadequate. This study, therefore, explores the learner-initiated use of technologies to support their comprehension, production, and acquisition of English following migration to Canada. Information about migrant use of technologies…

  11. Socioeconomic Status, Higher-Level Mathematics Courses, Absenteeism, and Student Mobility as Indicators of Work Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folds, Lea D.; Tanner, C. Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relations among socioeconomic status, highest-level mathematics course, absenteeism, student mobility and measures of work readiness of high school seniors in Georgia. Study participants were 476 high school seniors in one Georgia county. The full regression model explained 27.5% of the variance in…

  12. Work and Family in the Virtual Office: Perceived Influences of Mobile Telework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E. Jeffrey; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Explored influences of mobile telework on family life as reported by teleworkers in a large national corporation. Compared this group to office workers within the same company. Teleworkers reported greater work flexibility. Some described positive family influences, whereas others revealed family problems arising from blurred lines between work…

  13. Support given to lecturers when providing mobile centric services in teaching and learning: a policy analysis perspective

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chipangura, B

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to examine the status of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) policies in supporting lecturers when providing mobile centric services to students. The research was undertaken as a single case study within the Open...

  14. A portable dental image viewer using a mobile network to provide a tele-dental service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Wonse; Kim, Dong-Keun; Kim, Jung-Chae; Kim, Kee-Deog; Yoo, Sun K

    2009-01-01

    We tested three imaging devices for suitability in emergency dental situations for telemedicine. The three devices were a special-purpose oral camera, a digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera, and the built-in camera of a mobile phone. A total of 20 subjects volunteered to take part in the study. We simulated five different conditions which could affect the quality of the image and measured image transmission times across two widely available mobile networks (a CDMA-based 3G network and a Wireless Broadband Network, WiBRO). The DSLR produced the best quality images, although it was a relatively large device and not easy to use. The oral camera failed to give satisfactory images under certain conditions (i.e. without extra lighting, out of focus and head motion). In contrast, the mobile phone based camera was very easy to use and to handle, and it gave good information for initial diagnosis, even at high compression ratios. If the image acquisition conditions are carefully set up, this device might be the best for emergency dental trauma situations.

  15. Youth work in a marginalized area and its contribution to social mobility and social justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tireli, Üzeyir

    This paper addresses the question of how professionals involved in social pedagogical work in a marginalized area deal with young people’s possibilities of social mobility. Based on interviews with teachers, social pedagogues, pedagogical assistants, educational supervisors, street workers...... mobility therefore results in a form of social reproduction. The paper draws on data from an ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Copenhagen in 2013-2015 as part of a larger research project: “Youth, Social Communities and Educational Challenges...... and municipal employees and observations in youth clubs this paper carries out an analysis of the conditions for social pedagogical work in a socially deprived area in Copenhagen as experienced by these professionals. The paper puts special emphasis on the fact that the youth work takes place in an area...

  16. Brain activation during visual working memory correlates with behavioral mobility performance in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu eKawagoe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Functional mobility and cognitive function often decline with age. We previously found that functional mobility as measured by the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG was associated with cognitive performance for visually-encoded (i.e. for location and face working memory (WM in older adults. This suggests a common neural basis between TUG and visual WM. To elucidate this relationship further, the present study aimed to examine the neural basis for the WM-mobility association. In accordance with the well-known neural compensation model in aging, we hypothesized that attentional brain activation for easy WM would increase in participants with lower mobility. The data from 32 healthy older adults were analyzed, including brain activation during easy WM tasks via functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and mobility performance via both TUG and a simple walking test. WM performance was significantly correlated with TUG but not with simple walking. Some prefrontal brain activations during WM were negatively correlated with TUG performance, while positive correlations were found in subcortical structures including the thalamus, putamen and cerebellum. Moreover, activation of the subcortical regions was significantly correlated with WM performance, with less activation for lower WM performers. These results indicate that older adults with lower mobility used more cortical (frontal and fewer subcortical resources for easy WM tasks. To date, the frontal compensation has been proposed separately in the motor and cognitive domains, which have been assumed to compensate for dysfunction of the other brain areas; however, such dysfunction was less clear in previous studies.The present study observed such dysfunction as degraded activation associated with lower performance, which was found in the subcortical regions. We conclude that a common dysfunction -compensation activation pattern is likely the neural basis for the association between visual WM and functional

  17. Health-related quality of life and working conditions among nursing providers

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Aparecida Silva; José Maria Pacheco de Souza; Flávio Notarnicola da Silva Borges; Frida Marina Fischer

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate working conditions associated with health-related quality of life (HRQL) among nursing providers. METHODS: Cross-sectional study conducted in a university hospital in the city of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, during 2004-2005. The study sample comprised 696 registered nurses, nurse technicians and nurse assistants, predominantly females (87.8%), who worked day and/or night shifts. Data on sociodemographic information, working and living conditions, lifestyles, and hea...

  18. Emergency medical services and "psych calls": Examining the work of urban EMS providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prener, Christopher; Lincoln, Alisa K

    2015-11-01

    Emergency medical technicians and paramedics form the backbone of the United States' Emergency Medical Service (EMS) system. Despite the frequent involvement of EMS with people with mental health and substance abuse problems, the nature and content of this work, as well as how EMS providers think about this work, have not been fully explored. Using data obtained through observations and interviews with providers at an urban American EMS agency, this paper provides an analysis of the ways in which EMS providers interact with people with mental illness and substance abuse problems, as well as providers' experiences with the mental health care system. Results demonstrate that EMS providers share common beliefs and frustrations about "psych calls" and the types of calls that involve people with behavioral health problems. In addition, providers described their understandings of the ways in which people with mental health and substance use problems "abuse the system" and the consequences of this abuse. Finally, EMS providers discuss the system-level factors that impact their work and specific barriers and challenges to care. These results suggest that additional work is needed to expand our understanding of the role of EMS providers in the care of people with behavioral health problems and that mental health practitioners and policy makers should include consideration of the important role of EMS and prehospital care in providing community-based supports for people with behavioral health needs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Working on the Service Production Line: Integration and Mobility in Casino and Restaurant Work

    OpenAIRE

    Hatcher, Christina

    2014-01-01

    AbstractMy dissertation addresses a theoretical assertion in the literature that increasing the numbers of groups historically excluded from occupations will decrease inequality among workers at work (Bergmann 1986; Brewer and Brown 1998; Smith and Elliott 2001, 2002; Kanter 1977; Williams 1992; Wingfield 2009). It is assumed that if groups of workers are nearly evenly represented in occupations (or in integrated occupations), the more equally the labor market rewards will be distributed acr...

  20. Out-of-hospital emergency care providers' work and challenges in a changing care environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Riitta; Paavilainen, Eija; Salminen-Tuomaala, Mari; Leikkola, Päivi

    2017-05-19

    Acutely ill patients are often treated on site instead of being transported to hospital, so wide-ranging professional competence is required from staff. The aim of this study was to describe and produce new information about out-of-hospital emergency care providers' competence, skills and willingness to engage in self-development activities, and to uncover challenges experienced by care providers in the midst of changing work practices. A quantitative questionnaire was sent to out-of-hospital emergency care providers (N = 142, response rate 53%) of one Finnish hospital district. Data were analysed using spss for Windows 22 software. Almost all respondents found their work interesting and their ability to work independently sufficient. The majority found the work meaningful. Almost 20% felt that work was dominated by constant rush, and 40%, more than half of 25-year-olds but <10% of over 45-years-olds, found the work physically straining. The majority indicated that they had a sufficient theoretical-practical basis to perform their regular duties, and more than one-third felt that they had sufficient skills to deal with multiple patient or disaster situations. Over 20% stated that they were unsure about performing new or infrequent procedures. A number of factors experienced as challenging were revealed. The results provide a basis for improving care providers' initial and further training. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  1. Airport Territory as Interface: Mobile Work and Travel in Hybrid Space.

    OpenAIRE

    Codourey, Monika Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Premise In order to understand the future potential of work and air travel experience for constant travellers, design approaches from architecture and research methods from social studies should be combined. Abstract Global mobility, wireless technology and networked society are transforming the airport territory. These changes (hard factors) have been analysed in airport planning and transportation studies (Koll-Schretzenmayr 2003; Banister 2003; Schaafsma 2003; Knippenberger &Wall...

  2. Mobile phones and sex work in South India: the emerging role of mobile phones in condom use by female sex workers in two Indian states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navani-Vazirani, Sonia; Solomon, Davidson; Gopalakrishnan; Heylen, Elsa; Srikrishnan, Aylur Kailasom; Vasudevan, Canjeevaram K; Ekstrand, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine female sex workers' solicitation of clients using mobile phones and the association between this and condom use with clients. Cross-sectional data were utilised to address the study's aim, drawing on data collected from female sex workers in Calicut, Kerala, and Chirala, Andhra Pradesh. Use of mobile phone solicitation was reported by 46.3% (n = 255) of Kerala participants and 78.7% (n = 464) of those in Andhra Pradesh. Kerala participants reporting exclusive solicitation using mobile phones demonstrated 1.67 times higher odds (95% CI: 1.01-2.79) of inconsistent condom use than those reporting non-use of mobile phones for solicitation. However, those reporting exclusive solicitation through mobile phones in Andhra Pradesh reported lower odds of inconsistent condom use (OR: 0.03; 95% CI: 0.01-0.26) than those not using mobile phones for solicitation. Findings indicate that solicitation of clients using mobile phones facilitates or hampers consistency in condom use with clients depending on the context, and how mobile phones are incorporated into solicitation practices. Variations in sex work environments, including economic dependence on sex work or lack thereof may partially account for the different effects found.

  3. Management of pain induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs: views of patients and care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rannou François

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expectations of patients for managing pain induced by exercise and mobilization (PIEM have seldom been investigated. We identified the views of patients and care providers regarding pain management induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs. Methods We performed a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with a stratified sample of 12 patients (7 women and 14 care providers (6 women: 4 general practitioners [GPs], 1 rheumatologist, 1 physical medicine physician, 1 geriatrician, 2 orthopedic surgeons, and 5 physical therapists. Results Patients and care providers have differing views on PIEM in the overall management of the state of disease. Patients' descriptions of PIEM were polymorphic, and they experienced it as decreased health-related quality of life. The impact of PIEM was complex, and patient views were sometimes ambivalent, ranging from denial of symptoms to discontinuation of therapy. Care providers agreed that PIEM is generally not integrated in management strategies. Care providers more often emphasized the positive and less often the negative dimensions of PIEM than did patients. However, the consequences of PIEM cited included worsened patient clinical condition, fears about physical therapy, rejection of the physical therapist and refusal of care. PIEM follow-up is not optimal and is characterized by poor transmission of information. Patients expected education on how better to prevent stress and anxiety generated by pain, education on mobilization, and adaptations of physical therapy programs according to pain intensity. Conclusion PIEM management could be optimized by alerting care providers to the situation, improving communication among care providers, and providing education to patients and care providers.

  4. “Right Here is the Gateway”: Mobility, Sex Work Entry and HIV Risk Along the Mexico-U.S. Border

    OpenAIRE

    Goldenberg, SM; Silverman, JS; Engstrom, D; Bojorquez-Chapela, I; Strathdee, SA

    2013-01-01

    Women comprise an increasing proportion of migrants. Many voluntarily migrate for sex work or practice survival sex, while others may be trafficked for sexual exploitation. To investigate how the context of mobility shapes sex work entry and HIV risk, we conducted in-depth interviews with formerly trafficked women currently engaged in sex work (n=31) in Tijuana, Mexico and their service providers (n=7) in Tijuana and San Diego, USA from 2010–2011. Women’s experiences of coerced and deceptive ...

  5. Secure ICT service provisioning for cloud, mobile and beyond a workable architectural approach balancing between buyers and providers

    CERN Document Server

    von Faber, Eberhard

    2012-01-01

    This book introduces a reference architecture that enhances the security of services offered in the information and communication technology (ICT) market. It enables customers to compare offerings and to assess risks when using third-party ICT services including cloud computing and mobile services. Service providers are given a comprehensive blueprint for security implementation and maintenance covering service portfolio management, bid phases and realization projects as well as service delivery management. The architecture is completely modular and hierarchical. It contains a security taxonom

  6. Supporting students' scientific explanations: A case study investigating the synergy focusing on a teacher's practices when providing instruction and using mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delen, Ibrahim

    Engage students in constructing scientific practices is a critical component of science instruction. Therefore a number of researchers have developed software programs to help students and teachers in this hard task. The Zydeco group, designed a mobile application called Zydeco, which enables students to collect data inside and outside the classroom, and then use the data to create scientific explanations by using claim-evidence-reasoning framework. Previous technologies designed to support scientific explanations focused on how these programs improve students' scientific explanations, but these programs ignored how scientific explanation technologies can support teacher practices. Thus, to increase our knowledge how different scaffolds can work together, this study aimed to portray the synergy between a teacher's instructional practices (part 1) and using supports within a mobile devices (part 2) to support students in constructing explanations. Synergy can be thought of as generic and content-specific scaffolds working together to enable students to accomplish challenging tasks, such as creating explanations that they would not normally be able to do without the scaffolds working together. Providing instruction (part 1) focused on understanding how the teacher scaffolds students' initial understanding of the claim-evidence-reasoning (CER) framework. The second component of examining synergy (part 2: using mobile devices) investigated how this teacher used mobile devices to provide feedback when students created explanations. The synergy between providing instruction and using mobile devices was investigated by analyzing a middle school teacher's practices in two different units (plants and water quality). Next, this study focused on describing how the level of synergy influenced the quality of students' scientific explanations. Finally, I investigated the role of focused teaching intervention sessions to inform teacher in relation to students' performance. In

  7. Measuring and managing the work environment of the mid-level provider – the neglected human resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McAuliffe Eilish

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much has been written in the past decade about the health workforce crisis that is crippling health service delivery in many middle-income and low-income countries. Countries having lost most of their highly qualified health care professionals to migration increasingly rely on mid-level providers as the mainstay for health services delivery. Mid-level providers are health workers who perform tasks conventionally associated with more highly trained and internationally mobile workers. Their training usually has lower entry requirements and is for shorter periods (usually two to four years. Our study aimed to explore a neglected but crucial aspect of human resources for health in Africa: the provision of a work environment that will promote motivation and performance of mid-level providers. This paper explores the work environment of mid-level providers in Malawi, and contributes to the validation of an instrument to measure the work environment of mid-level providers in low-income countries. Methods Three districts were purposively sampled from each of the three geographical regions in Malawi. A total of 34 health facilities from the three districts were included in the study. All staff in each of the facilities were included in the sampling frame. A total of 153 staff members consented to be interviewed. Participants completed measures of perceptions of work environment, burnout and job satisfaction. Findings The Healthcare Provider Work Index, derived through Principal Components Analysis and Rasch Analysis of our modification of an existing questionnaire, constituted four subscales, measuring: (1 levels of staffing and resources; (2 management support; (3 workplace relationships; and (4 control over practice. Multivariate analysis indicated that scores on the Work Index significantly predicted key variables concerning motivation and attrition such as emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, satisfaction with the profession

  8. Motivations for entry into sex work and HIV risk among mobile female sex workers in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggurti, Niranjan; Verma, Ravi K; Halli, Shiva S; Swain, Suvakanta N; Singh, Rajendra; Modugu, Hanimi Reddy; Ramarao, Saumya; Mahapatra, Bidhubhusan; Jain, Anrudh K

    2011-09-01

    This paper assesses the reasons for entry into sex work and its association with HIV risk behaviours among mobile female sex workers (FSWs) in India. Data were collected from a cross-sectional survey conducted in 22 districts across four high HIV prevalence states in India during 2007-2008. Analyses were limited to 5498 eligible mobile FSWs. The reasons given by FSWs for entering sex work and associations with socio-demographic characteristics were assessed. Reported reasons for entering sex work include poor or deprived economic conditions; negative social circumstances in life; own choice; force by an external person; and family tradition. The results from multivariate analyses indicate that those FSWs who entered sex work due to poor economic conditions or negative social circumstances in life or force demonstrated elevated levels of current inconsistent condom use as well as in the past in comparison with those FSWs who reported entering sex work by choice or family tradition. This finding indicates the need for a careful assessment of the pre-entry contexts among HIV prevention interventions since these factors may continue to hinder the effectiveness of efforts to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS in India and elsewhere.

  9. Mobile-based patient-provider communication in cancer survivors: The roles of health literacy and patient activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shaohai; Hong, Y Alicia

    2017-11-28

    Thanks to rapid penetration of mobile tools, more and more cancer survivors have adopted mobile-based patient-provider communication (MBPPC). The relationship between MBPPC and patients' health outcomes, however, remains unclear; how health literacy and patient activation interact with such relationship is unexplored. Data were drawn from National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey 4 Cycle 3. A sample of 459 cancer survivors were included in the analysis. Based on the 3-stage model of health promotion using interactive media, this study empirically tested a moderated mediation model. MBPPC (eg, patient use of email, text message, mobile app, and social media to communicate with providers) had no direct effect on cancer survivors' emotional health. Instead, health literacy completely mediated this path. Patient activation positively moderated the effect of health literacy on emotional health and further increased the indirect effect of MBPPC on emotional health. MBPPC alone does not directly result in better emotional health outcomes; health literacy is the key to realize its health benefits; patient activation significantly strengthens the effects of MBPPC. As we embrace the mHealth movement, innovative programs are needed to promote MBPPC, and improve health literacy and activation of cancer survivors, particularly in underserved communities, to reduce health disparities. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Work-related stress and reward: an Australian study of multidisciplinary pediatric oncology healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, M J; Mukherjee, S; Williams, L K; DeGraves, S; Jackson, M; McCarthy, M C

    2015-11-01

    Managing staff stress and preventing long-term burnout in oncology staff are highly important for both staff and patient well-being. Research addressing work-related stress in adult oncology is well documented; however, less is known about this topic in the pediatric context. This study examined sources of work-related stress and reward specific to multidisciplinary staff working in pediatric oncology in Australia. Participants were 107 pediatric oncology clinicians, including medical, nursing, and allied health staff from two Australian pediatric oncology centers. Participants completed an online survey using two newly developed measures: the work stressors scale-pediatric oncology and the work rewards scale-pediatric oncology. The most commonly reported sources of both stress and reward are related to patient care and interactions with children. Results indicated that levels of work-related stress and reward were similar between the professional disciplines and between the two hospitals. Regression analyses revealed no demographic or organizational factors that were associated with either stress or reward. Work-related stress and reward are not mutually exclusive; particular situations and events can be simultaneously stressful and rewarding for healthcare providers. Although patient care and interactions with children was found to be the most stressful aspect of working in this speciality, it was also the greatest source of reward. Results are discussed in relation to workplace approaches to staff well-being and stress reduction. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Psychiatric disorder and work life: A longitudinal study of intra-generational social mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiikkaja, Sanna; Sandin, Sven; Hultman, Christina M; Modin, Bitte; Malki, Ninoa; Sparén, Pär

    2016-03-01

    Intra-generational social mobility, which describes the mobility within an individual's own working life, is seldom studied among employees with psychiatric disorders (EPD). There is need of knowledge of the intra-generational mobility patterns, in a broader perspective, among EPD. To investigate intra-generational social mobility in employed individuals diagnosed with affective disorder, personality disorder, schizophrenia and drug dependence in a national Swedish cohort. We identified a national sample of employed Swedish adults born in 1939-1949 (N = 876, 738), and among them individuals with a first-time hospital admission for affective psychosis, neurosis and personality disorder, alcoholism, drug dependence or schizophrenia in 1964-1980 (N = 18, 998). Employed individuals without hospital admission for such diagnoses were utilised as a comparison group (N = 866, 442). Intra-individual social class changes between 1980 and 1990 among EPD and the comparison group were described through summary statistics and graphs. EPD more often held Low manual occupations at baseline in 1980 than the comparison group (44% vs. 28%), although parental social class was similar. In 1990, 19% of EPD and 4% of the comparison group had lost contact with the labour market. Social stability was less common among EPD (49 %) than in the comparison group (67%). Mobility out of the labour force increased and social stability decreased by number of inpatient admissions. Employees diagnosed with affective psychosis or neurosis and personality disorder fared better in the labour market than employees with schizophrenia. Employees suffering from psychiatric disorder do not maintain their social class or remain in the labour force to the same extent as individuals without those problems, irrespective of their parental class. Our results support the social drift hypothesis that individuals with poor psychiatric health move downward in the social hierarchy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Who Are the Homeless? Student Mobility and Achievement in Michigan 2010-2013. Working Paper #53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    I provide a new, systematic profile of more than 18,000 homeless students in Michigan, utilizing rich administrative data from all test-taking students in grades 3-9 during the 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13 school years. These data are part of a larger study of school choice and student mobility in that state. Homelessness is a condition found…

  13. Exploring provider perspectives on respectful maternity care in Kenya: "Work with what you have".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndwiga, Charity; Warren, Charlotte E; Ritter, Julie; Sripad, Pooja; Abuya, Timothy

    2017-08-22

    Promoting respect and dignity is a key component of providing quality care during facility-based childbirth and is becoming a critical indicator of maternal health care. Providing quality care requires essential skills and attitudes from healthcare providers, as their role is central to optimizing interventions in maternity settings. In 13 facilities in Kenya we conducted a mixed methods, pre-post study design to assess health providers' perspectives of a multi-component intervention (the Heshima project), which aimed to mitigate aspects of disrespect and abuse during facility-based childbirth. Providers working in maternity units at study facilities were interviewed using a two-part quantitative questionnaire: an interviewer-guided section on knowledge and practice, and a self-administered section focusing on intrinsic value systems and perceptions. Eleven distinct composite scores were created on client rights and care, provider emotional wellbeing, and work environments. Bivariate analyses compared pre- and post-scores. Qualitative in-depth interviews focused on underlying factors that affected provider attitudes and behaviors including the complexities of service delivery, and perceptions of the Heshima interventions. Composite scales were developed on provider knowledge of client rights (Chronbach α = 0.70), client-centered care (α = 0.80), and HIV care (α = 0.81); providers' emotional health (α = 0.76) and working relationships (α = 0.88); and provider perceptions of management (α = 0.93), job fairness (α = 0.68), supervision (α = 0.84), promotion (α = 0.83), health systems (α = 0.85), and work environment (α = 0.85). Comparison of baseline and endline individual item scores and composite scores showed that provider knowledge of client rights and practice of a rights-based approach, treatment of clients living with HIV, and client-centered care during labor, delivery, and postnatal periods improved (p maternity care. Behavior

  14. The Effect of Performance Feedback Provided to Student-Teachers Working with Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, Pinar; Yilmaz, Hatice Cansu; Demiryurek, Pinar; Dogus, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of performance feedback (PF) provided to student teachers working with students with multiple disabilities and visual impairment (MDVI) on their teaching skills. The study group of the research was composed of 11 student teachers attending to the final year of the Teaching Students with Visual…

  15. Errorless learning for training individuals with schizophrenia at a community mental health setting providing work experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Robert S; Liberman, Robert P; Becker, Deborah R; Drake, Robert E; Sugar, Catherine A; Green, Michael F

    2009-07-01

    The effects of errorless learning (EL) on work performance, tenure, and personal well-being were compared with conventional job training in a community mental health fellowship club offering 12-week time-limited work experience. Participants were 40 clinically stable schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder outpatients randomly assigned to EL vs conventional instruction (CI) at a thrift-type clothing store. EL participants received training on how to perform their assigned job tasks based on principles of EL, such as error reduction and automation of task performance. CI participants received training common to other community-based entry-level jobs that included verbal instruction, a visual demonstration, independent practice, and corrective feedback. Participants were scheduled to work 2 hours per week for 12 weeks. For both groups, job training occurred during the first 2 weeks at the worksite. Work performance (assessed using the Work Behavior Inventory, WBI) and personal well-being (self-esteem, job satisfaction, and work stress) were assessed at weeks 2, 4, and 12. Job tenure was defined as the number of weeks on the job or total number of hours worked prior to quitting or study end. The EL group performed better than the CI group on the Work Quality Scale from the WBI, and the group differences were relatively consistent over time. Results from the survival analyses of job tenure revealed a non-significant trend favoring EL. There were no group differences on self-esteem, job satisfaction, or work stress. The findings provide modest support for the extensions of EL to community settings for enhancing work performance.

  16. 75 FR 22263 - Reexamination of Roaming Obligations of Commercial Mobile Radio Service Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ..., including in rural and remote areas. However, the Commission ] is not persuaded that replacing the current... consumers based on their perception of push-to-talk services as provided in the marketplace. As the...

  17. Giving voice to service providers who work with survivors of torture and trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, Allysa J; Shakespeare-Finch, Jane

    2014-12-01

    Clinicians who support people from refugee- and asylum-seeking backgrounds are routinely exposed to stories of trauma as part of their work. Hearing these stories can be highly distressing for clinicians but simultaneously provide opportunities for positive personal growth. Adopting a longitudinal qualitative design, we interviewed 12 service providers at two time points a year apart. We used a semistructured interview protocol and analyzed the data according to interpretative phenomenological analysis. Five superordinate and nineteen constituent themes emerged from the analysis at Time 1 and Time 2. We found that participants were both positively and negatively affected by their work, and their experiences remained relatively stable across time. The participants highlighted the use of organizational and personal coping strategies to help minimize distress and maximize well-being. Adopting a broad repertoire of such strategies is not only advantageous for the service providers but ultimately for those people they seek to assist. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. An investigation into the use of 3G mobile communications to provide telehealth services in rural KwaZulu-Natal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Malcolm; Mars, Maurice

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the use of third-generation (3G) mobile communications to provide telehealth services in remote health clinics in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. We specified a minimal set of services as our use case that would be representative of typical activity and to provide a baseline for analysis of network performance. Services included database access to manage chronic disease, local support and management of patients (to reduce unnecessary travel to the hospital), emergency care (up to 8 h for an ambulance to arrive), e-mail, access to up-to-date information (Web), and teleclinics. We made site measurements at a representative set of health clinics to determine the type of coverage (general packet radio service [GPRS]/3G), its capabilities to support videoconferencing (H323 and Skype™ [Microsoft, Redmond, WA]) and audio (Skype), and throughput for transmission control protocol (TCP) to gain a measure of application performance. We found that none of the remote health clinics had 3G service. The GPRS service provided typical upload speed of 44 kilobits per second (Kbps) and download speed of 64 Kbps. This was not sufficient to support any form of videoconferencing. We also observed that GPRS had significant round trip time (RTT), in some cases in excess of 750 ms, and this led to slow start-up for TCP applications. We found audio was always so broken as to be unusable and further observed that many applications such as Web access would fail under conditions of very high RTT. We found some health clinics were so remote that they had no mobile service. 3G, where available, had measured upload speed of 331 Kbps and download speed of 446 Kbps and supported videoconferencing and audio at all sites, but we frequently experienced 3G changing to GPRS. We conclude that mobile communications currently provide insufficient coverage and capability to provide reliable clinical services and would advocate dedicated wireless services where reliable

  19. Equal work for unequal pay: the gender reimbursement gap for healthcare providers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Tejas; Ali, Sadeem; Fang, Xiangming; Thompson, Wanda; Jawa, Pankaj; Vachharajani, Tushar

    2016-10-01

    Gender disparities in income continue to exist, and many studies have quantified the gap between male and female workers. These studies paint an incomplete picture of gender income disparity because of their reliance on notoriously inaccurate or incomplete surveys. We quantified gender reimbursement disparity between female and male healthcare providers using objective, non-self-reported data and attempted to adjust the disparity against commonly held beliefs as to why it exists. We analysed over three million publicly available Medicare reimbursement claims for calendar year 2012 and compared the reimbursements received by male and female healthcare providers in 13 medical specialties. We adjusted these reimbursement totals against how hard providers worked, how productive each provider was, and their level of experience. We calculated a reimbursement differential between male and female providers by primary medical specialty. The overall adjusted reimbursement differential against female providers was -US$18 677.23 (95% CI -US$19 301.94 to -US$18 052.53). All 13 specialties displayed a negative reimbursement differential against female providers. Only two specialties had reimbursement differentials that were not statistically significant. After adjustment for how hard a physician works, his/her years of experience and his/her productivity, female healthcare providers are still reimbursed less than male providers. Using objective, non-survey data will provide a more accurate understanding of this reimbursement inequity and perhaps lead the medical profession (as a whole) towards a solution that can reverse this decades-old injustice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Up-to-date, real-time localized ITS services provided on a mobile platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadayoni, Reza; Kloch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    situation is al-most static, limited and regional based. In order to provide a more accurate and applicable mean for controlling and guiding the traffic flow, either it is necessary to heavily invest in inten-sifying the reporting units or use a platform that provides the necessary access to an up......-to-date infrastructure technology and is carried by lay-mans, like the smart-phones (with GPS receiver, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, high speed cellular data connection and a large touch screen). With an 18 month replacement rate [1], and possibilities of combining navigational system, one-to-one communication, broadcast receiver...

  1. Environmental safety providing during heat insulation works and using thermal insulation materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velichko Evgeny

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the negative effect of thermal insulating materials and products on human health and environment pollution, particularly in terms of the composition of environmentally hazardous construction products. The authors have analyzed the complex measures for providing ecological safety, sanitary and epidemiological requirements, rules and regulations both during thermal insulation works and throughout the following operation of buildings and premises. The article suggests the protective and preventive measures to reduce and eliminate the negative impact of the proceeding of thermal insulation works on the natural environment and on human health.

  2. Burnout: Interpreting the perception of Iranian primary rural health care providers from working and organizational conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrokh Keshvari

    2012-01-01

    Results: During the content analysis process, six themes were obtained; "instability and frequent changes", "involved in laws and regulations", "pressure and stress due to unbalanced workload and manpower", "helplessness in performing the tasks and duties", "sense of identity threat and low self-concept", and "deprivation of professional development". The mentioned themes indicate a main and more important theme called "burnout". Conclusions: Health services providers in the rural health centers are working in stressful and challenging work conditions and are suffered from deprivation of something for which are responsible to the community.

  3. Supporting the well-being of people with mobility disabilities through social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Mee; Canda, Edward R

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this insight generating study was to explore the viewpoints of people with mobility disabilities (PWMD) about ways for social workers to promote their well-being through social work practice. A qualitative participant action style methodology encouraged PWMDto voice their concerns and recommendations. Eighteen PWMD were interviewed, including nine consumers and nine social workers. Participants indicated from their experiences that social workers commonly are not sufficiently cognizant of the personal goals, perspectives, and health potentials of PWMD. Overall, they suggested that the social work practice approach for people with disabilities should become more holistic and proactive. Their recommendations are consistent with current ideas about best practice in the social work and disabilities literature and they reinforce the importance of making these ideas more widely practiced.

  4. Applying mobile and pervasive computer technology to enhance coordination of work in a surgical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas Riisgaard; Bardram, Jakob E

    2007-01-01

    Collaboration, coordination, and communication are crucial in maintaining an efficient and smooth flow of work in an operating ward. This coordination, however, often comes at a high price in terms of unsuccessfully trying to get hold of people, disturbing telephone calls, looking for people, and unnecessary stress. To accommodate this situation and to increase the quality of work in operating wards, we have designed a set of pervasive computer systems which supports what we call context-mediated communication and awareness. These systems use large interactive displays, video streaming from key locations, tracking systems, and mobile devices to support social awareness and different types of communication modalities relevant to the current context. In this paper we report qualitative data from a one-year deployment of the system in a local hospital. Overall, this study shows that 75% of the participants strongly agreed that these systems had made their work easier.

  5. Youth work in a marginalized area and its contribution to social mobility and social justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tireli, Üzeyir

    2016-01-01

    and municipal employees and observations in youth clubs this paper carries out an analysis of the conditions for social pedagogical work in a socially deprived area in Copenhagen as experienced by these professionals. The paper puts special emphasis on the fact that the youth work takes place in an area......This paper addresses the question of how professionals involved in social pedagogical work in a marginalized area deal with young people’s possibilities of social mobility. Based on interviews with teachers, social pedagogues, pedagogical assistants, educational supervisors, street workers...... that in itself poses a potential risk for the young people living there. One of the main conclusions is that the professionals do not include the specific terms and conditions that the marginalized residential area represents in their practice. The professionals’ good intentions and initiatives for youth...

  6. Burnout: interpreting the perception of Iranian primary rural health care providers from working and organizational conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshvari, Mahrokh; Mohammadi, Eesa; Boroujeni, Ali Zargham; Farajzadegan, Ziba

    2012-03-01

    Health care providers in the rural centers offer the primary health services in the form of proficiencies and professions to the most required target population in the health system. These services are provided in certain condition and population with a verity of limitations. This study aimed to describe and interpret the experiences of the employees from their own working condition in the rural health centers. The present study conducted in a qualitative research approach and content analysis method through individual and group interviews with 26 employed primary health care providers (including 7 family physicians, 7 midwives, and 12 health workers) in the rural health centers in Isfahan in 2009. Sampling was done using purposive sampling method. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis as constant comparative basis. During the content analysis process, six themes were obtained; "instability and frequent changes", "involved in laws and regulations", "pressure and stress due to unbalanced workload and manpower", "helplessness in performing the tasks and duties", "sense of identity threat and low self-concept", and "deprivation of professional development". The mentioned themes indicate a main and more important theme called "burnout". Health services providers in the rural health centers are working in stressful and challenging work conditions and are suffered from deprivation of something for which are responsible to the community.

  7. Burnout: Interpreting the Perception of Iranian Primary Rural Health Care Providers from Working and Organizational Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshvari, Mahrokh; Mohammadi, Eesa; Boroujeni, Ali Zargham; Farajzadegan, Ziba

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Health care providers in the rural centers offer the primary health services in the form of proficiencies and professions to the most required target population in the health system. These services are provided in certain condition and population with a verity of limitations. This study aimed to describe and interpret the experiences of the employees from their own working condition in the rural health centers. Methods: The present study conducted in a qualitative research approach and content analysis method through individual and group interviews with 26 employed primary health care providers (including 7 family physicians, 7 midwives, and 12 health workers) in the rural health centers in Isfahan in 2009. Sampling was done using purposive sampling method. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis as constant comparative basis. Results: During the content analysis process, six themes were obtained; “instability and frequent changes”, “involved in laws and regulations”, “pressure and stress due to unbalanced workload and manpower”, “helplessness in performing the tasks and duties”, “sense of identity threat and low self-concept”, and “deprivation of professional development”. The mentioned themes indicate a main and more important theme called “burnout”. Conclusions: Health services providers in the rural health centers are working in stressful and challenging work conditions and are suffered from deprivation of something for which are responsible to the community. PMID:22826774

  8. iRoam: Leveraging Mobile Technology to Provide Innovative Point of Need Reference Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James MacDonald

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The University of Northern British Columbia’s Geoffrey R. Weller Library can boast of a healthy and stable reference service. While statistical analysis reveals that patron use of this service is on the decline, this is not unlike current trends experienced by many libraries today. The library averages a total of 6300 reference transactions per year, a significant number for a small, research-intensive university serving 3500 FTE. The unanswered question is why are the numbers dropping? One theory is that providing research and reference assistance in a traditional manner is affecting the number of transactions. Reference service is traditionally provided in a stationary manner, whereby patrons are required to visit the reference desk of their own volition. Recognizing that a stationary librarian cannot reach a stationary patron, UNBC library began an innovative roaming reference pilot project in September, 2010. Combining the power of wireless networks, tablet computing and chat services, 5 librarians provided point-of-need, face-to-face and virtual reference services during peak reference hours over the fall 2010 semester. This article outlines the project and technologies employed to make it happen (iPad, apps, instant messaging widgets and wireless networks.

  9. Spatial distribution, work patterns, and perception towards malaria interventions among temporary mobile/migrant workers in artemisinin resistance containment zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Khin Thet; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Oo, Tin; Zaw, PeThet; Nyunt, Myat Htut; Thida, Moe; Kyaw, Thar Tun

    2014-05-17

    Mobile populations are at a high risk of malaria infection and suspected to carry and spread resistant parasites. The Myanmar National Malaria Control Programme focuses on preventive interventions and vector control measures for the temporary mobile/migrant workers in Myanmar Artemisinin Resistance Containment Zones. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 in Kawthaung and Bokepyin townships of Tanintharyi Region, Myanmar, covering 192 mobile/migrant aggregates. The objectives were to identify the spatial distribution of the mobile/migrant populations, and to assess knowledge, attitudes, perceptions, and practices concerning malaria prevention and control, and their preferred methods of interventions. The structure of the 192 migrant aggregates was investigated using a migrant mapping tool. Individual and household information was collected by structured interviews of 408 respondents from 39 aggregates, supplemented by 12 in-depth interviews of health care providers, authorities, volunteers, and employers. Data were analyzed by triangulating quantitative and qualitative data. The primary reasons for the limitation in access to formal health services for suspected malaria within 24 hours were identified to be scattered distribution of migrant aggregates, variable working hours and the lack of transportation. Only 19.6% of respondents reported working at night from dusk to dawn. Among study populations, 73% reported a perceived risk of contracting malaria and 60% reported to know how to confirm a suspected case of malaria. Moreover, only 15% was able to cite correct antimalarial drugs, and less than 10% believed that non-compliance with antimalarial treatment may be related to the risk of drug resistance. About 50% of study population reported to seeking health care from the public sector, and to sleep under ITNs/LLINs the night before the survey. There was a gap in willingness to buy ITNs/LLINs and affordability (88.5% vs. 60.2%) which may affect

  10. Architectural geo-E-learning: geolocated teaching in urban environments with mobile devices: a case study and work in progress

    OpenAIRE

    Redondo Domínguez, Ernesto; Sánchez Riera, Alberto; Fonseca Escudero, David; Peredo, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses the implementation of a mobile Augmented Reality (AR) browser on educational environments. We seek to analyze new educational tools and methodologies, non-traditional, to improve students’ academic performance, commitment and motivation. The basis of our claim lies in the skills improvement that students can achieve thanks to their innate affinity to digital media features of new Smartphones. We worked under the Layar platform for mobile devices to create virtual informati...

  11. Randomized Comparison of Mobile and Web-Tools to Provide Dementia Risk Reduction Education: Use, Engagement and Participant Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Elodie; Farrow, Maree; Hatherly, Chris

    2014-01-01

    information-based website reported significantly higher scores on their ratings of the ease of navigation, F2,190=4.20, P=.02, than those using the mobile phone app and the interactive website. There were no significant differences between groups on ratings of ease of understanding the information, F2,188=0.27, P=.76. Most participants from each of the three intervention groups indicated that they intended to keep using the dementia risk reduction eHealth tool. Overall, results indicated that while participants across all three intervention groups reported a generally positive experience with the targeted dementia risk reduction tools, participants using the information-based website provided a more favorable evaluation across a range of areas than participants using the mobile phone app. Further research is required to investigate whether targeted dementia risk reduction tools, in the form of interactive websites and mobile apps, can be improved to provide benefits above those gained by providing static information alone.

  12. Early mobility and walking program for patients in intensive care units: creating a standard of care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Perme, Christiane; Chandrashekar, Rohini

    2009-01-01

    .... An early mobility and walking program was developed to provide guidelines for early mobility that would assist clinicians working in intensive care units, especially clinicians working with patients...

  13. Applying Mobile and Pervasive Computer Technology to Enhance Coordination of Work in a Surgical Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Riisgaard; Bardram, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    , and unnecessary stress. To accommodate this situation and to increase the quality of work in operating wards, we have designed a set of pervasive computer systems which supports what we call context-mediated communication and awareness. These systems use large interactive displays, video streaming from key......Collaboration, coordination, and communication are crucial in maintaining an efficient and smooth flow of work in an operating ward. This coordination, however, often comes at a high price in terms of unsuccessfully trying to get hold of people, disturbing telephone calls, looking for people...... locations, tracking systems, and mobile devices to support social awareness and different types of communication modalities relevant to the current context. In this paper we report qualitative data from a one-year deployment of the system in a local hospital. Overall, this study shows that 75...

  14. How global polity works: mobilizing political actors towards a joint agenda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella

    Conferences on Adult Education, organized every 12 years, since 1949. These conferences, funded by member states, gather representatives from governments, the academia, and other national and international entities, including non-governmental organizations, and represent a second level of political decision......Since World Word II the work by inter-states organizations created a shift in social imaginaries on the relation between education, work and the socio-economic development of nation-states (Milana 2012). These imaginaries materialized in a ‘global polity’ (Corry 2010), namely the mobilization......’ participation, quality of provision, governmental policy and global governance. In so doing, it focuses attention on the development of comparable statistical indicators, benchmarks and monitoring mechanisms for member states, developmental and aid agencies, and Unesco to examine systematic progress...

  15. Embodied Germ Cell at Work: Building an Expansive Concept of Physical Mobility in Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engestrom, Yrjo; Nummijoki, Jaana; Sannino, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a process of collective formation of a new concept of mobility between home care workers and their elderly clients, who are at risk of losing physical mobility and functional capacity. A new tool called mobility agreement was introduced to facilitate the inclusion of regular mobility exercises in home care visits and in the…

  16. Reducing the impact and mobilization for the implementation of the special working capacity to realize the potential of the special performance of qualified sprinters in athletics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinogradov V.Y.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Possibilities of the different impact use for recovery and mobilization in modeling conditions of high qualified sprinters in track and field athletics for special working capacity potential realization are analyzed in the article. Presents the impacts to stimulate and recovery of athletes in pre-stimulation performance in terms and re-training performance of loads the maximum intensity. The experimental results provide a basis for predicting the mobilization effects presented complex of subsidiary means for other sports and sports disciplines in athletics.

