WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing large numbers

  1. Dirac's Large Numbers Hypothesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 8. Dirac's Large Numbers Hypothesis. Biman Nath. Article-in-a-Box Volume 8 Issue 8 August 2003 pp 7-7. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/08/0007-0007. Author Affiliations.

  2. Numbers Defy the Law of Large Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Ruma; Lann, Avital Lavie

    2015-01-01

    As the number of independent tosses of a fair coin grows, the rates of heads and tails tend to equality. This is misinterpreted by many students as being true also for the absolute numbers of the two outcomes, which, conversely, depart unboundedly from each other in the process. Eradicating that misconception, as by coin-tossing experiments,…

  3. Hypergraphs with large transversal number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henning, Michael A.; Yeo, Anders

    2013-01-01

    For κ ≥ 2, let H be a k-uniform hypergraph on n vertices and m edges. The transversal number τ (H) of H is the minimum number of vertices that intersect every edge. We consider the following question: Is τ (H) ≤ n/k + m/6? For κ ≥ 4, we show that the inequality in the question does not always hol...

  4. Large number discrimination in newborn fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Piffer

    Full Text Available Quantitative abilities have been reported in a wide range of species, including fish. Recent studies have shown that adult guppies (Poecilia reticulata can spontaneously select the larger number of conspecifics. In particular the evidence collected in literature suggest the existence of two distinct systems of number representation: a precise system up to 4 units, and an approximate system for larger numbers. Spontaneous numerical abilities, however, seem to be limited to 4 units at birth and it is currently unclear whether or not the large number system is absent during the first days of life. In the present study, we investigated whether newborn guppies can be trained to discriminate between large quantities. Subjects were required to discriminate between groups of dots with a 0.50 ratio (e.g., 7 vs. 14 in order to obtain a food reward. To dissociate the roles of number and continuous quantities that co-vary with numerical information (such as cumulative surface area, space and density, three different experiments were set up: in Exp. 1 number and continuous quantities were simultaneously available. In Exp. 2 we controlled for continuous quantities and only numerical information was available; in Exp. 3 numerical information was made irrelevant and only continuous quantities were available. Subjects successfully solved the tasks in Exp. 1 and 2, providing the first evidence of large number discrimination in newborn fish. No discrimination was found in experiment 3, meaning that number acuity is better than spatial acuity. A comparison with the onset of numerical abilities observed in shoal-choice tests suggests that training procedures can promote the development of numerical abilities in guppies.

  5. Tutoring Large Numbers: An unmet challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Lentell

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Open and distance learning (ODL is increasingly being regarded as a viable policy option for developing countries with limited educational resources for buildings, books and trained teachers, seeking to increase accessibility for large numbers of learners in education and training opportunities. Advocates of ODL as an appropriate solution to development issues tend to emphasise the hardware and software (curricula, materials and media of instruction and delivery, and especially ICTs rather than the learning support needed (See, for example, World Bank, 2002.In one sense this should not be surprising. As Lentell has noted, tutoring has never been at the forefront of mainstream writing on distance education, at least not until fairly recently (Lentell, 2003. However, whilst tutoring might not be central to the writing about ODL in the north, the practice is somewhat different. Tutoring tends to be the less visible element of ODL, but it is no less essential than good materials and effective administration. Distance education cannot exist without tutors who provide feedback and guidance to students. This point is well demonstrated by, for example, the array of institutional handbooks on tutoring produced by distance education universities. In practice, established distance education providers typically invest considerably in tutoring and other forms of learner support (Rumble, 1997. Moreover, and certainly among learner support professionals, there is an implicit “preferred” model. This model assumes a relatively low student-to-tutor ratio, with the tutor offering proactive individual guidance and feedback. Such a model, however, is not easily transferable to a situation where the reasons for adopting distance education are limited numbers of teachers and limited access to educational provision.

  6. Categories of Large Numbers in Line Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, David; Charlesworth, Arthur; Ottmar, Erin

    2017-01-01

    How do people stretch their understanding of magnitude from the experiential range to the very large quantities and ranges important in science, geopolitics, and mathematics? This paper empirically evaluates how and whether people make use of numerical categories when estimating relative magnitudes of numbers across many orders of magnitude. We…

  7. Large numbers hypothesis. II - Electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper develops the theory of electromagnetic radiation in the units covariant formalism incorporating Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH). A direct field-to-particle technique is used to obtain the photon propagation equation which explicitly involves the photon replication rate. This replication rate is fixed uniquely by requiring that the form of a free-photon distribution function be preserved, as required by the 2.7 K cosmic radiation. One finds that with this particular photon replication rate the units covariant formalism developed in Paper I actually predicts that the ratio of photon number to proton number in the universe varies as t to the 1/4, precisely in accord with LNH. The cosmological red-shift law is also derived and it is shown to differ considerably from the standard form of (nu)(R) - const.

  8. Forecasting distribution of numbers of large fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidenshink, Jeffery C.; Preisler, Haiganoush K.; Howard, Stephen; Burgan, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Systems to estimate forest fire potential commonly utilize one or more indexes that relate to expected fire behavior; however they indicate neither the chance that a large fire will occur, nor the expected number of large fires. That is, they do not quantify the probabilistic nature of fire danger. In this work we use large fire occurrence information from the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project, and satellite and surface observations of fuel conditions in the form of the Fire Potential Index, to estimate two aspects of fire danger: 1) the probability that a 1 acre ignition will result in a 100+ acre fire, and 2) the probabilities of having at least 1, 2, 3, or 4 large fires within a Predictive Services Area in the forthcoming week. These statistical processes are the main thrust of the paper and are used to produce two daily national forecasts that are available from the U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation and Science Center and via the Wildland Fire Assessment System. A validation study of our forecasts for the 2013 fire season demonstrated good agreement between observed and forecasted values.

  9. Law of Large Numbers under Choquet Expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With a new notion of independence of random variables, we establish the nonadditive version of weak law of large numbers (LLN for the independent and identically distributed (IID random variables under Choquet expectations induced by 2-alternating capacities. Moreover, we weaken the moment assumptions to the first absolute moment and characterize the approximate distributions of random variables as well. Naturally, our theorem can be viewed as an extension of the classical LLN to the case where the probability is no longer additive.

  10. [International migration: small numbers, large challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Y Griego, M

    1988-01-01

    Mexican immigration into the United States during the period of 1850-1980 is analyzed relying on census data. In the late 1800's immigrants worked on railway construction and on farms in the central and northern plains, but they numbered only 68,000 in 1880. Between 1900-1930 their numbers exploded from 103,000 to close to 1 million due to the demand for agricultural laborers in California and Texas. The Great Depression saw en masse repatriation, by 1940 their numbers dwindled to 377,000, and it was not until the 60's that a resurgence started. By 1970 their number was 789,000, and the corrected 1980 census figure puts their number at 2,531,000 of which 1.1 million were illegals. Most were males 15-44 years old. Mexicans born outside Mexico were only 269,000 in 1980, a figure slightly higher than Mexicans registered in the U.S. in 1910. North Americans and Spanish have been the most numerous immigrants into Mexico since the 19th century, but in recent years a massive immigration from Central America has occurred as a result of political turmoil and war. Mexican immigration into the U.S. served as a safety valve for the economy and it has been compared to other demographic phenomena such as births and deaths. The legalization of immigrants in 1986 under a U.S. law has significantly dissipated a constant source of friction with the U.S.

  11. 48 CFR 1604.7201 - FEHB Program Large Provider Agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... methodology the carrier used to compute the provider's profit; and, (v) Describe the provider risk provisions... term ends. (c) Large Provider Agreements based on cost analysis are subject to the provisions of FAR 52.215-2, “Audit and Records-Negotiation.” (d) Large Provider Agreements based on price analysis are...

  12. The Intuitiveness of the Law of Large Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lem, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    In this paper two studies are reported in which two contrasting claims concerning the intuitiveness of the law of large numbers are investigated. While Sedlmeier and Gigerenzer ("J Behav Decis Mak" 10:33-51, 1997) claim that people have an intuition that conforms to the law of large numbers, but that they can only employ this intuition…

  13. Service Provider Revenue Dependence of Offered Number of Service Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Aćimović-Raspopović

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper possible applications of responsive pricing scheme and Stackelberg game for pricing telecommunication services with service provider as a leader and users acting as followers are analyzed. We have classified users according to an elasticity criterion into inelastic, partially elastic and elastic users. Their preferences are modelled through utility functions, which describe users’ sensitivity to changes in the quality of service and price. In the proposed algorithm a bandwidth management server is responsible for performing automatic optimal bandwidth allocation to each user’s session while maximizing its expected utility and the overall service provider’s revenue. The pricing algorithm is used for congestion control and more efficient network capacity utilization. We have analyzed different scenarios of the proposed usage-based pricing algorithm. Particularly, the influence of the number of service classes on price setting in terms of service provider’s revenue and total users’ utility maximization are discussed. The model is verified through numerous simulations performed by software that we have developed for that purpose.

  14. Mega numbers, lobbying and providing care for individuals with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, H Barry; Perlman, Steven P

    2009-10-01

    Lobbying is a competitive effort directed to reaching legislators who are attempting to balance the demands of individuals, organized groups, political parties, and the complex economic realities of our times. Unfortunately, the use of all-inclusive "mega numbers" (whether it is the millions of individuals with disabilities or the billions of dollars for needed services) is difficult for any person to place in proper perspective. As a result, the estimated 1.5 million children and adults with autism spectrum disorders and their families in the United States become just "numbers" - not actual people. The need is to somehow personalize these numbers if we are to bring increased attention to these individuals with special needs. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and private research foundation data are used to illustrate an approach to better personalize the information for individual politicians and health practitioners.

  15. A Chain Perspective on Large-scale Number Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grijpink, J.H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    As large-scale number systems gain significance in social and economic life (electronic communication, remote electronic authentication), the correct functioning and the integrity of public number systems take on crucial importance. They are needed to uniquely indicate people, objects or phenomena

  16. Service Provider Revenue Dependence of Offered Number of Service Classes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    V. S. Aćimović-Raspopović; V. Radonjić

    2011-01-01

    In this paper possible applications of responsive pricing scheme and Stackelberg game for pricing telecommunication services with service provider as a leader and users acting as followers are analyzed...

  17. Administrative and clinical denials by a large dental insurance provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Elias MIRANDA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence and the type of claim denials (administrative, clinical or both made by a large dental insurance plan. This was a cross-sectional, observational study, which retrospectively collected data from the claims and denial reports of a dental insurance company. The sample consisted of the payment claims submitted by network dentists, based on their procedure reports, reviewed in the third trimester of 2012. The denials were classified and grouped into ‘administrative’, ‘clinical’ or ‘both’. The data were tabulated and submitted to uni- and bivariate analyses. The confidence intervals were 95% and the level of significance was set at 5%. The overall frequency of denials was 8.2% of the total number of procedures performed. The frequency of administrative denials was 72.88%, whereas that of technical denials was 25.95% and that of both, 1.17% (p < 0.05. It was concluded that the overall prevalence of denials in the studied sample was low. Administrative denials were the most prevalent. This type of denial could be reduced if all dental insurance providers had unified clinical and administrative protocols, and if dentists submitted all of the required documentation in accordance with these protocols.

  18. Lovelock inflation and the number of large dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrer, Francesc

    2007-01-01

    We discuss an inflationary scenario based on Lovelock terms. These higher order curvature terms can lead to inflation when there are more than three spatial dimensions. Inflation will end if the extra dimensions are stabilised, so that at most three dimensions are free to expand. This relates graceful exit to the number of large dimensions.

  19. teaching multiplication of large positive whole numbers using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the teaching of multiplication of large positive whole numbers using the grating method and the effect of this method on students' performance in junior secondary schools. The study was conducted in Obio Akpor Local Government Area of Rivers state. It was quasi- experimental. Two research ...

  20. Teaching Multiplication of Large Positive Whole Numbers Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the teaching of multiplication of large positive whole numbers using the grating method and the effect of this method on students' performance in junior secondary schools. The study was conducted in Obio Akpor Local Government Area of Rivers state. It was quasi- experimental. Two research ...

  1. Periodic response of nonlinear dynamical system with large number ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... is proposed for predicting the periodic responses of nonlinear systems directly from solution of second order equations of motion without transforming to double first order equations. The proposed methodology is quite suitable for systems with large number of degrees of freedom such as the banded system of equations ...

  2. Student Understanding of Large Numbers and Powers: The Effect of Incorporating Historical Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Mala S.; Thomas, Michael O. J.

    2012-01-01

    The value of a consideration of large numbers and exponentiation in primary and early secondary school should not be underrated. In Indian history of mathematics, consistent naming of, and working with large numbers, including powers of ten, appears to have provided the impetus for the development of a place value system. While today's students do…

  3. A large number of stepping motor network construction by PLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lin; Zhang, Kai; Hongqiang, Guo

    2017-11-01

    In the flexible automatic line, the equipment is complex, the control mode is flexible, how to realize the large number of step and servo motor information interaction, the orderly control become a difficult control. Based on the existing flexible production line, this paper makes a comparative study of its network strategy. After research, an Ethernet + PROFIBUSE communication configuration based on PROFINET IO and profibus was proposed, which can effectively improve the data interaction efficiency of the equipment and stable data interaction information.

  4. Rotating thermal convection at very large Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stephan; van Gils, Dennis; Ahlers, Guenter; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2016-11-01

    The large scale thermal convection systems in geo- and astrophysics are usually influenced by Coriolis forces caused by the rotation of their celestial bodies. To better understand the influence of rotation on the convective flow field and the heat transport at these conditions, we study Rayleigh-Bénard convection, using pressurized sulfur hexaflouride (SF6) at up to 19 bars in a cylinder of diameter D=1.12 m and a height of L=2.24 m. The gas is heated from below and cooled from above and the convection cell sits on a rotating table inside a large pressure vessel (the "Uboot of Göttingen"). With this setup Rayleigh numbers of up to Ra =1015 can be reached, while Ekman numbers as low as Ek =10-8 are possible. The Prandtl number in these experiment is kept constant at Pr = 0 . 8 . We report on heat flux measurements (expressed by the Nusselt number Nu) as well as measurements from more than 150 temperature probes inside the flow. We thank the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for financial support through SFB963: "Astrophysical Flow Instabilities and Turbulence". The work of GA was supported in part by the US National Science Foundation through Grant DMR11-58514.

  5. Dirac cosmology. [large dimensionless numbers relation to universe age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V.; Lodenquai, J.

    1977-01-01

    The large numbers hypothesis (LNH) linking the magnitude of large dimensionless ratios in physics (on the order of 10 to the 40th power) to cosmic time is examined. The LNH is checked against evidence on 3K background radiation of the universe and the (log N, log S)-relation for radio galaxies. Earlier criticisms of LNH by Gamow and Teller are examined, and alternative hypotheses put forth by Dicke and Carter (1974) are discussed. The discussion covers: continuous (additive or multiplicative) creation of matter, the Einstein metric and the atomic metric, and general cosmological and local astronomical implications of LNH. LNH is also viewed in relation to solar evolution and pulsar physics.

  6. Methods of analysis and number of replicates for trials with large numbers of soybean genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilvani Matei

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the experimental precision of different methods of statistical analysis for trials with large numbers of soybean genotypes, and their relationship with the number of replicates. Soybean yield data (nine trials; 324 genotypes; 46 cultivars; 278 lines; agricultural harvest of 2014/15 were used. Two of these trials were performed at the same location, side by side, forming a trial with six replicates. Each trial was analyzed by the randomized complete block, triple lattice design, and use of the Papadakis method. The selective accuracy, least significant difference, and Fasoulas differentiation index were estimated, and model assumptions were tested. The resampling method was used to study the influence of the number of replicates, by varying the number of blocks and estimating the precision measurements. The experimental precision indicators of the Papadakis method are more favorable as compared to the randomized complete block design and triple lattice. To obtain selective accuracy above the high experimental precision range in trials with 324 soybean genotypes, two repetitions can be used, and data can be analyzed using the randomized complete block design or Papadakis method.

  7. First Contact with Astronomy for a Large Number of Pupils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Rosa M.

    The Spanish Royal Society of Physics (RSEF) co-operates with several European institutions to promote Physics and Astronomy in schools through the project ""Fisica en Acción"". This project started in 2000 integrated with the project ""Physics on Stage"" created by CERN ESA and ESO. ""Fisica en Accion"" is a Spanish competition bringing together a group of teachers in a common endeavour: * showing ""physics demonstrations"" to general audiences * engaging pedagogical presentations to introduce science into the classroom. The national final event of this competition takes place annually in a science museum during one weekend (entrance is free). The Science Fair is especially well received by visitors who can ask the demonstrators-teachers questions. Younger visitors enjoy experimenting for themselves. After the first year the RSEF introduced special prizes to encourage schools to participate in astronomical categories. The ""Centro de Astrobiologia de Madrid"" gave a cash prize and a visit to their headquarters to the winners. The ""Instituto Astrofísico de Canarias"" offered a prize of a trip to its observatories. In summary the astronomical elements of ""Fisica en Acción"" stimulate the teachers and students' interest in international activities and has been the first contact with Astronomy for a large number of pupils.

  8. 48 CFR 1652.204-74 - Large provider agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... insert the following clause in all FEHB Program contracts based on cost analysis (experience-rated...; (iv) Describe the methodology the carrier used to compute the provider's profit; and, (v) Describe provider risk provisions. (3) The Contracting officer may request from the carrier any additional...

  9. The Ramsey numbers of large cycles versus small wheels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surahmat, [Unknown; Baskoro, E.T.; Broersma, Haitze J.

    2002-01-01

    For two given graphs $G$ and $H$, the \\textit{Ramsey number} $R(G,H)$ is the smallest positive integer $N$ such that for every graph $F$ of order $N$ the following holds: either $F$ contains $G$ as a subgraph or the complement of $F$ contains $H$ as a subgraph. In this paper, we determine the Ramsey

  10. Hermann Weyl and large numbers in relativistic cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, Gennady

    It was only in the late 1910s, however, that the first physical fact was discovered that could provide a quantitative clue to the interconnection between the micro- and mega-worlds. It was a famous mathematician, Hermann Weyl, who made this discovery. His discovery later gave rise to such different ideas as the hypothetical variation of the gravitational constant and the anthropic principle. More cautiously, it was referred to as "an unexplained empirical connection between meta-galactic parameters and micro-physical constants" (Zel'manov 1962). Although this link between the micro- and mega-worlds is regarded as an empirical fact, its recognition was intertwined with developments in advanced theoretical physics. Before turning to the circumstances of the discovery of this fact, let us look at its contemporary status, which clearly points to its empirical nature.

  11. The large Reynolds number - Asymptotic theory of turbulent boundary layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    A self-consistent, asymptotic expansion of the one-point, mean turbulent equations of motion is obtained. Results such as the velocity defect law and the law of the wall evolve in a relatively rigorous manner, and a systematic ordering of the mean velocity boundary layer equations and their interaction with the main stream flow are obtained. The analysis is extended to the turbulent energy equation and to a treatment of the small scale equilibrium range of Kolmogoroff; in velocity correlation space the two-thirds power law is obtained. Thus, the two well-known 'laws' of turbulent flow are imbedded in an analysis which provides a great deal of other information.

  12. The numbers game in wildlife conservation: changeability and framing of large mammal numbers in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandiwa, E.

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife conservation in terrestrial ecosystems requires an understanding of processes influencing population sizes. Top-down and bottom-up processes are important in large herbivore population dynamics, with strength of these processes varying spatially and temporally. However, up until recently

  13. Cannabis abuse and age at onset in schizophrenia patients with large, rare copy number variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew Kenneth; Robinson, Gail; Reutens, David; Mowry, Bryan

    2014-05-01

    Large deletions are found to a greater extent in patients with schizophrenia compared with healthy controls. This study aims to investigate clinical symptomatology and substance abuse rates in patients with large (>500kb), rare (schizophrenia patients in general. 633 schizophrenia patients, including 60 with large (>500kb), rare (cannabis abuse rates as well as a range of symptom measures using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), Family Interview for Genetic Studies (FIGS), and medical records. Patients with large, rare deletions had significantly less cannabis abuse rates but comparable alcohol abuse rates, with an age at onset later than those without large, rare deletions. There was no significant difference in any substance abuse or clinical symptom rates between patients with and without large, rare duplications, but an interaction did exist between cannabis abuse, duplication status, and age at onset, with cannabis abuse resulting in an earlier age at onset only in those without a large, rare duplication. Similarly, patients with a large, rare duplication had a later onset age for cannabis abuse/dependence. Schizophrenia patients with large, rare deletions were less likely to have comorbid cannabis abuse over their lifetime. This provides support for a threshold model of risk with those carrying a schizophrenia-associated copy number variation less reliant on environmental insults. Patients with large, rare duplications were protected against earlier onset of schizophrenia in the presence of comorbid cannabis abuse in addition to later onset of cannabis abuse itself. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Providing cell phone numbers and email addresses to Patients: the physician's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Roni; Avdalimov, Angelika; Freud, Tamar

    2011-03-23

    The provision of cell phone numbers and email addresses enhances the accessibility of medical consultations, but can add to the burden of physicians' routine clinical practice and affect their free time. The objective was to assess the attitudes of physicians to providing their telephone number or email address to patients. Primary care physicians in the southern region of Israel completed a structured questionnaire that related to the study objective. The study population included 120 primary care physicians with a mean age of 41.2 ± 8.5, 88 of them women (73.3%). Physicians preferred to provide their cell phone number rather than their email address (P = 0.0007). They preferred to answer their cell phones only during the daytime and at predetermined times, but would answer email most hours of the day, including weekends and holidays (P = 0.001). More physicians (79.7%) would have preferred allotted time for email communication than allotted time for cell phone communication (50%). However, they felt that email communication was more likely to lead to miscommunication than telephone calls (P = 0.0001). There were no differences between male and female physicians on the provision of cell phone numbers or email addresses to patients. Older physicians were more prepared to provide cell phone numbers that younger ones (P = 0.039). The attitude of participating physicians was to provide their cell phone number or email address to some of their patients, but most of them preferred to give out their cell phone number.

  15. Providing cell phone numbers and email addresses to Patients: the physician's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freud Tamar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The provision of cell phone numbers and email addresses enhances the accessibility of medical consultations, but can add to the burden of physicians' routine clinical practice and affect their free time. The objective was to assess the attitudes of physicians to providing their telephone number or email address to patients. Methods Primary care physicians in the southern region of Israel completed a structured questionnaire that related to the study objective. Results The study population included 120 primary care physicians with a mean age of 41.2 ± 8.5, 88 of them women (73.3%. Physicians preferred to provide their cell phone number rather than their email address (P = 0.0007. They preferred to answer their cell phones only during the daytime and at predetermined times, but would answer email most hours of the day, including weekends and holidays (P = 0.001. More physicians (79.7% would have preferred allotted time for email communication than allotted time for cell phone communication (50%. However, they felt that email communication was more likely to lead to miscommunication than telephone calls (P = 0.0001. There were no differences between male and female physicians on the provision of cell phone numbers or email addresses to patients. Older physicians were more prepared to provide cell phone numbers that younger ones (P = 0.039. Conclusions The attitude of participating physicians was to provide their cell phone number or email address to some of their patients, but most of them preferred to give out their cell phone number.

  16. Health Care Marketing: Opinions of Providers. North Dakota Economic Studies, Number 46.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Donald G.; And Others

    The health care industry in the United States has undergone tremendous change. Health care providers must view their health care delivery organizations as businesses and must use the tools of business, including marketing. Most research on health care marketing has focused on the practices of large, urban facilities. Little work has been…

  17. Prospectus: towards the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klewicki, J. C.; Chini, G. P.; Gibson, J. F.

    2017-03-01

    Recent and on-going advances in mathematical methods and analysis techniques, coupled with the experimental and computational capacity to capture detailed flow structure at increasingly large Reynolds numbers, afford an unprecedented opportunity to develop realistic models of high Reynolds number turbulent wall-flow dynamics. A distinctive attribute of this new generation of models is their grounding in the Navier-Stokes equations. By adhering to this challenging constraint, high-fidelity models ultimately can be developed that not only predict flow properties at high Reynolds numbers, but that possess a mathematical structure that faithfully captures the underlying flow physics. These first-principles models are needed, for example, to reliably manipulate flow behaviours at extreme Reynolds numbers. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A provides a selection of contributions from the community of researchers who are working towards the development of such models. Broadly speaking, the research topics represented herein report on dynamical structure, mechanisms and transport; scale interactions and self-similarity; model reductions that restrict nonlinear interactions; and modern asymptotic theories. In this prospectus, the challenges associated with modelling turbulent wall-flows at large Reynolds numbers are briefly outlined, and the connections between the contributing papers are highlighted.

  18. Contralateral delay activity provides a neural measure of the number of representations in visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikkai, Akiko; McCollough, Andrew W; Vogel, Edward K

    2010-04-01

    Visual working memory (VWM) helps to temporarily represent information from the visual environment and is severely limited in capacity. Recent work has linked various forms of neural activity to the ongoing representations in VWM. One piece of evidence comes from human event-related potential studies, which find a sustained contralateral negativity during the retention period of VWM tasks. This contralateral delay activity (CDA) has previously been shown to increase in amplitude as the number of memory items increases, up to the individual's working memory capacity limit. However, significant alternative hypotheses remain regarding the true nature of this activity. Here we test whether the CDA is modulated by the perceptual requirements of the memory items as well as whether it is determined by the number of locations that are being attended within the display. Our results provide evidence against these two alternative accounts and instead strongly support the interpretation that this activity reflects the current number of objects that are being represented in VWM.

  19. Mapping Ad Hoc Communications Network of a Large Number Fixed-Wing UAV Swarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS MAPPING AD HOC COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK OF A LARGE NUMBER FIXED-WING UAV SWARM by Alexis...SUBTITLE MAPPING AD HOC COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK OF A LARGE NUMBER FIXED-WING UAV SWARM 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Alexis Pospischil 7. PERFORMING... UAVs ) simultaneously as a self-organizing swarm. These vehicles were able to execute behaviors based on message notification from a single ground

  20. Numerical and analytical approaches to an advection-diffusion problem at small Reynolds number and large P\\'eclet number

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Nathaniel J

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining a detailed understanding of the physical interactions between a cell and its environment often requires information about the flow of fluid surrounding the cell. Cells must be able to effectively absorb and discard material in order to survive. Strategies for nutrient acquisition and toxin disposal, which have been evolutionarily selected for their efficacy, should reflect knowledge of the physics underlying this mass transport problem. Motivated by these considerations, in this paper we consider a two-dimensional advection-diffusion problem at small Reynolds number and large P\\'eclet number. We discuss the problem of mass transport for a circular cell in a uniform far-field flow. We approach the problem numerically, and also analytically through a rescaling of the concentration boundary layer. A biophysically motivated first-passage problem for the absorption of material by the cell demonstrates quantitative agreement between the numerical and analytical approaches.

  1. A NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF BUBBLES RISING AT INTERMEDIATE REYNOLDS AND LARGE WEBER NUMBERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOFFMANN, AC; VANDENBOGAARD, HA

    The steady state rise of bubbles at intermediate Reynolds numbers and large Weber numbers has been investigated using finite element simulations. The velocity and stress fields are discussed. Near-constant normal stress profiles over a region around the bubble apex could be generated by optimizing

  2. Structure of Wall-Eddies at Very Large Reynolds Number--A Large-Scale PIV Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommema, S. E.; Adrian, R. J.

    2000-11-01

    The results of an experiment performed in the first 5 m of the neutral atmospheric boundary layer are presented. Large-scale PIV measurements (up to 2 m × 2 m field-of-view) were obtained in the streamwise / wall-normal plane of a very-large Reynolds number (Re_θ > 10^6, based on momentum thickness and freestream velocity), flat-plate, zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. Measurements were obtained at the SLTEST facility in the U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Grounds. Coherent packets of ramp-like structures with downstream inclination are observed and show a remarkable resemblance to those observed in typical laboratory-scale experiments at far lower Reynolds number. The results are interpreted in terms of a vortex packet paradigm(Adrian, R.J., C.D. Meinhart, and C.D. Tomkins, Vortex organization in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer, to appear in J. Fluid Mech., 2000.) and begin to extend the model to high Reynolds numbers of technological importance. Additional results obtained during periods of non-neutral atmospheric stability are contrasted with those of the canonical neutral boundary layer. Sample smoke visualization images (3 m × 15 m field-of-view) are available online from the author.

  3. Large-Actuator-Number Horizontal Path Correction of Atmospheric Turbulence utilizing an Interferometric Phase Conjugate Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Gavel, D; Tucker, J; Silva, D A; Wilks, S C; Olivier, S S; Olsen, J

    2004-08-25

    An adaptive optical system used to correct horizontal beam propagation paths has been demonstrated. This system utilizes an interferometric wave-front sensor and a large-actuator-number MEMS-based spatial light modulator to correct the aberrations incurred by the beam after propagation along the path. Horizontal path correction presents a severe challenge to adaptive optics systems due to the short atmospheric transverse coherence length and the high degree of scintillation incurred by laser propagation along these paths. Unlike wave-front sensors that detect phase gradients, however, the interferometric wave-front sensor measures the wrapped phase directly. Because the system operates with nearly monochromatic light and uses a segmented spatial light modulator, it does not require that the phase be unwrapped to provide a correction and it also does not require a global reconstruction of the wave-front to determine the phase as required by gradient detecting wave-front sensors. As a result, issues with branch points are eliminated. Because the atmospheric probe beam is mixed with a large amplitude reference beam, it can be made to operate in a photon noise limited regime making its performance relatively unaffected by scintillation. The MEMS-based spatial light modulator in the system contains 1024 pixels and is controlled to speeds in excess of 800 Hz, enabling its use for correction of horizontal path beam propagation. In this article results are shown of both atmospheric characterization with the system and open loop horizontal path correction of a 1.53 micron laser by the system. To date Strehl ratios of greater than 0.5 have been achieved.

  4. Historical changes in the annual number of large floods in North America and Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkins, G. A.; Whitfield, P. H.; Hannaford, J.; Burn, D. H.; Renard, B.; Stahl, K.; Fleig, A.; Madsen, H.; Mediero, L.; Korhonen, J.; Murphy, C.; Crochet, P.; Wilson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have analyzed historical changes in low magnitude floods, such as the annual peak flow, at a national or regional scale. However, the river basins used have often been influenced by human alterations such as reservoir regulation or urbanization. No known studies have analyzed changes in large floods (greater than 25-year return period) at a continental scale for minimally impacted basins. To fill this research gap, this study analyzed flood flows from reference hydrologic networks (RHNs) or RHN-like gauges in North America (United States and Canada) and Europe (United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Spain, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Iceland, Norway, Denmark, Sweden, and Finland). RHNs are formally defined networks in several countries that comprise gauging stations with a natural or near-natural flow regime and provide good quality data. Selected RHN-like gauges were included following a major effort to ensure RHN-like status through consultation with local experts. Peak flows with recurrence intervals of 25, 50, and 100 years were estimated using consistent methods for over 1200 study gauges, and peak flows at each gauge that exceeded these flood thresholds in the last 40-100 years were compiled. Continental and regional trends over time in the annual number of large floods, with regions differentiated by type of hydrological regime (pluvial, nival, mixed), are being computed and will be presented at AGU. The unique dataset used for this study is an example of successful international collaboration on hydro-climatic data exchange, which is potentially a step towards establishing RHN or RHN-like networks on a global scale. Analysis of flows from such networks would make a valuable contribution to the understanding of historical global hydrological change and would help inform expected future hydrologic changes.

  5. Intratumoral genetic heterogeneity and number of cytogenetic aberrations provide additional prognostic significance in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shuhua; Li, Zengjun; Zou, Dehui; An, Gang; Cui, Rui; Zhong, Shizhen; Li, Heng; Xiong, Wenjie; Li, Chenwen; Chen, Weiwei; Liu, Wei; Lv, Rui; Yu, Zhen; Wang, Huijun; Xu, Yan; Zhou, Keshu; Ru, Kun; Wang, Jianxiang; Cheng, Tao; Qiu, Lugui

    2017-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a heterogeneous disease with cytogenetic aberrations that are still considered the gold standard of prognostic factors. However, heterogeneity remains within each cytogenetic group, especially in patients with concomitant cytogenetic aberrations. A panel of DNA probes was used to detect cytogenetic aberrations, including RB1/D13S25 at 13q14, ATM at 11q22, TP53 at 17p13, CEP12 and IGH translocation at 14q32, by fluorescence in situ hybridization. A comprehensive method integrating the number of cytogenetic aberrations and intratumoral genetic heterogeneity was used to analyze the prognosis for patients with concomitant aberrations. Within the conventional favorable or neutral prognostic groups (i.e., with del 13q, trisomy 12, and/or t(14q32)), the coincidence of these three aberrations worsened survival in terms of time to first therapy, progression-free survival, and overall survival. However, within the conventional unfavorable prognostic group (i.e., del 11q or del 17p), patients with a minor unfavorable clone had an unexpected survival advantage compared with patients with a major unfavorable clone. A new cytogenetic prognostic system that integrates the number of cytogenetic aberrations and intratumoral genetic subclones was more precise than the conventional system. The number of cytogenetic aberrations and the size of intratumoral genetic subclones should be comprehensively considered to determine the prognosis for CLL.Genet Med 19 2, 182-191.

  6. Turbulent channel flow concentration profile and wall deposition of a large Schmidt number passive scalar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ybarra, Pedro L.; Pinelli, Alfredo

    2006-08-01

    The transport of a passive scalar within a turbulent plane channel flow has been theoretically analyzed by assuming that the Schmidt number Sc, associated to the molecular diffusivity of the passive scalar, is a large parameter. Throughout most of the channel cross-section the mean passive scalar density is constant, but adjacent to the walls a thin boundary layer develops embedded in the viscous sublayer, with a relative thickness of order Sc. In this narrow region a passive scalar profile arises due to the non-vanishing flux normal to the wall. This profile is parameter independent (universal) and leads to a constant flux of passive scalar that results from the addition of both the molecular diffusion flux and the turbulent transport one. The Sc-asymptotic matching of this profile with the constant core value provides an analytical expression for the wall-normal flux that depends on the fluid dynamics of the carrier flow. By using a DNS code to solve the external turbulent flow, the analytical expression has been quantified and compared with empirical expressions based on experimental data, showing excellent agreement. To cite this article: P.L. Garcia-Ybarra, A. Pinelli, C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  7. Heuristics for haplotype frequency estimation with a large number of analyzed loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotka, Michał; Nowak, Robert

    Determining haplotypes with laboratory methods is an expensive and time-consuming activity therefore unsuit- able for the analysis of genetic data coming from a large number of tested individuals. Many existing algorithms for phasing genotypes operate on very impractical runtime and take into account only certain types of polymor- phisms, often without providing graphical user interface. The heuristic algorithm for estimating haplotype frequency developed in this work was examined in terms of time complexity, the speed of execution and the accuracy of results. Consequently, a Rich Internet Application that implements described algorithm has been created and its performance and accuracy to a known set of test data is analyzed. Eventually, a discussion on the architecture and the applications usability in bioinformatics applications is presented. Proposed algorithm can be used to improve the complexity of any algorithm that solves the problem of genotype phasing, which has a worse time complexity and is convergent. The algorithm is easy to scale and can achieve the desired ratio of calculations accuracy to execution time. Implemented application meets all requirements for the programs to solve problems in biology i.e. high performance, accessibility, scalability and usability.

  8. The capture of a large number of Red-billed Oxpeckers Buphagus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The capture of a large number of Red-billed Oxpeckers Buphagus erythrorhynchus and their subsequent maintenance and behaviour. ... Included are aviary design, diet plan, host incorporation, management and behaviour of captive Red-billed Oxpeckers B. erythrorhynchus. It is hoped that the protocol described will assist ...

  9. Strong Laws of Large Numbers for Arrays of Rowwise NA and LNQD Random Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangfeng Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Some strong laws of large numbers and strong convergence properties for arrays of rowwise negatively associated and linearly negative quadrant dependent random variables are obtained. The results obtained not only generalize the result of Hu and Taylor to negatively associated and linearly negative quadrant dependent random variables, but also improve it.

