WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing low-energy measurements

  1. Compact Measurement Station for Low Energy Proton Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Yildiz, H.

    2017-02-24

    A compact, remote controlled, cost efficient diagnostic station has been developed to measure the charge, the profile and the emittance for low energy proton beams. It has been installed and tested in the proton beam line of the Project Prometheus at SANAEM of the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority.

  2. Linac4 Low Energy Beam Measurements with Negative Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Scrivens, R; Crettiez, O; Dimov, V; Gerard, D; Granemann Souza, E; Guida, R; Hansen, J; Lallement, J B; Lettry, J; Lombardi, A; Midttun, O; Pasquino, C; Raich, U; Riffaud, B; Roncarolo, F; Valerio-Lizarraga, C A; Wallner, J; Yarmohammadi Satri, M; Zickler, T

    2014-01-01

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H- linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H- beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  3. Low-energy house in Sisimiut - Measurement equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hvidthoeft Delff Andersen, P.; Rode, C.; Madsen, Henrik

    2013-08-15

    This paper documents the measurement equipment in a low-energy house in Sisimiut, Greenland. Detailed measurements are being taken on energy consumption, indoor temperatures, floor heating, ventilation, open/closed state of doors and windows, and indoors climate. Equipped with a central control unit, experiments can be designed in order to study heat dynamics of the building. It is described how to plan and execute such experiments in one apartment in the building. The building also features both a solar thermal system and extra buffer tank facilitating testing of storage strategies on the power generated by the solar thermal system. A weather station equipped with thermometer, pyranometer and anemometer is installed on the building as well. Finally, it is described how to retrieve data from an SQL server which is configured to take monthly backups. R functions have been implemented to fetch and prepare the data for time series analysis. Examples are given on the use of these. (Author)

  4. High-Resolution Measurements of Low-Energy Conversion Electrons

    CERN Multimedia

    Gizon, A; Putaux, J

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of low-energy internal conversion electrons have been performed with high energy resolution in some N = 105 odd and odd-odd nuclei using a semi-circular spectrograph associated to a specific tape transport system. These experiments aimed to answer the following questions~: \\begin{itemize} \\item Do M3 isomeric transitions exist in $^{183}$Pt and $^{181}$Os, isotones of $^{184}$Au~? \\item Are the neutron configurations proposed to describe the isomeric and ground states of $^{184}$Au right or wrong~? \\item Does it exist an isomeric state in $^{182}$Ir, isotone of $^{181}$Os, $^{183}$Pt and $^{184}$Au~? \\item What are the spin and parity values of the excited states of $^{182}$Ir~? \\end{itemize} In $^{183}$Pt, the 35.0 keV M3 isomeric transition has been clearly observed and the reduced transition probability has been determined. The deduced hindrance factor is close to that observed in the neighbouring odd-odd $^{184}$Au nucleus. This confirms the neutron configurations previously proposed for the ...

  5. Emittance measurements of low-energy beam line at KVI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toprek, D; Formanoy, [No Value

    2006-01-01

    In this paper is represented the results of beam profile measurements of He-3(+) beam delivered from ECR ion source at KVI. The beam emittance is estimated by varying quadrupole method. The estimated values for the beam emittance at the different profile grid locations along the transport beam line

  6. Faraday Cup - it is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    A Faraday Cup is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams. An electrically isolated metallic electrode intercepts the beam and captures all its charges. These charges are integrated using an current sensitive amplifier. When the beam impinges onto the electrode surface low energy electrons are liberated. In order to prevent these electrons from escaping the cup and thus falsifying the measurement, a repeller electrode with negative potential pushes the electrons back onto the electrode.

  7. Measurements of low-energy electron reflection at a plasma boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demidov, V. I., E-mail: vladimir.demidov@mail.wvu.edu [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Adams, S. F. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Kaganovich, I. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Koepke, M. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Kurlyandskaya, I. P. [Department of Optics and Spectroscopy, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); International Laboratory “Nonlocal Plasma in Nanotechnology and Medicine,” ITMO University, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    It is demonstrated that low-energy (<3 eV) electron reflection from a solid surface in contact with a low-temperature plasma can have significant variation with time. An uncontaminated, i.e., “clean,” metallic surface (just after heating up to glow) in a plasma environment may have practically no reflection of low-energy incident electrons. However, a contaminated, i.e., “dirty,” surface (in some time after cleaning by heating) that has a few monolayers of absorbent can reflect low-energy incident electrons and therefore significantly affect the net electron current collected by the surface. This effect may significantly change plasma properties and should be taken into account in plasma experiments and models. A diagnostic method is demonstrated for measurements of low-energy electron absorption coefficient in plasmas with a mono-energetic electron group.

  8. Charge Exchange Cross Sections Measured at Low Energies in Q-Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Michelsen, Poul

    1972-01-01

    A new technique for measurements of charge exchange cross sections at low energies is described. The measurements are performed in a single‐ended Q machine. The resonance charge exchange cross section for Cs at 2 eV was found to be 0.6×10−13 cm2±20%.......A new technique for measurements of charge exchange cross sections at low energies is described. The measurements are performed in a single‐ended Q machine. The resonance charge exchange cross section for Cs at 2 eV was found to be 0.6×10−13 cm2±20%....

  9. Measurements of low energy observables in proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Low energy phenomena have been studied in detail at the LHC, providing important input for improving models of non-perturbative QCD effects. The ATLAS collaboration has performed several new measurements in this sector: We present charged-particle distributions sensitive to the underlying event, measured by the ATLAS detector in proton- -proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The results are corrected for detector effects and compared to predictions from various Monte Carlo generators. In addition, we present studies on the correlated hadron production, as they are an important source for information on the early stages of hadron formation. In particular, an analysis of the momentum difference between charged hadrons in high–energy proton–proton collisions is performed in order to study coherent particle production. The results are compared to the predictions of a helical QCD string fragmenting model. ATLAS has also studied the production of neutral strange particles inside and outside li...

  10. Spatial distribution of low energy plasma at comet 67P from Rosetta RPC-LAP measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edberg, Niklas J. T.; Eriksson, Anders I.; Odelstad, Elias; Vigren, Erik; Henri, Pierre; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Mandt, Kathleen; Nilsson, Hans; Carr, Chris; Cupido, Emanuele; Vallat, Claire; Altwegg, Kathrin

    2015-04-01

    We present in situ measurements of the low energy plasma environment around comet 67P from the two Langmuir probes (LAP) on the Rosetta spacecraft, which form part of the Rosetta plasma consortium (RPC). RPC-LAP has operated almost continuously as Rosetta has orbited the comet at close distance (10-30 km) at low velocity (about 1 m/s) since August 2014. Using the RPC-LAP measurements we have produced global maps of the low energy plasma in the vicinity of 67P. Initial estimates indicate that the plasma density has reached values of several 100 cm^-3 and that the electron temperature has typically been in the range 5-10 eV, when the comet was beyond 2.5 AU from the sun. Photoionisation is the dominating process for producing the plasma around the comet while charge-exchange and impact ionisation may also contribute. The plasma environment has been found to be strongly coupled to the local neutral gas density, which in turn is coupled to which area on the comet is facing the sun. The northern summer neck-area of the comet outgasses more than other areas and above this region are the highest densities observed. In the southern winter and above the two main lobes of the comet body, the plasma density is lower. The plasma density is hence not determined by the solar wind, but by the outgassing from the comet. The 12.4-hour rotation period of the comet together with the varying latitude of the slow-moving Rosetta provide strong modulation of the RPC-LAP measurements. Besides orbiting the comet, Rosetta will also perform flybys of the comet in early 2015 when Rosetta will move to distances of several hundred kilometres from the nucleus. These flybys provide a cut-through view of the near-comet plasma environment, which will possibly give some insight to the solar-wind interaction with the cometary coma.

  11. The ISPM experiment for spectral, composition and anistropy measurements of charged particles at low energie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Gold, R. E.; Anderson, K. A.; Armstrong, T. P.; Lin, R. P.; Krimigis, S. M.; Pick, M.; Roelof, E. C.; Sarris, E. T.; Simnett, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    The Heliosphere Instrument for Spectral, Composition, and Anisotropy at Low Energies (HI-SCALE) designed to measure interplanetary ions and electrons is described. Ions and electrons are detected by five separate solid-state detector telescopes oriented to give complete pitch angle coverage from the spinning spacecraft. Ion elemental abundances are determined by a telescope using a thin front detector element in a three-element telescope. Experiment operation is controlled by a microprocessor-based data system. Inflight calibration is provided by radioactive sources mounted on closable telescope covers. Ion and electron spectral information is determined using broad-energy-range rate channels, and a pulse-height analyzer for more detailed spectra. The instrument weighs 5.775 kg and uses 4.0 W power.

  12. Precision low energy measurements and search for physics beyond the standard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylov, Andriy Alexandrovich

    In the first two parts of this dissertation I present the complete calculation of one-loop contributions to low energy charged and neutral current weak interaction observables in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). For the former, I perform the first model-independent analysis of charged current data and use it to constrain the MSSM parameter space. I show that the constraints are incompatible with the predictions of the most widely used models of SUSY breaking mediation and discuss possible solutions to this conflict. For neutral current reactions, I study the impact of SUSY corrections on the weak charges of the electron, QeW , and the proton, QpW . I show that the relative signs of the SUSY loop effects on QeW and QpW are correlated and positive, whereas inclusion of R-parity nonconserving interactions can lead to opposite sign relative shifts. Thus, a comparison of QpW and QeW measurements could help distinguish between different SUSY scenarios. In the third part, I construct the relationship between effective, nonrenormalizable, time-reversal violating (TV) parity-conserving (PC) interactions of quarks and gauge bosons and various low-energy TVPC and TV parity-violating (PV) observables. I delineate the scenarios under which experimental limits on electric dipole moments (EDM's) of the electron, neutron, and 199Hg as well as limits on TVPC observables provide the most stringent bounds on new TVPC interactions. If parity invariance is restored at short distances, the one-loop EDM of elementary fermions generate the most severe constraints. If parity remains broken at short distances, direct TVPC limits provide the least ambiguous bounds. In the fourth part I evaluate the one-loop SM radiative corrections to the charged (CC) and neutral (NC) current neutrino-deuterium disintegration cross sections for energies relevant to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment. The correction to the total CC cross section is independent

  13. A low-energy beta-particle imaging system for measuring tritium distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Takao; Ikebe, Yukimasa

    1986-12-01

    A low-energy beta-particle imaging system was constructed for rapid measurement of the distributions of low-energy beta-emitting nuclides, especially tritium. The imaging system consists of a scintillator screen, two tapered fibers, an image intensifier, and a Polaroid film for image recording. The distortion of the observed image is less than 2.5% and the spatial resolution is more than 5 line pairs (lp)/mm. ZnS(Ag) screens with thicknesses of 5-7 mg/cm 2 have the highest scintillation light yield for low-energy beta-particles. The detectable flux densities for 14C and 3H were 7.3 and 80 s -1 cm -2, respectively.

  14. Low-energy cross section measurements through detection of secondary gamma emission and thick target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barron P, L.; Chavez L, E.; Huerta H, A.; Ortiz, M.E. [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, A.P. 20-364, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Murillo O, G.; Aguilera, E.F.; Martinez Q, E.; Moreno B, E.; Policroniades R, R.; Varela G, A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento del Acelerador, A.P. 18-1027, 11801, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-12-01

    In this work, the detection of secondary gamma rays in a tightly shielded Germanium detector, together with a high intensity heavy ion beam on a thick target is used to measure the fusion cross section for the {sup 12} C + {sup 12} C system at very low energies. (Author) 14 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  15. Measurements of low energy observables in proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS Detector.

    CERN Document Server

    Myska, Miroslav; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Low energy phenomena have been studied in detail at the LHC, providing important input for improving models of non-perturbative QCD effects. The ATLAS collaboration has performed several new measurements in this sector: We present charged-particle distributions sensitive to the underlying event, measured by the ATLAS detector in proton--proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The results are corrected for detector effects and compared to predictions from various Monte Carlo generators. ATLAS has also studied the correlated hadron production. In particular, an analysis of the momentum difference between charged hadrons in high–energy proton–proton collisions is performed and the results are compared to the predictions of a helical QCD string fragmentation model. New results in forward physics are expected to be available soon. We close this presentation with the measurement of the exclusive "\\gamma\\gamma \\rightarrow \\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}" production in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass ...

  16. Measurements of low energy hydrogen ion effective sticking coefficients on titanium in the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, H.; Post, R. S.

    1981-02-01

    The effective sticking coefficient for low energy (< 30 eV) hydrogen ions on titanium gettered aluminium walls has been measured in the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole. A value of greater than 0.75 was measured. The H/sub 2/ effective sticking coefficient for the same conditions is less than 0.01. Seventy-four percent of the wall area of the Octupole is gettered. The effects of recycling on plasma parameters is also discussed.

  17. The Response of the Ionospheric Cusp to the Solar Through Two Perspectives: Low Energy Changed Particle In-Situ Measurements and Low- Energy Neutral Atom Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, V. N.; Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Craven, P. D.

    2000-01-01

    The IMAGE mission provides a new perspective on the study of the response of the magnetosphere/ionosphere system to changing solar wind conditions, particularly the variability of ion outflow. Learning to interpret this new type of data becomes an essential step in the process of melding these results with the wealth of in-situ charged particle observations obtained over the past 25 years. In order to understand how the in-situ data correspond to and contrast with IMAGE results we will perform a conjunctive study of event data from two instruments to shed light on the coupling of the solar wind and ionosphere from these different perspectives. We will use the Low Energy Neutral Atom instrument (LENA) which images energetic neutral atom emissions from upward flowing ionospheric ions and the Thermal Ion Dynamics Instrument (TIDE) on the Polar satellite which measures in-situ ion outflow from 0.3-300 eV. Our primary goal will be to understand how comparing the imaging and in-situ perspectives can aid in the analysis of both data sets.

  18. A compact low energy multibeam gamma-ray densitometer for pipe-flow measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Tjugum, S A; Johansen, G A

    2002-01-01

    A compact low-energy multibeam gamma-ray densitometer for oil/water/gas pipe-flow measurement has been built at the University of Bergen. The instrument consists of one Am-241 source and three detectors, all collimated and embedded in the pipe wall. Only the 59.5 keV radiation energy of the source is utilized. Two of the detectors measure transmitted radiation across the pipe flow, and one measure scattered radiation at a 90 degree sign angle. The purpose of the multibeam measurement geometry is to acquire flow regime information and to reduce the flow regime dependency of the gas volume fraction (GVF) measurements. The measurement of scattered radiation enables the dual modality densitometry (DMD) measurement principle to be exploited. Its basic principle is to combine the measurement of scattered and transmitted radiation in order to obtain salinity independent GVF measurements. The salinity dependency is otherwise strongly significant when using low-energy radiation. It is also possible to measure the sali...

  19. Low energy measurements of the 10B(p ,α )7Be reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiescher, M.; deBoer, R. J.; Görres, J.; Azuma, R. E.

    2017-04-01

    Background: The 11B(p,2 α ) 4He reaction is being discussed as a prime candidate for advanced aneutronic fusion fuel systems. Particular interest in this reaction has recently emerged for laser driven plasma systems for energy generation and jet-propulsion systems. The lack of long-lived radioactive reaction products has been suggested as the main advantage of proton-boron fusion fuel. However, 19% of natural boron is 10B, with the 10B(p ,α )7Be fusion reaction producing long-lived 7Be as a side product. Purpose: A detailed measurement of the 10B(p ,α )7Be reaction over the critical energy range of hot fusion plasma environments will help to determine the amount of 7Be radioactivity being produced. This information can be used in turn to monitor the actual fusion temperature by offline measurement of the extracted 7Be activity. The goal of the here presented experiment is to expand on the results of earlier experiments, covering a wider energy range of interest for aneutronic plasma fusion applications, including also both 10B(p ,α0)7Be and the 10B(p ,α1)7Be reaction channels. Method: The reaction cross section was measured over a wide energy range from Ep=400 to 1000 keV using particle detection and from Ep=80 to 1440 keV using γ -ray spectroscopic techniques. Reaction α particles were measured at different angles to obtain angular distribution information. The results are discussed in terms of an R -matrix analysis. Results: The cross section data cover a wider energy range than previously investigated and bridge a gap in the previously available data sets. The cross sections show good agreement with previous results in the low energy region and show that the 10B(p ,α0)7Be channel is considerably larger than that of the 10B(p ,α1)7Be channel up to Ep≈1 MeV . Conclusions: The new reaction data provides important new information about the reaction cross section over the entire energy range of plasma fusion facilities. This data, when coupled with

  20. Measurement Over Large Solid Angle of Low Energy Cosmic Ray Muon Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, H. F., III; Schwitters, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advancements in portable muon detectors have made cosmic ray imaging practical for many diverse applications. Working muon attenuation detectors have been built at the University of Texas and are already successfully being used to image tunnels, structures, and Mayan pyramids. Most previous studies have focused on energy measurements of the cosmic ray spectrum from of 1 GeV or higher. We have performed an accurate measurement of the ultra-low energy (muon spectrum down to the acceptance level of our detector, around one hundred MeV. Measurements include angular dependence, with acceptance approaching horizontal. Measurements were made underwater using a custom enclosure in Lake Travis, Austin, TX. This measurement will allow more accurate predictions and simulations of attenuation for small (muon tomography.

  1. Measuring the low-energy cosmic ray spectrum with the AFIS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losekamm, Martin [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Gaisbauer, Dominic; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Meng, Lingxin; Paul, Stephan; Poeschl, Thomas [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Renker, Dieter [Physics Department E17, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    High-energy cosmic rays interact with Earth's upper atmosphere and produce antiprotons, which can be trapped in Earth's magnetic field. The Antiproton Flux in Space (AFIS) Mission will measure the flux of trapped antiprotons with energies less than 100 MeV aboard the nanosatellite MOVE 2. An active-target tracking detector comprised of scintillating plastic fibers and silicon photomultipliers is already under construction at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen. As a precursor to the space-bound mission, a prototype version of the detector will be launched aboard a balloon from Kiruna, Sweden as part of the REXUS/BEXUS student program by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). Named AFIS-P, it will be used to measure the low-energy part of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies less than 100 MeV-per-nucleon. Spectrometers in previous balloon missions were not sensitive in this low-energy region. Thus AFIS-P will deliver unprecedented data, while simultaneously allowing us to field-test the AFIS detector.

  2. Lifetime Measurements of $ \\pi ^+ \\pi ^- $ and $\\pi^{+-} K^{-+}$ Atoms to Test Low-Energy QCD Predictions

    CERN Multimedia

    Iliescu, M A; Ponta, T C; Dumitriu, D E; Afanasyev, L; Zhabitskiy, M; Rykalin, V; Hons, Z; Schacher, J; Yazkov, V; Gerndt, J; Detraz, C C; Guaraldo, C; Dreossi, D; Smolik, J; Gorchakov, O; Nikitin, M; Dudarev, A; Kluson, J; Hansroul, M; Okada, K; Constantinescu, S; Kruglov, V; Komarov, V; Takeutchi, F; Tarta, P D; Kuptsov, A; Nemenov, L; Karpukhin, V; Shliapnikov, P; Brekhovskikh, V; Saborido silva, J J; Drijard, D; Rappazzo, G F; Pentia, M C; Gugiu, M M; Kruglova, L; Pustylnik, Z; Trojek, T; Vrba, T; Duma, M; Ciocarlan, C; Kulikov, A; Ol'shevskiy, V; Ryazantsev, A; Chiba, M; Anania, A; Tarasov, A; Gritsay, K; Lapchine, V; Cechak, T; Lopez aguera, A

    2002-01-01

    %PS212 \\\\ \\\\ The proposed experiment aims to measure the lifetime of $ \\pi ^+ \\pi ^- $ atoms in the ground state with 10\\% precision, using the 24~GeV/c proton beam of the CERN Proton Synchrotron. As the value of the above lifetime of order 10$ ^- ^{1} ^{5} $s is dictated by a strong interaction at low energy, the precise measurement of this quantity enables to determine a combination of S-wave pion scattering lengths to 5\\%. Pion scattering lengths have been calculated in the framework of chiral perturbation theory and values predicted at the same level of accuracy have, up to now, never been confronted with accurate experimental data. Such a measurement would submit the understanding of chiral symmetry breaking of QCD to a crucial test.

  3. Spatial distribution of low-energy plasma around comet 67P/CG from Rosetta measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Edberg, N J T; Odelstad, E; Henri, P; Lebreton, J -P; Gasc, S; Rubin, M; André, M; Gill, R; Johansson, E P G; Johansson, F; Vigren, E; Wahlund, J E; Carr, C M; Cupido, E; Glassmeier, K -H; Goldstein, R; Koenders, C; Mandt, K; Nemeth, Z; Nilsson, H; Richter, I; Wieser, G Stenberg; Szego, K; Volwerk, M

    2016-01-01

    We use measurements from the Rosetta plasma consortium (RPC) Langmuir probe (LAP) and mutual impedance probe (MIP) to study the spatial distribution of low-energy plasma in the near-nucleus coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The spatial distribution is highly structured with the highest density in the summer hemisphere and above the region connecting the two main lobes of the comet, i.e. the neck region. There is a clear correlation with the neutral density and the plasma to neutral density ratio is found to be about 1-2x10^-6, at a cometocentric distance of 10 km and at 3.1 AU from the sun. A clear 6.2 h modulation of the plasma is seen as the neck is exposed twice per rotation. The electron density of the collisonless plasma within 260 km from the nucleus falls of with radial distance as about 1/r. The spatial structure indicates that local ionization of neutral gas is the dominant source of low-energy plasma around the comet.

  4. Adaptive Kalman filter for indoor localization using Bluetooth Low Energy and inertial measurement unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Paul K; Zihajehzadeh, Shaghayegh; Bong-Soo Kang; Park, Edward J

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a novel indoor localization method using the Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and an inertial measurement unit (IMU). The multipath and non-line-of-sight errors from low-power wireless localization systems commonly result in outliers, affecting the positioning accuracy. We address this problem by adaptively weighting the estimates from the IMU and BLE in our proposed cascaded Kalman filter (KF). The positioning accuracy is further improved with the Rauch-Tung-Striebel smoother. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared against that of the standard KF experimentally. The results show that the proposed algorithm can maintain high accuracy for position tracking the sensor in the presence of the outliers.

  5. ACADEMIC TRAINING: Low Energy Experiments that Measure Fundamental Constants and Test Basic Symmetries

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    17, 18, 19 , 21 June LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Low Energy Experiments that Measure Fundamental Constants and Test Basic Symmetries by G. GABRIELSE / Professor of Physics and Chair of the Harvard Physics Department, Spokesperson for the ATRAP Collaboration Lecture 1: Particle Traps: the World's Tiniest Accelerators A single elementary particle, or a single ion, can be confined in a tiny accelerator called a particle trap. A single electron was held this way for more than ten months, and antiprotons for months. Mass spectroscopy of exquisite precision is possible with such systems. CERN's TRAP Collaboration thereby compared the charge-to-mass ratios of the antiproton and proton to a precision of 90 parts per trillion, by far the most stringent CPT test done with a baryon system. The important ratio of the masses of the electron and proton have been similarly measured, as have a variety of ions masses, and the neutron mass is most accurately known from such measurements. An i...

  6. Low-energy hadronic cross sections measurements at BABAR and g-2 of the muon

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The LO hadronic vacuum polarization (VP) contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment $a_\\mu$ is obtained as the integral as a function of energy of an expression that involves the ratio of the $e^+e^- \\rightarrow \\mathrm{hadron}$ cross section to the pointlike muon pair cross section. The former is extracted from experimental data for individual hadronic final states at low energies, and from perturbative QCD at high energies. The BaBar experiment at SLAC has a programme of systematic measurement of the production of the lowest-rest-mass hadronic final states, those that contribute most significantly to the integral. To that purpose, we use a method in which, while the PEP-II storage ring is operated at a constant energy in the center of mass system, $\\sqrt{s}$, of about 10.6 GeV, events are reconstructed and selected which have been produced with a hadronic final state together with a high-energy photon which may (photon tagging) or may not (no tagging) be observed. In our kinematic configuration the ...

  7. Energy Consumption and Indoor Climate Measurements in New Low-Energy Houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Ove; Andersen, Karen Holmegaard; Bergsøe, Niels Christian

    2013-01-01

    The CLASS1 project commenced in 2007 and involves 5 countries: Denmark, Estonia, France, Italy and Romania. Originally, 442 dwellings, a kindergarten and an activity centre for elderly people were to be designed and constructed as "low-energy class 1" houses according to requirements set by the M......The CLASS1 project commenced in 2007 and involves 5 countries: Denmark, Estonia, France, Italy and Romania. Originally, 442 dwellings, a kindergarten and an activity centre for elderly people were to be designed and constructed as "low-energy class 1" houses according to requirements set...... project used the requirements to low-energy buildings as a driving force for the technological development of 6 different key building components/technologies: windows, slab and foundation insulation systems, bio-mass gasification, local district heating distribution networks, ventilation heat recovery...

  8. PIP-II Injector Test’s Low Energy Beam Transport: Commissioning and Selected Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemyakin, A. [Fermilab; Alvarez, M. [Fermilab; Andrews, R. [Fermilab; Carneiro, J.-P. [Fermilab; Chen, A. [Fermilab; Hanna, B. [Fermilab; Prost, L. [Fermilab; Scarpine, V. [Fermilab; D' Arcy, R. [University Coll. London; Wiesner, C. [Goethe U., Frankfurt (main)

    2016-09-16

    The PIP2IT test accelerator is under construction at Fermilab. Its ion source and Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) in its initial (straight) configuration have been commissioned to full specification parameters. This paper introduces the LEBT design and summarizes the outcome of the commissioning activities.

  9. Results of low energy background measurements with the Liquid Scintillation Detector (LSD) of the Mont Blanc Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglietta, M.; Badino, G.; Bologna, G. F.; Castagnoli, C.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Saavedra, O.; Trinchero, G. C.; Vernetto, S.; Dadykin, V. L.

    1985-01-01

    The 90 tons liquid scintillation detector (LSD) is fully running since October 1984, at a depth of 5,200 hg/sq cm of standard rock underground. The main goal is to search for neutrino bursts from collapsing stars. The experiment is very sensitive to detect low energy particles and has a very good signature to gamma-rays from (n,p) reaction which follows the upsilon e + p yields n + e sup + neutrino capture. The analysis of data is presented and the preliminary results on low energy measurements are discussed.

  10. {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C cross-section measurements at low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barron-Palos, L.; Chavez L., E.; Huerta H., A.; Ortiz, M.E. [Ciudad Universitaria, Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Mexico (Mexico); Murillo O., G.; Aguilera R., E.; Martinez Q., E.; Moreno, E.; Policroniades R., R.; Varela G., A. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento del Acelerador, Salazar (Mexico)

    2005-09-01

    In order to study the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C reaction at low energies, a combination of an intense heavy ion beam on a thick target and the detection of secondary gamma rays on a well-shielded germanium detector has been used. Preliminary cross-section results are reported for E{sub c.m.}=2.63-3.45 MeV. (orig.)

  11. Application of a Low-Energy Electron Beam as a Tool for ultrashort bunch length measurement in circular machines

    CERN Document Server

    Nikiforov, D A; Malyutin, D; Matveenko, A; Rusinov, K; Starostenko, A A

    2017-01-01

    A new diagnostic device designed for non-destructive ultrashort bunch length measurement is described. The operating principle of the device and the measuring technique are described. The possible scheme of arrangement of the device elements are described. The results of simulations of EBP application for different beams under investigation are presented. The quality requirements of the low energy testing beam are considered and resolving detector ability is determined.

  12. Review of personal monitoring techniques for the measurement of absorbed dose from external beta and low energy photon radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Poul

    1986-01-01

    The techniques available at present for personal monitoring of doses from external beta and low energy photon radiation are reviewed. The performance of currently used dosimetry systems is compared with that recommended internationally, and developments for improving the actual performance...... are outlined. The subjects dealt with compromise: the quantity to be measured, the required accuracy of measurement, calibration procedures, and dosemeter design including the main parameters influencing the energy and angular response of the dosemeter, such as detector thickness, filter thickness, dosemeter...

  13. Direct measurement of low-energy $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Depalo, R; Aliotta, M; Anders, M; Bemmerer, D; Best, A; Boeltzig, A; Broggini, C; Bruno, C G; Caciolli, A; Ciani, G F; Corvisiero, P; Davinson, T; Di Leva, A; Elekes, Z; Ferraro, F; Formicola, A; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, Gy; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Menegazzo, R; Mossa, V; Pantaleo, F R; Piatti, D; Prati, P; Straniero, O; Szücs, T; Takács, M P; Trezzi, D

    2016-01-01

    The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction is the most uncertain process in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. At temperatures relevant for nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars and classical novae, its uncertainty is mainly due to a large number of predicted but hitherto unobserved resonances at low energy. Purpose: A new direct study of low energy $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na resonances has been performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA), in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. Method: The proton capture on $^{22}$Ne was investigated in direct kinematics, delivering an intense proton beam to a $^{22}$Ne gas target. $\\gamma$ rays were detected with two high-purity germanium detectors enclosed in a copper and lead shielding suppressing environmental radioactivity. Results: Three resonances at 156.2 keV ($\\omega\\gamma$ = (1.48\\,$\\pm$\\,0.10)\\,$\\cdot$\\,10$^{-7}$ eV), 189.5 keV ($\\omega\\gamma$ = (1.87\\,$\\pm$\\,0.06)\\,$\\cdot$\\,10$^{-6}$ eV) and 259.7 keV ($\\o...

  14. Activation measurement of the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be cross section at low energy

    CERN Document Server

    Bemmerer, D; Costantini, H; Formicola, A; Gyürky, G; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Corvisiero, P; Elekes, Z; Fülöp, Z; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Laubenstein, M; Lemut, A; Limata, B; Lozza, V; Marta, M; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C R; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P; Gyurky, Gy.; Fulop, Zs.

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear physics input from the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be cross section is a major uncertainty in the fluxes of 7Be and 8B neutrinos from the Sun predicted by solar models and in the 7Li abundance obtained in big-bang nucleosynthesis calculations. The present work reports on a new precision experiment using the activation technique at energies directly relevant to big-bang nucleosynthesis. Previously such low energies had been reached experimentally only by the prompt-gamma technique and with inferior precision. Using a windowless gas target, high beam intensity and low background gamma-counting facilities, the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be cross section has been determined at 127, 148 and 169 keV center-of-mass energy with a total uncertainty of 4%. The sources of systematic uncertainty are discussed in detail. The present data can be used in big-bang nucleosynthesis calculations and to constrain the extrapolation of the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be astrophysical S-factor to solar energies.

  15. A Precision Low-Energy Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastromarino, P.

    2005-01-26

    The E-158 experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) measures the parity-violating cross-section asymmetry in electron-electron (Moeller) scattering at low Q{sup 2}. This asymmetry, whose Standard Model prediction is roughly -150 parts per billion (ppb), is directly proportional to (1-4 sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}), where {theta}{sub W} is the weak mixing angle. Measuring this asymmetry to within 10% provides an important test of the Standard Model at the quantum loop level and probes for new physics at the TeV scale. The experiment employs the SLAC 50 GeV electron beam, scattering it off a liquid hydrogen target. A system of magnets and collimators is used to isolate and focus the Moeller scattering events into an integrating calorimeter. The electron beam is generated at the source using a strained, gradient-doped GaAs photocathode, which produces roughly 5 x 10{sup 11} electrons/pulse (at a beam rate of 120 Hz) with {approx} 80% longitudinal polarization. The helicity of the beam can be rapidly switched, eliminating problems associated with slow drifts. Helicity-correlations in the beam parameters (charge, position, angle and energy) are minimized at the source and corrected for using precision beam monitoring devices.

  16. Electrostatic interaction between Interball-2 and the ambient plasma. 2. Influence on the low energy ion measurements with Hyperboloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamelin

    Full Text Available The measurement of the thermal ion distributions in space is always strongly influenced by the ion motion through the complex 3D electrostatic potential structure built around a charged spacecraft. In this work, we study the related aberrations of the ion distribution detected on board, with special application to the case of the Hyperboloid instrument borne by the Interball-2 auroral satellite. Most of the time, the Interball-2 high altitude auroral satellite is charged at some non-negligible positive potential with respect to the ambient plasma, as shown in part 1; in consequence, the measurement of magnetospheric low energy ions (< 80 eV with the Hyperboloid instrument can be disturbed by the complex electric potential environment of the satellite. In the case of positive charging, as in previous experiments, a negative bias is applied to the Hyperboloid structure in order to reduce this effect and to keep as much as possible the opportunity to detect very low energy ions. Then, the ions reaching the Hyperboloid entrance windows would have travelled across a continuous huge electrostatic lens involving various spatial scales from ~ 10 cm (detector radius to ~ 10 m (satellite antennas. Neglecting space charge effects, we have computed the ion trajectories that are able to reach the Hyperboloid windows within their acceptance angles. There are three main results: (i for given values of the satellite potential, and for each direction of arrival (each window, we deduced the related energy cutoff; (ii we found that all ions in the energy channel, including the cutoff, can come from a large range of directions in the unperturbed plasma, especially when the solar panels or antennas act as electrostatic mirrors; (iii for higher energy channels, the disturbances are reduced to small angular shifts. Biasing of the aperture is not very effective with the Hyperboloid instrument (as on previous missions with instruments installed close to the spacecraft

  17. Electrostatic interaction between Interball-2 and the ambient plasma. 2. Influence on the low energy ion measurements with Hyperboloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hamelin

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the thermal ion distributions in space is always strongly influenced by the ion motion through the complex 3D electrostatic potential structure built around a charged spacecraft. In this work, we study the related aberrations of the ion distribution detected on board, with special application to the case of the Hyperboloid instrument borne by the Interball-2 auroral satellite. Most of the time, the Interball-2 high altitude auroral satellite is charged at some non-negligible positive potential with respect to the ambient plasma, as shown in part 1; in consequence, the measurement of magnetospheric low energy ions (< 80 eV with the Hyperboloid instrument can be disturbed by the complex electric potential environment of the satellite. In the case of positive charging, as in previous experiments, a negative bias is applied to the Hyperboloid structure in order to reduce this effect and to keep as much as possible the opportunity to detect very low energy ions. Then, the ions reaching the Hyperboloid entrance windows would have travelled across a continuous huge electrostatic lens involving various spatial scales from ~ 10 cm (detector radius to ~ 10 m (satellite antennas. Neglecting space charge effects, we have computed the ion trajectories that are able to reach the Hyperboloid windows within their acceptance angles. There are three main results: (i for given values of the satellite potential, and for each direction of arrival (each window, we deduced the related energy cutoff; (ii we found that all ions in the energy channel, including the cutoff, can come from a large range of directions in the unperturbed plasma, especially when the solar panels or antennas act as electrostatic mirrors; (iii for higher energy channels, the disturbances are reduced to small angular shifts. Biasing of the aperture is not very effective with the Hyperboloid instrument (as on previous missions with instruments installed close to the spacecraft

  18. Solar shading for low energy use and daylight quality in offices: Simulations, measurements and design tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, M.C.

    2001-11-01

    This thesis investigates the impact of solar shading devices on energy use and daylight quality in office rooms. The impact on energy use is analysed through computer simulations with the dynamic energy simulation program Derob-LTH while the impact on daylight quality is investigated through measurements in full-scale experimental office rooms and simulations with the program Radiance. This thesis also includes a literature review of research on solar shading as well as design tools to incorporate shading devices at an early stage in the design of buildings. This thesis indicates that, in cold countries, shading devices may provide more annual energy savings than any solar-protective (reflective, tinted) glazing and that the optimum glazing transmittance is orientation- and climate-dependent. For example, high annual energy savings are obtained on the south facade with higher transmittance glazings (compared with the east and west facade) because the potential for passive solar gain utilisation in the winter is high in comparison with the annual cooling demand. Exterior shading devices like awnings and overhangs may reduce the cooling demand dramatically but they are not suitable as daylight (glare) control devices. Devices like screens and venetian blinds are preferable because they cover the entire window area, which prevents sunlight patches in the room and the direct view of the bright sky. Screens and venetian blinds also reduce daylight in the room to levels that are suitable for computer work. However, it is essential that the screen is of a diffusing type since screens with a strong (specular) transmittance component result in poor daylight quality. The study on daylight quality also indicated that a screen transmittance of around 15 % may be optimum for a standard (3.5 by 6.0 m{sup 2}) south-oriented office room with a window covering around 25 % of the facade area (12 % of the floor area)

  19. Low energy supersymmetry phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, H.; Chen, C.H. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Bartl, A. [Universitaet Wien (Austria). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik; Feng, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Fujii, K. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba (Japan); Gunion, J. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kamon, T.; Lopez, J.L. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics; Kao, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy] [and others

    1995-04-01

    The authors summarize the current status and future prospects for low energy (weak scale) supersymmetry. In particular, they evaluate the capabilities of various e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, p{bar p} and pp colliders to discover evidence for supersymmetric particles. Furthermore, assuming supersymmetry is discovered, they discuss capabilities of future facilities to disentangle the anticipated spectrum of super-particles, and, via precision measurements, to test mass and coupling parameters for comparison with various theoretical expectations. The authors then comment upon the complementarity of proposed hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} machines for a comprehensive study of low energy supersymmetry.

  20. Low Energy Supersymmetry Phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, J.

    2003-06-16

    We summarize the current status and future prospects for low energy (weak scale) supersymmetry. In particular, we evaluate the capabilities of various e{sup +}e{sup -}, p{bar p} and pp colliders to discover evidence for supersymmetric particles. Furthermore, assuming supersymmetry is discovered, we discuss capabilities of future facilities to dis-entangle the anticipated spectrum of super-particles, and, via precision measurements, to test mass and coupling parameters for comparison with various theoretical expectations. We comment upon the complementarity of proposed hadron and e{sup +}e{sup -} machines for a comprehensive study of low energy supersymmetry.

  1. Low energy supersymmetry phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, H.; Chen, C.H. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Bartl, A. [Univ. Wien (Austria). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik] [and others

    1995-03-01

    The authors summarize the current status and future prospects for low energy (weak scale) supersymmetry. In particular, they evaluate the capabilities of various e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, p{anti p} and pp colliders to discover evidence for supersymmetric particles. Furthermore, assuming supersymmetry is discovered, they discuss capabilities of future facilities to disentangle the anticipated spectrum of superparticles, and, via precision measurements, to test mass and coupling parameters for comparison with various theoretical expectations. They comment upon the complementarity of proposed hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} machines for a comprehensive study of low energy supersymmetry.

  2. A transverse emittance and acceptance measurement system in a low-energy beam transport line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, H; Miyawaki, N; Kurashima, S; Okumura, S

    2014-02-01

    A transverse beam emittance and acceptance measurement system has been developed to visualize the relationship between the injected beam emittance and the acceptance of a cyclotron. The system is composed of a steering magnet, two pairs of slits to limit the horizontal and vertical phase-space, a beam intensity detector just behind the slits for the emittance measurement, and a beam intensity detector in the cyclotron for the acceptance measurement. The emittance is obtained by scanning the slits and measuring the beam intensity distribution. The acceptance is obtained by measuring the distribution of relative beam transmission by injecting small emittance beams at various positions in a transverse phase-space using the slits. In the acceptance measurement, the beam from an ion source is deflected to the defined region by the slits using the steering magnet so that measurable acceptance area covers a region outside the injection beam emittance. Measurement tests were carried out under the condition of accelerating a beam of (16)O(6+) from 50.2 keV to 160 MeV. The emittance of the injected beam and the acceptance for accelerating and transporting the beam to the entrance of the extraction deflector were successfully measured. The relationship between the emittance and acceptance is visualized by displaying the results in the same phase-plane.

  3. Measurement of low-energy backscatter factors using GAFCHROMIC film and OSLDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mart, Chris J; Elson, Howard R; Lamba, Michael A S

    2012-11-08

    Some of the lowest voltages used in radiotherapy are termed Grenz and superficial X-rays of ~ 20 and ~ 100 kVp, respectively. Dosimetrically, the surface doses from these beams are calculated with the use of a free in-air air kerma measurement combined with a backscatter factor and the appropriate ratio of mass energy absorption coefficients from the measurement material to water. Alternative tools to the standard ion chamber for measuring the BSF are GAFCHROMIC EBT2 film and optically stimulated luminescent dosimeter (OSLD) crystals made from Al2O3. The scope of this project included making three different backscatter measurements with an Xstrahl-D3100 X-ray unit on the Grenz ray and superficial settings. These measurements were with OSLDs, GAFCHROMIC EBT2 film, and a PTW ionization chamber. The varied measurement methods allowed for intercomparison to determine the accuracy of the results. The ion chamber measurement was the least accurate, as expected from previous experimental findings. GAFCHROMIC EBT2 film proved to be a useful tool which gave reasonable results, and Landauer OSLDs showed good results for smaller field sizes and an increasing overresponse with larger fields. The specific backscatter factors for this machine demonstrated values about 5% higher than the universal values suggested by the AAPM and IPEMB codes of practice for the 100 kVp setting. The 20 kvp measured data from both techniques showed general agreement with those found in the BJR Supplement No. 10, indicating that this unit's Grenz ray spectrum is similar to those used in previous experimental work.

  4. Measured performance of 12 demonstation projects - IEA Task 13 "advanced solar low energy buildings"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Schultz, Jørgen Munthe; Poel, Bart

    2005-01-01

    by means of questionnaires sent to the former participants in Task 13. A small IEA working group was re-sponsible for collecting and processing the results. The paper gives a brief presentation of the houses and the applied energy saving measures. Measured and expected energy consumptions and indoor...... climate conditions are compared and differences explained. Special innovative installations and systems are de-scribed and evaluated. In general the measured energy consumption was higher than the expected values due to user influence and unforeseen technical problems but still an energy saving of 60...... % compared with typical houses was achieved. Prevention of overheating requires special attention also at northern lati-tudes. Interviews with occupants revealed the need to explain the building's behaviour thoroughly to its users and elaboration of user manuals....

  5. Microdosimetry measurements for low-energy particles using a mini TEPC with removable plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, I.-Chun; Wen, Wan-Hsin; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Tung, Chuan-Jong

    2017-08-01

    Knowledge about the single-event energy deposition in a subcellular biological target, e.g. cell nucleus, is required in order to understand the radiation action and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This energy deposition can be measured using a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Such measurements are particularly useful to find the microdosimetric spectra for mixed radiation fields comprising different radiation types and energies. In the present work, several mixed radiation fields were generated by irradiating a mini TEPC, containing a small plug inserted into the hole on the counter wall, with reactor neutrons. The plug, made of A150, boron, nitrogen, lithium or cadmium mixture, was designed to generate different ionizing particles under the neutron irradiation. The measured spectra separated the contributions to the absorbed dose from electrons (photons), protons (neutrons) and heavy ions. The lineal energy spectra demonstrated that three distinct regions of lineal energy y, were identified, i.e. the region from heavy ions at y>100 keV/μm, the region for recoil protons at 10100 keV/μm due to the 10B (n, α)7Li reaction. If one substitutes the plug material by a radionuclide, microdosimetry spectra could be measured for internal dosimetry applications.

  6. Developments toward Understanding and Improving the Low Energy Measurement Capabilities of a Fission Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundgaard, Jeremy J.

    Nuclear physicists have been recently called upon for new, high precision fission measurements to improve existing fission models, ultimately enabling engineers to design next generation reactors as well as guarding the nation's stockpile. In response, a resurgence in fission research is aimed at developing detectors to design and build new experiments to meet these needs. The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) collaboration has developed the fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) to measure neutron induced fission with unprecedented precision. The fissionTPC is annually deployed to the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center LANSCE where it operates with a neutron beam passing axially through the drift volume, irradiating heavy actinide targets to induce fission. The fissionTPC was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) TPC lab, where it is tested with spontaneous fission (SF) from radioactive sources, typically 252Cf and 244Cm, to characterize detector response, improve performance, and evolve the design. One of the experiments relevant for both nuclear energy and nonproliferation is to measure the neutron induced fission of 239Pu, which exhibits a high alpha activity, generating a large unwanted background for the fission measurements. The ratio of alpha to fission present in our neutron induced fission measurement of 239Pu is on the same order of magnitude as the 244Cm alpha/SF branching ratio. The high alpha rate required the TPC to be triggering on fission signals during beam time and we set out to build a trigger system, which, using 244Cm to produce a similar alpha to fission ratio as 239Pu in the neutron beam, we successfully demonstrated the viability of this approach. The trigger design has been evolved for use in NIFFTE's current measurements at LANSCE. In addition to several hardware and software contributions in the development and operation of the fissionTPC, a central purpose of this thesis was

  7. Measurement of Coherent π^{+} Production in Low Energy Neutrino-Carbon Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K; Andreopoulos, C; Antonova, M; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Ban, S; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bartet-Friburg, P; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blondel, A; Bolognesi, S; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buizza Avanzini, M; Calland, R G; Campbell, T; Cao, S; Caravaca Rodríguez, J; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Chikuma, N; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Collazuol, G; Coplowe, D; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Denner, P F; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Dolan, S; Drapier, O; Duffy, K E; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Feusels, T; Finch, A J; Fiorentini, G A; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, D; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Garcia, A; Giffin, S G; Giganti, C; Gizzarelli, F; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Hadley, D R; Haegel, L; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Harada, J; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayashino, T; Hayato, Y; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Hogan, M; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Hosomi, F; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Intonti, R A; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Jiang, M; Johnson, S; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kim, H; Kim, J; King, S; Kisiel, J; Knight, A; Knox, A; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Koga, T; Konaka, A; Kondo, K; Kopylov, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Lasorak, P; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Liptak, Z J; Litchfield, R P; Li, X; Longhin, A; Lopez, J P; Ludovici, L; Lu, X; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martins, P; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Ma, W Y; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mefodiev, A; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mine, S; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K G; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, K D; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nantais, C; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; Novella, P; Nowak, J; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Ovsyannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Patel, N D; Pavin, M; Payne, D; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Pickering, L; Pinzon Guerra, E S; Pistillo, C; Popov, B; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J-M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radermacher, T; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riccio, C; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Rychter, A; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; Sánchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shah, R; Shaikhiev, A; Shaker, F; Shaw, D; Shiozawa, M; Shirahige, T; Short, S; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Stewart, T; Stowell, P; Suda, Y; Suvorov, S; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thakore, T; Thompson, L F; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vallari, Z; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Wakamatsu, K; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Warzycha, W; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, M; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yoo, J; Yoshida, K; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Żmuda, J

    2016-11-04

    We report the first measurement of the flux-averaged cross section for charged current coherent π^{+} production on carbon for neutrino energies less than 1.5 GeV, and with a restriction on the final state phase space volume in the T2K near detector, ND280. Comparisons are made with predictions from the Rein-Sehgal coherent production model and the model by Alvarez-Ruso et al., the latter representing the first implementation of an instance of the new class of microscopic coherent models in a neutrino interaction Monte Carlo event generator. We observe a clear event excess above background, disagreeing with the null results reported by K2K and SciBooNE in a similar neutrino energy region. The measured flux-averaged cross sections are below those predicted by both the Rein-Sehgal and Alvarez-Ruso et al.

  8. Measurement of Coherent π+ Production in Low Energy Neutrino-Carbon Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Andreopoulos, C.; Antonova, M.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Ban, S.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bartet-Friburg, P.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Berardi, V.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blondel, A.; Bolognesi, S.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Calland, R. G.; Campbell, T.; Cao, S.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Chikuma, N.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Collazuol, G.; Coplowe, D.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Denner, P. F.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dolan, S.; Drapier, O.; Duffy, K. E.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, D.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Garcia, A.; Giffin, S. G.; Giganti, C.; Gizzarelli, F.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Harada, J.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Hogan, M.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Hosomi, F.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Intonti, R. A.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kim, H.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Knight, A.; Knox, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Konaka, A.; Kondo, K.; Kopylov, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Lasorak, P.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Liptak, Z. J.; Litchfield, R. P.; Li, X.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Ludovici, L.; Lu, X.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Ma, W. Y.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Mine, S.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, K. D.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Novella, P.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Patel, N. D.; Pavin, M.; Payne, D.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pickering, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radermacher, T.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Rychter, A.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaikhiev, A.; Shaker, F.; Shaw, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Shirahige, T.; Short, S.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Stewart, T.; Stowell, P.; Suda, Y.; Suvorov, S.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thakore, T.; Thompson, L. F.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vallari, Z.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Wakamatsu, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Warzycha, W.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoo, J.; Yoshida, K.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    We report the first measurement of the flux-averaged cross section for charged current coherent π+ production on carbon for neutrino energies less than 1.5 GeV, and with a restriction on the final state phase space volume in the T2K near detector, ND280. Comparisons are made with predictions from the Rein-Sehgal coherent production model and the model by Alvarez-Ruso et al., the latter representing the first implementation of an instance of the new class of microscopic coherent models in a neutrino interaction Monte Carlo event generator. We observe a clear event excess above background, disagreeing with the null results reported by K2K and SciBooNE in a similar neutrino energy region. The measured flux-averaged cross sections are below those predicted by both the Rein-Sehgal and Alvarez-Ruso et al. models.

  9. Measurement of light and charge yield of low-energy electronic recoils in liquid xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzke, L. W.; Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; Plante, G.; Weber, M.

    2017-11-01

    The dependence of the light and charge yield of liquid xenon on the applied electric field and recoil energy is important for dark matter detectors using liquid xenon time projections chambers. Few measurements have been made of this field dependence at recoil energies less than 10 keV. In this paper, we present results of such measurements using a specialized detector. Recoil energies are determined via the Compton coincidence technique at four drift fields relevant for liquid xenon dark matter detectors: 0.19, 0.48, 1.02, and 2.32 kV /cm . Mean recoil energies down to 1 keV were measured with unprecedented precision. We find that the charge and light yield are anticorrelated above ˜3 keV and that the field dependence becomes negligible below ˜6 keV . However, below 3 keV, we find a charge yield significantly higher than expectation and a reconstructed energy deviating from linearity.

  10. Space Charge Correction on Emittance Measurement of Low Energy Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treado, Colleen J.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst

    2012-09-07

    The goal of any particle accelerator is to optimize the transport of a charged particle beam along a set path by confining the beam to a small region close to the design trajectory and directing it accurately along the beamline. To do so in the simplest fashion, accelerators use a system of magnets that exert approximately linear electromagnetic forces on the charged beam. These electromagnets bend the beam along the desired path, in the case of bending magnets, and constrain the beam to the desired area through alternating focusing and defocusing effects, in the case of quadrupole magnets. We can model the transport of such a beam through transfer matrices representing the actions of the various beamline elements. However, space charge effects, produced from self electric fields within the beam, defocus the beam and must be accounted for in the calculation of beam emittance. We present below the preliminary results of a MATLAB code built to model the transport of a charged particle beam through an accelerator and measure the emittance under the influence of space charge effects. We demonstrate the method of correctly calculating the emittance of a beam under space charge effects using a least square fit to determine the initial properties of the beam given the beam size measured at a specific point after transport.

  11. Measurement of coherent $\\pi^{+}$ production in low energy neutrino-Carbon scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K.

    2016-11-04

    We report the first measurement of the flux-averaged cross section for charged current coherent $\\pi^{+}$ production on carbon for neutrino energies less than 1.5 GeV to a restricted final state phase space region in the T2K near detector, ND280. Comparisons are made with predictions from the Rein-Sehgal coherent production model and the model by Alvarez-Ruso {\\it et al.}, the latter representing the first implementation of an instance of the new class of microscopic coherent models in a neutrino interaction Monte Carlo event generator. This results contradicts the null results reported by K2K and SciBooNE in a similar neutrino energy region.

  12. First measurement with a new setup for low-energy Coulomb excitation studies at INFN LNL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchini, M.; Hadyńska-Klȩk, K.; Nannini, A.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Goasduff, A.; Testov, D.; John, P. R.; Mengoni, D.; Zielińska, M.; Bazzacco, D.; Benzoni, G.; Boso, A.; Cocconi, P.; Chiari, M.; Doherty, D. T.; Galtarossa, F.; Jaworski, G.; Komorowska, M.; Matejska-Minda, M.; Melon, B.; Menegazzo, R.; Napiorkowski, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Ottanelli, M.; Perego, A.; Ramina, L.; Rampazzo, M.; Recchia, F.; Riccetto, S.; Rosso, D.; Siciliano, M.; Sona, P.

    2017-07-01

    A new segmented particle detector, SPIDER, has been designed to be used as an ancillary device with the GALILEO γ-ray spectrometer, as well as with other multi-detector γ-ray arrays that will be available at LNL in the future (e.g. AGATA). To commission the SPIDER-GALILEO experimental setup, a multi-step Coulomb excitation experiment was carried out with a 240 MeV beam of 66Zn produced by the Tandem-XTU accelerator at INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro. The measured particle and γ-ray spectra are compared with the results of detailed GEANT4 simulations which used the Coulomb excitation cross sections, estimated with the computer code GOSIA, as an input. The preliminary results indicate that precise transition probabilities will be obtained which are essential for solving discrepancies reported in the literature for this nucleus.

  13. CDMS Detector Fabrication Improvements and Low Energy Nuclear Recoil Measurements in Germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jastram, Andrew [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-12-01

    As the CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) experiment is scaled up to tackle new dark matter parameter spaces (lower masses and cross-sections), detector production efficiency and repeatability becomes ever more important. A dedicated facility has been commissioned for SuperCDMS detector fabrication at Texas A&M University (TAMU). The fabrication process has been carefully tuned using this facility and its equipment. Production of successfully tested detectors has been demonstrated. Significant improvements in detector performance have been made using new fabrication methods, equipment, and tuning of process parameters. This work has demonstrated the capability for production of next generation CDMS SNOLAB detectors. Additionally, as the dark matter parameter space is probed further, careful calibrations of detector response to nuclear recoil interactions must be performed in order to extract useful information (in relation to dark matter particle characterzations) from experimental results. A neutron beam of tunable energy is used in conjunction with a commercial radiation detector to characterize ionization energy losses in germanium during nuclear recoil events. Data indicates agreement with values predicted by the Lindhard equation, providing a best-t k-value of 0.146.

  14. Ion velocities in the presheath of electronegative, radio-frequency plasmas measured by low-energy cutoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolewski, Mark A.; Wang, Yicheng; Goyette, Amanda [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2016-07-11

    Simple kinematic considerations indicate that, under certain conditions in radio-frequency (rf) plasmas, the amplitude of the low-energy peak in ion energy distributions (IEDs) measured at an electrode depends sensitively on ion velocities upstream, at the presheath/sheath boundary. By measuring this amplitude, the velocities at which ions exit the presheath can be determined and long-standing controversies regarding presheath transport can be resolved. Here, IEDs measured in rf-biased, inductively coupled plasmas in CF{sub 4} gas determined the presheath exit velocities of all significant positive ions: CF{sub 3}{sup +}, CF{sub 2}{sup +}, CF{sup +}, and F{sup +}. At higher bias voltages, we detected essentially the same velocity for all four ions. For all ions, measured velocities were significantly lower than the Bohm velocity and the electropositive ion sound speed. Neither is an accurate boundary condition for rf sheaths in electronegative gases: under certain low-frequency, high-voltage criteria defined here, either yields large errors in predicted IEDs. These results indicate that many widely used sheath models will need to be revised.

  15. Low energy RBS-channeling measurement system with the use of a time-of-flight scattered ion detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Masataka; Kobayashi, Naoto; Hayashi, Nobuyuki [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-07-01

    We have developed a low energy Rutherford backscattering spectrometry-ion channeling measurement system for the analysis of thin films and solid surfaces with the use of several tens keV hydrogen ions and a time-of-flight particle energy spectrometer. For the detection of the scattered ions new TOF spectrometer has been developed, which consists of two micro-channel-plate detectors. The pulsing of the primary ion beam is not necessary for this type of TOF measurement, and it is possible to observe continues scattered ion beams. The dimension of whole system is very compact compared to the conventional RBS-channeling measurement system with the use of MeV He ions. The energy resolution, {delta} E/E, for 25 keV H{sup +} was 4.1%, which corresponds to the depth resolution of 4.8 nm for silicon. The depth resolution of our system is better than that of conventional RBS system with MeV helium ions and solid state detectors. We have demonstrated the ion channeling measurement by this system with 25 keV hydrogen ions. The system can be available well to the analysis of thin films and solid surfaces with the use of the ion channeling effect. The observation of the reaction between Fe and hydrogen terminated silicon surface was also demonstrated. (J.P.N.)

  16. Measurement of low-energy Na^+ -- Na total collision rate in an ion--neutral hybrid trap

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, D S; Kwolek, J M; Blümel, R; Narducci, F A; Smith, W W

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the total elastic and resonant charge-exchange ion-atom collision rate coefficient $k_\\mathrm{ia}$ of cold sodium (\\ce{Na}) with optically-dark low energy \\ce{Na+} ions in a hybrid ion-neutral trap. To determine $k_\\mathrm{ia}$, we measured the trap loading and loss from both a \\ce{Na} magneto-optical trap (MOT) and a linear radio frequency quadrupole Paul trap. We found the total rate coefficient to be $7.4 \\pm 1.9 \\times 10^{-8}$ cm$^3$/s for the type I \\ce{Na} MOT immersed within an $\\approx 140$ K ion cloud and $1.10 \\pm 0.25 \\times 10^{-7}$ cm$^3$/s for the type II \\ce{Na} MOT within an $\\approx 1070$ K ion cloud. Our measurements show excellent agreement with previously reported theoretical fully quantal \\textit{ab initio} calculations. In the process of determining the total rate coefficient, we demonstrate that a MOT can be used to probe an optically dark ion cloud's spatial distribution within a hybrid trap.

  17. Low-energy neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Ludhova, Livia

    2016-01-01

    There exist several kinds of sources emitting neutrinos in the MeV energy range. These low-energy neutrinos from different sources can be often detected by the same multipurpose detectors. The status-of-art of the feld of solar neutrinos, geoneutrinos, and the search for sterile neutrino with artifcial neutrino sources is provided here; other neutrino sources, as for example reactor or high-energy neutrinos, are described elsewhere. For each of these three felds, the present-day motivation and open questions, as well as the latest experimental results and future perspectives are discussed.

