WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing mental health

  1. Mobile Applications for Mental Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganstein, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets have fundamentally changed the ways in which we interact with information. Far more than communication devices, smartphones and tablets are now indispensable tools in the pocket of healthcare providers. Mobile mental health applications (apps) provide instant access to up-to-date information on prevention, assessment and treatment. Self-help apps allow patients to take greater ownership of their own health and well-being. The past decade has seen an extraordinarily rapid proliferation of mobile medical apps. Though thousands of apps now exist, the challenge for healthcare providers and consumers alike has become sorting through mobile apps for those which provide accurate content delivered in the most user-friendly format. This article will review six mobile apps that can assist healthcare providers and consumers interested in enhancing mental health.

  2. Initial Validation of the Mental Health Provider Stigma Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Stephanie C.; Abell, Neil; Mennicke, Annelise

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To conduct an initial validation of the mental health provider stigma inventory (MHPSI). The MHPSI assesses stigma within the service provider--client relationship on three domains--namely, attitudes, behaviors, and coworker influence. Methods: Initial validation of the MHPSI was conducted with a sample of 212 mental health employees…

  3. Mental Health Service Providers: College Student Perceptions of Helper Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Ashley M.; Wantz, Richard A.; Firmin, Michael W; Poindexter, Dawn C.; Pujara, Amita L.

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate perceptions of the overall effectiveness of six types of mental health service providers (MHSPs) were obtained with a survey. Although many mental health services are available to consumers in the United States, research has indicated that these services are underutilized. Perceptions have been linked to therapeutic outcomes and may…

  4. Providing Mental Health Services to Arab Americans: Recommendations and Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Chris D.; Al-Timimi, Nada R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents background information on the cultural sociopathology of the Arab American experience. It discusses how, in order to effectively deliver services, mental health workers need to be aware of their own biases. It explores ways to provide culturally relevant mental health services to Arab Americans. (JDM)

  5. Conflicts between ethics and law for military mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W Brad; Grasso, Ian; Maslowski, Kate

    2010-08-01

    Military mental health providers routinely experience mixed-agency ethical dilemmas when obligations to patients and the military conflict. Particularly difficult mixed-agency dilemmas occur when a military psychiatrist, psychologist, or social worker encounters an apparent conflict between an ethical obligation--enumerated in a professional code of ethics--and a federal statute. This article explores ethical-legal conflicts for uniformed mental health providers. Three case vignettes illustrate situations in which military providers may find themselves stuck between incongruent ethical and legal demands. The authors conclude with several recommendations designed to prevent and resolve ethical-legal conflicts for military mental health providers.

  6. Pediatric Primary Care Providers' Relationships with Mental Health Care Providers: Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidano, Anne E.; Honigfeld, Lisa; Bar-Halpern, Miri; Vivian, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: As many as 20 % of children have diagnosable mental health conditions and nearly all of them receive pediatric primary health care. However, most children with serious mental health concerns do not receive mental health services. This study tested hypotheses that pediatric primary care providers (PPCPs) in relationships with mental…

  7. Meeting the continuing education needs of rural mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Geri; Pritchett, Lonique R; Kauth, Michael R

    2013-11-01

    Historically, mental health clinicians at Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) community-based outpatient clinics (CBOCs) have not had the same access to continuing education (CE) as providers at VA medical centers. Mental health clinicians at CBOCs desire an opportunity for VA-sponsored CE, especially on topics and issues pertinent to rural mental healthcare. Since November 2011, VA CBOC mental health providers in 11 states have been offered a monthly live Web conferencing CE program. This article describes the program's development, implementation, and evaluation. Eleven CE programs have been offered to 397 unique participants. Participants have provided positive feedback about the topics and their impact on job performance. Most negative feedback has been related to technical and logistical problems with the Web conferencing platform. Although providers asked for reportable CE units for licensure, many did not complete the post-test, which is required to receive credit for completing the course. The Web conferencing format has been well received by participants. Despite technical issues, results show that the participants were satisfied with the content of the trainings and could apply the materials to their job. Although CE units were available, not all participants applied for credit. Efforts to improve technical support and the rate of post-test completion are discussed. Rural mental health providers often have limited access to training opportunities. The VA CBOC Mental Health Rounds, using an interactive Web conferencing platform, has been a successful modality for delivering CE to rural clinicians in the United States.

  8. Providing nursing leadership in a community residential mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Frances A; Bamford, Anita

    2011-07-01

    The worldwide burden of mental illness is increasing. Strong leadership is increasingly emerging as a core component of good mental health nursing. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the ways in which nurses can provide strong and consistent leadership in a values-based practice environment that embodies respect for individuals' dignity and self-determination within a community residential mental health service, which provides a structural foundation for effective action. This is accomplished through the presentation of two vignettes, which highlight how the seemingly impossible becomes possible when an economic paradigm such as agency theory is exchanged for a sociological and psychological paradigm found in leadership as stewardship at the point of service. It is through stronger nursing leadership in mental health that stigma and discrimination can be reduced and better access to treatments and services can be gained by those with mental illness. Nurse leadership in mental health services is not new, but it is still relatively uncommon to see residential services for "high needs" individuals being led by nurses. How nurses meet the challenges faced by mental health services are often at the heart of effective leadership skills and strategies. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Multiple-role dilemmas for military mental health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W Brad; Bacho, Roderick; Heim, Mark; Ralph, John

    2006-04-01

    Military psychologists and psychiatrists frequently face ethical quandaries involving boundary crossings, or extratherapy contact, and multiple relationships. A multiple relationship is defined as necessarily engaging psychotherapy patients in nonclinical roles, such as coworker, superior officer, neighbor, or friend. In contrast to their civilian counterparts, military mental health professionals must often engage patients in many different contexts and roles. In this article, we consider the distinctive features of mental health practice in the military and offer military providers several practice guidelines for avoiding harm to patients in military settings. This article is also designed to enhance sensitivity to multiple-role risks among nonpsychiatric providers.

  10. Body Image Assessment Among Community Mental Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseyer Winter, Virginia; Brett, Anna; Pevehouse-Pfeiffer, Danielle; O'Neill, Elizabeth A; Ellis-Ordway, Nancy

    2017-11-14

    Although research suggests an association between body image and mental health, with poor body image related to several mental illnesses, there is no research exploring mental health clinicians' body image screening practices. This study aims to fill this gap among a sample of community mental health providers (N = 216). Using a cross-sectional design, clinicians in Community Health Centers were recruited through email using purposeful and snowball sampling in a Midwest state. The majority of participants identified as women (88.4%) and White (88.4%). Additionally, the mean age of the sample was 36.66 years and participants reported working an average of 8.44 years as a mental health provider. We ran descriptive and Chi square analyses. Results suggest a relationship between viewing body image screening as important and level of preparedness as well as level of preparedness and actual assessment. Training and assessment tools may be warranted to increase clinician's preparedness. Additional clinical and policy recommendations are discussed.

  11. Mental health providers confronting organizational change: process, problems, and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, S; Oster, G D

    1998-01-01

    Under the influence of managed care and diminished funding, the mental health field is undergoing a major transformation. Existing mental health programs, departments, and agencies are downsizing and restructuring to develop new types of service delivery systems. Organizations must change to survive; yet necessary and adaptive change may be resisted in numerous ways by providers whose reactions and behaviors may reduce the viability of their own programs and agencies. This paper explores various characteristics and reactions of mental health care professionals as they face great stress, professional devaluation, and necessary organizational change and restructuring. Adaptive and maladaptive patterns in response to potential organizational change are explored. The role of the leader in guiding and implementing programmatic changes and in dealing with denial and resistance is highlighted. Strategies to enhance the prospects for adaptive organizational change are offered.

  12. Recruitment and retention of mental health care providers in rural Nebraska: perceptions of providers and administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Madison, Lynda; Watkins, Katherine L; Nguyen, Anh T; Chen, Li-Wu

    2015-01-01

    The nationwide shortage of mental health professionals is especially severe in rural communities in the USA. Consistent with national workforce statistics, Nebraska's mental health workforce is underrepresented in rural and frontier parts of the state, with 88 of Nebraska's 93 counties being designated as federal mental health professional shortage areas. Seventy-eight counties have no practicing psychiatrists. However, supply statistics alone are inadequate in understanding workforce behavior. The objective of this study was to understand mental health recruitment and retention issues from the perspectives of administrators and mental healthcare professionals in order to identify potential solutions for increasing the mental health workforce in rural communities. The study used semi-structured focus groups to obtain input from administrators and mental health providers. Three separate focus groups were conducted in each of four regions in 2012 and 2013: licensed psychiatrists and licensed psychologists, licensed (independent) mental health practitioners, and administrators (including community, hospital, and private practice administrators and directors) who hire mental health practitioners. The transcripts were independently reviewed by two reviewers to identify themes. A total of 21 themes were identified. Participants reported that low insurance reimbursement negatively affects rural healthcare organizations' ability to attract and retain psychiatrists and continue programs. Participants also suggested that enhanced loan repayment programs would provide an incentive for mental health professionals to practice in rural areas. Longer rural residency programs were advocated to encourage psychiatrists to establish roots in a community. Establishment of rural internship programs was identified as a key factor in attracting and retaining psychologists. To increase the number of psychologists willing to provide supervision to provisionally licensed psychologists and

  13. Determining provider choice for the treatment of mental disorder: the role of health and mental health status.

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, R G; Kamlet, M S

    1989-01-01

    This article specifies and estimates a model of provider choice for mental health services. Three types of providers are identified: specialty mental health providers, general medical providers, and informal providers. Specific attention is paid to the role of health and mental health status in determining provider choice. The model is estimated using a multinomial logit approach applied to a sample of 2,800 respondents to the Baltimore Epidemiological Catchment Area Survey. The results are l...

  14. Work-related Mental Consequences: Implications of Burnout on Mental Health Status Among Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, Ioanna V

    2015-02-01

    Burnout can create problems in every aspect of individual's' human life. It may have an adverse effect on interpersonal and family relations and can lead to a general negative attitude towards life. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether burnout is associated with the mental health status of health care providers. The sample in this study consisted of 240 health care employees. The Greek version of Maslach's Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used for measuring burnout levels and the Greek version of the Symptoms Rating Scale for Depression and Anxiety (SRSDA) questionnaire was used to evaluate health care providers' mental health status. Descriptive statistics were initially generated for sample characteristics. Normality was checked by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and data was processed with parametric tests. General linear models with MBI dimensions as independent variables and SRSDA subscales as dependent variables were used to determine the relation between burnout and mental health status. Statistics were processed with SPSS v. 17.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). Statistical significance was set at p=0.05. The average age of the sample is 40.00±7.95 years. Regarding gender the percentage of men is 21.40% (N=49) and of women is 78.60% (N=180). Overall the professional burnout of health care workers is moderate. The mean score for emotional exhaustion is 26.41, for personal accomplishment 36.70 and for depersonalization 9.81. The mean for each subscale of SRSDA is 8.23±6.79 for Depression Beck-21, 3.96±4.26 for Depression Beck-13, 4.91±4.44 for Melancholia, 6.32±4.35 for Asthenia and 6.36±4.72 for Anxiety. The results of general linear models with the MBI dimensions as independent variables and the SRSDA subscales as dependent variables are shown that emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment are statistically correlated with all subscales of SRSDA, while depersonalization is not correlated with any SRSDA subscale. Burnout appears to implicate

  15. Work-related Mental Consequences: Implications of Burnout on Mental Health Status Among Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasiou, Ioanna V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Burnout can create problems in every aspect of individual’s’ human life. It may have an adverse effect on interpersonal and family relations and can lead to a general negative attitude towards life. Aim: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether burnout is associated with the mental health status of health care providers. Material and Methods: The sample in this study consisted of 240 health care employees. The Greek version of Maslach’s Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used for measuring burnout levels and the Greek version of the Symptoms Rating Scale for Depression and Anxiety (SRSDA) questionnaire was used to evaluate health care providers’ mental health status. Descriptive statistics were initially generated for sample characteristics. Normality was checked by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and data was processed with parametric tests. General linear models with MBI dimensions as independent variables and SRSDA subscales as dependent variables were used to determine the relation between burnout and mental health status. Statistics were processed with SPSS v. 17.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). Statistical significance was set at p=0.05. Results: The average age of the sample is 40.00±7.95 years. Regarding gender the percentage of men is 21.40% (N=49) and of women is 78.60% (N=180). Overall the professional burnout of health care workers is moderate. The mean score for emotional exhaustion is 26.41, for personal accomplishment 36.70 and for depersonalization 9.81. The mean for each subscale of SRSDA is 8.23±6.79 for Depression Beck-21, 3.96±4.26 for Depression Beck-13, 4.91±4.44 for Melancholia, 6.32±4.35 for Asthenia and 6.36±4.72 for Anxiety. The results of general linear models with the MBI dimensions as independent variables and the SRSDA subscales as dependent variables are shown that emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment are statistically correlated with all subscales of SRSDA, while depersonalization is not correlated

  16. 42 CFR 51.46 - Disclosing information obtained from a provider of mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... mental health services. 51.46 Section 51.46 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... a provider of mental health services. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, if a... of mental health services, it may not disclose information from such records to the individual who is...

  17. Health care providers' perspective of the gender influences on immigrant women's mental health care experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Joyce M; Donnelly, Tamphd T

    2007-10-01

    The number of immigrants coming to Canada has increased in the last three decades. It is well documented that many immigrant women suffer from serious mental health problems such as depression, schizophrenia, and post migration stress disorders. Evidence has shown that immigrant women experience difficulties in accessing and using mental health services. Informed by the post-colonial feminist perspective, this qualitative exploratory study was conducted with seven health care providers who provide mental health services to immigrant women. In-depth interviews were used to obtain information about immigrant women's mental health care experiences. The primary goal was to explore how contextual factors intersect with race, gender, and class to influence the ways in which immigrant women seek help and to increase awareness and understanding of what would be helpful in meeting the mental health care needs of the immigrant women. The study's results reveal that (a) immigrant women face many difficulties accessing mental health care due to insufficient language skills, unfamiliarity/unawareness of services, and low socioeconomic status; (b) participants identified structural barriers and gender roles as barriers to accessing the available mental health services; (c) the health care relationship between health care providers and women had profound effects on whether or not immigrant women seek help for mental health problems.

  18. Recovery-promoting professional competencies: perspectives of mental health consumers, consumer-providers and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russinova, Zlatka; Rogers, E Sally; Ellison, Marsha Langer; Lyass, Asya

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically validate a set of conceptually derived recovery-promoting competencies from the perspectives of mental health consumers, consumer-providers and providers. A national sample of 603 consumers, 153 consumer-providers and 239 providers completed an anonymous survey via the Internet. The survey evaluated respondents' perceptions about a set of 37 competencies hypothesized to enhance clients' hope and empowerment and inquired about interactions with providers that enhanced clients' recovery process. We used descriptive statistics and ranking to establish the relevance of each competency and generalized linear models and post-hoc tests to examine differences in the consumers', consumer-providers' and providers' assessments of these competencies. Analyses confirmed the recovery relevance of several competencies and their relative importance within each group of study participants. They also revealed that while most competencies tended to have universal significance, others depended more strongly on the client's preferences. Finally, differences in the perceptions of consumers, consumer-providers and providers about the recovery relevance of these competencies were established. The study highlighted the crucial role practitioners play in enhancing recovery from serious mental illnesses through specific strategies and attitudes that acknowledge clients' personhood and foster their hopefulness, empowerment and illness management. It informed the development of a new instrument measuring providers' recovery-promoting competence and provides guidelines for sharpening the recovery focus of a wide range of mental health and rehabilitation services.

  19. Providing Perinatal Mental Health Services in Pediatric Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmi, Ayelet; Stafford, Brian; Buchholz, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    After birth, newborns and their caregivers are seen routinely and frequently in pediatric primary care settings. The close succession of visits in the first few months of life puts pediatric primary care professionals in a unique position to enhance infant mental health by developing strong relationships with caregivers, supporting babies and…

  20. Collaboration with Community Mental Health Service Providers: A Necessity in Contemporary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Victor; Castro-Villarreal, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Schools have played an increasingly central role in providing mental health services to youth, but there are limitations to the services that are available through school-based mental health professionals. Thus, collaboration with non-school-based community mental health providers is oftentimes necessary. As collaboration can address limitations…

  1. Women's Preferred Sources for Primary and Mental Health Care: Implications for Reproductive Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kelli Stidham; Harris, Lisa H; Dalton, Vanessa K

    To describe women's preferences for reproductive health providers as sources of primary and mental health care. This is secondary data analysis of the Women's Health Care Experiences and Preferences Study, an Internet survey conducted in September 2013 of 1,078 women aged 18 to 55 randomly sampled from a U.S. national probability panel. We estimated women's preferred and usual sources of care (reproductive health providers, generalists, other) for various primary care and mental health care services using weighted statistics and multiple logistic regression. Among women using health care in the past 5 years (n = 981), 88% received primary and/or mental health care, including a routine medical checkup (78%), urgent/acute (48%), chronic disease (27%), depression/anxiety (21%), stress (16%), and intimate partner violence (2%) visits. Of those, reproductive health providers were the source of checkup (14%), urgent/acute (3%), chronic disease (6%), depression/anxiety (6%), stress (11%), and intimate partner violence (3%) services. Preference for specific reproductive health-provided primary/mental health care services ranged from 7% to 20%. Among women having used primary/mental health care services (N = 894), more women (1%-17%) preferred than had received primary/mental health care from reproductive health providers. Nearly one-quarter (22%) identified reproductive health providers as their single most preferred source of care. Contraceptive use was the strongest predictor of preference for reproductive health-provided primary/mental health care (odds ratios range, 2.11-3.30). Reproductive health providers are the sole source of health care for a substantial proportion of reproductive-aged women-the same groups at risk for unmet primary and mental health care needs. Findings have implications for reproductive health providers' role in comprehensive women's health care provision and potentially for informing patient-centered, integrated models of care in current

  2. An Integrated Program to Train Local Health Care Providers to Meet Post-Disaster Mental Health Needs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kutcher, Stan; Chehil, Sonia; Roberts, Thorne

    2005-01-01

    ... & evidenced-based treatment of mental disorders occurring after a natural disaster. The approach also provided for ongoing, sustainable mental health care delivered in the community setting, as advocated by the World Health Organization...

  3. Students Seeking Help for Mental Health Problems: Do Australian University Websites Provide Clear Pathways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Thomas A.; Fiedler, Brenton A.

    2013-01-01

    Mental health problems in young Australians continue to be a major public health issue. Studying at university can generate social pressures particularly for youth, which have been associated with the onset of a mental illness or a worsening of an existing condition. Many universities provide health services to support students with health…

  4. Community Mental Health Care Providers' Understanding of Recovery Principles and Accounts of Directiveness with Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Lawrence A; Stein, Catherine H

    2017-12-01

    The present qualitative study examined community mental health providers' accounts of their therapeutic interactions with adults with serious mental illness in a recovery-oriented model of care. Ten long-time mental health care providers discussed their understanding of recovery principles, their use of directive practices, and factors that shape their work with consumers. Content analysis of mental health providers' accounts suggest that providers had no difficulty articulating basic principles of recovery-oriented care. Providers reported engaging in directive practices with consumers and described using traditional clinical factors such as level of functioning, degree of psychiatric symptoms, safety concerns, and legal status to assess consumers' ability for autonomous decision making. Providers generally did not express tension between their views of mental health recovery and their beliefs about utilizing directive approaches with consumers. Implications of present findings for research and practice are discussed.

  5. Challenges to HIV prevention in psychiatric settings: Perceptions of South African mental health care providers

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Pamela Y.

    2006-01-01

    Mental health services in South Africa increasingly feel the brunt of the AIDS epidemic. Despite the high prevalence of infection in the psychiatric setting, HIV risk reduction interventions targeting South Africans with psychiatric illness remain few and far between. The attitudes of mental health care providers about sexual relations and HIV among people with mental illness continue to influence the extent to which these issues are addressed in care settings. This study examines these attit...

  6. Perceived provider stigma as a predictor of mental health service users' internalized stigma and disempowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Katie; Link, Bruce G; Corrigan, Patrick W; Davidson, Larry; Flanagan, Elizabeth

    2017-11-13

    Despite increasing awareness of stigma from mental health service providers as a barrier to recovery, little research has directly examined how it might influence the service users' self-perceptions and treatment experience. The present study examined the association of service users' perceived provider stigma with their experience of internalized stigma and disempowerment, two psychosocial constructs known to hinder recovery. Mental health service users (N = 350) completed questionnaires assessing perceived stigma from mental health service providers, including perceptions of negative affective reactions towards individual users and desired social distance towards people with mental illnesses across various life domains, internalized stigma, and disempowerment (i.e., diminished self-efficacy and mastery) in mental health treatment settings. Structural equation modeling showed that both perceived negative affective reactions and perceived social distance were positively associated with disempowerment. Furthermore, these associations were significantly mediated by internalized stigma. These findings illuminate how perceived stigma from providers can "get under the skin" of mental health service users and contribute to their overall sense of disempowerment in mental health settings. They also highlight the need for future stigma reduction interventions to specifically target the attitudes and beliefs held by mental health professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Please break the silence: Parents' views on communication between pediatric primary care and mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Carolyn A; Ford, Julian D; Ward-Zimmerman, Barbara; Foster, Dana

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of parents' preferences regarding the sharing of information between their children's primary care and mental health providers. Fifty-five parents with a child who was actively engaged in mental health treatment completed an anonymous survey while accompanying their child to either a primary care or mental health clinic appointment. This brief measure elicited parents' experiences with and preferences for treatment coordination across their children's primary care and mental health providers, with a focus on communication practices. Parents consistently described communication among their children's primary care and mental health providers as important, yet frequently reported that such communication was not currently taking place. Further, parents reported that they were often called upon to act as "communication bridges" between professionals caring for their children. Implications for the collaborative pediatric and mental health care of children as well as recommendations for improving communication between mental health and pediatric providers are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Please break the silence: Parents’ views on communication between pediatric primary care and mental health providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Carolyn A.; Ford, Julian D.; Ward-Zimmerman, Barbara; Foster, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of parents’ preferences regarding the sharing of information between their children's primary care and mental health providers. Methods Fifty-five parents with a child who was actively engaged in mental health treatment completed an anonymous survey while accompanying their child to either a primary care or mental health clinic appointment. This brief measure elicited parents’ experiences with and preferences for treatment coordination across their children's primary care and mental health providers, with a focus on communication practices. Results Parents consistently described communication amongst their children's primary care and mental health providers as important, yet frequently reported that such communication was not currently taking place. Further, parents reported that they were often called upon to act as “communication bridges” between professionals caring for their children. Discussion Implications for the collaborative pediatric and mental health care of children as well as recommendations for improving communication between mental health and pediatric providers are discussed. PMID:25844776

  9. Mental health service responses to human trafficking: a qualitative study of professionals' experiences of providing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domoney, Jill; Howard, Louise M; Abas, Melanie; Broadbent, Matthew; Oram, Sian

    2015-11-17

    Human trafficking is a global crime and human rights violation. Although research has demonstrated a high prevalence of mental disorder among trafficked people and that trafficked people are in contact with mental health services, little is known about mental health professionals' experiences of identifying and providing care for trafficked people. This study aimed to understand how people are identified as trafficked within mental health services and the challenges professionals experience in responding to trafficked people's mental health needs. Qualitative study of electronic health records of trafficked people in contact with secondary mental health services in South East London, England. Comprehensive clinical electronic health records for over 200,000 patients in contact with secondary mental health services in South London were searched and retrieved to identify trafficked patients. Content analysis was used to establish how people were identified as trafficked, and thematic analysis was used to explore the challenges experienced in responding to mental health needs. The sample included 130 trafficked patients, 95 adults and 35 children. In 43 % (41/95) of adult cases and 63 % (22/35) child cases, mental health professionals were informed that their patient was a potential victim of trafficking by another service involved in their patient's care. Cases were also identified through patients disclosing their experiences of exploitation and abuse. Key challenges faced by staff included social and legal instability, difficulties ascertaining history, patients' lack of engagement, availability of services, and inter-agency working. Training to increase awareness, encourage helpful responses, and inform staff about the available support options would help to ensure the mental health needs of trafficked people are met. Further research is needed to establish if these challenges are similar in other health settings.

  10. Transformational Leadership Moderates the Relationship between Emotional Exhaustion and Turnover Intention among Community Mental Health Providers

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Amy E.; Miller, Elizabeth A.; Aarons, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    Public sector mental health care providers are at high risk for burnout and emotional exhaustion which negatively affect job performance and client satisfaction with services. Few studies have examined ways to reduce these associations, but transformational leadership may have a positive effect. We examine the relationships between transformational leadership, emotional exhaustion, and turnover intention in a sample of 388 community mental health providers. Emotional exhaustion was positively...

  11. Attitude about mental illness of health care providers and community leaders in rural Haryana, North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal Ramesh Salve

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Attitude about mental illness determines health seeking of the people. Success of National Mental Health Programme (NMHP is dependent on attitude about mental illness of various stakeholders in the programme. Material & Methods: A community based cross-sectional study was carried out in Ballabgarh block of Faridabad district in Haryana. We aimed to study attitude about mental illness of various stakeholders of health care providers (HCP, community leaders in rural area of Haryana, north India. Study area consisting of five Primary Health Centers (PHCs serving 2,12,000 rural population. All HCP working at PHCs, Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA and community leaders in study area were approached for participation. Hindi version of Opinion about Mental illness Scale for Chinese Community (OMICC was used to study attitude. Results: In total, 467 participants were participated in the study. Of which, HCP, ASHAs and community leaders were 81 (17.4%, 145 (31.0% and 241 (51.6% respectively. Community members reported socially restrictive, pessimistic and stereotyping attitude towards mentally ill person. ASHA and HCP reported stereotyping attitude about person with mental illness. None of the stakeholders reported stigmatizing attitude. Conclusion: Training programme focusing on spectrum of mental illness for HCP and ASHA working in rural area under NMHP programme is needed. Awareness generation of community leaders about bio-medical concept of mental illness is cornerstone of NMHP success in India.

  12. Experience of providing cultural safety in mental health to Aboriginal patients: A grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, Shirley; Wynaden, Dianne; Wright, Michael

    2017-02-06

    The need for mental health clinicians to practice cultural safety is vital in ensuring meaningful care and in moving towards improving the mental health outcomes for Aboriginal people. The concept of cultural safety is particularly relevant to mental health professionals as it seeks to promote cultural integrity and the promotion of social justice, equity and respect. A substantive theory that explained the experience of providing cultural safety in mental health care to Aboriginal patients was developed using grounded theory methodology. Mental health professionals engaged in a social psychological process, called seeking solutions by navigating the labyrinth to overcome the experience of being unprepared. During this process participants moved from a state of being unprepared to one where they began to navigate the pathway of cultural safety. The findings of this research suggest health professionals have a limited understanding of the concept of cultural safety. The experience of providing cultural safety has not been adequately addressed by organizations, health services, governments, educational providers and policy makers. Health services, organizations and government agencies must work with Aboriginal people to progress strategies that inform and empower staff to practice cultural safety. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  13. Computer-assisted client assessment survey for mental health: patient and health provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Manuela; Ahmad, Farah; Shakya, Yogendra; Ledwos, Cliff; McKenzie, Kwame

    2016-09-23

    The worldwide rise in common mental disorders (CMDs) is posing challenges in the provision of and access to care, particularly for immigrant, refugee and racialized groups from low-income backgrounds. eHealth tools, such as the Interactive Computer-Assisted Client Assessment Survey (iCCAS) may reduce some barriers to access. iCCAS is a tablet-based, touch-screen self-assessment completed by clients while waiting to see their family physician (FP) or nurse practitioner (NP). In an academic-community initiative, iCCAS was made available in English and Spanish at a Community Health Centre in Toronto through a mixed-method trial. This paper reports the perspectives of clients in the iCCAS group (n = 74) collected through an exit survey, and the perspectives of 9 providers (four FP and five NP) gathered through qualitative interviews. Client acceptance of the tool was assessed for cognitive and technical dimensions of their experience. They rated twelve items for perceived Benefits and Barriers and four questions for the technical quality. Most clients reported that the iCCAS completion time was acceptable (94.5 %), the touch-screen was easy to use (97.3 %), and the instructions (93.2 %) and questions (94.6 %) were clear. Clients endorsed the tool's Benefits, but were unsure about Barriers to information privacy and provider interaction (mean 4.1, 2.6 and 2.8, respectively on a five-point scale). Qualitative analysis of the provider interviews identified five themes: challenges in Assessing Mental Health Services, such as case complexity, time, language and stigma; the Tool's Benefits, including non-intrusive prompting of clients to discuss mental health, and facilitation of providers' assessment and care plans; the Tool's Integration into everyday practice; Challenges for Use (e.g. time); and Promoting Integration Effectively, centered on the timing of screening, setting readiness, language diversity, and technological advances. Participant clients and

  14. Expanding the geriatric mental health workforce through utilization of non-licensed providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunik, Mark E; Mills, Whitney L; Amspoker, Amber B; Cully, Jeffrey A; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Stanley, Melinda; Wilson, Nancy L

    2017-09-01

    We evaluate policy and practice strategies for bolstering the geriatric mental healthcare workforce and describe costs and considerations of implementing one approach. Narrative overview of the literature and policy retrieved from searches of databases, hand searches, and authoritative texts. We identified three proposed strategies to increase the geriatric mental healthcare workforce: (1) production of more geriatric mental health providers; (2) team-based care; and (3) non-licensed providers. We evaluate each in terms of challenges and potential and provide estimates of costs, policy, and practice considerations for training, employing, and supervising non-licensed mental health providers. Use of non-licensed providers is key to reforms needed to allow a more older adults to access necessary mental healthcare. Licensed and non-licensed providers have achieved similar improvements for generalized anxiety disorder among patients, although non-licensed providers did so at a lower cost. Supervised non-licensed providers can extend the reach of licensed providers for specific mental health conditions, resulting in lower costs and increased number of patients treated. Although several barriers to implementation exist, policy and infrastructure changes that may support this type of care delivery model are emerging from reforms in financing and associated delivery initiatives created by the Affordable Care Act.

  15. Important considerations when providing mental health first aid to Iraqi refugees in Australia: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe Guajardo, Maria Gabriela; Slewa-Younan, Shameran; Santalucia, Yvonne; Jorm, Anthony Francis

    2016-01-01

    Refugees are one of the most vulnerable groups in Australian society, presenting high levels of exposure to traumatic events and consequently high levels of severe psychological distress. While there is a need for professional help, only a small percentage will receive appropriate care for their mental health concerns. This study aimed to determine cultural considerations required when providing mental health first aid to Iraqi refugees experiencing mental health problems or crises. Using a Delphi method, 16 experts were presented with statements about possible culturally-appropriate first aid actions via questionnaires and were encouraged to suggest additional actions not covered by the questionnaire content. Statements were accepted for inclusion in a guideline if they were endorsed by ≥90 % of panellists as 'Essential' or 'Important'. From a total of 65 statements, 38 were endorsed (17 for cultural awareness, 12 for cross-cultural communication, 7 for stigma associated with mental health problems, and 2 for barriers to seeking professional help). Experts were able to reach consensus about how to provide culturally-appropriate first aid for mental health problems to Iraqi refugees, demonstrating the suitability of this methodology in developing cultural considerations guidelines. This specific refugee study provided potentially valuable cultural knowledge required to better equip members of the Australian public on how to respond to and assist Iraqi refugees experiencing mental health problems or crises.

  16. Organizational Stress Moderates the Relationship between Mental Health Provider Adaptability and Organizational Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Amy E.; Dishop, Christopher; Aarons, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    Objective Community mental health providers often operate within stressful work environments and are at high risk for emotional exhaustion, which can negatively affect job performance and client satisfaction with services. This cross-sectional study examines the relationships between organizational stress, provider adaptability, and organizational commitment. Methods Variables were analyzed using moderated multi-level regression in a sample of 311 mental health providers from 49 community mental health programs. Results Stressful organizational climate, characterized by high levels of emotional exhaustion, role conflict, and role overload, was negatively related to organizational commitment. Organizational stress moderated the relationship between provider adaptability and organizational commitment, such that those who were more adaptable had greater levels of organizational commitment when organizational stress was low, but were less committed than those who were less adaptable when organizational stress was high. Conclusions In the current study, providers higher in adaptability may perceive their organization as a greater fit when characterized by lower levels of stressfulness; however, highly adaptable providers may also exercise choice that manifests in lower commitment to staying in an overly stressful work environment. Service systems and organizational contexts are becoming increasingly demanding and stressful for direct mental health service providers. Therefore, community mental health organizations should assess and understand their organizational climate and intervene with empirically based organizational strategies when necessary to reduce stressful climates and maintain desirable employees. PMID:27301760

  17. Organizational Stress as Moderator of Relationship Between Mental Health Provider Adaptability and Organizational Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Amy E; Dishop, Christopher R; Aarons, Gregory A

    2016-10-01

    Community mental health providers often operate within stressful work environments and are at high risk of emotional exhaustion, which can negatively affect job performance and client satisfaction with services. This cross-sectional study examined the relationships between organizational stress, provider adaptability, and organizational commitment. Variables were analyzed with moderated multilevel regression in a sample of 311 mental health providers from 49 community mental health programs. Stressful organizational climate, characterized by high levels of emotional exhaustion, role conflict, and role overload, was negatively related to organizational commitment. Organizational stress moderated the relationship between provider adaptability and organizational commitment, such that those who were more adaptable had greater levels of organizational commitment when organizational stress was low but were less committed than those who were less adaptable when organizational stress was high. Providers higher in adaptability may perceive their organization as a greater fit when the work environment is less stressful; however, highly adaptable providers may also exercise choice that manifests in lower commitment to staying in an overly stressful work environment. Service systems and organizational contexts are becoming increasingly demanding and stressful for direct mental health service providers. Therefore, community mental health organizations should assess and understand their organizational climate and intervene with empirically based organizational strategies when necessary to reduce stressful climates and maintain adaptable employees.

  18. Comparing the performance of English mental health providers in achieving patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Valerie; Jacobs, Rowena

    2015-09-01

    Evidence on provider payment systems that incorporate patient outcomes is limited for mental health care. In England, funding for mental health care services is changing to a prospective payment system with a future objective of linking some part of provider payment to outcomes. This research examines performance of mental health providers offering hospital and community services, in order to investigate if some are delivering better outcomes. Outcomes are measured using the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) - a clinician-rated routine outcome measure (CROM) mandated for national use. We use data from the Mental Health Minimum Data Set (MHMDS) - a dataset on specialist mental health care with national coverage - for the years 2011/12 and 2012/13 with a final estimation sample of 305,960 observations with follow-up HoNOS scores. A hierarchical ordered probit model is used and outcomes are risk adjusted with independent variables reflecting demographic, need, severity and social indicators. A hierarchical linear model is also estimated with the follow-up total HoNOS score as the dependent variable and the baseline total HoNOS score included as a risk-adjuster. Provider performance is captured by a random effect that is quantified using Empirical Bayes methods. We find that worse outcomes are associated with severity and better outcomes with older age and social support. After adjusting outcomes for various risk factors, variations in performance are still evident across providers. This suggests that if the intention to link some element of provider payment to outcomes becomes a reality, some providers may gain financially whilst others may lose. The paper contributes to the limited literature on risk adjustment of outcomes and performance assessment of providers in mental health in the context of prospective activity-based payment systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Promoting optimal collaboration between mental health providers and nutritionists in the treatment of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejesse, Leighann D; Zelman, Diane C

    2013-01-01

    The mental health provider-nutritionist collaboration is a primary partnership in the treatment of eating disorders, and its integrity is important for good patient care. Utilizing critical incident qualitative methodology, 22 professionals who specialize in the treatment of eating disorders (12 mental health providers, 10 registered dieticians) were interviewed about instances of problems in collaborations between these two professions, and the impact and resolution of such conflicts. Findings were used to compile a list of best practices. Results are interpreted with reference to research on professional health care teams in medical settings. Implications for interprofessional education and training are discussed.

  20. Transformational leadership moderates the relationship between emotional exhaustion and turnover intention among community mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Amy E; Miller, Elizabeth A; Aarons, Gregory A

    2013-08-01

    Public sector mental health care providers are at high risk for burnout and emotional exhaustion which negatively affect job performance and client satisfaction with services. Few studies have examined ways to reduce these associations, but transformational leadership may have a positive effect. We examine the relationships between transformational leadership, emotional exhaustion, and turnover intention in a sample of 388 community mental health providers. Emotional exhaustion was positively related to turnover intention, and transformational leadership was negatively related to both emotional exhaustion and turnover intention. Transformational leadership moderated the relationship between emotional exhaustion and turnover intention, indicating that having a transformational leader may buffer the effects of providers' emotional exhaustion on turnover intention. Investing in transformational leadership development for supervisors could reduce emotional exhaustion and turnover among public sector mental health providers.

  1. Training School Mental Health Providers to Deliver Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidas, Rinad S; Mychailyszyn, Matthew P; Edmunds, Julie M; Khanna, Muniya S; Downey, Margaret Mary; Kendall, Philip C

    2012-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent mental health difficulties experienced by youth. A well-established literature has identified cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) as the gold-standard psychosocial treatment for youth anxiety disorders. Access to CBT in community clinics is limited, but a potential venue for the provision of CBT for child anxiety disorders is the school setting. The present study examined a subset of data from a larger study in which therapists from a variety of settings, including schools, were trained in CBT for child anxiety (N = 17). The study investigated the relationship between provider- and organizational-level variables associated with training and implementation among school mental health providers. The present findings indicate a positive relationship between provider attitudes and adherence to CBT. Self-reported barriers to implementation were also identified. Integrating CBT into school mental health providers' repertoires through training and consultation is a critical step for dissemination and implementation of empirically supported psychosocial treatments.

  2. Open communication: Recommendations for enhancing communication among primary care and mental health providers, services, and systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Shale L; Talmi, Ayelet

    2015-06-01

    Comments on the article "Please break the silence: Parents' views on communication between pediatric primary care and mental health providers" by Greene et al. (see record 2015-14521-001). The article highlights the need to improve communication between primary care and mental health care providers to better serve children and families. The report reaffirms that parents understand the value and necessity of collaborative care, as evidenced by the identification of gaps in consistency of bidirectional communication between providers in traditional and separate practice settings and the desire for improved care coordination. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Transformational Leadership Moderates the Relationship between Emotional Exhaustion and Turnover Intention among Community Mental Health Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Amy E.; Miller, Elizabeth A.; Aarons, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Public sector mental health care providers are at high risk for burnout and emotional exhaustion which negatively affect job performance and client satisfaction with services. Few studies have examined ways to reduce these associations, but transformational leadership may have a positive effect. We examine the relationships between transformational leadership, emotional exhaustion, and turnover intention in a sample of 388 community mental health providers. Emotional exhaustion was positively related to turnover intention, and transformational leadership was negatively related to both emotional exhaustion and turnover intention. Transformational leadership moderated the relationship between emotional exhaustion and turnover intention, indicating that having a transformational leader may buffer the effects of providers’ emotional exhaustion on turnover intention. Investing in transformational leadership development for supervisors could reduce emotional exhaustion and turnover among public sector mental health providers. PMID:22052429

  4. The influence of culture on immigrant women's mental health care experiences from the perspectives of health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Joyce Maureen; Donnelly, Tam Truong

    2007-05-01

    It is well documented that serious mental health problems such as depression, schizophrenia, and post migration stress disorders exist among immigrant women. Informed by Kleinman's explanatory model, this qualitative exploratory study was conducted with seven health care providers who provided mental health services to immigrant women. Analysis of the data revealed that (a) immigrant women face many difficulties when accessing mental health care services due to cultural differences, social stigma, and unfamiliarity with Western biomedicine, (b) spiritual beliefs and practices that influence immigrant women's mental health care practices, and (c) the health care provider-client relationship, which exerts great influence on how immigrant women seek mental health care. The study also revealed that cultural background exerts both positive and negative influences on how immigrant women seek mental health care. We suggest that although cultural knowledge and practices influence immigrant women's coping choices and strategies, awareness of social and economic differences among diverse groups of immigrant women is necessary to improve the accessibility of mental health care for immigrant women.

  5. Responding to the Challenges of Providing Mental Health Services to Refugees: An Australian Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ida; Stow, Hardy David; Szwarc, Josef

    2016-01-01

    There has been a growing recognition of the mental health needs of refugees in countries of settlement, as many are survivors of torture and other traumatic events experienced in countries of origin, during flight, and in places of temporary refuge. The challenges in providing access to services and quality mental health care arise not only from the fact that refugees generally come from cultures very different to the societies in which they settle and are not proficient in the languages of their new homes. Other significant barriers relate to the impact of the trauma and psychosocial stressors they experience despite finding apparent security. In response to the challenges, specialist agencies have developed ways of providing services that are trauma-informed, culture-informed, and holistic. This paper describes an Australian example of a mental health clinic as part of a community-based service for refugees who are survivors of torture and other traumatic events.

  6. Consumer-providers of care for adult clients of statutory mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Veronica; Lowe, Dianne; Hill, Sophie; Prictor, Megan; Hetrick, Sarah E; Ryan, Rebecca; Berends, Lynda

    2013-03-28

    In mental health services, the past several decades has seen a slow but steady trend towards employment of past or present consumers of the service to work alongside mental health professionals in providing services. However the effects of this employment on clients (service recipients) and services has remained unclear.We conducted a systematic review of randomised trials assessing the effects of employing consumers of mental health services as providers of statutory mental health services to clients. In this review this role is called 'consumer-provider' and the term 'statutory mental health services' refers to public services, those required by statute or law, or public services involving statutory duties. The consumer-provider's role can encompass peer support, coaching, advocacy, case management or outreach, crisis worker or assertive community treatment worker, or providing social support programmes. To assess the effects of employing current or past adult consumers of mental health services as providers of statutory mental health services. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 3), MEDLINE (OvidSP) (1950 to March 2012), EMBASE (OvidSP) (1988 to March 2012), PsycINFO (OvidSP) (1806 to March 2012), CINAHL (EBSCOhost) (1981 to March 2009), Current Contents (OvidSP) (1993 to March 2012), and reference lists of relevant articles. Randomised controlled trials of current or past consumers of mental health services employed as providers ('consumer-providers') in statutory mental health services, comparing either: 1) consumers versus professionals employed to do the same role within a mental health service, or 2) mental health services with and without consumer-providers as an adjunct to the service. Two review authors independently selected studies and extracted data. We contacted trialists for additional information. We conducted analyses using a random-effects model, pooling studies that measured

  7. "I understand just a little…" Perspectives of HIV/AIDS service providers in South Africa of providing mental health care for people living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Sumaya; Sorsdahl, Katherine; Swartz, Leslie; Joska, John

    2012-01-01

    Research conducted in South Africa and other parts of the world has revealed that people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) are more at risk of developing a mental disorder than the general population. It makes sense to explore means of integrating HIV/AIDS and mental health care thereby facilitating access of PLWHA to prompt mental health care. We conducted qualitative interviews with 22 HIV/AIDS service providers of three occupational categories (10 nurses, six adherence counsellors and six patient advocates) at three primary health care clinics in the Western Cape, South Africa. We explored the issues of knowledge and practice in mental health care as well as the role of nurses and lay health workers in providing mental health care to PLWHA thereby attempting to integrate mental health and HIV/AIDS care. Although the majority of participants were in favour of mental health screening for PLWHA, they lacked confidence to conduct the screening themselves. Most participants displayed poor knowledge of mental disorders and reported that they referred to colleagues or to an external mental health service if they suspected a possible mental disorder in a patient. Integration of mental health and HIV/AIDS care has potential benefit to the public HIV/AIDS care system. Mental health training should be provided to HIV/AIDS service providers in this regard.

  8. Intent to Sustain Use of a Mental Health Innovation by School Providers: What Matters Most?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livet, Melanie; Yannayon, Mary; Kocher, Kelly; McMillen, Janey

    2017-01-01

    Despite innovations being routinely introduced in schools to support the mental health of students, few are successfully maintained over time. This study explores the role of innovation characteristics, individual attitudes and skills, and organizational factors in school providers' decisions to continue use of "Centervention," a…

  9. School Mental Health Professionals' Training, Comfort, and Attitudes toward Interprofessional Collaboration with Pediatric Primary Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Prerna G.; Connors, Elizabeth H.; Biscardi, Krystin A.; Hill, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the well-documented need for interprofessional collaboration (IPC) between school mental health (SMH) professionals and pediatric primary care providers (PCPs), research on current collaborative practices of these professionals is limited. Accordingly, using survey methodology, this study investigated SMH professionals' previous training…

  10. Communication training improves patient-centered provider behavior and screening for soldiers' mental health concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Susan R; Vides de Andrade, Ana Regina; Boyd, Stephanie; Leslie, Melanie; Webb, Lynn; Davis, Lauren; Fraine, Melissa; Frazer, Nicole L; Hargraves, Ryan; Bickman, Leonard

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of patient-centered communication training for military providers who conduct post-deployment health screening. The half-day interactive workshop included simulated Soldier patients using video technology. Using a quasi-experimental design, all health care providers at four military treatment facilities were recruited for data collection during a four- to nine-day site visit (23 trained providers, 28 providers in the control group, and one provider declined to participate). All Soldiers were eligible to participate and were blinded to provider training status. Immediately after screening encounters, providers reported on their identification of mental health concerns and Soldiers reported on provider communication behaviors resulting in 1,400 matched pairs. Electronic health records were also available for 26,005 Soldiers. The workshop was found to increase (1) providers' patient-centered communication behaviors as evaluated by Soldiers; (2) provider identification of Soldier mental health concerns; and (3), related health outcomes including provision of education and referral to a confidential counseling resource. Results are promising, but with small effect sizes and study limitations, further research is warranted. A brief intensive workshop on patient-centered communication tailored to the military screening context is feasible and may improve key outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Health and education: service providers in partnership to improve mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Eapen Valsamma; Lee Lily; Austin Craig

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Children and adolescents from complex or disadvantaged backgrounds and multiple needs often are reluctant to seek help and this is particularly relevant in the context of mental health difficulties. Further, the complexity of the health system can be overwhelming to the family who are likely to be chaotic and less able to seek help. The current project piloted an integrated service delivery model involving a child psychiatry service and the department of education to promo...

  12. School Psychologists as Mental Health Providers: The Impact of Staffing Ratios and Medicaid on Service Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Katie; Meyer, Lauren; Way, Samara; Mclean, Deija

    2017-01-01

    As one out of five children in the United States demonstrate some type of mental or behavioral health concern warranting additional intervention, federal policies have emphasized the need for school-based mental health (SBMH) services and an expansion of Medicaid reimbursement for eligible children and families. Most youth access mental health…

  13. [Increased financial risks for health insurers: a challenge for providers of mental health care in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daansen, P J; van Schilt, J

    2014-01-01

    As from 2014 Dutch health insurance companies will bear the full financial risk for their clients in mental health care. Over the next years the existing risk settlement shared between insurance companies will gradually be brought to a close. Municipalities and the Ministry of Justice are already responsible for or will soon become responsible for financing health care for adolescents, patients with severe psychiatric disorders and forensic psychiatric patients. As a result, the health insurance companies are beginning to impose ever stricter conditions regarding the care 'product' they are 'buying'. To study the possible consequences, for mental health care institutions, of the increased risk to be borne by health care insurers. Use was made of relevant marketing literature and literature relating to mental health care. Studies of Dutch mental health care literature indicate that in the future the purchasing procedure will no longer consider the immediate treatment outcome as the sole performance indicator but will also take into account additional factors such as long-term improvements in patients' health, customer satisfaction and degree of patient participation, patient empowerment and autonomy. In formulating the details of their health products and business strategies, health care providers will now have to take into account not only the efficacy of the treatment they provide but also the purchasing policy and strategy of the health insurance companies.