  10. Unusually Large Number of Mutations in Asexually Reproducing Clonal Planarian Dugesia japonica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Nishimura

    Full Text Available We established a laboratory clonal strain of freshwater planarian (Dugesia japonica that was derived from a single individual and that continued to undergo autotomous asexual reproduction for more than 20 years, and we performed large-scale genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis on it. Despite the fact that a completely clonal strain of the planarian was used, an unusually large number of mutations were detected. To enable quantitative genetic analysis of such a unique organism, we developed a new model called the Reference Gene Model, and used it to conduct large-scale transcriptome analysis. The results revealed large numbers of mutations not only outside but also inside gene-coding regions. Non-synonymous SNPs were detected in 74% of the genes for which valid ORFs were predicted. Interestingly, the high-mutation genes, such as metabolism- and defense-related genes, were correlated with genes that were previously identified as diverse genes among different planarian species. Although a large number of amino acid substitutions were apparently accumulated during asexual reproduction over this long period of time, the planarian maintained normal body-shape, behaviors, and physiological functions. The results of the present study reveal a unique aspect of asexual reproduction.

  11. LEBU drag reduction in high Reynolds number boundary layers. [Large Eddy Break-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    Conventional and inverted, outer-layer leading-edge breakup devices (LEBUs) were water tunnel tested on an axisymmetric body over the Re number range from 380,000 to 3.8 million. Test results indicate a sharp degradation of the LEBUs' drag-reduction mechanism with increasing Re number. The most likely result of this degradation is a decoupling of the inner and outer scales at higher Re numbers; due to this decoupling, the breakup of the large structures by outer-layer devices has minimal influence on the near-wall, shear-producing scales. This suggests that smaller devices, closer to the walls, may be required for operation at elevated Re numbers.

  12. Confined rotating convection with large Prandtl number: centrifugal effects on wall modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curbelo, Jezabel; Lopez, Juan M; Mancho, Ana M; Marques, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Thermal convection in a rotating cylinder with a radius-to-height aspect ratio of Γ=4 for fluids with large Prandtl number is studied numerically. Centrifugal buoyancy effects are investigated in a regime where the Coriolis force is relatively large and the onset of thermal convection is in the so-called wall modes regime, where pairs of hot and cold thermal plumes ascend and descend in the cylinder sidewall boundary layer, forming an essentially one-dimensional pattern characterized by the number of hot and cold plume pairs. In our numerical study, we use the physical parameters corresponding to aqueous mixtures of glycerine with mass concentration in the range of 60%-90% glycerine and a Rayleigh number range that extends from the threshold for wall modes up to values where the bulk fluid region is also convecting. The study shows that for the range of Rayleigh numbers considered, the local variations in viscosity due to temperature variation in the flow are negligible. However, the mean viscosity, which varies faster than exponentially with variations in the percentage of glycerine, leads to a faster than exponential increase in the Froude number for a fixed Coriolis force, and hence an enhancement of the centrifugal buoyancy effects with significant dynamical consequences, which are detailed.

  13. Arbitrarily large numbers of kink internal modes in inhomogeneous sine-Gordon equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, J.A., E-mail: jalbertgonz@yahoo.es [Department of Physics, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Department of Natural Sciences, Miami Dade College, 627 SW 27th Ave., Miami, FL 33135 (United States); Bellorín, A., E-mail: alberto.bellorin@ucv.ve [Escuela de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Apartado Postal 47586, Caracas 1041-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); García-Ñustes, M.A., E-mail: monica.garcia@pucv.cl [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Casilla 4059 (Chile); Guerrero, L.E., E-mail: lguerre@usb.ve [Departamento de Física, Universidad Simón Bolívar, Apartado Postal 89000, Caracas 1080-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Jiménez, S., E-mail: s.jimenez@upm.es [Departamento de Matemática Aplicada a las TT.II., E.T.S.I. Telecomunicación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040-Madrid (Spain); Vázquez, L., E-mail: lvazquez@fdi.ucm.es [Departamento de Matemática Aplicada, Facultad de Informática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040-Madrid (Spain)

    2017-06-28

    We prove analytically the existence of an infinite number of internal (shape) modes of sine-Gordon solitons in the presence of some inhomogeneous long-range forces, provided some conditions are satisfied. - Highlights: • We have found exact kink solutions to the perturbed sine-Gordon equation. • We have been able to study analytically the kink stability problem. • A kink equilibrated by an exponentially-localized perturbation has a finite number of oscillation modes. • A sufficiently broad equilibrating perturbation supports an infinite number of soliton internal modes.

  14. Topological superconductor with a large Chern number and a large bulk excitation gap in single-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Wu, M. W.

    2016-02-01

    We show that a two-dimensional topological superconductor (TSC) can be realized in a hybrid system with a conventional s -wave superconductor proximity coupled to a quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state from the Rashba and exchange effects in single-layer graphene. With very low or even zero doping near the Dirac points, i.e., two inequivalent valleys, this TSC has a Chern number as large as 4, which supports four Majorana edge modes. More importantly, we show that this TSC has a robust topologically nontrivial bulk excitation gap, which can be larger or even 1 order of magnitude larger than the proximity-induced superconducting gap. This unique property paves a way for the application of QAH insulators as seed materials to realize robust TSCs and Majorana modes.

  15. Secret Sharing Schemes with a large number of players from Toric Varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Johan P.

    A general theory for constructing linear secret sharing schemes over a finite field $\\Fq$ from toric varieties is introduced. The number of players can be as large as $(q-1)^r-1$ for $r\\geq 1$. We present general methods for obtaining the reconstruction and privacy thresholds as well as conditions...... for multiplication on the associated secret sharing schemes. In particular we apply the method on certain toric surfaces. The main results are ideal linear secret sharing schemes where the number of players can be as large as $(q-1)^2-1$. We determine bounds for the reconstruction and privacy thresholds...... and conditions for strong multiplication using the cohomology and the intersection theory on toric surfaces....

  16. SECRET SHARING SCHEMES WITH STRONG MULTIPLICATION AND A LARGE NUMBER OF PLAYERS FROM TORIC VARIETIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Johan Peder

    2017-01-01

    This article consider Massey's construction for constructing linear secret sharing schemes from toric varieties over a finite field $\\Fq$ with $q$ elements. The number of players can be as large as $(q-1)^r-1$ for $r\\geq 1$. The schemes have strong multiplication, such schemes can be utilized...... in the domain of multiparty computation. We present general methods to obtain the reconstruction and privacy thresholds as well as conditions for multiplication on the associated secret sharing schemes. In particular we apply the method on certain toric surfaces. The main results are ideal linear secret sharing...... schemes where the number of players can be as large as $(q-1)^2-1$, we determine bounds for the reconstruction and privacy thresholds and conditions for strong multiplication using the cohomology and the intersection theory on toric surfaces....

  17. The holographic dual of a Riemann problem in a large number of dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Christopher P.; Spillane, Michael [C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy,Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Yarom, Amos [Department of Physics, Technion,Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2016-08-22

    We study properties of a non equilibrium steady state generated when two heat baths are initially in contact with one another. The dynamics of the system we study are governed by holographic duality in a large number of dimensions. We discuss the “phase diagram” associated with the steady state, the dual, dynamical, black hole description of this problem, and its relation to the fluid/gravity correspondence.

  18. Viscous decay of nonlinear oscillations of a spherical bubble at large Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. R.; Wang, Q. X.

    2017-08-01

    The long-time viscous decay of large-amplitude bubble oscillations is considered in an incompressible Newtonian fluid, based on the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. At large Reynolds numbers, this is a multi-scaled problem with a short time scale associated with inertial oscillation and a long time scale associated with viscous damping. A multi-scaled perturbation method is thus employed to solve the problem. The leading-order analytical solution of the bubble radius history is obtained to the Rayleigh-Plesset equation in a closed form including both viscous and surface tension effects. Some important formulae are derived including the following: the average energy loss rate of the bubble system during each cycle of oscillation, an explicit formula for the dependence of the oscillation frequency on the energy, and an implicit formula for the amplitude envelope of the bubble radius as a function of the energy. Our theory shows that the energy of the bubble system and the frequency of oscillation do not change on the inertial time scale at leading order, the energy loss rate on the long viscous time scale being inversely proportional to the Reynolds number. These asymptotic predictions remain valid during each cycle of oscillation whether or not compressibility effects are significant. A systematic parametric analysis is carried out using the above formula for the energy of the bubble system, frequency of oscillation, and minimum/maximum bubble radii in terms of the Reynolds number, the dimensionless initial pressure of the bubble gases, and the Weber number. Our results show that the frequency and the decay rate have substantial variations over the lifetime of a decaying oscillation. The results also reveal that large-amplitude bubble oscillations are very sensitive to small changes in the initial conditions through large changes in the phase shift.

  19. Loss of locality in gravitational correlators with a large number of insertions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sudip; Raju, Suvrat

    2017-09-01

    We review lessons from the AdS/CFT correspondence that indicate that the emergence of locality in quantum gravity is contingent upon considering observables with a small number of insertions. Correlation functions, where the number of insertions scales with a power of the central charge of the CFT, are sensitive to nonlocal effects in the bulk theory, which arise from a combination of the effects of the bulk Gauss law and a breakdown of perturbation theory. To examine whether a similar effect occurs in flat space, we consider the scattering of massless particles in the bosonic string and the superstring in the limit, where the number of external particles, n, becomes very large. We use estimates of the volume of the Weil-Petersson moduli space of punctured Riemann surfaces to argue that string amplitudes grow factorially in this limit. We verify this factorial behavior through an extensive numerical analysis of string amplitudes at large n. Our numerical calculations rely on the observation that, in the large n limit, the string scattering amplitude localizes on the Gross-Mende saddle points, even though individual particle energies are small. This factorial growth implies the breakdown of string perturbation theory for n ˜(M/plE ) d -2 in d dimensions, where E is the typical individual particle energy. We explore the implications of this breakdown for the black hole information paradox. We show that the loss of locality suggested by this breakdown is precisely sufficient to resolve the cloning and strong subadditivity paradoxes.

  20. 47 CFR 52.31 - Deployment of long-term database methods for number portability by CMRS providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... implementing a long-term number portability method, it may file with the Commission at least 60 days in advance... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deployment of long-term database methods for number portability by CMRS providers. 52.31 Section 52.31 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS...

  1. Monitoring a large number of pesticides and transformation products in water samples from Spain and Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousis, Nikolaos I; Bade, Richard; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Zuccato, Ettore; Sancho, Juan V; Hernandez, Felix; Castiglioni, Sara

    2017-07-01

    Assessing the presence of pesticides in environmental waters is particularly challenging because of the huge number of substances used which may end up in the environment. Furthermore, the occurrence of pesticide transformation products (TPs) and/or metabolites makes this task even harder. Most studies dealing with the determination of pesticides in water include only a small number of analytes and in many cases no TPs. The present study applied a screening method for the determination of a large number of pesticides and TPs in wastewater (WW) and surface water (SW) from Spain and Italy. Liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) was used to screen a database of 450 pesticides and TPs. Detection and identification were based on specific criteria, i.e. mass accuracy, fragmentation, and comparison of retention times when reference standards were available, or a retention time prediction model when standards were not available. Seventeen pesticides and TPs from different classes (fungicides, herbicides and insecticides) were found in WW in Italy and Spain, and twelve in SW. Generally, in both countries more compounds were detected in effluent WW than in influent WW, and in SW than WW. This might be due to the analytical sensitivity in the different matrices, but also to the presence of multiple sources of pollution. HRMS proved a good screening tool to determine a large number of substances in water and identify some priority compounds for further quantitative analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Large performance incentives had the greatest impact on providers whose quality metrics were lowest at baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jessica; Hibbard, Judith H; Overton, Valerie

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the impact of Fairview Health Services' primary care provider compensation model, in which 40 percent of compensation was based on clinic-level quality outcomes. Fairview Health Services is a Pioneer accountable care organization in Minnesota. Using publicly reported performance data from 2010 and 2012, we found that Fairview's improvement in quality metrics was not greater than the improvement in other comparable Minnesota medical groups. An analysis of Fairview's administrative data found that the largest predictor of improvement over the first two years of the compensation model was primary care providers' baseline quality performance. Providers whose baseline performance was in the lowest tertile improved three times more, on average, across the three quality metrics studied than those in the middle tertile, and almost six times more than those in the top tertile. As a result, there was a narrowing of variation in performance across all primary care providers at Fairview and a narrowing of the gap in quality between providers who treated the highest-income patient panels and those who treated the lowest-income panels. The large quality incentive fell short of its overall quality improvement aim. However, the results suggest that payment reform may help narrow variation in primary care provider performance, which can translate into narrowing socioeconomic disparities. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  3. Estimating the effective Reynolds number in implicit large-eddy simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye; Grinstein, Fernando F; Wachtor, Adam J; Haines, Brian M

    2014-01-01

    In implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES), energy-containing large scales are resolved, and physics capturing numerics are used to spatially filter out unresolved scales and to implicitly model subgrid scale effects. From an applied perspective, it is highly desirable to estimate a characteristic Reynolds number (Re)-and therefore a relevant effective viscosity-so that the impact of resolution on predicted flow quantities and their macroscopic convergence can usefully be characterized. We argue in favor of obtaining robust Re estimates away from the smallest scales of the simulated flow-where numerically controlled dissipation takes place and propose a theoretical basis and framework to determine such measures. ILES examples include forced turbulence as a steady flow case, the Taylor-Green vortex to address transition and decaying turbulence, and simulations of a laser-driven reshock experiment illustrating a fairly complex turbulence problem of current practical interest.

  4. Measured Variation in performance of handheld antennas for a large number of test persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gert Frølund; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Olesen, Kim

    This work investigates the variation in the mean effective gain (MEG) for a large number of test persons in order to find how much the difference in anatomy and persons who wear glasses, etc., changes the MEG (i.e., the received signal power with respect to a reference). The evaluation was carried......” and a person present is on the average 3 dB for a directive patch antenna, 6 dB for a whip antenna and 10 dB for a helical antenna...

  5. A study of beam-beam effects in hadron colliders with a large number of bunches

    CERN Document Server

    Pieloni, Tatiana; Bay, Aurelio; Rivkin, Leonid

    2008-01-01

    A particle beam is a collection of a large number of charges and represents an electromagnetic potential for other charges, therefore exerting forces on itself and other beams. The control of this so called Beam-Beam Interactions (BBIs) in particle colliders is fundamental to preserve beam stability and achieve the collider maximal luminosity. In the case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, these forces are experienced as localized periodic distortions when the two beams cross each other in the four experimental areas. The forces are most important for high density beams, i.e. high intensity and small beam sizes. Each LHC beam is composed of 2808 bunches, each containing $10^{11}$ protons and with a transverse size of 16~$\\mu $m at the interaction points. These extreme parameters are the key to obtain high ``luminosity'', i. e. the number of collisions per second needed to study rare physics phenomena. The BBI is therefore often the limiting factor for the luminosity of colliders. Within all BB effect...

  6. Automated 3D trajectory measuring of large numbers of moving particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hai Shan; Zhao, Qi; Zou, Danping; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2011-04-11

    Complex dynamics of natural particle systems, such as insect swarms, bird flocks, fish schools, has attracted great attention of scientists for years. Measuring 3D trajectory of each individual in a group is vital for quantitative study of their dynamic properties, yet such empirical data is rare mainly due to the challenges of maintaining the identities of large numbers of individuals with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We here present an automatic and efficient algorithm to track 3D motion trajectories of large numbers of moving particles using two video cameras. Our method solves this problem by formulating it as three linear assignment problems (LAP). For each video sequence, the first LAP obtains 2D tracks of moving targets and is able to maintain target identities in the presence of occlusions; the second one matches the visually similar targets across two views via a novel technique named maximum epipolar co-motion length (MECL), which is not only able to effectively reduce matching ambiguity but also further diminish the influence of frequent occlusions; the last one links 3D track segments into complete trajectories via computing a globally optimal assignment based on temporal and kinematic cues. Experiment results on simulated particle swarms with various particle densities validated the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. As real-world case, our method successfully acquired 3D flight paths of fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) group comprising hundreds of freely flying individuals. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  7. The power of sensitivity analysis and thoughts on models with large numbers of parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havlacek, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The regulatory systems that allow cells to adapt to their environments are exceedingly complex, and although we know a great deal about the intricate mechanistic details of many of these systems, our ability to make accurate predictions about their system-level behaviors is severely limited. We would like to make such predictions for a number of reasons. How can we reverse dysfunctional molecular changes of these systems that cause disease? More generally, how can we harness and direct cellular activities for beneficial purposes? Our ability to make accurate predictions about a system is also a measure ofour fundamental understanding of that system. As evidenced by our mastery of technological systems, a useful understanding ofa complex system can often be obtained through the development and analysis ofa mathematical model, but predictive modeling of cellular regulatory systems, which necessarily relies on quantitative experimentation, is still in its infancy. There is much that we need to learn before modeling for practical applications becomes routine. In particular, we need to address a number of issues surrounding the large number of parameters that are typically found in a model for a cellular regulatory system.

  8. Efficient generation of large number-path entanglement using only linear optics and feed-forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Hugo; Dowling, Jonathan P

    2007-10-19

    We show how an idealized measurement procedure can condense photons from two modes into one and how, by feeding forward the results of the measurement, it is possible to generate efficiently superposition states commonly called N00N states. For the basic procedure sources of number states leak onto a beam splitter, and the output ports are monitored by photodetectors. We find that detecting a fixed fraction of the input at one output port suffices to direct the remainder to the same port, with high probability, however large the initial state. When instead photons are detected at both ports, macroscopic quantum superposition states are produced. We describe a linear-optical circuit for making the components of such a state orthogonal, and another to convert the output to a N00N state. Our approach scales exponentially better than existing proposals. Important applications include quantum imaging and metrology.

  9. Optimum Guidance Law and Information Management for a Large Number of Formation Flying Spacecrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Yuichi; Nakasuka, Shinichi

    In recent years, formation flying technique is recognized as one of the most important technologies for deep space and orbital missions that involve multiple spacecraft operations. Formation flying mission improves simultaneous observability over a wide area, redundancy and reconfigurability of the system with relatively small and low cost spacecrafts compared with the conventional single spacecraft mission. From the viewpoint of guidance and control, realizing formation flying mission usually requires tight maintenance and control of the relative distances, speeds and orientations between the member satellites. This paper studies a practical architecture for formation flight missions focusing mainly on guidance and control, and describes a new guidance algorithm for changing and keeping the relative positions and speeds of the satellites in formation. The resulting algorithm is suitable for onboard processing and gives the optimum impulsive trajectory for satellites flying closely around a certain reference orbit, that can be elliptic, parabolic or hyperbolic. Based on this guidance algorithm, this study introduces an information management methodology between the member spacecrafts which is suitable for a large formation flight architecture. Routing and multicast communication based on the wireless local area network technology are introduced. Some mathematical analyses and computer simulations will be shown in the presentation to reveal the feasibility of the proposed formation flight architecture, especially when a very large number of satellites join the formation.

  10. MHC variability supports dog domestication from a large number of wolves: high diversity in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, A K; Hagström, E; Lohi, H; Ruokonen, M; Esparza-Salas, R; Aspi, J; Savolainen, P

    2013-01-01

    The process of dog domestication is still somewhat unresolved. Earlier studies indicate that domestic dogs from all over the world have a common origin in Asia. So far, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity has not been studied in detail in Asian dogs, although high levels of genetic diversity are expected at the domestication locality. We sequenced the second exon of the canine MHC gene DLA-DRB1 from 128 Asian dogs and compared our data with a previously published large data set of MHC alleles, mostly from European dogs. Our results show that Asian dogs have a higher MHC diversity than European dogs. We also estimated that there is only a small probability that new alleles have arisen by mutation since domestication. Based on the assumption that all of the currently known 102 DLA-DRB1 alleles come from the founding wolf population, we simulated the number of founding wolf individuals. Our simulations indicate an effective population size of at least 500 founding wolves, suggesting that the founding wolf population was large or that backcrossing has taken place.

  11. Chaotic advection at large Péclet number: Electromagnetically driven experiments, numerical simulations, and theoretical predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Aldo [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62209 (Mexico); Meunier, Patrice; Villermaux, Emmanuel [Aix-Marseille Univ., CNRS, Centrale Marseille, IRPHE, Marseille F-13384 (France); Cuevas, Sergio; Ramos, Eduardo [Instituto de Energías Renovables, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 34, Temixco, Morelos 62580 (Mexico)

    2014-01-15

    We present a combination of experiment, theory, and modelling on laminar mixing at large Péclet number. The flow is produced by oscillating electromagnetic forces in a thin electrolytic fluid layer, leading to oscillating dipoles, quadrupoles, octopoles, and disordered flows. The numerical simulations are based on the Diffusive Strip Method (DSM) which was recently introduced (P. Meunier and E. Villermaux, “The diffusive strip method for scalar mixing in two-dimensions,” J. Fluid Mech. 662, 134–172 (2010)) to solve the advection-diffusion problem by combining Lagrangian techniques and theoretical modelling of the diffusion. Numerical simulations obtained with the DSM are in reasonable agreement with quantitative dye visualization experiments of the scalar fields. A theoretical model based on log-normal Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of stretching factors, characteristic of homogeneous turbulence in the Batchelor regime, allows to predict the PDFs of scalar in agreement with numerical and experimental results. This model also indicates that the PDFs of scalar are asymptotically close to log-normal at late stages, except for the large concentration levels which correspond to low stretching factors.

  12. Large aerodynamic forces on a sweeping wing at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Sun; Jianghao, Wu

    2004-02-01

    The aerodynamic forces and flow structure of a model insect wing is studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equations numerically. After an initial start from rest, the wing is made to execute an azimuthal rotation (sweeping) at a large angle of attack and constant angular velocity. The Reynolds number ( Re) considered in the present note is 480 ( Re is based on the mean chord length of the wing and the speed at 60% wing length from the wing root). During the constant-speed sweeping motion, the stall is absent and large and approximately constant lift and drag coefficients can be maintained. The mechanism for the absence of the stall or the maintenance of large aerodynamic force coefficients is as follows. Soon after the initial start, a vortex ring, which consists of the leading-edge vortex (LEV), the starting vortex, and the two wing-tip vortices, is formed in the wake of the wing. During the subsequent motion of the wing, a base-to-tip spanwise flow converts the vorticity in the LEV to the wing tip and the LEV keeps an approximately constant strength. This prevents the LEV from shedding. As a result, the size of the vortex ring increases approximately linearly with time, resulting in an approximately constant time rate of the first moment of vorticity, or approximately constant lift and drag coefficients. The variation of the relative velocity along the wing span causes a pressure gradient along the wingspan. The base-to-tip spanwise flow is mainly maintained by the pressure-gradient force.

  13. Early Peritonitis in a Large Peritoneal Dialysis Provider System in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Edgar; Blake, Peter G; Sanabria, Mauricio; Bunch, Alfonso; López, Patricia; Vesga, Jasmín; Buitrago, Alberto; Astudillo, Kindar; Devia, Martha; Sánchez, Ricardo

    ♦ BACKGROUND: Peritonitis is the most important complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD), and early peritonitis rate is predictive of the subsequent course on PD. Our aim was to calculate the early peritonitis rate and to identify characteristics and predisposing factors in a large nationwide PD provider network in Colombia. ♦ METHODS: This was a historical observational cohort study of all adult patients starting PD between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2013, in 49 renal facilities in the Renal Therapy Services in Colombia. We studied the peritonitis rate in the first 90 days of treatment, its causative micro-organisms, its predictors and its variation with time on PD and between individual facilities. ♦ RESULTS: A total of 3,525 patients initiated PD, with 176 episodes of peritonitis during 752 patient-years of follow-up for a rate of 0.23 episodes per patient year equivalent to 1 every 52 months. In 41 of 49 units, the rate was better than 1 per 33 months, and in 45, it was better than 1 per 24 months. Peritonitis rates did not differ with age, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or PD modality. We identified high incidence risk periods at 2 to 5 weeks after initiation of PD and again at 10 to 12 weeks. ♦ CONCLUSION: An excellent peritonitis rate was achieved across a large nationwide network. This occurred in the context of high nationwide PD utilization and despite high rates of socioeconomic deprivation. We propose that a key factor in achieving this was a standardized approach to management of patients. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  14. A Multilayer Secure Biomedical Data Management System for Remotely Managing a Very Large Number of Diverse Personal Healthcare Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KeeHyun Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a multilayer secure biomedical data management system for managing a very large number of diverse personal health devices is proposed. The system has the following characteristics: the system supports international standard communication protocols to achieve interoperability. The system is integrated in the sense that both a PHD communication system and a remote PHD management system work together as a single system. Finally, the system proposed in this paper provides user/message authentication processes to securely transmit biomedical data measured by PHDs based on the concept of a biomedical signature. Some experiments, including the stress test, have been conducted to show that the system proposed/constructed in this study performs very well even when a very large number of PHDs are used. For a stress test, up to 1,200 threads are made to represent the same number of PHD agents. The loss ratio of the ISO/IEEE 11073 messages in the normal system is as high as 14% when 1,200 PHD agents are connected. On the other hand, no message loss occurs in the multilayered system proposed in this study, which demonstrates the superiority of the multilayered system to the normal system with regard to heavy traffic.

  15. Small genomes and large seeds: chromosome numbers, genome size and seed mass in diploid Aesculus species (Sapindaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahulcová, Anna; Trávnícek, Pavel; Krahulec, František; Rejmánek, Marcel

    2017-04-01

    Aesculus L. (horse chestnut, buckeye) is a genus of 12-19 extant woody species native to the temperate Northern Hemisphere. This genus is known for unusually large seeds among angiosperms. While chromosome counts are available for many Aesculus species, only one has had its genome size measured. The aim of this study is to provide more genome size data and analyse the relationship between genome size and seed mass in this genus. Chromosome numbers in root tip cuttings were confirmed for four species and reported for the first time for three additional species. Flow cytometric measurements of 2C nuclear DNA values were conducted on eight species, and mean seed mass values were estimated for the same taxa. The same chromosome number, 2 n = 40, was determined in all investigated taxa. Original measurements of 2C values for seven Aesculus species (eight taxa), added to just one reliable datum for A. hippocastanum , confirmed the notion that the genome size in this genus with relatively large seeds is surprisingly low, ranging from 0·955 pg 2C -1 in A. parviflora to 1·275 pg 2C -1 in A. glabra var. glabra. The chromosome number of 2 n = 40 seems to be conclusively the universal 2 n number for non-hybrid species in this genus. Aesculus genome sizes are relatively small, not only within its own family, Sapindaceae, but also within woody angiosperms. The genome sizes seem to be distinct and non-overlapping among the four major Aesculus clades. These results provide an extra support for the most recent reconstruction of Aesculus phylogeny. The correlation between the 2C values and seed masses in examined Aesculus species is slightly negative and not significant. However, when the four major clades are treated separately, there is consistent positive association between larger genome size and larger seed mass within individual lineages.

  16. CRISPR transcript processing: a mechanism for generating a large number of small interfering RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djordjevic Marko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CRISPR/Cas (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/CRISPR associated sequences is a recently discovered prokaryotic defense system against foreign DNA, including viruses and plasmids. CRISPR cassette is transcribed as a continuous transcript (pre-crRNA, which is processed by Cas proteins into small RNA molecules (crRNAs that are responsible for defense against invading viruses. Experiments in E. coli report that overexpression of cas genes generates a large number of crRNAs, from only few pre-crRNAs. Results We here develop a minimal model of CRISPR processing, which we parameterize based on available experimental data. From the model, we show that the system can generate a large amount of crRNAs, based on only a small decrease in the amount of pre-crRNAs. The relationship between the decrease of pre-crRNAs and the increase of crRNAs corresponds to strong linear amplification. Interestingly, this strong amplification crucially depends on fast non-specific degradation of pre-crRNA by an unidentified nuclease. We show that overexpression of cas genes above a certain level does not result in further increase of crRNA, but that this saturation can be relieved if the rate of CRISPR transcription is increased. We furthermore show that a small increase of CRISPR transcription rate can substantially decrease the extent of cas gene activation necessary to achieve a desired amount of crRNA. Conclusions The simple mathematical model developed here is able to explain existing experimental observations on CRISPR transcript processing in Escherichia coli. The model shows that a competition between specific pre-crRNA processing and non-specific degradation determines the steady-state levels of crRNA and is responsible for strong linear amplification of crRNAs when cas genes are overexpressed. The model further shows how disappearance of only a few pre-crRNA molecules normally present in the cell can lead to a large (two

  17. A METHOD AND AN APPARATUS FOR PROVIDING TIMING SIGNALS TO A NUMBER OF CIRCUITS, AN INTEGRATED CIRCUIT AND A NODE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    A method of providing or transporting a timing signal between a number of circuits, electrical or optical, where each circuit is fed by a node. The nodes forward timing signals between each other, and at least one node is adapted to not transmit a timing signal before having received a timing...... signal from at least two nodes. In this manner, the direction of the timing skew between nodes and circuits is known and data transport between the circuits made easier....

  18. A new system for the rapid collection of large numbers of developmentally staged zebrafish embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Adatto

    Full Text Available The zebrafish is an excellent genetic and developmental model system used to study biology and disease. While the zebrafish model is associated with high fecundity, its reproductive potential has not been completely realized by scientists. One major issue is that embryo collection is inefficient. Here, we have developed an innovative breeding vessel designed to stimulate the natural reproductive behavior of the fish. This novel apparatus allows us to collect large numbers of developmentally synchronized embryos in brief and defined windows of time, and with minimal investments in labor and space. To demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, we placed three separate groups (n = 180 of fish in the vessel and allowed them to spawn for 10-minute intervals. During these trials, which were repeated three times, the fish produced 8600±917, 8400±794, and 6800±1997 embryos, respectively. This level of embryo production is nearly twice what we were able to achieve when using conventional crossing equipment with some of the same fish, and it required significantly less room and time to set up and break down. This system overcomes major space and labor restrictions inherent in spawning equipment currently used in the field, and will greatly accelerate efforts to improve the scale and throughput of experiments.

  19. Indoor localization based on cellular telephony RSSI fingerprints containing very large numbers of carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oussar Yacine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new approach to indoor localization is presented, based upon the use of Received Signal Strength (RSS fingerprints containing data from very large numbers of cellular base stations--up to the entire GSM band of over 500 channels. Machine learning techniques are employed to extract good quality location information from these high-dimensionality input vectors. Experimental results in a domestic and an office setting are presented, in which data were accumulated over a 1-month period in order to assure time robustness. Room-level classification efficiencies approaching 100% were obtained, using Support Vector Machines in one-versus-one and one-versus-all configurations. Promising results using semi-supervised learning techniques, in which only a fraction of the training data is required to have a room label, are also presented. While indoor RSS localization using WiFi, as well as some rather mediocre results with low-carrier count GSM fingerprints, have been discussed elsewhere, this is to our knowledge the first study to demonstrate that good quality indoor localization information can be obtained, in diverse settings, by applying a machine learning strategy to RSS vectors that contain the entire GSM band.

  20. In-Center Nutrition Practices of Clinics within a Large Hemodialysis Provider in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Debbie; Burgess, Mary; Stasios, Maria; Brosch, Becky; Wilund, Ken; Shen, Sa; Kistler, Brandon

    2016-05-06

    Eating during hemodialysis treatment remains a controversial topic. It is perceived that more restrictive practices in the United States contribute to poorer nutritional status and elevated mortality compared with some other parts of the world. However, in-center food practices in the United States have not been previously described. In 2011, we conducted a survey of clinic practices and clinician (dietitian, facility administrator, and medical director) opinions related to in-center food consumption within a large dialysis organization. After the initial survey, we provided clinicians with educational materials about eating during treatment. In 2014, we performed a follow-up survey. Differences in practices and opinions were analyzed using chi-squared tests and logistic regression. In 2011, 343 of 1199 clinics (28.6%) did not allow eating during treatment, 222 clinics (18.2%) did not allow drinking during treatment, and 19 clinics (1.6%) did not allow eating at the facility before or after treatment. In 2014, the proportion of clinics that did not allow eating during treatment had declined to 22.6% (321 of 1422 clinics), a significant shift in practice (Pnutritional status. Among clinicians, a higher percentage encouraged eating during treatment (53.1% versus 37.4%; P<0.05), and facility administrators and medical directors were less concerned about the seven reasons commonly cited for restricting eating during treatment in 2014 compared with 2011 (P<0.05 for all). We found that 28.6% and 22.6% of hemodialysis clinics within the United States restricted eating during treatment in 2011 and 2014, respectively, a rate more than double that found in an international cohort on which we previously published. However, practices and clinician opinions are shifting toward allowing patients to eat. Additional research is warranted to understand the effect that these practices have on patient outcomes and outline best practices. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of

  1. Culture rather than genes provides greater scope for the evolution of large-scale human prosociality

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Adrian V; Peter J Richerson; McElreath, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Whether competition among large groups played an important role in human social evolution is dependent on how variation, whether cultural or genetic, is maintained between groups. Comparisons between genetic and cultural differentiation between neighboring groups show how natural selection on large groups is more plausible on cultural rather than genetic variation.

  2. Collaborating with a social housing provider supports a large cohort study of the health effects of housing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael G; Zhang, Jane; Blakely, Tony; Crane, Julian; Saville-Smith, Kay; Howden-Chapman, Philippa

    2016-02-16

    Despite the importance of adequate, un-crowded housing as a prerequisite for good health, few large cohort studies have explored the health effects of housing conditions. The Social Housing Outcomes Worth (SHOW) Study was established to assess the relationship between housing conditions and health, particularly between household crowding and infectious diseases. This paper reports on the methods and feasibility of using a large administrative housing database for epidemiological research and the characteristics of the social housing population. This prospective open cohort study was established in 2003 in collaboration with Housing New Zealand Corporation which provides housing for approximately 5% of the population. The Study measures health outcomes using linked anonymised hospitalisation and mortality records provided by the New Zealand Ministry of Health. It was possible to match the majority (96%) of applicant and tenant household members with their National Health Index (NHI) number allowing linkage to anonymised coded data on their hospitalisations and mortality. By December 2011, the study population consisted of 11,196 applicants and 196,612 tenants. Half were less than 21 years of age. About two-thirds identified as Māori or Pacific ethnicity. Household incomes were low. Of tenant households, 44% containing one or more smokers compared with 33% for New Zealand as a whole. Exposure to household crowding, as measured by a deficit of one or more bedrooms, was common for applicants (52%) and tenants (38%) compared with New Zealanders as whole (10%). This project has shown that an administrative housing database can be used to form a large cohort population and successfully link cohort members to their health records in a way that meets confidentiality and ethical requirements. This study also confirms that social housing tenants are a highly deprived population with relatively low incomes and high levels of exposure to household crowding and environmental

  3. On the chromatic number of triangle-free graphs of large minimum degree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2002-01-01

    We prove that, for each. fixed real number c > 1/3, the triangle-free graphs of minimum degree at least cn (where n is the number of vertices) have bounded chromatic number. This problem was raised by Erdos and Simonovits in 1973 who pointed out that there is no such result for c <1/3.......We prove that, for each. fixed real number c > 1/3, the triangle-free graphs of minimum degree at least cn (where n is the number of vertices) have bounded chromatic number. This problem was raised by Erdos and Simonovits in 1973 who pointed out that there is no such result for c

  4. Detection of large numbers of novel sequences in the metatranscriptomes of complex marine microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack A Gilbert

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Sequencing the expressed genetic information of an ecosystem (metatranscriptome can provide information about the response of organisms to varying environmental conditions. Until recently, metatranscriptomics has been limited to microarray technology and random cloning methodologies. The application of high-throughput sequencing technology is now enabling access to both known and previously unknown transcripts in natural communities.We present a study of a complex marine metatranscriptome obtained from random whole-community mRNA using the GS-FLX Pyrosequencing technology. Eight samples, four DNA and four mRNA, were processed from two time points in a controlled coastal ocean mesocosm study (Bergen, Norway involving an induced phytoplankton bloom producing a total of 323,161,989 base pairs. Our study confirms the finding of the first published metatranscriptomic studies of marine and soil environments that metatranscriptomics targets highly expressed sequences which are frequently novel. Our alternative methodology increases the range of experimental options available for conducting such studies and is characterized by an exceptional enrichment of mRNA (99.92% versus ribosomal RNA. Analysis of corresponding metagenomes confirms much higher levels of assembly in the metatranscriptomic samples and a far higher yield of large gene families with >100 members, approximately 91% of which were novel.This study provides further evidence that metatranscriptomic studies of natural microbial communities are not only feasible, but when paired with metagenomic data sets, offer an unprecedented opportunity to explore both structure and function of microbial communities--if we can overcome the challenges of elucidating the functions of so many never-seen-before gene families.