  18. A G/NARRLI Effort. Measuring the Ionization Yield of Low-Energy Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Tenzing Henry Yatish [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Liquid argon has long been used for particle detection due to its attractive drift properties, ample abundance, and reasonable density. The response of liquid argon to lowenergy O(102 -1044 eV) interactions is, however, largely unexplored. Weakly interacting massive particles such as neutrinos and hypothetical dark-matter particles (WIMPs) are predicted to coherently scatter on atomic nuclei, leaving only an isolated low-energy nuclear recoil as evidence. The response of liquid argon to low-energy nuclear recoils must be studied to determine the sensitivity of liquid argon based detectors to these unobserved interactions. Detectors sensitive to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering may be used to monitor nuclear reactors from a distance, to detect neutrinos from supernova, and to test the predicted behavior of neutrinos. Additionally, direct detection of hypothetical weakly interacting dark matter would be a large step toward understanding the substance that accounts for nearly 27% of the universe. In this dissertation I discuss a small dual-phase (liquid-gas) argon proportional scintillation counter built to study the low-energy regime and several novel calibration and characterization techniques developed to study the response of liquid argon to low-energy O(102 -104 eV) interactions.

  19. Measurements of low energy observables, elastic pp interactions and exclusive production in proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bussey, Peter; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A summary is given of recent ATLAS results at the LHC, covering a number of areas that reflect the Collaboration’s work in low energy physical observables in multiparticle events, elastic photon-photon scattering, proton-proton scattering.and the tagging of diffractive events.

  20. Low-Energy Proton Testing Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Heidel, David F.; Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Xapsos, M.A.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Kim, Hak S.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Use of low-energy protons and high-energy light ions is becoming necessary to investigate current-generation SEU thresholds. Systematic errors can dominate measurements made with low-energy protons. Range and energy straggling contribute to systematic error. Low-energy proton testing is not a step-and-repeat process. Low-energy protons and high-energy light ions can be used to measure SEU cross section of single sensitive features; important for simulation.

  1. Low energy γ- γ and e -- γ PAC measurements using APDs and the probe nuclei 83Rb(83Kr) and 83 m Kr(83Kr)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenz, M.; Vianden, R.

    2016-12-01

    In the field of Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) measurements Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) are rarely used, despite their favourable properties for fast counting purposes at low energies. This work demonstrates their application in combination with a simple and cheap custom build voltage sensitive preamplifier module. Using the PAC nuclei 83Rb(83Kr) and 83mKr(83Kr), the time resolution of the set-up is analysed and the feasibility of precise timing measurements is shown.

  2. Measurements on the gas desorption yield of the oxygen-free copper irradiated with low-energy Xe10+ and O+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Z. Q.; Li, P.; Yang, J. C.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xie, W. J.; Zheng, W. H.; Liu, X. J.; Chang, J. J.; Luo, C.; Meng, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, Y. M.; Yin, Y.; Chai, Z.

    2017-10-01

    Heavy ion beam lost on the accelerator vacuum wall will release quantity of gas molecules and make the vacuum system deteriorate seriously. This phenomenon is called dynamic vacuum effect, observed at CERN, GSI and BNL, leading to the decrease of beam lifetime when increasing beam intensity. Heavy ion-induced gas desorption, which results in dynamic vacuum effect, becomes one of the most important problems for future accelerators proposed to operate with intermediate charge state beams. In order to investigate the mechanism of this effect and find the solution method for the IMP future project High Intensity heavy-ion Accelerator Facility (HIAF), which is designed to extract 1 × 1011 uranium particles with intermediate charge state per cycle, two dedicated experiment setups have been installed at the beam line of the CSR and the 320 kV HV platform respectively. Recently, experiment was performed at the 320 kV HV platform to study effective gas desorption with oxygen-free copper target irradiated with continuous Xe10+ beam and O+ beam in low energy regime. Gas desorption yield in this energy regime was calculated and the link between gas desorption and electronic energy loss in Cu target was proved. These results will be used to support simulations about dynamic vacuum effect and optimizations about efficiency of collimators to be installed in the HIAF main synchrotron BRing, and will also provide guidance for future gas desorption measurements in high energy regime.

  3. Inside bluetooth low energy

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Naresh

    2013-01-01

    Bluetooth Low Energy (LE) is one of the latest enhancement to Bluetooth technology and, as the name suggests, it is aimed at ultra low power devices, such as heart rate monitors, thermometers, and sensors. Due to very low power consumption, devices compliant with this standard can operate for several years on coin cell batteries without the need for recharging. This cutting-edge book helps you understand the whats , whys , and hows of Bluetooth LE. It includes a broad view of the technology, identifies the various building blocks, and explains how they come together. You also find discussions on Bluetooth basics, providing the background information needed to master Bluetooth LE.The book explains the architecture of Bluetooth LE stack and the functionality provided by each of the layers. You find expert guidance in setting up your own system in a quick and efficient manner with inexpensive, easily available hardware and just a couple of PCs running Linux. This unique volume features two chapters that are dedi...

  4. Monte Carlo modelling of Germanium detectors for the measurement of low energy photons in internal dosimetry: Results of an international comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Ros, J.M. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: jm.gomezros@ciemat.es; Carlan, L. de [CEA DRT/LIST/DETECS/LNHB/LMD, Bat 534, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette, Cedex (France); IRSN DRPH/SDI/LEDI, BP6, F-92262, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Cedex (France); Franck, D. [IRSN DRPH/SDI/LEDI, BP6, F-92262, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Cedex (France); Gualdrini, G. [ENEA ION-IRP, Via dei Colli 16, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Lis, M.; Lopez, M.A.; Moraleda, M. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Zankl, M. [GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Badal, A. [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, UPC, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Capello, K. [Human Monitoring Laboratory (Canada); Cowan, P. [Serco Assurance, Bld. A32, Winfrith Tech. Centre Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset DT2 8DH (United Kingdom); Ferrari, P. [ENEA ION-IRP, Via dei Colli 16, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Heide, B. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Henniger, J. [Technical University of Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Hooley, V. [Serco Assurance, Bld. A32, Winfrith Tech. Centre Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset DT2 8DH (United Kingdom); Hunt, J. [IRD, Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, Recreio, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Kinase, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Kramer, G.H. [Human Monitoring Laboratory (Canada); Loehnert, D. [Technical University of Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Lucas, S. [LARN Laboratory, University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)] (and others)

    2008-02-15

    This communication summarizes the results concerning the Monte Carlo (MC) modelling of Germanium detectors for the measurement of low energy photons arising from the 'International comparison on MC modelling for in vivo measurement of Americium in a knee phantom' organized within the EU Coordination Action CONRAD (Coordinated Network for Radiation Dosimetry) as a joint initiative of EURADOS working groups 6 (computational dosimetry) and 7 (internal dosimetry). MC simulations proved to be an applicable way to obtain the calibration factor that needs to be used for in vivo measurements.

  5. Space-charge compensation measurements in electron cyclotron resonance ion source low energy beam transport lines with a retarding field analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklehner, D; Leitner, D; Cole, D; Machicoane, G; Tobos, L

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we describe the first systematic measurement of beam neutralization (space charge compensation) in the ECR low energy transport line with a retarding field analyzer, which can be used to measure the potential of the beam. Expected trends for the space charge compensation levels such as increase with residual gas pressure, beam current, and beam density could be observed. However, the overall levels of neutralization are consistently low (<60%). The results and the processes involved for neutralizing ion beams are discussed for conditions typical for ECR injector beam lines. The results are compared to a simple theoretical beam plasma model as well as simulations.

  6. Entanglement creation in low-energy scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weder, Ricardo [Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique Paris-Rocquencourt, Projet POEMS, Domaine de Voluceau-Rocquencourt, BP 105, F-78153, Le Chesnay Cedex (France)

    2011-12-15

    We study the entanglement creation in the low-energy scattering of two particles in three dimensions, for a general class of interaction potentials that are not required to be spherically symmetric. The incoming asymptotic state, before the collision, is a product of two normalized Gaussian states. After the scattering, the particles are entangled. We take as a measure of the entanglement the purity of one of them. We provide a rigorous explicit computation, with error bound, of the leading order of the purity at low energy. The entanglement depends strongly on the difference of the masses. It takes its minimum when the masses are equal, and it increases rapidly with the difference of the masses. It is quite remarkable that the anisotropy of the potential gives no contribution to the leading order of the purity, in spite of the fact that entanglement is a second-order effect.

  7. Crystal field and low energy excitations measured by high resolution RIXS at the L edge of Cu, Ni and Mn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghiringhelli, G.; Piazzalunga, A.; Wang, X.

    2009-01-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering in the soft x-ray regime has been profiting much from technical advances that have lowered considerably the instru- mental linewidth. At the ADRESS beam line of the Swiss Light Source the SAXES spectrometer can be used to measure RIXS spectra at the L edges...

  8. The K-meson form factor and charge radius: linking low-energy data to future Jefferson Laboratory measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutov, A.F. [Samara University, Samara (Russian Federation); Troitsky, S.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary Prospect 7a, Moscow (Russian Federation); Troitsky, V.E. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, D.V. Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-15

    Starting from a successful model of the π-meson electromagnetic form factor, we calculate a similar form factor, F{sub K}(Q{sup 2}), of the charged K meson for a wide range of the momentum transfer squared, Q{sup 2}. The only remaining free parameter is to be determined from the measurements of the K-meson charge radius, r{sub K}. We fit this single parameter to the published data of the NA-7 experiment which measured F{sub K}(Q{sup 2}) at Q{sup 2} → 0 and determine our preferred range of r{sub K}, which happens to be close to recent lattice results. Still, the accuracy in the determination of r{sub K} is poor. However, future measurements of the K-meson electromagnetic form factor at Q{sup 2}

  9. FLUKA Monte Carlo assessment of the terrestrial muon flux at low energies and comparison against experimental measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Infantino, Angelo, E-mail: angelo.infantino@cern.ch [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva 23, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Blackmore, Ewart W. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada); Brugger, Markus; Alía, Rubén García [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva 23, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); Stukel, Matthew; Trinczek, Michael [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 2A3 (Canada)

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the assessment and modelling of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) particularly regarding the evaluation of the radiation effects on airline crew and passengers, interplanetary missions and on-board microelectronics. In the latter field, today the problem is not just limited to Single Event Effects (SEE) as used in avionics, but is more and more observed at ground level. Galactic cosmic muons, coming from the interaction of primary cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere, represent the most numerous species at ground level. In this work, we used the Monte Carlo code FLUKA to assess the atmospheric and terrestrial neutron and muon differential fluxes at various altitudes and specific examples such as the geographic coordinates corresponding to New York City and Vancouver. In this context, particle energy spectra were compared with references available in literature, calculation results obtained by both the QARM and EXPACS codes, as well as recently performed measurements. In addition, the zenith angular distribution, at ground level, was assessed for both neutrons and muons and compared with available references. Differential particle fluxes assessed for Vancouver were used as a primary source to simulate a muon detector currently taking data at TRIUMF to evaluate the passing and stopping terrestrial muon rate under different conditions. Finally, simulations were compared with the experimental measurements made at TRIUMF. Results show an excellent agreement between the FLUKA simulations and both references and the experimental measurements made at TRIUMF.

  10. Prediction and Measurement of X-Ray Spectral and Intensity Distributions from Low Energy Electron Impact Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David L.

    1999-01-01

    In-vacuum electron beam welding is a technology that NASA considered as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. The interaction of energetic electrons with metal produces x-rays. The radiation exposure to astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding must be characterized and minimized to insure safe operating conditions. This investigation characterized the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the United States Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA, by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine, for ground based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests consisted of Thermoluminescence Dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) and exposed to x-ray radiation generated by operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x-rays of energy less than 10 KeV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was verified. Therefore, alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by electron impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during actual operation of the in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. The calculated absorbed dose

  11. Excitation function measurements and integral yields estimation for {sup nat}Zn(p,x) reactions at low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saleh, F.S. [Physics Department, Girls College of Education in Riyadh, P.O. Box 27329, Riyadh 11417 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: ferdoasalsaleh@hotmail.com; Al Mugren, K.S. [Physics Department, Girls College of Education in Riyadh, P.O. Box 27329, Riyadh 11417 (Saudi Arabia); Azzam, A. [Nuclear Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center, AEA, Cairo (Egypt)

    2007-10-15

    Excitation functions have been measured for a number of proton-induced nuclear reactions on natural zinc in the energy range from 27.5 MeV down to their threshold energy, using the activation method on stacked foils. Excitation functions and thick target yield for the reactions leading to the formation of {sup 67}Ga,{sup 66}Ga,{sup 68}Ga,{sup 62}Zn and {sup 65}Zn are presented and compared with earlier reported experimental data. The experimental cross-sections and the production yields are tabulated; the excitation functions and the thick target yield curves are plotted in graphs.

  12. Low Energy Nuclear Reactions?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Faccini, R.

    2014-01-01

    After an introduction to the controversial problem of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR) catalyzed by neutrons on metallic hydride surfaces we present the results of an experiment, made in collaboration with ENEA Labs in Frascati, to search neutrons from plasma discharges in electrolytic cells. The negative outcome of our experiment goes in the direction of ruling out those theoretical models expecting LENR to occur in condensed matter systems under specific conditions. Our criticism on the theoretical foundations of such models will also be presented.

  13. SOLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AND LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FLOW PARAMETERS FROM INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER LOW ENERGY HYDROGEN MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; French, J. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Saul, L.; Wurz, P. [University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Bzowski, M. [Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Fuselier, S. A.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Frisch, P. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gruntman, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Mueller, H. R. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Neutral hydrogen atoms that travel into the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM) experience strong effects due to charge exchange and radiation pressure from resonant absorption and re-emission of Lyα. The radiation pressure roughly compensates for the solar gravity. As a result, interstellar hydrogen atoms move along trajectories that are quite different than those of heavier interstellar species such as helium and oxygen, which experience relatively weak radiation pressure. Charge exchange leads to the loss of primary neutrals from the LISM and the addition of new secondary neutrals from the heliosheath. IBEX observations show clear effects of radiation pressure in a large longitudinal shift in the peak of interstellar hydrogen compared with that of interstellar helium. Here, we compare results from the Lee et al. interstellar neutral model with IBEX-Lo hydrogen observations to describe the distribution of hydrogen near 1 AU and provide new estimates of the solar radiation pressure. We find over the period analyzed from 2009 to 2011 that radiation pressure divided by the gravitational force (μ) has increased slightly from μ = 0.94 ± 0.04 in 2009 to μ = 1.01 ± 0.05 in 2011. We have also derived the speed, temperature, source longitude, and latitude of the neutral H atoms and find that these parameters are roughly consistent with those of interstellar He, particularly when considering the filtration effects that act on H in the outer heliosheath. Thus, our analysis shows that over the period from 2009 to 2011, we observe signatures of neutral H consistent with the primary distribution of atoms from the LISM and a radiation pressure that increases in the early rise of solar activity.

  14. Extra Low ENergy Antiproton

    CERN Multimedia

    To produce dense antiproton beams at very low energies (110 keV), it has been proposed to install a small decelerator ring between the existing AD ring and the experimental area. Phase-space blowup during deceleration is compensated by electron cooling such that the final emittances are comparable to the 5MeV beam presently delivered by the AD. An immediate consequence is a significant increase in the number of trapped antiprotons at the experiments as outlined in the proposal CERN/SPSC-2009-026; SPCS-P-338. This report describes the machine parameters and layout of the proposal ELENA (Extra Low ENergy Antiproton)ring also gives an approximate estimate of cost and manpower needs. Since the initial estimate, published in 2007 (CERN-AB-2007-079), the ELENA design has evolved considerably. This is due to a new location in the AD hall to acommodate for the possibility of another experimental zone, as suggested by the SPCS, and also due to improvements in the ring optics and layout. The cost estimate that is prese...

  15. Distortion of pulse height spectra due to absorbers in the measurement of low-energy beta-rays with a silicon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, H; Norimura, T; Katase, A

    2002-01-01

    In measurement of beta-rays from sup 1 sup 4 C with a silicon semiconductor detector, pulse height spectra are observed to change by insertion of absorbers between the source and the detector. An obvious broad peak appears in the spectra by the insertion. An increase in the absorber thickness reduces the peak height, and shifts the peak position to the higher energy side in the spectra. On the other hand, the increase in the distance between the source and the absorber also reduces the peak height, but does not move the position of the peak. The absorption curve derived from these results shows its particular shape corresponding to the respective position of the absorber. Therefore, the distortion of the pulse height spectrum for low-energy beta-rays depends not only on the thickness of the absorber but also on its position between the source and the detector. (author)

  16. Low-energy neutrino measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-05

    Oct 5, 2012 ... describes the thermonuclear processes in the core of the Sun and foresees the emission of neutrinos from ..... nuclear power reactors in Japan and Korea, ranging up to 7 MeV. The flux-weighted aver ... neutrino–electron elastic scattering and does not benefit from the handle of the delayed coincidence with ...

  17. Energy use in low-energy and passive buildings: A comparison of predicted and measured energy; Energibruk i lavenergi- og passivbygg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langseth, Benedicte; Everett, Emilie Naerum; Havskjold, Monica

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to get a better view of the real energy use in low-energy and passive buildings in relation to what is intended in the design phase.There is obtained 64 observations of expected and measured energy use in low-energy and passive buildings. Some of these observations are the average of several homes in the same field. There have been some difficulties to obtain information on energy use in Norwegian buildings. This is partly because there are few such buildings in Norway so far, it has not been a focus on energy monitoring, and partly that some building owners have not wanted to give up information.The data show that the measured energy use in buildings, on average, is higher than expected energy consumption. There are some very large differences between expected and measured energy use, both in terms of energy for heating and total energy consumption. In addition, there is big variation in the differences - some observations have almost no difference, others have large positive deviations while others have large negative deviation.There are five main reasons for discrepancies that go on in our findings, these are: errors in building body, faulty technical equipment, improper design of the building, higher indoor temperatures than expected, and improper use of the building. The first three reasons should be relatively easy to reduce the impact of, through increased training and knowledge of the developer, better monitoring of energy use, and especially the communication between the developer and the residents / operator. Many of them Xrgia have been in contact with think they could build 'correct' at the next opportunity. For the last two reasons, indoor temperature and the use of the building, this will be largely dependent on the individual. Data show that more than one building with the same expected energy consumption can have significant variations in measured energy use. Our conclusion is that the use of the building is

  18. The Impact of Feeding Diets of High or Low Energy Concentration on Carcass Measurements and the Weight of Primal and Subprimal Lean Cuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Schinckel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Pigs from four sire lines were allocated to a series of low energy (LE, 3.15 to 3.21 Mcal ME/kg corn-soybean meal-based diets with 16% wheat midds or high energy diets (HE, 3.41 to 3.45 Mcal ME/kg with 4.5 to 4.95% choice white grease. All diets contained 6% DDGS. The HE and LE diets of each of the four phases were formulated to have equal lysine:Mcal ME ratios. Barrows (N = 2,178 and gilts (N = 2,274 were fed either high energy (HE or low energy (LE diets from 27 kg BW to target BWs of 118, 127, 131.5 and 140.6 kg. Carcass primal and subprimal cut weights were collected. The cut weights and carcass measurements were fitted to allometric functions (Y = A CWB of carcass weight. The significance of diet, sex or sire line with A and B was evaluated by linearizing the equations by log to log transformation. The effect of diet on A and B did not interact with sex or sire line. Thus, the final model was B where Diet = −0.5 for the LE and 0.5 for HE diets and A and B are sire line-sex specific parameters. cut weight = (1+bD(Diet A(CW Diet had no affect on loin, Boston butt, picnic, baby back rib, or sparerib weights (p>0.10, bD = −0.003, −0.0029, 0.0002, 0.0047, −0.0025, respectively. Diet affected ham weight (bD = −0.0046, p = 0.01, belly weight (bD = 0.0188, p = 0.001 three-muscle ham weight (bD = −0.014, p = 0.001, boneless loin weight (bD = −0.010, p = 0.001, tenderloin weight (bD = −0.023, p = 0.001, sirloin weight (bD = −0.009, p = 0.034, and fat-free lean mass (bD = −0.0145, p = 0.001. Overall, feeding the LE diets had little impact on primal cut weight except to decrease belly weight. Feeding LE diets increased the weight of lean trimmed cuts by 1 to 2 percent at the same carcass weight.

  19. Changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone in patients participating in a low-energy dietary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliett, Mary; Burke, Jeanmarie R

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone following a low-energy-density dietary intervention plus regimented supplementation program. The study design was a pre-post intervention design without a control group. Normal participants were recruited from the faculty, staff, students, and community members from a chiropractic college to participate in a 21-day weight loss program. All participants (n = 49; 36 women, 13 men; 31 ± 10.3 years of age) received freshly prepared mostly vegan meals (breakfast, lunch, and dinner) that included 1200 to 1400 daily calories (5020.8 to 5857.6 J) for the women and 1600 to 1800 (6694.4 to 7531.2 J) daily calories for the men. Nutritional supplements containing enzymes that were intended to facilitate digestion, reduce cholesterol levels, increase metabolic rate, and mediate inflammatory processes were consumed 30 minutes before each meal. The regimented supplementation program included once-daily supplementation with a green drink that contained alfalfa, wheatgrass, apple cider vinegar, and fulvic acid throughout the study period. A cleanse supplementation containing magnesium, chia, flaxseed, lemon, camu camu, cat's claw, bentonite clay, tumeric, pau d'arco, chanca piedra, stevia, zeolite clay, slippery elm, garlic, ginger, peppermint, aloe, citrus bioflavonoids, and fulvic acid was added before each meal during week 2. During week 3, the cleanse supplementation was replaced with probiotic and prebiotic supplementation. Multiple paired t tests detected clinically meaningful reductions in weight (- 8.7 ± 5.54 lb) (- 3.9 ± 2.5 kg), total cholesterol (- 30.0 ± 29.77 mg/dL), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (- 21.0 ± 25.20 mg/dL) (P < .05). There was a pre-post intervention increase in testosterone for men (111.0 ± 121.13 ng/dL, P < .05). Weight loss and improvements in total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein

  20. Exploring the Hidden Sector @ Low Energies

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Over the years we have accumulated a large number of indications for physics beyond the standard model. This new physics is often sought-after at high masses and energies. Here collider experiments can bring decisive insights. However, over recent years it has become increasingly clear that new physics can also appear at low energy, but extremely weak coupling. Experiments and observations at this `low energy frontier' therefore provide a powerful tool to gain insight into fundamental physics, which is complementary to accelerators.

  1. Updated test of the Trojan horse nucleus invariance via the d(d,p)t measurement at ultra-low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chengbo; Fu, Yuanyong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Shuhua; Meng, Qiuying

    2016-01-01

    The Trojan horse nucleus invariance for the binary reaction 2H(d,p)3H was newly tested using the quasifree reaction 2H(6Li, pt)4He via the Trojan horse nucleus 6Li = (d+{\\alpha}) breakup at ultra-low energies compared with previous indirect investigation of the same binary reaction using the 3He = (d+p) as the Trojan horse nucleus instead. The study of 2H(d,p)3H reaction is very important for the nucleosynthesis in both standard Big Bang and stellar evolution. The 2H(d,p)3H bare nucleus astrophysical S(E) factor has been measured indirectly at energies from about 400 keV down to several keV by means of the Trojan-horse method applied to the quasifree process 2H(6Li, pt)4He induced at a lithium beam energy of 9.5 MeV, which is closer to the zero-quasifree-energy point. An accurate analysis leads to the determination of the S_bare (0) = 56.7 \\pm 2.0 keV b and of the corresponding electron screening potential Ue = 13.2 \\pm 4.3 eV. The obtained results are compared with direct data as well as with previous indire...

  2. Low energy {beta} counts at the radioactivity measurement laboratory of Grenoble; Les comptages {beta} de faibles energies effectues au L.M.R Grenoble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duplaa, AM.; Chevalier, M.; Choudens, H. de [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    Radioelements emitting {beta} low energy are very useful in biology specially in labelled compounds. The counting method with liquid scintillator is very often used. The radioactivity measurement laboratory of Grenoble uses for these measures a Tricarb-Packard. The samples to be counted are: tritiated water which is measured with a dioxane scintillator; animals textures which is measured with a dioxane scintillator; animals textures which contain {sup 14}C: these samples are dissolved in hyamine 10 X, then melted with a toluene scintillator, solid samples containing {sup 14}C or {sup 45}Ca (plant ashes); these samples are measured by suspension in scintillating mixtures. Gaseous samples {sup 14}CO{sub 2} are also counted, the gas is retained by hyamine, then mixed with a liquid scintillator. Counting of double labelled samples are also made {sup 4}5{sup C}a + {sup 32}P and {sup 14}C + {sup 32}P. The quenching corrections are made by internal standardization method, by channels ratio method or better by external standardization method. (author) [French] Les emetteurs {beta} de faible energie (C{sup 14}, H{sup 3}, Ca{sup 45}) sont tres utilises en biologie sous forme de molecules marquees. La methode de comptage par scintillateur liquide est celle qui est la plus employee. Le LMR de Grenoble effectue la mesure de ces emetteurs avec un appareil Tricarb-Packard. Les comptages portent sur des ehantillons d'eau titree comptee avec un scintillateur au dioxane; des echantillons de tissus animaux contenant du C{sup 14} sont dissous par de l'hyamine puis melange a un scintillateur au toluene. Des echantillons solides (cendres de vegetaux) contenant du C{sup 14} ou du Ca{sup 45} sont comptes sous forme de gels scintillants; des echantillons gazeux de {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, le gaz est retenu par de l'hyamine puis melange au scintillateur liquide. Enfin des comptages d'echantillons doublement marques CO{sup 45} + P{sup 32} et C{sup 14} + P{sup 32} sont effectues

  3. Low-energy electron potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobst, Johannes; Kautz, Jaap; Mytiliniou, Maria; Tromp, Rudolf M; van der Molen, Sense Jan

    2017-10-01

    In a lot of systems, charge transport is governed by local features rather than being a global property as suggested by extracting a single resistance value. Consequently, techniques that resolve local structure in the electronic potential are crucial for a detailed understanding of electronic transport in realistic devices. Recently, we have introduced a new potentiometry method based on low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) that utilizes characteristic features in the reflectivity spectra of layered materials [1]. Performing potentiometry experiments in LEEM has the advantage of being fast, offering a large field of view and the option to zoom in and out easily, and of being non-invasive compared to scanning-probe methods. However, not all materials show clear features in their reflectivity spectra. Here we, therefore, focus on a different version of low-energy electron potentiometry (LEEP) that uses the mirror mode transition, i.e. the drop in electron reflectivity around zero electron landing energy when they start to interact with the sample rather than being reflected in front of it. This transition is universal and sensitive to the local electrostatic surface potential (either workfunction or applied potential). It can consequently be used to perform LEEP experiments on a broader range of material compared to the method described in Ref[1]. We provide a detailed description of the experimental setup and demonstrate LEEP on workfunction-related intrinsic potential variations on the Si(111) surface and for a metal-semiconductor-metal junction with external bias applied. In the latter, we visualize the Schottky effect at the metal-semiconductor interface. Finally, we compare how robust the two LEEP techniques discussed above are against image distortions due to sample inhomogeneities or contamination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dosimetry of Low-Energy Beta Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Jette

    Useful techniques and procedures for derermination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy beta radiation were studied and evaluated. The four techniques included were beta spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical...... low-energy beta radiation field a moderated spectrum from a carbon-14 source was used. The measured responce of a Si(Li) detector to photons (bremsstrahlung) showed fine agreemant with the MC calculated photon response, whereas the difference between measured and MC calculated response to electrons...

  5. Instrumentation in small low energy machines

    CERN Document Server

    Raich, U

    2005-01-01

    Low energy particle accelerators are used either as injectors for higher energy machines or as dedicated machines for special purposes. These may be industrial, medical or prototype machines for testing new accelerating schemes. Low energy beams open measurement possibilities not available at higher energies due to the low magnetic rigidity of the particles, due to their small penetration depth and due to rather big beam spot sizes. On the other hand these beams also represent special challenges due to their high energy deposition in matter, space charge problems etc. which are not seen at higher energies. Measurement principles typical for small accelerators will be presented and explained with the help of example implementations.

  6. LENA: Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberauer, L.; Hellgartner, D.; Lewke, T. [TU Muenchen, Physik-Department, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Marrodan Undagoitia, T. [University of Zuerich, Physik Institut, Winterthurerstr. 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Meindl, Q.; Moellenstedt, R.; Potzel, W.; Tippmann, M.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Winter, J.; Wurm, M. [TU Muenchen, Physik-Department, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    We focus on the physics potential of a large liquid scintillation detector in the field of low energy neutrino astrophysics. Proton decay search and long baseline oscillations will be discussed briefly at the end.

  7. Low energy observables with the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Recent results in the soft QCD sector of the Standard Model are presented. Measurements of low energy observables were performed with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In particular, underlying event, charged particle correlation and diffraction observables are reported and various models of Monte Carlo predictions are compared to the data.

  8. Study on low-energy positron polarimetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A polarised positron source has been proposed for the design of the international linear collider (ILC). In order to optimise the positron beam, a measurement of its degree of polarisation close to the positron creation point is desired. In this contribution, methods for determining the positron polarisation at low energies are ...

  9. Can cellulite be treated with low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angehrn, Fiorenzo; Kuhn, Christoph; Voss, Axel

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigates the effects of low-energy defocused extracorporeal generated shock waves on collagen structure of cellulite afflicted skin. Cellulite measurement using high-resolution ultrasound technology was performed before and after low-energy defocused extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in 21 female subjects. ESWT was applied onto the skin at the lateral thigh twice a week for a period of six weeks. Results provide evidence that low-energy defocused ESWT caused remodeling of the collagen within the dermis of the tested region. Improving device-parameters and therapy regimes will be essential for future development of a scientific based approach to cellulite treatment. PMID:18225463

  10. Observational signatures of low-altitude low-energy ion motions up and down auroral field lines: a survey of sounding rocket measurements (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, K. A.; Fernandes, P. A.; Gayetsky, L.; Mella, M. R.; Hampton, D. L.; Lessard, M.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    A number of auroral sounding rocket missions have sampled low-energy ion distribution functions near and in the ionospheric footpoint of auroral field lines, both on the dayside and the nightside, at altitudes ranging from a few hundred km to over 1000 km. The results, taken singly, can be confusing, given the variety of features. An overview of these observations, in the context of numerical modelling of the ionosphere, begins to reveal overall patterns of highly structured and temporally varying behaviors. In this talk we review observations from SCIFER (dayside, up to 1400 km), SCIFER2 (also dayside), SERSIO (dayside, lower altitude); and SIERRA, Cascades2, and MICA (all nightside, 300-500 km altitude.) A common feature in these auroral observations is that the ion distributions are seen to be moving either up (SIERRA low energies, MICA) or down (SCIFER, Cascades2, SIERRA medium eneriges) the field line with no obvious observational pattern. The downward moving distributions, particularly in the case of Cascades2, can be highly structured and varying in time, even showing dispersion signatures. Recent modelling efforts (Zettergren et al., this session) show structured patterns of upflow and downflow on auroral field lines consistent with these observations. Proper interpretation of sounding rocket case study ion flow observations must include the context given by 2-dimensional imagery and 2-dimensional (altitude and latitude) ionospheric modelling, as the net ion upflow from these low-altitude processes is a result of averaging over this variability.

  11. Quantum scattering at low energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derezinski, Jan; Skibsted, Erik

    2009-01-01

    For a class of negative slowly decaying potentials, including V(x):=−γ|x|−μ with 0quantum mechanical scattering theory in the low-energy regime. Using appropriate modifiers of the Isozaki–Kitada type we show that scattering theory is well behaved on the whole continuous spectrum...

  12. Quantum scattering at low energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derezinski, Jan; Skibsted, Erik

    For a class of negative slowly decaying potentials, including with , we study the quantum mechanical scattering theory in the low-energy regime. Using modifiers of the Isozaki--Kitada type we show that scattering theory is well behaved on the {\\it whole} continuous spectrum of the Hamiltonian...

  13. Towards Low Energy Atrial Defibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Walsh

    2015-09-01

    . Efficient transcutaneous power transfer and sensing of ICI during cardioversion are evidenced as key to the advancement of low-energy atrial defibrillation.

  14. Gas Electron multipliers for low energy beams

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, F; Ropelewski, L; Spanggaard, J; Tranquille, G

    2010-01-01

    Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM) find their way to more and more applications in beam instrumentation. Gas Electron Multiplication uses a very similar physical phenomenon to that of Multi Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPC) but for small profile monitors they are much more cost efficient both to produce and to maintain. This paper presents the new GEM profile monitors intended to replace the MWPCs currently used at CERN’s low energy Antiproton Decelerator (AD). It will be shown how GEMs overcome the documented problems of profile measurements with MWPCs for low energy beams, where the interaction of the beam with the detector has a large influence on the measured profile. Results will be shown of profile measurements performed at 5 MeV using four different GEM prototypes, with discussion on the possible use of GEMs at even lower energies needed at the AD in 2013.

  15. Low energy electron scattering from fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M. Cristina A.; Silva, Daniel G.M.; Coelho, Rafael F.; Duque, Humberto V.; Santos, Rodrigo R. dos; Ribeiro, Thiago M. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Yates, Brent; Hong, Ling; Khakoo, Murtadha A. [California State University at Fullerton, CA (US). Physics Department; Bettega, Marcio H.F. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Costa, Romarly F. da [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas; Lima, Marco A.P. [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol (CTBE/CNPEM), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text. Accurate and precise values of absolute total cross section (TCS) represent important information in many scientific and technological applications. In our case, for example, we are motivated to provide such information for electron-fuel collision processes which are specifically relevant to modeling spark ignition in alcohol-fuelled internal combustion engines. Many electron scattering TCS measurements are presently available for a diverse range of atomic and molecular targets. However, lack of data for important bio-molecular targets still remains. Disagreements between the available TCS data for the alcohols have prompted several studies of electron scattering collision of slow electrons with these molecules which are currently important in applications as bio- fuels. This relevance, which has attracted much attention, has been one of the subjects of a recent collaboration between experimental and theoretical groups in the USA and Brazil. Recently this collaboration reported first measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for elastic low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering by several primary alcohols. In this work we address methanol and ethanol TCSs at low energy range and report additional studies of resonant structure in ethanol using the detection of metastable states produced by electron impact excitation with high energy resolution. We have recently constructed a TCS apparatus in our laboratory at Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brazil, based on the well-known linear transmission technique. The experimental setup is based on the measurement of the attenuation of a collimated electron beam through a gas cell containing the atoms or molecules to be studied at a given pressure. It consists essentially of an electron gun, a gas cell and an electron energy analyzer composed of an array of decelerating electrostatic lenses, a cylindrical dispersive 127o analyzer and a Faraday cup. To our knowledge, there exist

  16. Exploring neutrino mixing with low energy superbeams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakata, Hisakazu; Nunokawa, Hiroshi

    2001-10-01

    We explore the features of neutrino oscillation which are relevant for measurements of the leptonic CP violating phase δ and the sign of Δm213 in experiments with low-energy conventional superbeams. Toward the goal, we introduce a new powerful tool called the ``CP trajectory diagram in bi-probability space'' which allows us to represent pictorially the three effects, the effects of (a) genuine CP violation due to the sin δ term, (b) CP conserving cos δ term, and (c) fake CP violation due to earth matter, separately in a single diagram. By using the diagram, we observe that there is a two-fold ambiguity in the determination of δ which is related with the sign of Δm213. Possible ways of resolving the ambiguity are discussed. In particular, we point out that an in situ simultaneous measurement of δ and the sign of Δm213 can be carried out at distances of about 700 km, or at the Phase II of the JHF experiment provided that sin δ · Δm213 < 0, both with a megaton class water Cherenkov detector.

  17. Design and measurements of a fast high-voltage pulse generator for the MedAustron Low Energy Transfer line fast deflector

    CERN Document Server

    Fowler, T; Mueller, F; Kramer, T; Stadlbauer, T

    2012-01-01

    MedAustron, a centre for ion-therapy and research, will comprise an accelerator facility based on a synchrotron for the delivery of protons and light ions for cancer treatment. The Low Energy Beam Transfer line (LEBT) to the synchrotron contains an electrostatic fast deflector (EFE) which, when energized, deviates the continuous beam arriving from the ion source onto a Faraday Cup: the specified voltage is ±3.5 kV. De-energizing the EFE for variable pulse durations from 500 ns up to d.c. allows beam passage for multi-turn injection into the synchrotron. To maintain beam quality in the synchrotron, the EFE pulse generator requires rise and fall times of less than 300 ns between 90 % of peak voltage and a ±1 V level. To achieve this, a pulsed power supply (PKF), with high voltage MOSFET switches connected in a push-pull configuration, will be mounted in close proximity to the deflector itself. A fast, large dynamic range monitoring circuit will verify switching to the ±1 V level and subsequent flat bottom pu...

  18. PHENIX plans for RHIC low energy run

    CERN Document Server

    Sakaguchi, Takao

    2009-01-01

    PHENIX plans for low energy running are presented. Current detector setting makes it possible to measure dielectron spectra down to sqrt(s_NN)=39GeV, and photon/high pT hadron spectra down to below sub-injection energy (sqrt(s_NN)=5-10GeV). The upgrade of the trigger scheme after the installation of VTX detector will enable PHENIX to fully explore the sub-injection energy regime, starting 2011.

  19. The Abundance of Low Energy Cosmic Ray Boron and Nitrogen Nuclei Measured at Voyager 1 Beyond the Heliopause, Where Do They All Come From? An Interpretation Using a Leaky Box Galactic Propagation Model

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, W R

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainties in the Voyager data itself as well as the cross sections for production of these secondaries at these low energies are an important limitation on the estimates of the amount of matter traversed. We also attempt a fit to the B observations at low energies by considering a source component of B generated in 1.0 g/cm2 of matter near the sources but after acceleration. This would be equivalent to a Nested LBM. In this model the V1 data below 40 MeV/nuc is now well fit. For Nitrogen, which is dominated by a source component at these low energies, a fit to the data between 10-130 MeV/nuc can be obtained with a N/O source ratio = 6.3 + 1.0% and a path length compatible with the H and He propagation as noted above. This Voyager observation confirms earlier measurements of a low N abundance in the cosmic ray source relative to what is found for solar abundances, for example, where the N/O ratio is found to be ~12%.

  20. A low energy solar town

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svendsen, Svend; Balocco, Carla

    1998-12-31

    The use of solar energy at large scale is necessary to support the energy savings and a more efficient energy use, like besides the quality of the ambient and the quality of the available energy sources. The solar heating systems with seasonal storage can be combined with heat from refuse incineration plants and other renewable heat sources. These systems combined with district heating are an example of the sustainable energy planning and the reduction of the environmental stress. Strategies for sustainability in the settlements can be defined by and energy model to planning that individuates development and economic and financial supports to. The aim of the work concerns the development of a small sun city with no use of fossil fuels. The new low energy solar town is an idealised urban an energy system. The studied settlement regards one thousand new low-energy houses supplied by a district heating with a central solar heating system with seasonal heat storage. The heating and ventilation demand in the studied low energy buildings are less than 40 kWh/m{sup 2}/year, the electricity demand is less than 2000 kWh per house year. The result of the work is an useful tool to the energy planning of the urban areas and it is also a necessary support to the political and energetic decisions. (EG) 58 refs.

  1. PHYSICS WITH ULTRA-LOW ENERGY ANTIPROTONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. HOLZSCHEITER

    2001-02-01

    In this report the author describes the current status of the antiproton deceleration (AD) facility at CERN, and highlights the physics program with ultra-low energy antiproton at this installation. He also comments on future possibilities provided higher intensity antiproton beams become available at Fermilab, and review possibilities for initial experiments using direct degrading of high energy antiprotons in material has been developed and proven at CERN.

  2. A Low energy neutrino factory for large theta(13)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, Steve; Mena, Olga; /Fermilab /Rome U. /INFN, Rome; Pascoli, Silvia; /Durham U., IPPP

    2007-01-01

    If the value of {theta}{sub 13} is within the reach of the upcoming generation of long-baseline experiments, T2K and NOvA, they show that a low-energy neutrino factory, with peak energy in the few GeV range, would provide a sensitive tool to explore CP-violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy. They consider baselines with typical length 1000-1500 km. The unique performance of the low energy neutrino factory is due to the rich neutrino oscillation pattern at energies between 1 and 4 GeV at baselines {Omicron}(1000) km. They perform both a semi-analytical study of the sensitivities and a numerical analysis to explore how well this setup can measure {theta}{sub 13}, CP-violation, and determine the type of mass hierarchy and the {theta}{sub 23} quadrant. A low energy neutrino factory provides a powerful tool to resolve ambiguities and make precise parameter determinations, for both large and fairly small values of the mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13}.

  3. Can Composite Measures Provide a Different Perspective on Provider Performance Than Individual Measures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwartz, Michael; Rosen, Amy K; Burgess, James F

    2017-12-01

    Composite measures, which aggregate performance on individual measures into a summary score, are increasingly being used to evaluate facility performance. There is little understanding of the unique perspective that composite measures provide. To examine whether high/low (ie, high or low) performers on a composite measures are also high/low performers on most of the individual measures that comprise the composite. We used data from 2 previous studies, one involving 5 measures from 632 hospitals and one involving 28 measures from 112 Veterans Health Administration (VA) nursing homes; and new data on hospital readmissions for 3 conditions from 131 VA hospitals. To compare high/low performers on a composite to high/low performers on the component measures, we used 2-dimensional tables to categorize facilities into high/low performance on the composite and on the individual component measures. In the first study, over a third of the 162 hospitals in the top quintile based on the composite were in the top quintile on at most 1 of the 5 individual measures. In the second study, over 40% of the 27 high-performing nursing homes on the composite were high performers on 8 or fewer of the 28 individual measures. In the third study, 20% of the 61 low performers on the composite were low performers on only 1 of the 3 individual measures. Composite measures can identify as high/low performers facilities that perform "pretty well" (or "pretty poorly") across many individual measures but may not be high/low performers on most of them.

  4. Low energy γ- γ and e{sup −}- γ PAC measurements using APDs and the probe nuclei {sup 83}Rb({sup 83}Kr) and {sup 83m}Kr({sup 83}Kr)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenz, M., E-mail: arenz@hiskp.uni-bonn.de; Vianden, R., E-mail: vianden@hiskp.uni-bonn.de [Universität Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    In the field of Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) measurements Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) are rarely used, despite their favourable properties for fast counting purposes at low energies. This work demonstrates their application in combination with a simple and cheap custom build voltage sensitive preamplifier module. Using the PAC nuclei {sup 83}Rb({sup 83}Kr) and {sup 83m}Kr({sup 83}Kr), the time resolution of the set-up is analysed and the feasibility of precise timing measurements is shown.

  5. Low-energy house in Sisimiut - Data overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hvidthoeft Delff Andersen, P.; Rode, C.; Madsen, Henrik

    2013-08-15

    Experiments with persistently exciting heat inputs are a fundamental tool in identification of heat dynamics in buildings. The Low-energy house in Sisimiut, Greenland, provides an advanced experimental setup with frequent measurements of temperatures, heat inputs, and much more. This paper presents an overview of data collected since the installation of the new measurement and control system. Focus is on heat dynamics so only data related to that will be shown. 5 experiments have been conducted. They are described, and resulting data is shown. (Author)

  6. Enhancement mechanisms of low energy nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gareev, F. A.; Zhidkova, I.E.; Ratis, Yu.L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, 6 Joliot Curie Street, Dubna, Moscow Region 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The full review of Russian low energy nuclear reactors is represented. We have concluded that transmutation of nuclei at low energies, LENR, is possible in the framework of the modern physical theory - excitation and ionization of atoms and universal resonance synchronization principle are responsible for it. Investigation of this phenomenon requires knowledge of different branches of science: nuclear and atomic physics, chemistry and electrochemistry, condensed matter and solid state physics. The results of this research field can provide a new source of energy, substances and technologies. The puzzle of poor reproducibility of experimental data is due to the fact that LENR occurs in open systems and it is extremely sensitive to parameters of external fields and systems. Classical reproducibility principle should be reconsidered for LENR experiments. Poor reproducibility and unexplained results do not means that the experiment is wrong.

  7. Dosimetry of low-energy beta radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, J.

    1996-08-01

    Useful techniques and procedures for determination of absorbed doses from exposure in a low-energy {beta} radiation field were studied and evaluated in this project. The four different techniques included were {beta} spectrometry, extrapolation chamber dosimetry, Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, and exoelectron dosimetry. As a typical low-energy {beta} radiation field a moderated spectrum from a {sup 14}C source (E{sub {beta}},{sub max} =156 keV) was chosen for the study. The measured response of a Si(Li) detector to photons (bremsstrahlung) showed fine agreement with the MC calculated photon response, whereas the difference between measured and MC calculated responses to electrons indicates an additional dead layer thickness of about 12 {mu}m in the Si(Li) detector. The depth-dose profiles measured with extrapolation chambers at two laboratories agreed very well, and it was confirmed that the fitting procedure previously reported for {sup 147}Pm depth-dose profiles is also suitable for {beta} radiation from {sup 14}C. An increasing difference between measured and MC calculated dose rates for increasing absorber thickness was found, which is explained by limitations of the EGS4 code for transport of very low-energy electrons (below 10-20 keV). Finally a study of the thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) response of BeO thin film dosemeters to {beta} radiation for radiation fields with maximum {beta} energies ranging from 67 keV to 2.27 MeV is reported. For maximum {beta} energies below approximately 500 keV, a decrease in the response amounting to about 20% was observed. It is thus concluded that a {beta} dose higher than about 10 {mu}Gy can be measured with these dosemeters to within 0 to -20% independently of the {beta}energy for E{sub {beta}},{sub max} values down to 67 keV. (au) 12 tabs., 38 ills., 71 refs.

  8. What is a low-energy house and who cares?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litt, B.R.

    1994-12-01

    Most energy analysts view low-energy houses as good things, yet differ in their expectations of what exactly a low energy house is. There are two intertwining threads to this report. The first is an evaluation of 50 buildings that have been claimed to be low-energy residences, for which monitored energy performance data have been collected. These data represent the preliminary effort in the ongoing update of the Buildings Energy-Use Compilation and Analysis (BECA) data base for new residences. The second thread concerns the definition of a low-energy house. After the elements of a definition are presented, their implications for actors involved in providing housing are identified. Several more tractable definitions are applied to the houses in this compilation. The outcomes illustrate ways in which different interests are served by various definitions. Different definitions can yield very different energy rankings. No single definition of a low-energy house is universally applicable.

  9. Low-energy mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Wessel; Hviid, Christian Anker

    2014-01-01

    and with as little energy consumption as 41.1 kWh/m2/year including heating and all building services with no use of renewable energy such as PVcells or solar heating. One of the key means of reaching the objectives was to implement mechanical ventilation with low pressure loss and therefore low energy consumption....... The project consists of two buildings, building one is 6 stories high, and building two is 4 stories high. The buildings have a gross area of 50,500 m2 including underground parking. The ventilation and indoor climate concept was to use mechanical ventilation together with mechanical cooling and fanassisted......, with an average of 1.1 kJ/m3. The yearly mean SFP based on estimated runtime is approx. 0.8 kJ/m3. The case shows the unlocked potential that lies within mechanical ventilation for nearzero energy consuming buildings....

  10. Reflection of low energy plasma ions from metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbertson, J. W.; Langer, W. D.; Motley, R. W.

    1992-12-01

    Reflection of low energy (beam source based on acceleration and reflection of ions from a magnetically confined coaxial rf plasma source. The beam provides a large enough ion flux (over 4 A) to allow the characteristics of the reflected neutrals to be measured despite the inefficiency of detection. The energy distributions are measured by means of an electrostatic cylindrical mirror analyzer coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Energy distributions have been measured for oxygen, nitrogen and inert gas ions incident with from 10 to 70 eV reflected from amorphous metal surfaces of several compositions. The characteristics of particle reflection are commonly predicted in plasma modelling by use of simulation codes based on data from much higher incident energies. Measurements on this beam source allow the assumptions and approximations used in such codes to be tested. The predictions of the widely used TRIM code are compared to measured reflected energy distributions at low incident energies; significant differences are observed, particularly for lower target/projectile atomic mass ratios. The adequacy of the sequential binary collision approximation (used by TRIM) for modelling a collision process which at low energies is actually a simultaneous interaction between several atoms is tested by comparison with n-body trajectory calculations.

  11. Astrophysical S-factor of the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be reaction measured at low energy via prompt and delayed gamma detection

    CERN Document Server

    Confortola, F; Costantini, H; Formicola, A; Gyürky, Gy; Bezzon, P; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Corvisiero, P; Elekes, Z; Fülöp, Z; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Laubenstein, M; Lemut, A; Limata, B; Lozza, V; Marta, M; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P

    2007-01-01

    Solar neutrino fluxes depend both on astrophysical and on nuclear physics inputs, namely on the cross sections of the reactions responsible for neutrino production inside the Solar core. While the flux of solar 8B neutrinos has been recently measured at Superkamiokande with a 3.5% uncertainty and a precise measurement of 7Be neutrino flux is foreseen in the next future, the predicted fluxes are still affected by larger errors. The largest nuclear physics uncertainty to determine the fluxes of 8B and 7Be neutrinos comes from the 3He(alpha,gamma)7Be reaction. The uncertainty on its S-factor is due to an average discrepancy in results obtained using two different experimental approaches: the detection of the delayed gamma rays from 7Be decay and the measurement of the prompt gamma emission. Here we report on a new high precision experiment performed with both techniques at the same time. Thanks to the low background conditions of the Gran Sasso LUNA accelerator facility, the cross section has been measured at Ec...

  12. Quantitative Potassium Measurements with Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Using Low-Energy Lasers: Application to In Situ K-Ar Geochronology for Planetary Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yuichiro; Horiuchi, Misa; Shibasaki, Kazuo; Kameda, Shingo; Sugita, Seiji

    2017-08-01

    In situ radiogenic isotope measurements to obtain the absolute age of geologic events on planets are of great scientific value. In particular, K-Ar isochrons are useful because of their relatively high technical readiness and high accuracy. Because this isochron method involves spot-by-spot K measurements using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and simultaneous Ar measurements with mass spectrometry, LIBS measurements are conducted under a high vacuum condition in which emission intensity decreases significantly. Furthermore, using a laser power used in previous planetary missions is preferable to examine the technical feasibility of this approach. However, there have been few LIBS measurements for K under such conditions. In this study, we measured K contents in rock samples using 30 mJ and 15 mJ energy lasers under a vacuum condition (10-3 Pa) to assess the feasibility of in situ K-Ar dating with lasers comparable to those used in NASA's Curiosity and Mars 2020 missions. We obtained various calibration curves for K using internal normalization with the oxygen line at 777 nm and continuum emission from the laser-induced plasma. Experimental results indicate that when K2O K emission line at 769 nm normalized with that of the oxygen line yields the best results for the 30 mJ laser energy, with a detection limit of 88 ppm and 20% of error at 2400 ppm of K2O. Futhermore, the calibration curve based on the K 769 nm line intensity normalized with continuum emission yielded the best result for the 15 mJ laser, giving a detection limit of 140 ppm and 20% error at 3400 ppm K2O. Error assessments using obtained calibration models indicate that a 4 Ga rock with 3000 ppm K2O would be measured with 8% (30 mJ) and 10% (15 mJ) of precision in age when combined with mass spectrometry of 40Ar with 10% of uncertainty. These results strongly suggest that high precision in situ isochron K-Ar dating is feasible with a laser used in previous

  13. FLSR - The Frankfurt low energy storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiebing, K. E.; Alexandrov, V.; Dörner, R.; Enz, S.; Kazarinov, N. Yu.; Kruppi, T.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt Böcking, H.; Völp, M.; Ziel, P.; Dworak, M.; Dilfer, W.

    2010-02-01

    An electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions with a design energy of 50 keV is presently being set up at the Institut für Kernphysik der Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Germany (IKF). This new device will provide a basis for new experiments on the dynamics of ionic and molecular collisions, as well as for high precision and time resolved laser spectroscopy. In this article, the design parameters of this instrument are reported.

  14. Low energy constraints and scalar leptoquarks⋆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajfer Svjetlana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a colored weak doublet scalar state with mass below 1 TeV can provide an explanation of the observed branching ratios in B → D(∗τντ decays. Constraints coming from Z → bb̄, muon g − 2, lepton flavor violating decays are derived. The colored scalar is accommodated within 45 representation of SU(5 group of unification. We show that presence of color scalar can improve mass relations in the up-type quark sector mass. Impact of the colored scalar embedding in 45-dimensional representation of SU(5 on low-energy phenomenology is also presented.

  15. Low energy intake plus low energy expenditure (low energy flux), not energy surfeit, predicts future body fat gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David John; Yokum, Sonja; Stice, Eric

    2016-06-01

    There is a paucity of studies that have prospectively tested the energy surfeit theory of obesity with the use of objectively estimated energy intake and energy expenditure in humans. An alternative theory is that homeostatic regulation of body weight is more effective when energy intake and expenditure are both high (high energy flux), implying that low energy flux should predict weight gain. We aimed to examine the predictive relations of energy balance and energy flux to future weight gain and tested whether results were replicable in 2 independent samples. Adolescents (n = 154) and college-aged women (n = 75) underwent 2-wk objective doubly labeled water, resting metabolic rate, and percentage of body fat measures at baseline. Percentage of body fat was measured annually for 3 y of follow-up for the adolescent sample and for 2 y of follow-up for the young adult sample. Low energy flux, but not energy surfeit, predicted future increases in body fat in both studies. Furthermore, high energy flux appeared to prevent fat gain in part because it was associated with a higher resting metabolic rate. Counter to the energy surfeit model of obesity, results suggest that increasing energy expenditure may be more effective for reducing body fat than caloric restriction, which is currently the treatment of choice for obesity. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02084836. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  16. Beam-energy dependence and updated test of the Trojan-horse nucleus invariance via a measurement of the 2H(d ,p )3H reaction at low energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengbo; Wen, Qungang; Tumino, A.; Fu, Yuanyong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Shuhua; Meng, Qiuying; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; Lamia, L.

    2017-03-01

    The 2H(d ,p )3H bare nucleus astrophysical S (E ) factor has been measured indirectly at energies from about 500 keV down to several keV by means of the Trojan-horse method applied to the 2H(6Li,p t )4He quasifree reaction induced at 11 MeV. The obtained results are compared with direct data as well as with previous indirect investigation of the same binary reactions. It shows that the precision of S (E ) data in the low-energy range extracted via the same Trojan-horse nuclei [6Li=(d ⊕α )] becomes better when the incident energy of the virtual binary process decreases from high value down to the lower Gamow energy range, which near the zero-quasi-free-energy point. The very good agreement between data extracted from different Trojan-horse nuclei [6Li=(d ⊕α ) vs 3He=(d ⊕p )] gives a strong updated test for the independence of the binary indirect cross section on the chosen Trojan-horse nucleus at low energies.

  17. Measurement of the dynamic charge response of materials using low-energy, momentum-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy (M-EELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Vig, Anshul Kogar, Matteo Mitrano, Ali A. Husain, Vivek Mishra, Melinda S. Rak, Luc Venema, Peter D. Johnson, Genda D. Gu, Eduardo Fradkin, Michael R. Norman, Peter Abbamonte

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most fundamental properties of an interacting electron system is its frequency- and wave-vector-dependent density response function, $\\chi({\\bf q},\\omega$. The imaginary part, $\\chi''({\\bf q},\\omega$, defines the fundamental bosonic charge excitations of the system, exhibiting peaks wherever collective modes are present. $\\chi$ quantifies the electronic compressibility of a material, its response to external fields, its ability to screen charge, and its tendency to form charge density waves. Unfortunately, there has never been a fully momentum-resolved means to measure $\\chi({\\bf q},\\omega$ at the meV energy scale relevant to modern electronic materials. Here, we demonstrate a way to measure $\\chi$ with quantitative momentum resolution by applying alignment techniques from x-ray and neutron scattering to surface high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HR-EELS. This approach, which we refer to here as ``M-EELS" allows direct measurement of $\\chi''({\\bf q},\\omega$ with meV resolution while controlling the momentum with an accuracy better than a percent of a typical Brillouin zone. We apply this technique to finite-{\\bf q} excitations in the optimally-doped high temperature superconductor, Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+x}$ (Bi2212, which exhibits several phonons potentially relevant to dispersion anomalies observed in ARPES and STM experiments. Our study defines a path to studying the long-sought collective charge modes in quantum materials at the meV scale and with full momentum control.

  18. Very low energy electron microscopy of graphene flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikmeková, E; Bouyanfif, H; Lejeune, M; Müllerová, I; Hovorka, M; Unčovský, M; Frank, L

    2013-08-01

    Commercially available graphene samples are examined by Raman spectroscopy and very low energy scanning transmission electron microscopy. Limited lateral resolution of Raman spectroscopy may produce a Raman spectrum corresponding to a single graphene layer even for flakes that can be identified by very low energy electron microscopy as an aggregate of smaller flakes of various thicknesses. In addition to diagnostics of graphene samples at larger dimensions, their electron transmittance can also be measured at very low energies. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. Beam diagnostics for low energy beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Harasimowicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-energetic ion and antimatter beams are very attractive for a number of fundamental studies. The diagnostics of such beams, however, is a challenge due to low currents down to only a few thousands of particles per second and significant fraction of energy loss in matter at keV beam energies. A modular set of particle detectors has been developed to suit the particular beam diagnostic needs of the ultralow-energy storage ring (USR at the future facility for low-energy antiproton and ion research, accommodating very low beam intensities at energies down to 20 keV. The detectors include beam-profile monitors based on scintillating screens and secondary electron emission, sensitive Faraday cups for absolute intensity measurements, and capacitive pickups for beam position monitoring. In this paper, the design of all detectors is presented in detail and results from beam measurements are shown. The resolution limits of all detectors are described and options for further improvement summarized. Whilst initially developed for the USR, the instrumentation described in this paper is also well suited for use in other low-intensity, low-energy accelerators, storage rings, and beam lines.