  17. EMS providers' perceptions of safety climate and adherence to safe work practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseo, Laura J; Murray, Kate A; White, Laura F; Dyer, Sophia; Mitchell, Patricia A; Fernandez, William G

    2012-01-01

    Occupational injuries are an important source of morbidity for emergency medical services (EMS) providers. Previous work has shown that employee perceptions of an organization's commitment to safety (i.e., safety climate) correlate with adherence to safe practices. To assess the association between perceived safety climate and compliance with safety procedures in an urban EMS system with >100,000 calls/year. EMS providers were issued a self-administered survey that included questions on demographics, years of experience, perceived safety climate, and adherence to safety procedures. Safety climate was assessed with a 20-item validated instrument. Adherence to safety procedures was assessed with a nine-item list of safety behaviors. Strict adherence to safety procedures was defined as endorsing "agree" or "strongly agree" on 80% of items. The effect of safety climate on compliance with safe practices was estimated using multiple logistic regression. One hundred ninety-six of 221 providers (89%) completed surveys; 74% were male; the median age was 36-40 years; and the median amount of experience was 8 years. One hundred twenty-seven of 196 respondents (65%) reported strict adherence to safe work practice. Factor analysis confirmed the original six-factor grouping of questions; frequent safety-related feedback/training was significantly associated with safe practices (odds ratio [OR] = 2.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-4.51). EMS workers perceiving a high degree of perceived safety climate was associated with twofold greater odds of self-reported level of strict adherence to safe work practices. Frequent safety-related feedback/training was the one dimension of safety climate that had the strongest association with adherence to safe workplace behaviors.

  18. Midlife work ability and mobility limitation in old age among non-disability and disability retirees - a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika E. von Bonsdorff

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the wellbeing and mobility limitation of older disability retirees. Personal and environmental factors, such as time spent in working life, may either exacerbate or mitigate the onset of mobility limitation in general population. We aimed to study perceived midlife work ability as a determinant of self-reported mobility limitation in old age among municipal employees who transitioned into non-disability and disability retirement. Methods 4329 participants of the Finnish Longitudinal Study of Municipal Employees (FLAME had retired during January 1985 and July 2000. They had data on retirement, perceived work ability in 1985, and self-reported mobility limitation (non-disability retirement n = 2870, men 39 %; and diagnose-specific disability retirement n = 1459, men 48 %. Self-reported mobility was measured in 1985, 1992, 1997 and 2009. The latest score available was used to assess the number of mobility limitation. Work ability was measured by asking the respondents to evaluate their current work ability against their lifetime best in 1985. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs for work ability predicting mobility limitation in non-disability and diagnose-specific disability retirement groups were calculated using Poisson regression models. Results The prevalence of mobility limitation for those who transitioned into non-disability retirement (Incidence Rate, IR = 0.45, 95 % CI = 0.44–0.46 was lower compared to those who retired due to disability (IR = 0.65, CI = 0.63–0.66. A one-point increase in the work ability score decreased the risk for having one more mobility limitation among non-disability and all diagnose-specific retirement groups (musculoskeletal disease, cardiovascular disease, mental disorder, and other diseases. Conclusions Better midlife work ability may protect from old age mobility limitation among those who retire due to non

  19. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...

  20. Problems of the organizational providing of psychological work in divisions of the state traffic Inspectorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrov V. E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the problems of the organizational providing of psychological work in divisions of the state traffic Inspectorate. Detailed the range of tasks that need to be implemented to psychologists, and specifics of the state traffic Inspectorate. The features of carrying out of activities of professional psychological selection of candidates for service, psychological training, prevention and other support activities. Potentially conflicting interaction of inspectors of traffic police with the participants of traffic, the inability to predict traffic situations and the psycho drivers necessitate treatment to psychological knowledge and the application of the constant efforts of specialists-psychologists. It is shown that the replacement of tenured psychologists psychologists state traffic Inspectorate of the territorial body of internal Affairs will not amount to nor the volume of work nor its quality. Psychological work with the personnel of the state traffic Inspectorate should only be carried out by psychologists of this unit. Eventually psychologist in the state traffic Inspectorate has expressed prospects and can not be replaced by the activities of other specialists.

  1. Contralateral delay activity provides a neural measure of the number of representations in visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikkai, Akiko; McCollough, Andrew W; Vogel, Edward K

    2010-04-01

    Visual working memory (VWM) helps to temporarily represent information from the visual environment and is severely limited in capacity. Recent work has linked various forms of neural activity to the ongoing representations in VWM. One piece of evidence comes from human event-related potential studies, which find a sustained contralateral negativity during the retention period of VWM tasks. This contralateral delay activity (CDA) has previously been shown to increase in amplitude as the number of memory items increases, up to the individual's working memory capacity limit. However, significant alternative hypotheses remain regarding the true nature of this activity. Here we test whether the CDA is modulated by the perceptual requirements of the memory items as well as whether it is determined by the number of locations that are being attended within the display. Our results provide evidence against these two alternative accounts and instead strongly support the interpretation that this activity reflects the current number of objects that are being represented in VWM.

  2. The importance of work conditions and health for voluntary job mobility: a two-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reineholm Cathrine

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changing jobs is part of modern working life. Within occupational health, job mobility has mainly been studied in terms of employees’ intentions to leave their jobs. In contrast to actual turnover, turnover intentions are not definite and only reflect the probability that an individual will change job. The aim of this study was to determine what work conditions predict voluntary job mobility and to examine if good health or burnout predicts voluntary job mobility. Methods The study was based on questionnaire data from 792 civil servants. The data were analysed using logistic regressions. Results Low variety and high autonomy were associated with increased voluntary job mobility. However, the associations between health and voluntary job mobility did not reach significance. Possible explanations for the null results may be that the population was homogeneous, and that the instruments for measuring global health are too coarse for a healthy, working population. Conclusions Voluntary job mobility may be predicted by high autonomy and low variety. The former may reflect that individuals with high autonomy have stronger career development motives; the latter may reflect the fact that low variety leads to job dissatisfaction. In contrast to our results on job content, global health measurements are not strong predictors of voluntary job mobility. This may be because good health affects job mobility through several offsetting channels, involving the resources and ability to seek a new job. Future work should use more detailed measurements of health or examine other work settings so that we may learn more about which of the offsetting effects of health dominate in different contexts.

  3. Service providers' experiences and needs in working with refugees in the Geelong region: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewson, Ashlee; Lamaro, Greer; Crisp, Beth R; Hanna, Lisa; Taket, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Service providers in Geelong, one of the priority locations for the resettlement of refugees in regional Australia, were interviewed to explore their perceptions of the health and wellbeing needs of refugees, and the capacity of service providers in a regional area to meet these. In all, 22 interviews were conducted with health and human service professionals in a range of organisations offering refugee-specific services, culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) services in general, and services to the wider community, including refugees. The findings revealed that a more coordinated approach would increase the effectiveness of existing services; however, the various needs of refugees were more than could be met by organisations in the region at current resource levels. More staff and interpreting services were required, as well as professional development for staff who have had limited experience in working with refugees. It should not be assumed that service needs for refugees resettled in regional Australia will be the same as those of refugees resettled in capital cities. Some services provided in Melbourne were not available in Geelong, and there were services not currently provided to refugees that may be critical in facilitating resettlement in regional and rural Australia.

  4. Health insurance eroding for working families: employer-provided coverage declines for fifth consecutive year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Elise

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, the percentage of Americans with employer-provided health insurance fell for the fifth year in a row. Workers and their families have been falling into the ranks of the uninsured at alarming rates. The downward trend in employer-provided coverage for children also continued into 2005. In the previous four years, children were less likely to become uninsured as public sector health coverage expanded, but in 2005 the rate of uninsured children increased. While Medicaid and SCHIP still work for many, the government has not picked up coverage for everybody who lost insurance. The weakening of this system-notably for children-is particularly difficult for workers and their families in a time of stagnating incomes. Furthermore, these programs are not designed to prevent low-income adults or middle- or high-income families from becoming uninsured. Government at the federal and state levels has responded to medical inflation with policy changes that reduce public insurance eligibility or with proposals to reduce government costs. Federal policy proposals to lessen the tax advantage of workplace insurance or to encourage a private purchase system could further destabilize the employer-provided system. Now is a critical time to consider health insurance reform. Several promising solutions could increase access to affordable health care. The key is to create large, varied, and stable risk pools.

  5. Dental knowledge of educators and healthcare providers working with children with autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebtissam Z. Murshid

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate dental knowledge and attitudes toward oral health care among healthcare providers and educators working with children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD in central Saudi Arabia. Methods: There were 305 questionnaires distributed to 7 special-needs centers between September and November 2014. A total of 217 questionnaires were collected with a response rate of 71.1%. The study took place in the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Results: Approximately 50.2% of the participants did not offer any toothbrushing advice, and 73.3% never recommended dental checkup visits to parents, and 75.6% never performed dental examinations to children under their care. Ten percent thought that children should have their first dental visit after 6 years of age. Almost all participants agreed that children should practice oral hygiene, and 60.4% think they should brush twice per day. In general, the participants choose toothbrushes and toothpaste as the main tools to perform oral hygiene. There were 35% of participants who believed that parents should be responsible for the children’s oral hygiene, and a few participants mentioned teachers and therapists to be responsible. Most of the participants (71.4% did not receive any dental information from dental professional resources, only 14.3% of participants believed bacteria to be the cause of dental cavities. Conclusion: There is a clear lack of dental knowledge and attitudes, and its practical application among the participating group of healthcare providers working with children with ASD in Riyadh.

  6. Dental knowledge of educators and healthcare providers working with children with autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Ebtissam Z.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate dental knowledge and attitudes toward oral health care among healthcare providers and educators working with children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in central Saudi Arabia. Methods: There were 305 questionnaires distributed to 7 special-needs centers between September and November 2014. A total of 217 questionnaires were collected with a response rate of 71.1%. The study took place in the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Results: Approximately 50.2% of the participants did not offer any toothbrushing advice, and 73.3% never recommended dental checkup visits to parents, and 75.6% never performed dental examinations to children under their care. Ten percent thought that children should have their first dental visit after 6 years of age. Almost all participants agreed that children should practice oral hygiene, and 60.4% think they should brush twice per day. In general, the participants choose toothbrushes and toothpaste as the main tools to perform oral hygiene. There were 35% of participants who believed that parents should be responsible for the children’s oral hygiene, and a few participants mentioned teachers and therapists to be responsible. Most of the participants (71.4%) did not receive any dental information from dental professional resources, only 14.3% of participants believed bacteria to be the cause of dental cavities. Conclusion: There is a clear lack of dental knowledge and attitudes, and its practical application among the participating group of healthcare providers working with children with ASD in Riyadh. PMID:26620991

  7. A mobile field-work data collection system for the wireless era of health surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Forsell

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In many countries or regions the capacity of health care resources is below the needs of the population and new approaches for health surveillance are needed. Innovative projects, utilizing wireless communication technology, contribute to reliable methods for field-work data collection and reporting to databases. The objective was to describe a new version of a wireless IT-support system for field-work data collection and administration. The system requirements were drawn from the design objective and translated to system functions. The system architecture was based on field-work experiences and administrative requirements. The Smartphone devices were HTC Touch Diamond2s, while the system was based on a platform with Microsoft .NET components, and a SQL Server 2005 with Microsoft Windows Server 2003 operating system. The user interfaces were based on .NET programming, and Microsoft Windows Mobile operating system. A synchronization module enabled download of field data to the database, via a General Packet Radio Services (GPRS to a Local Area Network (LAN interface. The field-workers considered the here-described applications user-friendly and almost self-instructing. The office administrators considered that the back-office interface facilitated retrieval of health reports and invoice distribution. The current IT-support system facilitates short lead times from field-work data registration to analysis, and is suitable for various applications. The advantages of wireless technology, and paper-free data administration need to be increasingly emphasized in development programs, in order to facilitate reliable and transparent use of limited resources.

  8. A mobile field-work data collection system for the wireless era of health surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsell, Marianne; Sjögren, Petteri; Renard, Matthew; Johansson, Olle

    2011-03-01

    In many countries or regions the capacity of health care resources is below the needs of the population and new approaches for health surveillance are needed. Innovative projects, utilizing wireless communication technology, contribute to reliable methods for field-work data collection and reporting to databases. The objective was to describe a new version of a wireless IT-support system for field-work data collection and administration. The system requirements were drawn from the design objective and translated to system functions. The system architecture was based on fieldwork experiences and administrative requirements. The Smartphone devices were HTC Touch Diamond2s, while the system was based on a platform with Microsoft .NET components, and a SQL Server 2005 with Microsoft Windows Server 2003 operating system. The user interfaces were based on .NET programming, and Microsoft Windows Mobile operating system. A synchronization module enabled download of field data to the database, via a General Packet Radio Services (GPRS) to a Local Area Network (LAN) interface. The field-workers considered the here-described applications user-friendly and almost self-instructing. The office administrators considered that the back-office interface facilitated retrieval of health reports and invoice distribution. The current IT-support system facilitates short lead times from fieldwork data registration to analysis, and is suitable for various applications. The advantages of wireless technology, and paper-free data administration need to be increasingly emphasized in development programs, in order to facilitate reliable and transparent use of limited resources.

  9. Persons with Drug Addiction as Knowledge Providers: Their Contribution to Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Ron; Levit, Shabtay

    2012-01-01

    Social work students' stereotypical perceptions of excluded populations could be decisive in the way they treat those who are excluded. In an attempt to change such perceptions and enhance knowledge about how to work with an excluded population, a dialogue-in-class model was implemented between students of social work in Israel and persons with…

  10. Work-related Mental Consequences: Implications of Burnout on Mental Health Status Among Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, Ioanna V

    2015-02-01

    mental health status of healthcare providers in work index. Emotional exhaustion is the burnout dimension that is correlated the most with employees' mental health.

  11. Non-Model-Based Control of a Wheeled Vehicle Pulling Two Trailers to Provide Early Powered Mobility and Driving Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders Td Vr, David A

    2018-01-01

    Non-model-based control of a wheeled vehicle pulling two trailers is proposed. It is a fun train for disabled children consisting of a locomotive and two carriages. The fun train has afforded opportunities for both disabled and able bodied young people to share an activity and has provided early driving experiences for disabled children; it has introduced them to assistive and powered mobility. The train is a nonlinear system and subject to nonholonomic kinematic constraints, so that position and state depend on the path taken to get there. The train is described, and then, a robust control algorithm using proportional-derivative filtered errors is proposed to control the locomotive. The controller was not dependent on an accurate model of the train, because the mass of the vehicle and two carriages changed depending on the number, size, and shape of children and wheelchair seats on the train. The controller was robust and stable in uncertainty. Results are presented to show the effectiveness of the approach, and the suggested control algorithm is shown to be acceptable without knowing the exact plant dynamics.

  12. Work-related Mental Consequences: Implications of Burnout on Mental Health Status Among Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2015-01-01

    with any SRSDA subscale. Conclusions: Burnout appears to implicate mental health status of healthcare providers in work index. Emotional exhaustion is the burnout dimension that is correlated the most with employees’ mental health. PMID:25870487

  13. Justification for parameters of a dynamic stabilizer of the experimental stand mobile unit in studying of active rotational working tools of tiller machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir F. Kupryashkin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The article deals with design options and technological modes of the dynamic stabilizer of the experimental stand mobile unit for studying tillage machine active rotating work tools. Based on theoretical and experimental studies, the possibility the movable module instability was discovered. This negatively affects on implementing the experiment program trough the especific method. The need in engineering solutions for the defect correction is shown. In addition, the authors consider the structural features and characteristics of the used devices for providing the stabilization of the movable module in the study of active rotating work tools of tillage machines. An electromagnetic brake dynamic stabilizer in the structure of the existing rolling module was proposed as an engineering device. Materials and Methods: A theoretical study of rolling module stability, based on synthesis of basic regulations and laws of mechanics related to active rotating work tools was conducted. As a result of the theoretical research, a design scheme of movable module loading was created. This scheme includes the design features and structural power factors. Results: A database representing the settings of power specification in the motion stability determining the mobile unit was created. Further use of the database values allow supporting the most optimal location of the electromagnetic brake with its design options. Discussion and Conclusions: The research of the electromagnetic brake in a mobile unit promoted stabilizing the unit movement, increased the frequency of its use and provided data that are more precise during experiments.

  14. Online Ozonolysis Combined with Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Provides a New Platform for Lipid Isomer Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poad, Berwyck L. J. [Central; Zheng, Xueyun [Biological; Mitchell, Todd W. [School; Smith, Richard D. [Biological; Baker, Erin S. [Biological; Blanksby, Stephen J. [Central

    2017-12-21

    One of the most significant challenges in contemporary lipidomics lies in the separation and identification of lipid isomers that differ only in site(s) of unsaturation or geometric configuration of the carbon-carbon double bonds. While analytical separation techniques including ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and liquid chromatography (LC) can separate isomeric lipids under appropriate conditions, conventional tandem mass spectrometry cannot provide unequivocal identification. To address this challenge, we have implemented ozone-induced dissociation (OzID) in-line with LC, IMS and high resolution mass spectrometry. Modification of an IMS- capable quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer was undertaken to allow the introduction of ozone into the high-pressure trapping ion funnel region preceding the IMS cell. This enabled the novel LC-OzID-IMS-MS configuration where ozonolysis of ionized lipids occurred rapidly (10 ms) without prior mass-selection. LC-elution time alignment combined with accurate mass and arrival time extraction of ozonolysis products facilitated correlation of precursor and product ions without mass-selection (and associated reductions in duty cycle). Unsaturated lipids across 11 classes were examined using this workflow in both positive and negative ion modalities and in all cases the positions of carbon-carbon double bonds were unequivocally assigned based on predictable OzID transitions. Under these conditions geometric isomers exhibited different IMS arrival time distributions and distinct OzID product ion ratios providing a means for discrimination of cis/trans double bonds in complex lipids. The combination of OzID with multidimensional separations shows significant promise for facile profiling of unsaturation patterns within complex lipidomes.

  15. Frontline health care workers and perceived career mobility: do high-performance work practices make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Janette S; Morgan, Jennifer Craft; Weiner, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The use of high-performance work practices (HPWPs) related to career development (e.g., tuition remission, career ladders) is becoming more common in health care organizations, where skill shortages and concerns about quality of care have led to increasing investment in the frontline health care workforce. However, few studies have examined the effectiveness of these policies in shaping the career trajectories of health care workers. The aim of this study is to examine how HPWPs that focus on career development are related to an individuals' perceived mobility with their current employer. We will also examine the relationships between perceived mobility, job satisfaction, and turnover intent. We use confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling to examine the relationships between HPWPs and perceived mobility in a sample of 947 frontline health care workers in 22 health care organizations across the United States. The findings suggest that tuition remission and educational release time positively predict perceived mobility. Measures of perceived organizational support in one's current position (e.g., financial rewards, workload, and autonomy) and perceived supervisor support for career development are also significant predictors of perceived mobility. Finally, perceived mobility is a significant predictor of job satisfaction and intent to stay with current employer. Our findings suggest that HPWPs related to career development may be effective tools in improving workers' assessments of their own career potential and improving overall job satisfaction of frontline health care workers. Consequently, HPWPs related to career development may help employers both retain valuable workers and fill worker shortages.

  16. Investigating Learning through Work: The Development of the "Provider Learning Environment Scale"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Clive; Hawke, Geof

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research activity was to investigate contemporary understandings of the connections between learning and work. This initial work was then used to inform the development of an organisational tool that registered training organisations (RTOs) could use to identify organisational practices likely to lead to greater learning at…

  17. Mobile Learning Based Worked Example in Electric Circuit (WEIEC) Application to Improve the High School Students' Electric Circuits Interpretation Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadiannur, Mitra; Supahar

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to determine the feasibility and effectivity of mobile learning based Worked Example in Electric Circuits (WEIEC) application in improving the high school students' electric circuits interpretation ability on Direct Current Circuits materials. The research method used was a combination of Four-D Models and ADDIE model. The…

  18. Work experience, job-fulfillment and burnout among VMMC providers in Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania and Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnea Perry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human resource capacity is vital to the scale-up of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC services. VMMC providers are at risk of "burnout" from performing a single task repeatedly in a high volume work environment that produces long work hours and intense work effort. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The Systematic Monitoring of the Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Scale-up (SYMMACS surveyed VMMC providers in Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe in 2011 (n = 357 and 2012 (n = 591. Providers self-reported on their training, work experience, levels of job-fulfillment and work fatigue/burnout. Data analysis included a descriptive analysis of VMMC provider characteristics, and both bivariate and multivariate analyses of factors associated with provider work fatigue/burnout. In 2012, Kenyan providers had worked in VMMC for a median of 31 months compared to South Africa (10 months, Tanzania (15 months, and Zimbabwe (11 months. More than three-quarters (78 - 99% of providers in all countries in 2012 reported that VMMC is a personally fulfilling job. However, 67% of Kenyan providers reported starting to experience work fatigue/burnout compared to South Africa (33%, Zimbabwe (17%, and Tanzania (15%. Despite the high level of work fatigue/burnout in Kenya, none of the measured factors (i.e., gender, age, full-time versus part-time status, length of service, number of operations performed, or cadre were significantly associated with work fatigue/burnout in 2011. In 2012, logistic regression found increases in age (p<.05 and number of months working in VMMC (p<.01 were associated with an increased likelihood of experiencing work fatigue/burnout, while higher career total VMMCs decreased the likelihood of experiencing burnout. CONCLUSION: Given cross-country differences, further elucidation of cultural and other contextual factors that may influence provider burnout is required. Continuing to emphasize the contribution that providers make in

  19. Capability of a Mobile Monitoring System to Provide Real-Time Data Broadcasting and Near Real-Time Source Attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, M.; Olaguer, J.; Wijesinghe, A.; Colvin, J.; Neish, B.; Williams, J.

    2014-12-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to understand the emissions and health effects of industrial facilities. Many areas have no or limited sustained monitoring capabilities, making it difficult to quantify the major pollution sources affecting human health, especially in fence line communities. Developments in real-time monitoring and micro-scale modeling offer unique ways to tackle these complex issues. This presentation will demonstrate the capability of coupling real-time observations with micro-scale modeling to provide real-time information and near real-time source attribution. The Houston Advanced Research Center constructed the Mobile Acquisition of Real-time Concentrations (MARC) laboratory. MARC consists of a Ford E-350 passenger van outfitted with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and meteorological equipment. This allows for the fast measurement of various VOCs important to air quality. The data recorded from the van is uploaded to an off-site database and the information is broadcast to a website in real-time. This provides for off-site monitoring of MARC's observations, which allows off-site personnel to provide immediate input to the MARC operators on how to best achieve project objectives. The information stored in the database can also be used to provide near real-time source attribution. An inverse model has been used to ascertain the amount, location, and timing of emissions based on MARC measurements in the vicinity of industrial sites. The inverse model is based on a 3D micro-scale Eulerian forward and adjoint air quality model known as the HARC model. The HARC model uses output from the Quick Urban and Industrial Complex (QUIC) wind model and requires a 3D digital model of the monitored facility based on lidar or industrial permit data. MARC is one of the instrument platforms deployed during the 2014 Benzene and other Toxics Exposure Study (BEE-TEX) in Houston, TX. The main goal of the study is to quantify and explain the

  20. Exploring provider perspectives on respectful maternity care in Kenya: ?Work with what you have?

    OpenAIRE

    Ndwiga, Charity; Charlotte E Warren; Ritter, Julie; Sripad, Pooja; Abuya, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Background Promoting respect and dignity is a key component of providing quality care during facility-based childbirth and is becoming a critical indicator of maternal health care. Providing quality care requires essential skills and attitudes from healthcare providers, as their role is central to optimizing interventions in maternity settings. Methods In 13 facilities in Kenya we conducted a mixed methods, pre-post study design to assess health providers? perspectives of a multi-component in...

  1. Family Home Childcare Providers: A Comparison of Subsidized and Non-Subsidized Working Environments and Employee Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriner, Michael; Schlee, Bethanne M.; Mullis, Ronald L.; Cornille, Thomas A.; Mullis, Ann K.

    2008-01-01

    Federal and State Governments provide childcare subsidies for low-income working families. This study compares the encountered issues and working environments of family home providers of subsidized and non-subsidized childcare. Questionnaires were distributed throughout a southeastern state in the United States to 548 family home childcare…

  2. “Right Here is the Gateway”: Mobility, Sex Work Entry and HIV Risk Along the Mexico-U.S. Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, SM; Silverman, JS; Engstrom, D; Bojorquez-Chapela, I; Strathdee, SA

    2013-01-01

    Women comprise an increasing proportion of migrants. Many voluntarily migrate for sex work or practice survival sex, while others may be trafficked for sexual exploitation. To investigate how the context of mobility shapes sex work entry and HIV risk, we conducted in-depth interviews with formerly trafficked women currently engaged in sex work (n=31) in Tijuana, Mexico and their service providers (n=7) in Tijuana and San Diego, USA from 2010–2011. Women’s experiences of coerced and deceptive migration, deportation as forced migration, voluntary mobility, and migration to a risk environment illustrate that circumstances driving and resulting from migration shape vulnerability to sex trafficking, voluntary sex work entry, and HIV risk. Findings suggest an urgent need for public health and immigration policies that provide integrated support for deported and/or recently arrived female migrants. Policies to prevent sex trafficking and assist trafficked females must also consider the varying levels of personal agency involved in migration and sex work entry. PMID:25346548

  3. Training Family Child Care Providers To Work with Children Who Have Special Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Abby L. Winkler

    1999-01-01

    Notes the difficulty of finding quality day care for special needs children. Discusses Project Specialcare, designed to support family child-care providers who accept such children into their programs. Describes how providers participated in Saturday sessions focused on a topic followed by open discussion and how the advice and counsel of a…

  4. Prevalence of work-related health problems among providers of car ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With urbanization, there is increasing use of automobiles, automobile batteries and consequently, there are an increasing number of lead acid battery repairers in the major cities of developing countries. This study assessed the prevalence of work-related health problems among lead-acid battery repairers in Ilorin, Nigeria.

  5. 45 CFR 287.120 - What work activities may be provided under the NEW Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., alternative education, post secondary education, job readiness activity, job search, job skills training, training and employment activities, job development and placement, on-the-job training (OJT), employer work... employment services, job retention services, unsubsidized employment, subsidized public or private sector...

  6. Models Provide Specificity: Testing a Proposed Mechanism of Visual Working Memory Capacity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmering, Vanessa R.; Patterson, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have established that visual working memory has a limited capacity that increases during childhood. However, debate continues over the source of capacity limits and its developmental increase. Simmering (2008) adapted a computational model of spatial cognitive development, the Dynamic Field Theory, to explain not only the source…

  7. Providing Research-Focused Work-Integrated Learning for High Achieving Science Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, Theo; Charlton-Robb, Kate; Reina, Richard D.; Rayner, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Work-integrated learning has become an integral part of many undergraduate and postgraduate degrees, both in Australia and internationally. Such programs vary in structure, timeframe and discipline type, with concomitant amounts of support, assessment and evaluation. Their value to students, industry partners and higher education institutions,…

  8. Influencing HIV treatment success in India : do mobile phones really work?

    OpenAIRE

    SHET, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sustaining treatment adherence and long-term virological suppression is a global health challenge in HIV management. Mobile phone-based interventions are increasingly harnessed to enhance medication adherence in HIV infection, although supporting evidence for implementation is limited by lack of robust efficacy trials in settings such as India. The overall aim of this thesis was to assess whether customized mobile phone reminders would ...

  9. Customized Mobile Apps: Improving data collection methods in large-scale field works in Finnish Lapland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupila, Juho

    2017-04-01

    Since the 1990s, a huge amount of data related to the groundwater and soil has been collected in several regional projects in Finland. EU -funded project "The coordination of groundwater protection and aggregates industry in Finnish Lapland, phase II" started in July 2016 and it covers the last unstudied areas in these projects in Finland. Project is carried out by Geological Survey of Finland (GTK), University of Oulu and Finnish Environment Institute and the main topic is to consolidate the groundwater protection and extractable use of soil resource in Lapland area. As earlier, several kinds of studies are also carried out throughout this three-year research and development project. These include e.g. drilling with setting up of groundwater observation wells, GPR-survey and many kinds of point-type observations, like sampling and general mapping on the field. Due to size of a study area (over 80 000 km2, about one quarter of a total area of Finland), improvement of the field work methods has become essential. To the general observation on the field, GTK has developed a specific mobile applications for Android -devices. With these Apps, data can be easily collected for example from a certain groundwater area and then uploaded directly to the GTK's database. Collected information may include sampling data, photos, layer observations, groundwater data etc. and it is all linked to the current GPS-location. New data is also easily available for post-processing. In this project the benefits of these applications will be field-tested and e.g. ergonomics, economy and usability in general will be taken account and related to the other data collecting methods, like working with heavy fieldwork laptops. Although these Apps are designed for usage in GTK's projects, they are free to download from Google Play for anyone interested. Geological Survey of Finland has the main role in this project with support from national and local authorities and stakeholders. Project is funded

  10. Mobilized peripheral blood stem cells provide rapid reconstitution but impaired long-term engraftment in a mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeoh, J. S. G.; Ausema, A.; Wierenga, P.; de Haan, G.; van Os, R.

    In this study, we use competitive repopulation to compare the quality and frequency of stem cells isolated from mobilized blood with stem cells isolated from bone marrow (BM) in a mouse model. Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+) (LSK) cells were harvested from control BM and peripheral blood of mice following

  11. Effects of a dynamic chair on pelvic mobility, fatigue, and work efficiency during work performed while sitting: a comparison of dynamic sitting and static sitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanoue, Hironori; Mitsuhashi, Toshitaka; Sako, Shunji; Goto, Ryokichi; Nakai, Tomohiro; Inaba, Ryoichi

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] Working while sitting for long periods can cause lumbar pain, fatigue, and reduced work efficiency. How a dynamic chair with a seat that moves three-dimensionally affects pelvic mobility before and after work, work efficiency, and post-work fatigue were examined. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 17 healthy adults (10 males, 7 females, mean age 21.8 ± 2.7 years). Subjects performed a 30-min Kraepelin test under two conditions: sitting in a standard office chair and sitting in a dynamic sitting balance chair. Root mean square (RMS) values of pelvic movement measured by a triaxial accelerometer during 30 minutes of work, finger-floor distance before and after work, lumbar fatigue, and pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement were used as outcome measures. [Results] Pelvic movement RMS values collected every 5 minutes during 30 minutes of work were significantly higher while sitting in the dynamic balance chair. Changes in pelvic movement RMS values during finger-floor distance measurement after work and amount of work performed during 30 minutes were significantly higher and lumbar fatigue was significantly lower for the dynamic balance chair. [Conclusion] Dynamic sitting maintained or increased pelvic flexibility. The dynamic balance chair may effectively help workers work continuously in seated postures with little fatigue.

  12. Mobility, Accessibility, and Travel Impacts of Transportation Programs for the Elderly and Handicapped. Working Paper: 5050-4-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Ronald F.; McGillivray, Robert G.

    Special transportation assistance is currently provided for elderly and handicapped persons in the United States through a variety of programs at the federal, state, and local levels of government. The programs are concerned with improving the mobility of the client groups served, thereby making various activities and locations in urban areas more…

  13. Leveraging Partnerships: Families, Schools, and Providers Working Together to Improve Asthma Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Melanie; Cicutto, Lisa; Haas-Howard, Christy; Raleigh, Bridget M; Szefler, Stanley J

    2016-10-01

    Asthma is one of the most common illnesses of school-aged children and can lead to both health and educational disparities. Children from low socioeconomic backgrounds and racial/ethnic minorities suffer the greatest impact. They often lack the asthma self-management skills to successfully monitor, navigate, and negotiate appropriate asthma care. School settings are a strategic point of contact for this additional support. School nurses can monitor for signs of asthma worsening, manage symptoms, provide care coordination, and reinforce self-management skills. Likewise, school-based asthma programs have the potential to reduce health and educational disparities, but it is the strong linkage to the asthma care provider that is critical to successful school-based asthma management. Healthcare providers are encouraged to establish partnerships with families through patient-centered care and schools through clear communication and care coordination to ensure asthma is well controlled so the child is in school and ready to learn.

  14. Partnership working by default: district nurses and care home staff providing care for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Claire; Robb, Nadia; Drennan, Vari; Woolley, Rosemary

    2005-11-01

    Older people residents in care homes that only offer residential care rely on primary health care services for medical and nursing needs. Research has investigated the demands that care homes staff and residents make on general practice, but not the involvement of other members of the primary health care team. This paper describes two consecutive studies completed in 2001 and 2003 that involved focus groups and survey methods of enquiry conducted in two settings: an England shire and inner London. The research questions that both studies had in common were (1) What is the contribution of district nursing and other primary care services to care homes that do not have on-site nursing provision? (2) What strategies promote participation and collaboration between residents, care home staff and NHS primary care nursing staff? and (3) What are the current obstacles and aids to effective partnership working and learning? A total of 74 community-based nurses and care home managers and staff took part in 10 focus groups, while 124 care home managers (73% of the 171 surveyed) and 113 district nurse team leaders (80% of the 142 surveyed) participated in the surveys. Findings from both studies demonstrated that nurses were the most frequent NHS professional visiting care homes. Although care home managers and district nurses believed that they had a good working relationship, they had differing expectations of what the nursing contribution should be and how personal and nursing care were defined. This influenced the range of services that older people had access to and the amount of training and support care home staff received from district nurses and the extent to which they were able to develop collaborative and reciprocal patterns of working. Findings indicate that there is a need for community-based nursing services to adopt a more strategic approach that ensures older people in care homes can access the services they are entitled to and receive equivalent health care to

  15. Informal Adult Learning and Emotion Work of Service Providers for Refugee Claimants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, Susan M.; Baillie Abidi, Catherine; Tastsoglou, Evangelia; Lange, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Like the immigrant clients they serve, service providers have been overlooked in adult education literature, yet their roles are crucial for addressing the serious concerns of refugees and refugee claimants who flee their home countries hoping to find safe refuge in another country.

  16. MTFeedback: Providing Notifications to Enhance Teacher Awareness of Small Group Work in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Maldonado, Roberto; Clayphan, Andrew; Yacef, Kalina; Kay, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The teacher has very important roles in the classroom, particularly as manager of most resources for learning activities and in providing timely feedback that can enhance learning. But teachers need to be aware of students' achievements and weaknesses to decide how to time feedback. We present MTFeedback, a system that harnesses the new…

  17. Increased cardiac work provides a link between systemic hypertension and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alexander J; Wang, Vicky Y; Sands, Gregory B; Young, Alistair A; Nash, Martyn P; LeGrice, Ian J

    2017-01-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) is an established model of human hypertensive heart disease transitioning into heart failure. The study of the progression to heart failure in these animals has been limited by the lack of longitudinal data. We used MRI to quantify left ventricular mass, volume, and cardiac work in SHRs at age 3 to 21 month and compared these indices to data from Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) controls. SHR had lower ejection fraction compared with WKY at all ages, but there was no difference in cardiac output at any age. At 21 month the SHR had significantly elevated stroke work (51 ± 3 mL.mmHg SHR vs. 24 ± 2 mL.mmHg WKY; n = 8, 4; P failure in this animal model. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  18. Texting While Driving: Does the New Law Work Among Healthcare Providers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha E. Mathew

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study assessed whether Georgia Senate Bill 360, a statewide law passed in August 2010, that prohibits text messaging while driving, resulted in a decrease in this behavior among emergency medicine (EM and general surgery (GS healthcare providers. Methods: Using SurveyMonkey, we created a web-based survey containing up to 28 multiple choice and free-text questions about driving behaviors. EM and GS healthcare providers at a southeastern medical school and its affiliate county hospital received an email inviting them to complete this survey in February 2011. We conducted all analyses in SPSS (version 19.0, Chicago, IL, 2010, using chisquared tests and logistic regression models. The primary outcome of interest was a change in participant texting or emailing while driving after passage of the texting ban in Georgia. Results: Two hundred and twenty-six providers completed the entire survey (response rate 46.8%. Participants ranged in age from 23 to 71 years, with an average age of 38 (SD¼10.2; median¼35. Only three-quarters of providers (n¼173, 76.6% were aware of a texting ban in the state. Out of these, 60 providers (36.6% reported never or rarely sending texts while driving (0 to 2 times per year, and 30 engaged in this behavior almost daily (18.9%. Almost two-thirds of this group reported no change in texting while driving following passage of the texting ban (n¼110, 68%, while 53 respondents texted less (31.8%. Respondents younger than 40 were more than twice as likely to report no change in texting post-ban compared to older participants (OR¼2.31, p¼0.014. Providers who had been pulled over for speeding in the previous 5 years were about 2.5 times as likely to not change their texting while-driving behavior following legislation passage compared to those without a history of police stops for speeding (OR¼2.55, p¼0.011. Each additional ticket received in the past 5 years for a moving violation lessened the odds of

  19. Psychosocial work environment, job mobility and gender differences in turnover behaviour: a prospective study among the Swedish general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Mia; Härenstam, Annika; Rosengren, Annika; Schiöler, Linus; Olin, Anna-Carin; Lissner, Lauren; Waern, Margda; Torén, Kjell

    2014-06-14

    Throughout the literature, substantial evidence supports associations between poor psychosocial work characteristics and a variety of ill-health outcomes. Yet, few reports strategies workers carry out to improve detrimental work conditions and consequently their health, such as changing jobs. The aim of this study was to examine if adverse psychosocial work exposure, as measured with the job demand-control and effort-reward imbalance models, could predict job mobility over a 5 years observation period. Participants were working men and women (n = 940; 54.3% women), aged 24-60 years from the population of Gothenburg and surrounding metropolitan area. Job demand-control and effort-reward variables were compared with independent t-tests and chi2-test in persons with and without job mobility. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyse whether psychosocial factors could predict job mobility. All regression analyses were stratified by gender. Exposure to a combination of high demands-low control or high imbalance between effort and reward was related to increased odds of changing jobs (OR 1.63; CI 1.03-2.59 and OR 1.46; CI 1.13-1.89 respectively). When analysing men and women separately, men had a higher OR of changing jobs when exposed to either high demands-low control (OR 2.72; CI 1.24-5.98) or high effort-reward imbalance (OR 1.74; CI 1.11-2.72) compared to reference values. The only significant associations for women was slightly decreased odds for turnover in high reward jobs (OR 0.96; CI 0.92-0.99). The results indicate that workers will seek to improve poor work environment by changing jobs. There were notable gender differences, where men tended to engage in job mobility when exposed to adverse psychosocial factors, while women did not. The lack of measures for mechanisms driving job mobility was a limitation of this study, thus preventing conclusions regarding psychosocial factors as the primary source for job mobility.

  20. HIV Care Providers' Attitudes regarding Mobile Phone Applications and Web-Based Dashboards to support Patient Self-Management and Care Coordination: Results from a Qualitative Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swendeman, Dallas; Farmer, Shu; Mindry, Deborah; Lee, Sung-Jae; Medich, Melissa

    2016-10-01

    In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with healthcare providers (HCPs) from five HIV medical care coordination teams in a large Los Angeles County HIV clinic, including physicians, nurses, and psychosocial services providers. HCPs reported on the potential utility, acceptability, and barriers for patient self-monitoring and notifications via mobile phones, and web-based dashboards for HCPs. Potential benefits included: 1) enhancing patient engagement, motivation, adherence, and self-management; and 2) improving provider-patient relationships and HCP care coordination. Newly diagnosed and patients with co-morbidities were highest priorities for mobile application support. Facilitators included universal mobile phone ownership and use of smartphones or text messaging. Patient-level barriers included concerns about low motivation and financial instability for consistent use by some patients. Organizational barriers, cited primarily by physicians, included concerns about privacy protections, easy dashboard access, non-integrated electronic records, and competing burdens in limited appointment times. Psychosocial services providers were most supportive of the proposed mobile tools.

  1. A work sampling study of provider activities in school-based health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavis, Brian; Pearson, Rachel; Stewart, Gail; Keefe, Carole

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe provider activities in a convenience sample of School-Based Health Centers (SBHCs). The goal was to determine the relative proportion of time that clinic staff engaged in various patient care and non-patient care activities. All provider staff at 4 urban SBHCs participated in this study; 2 were in elementary schools, 1 in a middle school, and 1 in a school with kindergarten through grade 8. The study examined provider activity from 6 days sampled at random from the school year. Participants were asked to document their activities in 15-minute intervals from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. A structured recording form was used that included 35 activity categories. Overall, 1492 records were completed, accounting for 2708 coded activities. Almost half (48%) of all staff activities were coded as direct patient contact, with clinic operations the second largest category. Limited variations in activities were found across clinic sites and according to season. A significant amount of provider activity was directed at the delivery of health care; direct patient care and clinic operations combined accounted for approximately 75% of clinic activity. Patient, classroom, and group education activities, as well as contacts with parents and school staff accounted for 20% of all clinic activity and represent important SBHC functions that other productivity measures such as billing data might not consistently track. Overall, the method was acceptable to professional staff as a means of tracking activity and was adaptable to meet their needs.

  2. Using augmented-reality and mobile three-dimensional graphics techniques in relief work on radiological disaster sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Ming-Kuan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many countries tightly manage and monitor various radiological sources and facilities, yet some serious radiological disasters still occurred in recent decades. In order to reach effective relief work on radiological disaster sites, numerous information techniques have become popular, i. e. global positioning system, geographical information system, computer simulation, and three-dimensional graphics. However, this study recognizes insufficient information service in global positioning system and geographical information system and inconvenient information operation in computer simulation and three-dimensional graphics. Therefore, this study adopts augmented-reality and mobile three-dimensional graphics techniques to construct a mobile relief work system. This system helps relief workers to comprehend the spatial relationship among their localities, the targeted constructions, and the anticipated shelters. Based on the testing results regarding escaping victims, through the mobile relief work system in contrast to a Google maps-based system, relief workers more easily arrive at the targeted constructions, and more rapidly seek the anticipated shelters. In sum, this study is useful for similar applications in disaster management.

  3. MOSAIC vision and scenarios for mobile collaborative work related to health and wellbeing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Valerie M.; Saranummi, Niilo; Pallot, Marc; Pawar, Kulwant S.