  14. The Roles of Individual and Organizational Factors in Burnout among Community-Based Mental Health Service Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Amy E.; Albanese, Brian J.; Shapiro, Nicole M.; Aarons, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Public sector mental health care providers are at high risk for burnout which negatively affects not only provider well-being but also the quality of services for clients and the functioning of organizations. This study examines the influence of demographics, work characteristic, and organizational variables on levels of burnout among child and adolescent mental health service providers operating within a public sector mental health service system. Additionally, given the dearth of research examining differences in burnout levels among mental health sub-disciplines (e.g., social work, psychology, marital and family therapy) and mental health programs (e.g., outpatient, day treatment, Wraparound, case management), analyses were conducted to compare levels of burnout among multiple mental health disciplines and program types. Surveys were completed by 285 providers across 49 mental health programs in a large urban public mental health system. Variables representing dimensions of organizational climate and transformational leadership accounted for the greatest amount of variance in provider reported burnout. Analyses demonstrated significantly lower levels of depersonalization among Wraparound providers compared to traditional case managers. Age was the only demographic variable related to burnout. Additionally, no significant effects were found for provider discipline or for agency tenure and caseload size. Results suggest the need to consider organizational development strategies aimed at creating more functional and less stressful climates and increasing levels of transformational leadership behaviors in order to reduce levels of burnout among clinicians working in public mental health settings for youth and families. PMID:24564442

  15. Providing Tobacco Treatment in a Community Mental Health Setting: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoli, Chizimuzo T C; Mason, Dia A; Brumley-Shelton, Angela; Robertson, Heather

    Individuals with mental illnesses (MIs) are disproportionately affected by tobacco-related disease burden because of higher tobacco use prevalence and poor tobacco treatment outcomes. This pilot study examines the outcomes of delivering an evidence-based tobacco treatment program (the Cooper-Clayton program) in a community mental health setting. A prospective nonequivalent group design was used to assess outcomes. This study included 47 participants, of which 19 were in a community mental health setting and 28 were from two non-mental-health settings. Information on sociodemographic (gender, age, educational level, and current life stressors) and medical, MI, substance use, and tobacco use and cessation histories were obtained. Program completion and smoking cessation at the end of treatment (verified with expired carbon monoxide monitoring) were assessed. The program consists of combining behavioral counseling with nicotine replacement therapy for 12 weeks. Participants from the mental health setting were significantly less educated, had greater medical comorbidities, had greater psychiatric and mental health histories, and had greater perceived secondhand tobacco smoke exposure as compared with those from the non-mental-health settings. Thirty-two percent of the participants (6/19) completed the program in the mental health site as compared with 68% (19/28) from the non-mental-health site. None of those from the mental health site achieved cessation as compared with 68% of those from non-mental-health sites. The differential outcomes of evidence-based tobacco treatment programs in non-mental-health versus mental health settings may suggest the need to modify existing tobacco treatment approaches for those with MIs in community settings.

  16. Integration Between Mental Health-Care Providers and Traditional Spiritual Healers: Contextualising Islam in the Twenty-First Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Nayeefa

    2016-10-01

    In the United Arab Emirates, neuropsychiatric disorders are estimated to contribute to one-fifth of the global burden of disease. Studies show that the UAE citizens' apathy towards seeking professional mental health services is associated with the 'religious viewpoints' on the issue, societal stigma, lack of awareness of mental health and lack of confidence in mental health-care providers. Mental health expenditures by the UAE government health ministry are not available exclusively. The majority of primary health-care doctors and nurses have not received official in-service training on mental health within the last 5 years. Efforts are to be made at deconstructing the position of mental illness and its treatments in the light of Islamic Jurisprudence; drafting culturally sensitive and relevant models of mental health care for Emirati citizens; liaising between Imams of mosques and professional mental health service providers; launching small-scale pilot programs in collaboration with specialist institutions; facilitating mentoring in line with Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) outreach programmes for senior school Emirati students concerning mental health; and promoting mental health awareness in the wider community through participation in events open to public.

  17. Common Mental Health Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Susan R.; Levine, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of common student mental health issues and approaches for student affairs practitioners who are working with students with mental illness, and ways to support the overall mental health of students on campus.

  18. Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel and act as ... stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from ...

  19. Enhancing client welfare through better communication of private mental health data between rural service providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Kisalay Burmeister

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Client welfare is detrimentally affected by poor communication of data between rural service providers, which in part is complicated by privacy legislation. A study of service provision involving interviews with mental health professionals, found challenges in communicative processes between agencies were exacerbated by the heavy workloads. Dependence on individual interpretations of legislation, and on manual handling, led to delays that detrimentally affected client welfare. The main recommendation arising from this article is the creation of an ehealth system that is able to negotiate differing levels of access to client data through centralised controls, where the administration of that system ensures that it stays current with changing legislative requirements. The main contribution of the proposed model is to combine two well-known concepts: data integration and generalisation. People with mental illness are amongst the most vulnerable members of society, and current ehealth systems that provide access to medical records inadequately cater to their needs.

  20. [Survey on the barriers in providing the mental health services to the suicide attempters in ED].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Li, Tao; Hong, Xia; Jiang, Yinan; Xiong, Nana; Cao, Jinya; Wei, Jing

    2015-06-16

    The purpose of this study was to explore the barriers existing in medical settings behind the phenomenon that few suicide attempters were provided by mental health services when they got treatment in the general hospital ED. An anonymous and voluntary survey was administered among two groups: ED physicians and psychiatrists. Two tertiary general hospitals and one psychiatric hospital were chosen through convenience sampling. Suicide Behavior Attitude Questionnaire and a self-made questionnaire to evaluate barriers were used. The response rate was 68.7% for ED physicians, and 87.0% for psychiatrists. ED physicians generally scored unfavorably than psychiatrists on many items in SBAQ (P suicide attempters should have access to mental health services, the median of the scores = 10 for both group (P = 0.059), meaning highly agree. Some consistent barriers could be summarized from the self-made questionnaire. The majority of ED physicians in general hospitals still hold some misunderstanding about the suicide attempters, but they fully agree that the suicide attempters should have access to mental health services. The barriers for psychiatrists are clear.The barriers for ED physicians are complicated but workable.

  1. Mental health consultations in the perinatal period: a cost-analysis of Medicare services provided to women during a period of intense mental health reform in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Georgina M; Randall, Sean; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Reilly, Nicole; Sullivan, Elizabeth A; Highet, Nicole; Morgan, Vera A; Croft, Maxine L; Chatterton, Mary Lou; Austin, Marie-Paule

    2017-12-05

    Objective To quantify total provider fees, benefits paid by the Australian Government and out-of-pocket patients' costs of mental health Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) consultations provided to women in the perinatal period (pregnancy to end of the first postnatal year). Method A retrospective study of MBS utilisation and costs (in 2011-12 A$) for women giving birth between 2006 and 2010 by state, provider-type, and geographic remoteness was undertaken. Results The cost of mental health consultations during the perinatal period was A$17.5million for women giving birth in 2007, rising to A$29million in 2010. Almost 9% of women giving birth in 2007 had a mental health consultation compared with more than 14% in 2010. An increase in women accessing consultations, along with an increase in the average number of consultations received, were the main drivers of the increased cost, with costs per service remaining stable. There was a shift to non-specialist care and bulk billing rates increased from 44% to 52% over the study period. In 2010, the average total cost (provider fees) per woman accessing mental health consultations during the perinatal period was A$689, and the average cost per service was A$133. Compared with women residing in regional and remote areas, women residing in major cities where more likely to access consultations, and these were more likely to be with a psychiatrist rather than an allied health professional or general practitioner. Conclusion Increased access to mental health consultations has coincided with the introduction of recent mental health initiatives, however disparities exist based on geographic location. This detailed cost analysis identifies inequities of access to perinatal mental health services in regional and remote areas and provides important data for economic and policy analysis of future mental health initiatives. What is known about the topic? The mental healthcare landscape in Australia has changed significantly over the

  2. Pediatric provider processes for behavioral health screening, decision making, and referral in sites with colocated mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Karen; Goldstein, Joel; Link, David; Sengupta, Nandini; Bowers, Rachael; Tendulkar, Shalini; Wissow, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Validated behavioral health (BH) screens are recommended for use at well-child visits. This study aimed to explore how pediatricians experience and use these screens for subsequent care decisions in primary care. The study took place at 4 safety net health centers. Fourteen interviews were conducted with pediatricians who were mandated to use validated BH screens at well-child visits. Interview questions focused on key domains, including clinic BH context, screening processes, assessment of screening scores, and decision making about referral to mental health services. Qualitative analysis used the Framework Approach. A variety of themes emerged: BH screens were well accepted and valued for the way they facilitated discussion of mental health issues. However, screening results were not always used in the way that instrument designers intended. Providers' beliefs about the face validity of the instruments, and their observations about performance of instruments, led to discounting scored results. As a result, clinical decisions were made based on a variety of evidence, including individual item responses, parent or patient concerns, and perceived readiness for treatment. Additionally, providers, although interested in expanding their mental health discussions, perceived a lack of time and of their own skills to be major obstacles in this pursuit. Screens act as important prompts to stimulate discussion of BH problems, but their actual scored results play a variable role in problem identification and treatment decisions. Modifications to scheduling policies, additional provider training, and enhanced collaboration with mental health professionals could support better BH integration in pediatric primary care.

  3. Providing psychiatric services in general medical settings in South Africa: Mental health-friendly services in mental health-friendly hoaspitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaretha S van Heerden

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric disorders rank high on the list of the mostdisabling medical disorders in both the developed anddeveloping worlds.1Significant comorbidity also exists betweenneuropsychiatric disorders and general medical disorders;2this iskey in the South African context where HIV/AIDS and substanceuse disorders are highly prevalent.3,4It has therefore becomeessential to provide mental health services in a range of settings,including those that focus on the delivery of general medicalservices. Furthermore, the Mental Health Care Act 17 of 2002underlines the importance of providing integrated, accessiblemental health care in the local community.

  4. Depression Treatment by Non-Mental-Health Providers: Incremental Evidence for the Effectiveness of Listening Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Rebecca L; O'Hara, Michael W; Segre, Lisa S

    2017-03-01

    Maternal depression is a prevalent public health problem, particularly for low-income mothers of young children. Intervention development efforts, which often focus on surmounting instrumental barriers to care, have not successfully engaged and retained women in treatment. Task-sharing approaches like Listening Visits (LV) could overcome key instrumental and psychological barriers by leveraging the access of trusted, community caregivers to deliver treatment. A recent randomized controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated the efficacy of LV delivered by non-mental-health providers as compared to usual care. The present report presents results from a follow-up phase of that RCT during which participants who had completed LV were followed for an additional 8 weeks and completed measures of depression and quality of life. In addition, participants who were initially randomized to the wait-list control group received LV and were assessed. Treatment gains previously observed in participants completing LV were enhanced during the 8-week follow-up period. Participants receiving LV during the follow-up period experienced significant improvement in depressive symptoms. Results demonstrate the sustainability of LV delivered by non-mental-health providers, and provide preliminary evidence for the replicability of this approach in a sample of predominately low-income pregnant women and mothers of young children. © Society for Community Research and Action 2017.

  5. Querying the Call to Introduce Mental Capacity Testing to Mental Health Law: Does the Doctrine of Necessity Provide an Alternative?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piers Gooding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Trends in international human rights law have challenged States globally to rethink involuntary mental health interventions from a non-discrimination perspective. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD in particular prohibits laws that discriminate on the basis of disability. However, a key criterion for compulsory mental health treatment under typical mental health legislation is a psychiatric diagnosis (in conjunction with risk of harm and other criteria. Hence, for people with mental health disabilities, rights to liberty and consent in healthcare are held to a different standard compared to other citizens. A prominent law reform option being explored by some governments and commentators for achieving non-discrimination is to replace the diagnostic criterion for triggering involuntary intervention with an assessment of mental capacity. After all, every citizen is subject to restrictions on autonomy where they are deemed to lack mental capacity, such as where concussion necessitates emergency service. However, the use of mental capacity “testing” is seen by diverse commentators as wanting in key respects. A prominent criticism comes from the United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which considers mental capacity assessments a form of disability-based discrimination. This article queries the call to replace the diagnostic criterion in mental health law with an assessment of mental capacity in the light of jurisprudence on equality and non-discrimination in international human rights law. Instead, we examine the doctrine of necessity as an area of law, which might help identify specific thresholds for overriding autonomy in emergency circumstances that can be codified in a non-discriminatory way. We also consider the need for deliberative law reform processes to identify such measures, and we suggest interim, short-term measures for creating a “supported decision

  6. Integrating Self-Determination and Job Demands-Resources Theory in Predicting Mental Health Provider Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreison, Kimberly C; White, Dominique A; Bauer, Sarah M; Salyers, Michelle P; McGuire, Alan B

    2018-01-01

    Limited progress has been made in reducing burnout in mental health professionals. Accordingly, we identified factors that might protect against burnout and could be productive focal areas for future interventions. Guided by self-determination theory, we examined whether supervisor autonomy support, self-efficacy, and staff cohesion predict provider burnout. 358 staff from 13 agencies completed surveys. Higher levels of supervisor autonomy support, self-efficacy, and staff cohesion were predictive of lower burnout, even after accounting for job demands. Although administrators may be limited in their ability to reduce job demands, our findings suggest that increasing core job resources may be a viable alternative.

  7. Views of mental health care consumers on public reporting of information on provider performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Bradley D; Kogan, Jane N; Essock, Susan; Fudurich, Stephanie

    2009-05-01

    This qualitative study examined consumer preferences regarding the content and use of provider performance data and other provider information to aid in consumers' decision making. Focus groups were conducted with 41 adults who were consumers of mental health care, and discussions were transcribed and analyzed with standard qualitative research methods. Consumers supported trends toward enhancing information about providers and its availability. Several key themes emerged, including the need for easily accessible information and the most and least useful types of information. Current efforts to share provider performance information do not meet consumer preferences. Modest changes in the types of information being shared and the manner in which it is shared may substantially enhance use of such information. Such changes may help consumers to be more informed and empowered in making decisions about care, improve the quality of the care delivered, and support the movement toward a more recovery-focused system of care.

  8. The roles of individual and organizational factors in burnout among community-based mental health service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Amy E; Albanese, Brian J; Shapiro, Nicole M; Aarons, Gregory A

    2014-02-01

    Public-sector mental health care providers are at high risk for burnout, which negatively affects not only provider well-being but also the quality of services for clients and the functioning of organizations. This study examines the influence of demographics, work characteristic, and organizational variables on levels of burnout among child and adolescent mental health service providers operating within a public-sector mental health service system. Additionally, given the dearth of research examining differences in burnout levels among mental health subdisciplines (e.g., social work, psychology, marital and family therapy) and mental health programs (e.g., outpatient, day treatment, wraparound, case management), analyses were conducted to compare levels of burnout among multiple mental health disciplines and program types. Surveys were completed by 285 providers across 49 mental health programs in a large urban public mental health system. Variables representing dimensions of organizational climate and transformational leadership accounted for the greatest amount of variance in provider reported burnout. Analyses demonstrated significantly lower levels of depersonalization among wraparound providers compared to traditional case managers. Age was the only demographic variable related to burnout. Additionally, no significant effects were found for provider discipline or for agency tenure and caseload size. Results suggest the need to consider organizational development strategies aimed at creating more functional and less stressful climates and increasing levels of transformational leadership behaviors in order to reduce levels of burnout among clinicians working in public mental health settings for youth and families. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. The Role of Special and Incentive Pays in Retaining Military Mental Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    can be used to update the model in the future and take advantage of an increased sample size, and it may be possible to extend the model in promising... marriage and family therapy, mental health counseling, substance abuse counseling, and occupational therapy. As we discuss in later chapters, we estimate...have specific occupational codes for psychiatric nursing, marriage and family therapy, mental health counseling, and substance abuse counseling

  10. Dentist-Perceived Barriers and Attractors to Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment Provided by Mental Health Providers in Dental Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, R E; Wojda, A K; Eddy, J M; Haydt, N C; Geiger, J F; Slep, A M Smith

    2018-02-01

    Over 1 in 5 dental patients report moderate to severe dental fear. Although the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for dental fear has been examined in over 20 randomized controlled trials-with 2 meta-analyses finding strong average effect sizes ( d > 1)-CBT has received almost no dissemination beyond the specialty clinics that tested it. The challenge, then, is not how to treat dental fear but how to disseminate and implement such an evidence-based treatment in a way that recognizes the rewards and barriers in the US health care system. This mixed-method study investigated the potential of disseminating CBT through care from a mental health provider from within the dental home, a practice known as evidence-based collaborative care (EBCC). Two preadoption studies were conducted with practicing dentists drawn from a self-organized Practice-Based Research Network in the New York City metropolitan area. The first comprised 3 focus groups ( N = 17), and the second involved the administration of a survey ( N = 46). Focus group participants agreed that CBT for dental fear is worthy of consideration but identified several concerns regarding its appeal, feasibility, and application in community dental practices. Survey participants indicated endorsement of factors promoting the use of EBCC as a mechanism for CBT dissemination, with no factors receiving less than 50% support. Taken together, these findings indicate that EBCC may be a useful framework through which an evidence-based treatment for dental fear treatment can be delivered.

  11. Building capacity in mental health interventions in low resource countries: an apprenticeship model for training local providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Laura K; Dorsey, Shannon; Bolton, Paul; Jordans, Mark Jd; Rahman, Atif; Bass, Judith; Verdeli, Helena

    2011-11-18

    Recent global mental health research suggests that mental health interventions can be adapted for use across cultures and in low resource environments. As evidence for the feasibility and effectiveness of certain specific interventions begins to accumulate, guidelines are needed for how to train, supervise, and ideally sustain mental health treatment delivery by local providers in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). MODEL AND CASE PRESENTATIONS: This paper presents an apprenticeship model for lay counselor training and supervision in mental health treatments in LMIC, developed and used by the authors in a range of mental health intervention studies conducted over the last decade in various low-resource settings. We describe the elements of this approach, the underlying logic, and provide examples drawn from our experiences working in 12 countries, with over 100 lay counselors. We review the challenges experienced with this model, and propose some possible solutions. We describe and discuss how this model is consistent with, and draws on, the broader dissemination and implementation (DI) literature. In our experience, the apprenticeship model provides a useful framework for implementation of mental health interventions in LMIC. Our goal in this paper is to provide sufficient details about the apprenticeship model to guide other training efforts in mental health interventions.

  12. Association of mandated language access programming and quality of care provided by mental health agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Sean R; Snowden, Lonnie

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the association between language access programming and quality of psychiatric care received by persons with limited English proficiency (LEP). In 1999, the California Department of Mental Health required county Medicaid agencies to implement a "threshold language access policy" to meet the state's Title VI obligations. This policy required Medi-Cal agencies to provide language access programming, including access to interpreters and translated written material, to speakers of languages other than English if the language was spoken by at least 3,000, or 5%, of the county's Medicaid population. Using a longitudinal study design with a nonequivalent control group, this study examined the quality of care provided to Spanish speakers with LEP and a severe mental illness before and after implementation of mandatory language access programming. Quality was measured by receipt of at least two follow-up medication visits within 90 days or three visits within 180 days of an initial medication visit over a period of 38 quarter-years. On average, only 40% of Spanish-speaking clients received at least three medication follow-up visits within 180 days. In multivariate analyses, language access programming was not associated with receipt of at least two medication follow-up visits within 90 days or at least three visits within 180 days. This study found no evidence that language access programming led to increased rates of follow-up medication visits for clients with LEP.

  13. Preventing HIV among U.S. women of color with severe mental illness: perceptions of mental health care providers working in urban community clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agénor, Madina; Collins, Pamela Y

    2013-01-01

    Given their knowledge of the behavioral issues related to psychiatric illness, mental health care providers are in a unique position to help prevent HIV among women with severe mental illness (SMI). We conducted in-depth interviews with providers at two New York City community clinics. We identified three major, interrelated themes pertaining to HIV prevention among women of color with SMI. Interventions that address the barriers that clinicians face in discussing sex, sexuality, and HIV with patients and train providers in the cultural considerations of cross-cultural mental health care are needed to help prevent HIV among women of color with SMI.

  14. Preventing HIV Among U.S. Women of Color With Severe Mental Illness: Perceptions of Mental Health Care Providers Working in Urban Community Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agénor, Madina; Collins, Pamela Y.

    2013-01-01

    Given their knowledge of the behavioral issues related to psychiatric illness, mental health care providers are in a unique position to help prevent HIV among women with severe mental illness (SMI). We conducted in-depth interviews with providers at two New York City community clinics. We identified three major, interrelated themes pertaining to HIV prevention among women of color with SMI. Interventions that address the barriers that clinicians face in discussing sex, sexuality, and HIV with patients and train providers in the cultural considerations of cross-cultural mental health care are needed to help prevent HIV among women of color with SMI. PMID:23394326

  15. National integration of mental health providers in VA home-based primary care: an innovative model for mental health care delivery with older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Bradley E; Karel, Michele J

    2014-10-01

    To promote mental health (MH) service access and quality for veterans with complex and chronic medical, social, and behavioral conditions, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has integrated a full-time MH provider into each VA home-based primary care (HBPC) team. The goal of the current evaluation is to examine the nature and extent to which MH care processes and practices have been integrated into HBPC nationally. Separate surveys assessing the integration of a wide range of MH care practices and HBPC team processes were sent to MH providers and program directors in each HBPC program in 2010. A total of 132 MH providers representing 119 HBPC programs, and 112 program directors completed the surveys. The most common clinical issues addressed by MH providers were depression, coping with illness and disability, anxiety, caregiver/family stress, and cognitive evaluation. Other team members typically conducted initial MH screenings, with MH providers' time focusing on cases with identified needs. Approximately 40% of MH providers' time was devoted to direct clinical care. Significant time was also spent on team activities, driving, and charting. Integration of MH services into HBPC is feasible and facilitates service access for a vulnerable population. Mental health care delivery in HPBC generally involves a high degree of interdisciplinary practice. Mental health integration into HBPC may serve as a model for other systems interested in promoting MH care delivery among homebound and other older individuals. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America 2013.

  16. Availability of mental health service providers and suicide rates in Slovenia: a nationwide ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosec Jagodic, Helena; Rokavec, Tatjana; Agius, Mark; Pregelj, Peter

    2013-10-28

    To investigate the influence of socioeconomic factors, mental health service availability, and prevalence of mental disorders on regional differences in the suicide rate in Slovenia. The effects of different socioeconomic factors, mental health service availability, and mental disorders factors on suicide rates from 2000-2009 were analyzed using a general linear mixed model (GLMM). Pearson correlations were used to explore the direction and magnitude of associations. Among socioeconomic factors, unemployment rate ranked as the most powerful predictor of suicide and an increase of one unit in the unemployment rate increased regional suicide rate by 2.21 (β=2.21, 95% confidence intervals [CI]=1.87-2.54, Pdivorce ratio was negatively related to the suicide rate and an increase of one unit in marriage/divorce ratio reduced regional suicide rate by 1.16 (β=-1.16, 95% CI=-2.20 to -0.13, Prate and reduced regional suicide rate by 2.95 (β=-2.95, 95% CI=-4.60 to -1.31, P=0.002). Another negatively correlated factor was the antidepressant/anxiolytic ratio higher than 0.5, which reduced the regional suicide rate by 2.32 (β=-2.32, 95% CI=-3.75 to -0.89, P=0.003). Among mental health disorders, only the prevalence of alcohol use disorders was significantly related to the regional suicide rates and an increase of one unit in the prevalence of alcohol use disorders per 1000 inhabitants increased the regional suicide rate by 0.02 (β=0.02, 95% CI=0.01- 0.03, P=0.008). Besides unemployment, which was a very strong predictor of suicide rates, unequal availability of mental health services and quality of depressive disorder treatment may contribute to variations in suicide rates in different regions.

  17. Practice nurses mental health provide space to patients to discuss unpleasant emotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, E.C.; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van

    2016-01-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: A core skill of practice nurses' mental health is to recognize and explore patients' unpleasant emotions. Patients rarely express their unpleasant emotions directly and spontaneously, but instead give indirect signs that something is worrying them. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS

  18. Practice nurses mental health provide space to patients to discuss unpleasant emotions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, E.C.M.; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, A.M. van

    2016-01-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? A core skill of practice nurses' mental health is to recognize and explore patients' unpleasant emotions. Patients rarely express their unpleasant emotions directly and spontaneously, but instead give indirect signs that something is worrying them.

  19. Relationship of Evidence-Based Practice and Treatments: A Survey of Community Mental Health Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMeo, Michelle A.; Moore, G. Kurt; Lichtenstein, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based treatments (EBTs) are "interventions" that have been proven effective through rigorous research methodologies. Evidence-based practice (EBP), however, refers to a "decision-making process" that integrates the best available research, clinician expertise, and client characteristics. This study examined community mental health service…

  20. Recommendations from primary care providers for integrating mental health in a primary care system in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Bibhav; Tenpa, Jasmine; Thapa, Poshan; Gauchan, Bikash; Citrin, David; Ekstrand, Maria

    2016-09-19

    Globally, access to mental healthcare is often lacking in rural, low-resource settings. Mental healthcare services integration in primary care settings is a key intervention to address this gap. A common strategy includes embedding mental healthcare workers on-site, and receiving consultation from an off-site psychiatrist. Primary care provider perspectives are important for successful program implementation. We conducted three focus groups with all 24 primary care providers at a district-level hospital in rural Nepal. We asked participants about their concerns and recommendations for an integrated mental healthcare delivery program. They were also asked about current practices in seeking referral for patients with mental illness. We collected data using structured notes and analyzed the data by template coding to develop themes around concerns and recommendations for an integrated program. Participants noted that the current referral system included sending patients to the nearest psychiatrist who is 14 h away. Participants did not think this was effective, and stated that integrating mental health into the existing primary care setting would be ideal. Their major concerns about a proposed program included workplace hierarchies between mental healthcare workers and other clinicians, impact of staff turnover on patients, reliability of an off-site consultant psychiatrist, and ability of on-site primary care providers to screen patients and follow recommendations from an off-site psychiatrist. Their suggestions included training a few existing primary care providers as dedicated mental healthcare workers, recruiting both senior and junior mental healthcare workers to ensure retention, recruiting academic psychiatrists for reliability, and training all primary care providers to appropriately screen for mental illness and follow recommendations from the psychiatrist. Primary care providers in rural Nepal reported the failure of the current system of referral, which

  1. Health Gains and Financial Protection Provided by the Ethiopian Mental Health Strategy: an Extended Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Kjell Arne; Strand, Kirsten Bjerkreim; Fekadu, Abebaw; Chisholm, Dan

    2017-04-01

    Mental and neurological (MN) health care has long been neglected in low-income settings. This paper estimates health and non-health impacts of fully publicly financed care for selected key interventions in the National Mental Health Strategy in Ethiopia for depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and epilepsy. A methodology of extended cost-effectiveness analysis (ECEA) is applied to MN health care in Ethiopia. The impact of providing a package of selected MN interventions free of charge in Ethiopia is estimated for: epilepsy (75% coverage, phenobarbital), depression (30% coverage, fluoxetine, cognitive therapy and proactive case management), bipolar affective disorder (50% coverage, valproate and psychosocial therapy) and schizophrenia (75% coverage, haloperidol plus psychosocial treatment). Multiple outcomes are estimated and disaggregated across wealth quintiles: (1) healthy-life-years (HALYs) gained; (2) household out-of-pocket (OOP) expenditures averted; (3) expected financial risk protection (FRP); and (4) productivity impact. The MN package is expected to cost US$177 million and gain 155,000 HALYs (epilepsy US$37m and 64,500 HALYs; depression US$65m and 61,300 HALYs; bipolar disorder US$44m and 20,300 HALYs; and schizophrenia US$31m and 8,900 HALYs) annually. The health benefits would be concentrated among the poorest groups for all interventions. Universal public finance averts little household OOP expenditures and provides minimal FRP because of the low current utilization of these MN services in Ethiopia. In addition, economic benefits of US$ 51 million annually are expected from depression treatment in Ethiopia as a result of productivity gains, equivalent to 78% of the investment cost. The total MN package in Ethiopia is estimated to cost equivalent to US$1.8 per capita and yields large progressive health benefits. The expected productivity gain is substantially higher than the expected FRP. The ECEA approach seems to fit well with the current

  2. Health Gains and Financial Protection Provided by the Ethiopian Mental Health Strategy: an Extended Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Kirsten Bjerkreim; Fekadu, Abebaw; Chisholm, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mental and neurological (MN) health care has long been neglected in low-income settings. This paper estimates health and non-health impacts of fully publicly financed care for selected key interventions in the National Mental Health Strategy in Ethiopia for depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and epilepsy. Methods: A methodology of extended cost-effectiveness analysis (ECEA) is applied to MN health care in Ethiopia. The impact of providing a package of selected MN interventions free of charge in Ethiopia is estimated for: epilepsy (75% coverage, phenobarbital), depression (30% coverage, fluoxetine, cognitive therapy and proactive case management), bipolar affective disorder (50% coverage, valproate and psychosocial therapy) and schizophrenia (75% coverage, haloperidol plus psychosocial treatment). Multiple outcomes are estimated and disaggregated across wealth quintiles: (1) healthy-life-years (HALYs) gained; (2) household out-of-pocket (OOP) expenditures averted; (3) expected financial risk protection (FRP); and (4) productivity impact. Results: The MN package is expected to cost US$177 million and gain 155,000 HALYs (epilepsy US$37m and 64,500 HALYs; depression US$65m and 61,300 HALYs; bipolar disorder US$44m and 20,300 HALYs; and schizophrenia US$31m and 8,900 HALYs) annually. The health benefits would be concentrated among the poorest groups for all interventions. Universal public finance averts little household OOP expenditures and provides minimal FRP because of the low current utilization of these MN services in Ethiopia. In addition, economic benefits of US$ 51 million annually are expected from depression treatment in Ethiopia as a result of productivity gains, equivalent to 78% of the investment cost. Conclusions: The total MN package in Ethiopia is estimated to cost equivalent to US$1.8 per capita and yields large progressive health benefits. The expected productivity gain is substantially higher than the expected FRP. The

  3. Preventing HIV Among U.S. Women of Color With Severe Mental Illness: Perceptions of Mental Health Care Providers Working in Urban Community Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Agénor, Madina; Collins, Pamela Y.

    2013-01-01

    Given their knowledge of the behavioral issues related to psychiatric illness, mental health care providers are in a unique position to help prevent HIV among women with severe mental illness (SMI). We conducted in-depth interviews with providers at two New York City community clinics. We identified three major, interrelated themes pertaining to HIV prevention among women of color with SMI. Interventions that address the barriers that clinicians face in discussing sex, sexuality, and HIV with...

  4. Attitudes, practices, and barriers to adolescent suicide and mental health screening: a survey of pennsylvania primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Guy S; O'Malley, Alana; Wintersteen, Matthew B; Peters, Sherry; Yunghans, Suzanne; Biddle, Virginia; O'Brien, Connell; Schrand, Susan

    2012-01-01

    To determine primary care providers' rates of screening for suicide and mental health problems in adolescents and the factors that promote or discourage this practice. Overall, 671 medical professionals (ie, pediatricians, family physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) completed an electronic survey. The 53 items focused on (1) attitudes, knowledge, and comfort with general psychosocial and suicide screening and (2) current practices and barriers regarding screening and referrals to behavioral health services. Forty percent had a patient attempt suicide in the past year, and 7.7% had 6 or more patients attempt suicide. At a well visit, 67% screened for mental health, and 35.2% screened for suicide risk. Most (61.1%) primary care providers rarely screened for suicide or only when it was indicated. Only 14.2% of primary care providers often used a standardized suicide screening tool. Factors associated with screening were being knowledgeable about suicide risk, being female, working in an urban setting, and having had a suicidal patient. Only 3.0% reported adequate compensation for these practices, and 44% agreed that primary care providers frequently use physical health billing codes for behavioral health services. Nearly 90% said parent involvement was needed if adolescents were to follow through with referrals to mental health services. Only 21% frequently heard back from the behavioral health providers after a referral was made. Policy that promotes mental health education for primary care providers, provides reimbursement for mental health screening, and encourages better service integration could increase suicide screening and save healthcare costs and patients' lives.

  5. How do general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health problems? A qualitative study from Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen Natasja Koitzsch; Norredam Marie; Priebe Stefan; Krasnik Allan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Refugees are a particularly vulnerable group in relation to the development of mental illness and many may have been subjected to torture or other traumatic experiences. General practitioners are gatekeepers for access to several parts of the psychiatric system and knowledge of their patients’ refugee background is crucial to secure adequate care. The aim of this study is to investigate how general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health prob...

  6. What Is Mental Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Myths and Facts Recovery Is Possible What Is Mental Health? Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social ... mental health problems and where to find help . Mental Health and Wellness Positive mental health allows people to: ...

  7. Learn About Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Learn About Mental Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Mental Health Basics Types of Mental Illness Fast Facts Mental Health Basics What is mental illness? Mental illnesses are ...

  8. Community mental health provider modifications to cognitive therapy: implications for sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltsey Stirman, Shannon; Calloway, Amber; Toder, Katherine; Miller, Christopher J; Devito, Andrea K; Meisel, Samuel N; Xhezo, Regina; Evans, Arthur C; Beck, Aaron T; Crits-Christoph, Paul

    2013-10-01

    This study identified modifications to an evidence-based psychosocial treatment (cognitive therapy) within a community mental health system after clinicians had received intensive training and consultation. A coding system, consisting of four types of contextual modifications, 12 types of content-related modifications, seven levels at which modifications can occur, and a code for changes to training or evaluation processes, was applied to data from interviews with 27 clinicians who treat adult consumers within a mental health system. Nine of 12 content modifications were endorsed, and four (tailoring, integration into other therapeutic approaches, loosening structure, and drift) accounted for 65% of all modifications identified. Contextual modifications were rarely endorsed by clinicians in this sample. Modifications typically occurred at the client or clinician level. Clinicians in community mental health settings made several modifications to an evidence-based practice (EBP), often in an effort to improve the fit of the intervention to the client's needs or to the clinician's therapeutic style. These findings have implications for implementation and sustainability of EBPs in community settings, client-level outcomes, and training and consultation.

  9. #Socialmedia: A Preliminary Report of Social Networking Use among University and College Counseling Center Mental Health Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Carrie; Much, Kari

    2017-01-01

    The social networking use of university and college counseling center (UCCC) mental health providers has not been widely researched. Most of the 20 providers surveyed in this preliminary study reported engaging in social networking despite identifying pros and cons to its use. Participants' reported use of social media may indicate that social…

  10. Patient-provider relationship predicts mental and physical health indicators for HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankoff, Sarah M; McCullough, Mary B; Pantalone, David W

    2013-06-01

    We used secondary data analysis to examine associations among aspects of patient-provider relationships and mental and physical health indicators. Positive patient perceptions of patient-provider relationships were associated with fewer mental health symptoms in this outpatient sample of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (N = 171). Regression analyses revealed the role of anxiety and depression in explaining associations between two aspects of patient-provider relationships (i.e. quality of information offered and provider interactional style) and health-related quality of life. The findings demonstrated the importance of patient-provider relationships to improving physical health and functioning and maintaining engagement in care, among HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  11. The experience of primary care providers with an integrated mental health care program in safety-net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentham, Wayne D; Ratzliff, Anna; Harrison, David; Chan, Ya-Fen; Vannoy, Steven; Unützer, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Primary care providers participating in a statewide implementation of an integrated mental health care program for "safety-net" patients in primary care clinics were surveyed to elicit their experiences and level of satisfaction. Quantitative analyses were performed to identify respondent characteristics and satisfaction with the program. Qualitative analyses were done to identify common themes in response to the question "How could psychiatric consultation [in the program] be improved?" Primary care providers were generally satisfied with the integrated mental health care program and raised several concerns that suggest important principles for successful future implementations of these types of programs.

  12. Child disaster mental health interventions, part II: Timing of implementation, delivery settings and providers, and therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Sweeton, Jennifer L; Newman, Elana; Varma, Vandana; Noffsinger, Mary A; Shaw, Jon A; Chrisman, Allan K; Nitiéma, Pascal

    This review summarizes current knowledge on the timing of child disaster mental health intervention delivery, the settings for intervention delivery, the expertise of providers, and therapeutic approaches. Studies have been conducted on interventions delivered during all phases of disaster management from pre event through many months post event. Many interventions were administered in schools which offer access to large numbers of children. Providers included mental health professionals and school personnel. Studies described individual and group interventions, some with parent involvement. The next generation of interventions and studies should be based on an empirical analysis of a number of key areas.

  13. What are the Mental Health Needs of Adolescents in Rural South Australia? The Perceptions of Human Service Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms Marijeta Kurtin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND:Up to 20% of Australian adolescents experience the burden of having a mental health problem. Priorresearch has suggested that inhabitants of rural areas are at particular risk of mental healthmorbidity due to their location. The current study sought to investigate how ‘rurality’ influences themental health of adolescents in rural South Australia, and to explore the perceptions of the mentalhealth needs of adolescents as described by service providers in rural South Australia.METHODS:Four focus group discussions and 14 interviews were conducted with 38 human (allied health serviceproviders in the Eyre Peninsula, Spencer Gulf, Limestone Coast and Greater Green Triangle regions ofSouth Australia. Semi-structured telephone interviews were also conducted with three Victorianhuman service providers. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed to identify emergentthemes.RESULTS:Ninety codes were developed and subsequently categorised into five major themes: Community andSociety Factors; Youth Issues, Indigeneity; Service Delivery and Utilisation; and Occupational Factors.Significant gaps in mental health service delivery were identified. Better utilisation of currentresources was identified as a greater concern than the absence of resources per se.CONCLUSIONS:This study provided a unique opportunity for rural allied and primary health care service providers todiscuss adolescent mental health issues in their communities and as part of their work. The datagenerated by these discussions identified areas where practice could be improved.

  14. Providing web-based mental health services to at-risk women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny Meghan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined the feasibility of providing web-based mental health services, including synchronous internet video conferencing of an evidence-based support/education group, to at-risk women, specifically poor lone mothers. The objectives of this study were to: (i adapt a face-to-face support/education group intervention to a web-based format for lone mothers, and (ii evaluate lone mothers' response to web-based services, including an online video conferencing group intervention program. Methods Participating mothers were recruited through advertisements. To adapt the face-to-face intervention to a web-based format, we evaluated participant motivation through focus group/key informant interviews (n = 7, adapted the intervention training manual for a web-based environment and provided a computer training manual. To evaluate response to web-based services, we provided the intervention to two groups of lone mothers (n = 15. Pre-post quantitative evaluation of mood, self-esteem, social support and parenting was done. Post intervention follow up interviews explored responses to the group and to using technology to access a health service. Participants received $20 per occasion of data collection. Interviews were taped, transcribed and content analysis was used to code and interpret the data. Adherence to the intervention protocol was evaluated. Results Mothers participating in this project experienced multiple difficulties, including financial and mood problems. We adapted the intervention training manual for use in a web-based group environment and ensured adherence to the intervention protocol based on viewing videoconferencing group sessions and discussion with the leaders. Participant responses to the group intervention included decreased isolation, and increased knowledge and confidence in themselves and their parenting; the responses closely matched those of mothers who obtained same service in face-to-face groups. Pre-and post

  15. Providing web-based mental health services to at-risk women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Ellen L; Kenny, Meghan; Marziali, Elsa

    2011-08-19

    We examined the feasibility of providing web-based mental health services, including synchronous internet video conferencing of an evidence-based support/education group, to at-risk women, specifically poor lone mothers. The objectives of this study were to: (i) adapt a face-to-face support/education group intervention to a web-based format for lone mothers, and (ii) evaluate lone mothers' response to web-based services, including an online video conferencing group intervention program. Participating mothers were recruited through advertisements. To adapt the face-to-face intervention to a web-based format, we evaluated participant motivation through focus group/key informant interviews (n = 7), adapted the intervention training manual for a web-based environment and provided a computer training manual. To evaluate response to web-based services, we provided the intervention to two groups of lone mothers (n = 15). Pre-post quantitative evaluation of mood, self-esteem, social support and parenting was done. Post intervention follow up interviews explored responses to the group and to using technology to access a health service. Participants received $20 per occasion of data collection. Interviews were taped, transcribed and content analysis was used to code and interpret the data. Adherence to the intervention protocol was evaluated. Mothers participating in this project experienced multiple difficulties, including financial and mood problems. We adapted the intervention training manual for use in a web-based group environment and ensured adherence to the intervention protocol based on viewing videoconferencing group sessions and discussion with the leaders. Participant responses to the group intervention included decreased isolation, and increased knowledge and confidence in themselves and their parenting; the responses closely matched those of mothers who obtained same service in face-to-face groups. Pre-and post-group quantitative evaluations did not show

  16. Impact of Providing Compassion on Job Performance and Mental Health: The Moderating Effect of Interpersonal Relationship Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Li-Chuan

    2017-07-01

    To examine the relationships of providing compassion at work with job performance and mental health, as well as to identify the role of interpersonal relationship quality in moderating these relationships. This study adopted a two-stage survey completed by 235 registered nurses employed by hospitals in Taiwan. All hypotheses were tested using hierarchical regression analyses. The results show that providing compassion is an effective predictor of job performance and mental health, whereas interpersonal relationship quality can moderate the relationships of providing compassion with job performance and mental health. When nurses are frequently willing to listen, understand, and help their suffering colleagues, the enhancement engendered by providing compassion can improve the provider's job performance and mental health. Creating high-quality relationships in the workplace can strengthen the positive benefits of providing compassion. Motivating employees to spontaneously exhibit compassion is crucial to an organization. Hospitals can establish value systems, belief systems, and cultural systems that support a compassionate response to suffering. In addition, nurses can internalize altruistic belief systems into their own personal value systems through a long process of socialization in the workplace. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  17. Understanding Universal Elements in Mental Health Recovery: A Cross-Examination of Peer Providers and a Non-Clinical Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Galia; Russo-Netzer, Pninit

    2016-01-01

    In our study, we examined underlying human elements embedded in mental health recovery, by exploring shared positive change among peer providers with serious mental illnesses in recovery and a normative sample in spiritual growth following adversity. We conducted secondary analysis based on two independent qualitative study samples consisting of 31 American peer providers and 27 Israeli adults. We identified three shared and two distinct enablers of positive change: peer groups, significant mentor, self-transcendent experiences. Distinct enablers were having meaningful task/role (clinical sample) and deliberate choice to commit to change in face of uncertainty (non-clinical sample). Enablers facilitated positive processes of meaning making and enhancement of agency. Enablers provided opportunities to which the person responded and made use of--thus, enacting a positive reinforcement of change processes. The findings highlight the value of examining mental health recovery in a broad holistic perspective and have implications for practice. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Errorless learning for training individuals with schizophrenia at a community mental health setting providing work experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Robert S; Liberman, Robert P; Becker, Deborah R; Drake, Robert E; Sugar, Catherine A; Green, Michael F

    2009-07-01

    The effects of errorless learning (EL) on work performance, tenure, and personal well-being were compared with conventional job training in a community mental health fellowship club offering 12-week time-limited work experience. Participants were 40 clinically stable schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder outpatients randomly assigned to EL vs conventional instruction (CI) at a thrift-type clothing store. EL participants received training on how to perform their assigned job tasks based on principles of EL, such as error reduction and automation of task performance. CI participants received training common to other community-based entry-level jobs that included verbal instruction, a visual demonstration, independent practice, and corrective feedback. Participants were scheduled to work 2 hours per week for 12 weeks. For both groups, job training occurred during the first 2 weeks at the worksite. Work performance (assessed using the Work Behavior Inventory, WBI) and personal well-being (self-esteem, job satisfaction, and work stress) were assessed at weeks 2, 4, and 12. Job tenure was defined as the number of weeks on the job or total number of hours worked prior to quitting or study end. The EL group performed better than the CI group on the Work Quality Scale from the WBI, and the group differences were relatively consistent over time. Results from the survival analyses of job tenure revealed a non-significant trend favoring EL. There were no group differences on self-esteem, job satisfaction, or work stress. The findings provide modest support for the extensions of EL to community settings for enhancing work performance.

  19. Mental health parity legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldone, Arlene; Cullen-Drill, Mary

    2010-09-01

    Although recognition and treatment of mental health disorders have become integrated into routine medical care, inequities remain regarding limits on mental health outpatient visits and higher copayments and deductibles required for mental health services when accessed. Two federal laws were passed by Congress in 2008: The Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act. Both laws became effective on January 1, 2010. The purpose of this article is to discuss provisions of each act and provide clinical examples describing how patients are affected by lack of parity and may potentially benefit from implementation of these new laws. Using available evidence, we examine the potential strengths and limitations of mental health parity legislation from the health policy perspectives of health care access, cost, and quality and identify the important role of nurses as patient and mental health parity advocates. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Where do Peer Providers Fit into Newly Integrated Mental Health and Primary Care Teams? A Mixed Method Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siantz, Elizabeth; Rice, Eric; Henwood, Benjamin; Palinkas, Lawrence

    2017-12-21

    Little is known about the involvement of peer providers in integrated behavioral health teams. This study asks where peer providers fit within integrated care teams in Los Angeles County. Social network analysis combined with qualitative fieldwork was used to understand the network positions of peer providers in 14 integrated pilot programs. Four programs' peer providers were highly central, while 3 programs' were on the network's periphery. Positional variation appeared to be related to the peers' mental health status. Targeted efforts are needed to support the implementation of peer providers on integrated teams at the program and system levels.

  1. Inpatient Mental Health Recapture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-07

    FINAL REPORT DATES COVERED (From - To) JULY 2008 TO AUG 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE lnpatient Mental Health Recapture 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...provides 28 Medical/Surgical inpatient beds, 6 ICU beds, and full spectrum outpatient clinical services (Table l). EACH maintained inpatient mental health...Global War on Terrorism (GWOT), EACH experienced a significant increase in the amount of inpatient mental health purchased in the Colorado Springs

  2. Modeling the Mental Health Workforce in Washington State: Using State Licensing Data to Examine Provider Supply in Rural and Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Patanian, Miriam M.; Larson, Eric H.; Lishner, Denise M.; Mauksch, Larry B.; Katon, Wayne J.; Walker, Edward; Hart, L. Gary

    2006-01-01

    Context: Ensuring an adequate mental health provider supply in rural and urban areas requires accessible methods of identifying provider types, practice locations, and practice productivity. Purpose: To identify mental health shortage areas using existing licensing and survey data. Methods: The 1998-1999 Washington State Department of Health files…

  3. Psychometric properties of the Japanese version of the Recovery Attitudes Questionnaire (RAQ) among mental health providers: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Rie; Umeda, Maki; Goto, Kyohei; Miyamoto, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Sosei; Kawakami, Norito

    2016-02-16

    "Recovery" is a central concept in mental health, particularly for mental health services and policy-makers. The present study examined the factorial and concurrent validity, internal consistency reliability, and test-retest reliability of the Japanese version of the 7-item Recovery Attitudes Questionnaire (RAQ) among mental health service providers in community and inpatient settings in Japan. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire with a number of eligible professional groups, including psychiatrists, registered/assistant nurses, public health nurses, clinical psychologists, pharmacists, occupational therapists, and social workers. Participants were drawn from two psychiatric hospitals and 56 psychiatric clinics or community service agencies. In total, 331 participants completed the questionnaire. After excluding those with missing RAQ values, 307 participants were included in the analysis; the participants' mean age was 40.2 years and 29.6 % were men. The questionnaire comprised the Japanese version of the 7-item RAQ developed by the present authors, the revised scale of the positive attitudes of staff toward persons with mental disorder (the positive attitudes scale), and the Japanese-language version of the Social Distance Scale (SDSJ). Confirmatory factor analyses were used to examine factorial validity of a two-factor structure reported in a previous study (Borkin et al., 2000) as well as a single-factor structure. Concurrent validity was determined by calculating correlations between RAQ and the other two scales. Internal consistency reliability was assessed with Cronbach's alpha coefficients and inter-item correlations. Test-retest reliability was assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), with a weighted kappa in a subsample of participants (n = 13). The two-factor structure showed acceptable factorial validity. RAQ scores were significantly and positively correlated with the positive attitudes scale, and there was a significant

  4. Changes in maltreated children's emotional-behavioral problems following typically provided mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrae, Julie S; Barth, Richard P; Guo, Shenyang

    2010-07-01

    Child welfare agencies serve as gate keepers for children's mental health services (MHS). Yet, the impact of offered services on behavioral outcomes has not been well studied. Data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) were examined to measure caregivers' reported change in children's emotional-behavioral problems. Over 600 children in three age groups were matched and problem levels compared across 3 years. Although behavioral problems for the total group improved across time, scores for children who received MHS slightly worsened. Children who received MHS scored 1.4-3.7 points worse than children who did not receive MHS. Additionally, young Black, Hispanic, and other racially identified children had more problems than young White children, regardless of service. Higher behavior problem scores were noted for school-age children and adolescents. Although child welfare appears to rely on a cluster of MHS, including school-based counseling and private practitioner services, future service delivery should expand from improving access to achieving outcomes.

  5. Key successes and challenges in providing mental health care in an urban male remand prison: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samele, Chiara; Forrester, Andrew; Urquía, Norman; Hopkin, Gareth

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to describe the workings of an urban male remand prison mental health service exploring the key challenges and successes, levels of integration and collaboration with other services. A purposive sampling was used to recruit key prison and healthcare professionals for in-depth interviews. A thematic analysis was used to analyse transcripts based on an initial coding frame of several predefined themes. Other key themes were also identified. Twenty-eight interviews were conducted. Prisoners referred to the service had complex, sometimes acute mental illness requiring specialist assessment and treatment. Key successes of the in-reach service included the introduction of an open referral system, locating a mental health nurse at reception to screen all new prisoners and a zoning system to prioritise urgent or non-urgent cases. Achieving an integrated system of healthcare was challenging because of the numerous internal and external services operating across the prison, a highly transient population, limited time and space to deliver services and difficulties with providing inpatient care (e.g., establishing the criteria for admission and managing patient flow). Collaborative working between prison and healthcare staff was required to enable best care for prisoners. The prison mental health in-reach service worked well in assessing and prioritising those who required specialist mental health care. Although the challenges of working within the prison context limited what the in-reach team could achieve. Further work was needed to improve the unit environment and how best to target and deliver inpatient care within the prison.