  5. Comparative metabolic footprinting of a large number of commercial wine yeast strains in Chardonnay fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Chandra L; Dunn, Barbara; Sherlock, Gavin; Pugh, Tom

    2013-06-01

    Wine has been made for thousands of years. In modern times, as the importance of yeast as an ingredient in winemaking became better appreciated, companies worldwide have collected and marketed specific yeast strains for enhancing positive and minimizing negative attributes in wine. It is generally believed that each yeast strain contributes uniquely to fermentation performance and wine style because of its genetic background; however, the impact of metabolic diversity among wine yeasts on aroma compound production has not been extensively studied. We characterized the metabolic footprints of 69 different commercial wine yeast strains in triplicate fermentations of identical Chardonnay juice, by measuring 29 primary and secondary metabolites; we additionally measured seven attributes of fermentation performance of these strains. We identified up to 1000-fold differences between strains for some of the metabolites and observed large differences in fermentation performance, suggesting significant metabolic diversity. These differences represent potential selective markers for the strains that may be important to the wine industry. Analysis of these metabolic traits further builds on the known genomic diversity of these strains and provides new insights into their genetic and metabolic relatedness. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Love of Large Numbers: A Popularity Bias in Consumer Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Derek; Yu, Jingqi; DeWolf, Melissa; Holyoak, Keith J

    2017-10-01

    Social learning-the ability to learn from observing the decisions of other people and the outcomes of those decisions-is fundamental to human evolutionary and cultural success. The Internet now provides social evidence on an unprecedented scale. However, properly utilizing this evidence requires a capacity for statistical inference. We examined how people's interpretation of online review scores is influenced by the numbers of reviews-a potential indicator both of an item's popularity and of the precision of the average review score. Our task was designed to pit statistical information against social information. We modeled the behavior of an "intuitive statistician" using empirical prior information from millions of reviews posted on Amazon.com and then compared the model's predictions with the behavior of experimental participants. Under certain conditions, people preferred a product with more reviews to one with fewer reviews even though the statistical model indicated that the latter was likely to be of higher quality than the former. Overall, participants' judgments suggested that they failed to make meaningful statistical inferences.

  7. Evaluation of two sweeping methods for estimating the number of immature Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae in large containers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareth Regina Dibo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Here, we evaluated sweeping methods used to estimate the number of immature Aedes aegypti in large containers. Methods III/IV instars and pupae at a 9:1 ratio were placed in three types of containers with, each one with three different water levels. Two sweeping methods were tested: water-surface sweeping and five-sweep netting. The data were analyzed using linear regression. Results The five-sweep netting technique was more suitable for drums and water-tanks, while the water-surface sweeping method provided the best results for swimming pools. Conclusions Both sweeping methods are useful tools in epidemiological surveillance programs for the control of Aedes aegypti.

  8. Investigating the evolution of Shared Socioeconomic Pathways with a large number of scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, V. J.; Guivarch, C.; Rozenberg, J.

    2013-12-01

    The new scenario framework for climate change research includes alternative possible trends for socioeconomic development called Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSPs). The SSPs bear some similarities to other scenarios used for global change research, but they also have important differences. Like the IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios or the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, SSPs are defined by a scenario logic consisting of two axes. However, these axes define SSPs with respect to their location in an outcome space for challenges to mitigation and to adaptation rather than by their drivers. Open questions for the SSPs include what their drivers are and how the time dimension could be interpreted with the outcomes space. We present a new analytical approach for addressing both questions by studying large numbers of scenarios produced by an integrated assessment model, IMACLIM-R. We systematically generated 432 scenarios and used the SSP framework to classify them by typology. We then analyzed them dynamically, tracing their evolution through the SSP challenges space at annual time steps over the period 2010-2090. Through this approach, we found that many scenarios do not remain fixed to a particular SSP domain; they drift from one domain to another. In papers describing the framework for new scenarios, SSPs are envisioned as hypothetical (counter-factual) reference scenarios that remain fixed in one domain over some time period of interest. However, we conclude that it may be important to also research scenarios that shift across SSP domains. This is relevant for another open question, which is what scenarios are important to explore given their consequences. Through a data mining technique, we uncovered prominent drivers for scenarios that shift across SSP domains. Scenarios with different challenges for adaptation and mitigation (that is, mitigation and adaptation challenges that are not co-varying) were found to be the least stable, and the following

  9. On the computation of a very large number of eigenvalues for selfadjoint elliptic operators by means of multigrid methods

    CERN Document Server

    Heuveline, V

    2003-01-01

    Recent results in the study of quantum manifestations in classical chaos raise the problem of computing a very large number of eigenvalues of selfadjoint elliptic operators. The standard numerical methods for large eigenvalue problems cover the range of applications where a few of the leading eigenvalues are needed. They are not appropriate and generally fail to solve problems involving a number of eigenvalues exceeding a few hundreds. Further, the accurate computation of a large number of eigenvalues leads to much larger problem dimension in comparison with the usual case dealing with only a few eigenvalues. A new method is presented which combines multigrid techniques with the Lanczos process. The resulting scheme requires O(mn) arithmetic operations and O(n) storage requirement, where n is the number of unknowns and m, the number of needed eigenvalues. The discretization of the considered differential operators is realized by means of p-finite elements and is applicable on general geometries. Numerical exp...

  10. Providing the Public with Online Access to Large Bibliographic Data Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firschein, Oscar; Summit, Roger K.

    DIALOG, an interactive, computer-based information retrieval language, consists of a series of computer programs designed to make use of direct access memory devices in order to provide the user with a rapid means of identifying records within a specific memory bank. Using the system, a library user can be provided access to sixteen distinct and…

  11. Use of adaptive optimal control to provide energy conservation in large buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farris, D.R.; Miller, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    The use of an adaptive linear regulator approach for controlling heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in large buildings is discussed. The control manifestations of this approach are compared with those found in conventional applications. The salient features of the approach are discussed, and simulation results are presented. Implementation is discussed, and economic estimates for commercial use of this approach are also presented.

  12. Nurse-midwifery education through graduate programs to provide a sufficient number of high quality nurse-midwives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Hye Lee

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a decrease in the number of new midwives, resulting from the shutdown of midwifery education program in hospitals due to a decrease in birthrate in the Republic of Korea. To solve this problem, the current medical laws on midwifery education system in Korea should be revised; nurse-midwifery specialist programs must be established in educational institutes with nursing programs. To support this argument, the midwifery education programs of America, Europe, Australia, and Japan have been discussed, and a nurse-midwifery specialist curriculum at the master s level, based on the nurse-practitioner system of Korea, has been suggested. Since this assertion is very important and urgent for solving the future population problem of Korea and providing health care for women and children, it should be realized into action immediately.

  13. Large Eddy Simulation of an SD7003 Airfoil: Effects of Reynolds number and Subgrid-scale modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarlak Chivaee, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results of a series of numerical simulations in order to study aerodynamic characteristics of the low Reynolds number Selig-Donovan airfoil, SD7003. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique is used for all computations at chord-based Reynolds numbers 10,000, 24,000 and 60...

  14. Law of Large Numbers for a Heterogeneous System of Stochastic Differential Equations with Strong Local Interaction and Economic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Finnoff, William

    1994-01-01

    A model for the activities of a finite number of agents in an economy is presented as the solution to a system of stochastic differential equations driven by general semimartingales and displaying an extended form of strong local interaction. We demonstrate a law of large numbers for the systems of processes as the number of agents goes to infinity under a weak convergence hypothesis on the triangular array of starting values and driving semimartingales which induces the systems of equations....

  15. Large-eddy simulation of flow over a grooved cylinder up to transcritical Reynolds numbers

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, W.

    2017-11-27

    We report wall-resolved large-eddy simulation (LES) of flow over a grooved cylinder up to the transcritical regime. The stretched-vortex subgrid-scale model is embedded in a general fourth-order finite-difference code discretization on a curvilinear mesh. In the present study grooves are equally distributed around the circumference of the cylinder, each of sinusoidal shape with height , invariant in the spanwise direction. Based on the two parameters, and the Reynolds number where is the free-stream velocity, the diameter of the cylinder and the kinematic viscosity, two main sets of simulations are described. The first set varies from to while fixing . We study the flow deviation from the smooth-cylinder case, with emphasis on several important statistics such as the length of the mean-flow recirculation bubble , the pressure coefficient , the skin-friction coefficient and the non-dimensional pressure gradient parameter . It is found that, with increasing at fixed , some properties of the mean flow behave somewhat similarly to changes in the smooth-cylinder flow when is increased. This includes shrinking and nearly constant minimum pressure coefficient. In contrast, while the non-dimensional pressure gradient parameter remains nearly constant for the front part of the smooth cylinder flow, shows an oscillatory variation for the grooved-cylinder case. The second main set of LES varies from to with fixed . It is found that this range spans the subcritical and supercritical regimes and reaches the beginning of the transcritical flow regime. Mean-flow properties are diagnosed and compared with available experimental data including and the drag coefficient . The timewise variation of the lift and drag coefficients are also studied to elucidate the transition among three regimes. Instantaneous images of the surface, skin-friction vector field and also of the three-dimensional Q-criterion field are utilized to further understand the dynamics of the near-surface flow

  16. Spatial correlation of high density EMG signals provides features robust to electrode number and shift in pattern recognition for myocontrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stango, Antonietta; Negro, Francesco; Farina, Dario

    2015-03-01

    Research on pattern recognition for myoelectric control has usually focused on a small number of electromyography (EMG) channels because of better clinical acceptability and low computational load with respect to multi-channel EMG. However, recently, high density (HD) EMG technology has substantially improved, also in practical usability, and can thus be applied in myocontrol. HD EMG provides several closely spaced recordings in multiple locations over the skin surface. This study considered the use of HD EMG for controlling upper limb prostheses, based on pattern recognition. In general, robustness and reliability of classical pattern recognition systems are influenced by electrode shift in dons and doff, and by the presence of malfunctioning channels. The aim of this study is to propose a new approach to attenuate these issues. The HD EMG grid of electrodes is an ensemble of sensors that records data spatially correlated. The experimental variogram, which is a measure of the degree of spatial correlation, was used as feature for classification, contrary to previous approaches that are based on temporal or frequency features. The classification based on the variogram was tested on seven able-bodied subjects and one subject with amputation, for the classification of nine and seven classes, respectively. The performance of the proposed approach was comparable with the classic methods based on time-domain and autoregressive features (average classification accuracy over all methods ∼ 95% for nine classes). However, the new spatial features demonstrated lower sensitivity to electrode shift ( ± 1 cm) with respect to the classic features . When even just one channel was noisy, the classification accuracy dropped by ∼ 10% for all methods. However, the new method could be applied without any retraining to a subset of high-quality channels whereas the classic methods require retraining when some channels are omitted. In conclusion, the new spatial feature space

  17. DART: A Community Facility Providing State-of-the-Art, Efficient Ensemble Data Assimilation for Large (Coupled) Geophysical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoar, T. J.; Anderson, J. L.; Collins, N.; Kershaw, H.; Hendricks, J.; Raeder, K.; Mizzi, A. P.; Barré, J.; Gaubert, B.; Madaus, L. E.; Aydogdu, A.; Raeder, J.; Arango, H.; Moore, A. M.; Edwards, C. A.; Curchitser, E. N.; Escudier, R.; Dussin, R.; Bitz, C. M.; Zhang, Y. F.; Shrestha, P.; Rosolem, R.; Rahman, M.

    2016-12-01

    Strongly-coupled ensemble data assimilation with multiple high-resolution model components requires massive state vectors which need to be efficiently stored and accessed throughout the assimilation process. Supercomputer architectures are tending towards increasing the number of cores per node but have the same or less memory per node. Recent advances in the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART), a freely-available community ensemble data assimilation facility that works with dozens of large geophysical models, have addressed the need to run with a smaller memory footprint on a higher node count by utilizing MPI-2 one-sided communication to do non-blocking asynchronous access of distributed data. DART runs efficiently on many computational platforms ranging from laptops through thousands of cores on the newest supercomputers. Benefits of the new DART implementation will be shown. In addition, overviews of the most recently supported models will be presented: CAM-CHEM, WRF-CHEM, CM1, OpenGGCM, FESOM, ROMS, CICE5, TerrSysMP (COSMO, CLM, ParFlow), JULES, and CABLE. DART provides a comprehensive suite of software, documentation, and tutorials that can be used for ensemble data assimilation research, operations, and education. Scientists and software engineers at NCAR are available to support DART users who want to use existing DART products or develop their own applications. Current DART users range from university professors teaching data assimilation, to individual graduate students working with simple models, through national laboratories and state agencies doing operational prediction with large state-of-the-art models.

  18. High School Timetabling: Modeling and solving a large number of cases in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Matias; Stidsen, Thomas Riis

    2012-01-01

    A general model for the timetabling problem of high schools in Denmark is introduced, as seen from the perspective of the commercial system Lectio1, and an Adaptive Large Neighborhood Search (ALNS) algorithm is proposed for producing solutions. Lectio is a general-purpose cloud-based system for h...

  19. A regular Strouhal number for large-scale instability in the far wake of a rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Naumov, Igor V.; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Theory, vol. IV, 1935, pp. 169–360). The wake properties are studied for different tip speed ratios and free stream speeds. The data for the various rotor regimes show the existence of a regular Strouhal number associated with the development of an instability in the far wake of the rotor. From...

  20. Q-factorial Gorenstein toric Fano varieties with large Picard number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nill, Benjamin; Øbro, Mikkel

    2010-01-01

    In dimension $d$, ${\\boldsymbol Q}$-factorial Gorenstein toric Fano varieties with Picard number $\\rho_X$ correspond to simplicial reflexive polytopes with $\\rho_X + d$ vertices. Casagrande showed that any $d$-dimensional simplicial reflexive polytope has at most $3 d$ and $3d-1$ vertices if $d$ ...

  1. Serial Measurements of Apoptotic Cell Numbers Provide Better Acceptance Criterion for PBMC Quality than a Single Measurement Prior to the T Cell Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Wunsch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As soon as Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC are isolated from whole blood, some cells begin dying. The rate of apoptotic cell death is increased when PBMC are shipped, cryopreserved, or stored under suboptimal conditions. Apoptotic cells secrete cytokines that suppress inflammation while promoting phagocytosis. Increased numbers of apoptotic cells in PBMC may modulate T cell functions in antigen-triggered T cell assays. We assessed the effect of apoptotic bystander cells on a T cell ELISPOT assay by selectively inducing B cell apoptosis using α-CD20 mAbs. The presence of large numbers of apoptotic B cells did not affect T cell functionality. In contrast, when PBMC were stored under unfavorable conditions, leading to damage and apoptosis in the T cells as well as bystander cells, T cell functionality was greatly impaired. We observed that measuring the number of apoptotic cells before plating the PBMC into an ELISPOT assay did not reflect the extent of PBMC injury, but measuring apoptotic cell frequencies at the end of the assay did. Our data suggest that measuring the numbers of apoptotic cells prior to and post T cell assays may provide more stringent PBMC quality acceptance criteria than measurements done only prior to the start of the assay.

  2. A comment on "bats killed in large numbers at United States wind energy facilities"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huso, Manuela M.P.; Dalthorp, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Widespread reports of bat fatalities caused by wind turbines have raised concerns about the impacts of wind power development. Reliable estimates of the total number killed and the potential effects on populations are needed, but it is crucial that they be based on sound data. In a recent BioScience article, Hayes (2013) estimated that over 600,000 bats were killed at wind turbines in the United States in 2012. The scientific errors in the analysis are numerous, with the two most serious being that the included sites constituted a convenience sample, not a representative sample, and that the individual site estimates are derived from such different methodologies that they are inherently not comparable. This estimate is almost certainly inaccurate, but whether the actual number is much smaller, much larger, or about the same is uncertain. An accurate estimate of total bat fatality is not currently possible, given the shortcomings of the available data.

  3. Similarities between 2D and 3D convection for large Prandtl number

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-06-18

    Jun 18, 2016 ... Eθ(k) shows a dual branch with a dominant k. −2 spec- trum. They also showed that the scaling of the energy and entropy spectra are similar for the free-slip and no-slip boundary conditions, apart from the prefactors. In this study, we performed 2D and 3D RBC simu- lations for the Prandtl numbers 102,103, ...

  4. Efficient high speed communications over electrical powerlines for a large number of users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.; Tripathi, K.; Latchman, H.A. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Affordable broadband Internet communication is currently available for residential use via cable modem and other forms of digital subscriber lines (DSL). Powerline communication (PLC) systems were never considered seriously for communications due to their low speed and high development cost. However, due to technological advances PLCs are now spreading to local area networks and broadband over power line systems. This paper presented a newly proposed modification to the standard HomePlug 1.0 MAC protocol to make it a constant contention window-based scheme. The HomePlug 1.0 was developed based on orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) and carrier sense multiple access with collision avoidance (CSMA/CA). It is currently the most commonly used technology of power line communications, supporting a transmission rate of up to 14 Mbps on the power line. However, the throughput performance of this original scheme becomes critical when the number of users increases. For that reason, a constant contention window based medium access control protocol algorithm of HomePlug 1.0 was proposed under the assumption that the number of active stations is known. An analytical framework based on Markov Chains was developed in order to model this modified protocol under saturation conditions. Modeling results accurately matched the actual performance of the system. This paper revealed that the performance can be improved significantly if the variables were parameterized in terms of the number of active stations. 15 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  5. Production of large numbers of size-controlled tumor spheroids using microwell plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razian, Golsa; Yu, Yang; Ungrin, Mark

    2013-11-18

    Tumor spheroids are increasingly recognized as an important in vitro model for the behavior of tumor cells in three dimensions. More physiologically relevant than conventional adherent-sheet cultures, they more accurately recapitulate the complexity and interactions present in real tumors. In order to harness this model to better assess tumor biology, or the efficacy of novel therapeutic agents, it is necessary to be able to generate spheroids reproducibly, in a controlled manner and in significant numbers. The AggreWell system consists of a high-density array of pyramid-shaped microwells, into which a suspension of single cells is centrifuged. The numbers of cells clustering at the bottom of each microwell, and the number and ratio of distinct cell types involved depend only on the properties of the suspension introduced by the experimenter. Thus, we are able to generate tumor spheroids of arbitrary size and composition without needing to modify the underlying platform technology. The hundreds of microwells per square centimeter of culture surface area in turn ensure that extremely high production levels may be attained via a straightforward, nonlabor-intensive process. We therefore expect that this protocol will be broadly useful to researchers in the tumor spheroid field.

  6. Development and application of an optogenetic platform for controlling and imaging a large number of individual neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Ali Ibrahim Ali

    The understanding and treatment of brain disorders as well as the development of intelligent machines is hampered by the lack of knowledge of how the brain fundamentally functions. Over the past century, we have learned much about how individual neurons and neural networks behave, however new tools are critically needed to interrogate how neural networks give rise to complex brain processes and disease conditions. Recent innovations in molecular techniques, such as optogenetics, have enabled neuroscientists unprecedented precision to excite, inhibit and record defined neurons. The impressive sensitivity of currently available optogenetic sensors and actuators has now enabled the possibility of analyzing a large number of individual neurons in the brains of behaving animals. To promote the use of these optogenetic tools, this thesis integrates cutting edge optogenetic molecular sensors which is ultrasensitive for imaging neuronal activity with custom wide field optical microscope to analyze a large number of individual neurons in living brains. Wide-field microscopy provides a large field of view and better spatial resolution approaching the Abbe diffraction limit of fluorescent microscope. To demonstrate the advantages of this optical platform, we imaged a deep brain structure, the Hippocampus, and tracked hundreds of neurons over time while mouse was performing a memory task to investigate how those individual neurons related to behavior. In addition, we tested our optical platform in investigating transient neural network changes upon mechanical perturbation related to blast injuries. In this experiment, all blasted mice show a consistent change in neural network. A small portion of neurons showed a sustained calcium increase for an extended period of time, whereas the majority lost their activities. Finally, using optogenetic silencer to control selective motor cortex neurons, we examined their contributions to the network pathology of basal ganglia related to

  7. Analyzing the Large Number of Variables in Biomedical and Satellite Imagery

    CERN Document Server

    Good, Phillip I

    2011-01-01

    This book grew out of an online interactive offered through statcourse.com, and it soon became apparent to the author that the course was too limited in terms of time and length in light of the broad backgrounds of the enrolled students. The statisticians who took the course needed to be brought up to speed both on the biological context as well as on the specialized statistical methods needed to handle large arrays. Biologists and physicians, even though fully knowledgeable concerning the procedures used to generate microaarrays, EEGs, or MRIs, needed a full introduction to the resampling met

  8. Ecological specialization and rarity indices estimated for a large number of plant species in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobaied, Samira; Machon, Nathalie; Porcher, Emmanuelle

    2015-06-01

    The biological diversity of the Earth is being rapidly depleted due to the direct and indirect consequences of human activities. Specialist or rare species are generally thought to be more extinction prone than generalist or common species. Testing this assumption however requires that the rarity and ecological specialization of the species are quantified. Many indices have been developed to classify species as generalists vs. specialists or as rare vs. common, but large data sets are needed to calculate these indices. Here, we present a list of specialization and rarity values for more than 2800 plant species of continental France, which were computed from the large botanical and ecological dataset SOPHY. Three specialization indices were calculated using species co-occurrence data. All three indices are based on (dis)similarity among plant communities containing a focal species, quantified either as beta diversity in an additive (Fridley et al., 2007 [6]) or multiplicative (Zeleny, 2008 [15]) partitioning of diversity or as the multiple site similarity of Baselga et al. (2007) [1]. Species rarity was calculated as the inverse of a species occurrence.

  9. Electrically driving large magnetic Reynolds number flows on the Madison plasma dynamo experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, David; Wallace, John; Peterson, Ethan; Endrezzi, Douglass; Forest, Cary B.; Desangles, Victor

    2015-11-01

    Electrically-driven plasma flows, predicted to excite a large-scale dynamo instability, have been generated in the Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX), at the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory. Numerical simulations show that certain topologies of these simply-connected flows may be optimal for creating a plasma dynamo and predict critical thresholds as low as Rmcrit =μ0 σLV = 250 . MPDX plasmas are shown to exceed this critical Rm , generating large (L = 1 . 4 m), warm (Te > 10 eV), unmagnetized (MA > 1) plasmas where Rm torque in Helium plasmas. Detailed Mach probe measurements of plasma velocity for two flow topologies will be presented: edge-localized drive using the multi-cusp boundary field, and volumetric drive using an axial Helmholtz field. Radial velocity profiles show that edge-driven flow is established via ion viscosity but is limited by a volumetric neutral drag force (χ ~ 1 / (ντin)), and measurements of velocity shear compare favorably to Braginskii transport theory. Volumetric flow drive is shown to produce stronger velocity shear, and is characterized by the radial potential gradient as determined by global charge balance.

  10. A comparison of three approaches to compute the effective Reynolds number of the implicit large-eddy simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ye [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thornber, Ben [The Univ. of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2016-04-12

    Here, the implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) has been utilized as an effective approach for calculating many complex flows at high Reynolds number flows. Richtmyer–Meshkov instability (RMI) induced flow can be viewed as a homogeneous decaying turbulence (HDT) after the passage of the shock. In this article, a critical evaluation of three methods for estimating the effective Reynolds number and the effective kinematic viscosity is undertaken utilizing high-resolution ILES data. Effective Reynolds numbers based on the vorticity and dissipation rate, or the integral and inner-viscous length scales, are found to be the most self-consistent when compared to the expected phenomenology and wind tunnel experiments.

  11. Application of Evolution Strategies to the Design of Tracking Filters with a Large Number of Specifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús García Herrero

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the application of evolution strategies to the design of interacting multiple model (IMM tracking filters in order to fulfill a large table of performance specifications. These specifications define the desired filter performance in a thorough set of selected test scenarios, for different figures of merit and input conditions, imposing hundreds of performance goals. The design problem is stated as a numeric search in the filter parameters space to attain all specifications or at least minimize, in a compromise, the excess over some specifications as much as possible, applying global optimization techniques coming from evolutionary computation field. Besides, a new methodology is proposed to integrate specifications in a fitness function able to effectively guide the search to suitable solutions. The method has been applied to the design of an IMM tracker for a real-world civil air traffic control application: the accomplishment of specifications defined for the future European ARTAS system.

  12. Performance Of Five Chromatic Adaptation Transforms Using Large Number Of Color Patches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dajana Dordevic

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Input devices in general use light sources with different color temperatures. As a consequence, in color acquisition, display and rendering processes a number of chromatic adaptations transforms (CATS are being used. In our study, color transformations between three illuminant source pairs (D50-A, D50-D65 and D65-A were investigated using five cats (Bradford, von Kries, XYZ Scaling, CMCCAT97 and CMCCAT00. Research was made on 8190 color patches that were printed with inkjet printer. Results showed that color differences obtained with the Bradford method were the lowest regardless of the implemented illuminant source pair. The same ranking of CATSwas observed in all combinations of illuminant source pairs, however the smallest color differences were generated with D50-D65 CATS and the biggest with D65-A models.

  13. Performance Of Five Chromatic Adaptation Transforms Using Large Number Of Color Patches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Hladnik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Input devices in general use light sources with different color temperatures. As a consequence, in color acquisition, display and rendering processes a number of chromatic adaptations transforms (cats are being used. In our study, color transformations between three illuminant source pairs (d50-a, d50-d65 and d65-a were investigated using five cats (Bradford, von Kries, xyz Scaling, cmccat97 and cmccat00. Research was made on 8190 color patches that were printed with inkjet printer. Results showed that color differences obtained with the Bradford method were the lowest regardless of the implemented illuminant source pair. The same ranking of cats was observed in all combination of illuminant source pairs, however the smallest color differences were generated with d50-d65 cats and the biggest with d65-a models.

  14. Driving large magnetic Reynolds number flow in highly ionized, unmagnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, D. B.; Peterson, E.; Milhone, J.; Endrizzi, D.; Cooper, C.; Désangles, V.; Khalzov, I.; Siller, R.; Forest, C. B.

    2017-05-01

    Electrically driven, unmagnetized plasma flows have been generated in the Madison plasma dynamo experiment with magnetic Reynolds numbers exceeding the predicted Rmcrit = 200 threshold for flow-driven MHD instability excitation. The plasma flow is driven using ten thermally emissive lanthanum hexaboride cathodes which generate a J ×B torque in helium and argon plasmas. Detailed Mach probe measurements of plasma velocity for two flow topologies are presented: edge-localized drive using the multi-cusp boundary field and volumetric drive using an axial Helmholtz field. Radial velocity profiles show that the edge-driven flow is established via ion viscosity but is limited by a volumetric neutral drag force, and measurements of velocity shear compare favorably to the Braginskii transport theory. Volumetric flow drive is shown to produce larger velocity shear and has the correct flow profile for studying the magnetorotational instability.

  15. Jet Impingement Heat Transfer at High Reynolds Numbers and Large Density Variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2010-01-01

    Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall has been investigated numerically in a configuration with H/D=2, where H is the distance from the jet inlet to the wall and D is the jet diameter. The jet Reynolds number was 361000 and the density ratio across the wall boundary....... The results also show a noticeable difference in the heat transfer predictions when applying different turbulence models. Furthermore calculations were performed to study the effect of applying temperature dependent thermophysical properties versus constant properties and the effect of calculating the gas...... density from the ideal gas law versus real gas data. In both cases the effect was found to be negligible....

  16. Numerical analysis of jet impingement heat transfer at high jet Reynolds number and large temperature difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2013-01-01

    Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall was investigated numerically for a ratio of 2 between the jet inlet to wall distance and the jet inlet diameter. The influence of turbulence intensity at the jet inlet and choice of turbulence model on the wall heat transfer...... was investigated at a jet Reynolds number of 1.66 × 105 and a temperature difference between jet inlet and wall of 1600 K. The focus was on the convective heat transfer contribution as thermal radiation was not included in the investigation. A considerable influence of the turbulence intensity at the jet inlet...... was observed in the stagnation region, where the wall heat flux increased by a factor of almost 3 when increasing the turbulence intensity from 1.5% to 10%. The choice of turbulence model also influenced the heat transfer predictions significantly, especially in the stagnation region, where differences of up...

  17. Solar effects on circulation types over Europe: an analysis based on a large number of classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, R.; Cahynová, M.; Kyselý, J.

    2010-09-01

    Recently, effects of the 11-year solar cycle on various aspects of tropospheric circulation in the Northern Hemisphere in winter have been recognized. One of our previous studies showed a significant solar effect on the frequency of synoptic types from the Hess-Brezowsky catalogue. Here, we use a large collection of varied classifications of circulation patterns, defined over central Europe, assembled within the COST733 Action "Harmonization and Applications of Weather Types Classifications for European Regions" to detect the solar effect on the frequency of synoptic types. The advantage of this multi-classification approach is that peculiarities or biases present in any single classification (catalogue) that might influence the detected solar signal are eliminated once a large ensemble of classifications is used. We divide winter months (December to March) into three groups according to the mean monthly solar activity, quantified by the solar 10.7 cm flux. The three groups correspond to the minima of the 11-year solar cycle, a moderate solar activity, and solar maxima. Within each group, frequencies of occurrence of individual circulation types are calculated. Differences in the occurrence of individual classes between solar activity groups indicate the presence of a solar activity effect on atmospheric circulation over Europe. Statistical significance of these differences is estimated by a block resampling method. An enhanced frequency under solar minima and a reduced frequency under solar maxima are observed almost exclusively for the types with easterly flow over central Europe. On the other hand, a reduced frequency under solar minima and an enhanced frequency under solar maxima are found for the types with westerly flow over central Europe. The research is supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Academy of Sciences, project A300420805, and by the Ministry of Education, Youth, and Sports of the Czech Republic, contract OC115.

  18. Assessing copy number from exome sequencing and exome array CGH based on CNV spectrum in a large clinical cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retterer, Kyle; Scuffins, Julie; Schmidt, Daniel; Lewis, Rachel; Pineda-Alvarez, Daniel; Stafford, Amanda; Schmidt, Lindsay; Warren, Stephanie; Gibellini, Federica; Kondakova, Anastasia; Blair, Amanda; Bale, Sherri; Matyakhina, Ludmila; Meck, Jeanne; Aradhya, Swaroop; Haverfield, Eden

    2015-08-01

    Detection of copy-number variation (CNV) is important for investigating many genetic disorders. Testing a large clinical cohort by array comparative genomic hybridization provides a deep perspective on the spectrum of pathogenic CNV. In this context, we describe a bioinformatics approach to extract CNV information from whole-exome sequencing and demonstrate its utility in clinical testing. Exon-focused arrays and whole-genome chromosomal microarray analysis were used to test 14,228 and 14,000 individuals, respectively. Based on these results, we developed an algorithm to detect deletions/duplications in whole-exome sequencing data and a novel whole-exome array. In the exon array cohort, we observed a positive detection rate of 2.4% (25 duplications, 318 deletions), of which 39% involved one or two exons. Chromosomal microarray analysis identified 3,345 CNVs affecting single genes (18%). We demonstrate that our whole-exome sequencing algorithm resolves CNVs of three or more exons. These results demonstrate the clinical utility of single-exon resolution in CNV assays. Our whole-exome sequencing algorithm approaches this resolution but is complemented by a whole-exome array to unambiguously identify intragenic CNVs and single-exon changes. These data illustrate the next advancements in CNV analysis through whole-exome sequencing and whole-exome array.Genet Med 17 8, 623-629.

  19. Catering for large numbers of tourists: the McDonaldization of casual dining in Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Sanette L.A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Since 2002 Kruger National Park (KNP has subjected to a commercialisation strategy. Regarding income generation, SANParks (1 sees KNP as the goose that lays the golden eggs. As part of SANParks’ commercialisation strategy and in response to providing services that are efficient, predictable and calculable for a large number of tourists, SANParks has allowed well-known branded restaurants to be established in certain rest camps in KNP. This innovation has raised a range of different concerns and opinions among the public. This paper investigates the what and the where of casual dining experiences in KNP; describes how the catering services have evolved over the last 70 years; and evaluates current visitor perceptions of the introduction of franchised restaurants in the park. The main research instrument was a questionnaire survey. Survey findings confirmed that restaurant managers, park managers and visitors recognise franchised restaurants as positive contributors to the unique KNP experience. Park managers appraised the franchised restaurants as mechanisms for funding conservation.

  20. Polycomb repressive complex 1 provides a molecular explanation for repeat copy number dependency in FSHD muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casa, Valentina; Runfola, Valeria; Micheloni, Stefano; Aziz, Arif; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Gabellini, Davide

    2017-02-15

    Repression of repetitive elements is crucial to preserve genome integrity and has been traditionally ascribed to constitutive heterochromatin pathways. FacioScapuloHumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD), one of the most common myopathies, is characterized by a complex interplay of genetic and epigenetic events. The main FSHD form is linked to a reduced copy number of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat on 4q35, causing loss of silencing and aberrant expression of the D4Z4-embedded DUX4 gene leading to disease. By an unknown mechanism, D4Z4 copy-number correlates with FSHD phenotype. Here we show that the DUX4 proximal promoter (DUX4p) is sufficient to nucleate the enrichment of both constitutive and facultative heterochromatin components and to mediate a copy-number dependent gene silencing. We found that both the CpG/GC dense DNA content and the repetitive nature of DUX4p arrays are important for their repressive ability. We showed that DUX4p mediates a copy number-dependent Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) recruitment, which is responsible for the copy-number dependent gene repression. Overall, we directly link genetic and epigenetic defects in FSHD by proposing a novel molecular explanation for the copy number-dependency in FSHD pathogenesis, and offer insight into the molecular functions of repeats in chromatin regulation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Clinical Trials With Large Numbers of Variables: Important Advantages of Canonical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleophas, Ton J

    2016-01-01

    Canonical analysis assesses the combined effects of a set of predictor variables on a set of outcome variables, but it is little used in clinical trials despite the omnipresence of multiple variables. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of canonical analysis as compared with traditional multivariate methods using multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). As an example, a simulated data file with 12 gene expression levels and 4 drug efficacy scores was used. The correlation coefficient between the 12 predictor and 4 outcome variables was 0.87 (P = 0.0001) meaning that 76% of the variability in the outcome variables was explained by the 12 covariates. Repeated testing after the removal of 5 unimportant predictor and 1 outcome variable produced virtually the same overall result. The MANCOVA identified identical unimportant variables, but it was unable to provide overall statistics. (1) Canonical analysis is remarkable, because it can handle many more variables than traditional multivariate methods such as MANCOVA can. (2) At the same time, it accounts for the relative importance of the separate variables, their interactions and differences in units. (3) Canonical analysis provides overall statistics of the effects of sets of variables, whereas traditional multivariate methods only provide the statistics of the separate variables. (4) Unlike other methods for combining the effects of multiple variables such as factor analysis/partial least squares, canonical analysis is scientifically entirely rigorous. (5) Limitations include that it is less flexible than factor analysis/partial least squares, because only 2 sets of variables are used and because multiple solutions instead of one is offered. We do hope that this article will stimulate clinical investigators to start using this remarkable method.

  2. Neutrino oscillations, and hadronic physics when considering a large number of colors in quantum chromodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Daniel R.

    2005-11-01

    This document consists of three chapters. The first chapter includes a detailed description of neutrino oscillations with an emphasis on the naturalness of obtaining a small value Ue3 within the Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing matrix. With the use of the seesaw mechanism, it is found that the upper bound on this particular element is approaching its lower limit when we assume a very natural set of criteria for the origins of leptonic mixing. Also obtained are some general expressions which could provide insight into the Majorana nature of neutrino oscillations. The second chapter explores the use of operator methods in a 1/ Nc expansion for magnetic moments in QCD. An analysis of the entire set of magnetic moments is provided, including an explicit calculation of all twenty seven corresponding operators. A prediction of the sixteen unknown magnetic moments is also given, which were found using only the Wigner-Eckart theorem and a simple least squares fit to the available data. Using the predicted magnetic moments, we were also able to predict the six radiative decay widths corresponding to the Sigma*+, Sigma *0, xi*0, and xi*-. In the third chapter; using a formalism established to include systematic corrections to the leading order S-matrix elements, we derive expressions for the pion photoproduction amplitudes in the 1/Nc expansion of QCD, and obtain linear relations directly from this expansion that relate electromagnetic multipole amplitudes at all energies. The leading-order relations in 1/Nc compare favorably with available data, while the next-to-leading order relations seem to provide only a small improvement. However, when resonance parameters are compared directly, the agreement at O(1/Nc) or O(1/ N2c ) is impressive.