  20. Changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone in patients participating in a low-energy dietary intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliett, Mary; Burke, Jeanmarie R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to describe changes in anthropometric measurements, body composition, blood pressure, lipid profile, and testosterone following a low–energy-density dietary intervention plus regimented supplementation program. Methods The study design was a pre-post intervention design without a control group. Normal participants were recruited from the faculty, staff, students, and community members from a chiropractic college to participate in a 21-day weight loss program. All participants (n = 49; 36 women, 13 men; 31 ± 10.3 years of age) received freshly prepared mostly vegan meals (breakfast, lunch, and dinner) that included 1200 to 1400 daily calories (5020.8 to 5857.6 J) for the women and 1600 to 1800 (6694.4 to 7531.2 J) daily calories for the men. Nutritional supplements containing enzymes that were intended to facilitate digestion, reduce cholesterol levels, increase metabolic rate, and mediate inflammatory processes were consumed 30 minutes before each meal. The regimented supplementation program included once-daily supplementation with a green drink that contained alfalfa, wheatgrass, apple cider vinegar, and fulvic acid throughout the study period. A cleanse supplementation containing magnesium, chia, flaxseed, lemon, camu camu, cat's claw, bentonite clay, tumeric, pau d'arco, chanca piedra, stevia, zeolite clay, slippery elm, garlic, ginger, peppermint, aloe, citrus bioflavonoids, and fulvic acid was added before each meal during week 2. During week 3, the cleanse supplementation was replaced with probiotic and prebiotic supplementation. Results Multiple paired t tests detected clinically meaningful reductions in weight (− 8.7 ± 5.54 lb) (− 3.9 ± 2.5 kg), total cholesterol (− 30.0 ± 29.77 mg/dL), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (− 21.0 ± 25.20 mg/dL) (P < .05). There was a pre-post intervention increase in testosterone for men (111.0 ± 121.13 ng/dL, P < .05). Conclusions Weight loss and improvements

  1. Ps-atom scattering at low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Fabrikant, I I

    2015-01-01

    A pseudopotential for positronium-atom interaction, based on electron-atom and positron-atom phase shifts, is constructed, and the phase shifts for Ps-Kr and Ps-Ar scattering are calculated. This approach allows us to extend the Ps-atom cross sections, obtained previously in the impulse approximation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 243201 (2014)], to energies below the Ps ionization threshold. Although experimental data are not available in this low-energy region, our results describe well the tendency of the measured cross sections to drop with decreasing velocity at $v<1$ a.u. Our results show that the effect of the Ps-atom van der Waals interaction is weak compared to the polarization interaction in electron-atom and positron-atom scattering. As a result, the Ps scattering length for both Ar and Kr is positive, and the Ramsauer-Townsend minimum is not observed for Ps scattering from these targets. This makes Ps scattering quite different from electron scattering in the low-energy region, in contrast to the inter...

  2. A Penning sputter ion source with very low energy spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouri, Z., E-mail: znouri@uwo.c [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Li, R., E-mail: ruohong@triumf.c [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Holt, R.A., E-mail: rholt@uwo.c [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Rosner, S.D., E-mail: rosner@uwo.c [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a version of the Frankfurt Penning ion source that produces ion beams with very low energy spreads of approx3 eV, while operating in a new discharge mode characterized by very high pressure, low voltage, and high current. The extracted ions also comprise substantial metastable and doubly charged species. Detailed studies of the operating parameters of the source showed that careful adjustment of the magnetic field and gas pressure is critical to achieving optimum performance. We used a laser-fluorescence method of energy analysis to characterize the properties of the extracted ion beam with a resolving power of 1x10{sup 4}, and to measure the absolute ion beam energy to an accuracy of 4 eV in order to provide some insight into the distribution of plasma potential within the ion source. This characterization method is widely applicable to accelerator beams, though not universal. The low energy spread, coupled with the ability to produce intense ion beams from almost any gas or conducting solid, make this source very useful for high-resolution spectroscopic measurements on fast-ion beams.

  3. Classification of low energy houses in Danish Building Regulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    The new Danish Building Regulations (Building Regulations, 2005) introduces the total energy consumption, i.e. energy use for heating, ventilation, cooling and domestic hot water, for buildings as a measure for the energy efficiency of new buildings, i.e. moving away from the former U-value demands....... In addition to the minimum requirements for new buildings, the new Building Regulations also specify requirements for characterizing a building as either low energy building class 1 or low energy building class 2. This paper describes a type-house that is presently being built in Denmark. The type......-house easily meets the requirements for being categorized as a low energy building class 1, and the paper investigates how much U-values can be increased if the type-house were to fulfil the requirements for a low energy building class 2 or a building that just fulfils the minimum demands....

  4. D-mu-A new concept in industrial low-energy electron dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Miller, Arne; Sharpe, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Irradiation with low-energy electrons (100–300 keV) results in dose gradients across the thickness of the dosimeters that are typically used for dose measurement at these energies. This leads to different doses being measured with different thickness dosimeters irradiated at the same electron beam...... it is therefore possible to calibrate and measure doses from low-energy electron irradiations with measurement traceability to national standards......., resulting in difficulties in providing traceable dose measurements using reference dosimeters. In order to overcome these problems a new concept is introduced of correcting all measured doses to the average dose in the first micrometer—Dμ. We have applied this concept to dose measurements with dosimeters...

  5. Redesign of a Low Energy Probe Head

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, Yi-Nong; Ries, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The present situation of the low energy probe LE2 in TRIUMF cyclotron is that the thickness of the finger 5 is uniform over a radial length of 3.25 inch and its weight which amounts to ~447 g is affecting its re-circulating ball mechanism and causing it to fall below the median plane over its range of movement. We therefore re-design it in order to reduce its weight. First, we made simulations and determined the optimum thickness of the probe head vs its radial length. These simulation results are found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements made. Finally, we calculated the temperature rise caused by the beam power dumped on the probe, and figured out the maximum current of beam that can be dumped on the finger.

  6. Low energy ion-molecule reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, J.M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with elucidating the dynamics of elementary ion-molecule reactions at collision energies near and below 1 eV. From measurements of the angular and energy distributions of the reaction products, one can infer intimathe details about the nature of collisions leading to chemical reaction, the geometries and lifetimes of intermediate complexes that govern the reaction dynamics, and the collision energy dependence of these dynamical features. The author employs crossed-beam low energy mass spectrometry technology developed over the last several years, with the focus of current research on proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of te O{sup {minus}} ion with species such as HF, H{sub 2}O, and NH{sub 3}.

  7. Bluetooth Low Energy Mesh Networks: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darroudi, Seyed Mahdi; Gomez, Carles

    2017-06-22

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) has gained significant momentum. However, the original design of BLE focused on star topology networking, which limits network coverage range and precludes end-to-end path diversity. In contrast, other competing technologies overcome such constraints by supporting the mesh network topology. For these reasons, academia, industry, and standards development organizations have been designing solutions to enable BLE mesh networks. Nevertheless, the literature lacks a consolidated view on this emerging area. This paper comprehensively surveys state of the art BLE mesh networking. We first provide a taxonomy of BLE mesh network solutions. We then review the solutions, describing the variety of approaches that leverage existing BLE functionality to enable BLE mesh networks. We identify crucial aspects of BLE mesh network solutions and discuss their advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we highlight currently open issues.

  8. Leptogenesis without CP Violation at Low Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Rebelo, Margarida N

    2003-01-01

    In this letter we give a class of examples where the decays of the heavy Majorana neutrinos may violate CP even if there is no CP violation at low energies, i. e., leptogenesis can take place without Majorana or Dirac type CP phases at low energies.

  9. Performance of low-temperature district heating for low-energy houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Marek; Dalla Rosa, Alessandro; Svendsen, Svend

    2010-01-01

    houses, which was previously developed and reported in the project “Development and demonstration of low-energy district heating for low energy housing” [EFP, 2007]. Two different concepts of low energy district heating substations are tested, and measurements of their performance aim to document......A Low Energy District Heating (LEDH) network supplying district heating water with temperature 50°C was built in Lærkehaven-Lystrup, Denmark, as a part of the ongoing “Energy Technology Development and Demonstration Programme” [EUDP, 2008] focused on “CO2-reduction in low energy buildings...... and communities by implementation of low temperature district heating systems”. The network supplies 40 detached Low Energy Houses built in accordance with the requirements of the Danish low energy class 1. The project aims to test and evaluate in real conditions the concept of LEDH for the supply of low energy...

  10. Low-energy and very-low energy total cross sections for electron collisions with N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Masashi; Kishino, Takaya; Okumura, Takuma; Kobayashi, Naomasa; Sayama, Atsushi; Mori, Yuma; Hosaka, Kouichi; Odagiri, Takeshi; Hoshino, Masamitsu; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    Absolute grand total cross sections for electron scattering from N2 are obtained in the energy range from 20 eV down to 5 meV with very narrow electron energy width of 9 meV using the threshold-photoelectron source. Total cross sections obtained in the present study are compared with the previous experimentally obtained results. At the very-low energy region below 50 meV, the present total cross sections are somewhat smaller than those reported by the Aarhus group [S.V. Hoffmann et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 4157 (2002)], which has been the only experimental work that provided the total cross sections in the very-low energy region. The energy positions of the peaks in the total cross sections due to the 2Πg shape resonance are obtained with higher accuracy, due to the improved uncertainty of the energy position in the present measurement compared to the previous works. The resonance structure in the total cross sections due to the Feshbach resonances of N2 at around 11.5 eV are also observed. Analysis of the resonant structure was carried out in order to determine the values of resonance width of Feshbach resonances of N2. Contribution to the Topical Issue: "Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications", edited by Gordon W.F. Drake, Jung-Sik Yoon, Daiji Kato, Grzegorz Karwasz.

  11. Reprint of Low-energy electron potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobst, Johannes; Kautz, Jaap; Mytiliniou, Maria; Tromp, Rudolf M; van der Molen, Sense Jan

    2017-12-01

    In a lot of systems, charge transport is governed by local features rather than being a global property as suggested by extracting a single resistance value. Consequently, techniques that resolve local structure in the electronic potential are crucial for a detailed understanding of electronic transport in realistic devices. Recently, we have introduced a new potentiometry method based on low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) that utilizes characteristic features in the reflectivity spectra of layered materials [1]. Performing potentiometry experiments in LEEM has the advantage of being fast, offering a large field of view and the option to zoom in and out easily, and of being non-invasive compared to scanning-probe methods. However, not all materials show clear features in their reflectivity spectra. Here we, therefore, focus on a different version of low-energy electron potentiometry (LEEP) that uses the mirror mode transition, i.e. the drop in electron reflectivity around zero electron landing energy when they start to interact with the sample rather than being reflected in front of it. This transition is universal and sensitive to the local electrostatic surface potential (either workfunction or applied potential). It can consequently be used to perform LEEP experiments on a broader range of material compared to the method described in Ref[1]. We provide a detailed description of the experimental setup and demonstrate LEEP on workfunction-related intrinsic potential variations on the Si(111) surface and for a metal-semiconductor-metal junction with external bias applied. In the latter, we visualize the Schottky effect at the metal-semiconductor interface. Finally, we compare how robust the two LEEP techniques discussed above are against image distortions due to sample inhomogeneities or contamination. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Low Energy Mission Planning Toolbox Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Low Energy Mission Planning Toolbox is designed to significantly reduce the resources and time spent on designing missions in multi-body gravitational...

  13. Low-energy Planetary Excavator (LPE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC is developing an innovative Low-energy Planetary Excavator (LPE) to excavate in situ regolith, ice-regolith mixes, and a variety of other geologic materials...

  14. Low-energy Planetary Excavator (LPE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop an innovative Low-energy Planetary Excavator (LPE) to excavate in situ regolith, ice-regolith mixes, and a variety of other geologic...

  15. Low Energy Electronics Design for Mobile Platforms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    East, J

    2002-01-01

    In order to address the need for low-energy electronics design for mobile platforms in future Army communication systems a multidisciplinary effort is needed to investigate system and component design...

  16. Low Energy Electron Scattering from Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, M. Cristina A.

    2012-06-01

    We report an investigation of processes that occur during the ignition of the plasma and its consequences in post-discharge time for an internal combustion engine, in order to find the appropriate parameters to be used in cars that operate with lean mixtures air-fuel. The relevance of this theme has attracted much attention, and has been one of the subjects of collaboration between experimental and theoretical groups in the USA and Brazil. We have produced some basic information necessary to modeling spark ignition in alcohol- fuelled engines. Total cross sections of electron scattering by methanol and ethanol molecules were obtained, using the linear transmission method based on the Beer-Lambert law to first approximation. Measurements and calculations of differential cross sections for low-energy (rotationally unresolved) electron scattering were also obtained, for scattering angles of 5 --130 . The measurements were taken using the relative flow method with an aperture source, and calculations using two different implementations of the Schwinger multichannel method, one that takes all electrons into account and is adapted for parallel computers, and another that uses pseudopotentials and considers only the valence electrons. Additionally to these, computer simulation studies of electronic discharge in mixtures of ethanol were performed, using a Zero-Dimensional Plasma Kinetic solver. Previous reported models for combustion of ethanol and cross sections data for momentum transfer of electron collisions with ethanol were used. The time evolutions of the main species densities are reported and the ignition time delay discussed.

  17. Low-energy particle radiation environment at synchronous altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, E. G.; Lens, S. K.

    1972-01-01

    The degradation of thermal control coatings of satellites due to the effects of low energy charged particles in the space environment is discussed. Data obtained from ATS-5 satellite measurement of proton and electron fluxes are presented. The variations in electron density, proton density, and magnetic activity are presented to show correlations which exist between these space factors.

  18. Low energy beam line at the AGOR facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toprek, D; Formanoy, [No Value; Brandenburg, S

    The origin of the low transmission through the low energy beam line between the electron cyclotron resonance source and the AGOR cyclotron has been investigated. Measurements of beam size and emittance, determined with the "varying quadrupole method," are compared with calculations including fringe

  19. Can cellulite be treated with low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorenzo Angehrn

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiorenzo Angehrn1, Christoph Kuhn1, Axel Voss21Klinik Piano, Gottstattstrasse 24, Biel, Switzerland; 2SwiTech Medical AG, Kreuzlingen, SwitzerlandAbstract: The present study investigates the effects of low-energy defocused extracorporeal generated shock waves on collagen structure of cellulite afflicted skin. Cellulite measurement using high-resolution ultrasound technology was performed before and after low-energy defocused extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT in 21 female subjects. ESWT was applied onto the skin at the lateral thigh twice a week for a period of six weeks. Results provide evidence that low-energy defocused ESWT caused remodeling of the collagen within the dermis of the tested region. Improving device-parameters and therapy regimes will be essential for future development of a scientific based approach to cellulite treatment.Keywords: cellulite (gynoid lipodystrophy, collagen structure of dermis, collagenometry high-resolution ultrasound of skin, low-energy defocused extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT, septa of subcutaneous connective tissue

  20. ECR ion source based low energy ion beam facility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mass analyzed highly charged ion beams of energy ranging from a few keV to a few MeV plays an important role in various aspects of research in modern physics. In this paper a unique low energy ion beam facility (LEIBF) set up at Nuclear Science Centre (NSC) for providing low and medium energy multiply charged ion ...

  1. Nuclear phenomena in low-energy nuclear reaction research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivit, Steven B

    2013-09-01

    This is a comment on Storms E (2010) Status of Cold Fusion, Naturwissenschaften 97:861-881. This comment provides the following remarks to other nuclear phenomena observed in low-energy nuclear reactions aside from helium-4 make significant contributions to the overall energy balance; and normal hydrogen, not just heavy hydrogen, produces excess heat.

  2. Mirrored low-energy channel for the MiniXRD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutra, Eric [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); MacNeil, Lawrence [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Raphaelian, Mark [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Compton, Steve; Jacoby, Barry

    2015-10-08

    X-ray Diodes (XRDs) are currently used for spectroscopic measurements, measuring X-ray flux, and estimating spectral shape of the VUV to soft X-ray spectrum. A niche exists for an inexpensive, robust X-ray diode that can be used for experiments in hostile environments on multiple platforms, including explosively driven experiments that have the potential for destroying the diode during the experiment. A multiple channel stacked filtered array was developed with a small field of view where a wider parallel array could not be used, but filtered channels for energies lower than 1000 eV were too fragile to deploy under normal conditions. To achieve both the robustness and the required low-energy detection ability, the researchers designed a small low-energy mirrored channel with a spectral sensitivity from 30 to 1000 eV. The stacked MiniXRD X-ray diode system design incorporates the mirrored low-energy channel on the front of the stacked filtered channels to allow the system to work within a small field of view. We will present results that demonstrate this is a promising solution for low-energy spectrum measurements.

  3. Low energy fractures of the acetabulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakos, N; Pearce, R; Bircher, M D

    2014-05-01

    Acetabular fractures due to high energy injuries are common and well documented; those secondary to low energy mechanisms are less well described. We undertook a retrospective study of the acetabular fracture referrals to our unit to evaluate the proportion of injuries resulting from a low energy mechanism. A total of 573 acetabular fractures were evaluated from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2008. The plain radiography and computed tomography of those sustaining a low energy fracture were assessed and the fracture patterns classified. Of the 573 acetabular fractures, 71 (12.4%) were recorded as being a result of a low energy mechanism. The male-to-female ratio was 2.4:1 and the mean patient age was 67.0 years (standard deviation: 19.1 years). There was a significantly higher number of fractures (pfracture studies. Our results demonstrate that low energy fractures make up a considerable proportion of acetabular fractures with a distinctly different fracture pattern distribution. With the continued predicted rise in the incidence of osteoporosis, life expectancy and an aging population, it is likely that this type of fracture will become increasingly more common, posing difficult management decisions and leading to procedures that are technically more challenging.

  4. Performance of the provider satisfaction inventory to measure provider satisfaction with diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montori, Victor M; Tweedy, Deborah A; Vogelsang, Debra A; Schryver, Patricia G; Naessens, James M; Smith, Steven A

    2002-01-01

    To develop and validate an inventory to measure provider satisfaction with diabetes management. Using the Mayo Clinic Model of Care, a review of the literature, and expert input, we developed a 4-category (chronic disease management, collaborative team practice, outcomes, and supportive environment), 29-item, 7-point-per-item Provider Satisfaction Inventory (PSI). For evaluation of the PSI, we mailed the survey to 192 primary-care and specialized providers from 8 practice sites (of whom 60 primary-care providers were participating in either usual or planned diabetes care). The Cronbach a score was used to assess the instrument's internal reliability. Participating providers indicated satisfaction or dissatisfaction with management of chronic disease by responding to 29 statements. The response rate was 58%. In each category, the Cronbach a score ranged from 0.71 to 0.90. Providers expressed satisfaction with patient-physician relationships, with the contributions of the nurse educator to the team, and with physician leadership. Providers were dissatisfied with their ability to spend adequate time with the patient (3.6 +/- 1.4), their ability to give patients with diabetes necessary personal attention (4.1 +/- 1.2), the efficient passing of communication (4.3 +/- 1.2), and the opportunities for input to change practice (4.3 +/- 1.6). No statistically significant difference (P = 0.12) was found in mean total scores between planned care (5.0 +/- 0.5) and usual care (4.7 +/- 0.6) providers. Moreover, no significant differences were noted across practice sites. The PSI is a reliable and preliminarily valid instrument for measuring provider satisfaction with diabetes care. Use in research and quality improvement activities awaits further validation.

  5. Low-energy photon spectroscopy data in support of ASTM method development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dry, D. E. (Donald E.); Boone, S. (Stephanie)

    2002-01-01

    The Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry (C-INC) Radioassay Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been in operation since 1948 to measure fission-product and actinide activities from the U.S. weapons testing program. Since the cessation of testing in 1992, the facility has remained in continuous operation by analyzing samples for environmental, bioassay and research projects. In addition to the many gamma spectroscopy systems, two independent planar germanium detectors are employed for measurement of x-rays and low-energy gsunma rays. 'These counters were used to collect data of select isotopes to support the development of a new ASTM standard, 'Standard Practice for High-Resolution Low-Energy Photon Spectrometry of Water'. This standard is being developed by ASTM Subcommittee D19.04 as a tool for measurement of low-energy gamma-rays and x-rays fiom approximately 4 keV to 150 keV. This work describes empirical counting results obtained fkom traceable sources covering the energy range of interest. Specifically, the isotopes used were 5%i, 55Fe, Am, I, Cd, and 57C0 which provide a range of 5.9 to 136 keV. Mixed nuclide sources were also counted for the purpose of providing data for coincidence summing effects. All data is presented in hardcopy and accompanying electronic form.

  6. Low energy analysis techniques for CUORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alduino, C.; Alfonso, K.; Artusa, D. R.; Avignone, F. T.; Azzolini, O.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Benato, G.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; Branca, A.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Camacho, A.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cao, X. G.; Capelli, S.; Cappelli, L.; Cardani, L.; Carniti, P.; Casali, N.; Cassina, L.; Chiesa, D.; Chott, N.; Clemenza, M.; Copello, S.; Cosmelli, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Creswick, R. J.; Cushman, J. S.; D'Addabbo, A.; D'Aguanno, D.; Dafinei, I.; Davis, C. J.; Dell'Oro, S.; Deninno, M. M.; Di Domizio, S.; Di Vacri, M. L.; Drobizhev, A.; Fang, D. Q.; Faverzani, M.; Ferri, E.; Ferroni, F.; Fiorini, E.; Franceschi, M. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gladstone, L.; Gorla, P.; Gotti, C.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haller, E. E.; Han, K.; Hansen, E.; Heeger, K. M.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Huang, H. Z.; Kadel, R.; Keppel, G.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Leder, A.; Ligi, C.; Lim, K. E.; Ma, Y. G.; Maino, M.; Marini, L.; Martinez, M.; Maruyama, R. H.; Mei, Y.; Moggi, N.; Morganti, S.; Mosteiro, P. J.; Napolitano, T.; Nastasi, M.; Nones, C.; Norman, E. B.; Novati, V.; Nucciotti, A.; O'Donnell, T.; Ouellet, J. L.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Pallavicini, M.; Palmieri, V.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Piperno, G.; Pira, C.; Pirro, S.; Pozzi, S.; Previtali, E.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rusconi, C.; Sakai, M.; Sangiorgio, S.; Santone, D.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, J.; Scielzo, N. D.; Singh, V.; Sisti, M.; Smith, A. R.; Taffarello, L.; Terranova, F.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.; Wagaarachchi, S. L.; Wang, B. S.; Wang, H. W.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J.; Winslow, L. A.; Wise, T.; Woodcraft, A.; Zanotti, L.; Zhang, G. Q.; Zimmermann, S.; Zucchelli, S.

    2017-12-01

    CUORE is a tonne-scale cryogenic detector operating at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) that uses tellurium dioxide bolometers to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of ^{130}Te. CUORE is also suitable to search for low energy rare events such as solar axions or WIMP scattering, thanks to its ultra-low background and large target mass. However, to conduct such sensitive searches requires improving the energy threshold to 10 keV. In this paper, we describe the analysis techniques developed for the low energy analysis of CUORE-like detectors, using the data acquired from November 2013 to March 2015 by CUORE-0, a single-tower prototype designed to validate the assembly procedure and new cleaning techniques of CUORE. We explain the energy threshold optimization, continuous monitoring of the trigger efficiency, data and event selection, and energy calibration at low energies in detail. We also present the low energy background spectrum of CUORE-0 below 60 keV. Finally, we report the sensitivity of CUORE to WIMP annual modulation using the CUORE-0 energy threshold and background, as well as an estimate of the uncertainty on the nuclear quenching factor from nuclear recoils inCUORE-0.

  7. Parity violation in low-energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Savage

    2001-12-01

    Parity violation in low-energy nuclear observables is included in the pionless effective field theory. The model-independent relation between the parity-violating asymmetry in polarized np -> d gamma and the non-nucleon part of the deuteron anapole moment is discussed. The asymmetry in np -> d gamma computed with KSW power-counting, and recently criticized by Desplanques, is discussed.

  8. Architectural Quality of Low Energy Houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Michael; Marsh, Rob

    2008-01-01

    This paper expounds a systematic vocabulary concerning architectural quality in houses in general and low energy houses in particular. The vocabulary consists of nine themes. Inside each theme, examples are given of how to achieve both architectural quality and good environmental performance...

  9. Low-energy beam line at KVI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toprek, D.; Formanoy, I.; Brandenburg, S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the redesign of the low-energy beam line at KVI. Redesigned and properties of the optical elements of the transport beam line is done by using the code COSY INFINITY in the third-order of approximation. The effects of fringe fields of the optical elements are also taken into

  10. Heliosphere Instrument for Spectra, Composition and Anisotropy at Low Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Gold, R. E.; Anderson, K. A.; Armstrong, T. P.; Lin, R. P.; Krimigis, S. M.; Pick, M.; Roelof, E. C.; Sarris, E. T.; Simnett, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The Heliosphere Instrument for Spectra, Composition, and Anisotropy at Low Energies (HI-SCALE) is designed to make measurements of interplanetary ions and electrons throughout the entire Ulysses mission. The ions (E(i) greater than about 50 keV) and electrons (E(e) greater than about 30 keV) are identified uniquely and detected by five separate solid-state detector telescopes that are oriented to give nearly complete pitch-angle coverage from the spinning spacecraft. Ion elemental abundances are determined by Delta E vs E telescope using a thin (5 microns) front solid state detector element in a three-element telescope. Experimental operation is controlled by a microprocessor-based data system. Inflight calibration is provided by radioactive sources mounted on telescope covers which can be closed for calibration purposes and for radiation protection during the course of the mission. Ion and electron spectral information is determined using both broad-energy-range rate channels and a 32 channel pulse-height analyzer for more detailed spectra. Some initial in-ecliptic measurements are presented which demonstrate the features of the instrument.

  11. Low energy observables and exclusive production with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Tim; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Low energy phenomena have been studied in detail at the LHC, providing important input for improving models of non-perturbative QCD effects. The ATLAS collaboration has performed several new measurements in this sector: We present charged-particle distributions sensitive to the underlying event, measured by the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The results are corrected for detector effects and compared to predictions from various Monte Carlo generators. In addition, we present studies on the correlated hadron production, as they are an important source for information on the early stages of hadron formation. In particular, an analysis of the momentum difference between charged hadrons in high–energy proton–proton collisions is performed in order to study coherent particle production. The results are compared to the predictions of a helical QCD string fragmenting model. In the absence of forward proton tagging, exclusive processes can be distinguished in the ...

  12. Inelastic pion scattering by /sup 13/C at low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Angular distributions for inelastically scattered pions were obtained for several states in /sup 13/C at an incident energy of 65 MeV. The data include results from both ..pi../sup +/ and ..pi../sup -/ measurements. In addition, ..pi../sup -/ measurements were made at T/sub ..pi../ = 50 MeV at one angle to give a two point fixed-q excitation function. The data are compared to theory and the data of others. As might be expected, medium corrections are shown to be considerably more important at low energies than at resonance. This is true for inelastic transitions of multipolarity 0,2 and 3. Parameters derived from an analysis of elastic pion scattering and SCX data also provide an adequate description of the inelastic transitions. The charge asymmetry in the cross sections for the 9/2/sup +/ state that was seen at resonance persists at these energies. This result is consistent with an impulse approximation treatment of the spin-flip amplitude. This is true even though the incoming energy of the pions is far below the range where the validity of an impulse treatment is expected. 65 refs., 45 figs.

  13. Design of low energy bunch compressors with space charge effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore a method to manipulate low energy electron bunches in a space charge dominated regime, and we use this method to design low energy linac bunch compressors to compress electron bunches in a space charge dominated regime. In the method, we use the space charge effects instead of avoiding them; i.e., we use the space charge forces to generate the required energy chirp instead of the ordinary method which uses the rf accelerating system to generate the chirp. We redefine the concepts of the dispersion function and beta functions in a space charge dominated regime to guide the optimization. Using this method, we study the low energy (5–22 MeV linac bunch compressor design to produce short (∼150  fs and small size (∼30  μm bunches for the electron beam slicing project. The low energy linac bunch compressors work in a space charge dominated regime, and the bunches at the downstream of the gun have a negative energy chirp due to the space charge effects. To provide compression for the negative energy chirped bunch, we design a positive R_{56} dispersive section using a four-dipole chicane with several quadrupole magnets. We have designed low energy linac bunch compressors with different photocathode rf guns. For example, one linac bunch compressor with the BNL photocathode electron rf gun has achieved a low energy bunch with the 166 fs rms bunch length, 28 and 31  μm rms beam size in the vertical and horizontal directions, respectively, at 5 MeV with 50 pC charge. Another example with LBNL’s very-high frequency gun has achieved a low energy bunch with the 128 fs rms bunch length, 42 and 25  μm rms beam size in the vertical and horizontal directions, respectively, at 22 MeV with 200 pC charge.

  14. Determination of the radial gradient in the region 0.81-1.0 AU using both high- and low-energy /more than 10-GeV and more than 52-MeV/ detectors for the 1-AU monitor. [solar quiet measurements of alpha particles and protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, W. R.; Bukata, R. P.; Rao, U. R.

    1974-01-01

    A determination of the radial gradient for alpha particles (31-46 MeV/nuc) and protons with energies above 7.5 MeV and 44-77 MeV in the region 1.0-0.81 AU is presented for the solar-quiet year 1966. The determinations are based on data from the Pioneer 6 space probe. Two different detectors are used: the Deep River neutron monitor and measurements of low energy protons made on the IMP-C satellite. The average energy response of the Deep River monitor is 16 GeV, whereas the IMP-C data is for protons with energies above 50 MeV. The resulting radial gradient is found to be nearly zero for the alpha particles and slightly negative for the protons. The same qualitative results were found using the IMP-C data and the Deep River neutron monitor to measure the temporal variation in the cosmic ray intensity. The present analysis indicates that detectors over a wide range of energies are suitable for measuring the radial gradient, providing sufficient statistical precision is obtained to evaluate short-term modulation and the azimuthal separation of the detectors is not great.

  15. Low energy hadronic contribution to the QED vacuum polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, H

    2005-01-01

    Recent improvements in the low energy e+e- annihilation data and their influence on the determination of the hadronic contribution to the running of the QED fine structure constant at m_Z are discussed. Using CMD-2 and KLOE measurements in the rho region we obtain Delta alpha(5)_had(s) = 0.02758 +/- 0.00035 at s = m_Z^2.

  16. Liquid noble gas detectors for low energy particle physics

    OpenAIRE

    Chepel, Vitaly; Araújo, Henrique

    2012-01-01

    We review the current status of liquid noble gas radiation detectors with energy threshold in the keV range, wich are of interest for direct dark matter searches, measurement of coherent neutrino scattering and other low energy particle physics experiments. Emphasis is given to the operation principles and the most important instrumentation aspects of these detectors, principally of those operated in the double-phase mode. Recent technological advances and relevant developments in photon dete...

  17. Targeting Low-Energy Ballistic Lunar Transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous low-energy ballistic transfers exist between the Earth and Moon that require less fuel than conventional transfers, but require three or more months of transfer time. An entirely ballistic lunar transfer departs the Earth from a particular declination at some time in order to arrive at the Moon at a given time along a desirable approach. Maneuvers may be added to the trajectory in order to adjust the Earth departure to meet mission requirements. In this paper, we characterize the (Delta)V cost required to adjust a low-energy ballistic lunar transfer such that a spacecraft may depart the Earth at a desirable declination, e.g., 28.5(white bullet), on a designated date. This study identifies the optimal locations to place one or two maneuvers along a transfer to minimize the (Delta)V cost of the transfer. One practical application of this study is to characterize the launch period for a mission that aims to launch from a particular launch site, such as Cape Canaveral, Florida, and arrive at a particular orbit at the Moon on a given date using a three-month low-energy transfer.

  18. Selected Papers on Low-Energy Antiprotons and Possible Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert [Fermilab

    1998-09-19

    The only realistic means by which to create a facility at Fermilab to produce large amounts of low energy antiprotons is to use resources which already exist. There is simply too little money and manpower at this point in time to generate new accelerators on a time scale before the turn of the century. Therefore, innovation is required to modify existing equipment to provide the services required by experimenters.

  19. AES based secure low energy adaptive clustering hierarchy for WSNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, K. R.; Sarma, N. V. S. N.

    2013-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) provide a low cost solution in diversified application areas. The wireless sensor nodes are inexpensive tiny devices with limited storage, computational capability and power. They are being deployed in large scale in both military and civilian applications. Security of the data is one of the key concerns where large numbers of nodes are deployed. Here, an energy-efficient secure routing protocol, secure-LEACH (Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy) for WSNs based on the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is being proposed. This crypto system is a session based one and a new session key is assigned for each new session. The network (WSN) is divided into number of groups or clusters and a cluster head (CH) is selected among the member nodes of each cluster. The measured data from the nodes is aggregated by the respective CH's and then each CH relays this data to another CH towards the gateway node in the WSN which in turn sends the same to the Base station (BS). In order to maintain confidentiality of data while being transmitted, it is necessary to encrypt the data before sending at every hop, from a node to the CH and from the CH to another CH or to the gateway node.

  20. Status of the Frankfurt low energy electrostatic storage ring (FLSR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, F.; Kruppi, T.; Müller, J.; Dörner, R.; Schmidt, L. Ph H.; Schmidt-Böcking, H.; Stiebing, K. E.

    2015-11-01

    Frankfurt low-energy storage ring (FLSR) is an electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions up to q · 80 keV (q being the ion charge state) at Institut für Kernphysik der Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. It has especially been designed to provide a basis for experiments on the dynamics of ionic and molecular collisions in complete kinematics, as well as for high precision and time resolved laser spectroscopy. The ring has ‘racetrack’ geometry with a circumference of 14.23 m. It comprises four experimental/diagnostic sections with regions of enhanced ion density (interaction regions). First beam has successfully been stored in FLSR in summer 2013. Since then the performance of the ring has continuously been improved and an electron target for experiments on dissociative recombination has been installed in one of the experimental sections.

  1. Ionization cooling in a low-energy proton storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuffer, David V.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    At the FFAG05 meeting, Mori and Okabe presented a scenario in which the lifetime of protons in a low-energy storage ring ({approx}10 MeV) is extended by energy-loss in a wedge foil, and this enables greater neutron production from the foil. The lifetime extension is due to the cooling effect of this energy loss. We have previously analyzed ionization cooling for muons at optimal cooling energies. The same equations, with appropriate adaptations, can be used to analyze the dynamic situation for proton-material interactions at low energies. In this note we discuss this extension and calculate cooling and heating effects at these very different parameters. The ring could provide a practical application of ionization cooling methods.

  2. Electron cooling for low-energy RHIC program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Pendzick, A.; Satogata, T.

    2009-08-31

    Electron cooling was proposed to increase luminosity of the RHIC collider for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon. Providing collisions at such energies, termed RHIC 'low-energy' operation, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about existence and location of critical point on the QCD phase diagram. The electron cooling system should deliver electron beam of required good quality over energies of 0.9-5 MeV. Several approaches to provide such cooling were considered. The baseline approach was chosen and design work started. Here we describe the main features of the cooling system and its expected performance. We have started design work on a low-energy RHIC electron cooler which will operate with kinetic electron energy range 0.86-2.8 (4.9) MeV. Several approaches to an electron cooling system in this energy range are being investigated. At present, our preferred scheme is to transfer the Fermilab Pelletron to BNL after Tevatron shutdown, and to use it for DC non-magnetized cooling in RHIC. Such electron cooling system can significantly increase RHIC luminosities at low-energy operation.

  3. Simulation of low-energy ion scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelaar, M. H.; Breeman, M.; Mijiritskii, A. V.; Boerma, D. O.

    A new simulation program `MATCH' has been developed for a detailed analysis of low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) and recoiling data. Instead of performing the full calculation of the three-dimensional trajectories through the sample from the ion source towards the detector, incoming trajectories as well as reversed-time outgoing trajectories are calculated, separately. Finally, these trajectories are matched to obtain the yield. The program has been tested for spectra and azimuthal scans of scattering and recoiling events of various sample species in different scattering geometries.

  4. Low Energy Investigations at Kamioka Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Sekiya, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    At Kamioka Observatory many activities for low energy rare event search are ongoing. Super-Kamiokande(SK), the largest water Cherenkov neutrino detector, currently continues data taking as the fourth phase of the experiment (SK-IV). In SK-IV, we have upgraded the water purification system and tuned water flow in the SK tank. Consequently the background level was lowered significantly. This allowed SK-IV to derive solar neutrino results down to 3.5MeV energy region. With these data, neutrino o...

  5. Low-energy hot plasma and particles in Saturn's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Bostrom, C. O.; Keath, E. P.; Carbary, J. F.; Roelof, E. C.; Armstrong, T. P.; Axford, W. I.; Gloeckler, G.; Hamilton, D. C.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    Results of the low-energy charged particle experiment carried by Voyager 2 in the Saturn magnetosphere are presented. Measurements of ions of energy greater than 28 keV and electrons of energies greater than 22 keV revealed the presence of a region containing an extremely hot (30-50 keV) plasma extending from the orbit of Tethys past the orbit of Rhea, and a low-energy ion mantle inside the dayside and nightside magnetospheres. H, H2, H3, He, C and O at energies greater than 200 keV/n were found to be important constituents of the Saturn magnetosphere, at relative abundances suggestive of a solar wind origin. Low-energy electron flux enhancements were observed between the L shells of Rhea and Tethys which were absent during the Voyager 1 encounter, and persistent asymmetric electron pitch-angle distributions were noted in the outer magnetosphere in conjunction with the hot ion plasma torus. Signatures of the passage of Tethys and Enceladus through the magnetosphere were found, although not at the positions predicted by dipole magnetic field models.

  6. Measuring parental satisfaction of care quality provided in hospitalized children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridoula Tsironi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Measuring parental satisfaction is of major importance for pediatric hospitals and the key component of evaluating the quality of services provided to health services. Aim: To assess the degree of parental satisfaction from the care provided to their hospitalized children.Methodology: A descriptive study conducted using a convenience sample of parents of hospitalized children in two public pediatric hospitals in Athens. Data collection was completed in a period of 3 months. 352 questionnaires were collected (response rate 88%. The Pyramid Questionnaire for parents of hospitalized children was used which estimates the degree of parental satisfaction from the care provided to their hospitalized child.Results: More parents were satisfied with health care professionals’ behavior (81,9%, the supplied care (78,2% and the information provision to parents regarding the hospitalized child’s disease (71,9%. In contrast, less parents were satisfied with their hospitalized child’s involvement in care (52,3% and the accessibility to the hospital (39,5%. The overall parental satisfaction ranged in very good level (76,8% and it was higher on hospital A (78,8%, among married parents (77,4% and those not al all concerned or concerned less for child’s illness (83,1%. Logistic regression model showed that hospitalization in hospital B and the great concern for child’s illness and its complications decreased ovewrall satisfaction by 24% and 17% respectively. Conclusions: The assessment of the degree of parental satisfaction is the most important indicator of hospitals’ proper functioning. From our study certain areas need improvement, such as: the parental involvement in child’s care, information provision, the accessibility to the hospital, the communication and the interpersonal health care in order greater satisfaction to be achieved.

  7. Imaging and background in low-energy gamma ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Fan

    The current status of low energy gamma ray astronomy is reviewed and the conclusion drawn that the next generation of low energy gamma ray telescopes will require high sensitivity, good timing, and spectral resolution. High angular resolution imaging capability is also considered essential. The imaging of low energy gamma rays is hampered by the difficulties encountered in developing high resolution position sensitive detectors. To this end, an improved Rotation Modulation Collimator (RMC) imaging technique, the phoswich multi-pitch RMC, is discussed. This imaging method employs currently available detector and pulse-shape discrimination techniques and is capable of producing images with an angular resolution which is comparable with that of the Coded Aperture Mask (CAM) imaging techniques. The imaging property of this new technique is studied. A comparison of three of the main imaging techniques used in low energy gamma ray astronomy, CAM, Fourier Transform Collimator, and RMC, is performed in terms of both theoretical performances and simulated imaging of the Galactic Center region. A realistic assessment of the possible applications of these three techniques to different types of astronomical Observations is also given. The atmospheric gamma ray radiation was measured by a number of balloon and satellite-borne instruments. A model of this radiation is developed based on the data as measured by a Compton telescope designed by the Max-Planck group. Emission spectra, as predicted by the model, are compared with various observed data, both inside and outside the atmosphere. The sources of background noise in low energy gamma ray telescopes are discussed. A comprehensive model of the background sources is developed and a generalized simulation program is presented which uses a combination of Monte Carlo methods and empirical calculations. Photon, proton, and neutron induced backgrounds are all considered as well as the effects of spacecraft and orbit. The model is

  8. Measuring Efficiency of Secondary Healthcare Providers in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatnik, Patricia; Bojnec, Štefan; Tušak, Matej

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The chief aim of this study was to analyze secondary healthcare providers' efficiency, focusing on the efficiency analysis of Slovene general hospitals. We intended to present a complete picture of technical, allocative, and cost or economic efficiency of general hospitals. Methods We researched the aspects of efficiency with two econometric methods. First, we calculated the necessary quotients of efficiency with the stochastic frontier analyze (SFA), which are realized by econometric evaluation of stochastic frontier functions; then, with the data envelopment analyze (DEA), we calculated the necessary quotients that are based on the linear programming method. Results Results on measures of efficiency showed that the two chosen methods produced two different conclusions. The SFA method concluded Celje General Hospital is the most efficient general hospital, whereas the DEA method concluded Brežice General Hospital was the hospital to be declared as the most efficient hospital. Conclusion Our results are a useful tool that can aid managers, payers, and designers of healthcare policy to better understand how general hospitals operate. The participants can accordingly decide with less difficulty on any further business operations of general hospitals, having the best practices of general hospitals at their disposal. PMID:28730180

  9. Low Energy Electrons in the Mars Plasma Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Richard

    2001-05-01

    The ionosphere of Mars is rather poorly understood. The only direct measurements were performed by the Viking 1 and 2 landers in 1976, both of which carried a Retarding Potential Analyzer. The RPA was designed to measure ion properties during the descent, although electron fluxes were estimated from changes in the ion currents. Using these derived low-energy electron fluxes, Mantas and Hanson studied the photoelectron and the solar wind electron interactions with the atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. Unanswered questions remain regarding the origin of the low-energy electron fluxes in the vicinity of the Mars plasma boundary. Crider, in an analysis of Mars Global Surveyor Magnetometer/Electron Reflectometer measurements, has attributed the formation of the magnetic pile-up boundary to electron impact ionization of exospheric neutral species by solar wind electrons. However, the role of photoelectrons escaping from the lower ionosphere was not determined. In the proposed work, we will examine the role of solar wind and ionospheric photoelectrons in producing ionization in the upper ionosphere of Mars. Low-energy (< 4 keV) electrons will be modeled using the two-stream electron transport code of Link. The code models both external (solar wind) and internal (photoelectron) sources of ionization, and accounts for Auger electron production. The code will be used to analyze Mars Global Surveyor measurements of solar wind and photoelectrons down to altitudes below 200 km in the Mars ionosphere, in order to determine the relative roles of solar wind and escaping photoelectrons in maintaining plasma densities in the region of the Mars plasma boundary.

  10. Low Energy Electrons in the Mars Plasma Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The ionosphere of Mars is rather poorly understood. The only direct measurements were performed by the Viking 1 and 2 landers in 1976, both of which carried a Retarding Potential Analyzer. The RPA was designed to measure ion properties during the descent, although electron fluxes were estimated from changes in the ion currents. Using these derived low-energy electron fluxes, Mantas and Hanson studied the photoelectron and the solar wind electron interactions with the atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. Unanswered questions remain regarding the origin of the low-energy electron fluxes in the vicinity of the Mars plasma boundary. Crider, in an analysis of Mars Global Surveyor Magnetometer/Electron Reflectometer measurements, has attributed the formation of the magnetic pile-up boundary to electron impact ionization of exospheric neutral species by solar wind electrons. However, the role of photoelectrons escaping from the lower ionosphere was not determined. In the proposed work, we will examine the role of solar wind and ionospheric photoelectrons in producing ionization in the upper ionosphere of Mars. Low-energy (electrons will be modeled using the two-stream electron transport code of Link. The code models both external (solar wind) and internal (photoelectron) sources of ionization, and accounts for Auger electron production. The code will be used to analyze Mars Global Surveyor measurements of solar wind and photoelectrons down to altitudes below 200 km in the Mars ionosphere, in order to determine the relative roles of solar wind and escaping photoelectrons in maintaining plasma densities in the region of the Mars plasma boundary.

  11. Measuring stigma among abortion providers: assessing the Abortion Provider Stigma Survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lisa A; Debbink, Michelle; Hassinger, Jane; Youatt, Emily; Eagen-Torkko, Meghan; Harris, Lisa H

    2014-01-01

    We explored the psychometric properties of 15 survey questions that assessed abortion providers' perceptions of stigma and its impact on providers' professional and personal lives referred to as the Abortion Provider Stigma Survey (APSS). We administered the survey to a sample of abortion providers recruited for the Providers' Share Workshop (N = 55). We then completed analyses using Stata SE/12.0. Exploratory factor analysis, which resulted in 13 retained items and identified three subscales: disclosure management, resistance and resilience, and discrimination. Stigma was salient in abortion provider's lives: they identified difficulties surrounding disclosure (66%) and felt unappreciated by society (89%). Simultaneously, workers felt they made a positive contribution to society (92%) and took pride in their work (98%). Paired t-test analyses of the pre- and post-Workshop APSS scores showed no changes in the total score. However, the Disclosure Management subscale scores were significantly lower (indicating decreased stigma) for two subgroups of participants: those over the age of 30 and those with children. This analysis is a promising first step in the development of a quantitative tool for capturing abortion providers' experiences of and responses to pervasive abortion stigma.

  12. Evaluating Frameworks That Provide Value Measures for Health Care Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; Ramsey, Scott D; Lieu, Tracy A; Phelps, Charles E

    2017-02-01

    The recent acceleration of scientific discovery has led to greater choices in health care. New technologies, diagnostic tests, and pharmaceuticals have widely varying impact on patients and populations in terms of benefits, toxicities, and costs, stimulating a resurgence of interest in the creation of frameworks intended to measure value in health. Many of these are offered by providers and/or advocacy organizations with expertise and interest in specific diseases (e.g., cancer and heart disease). To help assess the utility of and the potential biases embedded in these frameworks, we created an evaluation taxonomy with seven basic components: 1) define the purpose; 2) detail the conceptual approach, including perspectives, methods for obtaining preferences of decision makers (e.g., patients), and ability to incorporate multiple dimensions of value; 3) discuss inclusions and exclusions of elements included in the framework, and whether the framework assumes clinical intervention or offers alternatives such as palliative care or watchful waiting; 4) evaluate data sources and their scientific validity; 5) assess the intervention's effect on total costs of treating a defined population; 6) analyze how uncertainty is incorporated; and 7) illuminate possible conflicts of interest among those creating the framework. We apply the taxonomy to four representative value frameworks recently published by professional organizations focused on treatment of cancer and heart disease and on vaccine use. We conclude that each of these efforts has strengths and weaknesses when evaluated using our taxonomy, and suggest pathways to enhance the utility of value-assessing frameworks for policy and clinical decision making. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Low-energy neutrino factory design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ankenbrandt

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The design of a low-energy (4 GeV neutrino factory (NF is described, along with its expected performance. The neutrino factory uses a high-energy proton beam to produce charged pions. The π^{±} decay to produce muons (μ^{±}, which are collected, accelerated, and stored in a ring with long straight sections. Muons decaying in the straight sections produce neutrino beams. The scheme is based on previous designs for higher energy neutrino factories, but has an improved bunching and phase rotation system, and new acceleration, storage ring, and detector schemes tailored to the needs of the lower energy facility. Our simulations suggest that the NF scheme we describe can produce neutrino beams generated by ∼1.4×10^{21} μ^{+} per year decaying in a long straight section of the storage ring, and a similar number of μ^{-} decays.

  14. Wire scanners in low energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Elmfors, P; Huhtinen, M; Lindroos, M; Olsfors, J; Raich, U

    1997-01-01

    Fast wire scanners are today considered as part of standard instrumentation in high energy synchrotrons. The extension of their use to synchrotrons working at lower energies, where Coulomb scattering can be important and the transverse beam size is large, introduces new complications considering beam heating of the wire, composition of the secondary particle shower and geometrical consideration in the detection set-up. A major problem in treating these effects is that the creation of secondaries in a thin carbon wire by a energetic primary beam is difficult to describe in an analytical way. We are here presenting new results from a full Monte Carlo simulation of this process yielding information on heat deposited in the wire, particle type and energy spectrum of secondaries and angular dependence as a function of primary beam energy. The results are used to derive limits for the use of wire scanners in low energy accelerators.

  15. Low-energy dynamics of gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torma, Tibor

    The present status of theories of quantum gravity are reviewed from the low energy point of view. String theory relates classical black-hole type solutions of Einstein- like equations (e.g. axidilaton gravity) to the string vacuum. Several such solutions are proposed and their properties are investigated, including their behavior under supersymmetry transformations. A general feature of all possible quantum theories of gravitation is that they lead to a field theory description at low (as compared to the Planck mass) energies. The theoretical consistency, uniqueness and consequences of such an effective theory are investigated. I show that a power counting theorem allows for the momentum expansion that defines the effective theory even in the presence of large masses. I also show that graviton-graviton scattering is free of potential infrared and collinear divergencies that plague perturbative discussions of Yang-Mills theories.

  16. Low-energy neutrino factory design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankenbrandt, C.; /Fermilab /MUONS Inc., Batavia; Bogacz, S.A.; /Jefferson Lab; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    The design of a low-energy (4 GeV) neutrino factory (NF) is described, along with its expected performance. The neutrino factory uses a high-energy proton beam to produce charged pions. The {pi}{sup {+-}} decay to produce muons ({mu}{sup {+-}}), which are collected, accelerated, and stored in a ring with long straight sections. Muons decaying in the straight sections produce neutrino beams. The scheme is based on previous designs for higher energy neutrino factories, but has an improved bunching and phase rotation system, and new acceleration, storage ring, and detector schemes tailored to the needs of the lower energy facility. Our simulations suggest that the NF scheme we describe can produce neutrino beams generated by {approx} 1.4 x 10{sup 21} {mu}{sup +} per year decaying in a long straight section of the storage ring, and a similar number of {mu}{sup -} decays.

  17. LEAR (Low Energy Antiproton Ring), general view.

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    When the Antiproton Project was launched in the late 1970s, it was recognized that in addition to the primary purpose of high-energy proton-antiproton collisions in the SPS, there was interesting physics to be done with low-energy antiprotons. In 1982, LEAR was ready to receive antiprotons from the Antiproton Accumulator (AA), via the PS. A year later, delivery of antiprotons to the experiments began, at momenta as low as 100 MeV/c (kinetic energy 5.3 MeV), in an "Ultra-Slow Extraction" mode, dispensing some E9 antiprotons over times counted in hours. For such an achievement, stochastic and electron cooling had to be brought to high levels of perfection.

  18. National Roadmaps for promotion of very low-energy house concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buvik, Karin

    2012-07-01

    This report is meant to contribute to the preparation of National Energy Efficiency Action Plans (NEEAPs), which are tools supporting the implementation of energy efficiency improvement policies. The NEEAPs are considered one of the cornerstones of the Energy End-use Efficiency and Energy Services Directive. Previous publications from the NorthPass project report from studies of existing concepts and building standards in the participating countries, and analyses of main challenges in aiming to increase the market share of very low-energy houses. In this report a short overview of the current situation is given, and measures are proposed to support the implementation of the nearly Zero-Energy Building level, as described in the recast of the Energy Performance of Building Directive. Necessary steps towards a successful implementation will vary within the participating countries; involving technological, financial and policy implications in various degrees. The eight North European countries, participating in the NorthPass project, have similarities and differences. The four Nordic countries have several similarities regarding market penetration of very low-energy houses, as well as activities implemented by the authorities. Poland and the Baltic States have similarities in terms of market situation which is different from the Nordic countries. In the Nordic countries, the path towards the EU 2020 targets has, to a large extent, been chosen, focusing on step by step tightening of building codes, financial incentives and training of actors in the building sector. A discussion is going on about how to affect changes in customers' preferences, which would lead to a growing demand for very low-energy residential buildings. The situation in Poland and the Baltic countries is more problematic, as only few very low energy houses have been built so far. However, a growing interest in energy savings seems to arise, as the energy consumption is considerably high and the

  19. Windows in Low Energy Houses. Size Matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Mari-Louise

    2004-06-01

    A generally accepted way of building passive houses has been to have small windows facing north and a large glass facade to the south. This is to minimize losses on the north side while gaining as much solar heat as possible on the south. In spring 2001, twenty terraced houses were built outside Goeteborg partly in this way. The indoor temperature is kept at a comfortable level by passive methods, using solar gains and internal gains from household appliances and occupants. Heat losses are very low, since the building envelope is well insulated and since modern coated triple-glazed windows have been installed. The purpose of this work is to investigate how decreasing the window size facing south and increasing the window size facing north in low energy houses will influence the energy consumption and maximum power needed to keep the indoor temperature between 23 and 26 deg C. Different climates and orientations have been investigated and so have the influence of occupancy and window type. A dynamic building simulation tool, DEROB, has been used and the simulations indicate an extremely low energy demand for the houses. The results show that the size of the energy efficient windows does not have a major influence on the heating demand in winter, but is of relevant signification looking at the cooling need in summer. This indicates that instead of the traditional technique of building passive houses it is possible to enlarge the window area facing north and get better lighting conditions. To decrease the energy need for cooling, there is an optimal window size facing south that is smaller than the original size of the investigated buildings.

  20. Low energy AMS of americium and curium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christl, Marcus, E-mail: mchristl@ethz.ch [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Dai, Xiongxin [AECL Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario K0J 1J0 (Canada); Lachner, Johannes [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila [AECL Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario K0J 1J0 (Canada); Synal, Hans-Arno [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-07-15

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has evolved over the past years as one of the most sensitive, selective, and robust techniques for actinide analyses. While analyses of U and Pu isotopes have already become routine at the ETH Zurich 0.5 MV AMS system “Tandy”, there is an increasing demand for highly sensitive analyses of the higher actinides such as Am and Cm for bioassay applications and beyond. In order to extend the actinide capabilities of the compact ETH Zurich AMS system and to develop new, more sensitive bioassay routines, a pilot study was carried out. The aim was to investigate and document the performance and the potential background of Am and Cm analyses with low energy AMS. Our results show that {sup 241}Am and Cm isotopes can be determined relative to a {sup 243}Am tracer if samples and AMS standards are prepared identically with regard to the matrix elements, in which the sample is dispersed. In this first test, detection limits for Cm and Am isotopes are all in the sub-femtogram range and even below 100 ag for Cm isotopes. In a systematic background study in the mass range of the Cm isotopes, two formerly unknown metastable triply charged Th molecules were found on amu(244) and amu(248). The presence of such a background is not a principal problem for AMS if the stripper pressure is increased accordingly. Based on our first results, we conclude that ultra-trace analyses of Am and Cm isotopes for bioassay are very well possible with low energy AMS.

  1. Low energy AMS of americium and curium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christl, Marcus; Dai, Xiongxin; Lachner, Johannes; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2014-07-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) has evolved over the past years as one of the most sensitive, selective, and robust techniques for actinide analyses. While analyses of U and Pu isotopes have already become routine at the ETH Zurich 0.5 MV AMS system "Tandy", there is an increasing demand for highly sensitive analyses of the higher actinides such as Am and Cm for bioassay applications and beyond. In order to extend the actinide capabilities of the compact ETH Zurich AMS system and to develop new, more sensitive bioassay routines, a pilot study was carried out. The aim was to investigate and document the performance and the potential background of Am and Cm analyses with low energy AMS. Our results show that 241Am and Cm isotopes can be determined relative to a 243Am tracer if samples and AMS standards are prepared identically with regard to the matrix elements, in which the sample is dispersed. In this first test, detection limits for Cm and Am isotopes are all in the sub-femtogram range and even below 100 ag for Cm isotopes. In a systematic background study in the mass range of the Cm isotopes, two formerly unknown metastable triply charged Th molecules were found on amu(244) and amu(248). The presence of such a background is not a principal problem for AMS if the stripper pressure is increased accordingly. Based on our first results, we conclude that ultra-trace analyses of Am and Cm isotopes for bioassay are very well possible with low energy AMS.

  2. Microdosimetry of low-energy electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Uehara, Shuzo; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2012-12-01

    To investigate differences in energy depositions and microdosimetric parameters of low-energy electrons in liquid and gaseous water using Monte Carlo track structure simulations. KURBUC-liq (Kyushu University and Radiobiology Unit Code for liquid water) was used for simulating electron tracks in liquid water. The inelastic scattering cross sections of liquid water were obtained from the dielectric response model of Emfietzoglou et al. (Radiation Research 2005;164:202-211). Frequencies of energy deposited in nanometre-size cylindrical targets per unit absorbed dose and associated lineal energies were calculated for 100-5000 eV monoenergetic electrons and the electron spectrum of carbon K edge X-rays. The results for liquid water were compared with those for water vapour. Regardless of electron energy, there is a limit how much energy electron tracks can deposit in a target. Phase effects on the frequencies of energy depositions are largely visible for the targets with diameters and heights smaller than 30 nm. For the target of 2.3 nm by 2.3 nm (similar to dimension of DNA segments), the calculated frequency- and dose-mean lineal energies for liquid water are up to 40% smaller than those for water vapour. The corresponding difference is less than 12% for the targets with diameters ≥ 30 nm. Condensed-phase effects are non-negligible for microdosimetry of low-energy electrons for targets with sizes smaller than a few tens of nanometres, similar to dimensions of DNA molecular structures and nucleosomes.

  3. Low-energy nuclear astrophysics studies at the Multicharged Ion Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febbraro, Michael; Pain, Steven; Bannister, Mark; Deboer, Richard; Chipps, Kelly; Havener, Charles; Peters, Willan; Ummel, Chad; Smith, Michael; Temanson, Eli; Toomey, Rebecca; Walter, David

    2017-09-01

    As low-energy nuclear astrophysics progresses toward measuring reaction cross sections in the stellar burning regimes, a worldwide effort is underway to continue these measurements at underground laboratories to achieve the requisite ultra-low-background environment. These facilities are crucial for providing the required low-background environments to perform such measurements of astrophysical importance. While advances have been made in the use of accelerators underground, of equal importance is the detectors, high-current targets, and techniques required to perform such measurements. With these goals in mind, a newly established astrophysics beamline has been built at the Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The unique capabilities of MIRF will be demonstrated through two recent low-energy above-ground measurements of the dominant s-process neutron source 13C(α,n)16O and associated beam-induced background source 13C(d,n)14N. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics. Research sponsored by the LDRD Program of ORNL, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE.

  4. Pepper-pot diagnostic method to define emittance and Twiss parameters on low energies accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Dolinska, M E

    2002-01-01

    The new complex mathematical algorithm to determine beam transverse emittance data and the Twiss parameters from intensity measured with pepper-por diagnostic device on rf low energies accelerators is described.

  5. Can Formal Methods Provide (Necessary and) Sufficient Conditions for Measurement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Luca

    2017-01-01

    In his focus article, "Rethinking Traditional Methods of Survey Validation," published in this issue of "Measurement: Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives," Andrew Maul introduces and discusses several foundational issues and concludes that self-report measures may be particularly difficult to validate and may fall short…

  6. Combining high-scale inflation with low-energy SUSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antusch, Stefan [Basel Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. of Physics; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany). Werner-Heisenberg-Institut; Dutta, Koushik [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Halter, Sebastian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany). Werner-Heisenberg-Institut

    2011-12-15

    We propose a general scenario for moduli stabilization where low-energy supersymmetry can be accommodated with a high scale of inflation. The key ingredient is that the stabilization of the modulus field during and after inflation is not associated with a single, common scale, but relies on two different mechanisms. We illustrate this general scenario in a simple example, where during inflation the modulus is stabilized with a large mass by a Kaehler potential coupling to the field which provides the inflationary vacuum energy via its F-term. After inflation, the modulus is stabilized, for instance, by a KKLT superpotential. (orig.)