  6. At the intersection of lay and professional social networks: how community ties shape perceptions of mental health treatment providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, B L; Pullen, E; Pescosolido, B A

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic alliance is a critical determinant of individuals' persistence and outcomes in mental health treatment. Simultaneously, individuals' community networks shape decisions about whether, when, and what kind of treatment are used. Despite the similar focus on social relationship influence for individuals with serious mental illness, each line of research has maintained an almost exclusive focus on either 'inside' (i.e. treatment) networks or 'outside' (i.e. community) networks, respectively. For this study, we integrate these important insights by employing a network-embedded approach to understand the therapeutic alliance. Using data from the Indianapolis Network Mental Health Study (INMHS, n = 169, obs = 2206), we target patients experiencing their first major contact with the mental health treatment system. We compare patients' perceptions of support resources available through treatment providers and lay people, and ask whether evaluations of interpersonal dimensions of the therapeutic alliance are contingent on characteristics of community networks. Analyses reveal that providers make up only 9% of the whole social network, but are generally perceived positively. However, when community networks are characterized by close relationships and frequent contact, patients are significantly more likely to report that treatment providers offer useful advice and information. Conversely, when community networks are in conflict, perceptions of treatment providers are more negative. Community-based social networks are critical for understanding facilitators of and barriers to effective networks inside treatment, including the therapeutic alliance. Implications for community-based systems of care are discussed in the context of the USA and global patterns of deinstitutionalization and community reintegration.

  7. Improving Deployment-Related Primary Care Provider Assessments of PTSD and Mental Health Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    medicine--a review with quality grading of articles. Medical Teacher , 21(6), 563-570. Back, A. L., Arnold, R. M., Baile, W. F., Fryer-Edwards, K. A...domain of expertise), intermediates (individuals with skills at an intermediate-stage between expert and novice such as intern or resident health care...providers), and novices (individuals with limited experience and content knowledge). Interestingly, research has demonstrated that intermediates

  8. Preparing MSW Students to Provide Mental and Behavioral Health Services to Military Personnel, Veterans, and Their Families in Rural Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rishel, Carrie W.; Hartnett, Helen P.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of mental health disorders constitutes a nationwide public health crisis. Estimates suggest that more than 90 million people live in areas designated mental health professional shortage areas, with almost 6,000 additional practitioners needed to meet the service needs in these areas. Military personnel and veterans have greater…

  9. Mental health consequences of disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Emily; Galea, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    We present in this review the current state of disaster mental health research. In particular, we provide an overview of research on the presentation, burden, correlates, and treatment of mental disorders following disasters. We also describe challenges to studying the mental health consequences of disasters and discuss the limitations in current methodologies. Finally, we offer directions for future disaster mental health research.

  10. Barriers to Office-Based Mental Health Care and Interest in E-Communication With Providers: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Minnie; Vigod, Simone N; Hensel, Jennifer M

    2016-08-01

    With rising availability and use of Internet and mobile technology in society, the demand and need for its integration into health care is growing. Despite great potential within mental health care and growing uptake, there is still little evidence to guide how these tools should be integrated into traditional care, and for whom. To examine factors that might inform how e-communication should be implemented in our local outpatient mental health program, including barriers to traditional office-based care, patient preferences, and patient concerns. We conducted a survey in the waiting room of our outpatient mental health program located in an urban, academic ambulatory hospital. The survey assessed (1) age, mobile phone ownership, and general e-communication usage, (2) barriers to attending office-based appointments, (3) preferences for, and interest in, e-communication for mental health care, and (4) concerns about e-communication use for mental health care. We analyzed the data descriptively and examined associations between the presence of barriers, identifying as a social media user, and interest level in e-communication. Respondents (N=68) were predominantly in the age range of 25-54 years. The rate of mobile phone ownership was 91% (62/68), and 59% (40/68) of respondents identified as social media users. There was very low existing use of e-communication between providers and patients, with high levels of interest endorsed by survey respondents. Respondents expressed an interest in using e-communication with their provider to share updates and get feedback, coordinate care, and get general information. In regression analysis, both a barrier to care and identifying as a social media user were significantly associated with e-communication interest (P=.03 and P=.003, respectively). E-communication interest was highest among people who both had a barrier to office-based care and were a social media user. Despite high interest, there were also many concerns

  11. The experiences of survivors and trauma counselling service providers in northern Uganda: Implications for mental health policy and legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebling, H; Davidson, L; Akello, G F; Ochola, G

    Previous research in northern Uganda found high levels of trauma-related difficulties amongst the conflict-affected population. There is international evidence that psychological therapy can reduce depression, as one of the psychological effects of trauma, but very limited literature regarding the experiences of trauma counselling in Sub-Saharan Africa. The current British Academy and Leverhulme-funded research investigated the experiences of service users and providers of trauma services in Kitgum and Gulu, northern Uganda. It also examined their implications for mental health policy and legislation. A decision was made to utilise qualitative methodology to highlight the in-depth experiences of participants. The researcher's carried out interviews with 10 women and 10 men survivors attending trauma services in Kitgum and Gulu. The researchers also interviewed 15 key informants in Kitgum, Gulu and Kampala including trauma counselling service providers, ministers, cultural leaders and mental health professionals. The authors report the findings of the research based on thematic analysis of the interviews. Themes included the experiences of survivors, bearing witness and instilling hope, constraints to service provision, stigma and abuse, holistic approach, service providers doing their best, specialist populations, limited understanding, training and skills development, gaps in service provision and mental health policy and legislation. The interviews resulted in a clear indication that counselling and medication was valued by service users, and that service providers felt the treatments that were provided improved depression, and increased empowerment and engagement in social activities. However, the authors argue that there was a limit to the benefits that could be achieved without using the holistic approach that the survivors requested. Thus, in cases of trauma arising from conflict, there is a clear need for the state to ensure reparation and/or justice for the

  12. Rural Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rural Health Topics & States Topics View more Rural Mental Health There is a significant need for mental health ... action to prevent suicides? Where can I find mental health statistics for rural populations? The Substance Abuse and ...

  13. Addressing Student Mental Health Needs by Providing Direct and Indirect Services and Building Alliances in the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaffenberger, Carol J.; O'Rorke-Trigiani, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Given that 20% of students experience mental health issues that interfere with school performance and most of these students will turn first to their school for help, school counselors need to consider how they can best serve this population. This article describes how school counselors can address the mental health needs of students by providing…

  14. Treatment of mental health problems in general practice: a survey of psychotropics prescribed and other treatments provided.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijswijk, E. van; Borghuis, M.; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Zitman, F.G.; Weel, C. van

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Real-life data on the treatment of patients with mental health problems are important as a reference to evaluate care and benchmarking. This study describes the treatment of mental health problems in general practice as diagnosed by general practitioners (GP). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data

  15. Good Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mental Health This information in Spanish ( en español ) Good mental health Nutrition and mental health Exercise and mental health ... a friend. Return to top More information on Good mental health Read more from womenshealth.gov Action Steps for ...

  16. Mental health legislation in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmebarek, Zoubir

    2017-02-01

    Mental health law in Algeria originates from the French colonial era. Although several pieces of legislation deal with mental disorders, their implementation remains unsatisfactory and does not meet the real needs of healthcare providers. Amendment of the current mental health law is required to enhance the delivery of care but also to protect those with a mental disorder from abuse.

  17. Mental Health Handbook for Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, M; Hornby, G

    2002-01-01

    This text provides information on a range of mental health problems that confront teachers and discusses their underlying causes. It considers what schools can do to help pupils and reflects on the role of the mental health services.

  18. Intimate partner violence, mental health disorders, and sexually transmitted infections: important screening opportunities for pediatric healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattishall, Amy E; Cruz, Mario; Spector, Nancy D

    2011-12-01

    This article addresses three critical areas where pediatric healthcare providers must employ effective screening techniques to ensure the best care for patients: intimate partner violence (IPV), mental health issues, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). IPV is now recognized as an important issue impacting the health of children. While long-term outcomes secondary to positive screening results are not known, routine, sensitive questioning can identify at-risk children and help connect families to resources in the community. Routine use of validated screening tools for mental health disorders (MHDs) in the office setting is now recommended. STIs disproportionately affect adolescents and young adults, yet timely diagnosis is often challenging because infections are frequently asymptomatic and adolescents may not be forthcoming about risk-taking behaviors. There is significant opportunity for pediatricians to improve screening rates of adolescents. Screening is an essential aspect of healthcare for pediatricians. An understanding of current screening recommendations for IPV, MHDs, and STIs will assist providers in earlier detection of medical problems in their patients and will likely improve patient outcomes.

  19. NHSC Jobs Center for Primary Care Medical, Dental and Mental Health Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Health Service Corps (NHSC) Jobs Center helps doctors and nurses who are interested in working at areas where there is the highest need find out more...

  20. Refinement of an Organizational Skills Intervention for Adolescents with ADHD for Implementation by School Mental Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langberg, Joshua M; Vaughn, Aaron J; Williamson, Pamela; Epstein, Jeffery N; Girio-Herrera, Erin; Becker, Stephen P

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to modify, test, and refine the Homework, Organization, and Planning Skills (HOPS) intervention for adolescents with ADHD for use by school mental health (SMH) providers. Ten SMH providers from three school districts implemented the HOPS intervention with 11 middle school students with ADHD. Parent and teacher ratings of materials organization and homework management were collected pre- and post-intervention and treatment fidelity was assessed. SMH providers and teachers participated in focus groups and provided feedback on ways to improve the feasibility and usability of the HOPS intervention. Students made large improvements in organization skills (d = 1.8) and homework problems (d = 1.6) according to parent ratings however, no improvements were observed on teacher ratings. Qualitative data generated from coding the focus groups and audio-recorded HOPS sessions were combined with the quantitative results to systematically refine the HOPS intervention for further evaluation of intervention effectiveness and disseminability.

  1. Teen Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worthless could be warning signs of a mental health problem. Mental health problems are real, painful, and sometimes severe. You ... things that could harm you or others Mental health problems can be treated. To find help, talk ...

  2. Experiences of mental health nursing staff at occupational stressors in a service provider institution in Cali, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Ruíz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing staff, who attend psychiatric patients, are confronted with differentiated occupational stressors. Objective: Interpret the experiences of mental health nursing staff when facing occupational stressors, ranging from three transactional cut stress models and Goffman paper theory. Materials and methods: A qualitative and phenomenological study was conducted. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with nurses from a health care institution. The analysis of content and map of the association of ideas was employed for the analysis. Results: The main occupational stressors found were: unfavorable physical resources and absence of others, patient characteristics, labor overload, interpersonal conflicts, lack of preparation and unpunctuality in salary. As a result, changes in the mental health of the staff and the provision of the services provided were found. Conclusions: The way in which the system of work is configured in the institution presents occupational stressors that affect all the participants, who confront them through their personal capacities, the available resources, the networks of support and the experience acquired; all this is permeated by the ways in which they understand and interpret their role in the framework of work.

  3. Teacher Candidate Mental Health and Mental Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dods, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Providing teacher candidates with a strong foundation in mental health literacy during their teacher education program is crucial in ensuring novice teachers are prepared to support the mental health needs of their students. In addition to responding to students, teacher candidates are typically at an age when mental health disorders are common…

  4. How do general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health problems? A qualitative study from Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Norredam, Marie; Priebe, Stefan; Krasnik, Allan

    2013-01-28

    Refugees are a particularly vulnerable group in relation to the development of mental illness and many may have been subjected to torture or other traumatic experiences. General practitioners are gatekeepers for access to several parts of the psychiatric system and knowledge of their patients' refugee background is crucial to secure adequate care. The aim of this study is to investigate how general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health problems. The study was conducted as part of an EU project on European Best Practices in Access, Quality and Appropriateness of Health Services for Immigrants in Europe (EUGATE). Semi-structured interviews were carried out with nine general practitioners in the vicinity of Copenhagen purposively selected from areas with a high proportion of immigrants. The analysis of the interviews is inspired by qualitative content analysis. One of the main themes identified in the analysis is communication. This includes the use of professional interpreters and that communication entails more than sharing a common language. Quality of care is another theme that emerges and includes awareness of possible trauma history, limited possibilities for refugees to participate in certain treatments due to language barriers and feelings of hopelessness in the general practitioners. The general practitioners may also choose different referral pathways for refugees and they report that their patients lack understanding regarding the differences between psychological problems and physical symptoms. General practitioners experience that providing care to refugees differs from providing care for patients from the majority population. The different strategies employed by the general practitioners in the health care treatment of refugees may be the result of the great diversity in the organisation of general practice in Denmark and the lack of a national strategy in the health care management of refugees. The findings from this

  5. Mental Health Support Provided Throughout the Bariatric Surgery Clinical Pathway in French Specialized Care Centers for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamore, Kristopher; Kaci, Sandra S; Czernichow, Sébastien; Bretault, Marion; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Naudé, Anne-Jeanne; Gribe-Ouaknine, Sandra; Carette, Claire; Flahault, Cécile

    2017-03-01

    Pre-operative psychological assessment is recommended by international guidelines for bariatric surgery candidates. Thereby, service teams caring for bariatric patients should include at least one mental health provider (e.g., a psychologist or psychiatrist). The objective of this study was to evaluate the psychology and psychiatry resources and practices in the 37 specialized obesity centers (CSOs) created by the French Ministry of Health. CSO coordinators were contacted by e-mail to collect general information on the centers (e.g., number of bariatric operations). Secondly, psychologists and psychiatrists of each center completed an anonymous questionnaire assessing their professional practices and their organization of care pathways. The vast majority of CSO coordinators (81%, n = 26/32) answered our survey. These results show significant differences and shortages in terms of the psychology/psychiatry resources available. Most of the psychologists (n = 26/31) and psychiatrists (n = 10/10) stated that they systematically meet new patients only before surgery (56%) or both before and after the operation (30%); however, some psychologists and psychiatrists (14%) do not systematically meet all the patients (before and/or after surgery). Nevertheless, all the professionals provide psychology assessments, and about 75% of them offer a psychological follow-up, indicating a similarity regarding the practices of psychologists and psychiatrists. Our results highlight the place of psychological/psychiatric evaluations in French CSOs and emphasize the absence of mental health providers in several of these services. Post-operative psychological follow-up is not usually provided. It would be appropriate to create clear recommendations for post-operative psychological or psychiatric long-term follow-up.

  6. Uganda mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndyanabangi, Sheila; Basangwa, David; Lutakome, Julius; Mubiru, Christine

    2004-01-01

    With the help of the International Consortium for Mental Health Policy and Services, data on country mental health services was gathered through a descriptive, cross sectional study. The study population included policymakers, health providers and consumers of health services. Data was collected at national level from relevant sectors including the Ministry of Health, Butabika National Referral Mental Hospital and four rural districts. The districts were purposively selected because of existing consumer groups. Quantitative data was collected by interviewer-administered questionnaire and record reviews at hospitals and district headquarters. It was observed that the country has inadequate numbers of mental health professionals with poor mental health funding. Such factors, compounded with inappropriate cultural beliefs, are major obstacles to the delivery of mental health services. There is however an attempt by the Government to improve mental health services. The current health policy is an opportunity to improve access to mental health care. Currently there is improved pre-service and in-service training for mental health workers with ongoing rehabilitation and remodelling of the mental health infrastructure in the country. The burden of mental disorders in Uganda is high in a country that is poorly resourced. The majority of the population is rural and still harbours negative cultural beliefs. There is a need to increase advocacy for mental health and develop capacity for professional mental and general health workers to be supported by appropriate policies, facilities and finances.

  7. Help-Seeking Behaviors Among Active-Duty Military Personnel: Utilization of Chaplains and Other Mental Health Service Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jessica Kelley; Hourani, Laurel; Lane, Marian E; Tueller, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Military chaplains not only conduct religious services, but also provide counseling and spiritual support to military service members, operating as liaisons between soldiers and mental health professionals. In this study, active-duty soldiers (N = 889) reported help-seeking behaviors and mental health. Using logistic regressions, we describe the issues for which soldiers reported seeking help, then outline the characteristics of those who are most likely to seek help from a chaplain. Of the soldiers who sought help from a chaplain within the previous year, 29.9% reported high levels of combat exposure, 50.8% screened positive for depression, 39.1% had probable PTSD, and 26.6% screened positive for generalized anxiety disorder. The participant's unit firing on the enemy, personally firing on the enemy, and seeing dead bodies or human remains predicted seeing a chaplain. Future research should examine ways to engage soldiers who have had more combat experiences with the chaplain community to address spiritual issues.

  8. What Does Success Look Like in the Forensic Mental Health System? Perspectives of Service Users and Service Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, James D

    2018-01-01

    Outcomes research in forensic mental health (FMH) has concentrated on reoffending as the principal indicator of success. Defining success in one-dimensional, negative terms can create a distorted view of the diverse objectives of the FMH system. This qualitative study examined the complexity of success from the perspectives of people in the FMH system. Interviews were conducted with 18 forensic service users and 10 forensic service providers. Data were analyzed inductively using thematic analysis to identify predominant themes. The participants conceptualized success as a dynamic process materializing across six different domains in the context of the FMH system: (a) normal life, (b) independent life, (c) compliant life, (d) healthy life, (e) meaningful life, and (f) progressing life. The results indicate that people who provide or use FMH services emphasize a broad range of processes and outcomes, apart from public safety, when they think about success.

  9. Women and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chats with Experts Clinical Trials Share Women and Mental Health Overview Mental disorders can affect women and men ... biological and psychosocial factors that may impact the mental health of both women and men. Warning Signs Women ...

  10. Exploring mental health providers' interest in using web and mobile-based tools in their practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Schueller

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of Internet sites and mobile applications are being developed intended for use in clinical practice. However, during the development process (e.g., creating features and determining use cases, the needs and interests of providers are often overlooked. We explored providers' interests using a mixed-methods approach incorporating both qualitative and quantitative research methods. A first study used an interview approach to identify the challenges providers faced, tools they used, and any use of computers and apps specifically. Fifteen providers from both the United States and Canada completed the interview and recordings were transcribed and analyzed using a constructivist grounded theory approach. Four primary themes were identified including challenges, potential tools, access and usability. A second study used a brief survey completed by 132 providers at a large healthcare system to explore current use of and potential interest in Internet and mobile technologies. Although many providers (80.9% reported recommending some form of technology to patients, these were mostly Internet websites that were predominantly informational/psychoeducational in nature. Overall, these studies combine to suggest a strong interest in websites and apps for use in clinical settings while highlighting potential areas (ease of use, patient security and privacy that should be considered in the design and deployment of these tools.

  11. Digitally enabled patients, professionals and providers: making the case for an electronic health record in mental health services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jonathan; McDonald, Joe

    2016-01-01

    The move to a digital health service may improve some components of health systems: information, communication and documentation of care. This article gives a brief definition and history of what is meant by an electronic health record (EHR). There is some evidence of benefits in a number of areas, including legibility, accuracy and the secondary use of information, but there is a need for further research, which may need to use different methodologies to analyse the impact an EHR has on patients, professionals and providers. PMID:27752348

  12. Mental Health and Heart Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It Works Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Mental Health and Heart Health Updated:Jan 8,2018 For years, doctors thought the connection between mental health and heart health was strictly behavioral – such as ...

  13. “Someone’s got to do it” – Primary care providers (PCPs) describe caring for rural women with mental health problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon-Gonzalez, Maria C.; McCall-Hosenfeld, Jennifer S.; Weisman, Carol S.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.; Perry, Amanda N.; Chuang, Cynthia H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about how primary care providers (PCPs) approach mental health care for low-income rural women. We developed a qualitative research study to explore the attitudes and practices of PCPs regarding the care of mood and anxiety disorders in rural women. Method We conducted semi-structured interviews with 19 family physicians, internists, and obstetrician-gynecologists (OBGYNs) in office-based practices in rural central Pennsylvania. Using thematic analysis, investigators developed a coding scheme. Questions focused on 1) screening and diagnosis of mental health conditions, 2) barriers to treatment among rural women, 3) management of mental illnesses in rural women, and 4) ideas to improve care for this population. Results PCP responses reflected these themes: 1) PCPs identify mental illnesses through several mechanisms including routine screening, indicator-based assessment, and self-identification by the patient; 2) Rural culture and social ecology are significant barriers to women in need of mental healthcare; 3) Mental healthcare resource limitations in rural communities lead PCPs to seek creative solutions to care for rural women with mental illnesses; 4) To improve mental healthcare in rural communities, both social norms and resource limitations must be addressed Conclusion Our findings can inform future interventions to improve women’s mental healthcare in rural communities. Ideas include promoting generalist education in mental healthcare, and expanding access to consultative networks. In addition, community programs to reduce the stigma of mental illnesses in rural communities may promote healthcare seeking and receptiveness to treatment. PMID:25632302

  14. School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

  15. Mental Health Care Providers' Views of Their Work with Consumers and Their Reports of Recovery-Orientation, Job Satisfaction, and Personal Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Lawrence A; Stein, Catherine H

    2016-10-01

    The research examined the role of mental health care providers' perceptions of their professional relationships with consumers in understanding their reports of agency recovery-oriented services and their own sense of job satisfaction and personal growth. Multidisciplinary community mental health care providers (N = 105) responded to an online self-report questionnaire. Providers' reports of higher levels of working alliance and greater provider directiveness in working with consumers was significantly related to providers' reports of higher levels of agency recovery-orientation and higher levels of personal growth. Providers' reports of working alliance accounted for the largest proportion of variance in providers' reports of job satisfaction. Mental health providers' perceptions of relationships with consumers are central to understanding providers' views of agency recovery-orientation and sense of professional and personal well-being.

  16. How do general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health problems? A qualitative study from Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Natasja Koitzsch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Refugees are a particularly vulnerable group in relation to the development of mental illness and many may have been subjected to torture or other traumatic experiences. General practitioners are gatekeepers for access to several parts of the psychiatric system and knowledge of their patients’ refugee background is crucial to secure adequate care. The aim of this study is to investigate how general practitioners experience providing care to refugees with mental health problems. Methods The study was conducted as part of an EU project on European Best Practices in Access, Quality and Appropriateness of Health Services for Immigrants in Europe (EUGATE. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with nine general practitioners in the vicinity of Copenhagen purposively selected from areas with a high proportion of immigrants. The analysis of the interviews is inspired by qualitative content analysis. Results One of the main themes identified in the analysis is communication. This includes the use of professional interpreters and that communication entails more than sharing a common language. Quality of care is another theme that emerges and includes awareness of possible trauma history, limited possibilities for refugees to participate in certain treatments due to language barriers and feelings of hopelessness in the general practitioners. The general practitioners may also choose different referral pathways for refugees and they report that their patients lack understanding regarding the differences between psychological problems and physical symptoms. Conclusion General practitioners experience that providing care to refugees differs from providing care for patients from the majority population. The different strategies employed by the general practitioners in the health care treatment of refugees may be the result of the great diversity in the organisation of general practice in Denmark and the lack of a national strategy

  17. Improving Mental Health in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossen, Eric; Cowan, Katherine C.

    2015-01-01

    Students do not leave their mental health at the front door when they come to school. From wellness to serious illness, a student's mental health status is integral to how they think, feel, interact, behave, and learn. Decades of research and experience have laid a solid foundation and framework for effectively providing mental health…

  18. The Role of Social Work in Providing Mental Health Services and Care Coordination in an Urban Trauma Center Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Megan; Whiteside, Lauren K; Dotolo, Danae; Wang, Jin; Ho, Leyna; Conley, Bonnie; Forrester, Mollie; Fouts, Susan O; Vavilala, Monica S; Zatzick, Douglas F

    2016-12-01

    This study examined the role of emergency department (ED) social workers and identified predictors of receipt of social work services and length of ED stay. Comprehensive reviews were conducted of medical records of all patients (N=49,354) treated in a level 1 trauma center ED from January 1, 2012, to March 31, 2013. Content analysis of chart notes was used to categorize the types of social work services provided. Poisson regression was used to assess associations between demographic and clinical characteristics, receipt of social work services, and length of ED stay. Social work services were provided to 18,532 (38%) patients. Most were mental health services (54%), followed by care coordination (31%) and material support or other referrals (15%). Patients seen by social workers had complex presentations, involving mental disorder diagnoses (18%), substance use disorder diagnoses (29%), comorbid diagnoses (32%), and injuries (51%); a quarter of patients had multiple ED visits (26%). In adjusted regression analysis, females (relative risk [RR]=1.15), patients not discharged home (RR=1.44), and those with two or more comorbid diagnoses (RR=1.80), injuries due to assault (RR=1.37), and traumatic brain injury (RR=1.20) were more likely to receive social work services. Such services were associated with an increased length of ED stay (RR=1.34). Social workers provided services to patients with multifaceted needs resulting from complex presentations. Provision of social work services modestly increased length of ED stay. Triage algorithms are needed to target efficiencies, systematize provision of ED social work services, and improve access to services for all patients.

  19. The development and psychometric properties of a new scale to measure mental illness related stigma by health care providers: The opening minds scale for Health Care Providers (OMS-HC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Research on the attitudes of health care providers towards people with mental illness has repeatedly shown that they may be stigmatizing. Many scales used to measure attitudes towards people with mental illness that exist today are not adequate because they do not have items that relate specifically to the role of the health care provider. Methods We developed and tested a new scale called the Opening Minds Scale for Health Care Providers (OMS-HC). After item-pool generation, stakeholder consultations and content validation, focus groups were held with 64 health care providers/trainees and six people with lived experience of mental illness to develop the scale. The OMS-HC was then tested with 787 health care providers/trainees across Canada to determine its psychometric properties. Results The initial testing OMS-HC scale showed good internal consistency, Cronbach’s alpha = 0.82 and satisfactory test-retest reliability, intraclass correlation = 0.66 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.75). The OMC-HC was only weakly correlated with social desirability, indicating that the social desirability bias was not likely to be a major determinant of OMS-HC scores. A factor analysis favoured a two-factor structure which accounted for 45% of the variance using 12 of the 20 items tested. Conclusions The OMS–HC provides a good starting point for further validation as well as a tool that could be used in the evaluation of programs aimed at reducing mental illness related stigma by health care providers. The OMS-HC incorporates various dimensions of stigma with a modest number of items that can be used with busy health care providers. PMID:22694771

  20. The development and psychometric properties of a new scale to measure mental illness related stigma by health care providers: The opening minds scale for Health Care Providers (OMS-HC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassam Aliya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on the attitudes of health care providers towards people with mental illness has repeatedly shown that they may be stigmatizing. Many scales used to measure attitudes towards people with mental illness that exist today are not adequate because they do not have items that relate specifically to the role of the health care provider. Methods We developed and tested a new scale called the Opening Minds Scale for Health Care Providers (OMS-HC. After item-pool generation, stakeholder consultations and content validation, focus groups were held with 64 health care providers/trainees and six people with lived experience of mental illness to develop the scale. The OMS-HC was then tested with 787 health care providers/trainees across Canada to determine its psychometric properties. Results The initial testing OMS-HC scale showed good internal consistency, Cronbach’s alpha = 0.82 and satisfactory test-retest reliability, intraclass correlation = 0.66 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.75. The OMC-HC was only weakly correlated with social desirability, indicating that the social desirability bias was not likely to be a major determinant of OMS-HC scores. A factor analysis favoured a two-factor structure which accounted for 45% of the variance using 12 of the 20 items tested. Conclusions The OMS–HC provides a good starting point for further validation as well as a tool that could be used in the evaluation of programs aimed at reducing mental illness related stigma by health care providers. The OMS-HC incorporates various dimensions of stigma with a modest number of items that can be used with busy health care providers.

  1. Mental health informatics

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Insu; Yellowlees, Peter; Diederich, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces approaches that have the potential to transform the daily practice of psychiatrists and psychologists. This includes the asynchronous communication between mental health care providers and clients as well as the automation of assessment and therapy. Speech and language are particularly interesting from the viewpoint of psychological assessment. For instance, depression may change the characteristics of voice in individuals and these changes can be detected by a special form of speech analysis. Computational screening methods that utilise speech and language can detect subtle changes and alert clinicians as well as individuals and caregivers. The use of online technologies in mental health, however, poses ethical problems that will occupy concerned individuals, governments and the wider public for some time. Assuming that these ethical problems can be solved, it should be possible to diagnose and treat mental health disorders online (excluding the use of medication).

  2. Mental Health Ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringer, Agnes

    2017-01-01

    In 2010, I began a PhD study to examine how professionals and patients talked to—and about—each other in mental health institutions in Denmark. One year later, I found myself chain-smoking, dressed in baggy clothing, and slouching on a sofa in a closed psychiatric ward. I had not myself been...... hospitalized, but to get inside the contemporary psychiatric institution and to participate in the social world of patients and professionals, I had to experiment with different ethnographic approaches. Ethnographies of mental health have become increasingly rare, and much research on language in psychiatric...... institutions is done by interview research. My study involved observing and participating in the day-to-day life at two mental health facilities: an outpatient clinic and an inpatient closed ward. The case study provides an account of some of the specific methodological problems and unanticipated events...

  3. Children's Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Mental health in childhood means reaching developmental and emotional milestones, ... health Articles Scientific articles and key findings Children’s Mental Health: What's New Policy Brief: Access to Mental Health ...

  4. Provider and Nonprovider Sources of Mental Health Help in the Military and the Effects of Stigma, Negative Attitudes, and Organizational Barriers to Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul Y; Toblin, Robin L; Riviere, Lyndon A; Kok, Brian C; Grossman, Sasha H; Wilk, Joshua E

    2016-02-01

    This study examined sources of help (providers or nonproviders) used by soldiers for mental health problems. Differences in perceived barriers to care by type of help used were also assessed. Active-duty soldiers from four brigade combat teams (N=3,380) were surveyed in 2008-2009. Items assessed posttraumatic stress disorder; depression; anxiety; help needed because of a stress, emotional, alcohol, or family problem; stigma; negative attitudes toward care; and organizational barriers. Participants reported receipt of help in the past three months from providers (mental health or medical professionals or an Army resource hotline) or nonproviders (fellow soldier, medic, chaplain, or chain of command). Nearly a third (31%) were identified as being in need of mental health care. Of those, 5% reported using nonprovider help exclusively, 14% used provider help exclusively, and 7% used both types. Stigma was rated significantly lower as a barrier among those who used help exclusively from providers than among those who did not use help from any source; however, no significant differences in stigma scores were found between those who used help from nonproviders and those who did not use help from any source. Soldiers who used help from nonproviders were more likely than those who used help from providers to perceive organizational barriers. Results show that soldiers may view nonproviders as alternative sources of mental health help, suggesting that the Army should ensure that such resources are adequately trained and integrated into the mental health community so that soldiers can receive the help they need.

  5. Mental Health Screening Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression Screening for Adult Depression Screening for ...

  6. International Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Welch, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the mental health status of international students in institutions of higher education, unique challenges these students face and their impact on mental health, and suggestions for ways to address these challenges.

  7. Development of Mental Health Indicators in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyeree; Ahn, Dong Hyun; Song, Jinhee; Hwang, Tae Yeon

    2012-01-01

    Objective Promoting mental health and preventing mental health problems are important tasks for international organizations and nations. Such goals entail the establishment of active information networks and effective systems and indicators to assess the mental health of populations. This being said, there is a need in Korea develop ways to measure the state of mental health in Korea. Methods This paper reviews the mental health indicator development policies and practices of seven organizations, countries, and regions: WHO, OECD, EU, United States, Australia, UK, and Scotland. Using Delphi method, we conducted two surveys of mental health indicators for experts in the field of mental health. The survey questionnaire included 5 domains: mental health status, mental health factor, mental health system, mental health service, and quality of mental health services. We considered 124 potential mental health indicators out of more than 600 from indicators of international organizations and foreign countries. Results We obtained the top 30 mental health indicators from the surveys. Among them, 10 indicators belong to the mental health system. The most important five mental health indicators are suicide rate, rate of increase in mental disorder treatment, burden caused by mental disorders, adequacy of identifying problems of mental health projects and deriving solutions, and annual prevalence of mental disorders. Conclusion Our study provides information about the process for indicator development and the use of survey results to measure the mental health status of the Korean population. The aim of mental health indicator development is to improve the mental health system by better grasping the current situation. We suggest these mental health indicators can monitor progress in efforts to implement reform policies, provide community services, and involve users, families and other stakeholders in mental health promotion, prevention, care and rehabilitation. PMID:23251193

  8. What Is Mental Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taking care of your kids or getting to work or school Learn more about specific mental health problems and where to find help . Mental Health and Wellness Positive mental health allows people to: Realize their full ... productively Make meaningful contributions to their communities Ways ...

  9. The meaning of mental health nurses experience of providing one-to-one observations: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, C

    2009-02-01

    There has been much recent literature about the need for appropriate policies and approaches to ensure that patient's rights and standards of care are safeguarded. The focus from national policy is on suicide reduction and prevention, and the nursing literature has concentrated on the importance of engaging the patient and ensuring that there is the least amount of restriction possible. A research study was carried out to explore the perspective of mental health nurses working in these intensive situations, using a purposive sample of nursing staff from the local National Health Service Trust's acute units. A phenomenological approach to the study was chosen to allow an in-depth exploration of the issues--'seeing things up close'--using the philosophy of Husserl as a base. The key areas of enquiry were: to explore and amplify the experiences of nurses undertaking constant observations, including any effects that may have on nurses; to gain further understanding of the dynamics and processes involved; to discover information that can inform and support development needs. Individual taped interviews were carried out with six nurses working in an acute admission ward, and these were then transcribed and analysed using Giorgi's method of analysis. The results of this analysis showed that nurses are keenly aware of some of the professional and ethical tensions involved in the process of keeping patients safe while trying to promote recovery. Results have implications for policies, preparation and support of staff, and provide some further insights into the nature of this experience for nursing staff who are caring for patients who are presenting with risks to themselves.

  10. Evaluation of the Homework, Organization, and Planning Skills (HOPS) Intervention for Middle School Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder as Implemented by School Mental Health Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langberg, Joshua M.; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Becker, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the Homework, Organization, and Planning Skills (HOPS) intervention for middle school students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as implemented by school mental health (SMH) providers using a randomized trial design. Seventeen SMH providers from five school districts implemented the HOPS…

  11. Mental Health and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Mental Health Mental Health and African Americans Poverty level affects mental health ... compared to 120% of non-Hispanic whites. 1 MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  12. Cultural diversity and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalkrishnan, Narayan; Babacan, Hurriyet

    2015-12-01

    Cultural diversity and its impact on mental health has become an increasingly important issue in a globalised world where the interactions between cultures continue to grow exponentially. This paper presents critical areas in which culture impacts on mental health, such as how health and illness are perceived, coping styles, treatment-seeking patterns, impacts of history, racism, bias and stereotyping, gender, family, stigma and discrimination. While cultural differences provide a number of challenges to mental health policy and practice they also provide a number of opportunities to work in unique and effective ways towards positive mental health. Ethno-specific approaches to mental health that incorporate traditional and community-based systems can provide new avenues for working with culturally diverse populations. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  13. Exploring Working Relationships in Mental Health Care via an E-Recovery Portal: Qualitative Study on the Experiences of Service Users and Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Monica; Gammon, Deede; Eng, Lillian Sofie; Ruland, Cornelia

    2017-11-14

    The quality of working relationships between service users and health providers is fundamental in the processes of recovery in mental health. How Internet-based interventions will influence these relationships for persons with long-term care needs, and the measures that can be taken to maintain and enhance working relationships through Internet, is still not well understood. The aim of this study was to gain insights into how service users and health providers experience their working relationships when they are offered the option of supplementing ongoing collaboration with an e-recovery portal. In this exploratory and descriptive study, an e-recovery portal was used by service users and their health providers in 2 mental health communities in Norway for at least 6 months and at most 12 months (2015-2016). The portal consists of secure messaging, a peer support forum, and a toolbox of resources for working with life domains including status, goals and activities, network map, crisis plan, and exercises. The portal was owned and managed by the service user while health providers could remotely access parts of the service user-generated content. The participants could use the portal in whatever way they wished, to suit their collaboration. Data from 6 focus groups, 17 individual interviews, and an interview with 1 dyad about their experiences of use of the portal over the study period were inductively coded and thematically analyzed. The thematic analysis resulted in 2 main themes: (1) new relational avenues and (2) out of alignment, illustrated by 8 subthemes. The first main theme is about dyads who reported new and enriching ways of working together through the portal, particularly related to written communication and use of the goal module. Illustrative subthemes are ownership, common ground, goals and direction, and sense of presence and availability. The second main theme illuminates the difficulties that arose when service users' and health providers

  14. Understanding integrated mental health care in "real-world" primary care settings: What matters to health care providers and clients for evaluation and improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Allyson; Sunderji, Nadiya; Jansz, Gwen; Ghavam-Rassoul, Abbas

    2017-09-01

    The integration of mental health specialists into primary care has been widely advocated to deliver evidence-based mental health care to a defined population while improving access, clinical outcomes, and cost efficiency. Integrated care has been infrequently and inconsistently translated into real-world settings; as a result, the key individual components of effective integrated care remain unclear. This article reports findings from a qualitative study that explored provider and client experiences of integrated care. We conducted in-depth interviews with integrated care providers (n = 13) and clients (n = 9) to understand their perspectives and experiences of integrated care including recommended areas for quality measurement and improvement. The authors used qualitative content and reflexive thematic analytic approaches to synthesize the interview data. Clients and integrated care providers agreed regarding the overarching concepts of the what, how, and why of integrated care including co-location of care; continuity of care; team composition and functioning; client centeredness; and comprehensive care for individuals and populations. Providers and clients proposed a number of dimensions that could be the focus for quality measurement and evaluation, illuminating what is needed for successful context-sensitive spreading and scaling of integrated care interventions. With a mounting gap between the empirical support for integrated care approaches and the implementation of these models, there is a need to clarify the aims of integrated care and the key ingredients required for widespread implementation outside of research settings. This study has important implications for future integrated care research, and health care provider and client engagement in the quality movement. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Counselor and client characteristics in mental health versus substance abuse treatment settings providing services for co-occurring disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangrum, Laurel F; Spence, Richard T

    2008-06-01

    The study compares counselor and client characteristics of state-funded co-occurring disorder (COPSD) programs in mental health (MH) versus substance abuse (SA) settings. SA counselors more often had graduate degrees and MH counselors rated their knowledge and skills lower on two of nine COPSD best practice principles. MH clients were more frequently diagnosed with schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder, whereas SA clients displayed evidence of greater substance use severity and had higher rates of treatment completion and abstinence at discharge. Results reveal significant implications for workforce development and potential system changes to enhance COPSD services that are unique to each setting.

  16. National Institute of Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to content Home Health & Education Health & Education Home Mental Health Information Statistics Consumer Health Publications Help for Mental ... Gordon, the Director of the National Institute of Mental Health, is now on Twitter. Follow @NIMHDirector for updates! ...

  17. Physiotherapy and Mental Health

    OpenAIRE

    Probst, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Physiotherapy in mental health care and psychiatry is a recognized specialty within physiotherapy. It offers a rich variety of observational and evaluation tools as well as a range of interventions that are related to the patient’s physical and mental health problems based on evidence-based literature and a 50-year history. Physiotherapy in mental health care addresses human movement, function, physical activity and exercise in individual and group therapeutic settings. Additionally, it conne...

  18. Disaster mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henderson, Silja; Berliner, Peter; Elsass, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we focus on disaster mental health, particularly theoretical and research-based implications for intervention. The field of disaster mental health research is vast and impossible to cover in a single chapter, but we will visit central research, concepts, and understandings within...... disaster mental health and intervention, and refer to further literature where meaningful. We conclude the chapter with recommendations for further research....

  19. An Online Health Prevention Intervention for Youth with Addicted or Mentally Ill Parents: Experiences and Perspectives of Participants and Providers from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolderink, Marla; Bindels, Jill A P M; Evers, Silvia M A A; Paulus, Aggie T G; van Asselt, Antoinette D I; van Schayck, Onno C P

    2015-12-02

    Mental illnesses affect many people around the world, either directly or indirectly. Families of persons suffering from mental illness or addiction suffer too, especially their children. In the Netherlands, 864,000 parents meet the diagnostic criteria for a mental illness or addiction. Evidence shows that offspring of mentally ill or addicted parents are at risk for developing mental disorders or illnesses themselves. The Kopstoring course is an online 8-week group course with supervision by 2 trained psychologists or social workers, aimed to prevent behavioral and psychological problems for children (aged 16 to 25 years) of parents with mental health problems or addictions. The course addresses themes such as roles in the family and mastery skills. An online randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted to assess the effectiveness of the Kopstoring course. The aim was to gain knowledge about expectations, experiences, and perspectives of participants and providers of the online Kopstoring course. A process evaluation was performed to evaluate the online delivery of Kopstoring and the experiences and perspectives of participants and providers of Kopstoring. Interviews were performed with members from both groups. Participants were drawn from a sample from the Kopstoring RCT. Thirteen participants and 4 providers were interviewed. Five main themes emerged from these interviews: background, the requirements for the intervention, experience with the intervention, technical aspects, and research aspects. Overall, participants and providers found the intervention to be valuable because it was online; therefore, protecting their anonymity was considered a key component. Most barriers existed in the technical sphere. Additional barriers existed with conducting the RCT, namely gathering informed consent and gathering parental consent in the case of minors. This study provides valuable insight into participants' and providers' experiences and expectations with the online

  20. Competencies for disaster mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Richard V; Burkle, Frederick M; Walsh, Lauren E; North, Carol S

    2015-03-01

    Competencies for disaster mental health are essential to domestic and international disaster response capabilities. Numerous consensus-based competency sets for disaster health workers exist, but no prior study identifies and discusses competency sets pertaining specifically to disaster mental health. Relevant competency sets were identified via MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EBSCO, and Google Scholar searches. Sixteen competency sets are discussed, some providing core competencies for all disaster responders and others for specific responder groups within particular professions or specialties. Competency sets specifically for disaster mental health professionals are lacking, with the exception of one set that focused only on cultural competence. The identified competency sets provide guidance for educators in developing disaster mental health curricula and for disaster health workers seeking education and training in disaster mental health. Valid, criterion-based competencies are required to guide selection and training of mental health professionals for the disaster mental health workforce. In developing these competencies, consideration should be given to the requirements of both domestic and international disaster response efforts.

  1. Religion and mental health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behere, Prakash B.; Das, Anweshak; Yadav, Richa; Behere, Aniruddh P.

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, the relation between religion and mental health and vice versa has been described. From primitive times different religions have different beliefs and systems of worshipping. Every religion with their belief system has implications on mental health and illness. We described how Hindu system of beliefs and rituals may have an effect in causation of various mental illnesses. It is also described how religion can help an individual to sustain one's life in various domains. The relationship between different religion and symptomatology is described. The impact and outcome of religion on mental health have been highlighted. PMID:23858253

  2. Infant mental health in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toran, Hasnah; Squires, Jane; Lawrence, Karen

    2011-03-01

    The Infant Mental Health system in Malaysia is described, beginning with cultural and religious practices that influence mental health practices. Second, a description of the Malaysian mental health system, including historical influences, is given. Third, policy and services for young children with mental health problems are described. Finally, recommendations for future steps for developing an effective infant mental health system are presented, including the development of infant mental health policies by the government, increased personnel training, increased community mental health resources, integration of culture into the mental health system, and finally, development of appropriate screening and assessment instruments and systems. Copyright © 2011 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  3. Women and mental health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kohen, Dora

    2000-01-01

    ... for the individual. Covering issues including perinatal psychiatric disorders, depression, eating disorders, schizophrenia, and alcohol and drug abuse - from a female perspective - Women and Mental Health will prove a valuable tool for all those working in the fields of mental health. Dora Kohen is a Consultant Psychiatrist and an Honorary Senior...

  4. Women and mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unaiza Niaz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Issues related to the mental health of women are a priority these days. Many international organisations working in the field of psychiatry are having sections on it now. This approach can go a long way in the improvement of the available mental health services for this population.

  5. E Mental Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    In book: Mental Health. A person-centred approach, Edition: 2, Chapter: 15, Publisher: Cambridge University Press, Editors: Procter, Hamer, McGarry, Wilson, Froggatt......In book: Mental Health. A person-centred approach, Edition: 2, Chapter: 15, Publisher: Cambridge University Press, Editors: Procter, Hamer, McGarry, Wilson, Froggatt...

  6. Smartphone Applications for Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vona, Pamela L.; Santostefano, Antonella M.; Ciaravino, Samantha; Miller, Elizabeth; Stein, Bradley D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many adolescents and adults do not seek treatment for mental health symptoms. Smartphone applications (apps) may assist individuals with mental health concerns in alleviating symptoms or increasing understanding. This study seeks to characterize apps readily available to smartphone users seeking mental health information and/or support. Ten key terms were searched in the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores: mental health, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar, trauma, trauma in schools, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), child trauma, and bullying. A content analysis of the first 20 application descriptions retrieved per category was conducted. Out of 300 nonduplicate applications, 208 (70%) were relevant to search topic, mental health or stress. The most common purported purpose for the apps was symptom relief (41%; n = 85) and general mental health education (18%; n = 37). The most frequently mentioned approaches to improving mental health were those that may benefit only milder symptoms such as relaxation (21%; n = 43). Most app descriptions did not include information to substantiate stated effectiveness of the application (59%; n = 123) and had no mention of privacy or security (89%; n = 185). Due to uncertainty of the helpfulness of readily available mental health applications, clinicians working with mental health patients should inquire about and provide guidance on application use, and patients should have access to ways to assess the potential utility of these applications. Strategic policy and research developments are likely needed to equip patients with applications for mental health, which are patient centered and evidence based. PMID:27428034

  7. Smartphone Applications for Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovic, Ana; Vona, Pamela L; Santostefano, Antonella M; Ciaravino, Samantha; Miller, Elizabeth; Stein, Bradley D

    2016-07-01

    Many adolescents and adults do not seek treatment for mental health symptoms. Smartphone applications (apps) may assist individuals with mental health concerns in alleviating symptoms or increasing understanding. This study seeks to characterize apps readily available to smartphone users seeking mental health information and/or support. Ten key terms were searched in the Apple iTunes and Google Play stores: mental health, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, bipolar, trauma, trauma in schools, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), child trauma, and bullying. A content analysis of the first 20 application descriptions retrieved per category was conducted. Out of 300 nonduplicate applications, 208 (70%) were relevant to search topic, mental health or stress. The most common purported purpose for the apps was symptom relief (41%; n = 85) and general mental health education (18%; n = 37). The most frequently mentioned approaches to improving mental health were those that may benefit only milder symptoms such as relaxation (21%; n = 43). Most app descriptions did not include information to substantiate stated effectiveness of the application (59%; n = 123) and had no mention of privacy or security (89%; n = 185). Due to uncertainty of the helpfulness of readily available mental health applications, clinicians working with mental health patients should inquire about and provide guidance on application use, and patients should have access to ways to assess the potential utility of these applications. Strategic policy and research developments are likely needed to equip patients with applications for mental health, which are patient centered and evidence based.

  8. Conceptualization and measurement of mental health providers' recovery-promoting competence: the recovery promoting relationships scale (RPRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russinova, Zlatka; Rogers, E Sally; Cook, Karon F; Ellison, Marsha Langer; Lyass, Asya

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct and validate an instrument that measures practitioners' competence to promote the recovery among individuals with psychiatric disabilities from the perspective of the person served. Items were developed based upon input from individuals served and practitioners as well as the extant literature on recovery. "Recovery-promoting competence" was conceptualized as a set of practitioner capabilities that promote the recovery process and enhance the working alliance. A scale was developed using a two-stage process that initially identified specific recovery-promoting competencies and then tested candidate items measuring those competencies. Item Response Theory and Classical Test Theory approaches were used to validate the instrument and assess its psychometric properties with a national sample of 382 individuals with psychiatric disabilities. Analyses revealed two distinct sets of recovery-promoting competencies: (a) competencies that enhance clients' recovery, and (b) competencies that build and maintain a strong therapeutic or working alliance. The first set further differentiated into subcompetencies-enhancing clients' hopefulness, empowerment, and self-acceptance. The instrument had high internal consistency and acceptable stability over time, convergent, criterion, and known groups' validity. This scale is a tool for assessing mental health and rehabilitation practitioners' competencies from the perspective of the individual served which can be used both in research and program evaluation of agencies serving individuals with psychiatric disabilities. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  9. Mental Health and Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Mental Health Mental Health and Asian Americans Suicide was the 9th leading ... Americans is half that of the White population. MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  10. Nepal mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, S K; Pokharel, A; Ojha, S P; Pradhan, S N; Chapagain, G

    2004-01-01

    The Kingdom of Nepal is situated in the heart of Asia, between its two big neighbours China and India. Nepal is home to several ethnic groups. The majority of the 23 million population reside in the countryside. Although figures on many of the health and socio-economic indicators are non-existing, some existing ones show gradual improvement over the years. However the figures for illiteracy and infant mortality are still one of the highest in the world. As per GDP, and population living below the poverty line and per capita income, Nepal still remains one of the poorest countries in the world. Despite this, it provides shelter to thousands of Bhutanese refugees in its land. Frequent natural disasters and recent violent conflicts in Nepal have further added hardship to life. Less than 3% of the national budget is allocated to the health sector. Mental health receives insignificant attention. The Government spends about 1% of the health budget on mental health. There is no mental health act and the National Mental Health Policy formulated in 1997 is yet to be fully operational. Mental ill health is not much talked about because of the stigma attached. The roles of the legal and insurance systems are almost negligible. The financial burden rests upon the family. The traditional/religious healing methods still remain actively practiced, specifically in the field of mental health. The service, comprising little more than two-dozen psychiatrists along with a few psychiatric nurses and clinical psychologists (mainly practicing in modern health care facilities) has started showing its impact--however this is limited to specific urban areas. The majority of the modern health care facilities across the country are devoid of a mental health facility. The main contextual challenges for mental health in Nepal are the provision of adequate manpower, spreading the services across the country, increasing public awareness and formulating and implementing an adequate policy.