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of the MOSAIC project is to accelerate innovation in Mobile Worker Support Environments by shaping future research and innovation activities in Europe. The modus operandi of MOSAIC is to develop visions and illustrative scenarios for future collaborative workspaces involving

  4. Urban Poverty and Juvenile Crime: Evidence from a Randomized Housing-Mobility Experiment. JCPR Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Jens; Duncan, Greg J.; Hirschfield, Paul

    This paper uses data from a randomized housing-mobility experiment to study the effects on juvenile crime of relocating families from high- to low-poverty neighborhoods. Since 1994, the Department of Housing and Urban Development's Moving to Opportunity (MTO) experiment has assigned families from high-poverty Baltimore neighborhoods into three…

  5. Online People Tagging: Social (Mobile) Network(ing) Services and Work-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, John; Pachler, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Social and mobile technologies offer users unprecedented opportunities for communicating, interacting, sharing, meaning-making, content and context generation. And, these affordances are in constant flux driven by a powerful interplay between technological innovation and emerging cultural practices. Significantly, also, they are starting to…

  6. Applying mobile and pervasive computer technology to enhance coordination of work in a surgical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Riisgaard; Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2007-01-01

    locations, tracking systems, and mobile devices to support social awareness and different types of communication modalities relevant to the current context. In this paper we report qualitative data from a one-year deployment of the system in a local hospital. Overall, this study shows that 75...

  7. Men's mobility into management from blue collar and white collar jobs: race differences across the early work-career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, George; Maume, David

    2014-07-01

    Within the context of the "particularistic mobility thesis" we examine racial differences in the incidence, and determinants of, as well as timing to, mobility into management across the critical early career years at a refined level, namely, when groups share similar white collar and blue collar jobs. Findings from a Panel Study of Income Dynamics sample of men support theory and indicate that from both job levels a racial hierarchy exists: African Americans have the lowest rate of mobility, reach management through a route that is relatively formal and structured by a traditional range of stratification-based causal factors and take longest to reach management. Whites, in contrast, have the highest mobility rate, reach management through a relatively informal path that is less structured by traditional stratification-based factors, and reach management the quickest, and, across all three issues Latinos occupy an intermediate ground between African Americans and Latinos. Further, as predicted by theory, racial differences, particularly, relative to whites, are greater among those tracked from blue collar jobs than white collar jobs. Discussed are implications of the findings for understanding racial disadvantage in the American labor market across the work-career and on an inter-generational basis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ketosteroid isomerase provides further support for the idea that enzymes work by electrostatic preorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerlin, Shina C L; Sharma, Pankaz K; Chu, Zhen T; Warshel, Arieh

    2010-03-02

    One of the best systems for exploring the origin of enzyme catalysis has been the reaction of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI). Studies of the binding of phenolates to KSI have been taken as proof that the electrostatic preorganization effect only makes a minor contribution to the binding of the real, multiring, transition state (TS). However, our simulation study has determined that the difference between the phenolates and the TS arises from the fact that the nonpolar state of the phenolate can rotate freely relative to the oxyanion hole and thus loses the preorganization contribution. A recent study explored the reactivity of both small and multiring systems and concluded that their similar reactivity contradicts our preorganization idea. Herein, we establish that the available experiments in fact provide what is perhaps the best proof and clarification of the preorganization idea and its crucial role in enzyme catalysis. First, we analyze the binding energy and the pK(a) of equilenin and identify direct experimental evidence for our prediction about the differential electrostatic stabilization of the large TS and the small phenolates. Subsequently, we show that the similar reactivity of the small and large systems is also due to an electrostatic preorganization effect but that this effect only appears in the intermediate state because the TS is not free to rotate. This establishes the electrostatic origin of enzyme catalysis. We also clarify the crucial importance of having a well-defined physical concept when examining catalytic effects and the need for quantitative tools for analyzing such effects.

  9. Primary care provider preferences for working with a collaborative support team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores Jennifer A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical interventions based on collaborative models require effective communication between primary care providers (PCPs and collaborative support teams. Despite growing interest in collaborative care, we have identified no published studies describing how PCPs prefer to communicate and interact with collaborative support teams. This manuscript examines the communication and interaction preferences of PCPs participating in an ongoing randomized clinical trial of a collaborative intervention for chronic pain and depression. Methods The trial is being conducted in five primary care clinics of a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Twenty-one PCPs randomized to the study intervention completed a survey regarding preferences for interacting with the collaborative support team. Results A majority of PCPs identified email (95% and telephone calls (68% as preferred modes for communicating with members of the support team. In contrast, only 29% identified in-person communications as preferred. Most PCPs preferred that the care manager and physician pain specialist assess patients (76% and make initial treatment changes (71% without first conferring with the PCP. One-half wanted to be designated cosigners of all support team notes in the electronic medical record, one-half wanted to receive brief and focused information rather than in-depth information about their patients, and one-half wanted their practice nurses automatically included in communications. Panel size was strongly associated (p Conclusion The substantial variation in PCP communication preferences suggests the need for knowledge of these preferences when designing and implementing collaborative interventions. Additional research is needed to understand relationships between clinician and practice characteristics and interaction preferences.

  10. Resources on work zone safety and mobility performance monitoring and measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Work zone performance measures are metrics that help quantify how work zones impact travelers, residents, businesses, and workers. Some performance measures describe how an individual work zone impacts these audiences; other performance measures desc...

  11. An Opportunity for Healing and Holistic Care: Exploring the Roles of Health Care Providers Working Within Northern Canadian Aboriginal Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Zaida; Holmes, Dave; Chartrand, Larry

    2016-05-22

    The purpose of this qualitative study was exploring what the roles and challenges of health care providers working within Northern Canadian Aboriginal communities are and what resources can help support or impede their efforts in working toward addressing health inequities within these communities. The qualitative research conducted was influenced by a postcolonial epistemology. The works of theorists Fanon on colonization and racial construction, Kristeva on semiotics and abjection, and Foucault on power/knowledge, governmentality, and biopower were used in providing a theoretical framework. Critical discourse analysis of 25 semistructured interviews with health care providers was used to gain a better understanding of their roles and challenges while working within Northern Canadian Aboriginal communities. Within this research study, three significant findings emerged from the data. First, the Aboriginal person's identity was constructed in relation to the health care provider's role of delivering essential health services. Second, health care providers were not treating the "ill" patient, but rather treating the patient for being "ill." Third, health care providers were treating the Aboriginal person for being "Aboriginal" by separating the patient from his or her identity. The treatment involved reforming the Aboriginal patient from the condition of being "Aboriginal." © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Complexities of short-term mobility for sex work and migration among sex workers: violence and sexual risks, barriers to care, and enhanced social and economic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Shira M; Chettiar, Jill; Nguyen, Paul; Dobrer, Sabina; Montaner, Julio; Shannon, Kate

    2014-08-01

    Despite research on the health and safety of mobile and migrant populations in the formal and informal sectors globally, limited information is available regarding the working conditions, health, and safety of sex workers who engage in short-term mobility and migration. The objective of this study was to longitudinally examine work environment, health, and safety experiences linked to short-term mobility/migration (i.e., worked or lived in another city, province, or country) among sex workers in Vancouver, Canada, over a 2.5-year study period (2010-2012). We examined longitudinal correlates of short-term mobility/migration (i.e., worked or lived in another city, province, or country over the 3-year follow-up period) among 646 street and off-street sex workers in a longitudinal community-based study (AESHA). Of 646 sex workers, 10.84 % (n = 70) worked or lived in another city, province, or country during the study. In a multivariate generalized estimating equations (GEE) model, short-term mobility/migration was independently correlated with older age (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.95, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.92-0.98), soliciting clients in indoor (in-call) establishments (AOR 2.25, 95 % CI 1.27-3.96), intimate partner condom refusal (AOR 3.00, 1.02-8.84), and barriers to health care (AOR 1.77, 95 % CI 1.08-2.89). In a second multivariate GEE model, short-term mobility for sex work (i.e., worked in another city, province, or country) was correlated with client physical/sexual violence (AOR 1.92, 95 % CI 1.02-3.61). In this study, mobile/migrant sex workers were more likely to be younger, work in indoor sex work establishments, and earn higher income, suggesting that short-term mobility for sex work and migration increase social and economic opportunities. However, mobility and migration also correlated with reduced control over sexual negotiation with intimate partners and reduced health care access, and mobility for sex work was associated with

  13. Influences of attribution and stigma on working relationships with providers practicing Western psychiatry in the Taiwanese context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang-Pei; Wu, Hui-Ching; Huang, Chun-Jen

    2014-12-01

    This study examined influences of causal attributions of schizophrenia and perceived and internalized mental illness stigma on perceived working alliance with, and informational support received from doctors practicing Western psychiatry in the Taiwanese social-cultural context. This cross-sectional quantitative study used a non-probability, purposive sampling technique to recruit 212 Taiwanese diagnosed with schizophrenia from Taiwanese Alliance of the Mentally Ill, 4 community mental health rehabilitation centres and 2 psychiatric hospitals between July 2012 and March 2013. Linear regression models were used for analysis. The results showed that environmental attributions were positively associated with both perceived working alliance and perceived informational support, while supernatural attributions were negatively associated with perceived working alliance and perceived informational support. Perceived stigma had a negative association with perceived working alliance. The discrimination domain of internalized stigma specifically had a positive association with perceived working alliance, while the withdraw domain had a negative association with perceived informational support. Findings inform the importance of culturally sensitive practices in developing an effective working relationship. Western psychiatric care providers need to explore consumers' casual attributions of mental illness and understand the impact of stigma so that providers may successfully engage consumers in care and provide tailored illness education and information.

  14. Assessment of the quality of antenatal care services provided by health workers using a mobile phone decision support application in northern Nigeria: a pre/post-intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNabb, Marion; Chukwu, Emeka; Ojo, Oluwayemisi; Shekhar, Navendu; Gill, Christopher J; Salami, Habeeb; Jega, Farouk

    2015-01-01

    Given the shortage of skilled healthcare providers in Nigeria, frontline community health extension workers (CHEWs) are commonly tasked with providing maternal and child health services at primary health centers. In 2012, we introduced a mobile case management and decision support application in twenty primary health centers in northern Nigeria, and conducted a pre-test/post-test study to assess whether the introduction of the app had an effect on the quality of antenatal care services provided by this lower-level cadre. Using the CommCare mobile platform, the app dynamically guides CHEWs through antenatal care protocols and collects client data in real time. Thirteen health education audio clips are also embedded in the app for improving and standardizing client counseling. To detect changes in quality, we developed an evidence-based quality score consisting of 25 indicators, and conducted a total of 266 client exit interviews. We analyzed baseline and endline data to assess changes in the overall quality score as well as changes in the provision of key elements of antenatal care. Overall, the quality score increased from 13.3 at baseline to 17.2 at endline (peducation. These study results suggest that the introduction of a low-cost mobile case management and decision support application can spur behavior change and improve the quality of services provided by a lower level cadre of healthcare workers. Future research should employ a more rigorous experimental design to explore potential longer-term effects on client health outcomes.

  15. Work Process Oriented Learning via Mobile Devices – Theoretical Basics and Examples for a (New Didactical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Spöttl

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Two problems can be identified which counteract the need for further training: On the one hand the clientele of skilled workers is not necessarily keen on further training. On the other hand the time and cost pressure within the sector does not offer any room for time-consuming further training measures far away from the workplace. This is why the project “Virtual Learning on the building site – (Vila-b” was realized in cooperation with the project partners of the University of Bremen (Working group »Digital Media« of the Centre for Information Technology as well as from the economy (Arbeitskreis ökologischer Holzbau e. V. and Claus Holm, pm|c. The project team has tested a concept which facilitated learning adapted to the occupational reality and supported by the advantages of digital media. The central didactical elements for the development of this further training course are the contextual and methodological orientation to real work processes as well as the use of digital mobile media which facilitate learning directly at the workplace. The present article starts with a description of the theoretical basics for learning within the work process and discusses the didactical elements which are necessary for work process oriented learning with digital and mobile media.

  16. Performing Work: Locality, Embodied Practice and Career Mobility of Chinese Women Bankers in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-wan Chan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Women are emerging as significant actors in international financial industries concentrated in metropolitan cities which function as national and international business hubs. Based on 17 in-depth interviews with Chinese women bankers in Hong Kong, where one finds the highest concentration of banking institutions in the world, this paper examines the interplay between locality, gender performance and the career mobility of women bankers. The author argues that branch location is embedded within hierarchical fields of power and leads to different client groups, and ultimately, to different opportunities for upward mobility. Women bankers in Hong Kong are skilled in displaying multiple identities by using differentiated styles of language and different tongues, or languages, when interacting with different client groups in different branches. This strategy involves evaluative interpretation of perception because clients themselves make class distinctions according to different service settings. Although mid-level management teams in the banking industry have recently been rapidly feminised, this paper demonstrates that the glass ceiling is still real and continues to exert its invisible, negative impact. The upward mobility of Chinese women bankers is often blocked by informal barriers deeply embedded in the social structure and culture of both local society and international companies. These structural barriers and their resultant structured disadvantages for women are the consequence of the intersection, and sometimes the collusion, of ethnic politics, business or capitalist interests and social norms. Factors and structural forces such as race, ethnicity and gender are intertwined with and compounded to produce deep and far-reaching effects that are often beyond the control of the individual actor.

  17. Mobility Management Algorithms for the Client-Driven Mobility Frame System–Mobility from a Brand New Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Fülöp

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new mobility management is introduced. The main idea in this approach is that the mobil node should manage the mobility for itself not the network. The network nodes provide only basic services for mobile entities: connectivity and administration. We construct a framework called the Client-based Mobility Frame System (CMFS for this mobility environment. We developed the CMFS protocol as a solution over IPv4 and we show how to use Mobile IPv6 to realize our concept. We propose some basic mobility management solutions that can be implemented into the mobile clients and give details about a working simulation of a complete Mobility Management System. Example mobility management approaches such as the centralized- and hierarchical- or cellular-like ones are also defined and hints are given what kind of algorithms might be implemented upon the Client-based Mobility Frame System over IPv4 and IPv6 as well. We introduce some example algorithms that can work with the CMFS making mobility management efficient by minimizing signalling load on the network. In the present work modeling and detailed discussion on the parameters of the algorithms is given and comparison to existing mobility approaches and protocols is done. We prepared a simulation to test our protocol and to back up the proposals we provide the reader with simulation results. We stress that still one the most important benefit of our findings is that all the MNs can run different management strategies and can optimize mobility for themselves.

  18. Do mobile clinics provide high-quality antenatal care? A comparison of care delivery, knowledge outcomes and perception of quality of care between fixed and mobile clinics in central Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Erica; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Michaud, Lesly; Pierre, Gracia Lionel Fils; Vermeylen, Francoise; Pelletier, David

    2017-10-16

    Antenatal care (ANC) is an important health service for women in developing countries, with numerous proven benefits. Global coverage of ANC has steadily increased over the past 30 years, in part due to increased community-based outreach. However, commensurate improvements in health outcomes such as reductions in the prevalence of maternal anemia and infants born small-for-gestational age have not been achieved, even with increased coverage, indicating that quality of care may be inadequate. Mobile clinics are one community-based strategy used to further improve coverage of ANC, but their quality of care delivery has rarely been evaluated. To determine the quality of care of ANC in central Haiti, we compared adherence to national guidelines between fixed and mobile clinics by performing direct observations of antenatal care consultations and exit interviews with recipients of care using a multi-stage random sampling procedure. Outcome variables were eight components of care, and women's knowledge and perception of care quality. There were significant differences in the predicted proportion or probability of recommended services for four of eight care components, including intake, laboratory examinations, infection control, and supplies, iron folic acid supplements and Tetanus Toxoid vaccine provided to women. These care components were more likely performed in fixed clinics, except for distribution of supplies, iron-folic acid supplements, and Tetanus Toxoid vaccine, more likely provided in mobile clinics. There were no differences between clinic type for the proportion of total physical exam procedures performed, health and communication messages delivered, provider communication or documentation. Women's knowledge about educational topics was poor, but women perceived extremely high quality of care in both clinic models. Although adherence to guidelines differed by clinic type for half of the care components, both clinics had a low percentage of overall services

  19. The Role of Social Work in Providing Mental Health Services and Care Coordination in an Urban Trauma Center Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Megan; Whiteside, Lauren K; Dotolo, Danae; Wang, Jin; Ho, Leyna; Conley, Bonnie; Forrester, Mollie; Fouts, Susan O; Vavilala, Monica S; Zatzick, Douglas F

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the role of emergency department (ED) social workers and identified predictors of receipt of social work services and length of ED stay. Comprehensive reviews were conducted of medical records of all patients (N=49,354) treated in a level 1 trauma center ED from January 1, 2012, to March 31, 2013. Content analysis of chart notes was used to categorize the types of social work services provided. Poisson regression was used to assess associations between demographic and clinical characteristics, receipt of social work services, and length of ED stay. Social work services were provided to 18,532 (38%) patients. Most were mental health services (54%), followed by care coordination (31%) and material support or other referrals (15%). Patients seen by social workers had complex presentations, involving mental disorder diagnoses (18%), substance use disorder diagnoses (29%), comorbid diagnoses (32%), and injuries (51%); a quarter of patients had multiple ED visits (26%). In adjusted regression analysis, females (relative risk [RR]=1.15), patients not discharged home (RR=1.44), and those with two or more comorbid diagnoses (RR=1.80), injuries due to assault (RR=1.37), and traumatic brain injury (RR=1.20) were more likely to receive social work services. Such services were associated with an increased length of ED stay (RR=1.34). Social workers provided services to patients with multifaceted needs resulting from complex presentations. Provision of social work services modestly increased length of ED stay. Triage algorithms are needed to target efficiencies, systematize provision of ED social work services, and improve access to services for all patients.

  20. Tracking working status of HIV/AIDS-trained service providers by means of a training information monitoring system in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadew Mesrak

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Federal Ministry of Health of Ethiopia is implementing an ambitious and rapid scale-up of health care services for the prevention, care and treatment of HIV/AIDS in public facilities. With support from the United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, 38 830 service providers were trained, from early 2005 until December 2007, in HIV-related topics. Anecdotal evidence suggested high attrition rates of providers, but reliable quantitative data have been limited. Methods With that funding, Jhpiego supports a Training Information Monitoring System, which stores training information for all HIV/AIDS training events supported by the same funding source. Data forms were developed to capture information on providers' working status and were given to eight partners who collected data during routine site visits on individual providers about working status; if not working at the facility, date of and reason for leaving; and source of information. Results Data were collected on 1744 providers (59% males in 53 hospitals and 45 health centres in 10 regional and administrative states. The project found that 32.6% of the providers were no longer at the site, 57.6% are still working on HIV/AIDS services at the same facility where they were trained and 10.4% are at the facility, but not providing HIV/AIDS services. Of the providers not at the facility, the two largest groups were those who had left for further study (27.6% and those who had gone to another public facility (17.6%. Of all physicians trained, 49.2% had left the facility. Regional and cadre variation was found, for example Gambella had the highest percent of providers no longer at the site (53.7% while Harari had the highest percentage of providers still working on HIV/AIDS (71.6%. Conclusion Overall, the project found that the information in the Training Information Monitoring System can be used to track the working status of trained providers. Data generated from

  1. Mobile agents basic concepts, mobility models, and the tracy toolkit

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Mobile agents are software nomads that act as your personal representative, working autonomously through networks. They are able to visit network nodes directly using available computing power and are not limited by platform. This emerging field is now poised to become a cornerstone for new Web-based ubiquitous computing environments. Mobile Agents provides a practical introduction to mobile agent technology and surveys the state of the art in mobile agent research. Students and researchers can use the book as an introduction to the concepts and possibilities of this field and as an overview of ongoing research. Developers can use it to identify the capabilities of the technology to decide if mobile agents are the right solution for them. Practioners can also gain hands-on experience in programming mobile agents through exploration of the source code for a complete mobile agent environment available through the companion website.*Summarizes the state of the art in mobile agent research*Identifies the benefits...

  2. Changing current practice in urological cancer care: Providing better information, advice and related support on work engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, S J; Murdoch, S E; Cox, T

    2017-09-01

    There is a growing body of evidence on the importance of work following a diagnosis of cancer and the need to provide better information, advice and related support to patients on work engagement. The aim of this study was to better understand the nature of those needs and to identify better ways to meet these for those with a urological cancer. The focus was on the issues that were common to three key stakeholder groups. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with stakeholders in North East Scotland: 12 individuals with kidney, bladder or prostate cancer, 10 healthcare providers and 10 managers from large organisations. Five key themes emerged from the Framework Analysis: perceived importance of work engagement; decision-making: treatment, work and cancer; roles and responsibilities; education and training; information, advice and support resources. The data confirmed that work engagement is important to those with urological cancer. It also made clear that the current provision of information and advice could be improved. Any such interventions should involve all three key stakeholder groups with greater clarity on their respective roles and responsibilities. Finally, any new system would be best integrated with existing care provision and supported by adequate education and training of those involved. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Team dynamics, clinical work satisfaction, and patient care coordination between primary care providers: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hummy; Ryan, Molly; Tendulkar, Shalini; Fisher, Josephine; Martin, Julia; Peters, Antoinette S; Frolkis, Joseph P; Rosenthal, Meredith B; Chien, Alyna T; Singer, Sara J

    Team-based care is essential for delivering high-quality, comprehensive, and coordinated care. Despite considerable research about the effects of team-based care on patient outcomes, few studies have examined how team dynamics relate to provider outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine relationships among team dynamics, primary care provider (PCP) clinical work satisfaction, and patient care coordination between PCPs in 18 Harvard-affiliated primary care practices participating in Harvard's Academic Innovations Collaborative. First, we administered a cross-sectional survey to all 548 PCPs (267 attending clinicians, 281 resident physicians) working at participating practices; 65% responded. We assessed the relationship of team dynamics with PCPs' clinical work satisfaction and perception of patient care coordination between PCPs, respectively, and the potential mediating effect of patient care coordination on the relationship between team dynamics and work satisfaction. In addition, we embedded a qualitative evaluation within the quantitative evaluation to achieve a convergent mixed methods design to help us better understand our findings and illuminate relationships among key variables. Better team dynamics were positively associated with clinical work satisfaction and quality of patient care coordination between PCPs. Coordination partially mediated the relationship between team dynamics and satisfaction for attending clinicians, suggesting that higher satisfaction depends, in part, on better teamwork, yielding more coordinated patient care. We found no mediating effects for resident physicians. Qualitative results suggest that sources of satisfaction from positive team dynamics for PCPs may be most relevant to attending clinicians. Improving primary care team dynamics could improve clinical work satisfaction among PCPs and patient care coordination between PCPs. In addition to improving outcomes that directly concern health care providers, efforts to

  4. Assessment of the quality of antenatal care services provided by health workers using a mobile phone decision support application in northern Nigeria: a pre/post-intervention study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion McNabb

    Full Text Available Given the shortage of skilled healthcare providers in Nigeria, frontline community health extension workers (CHEWs are commonly tasked with providing maternal and child health services at primary health centers. In 2012, we introduced a mobile case management and decision support application in twenty primary health centers in northern Nigeria, and conducted a pre-test/post-test study to assess whether the introduction of the app had an effect on the quality of antenatal care services provided by this lower-level cadre.Using the CommCare mobile platform, the app dynamically guides CHEWs through antenatal care protocols and collects client data in real time. Thirteen health education audio clips are also embedded in the app for improving and standardizing client counseling. To detect changes in quality, we developed an evidence-based quality score consisting of 25 indicators, and conducted a total of 266 client exit interviews. We analyzed baseline and endline data to assess changes in the overall quality score as well as changes in the provision of key elements of antenatal care.Overall, the quality score increased from 13.3 at baseline to 17.2 at endline (p<0.0001, out of a total possible score of 25, with the most significant improvements related to health counseling, technical services provided, and quality of health education.These study results suggest that the introduction of a low-cost mobile case management and decision support application can spur behavior change and improve the quality of services provided by a lower level cadre of healthcare workers. Future research should employ a more rigorous experimental design to explore potential longer-term effects on client health outcomes.

  5. The Ecology of the Mobile Worker. Workscape 21: The Ecology of New Ways of Working.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Franklin; Quinn, Kristen L.; Callentine, Livit U.

    A study addressed the impact of household composition--preschool, school-age, or no children--and nature of the home workspace--dedicated room or area--on IBM employees' satisfaction, stress, and work effectiveness. The IBM program allowed 300 employees who spent about 70 percent of their time with clients to work in home offices. Surveys,…

  6. Mobile payment

    CERN Document Server

    Lerner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Paying with mobile devices such as mobile phones or smart phones will expand worldwide in the coming years. This development provides opportunities for various industries (banking, telecommunications, credit card business, manufacturers, suppliers, retail) and for consumers.

  7. Mobile technology: streamlining practice and improving care

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Holly

    2013-01-01

    The use of mobile phones in care delivery has the potential to improve the way in which care is delivered. When implemented effectively, mobile technologies can empower patients and enhance communication between patients and their health-care providers. When barriers are recognised and addressed, mobile technologies can change working lives, facilitating rapid access to information and supporting efficiency in practice.

  8. Telemedicine, telehealth, and mobile health applications that work: opportunities and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Ronald S; Lopez, Ana Maria; Joseph, Bellal A; Erps, Kristine A; Holcomb, Michael; Barker, Gail P; Krupinski, Elizabeth A

    2014-03-01

    There has been a spike in interest and use of telehealth, catalyzed recently by the anticipated implementation of the Affordable Care Act, which rewards efficiency in healthcare delivery. Advances in telehealth services are in many areas, including gap service coverage (eg, night-time radiology coverage), urgent services (eg, telestroke services and teleburn services), mandated services (eg, the delivery of health care services to prison inmates), and the proliferation of video-enabled multisite group chart rounds (eg, Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes programs). Progress has been made in confronting traditional barriers to the proliferation of telehealth. Reimbursement by third-party payers has been addressed in 19 states that passed parity legislation to guarantee payment for telehealth services. Medicare lags behind Medicaid, in some states, in reimbursement. Interstate medical licensure rules remain problematic. Mobile health is currently undergoing explosive growth and could be a disruptive innovation that will change the face of healthcare in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Emerging revenue model structure for mobile industry: the case for traditional and OTT service providers in Sub-Sahara

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahola, U

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the emergence of internet-based service providers, known as Over-the-top (OTT), the business landscape has changed massively, hence the current traditional service provider’s business models are transforming. The question treated in this paper...

  10. 30 CFR 250.417 - What must I provide if I plan to use a mobile offshore drilling unit (MODU)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Gas Drilling Operations Applying for A Permit to Drill § 250.417 What must I provide if I plan to use... environment. Actions must include the suspension, curtailment, or modification of drilling or rig operations... offshore drilling unit (MODU)? 250.417 Section 250.417 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE...

  11. The problems of the providing the regions with health care infrastructure in conditions of increase of migratory mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Borisovna Bedrina

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Subject matter of the article is a question of the providing the newcomers to regions of the Russian Federation with healthcare infrastructure facilities. The purpose of the research is an assessment of level of this providing. On the basis of calculation of the integrated indicators of the development of health care infrastructure and the providing the population with healthcare infrastructure facilities the grouping of regions is carried out. By means of the two-dimensional analysis, we made a comparison of regions on indicators of arrival of the population and the above-named settlement indicators. The analysis of dynamics of the number change of healthcare infrastructure facilities during its reforming from 2005 to 2011 is performed. As a result of the research, the following conclusion is drawn: the level of investment into the regions as well as in its health care infrastructure do influence on the intensity of migratory flows, however, distribution of investments into health care facilities in regions does not take in to account the directions of migratory flows and poorly considers the population size of territories. This article may be interesting to the experts dealing with issues of development of regions.

  12. Can a mobile app improve the quality of patient care provided by trainee doctors? Analysis of trainees' case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Katie; Bullock, Alison; Dimond, Rebecca; Stacey, Mark

    2016-09-21

    To explore how a medical textbook app ('iDoc') supports newly qualified doctors in providing high-quality patient care. The iDoc project, funded by the Wales Deanery, provides new doctors with an app which gives access to key medical textbooks. Participants' submitted case reports describing self-reported accounts of specific instances of app use. The size of the data set enabled analysis of a subsample of 'complex' case reports. Of the 568 case reports submitted by Foundation Year 1s (F1s)/Year 2s (F2s), 142 (25%) detailed instances of diagnostic decision-making and were identified as 'complex'. We analysed these data against the Quality Improvement (QI) Framework using thematic content analysis. Clinical settings across Wales, UK. Newly qualified doctors (2012-2014; n=114), F1 and F2. The iDoc app, powered by Dr Companion software, provided newly qualified doctors in Wales with a selection of key medical textbooks via individuals' personal smartphone. Doctors' use of the iDoc app supported 5 of the 6 QI elements: efficiency, timeliness, effectiveness, safety and patient-centredness. None of the case reports were coded to the equity element. Efficiency was the element which attracted the highest number of case report references. We propose that the QI Framework should be expanding to include 'learning' as a 7th element. Access to key medical textbooks via an app provides trusted and valuable support to newly qualified doctors during a period of transition. On the basis of these doctors' self-reported accounts, our evidence indicates that the use of the app enhances efficiency, effectiveness and timeliness of patient-care in addition consolidating a safe, patient-centred approach. We propose that there is scope to extend the QI Framework by incorporating 'learning' as a 7th element in recognition of the relationship between providing high-quality care through educational engagement. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  13. Integrating International Student Mobility in Work-Based Higher Education: The Case of Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Lukas; Powell, Justin J. W.; Fortwengel, Johann; Bernhard, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    Dual study programs are hybrid forms of work-based higher education that have expanded very rapidly in Germany--a country traditionally considered a key model in both higher education (HE) and vocational education and training (VET). The continued expansion of these hybrid programs increasingly raises questions if, how, and why they may be…

  14. Work in Multidisciplinary Teams: a Study about Mobilization of Knowledge and Learning in an Organization of Complex Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Lucchi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article, the result of a Master‟s thesis, has as the main objective to investigate how trainee-engineers from the Advanced Training Program for Engineers (ATPE, from a Brazilian organization called Challenge, working in multidisciplinary teams with the help of mentors, interact and mobilize their knowledge, resulting in learning. To accomplish this, a Theoretical Reference Model based on the studies of Nonaka and Takeuchi (1997; Crossan, Lane and White (1999; Choo (2000, 2001; Garvin (2002; Schwartz (2003; Zietsma, Winn, Branzei and Vertinsky (2002; Senge (2006 and Castañeda, Rios (2007 and Pérez-Acosta (2005 was built. The data of this qualitative study case was garnered by an open questionnaire, individual interviews and questionnaires with a closed scale, applied in October and November of 2008. The results show that ATPE is seen as a proper driver of the mobilization, interaction and exchange of knowledge between trainee-engineers and mentors, resulting in learning at individual and group levels. Mentors are professionals that stimulate attention, autonomy and promote integration in an environment that simulates the business one. These aspects were seen as facilitators of the interaction and learning in ATPE. At the end, 18 notions were related to learning in ATPE and appear portrayed in an Empirical Representation done by authors.

  15. Mobile Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler Simonsen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phones are ubiquitous and have completely transformed the way we live, work, learn and conduct our everyday activities. Mobile phones have also changed the way users access lexicographic data. In fact, it can be argued that mobile phones and lexicography are not yet compatible. Modern users...... are already mobile – but lexicography is not yet fully ready for the mobile challenge, mobile users and mobile user situations. The article is based on empirical data from two surveys comprising 10 medical doctors, who were asked to look up five medical substances with the medical dictionary app Medicin...... and that lexicographic innovation is needed. A new type of users, new user situations and new access methods call for new lexicographic solutions, and this article proposes a six-pointed hexagram model, which can be used during dictionary app design to lexicographically calibrate the six dimensions in mobile...

  16. Developing a tool to assess motivation among health service providers working with public health system in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Bhaskar; Maneskar, Abhishek; Saxena, Deepak

    2016-04-14

    Addressing the shortage of health service providers (doctors and nurses) in rural health centres remains a huge challenge. The lack of motivation of health service providers to serve in rural areas is one of the major reasons for such shortage. While many studies have aimed at analysing the reasons for low motivation, hardly any studies in India have focused on developing valid and reliable tools to measure motivation among health service providers. Hence, the objective of the study was to test and develop a valid and reliable instrument to assess the motivation of health service providers working with the public health system in India and the extent to which the motivation factors included in the study motivate health service providers to perform better at work. The present study adapted an already developed tool on motivation. The reliability and validity of the tool were established using different methods. The first stage of the tool development involved content development and assessment where, after a detailed literature review, a predeveloped tool with 19 items was adapted. However, in light of the literature review and pilot test, the same tool was modified to suit the local context by adding 7 additional items so that the final modified tool comprised of 26 items. A correlation matrix was applied to check the pattern of relationships among the items. The total sample size for the study was 154 health service providers from one Western state in India. To understand the sampling adequacy, the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy and Bartlett's test of sphericity were applied and finally factor analysis was carried out to calculate the eigenvalues and to understand the relative impact of factors affecting motivation. A correlation matrix value of 0.017 was obtained narrating multi-co-linearity among the observations. Based on initial factor analysis, 8 out of 26 study factors were excluded from the study components with a cutoff range of less than

  17. ANALISA PERBANDINGAN KETELITIAN PENENTUAN POSISI DENGAN GPS RTK-NTRIP DENGAN BASE GPS CORS BIG DARI BERBAGAI MACAM MOBILE PROVIDER DIDASARKAN PADA PERGESERAN LINEAR (STUDI KASUS: SURABAYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atika Sari

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Penentuan posisi dalam pemetaan menggunakan penginderaan jauh dan foto udara memerlukan pengamatan GPS geodetik sebagai titik kontrol yang memilki ketelitian tinggi. Sistem koreksi data penentuan posisinya diperoleh dari transmisi data dari stasiun base ke receiver. Dalam perkembangan sekarang ini metode pengukuran RTK telah menggunakan metode NTRIP (Networked Transport of RTCM via Internet Protocol sebagai metode transmisi koreksi data dengan menggunakan intenet sehingga pengukuran tersebut masih bisa dilakukan dengan jarak yang lebih jauh dari base-nya. Pada metode NTRIP ini menggunakan metode pengiriman koreksi data GNSS melalui jaringan internet. Pengembangan sistem dengan fasilitas akses internet mobile melalui general packet radio service (GPRS dan global system for mobile (GSM, menyediakan metode cepat dan handal untuk mendistribusikan baris data GPS atau koreksi diferensial real-time (DGPS / RTK ke penerima GPS di daerah manapun yang berada di bawah jangkauan jaringan telepon seluler. Sehingga untuk mengetahui provider yang sesuai digunakan dalam wilayah surabaya dalam menggunakan metode RTK NTRIP maka dilakukanlah penelitian ini. Dari hasil pengamatan dari pengukuran dengan menggunakan  metode RTK-NTRIP dengan base GPS CORS BIG didapat nilai rata-rata dari masing-masing provider sekitar < 4 m.

  18. Noise exposure during prehospital emergency physicians work on Mobile Emergency Care Units and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Christian Tofte; Schmidt, Jesper Hvass; Brøchner, Anne C

    2017-01-01

    ). A second objective was to identify any occupational hearing loss amongst prehospital personnel. METHODS: Noise exposure during work in the MECU and HEMS was measured using miniature microphones worn laterally to the auditory canals or within the earmuffs of the helmet. All recorded sounds were analysed......BACKGROUND: Prehospital personnel are at risk of occupational hearing loss due to high noise exposure. The aim of the study was to establish an overview of noise exposure during emergency responses in Mobile Emergency Care Units (MECU), ambulances and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS...... in proportion to a known tone of 94 dB. Before and after episodes of noise exposure, the physicians underwent a hearing test indicating whether the noise had had any impact on the function of the outer sensory hair cells. This was accomplished by measuring the amplitude level shifts of the Distortion Product...

  19. World War II Mobilization in Men’s Work Lives: Continuity or Disruption for the Middle Class?1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechter, Aimée R.; Elder, Glen H.

    2016-01-01

    The labor needs of World War II fueled a growing demand for both military and war industry personnel. This longitudinal study investigates mobilization into these competing activities and their work life effects among men from the middle class. Hazard estimates show significant differences in wartime activities across occupations, apart from other deferment criteria. By war’s end, critical employment, in contrast to military service, is positively associated with supervisory responsibility for younger men and with occupation change. This empoloyment does not predict postwar career advancement up to the 1970s. By comparison, men who were officers had a “pipeline” to advancement after the war, whereas other service men fared worse than nonveterans. PMID:27656001

  20. Mobile marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Klečková, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this thesis was to provide a comprehensive overview of the mobile marketing and analyze selected campaigns of Czech mobile marketing in comparison to world successful campaigns. The research contained studying of available literature about the theme to gain general knowledge about the issue. The theoretical part of the thesis contains predominantly various definitions of mobile marketing and its tools, advantages of these tools and some information about Mobile Marketing Assoc...

  1. Diagnostic work-up of neurological syndromes in a rural African setting: knowledge, attitudes and practices of health care providers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Mpanya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurological disorders of infectious origin are common in rural sub-Saharan Africa and usually have serious consequences. Unfortunately, these syndromes are often poorly documented for lack of diagnostic tools. Clinical management of these diseases is a major challenge in under-equipped rural health centers and hospitals. We documented health care provider knowledge, attitudes and practices related to this syndrome in two rural health zones in Bandundu Province, Democratic Republic of Congo. METHODS: We used a qualitative research approach combining observation, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. We observed 20 patient-provider contacts related to a neurological syndrome, conducted 12 individual interviews and 4 focus group discussions with care providers. All interviews were audiotaped and the transcripts were analyzed with the software ATLAS.ti. RESULTS: Care providers in this region usually limit their diagnostic work-up to clinical examination primarily because of the financial hurdles in this entirely out-of-pocket payment system. The patients prefer to purchase drugs rather than diagnostic tests. Moreover the general lack of diagnostic tools and the representation of the clinician as a "diviner" do not enhance any use of laboratory or other diagnostic methods. CONCLUSION: Innovation in diagnostic technology for neurological disorders is badly needed in Central-Africa, but its uptake in clinical practice will only be a success if tools are simple, affordable and embedded in a patient-centered approach.

  2. Student Transience in North Carolina: The Effect of School Mobility on Student Outcomes Using Longitudinal Data. Working Paper 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zeyu; Hannaway, Jane; D'Souza, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the school mobility rates for elementary and middle school students in North Carolina and attempts to estimate the effect of school mobility on the performance of different groups of students using student fixed effects models. School mobility is defined as changing schools at times that are non-promotional (e.g., moving…

  3. Can simple mobile phone applications provide reliable counts of respiratory rates in sick infants and children? An initial evaluation of three new applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, James; Gerdtz, Marie; Nicholson, Pat; Crellin, Dianne; Browning, Laura; Simpson, Julie; Bell, Lauren; Santamaria, Nick

    2015-05-01

    Respiratory rate is an important sign that is commonly either not recorded or recorded incorrectly. Mobile phone ownership is increasing even in resource-poor settings. Phone applications may improve the accuracy and ease of counting of respiratory rates. The study assessed the reliability and initial users' impressions of four mobile phone respiratory timer approaches, compared to a 60-second count by the same participants. Three mobile applications (applying four different counting approaches plus a standard 60-second count) were created using the Java Mobile Edition and tested on Nokia C1-01 phones. Apart from the 60-second timer application, the others included a counter based on the time for ten breaths, and three based on the time interval between breaths ('Once-per-Breath', in which the user presses for each breath and the application calculates the rate after 10 or 20 breaths, or after 60s). Nursing and physiotherapy students used the applications to count respiratory rates in a set of brief video recordings of children with different respiratory illnesses. Limits of agreement (compared to the same participant's standard 60-second count), intra-class correlation coefficients and standard errors of measurement were calculated to compare the reliability of the four approaches, and a usability questionnaire was completed by the participants. There was considerable variation in the counts, with large components of the variation related to the participants and the videos, as well as the methods. None of the methods was entirely reliable, with no limits of agreement better than -10 to +9 breaths/min. Some of the methods were superior to the others, with ICCs from 0.24 to 0.92. By ICC the Once-per-Breath 60-second count and the Once-per-Breath 20-breath count were the most consistent, better even than the 60-second count by the participants. The 10-breath approaches performed least well. Users' initial impressions were positive, with little difference between the

  4. [Gender and work: the experience of providers of health services to indigenous women from Guerrero y Oaxaca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Castellanos, Claudia Isabel; Pelcastre-Villafuerte, Blanca; Márquez-Serrano, Margarita; Juárez-Ramírez, Clara

    2012-03-01

    The scope of this paper was to identify the role of gender for women as workers, through the perception and discourse of health service providers at the 'Health Centers for Indigenous Women' ("Casas de Salud de las Mujeres Indígenas") in Ometepec, Guerrero and Matías Romero, Oaxaca, Mexico. It is a qualitative study, based on a secondary analysis of the interviews conducted as part of the "Rescatando la experiencia de la Casa de la Mujer Indígena: sistematización y evaluación del proceso" project. A strong sense of the value of work and a strong commitment towards the community were identified. Guilt appears as the result of tension between work outside the home and the responsibilities as mothers and wives. The possibility of helping other women is a source of gratification that dissipates these conflicts; prestige and recognition are added to the benefits of their role. The labor experience of female workers in the "Casas de Salud de las Mujeres Indígenas" of Matías Romero, Oaxaca and Ometepec, Guerrero, described in this paper, reveals that it has very specific characteristics, which are difficult to replicate in other regions of the country. In future studies it is necessary to consider the different contexts of vulnerability.