  7. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Resarch Center Workshop: Fluctuations, Correlations and RHIC Low Energy Runs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsch, F.; Kojo, T.; Mukherjee, S.; Stephanov, M.; Xu, N.

    2011-10-27

    Most of our visible universe is made up of hadronic matter. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory of strong interaction that describes the hadronic matter. However, QCD predicts that at high enough temperatures and/or densities ordinary hadronic matter ceases to exist and a new form of matter is created, the so-called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Non-perturbative lattice QCD simulations shows that for high temperature and small densities the transition from the hadronic to the QCD matter is not an actual phase transition, rather it takes place via a rapid crossover. On the other hand, it is generally believed that at zero temperature and high densities such a transition is an actual first order phase transition. Thus, in the temperature-density phase diagram of QCD, the first order phase transition line emanating from the zero temperature high density region ends at some higher temperature where the transition becomes a crossover. The point at which the first order transition line turns into a crossover is a second order phase transition point belonging to three dimensional Ising universality class. This point is known as the QCD Critical End Point (CEP). For the last couple of years the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been performing experiments at lower energies in search of the elusive QCD CEP. In general critical behaviors are manifested through appearance of long range correlations and increasing fluctuations associated with the presence of mass-less modes in the vicinity of a second order phase transition. Experimental signatures of the CEP are likely to be found in observables related to fluctuations and correlations. Thus, one of the major focuses of the RHIC low energy scan program is to measure various experimental observables connected to fluctuations and correlations. On the other hand, with the start of the RHIC low energy scan program, a flurry of activities are taking place to provide solid theoretical

  8. Reduction of thermal conductivity by low energy multi-Einstein optic modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huili Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The lattice dynamics and thermal transport in Cu2-δSe compounds were investigated via theoretical calculations, neutron measurement, and characterization of thermal properties. The results show that binary ordered Cu2-δSe has an extremely low lattice thermal conductivity at low temperatures. The low energy multi-Einstein optic modes are the dominant approach obtaining such an extremely low lattice thermal conductivity. It is indicated that the damped vibrations of copper ions could contribute to the low energy multi-Einstein optic modes, especially for those low energy branches at 2–4 meV.

  9. Measuring Perceptual (In) Congruence between Information Service Providers and Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Crystal

    2017-01-01

    Library quality is no longer evaluated solely on the value of its collections, as user perceptions of service quality play an increasingly important role in defining overall library value. This paper presents a retooling of the LibQUAL+ survey instrument, blending the gap measurement model with perceptual congruence model studies from information…

  10. Developing effective rockfall protection barriers for low energy impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentani, Alessio; Giacomini, Anna; Buzzi, Olivier; Govoni, Laura; Gottardi, Guido; Fityus, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Recently, important progresses have been made towards the development of high capacity rockfall barriers (100 kJ - 8000 kJ). The interest of researchers and practitioners is now turning to the development of fences of minor capacity, whose use becomes essential in areas where rockfall events generally have low intensity and the use of high capacity barriers would be accompanied by excessive costs and high environmental impact. Low energy barriers can also provide a cost-effective solution even in areas where high energies events are expected. Results of full-scale tests are vital to any investigation on the behaviour of these structures. An experimental set-up has been developed at The University of Newcastle (AUS), to investigate the response of low energy rockfall barrier prototypes to low energy impacts. The Australian territory, and in particular New South Wales, is in fact characterised by rockfall events of low-to-medium intensity (50 kJ - 500 kJ) and the need of protection structures working within such energy range, is particularly felt [1]. The experiments involved the impact of a test block onto three spans, low energy barrier prototypes, made of steel structural posts, fully fixed at the base, side cables and a steel meshwork constituted by a double twist hexagonal wire net [2]. Test data enabled the development, calibration and assessment of FE models [3], on which non-linear and dynamic analyses have been performed addressing the effect of the block size. Results have shown that the response of the structure is strongly governed by the net. Data from tests conducted on the sole net and on the entire barrier showed in fact a similar trend, different to what typically observed for high capacity barriers, whose behaviour is also led by the presence of uphill cables and brakes. In particular, the numerical analyses have demonstrated a dependence of the net performance on the block size. In particular, a loss of capacity in the order of 50% occurred as the

  11. Universality of low-energy Rashba scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Joel; Maciejko, Joseph

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the scattering of a quantum particle with a two-dimensional (2D) Rashba spin-orbit coupled dispersion off of circularly symmetric potentials. As the energy of the particle approaches the bottom of the lowest spin-split band, i.e., the van Hove singularity, earlier work has shown that scattering off of an infinite circular barrier exhibits a number of features unusual from the point of view of conventional 2D scattering theory: the low-energy S matrix is independent of the range of the potential, all partial waves contribute equally, the differential cross section becomes increasingly anisotropic and 1D-like, and the total cross section exhibits quantized plateaus. Via a nonperturbative determination of the T matrix and an optical theorem which we prove here, we show that this behavior is universal for Rashba scattering off of any circularly symmetric, spin independent, finite-range potential. This is relevant both for impurity scattering in the noninteracting limit as well as for short-range two-particle scattering in the interacting problem.

  12. RHIC low-energy challenges and plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satogata,T.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Bruno, D.; Butler, J.; Drees, A.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Jappe, W.; Lee, R.C.; MacKay, W.W.; Malitsky, N.; Marr, G.; Michnoff, R.; Oerter, B.; Pozdeyev, E.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.

    2009-06-08

    Future Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) runs, including a portion of FY10 heavy ion operations, will explore collisions at center of mass energies of 5-50 GeV/n (GeV/nucleon). Operations at these energies is motivated by the search for a possible QCD phase transition critical point. The lowest end of this energy range is nearly a factor of four below the nominal RHIC injection center of mass energy {radical}s = 19.6 GeV/n. There are several operational challenges in the RHIC low-energy regime, including harmonic number changes, small longitudinal acceptance, lowered magnet field quality, nonlinear orbit control, and luminosity monitoring. We report on the experience with these challenges during beam tests with gold beams in March 2008. This includes first operations at {radical}s = 9.18 GeV/n, first beam experience at {radical}s = 5 GeV/n, and luminosity projections for near-term operations.

  13. Low Energy Desalination Using Battery Electrode Deionization

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Taeyoung

    2017-09-21

    New electrochemical technologies that use capacitive or battery electrodes are being developed to minimize energy requirements for desalinating brackish waters. When a pair of electrodes is charged in capacitive deionization (CDI) systems, cations bind to the cathode and anions bind to the anode, but high applied voltages (>1.2 V) result in parasitic reactions and irreversible electrode oxidation. In the battery electrode deionization (BDI) system developed here, two identical copper hexacyanoferrate (CuHCF) battery electrodes were used that release and bind cations, with anion separation occurring via an anion exchange membrane. The system used an applied voltage of 0.6 V, which avoided parasitic reactions, achieved high electrode desalination capacities (up to 100 mg-NaCl/g-electrode, 50 mM NaCl influent), and consumed less energy than CDI. Simultaneous production of desalinated and concentrated solutions in two channels avoided a two-cycle approach needed for CDI. Stacking additional membranes between CuHCF electrodes (up to three anion and two cation exchange membranes) reduced energy consumption to only 0.02 kWh/m3 (approximately an order of magnitude lower than values reported for CDI), for an influent desalination similar to CDI (25 mM decreased to 17 mM). These results show that BDI could be effective as a very low energy method for brackish water desalination.

  14. Low energy electron beam processing of YBCO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chromik, Š., E-mail: stefan.chromik@savba.sk [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Camerlingo, C. [CNR-SPIN, Istituto Superconduttori, Materiali Innovativi e Dispositivi, via Campi Flegrei 34, 80078 Pozzuoli (Italy); Sojková, M.; Štrbík, V.; Talacko, M. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Malka, I.; Bar, I.; Bareli, G. [Department of Physics, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, 84105 Beer Sheva (Israel); Jung, G. [Department of Physics, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O.B. 653, 84105 Beer Sheva (Israel); Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Improvement of superconducting properties of irradiated bridges under certain conditions. • 30 keV irradiation influence CuO{sub 2} planes as well as oxygen chains. • Direct confirmation of changes in oxygen chains using micro-Raman spectroscopy. • Possibility of electron writing. - Abstract: Effects of low energy 30 keV electron irradiation of superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} thin films have been investigated by means of transport and micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements. The critical temperature and the critical current of 200 nm thick films initially increase with increasing fluency of the electron irradiation, reach the maximum at fluency 3 − 4 × 10{sup 20} electrons/cm{sup 2}, and then decrease with further fluency increase. In much thinner films (75 nm), the critical temperature increases while the critical current decreases after low energy electron irradiation with fluencies below 10{sup 20} electrons/cm{sup 2}. The Raman investigations suggest that critical temperature increase in irradiated films is due to healing of broken Cu−O chains that results in increased carrier’s concentration in superconducting CuO{sub 2} planes. Changes in the critical current are controlled by changes in the density of oxygen vacancies acting as effective pinning centers for flux vortices. The effects of low energy electron irradiation of YBCO turned out to result from a subtle balance of many processes involving oxygen removal, both by thermal activation and kick-off processes, and ordering of chains environment by incident electrons.

  15. Low-energy spin fluctuations in filled skutterudites YbFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and LaFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} investigated through {sup 121}Sb nuclear quadrupole and {sup 139}La nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, A; Iemura, S; Wada, S [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Ishida, K [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Shirotani, I; Sekine, C [Faculty of Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, Mizumoto, Muroran 050-8585 (Japan)

    2008-05-14

    We have elucidated low-energy spin fluctuations in the new filled skutterudites YbFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} and LaFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} synthesized at high pressures, through {sup 121}Sb nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and {sup 139}La nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. The longitudinal spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T{sub 1} of {sup 121}Sb in YbFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} provides evidence that upon cooling below {approx}20 K, the compound transforms from the localized 4f electron state of Yb{sup 3+} ions to a nonmagnetic heavy Fermi liquid state, originating from the mixing of 4f electrons with conduction electrons. Whereas, the Curie-Weiss type behaviour of the {sup 139}La Knight shift and {sup 121}Sb- 1/T{sub 1} in LaFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} indicate that the compound remains in the localized electron state down to 1.4 K, it in fact originates from 3d electrons of Fe in [Fe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} ] anions. In both compounds, the transversal nuclear spin-spin relaxation rate 1/T{sub 2} exhibits a clear peak at T*{approx_equal}32 and {approx_equal}23K respectively. The origin of the 1/T{sub 2} peak is discussed in terms of the freezing of the thermal vibration of Sb cages or rare-earth ions filled in each Sb cage. By comparing the experimental results of the present study with those previously reported for the compounds synthesized at ambient pressure, it is pointed out that both the strongly correlated electron properties and the thermal vibrations are greatly modified with the increase of rare-earth atom deficiency.

  16. Comparison of different windows for low-energy houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juras Peter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with an outcome of long-term experimental measurement of windows suitable for low-energy or zero houses. Three different windows are evaluated since 2011 in the Laboratory of the Department of Building Engineering and Urban Planning, Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Zilina. All windows have implemented triple glazing, but with various frame type. Two frames are made from plastic and one from wood. The plastic frames differ from each other with use of thermal insulation inside one of mentioned frames. The test room has adjustable indoor boundary conditions and is exposed to real outdoor climate conditions measured through the own detached experimental weather station. Temperatures and heat fluxes are continuously measured on glazings and frames. This paper compares the windows by the requirements of Slovak standard on the inner surface temperatures and differences of the thermal transmittance for glazing and sash.

  17. Low energy electron attenuation lengths in core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Michael I; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R

    2017-05-24

    A velocity map imaging spectrometer is used to measure photoemission from free core-shell nanoparticles, where a salt core is coated with a liquid hydrocarbon shell (i.e. squalane). By varying the radial thickness of the hydrocarbon shell, electron attenuation lengths (EALs) are determined by measuring the decay in photoemission intensity from the salt core. In squalane, electrons with kinetic energy (KE) above 2 eV are found to have EALs of 3-5 nm, whereas electrons with smaller KE (15 nm. These results (in the context of other energy-resolved EAL measurements) suggest that the energy dependent behavior of low energy electrons is similar in dielectrics when KE > 2 eV. At this energy the EALs do not appear to exhibit strong energy dependence. However, at very low KE (<2 eV), the EALs diverge and appear to be extremely material dependent.

  18. Validation of GPUMCD for low-energy brachytherapy seed dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoit; Despres, Philippe; Carrier, Jean-Francois [Ecole polytechnique de Montreal, Departement de genie informatique et genie logiciel, 2500 chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, QC, H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, QC, G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada) and Departement de radio-oncologie and Centre de recherche du CHUM, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Montreal, QC, H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To validate GPUMCD, a new package for fast Monte Carlo dose calculations based on the GPU (graphics processing unit), as a tool for low-energy single seed brachytherapy dosimetry for specific seed models. As the currently accepted method of dose calculation in low-energy brachytherapy computations relies on severe approximations, a Monte Carlo based approach would result in more accurate dose calculations, taking in to consideration the patient anatomy as well as interseed attenuation. The first step is to evaluate the capability of GPUMCD to reproduce low-energy, single source, brachytherapy calculations which could ultimately result in fast and accurate, Monte Carlo based, brachytherapy dose calculations for routine planning. Methods: A mixed geometry engine was integrated to GPUMCD capable of handling parametric as well as voxelized geometries. In order to evaluate GPUMCD for brachytherapy calculations, several dosimetry parameters were computed and compared to values found in the literature. These parameters, defined by the AAPM Task-Group No. 43, are the radial dose function, the 2D anisotropy function, and the dose rate constant. These three parameters were computed for two different brachytherapy sources: the Amersham OncoSeed 6711 and the Imagyn IsoStar IS-12501. Results: GPUMCD was shown to yield dosimetric parameters similar to those found in the literature. It reproduces radial dose functions to within 1.25% for both sources in the 0.5< r <10 cm range. The 2D anisotropy function was found to be within 3% at r = 5 cm and within 4% at r = 1 cm. The dose rate constants obtained were within the range of other values reported in the literature.Conclusion: GPUMCD was shown to be able to reproduce various TG-43 parameters for two different low-energy brachytherapy sources found in the literature. The next step is to test GPUMCD as a fast clinical Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations with multiple seeds and patient geometry, potentially providing

  19. Analysis of low energy electron emission arising during slow multicharged ion-surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmichoven, P.A.Z.v. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6372 (United States) Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, Holified Heavy Ion Research Facility, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6734 (United States)); Havener, C.C. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6372 (United States)); Hughes, I.G. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6372 (United States) Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6374 (United States)); Zehner, D.M.; Meyer, F.W. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6732 (United States))

    1993-06-05

    We have undertaken a search for low energy electrons expected to arise in low energy multicharged ion-surface interactions when electrons captured into Rydberg levels of the projectile are promoted to the continuum as the projectile impacts the surface. Measurements are presented for 30--100 keV N[sup 2+] -N[sup 6+] ions incident at 20[degree] with the surface on Cu(001) and Au(011) single crystals, for a series of observation angles.

  20. Analysis of low energy electron emission arising during slow multicharged ion-surface interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Hughes, I.G. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States) Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Havener, C.C.; Zehner, D.M.; Meyer, F.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01

    We have undertaken a search for low energy electrons expected to arise in low energy multicharged ion-surface interactions when electrons captured into Rydberg levels of the projectile are promoted to the continuum as the projectile impacts the surface. Measurements are presented for 30--100 keV N{sup 2+} -- N{sup 6+} ions incident at 20{sup o} with the surface on Cu(001) and Au(0ll) single crystals, for a series of observation angles.

  1. Can cellulite be treated with low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Angehrn, Fiorenzo; Kuhn, Christoph; Voss, Axel

    2007-01-01

    Fiorenzo Angehrn1, Christoph Kuhn1, Axel Voss21Klinik Piano, Gottstattstrasse 24, Biel, Switzerland; 2SwiTech Medical AG, Kreuzlingen, SwitzerlandAbstract: The present study investigates the effects of low-energy defocused extracorporeal generated shock waves on collagen structure of cellulite afflicted skin. Cellulite measurement using high-resolution ultrasound technology was performed before and after low-energy defocused extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in 21 female subjects. ESWT...

  2. Low Energy Investigations at Kamioka Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    At Kamioka Observatory many activities for low energy rare event search are ongoing. Super-Kamiokande(SK), the largest water Cherenkov neutrino detector, currently continues data taking as the fourth phase of the experiment (SK-IV). In SK-IV, we have upgraded the water purification system and tuned water flow in the SK tank. Consequently the background level was lowered significantly. This allowed SK-IV to derive solar neutrino results down to 3.5 MeV energy region. With these data, neutrino oscillation parameters are updated from global fit; Δm212 = 7.44+0.2-0.19 × 10-5eV2, sin2 θ12 = 0.304 ± 0.013, sin2 θ13 = 0.0301+0.017-0.015. NEWAGE, the directional sensitive dark matter search experiment, is currently operated as "NEWAGE-0.3a" which is a 0.20 × 0.25 × 0.31 m3 micro-TPC filled with CF4 gas at 152 Torr. Recently we have developed "NEWAGE-0.3b". It was succeeded to lower the operation pressure down to 76 Torr and the threshold down to 50 keV (F recoils). XMASS experiment is looking for scintillation signals from dark matter interaction in 1 ton of liquid xenon. It was designed utilizing its self-shielding capability with fiducial volume confinement. However, we could lower the analysis threshold down to 0.3 keVee using whole volume of the detector. In February 2012, low threshold and very large exposure data (5591 kg·days) were collected. With these data, we have excluded some part of the parameter spaces claimed by DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments.

  3. Low-energy housing estate 'SUNDAYS'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, W.; Fink, C.; Thuer, A. [AEE - Arbeitsgemeinschaft Erneuerbare Energie, Gleisdorf (Austria)

    2000-07-01

    The low-energy housing estate 'SUNDAYS' was developed with the goal to find a prefabricated building standard with normal cost but very low energy demand. As a demonstration project in Gleisdorf / Styria six terraced houses and one office building were realised. The energy concept includes high insulation standard, passive solar gains by a conservatory and earth to air heat exchanger, active solar gains using thermal collectors and also biomass operating a pellets-boiler. A central waste air ventilator sucks the air out of the rooms and therefore fresh air comes into the conservatory directly or pre-warmed resp. pre-cooled through the earth to air heat exchanger. The remaining space-heating demand is covered by a low-temperature wall- and floor heating system. Results of the first measuring period in the office building showed a total energy demand covered by biomass and electricity of 35 kWh for each m{sup 2} of heated net floor space. (au)

  4. Development of Low Energy Gap and Fully Regioregular Polythienylenevinylene Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya M. S. David

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low energy gap and fully regioregular conjugated polymers find its wide use in solar energy conversion applications. This paper will first briefly review this type of polymers and also report synthesis and characterization of a specific example new polymer, a low energy gap, fully regioregular, terminal functionalized, and processable conjugated polymer poly-(3-dodecyloxy-2,5-thienylene vinylene or PDDTV. The polymer exhibited an optical energy gap of 1.46 eV based on the UV-vis-NIR absorption spectrum. The electrochemically measured highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO level is −4.79 eV, resulting in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO level of −3.33 eV based on optical energy gap. The polymer was synthesized via Horner-Emmons condensation and is fairly soluble in common organic solvents such as tetrahydrofuran and chloroform with gentle heating. DSC showed two endothermic peaks at 67°C and 227°C that can be attributed to transitions between crystalline and liquid states. The polymer is thermally stable up to about 300°C. This polymer appears very promising for cost-effective solar cell applications.

  5. Low energy probes of PeV scale sfermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmannshofer, Wolfgang; Harnik, Roni; Zupan, Jure

    2013-11-27

    We derive bounds on squark and slepton masses in mini-split supersymmetry scenario using low energy experiments. In this setup gauginos are at the TeV scale, while sfermions are heavier by a loop factor. We cover the most sensitive low energy probes including electric dipole moments (EDMs), meson oscillations and charged lepton flavor violation (LFV) transitions. A leading log resummation of the large logs of gluino to sfermion mass ratio is performed. A sensitivity to PeV squark masses is obtained at present from kaon mixing measurements. A number of observables, including neutron EDMs, mu->e transitions and charmed meson mixing, will start probing sfermion masses in the 100 TeV-1000 TeV range with the projected improvements in the experimental sensitivities. We also discuss the implications of our results for a variety of models that address the flavor hierarchy of quarks and leptons. We find that EDM searches will be a robust probe of models in which fermion masses are generated radiatively, while LFV searches remain sensitive to simple-texture based flavor models.

  6. Low energy tertiary beam line design for the CERN neutrino platform project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Charitonidis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of CERN neutrino platform project at the CERN SPS North Area, two new beam lines have been designed as extensions of the existing secondary beam lines, able to provide low energy particles in the momentum range of 0.4 to 12  GeV/c. The layout of these very low energy beam lines, their design parameters as well as outlook on their expected performance, are summarized in this paper.

  7. Low energy tertiary beam line design for the CERN neutrino platform project

    OpenAIRE

    N. Charitonidis; I. Efthymiopoulos

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of CERN neutrino platform project at the CERN SPS North Area, two new beam lines have been designed as extensions of the existing secondary beam lines, able to provide low energy particles in the momentum range of 0.4 to 12  GeV/c. The layout of these very low energy beam lines, their design parameters as well as outlook on their expected performance, are summarized in this paper.

  8. Low energy tertiary beam line design for the CERN neutrino platform project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charitonidis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, I.

    2017-11-01

    In the framework of CERN neutrino platform project at the CERN SPS North Area, two new beam lines have been designed as extensions of the existing secondary beam lines, able to provide low energy particles in the momentum range of 0.4 to 12 GeV /c . The layout of these very low energy beam lines, their design parameters as well as outlook on their expected performance, are summarized in this paper.

  9. Identification and tracking of low energy spectator protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mussgiller, A.

    2007-07-20

    The present theses discusses the development, technical design and realization as well as the read-out electronics of a detection system for the identification and tracking of low energy spectator protons. With the knowledge of the four-momentum of such spectator protons it will be possible to use deuterium as an effective neutron target. Previous measurements with an early version of the detection system have already shown that this method works quite well to investigate for instance the {omega} or {eta}-meson production in proton-neutron collisions. Moreover, after the completion and installation of the polarized internal target (PIT) at ANKE, it will be even possible to engage in that field with double polarized experiments. To increase the luminosity the polarized target is equipped with an extended target cell. The described detection-system will provide the vertex reconstruction for this extended interaction region. In addition, it will act as an independent beam polarimeter at ANKE. The detection system consists of three layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors which are arranged in a telescope structure and placed inside the accelerator vacuum as close as 2 cm to the interaction region. The modular design of the electronics and the support structures for the detectors allows one to exchange detectors and electronics in a maximum flexible way. In a minimum configuration the telescope is equipped with two detectors, a thin ({approx} 69 {mu}m) double-sided Silicon strip detector as a first layer and a very thick ({>=} 5 mm) double-sided micro-structured Lithium-drifted Silicon detector as a second layer. With this arrangement it is possible to track and identify protons in a kinetic energy range from 2.5 MeV to 25 MeV. For deuterons this range for such a telescope configuration is from 4 MeV to 34 MeV. The performance concerning the energy determination and tracking is shown based on data taken during a beam-time in November of 2003. With the existing

  10. Low-Energy Electron Diffraction Determination of the Structure of the Zeta Phase of Oxygen Physisorbed on Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toney, Michael; Fain, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    Low-energy electron diffraction measurements on the ζ phase of diatomic oxygen physisorbed on the basal plane of graphite single crystals are reported for 12......Low-energy electron diffraction measurements on the ζ phase of diatomic oxygen physisorbed on the basal plane of graphite single crystals are reported for 12...

  11. Sustainable Heating/Cooling for Low Energy Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krajčík, M.; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Petráš, D.

    2012-01-01

    with high accuracy and under well defined boundary conditions, which can be further verified by field measurements or used for validation of a computer simulation. A set of experimental studies of air distribution, ventilation effectiveness and thermal environment were carried out in a simulated room heated....../cooled and ventilated by different concepts, at various boundary conditions, differing in supply air temperature, floor temperature, simulated heat gain/heat loss, nominal air change rate and positions of air terminal devices. The experimental room simulated corresponds to a residential room or a single office room...... located in a low-energy building. Procedures and indicators that can be successfully used for experimental investigations of indoor environment are described and a sample of measured data is reported....

  12. Design of Low-Energy District Heating System for a Settlement with Low-Energy Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tol, Hakan; Svendsen, Svend

    2011-01-01

    With the integration of new low-energy buildings the traditional district heating (DH) systems with high operating temperatures will have significantly higher heat loss according to the heat supplied to the district. The relatively higher heat loss could be reduced with low operating temperatures...... of 55 °C and 25 °C in supply and return line of DH network, respectively with a convenient control of in-house installations (substations). Traditional DH pipe dimensioning methods were based on size searching algorithm in which lowest possible pipe diameter was defined according to the limit of max...

  13. Low-Energy Ballistic Transfers to Lunar Halo Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent lunar missions have begun to take advantage of the benefits of low-energy ballistic transfers between the Earth and the Moon rather than implementing conventional Hohmann-like lunar transfers. Both Artemis and GRAIL plan to implement low-energy lunar transfers in the next few years. This paper explores the characteristics and potential applications of many different families of low-energy ballistic lunar transfers. The transfers presented here begin from a wide variety of different orbits at the Earth and follow several different distinct pathways to the Moon. This paper characterizes these pathways to identify desirable low-energy lunar transfers for future lunar missions.

  14. Reconfigurable Low Energy Multiplier for Multimedia System Design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Suhwan

    2000-01-01

    This paper proposes a reconfigurable pipelined multiplier architecture that achieves high performance and very low energy dissipation by adapting its structure to computational requirements over time...

  15. Interaction between Low Energy Ions and the Complicated Organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zeng-liang

    1999-12-01

    Low energy ions exist widely in natural world, but people pay a little attention on the interaction between low energy ions and matter, it is even more out of the question of studying on the relation of low energy ions and the complicated organism. The discovery of bioeffect induced by ion implantation has, however, opened a new branch in the field of ion beam application in life sciences. This paper reports recent advances in research on the role of low energy ions in chemical synthesis of the biomolecules and application in genetic modification.

  16. Langevin model of low-energy fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierk, Arnold J.

    2017-09-01

    Background: Since the earliest days of fission, stochastic models have been used to describe and model the process. For a quarter century, numerical solutions of Langevin equations have been used to model fission of highly excited nuclei, where microscopic potential-energy effects have been neglected. Purpose: In this paper I present a Langevin model for the fission of nuclei with low to medium excitation energies, for which microscopic effects in the potential energy cannot be ignored. Method: I solve Langevin equations in a five-dimensional space of nuclear deformations. The macroscopic-microscopic potential energy from a global nuclear structure model well benchmarked to nuclear masses is tabulated on a mesh of approximately 107 points in this deformation space. The potential is defined continuously inside the mesh boundaries by use of a moving five-dimensional cubic spline approximation. Because of reflection symmetry, the effective mesh is nearly twice this size. For the inertia, I use a (possibly scaled) approximation to the inertia tensor defined by irrotational flow. A phenomenological dissipation tensor related to one-body dissipation is used. A normal-mode analysis of the dynamical system at the saddle point and the assumption of quasiequilibrium provide distributions of initial conditions appropriate to low excitation energies, and are extended to model spontaneous fission. A dynamical model of postscission fragment motion including dynamical deformations and separation allows the calculation of final mass and kinetic-energy distributions, along with other interesting quantities. Results: The model makes quantitative predictions for fragment mass and kinetic-energy yields, some of which are very close to measured ones. Varying the energy of the incident neutron for induced fission allows the prediction of energy dependencies of fragment yields and average kinetic energies. With a simple approximation for spontaneous fission starting conditions

  17. Studies of Heat Dynamics in an Arctic Low-energy House

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Philip Hvidthøft Delff; Rode, Carsten; Madsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    energy-efficient windows, and heat recovery. The house is divided into two symmetric apartments, of which one is inhabited by a family, and the other is used for experiments and demonstration. The situation provides unique options for measuring and analysis with large signal to noise ratios facilitating......A low energy house situated in Sisimiut, Greenland is used as study object for analysis of dynamic thermal properties of energy efficient buildings. The building is instrumented with a number of energy meters and thermal sensors, and these thermal data are logged with fine time intervals......, or not at all. The house is equipped with a weather station measuring temperature, solar radiation, wind speed and direction. The building is highly energy efficient and its performance has been followed since its inception in 2005. The energy efficiency of the building is due to good thermal insulation, large...

  18. Search for low Energy solar Axions with CAST

    CERN Document Server

    Cantatore, Giovanni; Aune, S.; Autiero, D.; Barth, K.; Belov, A.; Beltran, B.; Borghi, S.; Boydag, F.S.; Brauninger, H.; Cantatore, G.; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrian, S.; Cetin, S.A.; Collar, J.I.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Di Lella, L.; Dogan, O.B.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Elias, N.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Galan, J.; Gazis, E.; Geralis, T.; Giomataris, I.; Gninenko, S.; Gomez, H.; Hasinoff, M.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hikmet, I.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Irastorza, I.G.; Jacoby, J.; Jakovcic, K.; Kang, D.; Karageorgopoulou, T.; Karuza, M.; Konigsmann, Kay; Kotthaus, R.; Krcmar, M.; Kousouris, K.; Kuster, M.; Lakic, B.; Lasseur, C.; Liolios, A.; Ljubicic, A.; Lozza, V.; Lutz, G.; Luzon, G.; Miller, D.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Niinikoski, T.; Nordt, A.; Ortiz, A.; Papaevangelou, T.; Pivovaroff, M.; Placci, A.; Raiteri, G.; Raffelt, G.; Riege, H.; Rodriguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Savvidis, I.; Semertzidis, Y.; Serpico, P.; Solanki, S.K.; Soufli, R.; Stewart, L.; Tsagri, M.; van Bibber, K.; Villar, J.; Vogel, J.; Walckiers, L.; Zioutas, K.

    2008-01-01

    We have started the development of a detector system, sensitive to single photons in the eV energy range, to be suitably coupled to one of the CAST magnet ports. This system should open to CAST a window on possible detection of low energy Axion Like Particles emitted by the sun. Preliminary tests have involved a cooled photomultiplier tube coupled to the CAST magnet via a Galileian telescope and a switched 40 m long optical fiber. This system has reached the limit background level of the detector alone in ideal conditions, and two solar tracking runs have been performed with it at CAST. Such a measurement has never been done before with an axion helioscope. We will present results from these runs and briefly discuss future detector developments.

  19. Optimization of design parameters of low-energy buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vala, Jiří; Jarošová, Petra

    2017-07-01

    Evaluation of temperature development and related consumption of energy required for heating, air-conditioning, etc. in low-energy buildings requires the proper physical analysis, covering heat conduction, convection and radiation, including beam and diffusive components of solar radiation, on all building parts and interfaces. The system approach and the Fourier multiplicative decomposition together with the finite element technique offers the possibility of inexpensive and robust numerical and computational analysis of corresponding direct problems, as well as of the optimization ones with several design variables, using the Nelder-Mead simplex method. The practical example demonstrates the correlation between such numerical simulations and the time series of measurements of energy consumption on a small family house in Ostrov u Macochy (35 km northern from Brno).

  20. Measurements of {sup 67}Ga production cross section induced by protons on {sup nat}Zn in the low energy range from 1.678 to 2.444 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, J.A., E-mail: javier.wachter@utem.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Matemática y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago 7800002 (Chile); Miranda, P.A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Matemática y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago 7800002 (Chile); Morales, J.R.; Cancino, S.A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Correa, R. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales, Matemática y del Medio Ambiente, Universidad Tecnológica Metropolitana, Santiago 7800002 (Chile)

    2015-02-01

    The experimental production cross section for the reaction {sup nat}Zn(p,x){sup 67}Ga has been measured in the energy range from 1.678 to 2.444 MeV. The methodology used in this work is based on characteristic X-ray emitted after irradiation by the daughter nuclei that decays by electron capture (EC) and the use of a complementary PIXE experiment. By doing so, expressions needed to determine cross section values are simplified since experimental factors such as geometric setup and an detector efficiency are avoided. {sup 67}Ga is a radionuclide particularly suited for this method since it decays by electron capture in 100% and the subsequent characteristic X-ray emission is easily detected. Natural zinc targets were fabricated by PVD technique and afterwards their thicknesses were determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Cross sections measurements were carried out by using the Van de Graaff accelerator located at Faculty of Sciences, University of Chile. It was found that our data for the {sup nat}Zn(p,x){sup 67}Ga reaction are, in general, in good agreement when compared to existing experimental data and to those calculated ALICE/ASH nuclear code. On the other hand, values predicted by Talys-1.6 are showing systematically lower magnitudes than our measured data.

  1. Measurements of inner-shell characteristic X-ray yields of thick W, Mo and Zr targets by low-energy electron impact and comparison with Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.L.; Zhao, J.L. [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Tian, L.X. [East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); An, Z., E-mail: anzhu@scu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Zhu, J.J., E-mail: zhujingjun@scu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Liu, M.T. [Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: •We measured characteristic X-ray yields of thick W, Mo, Zr by 5–29 keV electrons. •Our measured data are in general in good agreement with the MC results with ∼10%. •Error of 10% of characteristic X-ray yields will produce errors of 2–7% for BIXS. -- Abstract: Inner-shell characteristic X-ray yields are one of the important ingredients in the β-ray induced X-ray spectrometry (BIXS) technique which can be used to perform tritium content and depth distribution analyses in plasma facing materials (PLMs) and other tritium-containing materials, such as W, Mo, Zr. In this paper, the measurements of K, L, M-shell X-ray yields Y(E) of pure thick W (Z = 74), Mo (Z = 42) and Zr (Z = 40) element targets produced by electron impact in the energy range of 5–29 keV are presented. The experimental data for Y(E) are compared with the corresponding predictions from Monte Carlo (MC) calculations using the general purpose MC code PENELOPE. In general, a good agreement is obtained between the experiment and the MC calculations for the variation of Y(E) with the impact energy both in shape and in magnitude with ∼10%. The effect of uncertainty of inner-shell characteristic X-ray yields on the BIXS technique is also discussed.

  2. Low-energy electronic recoil in xenon detectors by solar neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Chi, Hsin-Chang; Liu, C.-P.; Wu, Chih-Pan

    2017-11-01

    Low-energy electronic recoil caused by solar neutrinos in multi-ton xenon detectors is an important subject not only because it is a source of the irreducible background for direct searches of weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs), but also because it provides a viable way to measure the solar pp and 7Be neutrinos at the precision level of current standard solar model predictions. In this work we perform ab initio many-body calculations for the structure, photoionization, and neutrino-ionization of xenon. It is found that the atomic binding effect yields a sizable suppression to the neutrino-electron scattering cross section at low recoil energies. Compared with the previous calculation based on the free electron picture, our calculated event rate of electronic recoil in the same detector configuration is reduced by about 23%. We present in this paper the electronic recoil rate spectrum in the energy window of 100 eV to 30 keV with the standard per ton per year normalization for xenon detectors, and discuss its implication for low energy solar neutrino detection as the signal and WIMP search as a source of background.

  3. Modeling energy flexibility of low energy buildings utilizing thermal mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foteinaki, Kyriaki; Heller, Alfred; Rode, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    In the future energy system a considerable increase in the penetration of renewable energy is expected, challenging the stability of the system, as both production and consumption will have fluctuating patterns. Hence, the concept of energy flexibility will be necessary in order for the consumption...... to match the production patterns, shifting demand from on-peak hours to off-peak hours. Buildings could act as flexibility suppliers to the energy system, through load shifting potential, provided that the large thermal mass of the building stock could be utilized for energy storage. In the present study...... the load shifting potential of an apartment of a low energy building in Copenhagen is assessed, utilizing the heat storage capacity of the thermal mass when the heating system is switched off for relieving the energy system. It is shown that when using a 4-hour preheating period before switching off...

  4. District Heating in Areas with Low Energy Houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tol, Hakan Ibrahim

    in Denmark. The second case study was aimed at solving another regional energy planning scheme, one concerned with already existing houses, the heat requirements of which were currently being met by use of a natural gas grid or a conventional high-temperature district heating network. The idea considered......-energy houses involved, together with the idea of utilizing booster pumps in the district heating network and (ii) use of network layouts of either a branched (tree-like) or a looped type. The methods developed were applied in a case study, the data of which was provided by the municipality of Roskilde...... houses there being considered for renovation to houses of a low-energy class, and due to the existing heat-supply energy infrastructure there being a natural gas grid. The third case study carried out aimed at developing energy conversion systems based on use of renewable energy sources that were...

  5. Low-energy photoelectron transmission through aerosol overlayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanatidis, Stavros; Yoder, Bruce L.; Signorell, Ruth

    2017-06-01

    The transmission of low-energy (squalane, squalene, and di-ethyl-hexyl-sebacate shells. The photoelectrons are exclusively formed in the core of the particles by two-photon ionization. The total photoelectron yield recorded as a function of shell thicknesses (1-80 nm) shows a bi-exponential attenuation. For all substances, the damping parameter for shell thicknesses below 15 nm lies around 8 to 9 nm and is tentatively assigned to the electron attenuation length at electron kinetic energies of ≲1 eV. The significantly larger damping parameters for thick shells (>20 nm) are presumably a consequence of distorted core-shell structures. A first comparison of aerosol and traditional thin film overlayer methods is provided.

  6. Low-energy-consumption hybrid lasers for silicon photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Ran, Qijiang; Mørk, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Physics and characteristics of a hybrid vertical-cavity laser that can be an on-chip Si light source with high speed and low energy consumption are discussed.......Physics and characteristics of a hybrid vertical-cavity laser that can be an on-chip Si light source with high speed and low energy consumption are discussed....

  7. Occupant Experiences and Satisfaction with New Low-Energy Houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Henrik Nellemose; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Mørck, Ove

    2013-01-01

    The development and the erection of low-energy buildings have been intensified in recent years. Still, there are only few studies on occupant experiences and satisfaction of living in low-energy houses. A questionnaire survey was therefore carried out in the autumn 2011 among occupants of low-ene...

  8. Synthesis of sputtered thin films in low energy ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetron sputtering is a process which gives a highly energetic depositing species. The growing film can be further bombarded with ions of the heavy gas used for sputtering by directing a plasma of it onto the surface. This can be done quite simply by using an unbalanced magnetron. The immersion of an insulating or isolated substrate-film combination in this plasma leads to a self-bias of around 30 V appearing on it's surface and a bombardment of low energy ions of the sputtering gas of several milli-amps per square centimetre. If the residual gas contains a reactive component, to form a compound film, then the gas is made much more reactive and less is needed to form the stoichiometric film. This can take place in a continuously operating system made stable using partial pressure control of the reactive gas with plasma emission monitoring or something similar. It can also be operated when the process of deposition is separated in time from the process of reaction and is repeated to build the film. We have called this process successive-plasma-anodisation (SPA) and it can be achieved by mechanically transferring the substrate between two magnetrons, one to deposit the metal film and one, which is unbalanced, to provide an oxygen plasma. It can also be operated by pulsing the reactive gas under carefully controlled conditions. Examples are given of the synthesis of compound films using low energy ion bombardment with these techniques and it is demonstrated that excellent films of a large range of oxides and nitrides can be made.

  9. Thermal environment in eight low-energy and twelve conventional Finnish houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähkönen, Erkki; Salmi, Kari; Holopainen, Rauno; Pasanen, Pertti; Reijula, Kari

    2015-11-01

    We assessed the thermal environment of eight recently built low-energy houses and twelve conventional Finnish houses. We monitored living room, bedroom and outdoor air temperatures and room air relative humidity from June 2012 to September 2013. Perceived thermal environment was evaluated using a questionnaire survey during the heating, cooling and interim seasons. We compared the measured and perceived thermal environments of the low-energy and conventional houses. The mean air temperature was 22.8 °C (21.9-23.8 °C) in the low-energy houses, and 23.3 °C (21.4-26.5 °C) in the conventional houses during the summer (1. June 2013-31. August 2013). In the winter (1. December 2012-28. February 2013), the mean air temperature was 21.3 °C (19.8-22.5 °C) in the low-energy houses, and 21.6 °C (18.1-26.4 °C) in the conventional houses. The variation of the air temperature was less in the low-energy houses than that in the conventional houses. In addition, the occupants were on average slightly more satisfied with the indoor environment in the low-energy houses. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the mean air temperature and relative humidity of the low-energy and conventional houses. Our measurements and surveys showed that a good thermal environment can be achieved in both types of houses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Low energy electron transport in furfural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Ana I.; Krupa, Kateryna; Ferreira da Silva, Filipe; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Blanco, Francisco; Muñoz, Antonio; Jones, Darryl B.; Brunger, Michael J.; García, Gustavo

    2017-09-01

    We report on an initial investigation into the transport of electrons through a gas cell containing 1 mTorr of gaseous furfural. Results from our Monte Carlo simulation are implicitly checked against those from a corresponding electron transmission measurement. To enable this simulation a self-consistent cross section data base was constructed. This data base is benchmarked through new total cross section measurements which are also described here. In addition, again to facilitate the simulation, our preferred energy loss distribution function is presented and discussed.

  11. Annihilation of low energy antiprotons in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Aghion, S; Belov, A S; Bonomi, G; Bräunig, P; Bremer, J; Brusa, R S; Burghart, G; Cabaret, L; Caccia, M; Canali, C; Caravita, R; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Cialdi, S; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Derking, J H; Di Domizio, S; Di Noto, L; Doser, M; Dudarev, A; Ferragut, R; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Gninenko, S N; Haider, S; Harasimovic, J; Huse, T; Jordan, E; Jørgensen, L V; Kaltenbacher, T; Kellerbauer, A; Knecht, A; Krasnický, D; Lagomarsino, V; Magnani, A; Mariazzi, S; Matveev, V A; Moia, F; Nebbia, G; Nédélec, P; Pacifico, N; Petrácek, V; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Regenfus, C; Riccardi, C; Røhne, O; Rotondi, A; Sandaker, H; Susa, A; Vasquez, M A Subieta; Špacek, M; Testera, G; Welsch, C P; Zavatarelli, S

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the AE$\\mathrm{\\bar{g}}$IS experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN, is to measure directly the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antimatter. To achieve this goal, the AE$\\mathrm{\\bar{g}}$IS collaboration will produce a pulsed, cold (100 mK) antihydrogen beam with a velocity of a few 100 m/s and measure the magnitude of the vertical deflection of the beam from a straight path. The final position of the falling antihydrogen will be detected by a position sensitive detector. This detector will consist of an active silicon part, where the annihilations take place, followed by an emulsion part. Together, they allow to achieve 1$%$ precision on the measurement of $\\bar{g}$ with about 600 reconstructed and time tagged annihilations. We present here, to the best of our knowledge, the first direct measurement of antiproton annihilation in a segmented silicon sensor, the first step towards designing a position sensitive silicon detector for the AE$\\mathrm{\\bar{g}}$IS experiment. We also pr...

  12. An International Project on Indoor Air Quality Design and Control in Low Energy Residential Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Abadie, Marc; Qin, Menghao

    2016-01-01

    focal points to limiting energy consumption for thermally conditioning the indoor environment will be to possibly reducing the ventilation rate, or making it in a new way demand controlled. However, this must be done such that it does not have adverse effects on indoor air quality (IAQ). Annex 68......, Indoor Air Quality Design and Control in Low Energy Residential Buildings, is a project under IEA’s Energy Conservation in Buildings and Communities Program (EBC), which will endeavor to investigate how future residential buildings are able to have very high energy performance whilst providing...... the hygrothermal parameters, the chemical conditions, ventilation and the wellbeing of occupants. The project is divided into the five subtasks: 1. Defining the metrics. 2. Pollutant loads in residential buildings. 3. Modeling. 4. Strategies for design and control of buildings. 5. Field measurements and case...

  13. Mimicking bipolar sextupole power supplies for low-energy operations at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag, C.; Bruno, D.; Jain, A.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2011-03-28

    RHIC operated at energies below the nominal ion injection energy of E=9.8 GeV/u in 2010. Earlier test runs and magnet measurements indicated that all defocusing sextupole unipolar power supplies should be reversed to provide the proper sign of chromaticity. However, vertical chromaticity at E=3.85 GeV/u with this power supply configuration was still not optimal. This uncertainty inspired a new machine configuration where only half of the defocusing sextupole power supplies were reversed, taking advantage of the flexibility of the RHIC nonlinear chromaticity correction system to mimic bipolar sextupoles. This configuration resulted in a 30 percent luminosity gain and eliminated the need for further polarity changes for later 2010 low energy physics operations. Here we describe the background to this problem, operational experience, and RHIC online model changes to implement this solution.

  14. Passive low energy cooling of buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Givoni, Baruch

    1994-01-01

    A practical sourcebook for building designers, providing comprehensive discussion of the impact of basic architectural choices on cooling efficiency, including the layout and orientation of the structure, window size and shading, exterior color, and even the use of plantings around the site. All major varieties of passive cooling systems are presented, with extensive analysis of performance in different types of buildings and in different climates: ventilation; radiant cooling; evaporative cooling; soil cooling; and cooling of outdoor spaces.

  15. Low-energy house in Sisimiut - Measurement equipment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Philip Hvidthøft Delff; Rode, Carsten; Madsen, Henrik

    on the power generated by the solar thermal system. A weather station equipped with thermometer, pyranometer and anemometer is installed on the building as well. Finally, it is described how to retrieve data from an SQL server which is configured to take monthly backups. R functions have been implemented...

  16. Measuring physical inactivity: do current measures provide an accurate view of "sedentary" video game time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Simon; Taylor, Anne W; Dal Grande, Eleonora; Berry, Narelle

    2014-01-01

    Measures of screen time are often used to assess sedentary behaviour. Participation in activity-based video games (exergames) can contribute to estimates of screen time, as current practices of measuring it do not consider the growing evidence that playing exergames can provide light to moderate levels of physical activity. This study aimed to determine what proportion of time spent playing video games was actually spent playing exergames. Data were collected via a cross-sectional telephone survey in South Australia. Participants aged 18 years and above (n = 2026) were asked about their video game habits, as well as demographic and socioeconomic factors. In cases where children were in the household, the video game habits of a randomly selected child were also questioned. Overall, 31.3% of adults and 79.9% of children spend at least some time playing video games. Of these, 24.1% of adults and 42.1% of children play exergames, with these types of games accounting for a third of all time that adults spend playing video games and nearly 20% of children's video game time. A substantial proportion of time that would usually be classified as "sedentary" may actually be spent participating in light to moderate physical activity.

  17. Very low-energy neutrino interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toshio [Department of Physics and Graduate School of Integrated Basic Sciences, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Department of Physics and Graduate School of Integrated Basic Sciences, College of Humanities and Sciences, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    Neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections are now evaluated rather accurately by shell-model (SM) or SM+RPA calculations based on recent advances in nuclear structure studies. Due to these achievements, reliable constraints on super-nova neutrino temperatures as well as neutrino oscillation parameters become possible. Supernova neutrino tempeatures are constrained from abundances of elements obtained by using new ν-nucleus reaction cross sections. A possibility of constructing supernova neutrino spectrum from beta-beam measurements is pointed out. Neutrino mass hierarchy and mixing angle θ{sub 13} can be determined from abundance ratio of {sup 7}Li/{sup 11}B, which is sensitive to the MSW matter oscillation effects in supernova explosions. Inverted mass hierarchy is shown to be statistically more favored based on a recent analysis of presolar grains. Effects of neutrino-neutrino interactions are also shown to play important roles in r-process nucleosynthesis. Importance and possibilities of direct measurements of ν-induced cross sections on {sup 40}Ar and {sup 208}Pb are discussed for future supernova neutrino detections. Recent calculations of the cross sections for ν-{sup 40}Ar are presented. The need for new theoretical evaluations of the cross sections for ν-{sup 208}Pb is pointed out. Challenges to experiments on coherent elastic scattering are presented.

  18. Very low-energy neutrino interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toshio

    2015-05-01

    Neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections are now evaluated rather accurately by shell-model (SM) or SM+RPA calculations based on recent advances in nuclear structure studies. Due to these achievements, reliable constraints on super-nova neutrino temperatures as well as neutrino oscillation parameters become possible. Supernova neutrino tempeatures are constrained from abundances of elements obtained by using new ν-nucleus reaction cross sections. A possibility of constructing supernova neutrino spectrum from beta-beam measurements is pointed out. Neutrino mass hierarchy and mixing angle θ13 can be determined from abundance ratio of 7Li/11B, which is sensitive to the MSW matter oscillation effects in supernova explosions. Inverted mass hierarchy is shown to be statistically more favored based on a recent analysis of presolar grains. Effects of neutrino-neutrino interactions are also shown to play important roles in r-process nucleosynthesis. Importance and possibilities of direct measurements of ν-induced cross sections on 40Ar and 208Pb are discussed for future supernova neutrino detections. Recent calculations of the cross sections for ν-40Ar are presented. The need for new theoretical evaluations of the cross sections for ν-208Pb is pointed out. Challenges to experiments on coherent elastic scattering are presented.

  19. Low Energy Electron Cooler for NICA Booster

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, A P

    2017-01-01

    BINP has developed an electron cooler to increase the ion accumulation efficiency in the NICA (Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility) heavy ion booster (JINR, Dubna). Adjustment of the cooler magnetic system provides highly homogeneous magnetic field in the cooling section B trans/B long ≤ 4∙10-5 which is vital for efficient electron cooling. First experiments with an electron beam performed at BINP demonstrated the target DC current of 500 mA and electron energy 6 keV.

  20. Low Energy Dissipation Nano Device Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jenny

    2015-03-01

    The development of research on energy dissipation has been rapid in energy efficient area. Nano-material power FET is operated as an RF power amplifier, the transport is ballistic, noise is limited and power dissipation is minimized. The goal is Green-save energy by developing the Graphene and carbon nantube microwave and high performance devices. Higher performing RF amplifiers can have multiple impacts on broadly field, for example communication equipment, (such as mobile phone and RADAR); higher power density and lower power dissipation will improve spectral efficiency which translates into higher system level bandwidth and capacity for communications equipment. Thus, fundamental studies of power handling capabilities of new RF (nano)technologies can have broad, sweeping impact. Because it is critical to maximizing the power handling ability of grephene and carbon nanotube FET, the initial task focuses on measuring and understanding the mechanism of electrical breakdown. We aim specifically to determine how the breakdown voltage in graphene and nanotubes is related to the source-drain spacing, electrode material and thickness, and substrate, and thus develop reliable statistics on the breakdown mechanism and probability.

  1. VOYAGER 1 JUP LOW ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLE CALIB. 15MIN

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — THIS DATA SET CONSISTS OF RESAMPLED DATA FROM THE LOW ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLE (LECP) EXPERIMENT ON VOYAGER 1 WHILE THE SPACECRAFT WAS IN THE VICINITY OF JUPITER....

  2. VOYAGER 1 SAT LOW ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLE CALIB. 15MIN

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — THIS DATA SET CONSISTS OF RESAMPLED DATA FROM THE LOW ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLE (LECP) EXPERIMENT ON VOYAGER 1 WHILE THE SPACECRAFT WAS IN THE VICINITY OF SATURN. THIS...

  3. VOYAGER 2 SAT LOW ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLE CALIB. 15MIN

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — THIS DATA SET CONSISTS OF RESAMPLED DATA FROM THE LOW ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLE (LECP) EXPERIMENT ON VOYAGER 2 WHILE THE SPACECRAFT WAS IN THE VICINITY OF SATURN. THIS...

  4. VOYAGER 2 JUP LOW ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLE CALIB. 15MIN

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — THIS DATA SET CONSISTS OF RESAMPLED DATA FROM THE LOW ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLE (LECP) EXPERIMENT ON VOYAGER 2 WHILE THE SPACECRAFT WAS IN THE VICINITY OF JUPITER....

  5. Low energy planes for tilt grain boundaries in gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodhew, P. J.; Tan, T. Y.; Balluffi, R. W.

    1977-05-01

    Thin film bicrystals of gold were annealed to create a large variety of grain boundaries of controlled crystal misorientation. The faceting of these boundaries was studied, and some low-energy boundary planes were identified. Tilt boundaries with a (100) misorientation axis were found to facet more readily than those with a (100) axis. The results were considered in terms of O-lattices and coincident site lattices, but neither of these approaches is able to explain all the observations. Consequently, no simple and general criteria, based on geometrical considerations, were found for the occurrence of grain boundary planes of low energy. A further set of observations relates to the dissociation of some specific high-angle grain boundaries into a twin and another low-energy boundary. Boundaries with a ..sigma..33 coincidence site lattice relationship frequently appear to be characterized by a relatively low energy. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Biological assessments for the low energy demonstration accelerator, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, S.

    1997-03-01

    This report discusses the biological impact to the area around the Los Alamos National Laboratory of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator. In particular the impact to the soils, water quality, vegetation, and wildlife are discussed.

  7. Very low energy electron microscopy of graphene flakes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MIKMEKOVÁ, E; BOUYANFIF, H; LEJEUNE, M; MÜLLEROVÁ, I; HOVORKA, M; UNČOVSKÝ, M; FRANK, L

    2013-01-01

    .... Limited lateral resolution of Raman spectroscopy may produce a Raman spectrum corresponding to a single graphene layer even for flakes that can be identified by very low energy electron microscopy...

  8. γ*γ→π0 transition form factor at low energies from a model-independent approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masjuan, Pere

    2012-11-01

    The recent measured γ*γ→π0 transition form factor in the spacelike region by the Belle Collaboration together with the previously published results by CLEO, CELLO, and BABAR collaborations, are analyzed using the mathematical theory of Padé approximants. The theory provides a good and systematic description of the low-energy region exemplified here with the extraction of the slope aπ and curvature bπ of the form factor in a model-independent way. Their impact on the pion exchange contribution to the hadronic light-by-light scattering part of the anomalous magnetic moment aμ is also discussed.

  9. E1 and M1 strength functions at low energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwengner, Ronald; Massarczyk, Ralph; Bemmerer, Daniel; Beyer, Roland; Junghans, Arnd R.; Kögler, Toni; Rusev, Gencho; Tonchev, Anton P.; Tornow, Werner; Wagner, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    We report photon-scattering experiments using bremsstrahlung at the γELBE facility of Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and using quasi-monoenergetic, polarized γ beams at the HIγS facility of the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory in Durham. To deduce the photoabsorption cross sections at high excitation energy and high level density, unresolved strength in the quasicontinuum of nuclear states has been taken into account. In the analysis of the spectra measured by using bremsstrahlung at γELBE, we perform simulations of statistical γ-ray cascades using the code γDEX to estimate intensities of inelastic transitions to low-lying excited states. Simulated average branching ratios are compared with model-independent branching ratios obtained from spectra measured by using monoenergetic γ beams at HIγS. E1 strength in the energy region of the pygmy dipole resonance is discussed in nuclei around mass 90 and in xenon isotopes. M1 strength in the region of the spin-flip resonance is also considered for xenon isotopes. The dipole strength function of 74Ge deduced from γELBE experiments is compared with the one obtained from experiments at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory. The low-energy upbend seen in the Oslo data is interpreted as M1 strength on the basis of shell-model calculations.

  10. Sedimentary Indicators of Relative Sea-Level Change - Low Energy

    OpenAIRE

    EDWARDS, ROBIN JAMES

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED Fine grained sediments associated with low energy conditions have proven to be useful archives of relative sea-level data. Low energy inter-tidal environments, such as saltmarshes and mangroves, are closely linked to the tidal frame. Sediments accumulating in these environments, and the plant and animal remains they contain, can therefore be used to reconstruct the former position of relative sea level in time and space. A number of methodologies employing a combined lithostratig...

  11. Added soluble fiber enhances the satiating power of low-energy-density liquid yogurts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrigue, Martine M; Monsivais, Pablo; Drewnowski, Adam

    2009-11-01

    Low-energy-density foods with high satiating power may be useful tools for weight management. Energy density of yogurts can range from 0.4 to 1.8 kcal/g. To test the effects of added inulin, a soluble fiber, on the satiating properties of low-energy-density and high-energy-density yogurt beverages (16 oz or 472 mL). The study followed a within-subject preload design with repeated measures. Each participant completed six conditions, presented in a counterbalanced order. Participants were 18 men and 20 women, aged 18 to 35 years. The experimental conditions were two high-energy-density yogurt beverages (440 kcal; 0.9 kcal/g) and two low-energy-density yogurt beverages (180 kcal; 0.4 kcal/g) with or without inulin (6 g) and an equal volume of orange juice (180 kcal). A no beverage control condition was used as well. Repeated ratings of hunger, fullness, and desire to eat and energy consumption at the lunch meal served 120 minutes post-ingestion were the main measures. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used to analyze motivational ratings and energy and nutrient intakes at the test meal. Yogurt beverages and liquid orange juice significantly suppressed appetite and promoted satiety relatively to the no beverage condition. Yogurt beverages had greater satiating power than did orange juice, as evidenced by higher satiety ratings and reduced energy intakes at lunch. The satiating power of low-energy-density yogurt with inulin was comparable to that of high-energy-density yogurt. Energy presented in liquid form can have satiating power. Added fiber can potentiate the satiating properties of low-energy-density liquid yogurts. Adding fiber to low-energy-density foods may be an effective way to suppress appetite and control food intake.

  12. Addressing Kitchen Contaminants for Healthy, Low-Energy Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratton, J. Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Brett C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Cooking and cooking burners emit pollutants that can adversely affect indoor air quality in residences and significantly impact occupant health. Effective kitchen exhaust ventilation can reduce exposure to cooking-related air pollutants as an enabling step to healthier, low-energy homes. This report by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory identifies barriers to the widespread adoption of kitchen exhaust ventilation technologies and practice and proposes a suite of strategies to overcome these barriers. The recommendations have been vetted by a group of industry, regulatory, health, and research experts and stakeholders who convened for two meetings and provided input and feedback to early drafts of this document. The most fundamental barriers are (1) the common misconception, based on a sensory perception of risk, that kitchen exhaust when cooking is unnecessary and (2) the lack of a code requirement for kitchen ventilation in most U.S. locations. Highest priority objectives include the following: (1) Raise awareness among the public and the building industry of the need to install and routinely use kitchen ventilation; (2) Incorporate kitchen exhaust ventilation as a requirement of building codes and improve the mechanisms for code enforcement; (3) Provide best practice product and use-behavior guidance to ventilation equipment purchasers and installers, and; (4) Develop test methods and performance targets to advance development of high performance products. A specific, urgent need is the development of an over-the-range microwave that meets the airflow and sound requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

  13. Addressing Kitchen Contaminants for Healthy, Low-Energy Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratton, J. Chris; Singer, Brett C.