  11. Mental health in Tamil cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangala, R; Thara, R

    2009-06-01

    Tamil cinema is a vibrant part of the lives of many in south India. A chequered history and a phenomenal growth have made this medium highly influential not only in Tamil Nadu politics, but also in the social lives of the viewers. This paper provides an overview of the growth of Tamil cinema, and discusses in detail the way mental health has been handled by Tamil films. Cinema can be used very effectively to improve awareness about mental health issues.

  12. Latino Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other Latinos? Have you received training in cultural competence or on Latino mental health? How do you see our cultural backgrounds influencing our communication and my treatment? How do you plan to ...

  13. Mental health recovery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dihoff, Debra G; Weaver, Michael

    2012-01-01

    North Carolina has new opportunities for orienting its mental health care system toward client recovery as the system shifts to managed care with the possibility of offering more innovative services...

  14. Malaysia mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameshvara Deva, M

    2004-01-01

    Malaysia is a tropical country in the heart of south east Asia with a population of 24 million people of diverse ethnic, cultural and religious backgrounds living in harmony in 330,000 km(2) of land on the Asian mainland and Borneo. Malaysia, which lies on the crossroads of trade between east and west Asia, has an ancient history as a centre of trading attracting commerce between Europe, west Asia, India and China. It has had influences from major powers that dominated the region throughout its history. Today the country, after independence in 1957, has embarked on an ambitious development project to make it a developed country by 2020. In this effort the economy has changed from one producing raw material to one manufacturing consumer goods and services and the colonial health system has been overhauled and social systems strengthened to provide better services for its people. The per capita income, which was under 1,000 US dollars at independence, has now passed 4,000 US dollars and continues to grow, with the economy largely based on strong exports that amount to over 100 billion US dollars. The mental health system that was based on institutional care in four mental hospitals at independence from British colonial rule in 1957 with no Malaysian psychiatrists is today largely based on over 30 general hospital psychiatric units spread throughout the country. With three local postgraduate training programmes in psychiatry and 12 undergraduate departments of psychiatry in the country--all started after independence--there is now a healthy development of mental health services. This is being supplemented by a newly established primary care mental health service that covers community mental health by integrating mental health into primary health care. Mental health care at the level of psychiatrists rests with about 140 psychiatrists most of whom had undertaken a four-year masters course in postgraduate psychiatry in Malaysia since 1973. However, there continues to be

  15. Mental Health Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    stress in self and others; • Learn and apply skills to cope with stress; • Optimize mental fitness and resilience; • Decrease stigma toward and...Training, ensuring that service members have fundamental mental health coping skills just as they are also trained in fundamental combat skills. These...recruits found to be the most stressful, and coping strategies that they employed to manage those stressors. This effort required the development of

  16. Sufism and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamie, S Haque; Katshu, Mohammad Zia Ul Haq; Uvais, N A

    2013-01-01

    Human experience in, health and disease, always has a spiritual dimension. pirituality is accepted as one of the defining determinants of health and it no more remains a sole preserve of religion and mysticism. In recent years, pirituality has been an area of research in neurosciences and both in the nderstanding of psychiatric morbidity and extending therapeutic interventions it seems to be full of promises. Sufism has been a prominent spiritual tradition in Islam deriving influences from major world religions, such as, Christianity and Hinduism and contributing substantially toward spiritual well-being of a large number of people within and outside Muslim world. Though Sufism started in early days of Islam and had many prominent Sufis, it is in the medieval period it achieved great height culminating in many Sufi orders and their major proponents. The Sufism aims communion with God through spiritual realization; soul being the agency of this communion, and propounding the God to be not only the cause of all existence but the only real existence. It may provide a vital link to understand the source of religious experience and its impact on mental health.

  17. The 2013 Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Rachel E.; Boulos, David; Garber, Bryan G.; Jetly, Rakesh; Sareen, Jitender

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The 2013 Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey (CFMHS) collected detailed information on mental health problems, their impacts, occupational and nonoccupational determinants of mental health, and the use of mental health services from a random sample of 8200 serving personnel. The objective of this article is to provide a firm scientific foundation for understanding and interpreting the CFMHS findings. Methods: This narrative review first provides a snapshot of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), focusing on 2 key determinants of mental health: the deployment of more than 40,000 personnel in support of the mission in Afghanistan and the extensive renewal of the CAF mental health system. The findings of recent population-based CAF mental health research are reviewed, with a focus on findings from the very similar mental health survey done in 2002. Finally, key aspects of the methods of the 2013 CFMHS are presented. Results: The findings of 20 peer-reviewed publications using the 2002 mental health survey data are reviewed, along with those of 25 publications from other major CAF mental health research projects executed over the past decade. Conclusions: More than a decade of population-based mental health research in the CAF has provided a detailed picture of its mental health and use of mental health services. This knowledge base and the homology of the 2013 survey with the 2002 CAF survey and general population surveys in 2002 and 2012 will provide an unusual opportunity to use the CFMHS to situate mental health in the CAF in a historical and societal perspective. PMID:27270738

  18. Child and Adolescent Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Experts Clinical Trials Share Child and Adolescent Mental Health Overview Teen Depression Study: Understanding Depression in Teenagers ... Research Study: Enrolling nationally from around the country Mental health is an important part of overall health for ...

  19. FastStats: Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Mental Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Health, United States trend tables with data on mental health National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2011 Outpatient ...

  20. Mental Health Mobile Apps: From Infusion to Diffusion in the Mental Health Social System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The roles of mental health educators and professionals in the diffusion of mental health mobile apps are addressed in this viewpoint article. Mental health mobile apps are emerging technologies that fit under the broad heading of mobile health (mHealth). mHealth, encompassed within electronic health (eHealth), reflects the use of mobile devices for the practice of public health. Well-designed mental health mobile apps that present content in interactive, engaging, and stimulating ways can promote cognitive learning, personal growth, and mental health enhancement. As key influencers in the mental health social system, counselor educators and professional associations may either help or hinder diffusion of beneficial mHealth technologies. As mental health mobile apps move towards ubiquity, research will continue to be conducted. The studies published thus far, combined with the potential of mental health mobile apps for learning and personal growth, offer enough evidence to compel mental health professionals to infuse these technologies into education and practice. Counselor educators and professional associations must use their influential leadership roles to train students and practitioners in how to research, evaluate, and integrate mental health mobile apps into practice. The objectives of this article are to (1) increase awareness of mHealth and mental health mobile apps, (2) demonstrate the potential for continued growth in mental health mobile apps based on technology use and acceptance theory, mHealth organizational initiatives, and evidence about how humans learn, (3) discuss evidence-based benefits of mental health mobile apps, (4) examine the current state of mHealth diffusion in the mental health profession, and (5) offer solutions for impelling innovation diffusion by infusing mental health mobile apps into education, training, and clinical settings. This discussion has implications for counselor educators, mental health practitioners, associations

  1. Mental Health Mobile Apps: From Infusion to Diffusion in the Mental Health Social System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Marlene Lynette; Havard, Byron C

    2015-01-01

    The roles of mental health educators and professionals in the diffusion of mental health mobile apps are addressed in this viewpoint article. Mental health mobile apps are emerging technologies that fit under the broad heading of mobile health (mHealth). mHealth, encompassed within electronic health (eHealth), reflects the use of mobile devices for the practice of public health. Well-designed mental health mobile apps that present content in interactive, engaging, and stimulating ways can promote cognitive learning, personal growth, and mental health enhancement. As key influencers in the mental health social system, counselor educators and professional associations may either help or hinder diffusion of beneficial mHealth technologies. As mental health mobile apps move towards ubiquity, research will continue to be conducted. The studies published thus far, combined with the potential of mental health mobile apps for learning and personal growth, offer enough evidence to compel mental health professionals to infuse these technologies into education and practice. Counselor educators and professional associations must use their influential leadership roles to train students and practitioners in how to research, evaluate, and integrate mental health mobile apps into practice. The objectives of this article are to (1) increase awareness of mHealth and mental health mobile apps, (2) demonstrate the potential for continued growth in mental health mobile apps based on technology use and acceptance theory, mHealth organizational initiatives, and evidence about how humans learn, (3) discuss evidence-based benefits of mental health mobile apps, (4) examine the current state of mHealth diffusion in the mental health profession, and (5) offer solutions for impelling innovation diffusion by infusing mental health mobile apps into education, training, and clinical settings. This discussion has implications for counselor educators, mental health practitioners, associations

  2. Acute mental health care according to recent mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This is the second of three reports on the follow-up review of mental health care at Helen Joseph Hospital (HJH). Objectives for the review were to provide realistic estimates of cost for unit activities and to establish a quality assurance cycle that may facilitate cost centre management. Method: The study described ...

  3. Acute mental health care and South African mental health legislation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives for this review were to provide information on mental health care outcome, to do a cost analysis and to establish a quality assurance cycle that may facilitate a cost centre management approach. The operational areas identified were service delivery, teaching, and research. Activities within each area were ...

  4. [A Long Way Home: The Current State of Care Provided by Family Caregivers and Public Health Nurses to Persons With Mental Illness in the Community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Chu; Wang, Yu-Hui

    2015-08-01

    According to Taiwan's Health and Welfare Ministry statistics, Taiwan had a total of 122,538 people who were officially registered as mentally disabled at the end of December 2013. Worldwide, schizophrenia ranks as the sixth most burdensome disease in terms of total expenditures. The present paper uses the two actual care stories of the families of mental illness patients and compares and contrasts these with the community mental illness care models used in other countries. The hospital-based psychiatric and community-based mental illness care that is practiced in Taiwan presents dilemmas and has long focused on "disease-orientated care" rather than holistic care. The gap between institutional and community mental rehabilitation services in Taiwan are examined. We recommend that policy makers create an open space for mental illness family caregivers and public health nurses to engage in dialogue in order to effectively integrate the care resources available to community mental illness patients and to break down the care barriers that currently separate community mental illness patients, family caregivers, and public health nurses.

  5. Recommendations from primary care providers for integrating mental health in a primary care system in rural Nepal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Acharya, Bibhav; Tenpa, Jasmine; Thapa, Poshan; Gauchan, Bikash; Citrin, David; Ekstrand, Maria

    2016-01-01

    .... Primary care provider perspectives are important for successful program implementation. We conducted three focus groups with all 24 primary care providers at a district-level hospital in rural Nepal...

  6. Elderly mental health: needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkar, Shubhangi R

    2015-01-01

    This paper highlights the mental health needs of the elderly. It tackles the issues of their institutionalisation and community care. Rapid urbanisation in Indian society throws up special problems in elderly care. There is great evidence of a raise in morbidity, mortality, hospitalisation and loss of functional status related to common mental disorders in the elderly patients. Overlap of depression and anxiety is very common with up to almost half of the elderly patients reporting significant depressive and anxiety symptoms. Also, depression is the most common psychiatric disorder in late life. Growth in the elderly population means a direct increase in age related diseases such as dementia and poor mental health outcomes such as depression, anxiety, suicide and serious constraints on the quality of life among elderly individuals. The need to identify new and unmet problem areas and develop efficient therapeutic outcomes for this special population is stressed.

  7. Benchmarking forensic mental health organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Tim; Taylor, Monica; Pirkis, Jane

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes the forensic mental health forums that were conducted as part of the National Mental Health Benchmarking Project (NMHBP). These forums encouraged participating organizations to compare their performance on a range of key performance indicators (KPIs) with that of their peers. Four forensic mental health organizations took part in the NMHBP. Representatives from these organizations attended eight benchmarking forums at which they documented their performance against previously agreed KPIs. They also undertook three special projects which explored some of the factors that might explain inter-organizational variation in performance. The inter-organizational range for many of the indicators was substantial. Observing this led participants to conduct the special projects to explore three factors which might help explain the variability - seclusion practices, delivery of community mental health services, and provision of court liaison services. The process of conducting the special projects gave participants insights into the practices and structures employed by their counterparts, and provided them with some important lessons for quality improvement. The forensic mental health benchmarking forums have demonstrated that benchmarking is feasible and likely to be useful in improving service performance and quality.

  8. Benchmarking adult mental health organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Tim; Geyer, Tania; Pirkis, Jane

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the adult mental health forums that were conducted as part of the National Mental Health Benchmarking Project (NMHBP). Eight adult mental health forums were attended by staff from eight adult mental health services from around the country. The forums provided an avenue for these participants to document their organizations' performances against previously agreed key performance indicators (KPIs), and to compare this performance with that of their peers. The forums also encouraged discussion about appropriate targets. Forum participants found that the inter-organizational range for many of the KPIs was substantial, and they used this to inform practice change within their own organizations. They also found that they could set "alert targets" and "good practice targets" for some KPIs but not others. The discussion that ensued informed participants' understanding of factors that were within the control of their organizations that could be modified to improve service quality. Benchmarking in adult mental health services is not only possible but also likely to be extremely worthwhile as an exercise in improving service quality. For benchmarking to realize its potential, it requires strong national and local leadership, and a spirit of openness on the part of participating organizations.

  9. Media and Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, David

    1983-01-01

    Outlines some of the main issues and areas of debate at the first international Congress on Audio-Visual Communication and Mental Health, which was held in Helsinki in June 1983. The issues discussed include the connection between violent actions and violence on television and censorship. The declared congress objectives are listed. (Author/MBR)

  10. Selected Mental Health Audiovisuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

    Presented are approximately 2,300 abstracts on audio-visual Materials--films, filmstrips, audiotapes, and videotapes--related to mental health. Each citation includes material title; name, address, and phone number of film distributor; rental and purchase prices; technical information; and a description of the contents. Abstracts are listed in…

  11. Counseling on Access to Lethal Means (CALM): An Evaluation of a Suicide Prevention Means Restriction Training Program for Mental Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sale, Elizabeth; Hendricks, Michelle; Weil, Virginia; Miller, Collin; Perkins, Scott; McCudden, Suzanne

    2017-11-28

    This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the Counseling on Access to Lethal Means (CALM) suicide prevention program. CALM trains mental health providers how to counsel suicidal individuals and those who support them on mean restriction during times of crisis. Pre/post/3-month follow-up assessments measured knowledge of lethal means, confidence and comfort in discussing means restriction (self-efficacy), and future intentions to counsel clients on means restriction. Change in the number of clients receiving lethal means counseling was also assessed. All constructs increased significantly at posttest. Confidence and counseling intentions were sustained at follow-up and significantly more clients received means counseling in the 3 months following the CALM training. Knowledge and comfort levels decreased at follow-up but not to pre-training levels. CALM is effective at increasing mental health professionals' comfort, knowledge, and frequency of talking about means restriction with clients. an effective means restriction training program. A template to assess clients for suicidality and lethal means access and booster sessions are recommended to further sustain effects.

  12. Use of short messaging services to assess depressive symptoms among refugees in South Africa: Implications for social services providing mental health care in resource-poor settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Andrew; Kandolo, Ka Muzombo; Susser, Ezra; Burns, Jonathan K

    2016-09-01

    Few studies in developing nations have assessed the use of short messaging services (SMS) to identify psychological challenges in refugee populations. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of SMS-based methods to screen for depression risk among refugees in South Africa attending mental health services, and to compare its reliability and acceptability with face-to-face consultation. Of the 153 refugees enrolled at baseline, 135 were available for follow-up assessments in our cohort study. Depression symptomatology was assessed using the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS) instrument. Nearly everyone possessed a mobile phone and utilized SMS. Furthermore, low incomplete item response in QIDS and high perceived ease of interacting via SMS with service providers supported the feasibility of this method. There was a fair level of reliability between face-to-face and SMS-based screening methods, but no significant difference in preference rating between the two methods. Despite potential implementation barriers (network delay/phone theft), depression screening using SMS may be viable for refugee mental health services in low-resource settings. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. The mental health of seafarers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Robert T B

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to review published and unpublished information on the mental health of seafarers in order to 1) provide a window on the current status of seafarers' mental health; 2) establish whether the mental health of seafarers in many cases continues to be very poor; 3) describe two current projects to improve the mental health of seafarers; and 4) suggest an industry-wide effort to improve the mental health of seafarers. A review of recent literature on the mental health of seafarers was made, and published statistics covering the years 1960-2009 were obtained. In describing seafarers' mental health the use of rates to cite trends in suicides by seafarers was not employed. Statistics on seafarer deaths are given by two methods as percentages of deaths by suicide by seafarers. One compares deaths by suicide to total deaths and the second compares deaths by suicide to deaths due to illness. It is felt these methods are more readily understood by non-scientists who may be in policy-making roles in business or government. A detailed description covers two current projects to improve the mental health of seafarers. The causes of depression by seafarers are described. Statistics from 1960-2009 on the deaths by seafarers compared to total deaths of 17,026 show 1,011 seafarers died as a result of suicide (5.9%). Compared to deaths of 4,487 seafarers due to illness, 590 seafarers died as a result of suicide (13.1%). These percentages would be higher if 50% of deaths due to seafarers disappearing at sea were included. Based on industry data, in 2012 the daily expected costs to operate a 3,000-4,000 TEU container ship are US$7,825, and US$10,944 for a 10,000 TEU container ship--not including the cost of fuel oil. In 2011 a master who disappeared in waters off Australia may have cost the ship owner US$50,000-US$100,000 due to the voyage being diverted and delayed. Two projects to improve the mental health of seafarers, one by the Rotary Club of

  14. Mental health care providers' perceptions of the barriers to suicide prevention amongst people with substance use disorders in South Africa: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Daniel; Bantjes, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Substance use is a well-established, and potentially modifiable, risk factor for suicide. Suicide prevention interventions are typically framed within the biomedical paradigm and focus on addressing individual risk factors, improving access to psychiatric care, and improving the skills of medical personnel to recognise at-risk individuals. Few studies have focused on contextual factors that hinder suicide prevention in people with substance use disorders, particularly in low-resource settings. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore mental health care providers' perceptions of barriers to suicide prevention in people with substance use disorders in South Africa. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 mental health care providers who worked with suicidal people with substance use disorders in Cape Town, South Africa. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and Atlas.ti software was used to code the data inductively. Two superordinate themes were identified: structural issues in service provision and broad contextual issues that pose barriers to suicide prevention. Participants thought that inadequate resources and insufficient training hindered them from preventing suicide. Fragmented service provision was perceived to lead to patients not receiving the psychiatric, psychological, and social care that they needed. Contextual problems such as poverty and inequality, the breakdown of family, and stigma made participants think that preventing suicide in people with substance use disorders was almost impossible. These findings suggest that structural, social, and economic issues serve as barriers to suicide prevention. This challenges individual risk-factor models of suicide prevention and highlights the need to consider a broad range of contextual and socio-cultural factors when planning suicide prevention interventions. Findings suggest that the responsibility for suicide prevention may need to be distributed between multiple stakeholders

  15. Social ties and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, I; Berkman, L F

    2001-09-01

    It is generally agreed that social ties play a beneficial role in the maintenance of psychological well-being. In this targeted review, we highlight four sets of insights that emerge from the literature on social ties and mental health outcomes (defined as stress reactions, psychological well-being, and psychological distress, including depressive symptoms and anxiety). First, the pathways by which social networks and social supports influence mental health can be described by two alternative (although not mutually exclusive) causal models-the main effect model and the stress-buffering model. Second, the protective effects of social ties on mental health are not uniform across groups in society. Gender differences in support derived from social network participation may partly account for the higher prevalence of psychological distress among women compared to men. Social connections may paradoxically increase levels of mental illness symptoms among women with low resources, especially if such connections entail role strain associated with obligations to provide social support to others. Third, egocentric networks are nested within a broader structure of social relationships. The notion of social capital embraces the embeddedness of individual social ties within the broader social structure. Fourth, despite some successes reported in social support interventions to enhance mental health, further work is needed to deepen our understanding of the design, timing, and dose of interventions that work, as well as the characteristics of individuals who benefit the most.

  16. Overcoming the Research-to-Practice Gap: A Randomized Trial With Two Brief Homework and Organization Interventions for Students With ADHD as Implemented by School Mental Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langberg, Joshua M; Dvorsky, Melissa R; Molitor, Stephen J; Bourchtein, Elizaveta; Eddy, Laura D; Smith, Zoe R; Oddo, Lauren E; Eadeh, Hana-May

    2017-11-27

    To evaluate the effectiveness of 2 brief school-based interventions targeting the homework problems of adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-the Homework, Organization, and Planning Skills (HOPS) intervention and the Completing Homework by Improving Efficiency and Focus (CHIEF) intervention, as implemented by school mental health providers during the school day. A secondary goal was to use moderator analyses to identify student characteristics that may differentially predict intervention response. Two-hundred and eighty middle school students with ADHD were randomized to the HOPS or CHIEF interventions or to waitlist, and parent and teacher ratings were collected pre, post, and at a 6-month follow-up. Both interventions were implemented with fidelity by school mental health providers. Participants were pulled from elective periods and sessions averaged less than 20 min. Participants in HOPS and CHIEF demonstrated significantly greater improvements in comparison with waitlist on parent ratings of homework problems and organizational skills and effect sizes were large. HOPS participants also demonstrated moderate effect size improvements on materials management and organized action behaviors according to teachers. HOPS participants made significantly greater improvements in parent- and teacher-rated use of organized actions in comparison with CHIEF, but not on measures of homework problems. Moderation analyses revealed that participants with more severe psychopathology and behavioral dysregulation did significantly better with the HOPS intervention as compared to the CHIEF intervention. Brief school-based interventions implemented by school providers can be effective. This type of service delivery model may facilitate overcoming the oft cited research-to-practice gap. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Dystonia: Emotional and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Frequently Asked Questions Faces of Dystonia Emotional & Mental Health Although dystonia is a movement disorder that impacts ... emotion as well as muscle movement. For years, mental health professionals have recognized that coping with a chronic ...

  18. Mental Health Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... born with Down syndrome have a heart defect. Mental Health Issues & Down Syndrome At least half of ... and adults with Down syndrome face a major mental health concern during their life span. Obstructive Sleep ...

  19. American Christian Engagement With Mental Health and Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinghorn, Warren A

    2016-01-01

    Although religious belief and practice are relevant to mental health outcomes, many clinicians lack knowledge of particular religious traditions required to make informed judgments about referral to and collaboration with faith-based organizations and clinicians. This Open Forum examines five diverse American Christian approaches to mental health and mental illness-pastoral care and counseling, biblical counseling, integrationism, Christian psychology, and the work of the Institute for the Psychological Sciences--that are relevant for contemporary mental health service delivery. Each of these movements is briefly described and placed in historical, conceptual, and organizational context. Knowledge of the diverse and varied terrain of American Christian engagement with mental health care can inform clinicians' interactions with faith-based providers, clarify opportunities for responsible collaboration, and provide important insight into religious subcultures with faith-based concerns about contemporary psychiatric care.

  20. Assessment of Deployment-Related Exposures on Risk of Incident Mental Health Diagnoses Among Air Force Critical Care Providers: Nested Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvaryanas, Anthony P; Maupin, Genny M; Fouts, Brittany L

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between deployment-related occupational/environmental exposures and incident postdeployment mental health (PDMH) conditions in a defined population of military health care professionals working in the deployed critical care environment. A nested case-control study compared cohort members with a PDMH condition (cases, N = 146) with those without a PDMH condition (controls, N = 800) in terms of deployment-related exposures as ascertained using Postdeployment Health Assessment DD 2796 questionnaire data. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios. Nonphysician career fields (i.e., nurses and medical technicians), exposure to dead bodies or people killed/wounded, history of a vehicular accident/crash, exposure to sand/dust, exposure to lasers, and use of mission-oriented protective posture (MOPP) overgarments were associated with increased likelihood for a PDMH condition. The infrequent exposures (i.e., vehicular accident/crash, lasers, and MOPP overgarments) were the exposures most strongly associated with subsequent PDHM conditions. For military health care providers returning from the deployed environment, several exposures are useful for predicting those at increased risk for a PDMH condition. However, there are likely many other important risk factors beyond those captured on the DD 2796 questionnaire. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  1. The effects of mortality salience and conceptual focus in CISM providers: implications for mental health response to mass fatality disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Hope E; Haussmann, Robert

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of terror management theory (TMT) and cognitive-experiential self-theory (CEST), research has demonstrated that when individuals are experientially (rather than rationally)focused, mortality salience (MS) can engender world view defense in the form of increased in-group bias, increased favoritism toward others who uphold cultural values, and greater derogation of those who threaten them. The goal of the present study was to replicate previously observed effects of mortality salience on world view defense in a sample of disaster responders, specifically Criticallncident Stress Management (CISM) providers, and to examine the potential moderating effect of conceptual mode (rational versus experiential) on these effects. Sixty-two participants at the International Critical Incident Stress Foundation's 2011 World Congress were selected for participation in the study. Subsequent manipulation checks revealed that neither,manipulation (mortality salience: MS versus non-MS or conceptual mode: rational versus experiential) was effective. This failure is discussed in terms of the potentially mortality salient nature of conference proceedings that preceded data collection, the depletion of self-control resources required to maintain a rational focus on conference presentations, participants 'need to maintain their focus during future conference presentations, and profession-related practice effects that may have made it easier for some participants to maintain a rational focus.

  2. Reducing stigma among healthcare providers to improve mental health services (RESHAPE): protocol for a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial of a stigma reduction intervention for training primary healthcare workers in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrt, Brandon A; Jordans, Mark J D; Turner, Elizabeth L; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Luitel, Nagendra P; Rai, Sauharda; Singla, Daisy R; Lamichhane, Jagannath; Lund, Crick; Patel, Vikram

    2018-01-01

    Non-specialist healthcare providers, including primary and community healthcare workers, in low- and middle-income countries can effectively treat mental illness. However, scaling-up mental health services within existing health systems has been limited by barriers such as stigma against people with mental illness. Therefore, interventions are needed to address attitudes and behaviors among non-specialists. Aimed at addressing this gap, REducing Stigma among HealthcAre Providers to ImprovE mental health services (RESHAPE) is an intervention in which social contact with mental health service users is added to training for non-specialist healthcare workers integrating mental health services into primary healthcare. This protocol describes a mixed methods pilot and feasibility study in primary care centers in Chitwan, Nepal. The qualitative component will include key informant interviews and focus group discussions. The quantitative component consists of a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial (c-RCT), which will establish parameters for a future effectiveness study of RESHAPE compared to training as usual (TAU). Primary healthcare facilities (the cluster unit, k = 34) will be randomized to TAU or RESHAPE. The direct beneficiaries of the intervention are the primary healthcare workers in the facilities (n = 150); indirect beneficiaries are their patients (n = 100). The TAU condition is existing mental health training and supervision for primary healthcare workers delivered through the Programme for Improving Mental healthcarE (PRIME) implementing the mental health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP). The primary objective is to evaluate acceptability and feasibility through qualitative interviews with primary healthcare workers, trainers, and mental health service users. The secondary objective is to collect quantitative information on health worker outcomes including mental health stigma (Social Distance Scale), clinical knowledge (mhGAP), clinical

  3. Evaluation of the Homework, Organization, and Planning Skills (HOPS) Intervention for Middle School Students with ADHD as Implemented by School Mental Health Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langberg, Joshua M; Epstein, Jeffery N; Becker, Stephen P; Girio-Herrera, Erin; Vaughn, Aaron J

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the Homework, Organization, and Planning Skills (HOPS) intervention for middle school students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) as implemented by school mental health (SMH) providers using a randomized trial design. Seventeen SMH providers from five school districts implemented the HOPS intervention. Forty-seven middle school students with ADHD (grades 6-8) were randomly assigned to receive the HOPS intervention or to a waitlist comparison group. Parent and teacher ratings of organizational skills and homework problems were collected pre- and post-intervention and at a 3-monoth follow-up, and school grades were also collected. Intervention participants demonstrated significant improvements relative to the waitlist comparison across parent-rated organized action (d = .88), materials management (d = .63), planning (d = 1.05), and homework completion behaviors (d = .85). Intervention participants did not make significant improvements relative to the comparison group according to teacher ratings. SMH providers were able to implement the HOPS intervention with fidelity despite the fact that no formal ongoing consultation was provided.

  4. Holistic Health: Does It Really Include Mental Health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly K. McClanahan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Holistic health, incorporating mind and body as equally important and unified components of health, is a concept utilized in some health care arenas in the United States (U.S. over the past 30 years. However, in the U.S., mental health is not seen as conceptually integral to physical health and, thus, holistic health cannot be realized until the historical concept of mind-body dualism, continuing stigma regarding mental illness, lack of mental health parity in insurance, and inaccurate public perceptions regarding mental illness are adequately addressed and resolved. Until then, mental and physical health will continue to be viewed as disparate entities rather than parts of a unified whole. We conclude that the U.S. currently does not generally incorporate the tenets of holistic health in its view of the mental and physical health of its citizens, and provide some suggestions for changing that viewpoint.

  5. Undergraduate mental health nursing education in Australia: More than Mental Health First Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Wilson, Rhonda; McNamara, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Mental Health First Aid training is designed to equip people with the skills to help others who may be developing mental health problems or experiencing mental health crises. This training has consistently been shown to increase: (1) the recognition of mental health problems; (2) the extent to which course trainees' beliefs about treatment align with those of mental health professionals; (3) their intentions to help others; and (4) their confidence in their abilities to assist others. This paper presents a discussion of the potential role of Mental Health First Aid training in undergraduate mental health nursing education. Three databases (CINAHL, Medline, and PsycINFO) were searched to identify literature on Mental Health First Aid. Although Mental Health First Aid training has strong benefits, this first responder level of education is insufficient for nurses, from whom people expect to receive professional care. It is recommended that: (1) Mental Health First Aid training be made a prerequisite of preregistration nurse education, (2) registered nurses make a larger contribution to addressing the mental health needs of Australians requiring care, and (3) current registered nurses take responsibility for ensuring that they can provided basic mental health care, including undertaking training to rectify gaps in their knowledge.

  6. Cannabis use and mental health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gastel, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis use has been implicated as a risk factor for mental health problems, (subclinical) psychotic symptoms in particular. If cannabis use was a cause of these problems, cessation would lead to improved public mental health. If cannabis use was a mere consequence of a predisposition for mental

  7. What Is Infant Mental Health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osofsky, Joy D.; Thomas, Kandace

    2012-01-01

    Unfortunately, the term "infant mental health" can be confusing for some people because it may be understood as translating into "mental illness." Others may not appreciate that babies and toddlers have the capacity to experience complex emotions. The Guest Editors of this issue of the Journal explore the meaning of infant mental health.

  8. Mental health: More than neurobiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fried, E.; Tuerlinckx, F.; Borsboom, D.

    2014-01-01

    The decision by the US National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to fund only research into the neurobiological roots of mental disorders (Nature 507, 288; 2014) presumes that these all result from brain abnormalities. But this is not the case for many people with mental-health issues and we fear

  9. Psychosocial interventions for perinatal common mental disorders delivered by providers who are not mental health specialists in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Clarke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal common mental disorders (PCMDs are a major cause of disability among women. Psychosocial interventions are one approach to reduce the burden of PCMDs. Working with care providers who are not mental health specialists, in the community or in antenatal health care facilities, can expand access to these interventions in low-resource settings. We assessed effects of such interventions compared to usual perinatal care, as well as effects of interventions based on intervention type, delivery method, and timing.We conducted a systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression. We searched databases including Embase and the Global Health Library (up to 7 July 2013 for randomized and non-randomized trials of psychosocial interventions delivered by non-specialist mental health care providers in community settings and antenatal health care facilities in low- and middle-income countries. We pooled outcomes from ten trials for 18,738 participants. Interventions led to an overall reduction in PCMDs compared to usual care when using continuous data for PCMD symptomatology (effect size [ES] -0.34; 95% CI -0.53, -0.16 but not binary categorizations for presence or absence of PCMDs (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.35, 1.080 [corrected]. We found a significantly larger ES for psychological interventions (three studies; ES -0.46; 95% CI -0.58, -0.33 than for health promotion interventions (seven studies; ES -0.15; 95% CI -0.27, -0.02. Both individual (five studies; ES -0.18; 95% CI -0.34, -0.01 and group (three studies; ES -0.48; 95% CI -0.85, -0.11 interventions were effective compared to usual care, though delivery method was not associated with ES (meta-regression β coefficient -0.11; 95% CI -0.36, 0.14. Combined group and individual interventions (based on two studies had no benefit compared to usual care, nor did interventions restricted to pregnancy (three studies. Intervention timing was not associated with ES (β 0.16; 95% CI -0.16, 0.49. The small number

  10. Assessment of Deployment-Related Exposures on Risk of Incident Mental Health Diagnoses Among Air Force Critical Care Providers: Nested Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-04

    88ABW-2014-3916, 21 Aug 2014 17 associated with subsequent mental health conditions. A similar pattern was observed by Bouchard and...Washington, DC: Department of Defense; 2006 Aug 11. DoD Instruction 6490.03. 10. Bouchard S, Baus O, Bernier F, McCreary DR: Selection of key stressors

  11. European strategies for mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fiandra, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The most recent developments of strategies and policies in the mental health field in Europe are related to the World Health Organization (WHO) Declaration and Action Plan on Mental Health signed by all the Ministers of Health of all Member States in the European Region (2005). The Action Plan proposes ways and means of developing comprehensive mental health policies, listing 12 areas in which challenges are indicated and detailed actions are required. Afterwards the Green Paper on Mental Health has been launched by the European Commission for the definition of an European strategy. The more precise European Pact for Mental Health and Well-being has been presented in 2008. Many other international bodies (OECD, Council of Europe, etc.) have actively worked to stress the mental health issue. All are clearly referring to the Italian model, started 30 years ago.

  12. Challenges in mental health nursing: current opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabella D

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Donna Sabella, Theresa Fay-Hillier College of Nursing and Health Professions, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: The current mental health care system in the US continues to struggle with providing adequate care and services to all that require it due to limited resources, biases from both other professions and the public, and the complexities of treatment of many of those individuals or populations that suffer from mental illness. Mental health nurses, also referred to as psychiatric nurses, are impacted by those same biases, limited resources, and complexities in their role. This paper provides a brief history of mental health nursing and a discussion of the current challenges faced within the profession. It will also include how the public's perception of both those who have mental illness and those who treat it is based on the sensationalism of those who are violent, and misunderstanding of current treatments. It is imperative that mental health nurses continue to define and educate other health care professionals as well as the general public of the role of the mental health nurse and those who suffer from mental illness. Unfortunately, some of the same bias that was present in the 1930s remains today, but perhaps with perseverance and education it will not continue into the future. Keywords: mental health, psychiatric nursing, pre- licensure, post-licensure challenges, professional obstacles, public perception

  13. Impact of organisational change on mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean Bamberger, Simon; Vinding, Anker Lund; Larsen, Anelia

    2012-01-01

    Although limited evidence is available, organisational change is often cited as the cause of mental health problems. This paper provides an overview of the current literature regarding the impact of organisational change on mental health. A systematic search in PUBMED, PsychInfo and Web...... of Knowledge combining MeSH search terms for exposure and outcome. The criterion for inclusion was original data on exposure to organisational change with mental health problems as outcome. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were included. We found in 11 out of 17 studies, an association between...... organisational change and elevated risk of mental health problems was observed, with a less provident association in the longitudinal studies. Based on the current research, this review cannot provide sufficient evidence of an association between organisational change and elevated risk of mental health problems...

  14. Mental Health and Work: Issues and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Lou, Ed.; Verins, Irene, Ed.; Willis, Eileen, Ed.

    In Australia, there is increasing attention being paid to the promotion of mental health and the prevention of serious mental disorder by policymakers, funders, academics and service providers. This has required a shift in thinking to focus on health and well being, not just on illness and treatment. The National Action Plan for Promotion,…

  15. Policy for better mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Layard

    2014-01-01

    Treating mental illness should be a top national priority, especially as proven psychological therapies effectively cost nothing. Richard Layard explains how CEP research has led to a new deal for mental health - but much remains to be done. Mental illness has much greater economic costs than physical illness - but evidence-based ways of treating mental health problems have no net cost to the Exchequer.

  16. Natural disaster and mental health in Asia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KOKAI, MASAHIRO; FUJII, SENTA; SHINFUKU, NAOTAKA; EDWARDS, GLEN

    2004-01-01

    ...‐traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This has allowed greater involvement of mental health professionals in providing ongoing support to survivors of natural disasters as well as providing greater opportunities for further research...

  17. Brazil's mental health adventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This is an account of my trips to Brazil in 2001 where I worked on a series of mental health projects with Brazilian colleagues. I first got interested in Brazil after I graduated from college when I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Northeast Brazil (Bahia state). After I got out of the Peace Corps I moved to Rio de Janeiro and went to work for United Press International (UPI) in their Rio bureau. I was UPI foreign news correspondent for a year and a half. Those years in Brazil were probably the happiest years of my life. Later on, after I became ill in the U.S., my Brazilian connection played an important role in my recovery. Raised in a Victorian family in a small town in the Midwest, and schooled in a traditional boarding school for boys and then at an all men's college, Brazil's lively Latino culture served as a healthy antidote for my tendency to be reserved and often depressed. My contact with Brazilians and Brazilian culture always beckoned me on. I maintained contact with my friends in Brazil and they stuck by me through my illness years. What seemed like my emotional and intellectual "excess" to me, was easily accepted by my Brazilian friends. I felt much more myself interacting with Brazilians and connected to a larger sense of self I developed in Brazil. I traveled to Brazil at every opportunity and made friends with Brazilians I met in the States. I initiated Portuguese classes at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio in the early 1990s and then was invited to teach Brazilian culture to undergraduates. These appointments and my own resilience moved me past one depression and a dysthymia condition and into the wider community. I regained my confidence as a teacher, a role I had before and during the years of my illness. From this position, I organized a club for Brazilian students studying in the Cleveland area. After this teaching stint, I felt ready to pursue full time employment and began a job search that would eventually land me in New Haven at

  18. Mental Health staff views on improving burnout and mental toughness

    OpenAIRE

    Posner, Zoe; Janssen, Jessica; Roddam, Hazel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose- Burnout in mental health staff is acknowledged as a major problem. The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of mental health staff views on improving burnout and mental toughness in mental health staff.\\ud Design/methodology/approach-Ten participants from two mental health rehabilitation units across the North West of England took part in a Nominal Group Technique (NGT). Participants consisted of mental health workers from varied roles in order to\\ud capture views from a...

  19. Art and mental health in Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Brigid; Goding, Margaret; Fenner, Patricia; Percival, Steven; Percival, Wendy; Latai, Leua; Petaia, Lisi; Pulotu-Endemann, Fuimaono Karl; Parkin, Ian; Tuitama, George; Ng, Chee

    2015-12-01

    To pilot an art and mental health project with Samoan and Australian stakeholders. The aim of this project was to provide a voice through the medium of art for people experiencing mental illness, and to improve the public understanding in Samoa of mental illness and trauma. Over 12 months, a series of innovative workshops were held with Samoan and Australian stakeholders, followed by an art exhibition. These workshops developed strategies to support the promotion and understanding of mental health in Samoa. Key stakeholders from both art making and mental health services were engaged in activities to explore the possibility of collaboration in the Apia community. The project was able to identify the existing resources and community support for the arts and mental health projects, to design a series of activities aimed to promote and maintain health in the community, and to pilot these programs with five key organizations. This project demonstrates the potential for art and mental health projects to contribute to both improving mental health and to lowering the personal and social costs of mental ill health for communities in Samoa. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  20. From Mental Health to Mental Wealth in Athletes: Looking Back and Moving Forward

    OpenAIRE

    Uphill, Mark; Sly, Dan; Swain, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Considerations of athletes’ mental health are typically framed in the language of mental illness (Hughes and Leavey, 2012), a situation that contributes to stigmatization, denial, and the prevention of effective care. In this article, we provide a critical, narrative review of the extant literature on athlete mental health. Specifically, we begin by providing a brief synopsis of the extant literature on athletes’ mental health, illustrating both what we know about (i) the prevalence of mental...

  1. International Students and Mental Health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Helen Forbes-Mewett; Anne-Maree Sawyer

    2016-01-01

    .... Several studies indicate a greater incidence of mental health problems among tertiary students, compared with the general population, and higher levels of anxiety, in particular, among international...

  2. Population mental health: evidence, policy, and public health practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cohen, Neal L; Galea, Sandro

    2011-01-01

    ... on population mental health with public mental health policy and practice. Issues covered in the book include the influence of mental health policies on the care and well-­ being of individuals with mental illness, the interconnectedness of physical and mental disorders, the obstacles to adopting a public health orientation to mental health/mental ill...

  3. Acute mental health care and South African mental health legislation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Reliable data is necessary to facilitate the effective planning, management and restructuring of mental health care facilities. Access to accurate information on clinical conditions, treatment outcomes and expenditure is essential to ensure accountability, quality and cost-effective mental health care. This article is ...

  4. Acute mental health care and South African mental health legislation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    first of three that reports on a review of a local acute mental health care unit in a general ... Method: The study reviewed the existing mental health care program and activities in context of relevant policy and legislation. Results: Norms from a ... current physical facilities and structure of the unit and of the utilization of available ...

  5. Acute mental health care according to recent mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This is the third of three reports on the follow-up review of mental health care at Helen Joseph Hospital (HJH). The study reviewed existing South African standards for mental health care facilities. Architectural principles and implications for the use of space were deducted from recent legislation. Objectives were to ...

  6. Acute mental health care and South African mental health legislation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This is the first of three reports on a follow-up review of mental health care at Helen Joseph Hospital (HJH). In this first part, qualitative and quantitative descriptions were made of the services and of demographic and clinical data on acute mental health care users managed at HJH, in a retrospective review of ...

  7. Mental health systems research is urgently needed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraceno Benedetto

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent developments, including experience related to the development of WHO's World Health Report 2001, the WHO Atlas and the DCP Project related to Mental, Neurological, Developmental and Substance Abuse Disorders, indicate why advancing the interests of mental health is now so compelling. In order to deliver a high standard of mental health treatment and care WHO emphasizes the adoption of an integrated system of service delivery to address comprehensively the psychosocial needs of people with mental disorders. Even though the burden is large and increasing, the capacity to reach those in need is poor. This gap cannot be filled just by seeking more funding for mental health, more human resources, or more training. Of course, these aspects are key ingredients but what is often neglected is the need to conceive service delivery rationally. Mental health professionals' attention should be channeled towards mental health systems and service organization which obviously has consequences in their training which should include more public health knowledge. We need to know how to plan and organize services and improve the use of scarce financial and human resources in order to reach out to the mental health needs of the general population and to provide effective and humane services to those who need care.

  8. [Anomie and public mental health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parales-Quenza, Carlos J

    2008-01-01

    This article uses the concept of anomie for understanding public mental-health issues and constructing strategies aimed at promoting health and preventing disease. Studying anomie involves many definitions and approaches; this article conceptualises anomie as dérréglement or derangement and as a total social fact as its effects and consequences are pervasive across all areas of human experience. The article suggests the pertinence of the concept to public health based on several authors' observations depicting Latin-America as being a set of anomic societies and Colombia as the extreme case. Current definitions of mental health in positive terms (not just as being the absence of mental illness) validate the need for considering anomie as an indicator of public mental health. The article proposes that if anomie expresses itself through rules as basic social structure components, then such rules should also be considered as the point of intervention in promoting mental health.

  9. Mental health challenges of LGBT forced migrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Shidlo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Many LGBT forced migrants have significant and sometimesincapacitating psychological scars. Mental health providers can assistin documenting the psychological impact of anti-LGBT persecutionand its impact on the ability to secure refugee status.

  10. Disclosure during prenatal mental health screening

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kingston, Dawn E; Biringer, Anne; Toosi, Amy; Heaman, Maureen I; Lasiuk, Gerri C; McDonald, Sheila W; Kingston, Joshua; Sword, Wendy; Jarema, Karly; Austin, Marie-Paule

    2015-01-01

    While women and healthcare providers have generally viewed perinatal mental health screening favorably, some qualitative studies suggest that some women intentionally decide not to reveal their symptoms during screening...

  11. Social inclusion and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobigo, Virginie; Stuart, Heather

    2010-09-01

    Recent research on approaches to improving social inclusion for people with mental disabilities is reviewed. We describe four approaches (or tools) that can be used to improve social inclusion for people with mental disabilities: legislation, community-based supports and services, antistigma/antidiscrimination initiatives, and system monitoring and evaluation. While legislative solutions are the most prevalent, and provide an important framework to support social inclusion, research shows that their full implementation remains problematic. Community-based supports and services that are person-centered and recovery-oriented hold considerable promise, but they are not widely available nor have they been widely evaluated. Antistigma and antidiscrimination strategies are gaining in popularity and offer important avenues for eliminating social barriers and promoting adequate and equitable access to care. Finally, in the context of the current human rights and evidence-based health paradigms, systematic evidence will be needed to support efforts to promote social inclusion for people with mental disabilities, highlight social inequities, and develop best practice approaches. Tools that promote social inclusion of persons with mental disabilities are available, though not yet implemented in a way to fully realize the goals of current disability discourse.

  12. Placing physical activity in mental health care: a leadership role for mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Scott, David

    2011-10-01

    The wide-ranging benefits of physical activity for consumers with mental illness are acknowledged within the mental health nursing field; however, this is not commonly translated to practice. The primary aim of this paper is to argue that mental health nurses are well positioned to, and should, provide leadership in promoting physical activity to improve the quality of care for people with mental illness. Topics addressed in this paper include the relationship between physical activity and both physical and mental health, the views and experiences of consumers with physical activity, the efficacy of physical activity interventions, the attitudes of nurses to physical activity as a component of care, barriers to a physical activity focus in care for mental illness, and the role of mental health nurses in promoting physical activity. There is a clear and important relationship between physical activity and mental health. Mental health nurses are well positioned to encourage and assist consumers to engage in physical activity, although they might lack the educational preparation to perform this role effectively. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  13. Substance Use and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Alcohol Tobacco Learn More Substance Use and Mental Health Drugs and Alcohol Did you know that addiction ... Plus – also en Español Treatment Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA): SAMHSA’s National Helpline: 1-800-662- ...

  14. Mental Health Care: Who's Who

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Mental Health Care: Who's Who Page Content Article Body Psychiatrist: ... degree in psychology, counseling or a related field. Mental Health Counselor: Master’s degree and several years of supervised ...

  15. Teenage Pregnancy and Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Corcoran

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the intersection between adolescent pregnancy and mental health. The research involving mental health risks for adolescent pregnancy and for parents who are teenagers are discussed. Depression and conduct disorder have emerged with the most attention. Research-based treatment of these disorders in adolescents is presented.

  16. Mental Health Screening in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weist, Mark D.; Rubin, Marcia; Moore, Elizabeth; Adelsheim, Steven; Wrobel, Gordon

    2007-01-01

    Background: This article discusses the importance of screening students in schools for emotional/behavioral problems. Methods: Elements relevant to planning and implementing effective mental health screening in schools are considered. Screening in schools is linked to a broader national agenda to improve the mental health of children and…

  17. International Students and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Sawyer, Anne-Maree

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, reports of increased rates of mental ill health among young people worldwide have received much attention. Several studies indicate a greater incidence of mental health problems among tertiary students, compared with the general population, and higher levels of anxiety, in particular, among international students compared…

  18. Child Mental Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Child Mental Health URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/childmentalhealth.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  19. Mental health recovery and quilting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Rhonda Lynne

    2014-01-01

    A small project in a rural community church setting was undertaken to promote mental health recovery for one person and to develop a positive conversation about mental health amongst the wider group. Social capital within the group of people was successfully harnessed so that a warm and supportive...... recovery environment might be fostered within the broader community. The goals of the project were to reduce mental health stigma and to foster recovery. This was achieved as a mental health nurse, quilt maker, and a team of sewers came together to produce a quilt as a tangible expression of care...... and support for both the quilt recipient and each other. This project, as a case study, demonstrates how a church faith community and mental health care can be combined and yield positive outcomes. This article outlines how the project proceeded and presents the results of a post-project evaluation survey....

  20. Mental Health and Mental Illness in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    Statistics of mental illness in Maryland are provided in the areas of diagnostic distribution of admissions and resident patients, size and nature of patient population, percentage change in daily cost per patient, employee-patient ratios, length of hospitalization, diagnostic treatment trends, patient mortality, and Baltimore's specific problems…

  1. TRANSFORMACIONES EN LA PERCEPCIÓN DE LA CULTURA ORGANIZACIONAL GENERADAS POR LOS CAMBIOS IMPLEMENTADOS EN EL MANEJO GERENCIAL EN UNA INSTITUCIÓN PRESTADORA DE SERVICIOS DE SALUD MENTAL EN BOGOTÁ -- CHANGES IN - PERCEPTION OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE GENERATED BY THE CHANGES IMPLEMENTED IN HANDLING MANAGEMENT PROVIDER IN AN INSTITUTION FOR MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES IN BOGOTA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LUCÍA BARBOSA RAMÍREZ; LILIA ARREGOCES; JULIO LATORRE SANTOS; DIANA MARTÍNEZ; MARÍA MUÑOZ ORTEGA; JULIA ROZO

    2009-01-01

    ... institution’s, mental health providers located in Bogota, and whose objective was to make the necessary adjustments to the administrative and assistance care to meet the quality assurance system established...