  3. Semi-automated reconstruction of neural processes from large numbers of fluorescence images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Lu

    Full Text Available We introduce a method for large scale reconstruction of complex bundles of neural processes from fluorescent image stacks. We imaged yellow fluorescent protein labeled axons that innervated a whole muscle, as well as dendrites in cerebral cortex, in transgenic mice, at the diffraction limit with a confocal microscope. Each image stack was digitally re-sampled along an orientation such that the majority of axons appeared in cross-section. A region growing algorithm was implemented in the open-source Reconstruct software and applied to the semi-automatic tracing of individual axons in three dimensions. The progression of region growing is constrained by user-specified criteria based on pixel values and object sizes, and the user has full control over the segmentation process. A full montage of reconstructed axons was assembled from the approximately 200 individually reconstructed stacks. Average reconstruction speed is approximately 0.5 mm per hour. We found an error rate in the automatic tracing mode of approximately 1 error per 250 um of axonal length. We demonstrated the capacity of the program by reconstructing the connectome of motor axons in a small mouse muscle.

  4. ProteoMix: an integrated and flexible system for interactively analyzing large numbers of protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Kurotani, Atsushi; Kuroda, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2004-11-01

    ProteoMix is a suite of JAVA programs for identifying, annotating and predicting regions of interest in large sets of amino acid sequences, according to systematic and consistent criteria. It is based on two concepts (1) the integration of results from different sequence analysis tools increases the prediction reliability; and (2) the integration protocol is critical and needs to be easily adaptable in a case-by-case manner. ProteoMix was designed to analyze simultaneously multiple protein sequences using several bioinformatics tools, merge the results of the analyses using logical functions and display them on an integrated viewer. In addition, new sequences can be added seamlessly to an analysis performed on an initial set of sequences. ProteoMix has a modular design, and bioinformatics tools are run on remote servers accessed using the Internet Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP), ensuring the swift implementation of additional tools. ProteoMix has a user-friendly interactive graphical user interface environment and runs on PCs with Microsoft OS. ProteoMix is freely available for academic users at http://bio.gsc.riken.jp/ProteoMix/

  5. Normal zone detectors for a large number of inductively coupled coils. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1983-11-03

    In order to protect a set of inductively coupled superconducting magnets, it is necessary to locate and measure normal zone voltages that are small compared with the mutual and self-induced voltages. The method described in this paper uses two sets of voltage measurements to locate and measure one or more normal zones in any number of coupled coils. One set of voltages is the outputs of bridges that balance out the self-induced voltages. The other set of voltages can be the voltages across the coils, although alternatives are possible. The two sets of equations form a single combined set of equations. Each normal zone location or combination of normal zones has a set of these combined equations associated with it. It is demonstrated that the normal zone can be located and the correct set chosen, allowing determination of the size of the normal zone. Only a few operations take place in a working detector: multiplication of a constant, addition, and simple decision-making. In many cases the detector for each coil, although weakly linked to the other detectors, can be considered to be independent. The effect on accuracy of changes in the system parameters is discussed.

  6. Secondary organic aerosol formation from a large number of reactive man-made organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derwent, Richard G., E-mail: r.derwent@btopenworld.com [rdscientific, Newbury, Berkshire (United Kingdom); Jenkin, Michael E. [Atmospheric Chemistry Services, Okehampton, Devon (United Kingdom); Utembe, Steven R.; Shallcross, Dudley E. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Murrells, Tim P.; Passant, Neil R. [AEA Environment and Energy, Harwell International Business Centre, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    A photochemical trajectory model has been used to examine the relative propensities of a wide variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by human activities to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) under one set of highly idealised conditions representing northwest Europe. This study applied a detailed speciated VOC emission inventory and the Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.1 (MCM v3.1) gas phase chemistry, coupled with an optimised representation of gas-aerosol absorptive partitioning of 365 oxygenated chemical reaction product species. In all, SOA formation was estimated from the atmospheric oxidation of 113 emitted VOCs. A number of aromatic compounds, together with some alkanes and terpenes, showed significant propensities to form SOA. When these propensities were folded into a detailed speciated emission inventory, 15 organic compounds together accounted for 97% of the SOA formation potential of UK man made VOC emissions and 30 emission source categories accounted for 87% of this potential. After road transport and the chemical industry, SOA formation was dominated by the solvents sector which accounted for 28% of the SOA formation potential.

  7. Hydrodynamic interaction on large-Reynolds-number aligned bubbles: Drag effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Munoz, J., E-mail: jrm@correo.azc.uam.mx [Departamento de Energia, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas, 02200 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Centro de Investigacion en Polimeros, Marcos Achar Lobaton No. 2, Tepexpan, 55885 Acolman, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Salinas-Rodriguez, E.; Soria, A. [Departamento de IPH, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Iztapalapa, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gama-Goicochea, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Polimeros, Marcos Achar Lobaton No. 2, Tepexpan, 55885 Acolman, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > The hydrodynamic interaction of a pair aligned equal-sized bubbles is analyzed. > The leading bubble wake decreases the drag on the trailing bubble. > A new semi-analytical model for the trailing bubble's drag is presented. > The equilibrium distance between bubbles is predicted. - Abstract: The hydrodynamic interaction of two equal-sized spherical gas bubbles rising along a vertical line with a Reynolds number (Re) between 50 and 200 is analyzed. An approach to estimate the trailing bubble drag based on the search of a proper reference fluid velocity is proposed. Our main result is a new, simple semi-analytical model for the trailing bubble drag. Additionally, the equilibrium separation distance between bubbles is predicted. The proposed models agree quantitatively up to small distances between bubbles, with reported data for 50 {<=} Re {<=} 200. The relative average error for the trailing bubble drag, Er, is found to be in the range 1.1 {<=} Er {<=} 1.7, i.e., it is of the same order of the analytical predictions in the literature.

  8. Correlation of number of tumor buds and tumor stage in large bowel carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đerković Branislav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Standardized staging of tumors takes into account the depth of invasion of the intestinal wall and the presence of local or distant metastases, specifically focusing to precisely estimate length of patient survival. This assessment system does not fully reflect the biological behaviour of cancer individually, ie. tumor aggressiveness and ability of recurrence tumor after medical treatment. Furthermore, cancer at some patients have more aggressive growth than other carcinomas in the same clinical stage, because there are other parameters that determine the biological behaviors of colon cancer, which are not included in the standard classification of determining tumor stage. One of the recent arguments which are due in the spotlight is 'tumor budding', which represents one cell or group of up to five non-differentiated tumor cells, which are found in the stroma out of the invasive front line of cancer. There are 92 colon cancer and upper rectum processed, which are collected at General Hospital in Trebinje and Medical Center in Kosovska Mitrovica. The aim is to determine whether there is a correlation between the number of tumor budding and stage of tumors in colorectal cancer. The tumor stage is determined by Astler Coller classification. Investigation, based on x2-test, leads to the conclusion that there is not a statistical significance in tumor budding distribution in relation to tumor stage according to the Astler Coller classification (p = 0.383; p> 0.05.

  9. KISCH / UL AND DURABLE DEVELOPMENT OF THE REGIONS THAT HAVE A LARGE NUMBER OF RELIGIOUS SETTLEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ENEA CONSTANTA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We live in a world of contemporary kitsch, a world that merges authentic and false, good taste and meets often with bad taste. This phenomenon is găseseşte everywhere: in art, in literature cheap in media productions, shows, dialogues streets, in homes, in politics, in other words, in everyday life. Ksch site came directly in tourism, being identified in all forms of tourism worldwide, but especially religious tourism, pilgrimage with unexpected success in recent years. This paper makes an analysis of progressive evolution tourist traffic religion on the ability of the destination of religious tourism to remain competitive against all the problems, to attract visitors for their loyalty, to remain unique in terms of cultural and be a permanent balance with the environment, taking into account the environment religious phenomenon invaded Kisch, it disgraceful mixing dangerously with authentic spirituality. How trade, and rather Kisch's commercial components affect the environment, reflected in terms of religious tourism offer representatives highlighted based on a survey of major monastic ensembles in North Oltenia. Research objectives achieved in work followed, on the one hand the contributions and effects of the high number of visitors on the regions that hold religious sites, and on the other hand weighting and effects of commercial activity carried out in or near monastic establishments, be it genuine or kisck the respective regions. The study conducted took into account the northern region of Oltenia, and where demand for tourism is predominantly oriented exclusively practicing religious tourism

  10. Marcinkiewicz-type strong law of large numbers for double arrays of pairwise independent random variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dug Hun Hong

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Let {Xij} be a double sequence of pairwise independent random variables. If P{|Xmn|≥t}≤P{|X|≥t} for all nonnegative real numbers t and E|X|p(log+|X|3<∞, for 1

  11. Neutrino Oscillations, And Hadronic Physics When Considering A Large Number Of Colors In Quantum Chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, D R

    2005-01-01

    This document consists of three chapters. The first chapter includes a detailed description of neutrino oscillations with an emphasis on the naturalness of obtaining a small value Ue3 within the Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing matrix. With the use of the seesaw mechanism, it is found that the upper bound on this particular element is approaching its lower limit when we assume a very natural set of criteria for the origins of leptonic mixing. Also obtained are some general expressions which could provide insight into the Majorana nature of neutrino oscillations. The second chapter explores the use of operator methods in a 1/ Nc expansion for magnetic moments in QCD. An analysis of the entire set of magnetic moments is provided, including an explicit calculation of all twenty seven corresponding operators. A prediction of the sixteen unknown magnetic moments is also given, which were found using only the Wigner-Eckart theorem and a simple least squares fit to the available data. Using the predicted magnetic moments...

  12. Beating the numbers through strategic intervention materials (SIMs): Innovative science teaching for large classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboruto, Venus M.

    2017-05-01

    The study aimed to find out the effectiveness of using Strategic Intervention Materials (SIMs) as an innovative teaching practice in managing large Grade Eight Science classes to raise the performance of the students in terms of science process skills development and mastery of science concepts. Utilizing experimental research design with two groups of participants, which were purposefully chosen, it was obtained that there existed a significant difference in the performance of the experimental and control groups based on actual class observation and written tests on science process skills with a p-value of 0.0360 in favor of the experimental class. Further, results of written pre-test and post-test on science concepts showed that the experimental group with the mean of 24.325 (SD =3.82) performed better than the control group with the mean of 20.58 (SD =4.94), with a registered p-value of 0.00039. Therefore, the use of SIMs significantly contributed to the mastery of science concepts and the development of science process skills. Based on the findings, the following recommendations are offered: 1. that grade eight science teachers should use or adopt the SIMs used in this study to improve their students' performance; 2. training-workshop on developing SIMs must be conducted to help teachers develop SIMs to be used in their classes; 3. school administrators must allocate funds for the development and reproduction of SIMs to be used by the students in their school; and 4. every division should have a repository of SIMs for easy access of the teachers in the entire division.

  13. What caused a large number of fatalities in the Tohoku earthquake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, M.; Ishida, M.; Nishikawa, Y.; Mizuki, C.; Hayashi, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The Mw9.0 earthquake caused 20,000 deaths and missing persons in northeastern Japan. 115 years prior to this event, there were three historical tsunamis that struck the region, one of which is a "tsunami earthquake" resulted with a death toll of 22,000. Since then, numerous breakwaters were constructed along the entire northeastern coasts and tsunami evacuation drills were carried out and hazard maps were distributed to local residents on numerous communities. However, despite the constructions and preparedness efforts, the March 11 Tohoku earthquake caused numerous fatalities. The strong shaking lasted three minutes or longer, thus all residents recognized that this is the strongest and longest earthquake that they had been ever experienced in their lives. The tsunami inundated an enormous area at about 560km2 over 35 cities along the coast of northeast Japan. To find out the reasons behind the high number of fatalities due to the March 11 tsunami, we interviewed 150 tsunami survivors at public evacuation shelters in 7 cities mainly in Iwate prefecture in mid-April and early June 2011. Interviews were done for about 30min or longer focused on their evacuation behaviors and those that they had observed. On the basis of the interviews, we found that residents' decisions not to evacuate immediately were partly due to or influenced by earthquake science results. Below are some of the factors that affected residents' decisions. 1. Earthquake hazard assessments turned out to be incorrect. Expected earthquake magnitudes and resultant hazards in northeastern Japan assessed and publicized by the government were significantly smaller than the actual Tohoku earthquake. 2. Many residents did not receive accurate tsunami warnings. The first tsunami warning were too small compared with the actual tsunami heights. 3. The previous frequent warnings with overestimated tsunami height influenced the behavior of the residents. 4. Many local residents above 55 years old experienced

  14. Trends and Correlates of Consenting to Provide Social Security Numbers: Longitudinal Findings from the General Social Survey (1993-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jibum; Shin, Hee-Choon; Rosen, Zohn; Kang, Jeong-han; Dykema, Jennifer; Muennig, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Privacy and confidentiality are often of great concern to respondents answering sensitive questions posed by interviewers. Using the 1993-2010 General Social Survey, we examined trends in the provision of social security numbers (SSNs) and correlates of those responses. Results indicate that the rate of SSN provision has declined over the past…

  15. Study on lattice Boltzmann method/large eddy simulation and its application at high Reynolds number flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiqing Si

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lattice Boltzmann method combined with large eddy simulation is developed in the article to simulate fluid flow at high Reynolds numbers. A subgrid model is used as a large eddy simulation model in the numerical simulation for high Reynolds flow. The idea of subgrid model is based on an assumption to include the physical effects that the unresolved motion has on the resolved fluid motion. It takes a simple form of eddy viscosity models for the Reynolds stress. Lift and drag evaluation in the lattice Boltzmann equation takes momentum-exchange method for curved body surface. First of all, the present numerical method is validated at low Reynolds numbers. Second, the developed lattice Boltzmann method/large eddy simulation method is performed to solve flow problems at high Reynolds numbers. Some detailed quantitative comparisons are implemented to show the effectiveness of the present method. It is demonstrated that lattice Boltzmann method combined with large eddy simulation model can efficiently simulate high Reynolds numbers’ flows.

  16. The challenge for genetic epidemiologists: how to analyze large numbers of SNPs in relation to complex diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariman Edwin CM

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic epidemiologists have taken the challenge to identify genetic polymorphisms involved in the development of diseases. Many have collected data on large numbers of genetic markers but are not familiar with available methods to assess their association with complex diseases. Statistical methods have been developed for analyzing the relation between large numbers of genetic and environmental predictors to disease or disease-related variables in genetic association studies. In this commentary we discuss logistic regression analysis, neural networks, including the parameter decreasing method (PDM and genetic programming optimized neural networks (GPNN and several non-parametric methods, which include the set association approach, combinatorial partitioning method (CPM, restricted partitioning method (RPM, multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR method and the random forests approach. The relative strengths and weaknesses of these methods are highlighted. Logistic regression and neural networks can handle only a limited number of predictor variables, depending on the number of observations in the dataset. Therefore, they are less useful than the non-parametric methods to approach association studies with large numbers of predictor variables. GPNN on the other hand may be a useful approach to select and model important predictors, but its performance to select the important effects in the presence of large numbers of predictors needs to be examined. Both the set association approach and random forests approach are able to handle a large number of predictors and are useful in reducing these predictors to a subset of predictors with an important contribution to disease. The combinatorial methods give more insight in combination patterns for sets of genetic and/or environmental predictor variables that may be related to the outcome variable. As the non-parametric methods have different strengths and weaknesses we conclude that to approach

  17. Modelling high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions in laboratory experiments using large-scale free-stream turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Eda; Hearst, R Jason; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2017-03-13

    A turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence is investigated in order to ascertain the scale interactions that dominate the near-wall region. The results are discussed in relation to a canonical high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer because previous studies have reported considerable similarities between these two flows. Measurements were acquired simultaneously from four hot wires mounted to a rake which was traversed through the boundary layer. Particular focus is given to two main features of both canonical high Reynolds number boundary layers and boundary layers subjected to free-stream turbulence: (i) the footprint of the large scales in the logarithmic region on the near-wall small scales, specifically the modulating interaction between these scales, and (ii) the phase difference in amplitude modulation. The potential for a turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence to 'simulate' high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions is discussed. The results of this study have encouraging implications for future investigations of the fundamental scale interactions that take place in high Reynolds number flows as it demonstrates that these can be achieved at typical laboratory scales.This article is part of the themed issue 'Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. A method of providing engaging formative feedback to large cohort first-year physiology and anatomy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston-Green, Katrina; Wallace, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    A growing body of evidence demonstrates a critical role for effective, meaningful feedback to enhance student learning. Effective feedback can become part of the learning cycle that is not only a learning opportunity for the student but can also be used to inform the teacher and ongoing curriculum development. Feedback is considered particularly important during the first year of university and can even be viewed as a retention strategy that can help attenuate student performance anxieties and solidify perceptions of academic support. Unfortunately, the provision of individualized, timely feedback can be particularly challenging in first-year courses as they tend to be large and diverse cohort classes that pose challenges of time and logistics. Various forms of generic feedback can provide rapid and cost-effect feedback to large cohorts but may be of limited benefit to students other than signaling weaknesses in knowledge. The present study describes a method that was used to provide formative task-related feedback to a large cohort of first-year physiology and anatomy students. Based on student evaluations presented in this study, this method provided feedback in a manner that engaged students, uncovered underlying misconceptions, facilitated peer discussion, and provided opportunity for new instruction while allowing the lecturer to recognize common gaps in knowledge and inform ongoing curriculum development. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  19. Digital genotyping of macrosatellites and multicopy genes reveals novel biological functions associated with copy number variation of large tandem repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Brahmachary

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tandem repeats are common in eukaryotic genomes, but due to difficulties in assaying them remain poorly studied. Here, we demonstrate the utility of Nanostring technology as a targeted approach to perform accurate measurement of tandem repeats even at extremely high copy number, and apply this technology to genotype 165 HapMap samples from three different populations and five species of non-human primates. We observed extreme variability in copy number of tandemly repeated genes, with many loci showing 5-10 fold variation in copy number among humans. Many of these loci show hallmarks of genome assembly errors, and the true copy number of many large tandem repeats is significantly under-represented even in the high quality 'finished' human reference assembly. Importantly, we demonstrate that most large tandem repeat variations are not tagged by nearby SNPs, and are therefore essentially invisible to SNP-based GWAS approaches. Using association analysis we identify many cis correlations of large tandem repeat variants with nearby gene expression and DNA methylation levels, indicating that variations of tandem repeat length are associated with functional effects on the local genomic environment. This includes an example where expansion of a macrosatellite repeat is associated with increased DNA methylation and suppression of nearby gene expression, suggesting a mechanism termed "repeat induced gene silencing", which has previously been observed only in transgenic organisms. We also observed multiple signatures consistent with altered selective pressures at tandemly repeated loci, suggesting important biological functions. Our studies show that tandemly repeated loci represent a highly variable fraction of the genome that have been systematically ignored by most previous studies, copy number variation of which can exert functionally significant effects. We suggest that future studies of tandem repeat loci will lead to many novel insights into their

  20. Digital Genotyping of Macrosatellites and Multicopy Genes Reveals Novel Biological Functions Associated with Copy Number Variation of Large Tandem Repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilez, Javier; Hasson, Dan; Borel, Christelle; Warburton, Peter; Sharp, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repeats are common in eukaryotic genomes, but due to difficulties in assaying them remain poorly studied. Here, we demonstrate the utility of Nanostring technology as a targeted approach to perform accurate measurement of tandem repeats even at extremely high copy number, and apply this technology to genotype 165 HapMap samples from three different populations and five species of non-human primates. We observed extreme variability in copy number of tandemly repeated genes, with many loci showing 5–10 fold variation in copy number among humans. Many of these loci show hallmarks of genome assembly errors, and the true copy number of many large tandem repeats is significantly under-represented even in the high quality ‘finished’ human reference assembly. Importantly, we demonstrate that most large tandem repeat variations are not tagged by nearby SNPs, and are therefore essentially invisible to SNP-based GWAS approaches. Using association analysis we identify many cis correlations of large tandem repeat variants with nearby gene expression and DNA methylation levels, indicating that variations of tandem repeat length are associated with functional effects on the local genomic environment. This includes an example where expansion of a macrosatellite repeat is associated with increased DNA methylation and suppression of nearby gene expression, suggesting a mechanism termed “repeat induced gene silencing”, which has previously been observed only in transgenic organisms. We also observed multiple signatures consistent with altered selective pressures at tandemly repeated loci, suggesting important biological functions. Our studies show that tandemly repeated loci represent a highly variable fraction of the genome that have been systematically ignored by most previous studies, copy number variation of which can exert functionally significant effects. We suggest that future studies of tandem repeat loci will lead to many novel insights into their role in

  1. Pharmaceutical quality evaluation of lipid emulsions containing PGE1: alteration in the number of large particles in infusion solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Hiroko; Saito, Haruna; Yomota, Chikako; Kawanishi, Toru

    2009-08-13

    There are two generics of a parenteral lipid emulsion of prostaglandin E1 (PGE(1)) (Lipo-PGE(1)) in addition to two innovators. It was reported the change from innovator to generic in clinical practice caused the slowing of drip rate and formation of aggregates in the infusion line. Thus, we investigated the difference of pharmaceutical quality in these Lipo-PGE(1) formulations. After mixing with some infusion solutions, the mean diameter and number of large particles were determined. Although the mean diameter did not change in any infusion solutions, the number of large particles (diameter >1.0 microm) dramatically increased in generics with Hartmann's solution pH 8 or Lactec injection with 7% sodium bicarbonate. Next, we investigated the effect of these infusion solutions on the retention rate of PGE(1) in lipid particles. The retention rate of PGE(1) in these two infusion solutions decreased more quickly than that in normal saline. Nevertheless, there were no significant differences among the formulations tested. Our results suggest that there is no difference between innovators and generics except in mixing with these infusion solutions. Furthermore, that monitoring the number of large particles can be an effective means of evaluating pharmaceutical interactions and/or the stability of lipid emulsions.

  2. On the Required Number of Antennas in a Point-to-Point Large-but-Finite MIMO System

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2015-11-12

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of the point-to-point multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) systems in the presence of a large but finite numbers of antennas at the transmitters and/or receivers. Considering the cases with and without hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) feedback, we determine the minimum numbers of the transmit/receive antennas which are required to satisfy different outage probability constraints. We study the effect of the spatial correlation between the antennas on the system performance. Also, the required number of antennas are obtained for different fading conditions. Our results show that different outage requirements can be satisfied with relatively few transmit/receive antennas. © 2015 IEEE.

  3. Providing cell phone numbers and e-mail addresses to patients: The patient’s perspective, a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peleg Roni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today patients can consult with their treating physician by cell phone or e-mail. These means of communication enhance the quality of medical care and increase patient satisfaction, but they can also impinge on physicians’ free time and their patient schedule while at work. The objective of this study is to assess the attitudes and practice of patients on obtaining the cell phone number or e-mail address of their physician for the purpose of medical consultation. Methods Personal interviews with patients, 18 years of age or above, selected by random sampling from the roster of adults insured by Clalit Health Services, Southern Division. The total response rate was 41%. The questionnaire included questions on the attitude and practice of patients towards obtaining their physician’s cell phone number or e-mail address. Comparisons were performed using Chi-square tests to analyze statistically significant differences of categorical variables. Two-tailed p values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant, with a power of 0.8. Results The study sample included 200 patients with a mean age of 46.6 ± 17.1, of whom 110 were women (55%. Ninety-three (46.5% responded that they would be very interested in obtaining their physician’s cell phone number, and an additional 83 (41.5% would not object to obtaining it. Of the 171 patients (85.5% who had e-mail addresses, 25 (14.6% said they would be very interested in obtaining their physician’s e-mail address, 85 (49.7% said they would not object to getting it, and 61 (35.7% were not interested. In practice only one patient had requested the physician’s e-mail address and none actually had it. Conclusions Patients favored cell phones over e-mail for consulting with their treating physicians. With new technologies such as cell phones and e-mail in common use, it is important to determine how they can be best used and how they should be integrated into the flow

  4. Grading by Category: A simple method for providing students with meaningful feedback on exams in large courses

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Cassandra; Weiss, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Many instructors choose to assess their students using open-ended written exam items that require students to show their understanding of physics by solving a problem and/or explaining a concept. Grading these items is fairly time consuming, and in large courses time constraints prohibit providing significant individualized feedback on students' exams. Instructors typically cross out areas of the response that are incorrect and write the total points awarded or subtracted. Sometimes, instructors will also write a word or two to indicate the error. This paper describes a grading method that provides greater individualized feedback, clearly communicates to students expected performance levels, takes no more time than traditional grading methods for open-ended responses, and seems to encourage more students to take advantage of the feedback provided.

  5. The 3D MHD code GOEMHD3 for astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers. Code description, verification, and computational performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skála, J.; Baruffa, F.; Büchner, J.; Rampp, M.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The numerical simulation of turbulence and flows in almost ideal astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers motivates the implementation of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) computer codes with low resistivity. They need to be computationally efficient and scale well with large numbers of CPU cores, allow obtaining a high grid resolution over large simulation domains, and be easily and modularly extensible, for instance, to new initial and boundary conditions. Aims: Our aims are the implementation, optimization, and verification of a computationally efficient, highly scalable, and easily extensible low-dissipative MHD simulation code for the numerical investigation of the dynamics of astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers in three dimensions (3D). Methods: The new GOEMHD3 code discretizes the ideal part of the MHD equations using a fast and efficient leap-frog scheme that is second-order accurate in space and time and whose initial and boundary conditions can easily be modified. For the investigation of diffusive and dissipative processes the corresponding terms are discretized by a DuFort-Frankel scheme. To always fulfill the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability criterion, the time step of the code is adapted dynamically. Numerically induced local oscillations are suppressed by explicit, externally controlled diffusion terms. Non-equidistant grids are implemented, which enhance the spatial resolution, where needed. GOEMHD3 is parallelized based on the hybrid MPI-OpenMP programing paradigm, adopting a standard two-dimensional domain-decomposition approach. Results: The ideal part of the equation solver is verified by performing numerical tests of the evolution of the well-understood Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and of Orszag-Tang vortices. The accuracy of solving the (resistive) induction equation is tested by simulating the decay of a cylindrical current column. Furthermore, we show that the computational performance of the code scales very

  6. PartTree: an algorithm to build an approximate tree from a large number of unaligned sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Kazutaka; Toh, Hiroyuki

    2007-02-01

    To construct a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) of a large number (> approximately 10,000) of sequences, the calculation of a guide tree with a complexity of O(N2) to O(N3), where N is the number of sequences, is the most time-consuming process. To overcome this limitation, we have developed an approximate algorithm, PartTree, to construct a guide tree with an average time complexity of O(N log N). The new MSA method with the PartTree algorithm can align approximately 60,000 sequences in several minutes on a standard desktop computer. The loss of accuracy in MSA caused by this approximation was estimated to be several percent in benchmark tests using Pfam. The present algorithm has been implemented in the MAFFT sequence alignment package (http://align.bmr.kyushu-u.ac.jp/mafft/software/). Supplementary information is available at Bioinformatics online.

  7. Arrangement of scale-interaction and large-scale modulation in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Woutijn J.; Hutchins, Nicholas; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between small- and large-scale motions are inherent in the near-wall dynamics of wall-bounded flows. We here examine the scale-interaction embedded within the streamwise velocity component. Data were acquired using hot-wire anemometry in ZPG turbulent boundary layers, for Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ ≡ δUτ / ν ~ 2800 to 22800. After first decomposing velocity signals into contributions from small- and large-scales, we then represent the time-varying small-scale energy with time series of its instantaneous amplitude and instantaneous frequency, via a wavelet-based method. Features of the scale-interaction are inferred from isocorrelation maps, formed by correlating the large-scale velocity with its concurrent small-scale amplitude and frequency. Below the onset of the log-region, the physics constitutes aspects of amplitude modulation and frequency modulation. Time shifts, associated with the correlation extrema--representing the lead/lag of the small-scale signatures relative to the large-scales--are shown to be governed by inner-scaling. Wall-normal trends of time shifts are explained by considering the arrangement of scales in the log- and intermittent-regions, and how they relate to stochastic top-down and bottom-up processes.

  8. Atomic Number Dependence of Hadron Production at Large Transverse Momentum in 300 GeV Proton--Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, J. W.; Frisch, H. J.; Shochet, M. J.; Boymond, J. P.; Mermod, R.; Piroue, P. A.; Sumner, R. L.

    1974-07-15

    In an experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory we have compared the production of large transverse momentum hadrons from targets of W, Ti, and Be bombarded by 300 GeV protons. The hadron yields were measured at 90 degrees in the proton-nucleon c.m. system with a magnetic spectrometer equipped with 2 Cerenkov counters and a hadron calorimeter. The production cross-sections have a dependence on the atomic number A that grows with P{sub 1}, eventually leveling off proportional to A{sup 1.1}.

  9. Slepian simulation of distributions of plastic displacements of earthquake excited shear frames with a large number of stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Ditlevsen, Ove

    2005-01-01

    The object of study is a stationary Gaussian white noise excited plane multistory shear frame with a large number of rigid traverses. All the traverse-connecting columns have finite symmetrical yield limits except the columns in one or more of the bottom floors. The columns behave linearly elastic...... within the yield limits and ideally plastic outside these without accumulating eigenstresses. Within the elastic domain the frame is modeled as a linearly damped oscillator. The white noise excitation acts on the mass of the first floor making the movement of the elastic bottom floors simulate a ground...

  10. Large Eddy Simulation of an SD7003 Airfoil: Effects of Reynolds number and Subgrid-scale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlak, Hamid

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents results of a series of numerical simulations in order to study aerodynamic characteristics of the low Reynolds number Selig-Donovan airfoil, SD7003. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) technique is used for all computations at chord-based Reynolds numbers 10,000, 24,000 and 60,000 and simulations have been performed to primarily investigate the role of sub-grid scale (SGS) modeling on the dynamics of flow generated over the airfoil, which has not been dealt with in great detail in the past. It is seen that simulations are increasingly getting influenced by SGS modeling with increasing the Reynolds number, and the effect is visible even at a relatively low chord-Reynolds number of 60,000. Among the tested models, the dynamic Smagorinsky gives the poorest predictions of the flow, with overprediction of lift and a larger separation on airfoils suction side. Among various models, the implicit LES offers closest pressure distribution predictions compared with literature.

  11. Large scale motions of multiple limit-cycle high Reynolds number annular and toroidal rotor/stator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridel-Bertomeu, Thibault; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Staffelbach, G.

    2017-06-01

    Rotating cavity flows are essential components of industrial applications but their dynamics are still not fully understood when it comes to the relation between the fluid organization and monitored pressure fluctuations. From computer hard-drives to turbo-pumps of space launchers, designed devices often produce flow oscillations that can either destroy the component prematurely or produce too much noise. In such a context, large scale dynamics of high Reynolds number rotor/stator cavities need better understanding especially at the flow limit-cycle or associated statistically stationary state. In particular, the influence of curvature as well as cavity aspect ratio on the large scale organization and flow stability at a fixed rotating disc Reynolds number is fundamental. To probe such flows, wall-resolved large eddy simulation is applied to two different rotor/stator cylindrical cavities and one annular cavity. Validation of the predictions proves the method to be suited and to capture the disc boundary layer patterns reported in the literature. It is then shown that in complement to these disc boundary layer analyses, at the limit-cycle the rotating flows exhibit characteristic patterns at mid-height in the homogeneous core pointing the importance of large scale features. Indeed, dynamic modal decomposition reveals that the entire flow dynamics are driven by only a handful of atomic modes whose combination links the oscillatory patterns observed in the boundary layers as well as in the core of the cavity. These fluctuations form macro-structures, born in the unstable stator boundary layer and extending through the homogeneous inviscid core to the rotating disc boundary layer, causing its instability under some conditions. More importantly, the macro-structures significantly differ depending on the configuration pointing the need for deeper understanding of the influence of geometrical parameters as well as operating conditions.

  12. Summary of experience from a large number of construction inspections; Wind power plant projects; Erfarenhetsaaterfoering fraan entreprenadbesiktningar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Bertil; Holmberg, Rikard

    2010-08-15

    This report presents a summary of experience from a large number of construction inspections of wind power projects. The working method is based on the collection of construction experience in form of questionnaires. The questionnaires were supplemented by a number of in-depth interviews to understand more in detail what is perceived to be a problem and if there were suggestions for improvements. The results in this report is based on inspection protocols from 174 wind turbines, which corresponds to about one-third of the power plants built in the time period. In total the questionnaires included 4683 inspection remarks as well as about one hundred free text comments. 52 of the 174 inspected power stations were rejected, corresponding to 30%. It has not been possible to identify any over represented type of remark as a main cause of rejection, but the rejection is usually based on a total number of remarks that is too large. The average number of remarks for a power plant is 27. Most power stations have between 20 and 35 remarks. The most common remarks concern shortcomings in marking and documentation. These are easily adjusted, and may be regarded as less serious. There are, however, a number of remarks which are recurrent and quite serious, mainly regarding gearbox, education and lightning protection. Usually these are also easily adjusted, but the consequences if not corrected can be very large. The consequences may be either shortened life of expensive components, e.g. oil problems in gear boxes, or increased probability of serious accidents, e.g. maladjusted lightning protection. In the report, comparison between power stations with various construction period, size, supplier, geography and topography is also presented. The general conclusion is that the differences are small. The results of the evaluation of questionnaires correspond well with the result of the in-depth interviews with clients. The problem that clients agreed upon as the greatest is the lack

  13. Large-scale GWAS identifies multiple loci for hand grip strength providing biological insights into muscular fitness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willems, Sara M; Wright, Daniel J.; Day, Felix R

    2017-01-01

    Hand grip strength is a widely used proxy of muscular fitness, a marker of frailty, and predictor of a range of morbidities and all-cause mortality. To investigate the genetic determinants of variation in grip strength, we perform a large-scale genetic discovery analysis in a combined sample of 195...... with involvement of psychomotor impairment (PEX14, LRPPRC and KANSL1). Mendelian randomization analyses are consistent with a causal effect of higher genetically predicted grip strength on lower fracture risk. In conclusion, our findings provide new biological insight into the mechanistic underpinnings of grip...

  14. Experimental observation of pulsating instability under acoustic field in downward-propagating flames at large Lewis number

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Sung Hwan

    2017-10-12

    According to previous theory, pulsating propagation in a premixed flame only appears when the reduced Lewis number, β(Le-1), is larger than a critical value (Sivashinsky criterion: 4(1 +3) ≈ 11), where β represents the Zel\\'dovich number (for general premixed flames, β ≈ 10), which requires Lewis number Le > 2.1. However, few experimental observation have been reported because the critical reduced Lewis number for the onset of pulsating instability is beyond what can be reached in experiments. Furthermore, the coupling with the unavoidable hydrodynamic instability limits the observation of pure pulsating instabilities in flames. Here, we describe a novel method to observe the pulsating instability. We utilize a thermoacoustic field caused by interaction between heat release and acoustic pressure fluctuations of the downward-propagating premixed flames in a tube to enhance conductive heat loss at the tube wall and radiative heat loss at the open end of the tube due to extended flame residence time by diminished flame surface area, i.e., flat flame. The thermoacoustic field allowed pure observation of the pulsating motion since the primary acoustic force suppressed the intrinsic hydrodynamic instability resulting from thermal expansion. By employing this method, we have provided new experimental observations of the pulsating instability for premixed flames. The Lewis number (i.e., Le ≈ 1.86) was less than the critical value suggested previously.

  15. Systematic large-scale study of the inheritance mode of Mendelian disorders provides new insight into human diseasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Dapeng; Wang, Guangyu; Yin, Zuojing; Li, Chuanxing; Cui, Yan; Zhou, Meng

    2014-11-01

    One important piece of information about the human Mendelian disorders is the mode of inheritance. Recent studies of human genetic diseases on a large scale have provided many novel insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms. However, most successful analyses ignored the mode of inheritance of diseases, which severely limits our understanding of human disease mechanisms relating to the mode of inheritance at the large scale. Therefore, we here conducted a systematic large-scale study of the inheritance mode of Mendelian disorders, to bring new insight into human diseases. Our analyses include the comparison between dominant and recessive disease genes on both genomic and proteomic characteristics, Mendelian mutations, protein network properties and disease connections on both the genetic and the population levels. We found that dominant disease genes are more functionally central, topological central and more sensitive to disease outcome. On the basis of these findings, we suggested that dominant diseases should have higher genetic heterogeneity and should have more comprehensive connections with each other compared with recessive diseases, a prediction we confirm by disease network and disease comorbidity.