    2014-01-01

    Cooking and cooking burners emit pollutants that can adversely affect indoor air quality in residences and significantly impact occupant health. Effective kitchen exhaust ventilation can reduce exposure to cooking-related air pollutants as an enabling step to healthier, low-energy homes. This report identifies barriers to the widespread adoption of kitchen exhaust ventilation technologies and practice and proposes a suite of strategies to overcome these barriers. The recommendations have been vetted by a group of industry, regulatory, health, and research experts and stakeholders who convened for two web-based meetings and provided input and feedback to early drafts of this document. The most fundamental barriers are (1) the common misconception, based on a sensory perception of risk, that kitchen exhaust when cooking is unnecessary and (2) the lack of a code requirement for kitchen ventilation in most US locations. Highest priority objectives include the following: (1) Raise awareness among the public and the building industry of the need to install and routinely use kitchen ventilation; (2) Incorporate kitchen exhaust ventilation as a requirement of building codes and improve the mechanisms for code enforcement; (3) Provide best practice product and use-behavior guidance to ventilation equipment purchasers and installers, and; (4) Develop test methods and performance targets to advance development of high performance products. A specific, urgent need is the development of an over-the-range microwave that meets the airflow and sound requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

  14. Beam Dynamics Studies and Design Optimisation of New Low Energy Antiproton Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Resta-Lopez, Javier; Welsch, Carsten P.

    2017-01-01

    Antiprotons, stored and cooled at low energies in a storage ring or at rest in traps, are highly desirable for the investigation of a large number of basic questions on fundamental interactions. This includes the static structure of antiprotonic atomic systems and the time-dependent quantum dynamics of correlated systems. The Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is currently the worlds only low energy antiproton factory dedicated to antimatter experiments. New antiproton facilities, such as the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) at CERN and the Ultra-low energy Storage Ring (USR) at FLAIR, will open unique possibilities. They will provide cooled, high quality beams of extra-low energy antiprotons at intensities exceeding those achieved presently at the AD by factors of ten to one hundred. These facilities, operating in the energy regime between 100 keV down to 20 keV, face several design and beam dynamics challenges, for example nonlinearities, space charge and scattering effects limiting beam life time....

  15. Energy response of graphite-mixed magnesium borate TLDs to low energy x-rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelliccioni, M.; Prokic, M.; Esposito, A.

    1991-01-01

    of the energy response to very low energy x-rays are presented and evidence of agreement between experimental and calculated conversion coefficient H'(0.07, alpha = 0-degrees)/Ka is also shown. A monochromatized x-ray beam from a synchrotron radiation source in the energy range from 3 to 12 keV has been......Graphite-mixed sintered magnesium borate TL dosemeters are attractive for beta/gamma dosimetry because they combine a low energy dependence to beta-rays with near tissue or air equivalence to photon irradiations and a high sensitivity. In this paper results from the experimental measurements...

  16. Comparison of mixing and displacement ventilation in a low energy office building during heating season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Wu, Xiaozhou

    2014-01-01

    ventilation compared to those for displacement ventilation. Due to the heat emission from equipments and occupants, heating system was not needed in the low energy office building in a mild winter. In such a situation, indoor thermal environment was still acceptable in terms of the general thermal comfort......The present study investigated the performance of mixing and displacement ventilation systems in a low energy office building during heating season. Measurements were performed with regard to air distribution and ventilation effectiveness. The results show that indoor air temperatures in occupied...

  17. Identification of a new low energy 1ustate in dicopper with resonant four-wave mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, B; Beck, M; Bornhauser, P; Knopp, G; van Bokhoven, J A; Marquardt, R; Gourlaouen, C; Radi, P P

    2017-12-07

    The low energy electronic structure of the copper dimer has been re-investigated using non-linear four-wave mixing spectroscopy and high level ab initio calculations. In addition to the measurement of the previously reported A, B, and C electronic states, a new state denoted A' is identified with T 0 = 20 100.4090(16) cm -1 ( 63 Cu 2 ). Rotational analysis of the A'-X (0,0) and (1,0) transitions leads to the assignment of A' 1 u . Ab initio calculations present the first theoretical description of the low energy states of the copper dimer in Hund's case (c) and confirm the experimental assignment. The discovery of this new low energy excited state emphasizes that spin-orbit coupling is significant in states with d-hole electronic configurations and resolves a decades-long mystery in the initial assignment of the A state.

  18. An arctic low-energy house as experimental setup for studies of heat dynamics of buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Philip Hvidthøft Delff; Rode, Carsten; Madsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    throughout long winters, strong winds, and very different circumstances regarding solar radiation compared to areas where low-energy houses are usually built, make the location very interesting for modeling and testing purposes. In 2011 new measurement equipment was installed in the house, which will be used......This paper addresses the difficulties in pinpointing reasons for unexpectedly high energy consumption in construction, and in low-energy houses especially. Statistical methods are applied to improve the insight into the energy performance and heat dynamics of a building based on consumption records...... and weather data. Dynamical methods separate influences from outdoor temperature, solar radiation, and wind on the energy consumption in the building. The studied building is a low-energy house in Sisimiut, Greenland. Weather conditions like large temperature differences between indoors and outdoors...

  19. Low-energy ion outflow modulated by the solar wind energy input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Wei, Yong; Andre, Mats; Eriksson, Anders; Haaland, Stein; Kronberg, Elena; Nilsson, Hans; Maes, Lukas

    2017-04-01

    Due to the spacecraft charging issue, it has been difficult to measure low-energy ions of ionospheric origin in the magnetosphere. A recent study taking advantage of the spacecraft electric potential has found that the previously 'hidden' low-energy ions is dominant in the magnetosphere. This comprehensive dataset of low-energy ions allows us to study the relationship between the ionospheric outflow and energy input from the solar wind (ɛ). In this study, we discuss the ratios of the solar wind energy input to the energy of the ionospheric outflow. We show that the ɛ controls the ionospheric outflow when the ɛ is high, while the ionospheric outflow does not systematically change with the ɛ when the ɛ is low.

  20. Extracting the σ-term from low-energy pion-nucleon scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Elvira, Jacobo; Hoferichter, Martin; Kubis, Bastian; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2018-02-01

    We present an extraction of the pion-nucleon (π N) scattering lengths from low-energy π N scattering, by fitting a representation based on Roy–Steiner equations to the low-energy data base. We show that the resulting values confirm the scattering-length determination from pionic atoms, and discuss the stability of the fit results regarding electromagnetic corrections and experimental normalization uncertainties in detail. Our results provide further evidence for a large π N σ-term, {σ }π N=58(5) {{MeV}}, in agreement with, albeit less precise than, the determination from pionic atoms.

  1. Energy efficiency improvement potentials and a low energy demand scenario for the global industrial sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kermeli, Katerina; Graus, Wina H J; Worrell, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    The adoption of energy efficiency measures can significantly reduce industrial energy use. This study estimates the future industrial energy consumption under two energy demand scenarios: (1) a reference scenario that follows business as usual trends and (2) a low energy demand scenario that takes

  2. Specular reflection of low-energy ions during homoepitaxial growth of Ag(100)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenaar, M.H.; Boerma, D.O

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a novel technique to study epitaxial growth is presented. Specular reflection of low-energy ions was used to characterize the surface during growth. Angular scans of the specular yield of 5.0 keV Ar+ scattered from a Ag(100) surface were obtained. The measurements were interpreted by

  3. A comparison of the microbicidal effectiveness of gamma rays and high and low energy electron radiations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tallentire, A.; Miller, Arne; Helt-Hansen, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    The radiation response of spores of Bacillus pumilus were examined for irradiation with cobalt 60 photons, 10 MeV electrons and low energy electrons at 100 and 80 keV. The responses were found to be the same for all types of radiation within the measurement uncertainties and were also in agreemen...

  4. A pepper-pot emittance meter for low-energy heavy-ion beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremers, H. R.; Beijers, J. P. M.; Brandenburg, S.

    A novel emittance meter has been developed to measure the four-dimensional, transverse phase-space distribution of a low-energy ion beam using the pepper-pot technique. A characteristic feature of this instrument is that the pepper-pot plate, which has a linear array of holes in the vertical

  5. Ultra-low-energy analog straintronics using multiferroic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kuntal

    2014-03-01

    Multiferroic devices, i.e., a magnetostrictive nanomagnet strain-coupled with a piezoelectric layer, are promising as binary switches for ultra-low-energy digital computing in beyond Moore's law era [Roy, K. Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 173110 (2013), Roy, K. et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 063108 (2011), Phys. Rev. B 83, 224412 (2011), Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group) 3, 3038 (2013), J. Appl. Phys. 112, 023914 (2012)]. We show here that such multiferroic devices, apart from performing digital computation, can be also utilized for analog computing purposes, e.g., voltage amplification, filter etc. The analog computing capability is conceived by considering that magnetization's mean orientation shifts gradually although nanomagnet's potential minima changes abruptly. Using tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) measurement, a continuous output voltage while varying the input voltage can be produced. Stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation in the presence of room-temperature (300 K) thermal fluctuations is solved to demonstrate the analog computing capability of such multiferroic devices. This work was supported in part by FAME, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  6. Early Forest Fire Detection Using Low Energy Hydrogen Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Müller

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The North-east German Lowlands is a region with one of the highest forest fire risks in Europe. In order to keep damage levels as low as possible, it is important to have an effective early warning system. Such a system is being developed on the basis of a hydrogen sensor, which makes it possible to detect a smouldering forest fire before the development of open flames. The prototype hydrogen sensor produced at the Humboldt University Berlin has a metal/ solid electrolyte/insulator/ semiconductor (MEIS structure, which allows cost-effective production. Due to the low energy consumption, an autarchic working unit could be installed in the forest. Field trials have shown that it is possible to identify a forest fire in its early stages when hydrogen concentrations are still low. A significant change in the signal due to a fire was measured at a distance of about 100m. In view of the potential impacts of climate change, the innovative pre-ignition warning system is an important early diagnosis and monitoring module for the protection of the forests.

  7. Low energy electron bombardment induced surface contamination of Ru mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ajlony, A.; Kanjilal, A.; Catalfano, M.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Rice, B.

    2012-03-01

    The impact of secondary electrons induced contamination of the Ru surface was investigated. Mirror-like Ru sample was bombarded with low energy (100 eV) electrons and the change in surface chemistry was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).Along with XPS studies the corresponding effect on in-situ EUV reflectivity was examined by exposing the Ru surface to photons at a wavelength of 13.5 nm in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber. Detailed XPS analyses showed a sudden increase in carbon concentrations on the Ru surface in the first 60 min, followed by a slow but linear growth in carbon concentration. In parallel, a noticeable decrease in water content was observed during the time of electrons irradiation along with slight oxidation of pure Ru surface. All chemical changes were discussed in terms of the electrons bombardment mediated dissociation of water and hydrocarbon molecules. A time dependent EUV reflectivity measurements show insignificant change in reflectivity up to 510 min of electrons bombardment. The impact of water molecules on the Ru surface and the accumulation of carbon through dissociation of residual hydrocarbons is discussed in details.

  8. The Exploitation of Low-Energy Electrons in Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Mohammad; Hill, Richard P; Jaffray, David A

    2017-08-01

    Given the distinct characteristics of low-energy electrons (LEEs), particularly at energies less than 30 eV, they can be applied to a wide range of therapeutic modalities to improve cancer treatment. LEEs have been shown to efficiently produce complex molecular damage resulting in substantial cellular toxicities. Since LEEs are produced in copious amounts from high-energy radiation beam, including photons, protons and ions; the control of LEE distribution can potentially enhance the therapeutic radio of such beams. LEEs can play a substantial role in the synergistic effect between radiation and chemotherapy, particularly halogenated and platinum-based anticancer drugs. Radiosensitizing entities containing atoms of high atomic number such as gold nanoparticles can be a source of LEE production if high-energy radiation interacts with them. This can provide a high local density of LEEs in a cell and produce cellular toxicity. Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides also create a high number of LEEs in each decay, which can induce lethal damage in a cell. Exploitation of LEEs in cancer treatment, however, faces a few challenges, such as dosimetry of LEEs and selective delivery of radiosensitizing and chemotherapeutic molecules close to cellular targets. This review first discusses the rationale for utilizing LEEs in cancer treatment by explaining their mechanism of action, describes theoretical and experimental studies at the molecular and cellular levels, then discusses strategies for achieving modification of the distribution and effectiveness of LEEs in cancerous tissue and their associated clinical benefit.

  9. A low energy neutrino factory with non-magnetic detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    We show that a very precise neutrino/anti-neutrino event separation is not mandatory to cover the physics program of a low energy neutrino factory and thus non-magnetized detectors like water Cerenkov or liquid Argon detectors can be used. We point out, that oscillation itself strongly enhances the signal to noise ratio of a wrong sign muon search, provided there is sufficiently accurate neutrino energy reconstruction. Further, we argue that apart from a magnetic field, other means to distinguish neutrino from anti-neutrino events (at least statistically) can be explored. Combined with the fact that non-magnetic detectors potentially can be made very big, we show that modest neutrino/anti-neutrino separations at the level of 50% to 90% are sufficient to obtain good sensitivity to CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy for $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}>10^{-3}$. These non-magnetized detectors have a rich physics program outside the context of a neutrino factory, including topics like supernova neutrinos and proton...

  10. Odd–even effect in fragment angular momentum in low-energy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Quantitative explanation for the odd–even effect on fragment angular mo- menta in the low-energy fission of actinides have been provided by taking into account the single particle spin of the odd proton at the fragment's scission point deformation in the case of odd-Z fragments along with the contribution from the ...

  11. Free Muons and Muonium - Some Achievements and Possibilities in Low Energy Muon Physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungmann, K.P.

    2002-01-01

    Published in: Nucl. Phys. News 12 (2002) no. 3, pp.23 citations recorded in [Science Citation Index] Abstract: Some recent precision experiments in low energy muon physics are discussed. Spectroscopy on the muonium atom, the bound state of a positve muon and an electron, has provided precise tests

  12. Evaluation of a plane-parallel ionization chamber for low-energy radiotherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Santos, William de Souza; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: aperini@ipen.br, E-mail: lpneves@ipen.br, E-mail: wssantos@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    A plane-parallel ionization chamber, with a sensitive volume of 6.3 cm{sup 3}, developed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN (LCI), was utilized to verify the possibility of its application in low-energy X-ray beam qualities for radiotherapy (T-qualities). This homemade ion chamber was manufactured using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) coated with graphite, and co-axial cables. In order to evaluate the performance of this ionization chamber, some characterization tests were performed: short- and medium-term stability, leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect and linearity of response. The maximum value obtained in the short-term stability test was 0.2%, in accordance with the limit value of 0.3% provided by the IEC 60731 standard. The saturation curve was obtained varying the applied voltage from -400 V to +400 V, in steps of 50 V, using the charge collecting time of 20 s. From the saturation curve two other characteristics were analyzed: the polarity effect and the ion collection efficiency, with results within the international recommendations. The leakage current of the ionization chamber was measured in time intervals of 20 minutes, before and after its irradiations, and all the results obtained were in agreement with the IEC 60731 standard. The linearity of response was verified utilizing the T-50(b) radiation quality, and the ionization chamber was exposed to different air kerma rates. The response of the ionization chamber presented a linear behavior. Therefore, all results were considered satisfactory, within international recommendations, indicating that this homemade ionization chamber presents potential routine use in dosimetry of low-energy radiotherapy beams. (author)

  13. Low energy lepton scattering -- recent results for electron and positron interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, J. P.; Vizcaino, V.; Mondal, S.; Lower, J. C.; Jones, A.; Caradonna, P.; Makochekanwa, C.; Buckman, S. J.

    2008-07-01

    The interaction of low energy electrons with atoms, molecules and materials underpin a large number of technological, environmental and biomedical processes that impact on our everyday lives. Many of these areas have been well studied over the years and in some cases a large body of important and relevant cross section data has been gathered to assist in the understanding and development of the technology or phenomena. A perfect example of this is the area of low energy gaseous electronics where microscopic cross section information for a whole host of scattering processes (vibrational and electronic excitation, dissociation, ionization) have been critical to an understanding of the macroscopic behaviour of a range of gas discharge environments -- large area plasma processing discharges being a case in point. More recently there has been a realisation that fundamental information about both low energy electron and positron interactions also have significant bearing on issues of radiation damage in biological materials. Low energy electrons have been shown to cause significant damage to DNA strands, for instance, as a result of processes such as dissociative attachment -- a process which can occur at energies down to 0 eV. These processes result from the production of copious low energy electrons (body. This realisation has provided an enormous boost to the field of low energy electron physics and spawned an enormous number of new studies of interactions with biologically relevant molecules. In a similar fashion, low energy positron interactions are thought to be fundamentally important for an understanding of the atomic and molecular processes that underpin technologies such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET). PET scans image the coincident 511 keV gamma-rays that arise form the annihilation of an electron-positron pair. During a PET scan, high energy positrons thermalise in the body through scattering (ionization and excitation of molecules) until their energy

  14. Coulomb and Nuclear Breakup at Low Energies: Scaling Laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on a recent work on the low-energy behavior of the breakup cross section in so far as it has important role in the fusion of weakly bound and halo nuclei at near-barrier energies. We assess the way the nuclear component of this cross section scales with the target mass. In complete accord with previous finding at higher energies we verify that the low energy behavior of the breakup cross section for a given projectile and relative center of mass energy with respect to the Coulomb barrier height scales as the cubic root of the mass number of the target. Surprisingly we find that the Coulomb component of the breakup cross section at these low energies also obeys scaling, but with a linear dependence on the target charge. Our findings are important when planning for experiments involving these exotic nuclei.

  15. Charge promotion of low-energy fragmentations of peptide ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlet, O; Orkiszewski, R S; Ballard, K D; Gaskell, S J

    1992-11-01

    We have examined the hypothesis that structural features which predispose to localization of charge at a strongly favored site are not conducive to the low-energy fragmentation of peptide ions via a multiplicity of pathways. Consistent with this proposal, it is demonstrated that the formation of N- or C-terminal pre-charged derivatives is detrimental to the formation of sequence-specific product ions following low-energy collisional activation. Protonation of pre-charged derivatives (yielding doubly charged ions) restores favorable fragmentation properties; the effect is attributed to the fragmentation-directing properties of the proton which may occupy one of several sites. Similarly, a doubly protonated peptide which incorporates a C-terminal arginine residue as a single strongly favored site of protonation exhibits favored low-energy fragmentations attributable to location of the second proton at one of several sites remote from the C-terminus.

  16. Light element production by low energy nuclei from massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangioni-Flam, E.; Casse, M.; Ramaty, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Orion complex is a source of gamma rays attributed to the de-excitation of fast carbon and oxygen nuclei excited through interactions with ambient hydrogen and helium. This has consequences for the production and evolution of light isotopes in the Galaxy, as massive stars appear as prolific sources of C-O rich low energy nuclei. The different stages of massive star evolution are considered in relation to the acceleration of nuclei to moderate energies. It is concluded that the low energy nuclear component originating from massive stars plays a larger role than the usual Galactic cosmic rays in shaping the evolution of Li-6, Be-9, B-10 and B-11, especially in the early Galactic evolution. The enhancement of the B-11/B-10 ratio observed in meteorites and in the interstellar medium is attributed to the interaction of low energy carbon nuclei with ambient H and to a lesser degree, to neutrino spallation.

  17. The electromagnetic Sigma-to-Lambda hyperon transition form factors at low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granados, Carlos [Uppsala Universitet, Institutionen foer Fysik och Astronomi (Sweden); Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Leupold, Stefan; Perotti, Elisabetta [Uppsala Universitet, Institutionen foer Fysik och Astronomi (Sweden)

    2017-06-15

    Using dispersion theory the low-energy electromagnetic form factors for the transition of a Sigma to a Lambda hyperon are related to the pion vector form factor. The additionally required input, i.e. the two-pion-Sigma-Lambda amplitudes are determined from relativistic next-to-leading-order (NLO) baryon chiral perturbation theory including the baryons from the octet and optionally from the decuplet. Pion rescattering is again taken into account by dispersion theory. It turns out that the inclusion of decuplet baryons is not an option but a necessity to obtain reasonable results. The electric transition form factor remains very small in the whole low-energy region. The magnetic transition form factor depends strongly on one not very well determined low-energy constant of the NLO Lagrangian. One obtains reasonable predictive power if this low-energy constant is determined from a measurement of the magnetic transition radius. Such a measurement can be performed at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). (orig.)

  18. Low-energy charged particle environment at Jupiter - A first look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Bostrom, C. O.; Keath, E. P.; Zwickl, R. D.; Carbary, J. F.; Armstrong, T. P.; Axford, W. I.; Fan, C. Y.; Gloeckler, G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary results of measurements obtained by the low energy charged particle instrument on board the Voyager 1 spacecraft during its traversal of the Jovian magnetosphere are reported. The instrument consists of the low energy particle telescope and the low energy magnetospheric particle analyzer, designed to perform measurements in the inner and outer magnetosphere respectively. Ions and electrons comprising the Jovian magnetosphere were first detected at a distance of about 600 Jupiter radii from the planet, with the first bow shock crossing at 85.6 Jupiter radii. Upon crossing the magnetopause at about 67 Jupiter radii, the flows of electrons and ions were observed to change direction from away from the planet to the corotational direction. The hot plasma near the magnetosphere boundary is comprised predominantly of protons, sulfur and oxygen. Selective particle absorption near the Io flux tube indicates some form of particle deflection by Io. Fluxes in the outbound region were found to be enhanced from 90 to 160 deg longitude, and 5- and 10-hour low energy particle flux periodicities were observed.

  19. Performance Measurement for a Logistics Services Provider to the Polymer Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Tok, King Lai

    2007-01-01

    This management project discusses the form of performance measurement system suitable for a logistics services provider who focuses on providing its services to large multinational petrochemical companies in the polymer industry

  20. Properties of states of low energy on cosmological spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degner, Andreas

    2013-01-15

    The present thesis investigates properties of a class of physical states of the quantised scalar field in FRW spacetimes, namely the states of low energy (SLE's). These states are characterised by minimising the time-smeared energy density measured by an isotropic observer, where the smearing is performed with respect to a test function f of compact support. Furthermore, they share all spatial symmetries of the spacetime. Since SLE's are Hadamard states, expectations values of observables like the energy density can be rigorously defined via the so called point-splitting method. In a first step, this procedure is applied to the explicit calculation of the energy density in SLE's for the case of de Sitter space with flat spatial sections. In particular, the e ect of the choice of the mass m and the test function f is discussed. The obtained results motivate the question whether SLE's converge to a distinguished state (namely the Bunch Davies state) when the support of f is shifted to the infinite past. It is shown that this is indeed the case, even in the more general class of asymptotic de Sitter spacetimes, where an analogon of the Bunch Davies state can be defined. This result enables the interpretation of such distinguished states to be SLE's in the infinite past, independently of the form of the smearing function f. Finally, the role of SLE's for the semiclassical backreaction problem is discussed. We derive the semiclassical Friedmann equation in a perturbative approach over Minkowski space. This equation allows for a stability analysis of Minkowski space by the investigation of asymptotic properties of solutions. We also treat this problem using a numerical method.

  1. Projectile - Mass asymmetry systematics for low energy incomplete fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Pushpendra P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, low energy incomplete fusion (ICF in which only a part of projectile fuses with target nucleus has been investigated in terms of various entrance channel parameters. The ICF strength function has been extracted from the analysis of experimental excitation functions (EFs measured for different projectile-target combinations from near- to well above- barrier energies in 12C,16O(from 1.02Vb to 1.64Vb+169Tm systems. Experimental EFs have been analysed in the framework statistical model code PACE4 based on the idea of equilibrated compound nucleus decay. It has been found that the value of ICF fraction (FICF increases with incident projectile energy. A substantial fraction of ICF (FICF ≈ 7 % has been accounted even at energy as low as ≈ 7.5% above the barrier (at relative velocity νrel ≈0.027 in 12C+169Tm system, and FICF ≈ 10 % at νrel ≈0.014 in 16O+169Tm system. The probability of ICF is discussed in light of the Morgenstern’s mass-asymmetry systematics. The value of FICF for 16O+169Tm systems is found to be 18.3 % higher than that observed for 12C+169Tm systems. Present results together with the re-analysis of existing data for nearby systems conclusively demonstrate strong competition of ICF with CF even at slightly above barrier energies, and strong projectile dependence that seems to supplement the Morgenstern’s systematics.

  2. Resonances in low-energy electron elastic scattering from Fullerenes C60 through C92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felfli, Zineb; Msezane, Alfred

    2017-04-01

    The electron affinity (EA) provides a stringent test of theory when the calculated and measured EAs are compared. A strong motivation for the fundamental investigations of low-energy electron elastic scattering from the selected fullerenes C60, C70, C74, C80, C82, C84 and C92 is the availability of high quality measured EAs. The Regge pole calculated electron elastic total cross sections for these fullerenes are found to be characterized generally by Ramsauer-Townsend (R-T) minima, shape resonances and dramatically sharp resonances manifesting stable negative ion formation. The extracted binding energies for the resultant anions agree excellently with the measured EAs of the fullerenes listed above, giving great credence to the Regge pole method and confirming that fullerenes behave like ``big atoms''. Common among all these fullerenes is the appearance of their ground state negative ions at their second R-T minima, similarly to the atomic Au case. This work was supported by U.S. DOE, Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research.

  3. Low energy cross sections for electron scattering from tetrafluoroallene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Choi, Heechol; Song, Mi-Young; Chakrabarti, Kalyan; Yoon, Jung-Sik

    2017-08-01

    We report elastic, total, excitation, differential and momentum-transfer cross sections for scattering of low-energy electrons by tetrafluoroallene (C3F4) using the close-coupling (CC) approximation in the R-matrix method with Quantemol-N. We have tested various target models initially to check for the convergence of the result and the final results are provided with the best target model. We have detected shape resonances of symmetry 2 E(2B1,2B2) at 3.08 eV and 3.71 eV with a close-coupling and static exchange models which is seen as a sharp feature in the elastic and momentum transfer cross sections. We also detected other resonances of symmetry 2 E at 11.26 eV and of symmetry 2A2 at 11.12 eV below the ionization threshold of the target respectively. The present elastic and total cross sections are compared with the elastic and total cross sections of allene (C3H4), propene (C3H6) and hexafluoropropene (C3F6) as there were no results available for C3F4. The effect of fluorination is clearly seen with the shape resonance for C3F4 getting slightly shifted to higher energies compared to allene. Finally, we also report the ionization cross section calculated using the Binary-Encounter Bethe (BEB) method. The present calculation is a maiden attempt to find cross sections for C3F4 molecule which could be useful for fluorocarbon plasma modeling.

  4. Review of lattice results concerning low-energy particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, S. [Kyoto University, Center for Gravitational Physics, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto (Japan); Aoki, Y. [Nagoya University, Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe (KMI), Nagoya (Japan); Brookhaven National Laboratory, RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY (United States); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Becirevic, D. [Universite Paris-Sud, Universite Paris-Saclay, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (UMR8627), CNRS, Orsay (France); Bernard, C. [Washington University, Department of Physics, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Blum, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY (United States); University of Connecticut, Physics Department, Storrs, CT (United States); Colangelo, G.; Leutwyler, H.; Wenger, U. [Universitaet Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Bern (Switzerland); Della Morte, M. [University of Southern Denmark, CP3-Origins and Danish IAS, Odense M (Denmark); IFIC (CSIC), Paterna (Spain); Dimopoulos, P. [Centro Fermi-Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi Compendio del Viminale, Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Duerr, S. [University of Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Juelich Supercomputing Center, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Fukaya, H.; Onogi, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan); Golterman, M. [San Francisco State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gottlieb, Steven; Lunghi, E. [Indiana University, Department of Physics, Bloomington, IN (United States); Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies (Sokendai), School of High Energy Accelerator Science, Tsukuba (Japan); Heller, U.M. [American Physical Society (APS), Ridge, NY (United States); Horsley, R. [University of Edinburgh, Higgs Centre for Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Juettner, A.; Sachrajda, C.T. [University of Southampton, School of Physics and Astronomy, Southampton (United Kingdom); Lellouch, L. [CNRS, Aix-Marseille Universite, Universite de Toulon, Centre de Physique Theorique, UMR 7332, Marseille (France); Lin, C.J.D. [CNRS, Aix-Marseille Universite, Universite de Toulon, Centre de Physique Theorique, UMR 7332, Marseille (France); National Chiao-Tung University, Institute of Physics, Hsinchu (China); Lubicz, V. [Universita Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome (Italy); Mawhinney, R. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Pena, C. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Sharpe, S.R. [University of Washington, Physics Department, Seattle, WA (United States); Simula, S. [INFN, Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome (Italy); Sommer, R. [DESY, John von Neumann Institute for Computing (NIC), Zeuthen (Germany); Vladikas, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, Rome (Italy); Wittig, H. [University of Mainz, PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: Flavour Lattice Averaging Group (FLAG)

    2017-02-15

    We review lattice results related to pion, kaon, D- and B-meson physics with the aim of making them easily accessible to the particle-physics community. More specifically, we report on the determination of the light-quark masses, the form factor f{sub +}(0), arising in the semileptonic K → π transition at zero momentum transfer, as well as the decay constant ratio f{sub K}/f{sub π} and its consequences for the CKM matrix elements V{sub us} and V{sub ud}. Furthermore, we describe the results obtained on the lattice for some of the low-energy constants of SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} and SU(3){sub L} x SU(3){sub R} Chiral Perturbation Theory. We review the determination of the B{sub K} parameter of neutral kaon mixing as well as the additional four B parameters that arise in theories of physics beyond the Standard Model. The latter quantities are an addition compared to the previous review. For the heavy-quark sector, we provide results for m{sub c} and m{sub b} (also new compared to the previous review), as well as those for D- and B-meson-decay constants, form factors, and mixing parameters. These are the heavy-quark quantities most relevant for the determination of CKM matrix elements and the global CKM unitarity-triangle fit. Finally, we review the status of lattice determinations of the strong coupling constant α{sub s}. (orig.)

  5. Procuring low-energy design and consulting services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This report presents information which aids in the design of low energy building elements. The proven strategies can dramatically reduce a building`s energy consumption for little or no added cost while improving it`s comfort, economy, and environmental performance.

  6. Polarization observables in low-energy antiproton-proton scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Daren; Timmermans, Rob G. E.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the polarization parameters in low-energy antiproton-proton elastic ((p) over barp -> (p) over barp) and charge-exchange ((p) over barp -> (n) over barn) scattering. The predictions for unmeasured observables are based on our new energy-dependent partial-wave analysis of all

  7. Low-energy buildings on mainstream market terms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quitzau, Maj-Britt; Elle, Morten; Hoffmann, Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    implementation of strict energy performance requirements in mainstream building. The paper describes how the municipality of Egedal experienced a collapse in regulation for low-energy buildings and what struggles it had to take on in order to convince the mainstream building industry and their customers...

  8. Low energy electron imaging using Medipix 2 detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikharulidze, I.; van Gastel, Raoul; Schramm, S.; Abrahams, J.P.; Poelsema, Bene; Tromp, R.M.; van der Molen, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM) and Photo-Emission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) predominantly use a combination of microchannel plate (MCP), phosphor screen and optical camera to record images formed by 10–20 keV electrons. We have tested the performance of a LEEM/PEEM instrument with a Medipix2

  9. Working group report: Low energy and flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B physics, perturbative quantum chromodynamics. PACS No. 13.25.Hw. 1. Introduction. The activities of the 'low energy and flavour physics' working group at WHEPP-8 were almost exclusively in the area of B physics. Given that data from the B- factories are currently challenging the predictions of theoretical models as well ...

  10. Low-energy nuclear reactions with double-solenoid-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... The University of Notre Dame, USA (Becchetti et al, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Res. A505, 377 (2003)) and later the University of São Paulo, Brazil (Lichtenthaler et al, Eur. Phys. J. A25, S-01, 733 (2005)) adopted a system based on superconducting solenoids to produce low-energy radioactive nuclear beams.

  11. A primer for electroweak induced low-energy nuclear reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Under special circumstances, electromagnetic and weak interactions can in- duce low-energy nuclear reactions to occur with observable rates for a variety of processes. A common element in all these applications is that the electromagnetic energy stored in many relatively slow-moving electrons can – under ...

  12. Performance of the Low-energy House in Sisimiut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Kragh, Jesper; Borchersen, Egil

    2009-01-01

    A low-energy house was built in Sisimiut, Greenland in 2004-05 and since its inauguration in April 2005, its performance and operation have been object of study for researchers and students. The house is characterised by a highly insulated building envelope, advanced windows and a ventilation sys...

  13. Utilization of low-energy electron accelerators in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    There are more than 20 electron accelerators in Korea. Most of those are installed in factories for heat-resistant cables, heat-shrinkable cables, radial tires, foams, tube/ films, curing, etc. Four low-energy electron accelerators are in operation for research purposes such as polymer modification, purification of flue gas, waste water treatment, modification of semiconductor characteristics, etc. (author)

  14. Effects of disability-associated low energy expenditure deconditioning syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmer, James H; Schiller, William; Chen, Ming-De

    2012-01-01

    People with neuromuscular disabilities have high rates of sedentary behavior predisposing them to severe deconditioning and significant health risk. We describe this as disability-associated low energy expenditure deconditioning syndrome and propose new approaches for promoting light-to-moderate intensity physical activity in people with disabilities.

  15. Low energy neutral beam production by laser vaporization of metals

    OpenAIRE

    Breton, C.; De Michelis, C.; Hecq, W.; Mattioli, M.

    1980-01-01

    We have quantitatively studied the production of low energy (0.1-10 eV) metal neutral beams by laser vaporization of thin metal foils. For the experimental geometry available on the TFR tokamak, this technique results in the injection of 1015 neutrals in a time of ∼ 300 μs.

  16. Enhanced production of low energy electrons by alpha particle impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-Keun; Titze, Jasmin; Schöffler, Markus; Trinter, Florian; Waitz, Markus; Voigtsberger, Jörg; Sann, Hendrik; Meckel, Moritz; Stuck, Christian; Lenz, Ute; Odenweller, Matthias; Neumann, Nadine; Schössler, Sven; Ullmann-Pfleger, Klaus; Ulrich, Birte; Fraga, Rui Costa; Petridis, Nikos; Metz, Daniel; Jung, Annika; Grisenti, Robert; Czasch, Achim; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Schmidt, Lothar; Jahnke, Till; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Dörner, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    Radiation damage to living tissue stems not only from primary ionizing particles but to a substantial fraction from the dissociative attachment of secondary electrons with energies below the ionization threshold. We show that the emission yield of those low energy electrons increases dramatically in ion–atom collisions depending on whether or not the target atoms are isolated or embedded in an environment. Only when the atom that has been ionized and excited by the primary particle impact is in immediate proximity of another atom is a fragmentation route known as interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) enabled. This leads to the emission of a low energy electron. Over the past decade ICD was explored in several experiments following photoionization. Most recent results show its observation even in water clusters. Here we show the quantitative role of ICD for the production of low energy electrons by ion impact, thus approaching a scenario closer to that of radiation damage by alpha particles: We choose ion energies on the maximum of the Bragg peak where energy is most efficiently deposited in tissue. We compare the electron production after colliding He+ ions on isolated Ne atoms and on Ne dimers (Ne2). In the latter case the Ne atom impacted is surrounded by a most simple environment already opening ICD as a deexcitation channel. As a consequence, we find a dramatically enhanced low energy electron yield. The results suggest that ICD may have a significant influence on cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation. PMID:21730184

  17. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The MEIC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low-energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  18. Low-energy CZT detector array for the ASIM mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cenkeramaddi, Linga Reddy; Genov, Georgi; Kohfeldt, Anja

    2012-01-01

    In this article we introduce the low-energy CZT (CdZnTe) 16 384-pixel detector array on-board the Atmosphere Space Interaction Monitor (ASIM), funded by the European Space Agency. This detector is a part of the larger Modular X-and Gamma-ray sensor (MXGS). The CZT detector array is sensitive...

  19. Positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen at low energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    energies. K CHAKRABARTI. Department of Mathematics, Scottish Church College, 1 & 3 Urquhart Square, Calcutta 700 006,. India. MS received 26 June 2000. Abstract. Low energy positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen is studies theoretically using the hyperspherical partial wave method of Das [1] in constant ΘЅѕ, ...

  20. Positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen at low energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Low energy positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen is studies theoretically using the hyperspherical partial wave method of Das [1] in constant 12, equal energy sharing geometry. The TDCS reveal considerable differences in physics compared to electron impact ionization under the same geometry.

  1. Scattered ionizing radiations from low-energy focus plasma and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Scattered ionizing radiations from low-energy focus plasma and radiation dosimetery assessment. G M EL-ARAGI∗, M A AYAD, M A EL-KOLALY and .... 4000 system is in coaxial connection with a computer system which has a special software program for resolving TL-data and assorting the resolved data in classified files.

  2. Transport theory and low energy properties of colour superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Litim, Daniel F

    2002-01-01

    The one-loop polarisation tensor and the propagation of ``in-medium'' photons of colour superconductors in the 2SC and CFL phase is discussed. For a study of thermal corrections to the low energy effective theory in the 2SC phase, a classical transport theory for fermionic quasiparticles is invoked.

  3. A primer for electroweak induced low-energy nuclear reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Under special circumstances, electromagnetic and weak interactions can induce low-energy nuclear reactions to occur with observable rates for a variety of processes. A common element in all these applications is that the electromagnetic energy stored in many relatively slow-moving electrons can – under appropriate ...

  4. Low Energy Defibrillation in Human Cardiac Tissue: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Stuart W.; Plank, Gernot; Biktasheva, Irina V.; Biktashev, Vadim N.

    2009-02-01

    We aim to assess the effectiveness of feedback controlled resonant drift pacing as a method for low energy defibrillation. Antitachycardia pacing is the only low energy defibrillation approach to have gained clinical significance, but it is still suboptimal. Low energy defibrillation would avoid adverse side effects associated with high voltage shocks and allow the application of ICD therapy where it is not tolerated today. We present results of computer simulations of a bidomain model of cardiac tissue with human atrial ionic kinetics. Re-entry was initiated and low energy shocks were applied with the same period as the re-entry, using feedback to maintain resonance. We demonstrate that such stimulation can move the core of re-entrant patterns, in the direction depending on location of electrodes and a time delay in the feedback. Termination of re-entry is achieved with shock strength one order of magnitude weaker than in conventional single-shock defibrillation. We conclude that resonant drift pacing can terminate re-entry at a fraction of the shock strength currently used for defibrillation and can potentially work where antitachycardia pacing fails, due to the feedback mechanisms. Success depends on a number of details which these numerical simulations have uncovered. \\emph{Keywords} Re-entry; Bidomain model; Resonant drift; ICD; Defibrillation; Antitachycardia pacing; Feedback.

  5. Nanostructured fuzz growth on tungsten under low-energy and high-flux He irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; You, Yu-Wei; Liu, Lu; Fan, Hongyu; Ni, Weiyuan; Liu, Dongping; Liu, C. S.; Benstetter, Günther; Wang, Younian

    2015-06-01

    We report the formation of wave-like structures and nanostructured fuzzes in the polycrystalline tungsten (W) irradiated with high-flux and low-energy helium (He) ions. From conductive atomic force microscope measurements, we have simultaneously obtained the surface topography and current emission images of the irradiated W materials. Our measurements show that He-enriched and nanostructured strips are formed in W crystal grains when they are exposed to low-energy and high-flux He ions at a temperature of 1400 K. The experimental measurements are confirmed by theoretical calculations, where He atoms in W crystal grains are found to cluster in a close-packed arrangement between {101} planes and form He-enriched strips. The formations of wave-like structures and nanostructured fuzzes on the W surface can be attributed to the surface sputtering and swelling of He-enriched strips, respectively.

  6. Recent developments and research projects at the low-energy RI beam facility CRIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H., E-mail: yamag@cns.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kahl, D.; Nakao, T. [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo, RIKEN Campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubono, S. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hashimoto, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Hayakawa, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Kawabata, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kita-Shirakawa, Kyoto 606-8502,Japan (Japan); Iwasa, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kwon, Y.K. [Institute for Basic Science, 70, Yuseong-daero 1689-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Binh, D.N.; Khiem, L.H.; Duy, N.N. [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hong Quoc Viet, Nghia do, HaNoi (Viet Nam)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • CRIB is a unique low-energy RI beam separator of the University of Tokyo. • CRIB has been produced various RI beams mainly on the proton-rich side. • The major topics studied at CRIB are resonant scatterings and (alpha, p) reactions. • Strong alpha resonances were observed with {sup 7}Be + alpha resonant scattering. -- Abstract: CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator) is a low-energy RI beam separator at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. An overview of the recent developments and status of CRIB, including a detailed summary of beam parameters, is presented. Studies on proton and α resonant scatterings, direct measurements of (α,p) reactions, and other types of measurements (β-decay lifetimes, etc.) have been performed using RI beams at CRIB, motivated by interests in astrophysical reactions and exotic nuclear structure. Among the studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Be + α resonant scattering is discussed.

  7. How to Succeed in Low-Energy Housing—Path Creation Analysis of Low-Energy Innovation Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Pässilä

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The low-energy and the nearly zero-energy buildings trend is calling for radical new innovations from the construction industry. This study uses path creation theory to examine two innovation concepts for low-energy housing in Northern Europe with contrasting outcomes—with one being an apparent market success and the other a disappointment. The results highlight two issues behind the success, one of a systemic nature and the other concerning innovation management. First, the development of energy efficiency regulations and the dominant technological trajectory regarding low-energy houses are interdependent. However, it seems that while supporting the trajectory of the innovation developed in the first case, regulators created virtually insurmountable cognitive and normative obstacles to finding alternative technological pathways. Second, the significance of proof of concepts for new innovations cannot be underestimated. The importance of a pilot project rests not only on showcasing and testing the technology, but also on its ability to increase political support, investments, and public awareness. The study implies that low-energy construction seems to be the next great challenge, one where genuine co-operation between the industry, public authorities and academia is a prerequisite for success.

  8. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, G. F.; Grysan, P.; Guennou, M.; Kreisel, J.; Martinotti, D.; Rountree, C. L.; Mathieu, C.; Barrett, N.

    2016-09-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM - electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM - electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field.

  9. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, G F; Grysan, P; Guennou, M; Kreisel, J; Martinotti, D; Rountree, C L; Mathieu, C; Barrett, N

    2016-09-09

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM - electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM - electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field.

  10. The MUNU experiment on low energy nu-bar sub e e sup - scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Broggini, C

    2002-01-01

    We built a low background detector to measure the nu-bar sub e e sup - elastic cross section at low energy. The detector has been installed close to a nuclear reactor in Bugey and it is running since almost 2 years. After having reduced the electron background by more than three orders of magnitude we have now the evidence, for the first time, of the nu-bar sub e peak from the reactor.

  11. Low-energy charged particles in Saturn's magnetosphere - Results from Voyager 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Bostrom, C. O.; Keath, E. P.; Carbary, J. F.; Roelof, E. C.; Armstrong, T. P.; Axford, W. I.; Gloeckler, G.; Hamilton, D. C.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The Voyager 1 low-energy charged particle instrument measured electrons and ions with energies below 26 and 40 kiloelectron volts, respectively, in the Saturn magnetosphere. Spectra of all ion species were found to have an energy cutoff at levels greater than 2 million electron volts. In contrast to the magnetospheres of Jupiter and earth, there are no lobe regions essentially devoid of particles in Saturn's nighttime magnetosphere. One novel feature of the Saturn magnetosphere is a pervasive population of energetic molecular hydrogen.

  12. A Low Energy Intelligent Clustering Protocol for Wireless Sensor Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiao; Cui, Lingguo; Zhang, Baihai

    2010-01-01

    LEACH (low-energy adaptive clustering hierarchy) is a well-known self-organizing, adaptive clustering protocol of wireless sensor networks. However it has some shortcomings when it faces such problems as the cluster construction and energy management. In this paper, LEICP (low energy intelligent......-head as the next hop for delivering the messages or to send the data to the base station directly, using Dijkstra algorithm to compute an optimal path. The performance of LEICP is compared with that of LEACH. Simulation results demonstrate that LEICP can prolong the lifetime of the sensor network by about 62...... clustering protocol), an improvement of the LEACH protocol is proposed to overcome the shortcomings of LEACH. LEICP aims at balancing the energy consumption in every cluster and prolonging the network lifetime. A fitness function is defined to balance the energy consumption in every cluster according...

  13. European national strategies to move towards very low energy buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund

    of official subsidies or via private investment organisations. Another possibility is lower taxes for low energy buildings or the introduction of CO2 taxes. Furthermore mandatory certification schemes are expected to promote very low energy buildings by introduction of grades restricted to buildings with very....... A strategy for improved energy efficiency of existing buildings is a necessity if the energy consumption is to be reduced significantly over a limited period of time. The life time of buildings ranges from 50 to 100 years and improvement of the existing building stock will thus have much higher impact than...... is an effective instrument to achieve highly energy efficient buildings, as well as a valuable tool and guideline for the construction sector....

  14. Radiation processing of liquid with low energy electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makuuchi, Keizo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2003-02-01

    Radiation induced emulsion polymerization, radiation vulcanization of NR latex (RVNRL) and radiation degradation of natural polymers were selected and reviewed as the radiation processing of liquid. The characteristic of high dose rate emulsion polymerization is the occurrence of cationic polymerization. Thus, it can be used for the production of new materials that cannot be obtained by radical polymerization. A potential application will be production of polymer emulsion that can be used as water-borne UV/EB curing resins. The technology of RVNRL by {gamma}-ray has been commercialized. RVNRL with low energy electron accelerator is under development for further vulcanization cost reduction. Vessel type irradiator will be favorable for industrial application. Radiation degradation of polysaccharides is an emerging and promising area of radiation processing. However, strict cost comparison between liquid irradiation with low energy EB and state irradiation with {gamma}-ray should be carried out. (author)

  15. Energy performance of the low-energy house in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Jesper; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    The object of the low-energy house in Sisimiut in Greenland was to build a house with an energy consumption less than 80 kWh/m² corresponding to half the energy frame of the coming building code. Therefore the focus in this project has been on large insulation thicknesses, windows with high net...... energy gain, efficient ventilation system with heat recovery and solar heating. In this paper the results of a calculation of the energy consumption of low-energy house is presented. The calculation was done using the program BSim2002 [1] and a new weather test reference year based on climatic data...... by ventilation heat recovery (90% efficiency) specially designed for arctic conditions, by using thicker insulation in walls (300 mm) and roof/floor (350 mm), and by using solar hot water heating (3250 kWh/year). The building is intended to enhance sustainability in the building sector in Greenland....

  16. Photon Strength and the Low-Energy Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedeking, M; Bernstein, L A; Krticka, M; Bleuel, D L; Allmond, J M; Basunia, M S; Burke, J T; Fallon, P; Firestone, R B; Goldblum, B L; Hatarik, R; Lake, P T; Lee, I Y; Lesher, S R; Paschalis, S; Petri, M; Phair, L; Scielzo, N D

    2012-02-22

    The ability of atomic nuclei to emit and absorb photons with energy E{sub {gamma}} is known as the photon strength function f(E{sub {gamma}}). It has direct relevance to astrophysical element formation via neutron capture processes due to its central role in nuclear reactions. Studies of f(E{sub {gamma}}) have benefited from a wealth of data collected in neutron capture and direct reactions but also from newly commissioned inelastic photon scattering facilities. The majority of these experimental methods, however, rely on the use of models because measured {gamma}-ray spectra are simultaneously sensitive to both the nuclear level density and f(E{sub {gamma}}). As excitation energy increases towards the particle separation energies, the level density increases rapidly, creating the quasi-continuum. Nuclear properties in this excitation energy region are best characterized using statistical quantities, such as f(E{sub {gamma}}). A point of contention in studies of the quasi-continuum has been an unexpected and unexplained increase in f(E{sub {gamma}}) at low {gamma}-ray energies (i.e. below E{sub {gamma}} {approx}3 MeV) in a subset of light-to-medium mass nuclei. Ideally, a new model-independent experimental technique is required to address questions regarding the existence and origin of this low-energy enhancement in f(E{sub {gamma}}). Here such a model-independent approach is presented for determining the shape of f(E{sub {gamma}}) over a wide range of energies. The method involves the use of coupled high-resolution particle and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy to determine the emission of {gamma} rays from the quasi-continuum in a nucleus with defined excitation energy to individual discrete levels of known spins and parities. This method shares characteristics of two neutron capture-based techniques: the Average Resonance Capture (ARC) and the Two-Step Cascade analysis (TSC). The power of the new technique lies in the additional ability to positively identify primary

  17. Low-energy potential scattering in two and three dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Khuri, N.N.; Richard, Jean-Marc; Wu, Tai Tsun

    2009-01-01

    Conditions are established for the existence of a scattering length and an effective range in the low-energy expansion of the S-wave phase-shift of a central potential in two and three dimensions. The behavior of the phase-shift as a function of the momentum is also derived for longer-range power-law potentials which do not fulfill these conditions.

  18. Low Energy Supersymmetry from the Heterotic String Landscape

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, O; Raby, S; Ramos-Sanchez, S; Ratz, M; Vaudrevange, P K S; Wingerter, A; Lebedev, Oleg; Nilles, Hans-Peter; Raby, Stuart; Ramos-Sanchez, Saul; Ratz, Michael; Vaudrevange, Patrick K. S.; Wingerter, Akin

    2007-01-01

    We study possible correlations between properties of the observable and hidden sectors in heterotic string theory. Specifically, we analyze the case of the Z6-II orbifold compactification which produces a significant number of models with the spectrum of the supersymmetric standard model. We find that requiring realistic features does affect the hidden sector such that hidden sector gauge group factors SU(4) and SO(8) are favoured. In the context of gaugino condensation, this implies low energy supersymmetry breaking.

  19. Negative ions as a source of low energy neutral beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Little consideration has been given to the impact of recent developments in negative ion source technology on the design of low energy neutral beam injectors. However, negative ion sources of improved operating efficiency, higher gas efficiency, and smaller beam divergence will lead to neutral deuterium injectors, operating at less than 100 keV, with better operating efficiencies and more compact layouts than can be obtained from positive ion systems.

  20. Treatment of surfaces with low-energy electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Mikmeková, Eliška; Lejeune, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 407, JUN 15 (2017), s. 105-108 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Low-energy electrons * Electron beam induced release * Graphene * Ultimate cleaning of surfaces Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  1. Auroral Electrojet Index Designed to Provide a Global Measure, Hourly Intervals, of Auroral Zone Magnetic Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Auroral Electrojet (AE) index is designed to provide a global quantitative measure of auroral zone magnetic activity produced by enhanced ionospheric currents...

  2. Smartphone-Based Indoor Localization with Bluetooth Low Energy Beacons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yuan; Yang, Jun; Li, You; Qi, Longning; El-Sheimy, Naser

    2016-04-26

    Indoor wireless localization using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) beacons has attracted considerable attention after the release of the BLE protocol. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that uses the combination of channel-separate polynomial regression model (PRM), channel-separate fingerprinting (FP), outlier detection and extended Kalman filtering (EKF) for smartphone-based indoor localization with BLE beacons. The proposed algorithm uses FP and PRM to estimate the target's location and the distances between the target and BLE beacons respectively. We compare the performance of distance estimation that uses separate PRM for three advertisement channels (i.e., the separate strategy) with that use an aggregate PRM generated through the combination of information from all channels (i.e., the aggregate strategy). The performance of FP-based location estimation results of the separate strategy and the aggregate strategy are also compared. It was found that the separate strategy can provide higher accuracy; thus, it is preferred to adopt PRM and FP for each BLE advertisement channel separately. Furthermore, to enhance the robustness of the algorithm, a two-level outlier detection mechanism is designed. Distance and location estimates obtained from PRM and FP are passed to the first outlier detection to generate improved distance estimates for the EKF. After the EKF process, the second outlier detection algorithm based on statistical testing is further performed to remove the outliers. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by various field experiments. Results show that the proposed algorithm achieved the accuracy of <2.56 m at 90% of the time with dense deployment of BLE beacons (1 beacon per 9 m), which performs 35.82% better than <3.99 m from the Propagation Model (PM) + EKF algorithm and 15.77% more accurate than <3.04 m from the FP + EKF algorithm. With sparse deployment (1 beacon per 18 m), the proposed algorithm achieves the accuracies of <3.88 m at 90% of the

  3. Smartphone-Based Indoor Localization with Bluetooth Low Energy Beacons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhuang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Indoor wireless localization using Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE beacons has attracted considerable attention after the release of the BLE protocol. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that uses the combination of channel-separate polynomial regression model (PRM, channel-separate fingerprinting (FP, outlier detection and extended Kalman filtering (EKF for smartphone-based indoor localization with BLE beacons. The proposed algorithm uses FP and PRM to estimate the target’s location and the distances between the target and BLE beacons respectively. We compare the performance of distance estimation that uses separate PRM for three advertisement channels (i.e., the separate strategy with that use an aggregate PRM generated through the combination of information from all channels (i.e., the aggregate strategy. The performance of FP-based location estimation results of the separate strategy and the aggregate strategy are also compared. It was found that the separate strategy can provide higher accuracy; thus, it is preferred to adopt PRM and FP for each BLE advertisement channel separately. Furthermore, to enhance the robustness of the algorithm, a two-level outlier detection mechanism is designed. Distance and location estimates obtained from PRM and FP are passed to the first outlier detection to generate improved distance estimates for the EKF. After the EKF process, the second outlier detection algorithm based on statistical testing is further performed to remove the outliers. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by various field experiments. Results show that the proposed algorithm achieved the accuracy of <2.56 m at 90% of the time with dense deployment of BLE beacons (1 beacon per 9 m, which performs 35.82% better than <3.99 m from the Propagation Model (PM + EKF algorithm and 15.77% more accurate than <3.04 m from the FP + EKF algorithm. With sparse deployment (1 beacon per 18 m, the proposed algorithm achieves the accuracies of <3.88 m at

  4. Scanning ion microscopy with low energy lithium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twedt, Kevin A. [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Maryland NanoCenter, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Chen, Lei [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); McClelland, Jabez J., E-mail: jabez.mcclelland@nist.gov [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Using an ion source based on photoionization of laser-cooled lithium atoms, we have developed a scanning ion microscope with probe sizes of a few tens of nanometers and beam energies from 500 eV to 5 keV. These beam energies are much lower than the typical operating energies of the helium ion microscope or gallium focused ion beam systems. We demonstrate how low energy can be advantageous in ion microscopy when detecting backscattered ions, due to a decreased interaction volume and the potential for surface sensitive composition analysis. As an example application that demonstrates these advantages, we non-destructively image the removal of a thin residual resist layer during plasma etching in a nano-imprint lithography process. - Highlights: • We use an ion source based on photoionization of laser-cooled lithium atoms. • The ion source makes possible a low energy (500 eV to 5 keV) scanning ion microscope. • Low energy is preferred for ion microscopy with backscattered ions. • We use the microscope to image a thin resist used in nano-imprint lithography.

  5. The Medicare Electronic Health Record Incentive Program: provider performance on core and menu measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Feblowitz, Joshua; Samal, Lipika; McCoy, Allison B; Sittig, Dean F

    2014-02-01

    To measure performance by eligible health care providers on CMS's meaningful use measures. Medicare Electronic Health Record Incentive Program Eligible Professionals Public Use File (PUF), which contains data on meaningful use attestations by 237,267 eligible providers through May 31, 2013. Cross-sectional analysis of the 15 core and 10 menu measures pertaining to use of EHR functions reported in the PUF. Providers in the dataset performed strongly on all core measures, with the most frequent response for each of the 15 measures being 90-100 percent compliance, even when the threshold for a particular measure was lower (e.g., 30 percent). PCPs had higher scores than specialists for computerized order entry, maintaining an active medication list, and documenting vital signs, while specialists had higher scores for maintaining a problem list, recording patient demographics and smoking status, and for providing patients with an after-visit summary. In fact, 90.2 percent of eligible providers claimed at least one exclusion, and half claimed two or more. Providers are successfully attesting to CMS's requirements, and often exceeding the thresholds required by CMS; however, some troubling patterns in exclusions are present. CMS should raise program requirements in future years. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  6. Observation and analysis of self-amplified spontaneous emission at the APS low-energy undulator test line

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, N D; Banks, G; Bechtold, R; Beczek, K; Benson, C; Berg, S; Berg, W; Biedron, S G; Biggs, J A; Boerste, K; Borland, M; Bosek, M; Brzowski, W R; Budz, J; Carwardine, J A; Castro, P; Chae, Y C; Christensen, S; Clark, C; Conde, M; Crosbie, E A; Decker, G A; Dejus, Roger J; Deleon, H; Den Hartog, P K; Deriy, B N; Dohan, D; Dombrowski, P; Donkers, D; Doose, C L; Dortwegt, R J; Edwards, G A; Eidelman, Y; Erdmann, M J; Error, J J; Ferry, R; Flood, R; Forrestal, J; Freund, H; Friedsam, H; Gagliano, J; Gai, W; Galayda, J N; Gerig, R; Gilmore, R L; Gluskin, E; Goeppner, G A; Goetzen, J; Gold, C; Grelick, A E; Hahne, M W; Hanuska, S; Harkay, K C; Harris, G; Hillman, A L; Hogrefe, R; Hoyt, J; Huang, Z; Jagger, J M; Jansma, W G; Jaski, M; Jones, S J; Keane, R T; Kelly, A L; Keyser, C; Kim, K J; Kim, S H; Kirshenbaum, M; Klick, J H; Knoerzer, K; Knott, M; Koldenhoven, R J; Labuda, S; Laird, R; Lang, J; Lenkszus, F R; Lessner, E S; Lewellen, J W; Li, Y; Lill, R M; Lumpkin, Alex H; Makarov, O A; Markovich, G M; McDowell, M; McDowell, W P; McNamara, P E; Meier, T; Meyer, D; Michalek, W; Milton, S V; Moe, H; Moog, E; Morrison, L; Nassiri, A; Noonan, J R; Otto, R; Pace, J; Pasky, S J; Penicka, J M; Pietryla, A F; Pile, G; Pitts, C; Power, J; Powers, T; Putnam, C C; Puttkammer, A J; Reigle, D; Reigle, L; Ronzhin, D; Rotela, E R; Russell, E F; Sajaev, Vadim; Sarkar, S; Scapino, J C; Schröder, K; Seglem, R A; Sereno, N S; Sharma, S K; Sidarous, J F; Singh, O; Smith, T L; Soliday, R; Sprau, G A; Stein, S J; Stejskal, B; Svirtun, V; Teng, L C; Theres, E; Thompson, K; Tieman, B J; Torres, J A; Trakhtenberg, E; Travish, G; Trento, G F; Vacca, J; Vasserman, I B; Vinokurov, N A; Walters, D R; Wang, J; Wang, X J; Warren, J; Wesling, S; Weyer, D L; Wiemerslage, G; Wilhelmi, K; Wright, R; Wyncott, D; Xu, S; Yang, B X; Yoder, W; Zabel, R B

    2001-01-01

    Exponential growth of self-amplified spontaneous emission at 530 nm was first experimentally observed at the Advanced Photon Source low-energy undulator test line in December 1999. Since then, further detailed measurements and analysis of the results have been made. Here, we present the measurements and compare these with calculations based on measured electron beam properties and theoretical expectations.