  2. Mental health of those directly exposed to the World Trade Center disaster: unmet mental health care need, mental health treatment service use, and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackbill, Robert M; Stellman, Steven D; Perlman, Sharon E; Walker, Deborah J; Farfel, Mark R

    2013-03-01

    Mental health service utilization several years following a man-made or natural disaster can be lower than expected, despite a high prevalence of mental health disorders among those exposed. This study focused on factors associated with subjective unmet mental health care need (UMHCN) and its relationship to a combination of diagnostic history and current mental health symptoms, 5-6 years after the 9-11-01 World Trade Center (WTC) disaster in New York City, USA. Two survey waves of the WTC Health Registry, after exclusions, provided a sample of 36,625 enrollees for this analysis. Important differences were found among enrollees who were categorized according to the presence or absence of a self-reported mental health diagnosis and symptoms indicative of post-traumatic stress disorder or serious psychological distress. Persons with diagnoses and symptoms had the highest levels of UMHCN, poor mental health days, and mental health service use. Those with symptoms only were a vulnerable group much less likely to use mental health services yet reporting UMHCN and poor mental health days. Implications for delivering mental health services include recognizing that many persons with undiagnosed but symptomatic mental health symptoms are not using mental health services, despite having perceived need for mental health care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. India mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Sudhir K; Jhingan, Harsh P; Ramesh, S; Gupta, Rajesh K; Srivastava, Vinay K

    2004-01-01

    India, the second most populated country of the world with a population of 1.027 billion, is a country of contrasts. It is characterized as one of the world's largest industrial nations, yet most of the negative characteristics of poor and developing countries define India too. The population is predominantly rural, and 36% of people still live below poverty line. There is a continuous migration of rural people into urban slums creating major health and economic problems. India is one of the pioneer countries in health services planning with a focus on primary health care. Improvement in the health status of the population has been one of the major thrust areas for social development programmes in the country. However, only a small percentage of the total annual budget is spent on health. Mental health is part of the general health services, and carries no separate budget. The National Mental Health Programme serves practically as the mental health policy. Recently, there was an eight-fold increase in budget allocation for the National Mental Health Programme for the Tenth Five-Year Plan (2002-2007). India is a multicultural traditional society where people visit religious and traditional healers for general and mental health related problems. However, wherever modern health services are available, people do come forward. India has a number of public policy and judicial enactments, which may impact on mental health. These have tried to address the issues of stigma attached to the mental illnesses and the rights of mentally ill people in society. A large number of epidemiological surveys done in India on mental disorders have demonstrated the prevalence of mental morbidity in rural and urban areas of the country; these rates are comparable to global rates. Although India is well placed as far as trained manpower in general health services is concerned, the mental health trained personnel are quite limited, and these are mostly based in urban areas. Considering this

  4. The Financial Health of Mental Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya L. Britt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has suggested that mental health professionals may be at greater risk of endorsing money scripts associated with lower income, lower net worth, and problematic financial behaviors. This study more closely examined the financial health of mental health professionals using the Klontz-Britt Financial Health Scale (FHS. Data was collected from 264 individuals recruited through financial seminars given by the researchers and through social media. Results indicated that when compared to other occupations, mental health professionals report significantly lower levels of financial health. Regardless of occupation, money status and money worship scripts were associated with lower levels of financial health, while money vigilance scripts were associated with higher levels of financial health. These results are of interest to financial counselors and educators to inform their work with those in the mental health profession who may be at greater risk of lower financial health.

  5. Bulgaria mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Toma; Mladenova, Maya; Lazarova, Irina; Sotirov, Vladimir; Okoliyski, Mihail

    2004-01-01

    The mental health profile of Bulgaria has been compiled and following analysis of both the factual findings and the process of data collection a report has been prepared. The subject of discussion in the paper concerns several major findings: the discrepancy between what the policy documents state and the actual situation in mental health; the organizational culture, which alienates; and the peculiarities of the process of change and how it is driven under political pressure from outside the country. Analysis extends to encompass the influence of the general health reform on the mental health sector, the deficits of the leadership and how they impact on the effectiveness of the system, and the interdependence between the country's economy and the health sector. A conclusion is made about the need to consolidate the public health approach using the lever of international collaboration in the field of mental health.

  6. Mental health literacy: focus on developing countries | Ganasen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The review also reveals that improving the mental health literacy among primary health care professionals is imperative. Poor mental health literacy can be an obstacle to providing treatment for those in need, and is of particular concern in low and middle-income countries where mental health services are already scarce.

  7. The specialist youth mental health model: strengthening the weakest link in the public mental health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGorry, Patrick D

    2007-10-01

    Despite mental disorders being the dominant health issue confronting young people, youth mental health is yet to be recognised as a discrete, unified program area; responsibility for young people's mental health is currently split across multiple levels of government. Public specialist mental health services have followed a paediatric-adult split in service delivery, mirroring general and acute health care. The pattern of peak onset and the burden of mental disorders in young people means that the maximum weakness and discontinuity in the system occurs just when it should be at its strongest. Young people need youth-friendly services that recognise and respond to their special cultural and developmental needs. At the primary and community level, headspace: the National Youth Mental Health Foundation, is a national response to this and aims to provide better access, engagement and enhanced multidisciplinary care for young people across Australia. The specialist mental health service level should be complemented by youth-specific specialist mental health services for young people, aged 12-25 years, which would strengthen the existing system with a better targeted stream of care, providing access to integrated mental health, substance use, and vocational-recovery services. Alternative approaches to creating this capacity should be urgently developed and evaluated, and sustained reform informed by evidence as well as values.

  8. Disaster Management: Mental Health Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Math, Suresh Bada; Nirmala, Maria Christine; Moirangthem, Sydney; Kumar, Naveen C.

    2015-01-01

    Disaster mental health is based on the principles of ‘preventive medicine’ This principle has necessitated a paradigm shift from relief centered post-disaster management to a holistic, multi-dimensional integrated community approach of health promotion, disaster prevention, preparedness and mitigation. This has ignited the paradigm shift from curative to preventive aspects of disaster management. This can be understood on the basis of six ‘R’s such as Readiness (Preparedness), Response (Immediate action), Relief (Sustained rescue work), Rehabilitation (Long term remedial measures using community resources), Recovery (Returning to normalcy) and Resilience (Fostering). Prevalence of mental health problems in disaster affected population is found to be higher by two to three times than that of the general population. Along with the diagnosable mental disorders, affected community also harbours large number of sub-syndromal symptoms. Majority of the acute phase reactions and disorders are self-limiting, whereas long-term phase disorders require assistance from mental health professionals. Role of psychotropic medication is very limited in preventing mental health morbidity. The role of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in mitigating the mental health morbidity appears to be promising. Role of Psychological First Aid (PFA) and debriefing is not well-established. Disaster management is a continuous and integrated cyclical process of planning, organising, coordinating and implementing measures to prevent and to manage disaster effectively. Thus, now it is time to integrate public health principles into disaster mental health. PMID:26664073

  9. VA National Mental Health Statistics - 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — VAMC-level statistics on the prevalence, mental health utilization, non-mental health utilization, mental health workload, and psychological testing of Veterans with...

  10. Mental Health Concerns: Veterans & Active Duty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dialing 1-800-273-8255 and pressing 1. Mental Health Concerns There are three primary mental health concerns ... care or call 911. How Will Asking for Mental Health Treatment Affect My Career? Military personnel have always ...

  11. Types of health care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Types of health care providers URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001933.htm Types of health care providers To ...

  12. Tyranny and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Riadh T

    2004-01-01

    Tyrannical states came into existence with the emergence of the state as a socio-political phenomenon a few thousand years ago and are, therefore, novel creations from the standpoint of human evolution. A recent and particularly virulent form of tyranny was invented during the twentieth century in the form of totalitarianism. Such states utilise physical and psychological coercion as their primary method of governance. It is proposed that this will have mental health consequences on both the rulers and the ruled. The psychological roots of tyrannical systems are explored and some of the possible socio-psychological effects are discussed. The Iraqi Ba'th regime is used as an exemplar of a third world totalitarian state. It is suggested that the prevention of mass violations of basic human rights should become an international responsibility and this may, therefore, require a redefinition of the concept of sovereignty. Furthermore, it is proposed that the international community should share the responsibility of assisting in the process of social repair in the aftermath of the fall of tyrannical states.

  13. Refugees and mental health interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Guribye, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    This thesis focuses on refugees and mental health interventions. A literature review and 24 months of participant observation among Tamil refugee parents in Norway form the basis of the findings presented here. The first study is concerned with refugees and public mental health services in Norway. Many refugees may have difficulties trusting professional helpers within the bureaucratically organized public health care system, replacing these services with relationships to other...

  14. Information for global mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Lora, A.; Sharan, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Information is needed for development of mental health (MH) services; and particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LAMICs), where the MH systems are relatively weak. World Health Organization (WHO) has worked intensively during the last 15 years for developing a strategy in the field of MH information. Methods. The paper analyzes WHO instruments developed in this area [MH Atlas series and WHO Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems (WHO-AIMS)]. Results. Data from ...

  15. Natural disaster and mental health in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokai, Masahiro; Fujii, Senta; Shinfuku, Naotaka; Edwards, Glen

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of the present article was to review the literature on disaster mental health in relation to natural disasters such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, typhoons and cyclones throughout Asia. Articles reviewed show that disaster psychiatry in Asia is beginning to emerge from and leave behind the stigma attached to mental health. The emergence of the acceptance of disaster mental health throughout Asia can be attributed in part to the acceptance of the notion of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This has allowed greater involvement of mental health professionals in providing ongoing support to survivors of natural disasters as well as providing greater opportunities for further research. Also, articles reviewed in the present paper commonly suggested the need for using standardized diagnostic tools for PTSD to appropriately interpret the discrepancy of results among studies. The importance of post-disaster support services and cultural differences is highlighted.

  16. Reproductive Rights and Women's Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotland, Nada Logan

    2017-06-01

    Reproductive rights are essential to the recognition/treatment of women as full-fledged human beings/citizens. Barriers to reproductive rights pose a grave danger to women's well-being. This article explores the origins of these barriers, their nature, and their impact on mental health. The most controversial relationship is between induced abortion and mental health. Barriers, misinformation, and coercion affecting contraceptive, abortion, and pregnancy care are an ongoing danger to women's mental health and the well-being of their families. Mental health professionals are best qualified, and have an obligation, to know the facts, apply them, and provide accurate information to protect women's health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Strategic market positions for mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, D M; Lennox, L

    1988-01-01

    Faced with a rapidly changing market, increased legislation and intense competition, mental health service providers must be sophisticated planners and position themselves advantageously in the marketplace. They can effectively position themselves to be profitable and sustaining through market segmentation and sensitivity. The following article will address one concept of marketing that has received less attention but is of critical importance: positioning. As the market environment becomes increasingly competitive, positioning will be the key to success for mental health programs and institutions.

  18. Lithuania mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puras, Dainius; Germanavicius, Arunas; Povilaitis, Robertas; Veniute, Marija; Jasilionis, Domantas

    2004-01-01

    As a part of international mental health policy, programmes and services project, the 'country profile' instrument was used for assessment of mental health policy and services in the Republic of Lithuania. Analysis of contextual factors revealed high levels of social pathology (including violence, suicide and other self-destructive behaviour) with stigmatizing approaches by the general population to mentally disturbed persons and other vulnerable groups. Analysis of existing data about resources invested in the mental health care system raises questions for policymakers about the effectiveness of this traditional way of investment. The largest proportion of physical and human capital is concentrated in psychiatric institutions, with large numbers of beds, psychiatrists and increasing funding for medications, while other components of care--such as housing, psychosocial and vocational rehabilitation, community-based child mental health services--are not being developed. Statistical accounts keep the tradition of presenting processes as outcomes, while modern assessment of outcomes of services, programmes and policies are lacking. The findings from this country profile may be very useful in the development of modern mental health policies in the countries of Eastern and Central Europe, which have been deprived for decades from the opportunity to introduce evidence-based mental health policies and services.

  19. Facts About: College Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

    Facts about college mental health are presented in response to frequently asked questions. Areas of concern include common conditions interfering with student effectiveness, why students seek help and where they can get it, the frequency of severe mental illness in college students, the suicide problem, the limitations of nonprofessional help, the…

  20. Ontological security and connectivity provided by pets: a study in the self-management of the everyday lives of people diagnosed with a long-term mental health condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Helen; Rushton, Kelly; Walker, Sandra; Lovell, Karina; Rogers, Anne

    2016-12-09

    Despite evidence that connecting people to relevant wellbeing-related resources brings therapeutic benefit, there is limited understanding, in the context of mental health recovery, of the potential value and contribution of pet ownership to personal support networks for self-management. This study aimed to explore the role of pets in the support and management activities in the personal networks of people with long-term mental health problems. Semi-structured interviews centred on 'ego' network mapping were conducted in two locations (in the North West and in the South of England) with 54 participants with a diagnosis of a long-term mental health problem. Interviews explored the day-to-day experience of living with a mental illness, informed by the notion of illness work undertaken by social network members within personal networks. Narratives were elicited that explored the relationship, value, utility and meaning of pets in the context of the provision of social support and management provided by other network members. Interviews were recorded, then transcribed verbatim before being analysed using a framework analysis. The majority of pets were placed in the central, most valued circle of support within the network diagrams. Pets were implicated in relational work through the provision of secure and intimate relationships not available elsewhere. Pets constituted a valuable source of illness work in managing feelings through distraction from symptoms and upsetting experiences, and provided a form of encouragement for activity. Pets were of enhanced salience where relationships with other network members were limited or difficult. Despite these benefits, pets were unanimously neither considered nor incorporated into individual mental health care plans. Drawing on a conceptual framework built on Corbin and Strauss's notion of illness 'work' and notions of a personal workforce of support undertaken within whole networks of individuals, this study contributes to our

  1. Elderly mental health: needs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parkar, Shubhangi R

    2015-01-01

    ... of functional status related to common mental disorders in the elderly patients. Overlap of depression and anxiety is very common with up to almost half of the elderly patients reporting significant depressive and anxiety symptoms...

  2. Ethnic Families and Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angie M. Schock-Giordano

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mental health and well-being has become an increasingly important social concern today, and the manner in which families perceive and respond to mentally ill family members is often directly linked to symptom management and treatment outcomes. There has been a limited amount of research focusing on non-Caucasian families’ mental health concerns, yet some emerging evidence suggests that ethnicity may play a role in a variety of ways. The purpose of this article will be to apply the ABC-X Model of Family Stress to organize the research on ethnic families and mental health issues. In particular, occurrence of the stressor of mental illness among ethnic families, family resources that may be most relevant to ethnic families, and research highlighting the unique ways in which ethnic families may perceive mental health and illness conditions will be discussed. In addition, future research directions to better understand the interaction between ethnic families and mental health, as well as programmatic and policy initiatives that can address potential family, community, and large-scale social obstacles in seeking treatment will be presented.

  3. Public school teachers’ perceptions about mental health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Amanda Gonçalves Simões; Estanislau, Gustavo; Brietzke, Elisa; Lefèvre, Fernando; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine public school teachers’ perceptions about general health and mental health, and the way in which they obtained this information. METHODS Qualitative research was conducted with 31 primary and secondary school teachers at a state school in the municipality of Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil, in 2010. The teachers responded to a questionnaire containing open-ended questions about mental health and general health. The following aspects were evaluated: Teachers’ understanding of the terms “health and “mental health,” the relevance of the need for information on the subject, the method preferred for obtaining information, their experience with different media regarding such matters, and perceptions about the extent to which this available information is sufficient to support their practice. The data were processed using the Qualiquantisoft software and analyzed according to the Discourse of the Collective Subject technique. RESULTS From the teachers’ perspective, general health is defined as the proper physiological functioning of the body and mental health is related to the balance between mind and body, as a requirement for happiness. Most of the teachers (80.6%) showed great interest in acquiring knowledge about mental health and receiving educational materials on the subject. For these teachers, the lack of information creates insecurity and complicates the management of everyday situations involving mental disorders. For 61.3% of the teachers, television is the medium that provides the most information on the topic. CONCLUSIONS The data indicate that there is little information available on mental health for teachers, showing that strategies need to be developed to promote mental health in schools. PMID:26039397

  4. Decalogue of Positive Mental Health

    OpenAIRE

    Lluch Canut, Ma. Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The document is a decalogue that includes recommendations to enhance mental health from the positive side or promotion. Includes basic bibliography that the author has generated on this topic. It is written in three languages: English, Spanish and Catalan.

  5. No Child Overlooked: Mental Health Triage in the Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, F. Robert; Tang, Mei; Schiller, Kelly; Sebera, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    Mental health problems among children in schools are on the increase. To exercise due diligence in their responsibility to monitor and promote mental health among our nation's children, school counselors may learn from triage systems employed in hospitals, clinics, and mental health centers. The School Counselor's Triage Model provides school…

  6. Mental Health Services in South Africa: Taking stock | Lund | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is new policy commitment to mental health in South Africa, demonstrated in the national mental health summit of April 2012. This provides an opportunity to take stock of our mental health services. At primary care level key challenges include- training and supervision of staff in the detection and management of ...

  7. The Right to Mental Health in the Digital Era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Kokabisaghi (Fatemeh); I. Bakx (Iris); B. Zenelaj (Blerta)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPeople with mental illness usually experience higher rates of disability and mortality. Often, health care systems do not adequately respond to the burden of mental disorders worldwide. The number of health care providers dealing with mental health care is insufficient in many countries.

  8. Mental Health Services in South Africa: Taking stock

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in South Africa, it is important to take stock of our mental health services. This is necessary for four reasons. First, the burden of mental illness in South Africa is substantial, and is likely to increase with ... providers who work in the health and mental health sector. ... hour emergency management and observation in general.

  9. Social ties and mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Kawachi, Ichiro; Berkman, Lisa F.

    2001-01-01

    It is generally agreed that social ties play a beneficial role in the maintenance of psychological well-being. In this targeted review, we highlight four sets of insights that emerge from the literature on social ties and mental health outcomes (defined as stress reactions, psychological well-being, and psychological distress, including depressive symptoms and anxiety). First, the pathways by which social networks and social supports influence mental health can be described by two alternative...

  10. Fleet leaders' attitudes about subordinates' use of mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Richard J

    2007-11-01

    Mental disorders are a significant source of medical and occupational morbidity for sailors. Stigma, fear of negative career impact, and subordinates concern about leaders' attitudes are significant barriers to the use of mental health services. Semistructured interviews and military policies were data sources used to analyze the language, knowledge, and attitudes of Navy surface fleet leaders about mental illness and mental health treatment using Foucault's concept of discourse analysis. A discourse is a system of knowledge that influences language, perceptions, values, and social practices. The results showed that leaders' concerns about sailors' mental combat readiness, not mental illness stigma, was the dominant discourse about mental illness and mental health services use. In particular, organizational differences between the surface warfare and the mental health communities may influence leaders' attitudes more than stigma. This study provides an elaborated view of mental health knowledge and power within a Navy community.

  11. headspace: National Youth Mental Health Foundation: making headway with rural young people and their mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Craig A; O'Brien, Matthew S; McGorry, Patrick D

    2007-04-01

    Mental health is the number one health issue affecting young people in Australia today, yet only one in four of these young people receive professional help. Approximately 14% of 12- to 17-year-olds and 27% of 18- to 25-year-olds experience mental health problems each year. However, many do not have ready access to treatment or are reluctant to seek that help. These issues might be exacerbated in the rural and remote regions of Australia where sociocultural barriers such as stigma, lack of anonymity and logistic difficulties including cost and availability of transport can hinder young people accessing mental health services. headspace: the National Youth Mental Health Foundation has been funded to address these issues. headspace will provide funding for the establishment of communities of youth services across Australia, provide national and local community awareness campaigns and plans, establish a centre of excellence that will identify and disseminate evidence-based practice in addressing youth mental health issues, and translate findings into education and training programs that are targeted at service providers to work with youth mental health. The communities of youth services will build the capacity of local communities to identify early, and provide effective responses to, young people aged 12-25 years with mental health and related substance use disorders. Specific approaches in rural, regional and remote areas will be developed as well as specific programs to involve young Indigenous people.

  12. An Online Health Prevention Intervention for Youth with Addicted or Mentally Ill Parents : Experiences and Perspectives of Participants and Providers from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woolderink, Marla; Bindels, Jill A. P. M.; Evers, Silvia M. A. A.; Paulus, Aggie T. G.; van Asselt, Antoinette D. I.; van Schayck, Onno C. P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mental illnesses affect many people around the world, either directly or indirectly. Families of persons suffering from mental illness or addiction suffer too, especially their children. In the Netherlands, 864,000 parents meet the diagnostic criteria for a mental illness or addiction.

  13. Leadership and management in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blegen, Nina Elisabeth; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2011-05-01

    Mental health nurses are agents of change, and their leadership, management role and characteristics exist at many levels in health care. Previous research presents a picture of mental health nurses as subordinate and passive recipients of the leader's influence and regard leadership and management as distinct from the nurses' practical work. The aim was to provide a synthesis of the studies conducted and to discuss the relationship between nursing leadership and nursing management in the context of mental health nursing. A literature search was conducted using EBSCO-host, Academic Search Premier, Science Direct, CINAHL and PubMed for the period January 1995-July 2010. Leadership and management in the context of mental health nursing are human activities that imply entering into mutual relationships. Mental health nurses' leadership, management and transformational leadership are positively related in terms of effectiveness and nurses' skills. It is important to consider mental health nurses' management as a form of leadership similar to or as a natural consequence of transformational leadership (TL) and that ethical concerns must be constantly prioritized throughout every level of the organization. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Proximity to urban parks and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Roland; Cohen, Deborah

    2014-03-01

    Urban parks have received attention in recent years as a possible environmental factor that could encourage physical activity, prevent obesity, and reduce the incidence of chronic conditions. Despite long hypothesized benefits of parks for mental health, few park studies incorporate mental health measures. To test the association between proximity to urban parks and psychological distress. Cross-sectional analysis of individual health survey responses. Data were collected for a study of capital improvements of neighborhood parks in Los Angeles. A survey was fielded on a sample of residential addresses, stratified by distance from the park (within 400m, 800m, 1.6 km, and 3.2km; N=1070). We used multiple regression to estimate the relationship between the psychological distress as measured by the MHI-5 (outcome variable) and distance to parks (main explanatory variable), controlling for observed individual characteristics. Mental health is significantly related to residential distance from parks, with the highest MHI-5 scores among residents within short walking distance from the park (400m) and decreasing significantly over the next distances. The number of visits and physical activity minutes are significantly and independently related to distance, although controlling for them does not reduce the association between distance and mental health. This paper provides a new data point for an arguably very old question, but for which empirical data are sparse for the US. A nearby urban park is associated with the same mental health benefits as decreasing local unemployment rates by 2 percentage points, suggesting at least the potential of environmental interventions to improve mental health. The analysis is cross-sectional, making it impossible to control for important confounders, including residential selection. Mental health policy has traditionally focused on individual-centered interventions. Just as health policy for preventable chronic illnesses has shifted

  15. Mental health aspects of disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    Disaster preparations and responses are incomplete without addressing the mental health aspects of disasters. Unpleasant mental states can be a natural and even adaptive human response following a disaster; however, disasters also can contribute to the development of mental illnesses and substance use disorders or exacerbate existing disorders for disaster survivors, response personnel, and even families and close contacts of survivors and responders. Disaster-related psychopathology can mimic or negatively affect other disaster-related illnesses and can impair health professionals and others who must respond to catastrophic events; however, disasters also can encourage tremendous human coping, perseverance, and resilience and can even enhance personal and collective feelings of purpose, connection, and meaning. Integrating mental health promotion and care into disaster planning and response has the potential to mitigate psychiatric and medical consequences of a disaster and may preserve the mission readiness of disaster response personnel and promote healing among communities traumatized by disaster.

  16. Kenya mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiima, David Musau; Njenga, Frank G; Okonji, Max M O; Kigamwa, Pius A

    2004-01-01

    The Kenya country profile is a description of Kenya covering the demographic, economic, cultural, religious, and health aspects including mental health in the country today. Like any other developing countries, Kenya is faced today with major challenges in terms of poverty, economic decline, and lack of adequate resources to meet the health needs and demands, including the mental health of the population. The situational analysis is described in the country profile with a snapshot of the approach in terms of objectives to address the way forward for Kenya.

  17. Dangerousness and mental health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, J L

    2008-04-01

    Mental health policy development in the UK has become increasingly dominated by the assumed need to prevent violence and alleviate public concerns about the dangers of the mentally ill living in the community. Risk management has become the expected focus of contemporary mental health services, and responsibility has increasingly been devolved to individual service professionals when systems fail to prevent violence. This paper analyses the development of mental health legislation and its impact on services users and mental health professionals at the micro level of service delivery. Historical precedence, media influence and public opinion are explored, and the reification of risk is questioned in practical and ethical terms. The government's newest proposals for compulsory treatment in the community are discussed in terms of practical efficacy and therapeutic impact. Dangerousness is far from being an objectively observable phenomenon arising from clinical pathology, but is a formulation of what is partially knowable through social analysis and unknowable by virtue of its situation in individual psychic motivation. Risk assessment can therefore never be completely accurate, and the solution of a 'better safe than sorry' approach to mental health policy is ethically and pragmatically flawed.

  18. Acute mental health care according to recent mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    also for disabled and disorientated users. Additional requirements to facilitate recovery and the breakdown of stigma as mentioned during personal interviews by health care professionals at HJH include: - mental health care facilities should be designed to have a home-like rather than institutional atmosphere; - spaces.

  19. From Mental Health to Mental Wealth in Athletes: Looking Back and Moving Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uphill, Mark; Sly, Dan; Swain, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Considerations of athletes' mental health are typically framed in the language of mental illness (Hughes and Leavey, 2012), a situation that contributes to stigmatization, denial, and the prevention of effective care. In this article, we provide a critical, narrative review of the extant literature on athlete mental health. Specifically, we begin by providing a brief synopsis of the extant literature on athletes' mental health, illustrating both what we know about (i) the prevalence of mental health issues in sport and (ii) variables contributing to help-seeking behaviors in athletes. Against, this backdrop, we outline Keyes' (2002) two-continuum model of mental health as a theoretical framework that has considerable promise in understanding, talking-about, and intervening to enhance, athletes' mental health. This model posits two related, but distinct dimensions: one continuum indicates the presence or absence of mental health, the other the presence or absence of mental illness. From this perspective, a number of possibilities emerge. For instance, athletes could simultaneously have both positive mental health and experience of mental illness. Alternatively, athletes could be free from mental illness, but in Keyes' terms be "languishing" (i.e., experiencing low levels of mental health). Implications for interventions based on the two-continuum model are discussed, particularly drawing on assets-based approaches to enhance flourishing (Theokas et al., 2005). We conclude the review by considering limitations in our understanding of how to promote flourishing and suggest avenues for further research.

  20. Decentralizing provision of mental health care in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Neil; Suveendran, Thirupathy; de Silva, Chithramalee

    2017-04-01

    In the past, mental health services in Sri Lanka were limited to tertiary-care institutions, resulting in a large treatment gap. Starting in 2000, significant efforts have been made to reconfigure service provision and to integrate mental health services with primary health care. This approach was supported by significant political commitment to establishing island-wide decentralized mental health care in the wake of the 2004 tsunami. Various initiatives were consolidated in The mental health policy of Sri Lanka 2005-2015, which called for implementation of a comprehensive community-based, decentralized service structure. The main objectives of the policy were to provide mental health services of good quality at primary, secondary and tertiary levels; to ensure the active involvement of communities, families and service users; to make mental health services culturally appropriate and evidence based; and to protect the human rights and dignity of all people with mental health disorders. Significant improvements have been made and new cadres of mental health workers have been introduced. Trained medical officers (mental health) now provide outpatient care, domiciliary care, mental health promotion in schools, and community mental health education. Community psychiatric nurses have also been trained and deployed to supervise treatment adherence in the home and provide mental health education to patients, their family members and the wider community. A total of 4367 mental health volunteers are supporting care and raising mental health literacy in the community. Despite these important achievements, more improvements are needed to provide more timely intervention, combat myths and stigma, and further decentralize care provision. These, and other challenges, will be targeted in the new mental health policy for 2017-2026.

  1. Service network analysis for agricultural mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Jeffrey D

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Farmers represent a subgroup of rural and remote communities at higher risk of suicide attributed to insecure economic futures, self-reliant cultures and poor access to health services. Early intervention models are required that tap into existing farming networks. This study describes service networks in rural shires that relate to the mental health needs of farming families. This serves as a baseline to inform service network improvements. Methods A network survey of mental health related links between agricultural support, health and other human services in four drought declared shires in comparable districts in rural New South Wales, Australia. Mental health links covered information exchange, referral recommendations and program development. Results 87 agencies from 111 (78% completed a survey. 79% indicated that two thirds of their clients needed assistance for mental health related problems. The highest mean number of interagency links concerned information exchange and the frequency of these links between sectors was monthly to three monthly. The effectiveness of agricultural support and health sector links were rated as less effective by the agricultural support sector than by the health sector (p Conclusion Aligning with agricultural agencies is important to build effective mental health service pathways to address the needs of farming populations. Work is required to ensure that these agricultural support agencies have operational and effective links to primary mental health care services. Network analysis provides a baseline to inform this work. With interventions such as local mental health training and joint service planning to promote network development we would expect to see over time an increase in the mean number of links, the frequency in which these links are used and the rated effectiveness of these links.

  2. Nations for Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available La Organización Mundial de la Salud ha establecido un programa especial denominado "Naciones unidas para la salud mental" con el fin de fomentar la salud mental en poblaciones subatendidas, con particular énfasis en las mujeres, los niños, los adolescentes, los refugiados y los pueblos indígenas. Uno de los objetivos del programa es crear una mayor conciencia entre el público y los gobiernos acerca del costo social y económico de los trastornos mentales y del abuso de sustancias. Un segundo objetivo es identificar y promover estrategias de colaboración para mejorar la salud mental que se puedan poner en práctica por medio de proyectos de cooperación técnica de nivel nacional dirigidos por las organizaciones del sistema de las Naciones Unidas, en colaboración con otras organizaciones internacionales gubernamentales y no gubernamentales. Ya están en marcha varios proyectos de demostración y otros se están planificando.

  3. Parent-reported Mental Health Problems and Mental Health Services Use in South Australian School-aged Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:Monitoring and reporting childhood mental health problems and mental health services utilization over time provide important information to identify mental health related issues and to guide early intervention. This paper aims to describe the recent prevalence of parent-reported mental health problems among South Australian (SA children; to identify mental health problems associated characteristics; and to describe mental health services utilization and its related characteristics among this population. Methods:Parent-reported mental health problems were assessed against the first item of the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire. School-aged children were randomly sampled monthly and data were collected using a surveillance system between 2005 and 2015. Associations between mental health problems and various factors were analysed using univariable analysis and multivariable logistic regression modelling. Results:Prevalence of parent-reported mental health problems among children was 9.1% and 9.3% for children aged 5 to 11 years and children aged 12 to 15 years, respectively. No change in prevalence was observed during the past decade. Mental health problems were associated with male sex, long-term illness or pain, negative school experiences, not living with biological parents, and living in a rental dwelling. Less than half (48.7% of the children with mental health problems received professional help. An increasing trend was found in mental health services utilisation among children aged 5 to 15 years. Utilization of mental health services was associated with male sex, older age, long-term illness or pain, and feeling unhappy at school. Conclusion:This study reports the prevalence of parent-reported mental and mental health services utilisation among SA school-aged children. Identified characteristics associated with mental health problems and mental health services utilisation provide useful information for the planning of

  4. Children's and Adolescents' Mental Health. Factsheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Mental Health Services.

    This fact sheet addresses the mental health needs of children and adolescents. It emphasizes that children and adolescents can have mental health problems, that these mental health problems can be severe, and that these problems are common in young people. Some causes of mental health problems are identified, such as exposure to environmental…

  5. Poverty and mental health in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampubolon, Gindo; Hanandita, Wulung

    2014-04-01

    Community and facility studies in developing countries have generally demonstrated an inverse relationship between poverty and mental health. However, recent population-based studies contradict this. In India and Indonesia the poor and non-poor show no difference in mental health. We revisit the relationship between poverty and mental health using a validated measure of depressive symptoms (CES-D) and a new national sample from Indonesia - a country where widespread poverty and deep inequality meet with a neglected mental health service sector. Results from three-level overdispersed Poisson models show that a 1% decrease in per capita household expenditure was associated with a 0.05% increase in CES-D score (depressive symptoms), while using a different indicator (living on less than $2 a day) it was estimated that the poor had a 5% higher CES-D score than the better off. Individual social capital and religiosity were found to be positively associated with mental health while adverse events were negatively associated. These findings provide support for the established view regarding the deleterious association between poverty and mental health in developed and developing countries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Consultations for mental problems in general practices with and without mental health nurses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnée, T.; Beurs, D. de; Verhaak, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim: It seems cost-effective to provide mental health care to patient with mild mental problems in general practices instead of in specialized care, but general practitioners (GPs) often lack time or expertise. Since 2008, Dutch GPs have been collaborating with nurses with mental health

  7. The global burden of mental disorders : An update from the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Alonso, Jordi; Chatterji, Somnath; Lee, Sing; Ormel, Johan; Uestuen, T. Bedirhan; Wang, Philip S.

    2009-01-01

    Aims - The paper reviews recent findings from the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) surveys oil the global burden of mental disorders. Methods - The WMH surveys are representative community surveys in 28 countries throughout the world aimed at providing information to mental health policy makers about

  8. Babesiosis for Health Care Providers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-25

    This podcast will educate health care providers on diagnosing babesiosis and providing patients at risk with tick bite prevention messages.  Created: 4/25/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria.   Date Released: 4/25/2012.

  9. Police and mental health clinician partnership in response to mental health crisis: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Brian; Furness, Trentham; Oakes, Jane; Brown, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Police officers as first responders to acute mental health crisis in the community, commonly transport people in mental health crisis to a hospital emergency department. However, emergency departments are not the optimal environments to provide assessment and care to those experiencing mental health crises. In 2012, the Northern Police and Clinician Emergency Response (NPACER) team combining police and mental health clinicians was created to reduce behavioural escalation and provide better outcomes for people with mental health needs through diversion to appropriate mental health and community services. The aim of this study was to describe the perceptions of major stakeholders on the ability of the team to reduce behavioural escalation and improve the service utilization of people in mental health crisis. Responses of a purposive sample of 17 people (carer or consumer advisors, mental health or emergency department staff, and police or ambulance officers) who had knowledge of, or had interfaced with, the NPACER were thematically analyzed after one-to-one semistructured interviews. Themes emerged about the challenge created by a stand-alone police response, with the collaborative strengths of the NPACER (communication, information sharing, and knowledge/skill development) seen as the solution. Themes on improvements in service utilization were revealed at the point of community contact, in police stations, transition through the emergency department, and admission to acute inpatient units. The NPACER enabled emergency department diversion, direct access to inpatient mental health services, reduced police officer 'down-time', improved interagency collaboration and knowledge transfer, and improvements in service utilization and transition. © 2015 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  10. Stigmatization and mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Gulsum Ozge Doganavsargil Baysal

    2013-01-01

    Stigmatizasyon represent a chronic negative interaction with the environment that most of people with a of diagnosis mental disorders. Different types of stigma may have harmful effects. Poor psychological well being, poor quality of life and poor self esteem are related stigmatization. In this article, definition and mechanism of stigmatization, influenced factors and consequences of stigmatization are reviewed. Stigmatization is a modifiable environmental risk factor. Integrating approaches...

  11. Television and the promotion of mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Current media campaigns, realized within national campaigns and actions on mental health prevention and promotion, are considered in this paper, in the context of expert public relation, as well as the whole society, towards mental health. Mental health promotion is determined as a range of activities by which individuals, community and society are being enabled to take control over mental health determinants and to improve it, but also as an action for improvement of mental health posi...

  12. Childhood and Adolescence: Challenges in Mental Health

    OpenAIRE

    Shrivastava, Saurabh RamBihariLal; Shrivastava, Prateek Saurabh; Ramasamy, Jegadeesh

    2013-01-01

    Mental health is an integral and essential component of health. The World Health Organization (WHO) constitution states: “Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.” More than 450 million people suffer from mental disorders worldwide. In India, mental health services, especially for children and adolescents, are limited both in terms of number of facilities as well as trained professionals. The majority of mental he...

  13. Historical perspectives of mental health in the Eastern Cape

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of mental health services in the Eastern Cape Province is inextricably entwined in South Africa's colonial history and the racist policy of apartheid. Prior to the development of mental hospitals, mental health services were provided through a network of public and mission hospitals. This paper explores the ...

  14. Supporting Children with Mental Health Concerns in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climie, Emma; Altomare, Alyssa A.

    2013-01-01

    There are a growing number of children who begin to develop mental concerns during the school-age years. As such, it is important that schools recognize and understand mental health issues and are actively engaged in supporting these students. This article provides a review of mental health in schools, highlighting the importance of school-health…

  15. Zambia mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayeya, John; Chazulwa, Roy; Mayeya, Petronella Ntambo; Mbewe, Edward; Magolo, Lonia Mwape; Kasisi, Friday; Bowa, Annel Chishimba

    2004-01-01

    This country profile for Zambia was compiled between 1998 and 2002. The objectives of the exercise were to first of all avail policymakers, other key decision makers and leaders in Zambia, information about mental health in Zambia in order to assist policy and services development. Secondly, to facilitate comparative analyses of mental health services between countries. The work involved formation of a core group of experts who coordinated the collection of information from the various organizations in Zambia. The information was later shared to a broad spectrum of stakeholders for consensus. A series of focus group discussions (FGDs) supplemented the information collected. There are various factors that contribute to mental health in Zambia. It is clear from the Zambian perspective that social, demographic, economic, political, environmental, cultural and religious influences affect the mental health of the people. With a population of 10.3 million and annual growth rate of 2.9%, Zambia is one of the most urbanized countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Poverty levels stood at 72.9% in 1998. In terms of unemployment, the most urbanized provinces, Lusaka (the capital city), and the copper-belt are the most affected. The gross domestic product (GDP) is US$3.09 billion dollars while per capita income is US$300. The total budget allocation for health in the year 2002 was 15% while the proportion of the GDP per capita expenditure for health was 5.6%. The HIV/AIDS prevalence rates stand at 20% among the reproductive age group 15-49 years. Political instability and wars in neighbouring states has resulted in an influx of refugees. Environmental factors affecting the country include natural and man-made disasters such as floods and drought, mine accidents, and deforestation. To a large extent in Zambia, people who are mentally ill are stigmatized, feared, scorned at, humiliated and condemned. However, caring for mental ill health in old age is positively perceived. It is

  16. Stigmatization and mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsum Ozge Doganavsargil Baysal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Stigmatizasyon represent a chronic negative interaction with the environment that most of people with a of diagnosis mental disorders. Different types of stigma may have harmful effects. Poor psychological well being, poor quality of life and poor self esteem are related stigmatization. In this article, definition and mechanism of stigmatization, influenced factors and consequences of stigmatization are reviewed. Stigmatization is a modifiable environmental risk factor. Integrating approaches against stigma in treatment may represent cost-effective way to reduce the risk of relapse and poor outcome occasioned by chronic exposure to stigma. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 239-251

  17. [Mental disorders of working age : Evaluation of the administrative incidence and prevalence as well as regional differences in Lower Saxony on the basis of secondary data from a statutory health insurance provider].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdau-Heitmann, Cornelia; Mümken, Sarah; Eberhard, Sveja; Koppelin, Frauke

    2017-12-01

    Mental disorder is the subject of ever-increasing attention in the field of public health. However, the actual number of such cases is difficult to determine owing to the lack of comprehensive longitudinal studies. The administrative incidence and prevalence of mental disorders were estimated on the basis of data from 2010 to 2013 provided by the health insurance company AOK, Lower Saxony, and were assessed according to age and gender. Additionally, possible correlations between local conditions and the occurrence of diagnosed mental disorders were examined for both urban and rural districts. Analyses were conducted using the secondary datasets of 1.5 million persons born between 1940 and 1994 who had been continuously insured throughout the period specified. Only documented diagnoses from outpatient care were taken into account. One third of the insured persons showed at least one documented diagnosis of a mental disorder within a 12-month period. In approximately 11 out of 100 cases, there was a newly documented diagnosis in 2012. With the exception of cases relating to psychotropic substance use, women were significantly more frequently affected than men. Age-specific differences were also determined. At a regional level, in relation to administrative prevalence, mental disorders showed positive correlations in the density of doctors and psychotherapists. Moreover, regions with a high rate of unemployment generally show a higher prevalence of mental disorders. Despite certain limitations, the use of administrative incidence and prevalence data is a viable approach to assessing gender- and age-specific, and regional differences. Our regional analyses suggest a correlation between the local job situation and the level of regional administrative prevalence.

  18. Income Inequality and Mental Health

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Lordan; Prasada Rao; Lucy Bechtel

    2012-01-01

    The causal association between absolute income and health is well established, however the relationship between income inequality and health is not. The conclusions from the received studies vary across the region or country studied and/or the methodology employed. Using the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia panel survey, this paper investigates the relationship between mental health and inequality in Australia. A variety of income inequality indices are calculated to test bo...

  19. Email etiquette: guidelines for mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Freeman, Adele

    2005-03-01

    This note is about the use of email and its role in mental health settings. We anticipate that it may be of assistance to mental health nurses unfamiliar with the benefits and pitfalls of email and wanting to learn more about how to use it professionally and effectively. In mental health nursing, we pride ourselves on our interpersonal skills and being able to communicate. However, transferring these skills to an electronic medium is not always easy. Because many of us are self-taught, there is potential for email to be a hindrance rather than a help in the quest for good collegial relationships. In this note, we discuss some of the common situations that can arise when email use goes awry and provide some helpful tips for getting the most out of email. It is hoped that the information and checklist provided in this paper will strike a chord with many, encouraging discussion and promoting appropriate use of this form of communication.

  20. Mental Health: What's Normal, What's Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Adult health Understanding what's considered normal mental health can be tricky. See how feelings, thoughts and behaviors determine mental health and how to recognize if you or a ...

  1. Acute mental health care and South African mental health legislation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Reliable data is necessary to facilitate the effective planning, management and ... qualitative and quantitative descriptions were made of the services and of demographic and clinical data on acute mental health care users managed at HJH, .... service psychologists, 1 OT and a part time social worker. All doctors ...

  2. Appreciating the importance of history: a brief historical overview of mental health, mental health nursing and education in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    History is consistently acknowledged as crucial to the identity of a profession. In the case of mental health nursing this is perhaps more so, as published accounts of the history of nursing rarely pays attention to the specialty of mental health. The aim of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the history of mental health nursing in Australia. It is concluded that an understanding of history is essential in understanding and interpreting contemporary mental health service delivery and seeking to overcome the professional distance between mental health and other branches of nursing.

  3. Juvenile mental health courts for adjudicated youth: role implications for child and adolescent psychiatric mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burriss, F Antoinette; Breland-Noble, Alfiee M; Webster, Joe L; Soto, Jose A

    2011-05-01

    Juvenile mental health courts for adjudicated youth. To describe the role of psychiatric nurses in reducing mental health disparities for adjudicated youth via juvenile mental health courts. ISI Web of Knowledge; Sage Journals Online; HighWire; PubMed; Google Scholar and Wiley Online Library and websites for psychiatric nursing organizations. Years included: 2000-2010. Juvenile mental health courts may provide a positive and effective alternative to incarceration for youth with mental health problems with psychiatric nurses playing a key role in program implementation. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Malawi's Mental Health Service

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    health service of Malawi began - not in the com~ munity or in the hospital, .... comes home they may keep him at a distance and half-expect him to .... So a good service often begins in a blaze of publicity, with local leaders and villagers invited to a meeting, performances from health education bands and drama groups, and ...

  5. Better mental health and well-being

    OpenAIRE

    Cachia, John M.;

    2014-01-01

    Mental ill-health imposes a huge burden on individuals, their families, society, health systems and the economy. Mental health care remains a neglected area of health policy in too many countries. This statement by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD 2014) confirms the overall bleak assessment of the reaction to mental ill-health that prevails worldwide even in well-developed economies. Mental ill-health has accompanying costs in terms o...

  6. Mental Health Treatment and Criminal Justice Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Richard G.; McGuire, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Are many prisoners in jail or prison because of their mental illness? And if so, is mental health treatment a cost-effective way to reduce crime and lower criminal justice costs? This paper reviews and evaluates the evidence assessing the potential of expansion of mental health services for reducing crime. Mental illness and symptoms of mental illness are highly prevalent among adult and child criminal justice populations. The association between serious mental illness and violence and arrest...

  7. Preparedness of Lithuanian general practitioners to provide mental healthcare services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, Lina; Sauliune, Skirmante; Jarusevicius, Gediminas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A large unmet need for mental healthcare in Lithuania is partially attributable to a lack of primary care providers with skills in this area. The aim of this study was to assess general practitioners' (GPs) experience in mental healthcare and their perceptions about how to increase th...

  8. Racial Differences in Mental Health Recovery among Veterans with Serious Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mana K; Hack, Samantha M; Brown, Clayton H; Medoff, Deborah; Fang, Lijuan; Klingaman, Elizabeth A; Park, Stephanie G; Dixon, Lisa B; Kreyenbuhl, Julie A

    2017-04-14

    Black consumers with serious mental illness (SMI) face significant challenges in obtaining quality mental health care and are at risk for experiencing significant disparities in mental health care outcomes, including recovery from mental illness. Patient-provider interactions may partly contribute to this disparity. The purpose of the current study was to understand the effects of race, psychosis, and therapeutic alliance on mental health recovery orientation among Veterans with SMI. Participants were Veterans who had an SMI being treated at two Veteran Affairs outpatient mental health clinics by a psychiatrist or nurse practitioner. Participants completed the Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale (BASIS-24), Mental Health Recovery Measure, and patient-report Scale to Assess the Therapeutic Relationship (STAR-P) which includes three subscales: positive collaboration, positive clinician input, and non-supportive clinician input. Regression analyses were used to determine interactive effects of race, psychosis severity, and therapeutic alliance variables. The sample was 226 Veterans (50% black, 50% white). Black participants were slightly older (p mental health recovery (p mental health recovery orientation for black participants. Conversely, for white participants, positive collaboration had little effect on the negative relationship between psychosis severity and mental health recovery orientation. Increased levels of psychosis may inhibit patients' perceptions of their ability to recover from SMI. However, for black participants, positive collaboration with mental health providers may moderate the effects of psychotic symptomatology.

  9. Peruvian Mental Health Reform: A Framework for Scaling-up Mental Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Toyama

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Mental, neurological, and substance (MNS use disorders are a leading cause of disability worldwide; specifically in Peru, MNS affect 1 in 5 persons. However, the great majority of people suffering from these disorders do not access care, thereby making necessary the improvement of existing conditions including a major rearranging of current health system structures beyond care delivery strategies. This paper reviews and examines recent developments in mental health policies in Peru, presenting an overview of the initiatives currently being introduced and the main implementation challenges they face. Methods Key documents issued by Peruvian governmental entities regarding mental health were reviewed to identify and describe the path that led to the beginning of the reform; how the ongoing reform is taking place; and, the plan and scope for scale-up. Results Since 2004, mental health has gained importance in policies and regulations, resulting in the promotion of a mental health reform within the national healthcare system. These efforts crystallized in 2012 with the passing of Law 29889 which introduced several changes to the delivery of mental healthcare, including a restructuring of mental health service delivery to occur at the primary and secondary care levels and the introduction of supporting services to aid in patient recovery and reintegration into society. In addition, a performance-based budget was approved to guarantee the implementation of these changes. Some of the main challenges faced by this reform are related to the diversity of the implementation settings, eg, isolated rural areas, and the limitations of the existing specialized mental health institutes to substantially grow in parallel to the scaling-up efforts in order to be able to provide training and clinical support to every region of Peru. Conclusion Although the true success of the mental healthcare reform will be determined in the coming years, thus far, Peru

  10. Peruvian Mental Health Reform: A Framework for Scaling-up Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Mauricio; Castillo, Humberto; Galea, Jerome T.; Brandt, Lena R.; Mendoza, María; Herrera, Vanessa; Mitrani, Martha; Cutipé, Yuri; Cavero, Victoria; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Miranda, J. Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mental, neurological, and substance (MNS) use disorders are a leading cause of disability worldwide; specifically in Peru, MNS affect 1 in 5 persons. However, the great majority of people suffering from these disorders do not access care, thereby making necessary the improvement of existing conditions including a major rearranging of current health system structures beyond care delivery strategies. This paper reviews and examines recent developments in mental health policies in Peru, presenting an overview of the initiatives currently being introduced and the main implementation challenges they face. Methods: Key documents issued by Peruvian governmental entities regarding mental health were reviewed to identify and describe the path that led to the beginning of the reform; how the ongoing reform is taking place; and, the plan and scope for scale-up. Results: Since 2004, mental health has gained importance in policies and regulations, resulting in the promotion of a mental health reform within the national healthcare system. These efforts crystallized in 2012 with the passing of Law 29889 which introduced several changes to the delivery of mental healthcare, including a restructuring of mental health service delivery to occur at the primary and secondary care levels and the introduction of supporting services to aid in patient recovery and reintegration into society. In addition, a performance-based budget was approved to guarantee the implementation of these changes. Some of the main challenges faced by this reform are related to the diversity of the implementation settings, eg, isolated rural areas, and the limitations of the existing specialized mental health institutes to substantially grow in parallel to the scaling-up efforts in order to be able to provide training and clinical support to every region of Peru. Conclusion: Although the true success of the mental healthcare reform will be determined in the coming years, thus far, Peru has achieved a

  11. Mental Health Services in School-Based Health Centers: Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Ranbir Mangat; Diallo, Ana F.