  16. On the Use of Educational Numbers: Comparative Constructions of Hierarchies by Means of Large-Scale Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pettersson

    2016-01-01

    later the growing importance of transnational agencies and international, regional and national assessments. How to reference this article Pettersson, D., Popkewitz, T. S., & Lindblad, S. (2016. On the Use of Educational Numbers: Comparative Constructions of Hierarchies by Means of Large-Scale Assessments. Espacio, Tiempo y Educación, 3(1, 177-202. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.14516/ete.2016.003.001.10

  17. Large-System Analysis of Multiuser Detection with an Unknown Number of Users: A High-SNR Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Campo, Adrià Tauste; Biglieri, Ezio

    2010-01-01

    We analyze multiuser detection under the assumption that the number of users accessing the channel is unknown by the receiver. In this environment, users' activity must be estimated along with any other parameters such as data, power, and location. Our main goal is to determine the performance loss caused by the need for estimating the identities of active users, which are not known a priori. To prevent a loss of optimality, we assume that identities and data are estimated jointly, rather than in two separate steps. We examine the performance of multiuser detectors when the number of potential users is large. Statistical-physics methodologies are used to determine the macroscopic performance of the detector in terms of its multiuser efficiency. Special attention is paid to the fixed-point equation whose solution yields the multiuser efficiency of the optimal (maximum a posteriori) detector in the large signal-to-noise ratio regime. Our analysis yields closed-form approximate bounds to the minimum mean-squared...

  18. A genome-wide association study in large white and landrace pig populations for number piglets born alive.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Bergfelder-Drüing

    Full Text Available The number of piglets born alive (NBA per litter is one of the most important traits in pig breeding due to its influence on production efficiency. It is difficult to improve NBA because the heritability of the trait is low and it is governed by a high number of loci with low to moderate effects. To clarify the biological and genetic background of NBA, genome-wide association studies (GWAS were performed using 4,012 Large White and Landrace pigs from herdbook and commercial breeding companies in Germany (3, Austria (1 and Switzerland (1. The animals were genotyped with the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip. Because of population stratifications within and between breeds, clusters were formed using the genetic distances between the populations. Five clusters for each breed were formed and analysed by GWAS approaches. In total, 17 different significant markers affecting NBA were found in regions with known effects on female reproduction. No overlapping significant chromosome areas or QTL between Large White and Landrace breed were detected.

  19. Global repeat discovery and estimation of genomic copy number in a large, complex genome using a high-throughput 454 sequence survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varala Kranthi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive computational and database tools are available to mine genomic and genetic databases for model organisms, but little genomic data is available for many species of ecological or agricultural significance, especially those with large genomes. Genome surveys using conventional sequencing techniques are powerful, particularly for detecting sequences present in many copies per genome. However these methods are time-consuming and have potential drawbacks. High throughput 454 sequencing provides an alternative method by which much information can be gained quickly and cheaply from high-coverage surveys of genomic DNA. Results We sequenced 78 million base-pairs of randomly sheared soybean DNA which passed our quality criteria. Computational analysis of the survey sequences provided global information on the abundant repetitive sequences in soybean. The sequence was used to determine the copy number across regions of large genomic clones or contigs and discover higher-order structures within satellite repeats. We have created an annotated, online database of sequences present in multiple copies in the soybean genome. The low bias of pyrosequencing against repeat sequences is demonstrated by the overall composition of the survey data, which matches well with past estimates of repetitive DNA content obtained by DNA re-association kinetics (Cot analysis. Conclusion This approach provides a potential aid to conventional or shotgun genome assembly, by allowing rapid assessment of copy number in any clone or clone-end sequence. In addition, we show that partial sequencing can provide access to partial protein-coding sequences.

  20. Factors associated with self-reported number of teeth in a large national cohort of Thai adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiengprugsawan Vasoontara

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral health in later life results from individual's lifelong accumulation of experiences at the personal, community and societal levels. There is little information relating the oral health outcomes to risk factors in Asian middle-income settings such as Thailand today. Methods Data derived from a cohort of 87,134 adults enrolled in Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University who completed self-administered questionnaires in 2005. Cohort members are aged between 15 and 87 years and resided throughout Thailand. This is a large study of self-reported number of teeth among Thai adults. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to analyse factors associated with self-reported number of teeth. Results After adjusting for covariates, being female (OR = 1.28, older age (OR = 10.6, having low income (OR = 1.45, having lower education (OR = 1.33, and being a lifetime urban resident (OR = 1.37 were statistically associated (p Conclusions This study addresses the gap in knowledge on factors associated with self-reported number of teeth. The promotion of healthy childhoods and adult lifestyles are important public health interventions to increase tooth retention in middle and older age.

  1. CrossRef Large numbers of cold positronium atoms created in laser-selected Rydberg states using resonant charge exchange

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, R; Kolthammer, WS; Richerme, P; Müllers, A; Walz, J; Grzonka, D; Zielinski, M; Fitzakerley, D; George, MC; Hessels, EA; Storry, CH; Weel, M

    2016-01-01

    Lasers are used to control the production of highly excited positronium atoms (Ps*). The laser light excites Cs atoms to Rydberg states that have a large cross section for resonant charge-exchange collisions with cold trapped positrons. For each trial with 30 million trapped positrons, more than 700 000 of the created Ps* have trajectories near the axis of the apparatus, and are detected using Stark ionization. This number of Ps* is 500 times higher than realized in an earlier proof-of-principle demonstration (2004 Phys. Lett. B 597 257). A second charge exchange of these near-axis Ps* with trapped antiprotons could be used to produce cold antihydrogen, and this antihydrogen production is expected to be increased by a similar factor.

  2. Clinical and Pathologic Correlation of Increased MYC Gene Copy Number in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haws, Bryn T; Cui, Wei; Persons, Diane L; Zhang, Da

    2016-12-01

    Only a few studies have investigated the presence of increased MYC gene copy number (ICN) as a prognostic indicator in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and the results have been variable. We compared overall survival in patients with ICN to MYC-negative patients and investigated the prognostic significance of increased MYC gene copy number. Two groups, those with MYC ICN (n = 33) and those with no MYC aberrations (n = 43), identified by fluorescence in-situ hybridization DNA probes for the MYC region at 8q24, were compared for survival (1-9 years), MYC immunohistochemical (IHC) protein expression, and treatment protocol. Comparison of cases of DLBCL with MYC ICN to those with no MYC aberration demonstrated no significant difference in survival (P = .58). Additionally, no difference in survival was found between patients with increased MYC protein expression (IHC MYC ≥ 40%) compared to those with IHC MYC  .05). Importantly, the majority of patients in both groups (79% of patients with ICN and 81% of patients with no MYC aberrations) were treated with rituximab-based therapies. No significant difference in survival was found between patients with DLBCL with MYC ICN and patients with no MYC aberrations (P = .58). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Law of large numbers for the SIR model with random vertex weights on Erdős-Rényi graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaofeng

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we are concerned with the SIR model with random vertex weights on Erdős-Rényi graph G(n , p) . The Erdős-Rényi graph G(n , p) is generated from the complete graph Cn with n vertices through independently deleting each edge with probability (1 - p) . We assign i. i. d. copies of a positive r. v. ρ on each vertex as the vertex weights. For the SIR model, each vertex is in one of the three states 'susceptible', 'infective' and 'removed'. An infective vertex infects a given susceptible neighbor at rate proportional to the production of the weights of these two vertices. An infective vertex becomes removed at a constant rate. A removed vertex will never be infected again. We assume that at t = 0 there is no removed vertex and the number of infective vertices follows a Bernoulli distribution B(n , θ) . Our main result is a law of large numbers of the model. We give two deterministic functions HS(ψt) ,HV(ψt) for t ≥ 0 and show that for any t ≥ 0, HS(ψt) is the limit proportion of susceptible vertices and HV(ψt) is the limit of the mean capability of an infective vertex to infect a given susceptible neighbor at moment t as n grows to infinity.

  4. Modification of the large-scale features of high Reynolds number wall turbulence by passive surface obtrusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monty, J.P.; Lien, K.; Chong, M.S. [University of Melbourne, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Allen, J.J. [New Mexico State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2011-12-15

    A high Reynolds number boundary-layer wind-tunnel facility at New Mexico State University was fitted with a regularly distributed braille surface. The surface was such that braille dots were closely packed in the streamwise direction and sparsely spaced in the spanwise direction. This novel surface had an unexpected influence on the flow: the energy of the very large-scale features of wall turbulence (approximately six-times the boundary-layer thickness in length) became significantly attenuated, even into the logarithmic region. To the author's knowledge, this is the first experimental study to report a modification of 'superstructures' in a rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. The result gives rise to the possibility that flow control through very small, passive surface roughness may be possible at high Reynolds numbers, without the prohibitive drag penalty anticipated heretofore. Evidence was also found for the uninhibited existence of the near-wall cycle, well known to smooth-wall-turbulence researchers, in the spanwise space between roughness elements. (orig.)

  5. Pursuing the plasma dynamo and MRI in the laboratory: Hydrodynamic studies of unmagnetized plasmas at large magnetic Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, David B.

    A new method for studying flow-driven MHD instabilities in the laboratory has been developed, using a highly conductive, low viscosity, spherical plasma. The confinement, heating, and stirring of this unmagnetized plasma has been demonstrated experimentally, laying the foundations for the laboratory studies of a diverse collection of astrophysically-relevant instabilities. Specifically, plasma flows conducive to studies of the dynamo effect and the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are measured using a wide array of plasma diagnostics, and compare favorably to hydrodynamic numerical models. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) uses a cylindrically symmetric spherical boundary ring cusp geometry built from strong permanent magnets to confine a large (R=1.5 m), warm (Te torques using current drawn from emissive LaB6 cathodes located at the magnetized plasma edge, which also ionize and heat the plasma via sizable discharge current injection. Combination Langmuir/Mach probes measure maximum velocities of 6 km/s and 3 km/s in helium and argon plasmas, respectively, and ion viscosity is shown to be an efficient mechanism for transporting momentum from the magnetized edge into the unmagnetized core. Momentum loss to neutral charge-exchange collisions serves as the main source of drag on the bulk plasma velocity, and ionization fraction (He ˜ 0.6, Ar ˜ 0.95) is shown to be a limiting factor in momentum penetration. High Alfven Mach number flows have also been generated by drawing current across a global axial magnetic field, resulting in a velocity geometry conducive to MRI experiments. The experiment has achieved magnetic Reynolds numbers of Rm < 250 and fluid Reynolds numbers of Re < 200 (significantly higher than previous flow experiments in cusp-confined plasmas), setting the stage for future research of flow-driven MHD instabilities.

  6. Large scale genotype comparison of human papillomavirus E2-host interaction networks provides new insights for e2 molecular functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Muller

    Full Text Available Human Papillomaviruses (HPV cause widespread infections in humans, resulting in latent infections or diseases ranging from benign hyperplasia to cancers. HPV-induced pathologies result from complex interplays between viral proteins and the host proteome. Given the major public health concern due to HPV-associated cancers, most studies have focused on the early proteins expressed by HPV genotypes with high oncogenic potential (designated high-risk HPV or HR-HPV. To advance the global understanding of HPV pathogenesis, we mapped the virus/host interaction networks of the E2 regulatory protein from 12 genotypes representative of the range of HPV pathogenicity. Large-scale identification of E2-interaction partners was performed by yeast two-hybrid screenings of a HaCaT cDNA library. Based on a high-confidence scoring scheme, a subset of these partners was then validated for pair-wise interaction in mammalian cells with the whole range of the 12 E2 proteins, allowing a comparative interaction analysis. Hierarchical clustering of E2-host interaction profiles mostly recapitulated HPV phylogeny and provides clues to the involvement of E2 in HPV infection. A set of cellular proteins could thus be identified discriminating, among the mucosal HPV, E2 proteins of HR-HPV 16 or 18 from the non-oncogenic genital HPV. The study of the interaction networks revealed a preferential hijacking of highly connected cellular proteins and the targeting of several functional families. These include transcription regulation, regulation of apoptosis, RNA processing, ubiquitination and intracellular trafficking. The present work provides an overview of E2 biological functions across multiple HPV genotypes.

  7. Adolescent health care in a large multispecialty prepaid group practice. Who provides it and how well are they doing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitsner, I. N.; Borok, G. M.; Neinstein, L.; MacKenzie, R.

    1992-01-01

    Adolescents are at risk for pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, suicide, homicide, accidents, and substance abuse. Adolescent medicine involves an overlap of many skills needed to provide routine medical care, as well as care for those conditions that require psychosocial assessment. We report the results of a mail survey covering care of this age group by practitioners of pediatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, family practice, and adolescent medicine in a large, multispecialty, prepaid group practice. The mail survey covered 10 areas of adolescent care. Adolescent medicine physicians expressed the highest level of perceived knowledge and competence in these areas, with family practitioners ranked second. More than 50% of internists and pediatricians felt only fair to poor competence for a variety of adolescent conditions, whereas a third of internists and pediatricians reported that they liked to care for adolescents. Physicians in all 4 of the primary care specialties reported a need for a teen health center for both consultation and education. These results are similar to those reported for pediatricians and primary care physicians in private practice and for residents in internal medicine. PMID:1615655

  8. Automated calculation of the evapotranspiration and crop coefficients for a large number of peatland sites using diurnal groundwater table fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Eike; Bechtold, Michel; Dettmann, Ullrich; Tiemeyer, Bärbel

    2014-05-01

    Evapotranspiration is one of the main processes controlling peatland hydrology. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from peatlands are in turn strongly controlled by the groundwater table. Through the increasing political and scientific interest to reduce GHG emissions, monitoring and modelling strategies to optimize re-wetting strategies and to quantify GHG emissions are needed. To achieve these aims, an accurate determination of the evapotranspiration as an essential part of the water balance is required. Many different approaches are known to determine the evapotranspiration. They are mostly either expensive or hard to parameterize. Plant specific crop coefficients (Kc-values) are an option to calculate plant-specific evapotranspiration but due to the lack of Kc-values for typical peatland vegetation types more data on evapotranspiration from peatlands in the temperate zone are required. Furthermore, simple methods to estimate evapotranspiration are needed especially for monitoring projects. Diurnal groundwater table fluctuations caused by root water uptake and groundwater inflow can be used to calculate daily evapotranspiration rates. This approach was first described by White (1932) who compared groundwater recovery rates at night to the decline during daytime. Besides the groundwater table data only the specific yield (Sy) is needed to calculate evapotranspiration. However, the method has some limitations because not all days can be evaluated which leads to data gaps during rainy and very dry or very wet periods. This study presents an automated method to calculate the specific yield, evapotranspiration and crop coefficients for a large number of sites covering all major peatland types and their typical land uses in Germany. As an input for our method, only groundwater level, precipitation and grass reference evapotranspiration (ET0) data is required. In a first step, the groundwater level data was smoothed by a LOESS function. In a second step, site-specific SY

  9. Computational strategies for alternative single-step Bayesian regression models with large numbers of genotyped and non-genotyped animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Rohan L; Cheng, Hao; Golden, Bruce L; Garrick, Dorian J

    2016-12-08

    Two types of models have been used for single-step genomic prediction and genome-wide association studies that include phenotypes from both genotyped animals and their non-genotyped relatives. The two types are breeding value models (BVM) that fit breeding values explicitly and marker effects models (MEM) that express the breeding values in terms of the effects of observed or imputed genotypes. MEM can accommodate a wider class of analyses, including variable selection or mixture model analyses. The order of the equations that need to be solved and the inverses required in their construction vary widely, and thus the computational effort required depends upon the size of the pedigree, the number of genotyped animals and the number of loci. We present computational strategies to avoid storing large, dense blocks of the MME that involve imputed genotypes. Furthermore, we present a hybrid model that fits a MEM for animals with observed genotypes and a BVM for those without genotypes. The hybrid model is computationally attractive for pedigree files containing millions of animals with a large proportion of those being genotyped. We demonstrate the practicality on both the original MEM and the hybrid model using real data with 6,179,960 animals in the pedigree with 4,934,101 phenotypes and 31,453 animals genotyped at 40,214 informative loci. To complete a single-trait analysis on a desk-top computer with four graphics cards required about 3 h using the hybrid model to obtain both preconditioned conjugate gradient solutions and 42,000 Markov chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) samples of breeding values, which allowed making inferences from posterior means, variances and covariances. The MCMC sampling required one quarter of the effort when the hybrid model was used compared to the published MEM. We present a hybrid model that fits a MEM for animals with genotypes and a BVM for those without genotypes. Its practicality and considerable reduction in computing effort was

  10. Comparing large number of metaheuristics for artificial neural networks training to predict water temperature in a natural river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Adam P.; Osuch, Marzena; Napiorkowski, Maciej J.; Rowinski, Pawel M.; Napiorkowski, Jaroslaw J.

    2014-03-01

    Nature-inspired metaheuristics found various applications in different fields of science, including the problem of artificial neural networks (ANN) training. However, very versatile opinions regarding the performance of metaheuristics applied to ANN training may be found in the literature. Both nature-inspired metaheuristics and ANNs are widely applied to various geophysical and environmental problems. Among them the water temperature forecasting in a natural river, especially in colder climate zones where the seasonality plays important role, is of great importance, as water temperature has strong impact on aquatic life and chemistry. As the impact of possible future climate change on water temperature is not trivial, models are needed to allow projection of streamwater temperature based on simple hydro-meteorological variables. In this paper the detailed comparison of the performance of nature-inspired optimization methods and Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm in ANNs training is performed, based on the case study of water temperature forecasting in a natural stream, namely Biala Tarnowska river in southern Poland. Over 50 variants of 22 various metaheuristics, including a large number of Differential Evolution, as well as some Particle Swarm Optimization, Evolution Strategies, multialgorithms and Direct Search methods are compared with LM algorithm on ANN training for the described case study. The impact of population size and some control parameters of particular metaheuristics on the ANN training performance are verified. It is found that despite widely claimed large improvement in nature-inspired methods during last years, the vast majority of them are still outperformed by LM algorithm on the selected problem. The only methods that, based on this case study, seem competitive to LM algorithm in terms of the final performance (but not speed) are Differential Evolution algorithms that benefit from the concept of Global and Local neighborhood-based mutation

  11. DNA Bipedal Motor Achieves a Large Number of Steps Due to Operation Using Microfluidics-Based Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Toma E; Tsukanov, Roman; Glick, Yair; Berger, Yaron; Liber, Miran; Avrahami, Dorit; Gerber, Doron; Nir, Eyal

    2017-04-25

    Realization of bioinspired molecular machines that can perform many and diverse operations in response to external chemical commands is a major goal in nanotechnology, but current molecular machines respond to only a few sequential commands. Lack of effective methods for introduction and removal of command compounds and low efficiencies of the reactions involved are major reasons for the limited performance. We introduce here a user interface based on a microfluidics device and single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy that allows efficient introduction and removal of chemical commands and enables detailed study of the reaction mechanisms involved in the operation of synthetic molecular machines. The microfluidics provided 64 consecutive DNA strand commands to a DNA-based motor system immobilized inside the microfluidics, driving a bipedal walker to perform 32 steps on a DNA origami track. The microfluidics enabled removal of redundant strands, resulting in a 6-fold increase in processivity relative to an identical motor operated without strand removal and significantly more operations than previously reported for user-controlled DNA nanomachines. In the motor operated without strand removal, redundant strands interfere with motor operation and reduce its performance. The microfluidics also enabled computer control of motor direction and speed. Furthermore, analysis of the reaction kinetics and motor performance in the absence of redundant strands, made possible by the microfluidics, enabled accurate modeling of the walker processivity. This enabled identification of dynamic boundaries and provided an explanation, based on the "trap state" mechanism, for why the motor did not perform an even larger number of steps. This understanding is very important for the development of future motors with significantly improved performance. Our universal interface enables two-way communication between user and molecular machine and, relying on concepts similar to that of solid

  12. Meta-ethnography 25 years on: challenges and insights for synthesising a large number of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toye, Francine; Seers, Kate; Allcock, Nick; Briggs, Michelle; Carr, Eloise; Barker, Karen

    2014-06-21

    Studies that systematically search for and synthesise qualitative research are becoming more evident in health care, and they can make an important contribution to patient care. Our team was funded to complete a meta-ethnography of patients' experience of chronic musculoskeletal pain. It has been 25 years since Noblit and Hare published their core text on meta-ethnography, and the current health research environment brings additional challenges to researchers aiming to synthesise qualitative research. Noblit and Hare propose seven stages of meta-ethnography which take the researcher from formulating a research idea to expressing the findings. These stages are not discrete but form part of an iterative research process. We aimed to build on the methods of Noblit and Hare and explore the challenges of including a large number of qualitative studies into a qualitative systematic review. These challenges hinge upon epistemological and practical issues to be considered alongside expectations about what determines high quality research. This paper describes our method and explores these challenges. Central to our method was the process of collaborative interpretation of concepts and the decision to exclude original material where we could not decipher a concept. We use excerpts from our research team's reflexive statements to illustrate the development of our methods.

  13. The mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata: a mitogenome with a large number of intergenic spacers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynara de Melo Rodovalho

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata, assembled using transcriptomic libraries from Sanger and Illumina next generation sequencing (NGS, and PCR products. This mitogenome was found to be very large (18,729 bp, given the presence of 30 non-coding intergenic spacers (IGS spanning 3,808 bp. A portion of the putative control region remained unsequenced. The gene content and organization correspond to that inferred for the ancestral pancrustacea, except for two tRNA gene rearrangements that have been described previously in other ants. The IGS were highly variable in length and dispersed through the mitogenome. This pattern was also found for the other hymenopterans in particular for the monophyletic Apocrita. These spacers with unknown function may be valuable for characterizing genome evolution and distinguishing closely related species and individuals. NGS provided better coverage than Sanger sequencing, especially for tRNA and ribosomal subunit genes, thus facilitating efforts to fill in sequence gaps. The results obtained showed that data from transcriptomic libraries contain valuable information for assembling mitogenomes. The present data also provide a source of molecular markers that will be very important for improving our understanding of genomic evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships among hymenopterans.

  14. Email-Based Informed Consent: Innovative Method for Reaching Large Numbers of Subjects for Data Mining Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lesley R.; Mason, Sara S.; Babiak-Vazquez, Adriana; Ray, Stacie L.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Since the 2010 NASA authorization to make the Life Sciences Data Archive (LSDA) and Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) data archives more accessible by the research and operational communities, demand for data has greatly increased. Correspondingly, both the number and scope of requests have increased, from 142 requests fulfilled in 2011 to 224 in 2014, and with some datasets comprising up to 1 million data points. To meet the demand, the LSAH and LSDA Repositories project was launched, which allows active and retired astronauts to authorize full, partial, or no access to their data for research without individual, study-specific informed consent. A one-on-one personal informed consent briefing is required to fully communicate the implications of the several tiers of consent. Due to the need for personal contact to conduct Repositories consent meetings, the rate of consenting has not kept up with demand for individualized, possibly attributable data. As a result, other methods had to be implemented to allow the release of large datasets, such as release of only de-identified data. However the compilation of large, de-identified data sets places a significant resource burden on LSAH and LSDA and may result in diminished scientific usefulness of the dataset. As a result, LSAH and LSDA worked with the JSC Institutional Review Board Chair, Astronaut Office physicians, and NASA Office of General Counsel personnel to develop a "Remote Consenting" process for retrospective data mining studies. This is particularly useful since the majority of the astronaut cohort is retired from the agency and living outside the Houston area. Originally planned as a method to send informed consent briefing slides and consent forms only by mail, Remote Consenting has evolved into a means to accept crewmember decisions on individual studies via their method of choice: email or paper copy by mail. To date, 100 emails have been sent to request participation in eight HRP

  15. Microarray analysis reveals altered expression of a large number of nuclear genes in developing cytoplasmic male sterile Brassica napus flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Jenny; Lagercrantz, Ulf; Sundström, Jens; Teixeira, Rita; Wellmer, Frank; Meyerowitz, Elliot M; Glimelius, Kristina

    2007-02-01

    To gain new insights into the mechanism underlying cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), we compared the nuclear gene expression profiles of flowers of a Brassica napus CMS line with that of the fertile B. napus maintainer line using Arabidopsis thaliana flower-specific cDNA microarrays. The CMS line used has a B. napus nuclear genome, but has a rearranged mitochondrial (mt) genome consisting of both B. napus and A. thaliana DNA. Gene expression profiling revealed that a large number of genes differed in expression between the two lines. For example, nuclear genes coding for proteins that are involved in protein import into organelles, genes expressed in stamens and pollen, as well as genes implicated in either cell-wall remodeling or architecture, were repressed in the CMS line compared with B. napus. These results show that the mt genome of the CMS line strongly influences nuclear gene expression, and thus reveal the importance of retrograde signalling between the mitochondria and the nucleus. Furthermore, flowers of the CMS line are characterized by a replacement of stamens with carpelloid organs, and thus partially resemble the APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) mutants. In accordance with this phenotype, AP3 expression was downregulated in the stamens, shortly before these organs developed carpelloid characteristics, even though it was initiated correctly. Repression of PI succeeded that of AP3 and might be a consequence of a loss of AP3 activity. These results suggest that AP3 expression in stamens depends on proper mt function and a correct nuclear-mt interaction, and that mt alterations cause the male sterility phenotype of the CMS line.

  16. Generation of large numbers of fully mature and stable dendritic cells from leukapheresis products for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, B; Röder, C; Dieckmann, D; Heuer, M; Kruse, M; Glaser, A; Keikavoussi, P; Kämpgen, E; Bender, A; Schuler, G

    1999-02-01

    Dendritic Cell (DC)-based vaccination approaches in man require a reproducible DC generation method that can be performed in conformity with GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) guidelines and that circumvents the need for multiple blood drawings to generate DC. To this end we modified our previously described method to generate mature DC from CD14 + monocytes by a two step method (priming in GM-SF + IL-4 followed by maturation in monocyte conditioned medium) for use with leukapheresis products as a starting population. Several adaptations were necessary. We established, for example, a modified adherence step to reliably enrich CD14 + DC precursors from apheresis mononuclear cells. The addition of GM-CSF + IL-4 at the onset of culture proved disadvantageous and was, therefore, delayed for 24 h. DC development from apheresis cells occurred faster than from fresh blood or buffy coat, and was complete after 7 days. Monocyte conditioned medium when added on day 6 resulted in fully mature and stable DC (veiled, highly migratory and T cell sensitizing cells with a characteristic phenotype such as 85% CD83 + , p55/fascin + , CD115/M-CSF-R - , CD86 + ) already after 24 h. The mature DC progeny were shown to remain stable and viable if cultured for another 1-2 days in the absence of cytokines, and to be resistant to inhibitory effects of IL-10. Freezing conditions were established to generate DC from frozen aliquots of PBMC or to freeze mature DC themselves for later use. The approach yields large numbers of standardized DC (5-10 x 10(8) mature CD83 + DC/leukapheresis) that are suitable for performing sound DC-based vaccination trials that can be compared with each other.

  17. Historical changes in the annual number of large floods in near-natural catchments across North America and Europe, 1931-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkins, Glenn; Whitfield, Paul; Hannaford, Jamie; Burn, Donald; Renard, Benjamin; Stahl, Kerstin; Fleig, Anne; Madsen, Henrik; Mediero, Luis; Korhonen, Johanna; Murphy, Conor; Crochet, Philippe; Wilson, Donna

    2014-05-01

    Previous investigations have analyzed historical changes in low magnitude floods, such as the annual peak flow, at regional or national scales. These investigations often use catchments where streamflows have been influenced by human alterations such as reservoir regulation or urbanization. No known studies have analyzed changes in large floods (greater than 25-year return period floods) at a continental scale for near-natural catchments. To fill this research gap, this study analyzed flood flows from reference hydrologic networks (RHNs) or RHN-like gauges in North America (United States and Canada) and Europe (United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Spain, Germany, Switzerland, Iceland, Norway, Denmark, Sweden, and Finland). RHNs are formally defined networks in several countries that comprise gauges with a natural or near-natural flow regime and that provide good quality data. Selected RHN-like gauges were included following a major effort to ensure RHN-like status through consultation with local experts. Some 1206 study gauges met near-natural and completeness criteria for 1961-2010 and 322 gauges met criteria for 1931-2010. Peak flows with recurrence intervals of 25, 50, and 100 years were estimated using the generalized extreme-value distribution and L-moments, and peak flows at each gauge that exceeded these flood thresholds in each year were compiled. Continental and regional trends over time in the annual number of large floods, including groups differentiated by catchment size and major Köppen-Geiger climate group, are being computed and will be presented at EGU. Plots will also show the decadal variability in the annual number of large floods. The unique dataset used for this study is an example of successful international collaboration on hydro-climatic data exchange, which is potentially a step towards establishing RHN or RHN-like networks and analyzing near-natural streamflows on a global scale.

  18. Large-scale GWAS identifies multiple loci for hand grip strength providing biological insights into muscular fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Sara M.; Wright, D.J.; Day, Felix R.; Trajanoska, Katerina; Joshi, P.K.; Morris, John A.; Matteini, Amy M.; Garton, Fleur C.; Grarup, Niels; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Mangino, Massimo; Liu, Jun; Demirkan, Ayse; Lek, Monkol; Xu, Liwen; Wang, Guan; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Lotta, Luca A.; Miyamoto-Mikami, Eri; Rivas, Manuel A.; White, Tom; Loh, Po Ru; Aadahl, Mette; Amin, Najaf; Attia, John R.; Austin, Krista; Benyamin, Beben; Brage, Søren; Cheng, Yu Ching; Ciȩszczyk, Paweł; Derave, Wim; Eriksson, Karl Fredrik; Eynon, Nir; Linneberg, Allan; Lucia, Alejandro; Massidda, Myosotis; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Miyachi, Motohiko; Murakami, Haruka; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pandey, Ashutosh; Papadimitriou, Ioannis; Rajpal, Deepak K.; Sale, Craig; Schnurr, Theresia M.; Sessa, Francesco; Shrine, Nick; Tobin, Martin D.; Varley, Ian; Wain, Louise V.; Wray, Naomi R.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Pedersen, Oluf; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kiel, Douglas P.; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Fuku, Noriyuki; Franks, Paul W.; North, Kathryn N.; Duijn, Van C.M.; Mather, Karen A.; Hansen, Torben; Hansson, Ola; Spector, Tim D.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Richards, J.B.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Langenberg, Claudia; Perry, John R.B.; Wareham, Nick J.; Scott, Robert A.; Oei, Ling; Zheng, Hou Feng; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Leong, Aaron; Ahmad, Omar S.; Laurin, Charles; Mokry, Lauren E.; Ross, Stephanie; Elks, Cathy E.; Bowden, Jack; Warrington, Nicole M.; Murray, Anna; Ruth, Katherine S.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Estrada, Karol; Bis, Joshua C.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Demissie, Serkalem; Enneman, Anke W.; Hsu, Yi Hsiang; Ingvarsson, Thorvaldur; Kähönen, Mika; Kammerer, Candace; Lacroix, Andrea Z.; Li, Guo; Liu, Ching Ti; Liu, Yongmei; Lorentzon, Mattias; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Nielson, Carrie M.; Sham, Pack Chung; Siggeirsdotir, Kristin; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Stefansson, Kari; Trompet, Stella; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Velde, Van Der Nathalie; Viikari, Jorma; Xiao, Su Mei; Zhao, Jing Hua; Evans, Daniel S.; Cummings, Steven R.; Cauley, Jane; Duncan, Emma L.; Groot, De Lisette C.P.G.M.; Esko, Tonu; Gudnason, Vilmundar; Harris, Tamara B.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Jukema, J.W.; Ikram, Arfan M.A.; Karasik, David; Kaptoge, Stephen; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lyytikäinen, Leo Pekka; Lips, Paul; Luben, Robert; Metspalu, Andres; Meurs, van Joyce B.; Minster, Ryan L.; Orwoll, Erick; Oei, Edwin; Psaty, Bruce M.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Ralston, Stuart W.; Ridker, Paul M.; Robbins, John A.; Smith, Albert V.; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Tranah, Gregory J.; Thorstensdottir, Unnur; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Zmuda, Joseph; Zillikens, M.C.; Ntzani, Evangelia E.; Evangelou, Evangelos; Ioannidis, John P.A.; Evans, David M.; Ohlsson, Claes

    2017-01-01

    Hand grip strength is a widely used proxy of muscular fitness, a marker of frailty, and predictor of a range of morbidities and all-cause mortality. To investigate the genetic determinants of variation in grip strength, we perform a large-scale genetic discovery analysis in a combined sample of

  19. Large-scale GWAS identifies multiple loci for hand grip strength providing biological insights into muscular fitness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willems, Sara M.; Wright, Daniel J.; Day, Felix R.

    2017-01-01

    Hand grip strength is a widely used proxy of muscular fitness, a marker of frailty, and predictor of a range of morbidities and all-cause mortality. To investigate the genetic determinants of variation in grip strength, we perform a large-scale genetic discovery analysis in a combined sample of 1...

  20. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scott, Robert A.; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E.; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C. D.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V.; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Evans, David M.; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tõnu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M.; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Morris, Andrew P.; Rayner, Nigel W.; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Willems, Sara M.; Chines, Peter S.; Jackson, Anne U.; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M.; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F.; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A.; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S.; North, Kari E.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V.; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B.; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H.; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Fowkes, Gerard R.; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H.; Basart, Hanneke V.; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Province, Michael A.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F.; Dedoussis, George V.; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Morris, Andrew D.; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A.; Beilby, John P.; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Lakka, Timo A.; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S.; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D.; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Saaristo, Timo E.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B.; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L.; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I.; Franks, Paul W.; Meigs, James B.; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Florez, Jose C.; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have increased the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes

  1. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scott, Robert A.; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E.; Luan, Jian'an; Maegi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Yengo, Loic; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C. D.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V.; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Evans, David M.; St Pourcain, Beate; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tonu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M.; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Morris, Andrew P.; Rayner, Nigel W.; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Willems, Sara M.; Chines, Peter S.; Jackson, Anne U.; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M.; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F.; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A.; An, Ping; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S.; North, Kari E.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V.; Hallmans, Goeran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B.; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H.; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Fowkes, Gerard R.; Kovacs, Peter; Lindstrom, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H.; Basart, Hanneke V.; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Province, Michael A.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F.; Dedoussis, George V.; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Morris, Andrew D.; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A.; Beilby, John P.; Koerner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Lakka, Timo A.; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S.; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D.; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Saaristo, Timo E.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josee; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B.; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L.; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I.; Franks, Paul W.; Meigs, James B.; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Florez, Jose C.; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Ines

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have increased the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes

  2. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have increased the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes...

  3. A spatio-temporally compensated acousto-optic scanner for two-photon microscopy providing large field of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Y; Léger, J-F; Lapole, R; Honnorat, N; Candela, Y; Dieudonné, S; Bourdieu, L

    2008-07-07

    Acousto-optic deflectors (AOD) are promising ultrafast scanners for non-linear microscopy. Their use has been limited until now by their small scanning range and by the spatial and temporal dispersions of the laser beam going through the deflectors. We show that the use of AOD of large aperture (13mm) compared to standard deflectors allows accessing much larger field of view while minimizing spatio-temporal distortions. An acousto-optic modulator (AOM) placed at distance of the AOD is used to compensate spatial and temporal dispersions. Fine tuning of the AOM-AOD setup using a frequency-resolved optical gating (GRENOUILLE) allows elimination of pulse front tilt whereas spatial chirp is minimized thanks to the large aperture AOD.

  4. The development of a virtual database to provide on-line access to a large archive of clinical data.

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, L. E.; Huff, S.M.; Haug, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    The archival database of the HELP Hospital Information System at LDS Hospital is too large to be stored on line. The archival data are important for clinical and research applications. Demountable disk packs have been used to store the archival database. This method of storage has four significant disadvantages. A virtual database was developed to overcome the limitations of this data-management scheme. This virtual database enables the transparent use of appropriate low-cost network-based st...

  5. Large-scale GWAS identifies multiple loci for hand grip strength providing biological insights into muscular fitness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willems, Sara M; Wright, Daniel J.; Day, Felix R

    2017-01-01

    Hand grip strength is a widely used proxy of muscular fitness, a marker of frailty, and predictor of a range of morbidities and all-cause mortality. To investigate the genetic determinants of variation in grip strength, we perform a large-scale genetic discovery analysis in a combined sample of 195...... strength and the causal role of muscular strength in age-related morbidities and mortality....