  5. Is mobility in the labor market a solution to sustainable return to work for some sick listed persons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, Kerstin; Wåhlin, Charlotte; Persson, Jan; Bernfort, Lars; Öberg, Birgitta

    2011-09-01

    The study aims to identify characteristics associated with long-term expectations of professional stability or mobility among recently sick-listed workers, and to study whether expectations of professional mobility and turnover intentions were associated with duration of sick leave. A cross-sectional study was performed on baseline measures in a prospective cohort study of patients who were granted sick leave due to musculoskeletal (MSD) or mental (MD) disorders. A total of 1,375 individuals fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A baseline questionnaire was sent by mail within 3 weeks of their first day of certified medical sickness; 962 individuals responded (70%). The main diagnosis was MSD in 595 (62%) individuals and MD in 367 (38%). Expectations of ability to remain in the present profession in 2 years was associated with better health and health-related resources, younger age, higher education, and better effort-reward balance. Effort-reward imbalance, MD, high burnout scores, and better educational and occupational position were associated with turnover intentions. Low expectations of ability to remain in the present profession defined two vulnerable groups with regard to RTW, those with no turnover intentions were older, had lower personal resources, more often had MSD, and slower RTW rate. Those with turnover intentions had a clear effort-reward imbalance and high burnout scores. The results of this explorative study underline the importance of differentiating RTW-interventions based on knowledge about the sick-listed person's resources in relation to the labor market and the work place, and their expectations of future employment and employability.

  6. Sleep pattern and decision making in physicians from mobile emergency care service with 12-hour work schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Eleni de Araújo Sales; de Almondes, Katie Moraes

    2017-11-03

    Shift work schedules are biological standpoint worse because compel the body to anticipate periods of wakefulness and sleep and thus eventually cause a disruption of biological rhythms. To evaluate the sleep pattern and decision making in physicians working in mobile units of emergency attention undergoing Day Shift and Rotating Shift. The study included 26 physicians. The instruments utilized were a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Sleep Habits Questionnaire, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Chronotype Identification Questionnaire of Horne-Ostberg, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and hypothetical scenarios of decision-making created according to the Policy-Capturing Technique. For inclusion and exclusion criteria, the participants answered the Chalder Fatigue Scale, the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Inventory of Stress Symptoms for adults of Lipp (ISSL). It was found good sleep quality for physicians on Day Shift schedule and bad sleep quality for physicians on Rotating Shift schedule. The IGT measure showed no impairment in decision-making, but the hypothetical scenarios revealed impairment decision-making during the Shift for both schedules. Good sleep quality was related to a better performance in decision-making. Good sleep quality seems to influence a better performance in decision-making.

  7. Mobile Probes in Mobile Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Blomhøj, Ulla; Duvaa, Uffe

    In this paper experiences from using mobile probes in educational design of a mobile learning application is presented. The probing process stems from the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. In the project, the mobile phone was not only acting...... as an agent for acquiring empirical data (as the situation in hitherto mobile probe settings) but was also the technological medium for which data should say something about (mobile learning). Consequently, not only the content of the data but also the ways in which data was delivered and handled, provided...... a valuable dimension for investigating mobile use. The data was collected at the same time as design activities took place and the collective data was analysed based on user experience goals and cognitive processes from interaction design and mobile learning. The mobile probe increased the knowledge base...

  8. Mobile Design Pattern Gallery UI Patterns for Mobile Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Neil, Theresa

    2012-01-01

    When you're under pressure to produce a well designed, easy-to-navigate mobile app, there's no time to reinvent the wheel. This concise book provides a handy reference to 70 mobile app design patterns, illustrated by more than 400 screenshots from current iOS, Android, BlackBerry, WebOS, Windows Mobile, and Symbian apps. User experience professional Theresa Neil (Designing Web Interfaces) walks you through design patterns in 10 separate categories, including anti-patterns. Whether you're designing a simple iPhone application or one that's meant to work for every popular mobile OS on the mark

  9. Electron capture dissociation and drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry coupled with site directed mutations provide insights into the conformational diversity of a metamorphic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Sophie R; Porrini, Massimiliano; Tyler, Robert C; MacPhee, Cait E; Volkman, Brian F; Barran, Perdita E

    2015-04-28

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry can be combined with data from top-down sequencing to discern adopted conformations of proteins in the absence of solvent. This multi-technique approach has particular applicability for conformationally dynamic systems. Previously, we demonstrated the use of drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry (DT IM-MS) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) to study the metamorphic protein lymphotactin (Ltn). Ltn exists in equilibrium between distinct monomeric (Ltn10) and dimeric (Ltn40) folds, both of which can be preserved and probed in the gas-phase. Here, we further test this mass spectrometric framework, by examining two site directed mutants of Ltn, designed to stabilise either distinct fold in solution, in addition to a truncated form consisting of a minimum model of structure for Ltn10. The truncated mutant has similar collision cross sections to the wild type (WT), for low charge states, and is resistant to ECD fragmentation. The monomer mutant (CC3) presents in similar conformational families as observed previously for the WT Ltn monomer. As with the WT, the CC3 mutant is resistant to ECD fragmentation at low charge states. The dimer mutant W55D is found here to exist as both a monomer and dimer. As a monomer W55D exhibits similar behaviour to the WT, but as a dimer presents a much larger charge state and collision cross section range than the WT dimer, suggesting a smaller interaction interface. In addition, ECD on the W55D mutant yields greater fragmentation than for the WT, suggesting a less stable β-sheet core. The results highlight the power of MS to provide insight into dynamic proteins, providing further information on each distinct fold of Ltn. In addition we observe differences in the fold stability following single or double point mutations. This approach, therefore, has potential to be a useful tool to screen for the structural effects of mutagenesis, even when sample is limited.

  10. Role of Human Health Care Providers and Medical Treatment Facilities in Military Working Dog Care and Accessibility Difficulties with Military Working Dog Blood Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles Iii, James T

    2016-01-01

    The use of military working dogs (MWDs) in support of military operations has increased dramatically over recent years, as they have proven to be our most reliable deterrent to improvised explosive devices. Healthcare delivery for MWDs in combat presents unique challenges and requires extensive collaboration between veterinarians and human health care providers (HCPs). A successful example is the incorporation of MWD emergency care for nonveterinary HCPs into the Joint Trauma System Clinical Practice Guidelines, which has proven to be a helpful product. Additional challenges that need further solutions include MWDs as patients in human medical treatment facilities (MTFs) and the procurement of appropriate canine blood components in an operational environment. It is often necessary for MWDs to be treated as patients in human MTFs, however, there is no Department of Defense guidance to support this activity. Access to MWD blood products is limited to collection of fresh whole blood in the operational setting. Similar to humans, specific blood component therapy, such as fresh frozen plasma, is often indicated for sick or injured MWDs. Currently there is no formal system in place to deliver any blood products for MWDs or to facilitate collection in theater.

  11. Using Patient-Generated Health Data From Mobile Technologies for Diabetes Self-Management Support: Provider Perspectives From an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nundy, Shantanu; Lu, Chen-Yuan E; Hogan, Patrick; Mishra, Anjuli; Peek, Monica E

    2014-01-01

    Mobile health and patient-generated health data are promising health IT tools for delivering self-management support in diabetes, but little is known about provider perspectives on how best to integrate these programs into routine care. We explored provider perceptions of a patient-generated health data report from a text-message-based diabetes self-management program. The report was designed to relay clinically relevant data obtained from participants' responses to self-assessment questions delivered over text message. Likert-type scale response surveys and in-depth interviews were conducted with primary care physicians and endocrinologists who pilot tested the patient-generated health data report in an actual clinical encounter. Interview guides were designed to assess providers' perceptions of the feasibility and utility of patient-generated health data in routine clinical practice. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using the constant comparative method. Twelve providers successfully piloted the summary report in clinic. Although only a minority of providers felt the report changed the care they provided (3 of 12 or 25%), most were willing to use the summary report in a future clinical encounter (9 of 12 or 75%). Perceived benefits of patient-generated health data included agenda setting, assessment of self-care, and identification of patient barriers. Major themes discussed included patient selection, reliability of patient-generated health information, and integration into clinical workflow. Providers perceived multiple benefits of patient-generated health data in overcoming common barriers to self-management support in clinical practice and found the summary report feasible and usable in a clinical context. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  12. Cooperating mobile robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  13. Distributed mobility management - framework & analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebsch, M.; Seite, P.; Karagiannis, Georgios

    Mobile operators consider the distribution of mobility anchors to enable offloading some traffic from their core network. The Distributed Mobility Management (DMM) Working Group is investigating the impact of decentralized mobility management to existing protocol solutions, while taking into account

  14. 2nd International Conference on Mobile and Wireless Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wattanapongsakorn, Naruemon

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a snapshot of the current state-of-the-art in the fields of mobile and wireless technology, security and applications.  The proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Mobile and Wireless Technology (ICMWT2015), it represents the outcome of a unique platform for researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to share cutting-edge developments in the field of mobile and wireless science technology, including those working on data management and mobile security.   The contributions presented here describe the latest academic and industrial research from the international mobile and wireless community.  The scope covers four major topical areas: mobile and wireless networks and applications; security in mobile and wireless technology; mobile data management and applications; and mobile software.  The book will be a valuable reference for current researchers in academia and industry, and a useful resource for graduate-level students working on mobile and wireless technology...

  15. The effect of psychosocial stress on muscle activity during computer work: Comparative study between desktop computer and mobile computing products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taib, Mohd Firdaus Mohd; Bahn, Sangwoo; Yun, Myung Hwan

    2016-06-27

    The popularity of mobile computing products is well known. Thus, it is crucial to evaluate their contribution to musculoskeletal disorders during computer usage under both comfortable and stressful environments. This study explores the effect of different computer products' usages with different tasks used to induce psychosocial stress on muscle activity. Fourteen male subjects performed computer tasks: sixteen combinations of four different computer products with four different tasks used to induce stress. Electromyography for four muscles on the forearm, shoulder and neck regions and task performances were recorded. The increment of trapezius muscle activity was dependent on the task used to induce the stress where a higher level of stress made a greater increment. However, this relationship was not found in the other three muscles. Besides that, compared to desktop and laptop use, the lowest activity for all muscles was obtained during the use of a tablet or smart phone. The best net performance was obtained in a comfortable environment. However, during stressful conditions, the best performance can be obtained using the device that a user is most comfortable with or has the most experience with. Different computer products and different levels of stress play a big role in muscle activity during computer work. Both of these factors must be taken into account in order to reduce the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders or problems.

  16. Usability and feasibility of a mobile health system to provide comprehensive antenatal care in low-income countries: PANDA mHealth pilot study in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benski, Anne Caroline; Stancanelli, Giovanna; Scaringella, Stefano; Herinainasolo, Josea Léa; Jinoro, Jéromine; Vassilakos, Pierre; Petignat, Patrick; Schmidt, Nicole C

    2017-06-01

    Background Madagascar's maternal health mortality ratio in 2013 was 478 deaths per 100,000 live births. Most deaths are related to direct complications during pregnancy and childbirth and could be reduced by providing comprehensive antenatal care (ANC). Objective The objective of the study was to assess the usability and feasibility of a mobile health system (mHealth) to provide high-quality ANC, according to World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations. Methods PANDA (Pregnancy And Newborn Diagnostic Assessment) is an easy-to-use mHealth system that uses affordable communications technology to support diagnosis and health care worker decision-making regarding ANC. From January to March 2015, a cross-sectional pilot study was conducted in Ambanja District, Madagascar, in which ANC using PANDA was provided to 100 pregnant women. The collected data were transmitted to a database in the referral hospital to create individual electronic patient records. Accuracy and completeness of the data were closely controlled. The PANDA software was assessed and the number of abnormal results, treatments performed, and participants requiring referral to health care facilities were monitored. Results The PANDA system facilitated creation of individual electronic patient records that included socio-demographic and medical data for 100 participants. Duration of ANC visits averaged 29.6 min. Health care providers were able to collect all variables (100%) describing personal and medical data. No major technical problems were encountered and no data were lost. During 17 ANC visits (17%), an alert function was generated to highlight abnormal clinical results requiring therapy or referral to an affiliated hospital. Participants' acceptability of the system was very high. Conclusion This pilot study proved the usability and feasibility of the PANDA mHealth system to conduct complete and standardised ANC visits according to WHO guidelines, thus providing a promising solution to

  17. Work-related stress in midlife is associated with higher number of mobility limitation in older age-results from the FLAME study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmala, Jenni; Hinrichs, Timo; Törmäkangas, Timo; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B; von Bonsdorff, Monika E; Nygård, Clas-Håkan; Klockars, Matti; Seitsamo, Jorma; Ilmarinen, Juhani; Rantanen, Taina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether work-related stress symptoms in midlife are associated with a number of mobility limitations during three decades from midlife to late life. Data for the study come from the Finnish Longitudinal Study of Municipal Employees (FLAME). The study includes a total of 5429 public sector employees aged 44-58 years at baseline who had information available on work-related stress symptoms in 1981 and 1985 and mobility limitation score during the subsequent 28-year follow-up. Four midlife work-related stress profiles were identified: negative reactions to work and depressiveness, perceived decrease in cognition, sleep disturbances, and somatic symptoms. People with a high number of stress symptoms in 1981 and 1985 were categorized as having constant stress. The number of self-reported mobility limitations was computed based on an eight-item list of mobility tasks presented to the participants in 1992, 1997, and 2009. Data were analyzed using joint Poisson regression models. The study showed that depending on the stress profile, persons suffering from constant stress in midlife had a higher risk of 30-70 % for having one more mobility limitation during the following 28 years compared to persons without stress after adjusting for mortality, several lifestyle factors, and chronic conditions. A less pronounced risk increase (20-40 %) was observed for persons with occasional symptoms. The study suggests that effective interventions aiming to reduce work-related stress should focus on both primary and secondary prevention.

  18. Role of Human Health Care Providers and Medical Treatment Facilities in Military Working Dog Care and Accessibility Difficulties with Military Working Dog Blood Products

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giles Iii, James T

    2016-01-01

    The use of military working dogs (MWDs) in support of military operations has increased dramatically over recent years, as they have proven to be our most reliable deterrent to improvised explosive devices...

  19. jQuery Mobile

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Native apps have distinct advantages, but the future belongs to mobile web apps that function on a broad range of smartphones and tablets. Get started with jQuery Mobile, the touch-optimized framework for creating apps that look and behave consistently across many devices. This concise book provides HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript code examples, screen shots, and step-by-step guidance to help you build a complete working app with jQuery Mobile. If you're already familiar with the jQuery JavaScript library, you can use your existing skills to build cross-platform mobile web apps right now. This b

  20. Mobile Semiotics - signs and mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper is about how to comprehend the mobile condition of contemporary life with a particular view to the signifying dimension of the environment and its ‘readability’. The paper explores the potentials of semiotics and its relationship to the new mobilities literature. The theoretical scope...... is therefore an attempt to mobilize semiotics by drawing on a central body of theory within and adjacent to the discipline. For instance the founding works of C. S. Peirce will be related to the contemporary notions of ‘geosemiotics’ by Scollon & Scollon. The paper’s theoretical claim is that semiotics hold...... a potential for mobilities studies if the awareness of seeing the environment as a semiotic layer and system can be sensitized to the insights of the ‘mobilities turn’. Empirically the paper tentatively explores the usefulness of a mobile semiotics approach to cases such as street signage, airport design...

  1. Mobile phones and mobile communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ling, Richard; Donner, Jonathan

    With staggering swiftness, the mobile phone has become a fixture of daily life in almost every society on earth. In 2007, the world had over 3 billion mobile subscriptions. Prosperous nations boast of having more subscriptions than people. In the developing world, hundreds of millions of people who...... could never afford a landline telephone now have a mobile number of their own. With a mobile in our hand many of us feel safer, more productive, and more connected to loved ones, but perhaps also more distracted and less involved with things happening immediately around us. Written by two leading...... researchers in the field, this volume presents an overview of the mobile telephone as a social and cultural phenomenon. Research is summarized and made accessible though detailed descriptions of ten mobile users from around the world. These illustrate popular debates, as well as deeper social forces at work...

  2. Optimization of ATSC Mobile Handheld Service Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omneya Issa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile TV has become a reality offered on several mobile delivery systems. Among them is the Advanced Television System Committee (ATSC system for mobile and handheld digital television services, known as ATSC Mobile DTV or ATSC M/H, which has moved from standardization to implementation. As the North American broadcast industry is preparing to provide Mobile DTV service to consumers, this work discusses important technical parameters that affect the TV service quality and capacity. Since additional error correction mechanisms were added to overcome mobile transmission problems, the available payload for M/H services is limited. This creates a need to efficiently use the available M/H bandwidth. The paper aims to optimize the Mobile DTV service capacity while maintaining an acceptable perceived quality. It presents tradeoffs between several factors affecting service capacity and signal robustness, which is prominent for designing Mobile TV broadcasting scenarios.

  3. Mobile-to-mobile wireless channels

    CERN Document Server

    Zajic, Alenka

    2013-01-01

    Present-day mobile communications systems can be classified as fixed-to-mobile because they allow mobility on only one end (e.g. the mobile phone to a fixed mobile operator's cell tower). In answer to the consumer demand for better coverage and quality of service, emerging mobile-to-mobile (M-to-M) communications systems allow mobile users or vehicles to directly communicate with each other. This practical book provides a detailed introduction to state-of-the-art M-to-M wireless propagation. Moreover, the book offers professionals guidance for rapid implementation of these communications syste

  4. Editorial: Mobile (March 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kunz

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Open source software and hardware has become an accepted way of developing new and interesting applications in many information and communication technology domains: operating systems, databases, Web infrastructure, and applications. It's not surprising that with the increasing popularity of mobile handheld devices, users and researchers have explored the power of open approaches to providing innovative new applications and services in this domain. However, unlike personal computers and the Internet, mobile handsets were tightly controlled by mobile network operators (MNOs who developed a vertical ecosystem by integrating the communication infrastructure, the handheld device hardware, and often the applications installed on those devices. The software and protocols running the mobile communications infrastructure and devices are often standardized by membership-only bodies, where large MNOs and manufacturers have a predominant influence. These players invest significant financial resources into shaping the industry along their vision to gain a competitive advantage. A current example is the ongoing battle about the dominant radio access technology for 4G cellular systems: LTE vs. Wimax. These trends have changed recently. Companies such as Google, Nokia, or Openmoko and Industry Alliances such as the Open Handset Alliance are providing the core building blocks, both in hardware as well as software, of increasingly open mobile devices. This issue of the OSBR reviews the relevant trends in the open mobile platform space from a number of perspectives. As the articles in these issue show, there is a lot of exciting ongoing work that brings the power of open source development to the mobile space. This trend is not just confined to the mobile devices as there are also efforts in the development of open mobile infrastructure elements and whole systems.

  5. Mental Health Care Providers' Views of Their Work with Consumers and Their Reports of Recovery-Orientation, Job Satisfaction, and Personal Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Lawrence A; Stein, Catherine H

    2016-10-01

    The research examined the role of mental health care providers' perceptions of their professional relationships with consumers in understanding their reports of agency recovery-oriented services and their own sense of job satisfaction and personal growth. Multidisciplinary community mental health care providers (N = 105) responded to an online self-report questionnaire. Providers' reports of higher levels of working alliance and greater provider directiveness in working with consumers was significantly related to providers' reports of higher levels of agency recovery-orientation and higher levels of personal growth. Providers' reports of working alliance accounted for the largest proportion of variance in providers' reports of job satisfaction. Mental health providers' perceptions of relationships with consumers are central to understanding providers' views of agency recovery-orientation and sense of professional and personal well-being.

  6. Mobilizing Older Adults: Harnessing the Potential of Smart Home Technologies. Contribution of the IMIA Working Group on Smart Homes and Ambient Assisted Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, G; Thompson, H J

    2012-01-01

    This paper highlights the potential of smart home applications to not only assess mobility determinants for older adults in the home environment but also provide the opportunity for tailored interventions. We present a theoretical framework for assessing mobility parameters and utilizing this information to enable behavior change based on the Health Belief Model. We discuss examples that showcase the potential of smart home systems to not only measure but also improve mobility for community dwelling older adults. Mobility is a complex construct that cannot be addressed with a single monitoring approach or a single intervention. Instead, tailored interventions that address specific needs and behaviors of individuals and take into consideration preferences of older adults and potentially their social network are needed to effectively enforce positive behavior change. Smart home systems have the ability to capture details of one's daily living that could otherwise not be easily obtained; however, such data repositories alone are not sufficient to improve clinical outcomes if appropriate mechanisms for data mining and analysis, as well as tailored response systems are not in place. Unleashing the potential of smart home applications to measure and improve mobility has the potential of transforming elder care and providing potentially cost-effective tools to support independence for older adults. A technologically driven smart home application can maximize its clinical relevance by pursuing interactive features that can lead to behavior change.

  7. Perspectives of school-work transitions among youth with spina bifida, their parents and health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sally; McPherson, Amy C; Maxwell, Joanne

    2017-04-01

    Purpose Youth with disabilities encounter many challenges in finding employment and transitioning to post-secondary education. In this article, we explore the nature of school-work transitions for youth with spina bifida, which few studies have previously addressed. Method We conducted in-depth interviews with 44 participants (nine youth and 12 young adults with spina bifida, 11 parents and 12 clinicians). We analyzed our data using a qualitative content analysis approach. Results We identified several enablers to school-work transitions, including professional support, social support and school accommodations. Lacking such support created several challenges for youth with spina bifida. We also identified several barriers to school-work transitions, including lack of education and information on finances, housing and transportation; discrimination and stigma; and challenges coping with spina bifida at school and work. Conclusions Although some supports are available, youth with spina bifida encounter many challenges in transitioning to post-secondary education and employment. With clinicians at the helm, efforts should be put in place within the health and social services system to better prepare youth, as they transition to adulthood, to become connected to appropriate information and resources to help them to succeed in their school and employment goals. Implications for Rehabilitation Youth with spina bifida encounter many challenges in transitioning to post-secondary education or work. Clinicians, educators and parents should continue to support youth with spina bifida in choosing their vocations, setting career goals and developing career plans. Starting from a young age, parents, clinicians and educators should help youth with spina bifida prepare for school work transitions by fostering their independence, life skills and self-management of spina bifida-related symptoms. Clinicians and educators should help connect youth with spina bifida to appropriate

  8. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Wind, Simon

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we identify the nexus between design (architecture, urban design, service design, etc.) and mobilities as a new and emerging research field. In this paper, we apply a “situational mobilities” perspective and take point of departure in the pragmatist question: “What design decisions...... and interventions affords this particular mobile situation?” The paper presents the contours of an emerging research agenda within mobilities research. The advent of “mobilities design” as an emerging research field points towards a critical interest in the material as well as practical consequences of contemporary......-making. The paper proposes that increased understanding of the material affordances facilitated through design provides important insight to planning and policymaking that at times might be in risk of becoming too detached from the everyday life of the mobile subject within contemporary mobilities landscapes....

  9. Total hip arthroplasty using a cementless dual-mobility cup provides increased stability and favorable gait parameters at five years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, A; Fischer, J-F; Aminian, K; Lécureux, E; Jolles, B M

    2017-02-01

    Rates of dislocation following primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) vary from 0.5 to 10%. Dual-mobility cups in THA demonstrate increased stability. Clinical outcomes following THA with dual-mobility cups have been reported, but gait has not been assessed. Therefore we performed a retrospective case control study to answer: (1) is gait better in patients following THA with a dual-mobility cup than in frail, elderly patients of the same age? (2) Are clinical outcomes better in patients following THA with a dual-mobility cup than in frail, elderly patients? (3) What is the dislocation rate following THA with a dual-mobility cup? We hypothesized that patients who underwent THA with a dual-mobility cup have a better gait compared to frail, elderly patients of the same age. Twenty patients (22 hips), mean age 79.9±7.7 (range, 62.3-88.3) years were assessed in this retrospective case-control series 5.6±1.4 (range: 4.1-8.8) years following dual-mobility cup THA. A reference group consisted of 72 "frail elderly" patients in a rehabilitation hospital for health problems unrelated to the lower limb, with no lower limb surgery or neurological conditions. Temporal and spatial gait performance were measured with four miniature gyroscopes, mounted on each thigh and calf, while patients walked freely along a 30m corridor. Harris Hip Score, WOMAC, radiological outcomes, and dislocation rate were determined. All gait parameters were better in the dual-mobility group compared to the frail elderly group. The dual-mobility group had a higher cadence (100.3 steps/minute versus 75.6 steps/minute), shorter (relative to gait cycle time) stance (61.6% versus 67.8%), shorter (relative to gait cycle time) double stance (23.3% versus 36.0%), longer stride (1.13m versus 0.80m), and faster walking speed (0.96m/s versus 0.52m/s). Range of motion of the shank, thigh and knee were better in the dual-mobility group. Harris Hip Score was 87.6±13.9 (range 51-100) and WOMAC score was 11.3±12

  10. Exploring the Evolution of New Mobile Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and widespread use of mobile Internet technology has led to many different kinds of new mobile communications services, such as WeChat. Users could have more choices when attempting to satisfy their communications needs. The ability to predict the way in which users will use new mobile communications services is extremely valuable to mobile communications service providers. In this work, we propose a method for predicting how a user will use a new mobile service. Our scheme is inspired by the evolutionary game theory. With large-scale real world datasets collected from mobile service providers, we first extract the benefit-related features for users who were starting to use a new mobile service. Then we design our training and prediction methods for predicting potential users. We evaluate our scheme using experiments with large-scale real data. The results show that our approach can predict users’ future behavior with satisfying accuracy.

  11. Connecting with the World of Work: Horizontal Accountability Processes in Institutions Providing Vocational Education and Training (VET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooge, Edith

    2015-01-01

    In VET systems, connectivity with the world of work has been on the agenda for many years: for Western and Southern European countries, since the 1980s as a consequence of the 1973 oil crisis, and then for Central and Eastern European countries, since the early 1990s. In the last few decades, awareness has grown that European prosperity depended…

  12. Barriers and Facilitators for the Use of a Medical Mobile App to Prevent Work-Related Risks in Pregnancy: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velu, Adeline V; van Beukering, Monique Dm; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; Frings-Dresen, Monique Hw; Mol, Ben Wj; van der Post, Joris Am; Kok, Marjolein

    2017-08-22

    The number of women participating in the labor market in Europe has increased over the last several decades. At the same time, there is growing evidence that certain conditions of employment during pregnancy may have a negative influence on pregnancy outcomes. In order to better inform pregnant women, we aim to develop an app to help assess the health risk as a result of personal and work-related factors and provide personal advice for these women and their health care providers. The aim of this study was to compose a thematic overview of the perceived facilitators and barriers according to pregnant women, medical professionals, and employers for the use of a mobile app in obstetrical care to prevent occupational-related pregnancy complications. Two multidisciplinary focus group meetings with in total 14 participants were conducted with pregnant women, occupational physicians, general practitioners, midwives, obstetricians, and representatives of trade unions and employer organizations. Transcripts were analyzed by qualitatively coding procedures and constant comparative methods. We identified 24 potential facilitators and 12 potential barriers for the use of the app in 4 categories: content of the app, the app as a mean to provide information, ease of use, and external factors. The 3 main facilitators identified were the need for a good interaction between the app and the user, apps were viewed as a more practical source of information, and the information should be understandable, according to the existing guidelines, and well-dosed. The 2 main barriers for use were extensive battery and memory use of the smartphone and sending frequent push notifications. The results of this study are important considerations in the developing process of a medical app implementing a guideline or evidence-based information in practice.

  13. Educational Needs of Health Care Providers Working in Long-Term Care Facilities with Regard to Pain Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Tousignant-Laflamme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of chronic pain ranges from 40% to 80% in long-term care facilities (LTCF, with the highest proportion being found among older adults and residents with dementia. Unfortunately, pain in older adults is underdiagnosed, undertreated, inadequately treated or not treated at all. A solution to this problem would be to provide effective and innovative interdisciplinary continuing education to health care providers (HCPs.

  14. Intensive mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannini, Phillip; Bissell, David; Jensen, Ole B.

    which relate to transport, housing and employment. Yet we argue that the experiential dimensions of long distance mobilities have not received the attention that they deserve within geographical research on mobilities. This paper combines ideas from mobilities research and contemporary social theory......This paper explores the intensities of long distance commuting journeys as a way of exploring how bodily sensibilities are being changed by the mobilities that they undertake. The context of this paper is that many people are travelling further to work than ever before owing to a variety of factors...... with fieldwork conducted in Canada, Denmark and Australia to develop our understanding of the experiential politics of long distance workers. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions of this experience...

  15. The effects of a mobile stress management protocol on nurses working with cancer patients: a preliminary controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Daniela; Grassi, Alessandra; Cognetta, Chiara; Cipresso, Pietro; Toniolo, Davide; Riva, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Oncology nurses face extraordinary stresses that may lead to emotional exhaustion, a feeling of emotional distance from patients and burnout. The presentation describes the preliminary results of a study to test the effects of an innovative 4-week 8-session self-help stress management training for oncology nurses supported by mobile tools (Nokia N70 smarthphone). The sample included 16 female oncology nurses with permanent status employed in different oncology hospitals in Milan, Italy. The study used a between-subjects design, comparing the experimental condition (mobile phone stress management protocol) with a control group (neutral videos through mobile phones). In addition to a significant reduction in anxiety state at the end of each session, the experimental group demonstrated a significant improvement in affective change in terms of anxiety trait reduction and coping skills acquisition at the end of the protocol.

  16. Noise exposure during prehospital emergency physicians work on Mobile Emergency Care Units and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mads Christian Tofte; Schmidt, Jesper Hvass; Brøchner, Anne C; Johansen, Jakob Kjersgaard; Zwisler, Stine; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2017-12-06

    Prehospital personnel are at risk of occupational hearing loss due to high noise exposure. The aim of the study was to establish an overview of noise exposure during emergency responses in Mobile Emergency Care Units (MECU), ambulances and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS). A second objective was to identify any occupational hearing loss amongst prehospital personnel. Noise exposure during work in the MECU and HEMS was measured using miniature microphones worn laterally to the auditory canals or within the earmuffs of the helmet. All recorded sounds were analysed in proportion to a known tone of 94 dB. Before and after episodes of noise exposure, the physicians underwent a hearing test indicating whether the noise had had any impact on the function of the outer sensory hair cells. This was accomplished by measuring the amplitude level shifts of the Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions. Furthermore, the prehospital personnels' hearing was investigated using pure-tone audiometry to reveal any occupational hearing loss. All prehospital personnel were compared to ten in-hospital controls. Our results indicate high-noise exposure levels of ≥80 dB(A) during use of sirens on the MECU and during HEMS operations compared to in-hospital controls (70 dB(A)). We measured an exposure up to ≥90 dB(A) under the helmet for HEMS crew. No occupational hearing loss was identified with audiometry. A significant level shift of the Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions at 4 kHz for HEMS crew compared to MECU physicians was found indicating that noise affected the outer hair cell function of the inner ear, thus potentially reducing the hearing ability of the HEMS crew. Further initiatives to prevent noise exposure should be taken, such as active noise reduction or custom-made in-ear protection with communication system for HEMS personnel. Furthermore, better insulation of MECU and ambulances is warranted. We found that the exposure levels exceeded the

  17. Tablet-based Field Work: Opportunities and Challenges of Mobile Learning for Geography Education. GI_Forum 2014 – Geospatial Innovation for Society|

    OpenAIRE

    Fögele, Janis; Hofmann, Romy

    2014-01-01

    Our daily lives are increasingly dominated by new technology. 90% of youngsters between the ages of 14-19 years use mobile phones and the internet several times a week and thus develop their own images of the world. A responsible school has to address this development as well as other current social developments. For geography education in particular, field work is considered beneficial in developing students’ spatial orientation. Experiencing the world “outside” extends many facts that one l...

  18. MOBILITY: A SYSTEMS APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola I. Striuk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study on the problem of mobility in the socio-educational and technical systems was carried out: the evolution of the concept of mobility in scientific sources of XIX–XXI centuries was analyzed and the new sources on the issue of mobility introduced into scientific circulation, the interrelation of the types of mobility in the socio-pedagogical and technical systems are theoretically grounded, an integrative model of mobility in the information society is proposed. The major trends in academic mobility are identified (the transition from student mobility to mobility programs and educational services providers, the new mobility programs (franchising, double/joint degrees, combinations, nostrification etc. are characterized. The new types of mobility providers are reviewed and attention is focused on virtual universities that are now the basis of virtual mobility of students and activities which are based on the use of new ICT in higher education, especially – the Internet and mobile learning environments.

  19. Vulnerability and Agency: Beyond an Irreconcilable Dichotomy for Social Service Providers Working with Young Refugees in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Higgins, Aoife

    2012-01-01

    Many young refugees face significant difficulties in securing support from social services providers. This study invited 21 young refugees aged 16 to 21 to take part in focus groups and follow-up interviews about their experiences of accessing this support. The findings reveal that young refugees may deliberately conform to expectations about…

  20. Family child care providers' self-perceived role in obesity prevention: working with children, parents, and external influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Crowley, Angela A; Curry, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    To describe the perspective and strategies of family child care providers (FCCPs) to reduce children's suboptimal weight trajectories. In-person, in-depth interviews with FCCPs. Family child care homes. Seventeen FCCPs caring for children 6 weeks to 9 years old; 94% caring for children paying with a state subsidy. Strategies of FCCP to reduce children's suboptimal weight trajectories. Constant comparative method of qualitative data analysis. Family child care providers described 3 core strategies: (1) improving children's behavior, (2) engaging and educating parents, and (3) leveraging influences external to their relationship with parents to effect positive change and to avoid parental conflict. These strategies were framed within their knowledge of child development, parental communication, and community services. The findings suggest that FCCPs' role in obesity prevention may be framed within knowledge that may be commonly expected of a child care provider. Partnerships between public health policy makers and FCCP may reduce obesigenic environments by employing training and resources that link obesity prevention and child care provider expertise. Copyright © 2013 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluating Students' Perception of Group Work for Mobile Application Development Learning, Productivity, Enjoyment and Confidence in Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Loreen M.; Wimmer, Hayden

    2016-01-01

    Teaching programming and mobile application development concepts can be challenging for instructors; however, teaching an interdisciplinary class with varied skill levels amplifies this challenge. To encompass a broad range of students, many instructors have sought to improve their lessons and methods by experimenting with group/team programming.…

  2. Attractiveness of Vocational Education and Training: Permeability Successful School-to-Work Transitions and International Mobility. Selected Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linten, Markus, Comp.; Prustel, Sabine, Comp.; Woll, Christian, Comp.; Roth, Uta, Comp.; Wurdak, Alix, Comp.

    2014-01-01

    This bibliography covers the topics of international mobility, transfer and transitions in TVET, and their role in increasing its attractiveness. It features the range of currently available literature such as articles, books, government reports, UN agency documents, donor community documents, research theses, and other sources published in the…

  3. Following the call: how providers make sense of their decisions to work in faith-based and secular urban community health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curlin, Farr A; Serrano, Karen D; Baker, Matthew G; Carricaburu, Sarah L; Smucker, Douglas R; Chin, Marshall H

    2006-11-01

    We interviewed 49 health care providers from 6 faith-based and 4 secular community health centers (CHCs) to explore the ways they relate their religious commitments to practice among the underserved. Interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed for emergent themes through an iterative process of textual analysis. Providers in faith-based CHCs explained the decision to work in underserved settings as a response to a religious calling to medicine as a means of ministry, and by reference to particular benefits and freedoms of working with colleagues who share an explicitly faith-informed vision for care of the underserved. Most providers from secular CHCs explained their motivations in less religious terms by reference to intrinsic rewards such as "making a difference" for the underserved. Providers from both settings emphasized the frustrations and difficulties of meeting overwhelming demands with inadequate resources. In light of prior literature regarding work orientation, our findings suggest that CHCs may provide distinctive opportunities for intrinsically motivated providers to craft their work into a calling, where a calling is understood as a deeply felt motivation for work that goes beyond the satisfaction of the worker's material and social needs. Faith-based CHCs appear to provide a context that is attractive to some minority of providers who desire to enact a religious calling to ministry through the practice of medicine. Future studies are needed to test these hypotheses using quantitative methods and broader representative sampling.

  4. Comparison of the Effectiveness of a Mobile Phone-based Education Program in Educating Mothers as Oral Health Providers in Two Regions of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKlayb, Saleh Ali; Assery, Mansour K; AlQahtani, AlJohara; AlAnazi, Madawy; Pani, Sharat Chandra

    2017-01-01

    The penetration of mobile phone devices is widespread across the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Recently, there has been evidence of the success of phone-based applications in the provision of preventive oral health care to children and their parents. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a mobile phone-based application in educating mothers of children aged below 6 years of age in preventive dental care. A mobile phone-based application (iTeethey™) was developed for iPhone and Android and made freely available on Google Play and App Store. The application was then distributed to 3879 mothers of children below 6 years of age (1989 in Riyadh Region and 1890 in Najran region). The mothers were subjected to a standardized knowledge attitude and practice of oral hygiene questionnaire before being asked to download the application. A total of 1055 mothers who downloaded the application completed 3-month recall process. Significant improvement in the knowledge of the mothers was reported after the use of the application from both regions. The mothers from Najran showed significantly greater improvement in knowledge when compared to the mothers from Riyadh region. The application was also more effective in mothers with more than one child when compared to first-time mothers. Within the limitations of this study, we can state that the mobile phone application used in this study significantly improves the knowledge of mothers toward their child's oral health.

  5. Mobile MyPlate: A Pilot Study Using Text Messaging to Provide Nutrition Education and Promote Better Dietary Choices in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Onikia N.; O'Connor, Lauren E.; Savaiano, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the acceptance and effectiveness of repetitive nutrition-related text messages on college students' nutrition knowledge and fruit and vegetable consumption. Participants: One hundred fifty undergraduate (18-24 years old) non-health major students with a texting mobile phone. Methods: The intervention group received biweekly…

  6. Systematic review on what works, what does not work and why of implementation of mobile health (mHealth) projects in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Aranda-Jan, Clara B; Mohutsiwa-Dibe, Neo; Loukanova, Svetla

    2014-01-01

    Background Access to mobile phone technology has rapidly expanded in developing countries. In Africa, mHealth is a relatively new concept and questions arise regarding reliability of the technology used for health outcomes. This review documents strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) of mHealth projects in Africa. Methods A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature on mHealth projects in Africa, between 2003 and 2013, was carried out using PubMed and OvidSP. Data was syn...

  7. Mobile Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitzek, Frank; Katz, Marcos

    networks, creating a vast fertile ground for novel developments in both research and practical applications Considers research directions, emerging trends and visions This book is an excellent resource for wireless/networking researchers in industry and academia, students and mobile phone programmers...... users in very different ways and for various purposes. The book provides many stimulating examples of resource-sharing applications. Enabling technologies for mobile clouds are also discussed, highlighting the key role of network coding. Mobile clouds have the potential to enhance communications...... examples of mobile clouds applications, based on both existing commercial initiatives as well as proof-of-concept test-beds. Visions and prospects are also discussed, paving the way for further development. As mobile networks and social networks become more and more reliant on each other, the concept...

  8. Usability and Workflow Evaluation of "RhEumAtic Disease activitY" (READY). A Mobile Application for Rheumatology Patients and Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Po-Yin; Lara, Barbara; Lopetegui, Marcelo; Bharat, Aseem; Ardoin, Stacy; Johnson, Bernadette; Mathur, Puneet; Embi, Peter J; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2016-11-02

    RhEumAtic Disease activitY (READY) is a mobile health (mHealth) application that aims to create a shared platform integrating data from both patients and physicians, with a particular emphasis on arthritis disease activity. We made READY available on an iPad and pilot implemented it at a rheumatology outpatient clinic. We conducted 1) a usability evaluation study to explore patients' and physicians' interactions with READY, and 2) a time motion study (TMS) to observe the clinical workflow before and after the implementation. A total of 33 patients and 15 physicians participated in the usability evaluation. We found usability problems in navigation, data entry, pain assessment, documentation, and instructions along with error messages. Despite these issues, 25 (75,76%) patients reported they liked READY. Physicians provided mixed feedback because they were concerned about the impact of READY on clinical workflow. Six physicians participated in the TMS. We observed 47 patient visits (44.72 hours) in the pre-implementation phase, and 42 patient visits (37.82 hours) in the post-implementation phase. We found that patients spent more time on READY than paper (4.39mins vs. 2.26mins), but overall, READY did not delay the workflow (pre = 52.08 mins vs. post = 45.46 mins). This time difference may be compensated with READY eliminating a workflow step for the staff. Patients preferred READY to paper documents. Many found it easier to input information because of the larger font size and the ease of 'tapping' rather than writing-out or circling answers. Even though patients spent more time on READY than using paper documents, the longer usage of READY was mainly due to when troubleshooting was needed. Most patients did not have problems after receiving initial support from the staff. This study not only enabled improvements to the software but also serves as good reference for other researchers or institutional decision makers who are interested in implementing such a

  9. Understanding the mobile money ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobbin, P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the structure of the new mobile money ecosystem and the roles of its key players. Mobile money is an evolving sector both in volume and in economic impact especially in the developing world. The paper is an exploratory study that investigates the structure of the ecosystem......, providing a foundation for future strategic analysis of the system. We adopt a theoretical insight from Moore's business ecosystem theory to explain the key roles of the actors in the mobile money ecosystem. And also draw extensively from the work of Iansiti and Levien to explain the best strategies...

  10. Measurement of mobile antenna systems

    CERN Document Server

    Arai, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    If you're involved with the design, installation or maintenance of mobile antenna systems, this thoroughly revised and updated edition of a classic Artech book offers you the most current and comprehensive coverage of all the mandatory measurement techniques you need for your work in the field. This Second Edition presents critical new material in key areas, including radiation efficiency measurement, mobile phone usage position, and MIMO (multiple-input/multiple-output) antennas.This unique resource provides in-depth examinations of all relevant mobile antenna measurement theories, along with

  11. Use of mobile phones and cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayanda, Olushola S; Baba, Alafara A; Ayanda, Omolola T

    2012-01-01

    Mobile phones work by transmitting and receiving radio frequency microwave radiation. The radio frequency (RF) emitted by mobile phones is stronger than FM radio signal which are known to cause cancer. Though research and evidence available on the risk of cancer by mobile phones does not provide a clear and direct support that mobile phones cause cancers. Evidence does not also support an association between exposure to radio frequency and microwave radiation from mobile phones and direct effects on health. It is however clear that lack of available evidence of cancer as regards the use of mobile phone should not be interpreted as proof of absence of cancer risk, so that excessive use of mobile phones should be taken very seriously and with caution to prevent cancer.