    2016-01-01

    Mental health issues affect 20-25% of children and adolescents, of which few receive services. School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide access to mental health services to children and adolescents within their schools. A systematic review of literature was undertaken to review evidence on the effectiveness of delivery of mental health services…

  12. [Health Economic Evaluations within the Hamburg Network for Mental Health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Hans-Helmut; Grochtdreis, Thomas; Brettschneider, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Within the Hamburg Network for Mental Health, cost-effectiveness analyses of collaborative care models are conducted. After providing an overview of the international literature on the cost-effectiveness of collaborative care for mental disorders, this article describes the rationale, aims and methods of the cost-effectiveness analyses conducted within the Hamburg Network for Mental Health. Proof of cost-effectiveness is expected to promote the transfer of collaborative care models into routine care. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Physical health monitoring in mental health settings: a study exploring mental health nurses' views of their role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwebe, Herbert

    2017-10-01

    To explore nurses' views of their role in the screening and monitoring of the physical care needs of people with serious mental illness in a mental health service provider. There is increasing awareness through research that people with serious mental illness disproportionately experience and die early from physical health conditions. Mental health nurses are best placed as front-line workers to offer screening, monitoring and interventions; however, their views on physical care interventions are not studied often. Qualitative exploratory study. The study was carried out in a mental health inpatient centre in England. Volunteer sampling was adopted for the study with a total target sample of (n = 20) nurses from three inpatient wards. Semistructured interviews were conducted with (n = 10) registered mental health nurses who had consented to take part in the study. Inductive data analysis and theme development were guided by a thematic analytic framework. Participants shared a clear commitment regarding their role regarding physical health screening and monitoring in mental health settings. Four themes emerged as follows: features of current practice and physical health monitoring; perceived barriers to physical health monitoring; education and training needs; and strategies to improve physical health monitoring. Nurses were unequivocal in their resolve to ensure good standard physical health monitoring and screening interventions in practice. However, identified obstacles have to be addressed to ensure that physical health screening and monitoring is integrated adequately in everyday clinical activities. Achieving this would require improvements in nurses' training, and an integrated multiservice and team-working approach. Attending to the physical health needs of people with serious mental illness has been associated with multiple improvements in both mental and physical health; nurses have a vital role to play in identifying and addressing causes of poor

  14. [Smoking policy in mental health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopman, P; Blankers, M; Dom, G; Keet, R

    People with mental illnesses tend to smoke more often and more heavily than other members of the public and their addiction to tobacco also has harmful effects on their physical health. So far, however, limited priority was given to smoking cessation in mental health care settings. To provide insight into the formal and informal smoking policies of Dutch mental health care organisations and into the nature and extent of the smoking cessation support they offer, and, additionally, to look at the opportunities for improvement in clinical settings. Document research on formal policies of 61 mental health care facilities, interviews with workers directly involved (n = 10), and a survey on policy implementation among staff members of treatment facilities (n = 600). One-third of the facilities did not have a formalised smoking policy document, and there was a marked difference between the smoking policies at the rest of the facilities. Treatment provision was limited, strongly dependent on the individual staff member, and was often not the most effective form of care (like medication). Many mental health patients really do want to give up smoking and often respond well to treatment. Psychiatrists play a key role in integrating and implementing an anti-smoking policy which will benefit their patients.

  15. Mental health care in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaram, D. J.; van de Put, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    An effort is being made in Cambodia to involve grass-roots personnel in the integration of the care of the mentally ill into a broad framework of health services. This undertaking is examined with particular reference to the work of the Transcultural Psychosocial Organization. PMID:10212521

  16. Mental health care in Cambodia.

    OpenAIRE

    Somasundaram, D. J.; van de Put, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    An effort is being made in Cambodia to involve grass-roots personnel in the integration of the care of the mentally ill into a broad framework of health services. This undertaking is examined with particular reference to the work of the Transcultural Psychosocial Organization.

  17. Effects of Mental Health Benefits Legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipe, Theresa Ann; Finnie, Ramona K.C.; Knopf, John A.; Qu, Shuli; Reynolds, Jeffrey A.; Thota, Anilkrishna B.; Hahn, Robert A.; Goetzel, Ron Z.; Hennessy, Kevin D.; McKnight-Eily, Lela R.; Chapman, Daniel P.; Anderson, Clinton W.; Azrin, Susan; Abraido-Lanza, Ana F.; Gelenberg, Alan J.; Vernon-Smiley, Mary E.; Nease, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Context Health insurance benefits for mental health services typically have paid less than benefits for physical health services, resulting in potential underutilization or financial burden for people with mental health conditions. Mental health benefits legislation was introduced to improve financial protection (i.e., decrease financial burden) and to increase access to, and use of, mental health services. This systematic review was conducted to determine the effectiveness of mental health benefits legislation, including executive orders, in improving mental health. Evidence acquisition Methods developed for the Guide to Community Preventive Services were used to identify, evaluate, and analyze available evidence. The evidence included studies published or reported from 1965 to March 2011 with at least one of the following outcomes: access to care, financial protection, appropriate utilization, quality of care, diagnosis of mental illness, morbidity and mortality, and quality of life. Analyses were conducted in 2012. Evidence synthesis Thirty eligible studies were identified in 37 papers. Implementation of mental health benefits legislation was associated with financial protection (decreased out-of-pocket costs) and appropriate utilization of services. Among studies examining the impact of legislation strength, most found larger positive effects for comprehensive parity legislation or policies than for less-comprehensive ones. Few studies assessed other mental health outcomes. Conclusions Evidence indicates that mental health benefits legislation, particularly comprehensive parity legislation, is effective in improving financial protection and increasing appropriate utilization of mental health services for people with mental health conditions. Evidence is limited for other mental health outcomes. PMID:25998926

  18. Indices of Community Mental Health. A Proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Martin K.

    One of the major problems in measuring community mental health status is the lack of consensus among mental health workers in psychiatry, psychology, sociology, and epidemiology as to what constitutes mental illness. Additionally, changing social mores preclude a definition of mental illness in behavioral terms. An operational definition of mental…

  19. The impact of an educational mental health intervention on adolescents' perceptions of mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellari, E; Sourander, A; Kalokerinou-Anagnostopoulou, A; Leino-Kilpi, H

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, in many countries, mental health care is primarily community based. Community perceptions of mental illness are an essential issue for the quality of life of people with mental health problems and the promotion of mental health in general. The aim of this study was to explore adolescents' perceptions of mental illness and to examine the extent to which those perceptions changed after an educational mental health intervention. The data were collected twice, before and after the educational mental health intervention. Fifty-nine pupils from two Greek secondary schools were individually interviewed, and data were analyzed by inductive content analysis. The findings show that adolescents can provide a rich description of mental illness in a multidimensional way. After the intervention, they provide different descriptions, identify various forms of mental illness and express opinions on what mentally ill people need and how they should be treated. It is concluded that mental health educational interventions in schools can be effective in changing adolescents' perceptions towards mental illness. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Shared decision-making, stigma, and child mental health functioning among families referred for primary care-located mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Ashley M

    2014-03-01

    There is growing emphasis on shared decision making (SDM) to promote family participation in care and improve the quality of child mental health care. Yet, little is known about the relationship of SDM with parental perceptions of child mental health treatment or child mental health functioning. The objectives of this preliminary study were to examine (a) the frequency of perceived SDM with providers among minority parents of children referred to colocated mental health care in a primary care clinic, (b) associations between parent-reported SDM and mental health treatment stigma and child mental health impairment, and (c) differences in SDM among parents of children with various levels of mental health problem severity. Participants were 36 Latino and African American parents of children (ages 2-7 years) who were referred to colocated mental health care for externalizing mental health problems (disruptive, hyperactive, and aggressive behaviors). Parents completed questions assessing their perceptions of SDM with providers, child mental health treatment stigma, child mental health severity, and level of child mental health impairment. Descriptive statistics demonstrated the majority of the sample reported frequent SDM with providers. Correlation coefficients indicated higher SDM was associated with lower stigma regarding mental health treatment and lower parent-perceived child mental health impairment. Analysis of variance showed no significant difference in SDM among parents of children with different parent-reported levels of child mental health severity. Future research should examine the potential of SDM for addressing child mental health treatment stigma and impairment among minority families.

  1. Mental Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chin (Laiholh) Karen (S’gaw Karen) Kinyarwanda (Rwanda) Levantine (Arabic dialect) (Levantine Arabic) Modern Standard Arabic (al-ʻArabīyat ul- ... Russian (Русский) Somali (Af-Soomaali ) Spanish (español) Sudanese (Arabic dialect) (Sudanese Arabic) Swahili (Kiswahili) Tigrinya (tigriññā / ትግርኛ) HealthReach ...

  2. Mental Health Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... failure. It makes me human." – Scarlet Pomers, musician and former co-star on TV’s "Reba" Could ... health problem. Sometimes these problems are caused by brain damage, child abuse, or other traumas. But kids ...

  3. Counseling and Mental Health Care in Palestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawahin, Lamise; Ciftci, Ayse

    2012-01-01

    The authors provide a brief overview of counseling and mental health care in Palestine, including their history and a summary of their current status. Finally, a discussion is presented of future trends in the development of the profession with regard to recent changes in the region.

  4. Poor Pre-Pregnancy and Antepartum Mental Health Predicts Postpartum Mental Health Problems among US Women: A Nationally Representative Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Whitney P.; Wisk, Lauren E.; Cheng, Erika R.; Hampton, John M.; Creswell, Paul; Hagen, Erika W.; Spear, Hilary A.; Maddox, Torsheika; DeLeire, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Mental health problems disproportionately affect women, particularly during childbearing years. However, there is a paucity of research on the determinants of postpartum mental health problems using representative US populations. Taking a life course perspective, we determined the potential risk factors for postpartum mental health problems, with a particular focus on the role of mental health before and during pregnancy. Methods We examined data on 1,863 mothers from eleven panels of the 1996-2006 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Poor postpartum mental health was defined using self-reports of mental health conditions, symptoms of mental health conditions, or global mental health ratings of “fair” or “poor.” Results 9.5% of women reported experiencing postpartum mental health problems, with over half of these women reporting a history of poor mental health. Poor pre-pregnancy mental health and poor antepartum mental health both independently increased the odds of having postpartum mental health problems. Staged multivariate analyses revealed that poor antepartum mental health attenuated the relationship between pre-pregnancy and postpartum mental health problems. Additionally, significant disparities exist in women's report of postpartum mental health status. Conclusions While poor antepartum mental health is the strongest predictor of postpartum mental health problems, pre-pregnancy mental health is also important. Accordingly, health care providers should identify, treat, and follow women with a history of poor mental health, as they are particularly susceptible to postpartum mental health problems. This will ensure that women and their children are in the best possible health and mental health during the postpartum period and beyond. PMID:21349740

  5. Malayalam cinema and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Koravangattu Valsraj; Ranjith, Gopinath

    2009-06-01

    There is a tradition of using films to teach various aspects of psychiatry and we feel that Malayalam cinema can also be used suitably to teach effectively. These films can be an invaluable resource in cultural competency training as they depict the effects of culture on psychopathology and cultural and regional influences on attitudes to mental illness and stigma. We also note that the portrayal is often far from reality but this is not a barrier for using the films as an effective alternative to traditional and didactic teaching methods. This method of teaching can stimulate interest and discussion and demystify the myths of novice students and others about mental health.

  6. [Mental health and social determinants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surault, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Social disparities in health is becoming a topic of major importance. Recent studies presents data on social differences in morbidity on various diseases. This paper shows how mental health disorders prevalences are strongly linked to sociological variables. It is based on the data of the research-action entitled "Mental Health in General Population: images and realities (MHGP)" carried out by the World Health Organisation Collaborative Centre (Lille, France) and the Direction of research, studies, assessment and statistics (Drees) of the French Ministry of Health, in a sample of 36 000 French subjects over 18 years old, between 1999 and 2003. The MHGP Survey is an international multisite study aimed at assessing the prevalence of major psychiatric disorders in the general population, as well as describing the representations attached to insanity, mental illness and depression, and the related care. It allows the analysis of the impact of professional situation on prevalence data in a large sample. The MHGP Survey was carried out in 47 French public sites between 1999 and 2003. A face-to-face questionnaire was used to interview a representative sample of French metropolitan subjects, aged 18 and over, non-institutionalized and homeless. These subjects were recruited using quota sampling for age, gender, socio-professional and education levels, according to data from the 1999 national French population census. Representations of insane, mentally ill and depressive persons were explored by a specific questionnaire with open and semi-open questions. Psychiatric diagnoses were identified using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI); including: mood disorders, anxiety disorders, alcohol and drug disorders, psychotic disorders and suicidal risk. A national database was then constituted by pooling data from all sites, weighted for age, gender, level of education, socio-professional level and work status to be representative of the French general

  7. Mental Health Mobile Apps: From Infusion to Diffusion in the Mental Health Social System

    OpenAIRE

    East, Marlene Lynette; Havard, Byron C

    2015-01-01

    The roles of mental health educators and professionals in the diffusion of mental health mobile apps are addressed in this viewpoint article. Mental health mobile apps are emerging technologies that fit under the broad heading of mobile health (mHealth). mHealth, encompassed within electronic health (eHealth), reflects the use of mobile devices for the practice of public health. Well-designed mental health mobile apps that present content in interactive, engaging, and stimulating ways can pro...

  8. Mental health beliefs and barriers to accessing mental health services in youth aging out of foster care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Christina; Mackie, Thomas I; Shetgiri, Rashmi; Franzen, Sara; Partap, Anu; Flores, Glenn; Leslie, Laurel K

    2014-01-01

    To examine the perspectives of youth on factors that influence mental health service use after aging out of foster care. Focus groups were conducted with youth with a history of mental health needs and previous service use who had aged out of foster care. Questions were informed by the Health Belief Model and addressed 4 domains: youth perceptions of the "threat of mental health problems," treatment benefits versus barriers to accessing mental health services, self-efficacy, and "cues to action." Data were analyzed using a modified grounded-theory approach. Youth (N = 28) reported ongoing mental health problems affecting their functioning; however, they articulated variable levels of reliance on formal mental health treatment versus their own ability to resolve these problems without treatment. Past mental health service experiences influenced whether youth viewed treatment options as beneficial. Youth identified limited self-efficacy and insufficient psychosocial supports "cueing action" during their transition out of foster care. Barriers to accessing mental health services included difficulties obtaining health insurance, finding a mental health provider, scheduling appointments, and transportation. Youths' perceptions of their mental health needs, self-efficacy, psychosocial supports during transition, and access barriers influence mental health service use after aging out of foster care. Results suggest that strategies are needed to 1) help youth and clinicians negotiate shared understanding of mental health treatment needs and options, 2) incorporate mental health into transition planning, and 3) address insurance and other systemic barriers to accessing mental health services after aging out of foster care. Copyright © 2014 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluating the WHO Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems by comparing mental health policies in four countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Hamada; Abanilla, Karen; Bauta, Besa; Huang, Keng-Yen

    2008-06-01

    Mental health is a low priority in most countries around the world. Minimal research and resources have been invested in mental health at the national level. As a result, WHO has developed the Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems (WHO-AIMS) to encourage countries to gather data and to re-evaluate their national mental health policy. This paper demonstrates the utility and limitations of WHO-AIMS by applying the model to four countries with different cultures, political histories and public health policies: Iraq, Japan, the Philippines and The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. WHO-AIMS provides a useful model for analysing six domains: policy and legislative framework; mental health services; mental health in primary care; human resources; education of the public at large; and monitoring and research. This is especially important since most countries do not have experts in mental health policy or resources to design their own evaluation tools for mental health systems. Furthermore, WHO-AIMS provides a standardized database for cross-country comparisons. However, limitations of the instrument include the neglect of the politics of mental health policy development, underestimation of the role of culture in mental health care utilization, and questionable measurement validity.

  10. ?teen Mental Health First Aid?: a description of the program and an initial evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, Laura M; Mason, Robert J; Kelly, Claire M; Cvetkovski, Stefan; Jorm, Anthony F

    2016-01-01

    Background Many adolescents have poor mental health literacy, stigmatising attitudes towards people with mental illness, and lack skills in providing optimal Mental Health First Aid to peers. These could be improved with training to facilitate better social support and increase appropriate help-seeking among adolescents with emerging mental health problems. teen Mental Health First Aid (teen MHFA), a new initiative of Mental Health First Aid International, is a 3???75?min classroom based trai...

  11. Community mental health work: Negotiating support of users' recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Nina Petersen; Josephsson, Staffan; Alsaker, Sissel

    2017-06-23

    Mental health services have changed over the past decades through an increased emphasis on deinstitutionalization and normalization, and with recovery processes situated in everyday life as a new locus of support. These changes have led to a need for new knowledge and methods concerning the provision of community mental health services. The aim of the present study was to explore how community mental health workers provide support to users, by investigating professionals' own narratives of how they work. Seven community mental health workers participated in narrative interviews, which were subject to a qualitative, interpretive analysis. A primary finding was that community mental health workers provide flexible and individually-adjusted support through engaging in negotiations with users, management, and others. Our findings show both opportunities and challenges of negotiating support, raising the following question for discussion: How and when are negotiations a valuable way for professionals and users to collaborate? © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  12. Social capital and burnout among mental healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliacin, Johanne; Flanagan, Mindy; Monroe-DeVita, Maria; Wasmuth, Sarah; Salyers, Michelle P; Rollins, Angela L

    2018-01-06

    Provider burnout is a critical problem in mental health services. Contributing factors have been explicated across three domains: personal, job and organizational characteristics. Of these, organizational characteristics, including workplace environment, appear to be particularly important given that most interventions addressing burnout via the other domains (e.g. bolstering personal coping skills) have been modestly effective at best. This study builds on previous research by using social capital as a framework for the experience of work social milieu, and aims to provide a richer understanding of how workplace social environment might impact burnout and help create more effective ways to reduce burnout. Providers (n = 40) taking part in a larger burnout intervention study were randomly selected to take part in interviews regarding their workplace environment and burnout. Participant responses were analyzed thematically. Workplace social milieu revolved around two primary themes: workplace social capital in provider burnout and the protective qualities of social capital in cohesive work teams that appear to mitigate burnout. These results imply that work environments where managers support collaboration and social interaction among work teams may reduce burnout.

  13. Review of mobile health technology for military mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Jay H; Aldag, Matt; McVeigh, Francis L; Hoover, Ronald L; Ciulla, Robert; Fisher, Ashley

    2014-08-01

    Mental health problems pose challenges for military veterans, returning service members, and military family members including spouses and children. Challenges to meeting mental health needs include improving access to care and improving quality of care. Mobile Health, or "mHealth," can help meet these needs in the garrison and civilian environments. mHealth brings unique capabilities to health care provision through the use of mobile device technologies. This report identifies high-priority mHealth technology development considerations in two categories. First, priority considerations specific to mental health care provision include safety, privacy, evidence-based practice, efficacy studies, and temperament. Second, priority considerations broadly applicable to mHealth include security, outcomes, ease of use, carrier compliance, hardware, provider perspectives, data volume, population, regulation, command policy, and reimbursement. Strategic planning for the advancement of these priority considerations should be coordinated with stated Department of Defense capability needs to maximize likelihood of adoption. This report also summarizes three leading, military programs focused on mHealth projects in mental health, The Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center, The Military Operational Medicine Research Program, United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, and The National Center for Telehealth and Technology. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  14. Integrating mental health and social development in theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagerson, Sophie

    2015-03-01

    In many low and middle income countries, attention to mental illness remains compartmentalized and consigned as a matter for specialist policy. Despite great advances in global mental health, mental health policy and practice dovetail only to a limited degree with social development efforts. They often lag behind broader approaches to health and development. This gap ignores the small but growing evidence that social development unavoidably impacts the mental health of those affected, and that this influence can be both positive and negative. This article examines the theoretical and practical challenges that need to be overcome for a more effective integration of social development and mental health policy. From a theoretical perspective, this article demonstrates compatibility between social development and mental health paradigms. In particular, the capability approach is shown to provide a strong framework for integrating mental health and development. Yet, capability-oriented critiques on 'happiness' have recently been applied to mental health with potentially detrimental outcomes. With regard to policy and practice, horizontal and vertical integration strategies are suggested. Horizontal strategies require stronger devolution of mental health care to the primary care level, more unified messages regarding mental health care provision and the gradual expansion of mental health packages of care. Vertical integration refers to the alignment of mental health with related policy domains (particularly the social, economic and political domains). Evidence from mental health research reinforces aspects of social development theory in a way that can have tangible implications on practice. First, it encourages a focus on avoiding exclusion of those affected by or at risk of mental illness. Secondly, it underscores the importance of the process of implementation as an integral component of successful policies. Finally, by retaining a focus on the individual, it seeks to

  15. Quick Guide: Mental Health-Secondary Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Technical Assistance Center on Transition, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Recently researchers have begun focusing on young adults with mental health disorders transitioning into adulthood. Research exploring the importance of mental health support in secondary transition have yielded positive outcomes. For example, strong collaboration between educational and mental health agencies ensuring academic, employment, and…

  16. Cannabis Use and Mental Health Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ours, J.C.; Williams, J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates whether cannabis use leads to worse mental health. To do so, we account for common unobserved factors affecting mental health and cannabis consumption by modeling mental health jointly with the dynamics of cannabis use. Our main finding is that using cannabis increases the

  17. Towards anti-oppressive practice in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopton, J

    Working in Partnership, the Department of Health's report on the 1994 review of mental health nursing, implies that mental health nurses should develop anti-oppressive approaches to nursing practice. There is a notable absence of articles within the nursing literature which specifically address this issue. This is possibly because the historical and ideological issues which have informed the development of mental health nursing are complex and difficult to unravel. However, an integration of the theories of David Cooper and Frantz Fanon may provide an appropriate starting point for the development of a theory of anti-oppressive practice which addresses some of the issues specific to mental health nursing.

  18. 'Your experiences were your tools'. How personal experience of mental health problems informs mental health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, J; Drey, N; Jones, J

    2017-09-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: 'Expertise by experience' has become an increasingly valued element of service design and delivery by mental health service providers. The extent and influence of mental health professionals' personal experience of mental ill health on clinical practice has seldom been interrogated in depth. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: We investigate how mental health nurses' own personal experience of mental ill health informs their mental health nursing practice with particular reference to direct work with service users. Participants said that personal experience could impact on work in three positive ways: to develop their relationship with service users, to enhance their understanding of service users and as a motivation for potential mental health nurses to join the profession. This study moves the discussion of the state of mental health nurses' mental health further towards the recovery and well-being focus of contemporary mental health care, where 'expertise by experience' is highly valued. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: We must address the taboo of disclosure within clinical nursing practice and debate the extent to which personal and professional boundaries are negotiated during clinical encounters. Introduction 'Expertise by experience' is a highly valued element of service delivery in recovery-oriented mental health care, but is unacknowledged within the mental health nursing literature. Aim To explore the extent and influence of mental health professionals' personal experience of mental ill health on clinical practice. Method Twenty-seven mental health nurses with their own personal experience of mental ill health were interviewed about how their personal experience informed their mental health nursing practice, as part of a sequential mixed methods study. Results The influence of personal experience in nursing work was threefold: first, through overt disclosure; second, through the 'use of the self as a tool

  19. Collaboration in the provision of mental health care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaruseviciene, L.; Valius, L.; Lazarus, J.V.

    2012-01-01

    Background. General practitioners (GPs) often become the first point of care for mental health issues. Improved collaboration between GPs and mental health teams can make a GP's mental health services more efficient. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the collaboration between GPs...... and mental health team members and determine predictors for better collaboration. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, a 41- item questionnaire was distributed to a random sample of 797 Lithuanian GPs. The purpose of this questionnaire was to obtain knowledge about current practices of GPs in providing...... mental health care for patients as well as GPs' collaboration with metal health teams. Results. The response rate was 52.2%. GPs collaborated closest with psychiatrists: 30.7% of them reported that they discuss the mental health care of their patients with psychiatrists. Predictors of greater...

  20. Involuntary detention and treatment of the mentally ill: China's 2012 Mental Health Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    The long-awaited Mental Health Law of China was passed on 26 October 2012 and took effect on 1 May 2013. Being the first national legislation on mental health, it establishes a basic legal framework to regulate mental health practice and recognizes the fundamental rights of persons with mental disorders. This article focuses on the system of involuntary detention and treatment of the mentally ill under the new law, which is expected to prevent the so-called "Being misidentified as mentally disordered" cases in China. A systematic examination of the new system demonstrates that the Mental Health Law of China implicitly holds two problematic assumptions and does not provide adequate protection of the fundamental rights of the involuntary patients. Administrative enactments and further national legislative efforts are needed to remedy these flaws in the new law. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Women's mental health in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Niaz, Unaiza

    2004-01-01

    In Pakistan, societal attitudes and norms, as well as cultural practices (Karo Kari, exchange marriages, dowry, etc.), play a vital role in women's mental health. The religious and ethnic conflicts, along with the dehumanizing attitudes towards women, the extended family system, role of in-laws in daily lives of women, represent major issues and stressors. Such practices in Pakistan have created the extreme marginalisation of women in numerous spheres of life, which has had ...

  2. Survey of mental health needs of Hamedanian people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    farshid Shamsaei

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available For all individuals, mental, physical and social health is vital strands of life that are closely interwoven and deeply interdependent. And mental health is crucial to the overall well-being of individuals, societies and countries. Objectives: The aim of this study is to identify the mental health needs of Hamedanian people. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. The participants consist of 1300 persons who were selected by stratified sampling. A 30- item questionnaire was used to gather data from the samples. It consisted of three parts: A-demographic factors, B-questions related to mental health service delivery and C- questions related to mental health needs. Results: Results showed that the Hamedan city people believed that mental health services are inadequate, they did not access services near their home (76% and mass media educational programs about services was poor(34%. The expressed needs of people were: mental health education (72%, established mental health centers in schools (52. 8% and factories (50. 7% and expanding the comprehensive mental health centers in the city(57. 8%. Expanding the assurance services (85. 6%, modifying wrong beliefs and ideas about mental illness (42. 6%, and improving the mental health in society. Conclusion: Community based mental health services should to provide comprehensive and local cares and treatments. Services should be comprehensive in that they provide a range of facilities to meet the mental health needs of the population at large as well as of special groups, such as children, adolescents, women and elderly people.

  3. Mulheres, loucura e cuidado: a condição da mulher na provisão e demanda por cuidados em saúde mental Women, madness and care: the condition of the woman that both receives and provides care in mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Fabiana Pegoraro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available As políticas públicas brasileiras em saúde mental incentivam, atualmente, a criação de serviços extra-hospitalares e, como resultado, o papel da família, especialmente da mulher, no cuidado informal ao portador de sofrimento mental ganha a cada dia maior relevância. Embora considerada como fundamental na prestação de cuidados no meio familiar, a mulher também adoece e torna-se, deste modo, alvo de cuidados das equipes de saúde mental. A partir dessa consideração, este artigo apresenta uma revisão sobre a condição da mulher que recebe e provê cuidados em saúde mental. O artigo aborda, inicialmente, estudos que discutem a relação entre mulher e loucura, partindo de registros da Idade Antiga até estudos referentes ao início do Século XX no Brasil. Em seguida, enfoca a mulher enquanto principal prestadora de cuidados informais, em âmbito doméstico, ao portador de sofrimento mental, a partir de estudos que tratam do impacto dessa função na vida familiar. Por fim, destaca literatura sobre as necessidades específicas da mulher que demanda cuidados em saúde mental, notadamente aquela que tem filhos menores, dependentes de cuidado. Reconhecer as especificidades da condição da mulher pode auxiliar no desenvolvimento de novas formas de cuidar, que envolvam a família não apenas como fonte de informações sobre a paciente, mas como grupo que também necessita da intervenção profissional. Mulheres com filhos pequenos e diagnosticadas com transtorno mental severo demandam suporte profissional, especialmente se houver indicação de internação ou necessidade de cuidado contínuo.The current Brazilian public policies in mental health are stimulating the creation of out-of-hospital services. As a result, the role of the family, especially of the woman, in the informal care provided for a mental illness patient is increasing in importance. Although the woman is considered fundamental in providing care for the family, she may

  4. Providing mental healthcare to immigrants: current challenges and new strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacco, Domenico; Matanov, Aleksandra; Priebe, Stefan

    2014-07-01

    The article reviews recent evidence on improving access to mental healthcare for immigrants and best practice of care provision. Language barriers, different beliefs and explanatory models of illness, confidentiality concerns, stigma, reluctance to seek psychological help outside families, and social deprivation may prevent immigrants from accessing mental healthcare. Pathways are influenced by families, primary care practitioners, voluntary organizations, and social services. Interpreting services are often not available, and data documentation on immigrants' use of services is inconsistent. Nonmedical specific services for immigrants can be effective in outreach activities. Cultural training of staff can improve clinicians' attitudes and patients' satisfaction with care. Integrative approaches between primary and mental healthcare, psychoeducational programs, and technological innovations have been developed to improve access to care. Immigrants can face significant barriers in accessing mental healthcare. Strategies to overcome these barriers are as follows: increased coordination and communication between voluntary organizations, social services and mental health services; training of staff on cross-cultural issues; integration of mental healthcare with primary care; psychoeducational initiatives focused on families and broader social groups; and technology-based interventions.

  5. The Healthy Immigrant Effect on Mental Health: Determinants and Implications for Mental Health Policy in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Berta; Casal, Bruno; Currais, Luis

    2016-07-01

    Since the mid-1990s, Spain has started to receive a great number of migrant populations. The migration process can have a significantly negative impact on mental health of immigrant population and, consequently, generate implications for the delivery of mental health services. The aim of this article is to provide empirical evidence to demonstrate that the mental health of immigrants in Spain deteriorates the longer they are resident in the country. An empirical approach to this relationship is carried out with data from the National Survey of Health of Spain 2011-2012 and poisson and negative binomial models. Results show that immigrants who reside Spain appear to be in a better state of mental health than that observed for the national population. Studying health disparities in the foreign population and its evolution are relevant to ensure the population's access to health services and care. The need for further research is especially true in the case of the immigrant population's mental health in Spain because there is scant evidence available on their situation.

  6. Issues in consumer mental health information.

    OpenAIRE

    Angier, J J

    1984-01-01

    Consumer health information as applied to mental health includes areas such as the diagnosis, management, and treatment of mental illness, as well as self-help, emotional wellness, and the relationship between life events, stress, and disease. This paper presents issues specific to the provision of mental health information to the layperson, e.g., confidentiality, literacy, competence, the social stigma of mental illness, the state of the art in psychiatry, popular psychology, and treatment f...

  7. Why focus on mental health systems?

    OpenAIRE

    Minas, Harry; Cohen, Alex

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The global situation for people with mental illness – in developing and developed countries – is dire. Legislative and human rights protections are frequently lacking. Mental health budgets are inadequate. There are insufficient numbers of skilled policy makers, managers and clinicians. Communities are poorly informed about mental health and illness and not well organised for purposes of advocacy. In most of the world, mental health services are inaccessible or of poor quality. Most ...

  8. Community-based mental health care in Africa: mental health workers’ views

    OpenAIRE

    Alem, Atalay; JACOBSSON, LARS; Hanlon, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has for long proposed the development of community-based mental health services worldwide. However, the progress toward community mental health care in most African countries is still hampered by a lack of resources, with specialist psychiatric care essentially based in large, centrally located mental hospitals. It is again time to reconsider the direction of mental health care in Africa. Based on a small inquiry to a number of experienced mental health pro...

  9. Climate Change and Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombley, Janna; Chalupka, Stephanie; Anderko, Laura

    2017-04-01

    : Climate change is an enormous challenge for our communities, our country, and our world. Recently much attention has been paid to the physical impacts of climate change, including extreme heat events, droughts, extreme storms, and rising sea levels. However, much less attention has been paid to the psychological impacts. This article examines the likely psychological impacts of climate change, including anxiety, stress, and depression; increases in violence and aggression; and loss of community identity. Nurses can play a vital role in local and regional climate strategies by preparing their patients, health care facilities, and communities to effectively address the anticipated mental health impacts of climate change.

  10. Adult Education and Mental Health

    OpenAIRE

    Ladi Škerbinek

    1998-01-01

    Škerbinek writes about life-long education and its influence on the quality of life. Through education, people assume a different attitude towards health, and above all develop an awareness that they are themselves responsible for their health and general well-being. The majority of mental disorders spring from prolonged psychological pressures. Psychiatrists believe in the principle » Prevention is better than cure«, and it is therefore under­standable that strong emphasis should be put on e...

  11. Adult Education and Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladi Škerbinek

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Škerbinek writes about life-long education and its influence on the quality of life. Through education, people assume a different attitude towards health, and above all develop an awareness that they are themselves responsible for their health and general well-being. The majority of mental disorders spring from prolonged psychological pressures. Psychiatrists believe in the principle » Prevention is better than cure«, and it is therefore under­standable that strong emphasis should be put on education, particularly education leading to formation in the emotional sphere, resistance to consumerism, healthy productivity motivation, and a balanced and healthy life.

  12. Education in mental health promotion and its impact on the participants' attitudes and perceived mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaras Vlassis D

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the promotion of mental health (MHP through education and training is widely accepted, there is scarce evidence for its effectiveness in the literature from outcome studies worldwide. The present study aimed to assess the effect of a three-semester MHP educational program on the recipients' opinions towards mental illness and on their own self-assessed health. Methods Respondents were 78 attendees who completed the assessment battery at the first (baseline and the last session (end of the training course. They were primary care physicians or other professionals, or key community agents, working in the greater Athens area. The course consisted of 44 sessions (4 h each, over a 3-semester period, focusing on the principles and methods of mental health promotion, the main aspects of major psychiatric disorders, and on relevant to health skills. Assessment instruments included the Opinion about Mental Illness (OMI scale and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28. Results The mean scores of three OMI factors, that is, social discrimination, social restriction and social integration, and the two GHQ-28 subscales, that is, anxiety/insomnia and social dysfunction, were significantly improved by the end of the training course. Conclusions The results of this study provide evidence, with limitations, for the short-term effectiveness of the implemented educational MHP program on an adult group of recipients-key agents in their community. Because interventions for strengthening positive opinions about mental illness and enhancing self-assessed health constitute priority aims of mental health promotion, it would be beneficial to further investigate the sustainability of the observed positive changes. In addition it would be useful to examine (a the possible interplay between the two outcome measures, that is, the effect of opinions of recipients about mental health on their perceived health, and (b the applicability of this

  13. Education in mental health promotion and its impact on the participants' attitudes and perceived mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaras, Vlassis D; Ginieri-Coccossis, Maria; Vassiliadou, Maria; Malliori, Melpomeni; Ferentinos, Spyros; Soldatos, Constantin R; Tylee, Andre

    2011-12-23

    Although the promotion of mental health (MHP) through education and training is widely accepted, there is scarce evidence for its effectiveness in the literature from outcome studies worldwide. The present study aimed to assess the effect of a three-semester MHP educational program on the recipients' opinions towards mental illness and on their own self-assessed health. Respondents were 78 attendees who completed the assessment battery at the first (baseline) and the last session (end) of the training course. They were primary care physicians or other professionals, or key community agents, working in the greater Athens area. The course consisted of 44 sessions (4 h each), over a 3-semester period, focusing on the principles and methods of mental health promotion, the main aspects of major psychiatric disorders, and on relevant to health skills. Assessment instruments included the Opinion about Mental Illness (OMI) scale and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). The mean scores of three OMI factors, that is, social discrimination, social restriction and social integration, and the two GHQ-28 subscales, that is, anxiety/insomnia and social dysfunction, were significantly improved by the end of the training course. The results of this study provide evidence, with limitations, for the short-term effectiveness of the implemented educational MHP program on an adult group of recipients-key agents in their community. Because interventions for strengthening positive opinions about mental illness and enhancing self-assessed health constitute priority aims of mental health promotion, it would be beneficial to further investigate the sustainability of the observed positive changes. In addition it would be useful to examine (a) the possible interplay between the two outcome measures, that is, the effect of opinions of recipients about mental health on their perceived health, and (b) the applicability of this intervention in individuals with different sociodemographic

  14. Mental health priorities in Iranian women: overview of social determinants of mental health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monir Baradaran Eftekhari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mental health is an essential component for positive adaptation that enables people to cope with adversity to achieve their full potential and humanity. In this study, using a community based approach, the social determinants of mental health in Iranian women were extracted; and in addition, priority setting for interventional programs according to analytical framework of WHO was implemented.This study was a community based participatory research (CBPR in district 22 of Tehran (Iran. The target group was married females with age range of 18-65 years. In this study, mental health priorities were extracted by qualitative methods according to Essential National Health Research model (ENHR and the analytical framework of WHO. Data analysis was done based on content analysis by the open code 3.6 software.In the quantitative phase, according to secondary data, 1144 individuals (560 females and 584 males were selected, of whom 41 percent had impaired mental health based on General Health Questionnaire (GHQ (P<0.05. According to the qualitative phase, the first mental health priority in socioeconomic level was lack of insurance for unattended families, it was unemployment in differential exposure level and it was lack of knowledge and skills related to dealing with stress in the differential vulnerability level; in differential outcome and consequence levels, the priorities were lack of free counseling centers in the study area and lack of facilities for mental health rehabilitation.Providing training courses to improve the skills to deal with stress is considered one of the most important interventions for mental health promotion in women.

  15. Smoking, Mental Illness, and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Das, Smita; Young-Wolff, Kelly C.

    2018-01-01

    Tobacco use remains the leading preventable cause of death worldwide. In particular, people with mental illness are disproportionately affected with high smoking prevalence; they account for more than 200,000 of the 520,000 tobacco-attributable deaths in the United States annually and die on average 25 years prematurely. Our review aims to provide an update on smoking in the mentally ill. We review the determinants of tobacco use among smokers with mental illness, presented with regard to the public health HAVE framework of “the host” (e.g., tobacco user characteristics), the “agent” (e.g., nicotine product characteristics), the “vector” (e.g., tobacco industry), and the “environment” (e.g., smoking policies). Furthermore, we identify the significant health harms incurred and opportunities for prevention and intervention within a health care systems and larger health policy perspective. A comprehensive effort is warranted to achieve equity toward the 2025 Healthy People goal of reducing US adult tobacco use to 12%, with attention to all subgroups, including smokers with mental illness. PMID:27992725

  16. Smoking, Mental Illness, and Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Judith J; Das, Smita; Young-Wolff, Kelly C

    2017-03-20

    Tobacco use remains the leading preventable cause of death worldwide. In particular, people with mental illness are disproportionately affected with high smoking prevalence; they account for more than 200,000 of the 520,000 tobacco-attributable deaths in the United States annually and die on average 25 years prematurely. Our review aims to provide an update on smoking in the mentally ill. We review the determinants of tobacco use among smokers with mental illness, presented with regard to the public health HAVE framework of "the host" (e.g., tobacco user characteristics), the "agent" (e.g., nicotine product characteristics), the "vector" (e.g., tobacco industry), and the "environment" (e.g., smoking policies). Furthermore, we identify the significant health harms incurred and opportunities for prevention and intervention within a health care systems and larger health policy perspective. A comprehensive effort is warranted to achieve equity toward the 2025 Healthy People goal of reducing US adult tobacco use to 12%, with attention to all subgroups, including smokers with mental illness.

  17. School Nurses' Perceived Prevalence and Competence to Address Student Mental Health Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Sharon H.; Connors, Elizabeth H.

    2013-01-01

    Due to under-identification of student mental health problems and limited specialty mental health providers in schools, school nurses are often faced with identifying and addressing student mental health needs. This exploratory study assessed prevalence and types of student mental health problems encountered by school nurses, as well as their…

  18. Deaf Children and Young People's Experiences of Using Specialist Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Veronica; Beresford, Bryony; Sutherland, Hilary

    2009-01-01

    Deaf children have an increased prevalence of mental health problems compared with hearing children. Generic Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services do not have the skills or expertise to meet the mental health needs of this group of children. Three teams in England provide specialist mental health services for deaf children. This research…

  19. Promotion of mental health in children of parents with a mental disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrocchio, Maria Cristina; Ambrosini, Alessandra; Fulcheri, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders are associated with many difficulties in the activities of daily living, work, relationships and family, and they determine high social and economic costs that represent an important public health problem. The literature has shown that children of parents with mental disorders grow up in environments that are potentially harmful to their mental health and are at risk of neglect and maltreatment. Interventions to prevent mental disorders and psychological symptoms of children of parents with mental disorders are effective but supporting these families is a complex task which requires both cooperation between departments and an interdisciplinary knowledge. A greater knowledge of the responses provided to assist families with dependent children and a mentally ill parent, could stimulate reflections on critical issues and government actions aimed at promoting and protecting the mental health of children.

  20. Promotion of mental health in children of parents with a mental disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Verrocchio

    Full Text Available Mental disorders are associated with many difficulties in the activities of daily living, work, relationships and family, and they determine high social and economic costs that represent an important public health problem. The literature has shown that children of parents with mental disorders grow up in environments that are potentially harmful to their mental health and are at risk of neglect and maltreatment. Interventions to prevent mental disorders and psychological symptoms of children of parents with mental disorders are effective but supporting these families is a complex task which requires both cooperation between departments and an interdisciplinary knowledge. A greater knowledge of the responses provided to assist families with dependent children and a mentally ill parent, could stimulate reflections on critical issues and government actions aimed at promoting and protecting the mental health of children.

  1. Mental Health and Illness in the City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book highlights a broad range of issues on mental health and illness in large cities. It presents the epidemiology of mental disorders in cities, cultural issues of urban mental health care, and community care in large cities and urban slums. It also includes chapters on homelessness, crime...

  2. Mental health promotion: paradigms and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tudor, Keith

    1996-01-01

    ... concept which is clearly differentiated from mental illness and psychopathology. The second part of the book focuses on the theory and practice of mental health promotion through applications to policy, assessment, consultation, and to education and training in mental health promotion. Drawing on a wealth of international literature Keith Tudor offe...

  3. Issues in Children's Mental Health. Special Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, Margaret L.

    This Kids Count report examines issues related to children's mental health in Virginia. The report discusses the effects of children's mental illness, presents risk and protective factors, and describes the incidence of children's mental health problems. Information specific to Virginia is presented, including the prevalence of youth suicide,…

  4. Why focus on mental health systems?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minas Harry

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The global situation for people with mental illness – in developing and developed countries – is dire. Legislative and human rights protections are frequently lacking. Mental health budgets are inadequate. There are insufficient numbers of skilled policy makers, managers and clinicians. Communities are poorly informed about mental health and illness and not well organised for purposes of advocacy. In most of the world, mental health services are inaccessible or of poor quality. Most people who would benefit from psychiatric treatment and rehabilitation do not have affordable access to such services. Leadership – at all levels – for mental health system development needs to be greatly strengthened. While mental health research attention and funds are devoted predominantly to neuroscience and clinical research, we believe that the highest global mental health research priority is mental health systems research. There is an urgent need to focus on the development of effective, appropriate, affordable mental health services. The evidence base for such development is currently weak. The International Journal of Mental Health Systems aims to stimulate greater attention to the central importance of building functioning mental health systems. Rapid publication and global reach through open access will make this journal a resource for all those who wish to contribute to such development.

  5. States Pass Diverse Slate of Mental Health Legislation in 2013. Mental Health: 2013 Legislative Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Recent violence in schools and on college campuses has brought into sharp focus the need to address mental health issues in educational settings. Getting students with mental health problems the help they need, without stigmatizing mental illness, may help prevent future tragedies. Children with mental health problems face a host of challenges,…

  6. Community mental health program efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, B H; Bigelow, D A; Smith, J; Mofidi, A

    1997-07-01

    Six urban community mental health centers participated in a capitated payment system designed for persons with severe mental illness who frequently used the state hospital. The centers and their funding agency agreed that a chief outcome measure would be the length of time clients were able to remain enrolled in the outpatient program. Clients of the six agencies were quite similar to one another. During the 18-month study length of enrollment in the outpatient program did not vary among the agencies whereas agency expenditures varied by more than three-fold. Although some of this expenditure variation was due to economies of scale at larger agencies, different practice styles also contributed to variable efficiency.

  7. Interactions between youth and mental health professionals: The Youth Aware of Mental health (YAM) program experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Camilla; Postuvan, Vita; Herta, Dana; Iosue, Miriam; Värnik, Peeter; Carli, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    The Youth Aware of Mental health (YAM) experience Youth stand at the core of much mental health promotion, yet little is written about their experiences of such efforts. We aimed to take this on by interviewing youth after they participated in Youth Aware of Mental Health (YAM), a universal mental health promotion program. YAM has a non-anticipatory methodology that provides youth with a safe space for reflection, role-play, and discussion. Addressing everyday mental health, YAM invites the experiences and issues relevant to the youth present to influence the program in a slightly different direction every time. The YAM instructor guides the participants but does not present the youth with given formulas on how to solve their problems. Like any mental health promotion, YAM appeals to some more than others in its intended audience and individuals engage with the program in many different ways. We set out to learn more about these experiences. Conversations about mental health Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15–17 year olds in Estonia, Italy, Romania and Spain. In these interviews, the researchers made an effort to discuss mental health in terms relevant to youth. Still, wide-ranging levels of motivation, ease with engaging in dialogue with mental health professionals, and comfort with the format and content of YAM were detected. The youth were clustered in five different groups relating to their positioning vis-à-vis the researcher during the interview. The following evocative labels were used: “interested”, “foot in the door”, “respect for authority”, “careful”, and “not my topic”. Corresponding labels were devised for their YAM experience: “engaged”, “initially hesitant”, “cautious”, “eager to please”, or “disengaged”. We also observed that the researchers brought their own expectations and employed a variety of approaches that led to anticipating answers, stating the obvious, or getting along

  8. Contemporary Perspectives on Spirituality and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pulkit; Charak, Ruby; Sharma, Vibha

    2009-01-01

    The paper strives to elucidate the complex yet intimate relation between spirituality and mental health from contemporary perspectives. The diverse and constantly evolving views that spiritualists and mental health professionals have held toward each other over last century are discussed with special accent on the transpersonal spiritual framework within psychology. The role of spirituality in promoting mental health and alleviating mental illness is highlighted. The paper is concluded with an increasing need to integrate spirituality within the mental health field albeit there are several impediments in achieving the same, which need to be worked through circumspectly. PMID:21938086

  9. Ontological security and connectivity provided by pets: a study in the self-management of the everyday lives of people diagnosed with a long-term mental health condition

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Helen; Rushton, Kelly; Lovell, Karina; Walker, Sandra; Rogers, Anne

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundDespite evidence that connecting people to relevant wellbeing-related resources brings therapeutic benefit, there is limited understanding, in the context of mental health recovery, of the potential value and contribution of pet ownership to personal support networks for self-management. This study aimed to explore the role of pets in the support and management activities in the personal networks of people with long-term mental health problems.MethodsSemi-structured interviews centr...