  7. Composite Measures of Health Care Provider Performance: A Description of Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwartz, Michael; Restuccia, Joseph D; Rosen, Amy K

    2015-01-01

    Context Since the Institute of Medicine’s 2001 report Crossing the Quality Chasm, there has been a rapid proliferation of quality measures used in quality-monitoring, provider-profiling, and pay-for-performance (P4P) programs. Although individual performance measures are useful for identifying specific processes and outcomes for improvement and tracking progress, they do not easily provide an accessible overview of performance. Composite measures aggregate individual performance measures into a summary score. By reducing the amount of data that must be processed, they facilitate (1) benchmarking of an organization’s performance, encouraging quality improvement initiatives to match performance against high-performing organizations, and (2) profiling and P4P programs based on an organization’s overall performance. Methods We describe different approaches to creating composite measures, discuss their advantages and disadvantages, and provide examples of their use. Findings The major issues in creating composite measures are (1) whether to aggregate measures at the patient level through all-or-none approaches or the facility level, using one of the several possible weighting schemes; (2) when combining measures on different scales, how to rescale measures (using z scores, range percentages, ranks, or 5-star categorizations); and (3) whether to use shrinkage estimators, which increase precision by smoothing rates from smaller facilities but also decrease transparency. Conclusions Because provider rankings and rewards under P4P programs may be sensitive to both context and the data, careful analysis is warranted before deciding to implement a particular method. A better understanding of both when and where to use composite measures and the incentives created by composite measures are likely to be important areas of research as the use of composite measures grows. PMID:26626986

  8. An analysis of a low-energy, low-water use community in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez Alcocer, Jose Luis

    This study investigated how to determine a potential scenario to reduce energy, water and transportation use in Mexico City by implementing low-energy, low-water use communities. The proposed mixed-use community has multi-family apartments and a small grocery store. The research included the analysis of: case studies, energy simulation, and hand calculations for water, transportation and cost analysis. The previous case studies reviewed include: communities in Mexico City, Mexico, Austin, Texas, Phoenix, Arizona, New York City, New York and San Diego, California in terms of successful low-energy, low-water use projects. The analysis and comparison of these centers showed that the Multifamiliar Miguel Aleman is an excellent candidate to be examined for Mexico City. This technical potential study evaluated energy conserving measures such as low-energy appliances and efficient lighting that could be applied to the apartments in Mexico City to reduce energy-use. The use of the simulations and manual calculations showed that the application of the mixed-use concept was successful in reducing the energy and water use and the corresponding carbon footprint. Finally, this technical potential study showed taking people out of their cars as a result of the presence of the on-site grocery store, small recreation center and park on the ground floor also reduced their overall transportation energy-use. The improvement of the whole community (i.e., apartments plus grocery store) using energy-efficient measures provided a reduction of 70 percent of energy from the base-case. In addition a 69 percent reduction in water-use was achieved by using water-saving fixtures and greywater reuse technologies for the complex. The combination of high-efficiency automobiles and the presence of the on-site grocery store, small recreation center and park potentially reduced the transportation energy-use by 65 percent. The analysis showed an energy cost reduction of 82 percent reduction for

  9. eV-TEM: Transmission electron microscopy in a low energy cathode lens instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geelen, Daniël, E-mail: geelen@physics.leidenuniv.nl [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Physics, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Thete, Aniket [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Physics, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Schaff, Oliver; Kaiser, Alexander [SPECS GmbH, Voltastrasse 5, D-13355 Berlin (Germany); Molen, Sense Jan van der [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Physics, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Tromp, Rudolf [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We are developing a transmission electron microscope that operates at extremely low electron energies, 0–40 eV. We call this technique eV-TEM. Its feasibility is based on the fact that at very low electron energies the number of energy loss pathways decreases. Hence, the electron inelastic mean free path increases dramatically. eV-TEM will enable us to study elastic and inelastic interactions of electrons with thin samples. With the recent development of aberration correction in cathode lens instruments, a spatial resolution of a few nm appears within range, even for these very low electron energies. Such resolution will be highly relevant to study biological samples such as proteins and cell membranes. The low electron energies minimize adverse effects due to radiation damage. - Highlights: • We present a new way of performing low energy transmission electron microscopy in an aberration corrected LEEM/PEEM instrument. • We show a proof of principle where we measure transmitted electrons through a suspended graphene monolayer with a preliminary setup. • We present an improved setup design that provides better control of the incident electron beam.

  10. Evaluation of Digital Compressed Sensing for Real-Time Wireless ECG System with Bluetooth low Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yishan; Doleschel, Sammy; Wunderlich, Ralf; Heinen, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a wearable and wireless ECG system is firstly designed with Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE). It can detect 3-lead ECG signals and is completely wireless. Secondly the digital Compressed Sensing (CS) is implemented to increase the energy efficiency of wireless ECG sensor. Different sparsifying basis, various compression ratio (CR) and several reconstruction algorithms are simulated and discussed. Finally the reconstruction is done by the android application (App) on smartphone to display the signal in real time. The power efficiency is measured and compared with the system without CS. The optimum satisfying basis built by 3-level decomposed db4 wavelet coefficients, 1-bit Bernoulli random matrix and the most suitable reconstruction algorithm are selected by the simulations and applied on the sensor node and App. The signal is successfully reconstructed and displayed on the App of smartphone. Battery life of sensor node is extended from 55 h to 67 h. The presented wireless ECG system with CS can significantly extend the battery life by 22 %. With the compact characteristic and long term working time, the system provides a feasible solution for the long term homecare utilization.

  11. Evaluation of low energy electron beam dose application by means of a portable optical device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitzig, Manuela; Winkler, Martin; Härtling, Thomas; Röder, Olaf; Opitz, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    We present our recent development concerning the evaluation of a low energy dose application to electron beam responding materials with a simple portable optical device. Electron beam irradiation is a promising option to sterilize sensitive and high performance products or surfaces at a low temperature and without moisture. Especially in the fields of the food industry and medicine, regulations regarding sterility are increasingly tightened. Because of this, a secure proof for electron-beam-assisted sterilization is required. However, no nondestructive and in situ method exists up until now. Our approach to provide a secure proof of sterilization is to place a suitable marker material based on rare-earth-doped phosphors inside or on the top of the packaging material of the respective product. Upon electron irradiation the marker material changes its luminescence properties as a function of the applied energy dose. We verified the energy dependence by means of time-resolved measurements of the luminescence decay of an upconversion phosphor with a portable optical device. In our experimental realization, short laser pulses in the near-infrared range are triggered by a microcontrol unit (MCU) and excite the marker material. The light emitted by the marker is collected in the range between 400 and 1100 nm via a silicon photodiode, processed by the MCU, and analyzed in a Labview program via a single-exponential fit. As a main result, we observe an increasing reduction of the luminescence lifetime with higher dose applications.

  12. Low-energy electronic recoil in xenon detectors by solar neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Liu, C -P; Wu, Chih-Pan

    2016-01-01

    Low-energy electronic recoil caused by solar neutrinos in multi-ton xenon detectors is an important subject not only because it is a source of the irreducible background for direct searches of weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs), but also because it provides a viable way to measure the solar $pp$ and $^{7}\\textrm{Be}$ neutrinos at the precision level of current standard solar model predictions. In this work we perform $\\textit{ab initio}$ many-body calculations for the structure, photoionization, and neutrino-ionization of xenon. It is found that the atomic binding effect yields a sizable suppression to the neutrino-electron scattering cross section at low recoil energies. Compared with the previous calculation based on the free electron picture, our calculated event rate of electronic recoil in the same detector configuration is reduced by about $25\\%$. We present in this paper the electronic recoil rate spectrum in the energy window of 100 eV - 30 keV with the standard per ton per year normalizatio...

  13. The Low Energy Charged Particle /LECP/ experiment on the Voyager spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Bostrom, C. O.; Armstrong, T. P.; Axford, W. I.; Fan, C. Y.; Gloeckler, G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The Low Energy Magnetosphere Particle Analyzer (LEMPA) and the Low Energy Particle Telescope (LEPT) on board the Voyager spacecraft are described. The LEMPA has an energy range of about 10 keV to greater than 11 MeV for electrons and about 15 keV to greater than 150 MeV for protons and heavier ions; the LEPT covers a range of about 0.05 to 40 MeV/nucleon with good energy and species resolution. The LEPT and LEMPA subsystems are mounted on a stepping platform which rotates at variable rate through eight angular sectors. Comprehensive measurements of particles in the Jovian, Saturnian, Uranian, and interplanetary environments are expected from the experiment.

  14. Role of low-energy observables in precision Higgs boson analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Alexey A. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Pokorski, Stefan [Univ. of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Wells, James D. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Zhang, Zhengkang [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-04-02

    A conventional approach to precision calculations of Higgs boson observables uses quark masses mc and mb as inputs. However, quark masses are single numbers that hide a variety of low-energy data from which they are extracted, and also hide the various sources of theoretical uncertainties and correlations with additional input parameters such as αs. Higher-precision calculations, which are needed to give meaning to future measurements, require more direct engagement with the low-energy data in a global analysis. As a result, we present an initial calculation in this direction, which illustrates the procedure and reveals some of the theory uncertainties that challenge subpercent determinations of Higgs boson partial widths.

  15. Interstellar Low Energy Antiprotons as a Probe of Dark Matter and Primordial Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Ormes, J F; Wells, J

    1999-01-01

    Cosmic ray antiprotons can originate from dark matter annihilating into quarks that subsequently decay into antiprotons. Evaporation of primordial black holes also can produce a significant antiproton flux. Since the spectrum of secondary antiprotons from cosmic ray interactions peaks at ~ 2 GeV and goes down sharply at lower energy, there is a window at energies < 1 GeV in which to look for excess antiprotons as a signature of these exotic antiproton sources. However, in the vicinity of the Earth low energy particles are strongly modulated by the solar wind, which makes any analysis ambiguous. The adverse effects of the solar wind can be avoided by placing a low energy antiproton spectrometer aboard an interstellar probe. The theoretical predictions are reviewed and the preliminary design of a light-weight, low-power instrument to make the measurements and a summary of the anticipated results are given in this paper.

  16. Low-energy electron transmission through high aspect ratio Al O nanocapillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milosavljević, A.R.; Jureta, J.; Víkor, G.

    2009-01-01

    Electron transmission through insulating AlO nanocapillaries of different diameters (40 and 270 nm) and 15 μm length has been investigated for low-energy electrons (2-120 V). The total intensity of transmitted current weakly depends on the incident electron energy and tilt angle defined...... appears to influence significantly only the intensity of the elastic transmission. The present results suggest a more complex nature of low-energy electron transport through insulating nanocapillaries than proposed for positive ions....... with respect to the capillary axis. On the other hand, the intensity of elastically transmitted electrons significantly varies with the alteration of electron energy and tilt angle. In addition, we measured an energy distribution of electrons transmitted both in the straightforward direction and at large tilt...

  17. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Lettry, Jacques; Midttun, Øystein; Scrivens, Richard

    2014-02-01

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H(-) beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  18. SAX Low-Energy Gas Scintillation Proportional Counter (LE-GSPC): calibration and system performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Didier D. E.; Bavdaz, Marcos; Peacock, Anthony J.; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Parmar, Arvind N.

    1995-10-01

    The low energy gas scintillation proportional counter (LE-GSPC) is an imaging x-ray spectrometer. It is one of the narrow field instruments on board the SAX satellite and covers the lower energy range from 0.1 to 10 keV. The low energy response of the detector is achieved by using a driftless gas cell and a thin multilayer polyimide foil as entrance window. The overall design of the imaging GSPC for space application is described. Using unit level and system level calibration data, acquired at a synchrotron and a long beam x-ray source, the capabilities both in terms of energy and position resolution are discussed. The overall efficiency of the instrument which includes the mirror's effective area, the entrance windows' transparencies, the detector's efficiency and electronics deadtime are reviewed. Background rejection issues and the experiment's consequent sensitivity to the measurement of cosmic x- ray source spectra are addressed.

  19. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A., E-mail: cristhian.alfonso.valerio.lizarraga@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Departamento de Investigación en Física, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico); Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan (Mexico); Midttun, Øystein [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  20. Efficient design of direct low-energy transfers in multi-moon systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantino, Elena; Castelli, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    In this contribution, an efficient technique to design direct (i.e., without intermediate flybys) low-energy trajectories in multi-moon systems is presented. The method relies on analytical two-body approximations of trajectories originating from the stable and unstable invariant manifolds of two coupled circular restricted three-body problems. We provide a means to perform very fast and accurate computations of the minimum-cost trajectories between two moons. Eventually, we validate the methodology by comparison with numerical integrations in the three-body problem. Motivated by the growing interest in the robotic exploration of the Jovian system, which has given rise to numerous studies and mission proposals, we apply the method to the design of minimum-cost low-energy direct trajectories between Galilean moons, and the case study is that of Ganymede and Europa.

  1. Multiple Low Energy Long Bone Fractures in the Setting of Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Beckmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rothmund-Thomson syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis characterized by a poikilodermatous rash starting in infancy as well as various skeletal anomalies, juvenile cataracts, and predisposition to certain cancers. Although Rothmund-Thomson syndrome is associated with diminished bone mineral density in addition to multiple skeletal abnormalities, there are few reports of the association with stress fractures or pathologic fractures in low energy trauma or delayed healing of fractures. Presented is a case of a young adult male with Rothmund-Thomson syndrome presenting with multiple episodes of long bone fractures caused by low energy trauma with one of the fractures exhibiting significantly delayed healing. The patient was also found to have an asymptomatic stress fracture of the lower extremity, another finding of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome rarely reported in the literature. A thorough review of the literature and comprehensive presentation of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome is provided in conjunction with our case.

  2. Quantitative measures of walking and strength provide insight into brain corticospinal tract pathology in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora E Fritz

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative measures of strength and walking are associated with brain corticospinal tract pathology. The addition of these quantitative measures to basic clinical information explains more of the variance in corticospinal tract fractional anisotropy and magnetization transfer ratio than the basic clinical information alone. Outcome measurement for multiple sclerosis clinical trials has been notoriously challenging; the use of quantitative measures of strength and walking along with tract-specific imaging methods may improve our ability to monitor disease change over time, with intervention, and provide needed guidelines for developing more effective targeted rehabilitation strategies.

  3. Measuring factors affecting implementation of health innovations: a systematic review of structural, organizational, provider, patient, and innovation level measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudoir, Stephenie R; Dugan, Alicia G; Barr, Colin H I

    2013-02-17

    Two of the current methodological barriers to implementation science efforts are the lack of agreement regarding constructs hypothesized to affect implementation success and identifiable measures of these constructs. In order to address these gaps, the main goals of this paper were to identify a multi-level framework that captures the predominant factors that impact implementation outcomes, conduct a systematic review of available measures assessing constructs subsumed within these primary factors, and determine the criterion validity of these measures in the search articles. We conducted a systematic literature review to identify articles reporting the use or development of measures designed to assess constructs that predict the implementation of evidence-based health innovations. Articles published through 12 August 2012 were identified through MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and the journal Implementation Science. We then utilized a modified five-factor framework in order to code whether each measure contained items that assess constructs representing structural, organizational, provider, patient, and innovation level factors. Further, we coded the criterion validity of each measure within the search articles obtained. Our review identified 62 measures. Results indicate that organization, provider, and innovation-level constructs have the greatest number of measures available for use, whereas structural and patient-level constructs have the least. Additionally, relatively few measures demonstrated criterion validity, or reliable association with an implementation outcome (e.g., fidelity). In light of these findings, our discussion centers on strategies that researchers can utilize in order to identify, adapt, and improve extant measures for use in their own implementation research. In total, our literature review and resulting measures compendium increases the capacity of researchers to conceptualize and measure implementation-related constructs in their ongoing and

  4. A systematic review of the extent and measurement of healthcare provider racism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradies, Yin; Truong, Mandy; Priest, Naomi

    2014-02-01

    Although considered a key driver of racial disparities in healthcare, relatively little is known about the extent of interpersonal racism perpetrated by healthcare providers, nor is there a good understanding of how best to measure such racism. This paper reviews worldwide evidence (from 1995 onwards) for racism among healthcare providers; as well as comparing existing measurement approaches to emerging best practice, it focuses on the assessment of interpersonal racism, rather than internalized or systemic/institutional racism. The following databases and electronic journal collections were searched for articles published between 1995 and 2012: Medline, CINAHL, PsycInfo, Sociological Abstracts. Included studies were published empirical studies of any design measuring and/or reporting on healthcare provider racism in the English language. Data on study design and objectives; method of measurement, constructs measured, type of tool; study population and healthcare setting; country and language of study; and study outcomes were extracted from each study. The 37 studies included in this review were almost solely conducted in the U.S. and with physicians. Statistically significant evidence of racist beliefs, emotions or practices among healthcare providers in relation to minority groups was evident in 26 of these studies. Although a number of measurement approaches were utilized, a limited range of constructs was assessed. Despite burgeoning interest in racism as a contributor to racial disparities in healthcare, we still know little about the extent of healthcare provider racism or how best to measure it. Studies using more sophisticated approaches to assess healthcare provider racism are required to inform interventions aimed at reducing racial disparities in health.

  5. Provider performance measures in private and public programs: achieving meaningful alignment with flexibility to innovate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Aparna; Veselovskiy, German; McKown, Lauren

    2013-08-01

    In recent years there has been a significant expansion in the use of provider performance measures for quality improvement, payment, and public reporting. Using data from a survey of health plans, we characterize the use of such performance measures by private payers. We also compare the use of these measures among selected private and public programs. We studied twenty-three health plans with 121 million commercial enrollees--66 percent of the national commercial enrollment. The health plans reported using 546 distinct performance measures. There was much variation in the use of performance measures in both private and public payment and care delivery programs, despite common areas of focus that included cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, and preventive services. We conclude that policy makers and stakeholders who seek less variability in the use of performance measures to increase consistency should balance this goal with the need for flexibility to meet the needs of specific populations and promote innovation.

  6. Detector system for the study of low energy heavy ion reactions using kinematic coincidence technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhingan, Akhil; Kalkal, S.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Ahuja, R.; Gehlot, J.; Madhavan, N.; Behera, B. R.; Mandal, S. K.

    2014-05-01

    The characteristics and performance of a new detector system developed for the study of low energy heavy ion binary reactions using the kinematic coincidence technique are presented. The detector system has been developed to carry out experiments such as multi-nucleon transfer reactions using the General Purpose Scattering Chamber (GPSC) facility at IUAC [1,2]. The detector system consists of a pair of two-dimensional position sensitive multi wire proportional counter (MWPC) and a ΔE - E gas ionization chamber. Both MWPC have an active area of 5×5 cm2, and provide position signals in horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) plane, and timing signal for time of flight measurements. The main design feature of MWPC is the reduced wire pitch of 0.025 in. (0.635 mm) in all electrodes, giving uniform field and faster charge collection, and usage of 10 μm diameter in anode frame which gives higher gains. The position resolution of the detectors was determined to be 0.45 mm FWHM and time resolution was estimated to be 400 ps FWHM. The detector could handle heavy ion count rates exceeding 100 kHz without any break down. The timing and position signals of the detectors are used for kinematic coincidence measurements and subsequent extraction of their mass and angular distributions. The ionization chamber has a conventional transverse field geometry with segmented anode providing multiple ΔE signals for nuclear charge (Z) identification. This article describes systematic study of these detectors in terms of efficiency, count rate handling capability, time, position and energy resolution.

  7. Detector system for the study of low energy heavy ion reactions using kinematic coincidence technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhingan, Akhil, E-mail: akhil@iuac.res.in [Inter University Accelerator Centre, P. O. Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Kalkal, S. [Deptartment of Physics and Astrophysics, Delhi University, Delhi 110007 (India); Sugathan, P.; Golda, K.S.; Ahuja, R.; Gehlot, J.; Madhavan, N. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, P. O. Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Behera, B.R. [Deptartment of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Mandal, S.K. [Deptartment of Physics and Astrophysics, Delhi University, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2014-05-01

    The characteristics and performance of a new detector system developed for the study of low energy heavy ion binary reactions using the kinematic coincidence technique are presented. The detector system has been developed to carry out experiments such as multi-nucleon transfer reactions using the General Purpose Scattering Chamber (GPSC) facility at IUAC [1,2]. The detector system consists of a pair of two-dimensional position sensitive multi wire proportional counter (MWPC) and a ΔE−E gas ionization chamber. Both MWPC have an active area of 5×5 cm{sup 2}, and provide position signals in horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) plane, and timing signal for time of flight measurements. The main design feature of MWPC is the reduced wire pitch of 0.025 in. (0.635 mm) in all electrodes, giving uniform field and faster charge collection, and usage of 10μm diameter in anode frame which gives higher gains. The position resolution of the detectors was determined to be 0.45 mm FWHM and time resolution was estimated to be 400 ps FWHM. The detector could handle heavy ion count rates exceeding 100 kHz without any break down. The timing and position signals of the detectors are used for kinematic coincidence measurements and subsequent extraction of their mass and angular distributions. The ionization chamber has a conventional transverse field geometry with segmented anode providing multiple ΔE signals for nuclear charge (Z) identification. This article describes systematic study of these detectors in terms of efficiency, count rate handling capability, time, position and energy resolution.

  8. Measuring Provider Performance for Physicians Participating in the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squitieri, Lee; Chung, Kevin C

    2017-07-01

    In 2017, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services began requiring all eligible providers to participate in the Quality Payment Program or face financial reimbursement penalty. The Quality Payment Program outlines two paths for provider participation: the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System and Advanced Alternative Payment Models. For the first performance period beginning in January of 2017, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services estimates that approximately 83 to 90 percent of eligible providers will not qualify for participation in an Advanced Alternative Payment Model and therefore must participate in the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System program. The Merit-Based Incentive Payment System path replaces existing quality-reporting programs and adds several new measures to evaluate providers using four categories of data: (1) quality, (2) cost/resource use, (3) improvement activities, and (4) advancing care information. These categories will be combined to calculate a weighted composite score for each provider or provider group. Composite Merit-Based Incentive Payment System scores based on 2017 performance data will be used to adjust reimbursed payment in 2019. In this article, the authors provide relevant background for understanding value-based provider performance measurement. The authors also discuss Merit-Based Incentive Payment System reporting requirements and scoring methodology to provide plastic surgeons with the necessary information to critically evaluate their own practice capabilities in the context of current performance metrics under the Quality Payment Program.

  9. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF LOW ENERGY FRACTURES IN REPUBLIC OF ARMENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saakyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Until present no data was available inArmeniain respect of incidence of low energy fractures that are typical of osteoporotic locations which consequently did not allow to evaluate the scope of this problem across the country.Purpose of the study – to identify the incidence of low energy fractures in proximal femur, in distal forearm, in proximal humerus and in distal tibia across population ofArmenia aged 50 years and older.Materials and methods. An observing population study was performed in two regions of Armenia during 2011-2013 where the frequency of selected locations in cases of moderate trauma was identified. During 2011-2012 the information was collected based on traumatology service records adding in 2013 other sources including primary level of healthcare due to observed infrequent applications for medical help in cases of trauma. Results. In 2013 the incidence of proximal femur fractures in men was reported as 136 cases per 100 000 of population aged 50 years and older, in women – 201 cases per 100 000. At the same time only 57.7% of patients with proximal femur fractures were admitted to hospital. Distal forearm fractures incidence in men and women was observed correspondingly 56/100 000 and 176/100 000 cases, proximal humerus fractures – 39/100 000 and 86/100 000 cases and distal tibia fractures – 39/100 000 and 86/100 000 cases. The predicted annual number of proximal femur fracture in Armenia amounts to 2067 cases, distal forearm fractures – 1205, proximal humerus fractures – 640.Conclusion. Epidemiological data that was collected for the first time on low energy fractures incidence confirmed the acute osteoporosis issue inArmenia and revealed the problems in organization of medical care for the group of senior patients with injuries.

  10. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  11. Our clinical experience in low-energy laser medical treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipa, Ciprian; Bruckner, Ion I.; Crangulescu, Nicolae; Moldovan, Corneliu I.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.; Stanciulescu, Viorica; Ionescu, Elena

    1996-05-01

    In clinical research the efficiency of low-energy laser (LEL) therapy remains controversial. We present here some of the most important results of our clinical experience in this field. We summarize our opinions about the LEL effects in rheumatic diseases, in chronic pelvic inflammatory disorders, in the treatment of some dermatological disorders, and in the recovery of the distal forearm nerve from traumatic lesion after surgical suture. We conclude that these results may be important evidence for the real clinical efficiency of the LEL.

  12. Characterization of a free air ionization chamber for low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Natalia F.; Xavier, Marcos; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: nsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: mxavier@ipen.br, E-mail: vivolo@ipen.br, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Free air ionization chambers are used by most primary metrology laboratories as primary standards of the quantities air kerma and exposure in X-ray beams. The free air ionization chamber for low energies of the Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN showed in a characterization test a problem in the set responsible for the variation of its sensitive volume. After a modification in the support of the micrometers used for the movement of the internal cylinder and the establishment of a new alignment system protocol, the tests were redone. The objective of this work was to present the results obtained in the new condition. (author)

  13. Low energy electron beams for industrial and environmental applications

    CERN Document Server

    Skarda, Vlad

    2017-01-01

    EuCARD-2 Workshop, 8-9 December 2016, Warsaw, Poland. Organizers: Science and Technology Facilities Council, UK CERN - The European Organization for Nuclear Research, Switzerland, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Poland, Fraunhofer Institute for Electron Beam and Plasma Technology, Germany, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland. An article presents short information about EuCARD-2 Workshop “Low energy electron beams for industrial and environmental applications”, which was held in December 2016 in Warsaw. Objectives, main topics and expected output of meeting are described. List of organizers is included.

  14. Early forest fire detection using low-energy hydrogen sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nörthemann

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Most huge forest fires start in partial combustion. In the beginning of a smouldering fire, emission of hydrogen in low concentration occurs. Therefore, hydrogen can be used to detect forest fires before open flames are visible and high temperatures are generated. We have developed a hydrogen sensor comprising of a metal/solid electrolyte/insulator/semiconductor (MEIS structure which allows an economical production. Due to the low energy consumption, an autarkic working unit in the forest was established. In this contribution, first experiments are shown demonstrating the possibility to detect forest fires at a very early stage using the hydrogen sensor.

  15. Use of a streamer chamber for low energy nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Bibber, K.; Pang, W.; Avery, M.; Bloemhof, E.

    1979-10-01

    A small streamer chamber has been implemented for low energy heavy ion reaction studies at the LBL 88-inch cyclotron. The response of the chamber to light and heavy ions below 35 MeV/nucleon has been examined. The limited sensitivity of light output as a function of ionization works to advantage in recording a wide variety of tracks in the same photograph whose energy loss may vary considerably. Furthermore, as gas targets are attractive for several reasons, we have investigated the suitability of Ar and Xe for use in streamer chambers.

  16. Characterization of low energy radioactive beams using direct reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J.G.; Fraser, M.A.; Bildstein, V.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new technique to determine the beam structure of low energy radioactive beams using coincidence events from a direct reaction. The technique will be described and tested using Geant4 simulations. We use the technique to determine for the first time the width, divergence and energy...... of an accelerated radioactive beam produced at ISOLDE. We use data from an experiment with an 11Be beam incident on a deuteron target producing 10Be from a (d,t) reaction. The T-REX Si detector array was used for particle detection, but the technique is applicable for other setups....

  17. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair, E-mail: mzubairkhan-um76@yahoo.com [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Department of Physics, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device.

  18. Low Energy Lorentz Violation from Modified Dispersion at High Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Viqar; Louko, Jorma

    2016-02-12

    Many quantum theories of gravity propose Lorentz-violating dispersion relations of the form ω=|k|f(|k|/M⋆), with recovery of approximate Lorentz invariance at energy scales much below M⋆. We show that a quantum field with this dispersion predicts drastic low energy Lorentz violation in atoms modeled as Unruh-DeWitt detectors, for any f that dips below unity somewhere. As an example, we show that polymer quantization motivated by loop quantum gravity predicts such Lorentz violation below current ion collider rapidities.

  19. Collisions between low-energy antihydrogen and atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Armour, E A G; Liu, Y; Martin, G D R

    2004-01-01

    Antihydrogen is currently the subject of great interest as cold H has recently been prepared at CERN by the ATHENA and ATRAP projects. This work is described elsewhere in this volume. In this paper, we describe a calculation that we have carried out recently for very low-energy HH scattering using the Kohn variational method and including three rearrangement channels in addition to the elastic channel. We also consider the He-H system and give a progress report on the calculation that we are currently carrying out for this system.

  20. Low-energy features of a 1-tev higgs sector

    CERN Document Server

    Appelquist, Thomas

    1979-01-01

    It seems very likely that the Higgs sector of a spontaneously broken gauge theory could be heavy (M = 1 TeV) and strongly interacting. By exploiting the intimate connection of such theories to nonlinear a models, it is possible to show under quite general conditions what sort of impact the heavy Higgs sector can have on low energy experiments (E << 1 TeV). In this talk, the techniques and results will be summar- ized for an SU(2) gauge theory, The analysis of the Weinberg-Salam and other realistic theories will appear in a forthcoming paper.

  1. Low-energy universality in three-body models

    CERN Document Server

    Delfino, A; Tomio, L

    2000-01-01

    We study the low-energy universality observed in three-body models through a scale-independent approach. From the already estimated infinite number of three-body excited energy states, which happen in the limit when the energy of the subsystem goes to zero, we are able to identify the lower energies of the helium trimers as possible examples of Thomas-Efimov states. By considering this example, we illustrate the usefulness of a scaling function, which we have defined. The approach is applied to bosonic systems of three identical particles, and also to the case where two kinds of particles are present. (author)

  2. Engineering Properties and Microstructural Performance of Low Energy Super-Sulfated Cement Using Industrial Waste Anhydrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Tsung-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at proposing the mix proportions of low energy super-sulfated cement (SSC concrete from industrial waste anhydrite from circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC fly ash (CFA as an alternative sulfate activator of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS/slag. The optimized mix proportion of the SSC was carried out by using mixture of different amounts of CFA in range of 25—45 wt.% and various quantities of ordinary Portland cement (OPC in range of 0 — 10 wt.% to trigger the hydration of slag. Experimental results showed that with the expected slump at values of 190 — 220 mm, the 28-day compressive strengths of the concrete with low energy SSC reached 43.69 MPa which can be feasibly applied for widely advanced construction materials. The OPC in range of 3 — 5 wt.% and 25 wt.% of CFA were considered as the optimum ingredients of the activator and was suggested to be used for fabricating the low energy SSC concrete with the good performance on compressive strength, dynamic Young’s modulus, UPV measurement, and stabilized change of length. The OPC additive up to 10 wt.% was encouraged to be used for producing the SSC concrete with significant reduction on creep.

  3. Emergence of low-energy monopole strength in the neutron-rich calcium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2017-10-01

    Background: The isoscalar monopole response of neutron-rich nuclei is sensitive to both the incompressibility coefficient of symmetric nuclear matter and the density dependence of the symmetry energy. For exotic nuclei with a large neutron excess, a low-energy component emerges that is driven by transitions into the continuum. Purpose: While understanding the scaling of the giant monopole resonance with mass number is central to this work, the main goal of this paper is to explore the emergence, evolution, and origin of low-energy monopole strength along the even-even calcium isotopes: from 40Ca to 60Ca. Methods: The distribution of isoscalar monopole strength is computed in a relativistic random phase approximation (RPA) using three effective interactions that have been calibrated to the properties of finite nuclei and neutron stars. A nonspectral approach is adopted that allows for an exact treatment of the continuum without any reliance on discretization. This is particularly critical in the case of weakly bound nuclei with single-particle orbits near the continuum. The discretization of the continuum is neither required nor admitted. Results: For the stable calcium isotopes, no evidence of low-energy monopole strength is observed, even as the 1 f7 /2 neutron orbital is being filled and the neutron-skin thickness progressively grows. Further, in contrast to experimental findings, a mild softening of the monopole response with increasing mass number is predicted. Beyond 48Ca, a significant amount of low-energy monopole strength emerges as soon as the weak-binding neutron orbitals (2 p and 1 f5 /2 ) become populated. The emergence and evolution of low-energy strength is identified with transitions from these weakly bound states into the continuum—which is treated exactly in the RPA approach. Moreover, given that models with a soft symmetry energy tend to reach the neutron-drip line earlier than their stiffer counterparts, an inverse correlation is identified

  4. Response distortion in personality measurement: born to deceive, yet capable of providing valid self-assessments?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STEPHAN DILCHERT

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This introductory article to the special issue of Psychology Science devoted to the subject of “Considering Response Distortion in Personality Measurement for Industrial, Work and Organizational Psychology Research and Practice” presents an overview of the issues of response distortion in personality measurement. It also provides a summary of the other articles published as part of this special issue addressing social desirability, impression management, self-presentation, response distortion, and faking in personality measurement in industrial, work, and organizational settings.

  5. Low energy electron generator design and depth dose prediction for micro-superficies tumors treatment purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshidi, Abdollah; Rajaee, Azimeh; Ahmadinejad, Marjan; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Ettelaee, Mehdi

    2014-09-01

    We investigate deposited energy and linear energy transfer (LET) of low energy ejection electrons in air and water layers of a generator design via a plasma source. A structured model of a concave cold cathode electron generator was designed and simulated by using Monte Carlo n-particle version X 2.7.0 (MCNPX) code. A negative dc high voltage was applied to a concave cathode up to -12 kV to determine electron energy activity. Results determined that the geometric dimensions of field size toward the anode increased in relation to the angle of the conic beam, widening the accumulated bulks. The increased field size increased the anode current, which also resulted in an increase of electron energy, a reduction in LET, a stretched build-up area and a dose curve that shifted to a higher depth. The biological effect of low energy electron radiation can be increased with an increase of LET; as the depth dose decreased, the electron energy increased at the same time. The study of electron irradiation as a conic beam from an electron generator may provide an accurate investigation of the indirect effect of low energy electrons on bystander cells.

  6. Unveiling the strangeness secrets: low-energy kaon-nucleon/nuclei interactions studies at DAΦNE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curceanu C.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The DAΦNE electron-positron collider at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati of INFN, Italy has made available a unique quality low-energy negatively charged kaons “beam”, which is used to unveil the secrets of the kaon-nucleon/nuclei interactions at low energies by the SIDDHARTA-2 and AMADEUS experiments. SIDDHARTA has already performed unprecedented precision measurements of kaonic atoms, and is being presently upgraded, as SIDDHARTA-2, to approach new frontiers. The AMADEUS experiment plans to perform in the coming years precision measurements on kaon-nuclei interactions at low-energies, to study the possible formation of kaonic nuclei, of the Λ(1405 and of many other processes involving strangeness.

  7. Development of a low energy micro sheet forming machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, A. R.; Ann, C. T.; Shariff, H. M.; Kasim, N. I.; Musa, M. A.; Ahmad, A. F.

    2017-10-01

    It is expected that with the miniaturization of materials being processed, energy consumption is also being `miniaturized' proportionally. The focus of this study was to design a low energy micro-sheet-forming machine for thin sheet metal application and fabricate a low direct current powered micro-sheet-forming machine. A prototype of low energy system for a micro-sheet-forming machine which includes mechanical and electronic elements was developed. The machine was tested for its performance in terms of natural frequency, punching forces, punching speed and capability, energy consumption (single punch and frequency-time based). Based on the experiments, the machine can do 600 stroke per minute and the process is unaffected by the machine's natural frequency. It was also found that sub-Joule of power was required for a single stroke of punching/blanking process. Up to 100micron thick carbon steel shim was successfully tested and punched. It concludes that low power forming machine is feasible to be developed and be used to replace high powered machineries to form micro-products/parts.

  8. Formation of a high intensity low energy positron string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donets, E. D.; Donets, E. E.; Syresin, E. M.; Itahashi, T.; Dubinov, A. E.

    2004-05-01

    The possibility of a high intensity low energy positron beam production is discussed. The proposed Positron String Trap (PST) is based on the principles and technology of the Electron String Ion Source (ESIS) developed in JINR during the last decade. A linear version of ESIS has been used successfully for the production of intense highly charged ion beams of various elements. Now the Tubular Electron String Ion Source (TESIS) concept is under study and this opens really new promising possibilities in physics and technology. In this report, we discuss the application of the tubular-type trap for the storage of positrons cooled to the cryogenic temperatures of 0.05 meV. It is intended that the positron flux at the energy of 1-5 eV, produced by the external source, is injected into the Tubular Positron Trap which has a similar construction as the TESIS. Then the low energy positrons are captured in the PST Penning trap and are cooled down because of their synchrotron radiation in the strong (5-10 T) applied magnetic field. It is expected that the proposed PST should permit storing and cooling to cryogenic temperature of up to 5×109 positrons. The accumulated cooled positrons can be used further for various physics applications, for example, antihydrogen production.

  9. Quest for precision in hadronic cross sections at low energy: Monte Carlo tools vs. experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Actis, S. [Paul-Scherrer-Institute Wuerenlingen and Villigen, Villigen (Switzerland); Arbuzov, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Bogoliubov Lab. of Theoretical Physics; Balossini, G. [Pavia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica; INFN, Pavia (IT)] (and others)

    2009-12-15

    We present the achievements of the last years of the experimental and theoretical groups working on hadronic cross section measurements at the low energy e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders in Beijing, Frascati, Ithaca, Novosibirsk, Stanford and Tsukuba and on {tau} decays. We sketch the prospects in these fields for the years to come. We emphasise the status and the precision of the Monte Carlo generators used to analyse the hadronic cross section measurements obtained as well with energy scans as with radiative return, to determine luminosities and {tau} decays. The radiative corrections fully or approximately implemented in the various codes and the contribution of the vacuum polarisation are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Spectrum and angular distribution of low energy electrons from 152Eu deca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Sydorenko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Angular distribution of low energy electrons from 152Eu decay was measured. Measurements were carried out in cylindrical geometry, which permits minimum distortions of data. These data confirm existence of angular distribution dependence on the energy of emitted electrons but this dependence somewhat differs from theory predicted. It is noted that the theory predicts too low intensity of near-zero energy electrons e0 (Ee ~ 1 - 2 eV emission; also, the static screening of charge used in theory should not influence the emission of e0-electrons.

  11. Renovation of a Detached Single-Family House into an Energy Efficient Low Energy House

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen; Maagaard, Steffen; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2011-01-01

    single-family house built in the early nineteen seventies. The old house was renovated in accordance to the best Danish low energy class (class 1). The project was followed by detailed measurements of the indoor environment (temperature, relative humidity and CO2 levels) and energy consumption for room...... heating and hot water supply. Measurements were carried out before and after the renovation in order to compare results and see whether the ambition for a 78% reduction in the energy consumption was reached. The paper will describe some of the most important factors regarding the energy renovation, which...

  12. Guide on the use of low energy electron beams for microbiological decontamination of surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Gondim, Ondina

    This Guide describes the validation and routine monitoring of microbiological decontamination of surfaces by low energy electron beams (100-200 keV). The Guide is mainly based on experience gained in connection with installation of electron beam systems for surface decontamination of pre......-sterilized containers at several aseptic filling lines at pharmaceutical manufacturers. Its main emphasis is on the dosimetric measurements that should be carried out for the validation of the decontamination process and on establishing the appropriate effective dose. Other aspects such as use of measurement...

  13. A systematic characterization of the low-energy photon response of plastic scintillation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Jonathan; Beddar, Sam; Bonde, Chris; Schmidt, Daniel; Culberson, Wesley; Guillemette, Maxime; Beaulieu, Luc

    2016-08-01

    To characterize the low energy behavior of scintillating materials used in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs), 3 PSDs were developed using polystyrene-based scintillating materials emitting in different wavelengths. These detectors were exposed to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-matched low-energy beams ranging from 20 kVp to 250 kVp, and to 137Cs and 60Co beams. The dose in polystyrene was compared to the dose in air measured by NIST-calibrated ionization chambers at the same location. Analysis of every beam quality spectrum was used to extract the beam parameters and the effective mass energy-absorption coefficient. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to calculate the energy absorbed in the scintillators’ volume. The scintillators’ expected response was then compared to the experimental measurements and an energy-dependent correction factor was identified to account for low-energy quenching in the scintillators. The empirical Birks model was then compared to these values to verify its validity for low-energy electrons. The clear optical fiber response was below 0.2% of the scintillator’s light for x-ray beams, indicating that a negligible amount of fluorescence contamination was produced. However, for higher-energy beams (137Cs and 60Co), the scintillators’ response was corrected for the Cerenkov stem effect. The scintillators’ response increased by a factor of approximately 4 from a 20 kVp to a 60Co beam. The decrease in sensitivity from ionization quenching reached a local minimum of about 11%+/- 1% between 40 keV and 60 keV x-ray beam mean energy, but dropped by 20% for very low-energy (13 keV) beams. The Birks model may be used to fit the experimental data, but it must take into account the energy dependence of the kB quenching parameter. A detailed comprehension of intrinsic scintillator response is essential for proper calibration of PSD dosimeters for radiology.

  14. Dosimetric properties of radiophotoluminescent glass detector in low-energy photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Shimomura, Kouhei; Kitou, Satoshi; Shiota, Yasuo; Fujita, Yukio; Dobashi, Suguru; Takeda, Ken; Jingu, Keiichi; Matsushita, Haruo; Namito, Yoshihito; Ban, Syuichi; Koyama, Syuji; Tabushi, Katsuyoshi

    2012-10-01

    A radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter (RGD) has recently become commercially available. It is being increasingly used for dosimetry in radiotherapy to measure the absorbed dose including scattered low-energy photons on the body surface of a patient and for postal dosimetry audit. In this article, the dosimetric properties of the RGD, including energy dependence of the dose response, reproducibly, variation in data obtained by the RGD for each energy, and angular dependence in low-energy photons, are discussed. An RGD (GD-301, Asahi Techno Glass Corporation, Shizuoka, Japan) was irradiated with monochromatic low-energy photon beams generated by synchrotron radiation at Photon Factory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The size of GD-301 was 1.5 mm in diameter and 8.5 mm in length and the active dose readout volume being 1 mm diameter and 0.6 mm depth located 0.7 mm from the end of the detector. The energy dependence of the dose response and reproducibility and variation were investigated for RGDs irradiated with a plastic holder and those irradiated without the plastic holder. Response of the RGD was obtained by not only conventional single field irradiation but also bilateral irradiation. Angular dependence of the RGD was measured in the range of 0°-90° for 13, 17, 40, and 80 keV photon beams by conventional single field irradiation. The dose responses had a peak at around 40 keV. For the energy range of less than 25 keV, all dose response curves steeply decreased in comparison with the ratio of mass energy absorption coefficient of the RGD to that of air. As for the reproducibility and variation in data obtained by the RGD, the coefficient of variance increased with decrease in photon energy. Furthermore, the variation for bilateral irradiation was less than that for single field irradiation. Regarding angular dependence of the RGD, for energies of 13 and 17 keV, the response decreased with increase in the irradiation angle, and the

  15. Low-energy particle experiments-electron analyzer (LEPe) onboard the Arase spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Yoichi; Wang, Bo-Jhou; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Ho, Paul T. P.; Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Chang, Tzu-Fang; Chiang, Chih-Yu; Asamura, Kazushi

    2017-12-01

    In this report, we describe the low-energy electron instrument LEPe (low-energy particle experiments-electron analyzer) onboard the Arase (ERG) spacecraft. The instrument measures a three-dimensional distribution function of electrons with energies of ˜ 19 eV-19 keV. Electrons in this energy range dominate in the inner magnetosphere, and measurement of such electrons is important in terms of understanding the magnetospheric dynamics and wave-particle interaction. The instrument employs a toroidal tophat electrostatic energy analyzer with a passive 6-mm aluminum shield. To minimize background radiation effects, the analyzer has a background channel, which monitors counts produced by background radiation. Background counts are then subtracted from measured counts. Electronic components are radiation tolerant, and 5-mm-thick shielding of the electronics housing ensures that the total dose is less than 100 kRad for the one-year nominal mission lifetime. The first in-space measurement test was done on February 12, 2017, showing that the instrument functions well. On February 27, the first all-instrument run test was done, and the LEPe instrument measured an energy dispersion event probably related to a substorm injection occurring immediately before the instrument turn-on. These initial results indicate that the instrument works fine in space, and the measurement performance is good for science purposes.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. A Novel Low Energy Electron Microscope for DNA Sequencing and Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankos, M.; Shadman, K.; Persson, H.H.J.; N’Diaye, A.T.; Schmid, A.K.; Davis, R.W.

    2014-01-01

    Monochromatic, aberration-corrected, dual-beam low energy electron microscopy (MAD-LEEM) is a novel technique that is directed towards imaging nanostructures and surfaces with sub-nanometer resolution. The technique combines a monochromator, a mirror aberration corrector, an energy filter, and dual beam illumination in a single instrument. The monochromator reduces the energy spread of the illuminating electron beam, which significantly improves spectroscopic and spatial resolution. Simulation results predict that the novel aberration corrector design will eliminate the second rank chromatic and third and fifth order spherical aberrations, thereby improving the resolution into the sub-nanometer regime at landing energies as low as one hundred electron-Volts. The energy filter produces a beam that can extract detailed information about the chemical composition and local electronic states of non-periodic objects such as nanoparticles, interfaces, defects, and macromolecules. The dual flood illumination eliminates charging effects that are generated when a conventional LEEM is used to image insulating specimens. A potential application for MAD-LEEM is in DNA sequencing, which requires high resolution to distinguish the individual bases and high speed to reduce the cost. The MAD-LEEM approach images the DNA with low electron impact energies, which provides nucleobase contrast mechanisms without organometallic labels. Furthermore, the micron-size field of view when combined with imaging on the fly provides long read lengths, thereby reducing the demand on assembling the sequence. Experimental results from bulk specimens with immobilized single-base oligonucleotides demonstrate that base specific contrast is available with reflected, photo-emitted, and Auger electrons. Image contrast simulations of model rectangular features mimicking the individual nucleotides in a DNA strand have been developed to translate measurements of contrast on bulk DNA to the detectability of

  17. Formation of very low energy states crossing the ionization threshold of argon atoms in strong mid-infrared fields

    CERN Document Server

    Wolter, Benjamin; Baudisch, Matthias; Pullen, Michael G; Tong, Xiao-Min; Hemmer, Michaël; Senftleben, Arne; Schröter, Claus Dieter; Ullrich, Joachim; Moshammer, Robert; Biegert, Jens; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Atomic ionization by intense mid-infrared (mid-IR) pulses produces low electron energy features that the strong-field approximation, which is expected to be valid in the tunneling ionization regime characterized by small Keldysh parameters ($\\gamma \\ll 1$), cannot describe. These features include the low-energy structure (LES), the very-low-energy structure (VLES), and the more recently found zero-energy structure (ZES). They result from the interplay between the laser electric field and the atomic Coulomb field which controls the low-energy spectrum also for small $\\gamma$. In the present joint experimental and theoretical study we investigate the vectorial momentum spectrum at very low energies. Using a reaction microscope optimized for the detection of very low energy electrons, we have performed a thorough study of the three-dimensional momentum spectrum well below 1 eV. Our measurements are complemented by quantum and classical simulations, which allow for an interpretation of the LES, VLES and of the ne...

  18. White paper on nuclear astrophysics and low-energy nuclear physics, Part 2: Low-energy nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Joe; Carpenter, Michael P.; Casten, Richard; Elster, Charlotte; Fallon, Paul; Gade, Alexandra; Gross, Carl; Hagen, Gaute; Hayes, Anna C.; Higinbotham, Douglas W.; Howell, Calvin R.; Horowitz, Charles J.; Jones, Kate L.; Kondev, Filip G.; Lapi, Suzanne; Macchiavelli, Augusto; McCutchen, Elizabeth A.; Natowitz, Joe; Nazarewicz, Witold; Papenbrock, Thomas; Reddy, Sanjay; Riley, Mark A.; Savage, Martin J.; Savard, Guy; Sherrill, Bradley M.; Sobotka, Lee G.; Stoyer, Mark A.; Betty Tsang, M.; Vetter, Kai; Wiedenhoever, Ingo; Wuosmaa, Alan H.; Yennello, Sherry

    2017-05-01

    Over the last decade, the Low-Energy Nuclear Physics (LENP) and Nuclear Astrophysics (NAP) communities have increasingly organized themselves in order to take a coherent approach to resolving the challenges they face. As a result, there is a high level of optimism in view of the unprecedented opportunities for substantial progress. In preparation of the 2015 US Nuclear Science Long Range Plan (LRP), the two American Physical Society Division of Nuclear Physics town meetings on LENP and NAP were held jointly on August 21-23, 2014, at Texas A&M, College Station, in Texas. These meetings were co-organized to take advantage of the strong synergy between the two fields. The present White Paper attempts to communicate the sense of great anticipation and enthusiasm that came out of these meetings. A unanimously endorsed set of joint resolutions condensed from the individual recommendations of the two town meetings were agreed upon. The present LENP White Paper discusses the above and summarizes in detail for each of the sub-fields within low-energy nuclear physics, the major accomplishments since the last LRP, the compelling near-term and long-term scientific opportunities plus the resources needed to achieve these goals, along with the scientific impact on, and interdisciplinary connections to, other fields.

  19. Measuring value at the provider level in the management of cleft lip and palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Megan M; Rosen, Heather; Kupfer, Philipp; Meara, John G

    2014-03-01

    "Value" has become a buzzword in current health-care discussions. This study demonstrates a provider-led strategy to measuring costs, an understudied component of the value equation, for a complex diagnosis for the purposes of improvement. A retrospective, microcosting methodology was used to measure costs for all hospital and physician services and costs to the patient over 18 months of multidisciplinary care for patients with cleft lip and palate. Short-term outcomes were also recorded. Overall costs to all parts of the system ranged from $35,826 to $56,611 for different subtypes, and insight was gained into major cost drivers and variations in care that will drive internal improvement efforts. It is critical that providers learn to work together and become familiar with their own costs in conjunction with outcomes as insurers increase pressure to reduce payments or accept alternative payments so that well-informed decisions can be made.

  20. Low-energy ion implantation: Large mass fractionation of argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponganis, K. V.; Graf, TH.; Marti, K.

    1993-01-01

    The isotropic signatures of noble gases in the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets are considerably evolved when compared to signatures observed in the solar wind. The mechanisms driving the evolution of planetary volatiles from original compositions in the solar accretion disk are currently poorly understood. Modeling of noble-gas compositional histories requires knowledge of fractionating processes that may have operated through the evolutionary stages. Since these gases are chemically inert, information on noble-gas fractionation processes can be used as probes. The importance of understanding these processes extends well beyond 'noble-gas planetology.' Trapped argon acquired by low-energy implantation (approximately less than 100 eV) into solids is strongly mass fractionated (approximately greater than or equal to 3 percent/amu). This has potential implications for the origin and evolution of terrestrial planet atmospheres.

  1. NRV web knowledge base on low-energy nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpov, V., E-mail: karpov@jinr.ru; Denikin, A. S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Alekseev, A. P. [Chuvash State University (Russian Federation); Zagrebaev, V. I.; Rachkov, V. A.; Naumenko, M. A.; Saiko, V. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    Principles underlying the organization and operation of the NRV web knowledge base on low-energy nuclear physics (http://nrv.jinr.ru) are described. This base includes a vast body of digitized experimental data on the properties of nuclei and on cross sections for nuclear reactions that is combined with a wide set of interconnected computer programs for simulating complex nuclear dynamics, which work directly in the browser of a remote user. Also, the current situation in the realms of application of network information technologies in nuclear physics is surveyed. The potential of the NRV knowledge base is illustrated in detail by applying it to the example of an analysis of the fusion of nuclei that is followed by the decay of the excited compound nucleus formed.

  2. Further evidence for low-energy protonium production in vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Lodi Rizzini, E; Zurlo, N; Charlton, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Hayano, R; Jorgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Macri, M; Manuzio, G; Montagna, P; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; van der Werf, D P

    2012-01-01

    We describe an experiment performed in the ATHENA apparatus in which there is evidence that the antiproton-proton bound state, protonium, has been produced at very low energies in vacuum following the interaction of cold antiprotons with a trapped cloud of molecular hydrogen ions. The latter were confined in a centrifugally separated belt outside a positron plasma used for antihydrogen formation. Studies have been performed at low positron plasma temperatures in which the protonium annihilation signal has been identified along with that from antihydrogen, and we discuss how their contributions can be disentangled. With the positron plasma heated to around 10000 K the ions become distributed in the positrons, and the majority of the annihilation signal can be explained in terms of protonium formation, as antihydrogen creation is heavily suppressed. In this case we compare the observed protonium formation rate with expectations from theory and find reasonable accord, when experimental systematics are taken into...

  3. Further Evidence for Low Energy Protonium Production in Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Lodi Rizzini, Evandro; Zurlo, Nicola; Charlton, Michael; Amsler, Claude,; Bonomi, Germano; Canali, Carlo; Carraro, Carlo; Fontana, Andrea; Genova, Pablo; Hayano, Ryugo; Jorgensen, Lars Varming; Kellerbauer, Alban; Lagomarsino, Vittorio; Landua, R; Macrì, Mario; Manuzio, Giulio; Montagna, Paolo; Regenfus, Christian; Rotondi, Alberto; Testera, Gemma; Variola, Alessandro; van der Werf, Dirk Peter

    2012-01-01

    We describe an experiment performed in the ATHENA apparatus in which there is evidence that the antiproton-proton bound state, protonium, has been produced at very low energies in vacuum following the interaction of cold antiprotons with a trapped cloud of molecular hydrogen ions. The latter were confined in a centrifugally separated belt outside a positron plasma used for antihydrogen formation. Studies have been performed at low positron plasma temperatures in which the protonium annihilation signal has been identified along with that from antihydrogen, and we discuss how their contributions can be disentangled. With the positron plasma heated to around 10,000 K the ions become distributed in the positrons, and the majority of the annihilation signal can be explained in terms of protonium formationion, as antihydrogen creation is heavily suppressed. In this case we compare the observed protonium formation rate with expectations from theory and find reasonable accord, when experimental systematics are taken...

  4. Opportunistic Sensor Data Collection with Bluetooth Low Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Aguilar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE has gained very high momentum, as witnessed by its widespread presence in smartphones, wearables and other consumer electronics devices. This fact can be leveraged to carry out opportunistic sensor data collection (OSDC in scenarios where a sensor node cannot communicate with infrastructure nodes. In such cases, a mobile entity (e.g., a pedestrian or a vehicle equipped with a BLE-enabled device can collect the data obtained by the sensor node when both are within direct communication range. In this paper, we characterize, both analytically and experimentally, the performance and trade-offs of BLE as a technology for OSDC, for the two main identified approaches, and considering the impact of its most crucial configuration parameters. Results show that a BLE sensor node running on a coin cell battery can achieve a lifetime beyond one year while transferring around 10 Mbit/day, in realistic OSDC scenarios.

  5. The Construction of Affordable Low Energy Prefabricated Housing in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vibæk, Kasper Sánchez; Beim, Anne

    2013-01-01

    . Consideration of all these factors is a precondition for a truly integrated practice and as this chapter demonstrates, innovative project delivery methods founded on the manufacturing of prefabricated buildings contribute to the production of high performance homes that are cost effective to construct, energy......Can prefabrication contribute to the development of high performance homes? To answer this question, this chapter defines high performance in more broadly inclusive terms, acknowledging the technical, architectural, social and economic conditions under which energy consumption and production occur...... efficient to operate and valuable for building communities. Herein discussed are two successful examples of low energy prefabricated housing projects built in Copenhagen Denmark, which embraced both the constraints and possibilities offered by prefabrication....

  6. Improved global alpha-optical model potentials at low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Demetriou, P; Goriely, S

    2002-01-01

    Many nuclear astrophysics applications involve radiative alpha-particle captures, alpha decays and alpha-particle transfer reactions. Theoretical estimates of the corresponding reaction rates within the framework of the statistical model of Hauser-Feshbach remain highly uncertain due to the poor knowledge of the alpha-nucleus optical model potential, especially at low energies far below the Coulomb barrier. In the present paper we propose a new global alpha-optical potential that takes into account the strong energy dependence and nuclear structure effects that characterize the alpha-nucleus interaction. The real part of the potential is calculated using a double-folding procedure over the M3Y effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. A Woods-Saxon potential is used for the imaginary potential where now a new parameterization is introduced to describe its energy dependence. The influence of purely volume absorption or volume plus surface absorption on the description of the experimental data is investigated. Fin...

  7. Contact angle patterns on low-energy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Robert; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    It is well-known that on a given low-energy solid surface, the contact angles of different organic liquids follow a regular pattern. The experimental evidence for this, and semi-empirical equations describing the pattern, are reviewed. Theoretical and computational efforts to explain the pattern are discussed, and a simplified analytical approach is presented. The main pattern of contact angles is seen to arise from two factors: a common combining rule for liquid-solid molecular interactions, and the reduced density of liquid molecules adjacent to a lower-energy solid surface. Irregular departures from the main pattern are due to chemical effects originating in molecular structure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Five low energy phosphorene allotropes constructed through gene segments recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chaoyu; Zhang, Chunxiao; Tang, Chao; Ouyang, Tao; Li, Jin; Zhong, Jianxin

    2017-04-01

    Based on the crystal structures of the previously proposed low energy η-P and θ-P, five new phosphorene allotropes were predicted through gene segments recombination method. These five new phosphorene allotropes are confirmed dynamically stable and energetically more favorable than their parents (η-P and θ-P). Especially, the XX-XX type G1-P is confirmed energetically more favorable than most of all the previously proposed phosphorene allotropes, including black phosphorene and blue phosphorene, which is highly expected to be synthesized in future experiment through vapor deposition or epitaxial growth method like blue β-P. The calculated results also show that such a new promising phosphorene allotrope G1-P is a potential candidate for application in nano-electronics according to its middle band gap of about 1.491 eV from DFT-HSE06 calculation.