  6. Cold-water corals and large hydrozoans provide essential fish habitat for Lappanella fasciata and Benthocometes robustus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Pereira, José Nuno; Carmo, Vanda; Catarino, Diana; Jakobsen, Joachim; Alvarez, Helena; Aguilar, Ricardo; Hart, Justin; Giacomello, Eva; Menezes, Gui; Stefanni, Sergio; Colaço, Ana; Morato, Telmo; Santos, Ricardo S.; Tempera, Fernando; Porteiro, Filipe

    2017-11-01

    Many fish species are well-known obligatory inhabitants of shallow-water tropical coral reefs but such associations are difficult to study in deep-water environments. We address the association between two deep-sea fish with low mobility and large sessile invertebrates using a compilation of 20 years of unpublished in situ observations. Data were collected on Northeast Atlantic (NEA) island slopes and seamounts, from the Azores to the Canary Islands, comprising 127 new records of the circalittoral Labridae Lappanella fasciata and 15 of the upper bathyal Ophiididae Benthocometes robustus. Observations by divers, remote operated vehicles (ROV SP, Luso, Victor, Falcon Seaeye), towed vehicles (Greenpeace) and manned submersibles (LULA, Nautile) validated the species association to cold water corals (CWC) and large hydrozoans. L. fasciata occurred from lower infralittoral (41 m) throughout the circalittoral, down to the upper bathyal at 398 m depth. Smaller fishes (invertebrates (> 10 cm) occurring at biological information and dietary information reinforcing the trophic linkage between the CWC habitat and this predator. Gathered evidence renders CWC and hydroid gardens as Essential Fish Habitats for both species, being therefore sensitive to environmental and anthropogenic impacts on these Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems. The Mediterranean distribution of L. fasciata is extended to NEA seamounts and island slopes and the amphi-Atlantic distribution of B. robustus is bridged with molecular data support. Both species are expected to occur throughout the Macaronesia and Mediterranean island slopes and shallow seamounts on habitats with large sessile invertebrates.

  7. The genome-wide landscape of copy number variations in the MUSGEN study provides evidence for a founder effect in the isolated Finnish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduri, Chakravarthi; Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa; Oikkonen, Jaana; Buck, Gemma; Blancher, Christine; Raijas, Pirre; Karma, Kai; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Järvelä, Irma

    2013-12-01

    Here we characterized the genome-wide architecture of copy number variations (CNVs) in 286 healthy, unrelated Finnish individuals belonging to the MUSGEN study, where molecular background underlying musical aptitude and related traits are studied. By using Illumina HumanOmniExpress-12v.1.0 beadchip, we identified 5493 CNVs that were spread across 467 different cytogenetic regions, spanning a total size of 287.83 Mb (∼9.6% of the human genome). Merging the overlapping CNVs across samples resulted in 999 discrete copy number variable regions (CNVRs), of which ∼6.9% were putatively novel. The average number of CNVs per person was 20, whereas the average size of CNV per locus was 52.39 kb. Large CNVs (>1 Mb) were present in 4% of the samples. The proportion of homozygous deletions in this data set (∼12.4%) seemed to be higher when compared with three other populations. Interestingly, several CNVRs were significantly enriched in this sample set, whereas several others were totally depleted. For example, a CNVR at chr2p22.1 intersecting GALM was more common in this population (P=3.3706 × 10(-44)) than in African and other European populations. The enriched CNVRs, however, showed no significant association with music-related phenotypes. Moreover, the most common CNV locations in world's normal population cohorts (6q14.1, 11q11) were overrepresented in this population. Thus, the genome-wide CNV investigation in this Finnish sample set demonstrated features that are characteristic to isolated populations. Novel CNVRs and the functional implications of CNVs revealed in this study elucidate structural variation present in this population isolate, and may also serve as candidate gene loci for music-related traits.

  8. Lack of topoisomerase copy number changes in patients with de novo and relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Ø; Poulsen, Tim S; Gang, Anne O

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerase (TOP) gene copy number changes may predict response to treatment with TOP-targeting drugs in cancer treatment. This was first described in patients with breast cancer and is currently being investigated in other malignant diseases. TOP-targeting drugs may induce TOP gene copy number...... with chemotherapy regimens including TOP2-targeting drugs (n = 16). No TOP1 or TOP2A copy number changes were found. Polysomy of chromosomes 20 and 17 was seen in 3 of 25 patients (12%) and 2 of 32 patients (6%) with de novo DLBCL. Among relapsed patients, chromosome polysomy was more frequently observed in 5 of 13...... patients (38%) and 4 of 16 patients (25%) harboring chromosome 20 and 17 polysomy, respectively; however, these differences only tended to be significant (p = 0.09 and p = 0.09, respectively). The results suggest that TOP gene copy number changes are very infrequent in DLBCL and not likely induced by TOP2...

  9. Landscape mapping at sub-Antarctic South Georgia provides a protocol for underpinning large-scale marine protected areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Oliver T.; Huvenne, Veerle A. I.; Griffiths, Huw J.; Dorschel, Boris; Linse, Katrin

    2016-10-01

    Global biodiversity is in decline, with the marine environment experiencing significant and increasing anthropogenic pressures. In response marine protected areas (MPAs) have increasingly been adopted as the flagship approach to marine conservation, many covering enormous areas. At present, however, the lack of biological sampling makes prioritising which regions of the ocean to protect, especially over large spatial scales, particularly problematic. Here we present an interdisciplinary approach to marine landscape mapping at the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia as an effective protocol for underpinning large-scale (105-106  km2) MPA designations. We have developed a new high-resolution (100 m) digital elevation model (DEM) of the region and integrated this DEM with bathymetry-derived parameters, modelled oceanographic data, and satellite primary productivity data. These interdisciplinary datasets were used to apply an objective statistical approach to hierarchically partition and map the benthic environment into physical habitats types. We assess the potential application of physical habitat classifications as proxies for biological structuring and the application of the landscape mapping for informing on marine spatial planning.

  10. Characterizing large river sounds: Providing context for understanding the environmental effects of noise produced by hydrokinetic turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevelhimer, Mark S.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Scherelis, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Underwater noise associated with the installation and operation of hydrokinetic turbines in rivers and tidal zones presents a potential environmental concern for fish and marine mammals. Comparing the spectral quality of sounds emitted by hydrokinetic turbines to natural and other anthropogenic sound sources is an initial step at understanding potential environmental impacts. Underwater recordings were obtained from passing vessels of different sizes and other underwater sound sources in both static and flowing waters. Static water measurements were taken in a lake with minimal background noise. Flowing water measurements were taken at a previously proposed deployment site for hydrokinetic turbines on the Mississippi River, where the sound of flowing water is included in background measurements. The size of vessels measured ranged from a small fishing boat with a 60 HP outboard motor to an 18-unit barge train being pushed upstream by tugboat. As expected, large vessels with large engines created the highest sound levels, and when compared to the sound created by an operating HK turbine were many times greater. A comparison of sound levels from the same sources at different distances using both spherical and cylindrical sound attenuation functions suggests that spherical model results more closely approximate observed values.

  11. Analysis of the safety profile of treatment with a large number of shock waves per session in extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budía Alba, A; López Acón, J D; Polo-Rodrigo, A; Bahílo-Mateu, P; Trassierra-Villa, M; Boronat-Tormo, F

    2015-06-01

    To assess the safety of increasing the number of waves per session in the treatment of urolithiasis using extracorporeal lithotripsy. Prospective, comparative, nonrandomized parallel study of patients with renoureteral lithiasis and an indication for extracorporeal lithotripsy who were consecutively enrolled between 2009 and 2010. We compared group I (160 patients) treated on schedule with a standard number of waves/session (mean 2858,3±302,8) using a Dornier lithotripter U/15/50 against group II (172 patients) treated with an expanded number of waves/session (mean, 6728,9±889,6) using a Siemens Modularis lithotripter. The study variables were age, sex, location, stone size, number of waves/session and total number of waves to resolution, stone-free rate (SFR) and rate of complications (Clavien-Dindo classification). Student's t-test and the chi-squared test were employed for the statistical analysis. The total rate of complications was 11.9% and 10.46% for groups I and II, respectively (P=.39). All complications were minor (Clavien-Dindo grade I). The most common complications were colic pain and hematuria in groups I and II, respectively, with a similar treatment intolerance rate (P>.05). The total number of waves necessary was lower in group II than in group I (P=.001), with SFRs of 96.5% and 71.5%, respectively (P=.001). Treatment with an expanded number of waves per session in extracorporeal lithotripsy does not increase the rate of complications or their severity. However, it could increase the overall effectiveness of the treatment. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tönu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have raised the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional follow-up of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  13. A Study of Low-Reynolds Number Effects in Backward-Facing Step Flow Using Large Eddy Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidson, Lars; Nielsen, Peter V.

    The flow in ventilated rooms is often not fully turbulent, but in some regions the flow can be laminar. Problems have been encountered when simulating this type of flow using RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) methods. Restivo carried out experiment on the flow after a backward-facing step......, with a large step....

  14. A Few Large Roads or Many Small Ones? How to Accommodate Growth in Vehicle Numbers to Minimise Impacts on Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Jonathan R.; Lunney, Daniel; Callaghan, John; McAlpine, Clive A.

    2014-01-01

    Roads and vehicular traffic are among the most pervasive of threats to biodiversity because they fragmenting habitat, increasing mortality and opening up new areas for the exploitation of natural resources. However, the number of vehicles on roads is increasing rapidly and this is likely to continue into the future, putting increased pressure on wildlife populations. Consequently, a major challenge is the planning of road networks to accommodate increased numbers of vehicles, while minimising impacts on wildlife. Nonetheless, we currently have few principles for guiding decisions on road network planning to reduce impacts on wildlife in real landscapes. We addressed this issue by developing an approach for quantifying the impact on wildlife mortality of two alternative mechanisms for accommodating growth in vehicle numbers: (1) increasing the number of roads, and (2) increasing traffic volumes on existing roads. We applied this approach to a koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) population in eastern Australia and quantified the relative impact of each strategy on mortality. We show that, in most cases, accommodating growth in traffic through increases in volumes on existing roads has a lower impact than building new roads. An exception is where the existing road network has very low road density, but very high traffic volumes on each road. These findings have important implications for how we design road networks to reduce their impacts on biodiversity. PMID:24646891

  15. A few large roads or many small ones? How to accommodate growth in vehicle numbers to minimise impacts on wildlife.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan R Rhodes

    Full Text Available Roads and vehicular traffic are among the most pervasive of threats to biodiversity because they fragmenting habitat, increasing mortality and opening up new areas for the exploitation of natural resources. However, the number of vehicles on roads is increasing rapidly and this is likely to continue into the future, putting increased pressure on wildlife populations. Consequently, a major challenge is the planning of road networks to accommodate increased numbers of vehicles, while minimising impacts on wildlife. Nonetheless, we currently have few principles for guiding decisions on road network planning to reduce impacts on wildlife in real landscapes. We addressed this issue by developing an approach for quantifying the impact on wildlife mortality of two alternative mechanisms for accommodating growth in vehicle numbers: (1 increasing the number of roads, and (2 increasing traffic volumes on existing roads. We applied this approach to a koala (Phascolarctos cinereus population in eastern Australia and quantified the relative impact of each strategy on mortality. We show that, in most cases, accommodating growth in traffic through increases in volumes on existing roads has a lower impact than building new roads. An exception is where the existing road network has very low road density, but very high traffic volumes on each road. These findings have important implications for how we design road networks to reduce their impacts on biodiversity.

  16. A Large-Scale Initiative Inviting Patients to Share Personal Fitness Tracker Data with Their Providers: Initial Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevnick, Joshua M; Fuller, Garth; Duncan, Ray; Spiegel, Brennan M R

    2016-01-01

    Personal fitness trackers (PFT) have substantial potential to improve healthcare. To quantify and characterize early adopters who shared their PFT data with providers. We used bivariate statistics and logistic regression to compare patients who shared any PFT data vs. patients who did not. A patient portal was used to invite 79,953 registered portal users to share their data. Of 66,105 users included in our analysis, 499 (0.8%) uploaded data during an initial 37-day study period. Bivariate and regression analysis showed that early adopters were more likely than non-adopters to be younger, male, white, health system employees, and to have higher BMIs. Neither comorbidities nor utilization predicted adoption. Our results demonstrate that patients had little intrinsic desire to share PFT data with their providers, and suggest that patients most at risk for poor health outcomes are least likely to share PFT data. Marketing, incentives, and/or cultural change may be needed to induce such data-sharing.

  17. E-Mail Communication Practices and Preferences Among Patients and Providers in a Large Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Natalie; Maganti, Manjula; Dobriyal, Aditi; Sheinis, Michal; Wei, Alice C; Ringash, Jolie; Krzyzanowska, Monika K

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about how electronic mail (e-mail) is currently used in oncology practice to facilitate patient care. The objective of our study was to understand the current e-mail practices and preferences of patients and physicians in a large comprehensive cancer center. Separate cross-sectional surveys were administered to patients and physicians (staff physicians and clinical fellows) at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with current e-mail use. Record review was performed to assess the impact of e-mail communication on care. The survey was completed by 833 patients. E-mail contact with a member of the health care team was reported by 41% of respondents. The team members contacted included administrative assistants (52%), nurses (45%), specialist physicians (36%), and family physicians (18%). Patient factors associated with a higher likelihood of e-mail contact with the health care team included younger age, higher education, higher income, enrollment in a clinical trial, and receipt of multiple treatments. Eighty percent of physicians (n = 63 of 79) reported previous contact with a patient via e-mail. Physician factors associated with a greater likelihood of e-mail contact with patients included older age, more senior clinical position, and higher patient volume. Nine hundred sixty-two patient records were reviewed, with e-mail correspondence documented in only 9% of cases. E-mail is commonly used for patient care but is poorly documented. The use of e-mail in this setting can be developed with appropriate guidance; however, there may be concerns about widening the gap between certain groups of patients. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  18. Research and Teaching: Exploring the Use of an Online Quiz Game to Provide Formative Feedback in a Large-Enrollment, Introductory Biochemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Rachel; Parrish, Jonathan; Wright, Adrienne; Gnarpe, Judy; Keenan, Louanne

    2015-01-01

    In a large-enrollment, introductory biochemistry course for nonmajors, the authors provide students with formative feedback through practice questions in PDF format. Recently, they investigated possible benefits of providing the practice questions via an online game (Brainspan). Participants were randomly assigned to either the online game group…

  19. Utilization of Manipulative Treatment for Spine and Shoulder Conditions Between Different Medical Providers in a Large Military Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhon, Daniel; Greenlee, Tina; Fritz, Julie

    2017-07-14

    To describe the use of manipulative treatment for shoulder and spine conditions among various provider types. Retrospective observational cohort. Single military hospital. Consecutive sample of patients (N=7566) seeking care for an initial spine or shoulder condition from January 1 to December 31, 2009. Manipulative treatment (eg, manual therapy, spinal and joint manipulation). Manipulation treatment was identified with procedure billing codes in the medical records. Spine and shoulder conditions were identified by using the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes. All data were abstracted from the Department of Defense Military Health System Management and Analysis Tool. Of 7566 total patients seeking care, 2014 (26.6%) received manipulative treatment at least once, and 1870 of those received this treatment in a military facility (24.7%). Manipulative treatment was used most often for thoracic conditions and least often for shoulder conditions (50.8% and 24.2% of all patients). There was a total of 6706 unique medical visits with a manipulative treatment procedure (average of 3.3 manipulative treatment procedure visits per patient). Manipulative treatment utilization rates for shoulder and spine conditions ranged from 26.6% to 50.2%. Chiropractors used manipulation the most and physical therapists the least. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. High-speed horizontal-path atmospheric turbulence correction using a large actuator-number MEMS spatial light modulator in an interferometric phase conjugation engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K; Stappaerts, E; Gavel, D; Wilks, S; Tucker, J; Silva, D; Olsen, J; Olivier, S; Young, P; Kartz, M; Flath, L; Kruelivitch, P; Crawford, J; Azucena, O

    2004-03-04

    Atmospheric propagation results for a high-speed, large-actuator-number, adaptive optics system are presented. The system uses a MEMS-based spatial light modulator correction device with 1024 actuators. Tests over a 1.35 km path achieved correction speeds in excess of 800 Hz and Strehl ratios close to 0.5. The wave-front sensor was based on a quadrature interferometer that directly measures phase. This technique does not require global wave-front reconstruction, making it relatively insensitive to scintillation and phase residues. The results demonstrate the potential of large actuator number MEMS-based spatial light modulators to replace conventional deformable mirrors.

  1. High-speed horizontal-path atmospheric turbulence correction with a large-actuator-number microelectromechanical system spatial light modulator in an interferometric phase-conjugation engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Gavel, D; Wilks, S C; Tucker, J; Silva, D A; Olsen, J; Olivier, S S; Young, P E; Kartz, M W; Flath, L M; Kruelevitch, P; Crawford, J; Azucena, Oscar

    2004-08-01

    Results of atmospheric propagation for a high-speed, large-actuator-number adaptive optics system are presented. The system uses a microelectromechanical system- (MEMS-) based spatial light modulator correction device with 1024 actuators. Tests over a 1.35-km path achieved correction speeds in excess of 800 Hz and Strehl ratios close to 0.5. The wave-front sensor was based on a quadrature interferometer that directly measures phase. This technique does not require global wave-front reconstruction, making it relatively insensitive to scintillation and phase residues. The results demonstrate the potential of large-actuator-number MEMS-based spatial light modulators to replace conventional deformable mirrors.

  2. Precise large deviations of aggregate claims in a size-dependent renewal risk model with stopping time claim-number process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Dehui; Yu, Shihang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a size-dependent renewal risk model with stopping time claim-number process. In this model, we do not make any assumption on the dependence structure of claim sizes and inter-arrival times. We study large deviations of the aggregate amount of claims. For the subexponential heavy-tailed case, we obtain a precise large-deviation formula; our method substantially relies on a martingale for the structure of our models.

  3. Precise large deviations of aggregate claims in a size-dependent renewal risk model with stopping time claim-number process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we consider a size-dependent renewal risk model with stopping time claim-number process. In this model, we do not make any assumption on the dependence structure of claim sizes and inter-arrival times. We study large deviations of the aggregate amount of claims. For the subexponential heavy-tailed case, we obtain a precise large-deviation formula; our method substantially relies on a martingale for the structure of our models.

  4. Large-scale gene expression study in the ophiuroid Amphiura filiformis provides insights into evolution of gene regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Viktor Dylus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary mechanisms involved in shaping complex gene regulatory networks (GRN that encode for morphologically similar structures in distantly related animals remain elusive. In this context, echinoderm larval skeletons found in brittle stars and sea urchins provide an ideal system. Here, we characterize for the first time the development of the larval skeleton in the ophiuroid Amphiura filiformis and compare it systematically with its counterpart in sea urchin. Results We show that ophiuroids and euechinoids, that split at least 480 Million years ago (Mya, have remarkable similarities in tempo and mode of skeletal development. Despite morphological and ontological similarities, our high-resolution study of the dynamics of genetic regulatory states in A. filiformis highlights numerous differences in the architecture of their underlying GRNs. Importantly, the A.filiformis pplx, the closest gene to the sea urchin double negative gate (DNG repressor pmar1, fails to drive the skeletogenic program in sea urchin, showing important evolutionary differences in protein function. hesC, the second repressor of the DNG, is co-expressed with most of the genes that are repressed in sea urchin, indicating the absence of direct repression of tbr, ets1/2, and delta in A. filiformis. Furthermore, the absence of expression in later stages of brittle star skeleton development of key regulatory genes, such as foxb and dri, shows significantly different regulatory states. Conclusion Our data fill up an important gap in the picture of larval mesoderm in echinoderms and allows us to explore the evolutionary implications relative to the recently established phylogeny of echinoderm classes. In light of recent studies on other echinoderms, our data highlight a high evolutionary plasticity of the same nodes throughout evolution of echinoderm skeletogenesis. Finally, gene duplication, protein function diversification, and cis-regulatory element

  5. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay identifies additional copy number changes compared with R-band karyotype and provide more accuracy prognostic information in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingya; Ai, Xiaofei; Qin, Tiejun; Xu, Zefeng; Zhang, Yue; Liu, Jinqin; Li, Bing; Fang, Liwei; Zhang, Hongli; Pan, Lijuan; Hu, Naibo; Qu, Shiqiang; Cai, Wenyu; Ru, Kun; Jia, Yujiao; Huang, Gang; Xiao, Zhijian

    2017-01-03

    Cytogenetic analysis provides important diagnostic and prognostic information for patients with Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and plays an essential role in the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay is a recently developed technique to identify targeted cytogenetic aberrations in MDS patients. In the present study, we evaluated the results obtained using an MLPA assay in 437 patients with MDS to determine the efficacy of MLPA analysis. Using R-banding karyotyping, 45% (197/437) of MDS patients had chromosomal abnormalities, whereas MLPA analysis detected that 35% (153/437) of MDS cases contained at least one copy-number variations (CNVs) .2/5 individuals (40%) with R-band karyotype failures had trisomy 8 detected using only MLPA. Clonal cytogenetic abnormalities were detected in 20/235 (8.5%) MDS patients with a normal R-band karyotype, and 12/20 (60%) of those patients were reclassified into a higher-risk IPSS-R prognostic category. When sequencing and cytogenetics were combined, the fraction of patients with MDS-related oncogenic lesions increased to 87.3% (233/267 cases). MLPA analysis determined that the median OS of patients with a normal karyotype (n=218) was 65 months compared with 27 months in cases with an aberrant karyotype (P=0.002) in 240 patients with normal or failed karyotypes by R-banding karyotyping. The high-resolution MPLA assay is an efficient and reliable method that can be used in conjunction with R-band karyotyping to detect chromosomal abnormalities in patients with suspected MDS. MLPA may also provide more accurate prognostic information.

  6. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay identifies additional copy number changes compared with R-band karyotype and provide more accuracy prognostic information in myelodysplastic syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zefeng; Zhang, Yue; Liu, Jinqin; Li, Bing; Fang, Liwei; Zhang, Hongli; Pan, Lijuan; Hu, Naibo; Qu, Shiqiang; Cai, Wenyu; Ru, Kun; Jia, Yujiao; Huang, Gang; Xiao, Zhijian

    2017-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis provides important diagnostic and prognostic information for patients with Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and plays an essential role in the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay is a recently developed technique to identify targeted cytogenetic aberrations in MDS patients. In the present study, we evaluated the results obtained using an MLPA assay in 437 patients with MDS to determine the efficacy of MLPA analysis. Using R-banding karyotyping, 45% (197/437) of MDS patients had chromosomal abnormalities, whereas MLPA analysis detected that 35% (153/437) of MDS cases contained at least one copy-number variations (CNVs) .2/5 individuals (40%) with R-band karyotype failures had trisomy 8 detected using only MLPA. Clonal cytogenetic abnormalities were detected in 20/235 (8.5%) MDS patients with a normal R-band karyotype, and 12/20 (60%) of those patients were reclassified into a higher-risk IPSS-R prognostic category. When sequencing and cytogenetics were combined, the fraction of patients with MDS-related oncogenic lesions increased to 87.3% (233/267 cases). MLPA analysis determined that the median OS of patients with a normal karyotype (n=218) was 65 months compared with 27 months in cases with an aberrant karyotype (P=0.002) in 240 patients with normal or failed karyotypes by R-banding karyotyping. The high-resolution MPLA assay is an efficient and reliable method that can be used in conjunction with R-band karyotyping to detect chromosomal abnormalities in patients with suspected MDS. MLPA may also provide more accurate prognostic information. PMID:27906673

  7. Improved estimation of the noncentrality parameter distribution from a large number of t-statistics, with applications to false discovery rate estimation in microarray data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Long; Nettleton, Dan; Dekkers, Jack C M

    2012-12-01

    Given a large number of t-statistics, we consider the problem of approximating the distribution of noncentrality parameters (NCPs) by a continuous density. This problem is closely related to the control of false discovery rates (FDR) in massive hypothesis testing applications, e.g., microarray gene expression analysis. Our methodology is similar to, but improves upon, the existing approach by Ruppert, Nettleton, and Hwang (2007, Biometrics, 63, 483-495). We provide parametric, nonparametric, and semiparametric estimators for the distribution of NCPs, as well as estimates of the FDR and local FDR. In the parametric situation, we assume that the NCPs follow a distribution that leads to an analytically available marginal distribution for the test statistics. In the nonparametric situation, we use convex combinations of basis density functions to estimate the density of the NCPs. A sequential quadratic programming procedure is developed to maximize the penalized likelihood. The smoothing parameter is selected with the approximate network information criterion. A semiparametric estimator is also developed to combine both parametric and nonparametric fits. Simulations show that, under a variety of situations, our density estimates are closer to the underlying truth and our FDR estimates are improved compared with alternative methods. Data-based simulations and the analyses of two microarray datasets are used to evaluate the performance in realistic situations. © 2012, The International Biometric Society.

  8. Quantity Matters: Children With Dyslexia Are Impaired in a Small, but Not Large, Number of Exposures During Implicit Repeated Sequence Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xinjie; Tong, Shelley Xiuli

    2017-08-10

    The present study investigated the onset of statistical learning and examined whether the number of exposures to a repeated sequence influences the learning performance of children with dyslexia on a serial reaction time task. Three groups of children (29 with dyslexia, 29 age-matched controls, and 30 reading level-matched controls) were administered a serial reaction time task, and their statistical learning performances after a small and a large number of exposures (40 vs. 180 exposures) were recorded and compared. Children with dyslexia showed impaired statistical learning after a small number of exposures to a sequence, but intact statistical learning after a large number of exposures. In contrast, the age-matched and reading level-matched control groups showed intact statistical learning after both small and large numbers of exposures. Children with dyslexia also exhibited a slower learning rate than either control group. These results suggest that the amount of exposure to statistical patterns influences statistical learning performance in children with dyslexia.

  9. Single Cell Analysis Linking Ribosomal (r)DNA and rRNA Copy Numbers to Cell Size and Growth Rate Provides Insights into Molecular Protistan Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rao; Gong, Jun

    2017-11-01

    Ribosomal (r)RNA and rDNA have been golden molecular markers in microbial ecology. However, it remains poorly understood how ribotype copy number (CN)-based characteristics are linked with diversity, abundance, and activity of protist populations and communities observed at organismal levels. Here, we applied a single-cell approach to quantify ribotype CNs in two ciliate species reared at different temperatures. We found that in actively growing cells, the per-cell rDNA and rRNA CNs scaled with cell volume (CV) to 0.44 and 0.58 powers, respectively. The modeled rDNA and rRNA concentrations thus appear to be much higher in smaller than in larger cells. The observed rRNA:rDNA ratio scaled with CV 0.14 . The maximum growth rate could be well predicted by a combination of per-cell ribotype CN and temperature. Our empirical data and modeling on single-cell ribotype scaling are in agreement with both the metabolic theory of ecology and the growth rate hypothesis, providing a quantitative framework for linking cellular rDNA and rRNA CNs with body size, growth (activity), and biomass stoichiometry. This study also demonstrates that the expression rate of rRNA genes is constrained by cell size, and favors biomass rather than abundance-based interpretation of quantitative ribotype data in population and community ecology of protists. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Protistologists.

  10. SVA retrotransposon insertion-associated deletion represents a novel mutational mechanism underlying large genomic copy number changes with non-recurrent breakpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Julia; Bengesser, Kathrin; Claes, Kathleen B M; Wimmer, Katharina; Mautner, Victor-Felix; van Minkelen, Rick; Legius, Eric; Brems, Hilde; Upadhyaya, Meena; Högel, Josef; Lazaro, Conxi; Rosenbaum, Thorsten; Bammert, Simone; Messiaen, Ludwine; Cooper, David N; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard

    2014-06-02

    Genomic disorders are caused by copy number changes that may exhibit recurrent breakpoints processed by nonallelic homologous recombination. However, region-specific disease-associated copy number changes have also been observed which exhibit non-recurrent breakpoints. The mechanisms underlying these non-recurrent copy number changes have not yet been fully elucidated. We analyze large NF1 deletions with non-recurrent breakpoints as a model to investigate the full spectrum of causative mechanisms, and observe that they are mediated by various DNA double strand break repair mechanisms, as well as aberrant replication. Further, two of the 17 NF1 deletions with non-recurrent breakpoints, identified in unrelated patients, occur in association with the concomitant insertion of SINE/variable number of tandem repeats/Alu (SVA) retrotransposons at the deletion breakpoints. The respective breakpoints are refractory to analysis by standard breakpoint-spanning PCRs and are only identified by means of optimized PCR protocols designed to amplify across GC-rich sequences. The SVA elements are integrated within SUZ12P intron 8 in both patients, and were mediated by target-primed reverse transcription of SVA mRNA intermediates derived from retrotranspositionally active source elements. Both SVA insertions occurred during early postzygotic development and are uniquely associated with large deletions of 1 Mb and 867 kb, respectively, at the insertion sites. Since active SVA elements are abundant in the human genome and the retrotranspositional activity of many SVA source elements is high, SVA insertion-associated large genomic deletions encompassing many hundreds of kilobases could constitute a novel and as yet under-appreciated mechanism underlying large-scale copy number changes in the human genome.

  11. Improved multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat assay for Staphylococcus aureus genotyping, providing a highly informative technique together with strong phylogenetic value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pourcel, Christine; Hormigos, Katia; Onteniente, Lucie; Sakwinska, Olga; Deurenberg, Ruud H; Vergnaud, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    We describe an improved multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) scheme for genotyping Staphylococcus aureus. We compare its performance to those of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and spa typing in a survey of 309 strains. This collection includes 87 epidemic

  12. The influence of basic design variables on the acoustics of concert halls; new results derived from analysing a large number of existing halls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders Christian

    1997-01-01

    A large data base over values of various room acoustic parameters has provided the basis for statistical analyses of how and how much the acoustic properties of conert halls are influenced by their size, shape and absorption area (as deduced from measured reverberation time). The data have been...

  13. Providing supplementary, artificial milk for large litters during lactation: effects on performance and health of sows and piglets: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustal, J; Traulsen, I; Preißler, R; Müller, K; Beilage, T Große; Börries, U; Kemper, N

    2015-01-01

    One possible way to support raising large litter sizes in pigs is to offer supplementary, artificial milk ad libitum in the farrowing pen in addition to the sow's milk. In order to evaluate the potential use of this method and its effects on performance and health, supplemented (n = 60) and control sows (n = 60) with their litters were tested over 15 batches in one herd during one year. In the supplemented group (SG), piglets had access to supplementary milk in addition to sow's milk from their 2nd day of life until weaning (day 27). The litters of SG sows were adjusted to contain as many piglets as the sow had functional teats, whereas in the control group (CG), piglets were set to the number of functional teats minus one, due to animal welfare reasons. With supplementary milk provision, the weaning of large litters was achieved without any negative impacts on performance and health. On average, 13.5 and 12.4 piglets were weaned in SG and CG, respectively (P  0.05) and average daily weight gain of the piglets (SG: 0.25 kg v. CG: 0.25 kg; P > 0.05) did not differ, total litter weight was consequently higher in SG than in CG (104.9 kg v. 96.7 kg; P  0.05). With regard to documented medical treatments, facial lesions were treated less frequently in piglets of SG (46 v. 32 treatments; P  0.05). To summarise, in the presented case offering ad libitum supplementary, artificial milk supported the sow in raising large litters by compensating possible negative impacts of high piglet numbers on the weight gain of piglets and the body condition of the sows.

  14. Assessment of large copy number variants in patients with apparently isolated congenital left-sided cardiac lesions reveals clinically relevant genomic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchard, Neil A; Umana, Luis A; D'Alessandro, Lisa; Azamian, Mahshid; Poopola, Mojisola; Morris, Shaine A; Fernbach, Susan; Lalani, Seema R; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Zender, Gloria A; Fitzgerald-Butt, Sara; Garg, Vidu; Bowman, Jessica; Zapata, Gladys; Hernandez, Patricia; Arrington, Cammon B; Furthner, Dieter; Prakash, Siddharth K; Bowles, Neil E; McBride, Kim L; Belmont, John W

    2017-08-01

    Congenital left-sided cardiac lesions (LSLs) are a significant contributor to the mortality and morbidity of congenital heart disease (CHD). Structural copy number variants (CNVs) have been implicated in LSL without extra-cardiac features; however, non-penetrance and variable expressivity have created uncertainty over the use of CNV analyses in such patients. High-density SNP microarray genotyping data were used to infer large, likely-pathogenic, autosomal CNVs in a cohort of 1,139 probands with LSL and their families. CNVs were molecularly confirmed and the medical records of individual carriers reviewed. The gene content of novel CNVs was then compared with public CNV data from CHD patients. Large CNVs (>1 MB) were observed in 33 probands (∼3%). Six of these were de novo and 14 were not observed in the only available parent sample. Associated cardiac phenotypes spanned a broad spectrum without clear predilection. Candidate CNVs were largely non-recurrent, associated with heterozygous loss of copy number, and overlapped known CHD genomic regions. Novel CNV regions were enriched for cardiac development genes, including seven that have not been previously associated with human CHD. CNV analysis can be a clinically useful and molecularly informative tool in LSLs without obvious extra-cardiac defects, and may identify a clinically relevant genomic disorder in a small but important proportion of these individuals. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Implementation of provider-based electronic medical records and improvement of the quality of data in a large HIV program in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Castelnuovo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Starting in June 2010 the Infectious Diseases Institute (IDI clinic (a large urban HIV out-patient facility switched to provider-based Electronic Medical Records (EMR from paper EMR entered in the database by data-entry clerks. Standardized clinics forms were eliminated but providers still fill free text clinical notes in physical patients' files. The objective of this study was to compare the rate of errors in the database before and after the introduction of the provider-based EMR. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Data in the database pre and post provider-based EMR was compared with the information in the patients' files and classified as correct, incorrect, and missing. We calculated the proportion of incorrect, missing and total error for key variables (toxicities, opportunistic infections, reasons for treatment change and interruption. Proportions of total errors were compared using chi-square test. A survey of the users of the EMR was also conducted. We compared data from 2,382 visits (from 100 individuals of a retrospective validation conducted in 2007 with 34,957 visits (from 10,920 individuals of a prospective validation conducted in April-August 2011. The total proportion of errors decreased from 66.5% in 2007 to 2.1% in 2011 for opportunistic infections, from 51.9% to 3.5% for ART toxicity, from 82.8% to 12.5% for reasons for ART interruption and from 94.1% to 0.9% for reasons for ART switch (all P<0.0001. The survey showed that 83% of the providers agreed that provider-based EMR led to improvement of clinical care, 80% reported improved access to patients' records, and 80% appreciated the automation of providers' tasks. CONCLUSIONS: The introduction of provider-based EMR improved the quality of data collected with a significant reduction in missing and incorrect information. The majority of providers and clients expressed satisfaction with the new system. We recommend the use of provider-based EMR in large HIV programs in Sub

  16. Aerodynamic Effects of High Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade With Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of high inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. These results are compared to previous measurements made in a low turbulence environment. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The current study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Assessing the effects of turbulence at these large incidence and Reynolds number variations complements the existing database. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for 10 incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12×10(exp 5) to 2.12×10(exp 6) and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 8 to 15 percent for the current study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitch/yaw probe located in a survey plane 7 percent axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At

  17. The number of extranodal sites assessed by PET/CT scan is a powerful predictor of CNS relapse for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Galaly, Tarec Christoffer; Villa, Diego; Michaelsen, Thomas Yssing

    2017-01-01

    independently associated with SCNS. There was a strong correlation between absolute number of extranodal sites and risk of SCNS; the 144 patients (9%) with >2 extranodal sites had a 3-year cumulative incidence of SCNS of 15.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.2–21.2%) compared with 2.6% (95% CI 1.7–3.5) among......Purpose Development of secondary central nervous system involvement (SCNS) in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is associated with poor outcomes. The CNS International Prognostic Index (CNS-IPI) has been proposed for identifying patients at greatest risk, but the optimal model is unknown....... Methods We retrospectively analysed patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma diagnosed between 2001 and 2013, staged with PET/CT and treated with R-CHOP(-like) regimens. Baseline clinicopathologic characteristics, treatments, and outcome data were collected from clinical databases and medical files. We...