  10. Disclosure during prenatal mental health screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Dawn E; Biringer, Anne; Toosi, Amy; Heaman, Maureen I; Lasiuk, Gerri C; McDonald, Sheila W; Kingston, Joshua; Sword, Wendy; Jarema, Karly; Austin, Marie-Paule

    2015-11-01

    While women and healthcare providers have generally viewed perinatal mental health screening favorably, some qualitative studies suggest that some women intentionally decide not to reveal their symptoms during screening. The purpose of this study was to describe women's reported willingness to disclose mental health concerns during screening and factors associated with this. This cross-sectional study included pregnant women who were >16 years of age and could speak/read English. Women were recruited from five maternity clinics and two community hospitals in Alberta, Canada (May-December, 2013). Eligible women completed the online Barriers and Facilitators of Mental Health Screening Questionnaire on recruitment. The primary outcome for this analysis was women's level of honesty about mental health concerns (completely vs somewhat/not at all honest) during screening. Analyses included descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regressions to identify factors associated with honesty. Participation rate was 92% (460/500). Seventy-nine percent of women indicated that they could be 'completely honest' during screening. Women who feared their provider would view them as bad mothers were less likely to be honest. We found a significant association between 'less anonymous' modes of screening and honesty. Over eighty percent of women in this study were well-educated, partnered, Caucasian women. As such, generalizability of the study findings may be limited. Most women indicated they could be honest during screening. Stigma-related factors and screening mode influenced women's willingness to disclose. Strategies to reduce stigma during screening are warranted to enhance early detection of prenatal mental illness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mental Health Issues in Foster Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, W David; Jones, V Faye

    2016-10-01

    Children in foster care have exceptional needs due to their histories of abuse, neglect, and increased exposure to violence. The rates of psychiatric symptoms and disorders, such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and reactive attachment disorder, are much higher in children in foster care; furthermore, the rate of these children receiving psychotropic medications is 3 times that of children who are not in foster care. Pediatricians, in their role of providing a medical home, play a central role in safeguarding the physical and mental health of these children. By taking a trauma-informed approach to understanding the unique needs and gaps in their health care, pediatricians can improve the mental health and maximize outcome for children in foster care. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(10):e342-e348.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. "We Are Not Really Marketing Mental Health": Mental Health Advocacy in Zimbabwe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hendler, Reuben; Kidia, Khameer; Machando, Debra; Crooks, Megan; Mangezi, Walter; Abas, Melanie; Katz, Craig; Thornicroft, Graham; Semrau, Maya; Jack, Helen

    2016-01-01

    .... We conducted 30 semi-structured interviews with leaders in health and mental health in Zimbabwe to explore key stakeholder perceptions on the challenges and opportunities of the country's mental health system...

  13. Chronic Childhood Trauma, Mental Health, Academic Achievement, and School-Based Health Center Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Satu; Chapman, Susan; Spetz, Joanne; Brindis, Claire D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Children and adolescents exposed to chronic trauma have a greater risk for mental health disorders and school failure. Children and adolescents of minority racial/ethnic groups and those living in poverty are at greater risk of exposure to trauma and less likely to have access to mental health services. School-based health centers…

  14. Mental Health and Social Networks After Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Richard A; Gallagher, H Colin; Gibbs, Lisa; Pattison, Philippa; MacDougall, Colin; Harms, Louise; Block, Karen; Baker, Elyse; Sinnott, Vikki; Ireton, Greg; Richardson, John; Forbes, David; Lusher, Dean

    2017-03-01

    Although disasters are a major cause of mental health problems and typically affect large numbers of people and communities, little is known about how social structures affect mental health after a disaster. The authors assessed the extent to which mental health outcomes after disaster are associated with social network structures. In a community-based cohort study of survivors of a major bushfire disaster, participants (N=558) were assessed for probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and probable depression. Social networks were assessed by asking participants to nominate people with whom they felt personally close. These nominations were used to construct a social network map that showed each participant's ties to other participants they nominated and also to other participants who nominated them. This map was then analyzed for prevailing patterns of mental health outcomes. Depression risk was higher for participants who reported fewer social connections, were connected to other depressed people, or were connected to people who had left their community. PTSD risk was higher if fewer people reported being connected with the participant, if those who felt close to the participant had higher levels of property loss, or if the participant was linked to others who were themselves not interconnected. Interestingly, being connected to other people who in turn were reciprocally close to each other was associated with a lower risk of PTSD. These findings provide the first evidence of disorder-specific patterns in relation to one's social connections after disaster. Depression appears to co-occur in linked individuals, whereas PTSD risk is increased with social fragmentation. These patterns underscore the need to adopt a sociocentric perspective of postdisaster mental health in order to better understand the potential for societal interventions in the wake of disaster.

  15. Psychological Benefits of Aerobic Running: Implications for Mental Health Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, J. Scott

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the effect of aerobic running on psychological functioning and its adjunctive use in mental health counseling. Concludes that mental health counselors can provide more comprehensive services if they expand the psychoeducational model to include physiological parameters such as aerobic running that are associated with optimum mental…

  16. Managing psychiatric emergencies in persons with mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Managing psychiatric emergencies in persons with mental health issues at a primary care clinic. Rabi Ilemona Ekore. Abstract. Background: Psychiatric emergencies are commonly encountered by the emergency room team where non-mental health specialists are often the first care providers. Materials and Methods: The ...

  17. Teachers' perspectives of mental health needs in Nigerian schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The school environment was recognised as an ideal place for dealing with child mental health issues despite deficiencies in teachers' knowledge, skills and resources. A school mental health programme that would provide training for teachers and awareness campaigns as well as human, material and financial resources ...

  18. Patient aggression in clinical psychiatry: perceptions of mental health nurses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, E.J.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Steenhuis, I.H.; Oud, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    Mental health nurses are faced with an increasing number of aggressive incidents during their daily practice. The coercive intervention of seclusion is often used to manage patient aggression in the Netherlands. However, GGZ Nederland, the Dutch association of service providers for mental health and

  19. Patient aggression in clinical psychiatry: Perceptions of mental health nurses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, E.J.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Steenhuis, I.H.M.; Oud, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    Mental health nurses are faced with an increasing number of aggressive incidents during their daily practice. The coercive intervention of seclusion is often used to manage patient aggression in the Netherlands. However, GGZ Nederland, the Dutch association of service providers for mental health and

  20. Human Trafficking: A Review for Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushko, Oksana

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a review of current research on human trafficking for mental health practitioners and scholars. In addition to an overview of definitions, causes and processes of trafficking, the article highlights mental health consequences of trafficking along with suggestions for treatment of survivors. Directions for counseling services,…

  1. Mental health and wellbeing: focus on men's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Sarah; Robertson, Steve

    2016-11-24

    All nurses have a responsibility to ensure that they actively promote both mental and physical health and wellbeing. This article aims to bring together current thinking and evidence about nursing and men's mental health promotion. Key areas of concern outlined are the high rate of suicide in men, the expression of depression in men and the problems of masculinity when related to seeking help for mental health. The article highlights the importance of language and the normalising of distressing feelings when working with men and suggests that nurses need to recognise how men can experience depression differently, actively identify and address suicidal thinking, and provide gender-sensitive interventions. Additionally, nurses working with men need to demonstrate 'male-positive' values and offer future-focused and action-oriented interventions (such as solution-focused, coaching or cognitive behavioural therapy approaches) that contribute to a sense of agency, promote hope and are more engaging for many men.

  2. Mental Health under National Health Care Reform: The Empirical Foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Christopher G.; DeVito, Jo Anne

    1994-01-01

    Reviews research pertinent to mental health services under health care reform proposals. Examines redistributional impact of inclusion of outpatient mental health benefits, optimal benefit packages, and findings that mental health services lower medical utilization costs. Argues that extending minimalist model of time-limited benefits to national…

  3. Spiritual assessment in mental health recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomi, Sachiko; Starnino, Vincent R; Canda, Edward R

    2014-05-01

    Mental health recovery-oriented and strengths model proponents recognize spirituality to be a key aspect of the recovery process. In order to incorporate spirituality in practice, practitioners need to know how to conduct spiritual assessment effectively. Although implicit and explicit spiritual assessment approaches have been identified as useful frameworks for conducting spiritual assessment, there is a gap in knowledge about what constitutes effective approaches and questions for addressing spirituality in the lives of people with psychiatric disabilities. To address this gap, focus group interviews were conducted with providers and consumers of mental health services in order to develop practical guidance for spiritual assessment. Focus group participants provided feedback about a list of sample spiritual assessment questions and then suggested principles and questions for practitioners to use. Collective insights from the focus groups formed the basis for recommendations for spiritual assessment.

  4. Existing public health surveillance systems for mental health in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Wei; Xiao, Shuiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Mental health is a challenging public health issue worldwide and surveillance is crucial for it. However, mental health surveillance has not been developed until recently in certain developed countries; many other countries, especially developing countries, have poor or even no health information systems. This paper presents surveillance related to mental health in China, a developing country with a large population of patients with mental disorders. Detailed information of seven relevant sur...

  5. Mental health service users' experiences of mental health care: an integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, D; O'Reilly, P; Lee, S H; Kennedy, C

    2015-04-01

    A number of studies have highlighted issues around the relationship between service users and providers. The recovery model is predominant in mental health as is the recognition of the importance of person-centred practice. The authors completed an in-depth search of the literature to answer the question: What are service users' experiences of the mental health service? Three key themes emerged: acknowledging a mental health problem and seeking help; building relationships through participation in care; and working towards continuity of care. The review adds to the current body of knowledge by providing greater detail into the importance of relationships between service users and providers and how these may impact on the delivery of care in the mental health service. The overarching theme that emerged was the importance of the relationship between the service user and provider as a basis for interaction and support. This review has specific implications for mental health nursing. Despite the recognition made in policy documents for change, issues with stigma, poor attitudes and communication persist. There is a need for a fundamental shift in the provider-service user relationship to facilitate true service-user engagement in their care. The aim of this integrative literature review was to identify mental health service users' experiences of services. The rationale for this review was based on the growing emphasis and requirements for health services to deliver care and support, which recognizes the preferences of individuals. Contemporary models of mental health care strive to promote inclusion and empowerment. This review seeks to add to our current understanding of how service users experience care and support in order to determine to what extent the principles of contemporary models of mental health care are embedded in practice. A robust search of Web of Science, the Cochrane Database, Science Direct, EBSCO host (Academic Search Complete, MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus

  6. Redesigning community mental health services for urban children: Supporting schooling to promote mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Marc S; Shernoff, Elisa S; Frazier, Stacy L; Schoenwald, Sonja K; Cappella, Elise; Marinez-Lora, Ane; Mehta, Tara G; Lakind, Davielle; Cua, Grace; Bhaumik, Runa; Bhaumik, Dulal

    2015-10-01

    This study examined a school- and home-based mental health service model, Links to Learning, focused on empirical predictors of learning as primary goals for services in high-poverty urban communities. Teacher key opinion leaders were identified through sociometric surveys and trained, with mental health providers and parent advocates, on evidence-based practices to enhance children's learning. Teacher key opinion leaders and mental health providers cofacilitated professional development sessions for classroom teachers to disseminate 2 universal (Good Behavior Game, peer-assisted learning) and 2 targeted (Good News Notes, Daily Report Card) interventions. Group-based and home-based family education and support were delivered by mental health providers and parent advocates for children in kindergarten through 4th grade diagnosed with 1 or more disruptive behavior disorders. Services were Medicaid-funded through 4 social service agencies (N = 17 providers) in 7 schools (N = 136 teachers, 171 children) in a 2 (Links to Learning vs. services as usual) × 6 (pre- and posttests for 3 years) longitudinal design with random assignment of schools to conditions. Services as usual consisted of supported referral to a nearby social service agency. Mixed effects regression models indicated significant positive effects of Links to Learning on mental health service use, classroom observations of academic engagement, teacher report of academic competence and social skills, and parent report of social skills. Nonsignificant between-groups effects were found on teacher and parent report of problem behaviors, daily hassles, and curriculum-based measures. Effects were strongest for young children, girls, and children with fewer symptoms. Community mental health services targeting empirical predictors of learning can improve school and home behavior for children living in high-poverty urban communities. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Greek adolescents' views of people with mental illness through drawings: mental health education's impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellari, Evanthia; Lehtonen, Kimmo; Sourander, Andre; Kalokerinou-Anagnostopoulou, Athena; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2014-09-01

    People with mental illness are among the most stigmatized and discriminated against as a result of lack of knowledge among the public. Our study explored adolescents' perceptions of people with mental illness through drawings, described these perceptions, and tested the possible changes in perceptions after an educational mental health intervention. Drawings were collected before and after an educational mental health intervention from 59 Greek secondary school students. One group of participants served as the experimental group and received the educational mental health intervention. Content analysis of the drawings was used to analyze data. The drawings provided a clear understanding of adolescents' perceptions towards people with mental illness. After the educational mental health intervention the negative elements presenting the people with mental illness were less among the experimental group, while the drawings among the comparison group did not change. The findings support that educational mental health intervention can have a positive impact on adolescents' perceptions towards people with mental illness. Health professionals can use the findings of our study in order to develop and implement similar interventions. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Relationship between mental health and marital satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Abdolsattar Shahi; Ibrahim Ghaffari; Khalil Ghasemi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Marital satisfaction is an important component of the marriage. Mental health as a component of the personal characteristic also related with marital satisfaction. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between mental health and marital satisfaction of couples.Methods: Three hundred couples from high-risk area of Gorgan – North of Iran were selected. Association between men's and women’s mental health level was measured using General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-...

  9. The need for a behavioural science focus in research on mental health and mental disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Knappe, Susanne; Andersson, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    help to depict the advances needed to inform future research agendas specifically on mental health and mental disorders. From an integrative psychological perspective, most maladaptive health behaviours and mental disorders can be conceptualized as the result of developmental dysfunctions......Psychology as a science offers an enormous diversity of theories, principles, and methodological approaches to understand mental health, abnormal functions and behaviours and mental disorders. A selected overview of the scope, current topics as well as strength and gaps in Psychological Science may......-longitudinal studies. This model provides a conceptual framework to identify how individual vulnerabilities interact with environment over time, and promote critical behaviours that might act as proximal risk factors for ill-health and mental disorders. Within the models framework, such improved knowledge is also...

  10. Mental health in Zimbabwe: a health systems analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidia, Khameer; Machando, Debra; Mangezi, Walter; Hendler, Reuben; Crooks, Megan; Abas, Melanie; Chibanda, Dixon; Thornicroft, Graham; Semrau, Maya; Jack, Helen

    2017-11-01

    There has been little external analysis of Zimbabwe's mental health system. We did a systems analysis to identify bottlenecks and opportunities for mental health service improvement in Zimbabwe and to generate cost-effective, policy-relevant solutions. We combined in-depth interviews with a range of key stakeholders in health and mental health, analysis of mental health laws and policies, and publicly available data about mental health. Five themes are key to mental health service delivery in Zimbabwe: policy and law; financing and resources; criminal justice; workforce, training, and research; and beliefs about mental illness. We identified human resources, rehabilitation facilities, psychotropic medication, and community mental health as funding priorities. Moreover, we found that researchers should prioritise measuring the economic impact of mental health and exploring substance use, forensic care, and mental health integration. Our study highlights forensic services as a central component of the mental health system, which has been a neglected concept. We also describe a tailored process for mental health systems that is transferable to other low-income settings and that garners political will, builds capacity, and raises the profile of mental health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mental Health of Young Refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Teena M; Durand, Simone C

    2015-12-01

    Children and adolescents exposed to violence and upheaval of war and relocation are at high risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Rates of PTSD among refugee children may exceed 50%. Additional stressors encountered while adjusting to host cultures add another layer of difficulty. Most refugee children struggling with symptoms of PTSD or depression are never linked with appropriate mental health care resources. Psychiatric nurses can serve a critical function in the identification and treatment of refugee children experiencing PTSD and depression. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Using health psychology to help patients: common mental health disorders and psychological distress

    OpenAIRE

    Barley, Elizabeth; Lawson, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of how health psychology can be used by nurses to help patients experiencing common mental health problems and psychological distress. Mental health problems are common and are associated with poor outcomes, especially for patients with comorbid physical health conditions. Mental health problems are associated with unhealthy behaviours such as smoking, physical inactivity, overeating and excessive alcohol use, which will result in poorer outcomes for patients...

  13. Integrating mental health into primary care: a global perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Funk, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    ... for mental disorders is enormous 4. Primary care for mental health enhances access 5. Primary care for mental health promotes respect of human rights 6. Primary care for mental health is affordab...

  14. Mental health literacy survey of non-mental health professionals in six general hospitals in Hunan Province of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiuxia; Luo, Xiaoyang; Chen, Shubao; Qi, Chang; Long, Jiang; Xiong, Yifan; Liao, Yanhui; Liu, Tieqiao

    2017-01-01

    Mental illness has brought great economic burden related to misdiagnosis by non-mental health professionals in general hospitals. The aim of this study was to explore non-mental health professionals' conceptions related to the identification of mental illness and perceived treatments, first aid and prognosis. In 2014-2015, we presented 1123 non-mental health professionals from six general hospitals in Hunan Province with one of three vignettes describing a person with schizophrenia, depression, or generalized anxiety disorder. Identification rates, beliefs about various interventions, best methods, and the prognosis with or without treatment were measured. Less than 60% of the non-mental health professionals could identify the mental disorders correctly. Psychiatrists and psychologists were considered to be the people who would be most helpful in all vignettes. Over 70% of participants identified the correct medication for each vignette. Participants gave higher ratings to lifestyle interventions than to psychological and medical interventions, especially in the depression and generalized anxiety disorder vignettes. For the question about how the person could best be helped, about half of the participants rated listening or talking with the person more highly than accompanying the person to professional help or encouraging the person to visit a psychiatrist or psychologist. Participants believed that, with professional help, the people in the vignettes would fully recover but that problems would probably reoccur and that, without professional help, the people described would get worse. The beliefs that non-mental health professionals hold about mental disorders are inadequate to provide appropriate help. There is an urgent need for mental health education campaigns to improve non-mental health professionals' mental health knowledge in mainland China in order to provide better support for mental health service users.

  15. Is this normal? Assessing mental health in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGorry, Patrick D; Goldstone, Sherilyn

    2011-03-01

    Mental ill-health is a key health issue facing young Australians today. While the physical health of young people has improved in recent decades, their mental health appears to have worsened. Mental health and substance use disorders now account for over 50% of the burden of disease in the 15-25 years age group, and 75% of mental health disorders that will affect people across the lifespan will have emerged for the first time by the age of 25 years. This article provides the general practitioner with key factors in assessing the young person with a mental illness: when to worry and what the early stages of mental illness look like; and provides guidance and tips for effective treatment. Mental ill-health in young people is all too often accepted as a 'normal' feature of adolescence. However, the short and long term consequences of mental illness include impaired social functioning, poor educational achievement, substance abuse, self harm, suicide and violence. Distinguishing between what represents transitory and normative changes in behaviour and disturbances that may represent the early signs of the onset of a potentially serious mental illness is difficult, particularly in young people, where emotional disturbance and distress is such a common experience. The primary goal of initial assessment is not to make a definitive diagnosis but rather to assess risk and the need for clinical care. The GP has an important role to play in longitudinal assessment and ongoing review, and facilitating access to treatment and mobilising support networks.

  16. Acute mental health care according to recent mental health legislation. Part III. Structuring space for acute mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse van Rensburg, A; Janse van Rensburg, A B R

    2011-05-01

    This is the third of three reports on the follow-up review of mental health care at Helen Joseph Hospital (HJH). The study reviewed existing South African standards for mental health care facilities. Architectural principles and implications for the use of space were deducted from recent legislation. Objectives were to evaluate the use of space in the existing physical facilities, to identify appropriate architectural solutions considering identified human rights requirements and to provide provisional cost estimates to align the unit towards its designated functions. Personal interviews were conducted. An on-site assessment and survey was made of existing and potential new spaces. Spatial requirements for implementing the Mental Health Act, No. 17 of 2002 (MHCA) were explored. Principles for spatial design of acute facilities include that: - spaces should communicate clear individual identity; - space should be segregated into zones according to user functionality and privacy; - communal leisure spaces should open into safe contained outdoor spaces; - circulation routes should preferably be circular; - sufficient visual connection should exist between circulation space and group activities; and - open lines of sight should be provided to all access points. The potential options for extension included: - an extensive unused single storey structural shell for a potential office wing on the same floor; - a huge vacant double volume space which could be accessed across the existing flat roof for potential occupational therapy activities; and - the existing roof area could be altered and secured to become an adequate outside leisure and garden area. A proposed concept design in two phases - based on these principles - was submitted to hospital and provincial management. To implement the MHCA without violating the human rights of mental health care users at HJH will require specific adjustment and extension of the current use of space at HJH.

  17. Disparities in mental health care provision to immigrants with severe mental illness in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucci, P; Piazza, A; Perrone, E; Tarricone, I; Maisto, R; Donegani, I; Spigonardo, V; Berardi, D; Fantini, M P; Fioritti, A

    2015-08-01

    To determine whether disparities exist in mental health care provision to immigrants and Italian citizens with severe mental illness in Bologna, Italy. Records of prevalent cases on 31/12/2010 with severe mental illness and ≥1 contact with Community Mental Health Centers in 2011 were extracted from the mental health information system. Logistic and Poisson regressions were carried out to estimate the probability of receiving rehabilitation, residential or inpatient care, the intensity of outpatient treatments and the duration of hospitalisations and residential care for immigrant patients compared to Italians, adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates. The study population included 8602 Italian and 388 immigrant patients. Immigrants were significantly younger, more likely to be married and living with people other than their original family and had a shorter duration of contact with mental health services. The percentages of patients receiving psychosocial rehabilitation, admitted to hospital wards or to residential facilities were similar between Italians and immigrants. The number of interventions was higher for Italians. Admissions to acute wards or residential facilities were significantly longer for Italians. Moreover, immigrants received significantly more group rehabilitation interventions, while more social support individual interventions were provided to Italians. The probability of receiving any mental health intervention is similar between immigrants and Italians, but the number of interventions and the duration of admissions are lower for immigrants. Data from mental health information system should be integrated with qualitative data on unmet needs from the immigrants' perspective to inform mental health care programmes and policies.

  18. Mental health spending by private insurance: implications for the mental health parity and addiction equity act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Tami L; Vandivort-Warren, Rita; Miller, Kay

    2012-04-01

    The study developed information on behavioral health spending and utilization that can be used to anticipate, evaluate, and interpret changes in health care spending following implementation of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA). Data were from the Thomson Reuters' MarketScan database of insurance claims between 2001 and 2009 from large group health plans sponsored by self-insured employers. Annual rates in growth of total health spending and behavioral health spending and the contribution of behavioral health spending to growth in spending for all diseases were determined. Separate analyses examined behavioral health and total health spending by 135 employers in 2008 and 2009, and simulations were conducted to determine how increases in use of mental health services after implementation of parity would affect overall health care expenditures. Across the nine years examined, behavioral health expenditures contributed .3%, on average, to the total rate of growth in all health expenditures, a contribution that fell to .1%, on average, when prescription drugs were excluded. About 2% of employers experienced an increased contribution by behavioral health spending of more than 1%. More than 90% of enrollees used well below the maximum 30 inpatient days or outpatient visits typical of health insurance plans before parity. Simulations indicated that even large increases in utilization would increase total health care expenditures by less than 1%. The MHPAEA is unlikely to have a large effect on the growth rate of employers' health care expenditures. The data provide baseline information to further evaluate the implementation effect of the MHPAEA.

  19. The meaning of mental health recovery for consumers, carers and nurses: a phenomenological exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, Sini

    2017-01-01

    Mental health recovery is a prominent topic of discussion in western mental health settings. The concept and application of mental health recovery has been perceived as a guiding vision for many mental health services. However, there is an absence of input on mental health recovery from stakeholders such as carers and family members, service providers and policy makers globally, and a paucity of literature within the Australian context. The overall aim of this study was to explore the meaning...

  20. The role of religious advisors in mental health care in the World Mental Health surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovess-Masfety, Vivianne; Evans-Lacko, Sara; Williams, David; Andrade, Laura Helena; Benjet, Corina; Ten Have, Margreet; Wardenaar, Klaas; Karam, Elie G; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Abdumalik, Jibril; Haro Abad, Josep Maria; Florescu, Silvia; Wu, Benjamin; De Jonge, Peter; Altwaijri, Yasmina; Hinkov, Hristo; Kawakami, Norito; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Bromet, Evelyn; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Posada-Villa, José; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Huang, Yueqin; Hu, Chiyi; Viana, Maria Carmen; Fayyad, John; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Demyttenaere, Koen; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Murphy, Samuel; Xavier, Miguel; Takeshima, Tadashi; Gureje, Oye

    2017-03-01

    To examine the role of religious advisors in mental health care (MHC) according to disorder severity, socio-demographics, religious involvement and country income groups. Face to face household surveys in ten high income (HI), six upper-middle income (UMI) and five low/lower-middle (LLMI) income countries totalling 101,258 adults interviewed with the WMH CIDI plus questions on use of care for mental health problems and religiosity. 1.1% of participants turned to religious providers for MHC in the past year. Among those using services, 12.3% used religious services; as much as 30% in some LLMI countries, around 20% in some UMI; in the HI income countries USA, Germany, Italy and Japan are between 15 and 10% whenever the remaining countries are much lower. In LLMI 20.9% used religious advisors for the most severe mental disorders compared to 12.3 in UMI and 9.5% in HI. For severe cases most of religious providers use occurred together with formal care except in Nigeria, Iraq and Ukraine where, respectively, 41.6, 25.7 and 17.7% of such services are outside any formal care. Frequency of attendance at religious services was a strong predictor of religious provider usage OR 6.5 for those who attended over once a week (p mental health care and require appropriate training and collaboration with formal mental healthcare systems. Religious attitudes are strong predictors of religious advisors usage.

  1. Stigma Barriers of Mental Health in Iran: A Qualitative Study by Stakeholders of Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghva, Arsia; Farsi, Zahra; Javanmard, Yavar; Atashi, Afsaneh; Hajebi, Ahmad; Khademi, Mojgan

    2017-07-01

    Objective: Many people who access mental health services usually do not seek treatment to avoid the consequences of stigma and label of mental illness. Thus, determining each aspect related to stigma reduction barriers seems necessary. This qualitative study was conducted to investigate stigma reduction barriers towards mental disorders in Iran. Method: In this study that was conducted from 2013 to 2015, content analysis was used and all stakeholders were selected by purposive sampling technique. All data were obtained through 16 individual interviews, 2 focus groups, and 6 written narratives. The data were collected, coded, and analyzed accordingly. Results: The major themes were as follow: The universality of stigma, beliefs, attitudes and lack of awareness, mental health providers and other specialists, cultural barriers, structures and policymakers, and insufficient financial resources. Conclusion: It is necessarily to identify the barriers of stigma reduction programs in Iran to increase the quality of life of patients with mental disorders. In the present study, due to the presence of mental health stakeholders, the main barriers were obtained.

  2. Conceptions of mental illness: attitudes of mental health professionals and the general public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Jennifer P; Rocha, Anita; Christian, Ann; Link, Bruce G

    2014-04-01

    The authors compared attitudes of the U.S. general public and of mental health professionals about the competence and perceived dangerousness of people with mental health problems and the desire for social distance from them. Factors related to negative attitudes and the desire for social distance also were examined. Vignettes describing individuals meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depression and schizophrenia were included in the 2006 General Social Survey (GSS) and a 2009 study of mental health professionals, and responses were descriptively compared (GSS, N=397 responses to depression vignette, N=373 responses to schizophrenia vignette; 731 mental health professionals responded to both vignettes). Regression analyses examined whether demographic and provider characteristics were associated with perceptions of less competence and perceived dangerousness of the vignette character and with respondents' desire for social distance. Compared with the American public, mental health professionals had significantly more positive attitudes toward people with mental health problems. However, some providers' conceptions about the dangerousness of people with schizophrenia and provider desire for social distance from clients in work and personal situations were concerning. Younger age, self-identifying as non-Hispanic white, being female, having at least a four-year college degree, being familiar with mental illness, and certain job titles and more years of experience in the mental health field were predictive of more positive conceptions. Although mental health professionals held more positive attitudes than the general public about people with mental health problems, strong stereotypes persisted in both groups, especially concerning schizophrenia. This study identified several demographic and provider characteristics that can inform intervention strategies in both groups.

  3. Empirical evidence about recovery and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Mike; Longden, Eleanor

    2015-11-14

    Two discourses exist in mental health research and practice. The first focuses on the limitations associated with disability arising from mental disorder. The second focuses on the possibilities for living well with mental health problems. This article was prompted by a review to inform disability policy. We identify seven findings from this review: recovery is best judged by experts or using standardised assessment; few people with mental health problems recover; if a person no longer meets criteria for a mental illness, they are in remission; diagnosis is a robust basis for characterising groups and predicting need; treatment and other supports are important factors for improving outcome; the barriers to receiving effective treatment are availability, financing and client awareness; and the impact of mental illness, in particular schizophrenia, is entirely negative. We selectively review a wider range of evidence which challenge these findings, including the changing understanding of recovery, national mental health policies, systematic review methodology and undertainty, epidemiological evidence about recovery rates, reasoning biased due to assumptions about mental illness being an illness like any other, the contested nature of schizophrenia, the social construction of diagnoses, alternative explanations for psychosis experiences including the role of trauma, diagnostic over-shadowing, stigma, the technological paradigm, the treatment gap, social determinants of mental ill-health, the prevalence of voice-hearing in the general population, and the sometimes positive impact of psychosis experience in relation to perspective and purpose. We propose an alternative seven messages which are both empirically defensible and more helpful to mental health stakeholders: Recovery is best judged by the person living with the experience; Many people with mental health problems recover; If a person no longer meets criteria for a mental illness, they are not ill; Diagnosis is

  4. Insurance status, use of mental health services, and unmet need for mental health care in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Elizabeth Reisinger; Cummings, Janet R.; Hockenberry, Jason M.; Druss, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to provide updated national estimates and correlates of service use, unmet need, and barriers to mental health treatment among adults with mental disorders. Method The sample included 36,647 adults aged 18–64 years (9723 with any mental illness and 2608 with serious mental illness) from the 2011 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Logistic regression models were used to examine predictors of mental health treatment and perceived unmet need. Results Substantial numbers of adults with mental illness did not receive treatment (any mental illness: 62%; serious mental illness: 41%) and perceived an unmet need for treatment (any mental illness: 21%; serious mental illness: 41%). Having health insurance was a strong correlate of mental health treatment use (any mental illness: private insurance: AOR=1.63 (95% CI=1.29–2.06), Medicaid: AOR=2.66, (95% CI=2.04–3.46); serious mental illness: private insurance: AOR=1.65 (95% CI=1.12–2.45), Medicaid: AOR=3.37 (95% CI=2.02–5.61)) and of reduced perceived unmet need (any mental illness: private insurance: AOR=.78 (95% CI:.65–.95), Medicaid: AOR=.70 (95% CI=.54–.92)). Among adults with any mental illness and perceived unmet need, 72% reported at least one structural barrier and 47% reported at least one attitudinal barrier. Compared to respondents with insurance, uninsured individuals reported significantly more structural barriers and fewer attitudinal barriers. Conclusions Low rates of treatment and high unmet need persist among adults with mental illness. Strategies to reduce both structural barriers, such as cost and insurance coverage, and attitudinal barriers are needed. PMID:25726980

  5. Factors for success in mental health advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, Katrina; Pearson, Heather; Campbell, Doris; Sesay, Daniel; Eaton, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Background Mental health advocacy groups are an effective way of pushing the mental health agenda and putting pressure on national governments to observe the right to health; however, there is limited research that highlights best practices for such groups in low-resource settings. In an effort to improve the scaling up of mental health in Sierra Leone, stakeholders came together to form the country's first mental health advocacy group: the Mental Health Coalition – Sierra Leone. Since its inception, the group has worked towards raising the profile of mental health in Sierra Leone and developing as an advocacy organisation. Design The study's aim was to investigate views on enabling factors and barriers associated with mental health advocacy in a low-income country using a community-based participatory approach and qualitative methodology. Focus groups (N=9) were held with mental health stakeholders, and key informant interviews (N=15) were conducted with advocacy targets. Investigators analysed the data collaboratively using coding techniques informed by grounded theory. Results Investigators reveal viewpoints on key factors in networking, interacting with government actors, and awareness raising that enabled mental health advocacy aims of supporting policy, service delivery, service user rights, training for service delivery, and awareness raising. The investigators outline viewpoints on barriers for advocacy aims in framing the issue of mental health, networking, interacting with government actors, resource mobilization, and awareness raising. Conclusions The findings outline enabling factors, such as networking with key stakeholders, and barriers, such as lack of political will, for achieving mental health advocacy aims within a low-resource setting, Sierra Leone. Stakeholder coalitions can further key policy development aims that are essential to strengthen mental health systems in low-resource settings. PMID:26689456

  6. What characterizes persons with poor mental health?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Illemann; Davidsen, Michael; Kjøller, Mette

    2014-01-01

    analysed by means of logistic regression models. Results: Men and women with poor mental health are characterized by being single, having a long-term illness, not being able to rely on help from others in case of illness and by feeling that family and friends demand too much of them. Men with poor mental......Background: The aim of the study was to identify and characterize groups with poor mental health defined by the SF-12 Mental Component Summary (MCS-12) scale. Methods: The study is based on the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2005 and includes 10,082 participants (16 years or older). Data were...... health were further characterized by being a heavy smoker, and having a BMI below 25. Women with poor mental health were further characterized by being 16-44 years old and sedentary in leisure time. CONCLUSIONS THE PREVALENCE OF POOR MENTAL HEALTH IS HIGHER AMONG WOMEN THAN MEN, AND DIFFERENT FACTORS...

  7. The Unknown Role of Mental Health in Global Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the author contrasts the substantial impact of mental health problems on global disability with the limited attention and resources these problems receive. The author discusses possible reasons for the disparity: Compared to physical disorders, mental health problems are considered less important, perhaps due to lower priority of disorders that primarily cause dysfunction rather than mortality, and skepticism that mental disorders are treatable in low-resource countries. He argues that achieving improved global health and development requires addressing problems causing disability, particularly mental health problems among populations in which the common mental disorders are frequent due to deprivation, war, and disasters. The author contends that services addressing the common mental disorders could be made widely and relatively cheaply accessible if provided by non-professional workers at the community level. PMID:25191140

  8. Gaming well: links between videogames and flourishing mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christian M; Scholes, Laura; Johnson, Daniel; Katsikitis, Mary; Carras, Michelle C

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a review of the state of play of research linking videogaming and flourishing, and explores the role of videogames and technology to improve mental health and well-being. Its purpose is to develop understandings about the positive intersection of gaming and well-being, to document evidence regarding links between videogames and positive mental health, and to provide guidelines for use by other researchers as they design and use tools and games to improve mental health and well-being. Using Huppert's (Huppert and So, 2013) proposition that to flourish is more than the absence of mental disorder but rather a combination of feeling good and functioning effectively, resulting in high levels of mental well-being, and Seligman's (Seligman, 2011) PERMA theory of well-being, the paper identifies strengths in existing games that generate positive affect, positive functioning, and positive social functioning, contributing to, and supporting mental health and well-being.

  9. Bridging two worlds: Māori mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Denise; Baker, Maria

    2012-08-01

    Building an Indigenous mental health workforce is a strategy used to develop culturally responsive and effective mental health services in New Zealand. However, researchers know little about Indigenous (Māori) mental health nursing. We undertook a Māori-centered methodology and grounded theory using focus groups to collect data from 10 Māori mental health nurses. We then analyzed the data using constant comparative analysis and theoretical sampling until saturation of the core category and subcategories emerged. "Bridging two worlds," together with two subcategories, "going beyond" and "practicing differently," explains the process Māori mental health nurses used to resolve the tensions they encountered working in the worlds of mainstream and Māori health services. This research provides insight into the tensions Indigenous and minority nurses experience when attempting to integrate cultural perspectives and practices to meet the needs of their patients.

  10. Transformational leadership and the mental health team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Patrick W; Diwan, Sarah; Campion, John; Rashid, Fadwa

    2002-11-01

    Bass's (1990) multifactor model contrasts transformational and transactional styles of leadership with an essentially ineffective style: laissez-faire leadership. This study examines the relationship between these leadership styles and measures of organizational culture and staff burnout in mental health services teams. There were 236 leaders and 620 subordinates from 54 mental health teams who provided their perceptions of leadership style, organizational culture, and burnout in their program. Results show transformational leadership to be positively associated with a cohesive organizational culture and negatively associated with burnout. Moreover, leaders and subordinates differ in their ratings of transformational leadership-leaders viewed themselves more positively. These findings are helpful for understanding the central role of leaders in the organizational structure of teams.

  11. A legal "right" to mental health care? Impediments to a global vision of mental health care access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover-Thomas, N; Chima, S C

    2015-12-01

    Mental health law across many jurisdictions provides a legal framework for the compulsory detention and, where appropriate, treatment in hospital of people with mental health problems. Latent within many of these "systems" of mental health provision is the concern that the quality of care people receive does not always meet legal and ethical norms. For many, there remains the very serious recognition that access to mental health care in its entirety remains elusive. International human rights discourse has influenced the shaping of modern mental health laws in many developed countries. In 2008, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) entered into force. For many countries, such as South Africa, the CRPD provides a human rights instrument with the scope to establish a worldwide means of bolstering human rights. This paper examines both the UK and the broader African position with regard to the extent redress can be sought if and when an individual does not receive the care and treatment needed. Within this, consideration will be given to one of the paradoxes of mental health care which bedevil mental health systems: How do legal frameworks for detaining and treating people without their consent work when there is no corresponding enforceable right that appropriate treatment or suitable conditions of detention must be provided. The focus of this paper is the question of whether there is indeed a legal "right" to mental health care.

  12. Mental health: the current situation and trends

    OpenAIRE

    Prieto Rodríguez, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Information regarding the mental health situation, both at global and national levels, is updated. In the first place, the basic concepts and problems regarding mental health are presented. The burden of disease is also presented, bearing in mind that in developed countries deeper depression occupies second place and in developing countries comes fourth. On the other hand, depressive disorders represent 17% of DALYs. The mental health situation in Colombia is also presented, including its epi...

  13. Promoting mental health and preventing mental illness in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, S.; Jenkins, R.; Burch, T.; Nasir, L.C.; Fisher, B.; Giotaki, G.; Gnani, S.; Hertel, L.; Marks, M.; Mathers, N.; Millington-Sanders, C.; Morris, D.; Ruprah-Shah, B.; Stange, K.; Thomas, P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This paper calls for the routine integration of mental health promotion and prevention into UK General Practice in order to reduce the burden of mental and physical disorders and the ensuing pressure on General Practice. The proposals & the resulting document (https://ethicscharity.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/rcgp_keymsg_150925_v5.pdf) arise from an expert ?Think Tank? convened by the London Journal of Primary Care, Educational Trust for Health Improvement through Cognitive Strategie...

  14. Promoting Mental Health and Preventing Mental Illness in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Steve; Jenkins, Rachel; Burch, Tony; Calamos Nasir, Laura; Fisher, Brian; Giotaki, Gina; Gnani, Shamini; Hertel, Lise; Marks, Marina; Mathers, Nigel; Millington-Sanders, Catherine; Morris, David; Ruprah-Shah, Baljeet; Stange, Kurt; Thomas, Paul; White, Robert; Wright, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    This paper calls for the routine integration of mental health promotion and prevention into UK General Practice in order to reduce the burden of mental and physical disorders and the ensuing pressure on General Practice. The proposals & the resulting document (https://ethicscharity.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/rcgp_keymsg_150925_v5.pdf) arise from an expert 'Think Tank' convened by the London Journal of Primary Care, Educational Trust for Health Improvement through Cognitive Strategies (ETHICS Foundation) and the Royal College of General Practitioners. It makes 12 recommendations for General Practice: (1) Mental health promotion and prevention are too important to wait. (2) Work with your community to map risk factors, resources and assets. (3) Good health care, medicine and best practice are biopsychosocial rather than purely physical. (4) Integrate mental health promotion and prevention into your daily work. (5) Boost resilience in your community through approaches such as community development. (6) Identify people at increased risk of mental disorder for support and screening. (7) Support early intervention for people of all ages with signs of illness. (8) Maintain your biopsychosocial skills. (9) Ensure good communication, interdisciplinary team working and inter-sectoral working with other staff, teams and agencies. (10) Lead by example, taking action to promote the resilience of the general practice workforce. (11) Ensure mental health is appropriately included in the strategic agenda for your 'cluster' of General Practices, at the Clinical Commissioning Groups, and the Health and Wellbeing Board. (12) Be aware of national mental health strategies and localise them, including action to destigmatise mental illness within the context of community development.

  15. Mental health literacy: focus on developing countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    What Jorm's definition of mental health literacy fails to specify (although perhaps ... This is a non-systematic review of published articles on mental health literacy in the general population and among primary healthcare workers, in .... includes basic reading and numerical skills in health care settings, such as being able to ...

  16. Primary mental health care: Indications and obstacles

    OpenAIRE

    Y.G. Pillay; H. Subedar

    1992-01-01

    This paper considers indications and obstacles for the development of primary mental health care practice in both developed and under-developed countries. Both are considered as this represents the South African reality. While a significant body of literature has documented the need for primary mental health care, the obstacles (especially in terms of the commodification of health) to its fruition are seldom addressed.

  17. An online intervention using information on the mental health-mental illness continuum to reduce stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomerus, G; Angermeyer, M C; Baumeister, S E; Stolzenburg, S; Link, B G; Phelan, J C

    2016-02-01

    A core component of stigma is being set apart as a distinct, dichotomously different kind of person. We examine whether information on a continuum from mental health to mental illness reduces stigma. Online survey experiment in a quota sample matching the German population for age, gender and region (n=1679). Participants randomly received information on either (1) a continuum, (2) a strict dichotomy of mental health and mental illness, or (3) no information. We elicited continuity beliefs and stigma toward a person with schizophrenia or depression. The continuum intervention decreased perceived difference by 0.19 standard deviations (SD, Pmental illness can be improved by providing information on a mental health-mental illness continuum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Mobile health (mHealth) for mental health in Asia: objectives, strategies, and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, Rachel M; Ben-Zeev, Dror

    2014-08-01

    Mobile technologies are transforming the way in which we interact with one another, access resources, find information, and conduct business around the world. Harnessing the capabilities of mobile technologies to support health care initiatives worldwide has developed into a new interdisciplinary field called mobile health (mHealth). In the current paper, we review the penetration of mobile technology in Asia, and consider the integration of mobile technologies into the study, diagnoses, and treatment of mental disorders in the region. We outline how mHealth programs could improve mental health literacy, provide greater access to mental health services, extend community-based outreach and engagement, support self-management of illness, and regulate medication distribution. We end with a consideration of the potential barriers and limitations of mHealth for mental health, including funding, language and literacy barriers, power supply considerations, data security, and privacy issues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxford textbook of women and mental health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kohen, Dora

    2010-01-01

    ... psychiatric disorders, the biological and endocrinological concomitants of mental health, and eating disorders, perinatal psychiatric disorders, and the long term effects of abuse - helping readers...

  20. Health system preparedness for integration of mental health services in rural Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaikolo, Wilfred S; Kohrt, Brandon A; Cooper, Janice L

    2017-07-27

    infrastructure of health facilities at care delivery points; and (3) implementing concurrent interventions designed to improve attitudes towards people with mental illness, their family members and mental health care providers.

  1. Utilization of professional mental health services according to recognition rate of mental health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo Jung; Ju, Young Jun; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2017-04-01

    Despite the positive effect of community-based mental health centers, the utilization of professional mental health services appears to be low. Therefore, we analyzed the relationship between regional recognition of mental health centers and utilization of professional mental health services. We used data from the Community Health Survey (2014) and e-provincial indicators. Only those living in Seoul, who responded that they were either feeling a lot of stress or depression, were included in the study. Multiple logistic regression analysis using generalized estimating equations was performed to examine both individual- and regional-level variables associated with utilization of professional mental health services. Among the 7338 participants who reported depression or stress, 646 (8.8%) had consulted a mental health professional for their symptoms. A higher recognition rate of mental health centers was associated with more utilization of professional mental health services (odds ratio [OR]=1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.03-1.07). Accessibility to professional mental health services could be improved depending on the general population's recognition and attitudes toward mental health centers. Therefore, health policy-makers need to plan appropriate strategies for changing the perception of mental health services and informing the public about both the benefits and functions of mental health centers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Health and Stress Management and Mental-health Disability Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Alain; Haines, Victor Y; Harvey, Steve; Dextras-Gauthier, Julie; Durand, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    This study examines the associations between health and stress management (HSM) practices and mental-health disability claims. Data from the Salveo study was collected during 2009-2012 within 60 workplaces nested in 37 companies located in Canada (Quebec) and insured by a large insurance company. In each company, 1 h interviews were conducted with human resources managers in order to obtain data on 63 HSM practices. Companies and workplaces were sorted into the low-claims and high-claims groups according to the median rate of the population of the insurer's corporate clients. Logistic regression adjusted for design effect and multidimensional scaling was used to analyse the data. After controlling for company size and economic sector, task design, demands control, gratifications, physical activity and work-family balance were associated with low mental-health disability claims rates. Further analyses revealed three company profiles that were qualified as laissez-faire, integrated and partially integrated approaches to HSM. Of the three, the integrated profile was associated with low mental-health disability claims rates. The results of this study provide evidence-based guidance for a better control of mental-health disability claims. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. International collaboration in mental health: Contributions, opportunities, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratap Sharan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Arising from the push for global health, the movement for global mental health has established itself as a distinct identity in the last few decades. Collaboration between donors, international agencies, institutions, and individuals of different countries has been an essential component in this endeavor. Methods: We review relevant reports in the literature that describe the process of collaboration between individuals and institutions in the area of mental health, in order to describe current patterns in international collaboration. Results and Discussion: In the last decade, international collaboration for mental health has increased substantially. Newer international professional associations; centers for global mental health at academic centers in Europe, USA, and Australia; and international health aid agencies have joined more established agencies, to provide platforms for collaboration. A number of priority-setting exercises have been undertaken that have stressed service development for mental health. International consortia for genetics and neuroimaging have demonstrated successful research collaboration. However, barriers to collaboration persist—these include a continuing failure to prioritize mental healthcare at a policy level, as well as difficulties in arriving at a consensus on conceptualization, transcultural issues, and priority-setting for mental health research. Going forward, the challenge for “global mental health” is to establish a framework that recognizes the unique contributions of all stakeholders and emphasizes equitable partnerships, while adapting knowledge across settings and health systems. Such an approach would be essential to achieve the stated aims of this movement.

  4. Chronic Childhood Trauma, Mental Health, Academic Achievement, and School-Based Health Center Mental Health Services

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, S.; Chapman, S; Spetz, J; Brindis, CD

    2017-01-01

    Children and adolescents exposed to chronic trauma have a greater risk for mental health disorders and school failure. Children and adolescents of minority racial/ethnic groups and those living in poverty are at greater risk of exposure to trauma and less likely to have access to mental health services. School-based health centers (SBHCs) may be one strategy to decrease health disparities.Empirical studies between 2003 and 2013 of US pediatric populations and of US SBHCs were included if rese...

  5. Effects of a Program to Improve Mental Health Literacy for Married Immigrant Women in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Jung

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate a mental health improvement program for the acculturative stress and mental health literacy of married immigrant women using bilingual gatekeepers. Bilingual gatekeepers were recruited from multicultural centers and trained to provide 8-week structured mental health improvement services to the women in the experimental group using a mental health improvement guidebook developed by the authors in 8 different languages. The program was effective in improving mental health and mental health literacy scores as well as reducing the degree of acculturative stress. This study offers a model of effective mental healthcare for multicultural communities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Utilization of Health Services in Relation to Mental Health Problems in Adolescents: A Population Based Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Rödje Kjetil; Zachrisson Henrik D; Mykletun Arnstein

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Only a minority of adolescents reporting symptoms above case-levels on screenings for mental health seeks and receives help from specialist health services. The objective of this study was to a) examine help-seeking for symptoms of anxiety and depression in relation to symptom load dimensionally, b) identify the level of specialization in mental health among service-providers, and c) identify associations between mental health problems and contact with different types of h...

  7. Mental health expectancy--the European perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagger, C; Ritchie, K; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    The increase in life expectancy observed over the last decade has particular relevance for mental health conditions of old age, such as dementia. Although mental disorders have been estimated to be responsible for 60% of all disabilities, until recently population health indicators such as health...... expectancies have concentrated on calculating disability-free life expectancy based on physical functioning. In 1994, a European Network for the Calculation of Health Expectancies (Euro-REVES) was established, one of its aims being the development and promotion of mental health expectancies. Such indicators...... may have an important role in monitoring future changes in the mental health of populations and predicting service needs. This article summarizes the proceedings and recommendations of the first European Conference on Mental Health Expectancy....

  8. Chinese students' concept of mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W; Miao, X

    2001-04-01

    This study explored Chinese students' concept of mental health through a questionnaire completed by 999 students from six primary schools, six high schools, and three universities in Shanghai. The results confirmed the expectation that Chinese students' mental health concept would be multifaceted and would reflect psychological, physical, and sociocultural factors. An exploratory factor analysis on 12 mental health items with a subsample extracted a three-factor model, which was cross-validated by confirmatory factor analysis with a different subsample. These three factors were labeled as Affective Strength, Adaptive Strength, and Personal Strength. No gender differences were found. The grade differences supported the notion that Chinese students' concept of mental health seems to be more consistent with the developmental paradigm of health. The senior years in primary school could be the turning point at which children start to conceptualize health as a holistic experience by recognizing the importance of mental health.