  9. Heavy neutrino threshold effects in low energy phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Leontaris, George K; Ross, Graham G

    1995-01-01

    Right handed neutrinos with mass of {\\cal O} \\; (10^{12}-10^{13}) GeV are required to implement the see-saw mechanism and generate neutrino masses capable of playing a role in structure formation. Moreover models of fermion masses often relate the Yukawa couplings involving these neutrinos to the up-quark Yukawa couplings. Here we study the effects of such couplings on the radiative corrections to quark masses. We find that b-\\tau equality at M_{GUT} may still give the correct m_b/m_{\\tau}-- ratio at low energies, but only if there is large \\mu-\\tau mixing in the charged leptonic sector. We propose specific mass matrix ``textures'' dictated by a U(1) family symmetry whose structure preserves m_b=m_{\\tau} at M_{GUT}. In these schemes, due to the large \

  10. NRV web knowledge base on low-energy nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, A. V.; Denikin, A. S.; Naumenko, M. A.; Alekseev, A. P.; Rachkov, V. A.; Samarin, V. V.; Saiko, V. V.; Zagrebaev, V. I.

    2017-07-01

    The paper describes the principles of organization and operation of the NRV web knowledge base on low-energy nuclear physics (http://nrv.jinr.ru/) which integrates a large amount of digitized experimental data on the properties of nuclei and nuclear reaction cross sections with a wide range of computational programs for modeling of nuclear properties and various processes of nuclear dynamics which work directly in the browser of a remote user. The paper also gives an overview of the current situation in the field of application of network information technologies in nuclear physics. The features of the NRV knowledge base are illustrated in detail on the example of the analysis of nucleon transfer reactions within the distorted wave Born approximation.

  11. Modeling of human movement monitoring using Bluetooth Low Energy technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, G; Zhang, Q; Karunanithi, M

    2015-01-01

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is a wireless communication technology which can be used to monitor human movements. In this monitoring system, a BLE signal scanner scans signal strength of BLE tags carried by people, to thus infer human movement patterns within its monitoring zone. However to the extent of our knowledge one main aspect of this monitoring system which has not yet been thoroughly investigated in literature is how to build a sound theoretical model, based on tunable BLE communication parameters such as scanning time interval and advertising time interval, to enable the study and design of effective and efficient movement monitoring systems. In this paper, we proposed and developed a statistical model based on Monte-Carlo simulation, which can be utilized to assess impacts of BLE technology parameters in terms of latency and efficiency, on a movement monitoring system, and can thus benefit a more efficient system design.

  12. Bluetooth low energy: wireless connectivity for medical monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omre, Alf Helge

    2010-03-01

    Electronic wireless sensors could cut medical costs by enabling physicians to remotely monitor vital signs such as blood pressure, blood glucose, and blood oxygenation while patients remain at home. According to the IDC report "Worldwide Bluetooth Semiconductor 2008-2012 Forecast," published November 2008, a forthcoming radio frequency communication ("wireless connectivity") standard, Bluetooth low energy, will link wireless sensors via radio signals to the 70% of cell phones and computers likely to be fitted with the next generation of Bluetooth wireless technology, leveraging a ready-built infrastructure for data transmission. Analysis of trends indicated by this data can help physicians better manage diseases such as diabetes. The technology also addresses the concerns of cost, compatibility, and interoperability that have previously stalled widespread adoption of wireless technology in medical applications. (c) 2010 Diabetes Technology Society.

  13. Opportunistic Sensor Data Collection with Bluetooth Low Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Sergio; Vidal, Rafael; Gomez, Carles

    2017-01-23

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) has gained very high momentum, as witnessed by its widespread presence in smartphones, wearables and other consumer electronics devices. This fact can be leveraged to carry out opportunistic sensor data collection (OSDC) in scenarios where a sensor node cannot communicate with infrastructure nodes. In such cases, a mobile entity (e.g., a pedestrian or a vehicle) equipped with a BLE-enabled device can collect the data obtained by the sensor node when both are within direct communication range. In this paper, we characterize, both analytically and experimentally, the performance and trade-offs of BLE as a technology for OSDC, for the two main identified approaches, and considering the impact of its most crucial configuration parameters. Results show that a BLE sensor node running on a coin cell battery can achieve a lifetime beyond one year while transferring around 10 Mbit/day, in realistic OSDC scenarios.

  14. Low-energy structure of four-dimensional superstrings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwirner, F.

    1988-05-01

    The N = 1, d = 4 supergravity theories derived as the low-energy limit of four-dimensional superstrings are discussed, focusing on the properties of their effective potentials. Gauge symmetry breaking is possible along several flat directions. A class of superpotential modifications is introduced, which describes supersymmetry breaking with vanishing cosmological constant and Str M{sup 2} = 0 at any minimum of the tree level potential. Under more restrictive assumptions, there are minima with broken supersymmetry at which also Str f(M{sup 2}) = 0 for any function f, so that the whole one-loop cosmological constant vanishes. This result is interpreted in terms of a new discrete boson-fermion symmetry, relating particles whose helicities differ by 3/2, e.g., the graviton and the dilatino.' 21 refs.

  15. Formation of tetradecane nanoemulsion by low-energy emulsification methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalbart, P. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto M5S 3E5 (Canada); Kawaji, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto M5S 3E5 (Canada); Department of Mechanical Engineering, City College of New York, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Fumoto, K. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Hirosaki University, Bunkyo-cho, Hirosaki 036-8561 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    Compared with conventional single-phase heat transfer fluids such as chilled water for air conditioning applications, the apparent specific heat of phase change emulsions in the phase change temperature range is greatly increased, thus offering attractive opportunities for heat transfer enhancement as well as thermal energy transportation and storage. Milky white oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions have been formed in the system water/Tween60 + Span60/tetradecane by using several emulsification routes among the low-energy emulsification methods (e.g., phase inversion temperature method). The best emulsification routes for good stability of the resulting emulsions have been determined. Thermal analyses indicated promising properties of phase change nanoemulsions for thermal storage and transport applications. (author)

  16. Low Energy Reaction cell for advanced space power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, George H.; Rice, Eric

    2001-02-01

    Power units using Low Energy Reactions (LENRs) are under study as a radical new approach to power units that could potentially replace nuclear and chemical power sources for a number of space applications. These cells employ thin metallic films (order of 500 Å, using variously Ni, Pd and Ti) as cathodes with various electrolytes such as 0.5-1 molar lithium sulfate in light water. Power densities exceeding 10 W/cm3 in the thin-films have been achieved. An ultimate goal is to incorporate this thin-film technology into a ``tightly packed'' cell design where the film material occupies ~20% of the total cell volume. If this is achieved, overall power densities of ~20 W/cm3 appear feasible, opening the way to a number of potential applications ranging from distributed power units in spacecraft to advanced propulsion. .

  17. Inflation scenario driven by a low energy physics inflaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, J. G.; Pires, C. A. de S.; Rodrigues, J. G.; Rodrigues da Silva, P. S.

    2017-11-01

    It is a longstanding desire of cosmologists, and particle physicists as well, to connect inflation to low energy physics, culminating, for instance, in what is known as Higgs inflation. The condition for the standard Higgs boson playing the role of the inflaton, and driving sucessfully inflation, is that it couples nonminimally with gravity. Nevertheless, cosmological constraints impose that the nonminimal coupling be large. This causes the loss of perturbative unitarity in a scale of energy far below the Planck one. Our aim in this work is to point out that inflaton potential containing a particular type of trilinear coupling involving the inflaton may circumvent this problem by realizing Higgs inflation with tiny nonminimal coupling of the inflaton with gravity. We then develop the idea within a toy model and implement it in the inverse type-II seesaw mechanism for small neutrinos masses.

  18. Low energy properties of the two-impurity Anderson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lijun; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the low energy properties of the two-impurity Anderson model with the complete-Fock-space numerical renormalization group method. From the calculated spectral function, correlation functions and self-energy, two energy scales are identified, as onsets of the Kondo resonance and the Fermi liquid behaviors. With the tuning of the RKKY interaction, the latter is uniformly suppressed to zero in the particle-hole symmetric case, resembling the Jones-Varma quantum critical point. In cases with the particle-hole asymmetry, an inter-impurity hybridization term is generated, which turns the quantum critical point into a crossover. Similar behaviors are found with either a direct hopping term or a local magnetic field, to lift the parity or spin degeneracies, respectively. Application to the Anderson lattice model is also presented.

  19. [Low-energy laser therapy in medial tibial stress syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, L R; Astvad, K; Madsen, L

    1994-12-05

    The effect of low-energy laser therapy on shin splints was examined in a randomized study with an unblinded design. Constripts from the Jutland Dragoon regiment with shin splints were given either active laser treatment (40 mW in 60 sec per cm tender tibia edge) or placebo laser. All patients were exempted from normal duty concerning activities like running and march. Forty-nine patients participated in the study, 23 in the laser group and 26 in the control group. From the start the study was designed to be double-blind, but by accident the code was broken towards the end of the study. We found no significant differences between the groups regarding pain visual analog score and readiness to return to active duty after 14 days.

  20. Performance Evaluation of Bluetooth Low Energy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Jacopo; Taffoni, Fabrizio; Santacatterina, Marco; Sannino, Roberto; Formica, Domenico

    2017-12-13

    Small, compact and embedded sensors are a pervasive technology in everyday life for a wide number of applications (e.g., wearable devices, domotics, e-health systems, etc.). In this context, wireless transmission plays a key role, and among available solutions, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is gaining more and more popularity. BLE merges together good performance, low-energy consumption and widespread diffusion. The aim of this work is to review the main methodologies adopted to investigate BLE performance. The first part of this review is an in-depth description of the protocol, highlighting the main characteristics and implementation details. The second part reviews the state of the art on BLE characteristics and performance. In particular, we analyze throughput, maximum number of connectable sensors, power consumption, latency and maximum reachable range, with the aim to identify what are the current limits of BLE technology. The main results can be resumed as follows: throughput may theoretically reach the limit of ~230 kbps, but actual applications analyzed in this review show throughputs limited to ~100 kbps; the maximum reachable range is strictly dependent on the radio power, and it goes up to a few tens of meters; the maximum number of nodes in the network depends on connection parameters, on the network architecture and specific device characteristics, but it is usually lower than 10; power consumption and latency are largely modeled and analyzed and are strictly dependent on a huge number of parameters. Most of these characteristics are based on analytical models, but there is a need for rigorous experimental evaluations to understand the actual limits.

  1. Performance Evaluation of Bluetooth Low Energy: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo Tosi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Small, compact and embedded sensors are a pervasive technology in everyday life for a wide number of applications (e.g., wearable devices, domotics, e-health systems, etc.. In this context, wireless transmission plays a key role, and among available solutions, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE is gaining more and more popularity. BLE merges together good performance, low-energy consumption and widespread diffusion. The aim of this work is to review the main methodologies adopted to investigate BLE performance. The first part of this review is an in-depth description of the protocol, highlighting the main characteristics and implementation details. The second part reviews the state of the art on BLE characteristics and performance. In particular, we analyze throughput, maximum number of connectable sensors, power consumption, latency and maximum reachable range, with the aim to identify what are the current limits of BLE technology. The main results can be resumed as follows: throughput may theoretically reach the limit of ~230 kbps, but actual applications analyzed in this review show throughputs limited to ~100 kbps; the maximum reachable range is strictly dependent on the radio power, and it goes up to a few tens of meters; the maximum number of nodes in the network depends on connection parameters, on the network architecture and specific device characteristics, but it is usually lower than 10; power consumption and latency are largely modeled and analyzed and are strictly dependent on a huge number of parameters. Most of these characteristics are based on analytical models, but there is a need for rigorous experimental evaluations to understand the actual limits.

  2. Photon energy-fluence correction factor in low energy brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, Paula C.G.; Yoriyaz, Hélio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vijande, Javier; Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: pacrisguian@gmail.com [Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics and Instituto de Física Corpuscular (UV-CSIC), University of Valencia (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    The AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry formalism has become a standard for brachytherapy dosimetry worldwide; it implicitly assumes that charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) exists for the determination of absorbed dose to water at different locations. At the time of relating dose to tissue and dose to water, or vice versa, it is usually assumed that the photon fluence in water and in tissues are practically identical, so that the absorbed dose in the two media can be related by their ratio of mass energy-absorption coefficients. The purpose of this work is to study the influence of photon energy-fluence in different media and to evaluate a proposal for energy-fluence correction factors for the conversion between dose-to-tissue (D{sub tis}) and dose-to-water (D{sub w}). State-of-the art Monte Carlo (MC) calculations are used to score photon fluence differential in energy in water and in various human tissues (muscle, adipose and bone) in two different codes, MCNP and PENELOPE, which in all cases include a realistic modeling of the {sup 125}I low-energy brachytherapy seed in order to benchmark the formalism proposed. A correction is introduced that is based on the ratio of the water-to-tissue photon energy-fluences using the large-cavity theory. In this work, an efficient way to correlate absorbed dose to water and absorbed dose to tissue in brachytherapy calculations at clinically relevant distances for low-energy photon emitting seed is proposed. The energy-fluence based corrections given in this work are able to correlate absorbed dose to tissue and absorbed dose to water with an accuracy better than 0.5% in the most critical cases. (author)

  3. Effects of performance measure implementation on clinical manager and provider motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damschroder, Laura J; Robinson, Claire H; Francis, Joseph; Bentley, Douglas R; Krein, Sarah L; Rosland, Ann-Marie; Hofer, Timothy P; Kerr, Eve A

    2014-12-01

    Clinical performance measurement has been a key element of efforts to transform the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). However, there are a number of signs that current performance measurement systems used within and outside the VHA may be reaching the point of maximum benefit to care and in some settings, may be resulting in negative consequences to care, including overtreatment and diminished attention to patient needs and preferences. Our research group has been involved in a long-standing partnership with the office responsible for clinical performance measurement in the VHA to understand and develop potential strategies to mitigate the unintended consequences of measurement. Our aim was to understand how the implementation of diabetes performance measures (PMs) influences management actions and day-to-day clinical practice. This is a mixed methods study design based on quantitative administrative data to select study facilities and quantitative data from semi-structured interviews. Sixty-two network-level and facility-level executives, managers, front-line providers and staff participated in the study. Qualitative content analyses were guided by a team-based consensus approach using verbatim interview transcripts. A published interpretive motivation theory framework is used to describe potential contributions of local implementation strategies to unintended consequences of PMs. Implementation strategies used by management affect providers' response to PMs, which in turn potentially undermines provision of high-quality patient-centered care. These include: 1) feedback reports to providers that are dissociated from a realistic capability to address performance gaps; 2) evaluative criteria set by managers that are at odds with patient-centered care; and 3) pressure created by managers' narrow focus on gaps in PMs that is viewed as more punitive than motivating. Next steps include working with VHA leaders to develop and test implementation approaches to help

  4. Biosignatures in the Context of Low Energy Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, T. M.

    2017-01-01

    . Life detection strategies that directly target extant organisms should therefore be prepared to encounter average biomass densities that may be many orders of magnitude smaller than those found in most of Earth's surface environments (2) Life expends energy to synthesize new biomass. An end-member case in which new biomass is created at the energy-limited rate and the corresponding cells are immediately destroyed (so that the energy partitioned to cell maintenance is minimized) establishes an upper bound on the rate at which biological material can enter a bulk global pool. For a specified bulk concentration [i] of any particular biological compound, i, or for biologically produced matter overall, this synthesis rate, R (sub i), defines a characteristic time scale tau (sub i) equals [i] divided by R (sub i). tau (sub i) can be thought of as (a) the minimum time required for biosynthesis to yield a specific bulk concentration (e.g., a detection threshold) of i, and (b) the average residence time of i within a bulk pool when [i] is held in steady state through a balance between biosynthesis and attrition by physical, chemical, or biological consumption. tau (sub i) becomes an important quantity in considering the potential utility of enantiomeric excess (as a product of homochiral biosynthesis) as a biosignature. Spontaneous racemization of amino acids acts to "erase" the signature of homochiral synthesis over time scales that may range from hundreds to hundreds of thousands of years, depending on temperature. For environments in which low energy flux translates to low rates of biosynthesis, including the synthesis of homochiral amino acids, amino acid residence times in pools having detectable concentrations may compare to or significantly exceed the time scale for racemization. This and similar consequences of long residence times should be considered in the formulation of life detection strategies based on detection of biologically-produced species. Fluxes of

  5. Methodology for calibration of ionization chambers for X-ray of low energy in absorbed dose to water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, C.T.; Vivolo, V.; Potiens, M.P.A., E-mail: camila_fmedica@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The beams of low energy X-ray (10 to 150 kV) are used in several places in the world to treat a wide variety of surface disorders, and between these malignancies. As in Brazil, at this moment, there is no calibration laboratory providing the control service or calibration of parallel plate ionization chambers, the aim of this project was to establish a methodology for calibration of this kind of ionization chambers at low energy X-ray beams in terms of absorbed dose to water using simulators in the LCI. (author)

  6. Process measures or patient reported experience measures (PREMs) for comparing performance across providers? A study of measures related to access and continuity in Swedish primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenngård, Anna H; Anell, Anders

    2017-09-15

    Aim To study (a) the covariation between patient reported experience measures (PREMs) and registered process measures of access and continuity when ranking providers in a primary care setting, and (b) whether registered process measures or PREMs provided more or less information about potential linkages between levels of access and continuity and explaining variables. Access and continuity are important objectives in primary care. They can be measured through registered process measures or PREMs. These measures do not necessarily converge in terms of outcomes. Patient views are affected by factors not necessarily reflecting quality of services. Results from surveys are often uncertain due to low response rates, particularly in vulnerable groups. The quality of process measures, on the other hand, may be influenced by registration practices and are often more easy to manipulate. With increased transparency and use of quality measures for management and governance purposes, knowledge about the pros and cons of using different measures to assess the performance across providers are important. Four regression models were developed with registered process measures and PREMs of access and continuity as dependent variables. Independent variables were characteristics of providers as well as geographical location and degree of competition facing providers. Data were taken from two large Swedish county councils. Findings Although ranking of providers is sensitive to the measure used, the results suggest that providers performing well with respect to one measure also tended to perform well with respect to the other. As process measures are easier and quicker to collect they may be looked upon as the preferred option. PREMs were better than process measures when exploring factors that contributed to variation in performance across providers in our study; however, if the purpose of comparison is continuous learning and development of services, a combination of PREMs and

  7. Temporal profile monitor based on electro-optic spatial decoding for low-energy bunches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of electron bunch temporal profile is one of the key diagnostics in accelerators, especially for ultrashort bunches. The electro-optic (EO technique enables the precise longitudinal characterization of bunch electric field in a single-shot and nondestructive way, which can simultaneously obtain and analyze the time jitter between the electron bunch and the synchronized laser. An EO monitor based on spatial decoding for temporal profile measurement and timing jitter recoding has recently been demonstrated and analyzed in depth for low-energy bunches at the Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray source. A detailed description of the experimental setup and measurement results are presented in this paper. An EO signal as short as 82 fs (rms is observed with 100  μm gallium phosphide for a 40 MeV electron bunch, and the corresponding length is 106 fs (rms with 300  μm zinc telluride. Owing to the field-opening angle, we propose a method to eliminate the influence of energy factor for bunches with low energy, resulting in a bunch length of ∼60  fs (rms. The monitor is also successfully applied to measure time jitter with approximately 10 fs accuracy. The experiment environment is proved to be the main source of the slow drift, which is removed using feedback control. Consequently, the rms time jitter decreases from 430 fs to 320 fs.

  8. Impact of low-energy photons on the characteristics of prompt fission γ -ray spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberstedt, A.; Billnert, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we report on a new study of prompt γ -rays from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf . Photons were measured in coincidence with fission fragments by employing four different lanthanide halide scintillation detectors. Together with results from a previous work of ours, we determined characteristic parameters with high precision, such as the average γ -ray multiplicity ν¯γ=(8.29 ±0.13 ), the average energy per photon ɛγ=(0.80 ±0.02 ) MeV, and the total γ -ray energy release per fission Eγ ,tot=(6.65 ±0.10 ) MeV. The excellent agreement between the individual results obtained in all six measurements proves the good repeatability of the applied experimental technique. The impact of low-energy photons, i.e., below 500 keV, on prompt fission γ -ray spectra characteristics has been investigated as well by comparing our results with those taken with the DANCE detector system, which appears to suffer from absorption effects in the low-energy region. Correction factors for this effect were estimated, giving results comparable to ours as well as to historical ones. From this we demonstrate that the different techniques of determining the average γ -ray multiplicity, either from a properly measured and normalized spectrum or a measured multiplicity distribution, give equivalent and consistent results.

  9. Subthreshold test pulses versus low energy shock delivery to estimate high energy lead impedance in implanted cardioverter defibrillator patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmann, Dirk; Luethje, Lars; Zenker, Dieter; Domhof, Sebastian; Unterberg, Christina

    2003-01-01

    The high energy lead impedance is valuable for detecting lead failure in ICDs, but until recently shock delivery was necessary for high energy impedance measurement. This study compared the use of subthreshold test pulses and low energy test shocks to estimate the high energy impedance. Immediately after implantation of Ventak Prizm ICDs in 29 patients, the lead impedance was measured with five subthreshold (0.4 microJ) test pulses, 5 low energy (1.1 J) shocks, and two to three high energy (16 +/- 4.5 J) shocks. The mean impedances measured using high energy shocks, low energy shocks, and subthreshold pulses were 42.0 +/- 7.3 omega, 46.5 +/- 8.1 omega, and 42.4 +/- 7.1 omega, respectively. The impedances measured using high and low energy shocks differed significantly (P delivery. Safe and painless high energy impedance estimation with subthreshold pulses might, therefore, help to detect ICD lead failure during routine follow-up.

  10. Does the detection of primordial gravitational waves exclude low energy inflation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Namba, Ryo; Tada, Yuichiro

    2018-03-01

    We show that a detectable tensor-to-scalar ratio (r ≥10-3) on the CMB scale can be generated even during extremely low energy inflation which saturates the BBN bound ρinf ≈(30MeV) 4. The source of the gravitational waves is not quantum fluctuations of graviton but those of SU (2) gauge fields, energetically supported by coupled axion fields. The curvature perturbation, the backreaction effect and the validity of perturbative treatment are carefully checked. Our result indicates that measuring r alone does not immediately fix the inflationary energy scale.

  11. Does the detection of primordial gravitational waves exclude low energy inflation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Fujita

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that a detectable tensor-to-scalar ratio (r≥10−3 on the CMB scale can be generated even during extremely low energy inflation which saturates the BBN bound ρinf≈(30MeV4. The source of the gravitational waves is not quantum fluctuations of graviton but those of SU(2 gauge fields, energetically supported by coupled axion fields. The curvature perturbation, the backreaction effect and the validity of perturbative treatment are carefully checked. Our result indicates that measuring r alone does not immediately fix the inflationary energy scale.

  12. Radiographic absorptiometry for pre-screening of osteoporosis in patients with low energy fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Inge; Oturai, Peter Sandor; Jensen, Lars T

    2010-01-01

    department of a major Danish county hospital. In a 5-month period, 136 adult patients with LEF were invited for BMD measurements. In 74 (54%) patients DEXA-scans (spine and femoral neck) and phalangeal RA-scans were performed. A total of 86% of the patients were female and 39% were suffering from......Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) is the most accurate method and thus the method of choice for diagnosing osteoporosis. Due to the limited access to DEXA-scanners, screening of patients with low energy fractures (LEF) for osteoporosis is not routinely performed in Denmark. Pre...

  13. High resolution probe of coherence in low-energy charge exchange collisions with oriented targets

    CERN Document Server

    Leredde, A; Cassimi, A; Hennecart, D; Pons, B

    2013-01-01

    The trapping lasers of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) are used to bring Rb atoms into well defined oriented states. Coupled to recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy (RIMS), this yields a unique MOTRIMS setup which is able to probe scattering dynamics, including their coherence features, with unprecedented resolution. This technique is applied to the low-energy charge exchange processes Na$^+$+Rb($5p_{\\pm 1}$) $\\rightarrow$ Na($3p,4s$)+Rb$^+$. The measurements reveal detailed features of the collisional interaction which are employed to improve the theoretical description. All of this enables to gauge the reliability of intuitive pictures predicting the most likely capture transitions.

  14. Survey of nuclei for low-energy nuclear excitation in laser-produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granja, C. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: carlos.granja@utef.cvut.cz; Kuba, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Haiduk, A. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Renner, O. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2007-03-01

    We present a survey of stable and long-lived nuclei as well as nuclear isomers looking for candidates of studies of low-energy (1-30 keV) nuclear excitation by laser-produced plasma radiation. We concentrate on medium-size high-power lasers with pulse duration of hundreds of ps providing energy up to 1000 J and subrelativistic intensity of 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} Wcm{sup -2}. Screening criteria are primarily the transition energy and the half-life, spin and parity of nuclear levels. Ta181 is suggested as first candidate for which an estimation of reaction efficiency is included.

  15. Overview of Alternative Bunching and Current-shaping Techniques for Low-Energy Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piot, Philippe [Northern Illinois U.

    2015-12-01

    Techniques to bunch or shape an electron beam at low energies (E <15 MeV) have important implications toward the realization of table-top radiation sources [1] or to the design of compact multi-user free-electron lasers[2]. This paper provides an overview of alternative methods recently developed including techniques such as wakefield-based bunching, space-charge-driven microbunching via wave-breaking [3], ab-initio shaping of the electron-emission process [4], and phase space exchangers. Practical applications of some of these methods to foreseen free-electron-laser configurations are also briefly discussed [5].

  16. Potential luminosity improvement for low-energy RHIC operation with electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotov,A.

    2009-06-08

    There is a strong interest in heavy-ion RHIC collisions in the energy range below the present RHIC injection energy, which is termed 'low-energy' operation. These collisions will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about the existence and location of a critical point on the QCD phase diagram. However, luminosity projections are relatively low for the lowest energy points of interest. Luminosity improvement can be provided with RHIC electron cooling at low beam energies. This report summarizes the expected luminosity improvements with electron cooling and various limitations.

  17. Low-Energy Building Design Guidelines: Energy-Efficient Design for New Federal Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachman, W.; Carlisle, N.

    2001-07-19

    This guidebook has been prepared primarily for Federal energy managers to provide practical information for applying the principles of low-energy, whole-building design in new Federal buildings. An important objective of this guidebook is to teach energy managers how to be advocates for renewable energy and energy-efficient technologies, and how to apply specific strategies during each phase of a given project's time line. These key action items are broken out by phase and appear in abbreviated form in this guidebook.

  18. Case study of the Brownell low energy requirement house

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R F; Krajewski, R F; Dennehy, G

    1979-05-01

    An evaluation is made of the design and thermal performance of an innovative house built in 1977 in the Adirondacks area of New York State. The house has a very tight and well-insulated envelope, with the rigid insulation board applied to the outside of the frame. Passive solar gain through south-facing glass, along with internal free sources of heat, are shown to provide a substantial part of the building's heating requirements. Effective integral thermal storage, provided by the exposed interior structure, serves to keep interior temperature excursions within acceptable limits. Additional remote storage is provided in the form of a large thermal storage sand bed, with air ducts, located below the basement floor. Calculations and measured performance data show that the house's space heating needs are only about 40% of those of a similar size house built to HUD minimum property standards, and less than 25% of those of a typical inventory house in the Northeast United States.

  19. New experimental study of low-energy (p,gamma) resonances in magnesium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Limata, B; Formicola, A; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Becker, H W; Bemmerer, D; Best, A; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Caciolli, A; Corvisiero, P; Costantini, H; DiLeva, A; Elekes, Z; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, Gy; Lemut, A; Marta, M; Mazzocchi, C; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Salvo, C; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H -P

    2010-01-01

    Proton captures on Mg isotopes play an important role in the Mg-Al cycle active in stellar H shell burning. In particular, the strengths of low-energy resonances with E < 200 keV in 25Mg(p,gamma)26Al determine the production of 26Al and a precise knowledge of these nuclear data is highly desirable. Absolute measurements at such low-energies are often very difficult and hampered by gamma-ray background as well as changing target stoichiometry during the measurements. The latter problem can be partly avoided using higher energy resonances of the same reaction as a normalization reference. Hence the parameters of suitable resonances have to be studied with adequate precision. In the present work we report on new measurements of the resonance strengths omega_gamma of the E = 214, 304, and 326 keV resonances in the reactions 24Mg(p,gamma)25Al, 25Mg(p,gamma)26Al, and 26Mg(p,gamma)27Al, respectively. These studies were performed at the LUNA facility in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory using multiple experime...

  20. Mi Piacce – how to measure the pleasures provided by shoe design to physical disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Rachel Roncoletta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is presenting Mi Piacce Methodology, which can be applied by shoe wearers to measure the pleasures provided by shoe design for women with lower limb dysmetria. Qualitative methodology was applied with mix techniques, such as comparative analysis of secondary sources, semi-structured interviews with five health professionals, and a phenomenological methodology with nine wearers. After this, it was develop Mi Piacce Methodology, and it was applied in forty-two wearers’ shoes design; eight are presenting in this paper. It can be concluded that the inconsistency in the degree of pleasures provided by the same style of shoes underlines the importance of conducting a holistic analysis to detect the strong and weak points of each shoe design for the wearer.

  1. Measuring the quality of provided services for patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Heidari Jamebozorgi, Majid; Salesi, Mahmood; Ravangard, Ramin

    2014-09-01

    The healthcare organizations need to develop and implement quality improvement plans for their survival and success. Measuring quality in the healthcare competitive environment is an undeniable necessity for these organizations and will lead to improved patient satisfaction. This study aimed to measure the quality of provided services for patients with chronic kidney disease in Kerman in 2014. This cross-sectional, descriptive-analytic study was performed from 23 January 2014 to 14 February 2014 in four hemodialysis centers in Kerman. All of the patients on chronic hemodialysis (n = 195) who were referred to these four centers were selected and studied using census method. The required data were collected using the SERVQUAL questionnaire, consisting of two parts: questions related to the patients' demographic characteristics, and 28 items to measure the patients' expectations and perceptions of the five dimensions of service quality, including tangibility, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 21.0 through some statistical tests, including independent-samples t test, one-way ANOVA, and paired-samples t test. The results showed that the means of patients' expectations were more than their perceptions of the quality of provided services in all dimensions, which indicated that there were gaps in all dimensions. The highest and lowest means of negative gaps were related to empathy (-0.52 ± 0.48) and tangibility (-0.29 ± 0.51). In addition, among the studied patients' demographic characteristics and the five dimensions of service quality, only the difference between the patients' income levels and the gap in assurance were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Overall, the results of the present study showed that the expectations of patients on hemodialysis were more than their perceptions of provided services. The healthcare providers and employees should pay more attention to the patients' opinions and

  2. Silkworm eggs: An ideal model for studying the biological effects of low energy Ar{sup +} ion interaction in animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling Lin; Liu Xuelan [School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230031 (China); Xu Jiaping, E-mail: jiapingxu@163.com [School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230031 (China); You Zhengying; Zhou Jingbo [School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Low energy Ar{sup +} ion beam interactions with silkworm eggs. {yields} Ion beam bombardment as a novel method for gene transfer in silkworm. {yields} Provide evidence for studying the mechanisms of ion beam interaction in animals. - Abstract: The object of the current work was to study low energy Ar{sup +} ion beam interactions with silkworm eggs and thus provide further understanding of the mechanisms involved in ion bombardment-induced direct gene transfer into silkworm eggs. In this paper, using low-energy Ar{sup +} ion beam bombardment combined with piggyBac transposon, we developed a novel method to induce gene transfer in silkworm. Using bombardment conditions optimized for egg-incubation (25 keV with ion fluences of 800 x 2.6 x 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} in dry state under vacuum), vector pBac{l_brace}3 x P3-EGFPaf{r_brace} and helper plasmid pHA3pig were successfully transferred into the silkworm eggs. Our results obtained from by PCR assay and genomic Southern blotting analysis of the G1 generations provide evidence that low-energy ion beam can generate some craters that play a role in acting as pathways of exogenous DNA molecules into silkworm eggs.

  3. Charge collection efficiency of GaAs detectors studied with low-energy heavy charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, R; Linhart, V; O'Shea, V; Pospísil, S; Raine, C; Smith, K; Sinor, M; Wilhelm, I

    1999-01-01

    Epitaxially grown GaAs layers have recently been produced with sufficient thickness and low enough free carrier concentration to permit their use as radiation detectors. Initial tests have shown that the epi-material behaves as a classical semiconductor as the depletion behaviour follows the square root dependency on the applied bias. This article presents the results of measurements of the growth of the active depletion depth with increasing bias using low-energy protons and alpha particles as probes for various depths and their comparison to values extrapolated from capacitance measurements. From the proton and alpha particle spectroscopic measurements, an active depth of detector material that collects 100% of the charge generated inside it was determined. The consistency of these results with independent capacitance measurements supports the idea that the GaAs epi-material behaves as a classical semiconductor. (author)

  4. Review of lattice results concerning low energy particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Juttner, Andreas; Lellouch, Laurent; Leutwyler, Heinrich; Lubicz, Vittorio; Necco, Silvia; Sachrajda, Christopher T; Simula, Silvano; Vladikas, Anastassios; Wenger, Urs; Wittig, Hartmut

    2011-01-01

    We review lattice results relevant for pion and kaon physics with the aim of making them easily accessible to the particle physics community. Specifically, we review the determination of the light-quark masses, the form factor f_+(0), relevant for the semileptonic K -> pi transition at zero momentum transfer as well as the ratio f_K/f_pi of decay constants and discuss the consequences for the elements V_{us} and V_{ud} of the CKM matrix. Furthermore, we describe the results obtained on the lattice for some of the low-energy constants of SU(2)_LxSU(2)_R and SU(3)_LxSU(3)_R Chiral Perturbation Theory and review the determination of the B_K parameter of neutral kaon mixing. We introduce quality criteria and use these when forming averages. Although subjective and imperfect, these criteria may help the reader to judge different aspects of current lattice computations. Our main results are summarized in section 1.2, but we stress the importance of the detailed discussion that underlies these results and constitute...

  5. Analysis of Latency Performance of Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keuchul Cho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE is a short-range wireless communication technology aiming at low-cost and low-power communication. The performance evaluation of classical Bluetooth device discovery have been intensively studied using analytical modeling and simulative methods, but these techniques are not applicable to BLE, since BLE has a fundamental change in the design of the discovery mechanism, including the usage of three advertising channels. Recently, there several works have analyzed the topic of BLE device discovery, but these studies are still far from thorough. It is thus necessary to develop a new, accurate model for the BLE discovery process. In particular, the wide range settings of the parameters introduce lots of potential for BLE devices to customize their discovery performance. This motivates our study of modeling the BLE discovery process and performing intensive simulation. This paper is focused on building an analytical model to investigate the discovery probability, as well as the expected discovery latency, which are then validated via extensive experiments. Our analysis considers both continuous and discontinuous scanning modes. We analyze the sensitivity of these performance metrics to parameter settings to quantitatively examine to what extent parameters influence the performance metric of the discovery processes.

  6. Wettability Modification of Nanomaterials by Low-Energy Electron Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torchinsky I

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Controllable modification of surface free energy and related properties (wettability, hygroscopicity, agglomeration, etc. of powders allows both understanding of fine physical mechanism acting on nanoparticle surfaces and improvement of their key characteristics in a number of nanotechnology applications. In this work, we report on the method we developed for electron-induced surface energy and modification of basic, related properties of powders of quite different physical origins such as diamond and ZnO. The applied technique has afforded gradual tuning of the surface free energy, resulting in a wide range of wettability modulation. In ZnO nanomaterial, the wettability has been strongly modified, while for the diamond particles identical electron treatment leads to a weak variation of the same property. Detailed investigation into electron-modified wettability properties has been performed by the use of capillary rise method using a few probing liquids. Basic thermodynamic approaches have been applied to calculations of components of solid–liquid interaction energy. We show that defect-free, low-energy electron treatment technique strongly varies elementary interface interactions and may be used for the development of new technology in the field of nanomaterials.

  7. A cooler for intense low-energy ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Varentsov, V L

    2002-01-01

    A new efficient cooling technique for intense low-energy ion beams is explored. The primary ions are directly injected through a converging-diverging nozzle into a cold expanding supersonic He carrier gas jet. There they adopt the temperature and overall velocity of the gas jet, creating an e sup - He sup + plasma in the slowing down process. In the RF-funnel that is placed on axis in the immediate vicinity of the nozzle exit plane the He sup + ions and electrons penetrate into the funnel walls and the He sup + ions have neutralized, while the desired more heavy ions are confined and focused inside the funnel. After reducing the plasma to a small level in the funnel the ion beam is further purified and compressed passing through a RFQ channel. Finally, the cooled low-emittance ion beam is extracted into high vacuum conditions through the skimmer placed behind the RFQ channel. The operation of the new ion beam cooling technique has been studied by means of numerical simulations. The results of calculations are...

  8. DISCO: a low-energy multipurpose beamline at synchrotron SOLEIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Alexandre; Jamme, Frédéric; Rouam, Valérie; Wien, Frank; Giorgetta, Jean-Luc; Lagarde, Bruno; Chubar, Oleg; Bac, Stéphane; Yao, Isabelle; Rey, Solène; Herbeaux, Christian; Marlats, Jean-Louis; Zerbib, Daniel; Polack, François; Réfrégiers, Matthieu

    2009-11-01

    DISCO, a novel low-energy beamline covering the spectrum range from the VUV to the visible, has received its first photons at the French synchrotron SOLEIL. In this article the DISCO design and concept of three experimental stations serving research communities in biology and chemistry are described. Emphasis has been put on high flux generation and preservation of polarization at variable energy resolutions. The three experiments include a completely new approach for microscopy and atmospheric pressure experiments as well as a ;classical' synchrotron radiation circular dichroism station. Preliminary tests of the optical design and technical concept have been made. Theoretical predictions of the beam have been compared with the first images produced by the first photons originating from the large-aperture bending-magnet source. Results are also reported concerning the cold finger used to absorb hard X-ray radiation in the central part of the synchrotron beam and to avoid heavy thermal load on the following optics. Wavelength selection using monochromators with different gratings for each experimental set-up as well as beam propagation and conditioning throughout the optical system are detailed. First photons comply very well with the theoretical calculations.

  9. Low energy consumption vortex wave flow membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Dong, Weilong; Hu, Xiaohong; Sun, Tianyu; Wang, Tao; Sun, Youshan

    2017-11-01

    In order to reduce the energy consumption and membrane fouling of the conventional membrane bioreactor (MBR), a kind of low energy consumption vortex wave flow MBR was exploited based on the combination of biofilm process and membrane filtration process, as well as the vortex wave flow technique. The experimental results showed that the vortex wave flow state in the membrane module could be formed when the Reynolds number (Re) of liquid was adjusted between 450 and 1,050, and the membrane flux declined more slowly in the vortex wave flow state than those in the laminar flow state and turbulent flow state. The MBR system was used to treat domestic wastewater under the condition of vortex wave flow state for 30 days. The results showed that the removal efficiency for CODcr and NH3-N was 82% and 98% respectively, and the permeate quality met the requirement of 'Water quality standard for urban miscellaneous water consumption (GB/T 18920-2002)'. Analysis of the energy consumption of the MBR showed that the average energy consumption was 1.90 ± 0.55 kWh/m3 (permeate), which was only two thirds of conventional MBR energy consumption.

  10. ELISA - an electrostatic storage ring for low-energy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape Moeller, Soeren

    1997-05-01

    The design of a new type of storage ring for low-energy ions using electrostatic deflection and focusing devices is described. Electrostatic bends and quadrupoles are used since they are more efficient than magnetic ones for low-velocity heavy ions. Furthermore, electrostatic devices are more compact and easier to construct than magnetic devices. In comparison to an electromagnetic trap, one important advantage of the elecrostatic ring is the easy access to the circulating beam and its decay products. These and other features, e.g. no magnetic fields, makes such storage devices attractive for many atomic-physics experiments. Also neigboring fields as chemistry and biology might benefit from such an relatively inexpensive device. One important difference between an electrostatic and a magnetic ring is, that the longitudinal energy is not conserved for the electrostatic ring. The actual ring will have a race-track shape as defined by two straight sections each with two quadrupole doublets connected by 180-degrees bends. The bends will consist of 160-degrees spherical deflection plates surrounded by two parallel plate 10-degrees bends. The storage ring ELISA, currently being built, will have a circumference of 6 meters. The first beam tests will take place during summer 1996.

  11. The low-energy frontier of particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeckel, Joerg [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Most embeddings of the Standard Model into a more unified theory, in particular the ones based on supergravity or superstrings, predict the existence of a hidden sector of particles which have only very weak interactions with the visible sector Standard Model particles. Some of these exotic particle candidates (such as e.g. ''axions'', ''axion-like particles'' and ''hidden U(1) gauge bosons'') may be very light, with masses in the sub-eV range, and have very weak interactions with photons. Correspondingly, these very weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs) may lead to observable effects in experiments (as well as in astrophysical and cosmological observations) searching for light shining through a wall, for changes in laser polarisation, for non-linear processes in large electromagnetic fields and for deviations from Coulomb's law. We present the physics case and a status report of this emerging low-energy frontier of fundamental physics. (orig.)

  12. Collisions of low-energy electrons with cyclohexane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Bettega, Márcio H F

    2014-12-28

    We report calculated cross sections for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by cyclohexane (c-C6H12). We employed the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with norm-conserving pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations, for impact energies up to 30 eV. We compare our calculated integral cross section with experimental total cross sections available in the literature. We also compare our calculated differential cross sections (DCSs) with experimental results for benzene and experimental and theoretical results for 1,4-dioxane, in order to investigate the similarities between those molecules under electron collisions. Although benzene is a cyclic six-carbon molecule, as cyclohexane, we found that the differential cross sections of the latter are more similar to those of 1,4-dioxane than those of benzene. These similarities suggest that the geometry may play an important role in the behavior of the DCSs of these molecules. Our integral cross section displays a broad structure at around 8.5 eV, in agreement with the total cross section experimental data of 8 eV and vibrational excitation data of 7.5 eV. The present integral cross section also shows the presence of a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum at around 0.12 eV. In general, our integral cross section shows a qualitative agreement with the experimental total cross section.

  13. Low Energy Ion Implanting of Silver Ion in Titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Elisa Demore Palandi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In modern medicine, biomaterials have been widely used as implants. Among biomaterials, titanium medical class is distinguished by its high degree of biocompatibility. However, orthoses and prostheses infected with post-implanted microorganisms require surgeries and medical interventions that are costly and treatment can take months. To combat infections associated with implants, the best strategy is to prevent them from occurring. One strategy is the silver ion implantation in titanium. In this work, silver ions were implanted at low energies (4 keV in medical titanium with the goal to take bactericide titanium surface and therefore, inhibit biofilm formation. The implantation was done using the Ion Plating equipment. After ion implantation, the samples were analyzing for Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry, Glow-Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction. The results show that the silver was implanted at depths up to 10 nm, corroborating simulation data. In addition, the strategy used in this work can be applied on an industrial scale due to the type of equipment used for the surface treatment.

  14. Review of lattice results concerning low-energy particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, S. [Kyoto University, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto (Japan); Aoki, Y. [Nagoya University, Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe (KMI), Nagoya (Japan); Brookhaven National Laboratory, RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY (United States); Bernard, C. [Washington University, Department of Physics, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Blum, T. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY (United States); University of Connecticut, Physics Department, Storrs, CT (United States); Colangelo, G.; Leutwyler, H.; Necco, S.; Wenger, U. [Institut fuer theoretische Physik, Universitaet Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Bern (Switzerland); Della Morte, M. [University of Southern Denmark, CP3-Origins and Danish IAS, Odense M (Denmark); IFIC (CSIC), Paterna (Spain); Duerr, S. [Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Juelich Supercomputing Center, Juelich (Germany); El-Khadra, A.X. [University of Illinois, Department of Physics, Urbana, IL (United States); Fukaya, H.; Onogi, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics, Osaka (Japan); Horsley, R. [University of Edinburgh, School of Physics, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Juettner, A.; Sachrajda, C.T. [University of Southampton, School of Physics and Astronomy, Southampton (United Kingdom); Kaneko, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Ibaraki (Japan); Laiho, J. [University of Glasgow, SUPA, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Syracuse University, Department of Physics, Syracuse, New York (United States); Lellouch, L. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, CPT, UMR 7332, Marseille (France); Universite de Toulon, CNRS, CPT, UMR 7332, La Garde (France); Lubicz, V. [Universita Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Rome (Italy); Sezione di Roma Tre, INFN, Rome (Italy); Lunghi, E. [Indiana University, Physics Department, Bloomington, IN (United States); Pena, C. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC and Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain); Sharpe, S.R. [University of Washington, Physics Department, Seattle, WA (United States); Simula, S. [Sezione di Roma Tre, INFN, Rome (Italy); Sommer, R. [NIC rate at DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Water, R.S.V. de [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Vladikas, A. [Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, INFN, Sezione di Tor Vergata, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); Wittig, H. [University of Mainz, PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Helmholtz Institute Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: FLAG Working Group

    2014-09-15

    We review lattice results related to pion, kaon, D- and B-meson physics with the aim of making them easily accessible to the particle-physics community. More specifically, we report on the determination of the lightquark masses, the form factor f{sub +}(0), arising in semileptonic K → π transition at zero momentum transfer, as well as the decay-constant ratio f{sub K}/f{sub π} of decay constants and its consequences for the CKM matrix elements V{sub us} and V{sub ud}. Furthermore, we describe the results obtained on the lattice for some of the low-energy constants of SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} andSU(3)L{sub L} x SU(3){sub R} Chiral Perturbation Theory and review the determination of the BK parameter of neutral kaon mixing. The inclusion of heavy-quark quantities significantly expands the FLAG scope with respect to the previous review. Therefore, we focus here on D- and B-meson decay constants, form factors, and mixing parameters, since these are most relevant for the determination of CKM matrix elements and the global CKM unitarity-triangle fit. In addition we review the status of lattice determinations of the strong coupling constant α{sub s}. (orig.)

  15. Sgoldstino-less inflation and low energy SUSY breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argurio, Riccardo; Coone, Dries; Heurtier, Lucien; Mariotti, Alberto

    2017-07-01

    We assess the range of validity of sgoldstino-less inflation in a scenario of low energy supersymmetry breaking. We first analyze the consistency conditions that an effective theory of the inflaton and goldstino superfields should satisfy in order to be faithfully described by a sgoldstino-less model. Enlarging the scope of previous studies, we investigate the case where the effective field theory cut-off, and hence also the sgoldstino mass, are inflaton-dependent. We then introduce a UV complete model where one can realize successfully sgoldstino-less inflation and gauge mediation of supersymmetry breaking, combining the α-attractor mechanism and a weakly coupled model of spontaneous breaking of supersymmetry. In this class of models we find that, given current limits on superpartner masses, the gravitino mass has a lower bound of the order of the MeV, i.e. we cannot reach very low supersymmetry breaking scales. On the plus side, we recognize that in this framework, one can derive the complete superpartner spectrum as well as compute inflation observables, the reheating temperature, and address the gravitino overabundance problem. We then show that further constraints come from collider results and inflation observables. Their non trivial interplay seems a staple feature of phenomenological studies of supersymmetric inflationary models.

  16. Dynamics of anion-molecule reactions at low energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikosch, J.

    2007-11-15

    Anion-molecule reactions must find their way through deeply bound entrance and exit channel complexes separated by a central barrier. This results in low reaction rates and rich dynamics since direct pathways compete with the formation of transient intermediates. In this thesis we examine the probability of proton transfer to a small anion and transient lifetimes of a thermoneutral bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (S{sub N}2) reaction at well defined variable temperature down to 8 Kelvin in a multipole trap. The observed strong inverse temperature dependence is attributed to the deficit of available quantum states in the entrance channel at decreasing temperature. Furthermore we investigate scattering dynamics of S{sub N}2 reactions at defined relative energy between 0.4 and 10 eV by crossed beam slice imaging. A weakly exothermic reaction with high central barrier proceeds via an indirect, complex-mediated mechanism at low relative energies featuring high internal product excitation in excellent quantitative agreement with a statistical model. In contrast, direct backward scattering prevails for higher energies with product velocities close to the kinematical cutoff. For a strongly exothermic reaction, competing S{sub N}2-, dihalide- and proton transfer-channels are explored which proceed by complex mediation for low energy and various rebound-, grazing- and collision induced bond rupture-mechanisms at higher energy. From our data and a collaboration with theory we identify a new indirect roundabout S{sub N}2 mechanism involving CH{sub 3}-rotation. (orig.)

  17. Review of lattice results concerning low-energy particle physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, S; Aoki, Y; Bernard, C; Blum, T; Colangelo, G; Della Morte, M; Dürr, S; El-Khadra, A X; Fukaya, H; Horsley, R; Jüttner, A; Kaneko, T; Laiho, J; Lellouch, L; Leutwyler, H; Lubicz, V; Lunghi, E; Necco, S; Onogi, T; Pena, C; Sachrajda, C T; Sharpe, S R; Simula, S; Sommer, R; Van de Water, R S; Vladikas, A; Wenger, U; Wittig, H

    We review lattice results related to pion, kaon, [Formula: see text]- and [Formula: see text]-meson physics with the aim of making them easily accessible to the particle-physics community. More specifically, we report on the determination of the light-quark masses, the form factor [Formula: see text], arising in semileptonic [Formula: see text] transition at zero momentum transfer, as well as the decay-constant ratio [Formula: see text] of decay constants and its consequences for the CKM matrix elements [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. Furthermore, we describe the results obtained on the lattice for some of the low-energy constants of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] Chiral Perturbation Theory and review the determination of the [Formula: see text] parameter of neutral kaon mixing. The inclusion of heavy-quark quantities significantly expands the FLAG scope with respect to the previous review. Therefore, we focus here on [Formula: see text]- and [Formula: see text]-meson decay constants, form factors, and mixing parameters, since these are most relevant for the determination of CKM matrix elements and the global CKM unitarity-triangle fit. In addition we review the status of lattice determinations of the strong coupling constant [Formula: see text].

  18. Analysis of latency performance of bluetooth low energy (BLE) networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Keuchul; Park, Woojin; Hong, Moonki; Park, Gisu; Cho, Wooseong; Seo, Jihoon; Han, Kijun

    2014-12-23

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is a short-range wireless communication technology aiming at low-cost and low-power communication. The performance evaluation of classical Bluetooth device discovery have been intensively studied using analytical modeling and simulative methods, but these techniques are not applicable to BLE, since BLE has a fundamental change in the design of the discovery mechanism, including the usage of three advertising channels. Recently, there several works have analyzed the topic of BLE device discovery, but these studies are still far from thorough. It is thus necessary to develop a new, accurate model for the BLE discovery process. In particular, the wide range settings of the parameters introduce lots of potential for BLE devices to customize their discovery performance. This motivates our study of modeling the BLE discovery process and performing intensive simulation. This paper is focused on building an analytical model to investigate the discovery probability, as well as the expected discovery latency, which are then validated via extensive experiments. Our analysis considers both continuous and discontinuous scanning modes. We analyze the sensitivity of these performance metrics to parameter settings to quantitatively examine to what extent parameters influence the performance metric of the discovery processes.

  19. Testing SO(10)-inspired leptogenesis with low energy neutrino experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Di Bari, Pasquale

    2011-01-01

    We extend the results of a previous analysis of ours showing that, when both heavy and light flavour effects are taken into account, successful minimal (type I + thermal) leptogenesis with SO(10)-inspired relations is possible. Barring fine tuned choices of the parameters, these relations enforce a hierarchical RH neutrino mass spectrum that results into a final asymmetry dominantly produced by the next-to-lightest RH neutrino decays (N_2 dominated leptogenesis). We present the constraints on the whole set of low energy neutrino parameters. Allowing a small misalignment between the Dirac basis and the charged lepton basis as in the quark sector, the allowed regions enlarge and the lower bound on the reheating temperature gets relaxed to values as low as ~ 10^10 GeV. It is confirmed that for normal ordering (NO) there are two allowed ranges of values for the lightest neutrino mass: m_1 \\simeq (1-5)\\times 10^-3 eV and m_1\\simeq (0.03-0.1) eV. For m_1\\lesssim 0.01 eV the allowed region in the plane theta_13-thet...

  20. Low-energy-electron scattering by CH3CN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maioli, Leticia S.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2017-12-01

    We report integral and differential cross sections for the elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by methyl cyanide (CH3CN), also known as acetonitrile. The cross sections were computed using the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with pseudopotentials. The fixed-nuclei scattering calculations were performed in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations for energies up to 15 eV. In our calculations with polarization effects, we found a π * shape resonance at around 2.22 eV and a broad structure associated to a σ * shape resonance at around 7 eV. The low-lying resonance was assigned to the electron capture by the two-fold degenerate π * orbital of the E symmetry of C 3 v group; the second was assigned to a σ * shape resonance in the A 1 symmetry. We compared our cross sections with theoretical results and experimental data available in the literature, and in general we found good agreement for the positions of the two resonances.

  1. Collisions of low-energy electrons with cyclohexane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2014-12-01

    We report calculated cross sections for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by cyclohexane (c-C6H12). We employed the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with norm-conserving pseudopotentials in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations, for impact energies up to 30 eV. We compare our calculated integral cross section with experimental total cross sections available in the literature. We also compare our calculated differential cross sections (DCSs) with experimental results for benzene and experimental and theoretical results for 1,4-dioxane, in order to investigate the similarities between those molecules under electron collisions. Although benzene is a cyclic six-carbon molecule, as cyclohexane, we found that the differential cross sections of the latter are more similar to those of 1,4-dioxane than those of benzene. These similarities suggest that the geometry may play an important role in the behavior of the DCSs of these molecules. Our integral cross section displays a broad structure at around 8.5 eV, in agreement with the total cross section experimental data of 8 eV and vibrational excitation data of 7.5 eV. The present integral cross section also shows the presence of a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum at around 0.12 eV. In general, our integral cross section shows a qualitative agreement with the experimental total cross section.

  2. Low-energy buildings: Bioclimatic improvements appropriate to Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MiloradoviĆ Nenad

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Buildings consume around 40% of the total world energy and bioclimatic architecture may achieve energy savings for heating and air conditioning purposes. The geometric shape of a building membrane, its compactness aerodynamics and orientation, building aggregation, the level of isolation as well as the layout and size of windows are all determining for the energy performance of a building. In this paper it is presented an optimized configuration for the low-energy construction basis of a building, which reduces energy exchange with surroundings. Such layout, with specific south-eastern orientation (because of "košava" wind influence is suitable for Belgrade constructions. Here is also presented an example of dense structures, which can be developed in urban areas. Above all, the advantage of such layout of the base is in its compactness, whereas south-eastern orientation allows for opportune heating of a building in the morning hours it increases its aerodynamics (by which it reduces ventilation loss for heating, and represents a compromise solution for winter and summer energy requirements.

  3. Measuring ecosystem capacity to provide regulating services: forest removal and recovery at Hubbard Brook (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Colin M; Caputo, Jesse; Groffman, Peter M

    2015-10-01

    In this study, by coupling long-term ecological data with empirical proxies of societal demand for benefits, we measured the capacity of forest watersheds to provide ecosystem services over variable time periods, to different beneficiaries, and in response to discrete perturbations and drivers of change. We revisited one of the earliest ecosystem experiments in North America: the 1963 de-vegetation of a forested catchment at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, USA. Potential benefits of the regulation of water flow, water quality, greenhouse gases, and forest growth were compared between experimental (WS 2) and reference (WS 6) watersheds over a 30-year period. Both watersheds exhibited similarly high capacity for flow regulation, in part because functional loads remained low (i.e., few major storm events) during the de-vegetation period. Drought mitigation capacity, or the maintenance of flows sufficient to satisfy municipal water consumption, was higher in WS 2 due to reduced evapotranspiration associated with loss of plant cover. We also assessed watershed capacity to regulate flows to satisfy different beneficiaries, including hypothetical flood averse and drought averse types. Capacity to regulate water quality was severely degraded during de-vegetation, as nitrate concentrations exceeded drinking water standards on 40% of measurement days. Once forest regeneration began, WS 2 rapidly recovered the capacity to provide safe drinking water, and subsequently mitigated the eutrophication potential of rainwater at a marginally higher level than WS 6. We estimated this additional pollution removal benefit would have to accrue for approximately 65-70 years to offset the net eutrophication cost incurred during forest removal. Overall, our results affirmed the critical role of forest vegetation in water regulation, but also indicated trade-offs associated with forest removal and recovery that partially depend on larger-scale exogenous changes in climate

  4. Enhancements to the Low-Energy Ion Facility at SUNY Geneseo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfield, Zachariah; Kostick, Steven; Nagasing, Ethan; Fletcher, Kurt; Padalino, Stephen

    2017-10-01

    The Low Energy Ion Facility at SUNY Geneseo is used for detector development and characterization for inertial confinement fusion diagnostics. The system has been upgraded to improve the ion beam quality by reducing contaminant ions. In the new configuration, ions produced by the Peabody Scientific duoplasmatron ion source are accelerated through a potential, focused into a new NEC analyzing magnet and directed to an angle of 30°. A new einzel lens on the output of the magnet chamber focuses the beam into a scattering chamber with a water-cooled target mount and rotatable detector mount plates. The analyzing magnet has been calibrated for deuteron, 4He+, and 4He2+ ion beams at a range of energies, and no significant hysteresis has been observed. The system can accelerate deuterons to energies up to 25 keV to initiate d-d fusion using a deuterated polymer target. Charged particle spectra with protons, tritons, and 3He ions from d-d fusion have been measured at scattering angles ranging from 55° to 135°. A time-of-flight beamline has been designed to measure the energies of ions elastically scattered at 135°. CEM detectors initiate start and stop signals from secondary electrons produced when low energy ions pass through very thin carbon foils. Funded in part by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  5. Systematic study of low-energy incomplete fusion: Role of entrance channel parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Abhishek; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Shuaib, Mohd.; Sharma, Vijay R.; Bala, Indu; Unnati, Gupta, Sunita; Singh, D. P.; Sharma, M. K.; Kumar, R.; Murlithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2017-10-01

    An attempt has been made to investigate the role of various entrance channel parameters in low-energy (≈4 -7 MeV/nucleon) incomplete fusion reactions through excitation function measurements. The analysis of measured excitation functions, in the framework of statistical model code pace4, reveals that the x n /p x n channels are populated, predominantly, via complete fusion processes. However, in the production of α -emitting channels, even after correcting for the precursor decay contribution, a significant enhancement as compared to statistical model predictions has been observed, which may be attributed due to the contribution of breakup processes. The observed enhancement is found to increase with projectile energy. Further, the comparison of present work with literature data reveals the dependence of incomplete fusion on mass-asymmetry of interacting partners, α -Q value of the projectile, and also on ZPZT (the Coulomb factor). From the present analysis, it may be concluded that a single entrance channel parameter (i.e., mass asymmetry or ZPZT or α -Q value) is not able to explain, completely, the yields of the low-energy incomplete fusion component. Therefore, a combination of these parameters and/or a parameter which can incorporate all gross features of interacting partners should be chosen to get a systematics for such reactions.