  12. Scenarios of Use for Sociable Mobile TV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorianopoulos, Konstantinos

    Mobile TVs have been available for many years, without ever becoming very popular. Moreover, the first wave of research has been mostly concerned with technology and standards, which are necessary to ensure interoperability and market acceptance. Although, there has been a significant body of computer-supported co-operative work (CSCW) and mobile human-computer interaction (HCI) research findings, there is limited investigation in the context of leisure activities, such as TV. In this article, we propose three concepts that drive the main paths for research and practice in mobile and social TV: (1) Mobile TV as a content format, (2) Mobile TV as user behavior, and (3) Mobile TV as interaction terminal. Finally, we provide particular directions to be considered in further research in social and mobile TV.

  13. ESTERASE ACTIVITY AMONG PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL DISEASES WORKING AT THE PLANTS PROVIDING STORAGE AND DISPOSAL OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Fomichev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that exposure to organophosphates (OPs is associated with increased frequency of gastrointestinal diseases. In order to evaluate the effect of dysfunction of detoxification system on the development of gastrointestinal pathology, we studied «esterase status» (activity of acetylcholinesterase, butyrylcholinesterase and paraoxonase 1 (PON1 among workers at the plants providing storage and disposal of OPs. The enzymatic activity of PON1 was significantly increased in individuals who had prolonged direct contact with the OPs. It was shown that among all gastrointestinal diseases included in this study PON1 activity was increased in patients with chronic esophagitis and chronic gastritis as compared to workers without gastrointestinal diseases (p<0.05, so and with diseased workers who had no direct contact with OPs (p<0.05. Thus, changes in PON1 activity may contribute to development of the gastrointestinal pathology among persons having direct contact with OPs. 

  14. Mobile video with mobile IPv6

    CERN Document Server

    Minoli, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Increased reliance on mobile devices and streaming of video content are two of the most recent changes that have led those in the video distribution industry to be concerned about the shifting or erosion of traditional advertising revenues. Infrastructure providers also need to position themselves to take advantage of these trends. Mobile Video with Mobile IPv6provides an overview of the current mobile landscape, then delves specifically into the capabilities and operational details of IPv6. The book also addresses 3G and 4G services, the application of Mobile IPv6 to streaming and other mobil

  15. Le « mobile working » : De nouvelles perspectives sur les lieux et les formes du télétravail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane-Gabrielle Tremblay

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Le télétravail suscite de plus en plus d’intérêt depuis quelques années, notamment en Europe, depuis la Commission européenne a adopté un accord-cadre sur le télétravail en 2002. Les résultats présentés ici sont issus d’une enquête menée en Belgique, dans une grande organisation du domaine des technologies de l’information. L’enquête porte en fait sur le « mobile working », soit une définition un peu plus large que celle souvent retenue pour le télétravail. Ici, on inclut la possibilité que les télétravailleurs travaillent chez le client, à l’hôtel et en nombre d’endroits, et l’on s’est intéressé entre autres aux enchaînements de lieux de travail que vivent ces populations, ce qui représente d’ailleurs une des originalités de la recherche. Ceci est particulièrement intéressant en effet puisque l’on considère que le travail mobile (en divers lieux a eu tendance à s’accroître au cours des dernières années, mais que peu d’enquêtes ont permis d’en mesurer aussi précisément le contenu, les enchaînements de lieux de travail, les sources de satisfaction et d’insatisfaction, ce qui est fait ici.Telework has been the object of more and more interest over recent years, especially in Europe, since the European commission has adopted a general agreement on telework in 2002. The results presented here are from a research conducted in a large organization of information technology in Belgium. The research was actually conducted on the issue of ‘mobile working’, a concept which is somewhat larger than traditional forms of telework, and includes working in the clients’ offices, in hotels and elsewhere; the research studied in detail the succession of working places that mobile workers encounter, which is one of the important originalities of the research. This is particularly interesting since it is considered that mobile work has increased over recent years but few surveys have

  16. Mobile platform security

    CERN Document Server

    Asokan, N; Dmitrienko, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Recently, mobile security has garnered considerable interest in both the research community and industry due to the popularity of smartphones. The current smartphone platforms are open systems that allow application development, also for malicious parties. To protect the mobile device, its user, and other mobile ecosystem stakeholders such as network operators, application execution is controlled by a platform security architecture. This book explores how such mobile platform security architectures work. We present a generic model for mobile platform security architectures: the model illustrat

  17. WhichWayNC: A Model for Mobile Media Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Meredith D.

    2015-01-01

    This student newsroom ethnography examines the emergent culture and values of a group-created news and information content with a mobile-first focus. Using semi-structured interviews from 12 participants working on a mobile-optimized summer news project, the study provides insights on the work practices of the digital student newsroom. Validated…

  18. Head First Mobile Web

    CERN Document Server

    Gardner, Lyza; Grigsby, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Despite the huge number of mobile devices and apps in use today, your business still needs a website. You just need it to be mobile. Head First Mobile Web walks you through the process of making a conventional website work on a variety smartphones and tablets. Put your JavaScript, CSS media query, and HTML5 skills to work-then optimize your site to perform its best in the demanding mobile market. Along the way, you'll discover how to adapt your business strategy to target specific devices. Navigate the increasingly complex mobile landscapeTake both technical and strategic approaches to mobile

  19. Integrated risk management for improving internal traffic control, work-zone safety, and mobility during major construction : tech transfer summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Construction work zones are among the most dangerous places to work in any industry in the world. This is because many factors in construction, such as constant change in working environments and driver errors, contribute to a workplace with a higher...

  20. Individual mobility: issues and assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Center for Technology, Policy and Industrial Development, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Problems relating to mobility will intensify in developing countries due to explosive growth in motorization. In the Western countries, individual travel needs will change as a result of demographics (e.g. an increase in the elderly population, working women and single person households), and new information and communication technology. Increased congestion and global warming are the principal concerns that impact mobility. To respond to these concerns, significant mobility improvements can be realized by replicating successful mobility strategies that have been implemented in some cities throughout the world. However, a more fundamental reappraisal will be necessary that considers mobility in an overall sustainability context. Intelligent transportation systems (ITS) may provide a framework for a new mobility infrastructure that enables implementation of a dynamic transportation system. Such a system can adapt on a real-time basis to customer needs and social concerns. ITS enables pricing and control strategies to be more easily utilized on an episodic basis. Development of a rational approach to sustainable mobility requires the public and private sectors as well as various stakeholders to develop a shared vision of the future, since mobility goes beyond national and competitive interests. (author) 3 figs.

  1. A Distributed Network Mobility Management Scheme for Hierarchical Mobile IPv6 Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Keita; Kinoshita, Kazuhiko; Yamai, Nariyoshi

    Route optimization for network mobility is a key technique for providing a node in a mobile network (Mobile Network Node or MNN) with high quality broadband communications. Many schemes adding route optimization function to Network Mobility (NEMO) Basic Support protocol, the standardized network mobility management protocol from the IETF nemo working group, have already been proposed in recent years. One such scheme, a scheme using Hierarchical Mobile IPv6 (HMIPv6) aims to overcome micromobility management issues as well by applying a mechanism based on HMIPv6. The traditional scheme, however, suffers from a significant number of signaling messages as the number of MNNs and/or the number of their Correspondent Nodes (CNs) increase, because many messages notifying the MNNs' Home Agents (HAMNNs) and the CNs of the mobile network's movement are generated simultaneously each time the mobile network moves to the domain of another micromobility management router (Mobility Anchor Point or MAP). This paper proposes a scheme to overcome this problem. Our scheme reduces the number of signaling messages generated at the same time by managing the mobility of MNNs using multiple MAPs distributed within a network for load sharing. The results of simulation experiments show that our scheme works efficiently compared to the traditional scheme when a mobile network has many MNNs and/or these MNNs communicate with many CNs.

  2. 20 CFR 645.225 - How do Welfare-to-Work activities relate to activities provided through TANF and other related...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... coordinated effectively at the State and local levels with activities being provided through TANF (section 403..., prior work experience, employability, and other relevant information in place for each WtW participant... employment service, private sector employers, labor organizations, business and trade associations, education...

  3. Investigating the anatomy of the helping relationship in the context of psychiatric rehabilitation: the relation between working alliance, providers' recovery competencies and personal recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Galia; Mashiach-Eizenberg, Michal; Roe, David; Berman, Yael; Shalev, Anat; Kaplan, Zeev; Garber Epstein, Paula

    2014-12-15

    Professional helping relationships established with mental health consumers are vital in mental health recovery processes. However, little is known about how the constructs of alliance building and providers' recovery promoting strategies relate to each other and play a role in supporting recovery. To this end, we examined associations between consumer-reported working alliance, perceived providers' recovery competencies, and personal recovery. In a cross-sectional study design, 72 mental health consumers who established relationships with providers through a psycho-educational intervention over a period of 10 months in hourly weekly sessions were examined as part of a larger study conducted in mental health community settings in Israel. Participants filled in the Working Alliance Inventory (Tracey and Kokotovic, 1989), the Recovery Promoting Relationships Scale (Russinova et al., 2013), and Recovery Assessment Scale (Corrigan et al., 2004). Pearson correlations and linear regression analysis showed positive correlations between relational variables and recovery. A mediating model was identified whereby providers' recovery strategies positively impact the working alliance, which, in turn, positively impact consumers' recovery. Implications of the current study for future research and clinical practice are discussed, emphasizing the importance of examining recovery strategies and the working alliance with regard to the process of mental health recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mobile healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Stephen A; Agee, Nancy Howell

    2012-01-01

    Mobile technology's presence in healthcare has exploded over the past five years. The increased use of mobile devices by all segments of the US population has driven healthcare systems, providers, and payers to accept this new form of communication and to develop strategies to implement and leverage the use of mobile healthcare (mHealth) within their organizations and practices. As healthcare systems move toward a more value-driven model of care, patient centeredness and engagement are the keys to success. Mobile healthcare will provide the medium to allow patients to participate more in their care. Financially, mHealth brings to providers the ability to improve efficiency and deliver savings to both them and the healthcare consumer. However, mHealth is not without challenges. Healthcare IT departments have been reluctant to embrace this shift in technology without fully addressing security and privacy concerns. Providers have been hesitant to adopt mHealth as a form of communication with patients because it breaks with traditional models. Our healthcare system has just started the journey toward the development of mHealth. We offer an overview of the mobile healthcare environment and our approach to solving the challenges it brings to healthcare organizations.

  5. Next generation mobile broadcasting

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Barquero, David

    2013-01-01

    Next Generation Mobile Broadcasting provides an overview of the past, present, and future of mobile multimedia broadcasting. The first part of the book-Mobile Broadcasting Worldwide-summarizes next-generation mobile broadcasting technologies currently available. This part covers the evolutions of the Japanese mobile broadcasting standard ISDB-T One-Seg, ISDB-Tmm and ISDB-TSB; the evolution of the South Korean T-DMB mobile broadcasting technology AT-DMB; the American mobile broadcasting standard ATSC-M/H; the Chinese broadcasting technologies DTMB and CMMB; second-generation digital terrestrial

  6. Advocating for schools to provide effective HIV and sexuality education: a case study in how social service organizations working in coalition can (and should) affect sustained policy change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogusky, Jeremy; Tenner, Adam

    2010-05-01

    Advocates believed that to slow an expanding HIV/ AIDS epidemic in Washington, D.C., a local effort could ensure that HIV prevention was brought to scale. Schools were chosen as the focus and a new coalition advocated for the city government to pass new academic standards for health education. HIV and sex education policies had not been revised in more than 12 years and HIV education in D.C. public schools varied greatly in quality. Metro TeenAIDS (MTA), a traditional social service organization with no real history of advocacy work, reached only 10% of D.C. adolescents with critical HIV/AIDS prevention information. Clearly, to make a sustained impact, system change was necessary. After deciding to pursue a campaign focused on updating health education policy and creating standards, MTA convened a variety of reproductive health, adolescent medicine, and other organizations to establish the DC Healthy Youth Coalition. The Coalition used three complementary strategies to achieve campaign goals: mobilizing grassroots community support, involving parents in the discussion, and educating city leaders. By building an alliance of social service organizations and influencing critical public policy, the coalition ensured that new educational standards were passed.

  7. Exploring Working Relationships in Mental Health Care via an E-Recovery Portal: Qualitative Study on the Experiences of Service Users and Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Monica; Gammon, Deede; Eng, Lillian Sofie; Ruland, Cornelia

    2017-11-14

    The quality of working relationships between service users and health providers is fundamental in the processes of recovery in mental health. How Internet-based interventions will influence these relationships for persons with long-term care needs, and the measures that can be taken to maintain and enhance working relationships through Internet, is still not well understood. The aim of this study was to gain insights into how service users and health providers experience their working relationships when they are offered the option of supplementing ongoing collaboration with an e-recovery portal. In this exploratory and descriptive study, an e-recovery portal was used by service users and their health providers in 2 mental health communities in Norway for at least 6 months and at most 12 months (2015-2016). The portal consists of secure messaging, a peer support forum, and a toolbox of resources for working with life domains including status, goals and activities, network map, crisis plan, and exercises. The portal was owned and managed by the service user while health providers could remotely access parts of the service user-generated content. The participants could use the portal in whatever way they wished, to suit their collaboration. Data from 6 focus groups, 17 individual interviews, and an interview with 1 dyad about their experiences of use of the portal over the study period were inductively coded and thematically analyzed. The thematic analysis resulted in 2 main themes: (1) new relational avenues and (2) out of alignment, illustrated by 8 subthemes. The first main theme is about dyads who reported new and enriching ways of working together through the portal, particularly related to written communication and use of the goal module. Illustrative subthemes are ownership, common ground, goals and direction, and sense of presence and availability. The second main theme illuminates the difficulties that arose when service users' and health providers

  8. Dendritic cell targeted HIV-1 gag protein vaccine provides help to a recombinant Newcastle disease virus vectored vaccine including mobilization of protective CD8+T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngu, Loveline N; Nji, Nadesh N; Ambada, Georgia; Ngoh, Apeh A; Njambe Priso, Ghislain D; Tchadji, Jules C; Lissom, Abel; Magagoum, Suzanne H; Sake, Carol N; Tchouangueu, Thibau F; Chukwuma, George O; Okoli, Arinze S; Sagnia, Bertrand; Chukwuanukwu, Rebecca; Tebit, Denis M; Esimone, Charles O; Waffo, Alain B; Park, Chae G; Überla, Klaus; Nchinda, Godwin W

    2018-03-01

    Recombinant Newcastle Disease virus (rNDV) vectored vaccines are safe mucosal applicable vaccines with intrinsic immune-modulatory properties for the induction of efficient immunity. Like all viral vectored vaccines repeated inoculation via mucosal routes invariably results to immunity against viral vaccine vectors. To obviate immunity against viral vaccine vectors and improve the ability of rNDV vectored vaccines in inducing T cell immunity in murine air way we have directed dendritic cell targeted HIV-1 gag protein (DEC-Gag) vaccine; for the induction of helper CD4 + T cells to a Recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing codon optimized HIV-1 Gag P55 (rNDV-L-Gag) vaccine. We do so through successive administration of anti-DEC205-gagP24 protein plus polyICLC (DEC-Gag) vaccine and rNDV-L-Gag. First strong gag specific helper CD4 + T cells are induced in mice by selected targeting of anti-DEC205-gagP24 protein vaccine to dendritic cells (DC) in situ together with polyICLC as adjuvant. This targeting helped T cell immunity develop to a subsequent rNDV-L-Gag vaccine and improved both systemic and mucosal gag specific immunity. This sequential DEC-Gag vaccine prime followed by an rNDV-L-gag boost results to improved viral vectored immunization in murine airway, including mobilization of protective CD8 + T cells to a pathogenic virus infection site. Thus, complementary prime boost vaccination, in which prime and boost favor distinct types of T cell immunity, improves viral vectored immunization, including mobilization of protective CD8 + T cells to a pathogenic virus infection site such as the murine airway. © 2017 The Authors. Immunity, Inflammation and DiseasePublished by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Systematic review on what works, what does not work and why of implementation of mobile health (mHealth) projects in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda-Jan, Clara B; Mohutsiwa-Dibe, Neo; Loukanova, Svetla

    2014-02-21

    Access to mobile phone technology has rapidly expanded in developing countries. In Africa, mHealth is a relatively new concept and questions arise regarding reliability of the technology used for health outcomes. This review documents strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) of mHealth projects in Africa. A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature on mHealth projects in Africa, between 2003 and 2013, was carried out using PubMed and OvidSP. Data was synthesized using a SWOT analysis methodology. Results were grouped to assess specific aspects of project implementation in terms of sustainability and mid/long-term results, integration to the health system, management process, scale-up and replication, and legal issues, regulations and standards. Forty-four studies on mHealth projects in Africa were included and classified as: "patient follow-up and medication adherence" (n = 19), "staff training, support and motivation" (n = 2), "staff evaluation, monitoring and guidelines compliance" (n = 4), "drug supply-chain and stock management" (n = 2), "patient education and awareness" (n = 1), "disease surveillance and intervention monitoring" (n = 4), "data collection/transfer and reporting" (n = 10) and "overview of mHealth projects" (n = 2). In general, mHealth projects demonstrate positive health-related outcomes and their success is based on the accessibility, acceptance and low-cost of the technology, effective adaptation to local contexts, strong stakeholder collaboration, and government involvement. Threats such as dependency on funding, unclear healthcare system responsibilities, unreliable infrastructure and lack of evidence on cost-effectiveness challenge their implementation. mHealth projects can potentially be scaled-up to help tackle problems faced by healthcare systems like poor management of drug stocks, weak surveillance and reporting systems or lack of resources. mHealth in Africa is an innovative approach

  10. Staging Mobilities / Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2015-01-01

    asks: what are the physical, social, technical, and cultural conditions to the staging of contemporary urban mobilities? The theoretical framing in the Staging mobilities book is applied to four in-depth cases in the accompanying volume Designing mobilities.This book explore how places, sites......In recent years, urban research has taken a ‘mobilities turn’. There has been a developing realisation that mobilities do not ‘just happen.’ Mobilities are carefully and meticulously designed, planned and staged (from above). However, they are equally importantly acted out, performed and lived......, and systems 'hosting' these multiple and complex mobilities are designed and how they are staging these in terms of their physical layout. By analysing specific cases of ‘mobilities design’ related to the four modes of moving; Walk, Bike, Train, and Car, the book uncover important and until now neglected...

  11. Mobile Student Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  12. Mobile Portal Implementation Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Ping; Damsgaard, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Mobile portal plays an important role in mobile commerce market. Current literature focuses on static analysis on the value chain of mobile portals. This article provides a dynamic perspective on mobile portal strategy. Drawing upon network economics, we describe mobile portal implementation...... as a fourphase process. In different phase, a portal provider has various challenges to overcome and adopt diverse strategies, and correspondingly the regulator has different foci. The conceptual framework proposed in this article offers a basis for further analyses on the market dynamics of mobile commerce......, and can be generalized to studying other networked technologies...

  13. Tandem mobile robot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  14. STABILITY OF MOTION OF MOBILE MODULE OF EXPERIMENTAL SETUP IN THE STUDY OF ACTIVE ROTARY WORKING OF MACHINES FOR SOIL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir F. Kupryashkin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The paper is devoted to the theoretical study of stability of movement of the movable unit of the experimental setup intended for the exploration of the active rotational working organs of the car for soil treatment. This takes into account the design features of the mobile unit and features active rotary force interaction of working bodies with the soil. From the analysis of previously conducted both theoretical and experimental studies of this type of working bodies noted the possibility of breaking the stability of the mobile stroke unit, which in turn will have a negative impact on the enforcement of a given method of the experiment program. From the analysis of previous studies shows that the assumptions under which they were made, not allow you to fully take into account the nature of the effect occurring dynamic processes of interaction of active rotary working bodies with the soil on the experimental setup truck driving stability. Materials and Methods. To address the shortcomings in the research, based on a synthesis of the main provisions and laws of mechanics and the experimental data of active rotary force interaction of working bodies with the soil, carried out theoretical studies of stability of movement of the movable unit of the experimental setup in view of its design features and conditions of the experiment. Results. A theoretical study was composed of loading trolley design scheme of the experimental setup with regard to its design features and power factors acting on its working elements, namely, the wheel bearing and studied active rotary working bodies. Processing results of the study allowed the weary twist zone of stable and unstable movement of the movable unit Expo tal installation. The presence of unstable movement zone carts at-leads to a breach of the conditions set by the plan of experimental-governmental research and a negative impact on their quality and purity. Discussion and Conclusions. All of

  15. Preliminary Evaluation of a Brief Web and Mobile Phone Intervention for Men With Depression: Men's Positive Coping Strategies and Associated Depression, Resilience, and Work and Social Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Andrea Susan; Proudfoot, Judy; Whittle, Erin Louise; Clarke, Janine; Player, Michael J; Christensen, Helen; Wilhelm, Kay

    2017-08-10

    Previous research has identified that men experiencing depression do not always access appropriate health services. Web-based interventions represent an alternative treatment option for men, are effective in reducing anxiety and depression, and have potential for wide dissemination. However, men do not access Web-based programs at the same rate as women. Programs with content explicitly tailored to men's mental health needs are required. This study evaluated the applicability of Man Central, a new Web and mobile phone intervention for men with depression. The impact of the use of Man Central on depression, resilience, and work and social functioning was assessed. A recruitment flier was distributed via social media, email networks, newsletters, research registers, and partner organizations. A single-group, repeated measures design was used. The primary outcome was symptoms of depression. Secondary outcomes included externalizing symptoms, resilience, and work and social functioning. Man Central comprises regular mood, symptom, and behavior monitoring, combined with three 15-min interactive sessions. Clinical features are grounded in cognitive behavior therapy and problem-solving therapy. A distinguishing feature is the incorporation of positive strategies identified by men as useful in preventing and managing depression. Participants were directed to use Man Central for a period of 4 weeks. Linear mixed modeling with intention-to-treat analysis assessed associations between the intervention and the primary and secondary outcomes. A total of 144 men aged between 18 and 68 years and with at least mild depression enrolled in the study. The symptoms most often monitored by men included motivation (471 instances), depression (399), sleep (323), anxiety (316), and stress (262). Reminders were scheduled by 60.4% (87/144). Significant improvements were observed in depression symptoms (Psocial functioning (P<.001, d=0.78). No change was observed in measures of resilience

  16. Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    are often still not engaged with in a sufficiently manner. Often social sciences keep distance to the physical and material as if the social was still to be understood as a realm separate of technology, architecture, and design (for a critique of this see; Latour 2005 and Urry 2000). This paper takes point...... of departure in the sociological perspective termed ‘Staging Mobilities’ (Jensen 2013a) and utilizes this as an analytical frame for exploring cases of mobility design. The paper put focus on how the material shape, design and architectures of technologies, spaces and sites influence mobilities practices......, mobilitiy technologies or urban sites of movement we get much closer to understanding the meaning of mobilities to social interaction and culture. The cases are still representing work-in-progress but will be reported in the book ‘Designing Mobilites’ (Jensen 2013b) and will cover the four cases of...

  17. Self-reported depression and anxiety symptoms and usage of computers and mobile phones among working-age Finns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpinen, Leena; Pääkkönen, Rauno

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the work is to study self-reported depression and anxiety symptoms among working-age Finns using logistical regression models. The study was carried out as a cross-sectional study by posting a questionnaire to 15,000 working-age persons. The responses (6121) revealed that 101 (1.7%) Finnish working-age persons suffered depression very often and 77 (1.3%) suffered anxiety very often during the last 12 months. Symptoms uncovered in the comparative analysis of respondents who had quite often or more often depression to respondents who had less depression showed differentiation. The same result was obtained in the analysis of self-reported anxiety symptoms. With the logistical regression models (from depression and anxiety), we found associations between physical symptoms (in shoulder) and depression and between different mental symptoms and anxiety or depression. In the future, it is important to take into accout that persons with physical symptoms can also have mental symptoms (depression or anxiety).

  18. "I'm Like You Not": Intergenerational Mobility of Working Class Students from a Cultural-Evolutionary Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective narrative investigation challenges aspects of structural determinism. The biographical data generated in the study revealed that the baby-boomer, male participants were not academically constrained by their working class identities. Interpersonal relationships experienced within an individual's unique communities of practice…

  19. Mechanisms of biopower and neoliberal governmentality in precarious work: Mobilizing the dependent self-employed as independent business owners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moisander, J.; Groß, C.; Eräranta, K.

    2018-01-01

    In the contemporary conditions of neoliberal governmentality, and the emerging ‘gig economy,’ standard employment relationships appear to be giving way to precarious work. This article examines the mechanisms of biopower and techniques of managerial control that underpin—and produce consent

  20. Fixed mobile convergence handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Ahson, Syed A

    2010-01-01

    From basic concepts to future directions, this handbook provides technical information on all aspects of fixed-mobile convergence (FMC). The book examines such topics as integrated management architecture, business trends and strategic implications for service providers, personal area networks, mobile controlled handover methods, SIP-based session mobility, and supervisory and notification aggregator service. Case studies are used to illustrate technical and systematic implementation of unified and rationalized internet access by fixed-mobile network convergence. The text examines the technolo

  1. Augmented reality as a design tool for mobile interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege; Nielsen, Christina

    2000-01-01

    applications derived from the classification of augmented reality interfaces. The focus on physical interaction with objects of work and with the mobile device provides us with a range of interaction styles, based on e.g. gestures and manipulation of objects. Furthermore, issues of transparency and directness......This paper challenges user interface paradigms for mobile devices, by using the technical classification of augmented reality interfaces as a thinking tool to develop ideas for interaction with mobile devices. The paper presents future work scenarios from a wastewater treatment plant embodying PDA...... are addressed. The future scenarios indicate that the concepts of augmented reality support solving context problems in mobile design....

  2. No programming required. Mobile PCs can help physicians work more efficiently, especially when the application is designed to fit the practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J

    2000-09-01

    The Jacobson Medical Group San Antonio Jacobson Medical Group (JMG) needed a way to effectively and efficiently coordinate referral information between their hospitalist physicians and specialists. JMG decided to replace paper-based binders with something more convenient and easily updated. The organization chose to implement a mobile solution that would provide its physicians with convenient access to a database of information via a hand-held computer. The hand-held solution provides physicians with full demographic profiles of primary care givers for each area where the group operates. The database includes multiple profiles based on different healthcare plans, along with details about preferred and authorized specialists. JMG adopted a user-friendly solution that the hospitalists and specialists would embrace and actually use.

  3. Mobile Router Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  4. Communication between office-based primary care providers and nurses working within patients' homes: an analysis of process data from CAPABLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick D; Boyd, Cynthia; Bellantoni, Julia; Roth, Jill; Becker, Kathleen L; Savage, Jessica; Nkimbeng, Manka; Szanton, Sarah L

    2016-02-01

    To examine themes of communication between office-based primary care providers and nurses working in private residences; to assess which methods of communication elicit fruitful responses to nurses' concerns. Lack of effective communication between home health care nurses and primary care providers contributes to clinical errors, inefficient care delivery and decreased patient safety. Few studies have described best practices related to frequency, methods and reasons for communication between community-based nurses and primary care providers. Secondary analysis of process data from 'Community Aging in Place: Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE)'. Independent reviewers analysed nurse documentation of communication (phone calls, letters and client coaching) initiated for 70 patients and analysed 45 letters to primary care providers to identify common concerns and recommendations raised by CAPABLE nurses. Primary care providers responded to 86% of phone calls, 56% of letters and 50% of client coaching efforts. Primary care providers addressed 86% of concerns communicated by phone, 34% of concerns communicated by letter and 41% of client-raised concerns. Nurses' letters addressed five key concerns: medication safety, pain, change in activities of daily living, fall safety and mental health. In letters, CAPABLE nurses recommended 58 interventions: medication change; referral to a specialist; patient education; and further diagnostic evaluation. Effective communication between home-based nurses and primary care providers enhances care coordination and improves outcomes for home-dwelling elders. Various methods of contact show promise for addressing specific communication needs. Nurses practicing within patients' homes can improve care coordination by using phone calls to address minor matters and written letters for detailed communication. Future research should explore implementation of Situation, Background, Assessment and Recommendation in home care to promote

  5. Embodied Cultures of Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2010-01-01

    and material artifacts. The paper target the complex relationship between the moving, sensing body and the material and built environment of infrastructures and mobility modes in order to explore what norms, and meanings, and everyday life mobility cultures are being produced and re-produced in this process...... contemporary theorists understanding bodily movement, material sites of mobility, and social interactions must be consulted along the road (e.g. Latour’s work on objects and ANT, Thrift’s work on the body and ‘non-representational theory, and Massumi’s notions of affects and emotions related to bodily mobility......The paper explores the relationship between the body and mobility by looking into a number of modes of transportation and their ways of constructing particular engagements with mobility. The ‘mobile embodiments’ are significant to a material and symbolic set of relations between human agents...

  6. Operator dermal exposure and protection provided by personal protective equipment and working coveralls during mixing/loading, application and sprayer cleaning in vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenin, Isabelle; Bouneb, Françoise; Mercier, Thierry

    2017-06-01

    The efficiency of a working coverall combined with personal protective equipment to protect operators against dermal exposure to plant protection products under field conditions was studied. Operators wore a non-certified water-repellent finish polyester/cotton coverall plus a certified gown during the mixing/loading and the cleaning phases. Insecticide foliar application to a vineyard was selected as the exposure scenario. The overall dermal residue levels measured in this study were in the range of data recently collected in Europe. The water-repellent finish working coverall reduced body exposure by a factor of approximately 95%. Wearing a Category III Type 3 partial body gown during mixing/loading and cleaning of the application equipment led to a further protective effect of 98.7%. The combination of a water-repellent finish working coverall and partial body protection during specific tasks provided satisfactory levels of protection and can be considered as suitable protection for the conditions of use studied.

  7. What is mobile in entrepreneurship?

    OpenAIRE

    Lundmark, Erik; Waern, Åsa

    2008-01-01

    This report focuses on the relation between entrepreneurship and different aspects of mobility and provides a basis for further studies. To date the entrepreneurship field has focused little on the role of mobility and the studies that do, have predominantly focused on labour mobility. We argue that entrepreneurship and mobility are intertwined and that limiting the concept of mobility to labour mobility limits our view of the entrepreneurial process. The study is based on a literature review...

  8. Housing and Schools: Working Together to Reduce the Negative Effects of Student Mobility. "A Summary from the Washington, D.C.,and Baltimore Region Roundtables." Perspectives on Low Income Working Families. Urban Institute Brief 26

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comey, Jennifer; Litschwartz, Sophie; Pettit, Kathryn L. S.

    2012-01-01

    How has the recession and its resulting family instability impacted children’s residential and school mobility? Officials from housing, homeless, and school programs discussed the full spectrum of residential mobility in two recent Urban Institute roundtables: from chronic mobility, eviction, and foreclosure to doubled-up households and…

  9. Mobile Learning in Medical Education: Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kieran

    2015-10-01

    In the past several years, mobile learning made rapid inroads into the provision of medical education. There are significant advantages associated with mobile learning. These include high access, low cost, more situated and contextual learning, convenience for the learner, continuous communication and interaction between learner and tutor and between learner and other learners, and the ability to self-assess themselves while learning. Like any other form of medical pedagogy, mobile learning has its downsides. Disadvantages of mobile learning include: inadequate technology, a risk of distraction from learning by using a device that can be used for multiple purposes, and the potential for breakdown in barriers between personal usage of the mobile device and professional or educational use. Despite these caveats, there is no question but that mobile learning offers much potential. In the future, it is likely that the strategy of mobile first, whereby providers of e-learning think of the user experience on a mobile first, will result in learners who increasingly expect that all e-learning provision will work seamlessly on a mobile device.

  10. The invisible work of personal health information management among people with multiple chronic conditions: qualitative interview study among patients and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancker, Jessica S; Witteman, Holly O; Hafeez, Baria; Provencher, Thierry; Van de Graaf, Mary; Wei, Esther

    2015-06-04

    A critical problem for patients with chronic conditions who see multiple health care providers is incomplete or inaccurate information, which can contribute to lack of care coordination, low quality of care, and medical errors. As part of a larger project on applications of consumer health information technology (HIT) and barriers to its use, we conducted a semistructured interview study with patients with multiple chronic conditions (MCC) with the objective of exploring their role in managing their personal health information. Semistructured interviews were conducted with patients and providers. Patients were eligible if they had multiple chronic conditions and were in regular care with one of two medical organizations in New York City; health care providers were eligible if they had experience caring for patients with multiple chronic conditions. Analysis was conducted from a grounded theory perspective, and recruitment was concluded when saturation was achieved. A total of 22 patients and 7 providers were interviewed; patients had an average of 3.5 (SD 1.5) chronic conditions and reported having regular relationships with an average of 5 providers. Four major themes arose: (1) Responsibility for managing medical information: some patients perceived information management and sharing as the responsibility of health care providers; others—particularly those who had had bad experiences in the past—took primary responsibility for information sharing; (2) What information should be shared: although privacy concerns did influence some patients' perceptions of sharing of medical data, decisions about what to share were also heavily influenced by their understanding of health and disease and by the degree to which they understood the health care system; (3) Methods and tools varied: those patients who did take an active role in managing their records used a variety of electronic tools, paper tools, and memory; and (4) Information management as invisible work

  11. Proposal by simple design of the lower limb exoskeleton of continuous use, provided of own mobility and body load support. Case: application due to an illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Martinez, Rafael; Lopez-Amaya, Julio Alberto; Urriolagoitia-Sosa, Guillermo; Romero-Ángeles, Beatriz; Urriolagoitia-Calderón, Guillermo Manuel

    2017-01-01

    In recent times it has established a debate between experts and academics about the social and economic impact of advances in robotics. The robotic exoskeletons mounted as suits on affected parts of the human body, represent one of the most significant examples of which is oriented towards robotics. With recent technological advances have increased the fields of application of these devices widely with respect to the first applications were teleoperation and increase in strength of a human being for various tasks. The aim of this work is to contribute as much as possible, to start a discussion about the vision of offering future developments in socio-economic terms and its impact resulting from the use of robotic exoskeletons, especially with regard to its application in medical rehabilitation of lower member and especially its use permanent, replacing cumbersome devices such as crutches, walkers, canes. All this, focused on the health sector, which is most affected by different diseases cannot have access to these devices. In this paper, only it proposes a design that could be inexpensive and used for various ailments.

  12. Workforce mobility: Contributing towards smart city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, N. M.; Wahap, N. A.

    2014-02-01

    Smart cities gained importance as a means of making ICT enabled services and applications available to the citizens, companies and authorities that form part of a city's system. It aims at increasing citizen's quality of life, and improving the efficiency and quality of the services provided by governing entities and businesses. This perspective requires an integrated vision of a city and of its infrastructures in all components. One of the characteristics of a smart city is mobility. The concept of mobility, especially for the workforce, is studied through a research carried out on a daily work undertaken as a prototype in the administrative town of Putrajaya, Malaysia. Utilizing the location track from GNSS integrated with mobile devices platform, information on movement and mobility was analysed for quality and efficiency of services rendered. This paper will highlight the research and outcomes that were successfully carried out and will suggest that workforce mobility management can benefit the authorities towards implementing a smart city concept.

  13. Device Data Protection in Mobile Healthcare Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasinghe, Dasun; Rajarajan, Muttukrishnan; Rakocevic, Veselin

    The rapid growth in mobile technology makes the delivery of healthcare data and services on mobile phones a reality. However, the healthcare data is very sensitive and has to be protected against unauthorized access. While most of the development work on security of mobile healthcare today focuses on the data encryption and secure authentication in remote servers, protection of data on the mobile device itself has gained very little attention. This paper analyses the requirements and the architecture for a secure mobile capsule, specially designed to protect the data that is already on the device. The capsule is a downloadable software agent with additional functionalities to enable secure external communication with healthcare service providers, network operators and other relevant communication parties.

  14. Mobile-assisted ESP learning in technical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimonová Ivana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents research results from the field of mobile-assisted instruction of English for specific purposes for technical and engineering students. The research was structured in three phases: (1 Questionnaire 1 was applied to detect what sources of information students use in higher education, what types of mobile devices they own, what purposes they use them for, (2 how the process of instruction, particularly students´ autonomous work supported by mobile devices ran, (3 students´ feedback was collected by Questionnaire 2 to evaluate the mobile-assisted learning and provide proposals for future exploitation of mobile devices in higher technical language education. The results show students are sufficiently equipped with mobile technologies and exploit them for various purposes, including education and ESP. At the end, examples of helpful mobile applications are presented.

  15. Mobile phone messages to provide support to women during the home phase of medical abortion in South Africa: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constant, Deborah; de Tolly, Katherine; Harries, Jane; Myer, Landon

    2014-09-01

    Home use of misoprostol for medical abortion is more convenient for many women than in-clinic use but requires management of abortion symptoms at home without provider backup. This study evaluated whether automated text messages to women undergoing medical abortion can reduce anxiety and emotional discomfort, and whether the messages can better prepare women for symptoms they experience. A multisite randomized controlled trial was conducted in which women undergoing early medical abortion were allocated to receive standard of care (SOC) only (n=235) or SOC+a messaging intervention (n=234). Consenting women were interviewed at the clinic after taking mifepristone and again at their follow-up clinic visit 2-3 weeks later; the intervention group received text messages over the duration of this period. Emotional outcomes were evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Adler's 12-item emotional scale and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised. Preparedness for the abortion symptoms and overall satisfaction with the procedure were assessed using 4-point Likert-type scales. Between baseline and follow-up, anxiety decreased more (p=0.013), and less emotional stress was experienced (adjusted for baseline anxiety, p=0.015), in the intervention compared to the SOC group. Participants in the intervention group were also more likely to report that they felt very well prepared for the bleeding (peffects (p=0.027) they experienced. Acceptability and other negative emotions relating to the abortion did not differ between study groups. Ninety-nine percent of the intervention group stated that they would recommend the messages to a friend having the same procedure. Text messages to women following mifepristone administration for early medical abortion may assist them in managing symptoms and appear highly acceptable to recipients. This randomized controlled trial provides evidence for the effectiveness of text messages following mifepristone administration in

  16. Providing a Roof That Allows One to Dream of a Better Life”: A Case Study of Working with Families in Extreme Poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tsekoura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a case study of a youth organisation working with families in extreme poverty and lack of adequate housing in Chile and Mexico. It initially describes the considerable structural changes that relate to the emergence of the organisation, and then discusses how across context case study research that draws from the interpretivist interactionist tradition was employed. In the main body it presents interventions that aim to provide families with temporary accommodation, social support, education, micro-credit opportunities, and legal support. The paper aims to contribute to a discussion concerning wider insights to be gained from context-specific approaches in working with families. The article highlights the need for policy and practice that approaches families as complex, dynamic and context specific entities that are re-configured through their networks and interpersonal interactions, and are subject to particular plays of power relations. Furthermore, it argues for practice that fosters family agency that is based on recognition of strengths, emotional and cognitive aspects of decision making as well as nurturing of hope.

  17. Mobile Robot and Mobile Manipulator Research Towards ASTM Standards Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostelman, Roger; Hong, Tsai; Legowik, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Performance standards for industrial mobile robots and mobile manipulators (robot arms onboard mobile robots) have only recently begun development. Low cost and standardized measurement techniques are needed to characterize system performance, compare different systems, and to determine if recalibration is required. This paper discusses work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and within the ASTM Committee F45 on Driverless Automatic Guided Industrial Vehicles. This includes standards for both terminology, F45.91, and for navigation performance test methods, F45.02. The paper defines terms that are being considered. Additionally, the paper describes navigation test methods that are near ballot and docking test methods being designed for consideration within F45.02. This includes the use of low cost artifacts that can provide alternatives to using relatively expensive measurement systems.

  18. Mobile Robot and Mobile Manipulator Research Towards ASTM Standards Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostelman, Roger; Hong, Tsai; Legowik, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Performance standards for industrial mobile robots and mobile manipulators (robot arms onboard mobile robots) have only recently begun development. Low cost and standardized measurement techniques are needed to characterize system performance, compare different systems, and to determine if recalibration is required. This paper discusses work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and within the ASTM Committee F45 on Driverless Automatic Guided Industrial Vehicles. This includes standards for both terminology, F45.91, and for navigation performance test methods, F45.02. The paper defines terms that are being considered. Additionally, the paper describes navigation test methods that are near ballot and docking test methods being designed for consideration within F45.02. This includes the use of low cost artifacts that can provide alternatives to using relatively expensive measurement systems. PMID:28690359

  19. Making Sense of Mobile Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David Pauleen; John Campbell; Brian Harmer; Ali Intezari

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies have facilitated a radical shift in work and private life. In this article, we seek to better understand how individual mobile technology users have made sense of these changes and adapted...

  20. Evaluating Teleworkers' Acceptance of Mobile Technology: A Study Based on the Utaut Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jamia Sharie

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology has provided flexible methods for employees to complete work-related tasks without being tied to an office. Research has predicted the level of training on mobile technology may impact a user's ability to complete work responsibilities accurately. This study intended to examine what behavior factors from the unified theory of…

  1. Instant XenMobile MDM

    CERN Document Server

    Lakhani, Aamir

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. Written in a user friendly style, this guide will get readers up and running with XenMobile MDM.If you want to run your mobile enterprises on XenMobile, or work on a BYOD strategy within your organization, then this is the ideal book for you. XenMobile MDM comprehensively explores how to set up and use XenMobile to provision, secure, and manage mobile devices.