  18. Dogs Have the Most Neurons, Though Not the Largest Brain: Trade-Off between Body Mass and Number of Neurons in the Cerebral Cortex of Large Carnivoran Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim-Messeder, Débora; Lambert, Kelly; Noctor, Stephen; Pestana, Fernanda M; de Castro Leal, Maria E; Bertelsen, Mads F; Alagaili, Abdulaziz N; Mohammad, Osama B; Manger, Paul R; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2017-01-01

    Carnivorans are a diverse group of mammals that includes carnivorous, omnivorous and herbivorous, domesticated and wild species, with a large range of brain sizes. Carnivory is one of several factors expected to be cognitively demanding for carnivorans due to a requirement to outsmart larger prey. On the other hand, large carnivoran species have high hunting costs and unreliable feeding patterns, which, given the high metabolic cost of brain neurons, might put them at risk of metabolic constraints regarding how many brain neurons they can afford, especially in the cerebral cortex. For a given cortical size, do carnivoran species have more cortical neurons than the herbivorous species they prey upon? We find they do not; carnivorans (cat, mongoose, dog, hyena, lion) share with non-primates, including artiodactyls (the typical prey of large carnivorans), roughly the same relationship between cortical mass and number of neurons, which suggests that carnivorans are subject to the same evolutionary scaling rules as other non-primate clades. However, there are a few important exceptions. Carnivorans stand out in that the usual relationship between larger body, larger cortical mass and larger number of cortical neurons only applies to small and medium-sized species, and not beyond dogs: we find that the golden retriever dog has more cortical neurons than the striped hyena, African lion and even brown bear, even though the latter species have up to three times larger cortices than dogs. Remarkably, the brown bear cerebral cortex, the largest examined, only has as many neurons as the ten times smaller cat cerebral cortex, although it does have the expected ten times as many non-neuronal cells in the cerebral cortex compared to the cat. We also find that raccoons have dog-like numbers of neurons in their cat-sized brain, which makes them comparable to primates in neuronal density. Comparison of domestic and wild species suggests that the neuronal composition of carnivoran

  19. Dogs Have the Most Neurons, Though Not the Largest Brain: Trade-Off between Body Mass and Number of Neurons in the Cerebral Cortex of Large Carnivoran Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim-Messeder, Débora; Lambert, Kelly; Noctor, Stephen; Pestana, Fernanda M.; de Castro Leal, Maria E.; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Alagaili, Abdulaziz N.; Mohammad, Osama B.; Manger, Paul R.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2017-01-01

    Carnivorans are a diverse group of mammals that includes carnivorous, omnivorous and herbivorous, domesticated and wild species, with a large range of brain sizes. Carnivory is one of several factors expected to be cognitively demanding for carnivorans due to a requirement to outsmart larger prey. On the other hand, large carnivoran species have high hunting costs and unreliable feeding patterns, which, given the high metabolic cost of brain neurons, might put them at risk of metabolic constraints regarding how many brain neurons they can afford, especially in the cerebral cortex. For a given cortical size, do carnivoran species have more cortical neurons than the herbivorous species they prey upon? We find they do not; carnivorans (cat, mongoose, dog, hyena, lion) share with non-primates, including artiodactyls (the typical prey of large carnivorans), roughly the same relationship between cortical mass and number of neurons, which suggests that carnivorans are subject to the same evolutionary scaling rules as other non-primate clades. However, there are a few important exceptions. Carnivorans stand out in that the usual relationship between larger body, larger cortical mass and larger number of cortical neurons only applies to small and medium-sized species, and not beyond dogs: we find that the golden retriever dog has more cortical neurons than the striped hyena, African lion and even brown bear, even though the latter species have up to three times larger cortices than dogs. Remarkably, the brown bear cerebral cortex, the largest examined, only has as many neurons as the ten times smaller cat cerebral cortex, although it does have the expected ten times as many non-neuronal cells in the cerebral cortex compared to the cat. We also find that raccoons have dog-like numbers of neurons in their cat-sized brain, which makes them comparable to primates in neuronal density. Comparison of domestic and wild species suggests that the neuronal composition of carnivoran

  20. Dogs Have the Most Neurons, Though Not the Largest Brain: Trade-Off between Body Mass and Number of Neurons in the Cerebral Cortex of Large Carnivoran Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Jardim-Messeder

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Carnivorans are a diverse group of mammals that includes carnivorous, omnivorous and herbivorous, domesticated and wild species, with a large range of brain sizes. Carnivory is one of several factors expected to be cognitively demanding for carnivorans due to a requirement to outsmart larger prey. On the other hand, large carnivoran species have high hunting costs and unreliable feeding patterns, which, given the high metabolic cost of brain neurons, might put them at risk of metabolic constraints regarding how many brain neurons they can afford, especially in the cerebral cortex. For a given cortical size, do carnivoran species have more cortical neurons than the herbivorous species they prey upon? We find they do not; carnivorans (cat, mongoose, dog, hyena, lion share with non-primates, including artiodactyls (the typical prey of large carnivorans, roughly the same relationship between cortical mass and number of neurons, which suggests that carnivorans are subject to the same evolutionary scaling rules as other non-primate clades. However, there are a few important exceptions. Carnivorans stand out in that the usual relationship between larger body, larger cortical mass and larger number of cortical neurons only applies to small and medium-sized species, and not beyond dogs: we find that the golden retriever dog has more cortical neurons than the striped hyena, African lion and even brown bear, even though the latter species have up to three times larger cortices than dogs. Remarkably, the brown bear cerebral cortex, the largest examined, only has as many neurons as the ten times smaller cat cerebral cortex, although it does have the expected ten times as many non-neuronal cells in the cerebral cortex compared to the cat. We also find that raccoons have dog-like numbers of neurons in their cat-sized brain, which makes them comparable to primates in neuronal density. Comparison of domestic and wild species suggests that the neuronal

  1. Timoides agassizii Bigelow, 1904, little-known hydromedusa (Cnidaria), appears briefly in large numbers off Oman, March 2011, with additional notes about species of the genus Timoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, Jasmine; Kharusi, Lubna Al; Mills, Claudia E; Ghielani, Hamed; Marzouki, Mohammad Al

    2013-12-11

    A bloom of the hydromedusan jellyfish, Timoides agassizii, occurred in February 2011 off the coast of Sohar, Al Batinah, Sultanate of Oman, in the Gulf of Oman. This species was first observed in 1902 in great numbers off Haddummati Atoll in the Maldive Islands in the Indian Ocean and has rarely been seen since. The species appeared briefly in large numbers off Oman in 2011 and subsequent observation of our 2009 samples of zooplankton from Sohar revealed that it was also present in low numbers (two collected) in one sample in 2009; these are the first records in the Indian Ocean north of the Maldives. Medusae collected off Oman were almost identical to those recorded previously from the Maldive Islands, Papua New Guinea, the Marshall Islands, Guam, the South China Sea, and Okinawa. T. agassizii is a species that likely lives for several months. It was present in our plankton samples together with large numbers of the oceanic siphonophore Physalia physalis only during a single month's samples, suggesting that the temporary bloom off Oman was likely due to the arrival of mature, open ocean medusae into nearshore waters. We see no evidence that T. agassizii has established a new population along Oman, since if so, it would likely have been present in more than one sample period. We are unable to deduce further details of the life cycle of this species from blooms of many mature individuals nearshore, about a century apart. Examination of a single damaged T. agassizii medusa from Guam, calls into question the existence of its congener, T. latistyla, known only from a single specimen.

  2. Comparative efficacy of tulathromycin versus a combination of florfenicol-oxytetracycline in the treatment of undifferentiated respiratory disease in large numbers of sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Champour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of tulathromycin (TUL with a combination of florfenicol (FFC and long-acting oxytetracycline (LAOTC in the treatment of naturally occurring undifferentiated respiratory diseases in large numbers of sheep. In this study, seven natural outbreaks of sheep pneumonia in Garmsar, Iran were considered. From these outbreaks, 400 sheep exhibiting the signs of respiratory diseases were selected, and the sheep were randomly divided into two equal groups. The first group was treated with a single injection of TUL (dosed at 2.5 mg/kg body weight, and the second group was treated with concurrent injections of FFC (dosed at 40 mg/kg bwt and LAOTC (dosed at 20 mg/kg bwt. In the first group, 186 (93% sheep were found to be cured 5 days after the injection, and 14 (7% sheep needed further treatment, of which 6 (3% were cured, and 8 (4% died. In the second group, 172 (86% sheep were cured after the injections, but 28 (14% sheep needed further treatment, of which 10 (5% were cured, and 18 (9% died. This study revealed that TUL was more efficacious as compared to the combined treatment using FFC and LAOTC. As the first report, this field trial describes the successful treatment of undifferentiated respiratory diseases in large numbers of sheep. Thus, TUL can be used for the treatment of undifferentiated respiratory diseases in sheep. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2015; 2(3.000: 279-284

  3. Provider risk factors for medication administration error alerts: analyses of a large-scale closed-loop medication administration system using RFID and barcode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yeonsoo; Yoon, Dukyong; Ahn, Eun Kyoung; Hwang, Hee; Park, Rae Woong

    2016-12-01

    To determine the risk factors and rate of medication administration error (MAE) alerts by analyzing large-scale medication administration data and related error logs automatically recorded in a closed-loop medication administration system using radio-frequency identification and barcodes. The subject hospital adopted a closed-loop medication administration system. All medication administrations in the general wards were automatically recorded in real-time using radio-frequency identification, barcodes, and hand-held point-of-care devices. MAE alert logs recorded during a full 1 year of 2012. We evaluated risk factors for MAE alerts including administration time, order type, medication route, the number of medication doses administered, and factors associated with nurse practices by logistic regression analysis. A total of 2 874 539 medication dose records from 30 232 patients (882.6 patient-years) were included in 2012. We identified 35 082 MAE alerts (1.22% of total medication doses). The MAE alerts were significantly related to administration at non-standard time [odds ratio (OR) 1.559, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.515-1.604], emergency order (OR 1.527, 95%CI 1.464-1.594), and the number of medication doses administered (OR 0.993, 95%CI 0.992-0.993). Medication route, nurse's employment duration, and working schedule were also significantly related. The MAE alert rate was 1.22% over the 1-year observation period in the hospital examined in this study. The MAE alerts were significantly related to administration time, order type, medication route, the number of medication doses administered, nurse's employment duration, and working schedule. The real-time closed-loop medication administration system contributed to improving patient safety by preventing potential MAEs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Study of 3-D Dynamic Roughness Effects on Flow Over a NACA 0012 Airfoil Using Large Eddy Simulations at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guda, Venkata Subba Sai Satish

    There have been several advancements in the aerospace industry in areas of design such as aerodynamics, designs, controls and propulsion; all aimed at one common goal i.e. increasing efficiency --range and scope of operation with lesser fuel consumption. Several methods of flow control have been tried. Some were successful, some failed and many were termed as impractical. The low Reynolds number regime of 104 - 105 is a very interesting range. Flow physics in this range are quite different than those of higher Reynolds number range. Mid and high altitude UAV's, MAV's, sailplanes, jet engine fan blades, inboard helicopter rotor blades and wind turbine rotors are some of the aerodynamic applications that fall in this range. The current study deals with using dynamic roughness as a means of flow control over a NACA 0012 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers. Dynamic 3-D surface roughness elements on an airfoil placed near the leading edge aim at increasing the efficiency by suppressing the effects of leading edge separation like leading edge stall by delaying or totally eliminating flow separation. A numerical study of the above method has been carried out by means of a Large Eddy Simulation, a mathematical model for turbulence in Computational Fluid Dynamics, owing to the highly unsteady nature of the flow. A user defined function has been developed for the 3-D dynamic roughness element motion. Results from simulations have been compared to those from experimental PIV data. Large eddy simulations have relatively well captured the leading edge stall. For the clean cases, i.e. with the DR not actuated, the LES was able to reproduce experimental results in a reasonable fashion. However DR simulation results show that it fails to reattach the flow and suppress flow separation compared to experiments. Several novel techniques of grid design and hump creation are introduced through this study.

  5. Cascaded lattice Boltzmann method with improved forcing scheme for large-density-ratio multiphase flow at high Reynolds and Weber numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycett-Brown, Daniel; Luo, Kai H

    2016-11-01

    A recently developed forcing scheme has allowed the pseudopotential multiphase lattice Boltzmann method to correctly reproduce coexistence curves, while expanding its range to lower surface tensions and arbitrarily high density ratios [Lycett-Brown and Luo, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023305 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.91.023305]. Here, a third-order Chapman-Enskog analysis is used to extend this result from the single-relaxation-time collision operator, to a multiple-relaxation-time cascaded collision operator, whose additional relaxation rates allow a significant increase in stability. Numerical results confirm that the proposed scheme enables almost independent control of density ratio, surface tension, interface width, viscosity, and the additional relaxation rates of the cascaded collision operator. This allows simulation of large density ratio flows at simultaneously high Reynolds and Weber numbers, which is demonstrated through binary collisions of water droplets in air (with density ratio up to 1000, Reynolds number 6200 and Weber number 440). This model represents a significant improvement in multiphase flow simulation by the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann method in which real-world parameters are finally achievable.

  6. On the Required Number of Antennas in a Point-to-Point Large-but-Finite MIMO System: Outage-Limited Scenario

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2016-03-22

    This paper investigates the performance of the point-To-point multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) systems in the presence of a large but finite numbers of antennas at the transmitters and/or receivers. Considering the cases with and without hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) feedback, we determine the minimum numbers of the transmit/receive antennas, which are required to satisfy different outage probability constraints. Our results are obtained for different fading conditions and the effect of the power amplifiers efficiency/feedback error probability on the performance of the MIMO-HARQ systems is analyzed. Then, we use some recent results on the achievable rates of finite block-length codes, to analyze the effect of the codewords lengths on the system performance. Moreover, we derive closed-form expressions for the asymptotic performance of the MIMO-HARQ systems when the number of antennas increases. Our analytical and numerical results show that different outage requirements can be satisfied with relatively few transmit/receive antennas. © 1972-2012 IEEE.

  7. Long-term changes in nutrients and mussel stocks are related to numbers of breeding eiders Somateria mollissima at a large Baltic colony.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Laursen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Baltic/Wadden Sea eider Somateria mollissima flyway population is decreasing, and this trend is also reflected in the large eider colony at Christiansø situated in the Baltic Sea. This colony showed a 15-fold increase from 1925 until the mid-1990's, followed by a rapid decline in recent years, although the causes of this trend remain unknown. Most birds from the colony winter in the Wadden Sea, from which environmental data and information on the size of the main diet, the mussel Mytilus edulis stock exists. We hypothesised that changes in nutrients and water temperature in the Wadden Sea had an effect on the ecosystem affecting the size of mussel stocks, the principal food item for eiders, thereby influencing the number of breeding eider in the Christiansø colony. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: A positive relationship between the amount of fertilizer used by farmers and the concentration of phosphorus in the Wadden Sea (with a time lag of one year allowed analysis of the predictions concerning effects of nutrients for the period 1925-2010. There was (1 increasing amounts of fertilizer used in agriculture and this increased the amount of nutrients in the marine environment thereby increasing the mussel stocks in the Wadden Sea. (2 The number of eiders at Christiansø increased when the amount of fertilizer increased. Finally (3 the number of eiders in the colony at Christiansø increased with the amount of mussel stocks in the Wadden Sea. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The trend in the number of eiders at Christiansø is representative for the entire flyway population, and since nutrient reduction in the marine environment occurs in most parts of Northwest Europe, we hypothesize that this environmental candidate parameter is involved in the overall regulation of the Baltic/Wadden Sea eider population during recent decades.

  8. Aerodynamic Effects of Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade with Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Ashlie Brynn; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The high turbulence study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for ten incidence angles ranging from +15.8 to 51.0. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12105 to 2.12106 and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 0.25 - 0.4 for the low Tu tests and 8- 15 for the high Tu study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitchyaw probe located in a survey plane 7 axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At the extreme positive and negative incidence angles, the data show substantial differences in the exit flow field. These differences are attributable to both the higher inlet Tu directly and to the thinner inlet endwall

  9. Algebraic Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watase Yasushige

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides definitions and examples upon an integral element of unital commutative rings. An algebraic number is also treated as consequence of a concept of “integral”. Definitions for an integral closure, an algebraic integer and a transcendental numbers [14], [1], [10] and [7] are included as well. As an application of an algebraic number, this article includes a formal proof of a ring extension of rational number field ℚ induced by substitution of an algebraic number to the polynomial ring of ℚ[x] turns to be a field.

  10. Inhibition of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK activity provides a therapeutic approach for CLTC-ALK-positive human diffuse large B cell lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Cerchietti

    Full Text Available ALK positive diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL are a distinct lymphoma subtype associated with a poor outcome. Most of them feature a t(2;17 encoding a clathrin (CLTC-ALK fusion protein. The contribution of deregulated ALK-activity in the pathogenesis and maintenance of these DLBCLs is not yet known. We established and characterized the first CLTC-ALK positive DLBCL cell line (LM1. LM1 formed tumors in NOD-SCID mice. The selective ALK inhibitor NVP-TAE684 inhibited growth of LM1 cells in vitro at nanomolar concentrations. NVP-TAE684 repressed ALK-activated signalling pathways and induced apoptosis of LM1 DLBCL cells. Inhibition of ALK-activity resulted in sustained tumor regression in the xenotransplant tumor model. These data indicate a role of CLTC-ALK in the maintenance of the malignant phenotype thereby providing a rationale therapeutic target for these otherwise refractory tumors.

  11. A study of the effectiveness of machine learning methods for classification of clinical interview fragments into a large number of categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mehedi; Kotov, Alexander; Carcone, April; Dong, Ming; Naar, Sylvie; Hartlieb, Kathryn Brogan

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of state-of-the-art supervised machine learning methods in conjunction with different feature types for the task of automatic annotation of fragments of clinical text based on codebooks with a large number of categories. We used a collection of motivational interview transcripts consisting of 11,353 utterances, which were manually annotated by two human coders as the gold standard, and experimented with state-of-art classifiers, including Naïve Bayes, J48 Decision Tree, Support Vector Machine (SVM), Random Forest (RF), AdaBoost, DiscLDA, Conditional Random Fields (CRF) and Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) in conjunction with lexical, contextual (label of the previous utterance) and semantic (distribution of words in the utterance across the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count dictionaries) features. We found out that, when the number of classes is large, the performance of CNN and CRF is inferior to SVM. When only lexical features were used, interview transcripts were automatically annotated by SVM with the highest classification accuracy among all classifiers of 70.8%, 61% and 53.7% based on the codebooks consisting of 17, 20 and 41 codes, respectively. Using contextual and semantic features, as well as their combination, in addition to lexical ones, improved the accuracy of SVM for annotation of utterances in motivational interview transcripts with a codebook consisting of 17 classes to 71.5%, 74.2%, and 75.1%, respectively. Our results demonstrate the potential of using machine learning methods in conjunction with lexical, semantic and contextual features for automatic annotation of clinical interview transcripts with near-human accuracy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Three-Dimensional Interaction of a Large Number of Dense DEP Particles on a Plane Perpendicular to an AC Electrical Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanchuan Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of dielectrophoresis (DEP particles in an electric field has been observed in many experiments, known as the “particle chains phenomenon”. However, the study in 3D models (spherical particles is rarely reported due to its complexity and significant computational cost. In this paper, we employed the iterative dipole moment (IDM method to study the 3D interaction of a large number of dense DEP particles randomly distributed on a plane perpendicular to a uniform alternating current (AC electric field in a bounded or unbounded space. The numerical results indicated that the particles cannot move out of the initial plane. The similar particles (either all positive or all negative DEP particles always repelled each other, and did not form a chain. The dissimilar particles (a mixture of positive and negative DEP particles always attracted each other, and formed particle chains consisting of alternately arranged positive and negative DEP particles. The particle chain patterns can be randomly multitudinous depending on the initial particle distribution, the electric properties of particles/fluid, the particle sizes and the number of particles. It is also found that the particle chain patterns can be effectively manipulated via tuning the frequency of the AC field and an almost uniform distribution of particles in a bounded plane chip can be achieved when all of the particles are similar, which may have potential applications in the particle manipulation of microfluidics.

  13. CD3+/CD16+CD56+ cell numbers in peripheral blood are correlated with higher tumor burden in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Twardosz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the commonest histological type of malignant lymphoma, andremains incurable in many cases. Developing more efficient immunotherapy strategies will require betterunderstanding of the disorders of immune responses in cancer patients. NKT (natural killer-like T cells wereoriginally described as a unique population of T cells with the co-expression of NK cell markers. Apart fromtheir role in protecting against microbial pathogens and controlling autoimmune diseases, NKT cells havebeen recently revealed as one of the key players in the immune responses against tumors. The objective of thisstudy was to evaluate the frequency of CD3+/CD16+CD56+ cells in the peripheral blood of 28 diffuse largeB-cell lymphoma (DLBCL patients in correlation with clinical and laboratory parameters. Median percentagesof CD3+/CD16+CD56+ were significantly lower in patients with DLBCL compared to healthy donors(7.37% vs. 9.01%, p = 0.01; 4.60% vs. 5.81%, p = 0.03, although there were no differences in absolute counts.The frequency and the absolute numbers of CD3+/CD16+CD56+ cells were lower in advanced clinical stagesthan in earlier ones. The median percentage of CD3+/CD16+CD56+ cells in patients in Ann Arbor stages 1–2 was5.55% vs. 3.15% in stages 3–4 (p = 0.02, with median absolute counts respectively 0.26 G/L vs. 0.41 G/L (p == 0.02. The percentage and absolute numbers of CD3+/CD16+CD56+ cells were significantly higher in DL-BCL patients without B-symptoms compared to the patients with B-symptoms, (5.51% vs. 2.46%, p = 0.04;0.21 G/L vs. 0.44 G/L, p = 0.04. The percentage of CD3+/CD16+CD56+ cells correlated adversely with serumlactate dehydrogenase (R= –445; p < 0.05 which might influence NKT count. These figures suggest a relationshipbetween higher tumor burden and more aggressive disease and decreased NKT numbers. But it remains tobe explained whether low NKT cell counts in the peripheral blood of patients with DLBCL are the result

  14. Combining the formative with the summative: the development of a two-stage online test to encourage engagement and provide personal feedback in large classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Voelkel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this action research project was to improve student learning by encouraging more “time on task” and to improve self-assessment and feedback through the introduction of weekly online tests in a Year 2 lecture module in biological sciences. Initially voluntary online tests were offered to students and those who participated achieved higher exam marks than those who did not, but completion rate was low. Making the tests compulsory led to high completion rates, but class performance decreased, indicating that using the same assessment for formative and for summative purposes is not always beneficial for learning. Finally, these problems were resolved by introducing a two-stage approach: the first stage of each test was formative and provided prompt feedback. However, students had to achieve 80% to progress to the second summative stage of the test. The two-stage online tests led to significantly improved class performance. This novel test design ensures that students go through at least two attempts and therefore fully benefit from the learning opportunities presented by the formative stage. Two-stage online tests present the opportunity to provide regular feedback in large classes and to improve performance not only of good but also of “weak” students.

  15. LigoDV-web: Providing easy, secure and universal access to a large distributed scientific data store for the LIGO scientific collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areeda, J. S.; Smith, J. R.; Lundgren, A. P.; Maros, E.; Macleod, D. M.; Zweizig, J.

    2017-01-01

    Gravitational-wave observatories around the world, including the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), record a large volume of gravitational-wave output data and auxiliary data about the instruments and their environments. These data are stored at the observatory sites and distributed to computing clusters for data analysis. LigoDV-web is a web-based data viewer that provides access to data recorded at the LIGO Hanford, LIGO Livingston and GEO600 observatories, and the 40 m prototype interferometer at Caltech. The challenge addressed by this project is to provide meaningful visualizations of small data sets to anyone in the collaboration in a fast, secure and reliable manner with minimal software, hardware and training required of the end users. LigoDV-web is implemented as a Java Enterprise Application, with Shibboleth Single Sign On for authentication and authorization, and a proprietary network protocol used for data access on the back end. Collaboration members with proper credentials can request data be displayed in any of several general formats from any Internet appliance that supports a modern browser with Javascript and minimal HTML5 support, including personal computers, smartphones, and tablets. Since its inception in 2012, 634 unique users have visited the LigoDV-web website in a total of 33 , 861 sessions and generated a total of 139 , 875 plots. This infrastructure has been helpful in many analyses within the collaboration including follow-up of the data surrounding the first gravitational-wave events observed by LIGO in 2015.

  16. Utilization Management of High-Cost Imaging in an Outpatient Setting in a Large Stable Patient and Provider Cohort over 7 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilburg, Jeffrey B; Sistrom, Christopher L; Rosenthal, Daniel I; Stout, Markus B; Dreyer, Keith J; Rockett, Helaine R; Baron, Jason M; Ferris, Timothy G; Thrall, James H

    2017-09-01

    Purpose To quantify the effect of a comprehensive, long-term, provider-led utilization management (UM) program on high-cost imaging (computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear imaging, and positron emission tomography) performed on an outpatient basis. Materials and Methods This retrospective, 7-year cohort study included all patients regularly seen by primary care physicians (PCPs) at an urban academic medical center. The main outcome was the number of outpatient high-cost imaging examinations per patient per year ordered by the patient's PCP or by any specialist. The authors determined the probability of a patient undergoing any high-cost imaging procedure during a study year and the number of examinations per patient per year (intensity) in patients who underwent high-cost imaging. Risk-adjusted hierarchical models were used to directly quantify the physician component of variation in probability and intensity of high-cost imaging use, and clinicians were provided with regular comparative feedback on the basis of the results. Observed trends in high-cost imaging use and provider variation were compared with the same measures for outpatient laboratory studies because laboratory use was not subject to UM during this period. Finally, per-member per-year high-cost imaging use data were compared with statewide high-cost imaging use data from a major private payer on the basis of the same claim set. Results The patient cohort steadily increased in size from 88 959 in 2007 to 109 823 in 2013. Overall high-cost imaging utilization went from 0.43 examinations per year in 2007 to 0.34 examinations per year in 2013, a decrease of 21.33% (P < .0001). At the same time, similarly adjusted routine laboratory study utilization decreased by less than half that rate (9.4%, P < .0001). On the basis of unadjusted data, outpatient high-cost imaging utilization in this cohort decreased 28%, compared with a 20% decrease in statewide utilization (P = .0023). Conclusion

  17. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT provides powerful prognostic stratification in the primary staging of large breast cancer when compared with conventional explorations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, Alexandre [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dijon Cedex (France); Le2i UMR CNRS 6306, Dijon (France); Dygai-Cochet, Inna; Riedinger, Jean-Marc; Berriolo-Riedinger, Alina; Toubeau, Michel [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dijon Cedex (France); Humbert, Olivier; Brunotte, Francois [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dijon Cedex (France); Le2i UMR CNRS 6306, Dijon (France); CHU Dijon, MRI and Spectroscopy Unit, Dijon (France); Guiu, Severine; Coudert, Bruno [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Oncology, Dijon (France); Coutant, Charles; Fumoleau, Pierre [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Surgery, Dijon (France)

    2014-03-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact on management and the prognostic value of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT for initial staging of newly diagnosed large breast cancer (BC) when compared with conventional staging. We prospectively included 142 patients with newly diagnosed BC and at least grade T2 tumour. All patients were evaluated with complete conventional imaging (CI) procedures (mammogram and/or breast ultrasound, bone scan, abdominal ultrasound and/or CT, X-rays and/or CT of the chest), followed by FDG PET/CT exploration, prior to treatment. The treatment plan based on CI staging was compared with that based on PET/CT findings. CI and PET/CT findings were confirmed by imaging and clinical follow-up and/or pathology when assessable. Progression-free survival (PFS) was analysed using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. According to CI staging, 79 patients (56 %) were stage II, 46 (32 %) stage III and 17 (12 %) stage IV (distant metastases). Of the patients, 30 (21 %) were upstaged by PET/CT, including 12 (8 %) from stage II or III to stage IV. On the other hand, 23 patients (16 %) were downstaged by PET/CT, including 4 (3 %) from stage IV to stage II or III. PET/CT had a high or medium impact on management planning for 18 patients (13 %). Median follow-up was 30 months (range 9-59 months); 37 patients (26 %) experienced recurrence or progression of disease during follow-up and 17 patients (12 %) died. The Cox model indicated that CI staging was significantly associated with PFS (p = 0.01), but PET/CT staging provided stronger prognostic stratification (p < 0.0001). Moreover, Cox regression multivariate analysis showed that only PET/CT staging remained associated with PFS (p < 0.0001). FDG PET/CT provides staging information that more accurately stratifies prognostic risk in newly diagnosed large BC when compared with conventional explorations alone. (orig.)

  18. QUIESCENT GALAXIES IN THE 3D-HST SURVEY: SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF A LARGE NUMBER OF GALAXIES WITH RELATIVELY OLD STELLAR POPULATIONS AT z {approx} 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitaker, Katherine E. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Skelton, Rosalind; Nelson, Erica J. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon G. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Kriek, Mariska [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lundgren, Britt F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Rix, Hans-Walter, E-mail: kate.whitaker@nasa.gov [Max Planck Institut fur Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-06-20

    Quiescent galaxies at z {approx} 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 < z < 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to H{beta} ({lambda}4861 A), we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band ({lambda}4304 A), Mg I ({lambda}5175 A), and Na I ({lambda}5894 A). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was {approx}3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3{sup +0.1}{sub -0.3} Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80% of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6{sup +0.5}{sub -0.4} Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9{sup +0.2}{sub -0.1} Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O III] and H{beta} emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with L{sub OIII}=1.7{+-}0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  19. Quiescent Galaxies in the 3D-HST Survey: Spectroscopic Confirmation of a Large Number of Galaxies With Relatively Old Stellar Populations at z Approx. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tease, Katherine Whitaker; vanDokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind; Franx, Marijin; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt F.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent galaxies at z approx. 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 grism survey. In addition to H (4861 ),we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band (4304 ),Mgi (5175 ), and Na i (5894 ). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was approx. 3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3+0.10.3 Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80 of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6+0.50.4 Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9+0.20.1 Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O iii] and H emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with LOiii = 1.7+/- 0.3 x 10(exp 40) erg/s, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  20. Effects of a large number of cycles on pile shaft resistance analyzed at the grain scale using x-ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doreau-Malioche, Jeanne; Combe, Gaël; Toni, Jean-Benoît; Viggiani, Gioacchino

    2017-06-01

    This study presents the results of laboratory-scale cyclic loading tests performed on an instrumented pile in sand using x-ray micro tomography and three-dimensional (3D) image analysis techniques. The macroscopic behaviour of sand-pile interface shows a two-phases evolution during cycles with a non negligible increase of shaft friction in the second phase. A discrete version of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is employed to analyze quantitatively the mechanisms occurring at the grain scale. Using segmented images this method is able to correlate and follow each grain individually between two configurations. Displacement fields are measured and compared for different amounts of cycles. Grain breakage and density evolution are investigated using grey level measurements. The results provide a better understanding of the phenomena observed at the macroscale for a high number of load cycles.

  1. A modification to linearized theory for prediction of pressure loadings on lifting surfaces at high supersonic Mach numbers and large angles of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    A new linearized-theory pressure-coefficient formulation was studied. The new formulation is intended to provide more accurate estimates of detailed pressure loadings for improved stability analysis and for analysis of critical structural design conditions. The approach is based on the use of oblique-shock and Prandtl-Meyer expansion relationships for accurate representation of the variation of pressures with surface slopes in two-dimensional flow and linearized-theory perturbation velocities for evaluation of local three-dimensional aerodynamic interference effects. The applicability and limitations of the modification to linearized theory are illustrated through comparisons with experimental pressure distributions for delta wings covering a Mach number range from 1.45 to 4.60 and angles of attack from 0 to 25 degrees.

  2. Correlation between the structural and cathodoluminescence properties in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells with large number of quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Degang, E-mail: dgzhao@red.semi.ac.cn; Jiang, Desheng; Chen, Ping; Zhu, Jianjun; Liu, Zongshun; Le, Lingcong; He, Xiaoguang; Li, Xiaojing [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO BOX 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Hui; Yang, Hui [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215123 (China); Jahn, Uwe [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5–7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-09-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) characteristics on 30-period InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) solar cell structures are investigated, revealing the relationship between optical and structural properties of the MQW structures with a large number of quantum wells. In the bottom MQW layers, a blueshift of CL peak along the growth direction is found and attributed to the decrease of indium content due to the compositional pulling effect. An obvious split of emission peak and a redshift of the main emission energy are found in the top MQW layers when the MQW grows above the critical layer thickness. They are attributed to the segregation of In-rich InGaN clusters rather than the increase of indium content in quantum well layer. The MQW structure is identified to consist of two regions: a strained one in the bottom, where the indium content is gradually decreased, and a partly relaxed one in the top with segregated In-rich InGaN clusters.

  3. The application of the central limit theorem and the law of large numbers to facial soft tissue depths: T-Table robustness and trends since 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Carl N

    2014-03-01

    By pooling independent study means (x¯), the T-Tables use the central limit theorem and law of large numbers to average out study-specific sampling bias and instrument errors and, in turn, triangulate upon human population means (μ). Since their first publication in 2008, new data from >2660 adults have been collected (c.30% of the original sample) making a review of the T-Table's robustness timely. Updated grand means show that the new data have negligible impact on the previously published statistics: maximum change = 1.7 mm at gonion; and ≤1 mm at 93% of all landmarks measured. This confirms the utility of the 2008 T-Table as a proxy to soft tissue depth population means and, together with updated sample sizes (8851 individuals at pogonion), earmarks the 2013 T-Table as the premier mean facial soft tissue depth standard for craniofacial identification casework. The utility of the T-Table, in comparison with shorths and 75-shormaxes, is also discussed. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. MISSEL: a method to identify a large number of small species-specific genomic subsequences and its application to viruses classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiscon, Giulia; Weitschek, Emanuel; Cella, Eleonora; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Giovanetti, Marta; Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Ciotti, Marco; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Pierangeli, Alessandra; Bertolazzi, Paola; Felici, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Continuous improvements in next generation sequencing technologies led to ever-increasing collections of genomic sequences, which have not been easily characterized by biologists, and whose analysis requires huge computational effort. The classification of species emerged as one of the main applications of DNA analysis and has been addressed with several approaches, e.g., multiple alignments-, phylogenetic trees-, statistical- and character-based methods. We propose a supervised method based on a genetic algorithm to identify small genomic subsequences that discriminate among different species. The method identifies multiple subsequences of bounded length with the same information power in a given genomic region. The algorithm has been successfully evaluated through its integration into a rule-based classification framework and applied to three different biological data sets: Influenza, Polyoma, and Rhino virus sequences. We discover a large number of small subsequences that can be used to identify each virus type with high accuracy and low computational time, and moreover help to characterize different genomic regions. Bounding their length to 20, our method found 1164 characterizing subsequences for all the Influenza virus subtypes, 194 for all the Polyoma viruses, and 11 for Rhino viruses. The abundance of small separating subsequences extracted for each genomic region may be an important support for quick and robust virus identification. Finally, useful biological information can be derived by the relative location and abundance of such subsequences along the different regions.

  5. Why choose Random Forest to predict rare species distribution with few samples in large undersampled areas? Three Asian crane species models provide supporting evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunrong Mi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution models (SDMs have become an essential tool in ecology, biogeography, evolution and, more recently, in conservation biology. How to generalize species distributions in large undersampled areas, especially with few samples, is a fundamental issue of SDMs. In order to explore this issue, we used the best available presence records for the Hooded Crane (Grus monacha, n = 33, White-naped Crane (Grus vipio, n = 40, and Black-necked Crane (Grus nigricollis, n = 75 in China as three case studies, employing four powerful and commonly used machine learning algorithms to map the breeding distributions of the three species: TreeNet (Stochastic Gradient Boosting, Boosted Regression Tree Model, Random Forest, CART (Classification and Regression Tree and Maxent (Maximum Entropy Models. In addition, we developed an ensemble forecast by averaging predicted probability of the above four models results. Commonly used model performance metrics (Area under ROC (AUC and true skill statistic (TSS were employed to evaluate model accuracy. The latest satellite tracking data and compiled literature data were used as two independent testing datasets to confront model predictions. We found Random Forest demonstrated the best performance for the most assessment method, provided a better model fit to the testing data, and achieved better species range maps for each crane species in undersampled areas. Random Forest has been generally available for more than 20 years and has been known to perform extremely well in ecological predictions. However, while increasingly on the rise, its potential is still widely underused in conservation, (spatial ecological applications and for inference. Our results show that it informs ecological and biogeographical theories as well as being suitable for conservation applications, specifically when the study area is undersampled. This method helps to save model-selection time and effort, and allows robust and rapid

  6. Analysis of the latitudinal variability of tropospheric ozone in the Arctic using the large number of aircraft and ozonesonde observations in early summer 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancellet, Gerard; Daskalakis, Nikos; Raut, Jean Christophe; Tarasick, David; Hair, Jonathan; Quennehen, Boris; Ravetta, François; Schlager, Hans; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Thompson, Anne M.; Johnson, Bryan; Thomas, Jennie L.; Law, Katharine S.