  6. In-orbit performance of the SAX Low-Energy Concentrator System (LECS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Didier D.; Parmar, A. N.; Bavdaz, Marcos; Peacock, Anthony J.; Taylor, B. G.

    1996-10-01

    The low energy concentrator system (LECS) is an imaging x- ray spectrometer. I is one of the narrow field instruments onboard the SAX satellite and covers the energy range from 0.1 to 10 keV. The good low energy response of the detector is achieved by using a driftless gas cell and a thin multilayer polyimide foil as an entrance window. SAX was launched on April 30, 1996. Following a two month commissioning phase, the satellite has entered the science verification phase. We report here on the first in-flight data acquired with the LECS. Using back-ground measurements and well known x-ray sources, we present the first results of the in-orbit performance and calibrations an compare them to ground measurements acquired at synchrotron and long beam x-ray sources. After a brief description of the instrument we discuss some aspects related to the ground calibrations. I particular the entrance window characteristics and the particularities of a driftless detector design are reviewed. By correcting for the x-ray absorption depth, we also show how the energy resolution could be enhanced.

  7. A Geosynchronous Synthetic Aperture Provides for Disaster Management, Measurement of Soil Moisture, and Measurement of Earth-Surface Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Soren; Komar, George (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A GEO-based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) could provide daily coverage of basically all of North and South America with very good temporal coverage within the mapped area. This affords a key capability to disaster management, tectonic mapping and modeling, and vegetation mapping. The fine temporal sampling makes this system particularly useful for disaster management of flooding, hurricanes, and earthquakes. By using a fairly long wavelength, changing water boundaries caused by storms or flooding could be monitored in near real-time. This coverage would also provide revolutionary capabilities in the field of radar interferometry, including the capability to study the interferometric signature immediately before and after an earthquake, thus allowing unprecedented studies of Earth-surface dynamics. Preeruptive volcano dynamics could be studied as well as pre-seismic deformation, one of the most controversial and elusive aspects of earthquakes. Interferometric correlation would similarly allow near real-time mapping of surface changes caused by volcanic eruptions, mud slides, or fires. Finally, a GEO SAR provides an optimum configuration for soil moisture measurement that requires a high temporal sampling rate (1-2 days) with a moderate spatial resolution (1 km or better). From a technological point of view, the largest challenges involved in developing a geosynchronous SAR capability relate to the very large slant range distance from the radar to the mapped area. This leads to requirements for large power or alternatively very large antenna, the ability to steer the mapping area to the left and right of the satellite, and control of the elevation and azimuth angles. The weight of this system is estimated to be 2750 kg and it would require 20 kW of DC-power. Such a system would provide up to a 600 km ground swath in a strip-mapping mode and 4000 km dual-sided mapping in a scan-SAR mode.

  8. The Role of Low-Energy Electrons in Astrochemistry: A Tale of Two Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumainayagam, Chris; Cambell, Jyoti; Leon Sanche, Michael Boyer, and Petra Swiderek.

    2016-06-01

    In the interstellar medium, UV photolysis of ice mantles encasing dust grains is thought to be the mechanism that drives the synthesis of “complex” molecules. The source of this reaction-initiating UV light is assumed to be local because externally-sourced UV radiation cannot pass through the ice-containing dark, dense molecular clouds. Externally sourced cosmic rays (Emax ~ 1020 eV), in addition to producing UV light within these clouds, also produce large numbers of low-energy (≤ 20 eV) secondary electrons. The goal of our studies is to understand the low-energy electron-induced processes that occur when high-energy cosmic rays interact with interstellar ices. Using electron stimulated desorption (ESD), post-irradiation temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), we have investigated the radiolysis initiated by electrons in condensed methanol and ammonia at ~ 90 K under ultrahigh vacuum (1×10-9 Torr) conditions. We have identified fifteen low-energy (≤ 20 eV) electron-induced methanol radiolysis products, many of which have been previously identified as being formed by methanol UV photolysis in the interstellar medium. We have also found evidence for the electron-induced formation from ammonia of hydrazine (N2H4), diazene (N2H2), cyclotriazane/triazene (N3H3) and triazane (N3H5). We have investigated the reaction yields’ dependence on film thickness, irradiation time, incident current, electron energy, and metal substrate. These results provide a basis from which we can begin to understand the mechanisms by which methanol and ammonia can form more complex species in cosmic ices. Studies such as ours may ultimately help us better understand the initial stages of the genesis of life.

  9. Low energy class 1 typehouses according to the Danish building regulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen; Kragh, Jesper; Svendsen, Svend

    2008-01-01

    In 2005 the Danish Building regulations introduced two low energy classes for buildings in addition to tightened minimum requirements. The low energy class 1 and low energy class 2 correspond to total energy use, i.e. energy use for heating, ventilation, cooling and domestic hot water, as 50...... it is expected that the minimum demand will correspond to the low energy class 1 demands of today. In order to secure this development in the building regulations, it is essential to support the development of low energy solutions and demonstrate that the goal is well within reach of the Danish building industry....... This paper describes the development of a low energy class 1 typehouse. The house is based on a standard typehouse, and through an optimization process of the building constructions and heating and ventilation systems, the total energy use for the typehouse has been reduced in order to meet the low energy...

  10. Final Technical Report Project: Low-Energy Photonuclear Studies at HIGS and Lund

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, Gerald [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-06-15

    This report summarizes a program of low-energy photonuclear studies at MAX-Lab in Lund (Sweden) and at the High Intensity Gamma Source (HIGS) at Duke University. A major emphasis has been on Compton scattering from deuterium in order to determine the electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the neutron. The studies at Lund utilized unpolarized photons at Egamma = 62-115 MeV to measure differential cross sections. The studies at HIGS utilized polarized and unpolarized photon beams (both linear and circular) at Egamma < 90 MeV. Polarization observables will be exploited to improve our understanding of the electric and magnetic polarizabilities, and in particular, double-polarization observables (using polarized targets) will be measured in the future to provide new information about the spin polarizabilities of the nucleon. The MAX-Lab experiments (using unpolarized photons) focused on an approved PAC proposal for Compton scattering on the deuteron aimed at making a precise determination of the electromagnetic polarizabilities of the neutron. At MAX-Lab we had three of the largest NaI detectors in the world, each capable of ~2% energy resolution. We have completed our measurements in two separate tagged photon energy ranges which overlap each other (62-97 MeV and 90-115 MeV) and the results of these experiments have been published. The photon beam at the High Intensity Gamma Source (HIGS) has several distinct advantages that make it unique: (1) ultra-high photon flux, ultimately reaching 100 MHz, (2) 100% linearly polarized photon beam, as well as circular polarization, (3) monoenergetic beam, with ~2% energy resolution, and (4) extremely low-background beam environment. Exploiting the high flux and polarization capabilities of the HIGS photon beam is central in the series of experiments being performed at this facility. Very little data exist on Compton scattering using polarized photons. We will exploit clear sensitivities in the polarization observables to the

  11. Treatment of PVC using an alternative low energy ion bombardment procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Elidiane C., E-mail: elidiane@sorocaba.unesp.br [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus Experimental de Sorocaba, Av. Tres de Marco, 511 Alto da Boa Vista, 18087-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Santos, Nazir M. dos; Bortoleto, Jose Roberto R.; Durrant, Steven F. [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus Experimental de Sorocaba, Av. Tres de Marco, 511 Alto da Boa Vista, 18087-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Schreiner, Wido H. [Laboratorio de Interfaces e Filmes Finos, Universidade Federal de Parana (UFPR), C.P. 19044, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Honda, Roberto Y. [Laboratorio de Plasmas, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, 12516-410, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil); Cassia C Rangel, Rita de; Cruz, Nilson C. [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus Experimental de Sorocaba, Av. Tres de Marco, 511 Alto da Boa Vista, 18087-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil)

    2011-12-15

    In many applications, polymers have progressively substituted traditional materials such as ceramics, glasses, and metals. Nevertheless, the use of polymeric materials is still limited by their surface properties. Frequently, selective modifications are necessary to suit the surface to a given application. Amongst the most common treatments, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) has attracted the attention of many researchers owing to its versatility and practicality. This method, however, requires a power supply to provide high voltage (tens of kV) negative pulses, with a controlled duty cycle, width and frequency. Owing to this, the implementation of PIII on the industrial scale can become economically inviable. In this work, an alternative plasma treatment that enables low energy ion bombardment without the need of a high voltage pulse generator is presented. To evaluate the efficiency of the treatment of polymers, polyvinylchloride, PVC, specimens were exposed to 5 Pa argon plasmas for 3600 s, at excitation powers, P, of between 10 and 125 W. Through contact angle and atomic force microscopy data, the influence of P on the wettability, surface free energy and roughness of the samples was studied. Surface chemical composition was measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS. To evaluate the effect of aging under atmospheric conditions, contact angle and XPS measurements were performed one and 1334 days after the treatment. The plasma potential and ion density around the driven electrode were determined from Langmuir probe measurements while the self-bias potential was derived with the aid of an oscilloscope. From these data it was possible to estimate the mean energy of ions bombarding the PVC surface. Chlorine, carbon and oxygen contamination were detected on the surface of the as-received PVC. Upon exposure to the plasma, the proportion of chlorine was observed to decrease while that of oxygen increased. Consequently, the wettability and surface energy

  12. Measuring Physical Inactivity: Do Current Measures Provide an Accurate View of “Sedentary” Video Game Time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Fullerton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Measures of screen time are often used to assess sedentary behaviour. Participation in activity-based video games (exergames can contribute to estimates of screen time, as current practices of measuring it do not consider the growing evidence that playing exergames can provide light to moderate levels of physical activity. This study aimed to determine what proportion of time spent playing video games was actually spent playing exergames. Methods. Data were collected via a cross-sectional telephone survey in South Australia. Participants aged 18 years and above (n=2026 were asked about their video game habits, as well as demographic and socioeconomic factors. In cases where children were in the household, the video game habits of a randomly selected child were also questioned. Results. Overall, 31.3% of adults and 79.9% of children spend at least some time playing video games. Of these, 24.1% of adults and 42.1% of children play exergames, with these types of games accounting for a third of all time that adults spend playing video games and nearly 20% of children’s video game time. Conclusions. A substantial proportion of time that would usually be classified as “sedentary” may actually be spent participating in light to moderate physical activity.

  13. Detectors for low energy electron cooling in RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlier, F. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Low-energy operation of RHIC is of particular interest to study the location of a possible critical point in the QCD phase diagram. The performance of RHIC at energies equal to or lower than 10 GV/nucleon is limited by nonlinearities, Intra-BeamScattering (IBS) processes and space-charge effects. To successfully address the luminosity and ion store lifetime limitations imposed by IBS, the method of electron cooling has been envisaged. During electron cooling processes electrons are injected along with the ion beam at the nominal ion bunch velocities. The velocity spread of the ion beam is reduced in all planes through Coulomb interactions between the cold electron beam and the ion beam. The electron cooling system proposed for RHIC will be the first of its kind to use bunched beams for the delivery of the electron bunches, and will therefore be accompanied by the necessary challenges. The designed electron cooler will be located in IP2. The electron bunches will be accelerated by a linac before being injected along side the ion beams. Thirty consecutive electron bunches will be injected to overlap with a single ion bunch. They will first cool the yellow beam before being extracted, turned by 180-degrees, and reinjected into the blue beam for cooling. As such, both the yellow and blue beams will be cooled by the same ion bunches. This will pose considerable challenges to ensure proper electron beam quality to cool the second ion beam. Furthermore, no ondulator will be used in the electron cooler so radiative recombination between the ions and the electrons will occur.

  14. Using a novel assessment of procedural proficiency provides medical educators insight into blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrup, Michael; Jensen, Brock; Burkart, Rebecca; Levis, Malorie

    2016-11-19

    This investigation was performed to determine how students in a health sciences program utilize and explain techniques within blood pressure measurement using a novel assessment, and changes associated with greater curricular exposure. An exploratory, qualitative and quantitative study was conducted using a 'Think Aloud' design with protocol analysis. Following familiarization, participants performed the task of measuring blood pressure on a reference subject while stating their thought processes. A trained practitioner recorded each participant's procedural proficiency using a standardized rubric. There were 112 participants in the study with varying levels of curricular exposure to blood pressure measurement. Four trends are noted. Specifically, a trend was observed wherein a marked increase in procedural proficiency with a plateau occurred (e.g. released cuff pressure 2-4 mmHg, 10%, 60%, 83%, 82%). Secondly, a trend was observed with improvement across groups (e.g. cuff placed snugly/smoothly on upper arm, 20%, 60%, 81%, and 91%). Other trends included a marked improvement with subsequent decrease, and an improvement without achieving proficiency (e.g. palpation of the brachial pulse, 5%, 90%, 81%, 68%, appropriate size cuff, 17%, 40%, 33%, 41%, respectively). Qualitatively, transcript interpretation resulted in a need for clarification in the way blood pressure procedure is instructed in the curriculum. The current investigation provides a snapshot of proficiency in blood pressure assessment across a curriculum and highlights considerations for best instructional practices, including the use of Think Aloud. Consequently, medical educators should use qualitative and quantitative assessments concurrently to determine achievement of blood pressure skill proficiency.

  15. Does the edge effect impact on the measure of spatial accessibility to healthcare providers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Kihal, Wahida; Le Meur, Nolwenn; Souris, Marc; Deguen, Séverine

    2017-12-11

    autocorrelation index and local indicators of spatial autocorrelation) are not really impacted. Our research has revealed minor accessibility variation when edge effect has been considered in a French context. No general statement can be set up because intensity of impact varies according to healthcare provider type, territorial organization and methodology used to measure the accessibility to healthcare. Additional researches are required in order to distinguish what findings are specific to a territory and others common to different countries. It constitute a promising direction to determine more precisely healthcare shortage areas and then to fight against social health inequalities.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis Applied in Design of Low Energy Office Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Building performance can be expressed by different indicators as primary energy use, environmental load and/or the indoor environmental quality and a building performance simulation can provide the decision maker with a quantitative measure of the extent to which an integrated design solution...... satisfies the design requirements and objectives. In the design of sustainable Buildings it is beneficial to identify the most important design parameters in order to develop more efficiently alternative design solutions or reach optimized design solutions. A sensitivity analysis makes it possible...... to identify the most important parameters in relation to building performance and to focus design and optimization of sustainable buildings on these fewer, but most important parameters. The sensitivity analyses will typically be performed at a reasonably early stage of the building design process, where...

  17. Models for the energy performance of low-energy houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Philip Hvidthøft Delff

    -building. The building is well-insulated and features large modern energy-effcient windows and oor heating. These features lead to increased non-linear responses to solar radiation and longer time constants. The building is equipped with advanced control and measuring equipment. Experiments are designed and performed......The aim of this thesis is data-driven modeling of heat dynamics of buildings. Traditionally, thermal modeling of buildings is done using simulation tools which take information about the construction, weather data, occupancy etc. as inputs and generate deterministic energy profiles of the buildings...... such as mechanical ventilation, floor heating, and control of the lighting effect, the heat dynamics must be taken into account. Hence, this thesis provides methods for data-driven modeling of heat dynamics of modern buildings. While most of the work in this thesis is related to characterization of heat dynamics...

  18. LENDA: A low energy neutron detector array for experiments with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdikakis, G., E-mail: perdikak@nscl.msu.edu [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Sasano, M.; Austin, Sam M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Bazin, D. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Caesar, C. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Cannon, S. [Hastings College, Hastings, NE 68901 (United States); Deaven, J.M.; Doster, H.J.; Guess, C.J.; Hitt, G.W. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Marks, J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Meharchand, R. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Joint Institute of Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Nguyen, D.T. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Peterman, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); and others

    2012-09-11

    The Low Energy Neutron Detector Array (LENDA) is a neutron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer developed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) for use in inverse kinematics experiments with rare isotope beams. Its design has been motivated by the need to study the spin-isospin response of unstable nuclei using (p,n) charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies (>100MeV/u). It can be used, however, for any reaction study that involves emission of low energy neutrons (150 keV to 10 MeV). The array consists of 24 plastic scintillator bars and is capable of registering the recoiling neutron energy and angle with high detection efficiency. The neutron energy is determined by the time-of-flight technique, while the position of interaction is deduced using the timing and energy information from the two photomultipliers of each bar. A simple test setup utilizing radioactive sources has been used to characterize the array. Results of test measurements are compared with simulations. A neutron energy threshold of <150keV, an intrinsic time (position) resolution of {approx} 400 ps ({approx} 6 cm) and an efficiency >20% for neutrons below 4 MeV have been obtained.

  19. On the Role of low-energy electrons in the radiosensitization of DNA by gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fangxing; Zheng, Yi; Cloutier, Pierre; He, Yunhui; Hunting, Darel; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    Four different gold nanoparticle (GNP) preparations, including nude GNP and GNP coated either with thiolated undecane (S-C11H23), or with dithiolated diethylenetriaminepentaacetic (DTDTPA) or gadolinium (Gd) DTDTPA chelating agents were synthesized. The average diameters, for each type of nanoparticle are 5 nm, 10 and 13 nm, respectively. Dry films of plasmid DNA pGEM-3Zf(-), DNA with bound GNP and DNA with coated GNP were bombarded with 60 keV electrons. The yields of single and double strand breaks were measured as a function of exposure by electrophoresis. The binding of only one GNP without coating to DNA containing 3197 base pairs increases single and double strand breaks by a factor of 2.3 while for GNP coated with S-C11H23 this factor is reduced to 1.6. GNP coated with the DTDTPA and DTDTPA:Gd in same ratio with DNA, produce essentially no increment in damage. These results could be explained by the attenuation by the coatings of the intensity of low energy photoelectrons emitted from GNP. Thus, coatings of GNP may considerably attenuate short-range low energy electrons emitted from gold, leading to a considerable decrease of radiosensitization. According to our results, the highest radiosensitization should be obtained with GNP having the shortest possible ligand, directed to the DNA of cancer cells. PMID:22024607

  20. A heating system for low energy houses. Varmeanlaeg til lavenergihuse; Projektrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savstrup Kristensen, L.

    1992-12-01

    The aim was to design a simple and inexpensive heat distribution system, based on the use of natural gas and solar heating, for use in low-energy residential buildings. The system, which would also heat the domestic water supply, should be placed at the center of the building and be based on air as the heating medium. Low energy houses need mechanical ventilation systems as they are normally airtight. The testing did not include the solar collector as it was decided that the efficiency of these was well documented. The system was measured to have an efficiency of 80% during the winter period with a constant heat need of 1.6 kW, answering to an outside temperature of 5.5 degrees centigrade. The installation costs were lower than in the case of a heating system based on water circulation. Control of air exchange by ventilation systems also saves energy. By using the described tapping program the temperature of the air will not fall significantly. In the case of a lower outside temperature it would be necessary to increase the volume of air in the heating system unless the temperature in the hot water container is raised. This can be done through the heat recovery system, but it is recommended to install a recirculation possibility through the heat exchanger. (AB).

  1. The production of low-energy neutral oxygen beams by grazing-incidence neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albridge, R. G.; Haglund, R. F.; Tolk, N. H.; Daech, A. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University neutral oxygen facility produces beams of low-energy neutral oxygen atoms by means of grazing-incidence collisions between ion beams and metal surfaces. Residual ions are reflected by applied electric fields. This method can utilize initial ion beams of either O(+) or O2(+) since a very large percentage of molecular oxygen ions are dissociated when they undergo grazing-incidence neutralization. The method of neutralization is applicable to low-energy beams and to all ions. Particular emphasis is on O and N2 beams for simulation of the low Earth orbit space environment. Since the beam is a pure O-neutral beam and since measurements of the interaction of the beam with solid surfaces are made spectroscopically, absolute reaction rates can be determined. The technique permits the beams to be used in conjunction with electron and photon irradiation for studies of synergistic effects. Comparisons of optical spectra of Kapton excited by 2.5-keV O, O(+), and O2(+) show significant differences. Optical spectra of Kapton excited by neutral oxygen beams of less than 1 keV have been recorded.

  2. Levels of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone in ground beef patties irradiated by low-energy X-ray and gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijaz, Faraj M; Smith, J Scott

    2010-01-01

    Food irradiation improves food safety and maintains food quality by controlling microorganisms and extending shelf life. However, acceptance and commercial adoption of food irradiation is still low. Consumer groups such as Public Citizen and the Food and Water Watch have opposed irradiation because of the formation of 2-alkylcyclobutanones (2-ACBs) in irradiated, lipid-containing foods. The objectives of this study were to measure and to compare the level of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) in ground beef irradiated by low-energy X-rays and gamma rays. Beef patties were irradiated by low-energy X-rays and gamma rays (Cs-137) at 3 targeted absorbed doses of 1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 kGy. The samples were extracted with n-hexane using a Soxhlet apparatus, and the 2-DCB concentration was determined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The 2-DCB concentration increased linearly (P gamma-ray and low-energy X-ray irradiated patties. There was no significant difference in 2-DCB concentration between gamma-ray and low-energy X-ray irradiated patties (P > 0.05) at all targeted doses. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®

  3. Energy-Efficient Capacitance-to-Digital Converters for Low-Energy Sensor Nodes

    KAUST Repository

    Omran, Hesham

    2015-11-01

    Energy efficiency is a key requirement for wireless sensor nodes, biomedical implants, and wearable devices. The energy consumption of the sensor node needs to be minimized to avoid battery replacement, or even better, to enable the device to survive on energy harvested from the ambient. Capacitive sensors do not consume static power; thus, they are attractive from an energy efficiency perspective. In addition, they can be employed in a wide range of sensing applications. However, the sensor readout circuit–i.e., the capacitance-to-digital converter (CDC)–can be the dominant source of energy consumption in the system. Thus, the development of energy-efficient CDCs is crucial to minimizing the energy consumption of capacitive sensor nodes. In the first part of this dissertation, we propose several energy-efficient CDC architectures for low-energy sensor nodes. First, we propose a digitally-controlled coarsefine multislope CDC that employs both current and frequency scaling to achieve significant improvement in energy efficiency. Second, we analyze the limitations of successive approximation (SAR) CDC, and we address these limitations by proposing a robust parasitic-insensitive opamp-based SAR CDC. Third, we propose an inverter-based SAR CDC that achieves an energy efficiency figure-of-merit (FoM) of 31fJ/Step, which is the best energy efficiency FoM reported to date. Fourth, we propose a differential SAR CDC with quasi-dynamic operation to maintain excellent energy efficiency for a scalable sample rate. In the second part of this dissertation, we study the matching properties of small integrated capacitors, which are an integral component of energy-efficient CDCs. Despite conventional wisdom, we experimentally illustrate that the mismatch of small capacitors can be directly measured, and we report mismatch measurements for subfemtofarad integrated capacitors. We also correct the common misconception that lateral capacitors match better than vertical capacitors

  4. Study of chirally motivated low-energy K sup - optical potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Cieply, A; Gal, A; Mares, J

    2001-01-01

    The K sup - optical potential in the nuclear medium is evaluated self consistently from a free-space K sup - N t matrix constructed within a coupled-channel chiral approach to the low-energy KbarN data. The chiral-model parameters are fitted to a select subset of the low-energy data plus the K sup - atomic data throughout the periodic table. The resulting attractive K sup - optical potentials are relatively 'shallow', with central depth of the real part about 55 MeV, for a fairly reasonable reproduction of the atomic data with chi sup 2 /N approx 2.2. Relatively 'deep' attractive potentials of depth about 180 MeV, which result in other phenomenological approaches with chi sup 2 /N approx 1.5, are ruled out within chirally motivated models. Different physical data input is required to distinguish between shallow and deep K sup - optical potentials. The (K sup - sub s sub t sub o sub p ,pi) reaction could provide such a test, with exclusive rates differing by over a factor of three for the two classes of potent...

  5. Uncertainties in constraining low-energy constants from {sup 3}H β decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klos, P.; Carbone, A.; Hebeler, K. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany); Menendez, J. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, Tokyo (Japan); Schwenk, A. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    We discuss the uncertainties in constraining low-energy constants of chiral effective field theory from {sup 3}H β decay. The half-life is very precisely known, so that the Gamow-Teller matrix element has been used to fit the coupling c{sub D} of the axial-vector current to a short-range two-nucleon pair. Because the same coupling also describes the leading one-pion-exchange three-nucleon force, this in principle provides a very constraining fit, uncorrelated with the {sup 3}H binding energy fit used to constrain another low-energy coupling in three-nucleon forces. However, so far such {sup 3}H half-life fits have only been performed at a fixed cutoff value. We show that the cutoff dependence due to the regulators in the axial-vector two-body current can significantly affect the Gamow-Teller matrix elements and consequently also the extracted values for the c{sub D} coupling constant. The degree of the cutoff dependence is correlated with the softness of the employed NN interaction. As a result, present three-nucleon forces based on a fit to {sup 3}H β decay underestimate the uncertainty in c{sub D}. We explore a range of c{sub D} values that is compatible within cutoff variation with the experimental {sup 3}H half-life and estimate the resulting uncertainties for many-body systems by performing calculations of symmetric nuclear matter. (orig.)

  6. Potential applications of low-energy shock waves in functional urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hung-Jen; Cheng, Jai-Hong; Chuang, Yao-Chi

    2017-08-01

    A shock wave, which carries energy and can propagate through a medium, is a type of continuous transmitted sonic wave with a frequency of 16 Hz-20 MHz. It is accompanied by processes involving rapid energy transformations. The energy associated with shock waves has been harnessed and used for various applications in medical science. High-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy is the most successful application of shock waves, and has been used to disintegrate urolithiasis for 30 years. At lower energy levels, however, shock waves have enhanced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, chemoattractant factors and recruitment of progenitor cells; shock waves have also improved tissue regeneration. Low-energy shock wave therapy has been used clinically with musculoskeletal disorders, ischemic cardiovascular disorders and erectile dysfunction, through the mechanisms of neovascularization, anti-inflammation and tissue regeneration. Furthermore, low-energy shock waves have been proposed to temporarily increase tissue permeability and facilitate intravesical drug delivery. The present review article provides information on the basics of shock wave physics, mechanisms of action on the biological system and potential applications in functional urology. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  7. Measuring factors that influence the utilisation of preventive care services provided by general practitioners in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oldenburg Brian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relatively little research attention has been given to the development of standardised and psychometrically sound scales for measuring influences relevant to the utilisation of health services. This study aims to describe the development, validation and internal reliability of some existing and new scales to measure factors that are likely to influence utilisation of preventive care services provided by general practitioners in Australia. Methods Relevant domains of influence were first identified from a literature review and formative research. Items were then generated by using and adapting previously developed scales and published findings from these. The new items and scales were pre-tested and qualitative feedback was obtained from a convenience sample of citizens from the community and a panel of experts. Principal Components Analyses (PCA and internal reliability testing (Cronbach's alpha were then conducted for all of the newly adapted or developed scales utilising data collected from a self-administered mailed survey sent to a randomly selected population-based sample of 381 individuals (response rate 65.6 per cent. Results The PCA identified five scales with acceptable levels of internal consistency were: (1 social support (ten items, alpha 0.86; (2 perceived interpersonal care (five items, alpha 0.87, (3 concerns about availability of health care and accessibility to health care (eight items, alpha 0.80, (4 value of good health (five items, alpha 0.79, and (5 attitudes towards health care (three items, alpha 0.75. Conclusion The five scales are suitable for further development and more widespread use in research aimed at understanding the determinants of preventive health services utilisation among adults in the general population.

  8. Nuclear astrophysics projects at the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Hayakawa, S.; Yang, L.; Shimizu, H.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Abe, K.; Nakao, T.; Suhara, T.; Iwasa, N.; Kim, A.; Kim, D. H.; Cha, S. M.; Kwag, M. S.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, E. J.; Chae, K. Y.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Imai, N.; Kitamura, N.; Lee, P.; Moon, J. Y.; Lee, K. B.; Akers, C.; Jung, H. S.; Duy, N. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Lee, C. S.; Hashimoto, T.; Kubono, S.; Kawabata, T.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.

    2018-01-01

    Studies on nuclear reactions relevant for astrophysics have been performed using the radioactive-isotope (RI) beams at the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, operated by Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), the University of Tokyo. A type of measurement to study astrophysical reactions at CRIB is by the elastic resonant scattering with the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. We introduce the α resonant scattering with 7Be beam, related to the astrophysical 7Be(α, γ) reactions, which is relevant in the hot p-p chain and νp-process in supernovae. Other α resonant scattering measurements with 30S, 10Be, 15O, and 18Ne beams have been performed at CRIB, using the thick-target method.

  9. Low-energy beam test results of a calorimeter prototype for the CREAM experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bagliesi, M G; Ganel, O; Kim, K C; Lee, M H; Lomtadze, T A; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Meucci, M; Millucci, V; Morsani, F; Seo, E S; Valle, G D

    2003-01-01

    CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass) is an experiment under construction for a direct measurement of high energy cosmic rays (10 /sup 12/ to >5.10/sup 14/ eV) over the elemental range from proton to iron. The first flight of CREAM is intended to demonstrate the new ultra long duration balloon (ULDB) capability under development by NASA. A prototype of a tungsten-SciFi imaging calorimeter designed for CREAM has been tested at CERN with electron beam energies ranging from 5 to 100 GeV. Although the calorimeter module is optimized for cosmic-ray spectral measurements in the multiTeV region, the response of its electromagnetic section to low energy electrons has been studied with this dedicated prototype. Results show good agreement with the expected behaviour in terms of linearity and energy resolution.

  10. Particle reflections of low energy light ions from a vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaoka, H. [Harima Institute, RIKEN The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)]. E-mail: yamaoka@spring8.or.jp; Tanaka, N. [Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)]. E-mail: nozomi.tanaka@ppl2.qse.tohoku.ac.jp; Matsumoto, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Nishiura, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Tsumori, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Takeuchi, S. [Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Sugawara, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Shinto, K. [Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Okamoto, A. [Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Sasao, M. [Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Wada, M. [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    The angular distributions and energy spectra of positive and negative ions reflected from a vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) bombarded by beams of low energy (1-2 keV) ions of H, He, and O were measured. The intensities of H{sup +} or H{sup -} produced from reflection of 2 keV H{sup +} beam at the surface of vanadium alloy showed the maxima at the angles closer to the surface normal from the mirror reflection angle, compared with Mo and W samples. The time dependence of the angular distributions of the reflected H{sup +} or H{sup -} ions measured at the sample temperature of about 240-260 {sup o}C showed a shift of the peak in the angular distribution to the mirror reflection angle.

  11. THE NEED FOR CONTINUITY OF INTEGRATION MEASURES PROVIDED FOR SINGLE REFUGEES IN MUNICIPALITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Vaitkevičiūtė

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available If single refugees do not belong to any groups of vulnerable persons, the support for their integration in municipality of lasts 12 months. After this period, people begin an independent life in Lithuanian society. However, not all single refugees manage successfully to do this. The aim of the research is to reveal the need for continuity of the integration measures provided for single refugees in municipalities. The qualitative research was made using semi-structured interviewing. The participants of the study are five social workers, who work in non-governmental organizations and mentoring refugee integration processes in the municipalities. The study results suggest that support period for integration in the municipality is too short. The needs of single foreigners are the least satisfied when learning Lithuanian language, trying to establish themselves in the labour market, gaining professional skills or acquiring qualification, and renting a place to live in. In these contexts, single refugees face discrimination, bullying, language barrier, ignorance and lack of information, experience financial difficulties or even social exclusion. During integration, single refugees have the least difficulties with the healthcare system. Such process and not satisfied psycho-emotional needs encourage the emigration of single refugees. In order to successfully integrate people into Lithuanian society it is necessary to individualize the program, taking into account the particular experiences, abilities, needs of individuals as well as educating professionals of public services.

  12. In situ biodeposition measurements on a Modiolus modiolus (horse mussel) reef provide insights into ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Flora E. A.; Last, Kim S.; Harries, Daniel B.; Sanderson, William G.

    2017-01-01

    Horse mussel (Modiolus modiolus) shellfish reefs are a threatened and declining habitat in the North East Atlantic and support high levels of biodiversity. Shellfish can influence the surrounding water column and modify the quality of material that reaches the seabed by filtering water, actively depositing particles and changing the benthic boundary layer due to surface roughness. In the present study M. modiolus biodeposition was measured in a field location for the first time. The results show that M. modiolus enhance sedimentation and contribute to the downward flux of material to the seabed. Approximately 30% of the total sediment deposition was attributed to active filter feeding and overall, the presence of horse mussels enhanced deposition two fold. The results are discussed in terms of the potential for horse mussel reefs to provide ecosystem services to society, through functions such as benthopelagic coupling and sediment stabilisation. Highlighting the societal benefits supplied by marine habitats can help prioritise conservation efforts and feed into the sustainable management of coastal water bodies.

  13. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raparia, D; Alessi, J; Atoian, G; Zelenski, A

    2016-02-01

    The H(-) magnetron source provides about 100 mA H(-) beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H(-) beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H(-) beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H(-) beam from optically pumped polarized ion source.

  14. The importance of sensory-motor control in providing core stability: implications for measurement and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghuis, Jan; Hof, At L; Lemmink, Koen A P M

    2008-01-01

    Although the hip musculature is found to be very important in connecting the core to the lower extremities and in transferring forces from and to the core, it is proposed to leave the hip musculature out of consideration when talking about the concept of core stability. A low level of co-contraction of the trunk muscles is important for core stability. It provides a level of stiffness, which gives sufficient stability against minor perturbations. Next to this stiffness, direction-specific muscle reflex responses are also important in providing core stability, particularly when encountering sudden perturbations. It appears that most trunk muscles, both the local and global stabilization system, must work coherently to achieve core stability. The contributions of the various trunk muscles depend on the task being performed. In the search for a precise balance between the amount of stability and mobility, the role of sensory-motor control is much more important than the role of strength or endurance of the trunk muscles. The CNS creates a stable foundation for movement of the extremities through co-contraction of particular muscles. Appropriate muscle recruitment and timing is extremely important in providing core stability. No clear evidence has been found for a positive relationship between core stability and physical performance and more research in this area is needed. On the other hand, with respect to the relationship between core stability and injury, several studies have found an association between a decreased stability and a higher risk of sustaining a low back or knee injury. Subjects with such injuries have been shown to demonstrate impaired postural control, delayed muscle reflex responses following sudden trunk unloading and abnormal trunk muscle recruitment patterns. In addition, various relationships have been demonstrated between core stability, balance performance and activation characteristics of the trunk muscles. Most importantly, a significant

  15. The Exergetic, Environmental and Economic Effect of the Hydrostatic Design Static Pressure Level on the Pipe Dimensions of Low-Energy District Heating Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan İbrahim Tol

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-Energy District Heating (DH systems, providing great energy savings by means of very low operating temperatures of 55 °C and 25 °C for supply and return respectively, were considered to be the 4th generation of the DH systems for a low-energy future. Low-temperature operation is considered to be used in a low-energy DH network to carry the heat produced by renewable and/or low grade energy sources to low-energy Danish buildings. In this study, a comparison of various design considerations with different levels of maximum design static pressures was performed, and their results evaluated in terms of energetic, exergetic, economic, and environmental perspectives.

  16. Low energy electron attachment to cyanamide (NH2CN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzer, Katrin; Pelc, Andrzej; Huber, Stefan E.; Czupyt, Z.; Denifl, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Cyanamide (NH2CN) is a molecule relevant for interstellar chemistry and the chemical evolution of life. In the present investigation, dissociative electron attachment to NH2CN has been studied in a crossed electron-molecular beams experiment in the electron energy range from about 0 eV to 14 eV. The following anionic species were detected: NHCN-, NCN-, CN-, NH2-, NH-, and CH2-. The anion formation proceeds within two broad electron energy regions, one between about 0.5 and 4.5 eV and a second between 4.5 and 12 eV. A discussion of possible reaction channels for all measured negative ions is provided. The experimental results are compared with calculations of the thermochemical thresholds of the anions observed. For the dehydrogenated parent anion, we explain the deviation between the experimental appearance energy of the anion with the calculated corresponding reaction threshold by electron attachment to the isomeric form of NH2CN—carbodiimide.

  17. Status of the PXIE Low Energy Beam Transport Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, Lionel [Fermilab; Andrews, Richard [Fermilab; Chen, Alex [Fermilab; Hanna, Bruce [Fermilab; Scarpine, Victor [Fermilab; Shemyakin, Alexander [Fermilab; Steimel, Jim [Fermilab; D' Arcy, Richard [University Coll. London

    2014-07-01

    A CW-compatible, pulsed H- superconducting RF linac (a.k.a. PIP-II) is envisaged as a possible path for upgrading Fermilab’s injection complex [1]. To validate the concept of the front-end of such machine, a test accelerator (a.k.a. PXIE) [2] is under construction. The warm part of this accelerator comprises a 10 mA DC, 30 keV H- ion source, a 2m-long LEBT, a 2.1 MeV CW RFQ, and a MEBT that feeds the first cryomodule. In addition to operating in the nominal CW mode, the LEBT should be able to produce a pulsed beam for both PXIE commissioning and modelling of the front-end nominal operation in the pulsed mode. Concurrently, it needs to provide effective means of inhibiting beam as part of the overall machine protection system. A peculiar feature of the present LEBT design is the capability of using the ~1m-long section immediately preceding the RFQ in two regimes of beam transport dynamics: neutralized and space charge dominated. This paper introduces the PXIE LEBT, reports on the status of the ion source and LEBT installation, and presents the first beam measurements.

  18. The sup 1 sup 4 N(p,gamma) sup 1 sup 5 O low-energy S-factor

    CERN Document Server

    Angulo, C

    2001-01-01

    The sup 1 sup 4 N(p,gamma) sup 1 sup 5 O low-energy S-factor is analyzed using the R-matrix model. We find that the g.s. contribution is less than previously reported. The S-factor is mainly given by the 6.79 MeV state contribution which is determined by its asymptotic normalization constant (ANC). Consequently, the S-factor at zero energy is lower by a factor of 1.7 compared to the values given in recent compilations. This result may affect the nucleosynthesis and time scale evolution in massive stars. New measurements of the sup 1 sup 4 N(p,gamma) sup 1 sup 5 O cross section over a wide energy range, and especially at low energies, are highly desirable. Significant improvement could be also obtained from the ANC measurement of the 6.79 MeV state.

  19. Development and demonstration of low-energy district heating for low-energy buildings. Main report and appendices; Udvikling og demonstration af lavenergifjernvarme til lavenergibyggeri. Hovedrapport + bilag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, C.H.; Paulsen, O.; Boehm, B. (Teknologisk Institut, Taastrup (Denmark)); Thorsen, J.E. (Danfoss A/S, (Denmark)); Ting Larsen, C.; Jepsen, B.K. (LOGSTOR A/S, (Denmark)); Kaarup Olsen, P.; Lambertsen, H.; Hummelshoej, R. (COWI A/S, (Denmark)); Svendsen, Svend; Fan, J.; Furbo, S. (DTU-BYG, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Worm, J.; Didriksen, J. (Energitjenesten, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2009-03-15

    The project describes a design concept for district heating supply of low energy houses based on 24 hour equalizing of load and very low district heating flow temperatures. District heating is a very flexible system in terms of utilizing waste heat from CHPplants, refuse incineration and industrial processes as well as renewable energy sources in an energy efficient manner. However, in relation to district heating for low energy houses there are some challenges according to investment costs and costs related to heat loss from distribution network. The objective of the project is to develop a design concept that will reduce these costs and be a 'de facto' standard of district heating to low energy houses. The design concept is based on a new type of consumer station with a domestic hot water plate heat exchanger connected to a tank on the district heating primary side. To specify design and operating parameters a simulation model of the consumer station was developed in TRNSYS. Different parameters were investigated e.g. tank size (60-200 liter) and charge flow (120-14 kg/h). An area of 92 single family houses classified as 'class 1' (42.6 kWh/m2) according to the Danish Building Regulation was chosen as reference area. Hydraulic and thermal analysis in the calculation tool TERMIS were used to lay out the distribution network based on pre-insulated twinpipes (supply and return in same casing pipe) with low-lambda PUR insulation and diffusion barrier. The design concept is compared with 3 other types of district heating systems. For a traditional system with single pipes and high district heating temperatures, the heat loss of the distribution network is calculated to 36%. In comparison, the distribution loss of the design concept can be as low as 12%. The total investment costs are almost equal for the 4 systems. In the new design concept, the cost of distribution network is reduced due to the use of smaller dimensions and twin-pipes. Though, the

  20. Modeling Transient Heat Transfer in Small-Size Twin Pipes for End-User Connections to Low-Energy District Heating Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalla Rosa, Alessandro; Li, Hongwei; Svendsen, Svend

    2013-01-01

    The low-energy district heating concept has the potential of increasing the energy and exergy efficiencies of heat supply systems and of exploiting renewable energy, provided technical solutions for its wide application can be developed and implemented. This paper investigates the dynamic behaviour...... against experimental measurements and compared to the results of an analytical formula and the FV simulations. The model proved accurate, since it gives results that well represent the outlet temperature profiles measured in the experiments and calculated in the FV simulations, both where there was a step...... change of the inlet temperature and where there was a sinusoidal inlet temperature profile. The model could be used for the development of improved substation concepts and enhanced control strategies....

  1. Development of a low-energy radioactive ion beam facility for the MARA separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadakis, Philippos, E-mail: philippos.papadakis@jyu.fi; Moore, Iain; Pohjalainen, Ilkka; Sarén, Jan; Uusitalo, Juha [University of Jyväskylä, Department of Physics (Finland)

    2016-12-15

    A low-energy radioactive ion beam facility for the production and study of nuclei produced close to the proton drip line is under development at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. The facility will take advantage of the mass selectivity of the recently commissioned MARA vacuum-mode mass separator. The ions selected by MARA will be stopped and thermalised in a small-volume gas cell prior to extraction and further mass separation. The gas cell design allows for resonance laser ionisation/spectroscopy both in-gas-cell and in-gas-jet. The facility will include experimental setups allowing ion counting, mass measurement and decay spectroscopy.

  2. Origin of the Differential Fluxes of Low-energy Electrons in the Inner Heliosheath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahr, H. J. [Argelander Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Krimigis, S. M. [Office of Space Research and Technology, Academy of Athens, 10679 Athens (Greece); Fichtner, H.; Scherer, K.; Sylla, A. [Institut für Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Ferreira, S. E. S.; Potgieter, M. S., E-mail: hf@tp4.rub.de [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa)

    2017-10-10

    The study addresses the question of the origin of low-energy electrons measured by Voyager 1 in the multi-keV range in the inner heliosheath. It intends to demonstrate that the observed keV-fluxes of electrons are consistent with their transmission through the termination shock under the influence of the associated electrostatic field. A power-law representation of the electron velocity distribution just downstream of the solar wind termination shock is motivated and formulated in terms of a so-called κ -distribution function. From this initial function spectral electron fluxes in the range 40–70 keV are derived and compared to the data. It is shown that with κ -values between 7 and 8 the data can be satisfactorily explained. Given these comparatively high κ -values, it is concluded that the electron distribution just downstream of the termination shock relaxes toward but does not reach a Maxwellian shape in the inner heliosheath.

  3. Nondissociative low energy electron attachment to C2Cl4:C2Cl4- ion lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, L.; Parthasarathy, R.; Dunning, F. B.

    2003-04-01

    The lifetimes of long-lived parent anions formed by nondissociative electron attachment to C2Cl4 are investigated using Rydberg atom techniques. The ions are created through electron transfer in collisions with K(np) Rydberg atoms and their lifetimes are measured using both time-of-flight techniques and a permanent magnet Penning trap designed specifically for heavy ion storage. The data show that low-energy electron attachment to C2Cl4 leads to the formation of C2Cl4- ions with a broad range of lifetimes extending from ˜3 to ˜130 μs, which is attributed to capture by molecules in different initial vibrational states.

  4. Optical characteristics of recrystallized tungsten mirrors exposed to low-energy, high flux D plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, A.I. [National Technical University ' Kharkiv Polytechnical Institute' , 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine); Alimov, V.Kh., E-mail: vkahome@mail.ru [Tritium Technology Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Galuza, A.A. [Institute of Electrophysics and Radiation Technologies, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine); Isobe, K. [Tritium Technology Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Konovalov, V.G.; Ryzhkov, I.V. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Scientific Center ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' , 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Savchenko, A.A.; Slatin, K.A. [National Technical University ' Kharkiv Polytechnical Institute' , 61002 Kharkov (Ukraine); Voitsenya, V.S. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Scientific Center ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' , 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Yamanishi, T. [Tritium Technology Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2011-06-01

    The surface topography and optical properties of recrystallized tungsten exposed to a low-energy (38 eV/D), high flux (10{sup 22} D/m{sup 2s}) deuterium plasma with an ion fluence of 10{sup 26} D/m{sup 2} at various temperatures was investigated. It was found that the surface morphology weakly depends on the exposure temperature in the range 320-695 K with the exception of the narrow temperature region around 535 K, where large changes to all optical characteristics occurs. After plasma exposure at this temperature, the surface topography of the W sample is characterized by active blistering as has already been indicated in previous publications. The reflectance found in direct measurements at normal incidence drops in the wavelength interval 220-650 nm, whereas the estimations of reflectance using the ellipsometry data demonstrate some increase.

  5. Development of a low-energy radioactive ion beam facility for the MARA separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Philippos; Moore, Iain; Pohjalainen, Ilkka; Sarén, Jan; Uusitalo, Juha

    2016-12-01

    A low-energy radioactive ion beam facility for the production and study of nuclei produced close to the proton drip line is under development at the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä, Finland. The facility will take advantage of the mass selectivity of the recently commissioned MARA vacuum-mode mass separator. The ions selected by MARA will be stopped and thermalised in a small-volume gas cell prior to extraction and further mass separation. The gas cell design allows for resonance laser ionisation/spectroscopy both in-gas-cell and in-gas-jet. The facility will include experimental setups allowing ion counting, mass measurement and decay spectroscopy.

  6. A kinematic coincidence technique for the study of low-energy heavy-ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradi, L.; Montagnoli, G.; Napoli, D.R.; Spolaore, P.; Stefanini, A.M.; Xu Jincheng (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padua (Italy). Lab. di Legnaro); Beghini, S.; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.F.; Soramel, F. (Padua Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padua (Italy)); Signorini, C. (Salerno Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padua (Italy))

    1990-12-10

    A setup for kinematic coincidences has been developed for the study of low-energy binary heavy-ion reactions. It consists of a position-sensitive silicon detector, and a counter telescope with microchannel plates detectors and a conventional {Delta}E-E ionization chamber. The solid angle is around 0.6 msr. By measuring the time of flight of one of the ions, and both correlated scattering angles, we achieve mass and Q-value resolutions of {Delta}A/A{approx equal}1/120 FWHM and {Delta}Q{approx equal}900 keV, respectively, for the elastic scattering of {sup 58}Ni+{sup 64}Ni near the barrier. (orig.).

  7. Absolute sputtering yields from solid Ne by low energy He+ and Arq+ (1 >= q >= 6) impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Shinya; Tachibana, Takayuki; Koizumi, Tetsuo; Hirayama, Takato

    2009-04-01

    Absolute sputtering yields from the surface of solid Ne by low energy He+ and Arq+ (1 >= q >= 6) impact are measured. Very large sputtering yields (300 atoms/ion for 1 keV He+ impact, and 3000 atoms/ion for 1keV Ar+ impact) have been observed. A significant dependence of the sputtering yields on the chage state, i.e. the potential energy, of the incident ion for Arq+ has not been observed because it is estimated to be much smaller than that of the kinetic sputtering, which suggests that the mechanism of potential sputtering is similar to those known for the electron- and photon-stimulated desorption processes.

  8. Preliminary Results on a low-energy RMF-FRC Plasma Translation Experiment for Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Carrie; Uchizono, Nolan; Holmes, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory-Edwards has developed a new experimental test cell to study the translation physics of Field-Reversed-Configurations (FRC) formed at low-energy (RMF) source, capable of producing a burst of 10 plasmoids at 5 J/pulse. This source has been characterized at full energy with a xenon propellant at a range of flow rates (5-70 sccm), bias fields up to 500 G, and antenna phasing. Data from a suite of diagnostics has been analyzed to track plasmoid formation and axial motion. These diagnostics include voltage and current probes, axial magnetic field probes, magnetic flux loops, and Langmuir probes. A time-of-flight array measures the plasmoid's exit velocity. Emission spectroscopy using streak-imaging is also implemented. A basic global energy balance from these diagnostics is used to estimate the efficiency of the translation process and determine how it scales with magnetic field, flow rate, and antenna phasing.

  9. Preliminary Results on a Low-Energy RMF-FRC Experiment with Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchizono, Nolan; Hill, Carrie; Holmes, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory-Edwards has developed a new Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) test cell for researching low-energy (RMF) FRC plasma source. FRC's are compatible with a variety of propellants - including complex propellants, like water and CO2. Water was the propellant of choice for this experiment. The input conditions of the test cell were varied to study their effects on FRC formation and plasma content. FRC formation was studied using a suite of diagnostics, including voltage and current probes, and excluded-flux measurements. Plasma species composition was studied using a residual gas analyzer, and optical emission spectroscopy. The propellant decomposition and ionization stage used in this experiment is presented in companion work at this conference.

  10. Improvement of passive shielding to reduce background components to determinate radioactivity at low energy gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, Tran Thien [VNUHCM-Univ. of Science, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Physics; Ton Duc Thang Univ., Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam). Div. of Nuclear Physics; Loan, T.T.H.; Nhon, M.V.; Tao, C.V. [VNUHCM-Univ. of Science, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Physics

    2014-06-15

    This paper describes a new system that has the ability to reduce background components to apply for environmental studies. This system uses gamma spectrometry with semi-empirical self-absorption correction and practical method for routine measurements of the mass activity radionuclides at low energy such as {sup 210}Pb (46.5 keV), {sup 234}Th (63.3 keV) and {sup 226}Ra (186.2 keV). The reliability and precision of proficiency test must pass for final scores all the analytical determinations of received ''acceptable'' for all radionuclides. Our work shows an experiment developed for the calculation of self-absorption correction in that case that the sample's chemical composition is unknown.

  11. First observation of low-energy {\\gamma}-ray enhancement in the rare-earth region

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, A; Larsen, A C; Beausang, C W; Humby, P; Burke, J T; Casperson, R J; Hughes, R O; Ross, T J; Allmond, J M; Chyzh, R; Dag, M; Koglin, J; McCleskey, E; McCleskey, M; Ota, S; Saastamoinen, A

    2016-01-01

    The {\\gamma}-ray strength function and level density in the quasi-continuum of 151,153Sm have been measured using BGO shielded Ge clover detectors of the STARLiTeR system. The Compton shields allow for an extraction of the {\\gamma} strength down to unprecedentedly low {\\gamma} energies of about 500 keV. For the first time an enhanced low- energy {\\gamma}-ray strength has been observed in the rare-earth region. In addition, for the first time both the upbend and the well known scissors resonance have been observed simultaneously for the same nucleus. Hauser-Feshbach calculations show that this strength enhancement at low {\\gamma} energies could have an impact of 2-3 orders of magnitude on the (n,{\\gamma}) reaction rates for the r-process nucleosynthesis.

  12. Heat of Fusion Storage with High Solar Fraction for Solar Low Energy Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Jørgen Munthe; Furbo, Simon

    2006-01-01

    of the storage to cool down below the melting point without solidification preserving the heat of fusion energy. If the supercooled storage reaches the surrounding temperature no heat loss will take place until the supercooled salt is activated. The investigation shows that this concept makes it possible...... to achieve 100% coverage of space heating and domestic hot water in a low energy house in a Danish climate with a solar heating system with 36 m² flat plate solar collector and approximately 10 m³ storage with sodium acetate. A traditional water storage solution aiming at 100% coverage will require a storage......This paper presents the theoretical investigation on a concept for a seasonal thermal storage based on the phase change material sodium acetate trihydrate with active use of supercooling as a measure to achieve a partly heat loss free thermal storage. The effect of supercooling allows a melted part...

  13. Theoretical motivation for gravitation experiments on ultra-low energy antiprotons and antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    It is known that the generally accepted theories of gravity and quantum mechanics are fundamentally incompatible. Thus, when one tries to combine these theories, one must beware of physical pitfalls. Modern theories of quantum gravity are trying to overcome these problems. Any ideas must confront the present agreement with general relativity, but yet be free to wonder about not understood phenomena, such as the dark matter problem. This all has led some {open_quotes}intrepid{close_quotes} theorists to consider a new gravitational regime, that of antimatter. Even more {open_quotes}daring{close_quotes} experimentalists are attempting, or considering attempting, the measurement of the gravitational force on antimatter, including low-energy antiprotons and, perhaps most enticing, antihydrogen.

  14. Enhancing growth of cultured human skin cells using low-energy CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Nili; Reuveni, Haim; Halevy, Sima; Lubart, Rachel

    1997-12-01

    In view of the versatility and usage of the CO2 laser as a too. in surgery and dermatology, we have studied its effect on enhancing proliferation of cultured skin cells using an attenuated CO2 laser. Exposure of cultured keratinocytes or fibroblasts to continuous wave or pulse mode irradiation enhanced thymidine incorporation by 1.4 to 1.7 folds, and cell number by 1.25 to 1.4 folds, measured 24 and 48 hours later, depending on the fluency applied. As expected, these effects were not suppressed by added antioxidants, indicating that the mechanism involved in this newly observed effect, differ from photosensitization by low energy visible and near IR lasers.

  15. Carbon monoxide production in low energy oxygen ion bombardment of pyrolytic graphite and Kapton surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, C. C.; Eck, T. G.; Hoffman, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The results of an investigtion of the interaction of low energy oxygen ions with pyrolytic graphite and Kapton surface are reported. CO molecules emitted from the surface as a result of the ion bombardment were detected by a mass spectrometer. Because the ion-induced signals were small compared to that arising from the CO background pressure in the vacuum system, the ion beam was modulated and the modulated component of the CO signal measured with a lock-in amplifier. The quantum yield (CO molecules emitted per incident oxygen ion) for graphite rose from 1.9 at 4.5 eV ion energy to 6.6 at 465 eV. Comparable yields were obtained for Kapton. The large size of the yields suggests contributions to the reaction process from the background O2 molecules in the vacuum system.

  16. A Cryogenic Current Comparator for the Low Energy Antiproton Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, M; Welsch, CP

    2014-01-01

    Several laboratories have shown the potential of using Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers together with superconductor magnetic shields to measure beam current intensities in the submicro-Ampere regime. CERN, in collaboration with GSI, Jena university and Helmholtz Institute Jena, is currently working on developing an improved version of such a current monitor for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) and Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) rings at CERN, aiming for better current resolution and overall system availability. This contribution will present the current design, including theoretical estimation of the current resolution; stability limits of SQUID systems and adaptation of the coupling circuit to the AD beam parameters; the analysis of thermal and mechanical cryostat modes.

  17. Low Energy 8 B Solar Neutrinos with the Wideband Intelligent Trigger at Super-Kamiokande

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnimr, Muhammad; Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The water Cherenkov experiment Super-Kamiokande (SK) has accumulated a sample of ˜ 90k solar neutrino data in the past two decades. Currently, the detector measures recoil electrons from solar 8 B neutrino-electron scattering above a kinetic energy of ˜ 3.5 MeV, limited by the capacity of the software trigger, although electrons as low as 2.5 MeV can be reconstructed. The next frontier for the low energy program at Super-K is the current operation of the Wideband Intelligent Trigger (WIT) to push the trigger threshold to the event reconstruction limit of 2.5 MeV. This opens up the possibility to explore the lower energy edge of the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect in the sun. In this work we will present the prelimiary analysis of the accumlated WIT data taken so far as well as future prospects.

  18. Low-Energy Plasma Focus Device as an Electron Beam Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zubair Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A low-energy plasma focus device was used as an electron beam source. A technique was developed to simultaneously measure the electron beam intensity and energy. The system was operated in Argon filling at an optimum pressure of 1.7 mbar. A Faraday cup was used together with an array of filtered PIN diodes. The beam-target X-rays were registered through X-ray spectrometry. Copper and lead line radiations were registered upon usage as targets. The maximum electron beam charge and density were estimated to be 0.31 μC and 13.5×1016/m3, respectively. The average energy of the electron beam was 500 keV. The high flux of the electron beam can be potentially applicable in material sciences.

  19. Low-Energy Plasma Focus Device as an Electron Beam Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong Ling, Yap; Naresh Kumar, Nitturi; Lian Kuang, Lim; Chiow San, Wong

    2014-01-01

    A low-energy plasma focus device was used as an electron beam source. A technique was developed to simultaneously measure the electron beam intensity and energy. The system was operated in Argon filling at an optimum pressure of 1.7 mbar. A Faraday cup was used together with an array of filtered PIN diodes. The beam-target X-rays were registered through X-ray spectrometry. Copper and lead line radiations were registered upon usage as targets. The maximum electron beam charge and density were estimated to be 0.31 μC and 13.5 × 1016/m3, respectively. The average energy of the electron beam was 500 keV. The high flux of the electron beam can be potentially applicable in material sciences. PMID:25544952

  20. Capture, Electron-Cooling and Compression of Antiprotons in a Large Penning-Trap for Physics Experiments with an Ultra-Low Energy Extracted Antiproton Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS200 \\\\ \\\\The availability of ultra-low energy antiprotons is a crucial ingredient for the execution of the gravity measurements PS200. We have developed a method to provide such low energy antiprotons based on a large Penning trap (the PS200 catching trap). This system can accept a fast-extracted pulse from LEAR, reduce the energy of the antiprotons in the pulse from 5.9~MeV to several tens of kilovolts using a degrading foil, and then capture the antiprotons in a large Penning trap. These antiprotons are cooled by electrons previously admitted to the trap and are collected in a small region at the center of the trap. We have demonstrated our capability to capture up to 1~million antiprotons from LEAR in a single shot, electron cool these antiprotons, and transfer up to 95\\% of them into the inner, harmonic region. A storage time in excess of 1 hour was observed. These results have been obtained with the cryogenic trap vacuum coupled to a room temperature vacuum at about l0$ ^- ^{1} ^0 $ Torr, which is an...