  2. Client Mobile Software Design Principles for Mobile Learning Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Tan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In a client-server mobile learning system, client mobile software must run on the mobile phone to acquire, package, and send student’s interaction data via the mobile communications network to the connected mobile application server. The server will receive and process the client data in order to offer appropriate content and learning activities. To develop the mobile learning systems there are a number of very important issues that must be addressed. Mobile phones have scarce computing resources. They consist of heterogeneous devices and use various mobile operating systems, they have limitations with their user/device interaction capabilities, high data communications cost, and must provide for device mobility and portability. In this paper we propose five principles for designing Client mobile learning software. A location-based adaptive mobile learning system is presented as a proof of concept to demonstrate the applicability of these design principles.

  3. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  4. Can the Enhancement of Group Working in Classrooms Provide a Basis for Effective Communication in Support of School-Based Cognitive Achievement in Classrooms of Young Learners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutnick, Peter; Berdondini, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study was part of the SPRinG project (Social Pedagogy Research into Group Work). The review notes group work in "authentic" classrooms rarely fulfils its interactive or attainment potential. SPRinG classes undertook a programme of relational training to enhance children's group working skills while control classes…

  5. Downwardly mobile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    P & H Mining Equipment has produced the 250XP rotary blasthole drill, its first `clean sheet` drill after eight years of upgrading the line of large rotaries it acquired from Gardner Denver in 1991. A prototype has been working on an Australian coal mine since June 1998. A further two units of the 250XP are being erected at a diamond mine in Botswana for start-up in January 1999 and another will begin drilling at a Wyoming, USA coal mine in February. The drill is a highly mobile, heavy duty, highly reliable diesel/hydraulic drill weighing 113,500 kg and can drill holes at angles up to 30 degrees.

  6. Engaging with mobile methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Trandberg

    2014-01-01

    This chapter showcases how mobile methods are more than calibrated techniques awaiting application by tourism researchers, but productive in the enactment of the mobile (Law and Urry, 2004). Drawing upon recent findings deriving from a PhD course on mobility and mobile methods it reveals...... the conceptual ambiguousness of the term ‘mobile methods’. In order to explore this ambiguousness the chapter provides a number of examples deriving from tourism research, to explore how mobile methods are always entangled in ideologies, predispositions, conventions and practice-realities. Accordingly......, the engagements with methods are acknowledged to be always political and contextual, reminding us to avoid essentialist discussions regarding research methods. Finally, the chapter draws on recent fieldwork to extend developments in mobilities-oriented tourism research, by employing auto-ethnography to call...

  7. European mobility cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haustein, Sonja; Nielsen, Thomas A. Sick

    2016-01-01

    More targeted European policies promoting green travel patterns require better knowledge on differing mobility cultures across European regions. As a basis for this, we clustered the EU population into eight mobility styles based on Eurobarometer data. The mobility styles - including, for example......-economic resources. In a second step, the 28 EU member countries were clustered into six country clusters based on their representation of mobility styles. The country clusters indicate the existence of considerably different mobility cultures across the EU. Sub-regions can be identified that have highly different...... positions on the path towards sustainable mobility and therefore different requirements towards European platforms and support measures, e.g. for 'Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans'. The country clusters can provide a starting point for future communication and targeting of European efforts in sustainable...

  8. Intelligent Mobile Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alena, Rick; Gilbaugh, Bruce; Glass, Brian; Swanson, Keith (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Testing involves commercial radio equipment approved for export and use in Canada. Testing was conducted in the Canadian High Arctic, where hilly terrain provided the worst-case testing. SFU and Canadian governmental agencies made significant technical contributions. The only technical data related to radio testing was exchanged with SFU. Test protocols are standard radio tests performed by communication technicians worldwide. The Joint Fields Operations objectives included the following: (1) to provide Internet communications services for field science work and mobile exploration systems; (2) to evaluate the range and throughput of three different medium-range radio link technologies for providing coverage of the crater area; and (3) to demonstrate collaborative software such as NetMeeting with multi-point video for exchange of scientific information between remote node and base-base camp and science centers as part of communications testing.

  9. Continuously Connected With Mobile IP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems developed Cisco Mobile Networks, making IP devices mobile. With this innovation, a Cisco router and its connected IP devices can roam across network boundaries and connection types. Because a mobile user is able to keep the same IP address while roaming, a live IP connection can be maintained without interruption. Glenn Research Center jointly tested the technology with Cisco, and is working to use it on low-earth-orbiting research craft. With Cisco's Mobile Networks functionality now available in Cisco IOS Software release 12.2(4)T, the commercial advantages and benefits are numerous. The technology can be applied to public safety, military/homeland security, emergency management services, railroad and shipping systems, and the automotive industry. It will allow ambulances, police, firemen, and the U.S. Coast Guard to stay connected to their networks while on the move. In the wireless battlefield, the technology will provide rapid infrastructure deployment for U.S. national defense. Airline, train, and cruise passengers utilizing Cisco Mobile Networks can fly all around the world with a continuous Internet connection. Cisco IOS(R) Software is a registered trademark of Cisco Systems.

  10. Network-based Mobility with DVB-RCS2 using the Evolved Packet Core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walraven, F.A.; Venemans, P.H.A.; Velt, R. in 't; Fransen, F.

    2013-01-01

    The network of the future consists of a combination of different access networks, each providing a level of network availability and mobility suited for a wide range of applications. Mobile network developments culminated in work on the E-UTRAN and Evolved Packet Core (EPC) network and can provide

  11. Programming the Mobile Web

    CERN Document Server

    Firtman, Maximiliano

    2010-01-01

    Today's market for mobile apps goes beyond the iPhone to include BlackBerry, Nokia, Windows Phone, and smartphones powered by Android, webOS, and other platforms. If you're an experienced web developer, this book shows you how to build a standard app core that you can extend to work with specific devices. You'll learn the particulars and pitfalls of building mobile apps with HTML, CSS, and other standard web tools. You'll also explore platform variations, finicky mobile browsers, Ajax design patterns for mobile, and much more. Before you know it, you'll be able to create mashups using Web 2.

  12. 'For a mere cough, men must just chew Conjex, gain strength, and continue working': the provider construction and tuberculosis care-seeking implications in Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikovore, Jeremiah; Hart, Graham; Kumwenda, Moses; Chipungu, Geoffrey A; Corbett, Liz

    2015-01-01

    Delay by men in seeking healthcare results in their higher mortality while on HIV or tuberculosis (TB) treatment and contributes to ongoing community-level disease transmission before going on treatment. To understand masculinity's role in delay in healthcare seeking for men, with a focus on TB-suggestive symptoms. Data were collected between March 2011 and March 2012 in low-income suburbs in urban Blantyre using focus group discussions with community members (n=8) and health workers (n=2), in-depth interviews with 20 TB patients (female=14) and 20 uninvestigated chronic coughers (female=8), and a 3-day participatory workshop with 27 health stakeholder representatives. The research process drew to a large extent on grounded theory principles in the manner of Strauss and Corbin (1998) and also Charmaz (1995). Role descriptions by both men and women in the study universally assigned men as primary material providers for their immediate family, that is, the ones earning and bringing livelihood and additional material needs. In a context where collectivism was valued, men were also expected to lead the provision of support to wider kin. Successful role enactment was considered key to achieving recognition as an adequate man; at the same time, job scarcity and insecurity, and low earnings gravely impeded men. Pressures to generate continuing income then meant constantly looking for jobs, or working continuously to retain insecure jobs or to raise money through self-employment. All this led men to relegate their health considerations. Early engagement with formal healthcare is critical to dealing with TB and HIV. However, role constructions as portrayed for men in this study, along with the opportunity costs of acknowledging illness seem, in conditions of vulnerability, important barriers to care-seeking. There is a need to address hidden care-seeking costs and to consider more complex interventions, including reducing precarity, in efforts to improve men's engagement

  13. Efficient Mobility Management Signalling in Network Mobility Supported PMIPV6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananthi Jebaseeli Samuelraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proxy Mobile IPV6 (PMIPV6 is a network based mobility management protocol which supports node’s mobility without the contribution from the respective mobile node. PMIPV6 is initially designed to support individual node mobility and it should be enhanced to support mobile network movement. NEMO-BSP is an existing protocol to support network mobility (NEMO in PMIPV6 network. Due to the underlying differences in basic protocols, NEMO-BSP cannot be directly applied to PMIPV6 network. Mobility management signaling and data structures used for individual node’s mobility should be modified to support group nodes’ mobility management efficiently. Though a lot of research work is in progress to implement mobile network movement in PMIPV6, it is not yet standardized and each suffers with different shortcomings. This research work proposes modifications in NEMO-BSP and PMIPV6 to achieve NEMO support in PMIPV6. It mainly concentrates on optimizing the number and size of mobility signaling exchanged while mobile network or mobile network node changes its access point.

  14. Work-related critical incidents in hospital-based health care providers and the risk of post-traumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, and depression: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jacoba; Lok, Anja; van 't Verlaat, Ellen; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Smit, Bert J.

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analysis reviewed existing data on the impact of work-related critical incidents in hospital-based health care professionals. Work-related critical incidents may induce post-traumatic stress symptoms or even post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, and depression and may negatively

  15. STRATEGIC IMPACT OF MOBILITY ON ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Golovkova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The current rapid social and economic developments show mobility as the most important factor of economic growth, social and cultural progress. Mobile technology has undergone a sea change over the past ten years. The evolution of mobility is about creating better ways to change the world. It will increasingly shape our lives and thinking in ways we cannot fully anticipate. Mobile revolution is a global reality which creates new opportunities and challenges for all companies in the world. Methodology. Proposed methodological approach is based on a comprehensive assessment of the strategic impact of mobility on the organization as a major tool to improve competitiveness and efficiency of the company. During the research have been used both qualitative and quantitative methods. As a result, the article provides bridges between the field of mobility, organization science, information systems, and certain aspects of philosophy. Findings. This research provides a glimpse into the fast-evolving world of mobile technology and maybe even faster evolving world of organizations. The research is designed to understand the strategic impact of mobility on organizations, and evaluate the benefits of integration of these new technologies into the company. The research comprised of an extensive literature review, observation of existing practices, and semi-structured interviews geared toward understanding the strategic impact of mobility on organization and its employees. Originality. The research findings suggest three main strategic implications of mobility: (1 improve working process; (2 increase internal communication and knowledge sharing; and (3 enhance sales and marketing effectiveness. Practical value. The use of mobile technology and it impact on organizational change and strategy, stability and development of competitive advantage allow the company to ensure the effectiveness of its business. Mobility can dramatically transform the company by

  16. Mobile healthcare informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siau, Keng; Shen, Zixing

    2006-06-01

    Advances in wireless technology give pace to the rapid development of mobile applications. The coming mobile revolution will bring dramatic and fundamental changes to our daily life. It will influence the way we live, the way we do things, and the way we take care of our health. For the healthcare industry, mobile applications provide a new frontier in offering better care and services to patients, and a more flexible and mobile way of communicating with suppliers and patients. Mobile applications will provide important real time data for patients, physicians, insurers, and suppliers. In addition, it will revolutionalize the way information is managed in the healthcare industry and redefine the doctor - patient communication. This paper discusses different aspects of mobile healthcare. Specifically, it presents mobile applications in healthcare, and discusses possible challenges facing the development of mobile applications. Obstacles in developing mobile healthcare applications include mobile device limitations, wireless networking problems, infrastructure constraints, security concerns, and user distrust. Research issues in resolving or alleviating these problems are also discussed in the paper.

  17. Usefulness of an ability-based health model in work ability assessments provided by psychiatrists and psychology specialists writing social security certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solli, Hans Magnus; Barbosa da Silva, António; Egeland, Jens

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether adding descriptions of the health factors "ability," "environment" and "intentions/goals" to the officially sanctioned biomedical disability model (BDM) would improve assessments of work ability for social security purposes. The study was based on a theoretical design consisting of textual analysis and interpretation. Two further work ability models were defined: the mixed health model (MHM), which describes health factors without assessing a person's abilities in context, and the ability-based health model (AHM), which assesses abilities in a concrete context of environment and intention. Eighty-six social security certificates, written by psychiatrists and psychology specialists in a Norwegian hospital-based mental health clinic, were analysed in relation to the three work ability/disability models. In certificates based on the BDM, a general pattern was found of "gradual work training". The MHM added health factors, but without linking them together in a concrete way. With the AHM, work ability was assessed in terms of a concrete unified evaluation of the claimant's abilities, environments and intentions/goals. Applying the AHM in work ability assessments, in comparison with the BDM and the MHM, is useful because this foregrounds claimants' abilities in a context of concrete goals and work-related opportunities, as a unity. Implications for Rehabilitation A concept of health should include ability, environment and intentions/goals as components. When all three of these components are described in concrete terms in a work ability assessment, an integrated picture of the individual's abilities in the context of his/her particular intentions/goals and work opportunities comes to the fore. This kind of assessment makes it possible to meet the individual's needs for individual follow-up in a work environment.

  18. Enhancing mobile learning security

    OpenAIRE

    Shonola, Shaibu Adekunle; Joy, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices have been playing vital roles in modern day education delivery as students can access or download learning materials on their smartphones and tablets, they can also install educational apps and study anytime, anywhere. The need to provide adequate security for portable devices being used for learning cannot be underestimated. In this paper, we present a mobile security enhancement app, designed and developed for Android smart mobile devices in order to promote security awarenes...

  19. Mobility Integration of ERP Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Álvaro LOZANO; Gabriel VILLARRUBIA; Alberto LÓPEZ

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays a lot of enterprises work with ERP systems. It usefulness is generally used in office environments and different enterprises which offer this software are developing mobile applications. These mobile applications work with their own system and they don’t usually work in other platforms. Currently any mobile application can communicate with more than one ERP system because each one has its own communications methods. This article presents a system that expect unify the communication b...

  20. Emerging Mobile Networking Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    years to address this problem area. Basic concepts began as early a the 1970s with DARPA sponsored "packet radio" research, yet a new flurry of design...routing, MAC , middleware). The appropriate mechanisms are also not orthogonal to the intended application or deployment scenario of the mobile ad hoc...technology that can improve the capability of future mobile architectures Original work dates back to DARPA packet radio work 1970s More recent flurry of

  1. The Mobile Robot "Little Helper"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilshøj, Mads; Bøgh, Simon; Madsen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    Increased customer needs and intensified global competition require intelligent and flexible automation. The interaction technology mobile robotics addresses this, so it holds great potential within the industry. This paper presents the concepts, ideas and working principles of the mobile robot...... this show promising results regarding industrial integration, exploitation and maturation of mobile robotics....

  2. Road Bridges and Culverts, Bridge dataset only includes bridges maintained by Johnson County Public Works in the unincorporated areas, Published in Not Provided, Johnson County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Road Bridges and Culverts dataset current as of unknown. Bridge dataset only includes bridges maintained by Johnson County Public Works in the unincorporated areas.

  3. Work-related critical incidents in hospital-based health care providers and the risk of post-traumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, and depression: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Jacoba; Lok, Anja; Van't Verlaat, Ellen; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Bakker, Arnold B; Smit, Bert J

    2011-07-01

    This meta-analysis reviewed existing data on the impact of work-related critical incidents in hospital-based health care professionals. Work-related critical incidents may induce post-traumatic stress symptoms or even post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, and depression and may negatively affect health care practitioners' behaviors toward patients. Nurses and doctors often cope by working part time or switching jobs. Hospital administrators and health care practitioners themselves may underestimate the effects of work-related critical incidents. Relevant online databases were searched for original research published from inception to 2009 and manual searches of the Journal of Traumatic Stress, reference lists, and the European Traumatic Stress Research Database were conducted. Two researchers independently decided on inclusion and study quality. Effect sizes were estimated using standardized mean differences with 95% confidence intervals. Consistency was evaluated, using the I(2)-statistic. Meta-analysis was performed using the random effects model. Eleven studies, which included 3866 participants, evaluated the relationship between work-related critical incidents and post-traumatic stress symptoms. Six of these studies, which included 1695 participants, also reported on the relationship between work-related critical incidents and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Heterogeneity among studies was high and could not be accounted for by study quality, character of the incident, or timing of data collection. Pooled effect sizes for the impact of work-related critical incidents on post-traumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, and depression were small to medium. Remarkably, the effect was more pronounced in the longer than in the shorter term. In conclusion, this meta-analysis supports the hypothesis that work-related critical incidents are positively related to post-traumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, and depression in hospital-based health care professionals

  4. An OpenMP Programming Environment on Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyng-Yeu Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the computational speed and battery capability of mobile devices were greatly promoted. With an enormous number of APPs, users can do many things in mobile devices as well as in computers. Consequently, more and more scientific researchers are encouraged to move their working environment from computers to mobile devices for increasing their work efficiency because they can analyze data and make decisions on their mobile devices anytime and anywhere. Accordingly, we propose a mobile OpenMP programming environment called MOMP in this paper. Using this APP, users can directly write, compile, and execute OpenMP programs on their Android-based mobile devices to exploit embedded CPU and GPU for resolving their problems without network connection. Because of source compatibility, MOMP makes users easily port their OpenMP programs from computers to mobile devices without any modification. Moreover, MOMP provides users with an easy interface to choose CPU or GPU for executing different parallel regions in the same program based on the properties of parallel regions. Therefore, MOMP can effectively reduce the programming complexity of heterogeneous computing in mobile devices and exploit the computational power of mobile devices for the performance of user applications.

  5. Advertising sexual health services that provide sexually transmissible infection screening for rural young people - what works and what doesn't.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Deepa G; Fuller, Candice A; Cummings, Rosey; Tomnay, Jane E; Chung, Mark; Chen, Marcus; Garrett, Cameryn C; Hocking, Jane S; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Fairley, Christopher K

    2011-09-01

    'TESTme' is a sexually transmissible infection (STI) screening service for Victorian young people living in rural areas. We evaluated the effectiveness of advertising for this service over an 11-month pilot period. The advertising that was used included websites, a Facebook page, posters, flyers, business cards, wrist bands and professional development sessions for health nurses that occurred throughout the pilot period. We also used once-off methods including advertisements in newspapers, student diaries and short messages to mobile phones. Twenty-eight clients had a consultation through TESTme. Twenty found the service through health professionals, six through the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC) web page, one through the Facebook page and one through the student diary. The total direct costs incurred by the centre for advertising were $20850. The advertising cost per client reached for each advertising method was $26 for health professionals, $80 for the MSHC web advertisement, $1408 for Facebook and $790 for the student diary. Other advertising methods cost $12248 and did not attract any clients. Advertising STI health services for rural young people would be best to focus on referrals from other health services or health care websites.

  6. Development of mobile platform integrated with existing electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YoungAh; Kim, Sung Soo; Kang, Simon; Kim, Kyungduk; Kim, Jun

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a mobile Electronic Medical Record (EMR) platform designed to manage and utilize the existing EMR and mobile application with optimized resources. We structured the mEMR to reuse services of retrieval and storage in mobile app environments that have already proven to have no problem working with EMRs. A new mobile architecture-based mobile solution was developed in four steps: the construction of a server and its architecture; screen layout and storyboard making; screen user interface design and development; and a pilot test and step-by-step deployment. This mobile architecture consists of two parts, the server-side area and the client-side area. In the server-side area, it performs the roles of service management for EMR and documents and for information exchange. Furthermore, it performs menu allocation depending on user permission and automatic clinical document architecture document conversion. Currently, Severance Hospital operates an iOS-compatible mobile solution based on this mobile architecture and provides stable service without additional resources, dealing with dynamic changes of EMR templates. The proposed mobile solution should go hand in hand with the existing EMR system, and it can be a cost-effective solution if a quality EMR system is operated steadily with this solution. Thus, we expect this example to be shared with hospitals that currently plan to deploy mobile solutions.

  7. The Mobile Phone Affinity Scale: Enhancement and Refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Beth C; Lantini, Ryan; Thind, Herpreet; Walaska, Kristen; Rosen, Rochelle K; Fava, Joseph L; Barnett, Nancy P; Scott-Sheldon, Lori Aj

    2016-12-15

    Existing instruments that assess individuals' relationships with mobile phones tend to focus on negative constructs such as addiction or dependence, and appear to assume that high mobile phone use reflects pathology. Mobile phones can be beneficial for health behavior change, disease management, work productivity, and social connections, so there is a need for an instrument that provides a more balanced assessment of the various aspects of individuals' relationships with mobile phones. The purpose of this research was to develop, revise, and validate the Mobile Phone Affinity Scale, a multi-scale instrument designed to assess key factors associated with mobile phone use. Participants (N=1058, mean age 33) were recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk between March and April of 2016 to complete a survey that assessed participants' mobile phone attitudes and use, anxious and depressive symptoms, and resilience. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a 6-factor model. The final measure consisted of 24 items, with 4 items on each of 6 factors: Connectedness, Productivity, Empowerment, Anxious Attachment, Addiction, and Continuous Use. The subscales demonstrated strong internal consistency (Cronbach alpha range=0.76-0.88, mean 0.83), and high item factor loadings (range=0.57-0.87, mean 0.75). Tests for validity further demonstrated support for the individual subscales. Mobile phone affinity may have an important impact in the development and effectiveness of mobile health interventions, and continued research is needed to assess its predictive ability in health behavior change interventions delivered via mobile phones.

  8. Frailty and Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeles, Eamonn; Low Choy, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Frailty represents a state of heightened vulnerability. Mobility impairment contributes to the construct of frailty and channels adverse events. While mobility disorder is universal at a high burden of frailty, neither mobility nor balance dysfunction is sufficient to fully define frailty. Frailty represents proximity to complex system failure, with higher-order disturbance, such as mobility and balance disturbance, as a consequence. Impairment of mobility and balance is a common manifestation of illness in the frail individual and is therefore a sensitive marker of acute disease, putatively also in delirium. Clinical measurement of mobility and balance should be prioritized. Consequently, assessment tools, such as the de Morton Mobility Index and the Hierarchical Assessment of Balance and Mobility, are being explored, with the sensitivity of the latter illustrated in the acute hospital setting. Walking with speed and under dual/multi-task conditions better differentiates healthier and frail ambulant adults, providing a basis for screening older adults for pre-emptive interventions. Specific mobility and balance interventions reduce falls risk. However, patients with dementia walk too fast for their level of frailty, creating an ethical dimension to rehabilitation and risk. Overall, there is no need for reduced mobility to reinforce the frailty stereotype; both are potentially modifiable and amenable to intervention strategies. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Mobile Project Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin BOJA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the development of new communication and data transfer technologies, the mobile solutions for the management process have been able to provide new ways to conduct management actions. This environment describes methods and tools available only here, which will bring information, speed and efficiency to any stage and component of the management process. The paper takes into discussion the impact of the technological development on the management process paradigm. The paper presents the main aspects regarding the business and management models used in mobile management. The role of mobile multimedia informatics applications in mobile management is highlighted.

  10. Mobile positioning and tracking from conventional to cooperative techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Frattasi, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Current trends in mobile services envisage location-based networking as a major strong stimulator for the development of novel solutions for obtaining positioning information in wireless networks. This book discusses mobile positioning solutions applied on top of current wireless communication networks. Moreover, it introduces advanced and novel topics such as localization in heterogeneous and cooperative scenarios. In this fully updated second edition, the authors summarize recent developments in mobile positioning and tracking. Compared with the previous version, the new edition introduces more advanced topics, providing the bridge between research and industry. It works as an important reference and provides good foundations for new researchers.

  11. Carts in a time of transition. As multiple trends shape how clinicians do their work, CIOs ponder the future of mobile carts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagland, Mark

    2010-07-01

    CIOs are actively trying to figure out how to plan for the mobile computing needs of their clinicians in the next several years. Though a broad range of viewpoints prevails across the healthcare system, most CIOs believe they will continue to rely heavily on mobile computing carts to meet clinicians' computing needs within their facilities, even in the face of the emergence of newer, tablet-sized computing devices. Clinician needs and preferences remain paramount considerations as CIOs move to replace sometimes-aging current fleets of computing carts.

  12. Guest Editorial ~ Mobile Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ally

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This special IRRODL issue on mobile learning is timely because of the proliferation of mobile technology in society, globalization, and the need to re-examine how learning materials are designed and delivered for the new generation of learners. In today’s world, people are on the move and are demanding access to learning materials and information anytime and anywhere. At the same time, there is increasing use of mobile technology in different sectors of society to meet the needs of people on the move. In business, there is increasing use of mobile technologies for individuals to conduct their business anywhere and anytime. In healthcare, medical staff are using mobile technologies to access just-in-time information and to enter information in real time. People working in the field away from the central office use mobile technologies to access information and to communicate with other workers. Also, younger generations of learners are using mobile technologies for entertainment and socialization. These learners are using mobile devices to access information and multimedia materials and to communicate with friends. These new generations of learners do not see technology as something foreign. They readily accept technology and consider technology to be part of their lives. Moreover, the use of mobile technology is a 21st Century skill that students and workers must have to function in society.

  13. Mobile Apps and Romanian Mobile Devices Users’ Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Filofteia TUTUNEA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last years the development of mobile technologies generated the formation of a new segment of software industry dedicated to applications for mobile devices. At their turn, mobile apps created new tendencies in software development but also generated important revenues at the level of the specialized industry as well as at global level. From this perspective, the present article, on one hand, describes an image of the mobile infrastructure, mobile applications and their users, on the other hand, includes a study regarding Romanian users of mobile devices in order to identify the types of applications usually employed in mobile activities, the time dedicated to these activities, the number of downloaded applications and their cost levels. We consider that the results of this study may be useful to mobile app users and developers, and mobile device providers.

  14. Mobile phones, social ties, and collective action mobilization in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    participants for protests, this study observes that mobile communication in China embodies guanxi, the indigenous social tie in Chinese society that introduces reciprocity as an influential facilitator of collective actions. The embedment of reciprocity facilitates the proliferation of mobilizing calls......To provide a better understanding of mobile phones as a recruitment tool in collective actions, this study explores the use of mobile phones for mobilizing protest in China. Using in-depth interviews and investigating four cases in which Chinese people employed mobile devices to recruit......, legitimizes mobilizing appeals, generates obligations and consolidates solidarity for collective actions. The study concludes with a consideration of the relevance of mobile phones for the embedment of reciprocity in social ties in the mobilization of collective action in authoritarian regimes such as China....

  15. Preventing HIV among U.S. women of color with severe mental illness: perceptions of mental health care providers working in urban community clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agénor, Madina; Collins, Pamela Y

    2013-01-01

    Given their knowledge of the behavioral issues related to psychiatric illness, mental health care providers are in a unique position to help prevent HIV among women with severe mental illness (SMI). We conducted in-depth interviews with providers at two New York City community clinics. We identified three major, interrelated themes pertaining to HIV prevention among women of color with SMI. Interventions that address the barriers that clinicians face in discussing sex, sexuality, and HIV with patients and train providers in the cultural considerations of cross-cultural mental health care are needed to help prevent HIV among women of color with SMI.

  16. Preventing HIV Among U.S. Women of Color With Severe Mental Illness: Perceptions of Mental Health Care Providers Working in Urban Community Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agénor, Madina; Collins, Pamela Y.

    2013-01-01

    Given their knowledge of the behavioral issues related to psychiatric illness, mental health care providers are in a unique position to help prevent HIV among women with severe mental illness (SMI). We conducted in-depth interviews with providers at two New York City community clinics. We identified three major, interrelated themes pertaining to HIV prevention among women of color with SMI. Interventions that address the barriers that clinicians face in discussing sex, sexuality, and HIV with patients and train providers in the cultural considerations of cross-cultural mental health care are needed to help prevent HIV among women of color with SMI. PMID:23394326

  17. How Diverse Schools Affect Student Mobility: Charter, Magnet, and Newly Built Institutions in Los Angeles. Los Angeles School Infrastructure Project. Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauter, Luke; Fuller, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Everyone knows that student achievement often suffers when children and families move, leaving behind their school and neighborhood, yet, in urban districts like Los Angeles, mobility is now encouraged by the development of mixed-markets of diverse schools, including charter, pilot, and magnet schools in. Over 60 new school facilities were opened…

  18. Mapping Careers and Mobility of Doctorate Holders: Draft Guidelines, Model Questionnaire and Indicators. OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers, 2007/6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriol, Laudeline; Felix, Bernard; Fernandez-Polcuch, Ernesto

    2007-01-01

    Human resources are recognised as being key to the creation, commercialisation and diffusion of innovation. Among them, doctorate holders are not only the most qualified in terms of educational attainment, but also those who are specifically trained to conduct research. Not much is known however about their career and mobility patterns on the…

  19. Short-Term Study Tours as a Driver for Increasing Domestic Student Mobility in Order to Generate Global Work-Ready Students and Cultural Exchange in Asia Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharoun, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Recent federal government programmes in Australia have seen a shift in focus from the international student towards increasing the possibilities for domestic mobility through short- and long-term exchange opportunities. The current New Colombo Plan funding scheme encourages Australian students, who have traditionally undertaken semester-long…

  20. Recent trends in assistive technology for mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowan Rachel E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Loss of physical mobility makes maximal participation in desired activities more difficult and in the worst case fully prevents participation. This paper surveys recent work in assistive technology to improve mobility for persons with a disability, drawing on examples observed during a tour of academic and industrial research sites in Europe. The underlying theme of this recent work is a more seamless integration of the capabilities of the user and the assistive technology. This improved integration spans diverse technologies, including powered wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, functional electrical stimulation, and wearable exoskeletons. Improved integration is being accomplished in three ways: 1 improving the assistive technology mechanics; 2 improving the user-technology physical interface; and 3 sharing of control between the user and the technology. We provide an overview of these improvements in user-technology integration and discuss whether such improvements have the potential to be transformative for people with mobility impairments.

  1. Mobile shearography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalms, Michael; Jueptner, Werner

    2005-04-01

    By reason of their sensitivity, accuracy and non-contact as well as non-destructive characteristics, modern optical methods such as digital speckle shearography have found an increasing interest for NDT applications on the factory floor. With new carbon filter technologies and other lightweight constructions in aircraft and automotive manufacturing, adapted examination designs and especially developed testing methods are necessary. Shearography as a coherent optical method has been widely accepted as an useful NDT tool. It is a robust interferometric method to determine locations with maximum stress on various material structures. However, limitations of this technique can be found in the bulky equipment components, the interpretation of the complex sherographic result images and at the work with non-cooperative surfaces (dark absorber, bright shining reflectors). We report a mobile shearography system that was especially designed for investigations at aircraft and automotive constructions.

  2. Preventing HIV Among U.S. Women of Color With Severe Mental Illness: Perceptions of Mental Health Care Providers Working in Urban Community Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Agénor, Madina; Collins, Pamela Y.

    2013-01-01

    Given their knowledge of the behavioral issues related to psychiatric illness, mental health care providers are in a unique position to help prevent HIV among women with severe mental illness (SMI). We conducted in-depth interviews with providers at two New York City community clinics. We identified three major, interrelated themes pertaining to HIV prevention among women of color with SMI. Interventions that address the barriers that clinicians face in discussing sex, sexuality, and HIV with...

  3. The Mobile Application Social Mode of Manufacturing Enterprise under the Environment of Mobile Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuo Cen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of the mobile internet, mobile communication technology and mobile terminal stimulate demand of mobile application in manufacturing enterprises, which makes the enterprise implement the mobile ERP. The implementation of mobile ERP changes the internal application management of manufacturing enterprises to social applications. We analyse the driving factors of implementing the mobile application social mode considering the complexity of organization relations and business processes of manufacturing enterprise. And then the mobile application social mode of the manufacturing enterprise is built based on mobile internet. Finally, we present the management strategies of the mobile application social network to provide references for the manufacturing enterprise.

  4. Mobility Integration of ERP systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro LOZANO

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays a lot of enterprises work with ERP systems. It usefulness is generally used in office environments and different enterprises which offer this software are developing mobile applications. These mobile applications work with their own system and they don’t usually work in other platforms. Currently any mobile application can communicate with more than one ERP system because each one has its own communications methods. This article presents a system that expect unify the communication between different ERP systems and allows mobile applications to communicate with them in a homogeneous way.

  5. Mobile Lexicography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler Simonsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Users are already mobile, but the question is to which extent knowledge-based dictionary apps are designed for the mobile user situation. The objective of this article is to analyse the characteristics of the mobile user situation and to look further into the stationary user situation...

  6. Staging Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    and lived as people are “staging themselves” (from below). Staging mobilities is a dynamic process between “being staged” (for example, being stopped at traffic lights) and the “mobile staging” of interacting individuals (negotiating a passage on the pavement). Staging Mobilities is about the fact...

  7. Mobile learning in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serkan Güllüoüǧlu, Sabri

    2013-03-01

    This paper outlines the main infrastructure for implicating mobile learning in medicine and present a sample mobile learning application for medical learning within the framework of mobile learning systems. Mobile technology is developing nowadays. In this case it will be useful to develop different learning environments using these innovations in internet based distance education. M-learning makes the most of being on location, providing immediate access, being connected, and acknowledges learning that occurs beyond formal learning settings, in places such as the workplace, home, and outdoors. Central to m-learning is the principle that it is the learner who is mobile rather than the device used to deliver m learning. The integration of mobile technologies into training has made learning more accessible and portable. Mobile technologies make it possible for a learner to have access to a computer and subsequently learning material and activities; at any time and in any place. Mobile devices can include: mobile phone, personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal digital media players (eg iPods, MP3 players), portable digital media players, portable digital multimedia players. Mobile learning (m-learning) is particularly important in medical education, and the major users of mobile devices are in the field of medicine. The contexts and environment in which learning occurs necessitates m-learning. Medical students are placed in hospital/clinical settings very early in training and require access to course information and to record and reflect on their experiences while on the move. As a result of this paper, this paper strives to compare and contrast mobile learning with normal learning in medicine from various perspectives and give insights and advises into the essential characteristics of both for sustaining medical education.

  8. Different arms of the adaptive immune system induced by a combination vaccine work in concert to provide enhanced clearance of influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbin, Joanna C A; Zeng, Weiguang; Jackson, David C; Brown, Lorena E

    2014-01-01

    Current split influenza virus vaccines that induce strain-specific neutralising antibodies provide some degree of protection against influenza infection but there is a clear need to improve their effectiveness. The constant antigenic drift of influenza viruses means that vaccines are often not an exact match to the circulating strain and so levels of relevant antibodies may not be sufficiently high to afford protection. In the situation where the emergent influenza virus is completely novel, as is the case with pandemic strains, existing vaccines may provide no benefit. In this study we tested the concept of a combination vaccine consisting of sub-optimal doses of split influenza virus vaccine mixed with a cross-protective T-cell inducing lipopeptide containing the TLR2 ligand Pam2Cys. Mice immunised with combination vaccines showed superior levels of lung viral clearance after challenge compared to either split virus or lipopeptide alone, mediated through activation of enhanced humoral and/or additional cellular responses. The mechanism of action of these vaccines was dependent on the route of administration, with intranasal administration being superior to subcutaneous and intramuscular routes, potentially through the induction of memory CD8+ T cells in the lungs. This immunisation strategy not only provides a mechanism for minimising the dose of split virus antigen but also, through the induction of cross-protective CD8+ T cells, proves a breadth of immunity to provide potential benefit upon encounter with serologically diverse influenza isolates.

  9. Different arms of the adaptive immune system induced by a combination vaccine work in concert to provide enhanced clearance of influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna C A Cobbin

    Full Text Available Current split influenza virus vaccines that induce strain-specific neutralising antibodies provide some degree of protection against influenza infection but there is a clear need to improve their effectiveness. The constant antigenic drift of influenza viruses means that vaccines are often not an exact match to the circulating strain and so levels of relevant antibodies may not be sufficiently high to afford protection. In the situation where the emergent influenza virus is completely novel, as is the case with pandemic strains, existing vaccines may provide no benefit. In this study we tested the concept of a combination vaccine consisting of sub-optimal doses of split influenza virus vaccine mixed with a cross-protective T-cell inducing lipopeptide containing the TLR2 ligand Pam2Cys. Mice immunised with combination vaccines showed superior levels of lung viral clearance after challenge compared to either split virus or lipopeptide alone, mediated through activation of enhanced humoral and/or additional cellular responses. The mechanism of action of these vaccines was dependent on the route of administration, with intranasal administration being superior to subcutaneous and intramuscular routes, potentially through the induction of memory CD8+ T cells in the lungs. This immunisation strategy not only provides a mechanism for minimising the dose of split virus antigen but also, through the induction of cross-protective CD8+ T cells, proves a breadth of immunity to provide potential benefit upon encounter with serologically diverse influenza isolates.

  10. Electronic Payments using Mobile Communication Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaij, B.D. van der; Siljee, B.I.J.; Broekhuijsen, B.J.; Ponsioen, C.; Maas, A.; Aten, R.M.; Hoepman, J.H.; Loon, J.H. van; Smit, M.

    2009-01-01

    A method of making a payment uses a first mobile communication device (1) and a second mobile communication device (2), each mobile communication device being provided with a respective near field communication unit (11, 21) and at least one of the mobile communication devices being provided with an

  11. Doing the right task: Context-Aware Notification for Mobile Police Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streefkerk, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The main argument in this thesis is that mobile technology has to adapt information presentation to the mobile use context and Human Factors (attention, workload and individual characteristics). This will provide better support for work in these domains than non-adaptive systems. We expect such

  12. "UML Quiz": Automatic Conversion of Web-Based E-Learning Content in Mobile Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Franqué, Alexander; Tellioglu, Hilda

    2014-01-01

    Many educational institutions use Learning Management Systems to provide e-learning content to their students. This often includes quizzes that can help students to prepare for exams. However, the content is usually web-optimized and not very usable on mobile devices. In this work a native mobile application ("UML Quiz") that imports…

  13. Doing the right task : Context-aware notification for mobile police teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streefkerk, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The main argument in this thesis is that mobile technology has to adapt information presentation to the mobile use context and Human Factors (attention, workload and individual characteristics). This will provide better support for work in these domains than non-adaptive systems. We expect such

  14. Mobile phone as a platform for numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Filip A.

    2012-01-01

    In this work numerical simulations performed on mobile devices equipped with ARM microprocessors are shown. Calculations include: light propagation in linear and nonlinear media based on one-dimensional Schrödinger equation and molecules reorientation in nematic liquid crystals. The purpose of this publication is to show advantages and disadvantages of using mobile devices as a platform for education and research. Discussion about software development is provided.

  15. Radio channel measurement and modelling for future mobile radio systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerdenli, E.; Huish, P. W.

    1989-12-01

    Digital mobile radio systems will require planning methods that provide accurate predictions of signal strength, distortion, and interference for situations ranging from very small cells in dense urban locations to large rural cells. Topographic and land usage data bases will find increasing use to enhance the accuracy of prediction models. The implications of these issues are discussed and the work in progress at British Telecommunications Research Laboratories on land mobile radio propagation modeling and wide-band channel measurements is presented.

  16. Working with Individuals Who Provide Nursing Care to Educate Older Adults about Foodborne Illness Prevention: The Food Safety Because You Care! Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly C. Wohlgenant

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Older adults are more susceptible to foodborne infections than younger adults and many older adults do not follow recommended food safety practices. This study implemented the Food Safety Because You Care! program with 88 individuals in the United States who provide nursing care to older adult patients and subsequently surveyed them. The majority of respondents had favorable opinions of the program. Following program exposure, many of the respondents advised their older adult patients about food safety. The findings from this study suggest that the program is a useful tool that can assist those who provide nursing care as they interact with their older patients and lead them to positively influence older adults’ food safety practices. However, more research is needed to examine changes in providers’ behaviors as a result of program exposure and the accompanying effect on older adults’ food safety practices.

  17. Dexras1 a unique ras-GTPase interacts with NMDA receptor activity and provides a novel dissociation between anxiety, working memory and sensory gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, G C; Lin, R E; Chen, Y; Brookshire, B R; White, R S; Lucki, I; Siegel, S J; Kim, S F

    2016-05-13

    Dexras1 is a novel GTPase that acts at a confluence of signaling mechanisms associated with psychiatric and neurological disease including NMDA receptors, NOS1AP and nNOS. Recent work has shown that Dexras1 mediates iron trafficking and NMDA-dependent neurodegeneration but a role for Dexras1 in normal brain function or psychiatric disease has not been studied. To test for such a role, mice with germline knockout (KO) of Dexras1 were assayed for behavioral abnormalities as well as changes in NMDA receptor subunit protein expression. Because Dexras1 is up-regulated during stress or by dexamethasone treatment, we included measures associated with emotion including anxiety and depression. Baseline anxiety-like measures (open field and zero maze) were not altered, nor were depression-like behavior (tail suspension). Measures of memory function yielded mixed results, with no changes in episodic memory (novel object recognition) but a significant decrement on working memory (T-maze). Alternatively, there was an increase in pre-pulse inhibition (PPI), without concomitant changes in either startle amplitude or locomotor activity. PPI data are consistent with the direction of change seen following exposure to dopamine D2 antagonists. An examination of NMDA subunit expression levels revealed an increased expression of the NR2A subunit, contrary to previous studies demonstrating down-regulation of the receptor following antipsychotic exposure (Schmitt et al., 2003) and up-regulation after exposure to isolation rearing (Turnock-Jones et al., 2009). These findings suggest a potential role for Dexras1 in modulating a selective subset of psychiatric symptoms, possibly via its interaction with NMDARs and/or other disease-related binding-partners. Furthermore, data suggest that modulating Dexras1 activity has contrasting effects on emotional, sensory and cognitive domains. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Creating mobile apps with Appcelerator Titanium

    CERN Document Server

    Brousseau, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Creating Mobile Apps with Appcelerator Titanium provides a hands-on approach and working examples on creating apps and games as well as embedding them onto a social networking website. Developers can then move on from there to develop their own applications based on the ones they have developed throughout the course of this book.""Creating Mobile Apps with Appcelerator Titanium"" is for developers who have experience with modern languages and development environments. Also, if you are familiar with the concepts of Object-oriented Programming (OOP), reusable components, AJAX closures, and so on

  19. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  20. Mobile Health Information System: A Mobile App

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Steve

    It also serves as an inventory control where statistics about a particular illness is known. Generally, Mobile Health Information System (MHIS) is built to help manage, control, and store health information, and at the same time help the health workers on field work to pass accurate and timely report to the necessary quarters.