  9. Current models of positive mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević Dragana Z.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of positive mental health represents not merely the absence of mental disease but presence of high level of happiness and well-being. In this paper we mentioned shortly the earliest concept of mental health, presented by Marie Jahoda in the mid-twentieth century. After that, we described two traditions in understanding and researching of subjective well-being: hedonic and eudaimonic approach. First approach focuses on investigation of positive affects and happiness as emotional and life satisfaction as cognitive component of subjective well-being. Second tradition emphasizes potentials and competences that person develops to the highest level, in personal and social area. Both psychological and social well-being are core concept of positive mental health psychology, designated together as positive functioning. The psychological well-being comprises six dimensions: self-acceptance, positive relations with others, environmental mastery, autonomy, purpose of life and personal growth. Social well-being consists of five dimensions: social integration, social acceptance, social contribution, social actualization and social coherence. By integrating hedonic and eudaimonic well-being as well as absence of mental disease, Corey Keyes introduced concept of complete mental health. People with complete mental health have reported absence of disease during past year and presence of high level of emotional, psychological and social well-being (flourishing. People with incomplete mental health have also reported absence of mental disease but low level of positive functioning (languishing. Keyes thought there are people with complete and incomplete mental illness; both groups report presence of mental disease, but second group has high level of positive functioning. Models of positive mental health are widely used in research studies as well as in programs for prevention and promotion of mental health. .

  10. Improving Malawian teachers' mental health knowledge and attitudes: an integrated school mental health literacy approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kutcher, S; Gilberds, H.; Morgan, C.; Greene, R.; Hamwaka, K.; Perkins, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Mental health literacy is foundational for mental health promotion, prevention, stigma reduction and care. Integrated school mental health literacy interventions may offer an effective and sustainable approach to enhancing mental health literacy for educators and students globally. Methods. Through a Grand Challenges Canada funded initiative called ?An Integrated Approach to Addressing the Issue of Youth Depression in Malawi and Tanzania?, we culturally adapted a previously demons...

  11. Innovative strategies for closing the mental health treatment gap globally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, Tahilia J; Marques, Andrea; Gureje, Oye; Pike, Kathleen M

    2014-07-01

    In the field of global mental health, an enormous gap between what we know and what we do exists in the delivery of clinical care. Creative and effective strategies that surmount the barriers to provision of mental healthcare are essential to improve the lives of millions affected by mental illness. This article provides a review of three classes of innovative strategies currently being developed and implemented to diminish the mental health treatment gap globally. This review provides recent evidence related to the feasibility of implementation and efficacy for the following three classes of innovation that show promise for building clinical capacity and expanding mental health coverage: integration of mental health services into primary care; expansion of human capacity through task sharing and training of nonspecialists; and innovative use of technological platforms to enhance access, cut costs, and reduce stigma. The strategies outlined in this review hold great potential for enhancing mental health treatment services, and address some of the major barriers globally to accessing mental healthcare, such as scarcity of resources (infrastructure, capacity, and funding) and stigma. Despite much evidence supporting the efficacy of these models, thorough studies that test their feasibility, acceptability, utility, and effectiveness in various contexts, including low-income and middle-income countries, are required. Moreover, these innovations require social support and political will in order to be successfully implemented and scaled-up such that they have a meaningful impact on the burden of disease associated with mental illness worldwide.

  12. Shared decision making in public mental health care: perspectives from consumers living with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woltmann, Emily M; Whitley, Rob

    2010-01-01

    Most theoretical and empirical work regarding decision making in mental health suggests that mental health consumers have better outcomes when their preferences are integrated into quality of life decisions. A wealth of research, however, indicates that providers have difficulty predicting what their clients' priorities are. This study investigates consumer decision-making preferences and understanding of construction of decisions in community mental health. People living with severe mental illness being treated in the public mental health care system (N=16) participated in qualitative interviews regarding case management decision making as a part of a larger study investigating a decision support system to facilitate shared decision making. Interviews were transcribed, coded, and cross-case thematic analyses were conducted. Mental health consumers generally endorse a "shared" style of decision making. When asked what "shared" means, however, consumers describe a two-step process which first prioritizes autonomy, and if that is not possible, defers to case managers' judgment. Consumers also primarily focused on the relationship and affective components of decision making, rather than information-gathering or deliberating on options. Finally, when disagreements arose, consumers primarily indicated they handled them. Mental health consumers may have a different view of decision making than the literature on shared decision making suggests. Mental health consumers may consciously decide to at least verbally defer to their case managers, and remain silent about their preferences or wishes.

  13. Mental Health, Access, and Equity in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper tackles the difficult and often not openly discussed This paper tackles the difficult and often not openly discussed topic of access and equity in higher education for people with mental health difficulties. Recent legislative and policy developments in mental health, disability, anti-discrimination and education mean that all students who disclose a mental health condition can expect fair and equitable treatment. However the findings of an exploratory study at an Australian university reveal that just under two thirds of the 54 students who reported mental health difficulties did not disclose this to staff due to fears of discrimination at university and in future employment. Students who did disclose felt supported when staff displayed a respectful attitude and provided appropriate advice and useful strategies for them to remain engaged in university studies when experiencing mental health difficulties.

  14. Improving mental health service responses to domestic violence and abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevillion, Kylee; Corker, Elizabeth; Capron, Lauren E; Oram, Siân

    2016-10-01

    Domestic violence and abuse is a considerable international public health problem, which is associated with mental disorders in both women and men. Nevertheless, victimization and perpetration remain undetected by mental health services. This paper reviews the evidence on mental health service responses to domestic violence, including identifying, referring, and providing care for people experiencing or perpetrating violence. The review highlights the need for mental health services to improve rates of identification and responses to domestic violence and abuse, through the provision of specific training on domestic violence and abuse, the implementation of clear information sharing protocols and evidence-based interventions, and the establishment of care referral pathways. This review also highlights the need for further research into mental health service users who perpetrate domestic violence and abuse.

  15. Communication problems in Swedish Mental Health reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberg, Jonas

    2005-01-01

    In a study on the implementation of the Swedish Mental Health reform in the county of Gavleborg in Sweden, attention was called, at an early stage, to the need for relevant theories on the nature of the obstacles that slowed down the reform process. Data had initially been gathered from interviews with persons from all levels of the implementation work. A Grounded Theory (GT) study was carried out using these data in order to generate a theory on the nature of the obstacles. Two separate analyses were made, one based on data from experts and decision makers and the other based on data from consumers and staff. Each of these analyses generated a theory with great explanatory and predictive value. In a further analysis, it became possible to merge the theories into an expanded theory with a greater general validity within the entire field of the Swedish Mental Health reform process. The expanded theory states that the psychiatric reform in Sweden is slowed down by obstacles preventing the transfer of information: 1) between staff in the mental health services and staff in the social services; 2) between social services' care givers and consumers. One reason for not removing these obstacles is that they serve an important purpose for those involved, in terms of preserving group identity, which gives them the opportunity to exert influence on their situation and provides room for manoeuvring.

  16. [Financial crisis and mental health in Greece].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giotakos, O; Karabelas, D; Kafkas, A

    2011-01-01

    Several studies indicate an association between economic crises and psychological burden. To investigate the possible impact of the current economic crisis on mental health in Greece, the association between two economic indicators (unemployment and average income) and mental health variables (psychiatric clinic admittance, visits to outpatients' departments and emergency units, suicides, homicides, mortality rates and divorces) was studied. The data were gathered by the Greek Statistical Service and some others were provided by the following hospitals: Eginition Hospital, Psychiatric Hospital of Attica, Athens General Hospital and Evaggelismos Hospital. Simple and multiple regression analyses were performed on the data. There was no significant correlation between the level of unemployment, as well as the average income, and admittance to the psychiatric clinics. A significant correlation was isolated between unemployment and visits to outpatients' department (R2 = 0.40, p = 0.001) and emergency unit (R2 = 0.49, p = 0.0002) of Eginition Hospital. The unemployment rate during the period 1981-2008 was positively associated with the number of homicides (R2 = 0.16, beta = 0.000049, p = 0.03), as well as the number of divorces (R2 = 0.20, beta = 0.005, p = 0.02) during the same period. The average income showed positive association with the visits to both outpatients' department (R2 = 0.55, p positive correlation between the average income and divorce rates (R2 = 0.73, p impact of economic crisis on citizens' mental health.

  17. Rural Mental Health Ecology: A Framework for Engaging with Mental Health Social Capital in Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rhonda L; Wilson, G Glenn; Usher, Kim

    2015-09-01

    The mental health of people in rural communities is influenced by the robustness of the mental health ecosystem within each community. Theoretical approaches such as social ecology and social capital are useful when applied to the practical context of promoting environmental conditions which maximise mental health helping capital to enhance resilience and reduce vulnerably as a buffer for mental illness. This paper explores the ecological conditions that affect the mental health and illness of people in rural communities. It proposes a new mental health social ecology framework that makes full use of the locally available unique social capital that is sufficiently flexible to facilitate mental health helping capital best suited to mental health service delivery for rural people in an Australian context.

  18. Pathways to mental health care in KwaZulu - Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Mkize

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of popular beliefs about mental health care and the pathways clients take prior to admission to a mental health institution is vital in planning to reduce delays in seeking treatment. The objectives of this exploratory survey were to determine pathways of care the clients with mental illness take, which ultimately lead to the mental health institution, the effects of socio-cultural and economic factor on the pathways to mental health care and the satisfaction with different service providers consulted. Data was gathered through semi-structured interviews. The results indicate that African clients interpret mental illness as bewitchment. Delays in seeking appropriate mental health care are experienced because traditional and faith healers are the first port of call. The short pathways are used when the first signs of psychotic features are severe, including like aggressive or violent behaviour. Financial constraints seem to be the problem for most of the clients in accessing mental health care. Furthermore, defaulting treatment was also observed due to the fact that mental illnesses are stigmatised in African communities.

  19. Perceived mental health and needs for mental health services following trauma with and without brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellet, Marie-Christine; Sirois, Marie-Josée; Lavoie, André

    2009-02-01

    To compare self-reported mental health in trauma survivors with and without brain injury; to describe factors associated with lower mental health; and to compare needs in terms of mental health services and perceived access limitations to such services. Cross-sectional community survey. A total of 405 trauma survivors (239 with traumatic brain injury and 166 without) interviewed 2-4 years post-injury. Short Form-12 mental health scales and a survey measuring perceived needs for mental health services, and access limitations. Injury survivors with and without traumatic brain injury are similarly affected on subjective reports of global mental health, vitality, role changes, and social functioning except for cognitive complaints. Variables associated with lower mental health in trauma survivors include younger age, being a woman, shorter time since injury, higher pain, lower social support, and presence of cognitive problems. Although individuals with traumatic brain injury report slightly more mental health problems and more need for mental health services, proportionally to their needs, more individuals without traumatic brain injury report access limitations to mental health services. Mental health problems affect important proportions of trauma survivors, either with or without traumatic brain injury. More effort should be made to facilitate access to mental health services for all trauma survivors.

  20. Mental health disorders in childhood: assessing the burden on families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Susan H; Barry, Colleen L

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that caring for a sick child creates an economic burden for families. Less is known about how this burden differs by condition. We found that caring for a child with mental health care needs affects financial well-being more than caring for a child with other special health care needs. Parents of children with mental health disorders are also more likely than other parents to cut work hours, to quit work, and to spend more time arranging their child's care. Equalizing private insurance coverage and providing cash support could play a vital role in easing the economic toll of care for children with mental health disorders.

  1. Mental health and PTSD in female North Korean refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Gisoo; Lee, Suk Jeong

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify mental health status, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and psychophysiological change in female North Korean refugees. Data were collected using questionnaires and symptom checklists that measured PTSD and the psychosomatic state of the subjects. As many as 97 subjects, who had settled in and around Seoul, South Korea, were selected by snowball sampling. Mental health and PTSD levels of the participants were above a moderate level. We conclude that health care professionals need to provide female North Korean defectors with services to improve mental health and make the sociocultural transition successfully.

  2. Cultural change and mental health in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Curtis, Tine; Greenland, Population Study

    2002-01-01

    In Greenland, the rapid sociocultural change of the last 50 years has been paralleled by an epidemiological transition characterized by a reduction in infectious diseases, an increase in cancer and cardiovascular diseases, and an increased prevalence of mental health problems. During 1993......-94 and 1997-98, two health interview surveys were conducted among Inuit in Greenland and Inuit migrants in Denmark. The response rates were 71 and 55%. Information on mental health was obtained from 1388 and 1769 adults. As indicators of mental health, the prevalence of potential psychiatric cases according...... of poor mental health: as a result of successful integration into the modern Greenlandic society, some population groups have better mental health compared to other groups....

  3. Standards for the mental health care of people with severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Porteus and Tennyson Lee (Centre for Health Policy,. Witwatersand University) and Melyven Freeman and. Edith Madela-Mntla (Directorate: Mental Health and. Substance Abuse, Department of Health).Our thanks and appreciation also to all those individuals, organisations and busy health providers and managers who ...

  4. Current models of positive mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Stanojević Dragana Z.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of positive mental health represents not merely the absence of mental disease but presence of high level of happiness and well-being. In this paper we mentioned shortly the earliest concept of mental health, presented by Marie Jahoda in the mid-twentieth century. After that, we described two traditions in understanding and researching of subjective well-being: hedonic and eudaimonic approach. First approach focuses on investigation of positive affects and happiness as emotional an...

  5. Barriers to Mental Health Treatment: Results from the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, L. H.; Alonso, J.; Mneimneh, Z.; Wells, J. E.; Al-Hamzawi, A.; Borges, G.; Bromet, E.; Bruffaerts, R.; de Girolamo, G.; de Graaf, R.; Florescu, S.; Gureje, O.; Hinkov, H. R.; Hu, C.; Huang, Y.; Hwang, I.; Jin, R.; Karam, E. G.; Kovess-Masfety, V.; Levinson, D.; Matschinger, H.; O’Neill, S.; Posada-Villa, J.; Sagar, R.; Sampson, N. A.; Sasu, C.; Stein, D.; Takeshima, T.; Viana, M. C.; Xavier, M.; Kessler, R. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background To examine barriers to initiation and continuation of mental health treatment among individuals with common mental disorders. Methods Data are from the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys. Representative household samples were interviewed face-to-face in 24 countries. Reasons to initiate and continue treatment were examined in a subsample (n= 63,678) and analyzed at different levels of clinical severity. Results Among those with a DSM-IV disorder in the past twelve months, low perceived need was the most common reason for not initiating treatment and more common among moderate and mild than severe cases. Women and younger people with disorders were more likely to recognize a need for treatment. Desire to handle the problem on one’s own was the most common barrier among respondents with a disorder who perceived a need for treatment (63.8%). Attitudinal barriers were much more important than structural barriers both to initiating and continuing treatment. However, attitudinal barriers dominated for mild-moderate cases and structural barriers for severe cases. Perceived ineffectiveness of treatment was the most commonly reported reason for treatment dropout (39.3%) followed by negative experiences with treatment providers (26.9% of respondents with severe disorders). Conclusions Low perceived need and attitudinal barriers are the major barriers to seeking and staying in treatment among individuals with common mental disorders worldwide. Apart from targeting structural barriers, mainly in countries with poor resources, increasing population mental health literacy is an important endeavor worldwide. PMID:23931656

  6. Emerging Issues and Models in College Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Ben; Wallace, David; Brunner, Jon

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief overview of the psychological issues facing today's college students, information about students receiving mental health services, and an evidence-based model describing the practice and functions of today's counseling centers.

  7. Gaming well: links between videogames and flourishing mental health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Christian M; Scholes, Laura; Johnson, Daniel; Katsikitis, Mary; Carras, Michelle C

    2014-01-01

    .... Its purpose is to develop understandings about the positive intersection of gaming and well-being, to document evidence regarding links between videogames and positive mental health, and to provide...

  8. NIMH Prototype Management Information System for Community Mental Health Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Wurster, Cecil R.; Goodman, John D.

    1980-01-01

    Various approaches to centralized support of computer applications in health care are described. The NIMH project to develop a prototype Management Information System (MIS) for community mental health centers is presented and discussed as a centralized development of an automated data processing system for multiple user organizations. The NIMH program is summarized, the prototype MIS is characterized, and steps taken to provide for the differing needs of the mental health centers are highligh...

  9. NIMH Prototype Management Information System for Community Mental Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Cecil R.; Goodman, John D.

    1980-01-01

    Various approaches to centralized support of computer applications in health care are described. The NIMH project to develop a prototype Management Information System (MIS) for community mental health centers is presented and discussed as a centralized development of an automated data processing system for multiple user organizations. The NIMH program is summarized, the prototype MIS is characterized, and steps taken to provide for the differing needs of the mental health centers are highlighted.

  10. Mental health care user participation in mental health policy development and implementation in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleintjes, Sharon; Lund, Crick; Swartz, Leslie; Flisher, Alan

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes current support for mental health care user participation in policy development and implementation in South Africa and suggests strategies for improving participation. The World Health Organization (WHO) Mental Health Policy Checklist and WHO Mental Health Legislation Checklist were completed. Between August 2006 and August 2009 96 semi-structured interviews with national, regional and district stakeholders were conducted. Most respondents felt that inclusion of user perspectives in policy processes would improve policy development. In practice, mental health care user consultation in policy development and implementation has been limited during the 16 years of democracy in South Africa. Strategies to create a supportive environment for user participation include social action directed at reducing stigma, advocating for acceptance of users' rights to participate in decision making, crafting a supportive regulatory framework to promote participation, and equipping providers and policy makers to support inclusion. User capacity for participation could be strengthened through early and effective access to treatment and support, development of a national user lobby, skills training and practical exposure to the policy and service development environment.

  11. Unemployment Impairs Mental Health: Meta-Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Karsten I.; Moser, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The effect of unemployment on mental health was examined with meta-analytic methods across 237 cross-sectional and 87 longitudinal studies. The average overall effect size was d = 0.51 with unemployed persons showing more distress than employed persons. A significant difference was found for several indicator variables of mental health (mixed…

  12. Coping and Mental Health in Early Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancherel, Bernard; Bolognini, Monique

    1995-01-01

    Focused on mental health and protective factors in early adolescence. Significant relations between coping strategies and mental health were found, which are different according to gender: girls invest in more social relations, negative feelings, and consumption habits; boys often use sense of humor, or practice a hobby or sport. (JBJ)

  13. Mental Health of Students. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that mental health is as critical to academic success as physical well-being. School nurses play a vital role in the school community by promoting positive mental health development in students through school/community-based programs and curricula. As members of…

  14. The Counselor as a Mental Health Consultant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaverella, Michael A.

    1970-01-01

    The school counselor is the most logical person in the school to act as a mental health consultant. He has the necessary psychosocial background, is available for consultations, has a wealth of information about the students, and maintains a working relationship with other mental health specialists. He can do much to improve the school environment…

  15. Positive Mental Health; measurement, relevance and implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, S.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    The professionalization of psychology yielded many advantages, but also led to a main focus on psychopathology in mental health care. This thesis investigated an additional positive approach to mental health, focusing on positive feelings and life satisfaction (emotional well-being) and optimal

  16. Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

  17. Wisdom and mental health across the lifespan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Webster, Jeffrey Dean; Webster, J.D.; Westerhof, Gerben Johan; Bohlmeijer, Ernst Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The relationships between wisdom and age and between wisdom and mental health are complex with empirical results often inconsistent. We used a lifespan sample and broad, psychometrically sound measures of wisdom and mental health to test for possible age trends in wisdom and its

  18. Effect of Dynamic Meditation on Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Naved; Singh, Archana; Aleem, Sheema

    2016-02-01

    Although traditional meditation has been found to be effective in improving physical and mental health of subjects, there was a paucity of research of the effect of active or dynamic meditation on these variables. Therefore, the present study was aimed at studying the effect of dynamic meditation on mental health of the subjects. Total sample of the present study comprised 60 subjects, 30 each in experimental and control group. Subjects in experimental group were given 21-day training in dynamic meditation. Mental health of the experimental and control group subjects was measured in pre- and post-condition with the help of Mental Health Inventory developed by Jagadish and Srivastava (Mental Health inventory, Manovaigyanik Parikshan Sansthan, Varanasi, 1983). Obtained data were analyzed with the help of ANCOVA. In post-condition, experimental group scored better than control group on integration of personality, autonomy and environmental mastery. Effect sizes of dynamic meditation on these dimensions of mental health were large. However, experimental group and control group did not differ significantly on positive self-evaluation, perception of reality and group-oriented attitude dimensions of mental health in post-condition. Overall, dynamic meditation training was effective in improving mental health of the subjects.

  19. Global mental health and neuroscience: potential synergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J; He, Yanling; Phillips, Anthony; Sahakian, Barbara J; Williams, John; Patel, Vikram

    2015-02-01

    Global mental health has emerged as an important specialty. It has drawn attention to the burden of mental illness and to the relative gap in mental health research and services around the world. Global mental health has raised the question of whether this gap is a developmental issue, a health issue, a human rights issue, or a combination of these issues-and it has raised awareness of the need to develop new approaches for building capacity, mobilising resources, and closing the research and treatment gap. Translational neuroscience has also advanced. It comprises an important conceptual approach to understanding the neurocircuitry and molecular basis of mental disorders, to rethinking how best to undertake research on the aetiology, assessment, and treatment of these disorders, with the ultimate aim to develop entirely new approaches to prevention and intervention. Some apparent contrasts exist between these fields; global mental health emphasises knowledge translation, moving away from the bedside to a focus on health systems, whereas translational neuroscience emphasises molecular neuroscience, focusing on transitions between the bench and bedside. Meanwhile, important opportunities exist for synergy between the two paradigms, to ensure that present opportunities in mental health research and services are maximised. Here, we review the approaches of global mental health and clinical neuroscience to diagnosis, pathogenesis, and intervention, and make recommendations for facilitating an integration of these two perspectives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. College Mental Health at the Cutting Edge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Victor

    2013-01-01

    As someone who has been involved in college mental health in three different roles, the author would say those who work in this field inhabit a strange space. College mental health centers are generally seen as somewhat peripheral to the core mission of universities by upper administration. Counseling centers do not reside within academic…

  1. Mental health services for parents affected by mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumm, Silvia; Becker, Thomas; Wiegand-Grefe, Silke

    2013-07-01

    Despite an increasing awareness of support needs of families affected by parental mental illness, there is a lack of adequate mental healthcare provision for parents. As contemporary mental health services are both user-focused and evidence based, the present review focuses on knowledge regarding the subjective perspective on parenting issues among affected parents and the evidence base for parenting programs. There has been a shift in the research focus from adverse effects of parental mental illness on children toward inclusion and the subjective perspective in affected mothers and, more recently, fathers with mental health problems. Parents report on role conflicts, parenting difficulties, and stigma. Despite a broad spectrum of parental needs, many parents are reluctant to use services. There is an increasing evidence base for intervention programs. Adequate care for parents affected by mental illness requires sensitivity for parents' subjective perspective, interagency collaboration, standard intake practice, high level of professional knowledge and skills, provision of family-friendly environments, evidence-based parenting programs comprising both individual and group approaches and peer support. There is a lack of research on other parenting needs such as desire for children, coping with custody loss, and childlessness related to mental illness.

  2. Eating Disorders: National Institute of Mental Health's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Mark; Insel, Thomas R.

    2007-01-01

    The mission of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is to reduce the burden of mental and behavioral disorders through research, and eating disorders embody an important fraction of this burden. Although past and current research has provided important knowledge regarding the etiology, classification, pathophysiology, and treatment of…

  3. Facilitating Soldier Receipt of Needed Mental Health Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Beliefs About Medications 1. The medications prescribed by mental health providers are usually addictive . (.705) 2. Ifl were to receive mental...deploymenL He ... wasn’t able to cope, but his outlet was the use of marijuana , primarily. It was one of those things that he just

  4. Resources available for school based mental health services in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Childhood mental illnesses most times are detected earlier in schools than at homes as the schools provide enabling environment for early identification of children with problems. Objectives: To evaluate the resources available for school-based mental health services in Enugu urban and to determine the head ...

  5. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Violence Tribal Affairs Underage Drinking Veterans and Military Families Wellness Workforce Featured Campaign Recovery Month Recovery ... areas. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ( ...

  6. Community Mental Health Clinic Cost Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Healthcare Cost Report Information System (HCRIS) Dataset - Community Mental Health Center (CMHC). This data was reported on form CMS-2088-92. The data in this...

  7. Health Care Provider Initiative Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Environmental Education & Training Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document lays out the strategy for achieving the goals and objectives of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative." The goal of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative" is to incorporate environmental health into health professionals' education and practice in order to improve health care and public health, with a special emphasis on…

  8. 78 FR 14034 - Health Insurance Providers Fee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 57 RIN 1545-BL20 Health Insurance Providers Fee AGENCY: Internal... covered entities engaged in the business of providing health insurance for United States health risks... regulations affect persons engaged in the business of providing health insurance for United States health...

  9. School-Based Health Centers: On the Front Line for Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2011

    2011-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) are the "ideal location" for primary care and mental health staff to "collaboratively address students' physical and mental health needs"--leading to greater success in school and in life. This brief document provides key facts that support this argument.

  10. Democracy: the forgotten determinant of mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Marilyn; Sainsbury, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Promoting mental health is a relatively new initiative being taken across the world, stimulated by concerns about the global burden of mental illness, inequalities in mental health and debate about the relationship between quality of life and economic growth. Social factors influence the health of populations but the distribution of these is determined by people who exercise political power through societies' institutions of governance. Inequalities in health (and mental health) arise from the unequal distribution of these social determinants of health. This paper aims to stimulate interest and debate on the role of democracy, a mechanism for allocating political power, as a determinant of health and of mental health in particular. Drawing principally on the political science literature, we briefly describe the development of democracy in some of its commoner current forms and relate this to the spread of political power and participation in collective decision making and improvements in public health over the past 200 years. We conducted a non-systematic literature search and identified 34 studies examining the link between democracy and health. Despite methodological weaknesses, these papers suggest that there is a weak empirical link between democracy and health, including mental health. We suggest mechanisms that might account for this. Historical, theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that democracy is a (frequently forgotten) determinant of health.

  11. Stemming the tide: promoting mental health and preventing mental disorders in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, W A

    2015-01-01

    The first World Health Organization's global action plan for mental health recognizes the importance of mental health promotion and prevention of mental disorders, through the inclusion of one of four objectives focused on this crucial area of research and practice. This paper aims to provide an 'aerial view' of the field of mental health promotion and prevention of mental disorders with a focus on low- and middle-income countries. Starting with reasons why promotion and prevention need to take center stage in global mental health efforts, the paper provides a framework and four general principles to guide such efforts: a socio-ecological perspective (place); an inter-sectoral and interdisciplinary approach (collaboration), a developmental perspective (timing), and a participatory and empowerment approach (strengths), or PaCTS. Evidence-based examples of mental health promotion, universal, selective, and indicated prevention are described.

  12. Unnecessary work tasks and mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida E H; Tripathi, Manisha; Borritz, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    with increased self-reported stress, cortisol, and counterproductive work behavior. In this article, we examine the prospective association between unnecessary work tasks, one type of illegitimate work tasks, and mental health among Danish human service workers. Further, we explore whether this association...... is modified by sex, age, occupational position, and baseline mental health status. METHODS: The data were obtained from self-administered questionnaires from 1351 Danish human service workers in three waves of data-collection during 1999-2005. We measured unnecessary work tasks by a single item, and assessed...... mental health using the 5-item mental health inventory from the Short form 36 questionnaire. We analyzed data using multi-level modeling, adjusting for potential confounding by sex, age, cohabitation, occupational position, and baseline mental health. RESULTS: Unnecessary work tasks were prospectively...

  13. Community-based mental health service utilization among low-income Latina immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhausen, Laila; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Perry, Deborah F

    2011-02-01

    Latina immigrants may be at increased risk for mental illnesses, but have less access to and seek mental health services less often than Black and White counterparts. Guided by the Andersen Behavioral Model of service utilization, the current study employed a medical chart review to elucidate factors associated with use of mental health services at a community health center. Of the clients referred for mental health services, only 36% followed through on the referral. Older age, use of case management services, and depressive symptomatology were predictors of attending mental health services. These findings have implications for community health and mental health providers.

  14. [The sainsbury centre for mental health: forensic mental health services in England and wales].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, M; Duggan, S

    2008-06-01

    The Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health (SCMH) is a charity founded in 1985 by Gatsby Charitable Foundation. The SCMH works to improve the quality of life for people with mental health problems by influencing policy and practice in mental health and related services. Working to improve the quality of mental health care for people in prison is one of SCMH main work theme. This paper describes some epidemiological aspects of mental health situation of prisoners in England and Wales and the available forensic facilities to manage this kind of patients in prison.

  15. Health Provider Networks, Quality and Costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.; Schottmuller, C.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a modeling framework to think about selective contracting in the health care sector. Two health care providers differ in quality and costs. When buying health insurance, consumers observe neither provider quality nor costs. We derive an equilibrium where health insurers signal provider

  16. Health provider networks, quality and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, Jan; Schottmuller, C.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a modeling framework to think about selective contracting in the health care sector. Two health care providers differ in quality and costs. When buying health insurance, consumers observe neither provider quality nor costs. We derive an equilibrium where health insurers signal provider

  17. Seeing Your Health Care Provider

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reduce Font Size 100% Increase Font Size Positive Spin Basics Federal Response Digital Tools Events Blog Home ... that may assist you. Be on time. Most healthcare providers have full appointment schedules—if you are ...

  18. Whole-school mental health promotion in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip T. Slee

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Although there is increasing recognition internationally of the significance of social and emotional health and wellbeing for the healthy development of young people, the levels of support that governments provide for mental health policy and programme initiatives vary widely. In this paper, consideration is given to Australia's approach to mental health promotion from early years to secondary school, including specific reference to the KidsMatter Primary mental health promotion, prevention and early intervention initiative. Although it is now well established that schools provide important settings for the promotion of mental health initiatives, there are significant challenges faced in effectively implementing and maintaining the delivery of evidence-based practice in school settings, including concerns about quality assurance in processes of implementation, translation, dissemination and evaluation.

  19. Mental health, intimate partner violence and HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mental health, intimate partner violence and HIV. N Woollett,1 MA (Psychology, Art Therapy); A M Hatcher,1,2 MPhil (Sociology). 1 Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. 2 School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, ...

  20. Family burden, family health and personal mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Edel; Bunting, Brendan P

    2013-03-21

    The economic and moral implications of family burden are well recognised. What is less understood is whether or how family health and family burden relate to personal mental health. This study examines family health and perceived family burden as predictors of personal mental health, taking personal and sociodemographic factors into consideration. Data used was from the National Comorbidity Study Replication (NCS-R), namely the random 30% of participants (N = 3192) to whom the family burden interview was administered. Measures of family burden and mental health were considered for analysis. Binary logistic regressions were used as means of analyses. Perception of family burden was associated with an increased vulnerability to personal mental health problems, as was the presence of mental health difficulties within the family health profile. Which member of the family (kinship) was ill bore no relation to prediction of personal mental health. Personal and socio-demographic factors of sex, age, marital status, education and household income were all predictive of increased vulnerability to mental health problems over the last 12 months. Certain elements of family health profile and its perceived burden on the individuals themselves appears related to risk of personal incidence of mental health problems within the individuals themselves. For moral and economic reasons, further research to understand the dynamics of these relationships is essential to aid developing initiatives to protect and support the mental health and wellbeing of relatives of ill individuals.

  1. A Novel Network for Mentoring Family Physicians on Mental Health Issues Using E-Mail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jon J.; Rockman, Patricia; Gingrich, Nadine; Silveira, Jose; Salach, Lena

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Family practitioners are significant providers of mental health care and routinely report difficulty acquiring timely support in this area. The Collaborative Mental Health Care Network assembled groups of family practitioners and provided them with mental health practitioner mentors. This article addresses communication in the Network,…

  2. Occupational Health for Health Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health care workers are exposed to many job hazards. These can include Infections Needle injuries Back injuries ... prevention practices. They can reduce your risk of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, ...

  3. Refugees' advice to physicians: how to ask about mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Patricia J

    2014-08-01

    About 45.2 million people were displaced from their homes in 2012 due to persecution, political conflict, generalized violence and human rights violations. Refugees who endure violence are at increased risk of developing chronic psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder and major depression. The primary care visit may be the first opportunity to detect the devastating psychological effects of trauma. Physicians and refugees have identified communication barriers that inhibit discussions about mental health. In this study, refugees offer advice to physicians about how to assess the mental health effects of trauma. Ethnocultural methodology informed 13 focus groups with 111 refugees from Burma, Bhutan, Somali and Ethiopia. Refugees responded to questions concerning how physicians should ask about mental health in acceptable ways. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using thematic categorization informed by Spradley's Developmental Research Sequence. Refugees recommended that physicians should take the time to make refugees comfortable, initiate direct conversations about mental health, inquire about the historical context of symptoms and provide psychoeducation about mental health and healing. Physicians may require specialized training to learn how to initiate conversations about mental health and provide direct education and appropriate mental health referrals in a brief medical appointment. To assist with making appropriate referrals, physicians may also benefit from education about evidence-based practices for treating symptoms of refugee trauma. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Instruments for measuring mental health recovery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklar, Marisa; Groessl, Erik J; O'Connell, Maria; Davidson, Larry; Aarons, Gregory A

    2013-12-01

    Persons in recovery, providers, and policymakers alike are advocating for recovery-oriented mental health care, with the promotion of recovery becoming a prominent feature of mental health policy in the United States and internationally. One step toward creating a recovery-oriented system of care is to use recovery-oriented outcome measures. Numerous instruments have been developed to assess progress towards mental health recovery. This review identifies instruments of mental health recovery and evaluates the appropriateness of their use including their psychometric properties, ease of administration, and service-user involvement in their development. A literature search using the Medline and Psych-INFO databases was conducted, identifying 21 instruments for potential inclusion in this review, of which thirteen met inclusion criteria. Results suggest only three instruments (25%) have had their psychometric properties assessed in three or more unique samples of participants. Ease of administration varied between instruments, and for the majority of instruments, development included service user involvement. This review updates and expands previous reviews of instruments to assess mental health recovery. As mental health care continues to transform to a recovery-oriented model of service delivery, this review may facilitate selection of appropriate assessments of mental health recovery for systems to use in evaluating and improving the care they provide. © 2013.

  5. [Work-related stress and mental health - can work lead to mental disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptáček, Radek; Vňuková, Martina; Raboch, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    In the past two decades, special attention was paid to mental health issues. The available literature suggests, for example, the relationship between the workload and mental discomfort and the occurrence of myocardial infarction. This article focuses mainly on the issue of work-related stress and its impact on mental health. In this context, it must be acknowledged that possible psychological problems due to work are not only employees problem. These difficulties can significantly affect performance - and thus they should be the concern of the employer, but also of customers, clients and patients who come into contact with the worker who might develop some mental problems, due to the nature of his work and working conditions. This article provides an overview of the various factors affecting the mental health of employees. These are, for example, work demands, working hours and workplace relations. In conclusion, it brings results of Czech study examining job stress among working population.

  6. Intimate partner violence and mental health in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekers, Dominique; Pallin, Sarah C; Hutchinson, Paul

    2013-06-26

    Latin America has among the highest rates of intimate partner violence. While there is increasing evidence that intimate partner violence is associated with mental health problems, there is little such research for developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between Bolivian women's experiences with physical, psychological, and sexual intimate partner violence and mental health outcomes. This study analyzes data from the 2008 Bolivia Demographic and Health Survey. 10,119 married or cohabiting women ages 15-49 are included in the analysis. Probit regression models are used to assess the association between intimate partner violence and mental health, after controlling for other demographic factors and partner characteristics. The questionnaire uses selected questions from the SRQ-20 to measure symptoms of mental health problems. Intimate partner violence is common in Bolivia, with 47% of women experiencing some type of spousal abuse in the 12 months before the survey. Women exposed to physical spousal violence in the past year are more likely to experience symptoms of depression, anxiety, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and psychotic disorders, after controlling for other demographic and partner characteristics. Women who experienced sexual abuse by a partner are most likely to suffer from all mental health issues. Psychological abuse is also associated with an increased risk of experiencing symptoms of depression, anxiety, and psychogenic seizures. Women who experienced only psychological abuse report mental health problems similar to those who were physically abused. This study demonstrates an urgent need for research on the prevalence and health consequences of psychological abuse in developing countries. Our findings highlight the need for mental health services for victims of intimate partner violence. Because physical and psychological violence are often experienced concurrently, it is recommended that health providers

  7. Program for suicidal prevention, mental disorder treatment, and mental health development for resident doctors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Jiménez López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High demand of care and the academic burden of courses of specialization in medicine affect the mental health of medical residents with events ranging from simple emotional discomfort to development of affective disorders in susceptible individuals. The suicide of physicians has produced programs for their attention in some countries. We present the first mental health clinic for residents of a high specialty hospital in Mexico, focused on the prevention of suicide and depression, treatment of mental disorders and mental health promotion. Unlike the reports of other countries, we get participation of more than 95%, we provide appropriate treatment and follow-up to residents with mental disorder, and there has not been a consummate suicide. We assume that the use of different strategies (scrutiny, adapting models of prevention of suicide as a peer and gatekeeper training, informative sessions of mental health promotion and stigma, interventions targeted at individuals and groups with conflicts has been useful against barriers that do not allow doctors to identify the risk of suicide warning signs, seek help for mental disorder, and seek to improve their mental health.

  8. Mental Health and Illness in the City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book highlights a broad range of issues on mental health and illness in large cities. It presents the epidemiology of mental disorders in cities, cultural issues of urban mental health care, and community care in large cities and urban slums. It also includes chapters on homelessness, crime...... and racism - problems that are increasingly prevalent in many cities world wide. Finally, it looks at the increasing challenges of mental disorders in rapidly growing cities. The book is aimed at an international audience and includes contributions from clinicians and researchers worldwide....

  9. Sexuality of people living with a mental illness: a collaborative challenge for mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Chris; Browne, Graeme

    2009-06-01

    This article is a review of the literature examining the sexuality of mental health consumers and the role of mental health nurses. A search identified 72 English articles on the topic. The evidence clearly indicates that sexuality is a critical aspect of who we are as individuals, and of how we view ourselves, but discussion of this topic is neglected by mental health nurses. Discussion focuses upon the wide acceptance of sexuality as a legitimate area for nurses to address in their care, and addresses mental health nurses' lack of knowledge about sexuality, conservative attitudes, and anxiety when discussing sexual issues. Consumer sexuality is poorly assessed in mental health, and is infrequently explored by mental health nurses. The result is that issues of sexuality for the consumer continue to affect many areas of their lives, including their relationships and ongoing commitment to treatment. The nurse-consumer relationship provides an opportunity to take sexual history into consideration, promote safe sexual practices, discuss sexual problems, and educate clients about sexual issues. This literature review identifies the need for further discussion of this topic and for research to point the way ahead for this important but neglected area of mental health nursing.

  10. Principles of youth participation in mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Anthony M

    2007-10-01

    Young people with mental illness face many barriers in accessing care and often have different needs to those of adult consumers. Young people's participation in mental health services is one way of addressing quality and access issues, through receiving feedback and implementing youth-driven and youth-friendly strategies. headspace, the National Youth Mental Health Foundation, established in July 2006, highlights the mental health care sector's commitment to young people. Existing youth participation programs provide examples of what can be achieved at national and local levels and with varying levels of financial and other support. These include: Ybblue, the youth program of beyondblue; Reach Out!, a web-based service; Headroom, providing health promotion and a website; and Platform Team (ORYGEN Youth Health), comprising current and past clients who advise the service and provide peer support. Current practice in youth participation in mental health services involves a variety of methods, such as ensuring information and education is appropriate for a youth audience, and participating in peer-support programs and staff selection panels. Challenges in the future development of youth participation in mental health services include avoiding tokenism, acknowledging that young people are not a uniform group, translating national strategies into local improvements in services, and gaining the support and cooperation of health care workers in genuine participation.

  11. Stigma and Mental Illness: Investigating Attitudes of Mental Health and Non-Mental-Health Professionals and Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Allison L.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored attitudes toward adults with mental illness. Results suggest that mental health trainees and professionals had less stigmatizing attitudes than did non-mental-health trainees and professionals. Professionals receiving supervision had higher mean scores on the Benevolence subscale than did professionals who were not receiving…

  12. Predictors of mental health in female teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reingard Seibt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Teaching profession is characterised by an above-average rate of psychosomatic and mental health impairment due to work-related stress. The aim of the study was to identify predictors of mental health in female teachers. Material and Methods: A sample of 630 female teachers (average age 47±7 years participated in a screening diagnostic inventory. Mental health was surveyed with the General Health Questionnaire GHQ-12. The following parameters were measured: specific work conditions (teacher-specific occupational history, scales of the Effort-Reward-Imbalance (ERI Questionnaire as well as cardiovascular risk factors, physical complaints (BFB and personal factors such as inability to recover (FABA, sense of coherence (SOC and health behaviour. Results: First, mentally fit (MH+ and mentally impaired teachers (MH- were differentiated based on the GHQ-12 sum score (MH+: < 5; MH-: ≥ 5; 18% of the teachers showed evidence of mental impairment. There were no differences concerning work-related and cardiovascular risk factors as well as health behaviour between MH+ and MH-. Binary logistic regressions identified 4 predictors that showed a significant effect on mental health. The effort-reward-ratio proved to be the most relevant predictor, while physical complaints as well as inability to recover and sense of coherence were identified as advanced predictors (explanation of variance: 23%. Conclusion: Contrary to the expectations, classic work-related factors can hardly contribute to the explanation of mental health. Additionally, cardiovascular risk factors and health behaviour have no relevant influence. However, effort-reward-ratio, physical complaints and personal factors are of considerable influence on mental health in teachers. These relevant predictors should become a part of preventive arrangements for the conservation of teachers' health in the future.

  13. A qualitative systematic review of service user and service provider perspectives on the acceptability, relative benefits, and potential harms of art therapy for people with non-psychotic mental health disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scope, Alison; Uttley, Lesley; Sutton, Anthea

    2017-03-01

    This systematic review aimed to synthesize qualitative evidence relating to user and service provider perspective on the acceptability and relative benefits and potential harms of art therapy for people with non-psychotic mental disorders. A comprehensive literature search was conducted in 13 major bibliographic databases from May to July 2013. A qualitative evidence synthesis was conducted using thematic framework synthesis. The searches identified 10,270 citations from which 12 studies were included. Ten studies included data from 183 service users, and two studies included data from 16 service providers. The evidence demonstrated that art therapy was an acceptable treatment. The benefits associated with art therapy included the following: the development of relationships with the therapist and other group members; understanding the self/own illness/the future; gaining perspective; distraction; personal achievement; expression; relaxation; and empowerment. Small numbers of patients reported varying reasons for not wanting to take part, and some highlighted potentially negative effects of art therapy which included the evoking of feelings which could not be resolved. The findings suggest that for the majority of respondents art therapy was an acceptable intervention, although this was not the case for all respondents. Therefore, attention should be focussed on both identifying those who are most likely to benefit from art therapy and ensuring any potential harms are minimized. The findings provide evidence to commissioners and providers of mental health services about the value of future art therapy services. Art therapy was reported to be an acceptable treatment for the majority of respondents. Art therapy may not be a preferred treatment option for a small number of patients, emphasizing the importance of considering patient preference in choice of treatment, and selection of the most suitable patients for art therapy. Consideration should be made of adjustments

  14. Retention in mental health care of Portuguese-speaking patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Marta; Cook, Benjamin; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Alegría, Margarita; Kinrys, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    We compared service outcomes of dedicated language and cultural competency services in adequacy of care, ER, and inpatient care among Portuguese-speaking patients in ethnic- and non-ethnic-specific behavioral health clinics. We assessed adequacy of mental health care, and use of inpatient emergency department among Portuguese-speaking patients, comparing individuals receiving care from a culturally and linguistically competent mental health care setting (the Portuguese Mental Health Program [PMHP]) with usual mental health care in a community health care system in the USA. Propensity score matching was used to balance patients in treatment and control groups on gender, marital status, age, diagnosis of mental disorder, and insurance status. We used de-identified, longitudinal, administrative data of 854 Portuguese-speaking patients receiving care from the PMHP and 541 Portuguese-speaking patients receiving usual care from 2005–2008. Adequate treatment was defined as receipt of at least eight outpatient psychotherapy visits, or at least four outpatient visits of which one was a psychopharmacological visit. PMHP patients were more likely to receive adequate care. No differences were found in rates of ER use or inpatient mental health care. The present study suggests increased quality of care for patients that have contact with a clinic that dedicates resources specifically to a minority/immigrant group. Advantages of this setting include greater linguistic and cultural concordance among providers and patients. Further research is warranted to better understand the mechanisms by which culturally appropriate mental health care settings benefit minority/immigrant patients. PMID:23427258

  15. Does biodiversity improve mental health in urban settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Julie; van Dooren, Kate; Weinstein, Philip

    2011-06-01

    Globally, the human and economic burdens of mental illness are increasing. As the prevalence and costs associated with mental illness rise, we are progressively more aware that environmental issues such as climate change and biodiversity loss impact on human health. This paper hypothesises that increased biodiversity in urban environments is associated with improved mental health and wellbeing. It proposes the ecological mechanism through which the association may exist, and explores the extant literature to determine the extent of empirical evidence to support our hypothesis. While there is a substantial literature investigating the impact of 'green space' and contact with nature on mental health, we identified only one original research paper that directly investigated the link between biodiversity and mental health. This suggests that the extant evidence considers only 'one part of the story', providing an evidence base which is inadequate to inform policy on biodiversity conservation and public health. Our hypothesised relationship between environmental change and mental health proposes conservation and restoration of biodiversity in urban environments as a form of intervention for improving human health. It also highlights the need for a better evidence base to demonstrate the synergistic benefits of increased biodiversity and mental health to decision makers. Well-designed quantitative epidemiological research is needed to establish the strength of any such causal relationship. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. From mobile mental health to mobile wellbeing: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggioli, Andrea; Riva, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The combination of smart phones, wearable sensor devices and social media offer new ways of monitoring and promoting mental and physical wellbeing. In this contribution, we describe recent developments in the field of mobile healthcare (or mHealth), by focusing in particular on mobile mental health applications. First, we examine the potential benefits associated with this approach, providing examples from existing projects. Next, we identify and explain possible differences in focus between mobile mental health and mobile wellbeing applications. Finally, we discuss some open challenges associated with the implementation of this vision, ranging from the lack of evidence-based validation to privacy, security and ethical concerns.

  17. European military mental health research: benefits of collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmerich, Hubertus; Willmund, G D; Wesemann, U; Jones, N; Fear, N T

    2017-06-01

    Despite joint participation in international military operations, few collaborative military mental health research projects have been undertaken by European countries. From a common perspective of military mental health researchers from Germany and the UK, the lack of shared research might be related not only to the use of different languages but also the different ways in which the two militaries provide mental health and medical support to operations and differences in military institutions. One area that is suitable for military health research collaboration within UK and German forces is mental health and well-being among military personnel. This could include the study of resilience factors, the prevention of mental disorder, mental health awareness, stigma reduction and the treatment of mental disorder. Military mental health research topics, interests and the studies that have been conducted to date in the UK and Germany have considerable overlap and commonality of purpose. To undertake the investigation of the long-term consequences of operational deployment, the specific burdens placed on military families and to further the understanding of the role of factors such as biomarkers for use in military mental health research, it seems advisable to forge international research alliances across European nations, which would allow for researchers to draw transcultural and generalisable conclusions from their work. Such an enterprise is probably worthwhile given the shared research interests of Germany and the UK and the common perspectives on military mental health in particular. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. The economics of mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Layard, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In a typical country, one in five people suffers from a mental illness, the great majority from depression or crippling anxiety. Mental illness accounts for half of all illness up to age 45 in rich countries, making it the most prevalent disease among working-age people; it also accounts for close to half of disability benefits in many countries. Mentally ill people are less likely to be employed and, if employed, more likely to be out sick or working below par. If mentally ill people receive...

  19. Community factors supporting child mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earls, F

    2001-10-01

    A principal purpose of this article has been to examine the gap between research and practice in relation to community factors in child mental health. Two caveats were introduced in preparation for this assessment. First, it was pointed out that the definition of communities has been expanded by considering the organizing properties of social aggregates that are not simply a function of the race, ethnicity, or social class of individuals who compose them. Having these definitions grounded in theory substantially advances the needs of research and the design and goals of community-level interventions. The second caveat relates to the boundaries of the disciplines that cater to the needs of children. During the same era when child psychiatry is largely occupied with placing psychotropic medications at the center of clinical approaches, there is an important effort in child psychology and sociology to cut across their disciplinary confines to form more comprehensive designs that are sensitive to experiences and circumstances that emerge from specific aspects of community context. Research from the PHDCN was used as an example of this new interdisciplinary approach. Several community-based research projects were selected for review based on their clear implications to improve context-sensitive assessment of child mental health and design effective community-based interventions to improve child mental health. The Healthy Start and CATCH programs indicate that involving child professionals at the grassroots of community life requires skill and patience but that the effort is satisfying and potentially effective. Other examples, exemplified by North Carolina's Smart Start initiative and the program of developmental assets from the Search Institute, demonstrate coherent approaches that provide a foundation for long-term capacity building in assessment, local decision making, and the design and evaluation of interventions. Three conclusions are warranted from this

  20. Psychometric properties of a Mental Health Team Development Audit Tool.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roncalli, Silvia

    2013-02-01

    To assist in improving team working in Community Mental Health Teams (CMHTs), the Mental Health Commission formulated a user-friendly but yet-to-be validated 25-item Mental Health Team Development Audit Tool (MHDAT).