  1. Robonaut Mobile Autonomy: Initial Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diftler, M. A.; Ambrose, R. O.; Goza, S. M.; Tyree, K. S.; Huber, E. L.

    2006-01-01

    A mobile version of the NASA/DARPA Robonaut humanoid recently completed initial autonomy trials working directly with humans in cluttered environments. This compact robot combines the upper body of the Robonaut system with a Segway Robotic Mobility Platform yielding a dexterous, maneuverable humanoid ideal for interacting with human co-workers in a range of environments. This system uses stereovision to locate human teammates and tools and a navigation system that uses laser range and vision data to follow humans while avoiding obstacles. Tactile sensors provide information to grasping algorithms for efficient tool exchanges. The autonomous architecture utilizes these pre-programmed skills to form complex behaviors. The initial behavior demonstrates a robust capability to assist a human by acquiring a tool from a remotely located individual and then following the human in a cluttered environment with the tool for future use.

  2. AN AGENT BASED TRANSACTION PROCESSING SCHEME FOR DISCONNECTED MOBILE NODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Walter Jeyakumar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a mobile transaction framework in which mobile users can share data which is stored in the cache of a mobile agent. This mobile agent is a special mobile node which coordinates the sharing process. The proposed framework allows mobile affiliation work groups to be formed dynamically with a mobile agent and mobile hosts. Using short range wireless communication technology, mobile users can simultaneously access the data from the cache of the mobile agent. The data Access Manager module at the mobile agent enforces concurrency control using cache invalidation technique. This model supports disconnected mobile computing allowing mobile agent to move along with the Mobile Hosts. The proposed Transaction frame work has been simulated in Java 2 and performance of this scheme is compared with existing frame works.

  3. M3-learning - Exploring mobile multimedia microblogging learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Holotescu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the context in which the new frontier of Web 2.0 is marked out by the use of mobile devices anywhere, anytime, by anyone and anything, our paper aims at valorizing the mobility parameters of the Cirip.eu platform in order to integrate the microblogging technology in higher education, for the purpose of increasing knowledge and learning in authentic mobile learning environments. As an innovation for the mobile learning through microblogging, we mention the following elements:•On a technological level: localize / join mobile groups, access content and OERs, share opinions, work collaboratively on multimedia objects, participate in polls / quizzes, receive / send updates via SMS, create / manage mobile PLEs, recover password via SMS;On a pedagogical level: develop multimedia educational resources / learning objects by using mobile technologies specific for different subject areas to be teached with microblogging.Thus, the aim of our experiment is not only to provide a general overview / a framework for using microblogging through mobile technologies, but also a way to enhance teaching and learning in formal university courses and to present mobile microblogging learning benefits, opportunities, limits and risks.

  4. Mobile contingency unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Sergio O. da; Magalhaes, Milton P. de [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Junqueira, Rodrigo A.; Torres, Carlos A.R. [PETROBRAS Transporte S/A (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting what is already a reality in TRANSPETRO in the area covered by OSBRA, a pipeline that carries by-products to the Mid-West region of Brazil. In order to meet the needs of covering occasional accidents, TRANSPETRO counts on a standardized system of emergency management. It is a great challenge to secure an efficient communication along the 964 km of extension, considering that there are shadow zones where it is not possible to use conventional means of communication such as mobile telephony and internet. It was in this context that the Mobile Contingency Unit Via Satellite - MCU was developed, to extend the communication facilities existing in fixed installations to remote places, mainly the pipeline right of ways. In case of emergency, simulation and work in the pipeline right of way, MCU is fully able to provide the same data, voice, closed-circuit TV and satellite video conference facilities that are available in any internal area of the PETROBRAS system. (author)

  5. The mobile LBS positioning solution based on NRTK and Windows Mobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhongping; Duan, Xuwen; Lu, Jingxin; Yue, Xiaoyong; Liu, Wen; He, Qianqian

    2009-12-01

    In order to meet the requirements of Location-based Service (LBS), there are many proposed positioning solutions that may be able to provide LBS support, such as GPS, Mobile Phone Location, RFID, and so on. With the most widely recognized system being the Global Positioning System (GPS) and Windows Mobile 5.0 system characteristics, this paper first provides three kinds method, i.e. invoking Win32 API, using Ports namespace and calling GPS Intermediate Driver, to receive GPS raw data on Windows Mobile devices. Since internet-based GPS VRS RTK workstation can provide real-time streaming of differential GPS corrections. The following text introduces a high precision Net-based RTK (NRTK) mobile positioning solution which is mainly equipped with a Windows Mobile 5.0 device and an Ashtech Z-Xtreme receiver. With it a rover-side (NtripClient) firstly connects to an NtripCaster which is a part of a VRS workstation, via GPRS /CDMA, using the IP and specified listening Port of the Tongji VRS workstation. Then the rover-side transmits NMEA GGA strings after the HTTP request to the NtripCaster. With that the Windows Mobile device continuously receives RTCM data back from the NtripCaster and instantly sends them out into the Ashtech Z-Xtreme receiver. Finally, the Ashtech Z-Xtreme receiver will work out vector solution information of the rover-side. Thus, this paper provides a multimode mobile LBS positioning solution based on NRTK and Windows Mobile 5.0.

  6. Joint mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Deborah Gross; Walker, J Randy; Levine, David

    2005-11-01

    Therapeutic touch has been used in human beings to soothe aches and pains. Most dogs also seem to enjoy being touched. Manual therapy techniques are skilled hand movements intended to improve tissue extensibility; increase range of motion; induce relaxation; mobilize or manipulate soft tissue and joints; modulate pain; and reduce soft tissue swelling, inflammation, or restriction. The intent of this article is to provide an overview of the principles of manual therapy, followed by selected treatment techniques for the hip, stifle, elbow, shoulder, carpus.and thoracic and lumbar spine. The techniques of G.D. Maitland, an Australian physical therapist who developed a clinically based approach in the 1960s and 1970s, are emphasized.

  7. Visualizing Mobility of Public Transportation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Fu, Chi-Wing; Arisona, Stefan Müller; Erath, Alexander; Qu, Huamin

    2014-12-01

    Public transportation systems (PTSs) play an important role in modern cities, providing shared/massive transportation services that are essential for the general public. However, due to their increasing complexity, designing effective methods to visualize and explore PTS is highly challenging. Most existing techniques employ network visualization methods and focus on showing the network topology across stops while ignoring various mobility-related factors such as riding time, transfer time, waiting time, and round-the-clock patterns. This work aims to visualize and explore passenger mobility in a PTS with a family of analytical tasks based on inputs from transportation researchers. After exploring different design alternatives, we come up with an integrated solution with three visualization modules: isochrone map view for geographical information, isotime flow map view for effective temporal information comparison and manipulation, and OD-pair journey view for detailed visual analysis of mobility factors along routes between specific origin-destination pairs. The isotime flow map linearizes a flow map into a parallel isoline representation, maximizing the visualization of mobility information along the horizontal time axis while presenting clear and smooth pathways from origin to destinations. Moreover, we devise several interactive visual query methods for users to easily explore the dynamics of PTS mobility over space and time. Lastly, we also construct a PTS mobility model from millions of real passenger trajectories, and evaluate our visualization techniques with assorted case studies with the transportation researchers.

  8. On the extent of researcher mobility and indicators for mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriere, S.; Baard, P.; Karlsson, S.; Jacobsson, C.; Tumpane, J.

    2016-07-01

    Researchers' mobility is significant for the quality of research, although mobility does not necessarily have an intrinsic value. Sweden appears to have a lover degree of mobility when compared to a selection of successful research countries. The Swedish Research Council shall, according to the instruction from the government , promote researcher mobility. This study explores job-mobility within the Swedish academic system based on register studies and draw some conclusions on the degree of mobility in different different disciplines, differences between men and women as well as on the development of comprehensive and easy to follow indicators for mobility. The study intends to provide support for recommendations on researcher mobility within the Research Council's overarching goal to promote excellence in research. (Author)

  9. Advanced care nurse practitioners can safely provide sole resident cover for level three patients: impact on outcomes, cost and work patterns in a cardiac surgery programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Henry; Skoyles, Julian; Redfearn, Sue; Jutley, Raj; Mitchell, Ian; Richens, David

    2013-01-01

    There are significant pressures on resident medical rotas on intensive care. We have evaluated the safety and feasibility of nurse practitioners (NPs) delivering first-line care on an intensive care unit with all doctors becoming non-resident. Previously, resident doctors on a 1:8 full-shift rota supported by NPs delivered first-line care to patients after cardiac surgery. Subsequently, junior doctors changed to a 1:5 non-resident rota and NPs onto a 1:7 full-shift rota provided first-line care. A single centre before-and-after service evaluation on cardiac intensive care. mortality rates, surgical trainee attendance in theatre and cost before and after the change. After-hour calls by NPs to doctors and subsequent actions were also audited after the change. The overall mortality rates in the 12 months before the change were 2.8 and 2.2% in the 12 months after (P = 0.43). The median [range] logistic EuroSCORE was 5.3 [0.9-84] before and 5.0 [0.9-85] after the change (P = 0.16). After accounting for the risk profile, the odds ratio for death after the change relative to before was 0.83, 95% confidence interval 0.41-1.69. Before the change, a surgical trainee attended theatre 467 of 702 (68%) cases. This increased to 539 of 677 (80%) cases after the change (P cost of staffing the junior doctor and NP programme before the change was £933 344 and £764 691 after. In the year after the change, 192 after-hour calls were made to doctors. In 57% of cases telephone advice sufficed and doctors attended in 43%. With adequate training and appropriate support, resident NPs can provide a safe, sustainable alternative to traditional staffing models of cardiac intensive care. Training opportunities for junior surgeons increased and costs were reduced.

  10. Mobilities, Futures & the City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freudendal-Pedersen, Malene; Kesselring, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The future of cities and regions will be strongly shaped by the mobilities of people, goods, modes of transport, waste and information. In many ways, the ‘why and ‘for what’ often get lost in discourses on planning and designing mobilities. The predominant planning paradigm still conceptualizes...... the future of cities and mobilities as a matter of rather more efficient technologies than of social cohesion, integration and connectivity. Sustainable mobility needs the mobilities of ideas and concepts and the reflexivity of policies. Communicative planning theory and the ‘argumentative turn’ have given...... this article, was to explicitly provide an intersection for reflexivity, interdisciplinarity and exchange, to foster the creation of such stories....

  11. Mobilities and Representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thelle, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    , literature, and film. Moreover, we hope the authors of future reviews will reflect on the ways they approached those representations. Such commentaries would provide valuable methodological insights, and we hope to begin that effort with this interview. We have asked four prominent mobility scholars......As the centerpiece of the eighth T2M yearbook, the following interview about representations of mobility signals a new and exciting focus area for Mobility in History. In future issues we hope to include reviews that grapple more with how mobilities have been imagined and represented in the arts...... to consider how they and their peers are currently confronting representations of mobility. This is particularly timely given the growing academic focus on practices, material mediation, and nonrepresentational theories, as well as on bodily reactions, emotions, and feelings that, according to those theories...

  12. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  13. Development of a Mobile User Interface for Image-based Dietary Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungye; Schap, Tusarebecca; Bosch, Marc; Maciejewski, Ross; Delp, Edward J; Ebert, David S; Boushey, Carol J

    2010-12-31

    In this paper, we present a mobile user interface for image-based dietary assessment. The mobile user interface provides a front end to a client-server image recognition and portion estimation software. In the client-server configuration, the user interactively records a series of food images using a built-in camera on the mobile device. Images are sent from the mobile device to the server, and the calorie content of the meal is estimated. In this paper, we describe and discuss the design and development of our mobile user interface features. We discuss the design concepts, through initial ideas and implementations. For each concept, we discuss qualitative user feedback from participants using the mobile client application. We then discuss future designs, including work on design considerations for the mobile application to allow the user to interactively correct errors in the automatic processing while reducing the user burden associated with classical pen-and-paper dietary records.

  14. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix

    Contemporary society is marked and defined by the ways in which mobile goods, bodies, vehicles, objects, and data are organized, moved and staged. On the background of the ‘mobilities turn’ (e.g. Cresswell 2006, Urry 2007) this book articulates a new and emerging research field, namely that of ‘m......Contemporary society is marked and defined by the ways in which mobile goods, bodies, vehicles, objects, and data are organized, moved and staged. On the background of the ‘mobilities turn’ (e.g. Cresswell 2006, Urry 2007) this book articulates a new and emerging research field, namely...... that of ‘mobilities design’. The book revolves around the following research question: How are design decisions and interventions staging mobilities? It builds upon the Staging Mobilities model (Jensen 2013) in an explorative inquiry into the problems and potentials of the design of mobilities. The exchange value...... between mobilities and design research is twofold. To mobilities research this means getting closer to the ‘material’, and to engage in the creative, explorative and experimental approaches of the design world which offer new potentials for innovative research. Design research, on the other hand, might...

  15. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix

    2016-01-01

    of increasing concern and societal importance, regardless if the focus is on new inequalities, environmental sustainability, or the meaning of vernacular mobilities design to the everyday life. The theme of ‘mobilities design’ opens up the agenda of architectural research into infrastructure spaces as ‘spaces...... of the perspective in the direction of a material and design oriented turn. In order to fulfill this purpose we articulate a new and emerging research field, namely that of ‘mobilities design’. In our understanding time has come to articulate ‘Mobilities Design’ as a dedicated research field in and of its own....... There is a need for research targeting the material, physical and design-oriented dimensions of the multiple mobilities from the local to the global. Despite its cross-disciplinary identity the ‘mobilities turn’ has not sufficiently capitalized from the potential in exploring issues of material design...

  16. Mobility Divides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    Contemporary mobilities are cultural and social manifestations, and the mobile practices in the everyday life of billions of humans are re-configuring senses of place, self, other and relationships to the built environment. The way ‘mobile situations’ are staged in designed and built environments......’ in the everyday life and cast light on how design and ‘materialities of mobilites’ are creating differential mobilities across societies, social networks, and communities of practices....... are increasingly becoming ‘second nature’ but also expressions of power, exclusion, and difference. In this talk I will be applying a perspective of ‘mobile situationism’ illustrating how mobile everyday life practices are staged ‘from above’ in planning and policy frameworks, design codes and architectural...

  17. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Wind, Simon; Jensen, Ole B.

    2017-01-01

    is a relevant field of knowledge for urban design, because of its focus on a nuanced conceptualization of the daily journeys that we all undertake in mobilities spaces. Second, the mobilities turn aids a theoretical “mobilization” of the design of mobilities spaces with a point of departure in a fused theory...... field with particular attention to actor-network theory (ANT), which offers tools to understand the embeddedness of mobilities spaces in hybrid and dynamic relationships. Through these linkages between the mobilities turn and urban design, the article suggests a pathway for a carefully radical...... for urban designers and architects to address mobilities spaces in relation not only to technical demands, but also to the wide host of social, cultural, political, economic, and affective formations in which they are embedded and which they influence....

  18. [Social mobilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bop, C

    1990-04-01

    One of the principal recommendations from Alma Ata and the Bamako Initiative was the need for communities to take responsibility for their own health--a recommendation that still remains unmet and in need of reform in Africa because of the severe economic recession and lack of resources allocated for health care in the region. The mobilization of communities "is the opposite of passivity and submission." People must demystify the notion that health care is the exclusive right of health professionals and should realize that they themselves can bring about changes from the household to the village levels; community mobilization is an integral component of development planning. African societies have developed very centralized structures requiring changes that only their own communities can bring about. Because women remain the principal agents for the family's health they should be informed, about the multiple dimensions leading to good health care to enable them to provide the rest of the family with good nourishment and health care follow-up. Children are a vulnerable and important group that require preventive care. A UNICEF experiment in Senegal is training 10-13 year old school children to visit the parents of 5 children, inform them about vaccinating their children, and to follow-up on their activities with these "adopted families." The need for short and long-term IEC interventions in Africa are a priority and effective strategies must be found to reach the majority of the rural populations where all obstacles such as the lack of infrastructure and illiteracy exist. Mali has used traditional theatre "Koteba" to reach the rural populations on a variety of health issues such as oral rehydration and diarrhea as well as the Rural Audio Library (it used cassettes rather than books) to reach villagers in their own languages. The worst obstacle facing Africa today is the refusal of officials in power to allow people to manage their own lives, of which health is a

  19. Trends In Academic Content for Mobile Devices [video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan D'Agostino

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This presentation by Sarah Forbes and Dan D'Agostino was given at the Ontario Library Association's Super Conference in Toronto, Ontario, on February 3, 2012. Session Abstract from the Super Conference Program: As ownership of mobile devices continues to proliferate, libraries are finding it difficult to provide academic content that works well in the mobile world. Discover how various e-book and e-journal formats can be made to work with mobile devices of all kinds, and will explore the next generation of digital content designed for mobile devices – new formats that may re-invent how information is used by readers. Partnership would like to thank the authors and the Ontario Library Association for their generous permission to publish an Open Access version of this conference session. This is one of several Super Conference 2012 video presentations available for purchase from Super Conference: the Virtual Experience - http://ola.scholarlab.ca/.

  20. Mobile Semiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2013-01-01

    is a ‘mobile sense making’ where signs and materially situated meanings connect to the moving human body and thus create particular challenges and complexities of making sense of the world. The chapter includes notions of mobility systems and socio-technical networks in order to show how a ‘semiotic layer’ may......This chapter aims to understand the mobile condition of contemporary life with a particular view to the signifying dimension of the environment and its ‘readability’. The chapter explores the potentials of semiotics and its relationship to the new mobilities literature. What takes place...

  1. Mobile sensing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-12-16

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high.

  2. Limits of social mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-04-16

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability.

  3. Mobile Sensing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Macias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high.

  4. Mobile Sensing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high. PMID:24351637

  5. Mobile Context Toolbox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Skomail, Lukasz

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe an open framework utilizing sensors and application data on the Maemo mobile platform enabling rapid prototyping of context-aware mobile applications. The framework has an extensible layered architecture allowing new hardware and software sensors and features to be added...... to the context framework. We present initial results from in-the-wild experiments where contextual data was acquired using the tool. In the experiments 6 participants were using a Nokia N900 mobile phone continuously with a logger application for an average of 33 days. The study has provided valuable insights...

  6. Mobile ad hoc networking

    CERN Document Server

    John Wiley & Sons

    2004-01-01

    "Assimilating the most up-to-date information on research and development activities in this rapidly growing area, Mobile Ad Hoc Networking covers physical, data link, network, and transport layers, as well as application, security, simulation, and power management issues in sensor, local area, personal, and mobile ad hoc networks. Each of the book's sixteen chapters has been written by a top expert and discusses in-depth the most important topics in the field. Mobile Ad Hoc Networking is an excellent reference and guide for professionals seeking an in-depth examination of topics that also provides a comprehensive overview of the current state-of-the-art."--Jacket.

  7. Data mining mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Mena, Jesus

    2013-01-01

    With today's consumers spending more time on their mobiles than on their PCs, new methods of empirical stochastic modeling have emerged that can provide marketers with detailed information about the products, content, and services their customers desire.Data Mining Mobile Devices defines the collection of machine-sensed environmental data pertaining to human social behavior. It explains how the integration of data mining and machine learning can enable the modeling of conversation context, proximity sensing, and geospatial location throughout large communities of mobile users

  8. The future of mobile devices : security and mobility

    OpenAIRE

    Fitton, Oliver; Prince, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Mobile computing has transformed the way we work, play and communicate in a very short space of time. Advances in mobile technology and the innovative uses of that technology have contributed to a multitude of social and political effects from new ecommerce enterprises to the London Riots. Alongside these innovations are security concerns which will underpin how we think about and develop mobile technology in the future. This two day workshop comprised of a conceptual discussion and two techn...

  9. Mobile electric vehicles online charging and discharging

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Miao; Shen, Xuemin (Sherman)

    2016-01-01

    This book examines recent research on designing online charging and discharging strategies for mobile electric vehicles (EVs) in smart grid. First, the architecture and applications are provided. Then, the authors review the existing works on charging and discharging strategy design for EVs. Critical challenges and research problems are identified. Promising solutions are proposed to accommodate the issues of high EV mobility, vehicle range anxiety, and power systems overload. The authors investigate innovating charging and discharging potentials for mobile EVS based on real-time information collections (via VANETS and/or cellular networks) and offer the power system adjustable load management methods.  Several innovative charging/discharging strategy designs to address the challenging issues in smart grid, i.e., overload avoidance and range anxiety for individual EVs, are presented. This book presents an alternative and promising way to release the pressure of the power grid caused by peak-time EV charging ...

  10. Towards urban mobility designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Harder, Henrik; Jensen, Ole B.

    2012-01-01

    Functionalist traffic design aims at a rational organisation of movement from A to B in a segregated and uniform physical environment. Such urban areas have been criticized for being exclusively functional and lacking sensuous and social qualities. Recent research on mobilities challenges the more...... are concerned with. - Third, we introduce an embodied mobile perspective through insights from the mobilities turn. - Fourth, through our own journey experience en route we present a mapping of the transit site. - We conclude by outlining a few propositions on the design challenge and design potentials......, in relation to re-conceptualisation of the transit site, to mapping, and to design intervention. These propositions form part of our on-going work with urban mobility designs....

  11. Benefits of dynamic mobility applications : preliminary estimates from the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This white paper examines the available quantitative information on the potential mobility benefits of the connected vehicle Dynamic Mobility Applications (DMA). This work will be refined as more and better estimates of benefits from mobility applica...

  12. Mobile devices tools and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Mobile Devices: Tools and Technologies provides readers with an understanding of the mobile landscape available to app developers, system and network engineers, and the avid techie. As the trend of mobile technology has enabled the continuous development of ubiquitous applications, this book offers insights into tools and technologies critical to evaluating and implementing mobile strategies.The book is organized into four parts of 18 contributed chapters written by engineers in the areas of application and database development, mobile enterprise strategy, and networking and security. Througho

  13. Tellurium Mobility Through Mine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsk, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tellurium is a rare metalloid that has received minimal research regarding environmental mobility. Observations of Tellurium mobility are mainly based on observations of related metalloids such as selenium and beryllium; yet little research has been done on specific Tellurium behavior. This laboratory work established the environmental controls that influence Tellurium mobility and chemical speciation in aqueous driven systems. Theoretical simulations show possible mobility of Te as Te(OH)3[+] at highly oxidizing and acidic conditions. Movement as TeO3[2-] under more basic conditions may also be possible in elevated Eh conditions. Mobility in reducing environments is theoretically not as likely. For a practical approach to investigate mobility conditions for Te, a site with known Tellurium content was chosen in Colorado. Composite samples were selected from the top, center and bottom of a tailings pile for elution experiments. These samples were disintegrated using a rock crusher and pulverized with an automated mortar and pestle. The material was then classified to 70 microns. A 10g sample split was digested in concentrated HNO3 and HF and analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy to determine initial Te concentrations. Additional 10g splits from each location were subjected to elution in 100 mL of each of the following solutions; nitric acid to a pH of 1.0, sulfuric acid to a pH of 2.0, sodium hydroxide to a pH of 12, ammonium hydroxide to a pH of 10, a pine needle/soil tea from material within the vicinity of the collection site to a pH of 3.5 and lastly distilled water to serve as control with a pH of 7. Sulfuric acid was purposefully chosen to simulate acid mine drainage from the decomposition of pyrite within the mine tailings. Sample sub sets were also inundated with 10mL of a 3% hydrogen peroxide solution to induce oxidizing conditions. All collected eluates were then analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) to measure Tellurium concentrations in

  14. Work and Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willig, Rasmus

    2004-01-01

    individual and collective identity formation and has led to an increase in social pathological illnesses such as stress and depression. By juxtaposing these analyses with Honneth’s theory on recognition, we conclude that the contemporary logic of work is unable to provide adequate forms of recognition......The article deals with the relationship between work and recognition, taking Axel Honneth’s social-philosophical theory of the struggle for recognition as its point of departure. In order to give sociological substance to Honneth’s theory, we turn to three contemporary social theorists - Jean......-Pierre Le Goff, Christophe Dejours and Emmanuel Renault. In spite of many differences, their work is united by a critical description of the logic of work and its consequences for individual individuation. These theorists agree that the growth of autonomy, flexibility and mobility has destabilised...

  15. Learning for intelligent mobile robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ernest L.; Liao, Xiaoqun; Alhaj Ali, Souma M.

    2003-10-01

    Unlike intelligent industrial robots which often work in a structured factory setting, intelligent mobile robots must often operate in an unstructured environment cluttered with obstacles and with many possible action paths. However, such machines have many potential applications in medicine, defense, industry and even the home that make their study important. Sensors such as vision are needed. However, in many applications some form of learning is also required. The purpose of this paper is to present a discussion of recent technical advances in learning for intelligent mobile robots. During the past 20 years, the use of intelligent industrial robots that are equipped not only with motion control systems but also with sensors such as cameras, laser scanners, or tactile sensors that permit adaptation to a changing environment has increased dramatically. However, relatively little has been done concerning learning. Adaptive and robust control permits one to achieve point to point and controlled path operation in a changing environment. This problem can be solved with a learning control. In the unstructured environment, the terrain and consequently the load on the robot"s motors are constantly changing. Learning the parameters of a proportional, integral and derivative controller (PID) and artificial neural network provides an adaptive and robust control. Learning may also be used for path following. Simulations that include learning may be conducted to see if a robot can learn its way through a cluttered array of obstacles. If a situation is performed repetitively, then learning can also be used in the actual application. To reach an even higher degree of autonomous operation, a new level of learning is required. Recently learning theories such as the adaptive critic have been proposed. In this type of learning a critic provides a grade to the controller of an action module such as a robot. The creative control process is used that is "beyond the adaptive critic." A

  16. Resource Mobilization

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This practical guidebook supports and promotes new and creative thinking on resource mobilization for ... sources and come up with creative resource mobilization strategies to ensure survival. The Importance of ...... funds had already been earmarked for buying new classroom facilities. Maintain integrity of auction. 2.

  17. Guide to Working with Model Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Katie; Hassel, Bryan C.

    Often a central feature of a school's improvement efforts is the adoption of a Comprehensive School Reform (CSR) model, an externally developed research-based design for school improvement. Adopting a model is only the first step in CSR. Another important step is forging partnerships with developers of CSR models. This guide aims to help schools…

  18. Creating a Mobile Library Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutshall, Tom C.; Blake, Lindsay; Bandy, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    The overwhelming results were iPhones and Android devices. Since the library wasn't equipped technologically to develop an in-house application platform and because we wanted the content to work across all mobile platforms, we decided to focus on creating a mobile web-based platform. From the NLM page of mobile sites we chose the basic PubMed/…

  19. Compelled to Be Connected: An Ethnographic Exploration of Organizational Culture, Work-Life Balance, and the Use of Mobile Workplace Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kristopher J.

    2013-01-01

    This study is an ethnographic exploration of organizational culture, work-life balance, and the use of information and communication technology ("ICT") in the work and home settings. The researcher was embedded for nine weeks within the Information Technology ("IT") department at the corporate headquarters of a mid-sized…

  20. Analyzing Cultural Usability of Mobile Keypad and Displays for Textual Communication in Internationalization and Localization Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orngreen, Rikke; Katre, Dinesh; Sandeep, Mulagapati

    The aim of this paper is to identify the cultural usability aspects that need to be considered while internationalizing or localizing the interaction design of mobile keypads and displays for textual communication. The analysis is based primarily on heuristics tests, where: Hindi, Arabic and Danish mobile phones are evaluated based on assumptions of user needs, and in comparison to English. We have also referred the existing research on Chinese mobile phones to further complement our work. The study provides an insight into the much needed local-language centred approach in contrast with the current English centred approach of existing mobile keypad designs and display of text.

  1. Mobility Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lassen, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This article takes point of departure in the challenges to understand the importance of contemporary mobility. The approach advocated is a cross-disciplinary one drawing on sociology, geography, urban planning and design, and cultural studies. As such the perspective is to be seen as a part...... mobilities. In particular the article discusses 1) the physical city, its infrastructures and technological hardware/software, 2) policies and planning strategies for urban mobility and 3) the lived everyday life in the city and the region....... of the so-called ‘mobility turn’ within social science. The perspective is illustrative for the research efforts at the Centre for Mobility and Urban Studies (C-MUS), Aalborg University. The article presents the contours of a theoretical perspective meeting the challenges to research into contemporary urban...

  2. Mobilities Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Lanng, Ditte Bendix

    2016-01-01

    and physical form. The exchange value with design is twofold; first this means getting closer to the ‘material’ which is needed if mobilities research can claim to have understood contemporary mobilities, second it means that the creative, explorative and experimental approaches of the design world becomes...... insights, concepts of space and place, and relations between fixities and flows. The new and emerging field of ‘mobilities design’ will be exploring the borderlines between architecture, urban design, urban planning, and infrastructure design. The field will address the ‘gap’ in research on an issue...... of increasing concern and societal importance, regardless if the focus is on new inequalities, environmental sustainability, or the meaning of vernacular mobilities design to the everyday life. The theme of ‘mobilities design’ opens up the agenda of architectural research into infrastructure spaces as ‘spaces...

  3. Entropy-Based Privacy against Profiling of User Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Rodriguez-Carrion

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Location-based services (LBSs flood mobile phones nowadays, but their use poses an evident privacy risk. The locations accompanying the LBS queries can be exploited by the LBS provider to build the user profile of visited locations, which might disclose sensitive data, such as work or home locations. The classic concept of entropy is widely used to evaluate privacy in these scenarios, where the information is represented as a sequence of independent samples of categorized data. However, since the LBS queries might be sent very frequently, location profiles can be improved by adding temporal dependencies, thus becoming mobility profiles, where location samples are not independent anymore and might disclose the user’s mobility patterns. Since the time dimension is factored in, the classic entropy concept falls short of evaluating the real privacy level, which depends also on the time component. Therefore, we propose to extend the entropy-based privacy metric to the use of the entropy rate to evaluate mobility profiles. Then, two perturbative mechanisms are considered to preserve locations and mobility profiles under gradual utility constraints. We further use the proposed privacy metric and compare it to classic ones to evaluate both synthetic and real mobility profiles when the perturbative methods proposed are applied. The results prove the usefulness of the proposed metric for mobility profiles and the need for tailoring the perturbative methods to the features of mobility profiles in order to improve privacy without completely loosing utility.

  4. Mobile Multicast in Hierarchical Proxy Mobile IPV6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafizah Mohd Aman, Azana; Hashim, Aisha Hassan A.; Mustafa, Amin; Abdullah, Khaizuran

    2013-12-01

    Mobile Internet Protocol Version 6 (MIPv6) environments have been developing very rapidly. Many challenges arise with the fast progress of MIPv6 technologies and its environment. Therefore the importance of improving the existing architecture and operations increases. One of the many challenges which need to be addressed is the need for performance improvement to support mobile multicast. Numerous approaches have been proposed to improve mobile multicast performance. This includes Context Transfer Protocol (CXTP), Hierarchical Mobile IPv6 (HMIPv6), Fast Mobile IPv6 (FMIPv6) and Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIPv6). This document describes multicast context transfer in hierarchical proxy mobile IPv6 (H-PMIPv6) to provide better multicasting performance in PMIPv6 domain.

  5. Mobile and contextual learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Kukulska-Hulme

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Is mobile learning just a part of everyday learning? This is a relevant question in an age when most people throughout the world now have access to mobile phones and mobility is increasingly taken for granted. In one sense, mobile learning is no different to carrying a textbook or learning through conversations at home, as part of formal education or in the workplace. The technology may be more engaging, but is the learning any different? Despite the ubiquity of mobile phones, smartphones, mp3 players and, increasingly, access to Wi-Fi connections and GPS navigation, the reasons for using mobile and wireless technologies in education are not yet widely known. There is significant specialist expertise, built from ten years of research (and more recently, reflective practice to demonstrate the unique characteristics of mobile learning, which include orchestrating shared learning with personal devices across formal and informal settings, providing immediately useful information, offering timely revision and reflection, connecting real and virtual locations, and enriching field trips and cultural visits. This knowledge needs to be disseminated and examined from new perspectives.

  6. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  7. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings......Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  8. Using a mobile app and mobile workforce to validate data about emergency public health resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anna Marie; Leung, Alison C; Saynisch, Olivia; Griffis, Heather; Hill, Shawndra; Hershey, John C; Becker, Lance B; Asch, David A; Seidman, Ariel; Merchant, Raina Martha

    2014-07-01

    Social media and mobile applications that allow people to work anywhere are changing the way people can contribute and collaborate. We sought to determine the feasibility of using mobile workforce technology to validate the locations of automated external defibrillators (AEDs), an emergency public health resource. We piloted the use of a mobile workforce application, to verify the location of 40 AEDs in Philadelphia county. AEDs were pre-identified in public locations for baseline data. The task of locating AEDs was posted online for a mobile workforce from October 2011 to January 2012. Participants were required to submit a mobile phone photo of AEDs and descriptions of the location. Thirty-five of the 40 AEDs were identified within the study period. Most, 91% (32/35) of the submitted AED photo information was confirmed project baseline data. Participants also provided additional data such as business hours and other nearby AEDs. It is feasible to engage a mobile workforce to complete health research-related tasks. Participants were able to validate information about emergency public health resources. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Meeting the customer's needs for mobility and safety during construction and maintenance operations : model work zone traffic management program and self evaluation guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This model program was developed by combining traffic management concepts reported in research studies and papers with the effective techniques currently being used by States to minimize motorist delays and enhance work zone safety. This model is pre...

  10. A Reflection on the Work of an Educational Psychologist in Providing Supervision for a Team of Community Based Support Workers, Supporting Families with Vulnerable Adolescents at Risk of Exclusion from School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The evolving role of the educational psychologist (EP) is discussed with an emphasis on the supervision provided for a team of support workers for vulnerable adolescents, working within a Local Service Team. This development is considered in the context of the Every Child Matters (DfES, 2004) agenda and the Farrell, Woods, Lewis, Rooney, Squire…

  11. SECURE QR-PAY SYSTEM WITH CIPHERING TECHNIQUES IN MOBILE DEVICES

    OpenAIRE

    SURESH GONABOINA; LAKSHMI RAMANI BURRA; PRAVEEN TUMULURU

    2012-01-01

    Mobile payment is very important and critical solution for mobile commerce. A user-friendly mobile payment solution is strongly needed to support mobile users to conduct secure and reliable payment transactions using mobile devices. This paper presents an innovative mobile payment system based on 2-Dimentional (2D) barcodes called QR-codes for mobile users to improve mobile user experience in mobile payment. Unlike other existing mobile payment systems, the proposed payment solution provides...

  12. The Ambiguous Attractiveness of Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Presskorn-Thygesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    a fruitful and important perspective in conceptualizing and understanding the forms of mobility that are becoming increasingly prevalent in today’s knowledge work. The sociology of critique allows one to chart the economic and historical conditions of mobility critically, while its sociology of morals also...

  13. A New Approach to Predict user Mobility Using Semantic Analysis and Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Roshan; D'Souza G L, Rio

    2017-10-19

    Mobility prediction is a technique in which the future location of a user is identified in a given network. Mobility prediction provides solutions to many day-to-day life problems. It helps in seamless handovers in wireless networks to provide better location based services and to recalculate paths in Mobile Ad hoc Networks (MANET). In the present study, a framework is presented which predicts user mobility in presence and absence of mobility history. Naïve Bayesian classification algorithm and Markov Model are used to predict user future location when user mobility history is available. An attempt is made to predict user future location by using Short Message Service (SMS) and instantaneous Geological coordinates in the absence of mobility patterns. The proposed technique compares the performance metrics with commonly used Markov Chain model. From the experimental results it is evident that the techniques used in this work gives better results when considering both spatial and temporal information. The proposed method predicts user's future location in the absence of mobility history quite fairly. The proposed work is applied to predict the mobility of medical rescue vehicles and social security systems.

  14. An Efficient and Secure m-IPS Scheme of Mobile Devices for Human-Centric Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Sik Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent rapid developments in wireless and mobile IT technologies have led to their application in many real-life areas, such as disasters, home networks, mobile social networks, medical services, industry, schools, and the military. Business/work environments have become wire/wireless, integrated with wireless networks. Although the increase in the use of mobile devices that can use wireless networks increases work efficiency and provides greater convenience, wireless access to networks represents a security threat. Currently, wireless intrusion prevention systems (IPSs are used to prevent wireless security threats. However, these are not an ideal security measure for businesses that utilize mobile devices because they do not take account of temporal-spatial and role information factors. Therefore, in this paper, an efficient and secure mobile-IPS (m-IPS is proposed for businesses utilizing mobile devices in mobile environments for human-centric computing. The m-IPS system incorporates temporal-spatial awareness in human-centric computing with various mobile devices and checks users’ temporal spatial information, profiles, and role information to provide precise access control. And it also can extend application of m-IPS to the Internet of things (IoT, which is one of the important advanced technologies for supporting human-centric computing environment completely, for real ubiquitous field with mobile devices.

  15. Mobile Objects and Agents (MOA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milojicic, Dejan S.; LaForge, William; Chauhan, Deepika

    1998-12-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of the Mobile Objects and Agents (MOA) project at the Open Group Research Institute. MOA was designed to support migration, communication and control of agents. It was implemented on top of the Java Virtual Machine, without any modifications to it. The initial project goals were to support communication across agent migration, as a means for collaborative work; and to provide extensive resource control, as a basic support for countering denial of service attacks. In the course of the project we added two further goals: compliance with the Java Beans component model, which provides for additional configurability and customization of agent system and agent applications; and interoperability, which allows cooperation with other agent systems. This paper analyses the architecture of MOA, in particular the support for mobility, naming and locating, communication, and resource management. Object and component models of MOA are discussed and some implementation details described. We summarize the lessons learned while developing and implementing MOA and compare it with related work.

  16. Sustainable Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærulff, Aslak Aamot

    This paper combines strands of mobilities theory and planning theory, and develops a qualitative approach to look across emerging planning practices. By actively following 8 Danish urban and transport planners, over the course of 2 years, we learn how their practices have changed, inspired...... by mobility management, a concept aiming to reduce carbon emissions from transportation in western societies. The article focuses on how municipal planners formulate the role of mobility management activities organized around private companies, and how their practices are connected to wider ideas on planning....

  17. Going Mobile?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tallon, Loic; Froes, Isabel Cristina G.

    2011-01-01

    If the future is mobile, how is the museum community developing within that future? What are the challenges museums face within it? In which directions should we be seeking to evolve our collective knowledge share? It was to gain observations on questions such as these that the 2011 Museums...... & Mobile survey was developed: 660 museum professionals responded. In this paper the authors highlight nine survey observations that they believe are important to the museum community’s increased understanding of and continued progress within mobile interpretation....

  18. Value-Based Analysis of Mobile Tagging

    OpenAIRE

    Oguzhan Aygoren; Kaan Varnali

    2011-01-01

    Innovative use of the mobile medium in delivering customer value presents unprecedented opportunities for marketers. Various types of mobile applications have evolved to provide ubiquitous and instant customer service to capitalize on this opportunity. One application is mobile tagging, a mobile-based innovative tool for convergence marketing. The accumulated academic knowledge on mobile marketing lacks consumer-centric information about this phenomenon. This paper addresses this issue and co...

  19. Software test attacks to break mobile and embedded devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hagar, Jon Duncan

    2013-01-01

    Address Errors before Users Find Them Using a mix-and-match approach, Software Test Attacks to Break Mobile and Embedded Devices presents an attack basis for testing mobile and embedded systems. Designed for testers working in the ever-expanding world of ""smart"" devices driven by software, the book focuses on attack-based testing that can be used by individuals and teams. The numerous test attacks show you when a software product does not work (i.e., has bugs) and provide you with information about the software product under test. The book guides you step by step starting with the basics. It

  20. Development of mobile electronic health records application in a secondary general hospital in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wookjin; Park, Min Ah; Hong, Eunseok; Kim, Sunhyu; Ahn, Ryeok; Hong, Jungseok; Song, Seungyeol; Kim, Tak; Kim, Jeongkeun; Yeo, Seongwoon

    2013-12-01

    The recent evolution of mobile devices has opened new possibilities of providing strongly integrated mobile services in healthcare. The objective of this paper is to describe the decision driver, development, and implementation of an integrated mobile Electronic Health Record (EHR) application at Ulsan University Hospital. This application helps healthcare providers view patients' medical records and information without a stationary computer workstation. We developed an integrated mobile application prototype that aimed to improve the mobility and usability of healthcare providers during their daily medical activities. The Android and iOS platform was used to create the mobile EHR application. The first working version was completed in 5 months and required 1,080 development hours. The mobile EHR application provides patient vital signs, patient data, text communication, and integrated EHR. The application allows our healthcare providers to know the status of patients within and outside the hospital environment. The application provides a consistent user environment on several compatible Android and iOS devices. A group of 10 beta testers has consistently used and maintained our copy of the application, suggesting user acceptance. We are developing the integrated mobile EHR application with the goals of implementing an environment that is user-friendly, implementing a patient-centered system, and increasing the hospital's competitiveness.

  1. Restricted Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette; Lassen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    communities and shopping centres through mobility lenses. The article shows how different mobility systems enable and restrict the public access to private-public spaces, and it points out that proprietary communities create an unequal potential for human movement and access in the city. The main argument......Privatisation of public spaces in the contemporary city has increased during the last decades but only few studies have approached this field from a mobility perspective. Therefore the article seeks to rectify this by exploring two Australian examples of private spaces in the city; gated...... in the article is that the many mobility systems enable specialization of places that are targeted at a special section of the population. This means that various forms of motilities not only create new opportunities for urban life but it is also one of the most critical components of production of new exclusion...

  2. Staying Mobile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... favorite. People who use scooters and wheelchairs bowl, fish, ski, and play golf, tennis or basketball. Enable ... the Independent Care System of NY addresses the importance of selecting the wheeled mobility device that best ...

  3. Mobile museology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    Drawing together perspectives from museology, digital culture studies and fashion theory, this thesis considers changes in and challenges for current - day museums as related to ‘mobile museology’. This concept is developed for and elucidated in the thesis to describe an orientation towards...... the fashionable, the ephemeral, and towards an (ideal) state of change and changeability. This orientation is characterised with the triplet concepts of mobile, mobility, and mobilisation, as related to mobile media and movability; to ‘trans - museal’ mediation; and to the mobilisation of collections, audiences...... and institutional mindsets. The research project’s transdisciplinary and exploratory approach takes inspiration from critical design, minding Latour’s (2004a) call for rethink ing critical approaches in the humanities. Through a creative process, focused on designs for framing fashion in everyday contexts...

  4. Community Mobilization: Strategies To Support Young Children and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombro, Amy Laura; O'Donnell, Nina Sazer; Galinsky, Ellen; Melchar, Sarah Gilkeson; Farber, Abby

    Noting the increasing need for public officials, practitioners, business leaders, concerned citizens, and parents to work together to improve the quality of life for young children and families, this book for community organizations provides information needed to begin or enhance local or statewide community mobilization efforts. Included are…

  5. Mobile Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Enache

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobile commerce, or m-commerce, refers to the use of wireless digital devices to enable transactions on the Web. Described more fully in Chapter 3, m-commerce involves the use of wireless networks to connect cell phones, handheld devices such Blackberries, and personal computers to the Web. Once connected, mobile consumers can conduct transactions, including stock trades, in-store price comparisons, banking, travel reservations, and more.

  6. Mobilizing Senior Citizens in Co-Design of Mobile Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmborg, Lone; Gronvall, Erik; Messeter, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    . Based on the notions of design culture, communities of everyday practice and situated elderliness we present accounts from two European countries, and discuss methodological issues related to mobilizing senior citizens in co-design work as they have manifested themselves and influenced the Give......This paper disseminates work from the European Give&Take project, which aims at co-designing service sharing among senior citizens based on a mobile and distributed platform. With this project as a frame, our paper addresses methodological considerations of participation in co-design for ageing......&Take project. Challenges for mobilization are identified, based on an analysis of attitudes and values among design researchers and senior citizens. This analysis lead us to identify and discuss three strategies for mobilizing senior citizens in co-design of mobile technology: 1) Understanding being ‘elderly...

  7. Mobilizing Senior Citizens in Co-Design of Mobile Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmborg, Lone; Gronvall, Erik; Messeter, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    This paper disseminates work from the European Give&Take project, which aims at co-designing service sharing among senior citizens based on a mobile and distributed platform. With this project as a frame, our paper addresses methodological considerations of participation in co-design for ageing....... Based on the notions of design culture, communities of everyday practice and situated elderliness we present accounts from two European countries, and discuss methodological issues related to mobilizing senior citizens in co-design work as they have manifested themselves and influenced the Give......&Take project. Challenges for mobilization are identified, based on an analysis of attitudes and values among design researchers and senior citizens. This analysis lead us to identify and discuss three strategies for mobilizing senior citizens in co-design of mobile technology: 1) Understanding being ‘elderly...

  8. Mobile network maintenance (GSM)

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    Maintenance work will be carried out on the CERN mobile network infrastructure (GSM) on the 23 and 24 July from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. in order to replace discontinued equipment and to increase the bandwidth capacity of the GSM mobile network. All CERN GSM emitters (40 units) will be moved one by one to the new infrastructure during the maintenance. The call of a user connected to an emitter at the time of its maintenance will be cut off. However, the general overlapping of the GSM radio coverage should mean that users are able immediately to call again should their call be interrupted. IT/CS/CS

  9. Benefits of Mobile Phone Technology for Personal Environmental Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaire-Gonzalez, David; Valentín, Antònia; de Nazelle, Audrey; Ambros, Albert; Carrasco-Turigas, Glòria; Seto, Edmund; Jerrett, Michael; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2016-11-10

    Tracking individuals in environmental epidemiological studies using novel mobile phone technologies can provide valuable information on geolocation and physical activity, which will improve our understanding of environmental exposures. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of one of the least expensive mobile phones on the market to track people's travel-activity pattern. Adults living and working in Barcelona (72/162 bicycle commuters) carried simultaneously a mobile phone and a Global Positioning System (GPS) tracker and filled in a travel-activity diary (TAD) for 1 week (N=162). The CalFit app for mobile phones was used to log participants' geographical location and physical activity. The geographical location data were assigned to different microenvironments (home, work or school, in transit, others) with a newly developed spatiotemporal map-matching algorithm. The tracking performance of the mobile phones was compared with that of the GPS trackers using chi-square test and Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. The minute agreement across all microenvironments between the TAD and the algorithm was compared using the Gwet agreement coefficient (AC1). The mobile phone acquired locations for 905 (29.2%) more trips reported in travel diaries than the GPS tracker (Pinformation on which microenvironments people spend their time in than previous approaches based only on GPS trackers. The improvements of mobile phone technology in microenvironment determination are because the mobile phones are faster at identifying first locations and capable of getting location in challenging environments thanks to the combination of assisted-GPS technology and network positioning systems. Moreover, collecting location information from mobile phones, which are already carried by individuals, allows monitoring more people with a cheaper and less burdensome method than deploying GPS trackers.

  10. High available and fault tolerant mobile communications infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beiroumi, Mohammad Zib

    2006-01-01

    High availability is a key requirement in mobile communication systems, especially, when it is used for mission-critical services such as public safety e.g. police, ambulance and fire services. A failure in the fixed network infrastructure that provides services to mobile users can affect a large...... number of users and risk loss of lives. The fixed infrastructure of mobile communication system has different characteristics, for example, architecture ´complexity, real-time peer-topeer communication and performance requirements that make the already existing failure recovery techniques, such as those...... infrastructure. The method enables the faulty applications in the infrastructure to quickly and effectively resume their services to their mobile clients with no or minimal loss of work after failure. In our approach, we do not assume a specific fault behavior for example failstop or transient behavior...

  11. Performance analysis of a self-locating mobile sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgsted, Martin; Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren

    is performed with the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and a particle filtering method. Precision of the position estimate is evaluated by the root mean square error (RMSE). A lower bound on the RMSE of the estimate is derived, thus providing important information on the best achievable precision for any algorithm...... radio propagation characteristics for received signals from sensors in the proximity of the mobile sensor. It is of fundamental importance that such systems also works in critical situations such as loss of observability or the presence of multipath. The present paper suggest a framework to assess...... the performance of localization algorithms in mobile and critical situations. This is done by exploring the performance of various filtering techniques for self-localization of a mobile sensor in a field of sensors. More specifically, we model the mobility of the sensor such that the velocity varies according...

  12. Perspectives on Knowledge Mobilization: An Introduction to the Special Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Matheson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this introduction to the Technology Innovation Management Review's special issue on Knowledge Mobilization, Guest Editors Kimberly Matheson and Cathy Malcolm Edwards share their different perspectives as an academic and a knowledge broker on the process of knowledge mobilization. Despite their distinctive points of entry into the knowledge mobilization field, they share a common perspective on the value of researchers and knowledge users learning from each other, working together to co-create solutions, and the importance of contributing back into the basic research and training of the next generation. They also provide the context of the authors' contributions to this special issue, noting that the articles are rooted in the authors’ experiences in the health domain, but that they help to understand some of the challenges and rewards of integrating knowledge mobilization into research approaches more generally.

  13. Assessment of salivary cortisol as stress marker in ambulance service personnel: comparison between shifts working on mobile intensive care unit and patient transport ambulance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backé, Eva M; Kaul, Gerlinde; Klussmann, André; Liebers, Falk; Thim, Carmen; Massbeck, Peter; Steinberg, Ulf

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare salivary cortisol of ambulance personnel on days with different work demands as well as to correlate the individual perception of demands to the physiological outcome cortisol. Diurnal cortisol profiles on a day in emergency service and on a day in patient transport were monitored for 24 subjects working in an urban ambulance station. Changes of cortisol were also observed during 42 operations in emergency service and 24 operations in patient transport and were compared to the individual perception of physical and emotional demands. Rise of cortisol in the morning on days in emergency service was significantly higher than in patient transport suggesting adjustment to forthcoming demanding tasks. There were only few situations with strong endocrine reaction in emergency service as well as in patient transport. The magnitude of this reaction was not related to the individual perception of demand. Ambulance service personnel seem to be used to critical situations. There was few awareness of the "physiological" stress response indicating that stress is probably not perceived in work situations characterised by routines.

  14. Mobile healthcare information management utilizing Cloud Computing and Android OS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, Charalampos; Pliakas, Thomas; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2010-01-01

    Cloud Computing provides functionality for managing information data in a distributed, ubiquitous and pervasive manner supporting several platforms, systems and applications. This work presents the implementation of a mobile system that enables electronic healthcare data storage, update and retrieval using Cloud Computing. The mobile application is developed using Google's Android operating system and provides management of patient health records and medical images (supporting DICOM format and JPEG2000 coding). The developed system has been evaluated using the Amazon's S3 cloud service. This article summarizes the implementation details and presents initial results of the system in practice.

  15. Distinctive Features of Mobile Messages Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Braithwaite, Ken; Lishman, Mark; Lovitskii, Vladimir; Traynor, David

    2007-01-01

    World’s mobile market pushes past 2 billion lines in 2005. Success in these competitive markets requires operational excellence with product and service innovation to improve the mobile performance. Mobile users very often prefer to send a mobile instant message or text messages rather than talking on a mobile. Well developed “written speech analysis” does not work not only with “verbal speech” but also with “mobile text messages”. The main purpose of our paper is, firstly, to hig...

  16. From mobile mental health to mobile wellbeing: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggioli, Andrea; Riva, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The combination of smart phones, wearable sensor devices and social media offer new ways of monitoring and promoting mental and physical wellbeing. In this contribution, we describe recent developments in the field of mobile healthcare (or mHealth), by focusing in particular on mobile mental health applications. First, we examine the potential benefits associated with this approach, providing examples from existing projects. Next, we identify and explain possible differences in focus between mobile mental health and mobile wellbeing applications. Finally, we discuss some open challenges associated with the implementation of this vision, ranging from the lack of evidence-based validation to privacy, security and ethical concerns.

  17. Correlations and scaling laws in human mobility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Xiang-Wen; Han, Xiao-Pu; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2014-01-01

    .... The empirical analysis of the data which can reflect the real-world human mobility provides the basic cognition and verification of the theoretical models and predictive results on human mobility...

  18. Mobile and more productive? : firm-level evidence on the productivity effects of mobile internet use

    OpenAIRE

    Bertschek, Irene; Niebel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Mobile internet access allows for flexibility with respect to working time and working place. We analyse whether employees' use of mobile internet access improves firms' labour productivity. Our data set contains 2143 German firms and refers to the year 2014, when high-speed mobile internet was still at a relatively early stage of diffusion within firms. The econometric analysis shows that firms' labour productivity significantly increases with the share of employees with mobile internet acce...

  19. Mobile Learning and Integration of Mobile Technologies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Bhargava, Malini

    2014-01-01

    Mobile technologies have a huge potential to transform education provided these technologies are designed and implemented in such a way that they are relevant to the social and cultural context of learning. Clearly, the application, implementation, and design of mobile technology in the global educational context pose technological and…

  20. Intensities of Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissell, David; Vannini, Phillip; Jensen, Ole B.

    2017-01-01

    to complex social and geographical dynamics of transport, housing, lifestyle, and employment. Yet, the experiential dimensions of long-distance commuting have not received the attention that they deserve within research on mobilities. Drawing from fieldwork conducted in Australia, Canada, and Denmark...... this paper aims to further develop our collective understanding of the experiential particulars of long-distance workers or ‘supercommuters’. Rather than focusing on the extensive dimensions of mobilities that are implicated in broad social patterns and trends, our paper turns to the intensive dimensions......This paper explores the intensities of long-distance commuting journeys in order to understand how bodily sensibilities become attuned to the regular mobilities which they undertake. More people are travelling farther to and from work than ever before, owing to a variety of factors which relate...

  1. [Algorithms for early mobilization in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nydahl, P; Dubb, R; Filipovic, S; Hermes, C; Jüttner, F; Kaltwasser, A; Klarmann, S; Mende, H; Nessizius, S; Rottensteiner, C

    2017-03-01

    Immobility of patients in intensive care units (ICU) can lead to long-lasting physical and cognitive decline. During the last few years, bundles for rehabilitation were developed, including early mobilization. The German guideline for positioning therapy and mobilization, in general, recommends the development of ICU-specific protocols. The aim of this narrative review is to provide guidance when developing a best practice protocol in one's own field of work. It is recommended to a) implement early mobilization as part of a bundle, including screening and management of patient's awareness, pain, anxiety, stress, delirium and family's presence, b) develop a traffic-light system of specific in- and exclusion criteria in an interprofessional process, c) use checklists to assess risks and preparation of mobilization, d) use the ICU Mobility Scale for targeting and documentation of mobilization, e) use relative safety criteria for hemodynamic and respiratory changes, and Borg Scale for subjective evaluation, f) document and evaluate systematically mobilization levels, barriers, unwanted safety events and other parameters.

  2. Human mobility patterns predict divergent epidemic dynamics among cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalziel, Benjamin D; Pourbohloul, Babak; Ellner, Stephen P

    2013-09-07

    The epidemic dynamics of infectious diseases vary among cities, but it is unclear how this is caused by patterns of infectious contact among individuals. Here, we ask whether systematic differences in human mobility patterns are sufficient to cause inter-city variation in epidemic dynamics for infectious diseases spread by casual contact between hosts. We analyse census data on the mobility patterns of every full-time worker in 48 Canadian cities, finding a power-law relationship between population size and the level of organization in mobility patterns, where in larger cities, a greater fraction of workers travel to work in a few focal locations. Similarly sized cities also vary in the level of organization in their mobility patterns, equivalent on average to the variation expected from a 2.64-fold change in population size. Systematic variation in mobility patterns is sufficient to cause significant differences among cities in infectious disease dynamics-even among cities of the same size-according to an individual-based model of airborne pathogen transmission parametrized with the mobility data. This suggests that differences among cities in host contact patterns are sufficient to drive differences in infectious disease dynamics and provides a framework for testing the effects of host mobility patterns in city-level disease data.

  3. Mobile applications in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Ann Chang; Endly, Dawnielle C; Henley, Jill; Amir, Mahsa; Sampson, Blake P; Moreau, Jacqueline F; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2013-11-01

    With advancements in mobile technology, cellular phone-based mobile applications (apps) may be used in the practice and delivery of dermatologic care. To identify and categorize the variety of current mobile apps available in dermatology for patients and providers. Dermatology-related search terms were queried in the online app stores of the most commonly used mobile platforms developed by Apple, Android, Blackberry, Nokia, and Windows. Applications were assigned to categories based on description. Popularity, price, and reviews were recorded and target audiences were determined through websites offering online mobile apps. Number, type, and price of mobile apps in dermatology. A total of 229 dermatology-related apps were identified in the following categories: general dermatology reference (61 [26.6%]), self-surveillance/diagnosis (41 [17.9%]), disease guide (39 [17.0%]), educational aid (20 [8.7%]), sunscreen/UV recommendation (19 [8.3%]), calculator (12 [5.2%]), teledermatology (8 [3.5%]), conference (6 [2.6%]), journal (6 [2.6%]), photograph storage/sharing (5 [2.2%]), dermoscopy (2 [0.9%]), pathology (2 [0.9%]), and other (8 [3.5%]). The most reviewed apps included Ultraviolet ~ UV Index (355 reviews), VisualDx (306), SPF (128), iSore (61), and SpotMole (50). There were 209 unique apps, with 17 apps existing on more than 1 operating system. More than half of the apps were offered free of charge (117 [51.1%]). Paid apps (112 [48.9%]) ranged from $0.99 to $139.99 (median, $2.99). Target audiences included patient (117 [51.1%]), health care provider (94 [41.0%]), and both (18 [7.9%]). The widespread variety and popularity of mobile apps demonstrate a great potential to expand the practice and delivery of dermatologic care.

  4. What works in practice: user and provider perspectives on the acceptability, affordability, implementation, and impact of a family-based intervention for child overweight and obesity delivered at scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Patricia J; Curtis-Tyler, Katherine; Arai, Lisa; Stapley, Sally; Fagg, Jamie; Roberts, Helen

    2014-06-17

    As part of a study considering the impact of a child weight management programme when rolled out at scale following an RCT, this qualitative study focused on acceptability and implementation for providers and for families taking part. Participants were selected on the basis of a maximum variation sample providing a range of experiences and social contexts. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 29 professionals who commissioned or delivered the programme, and 64 individuals from 23 families in 3 English regions. Topic guides were used as a tool rather than a rule, enabling participants to construct a narrative about their experiences. Transcripts were analysed using framework analysis. Practical problems such as transport, work schedules and competing demands on family time were common barriers to participation. Delivery partners often put considerable efforts into recruiting, retaining and motivating families, which increased uptake but also increased cost. Parents and providers valued skilled delivery staff. Some providers made adaptations to meet local social and cultural needs. Both providers and parents expressed concerns about long term outcomes, and how this was compromised by an obesogenic environment. Concerns about funding together with barriers to uptake and engagement could translate into barriers to commissioning. Where these barriers were not experienced, commissioners were enthusiastic about continuing the programme. Most families felt that they had gained something from the programme, but few felt that it had 'worked' for them. The demands on families including time and emotional work were experienced as difficult. For commissioners, an RCT with positive results was an important driver, but family barriers, alongside concerns about recruitment and retention, a desire for local adaptability with qualified motivated staff, and funding changes discouraged some from planning to use the intervention in future.

  5. Access to healthcare, HIV/STI testing, and preferred pre-exposure prophylaxis providers among men who have sex with men and men who engage in street-based sex work in the US.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Underhill

    Full Text Available Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP is a promising strategy for HIV prevention among men who have sex with men (MSM and men who engage in sex work. But access will require routine HIV testing and contacts with healthcare providers. This study investigated men's healthcare and HIV testing experiences to inform PrEP implementation.We conducted 8 focus groups (n = 38 in 2012 and 56 in-depth qualitative interviews in 2013-14 with male sex workers (MSWs (n = 31 and other MSM (n = 25 in Providence, RI. MSWs primarily met clients in street-based sex work venues. Facilitators asked participants about access to healthcare and HIV/STI testing, healthcare needs, and preferred PrEP providers.MSWs primarily accessed care in emergency rooms (ERs, substance use clinics, correctional institutions, and walk-in clinics. Rates of HIV testing were high, but MSWs reported low access to other STI testing, low insurance coverage, and unmet healthcare needs including primary care, substance use treatment, and mental health services. MSM not engaging in sex work were more likely to report access to primary and specialist care. Rates of HIV testing among these MSM were slightly lower, but they reported more STI testing, more insurance coverage, and fewer unmet needs. Preferred PrEP providers for both groups included primary care physicians, infectious disease specialists, and psychiatrists. MSWs were also willing to access PrEP in substance use treatment and ER settings.PrEP outreach efforts for MSWs and other MSM should engage diverse providers in many settings, including mental health and substance use treatment, ERs, needle exchanges, correctional institutions, and HIV testing centers. Access to PrEP will require financial assistance, but can build on existing healthcare contacts for both populations.

  6. Mobility-Enhanced Reliable Geographical Forwarding in Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, Suleiman; Syed Yusoff, Sharifah Kamilah; Fisal, Norsheila

    2016-01-29

    The emergence of the Internet of Things and the proliferation of mobile wireless devices has brought the area of mobile cognitive radio sensor networks (MCRSN) to the research spot light. Notwithstanding the potentials of CRSNs in terms of opportunistic channel usage for bursty traffic, the effect of the mobility of resource-constrained nodes to route stability, mobility-induced spatio-temporal spectral opportunities and primary user (PU) protection still remain open issues that need to be jointly addressed. To this effect, this paper proposes a mobile reliable geographical forwarding routing (MROR) protocol. MROR provides a robust mobile framework for geographical forwarding that is based on a mobility-induced channel availability model. It presents a comprehensive routing strategy that considers PU activity (to take care of routes that have to be built through PU coverage), PU signal protection (by the introduction of a mobility-induced guard (mguard) distance) and the random mobility-induced spatio-temporal spectrum opportunities (for enhancement of throughput). It also addresses the issue of frequent route maintenance that arises when speeds of the mobile nodes are considered as a routing metric. As a result, simulation has shown the ability of MROR to reduce the route failure rate by about 65% as against other schemes. In addition, further results show that MROR can improve both the throughput and goodput at the sink in an energy-efficient manner that is required in CRSNs as against compared works.

  7. Mobile Robots Control and Path Planning Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Furci, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Mobile robots gained lots of attention in the last decades. Because of its flexibility and increased capabilities of automation, mobile robots are used in many applications: from domotic, to search and rescue missions, to agriculture, environment protection and many more. The main capability of mobile robots to accomplish a mission is the mobility in the work environment. To move in a certain environment the robots should achieve: guidance, navigation and control. This thesis focuses on...

  8. The provision of mobile satellite services in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, N. G.; Roscoe, O. S.

    1990-05-01

    Telesat Mobile Inc. (TMI) is a private company authorized to provide mobile satellite services in Canada. TMI will operate a dedicated MSAT satellite to provide mobile telephone, mobile radio and mobile data services to customers on the move in any part of Canada. The baseline TMI system is described in this paper. The network architecture and the signaling system under development to support the mobile services are discussed. The time-scale for procurement of the system is discussed.

  9. The mobile application hacker's handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Chell, Dominic; Colley, Shaun; Whitehouse, Ollie

    2015-01-01

    See your app through a hacker's eyes to find the real sources of vulnerability The Mobile Application Hacker's Handbook is a comprehensive guide to securing all mobile applications by approaching the issue from a hacker's point of view. Heavily practical, this book provides expert guidance toward discovering and exploiting flaws in mobile applications on the iOS, Android, Blackberry, and Windows Phone platforms. You will learn a proven methodology for approaching mobile application assessments, and the techniques used to prevent, disrupt, and remediate the various types of attacks. Coverage i

  10. The Models and Politics of Mobile Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Goggin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I seek to critically evaluate the models at play in an important area of new media cultures -- mobile media. By 'mobile', I mean the new technologies, cultural practices, and arrangements of production, consumption, and exchange, emerging with hand-held, networked devices --especially those based on mobile cellular networks. These mobile phone technologies are now commonly being framed as media; and so we see the appearance of objects such as mobile television, mobile film, mobile games, and mobile Internet. This much-heralded move, with its large cultural and commercial claims, raises important theoretical and political questions. To zero in on what it at stake in the shift from mobile phone to mobile media, I consider three distinct though related models that for ease of reference I will term: phones; commons; publics. Firstly, I look at the model of the telephone (latterly, telecommunications that is still strongly influential in the shaping of mobiles as they now figure as media. This is something that is not widely recognised, however -- for instance, when mobiles as simply seen as an extension of new media cultures based on ideas formed through the experience of the Internet. Secondly, I consider the model of the commons and what light it throws on the politics of mobile media. Discussions of the commons -- for instance, the lucid work of Yochai Benkler in his 2006 The Wealth of Networks -- typically take the Internet as their paradigm example. But what how does the model of commons relate to mobiles, and what might it tell us about mobile media? Thirdly, while the telephone and mobile phone also have often been modelled through the concept of 'community', mobile media encourage us to think about the different and sometimes opposed model of publics. In drawing upon recent work on publics, what I am interested here is how new kinds of publics are emerging with mobile media.

  11. Optimizations in Heterogeneous Mobile Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovska Avramova, Andrijana

    Heterogeneous Mobile Networks bring advantages over homogeneous deployments in achieving the demand for mobile network capacity and coverage not just outdoor rural and urban areas, but also to homes and enterprises where the large portion of the mobile traffic is generated. However......, the heterogeneity in the mobile networks bring many challenges that are discusses with this dissertation. More focus is placed on specific issues with indifferent areas of heterogeneity by proposing optimizations in order to overcome the considered problems.The heterogeneity of mobile networks, together...... with the densification of the base stations, bring into a very complex network management and operation control for the mobile operators. Furthermore, the need to provide always best connection and service with high quality demands for a joint overall network resource management. This thesis addresses this challenge...

  12. Mobility support for ubiquitous Internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagiannis, Georgios; Heijenk, Geert

    2000-01-01

    This document describes an architecture that is providing Internet access to mobile hosts, by allowing them to access this architecture through various access points and using various wireless technologies. In particular, this deliverable focuses on QoS and mobility between various IP subnetworks

  13. Mobile Assisted Language Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daesang; Ruecker, Daniel; Kim, Dong-Joong

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the benefits of learning with mobile technology for TESOL students and to explore their perceptions of learning with this type of technology. The study provided valuable insights on how students perceive and adapt to learning with mobile technology for effective learning experiences for both students…

  14. Why Mobile Is a Must

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Mary

    2011-01-01

    There is a need for a new educational model that makes learning personal and motivating, and helps secure students' future in the knowledge economy. Mobile technology opens the door to it. Mobile devices provide the platform and, as importantly, the incentive for students to take personal ownership of the learning experience. The lessons absorbed…

  15. Usability Studies on Mobile User Interface Design Patterns: A Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumpapun Punchoojit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile platforms have called for attention from HCI practitioners, and, ever since 2007, touchscreens have completely changed mobile user interface and interaction design. Some notable differences between mobile devices and desktops include the lack of tactile feedback, ubiquity, limited screen size, small virtual keys, and high demand of visual attention. These differences have caused unprecedented challenges to users. Most of the mobile user interface designs are based on desktop paradigm, but the desktop designs do not fully fit the mobile context. Although mobile devices are becoming an indispensable part of daily lives, true standards for mobile UI design patterns do not exist. This article provides a systematic literature review of the existing studies on mobile UI design patterns. The first objective is to give an overview of recent studies on the mobile designs. The second objective is to provide an analysis on what topics or areas have insufficient information and what factors are concentrated upon. This article will benefit the HCI community in seeing an overview of present works, to shape the future research directions.

  16. Mobile lighting apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

    2013-05-14

    A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

  17. Telehealth and Mobile Health

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    The E-Medicine, E-Health, M-Health, Telemedicine, and Telehealth Handbook provides extensive coverage of modern telecommunication in the medical industry, from sensors on and within the body to electronic medical records and beyond. Telehealth and Mobile Health is the second volume of this handbook. Featuring chapters written by leading experts and researchers in their respective fields.

  18. Lazy Mobile Intruders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2013-01-01

    that by communication, the malicious code can learn new information that it can use in subsequent operations, or that we may have several pieces of malicious code that can exchange information if they “meet”. To formalize both the platform and the malicious code we use the mobile ambient calculus, since it provides...

  19. Establishment of mobile based nuclear safety inspection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Hyeon; Lee, Yoon; Choi, Keun Ho; Lee, Kwang Pyo; Cha, Gi Hyeon; Gook, Cheol Woong; Park, Tae Joo; Kang, Roc Hyeong; Kim, Ji Young; Yoo, Mi Jung [Korea geoSpatial Information and Communication Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    We have developed the mobile-based atomic energy status real time monitoring system and mobile-based atomic energy accident and trouble retrieval system through this study. The mobile-based atomic energy status real time monitoring system is the system enabling its users to monitor nineteen (19) Nuclear Power Plants under operation in the real time based on the PDA(Personal Digital Assistance) via a wireless communication. We have developed the mobile information providing server program and PDA client program for the purpose of providing the atomic energy status information service on the PDA by linking the real time atomic energy status information collected by the computerized technical advisory system for the radiological emergency installed and operated by the KINS. The mobile based atomic energy accident and trouble retrieval system has been developed under the intention of enabling the site inspector to effectively use the past information upon performing the test works at the sites through the local retrieval of past accidents and troubles occurred in the Nuclear Power Plants at the mobile client(PDA). In this regard, we have developed the client program to retrieve the atomic energy accident and trouble status by installing the accident and trouble information database. We also include the function supporting the rapid site report through the employees' information retrieval, site status image file transmission, e-mail and SMS(Short Message Service)

  20. Neuroergonomics: A Review of Applications to Physical and Cognitive Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana K Mehta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuroergonomics is an emerging science that is defined as the study of the human brain in relation to performance at work and in everyday settings. This paper provides a critical review of the neuroergonomic approach to evaluating physical and cognitive work, particularly in mobile settings. Neuroergonomics research employing mobile and immobile brain imaging techniques are discussed in the following areas of physical and cognitive work: 1 physical work parameters; 2 physical fatigue; 3 vigilance and mental fatigue; 4 training and neuroadaptive systems; and 5 assessment of concurrent physical and cognitive work. Finally, the integration of brain and body measurements in investigating workload and fatigue, in the context of mobile brain/body imaging ('MoBI', is discussed.

  1. Designing Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    How is the width of the pavement shaping the urban experience? How is the material design of transport infrastructure and mobile technology affording social interaction in everyday life spaces? How do people inhabit these spaces with their bodies and in accordance to social and cultural norms...

  2. Mobile Misfortune

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigh, Henrik Erdman

    2015-01-01

    of the mobility it enables. This article, thus, looks at the motives and manners in which young men in Bissau become caught up in transnational flows of cocaine. It shows how motion is emotively anchored and affectively bound: tied to and directed toward a feeling of worth and realisation of being, and how...

  3. Mobile IP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijenk, Geert; Sallent, S.; Pras, Aiko

    1999-01-01

    The Internet is growing exponentially, both in the amount of traffic carried, and in the amount of hosts connected. IP technology is becoming more and more important, in company networks (Intranets), and also in the core networks for the next generation mobile networks. Further, wireless access to

  4. Mobility Network and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Galderisi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobility network is crucial for ensuring territorial safety with respect to natural and technological hazards. They represent a basic support to community’s everyday life although being exposed elements often characterized by high vulnerability to different hazards and, in the meanwhile, strategic equipments for emergency management. Physical damages or the lack in functioning of those networks may greatly increase the loss of human lives caused by hazardous events as well as produce relevant economic damages at medium and long term. Although the relevance of the mobility networks in assuring territorial safety is at present largely recognized, risk analyses have been long focused on buildings’ vulnerability or, even where they have paid attention to mobility network, they have been mainly focused on the physical damages that a given hazard could may induce on individual elements of such network. It is recent the awareness that mobility network represents a system, characterized by relevant interdependences both among its elements and among network infrastructures and urban systems. Based on these assumptions, this paper points out the heterogeneous aspects of the mobility network vulnerability and their relevance in increasing the overall territorial or urban vulnerability to hazardous events. Therefore, an in-depth investigation of the concept of mobility network vulnerability is provided, in order to highlight the aspects mostly investigated and more recent research perspectives. Finally, a case study in the Campania Region is presented in order to point out how traditional risk analyses, generally referred to individual hazards, can sometimes led to invest in the mobility network improvement or development which, targeted to increase the security of a territory result, on the opposite, in an increase of the territorial vulnerability.

  5. Interpretation of medical imaging data with a mobile application: a mobile digital imaging processing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng Kuan; Nicolini, Oliver; Waxenegger, Harald; Galloway, Graham J; Ullmann, Jeremy F P; Janke, Andrew L

    2013-01-01

    Digital Imaging Processing (DIP) requires data extraction and output from a visualization tool to be consistent. Data handling and transmission between the server and a user is a systematic process in service interpretation. The use of integrated medical services for management and viewing of imaging data in combination with a mobile visualization tool can be greatly facilitated by data analysis and interpretation. This paper presents an integrated mobile application and DIP service, called M-DIP. The objective of the system is to (1) automate the direct data tiling, conversion, pre-tiling of brain images from Medical Imaging NetCDF (MINC), Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (NIFTI) to RAW formats; (2) speed up querying of imaging measurement; and (3) display high-level of images with three dimensions in real world coordinates. In addition, M-DIP provides the ability to work on a mobile or tablet device without any software installation using web-based protocols. M-DIP implements three levels of architecture with a relational middle-layer database, a stand-alone DIP server, and a mobile application logic middle level realizing user interpretation for direct querying and communication. This imaging software has the ability to display biological imaging data at multiple zoom levels and to increase its quality to meet users' expectations. Interpretation of bioimaging data is facilitated by an interface analogous to online mapping services using real world coordinate browsing. This allows mobile devices to display multiple datasets simultaneously from a remote site. M-DIP can be used as a measurement repository that can be accessed by any network environment, such as a portable mobile or tablet device. In addition, this system and combination with mobile applications are establishing a virtualization tool in the neuroinformatics field to speed interpretation services.

  6. Interpretation of Medical Imaging Data with a Mobile Application: A Mobile Digital Imaging Processing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng Kuan; Nicolini, Oliver; Waxenegger, Harald; Galloway, Graham J.; Ullmann, Jeremy F. P.; Janke, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Digital Imaging Processing (DIP) requires data extraction and output from a visualization tool to be consistent. Data handling and transmission between the server and a user is a systematic process in service interpretation. The use of integrated medical services for management and viewing of imaging data in combination with a mobile visualization tool can be greatly facilitated by data analysis and interpretation. This paper presents an integrated mobile application and DIP service, called M-DIP. The objective of the system is to (1) automate the direct data tiling, conversion, pre-tiling of brain images from Medical Imaging NetCDF (MINC), Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (NIFTI) to RAW formats; (2) speed up querying of imaging measurement; and (3) display high-level of images with three dimensions in real world coordinates. In addition, M-DIP provides the ability to work on a mobile or tablet device without any software installation using web-based protocols. M-DIP implements three levels of architecture with a relational middle-layer database, a stand-alone DIP server, and a mobile application logic middle level realizing user interpretation for direct querying and communication. This imaging software has the ability to display biological imaging data at multiple zoom levels and to increase its quality to meet users’ expectations. Interpretation of bioimaging data is facilitated by an interface analogous to online mapping services using real world coordinate browsing. This allows mobile devices to display multiple datasets simultaneously from a remote site. M-DIP can be used as a measurement repository that can be accessed by any network environment, such as a portable mobile or tablet device. In addition, this system and combination with mobile applications are establishing a virtualization tool in the neuroinformatics field to speed interpretation services. PMID:23847587

  7. The Space Mobile Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, David

    2017-01-01

    The definition and development of the next generation space communications and navigation architecture is underway. The primary goals are to remove communications and navigations constraints from missions and to enable increased autonomy. The Space Mobile Network (SMN) is an architectural concept that includes new technology and operations that will provide flight systems with an similar user experience to terrestrial wireless mobile networks. This talk will describe the SMN and its proposed new features, such as Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN), optical communications, and User Initiated Services (UIS).

  8. Lazy Mobile Intruders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    We present a new technique for analyzing platforms that execute potentially malicious code, such as web-browsers, mobile phones, or virtualized infrastructures. Rather than analyzing given code, we ask what code an intruder could create to break a security goal of the platform. To avoid searching...... a small, abstract formalism that models the essence of mobile code. We provide a decision procedure for security against arbitrary intruder ambients when the honest ambients can only perform a bounded number of steps and without path constraints in communication....

  9. Perceptions regarding the ease of use and usefulness of health information exchange systems among medical providers, case managers and non-clinical staff members working in HIV care and community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Janet J; Koester, Kimberly A; Chakravarty, Deepalika; Pearson, Charles; Maiorana, Andres; Shade, Starley B; Steward, Wayne T

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe how members of HIV patients' care teams perceived the usefulness and ease of use of newly implemented, innovative health information exchange systems (HIEs) in diverse HIV treatment settings. Five settings with existing electronic medical records (EMRs) received special funding to test enhancements to their systems. Participating clinics and community-based organizations added HIEs permitting bi-directional exchange of information across multiple provider sites serving the same HIV patient population. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews and quantitative web-based surveys with case managers, medical providers, and non-clinical staff members to assess the systems' perceived usefulness and ease of use shortly after the HIEs were implemented. Our approach to data analysis was iterative. We first conducted a thematic analysis of the qualitative data and discovered that there were key differences in perceptions and actual use of HIEs across occupational groups. We used these results to guide our analysis of the quantitative survey data, stratifying by occupational group. We found differences in reports of how useful and how well-used HIEs were, by occupation. Medical providers were more likely to use HIEs if they provided easier access to clinical information than was present in existing EMRs. Case managers working inside medical clinics found HIEs to be less helpful because they already had access to the clinical data. In contrast, case managers working in community settings appreciated the new access to patient information that the HIEs provided. Non-clinical staff uniformly found the HIEs useful for a broad range of tasks including clinic administration, grant writing and generating reports for funders. Our study offers insights into the use and potential benefits of HIE in the context of HIV care across occupational groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mobile apps in cardiology: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Herreros-González, Jesús

    2013-07-24

    apps that assist people who have undergone a heart transplant. The distribution of work in the field of cardiology apps is considerably disproportionate. Whereas some systems have significant research and apps are available, other important systems lack such research and lack apps, even though the contribution they could provide is significant.

  11. Earth Science Data for a Mobile Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, D.; Chambers, L. H.; Lewis, P. M.; Baize, R.; Oots, P.; Rogerson, T.; Crecelius, S.; Coleman, T.

    2012-12-01

    /needs and generate new data combinations--targeting users with a web 3.0 methodology. We will examine applications that give users direct access to data in near real-time and find solutions for the educational community. MND and S'COOL will identify trends in the mobile and web application sectors to provide the greatest effect upon relevant audiences within the science and educational communities. Greater access is the goal, with an acute focus on educating our future explorers and scientists with tools and data that will provide the most efficacy, use, and enriching science experiences. Current trends point to cross-platform web applications as being the most effective and efficient means of delivering content, data, and ideas to end users. Universal availability of key datasets on any device will encourage users to continue to use data and attract potential data users and providers. Projected Outcomes Initially, the outcome for this work is to increase the effectiveness of the MND and S'COOL projects by learning more about our users needs and anticipating how data will be used in the future. Through our work we will increase exposure and ease of access to NASA datasets relevant to our communities. Our goal is to focus on our participants mobile usage in the classroom, thereby gaining a greater understanding on how data is being used to teach students about the Earth and begin to develop better tools and technologies.

  12. Continuously adjustable Pulfrich spectacles for mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ken; Karpf, Ron

    2012-02-01

    Mobile devices present a challenging platform for 3D video because of inherent device limitations. Continuously Adjustable Pulfrich Spectacles for Mobile Devices (CAPS-MD) is a new implementation of the Pulfrich 3D stereoscopic effect. For every scene that contains lateral motion in a 2D movie, CAPS-MD provides realistic 3D. Since it requires minimal additional processing, it is appropriate for mobile devices. 3D movies utilizing the Pulfrich stereoscopic effect have been made for 80 years using passive viewing spectacles. CAPS-MD use active viewing spectacles to overcome the limitations of passive spectacles. 3D movies normally employ the asymmetry of dual images to produce stereopsis. CAPS-MD works on the principle of illumination asymmetry, and only needs to control the differential lens optical densities. CAPS-MD is fabricated from optoelectronic materials that electronically control the lens optical densities. The eye's retinal triggering is used by CAPS-MD to determine the differential lens optical densities. Motion estimation calculations from the digital image processing used to display 2D video on mobile devices are reused to calculate realtime lens adjustments so CAPS-MD always conform to the optical density that optimizes the Pulfrich stereoscopic effect. Only negligible additional processing is necessary for CAPS-MD to show 3D for every scene that contains lateral motion in any 2D movie.

  13. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  14. The Mobile Audience

    OpenAIRE

    Rieser, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Introduction by Howard Rheingold The convergence of mobile technologies and ubiquitous computing is creating a world where information-rich environments may be mapped directly onto urban topologies. This book tracks the history and genesis of locative and wearable media and the ground-breaking work of pioneer artists in the field. It examines changing concepts of space and place for a wide range of traditional disciplines ranging from Anthropology, Sociology, Fine Art and Architecture to C...

  15. Virtual Enterprises, Mobile Markets and Volatile Customers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.P.H. Jaspers (Ferdinand); W. Hulsink (Wim); J.J.M. Theeuwes (Myrte)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractRecently, several new mobile virtual network operators (MVNOs) have entered the European mobile telecommunications markets. These service providers do not own a mobile network, but instead they buy capacity from other companies. Because these virtual operators do not possess an

  16. Queueing Models for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Roland

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents models for the performance analysis of a recent communication paradigm: \\emph{mobile ad hoc networking}. The objective of mobile ad hoc networking is to provide wireless connectivity between stations in a highly dynamic environment. These dynamics are driven by the mobility of

  17. Mobile Agents in Networking and Distributed Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Jiannong

    2012-01-01

    The book focuses on mobile agents, which are computer programs that can autonomously migrate between network sites. This text introduces the concepts and principles of mobile agents, provides an overview of mobile agent technology, and focuses on applications in networking and distributed computing.

  18. Business Models for NFC Based Mobile Payments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chae, Johannes Sang-Un; Hedman, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    investigates Google Wallet and ISIS Mobile Wallet and their underlying business models. Findings: Google Wallet and ISIS Mobile Wallet are focusing on providing an enhanced customer experience with their mobile wallet through a multifaceted value proposition. The delivery of its offering requires cooperation...

  19. Dicoogle Mobile: a medical imaging platform for Android.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana-Ferreira, Carlos; Ferreira, Daniel; Valente, Frederico; Monteiro, Eriksson; Costa, Carlos; Oliveira, José Luís

    2012-01-01

    Mobile computing technologies are increasingly becoming a valuable asset in healthcare information systems. The adoption of these technologies helps to assist in improving quality of care, increasing productivity and facilitating clinical decision support. They provide practitioners with ubiquitous access to patient records, being actually an important component in telemedicine and tele-work environments. We have developed Dicoogle Mobile, an Android application that provides remote access to distributed medical imaging data through a cloud relay service. Besides, this application has the capability to store and index local imaging data, so that they can also be searched and visualized. In this paper, we will describe Dicoogle Mobile concept as well the architecture of the whole system that makes it running.

  20. The African Mobile Story

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book identifies the factors that has enabled the growth of mobile telephony in Africa. The book covers the regulatory factors, the development and usage of mobile application, mobile security and sustainable power source for mobile networks......This book identifies the factors that has enabled the growth of mobile telephony in Africa. The book covers the regulatory factors, the development and usage of mobile application, mobile security and sustainable power source for mobile networks...