    2016-10-01

    During the 2008 International Polar Year, the POLARCAT (Polar Study using Aircraft, Remote Sensing, Surface Measurements, and Models of Climate Chemistry, Aerosols, and Transport) campaign, conducted in summer over Greenland and Canada, produced a large number of measurements from three aircraft and seven ozonesonde stations. Here we present an observation-integrated analysis based on three different types of O3 measurements: airborne lidar, airborne UV absorption or chemiluminescence measurement, and intensified electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesonde profiles. Discussion of the latitudinal and vertical variability of tropospheric ozone north of 55° N during this period is performed with the aid of a regional model (WFR-Chem). The model is able to reproduce the O3 latitudinal and vertical variability but with a negative O3 bias of 6-15 ppbv in the free troposphere above 4 km, especially over Canada. For Canada, large average CO concentrations in the free troposphere above 4 km ( > 130 ppbv) and the weak correlation ( 40 %) and the higher values of the 75th PV percentile. It is related to the persistence of cyclonic activity during the summer over Baffin Bay. Using differences between average concentration above Northern and Southern Canada, a weak negative latitudinal summer ozone gradient of -6 to -8 ppbv is found in the mid-troposphere between 4 and 8 km. This is attributed to an efficient O3 photochemical production from BB emissions at latitudes less than 65° N, while the STE contribution is more homogeneous in the latitude range 55-70° N. A positive ozone latitudinal gradient of 12 ppbv is observed in the same altitude range over Greenland not because of an increasing latitudinal influence of STE, but because of different long-range transport from multiple mid-latitude sources (North America, Europe, and even Asia for latitudes higher than 77° N). For the Arctic latitudes (> 80° N), free tropospheric O3 concentrations during summer 2008 are

  7. Number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, George E

    1994-01-01

    Although mathematics majors are usually conversant with number theory by the time they have completed a course in abstract algebra, other undergraduates, especially those in education and the liberal arts, often need a more basic introduction to the topic.In this book the author solves the problem of maintaining the interest of students at both levels by offering a combinatorial approach to elementary number theory. In studying number theory from such a perspective, mathematics majors are spared repetition and provided with new insights, while other students benefit from the consequent simpl

  8. The Price per Prospective Consumer of Providing Therapist Training and Consultation in Seven Evidence-Based Treatments within a Large Public Behavioral Health System: An Example Cost-Analysis Metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsie H. Okamura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivePublic-sector behavioral health systems seeking to implement evidence-based treatments (EBTs may face challenges selecting EBTs given their limited resources. This study describes and illustrates one method to calculate cost related to training and consultation to assist system-level decisions about which EBTs to select.MethodsTraining, consultation, and indirect labor costs were calculated for seven commonly implemented EBTs. Using extant literature, we then estimated the diagnoses and populations for which each EBT was indicated. Diagnostic and demographic information from Medicaid claims data were obtained from a large behavioral health payer organization and used to estimate the number of covered people with whom the EBT could be used and to calculate implementation-associated costs per consumer.ResultsFindings suggest substantial cost to therapists and service systems related to EBT training and consultation. Training and consultation costs varied by EBT, from Dialectical Behavior Therapy at $238.07 to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy at $0.18 per potential consumer served. Total cost did not correspond with the number of prospective consumers served by an EBT.ConclusionA cost-metric that accounts for the prospective recipients of a given EBT within a given population may provide insight into how systems should prioritize training efforts. Future policy should consider the financial burden of EBT implementation in relation to the context of the population being served and begin a dialog in creating incentives for EBT use.

  9. SVA retrotransposon insertion-associated deletion represents a novel mutational mechanism underlying large genomic copy number changes with non-recurrent breakpoints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vogt (Julia); K. Bengesser (Kathrin); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); K. Wimmer (Katharina); V.-F. Mautner (Victor-Felix); R. van Minkelen (Rick); E. Legius (Eric); H. Brems (Hilde); M. Upadhyaya (Meena); J. Högel (Josef); C. Lazaro (Conxi); T. Rosenbaum (Thorsten); S. Bammert (Simone); L. Messiaen (Ludwine); D.N. Cooper (David); H. Kehrer-Sawatzki (Hildegard)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Genomic disorders are caused by copy number changes that may exhibit recurrent breakpoints processed by nonallelic homologous recombination. However, region-specific disease-associated copy number changes have also been observed which exhibit non-recurrent breakpoints. The

  10. Genome-wide detection of loss of heterozygosity and copy number variation in a human lung large cell carcinoma cell line by affymetrix single-nucleotide polymorphism array 500K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin HU

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Loss of heterozygosity (LOH and Copy number copy number variation (CNV of DNA sequences is a common feature of cancer genomes, which is thought to be linked to tumorigenesis and progression. High-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping array are able to provided a genotype and copy number information with genome-wide coverage, which is suitable for the analysis of complex genetic alterations present in cancer. Thus a human lung large cell carcinoma cell line NL9980 was assayed for the global profile of LOH and CNV. Methods Genomic DNA from the cell line was screened for LOH and CNV using Affymetrix GeneChip® Human Mapping array 500K Set. The hybridization intensity data of 500 000 SNP loci was analyzed using Affymetrix proprietary software for genotyping and copy number of each locus, and a genome-wide map of LOH and CNV of the cell line was constructed. Results The SNP call rate of array Nsp I (-262K was 95.14%, and the rate of Sty I (-238K was 97.15%. The both call rates of the components of 500K array set were in excess of 93%, the cardinal quality control standard. LOH profiles of the sample were across all chromosomes, and most of CN gains and losses regions were found on chromosomes such as 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 11, and 18. Conclusion The results have shown that there were complex genetic alterations present in NL9980. And it is possible to achieve high performance outcomes using Affymetrix SNP array 500K to interrogate LOH and CNV in lung cancer genome. This advance of high-resolution with allelic information should substantially improve the ability to further understanding of the genetic basis of lung cancers.

  11. Funny Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore M. Porter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The struggle over cure rate measures in nineteenth-century asylums provides an exemplary instance of how, when used for official assessments of institutions, these numbers become sites of contestation. The evasion of goals and corruption of measures tends to make these numbers “funny” in the sense of becoming dis-honest, while the mismatch between boring, technical appearances and cunning backstage manipulations supplies dark humor. The dangers are evident in recent efforts to decentralize the functions of governments and corporations using incen-tives based on quantified targets.

  12. Nice numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, John

    2016-01-01

    In this intriguing book, John Barnes takes us on a journey through aspects of numbers much as he took us on a geometrical journey in Gems of Geometry. Similarly originating from a series of lectures for adult students at Reading and Oxford University, this book touches a variety of amusing and fascinating topics regarding numbers and their uses both ancient and modern. The author intrigues and challenges his audience with both fundamental number topics such as prime numbers and cryptography, and themes of daily needs and pleasures such as counting one's assets, keeping track of time, and enjoying music. Puzzles and exercises at the end of each lecture offer additional inspiration, and numerous illustrations accompany the reader. Furthermore, a number of appendices provides in-depth insights into diverse topics such as Pascal’s triangle, the Rubik cube, Mersenne’s curious keyboards, and many others. A theme running through is the thought of what is our favourite number. Written in an engaging and witty sty...

  13. Exploring Cumulates in Small, Shallow Parts of a Large Mafic Magma System to Provide Baseline Models for Crystallization in Larger Intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srogi, L.; Willis, K. V.; Lutz, T. M.; Plank, T. A.; Pollock, M.; Connolly, B.; Wood, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Small, shallow portions of large magmatic systems cool more rapidly and potentially have less subsolidus overprinting than large mafic intrusions, but it is unclear whether they are small-scale analogs for the same crystallization processes. The Morgantown-Jacksonwald magmatic system (MJS), western Newark Basin, Pennsylvania, is part of the 201-Ma Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) formed during Pangean rifting. The MJS consists of several interconnected intrusions exposed in cross-section from the Jacksonwald basalt at the paleosurface to 6 km depth (variably LREE-enriched rims; some negative Eu anomalies. REE patterns calculated for liquids in equilibrium with opx using published Kd values are roughly parallel to but significantly higher than REE in host chill margin diabase. CSDs of opx and matrix plagioclase from several samples within 10m of the basal contact will be used to evaluate models of crystal growth vs. mechanical sorting. Modes and mineral compositions are not consistent with MELTS fractionation models: opx crystallizes in place of pigeonite; pyroxenes are zoned in Ca not Fe-Mg; late-crystallizing quartz and K-feldspar are lacking. These features suggest crystallization buffered by earlier phases in the crystal mush with some melt migration, similar to processes that produce more extreme layering in large mafic intrusions.

  14. Dogs Have the Most Neurons, Though Not the Largest Brain: Trade-Off between Body Mass and Number of Neurons in the Cerebral Cortex of Large Carnivoran Species

    OpenAIRE

    Débora Jardim-Messeder; Kelly Lambert; Stephen Noctor; Fernanda M. Pestana; Maria E. de Castro Leal; Mads F. Bertelsen; Abdulaziz N. Alagaili; Osama B. Mohammad; Paul R. Manger; Suzana Herculano-Houzel; Suzana Herculano-Houzel; Suzana Herculano-Houzel

    2017-01-01

    Carnivorans are a diverse group of mammals that includes carnivorous, omnivorous and herbivorous, domesticated and wild species, with a large range of brain sizes. Carnivory is one of several factors expected to be cognitively demanding for carnivorans due to a requirement to outsmart larger prey. On the other hand, large carnivoran species have high hunting costs and unreliable feeding patterns, which, given the high metabolic cost of brain neurons, might put them at risk of metabolic constr...

  15. The Use of Corticosteroids as Adjuvant Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases: A Large Cross-Sectional Survey of Palliative Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Patrick; Arnold, Robert; Bull, Janet; Cicero, Brandon

    2018-01-01

    Bone metastases are a common complication in patients with advanced cancer but little is known regarding current practice patterns of palliative care providers when prescribing corticosteroids as adjuvant therapy for painful bone metastases. To identify current practice patterns among palliative care providers when prescribing corticosteroids for the treatment of painful bone metastases. A cross-sectional, online survey of the membership of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Providers were asked to report how frequently they prescribed corticosteroids as adjuvant therapy in patients with painful bone metastases, and to specify the corticosteroid, dosage, treatment duration, and the gastroprotective strategy most frequently utilized. Seven hundred sixty-five participants responded to the survey and 600 (78%) of respondents completed the survey. Ninety-eight percent of respondents completing the survey reported having prescribed corticosteroids as adjuvant pain therapy, and 66% ordered corticosteroids for the majority of their patients with painful bone metastases. Dexamethasone was the most widely prescribed corticosteroid. Eight milligrams divided twice daily was the most common dosage selected and once started, it was usually continued indefinitely. Corticosteroids are commonly prescribed as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of painful bone metastases in patients with limited life expectancy. Dexamethasone is the most commonly selected corticosteroid by American palliative care providers with variation existing among providers regarding dosing schedule, treatment duration, and gastroprotective strategies. Clinical trials comparing a total daily dose of four versus eight milligrams of dexamethasone would be clinically useful to inform evidence-based practice.

  16. Identification of Two Subgroups of Type I IFNs in Perciforme Fish Large Yellow Croaker Larimichthys crocea Provides Novel Insights into Function and Regulation of Fish Type I IFNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ding

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Like mammals, fish possess an interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3/IRF7-dependent type I IFN responses, but the exact mechanism by which IRF3/IRF7 regulate the type I IFNs remains largely unknown. In this study, we identified two type I IFNs in the Perciforme fish large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea, one of which belongs to the fish IFNd subgroup, and the other is assigned to a novel subgroup of group I IFNs in fish, tentatively termed IFNh. The two IFN genes are constitutively expressed in all examined tissues, but with varied expression levels. Both IFN genes can be rapidly induced in head kidney and spleen tissues by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid. The recombinant IFNh was shown to be more potent to trigger a rapid induction of the antiviral genes MxA and PKR than the IFNd, suggesting that they may play distinct roles in regulating early antiviral immunity. Strikingly, IFNd, but not IFNh, could induce the gene expression of itself and IFNh through a positive feedback loop mediated by the IFNd-dependent activation of IRF3 and IRF7. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that the induction of IFNd can be enhanced by the dimeric formation of IRF3 and IRF7, while the IFNh expression mainly involves IRF3. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the IFN responses are diverse in fish and are likely to be regulated by distinct mechanisms.

  17. Do we really need a large number of particles to simulate bimolecular reactive transport with random walk methods? A kernel density estimation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbaralam, Maryam; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Random walk particle tracking methods are a computationally efficient family of methods to solve reactive transport problems. While the number of particles in most realistic applications is in the order of 106-109, the number of reactive molecules even in diluted systems might be in the order of fractions of the Avogadro number. Thus, each particle actually represents a group of potentially reactive molecules. The use of a low number of particles may result not only in loss of accuracy, but also may lead to an improper reproduction of the mixing process, limited by diffusion. Recent works have used this effect as a proxy to model incomplete mixing in porous media. In this work, we propose using a Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) of the concentrations that allows getting the expected results for a well-mixed solution with a limited number of particles. The idea consists of treating each particle as a sample drawn from the pool of molecules that it represents; this way, the actual location of a tracked particle is seen as a sample drawn from the density function of the location of molecules represented by that given particle, rigorously represented by a kernel density function. The probability of reaction can be obtained by combining the kernels associated to two potentially reactive particles. We demonstrate that the observed deviation in the reaction vs time curves in numerical experiments reported in the literature could be attributed to the statistical method used to reconstruct concentrations (fixed particle support) from discrete particle distributions, and not to the occurrence of true incomplete mixing. We further explore the evolution of the kernel size with time, linking it to the diffusion process. Our results show that KDEs are powerful tools to improve computational efficiency and robustness in reactive transport simulations, and indicates that incomplete mixing in diluted systems should be modeled based on alternative mechanistic models and not on a

  18. Forty-Five-Year Mortality Rate as a Function of the Number and Type of Psychiatric Diagnoses Found in a Large Danish Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madarasz, Wendy; Manzardo, Ann; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2012-01-01

    diagnostic categories. Mortality rates were examined as a function of number and type of co-occurring diagnoses. Results: Psychiatric outcomes for 1247 subjects were associated with 157 deaths. Early mortality risk in psychiatric patients correlated with the number of diagnostic categories (Wald ¿² = 25.......0, df = 1, P anxiety and personality disorders, but not for schizophrenia and substance abuse, which had intrinsically high mortality rates with no comorbidities. Conclusions: Risk of early mortality among psychiatric patients appears to be a function of both...

  19. Forty-Five-Year Mortality Rate as a Function of the Number and Type of Psychiatric Diagnoses Found in a Large Danish Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madarasz, Wendy; Manzardo, Ann; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2012-01-01

    diagnostic categories. Mortality rates were examined as a function of number and type of co-occurring diagnoses. Results: Psychiatric outcomes for 1247 subjects were associated with 157 deaths. Early mortality risk in psychiatric patients correlated with the number of diagnostic categories (Wald χ² = 25.......0, df = 1, P anxiety and personality disorders, but not for schizophrenia and substance abuse, which had intrinsically high mortality rates with no comorbidities. Conclusions: Risk of early mortality among psychiatric patients appears to be a function of both...

  20. Large-scale studies of the HphI insulin gene variable-number-of-tandem-repeats polymorphism in relation to Type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S K; Gjesing, A P; Rasmussen, S K

    2004-01-01

    The class III allele of the variable-number-of-tandem-repeats polymorphism located 5' of the insulin gene (INS-VNTR) has been associated with Type 2 diabetes and altered birthweight. It has also been suggested, although inconsistently, that the class III allele plays a role in glucose-induced ins......The class III allele of the variable-number-of-tandem-repeats polymorphism located 5' of the insulin gene (INS-VNTR) has been associated with Type 2 diabetes and altered birthweight. It has also been suggested, although inconsistently, that the class III allele plays a role in glucose...

  1. Analysis of the Latitudinal Variability of Tropospheric Ozone in the Arctic Using the Large Number of Aircraft and Ozonesonde Observations in Early Summer 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancellet, Gerard; Daskalakis, Nikos; Raut, Jean Christophe; Quennehen, Boris; Ravetta, Francois; Hair, Jonathan; Tarasick, David; Schlager, Hans; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Thompson, Anne M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the paper are to: (1) present tropospheric ozone (O3) climatologies in summer 2008 based on a large amount of measurements, during the International Polar Year when the Polar Study using Aircraft, Remote Sensing, Surface Measurements, and Models of Climate Chemistry, Aerosols, and Transport (POLARCAT) campaigns were conducted (2) investigate the processes that determine O3 concentrations in two different regions (Canada and Greenland) that were thoroughly studied using measurements from 3 aircraft and 7 ozonesonde stations. This paper provides an integrated analysis of these observations and the discussion of the latitudinal and vertical variability of tropospheric ozone north of 55oN during this period is performed using a regional model (WFR-Chem). Ozone, CO and potential vorticity (PV) distributions are extracted from the simulation at the measurement locations. The model is able to reproduce the O3 latitudinal and vertical variability but a negative O3 bias of 6-15 ppbv is found in the free troposphere over 4 km, especially over Canada. Ozone average concentrations are of the order of 65 ppbv at altitudes above 4 km both over Canada and Greenland, while they are less than 50 ppbv in the lower troposphere. The relative influence of stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) and of ozone production related to the local biomass burning (BB) emissions is discussed using differences between average values of O3, CO and PV for Southern and Northern Canada or Greenland and two vertical ranges in the troposphere: 0-4 km and 4-8 km. For Canada, the model CO distribution and the weak correlation (less than 30%) of O3 and PV suggests that stratosphere troposphere exchange (STE) is not the major contribution to average tropospheric ozone at latitudes less than 70 deg N, due to the fact that local biomass burning (BB) emissions were significant during the 2008 summer period. Conversely over Greenland, significant STE is found according to the better O3 versus PV

  2. Aspergillus niger genome-wide analysis reveals a large number of novel alpha-glucan acting enzymes with unexpected expression profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, X.-L.; Kaaij, R.M. van der; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.; Maarel, M.J.E.C. van der; Dijkhuizen, L.; Ram, A.F.J.

    2008-01-01

    The filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus niger is well known for its ability to produce a large variety of enzymes for the degradation of plant polysaccharide material. A major carbon and energy source for this soil fungus is starch, which can be degraded by the concerted action of α-amylase,

  3. A large increase of sour taste receptor cells in Skn-1-deficient mice does not alter the number of their sour taste signal-transmitting gustatory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Naohiro; Narukawa, Masataka; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Yamamoto, Kurumi; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko

    2017-05-01

    The connections between taste receptor cells (TRCs) and innervating gustatory neurons are formed in a mutually dependent manner during development. To investigate whether a change in the ratio of cell types that compose taste buds influences the number of innervating gustatory neurons, we analyzed the proportion of gustatory neurons that transmit sour taste signals in adult Skn-1a -/- mice in which the number of sour TRCs is greatly increased. We generated polycystic kidney disease 1 like 3-wheat germ agglutinin (pkd1l3-WGA)/Skn-1a +/+ and pkd1l3-WGA/Skn-1a -/- mice by crossing Skn-1a -/- mice and pkd1l3-WGA transgenic mice, in which neural pathways of sour taste signals can be visualized. The number of WGA-positive cells in the circumvallate papillae is 3-fold higher in taste buds of pkd1l3-WGA/Skn-1a -/- mice relative to pkd1l3-WGA/Skn-1a +/+ mice. Intriguingly, the ratio of WGA-positive neurons to P2X 2 -expressing gustatory neurons in nodose/petrosal ganglia was similar between pkd1l3-WGA/Skn-1a +/+ and pkd1l3-WGA/Skn-1a -/- mice. In conclusion, an alteration in the ratio of cell types that compose taste buds does not influence the number of gustatory neurons that transmit sour taste signals. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Testosterone levels and their associations with lifetime number of opposite sex partners and remarriage in a large sample of American elderly men and women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollet, Thomas V.; van der Meij, Leander; Cobey, Kelly D.; Buunk, Abraham P.

    Testosterone (T) has been argued to modulate mating and parenting behavior in many species, including humans. The role of T for these behaviors has been framed as the challenge hypothesis. Following this hypothesis, T should be positively associated with the number of opposite sex partners a male

  5. Taurus II Stage Test Simulations: Using Large-Scale CFD Simulations to Provide Critical Insight into Plume Induced Environments During Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzenberg, L. L.; West, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the use of targeted Loci/CHEM CFD simulations to evaluate the effects of a dual-engine first-stage hot-fire test on an evolving integrated launch pad/test article design. This effort was undertaken as a part of the NESC Independent Assessment of the Taurus II Stage Test Series. The underlying conceptual model included development of a series of computational models and simulations to analyze the plume induced environments on the pad, facility structures and test article. A pathfinder simulation was first developed, capable of providing quick-turn around evaluation of plume impingement pressures on the flame deflector. Results from this simulation were available in time to provide data for an ongoing structural assessment of the deflector. The resulting recommendation was available in a timely manner and was incorporated into construction schedule for the new launch stand under construction at Wallops Flight Facility. A series of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) quasi-steady simulations representative of various key elements of the test profile was performed to identify potential concerns with the test configuration and test profile. As required, unsteady Hybrid-RANS/LES simulations were performed, to provide additional insight into critical aspects of the test sequence. Modifications to the test-specific hardware and facility structures thermal protection as well as modifications to the planned hot-fire test profile were implemented based on these simulation results.

  6. Large-scale microfluidics providing high-resolution and high-throughput screening of Caenorhabditis elegans poly-glutamine aggregation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sudip; Hegarty, Evan; Martin, Chris; Gökçe, Sertan Kutal; Ghorashian, Navid; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2016-10-01

    Next generation drug screening could benefit greatly from in vivo studies, using small animal models such as Caenorhabditis elegans for hit identification and lead optimization. Current in vivo assays can operate either at low throughput with high resolution or with low resolution at high throughput. To enable both high-throughput and high-resolution imaging of C. elegans, we developed an automated microfluidic platform. This platform can image 15 z-stacks of ~4,000 C. elegans from 96 different populations using a large-scale chip with a micron resolution in 16 min. Using this platform, we screened ~100,000 animals of the poly-glutamine aggregation model on 25 chips. We tested the efficacy of ~1,000 FDA-approved drugs in improving the aggregation phenotype of the model and identified four confirmed hits. This robust platform now enables high-content screening of various C. elegans disease models at the speed and cost of in vitro cell-based assays.

  7. Potential dynamic range in a scheme of the acousto-optical spectrometer providing light beam apodization for a large-aperture crystalline cell with linear acoustic losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Alexandre S.; Luna Castellanos, Abraham; Tepichin Rodriguez, Eduardo; Balderas Mata, Sandra E.

    2008-02-01

    We develop our previous considerations for one of the most important problems related to optimizing the performance data of a new acousto-optical spectrometer for the analysis of radio-astronomical signals. The main attention is paid to estimating the side lobes of light distributions inherent in an individual resolvable spot in the output Fourier plane, governing the dynamic range of that spectrometer. At first, we analyze the Akhieser mechanism responsible for linear attenuation of both longitudinal and shear elastic waves in isotropic solid states. Similar analysis can be directly applied to crystalline materials as well in all the cases of passing elastic wave along the acoustic axis in crystals. Then, we estimate the influence of the acoustic attenuation along a large-aperture acousto-optical cells operating in a one- and two-phonon light scattering regimes. In so doing, the optimal operating points are discussed for both these regimes. Finally, the combined effect of the acoustic attenuation and the incident light beam apodization is studied from the points of view of optimizing the levels of side lobes and minima in light distribution of an individual resolvable spot in focal plane of the integrating lens and, consequently, estimating potential limitations of the dynamic range.

  8. A Large Number of Nuclear Genes in the Human Parasite Blastocystis Require mRNA Polyadenylation to Create Functional Termination Codons

    OpenAIRE

    Klimeš, Vladimír; Gentekaki, Eleni; Roger, Andrew J.; Eliáš, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Termination codons in mRNA molecules are typically specified directly by the sequence of the corresponding gene. However, in mitochondria of a few eukaryotic groups, some mRNAs contain the termination codon UAA deriving one or both adenosines from transcript polyadenylation. Here, we show that a similar phenomenon occurs for a substantial number of nuclear genes in Blastocystis spp., divergent unicellular eukaryote gut parasites. Our analyses of published genomic data from Blastocystis sp. su...

  9. Large-Scale Evolutionary Analysis of Genes and Supergene Clusters from Terpenoid Modular Pathways Provides Insights into Metabolic Diversification in Flowering Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofberger, Johannes A.; Ramirez, Aldana M.; van den Bergh, Erik; Zhu, Xinguang; Bouwmeester, Harro J.; Schuurink, Robert C.; Schranz, M. Eric

    2015-01-01

    An important component of plant evolution is the plethora of pathways producing more than 200,000 biochemically diverse specialized metabolites with pharmacological, nutritional and ecological significance. To unravel dynamics underlying metabolic diversification, it is critical to determine lineage-specific gene family expansion in a phylogenomics framework. However, robust functional annotation is often only available for core enzymes catalyzing committed reaction steps within few model systems. In a genome informatics approach, we extracted information from early-draft gene-space assemblies and non-redundant transcriptomes to identify protein families involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis. Isoprenoids comprise terpenoids with various roles in plant-environment interaction, such as pollinator attraction or pathogen defense. Combining lines of evidence provided by synteny, sequence homology and Hidden-Markov-Modelling, we screened 17 genomes including 12 major crops and found evidence for 1,904 proteins associated with terpenoid biosynthesis. Our terpenoid genes set contains evidence for 840 core terpene-synthases and 338 triterpene-specific synthases. We further identified 190 prenyltransferases, 39 isopentenyl-diphosphate isomerases as well as 278 and 219 proteins involved in mevalonate and methylerithrol pathways, respectively. Assessing the impact of gene and genome duplication to lineage-specific terpenoid pathway expansion, we illustrated key events underlying terpenoid metabolic diversification within 250 million years of flowering plant radiation. By quantifying Angiosperm-wide versatility and phylogenetic relationships of pleiotropic gene families in terpenoid modular pathways, our analysis offers significant insight into evolutionary dynamics underlying diversification of plant secondary metabolism. Furthermore, our data provide a blueprint for future efforts to identify and more rapidly clone terpenoid biosynthetic genes from any plant species. PMID

  10. Large-Scale Evolutionary Analysis of Genes and Supergene Clusters from Terpenoid Modular Pathways Provides Insights into Metabolic Diversification in Flowering Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofberger, Johannes A; Ramirez, Aldana M; Bergh, Erik van den; Zhu, Xinguang; Bouwmeester, Harro J; Schuurink, Robert C; Schranz, M Eric

    2015-01-01

    An important component of plant evolution is the plethora of pathways producing more than 200,000 biochemically diverse specialized metabolites with pharmacological, nutritional and ecological significance. To unravel dynamics underlying metabolic diversification, it is critical to determine lineage-specific gene family expansion in a phylogenomics framework. However, robust functional annotation is often only available for core enzymes catalyzing committed reaction steps within few model systems. In a genome informatics approach, we extracted information from early-draft gene-space assemblies and non-redundant transcriptomes to identify protein families involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis. Isoprenoids comprise terpenoids with various roles in plant-environment interaction, such as pollinator attraction or pathogen defense. Combining lines of evidence provided by synteny, sequence homology and Hidden-Markov-Modelling, we screened 17 genomes including 12 major crops and found evidence for 1,904 proteins associated with terpenoid biosynthesis. Our terpenoid genes set contains evidence for 840 core terpene-synthases and 338 triterpene-specific synthases. We further identified 190 prenyltransferases, 39 isopentenyl-diphosphate isomerases as well as 278 and 219 proteins involved in mevalonate and methylerithrol pathways, respectively. Assessing the impact of gene and genome duplication to lineage-specific terpenoid pathway expansion, we illustrated key events underlying terpenoid metabolic diversification within 250 million years of flowering plant radiation. By quantifying Angiosperm-wide versatility and phylogenetic relationships of pleiotropic gene families in terpenoid modular pathways, our analysis offers significant insight into evolutionary dynamics underlying diversification of plant secondary metabolism. Furthermore, our data provide a blueprint for future efforts to identify and more rapidly clone terpenoid biosynthetic genes from any plant species.

  11. A robust variant of block Jacobi-Davidson for extracting a large number of eigenpairs: Application to grid-based real-space density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.; Leiter, K.; Eisner, C.; Breuer, A.; Wang, X.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we investigate a block Jacobi-Davidson (J-D) variant suitable for sparse symmetric eigenproblems where a substantial number of extremal eigenvalues are desired (e.g., ground-state real-space quantum chemistry). Most J-D algorithm variations tend to slow down as the number of desired eigenpairs increases due to frequent orthogonalization against a growing list of solved eigenvectors. In our specification of block J-D, all of the steps of the algorithm are performed in clusters, including the linear solves, which allows us to greatly reduce computational effort with blocked matrix-vector multiplies. In addition, we move orthogonalization against locked eigenvectors and working eigenvectors outside of the inner loop but retain the single Ritz vector projection corresponding to the index of the correction vector. Furthermore, we minimize the computational effort by constraining the working subspace to the current vectors being updated and the latest set of corresponding correction vectors. Finally, we incorporate accuracy thresholds based on the precision required by the Fermi-Dirac distribution. The net result is a significant reduction in the computational effort against most previous block J-D implementations, especially as the number of wanted eigenpairs grows. We compare our approach with another robust implementation of block J-D (JDQMR) and the state-of-the-art Chebyshev filter subspace (CheFSI) method for various real-space density functional theory systems. Versus CheFSI, for first-row elements, our method yields competitive timings for valence-only systems and 4-6× speedups for all-electron systems with up to 10× reduced matrix-vector multiplies. For all-electron calculations on larger elements (e.g., gold) where the wanted spectrum is quite narrow compared to the full spectrum, we observe 60× speedup with 200× fewer matrix-vector multiples vs. CheFSI.

  12. A robust variant of block Jacobi-Davidson for extracting a large number of eigenpairs: Application to grid-based real-space density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M; Leiter, K; Eisner, C; Breuer, A; Wang, X

    2017-09-21

    In this work, we investigate a block Jacobi-Davidson (J-D) variant suitable for sparse symmetric eigenproblems where a substantial number of extremal eigenvalues are desired (e.g., ground-state real-space quantum chemistry). Most J-D algorithm variations tend to slow down as the number of desired eigenpairs increases due to frequent orthogonalization against a growing list of solved eigenvectors. In our specification of block J-D, all of the steps of the algorithm are performed in clusters, including the linear solves, which allows us to greatly reduce computational effort with blocked matrix-vector multiplies. In addition, we move orthogonalization against locked eigenvectors and working eigenvectors outside of the inner loop but retain the single Ritz vector projection corresponding to the index of the correction vector. Furthermore, we minimize the computational effort by constraining the working subspace to the current vectors being updated and the latest set of corresponding correction vectors. Finally, we incorporate accuracy thresholds based on the precision required by the Fermi-Dirac distribution. The net result is a significant reduction in the computational effort against most previous block J-D implementations, especially as the number of wanted eigenpairs grows. We compare our approach with another robust implementation of block J-D (JDQMR) and the state-of-the-art Chebyshev filter subspace (CheFSI) method for various real-space density functional theory systems. Versus CheFSI, for first-row elements, our method yields competitive timings for valence-only systems and 4-6× speedups for all-electron systems with up to 10× reduced matrix-vector multiplies. For all-electron calculations on larger elements (e.g., gold) where the wanted spectrum is quite narrow compared to the full spectrum, we observe 60× speedup with 200× fewer matrix-vector multiples vs. CheFSI.

  13. Transferring the financial risks of pharmaceutical benefits from a large health care provider in Argentina to a consortium of pharmaceutical companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervellino Juan C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The National Institute of Social Services for Retirees and Pensioners (NISSRP is a nationwide health care financing agency and service provider in Argentina. Among its services, the NISSRP provides outpatient drug coverage to more than 3.3 million beneficiaries, mainly senior citizens and disabled persons. In 1997, to help cope with its rising costs, the NISSRP agreed to transfer the risk for the cost of outpatient medications and cancer-treatment drugs to a consortium of pharmaceutical companies in exchange for a fixed monthly payment. The objective of this study was to determine the impact that this new approach had on three things: (1 the level of expenditures for the medicines that were included in the agreement, (2 the pattern of nonrational prescribing for NISSRP beneficiaries, and (3 this pattern's relationship with macroeconomic variables and the pattern of prescribing for Argentina as a whole. METHODS: We compared outpatient-medicine consumption in 1999 with consumption before the agreement went into effect. RESULTS: The actual amount that NISSRP beneficiaries spent out-of-pocket climbed from US$ 336.13 million in 1996 to US$ 473.36 million in 1999, an increase of almost 41%. The nominal amount "spent" by the NISSRP in 1999 was US$ 601.11 million, versus a real amount of US$ 374.75 million in 1996, an "increase" of 60% (that increase for the NISSRP was only theoretical since the agreement specified the fixed monthly amount that the NISSRP would have to pay to the pharmaceutical consortium. In contrast with the increased real spending by NISSRP beneficiaries, Argentina's economy remained stable over the assessed period, with the consumer price index even falling by 0.8%. We found high levels of nonrational drug use in the NISSRP system in both 1996 and 1999, indicating a serious ongoing problem. CONCLUSIONS: An agreement with pharmaceutical companies, like the one we have described, might add an element of financial

  14. Direct charge number and molecular weight determination of large individual ions by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, R.; Wu, Q.; Mitchell, D.W.; Hofstadler, S.A.; Rockwood, A.L.; Smith, R.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1994-11-15

    The coupling of electrospray ionization (ESI) techniques with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry allows the analysis of individual (i.e., single) multiply charged ions. In this paper, we demonstrate that individual large ions can be directly characterized through their excitation and ejection behavior in the FTICR cell. We also report the direct measurement of the charge carried by an individual poly(ethylene glycol) ion (5 [times] 10[sup 6] nominal molecular weight) and thus obtain the molecular weight of an individual ion ([approximately] 4.1 [times] 10[sup 6]) directly from the m/z measurement. These results confirm that the observed ions are indeed large individual molecular ions produced by ESI, as opposed to small fragments, and that an approximate molecular weight can be directly measured on the basis of charge determination and measured m/z. This capability augments the ability for more precise mass determination based upon the observation of a known reaction process (e.g., proton transfer) for individual ions. 39 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Solar and geomagnetic effects on the frequency of atmospheric circulation types over Europe: an analysis based on a large number of classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Radan; Cahynová, Monika; Kyselý, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Recently, effects of the 11-year solar cycle on various aspects of tropospheric circulation in the Northern Hemisphere in winter have been recognized. One of our previous studies showed a significant solar effect on the frequency of synoptic types from the Hess-Brezowsky catalogue. Here, we use a large collection of varied classifications of circulation patterns, assembled within the COST733 Action "Harmonization and Applications of Weather Types Classifications for European Regions" to detect the solar effect on the frequency of synoptic types. The collection contains both objective and subjective classifications. The advantage of this multi-classification approach is that peculiarities or biases of any single classification (catalogue) that might influence the detected solar signal vanish once a large ensemble of classifications is used. We divide winter months (December to March) into three groups according to the mean monthly solar activity, quantified by the F10.7 flux. The three groups correspond to the minima of the 11-year solar cycle, a moderate solar activity, and solar maxima. Within each group, frequencies of occurrence of individual circulation types are calculated. Differences in the occurrence of individual classes between solar activity groups indicate the presence of a solar activity effect on atmospheric circulation over Europe. Statistical significance of these differences is estimated by a block resampling method. The research is supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Academy of Sciences, project A300420805, and by the Ministry of Education, Youth, and Sports of the Czech Republic, contract OC115.

  16. Regional short-term climate variations influence on the number of visits for renal colic in a large urban Emergency Department: results of a 7-year survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Comelli, Ivan; Comelli, Denis; Cortellini, Pietro; Lippi, Giuseppe; Meschi, Tiziana; Borghi, Loris

    2011-04-01

    The pathogenesis of renal stones is an intricate process and varies widely depending on the composition of stones. There is also a marked geographic variability, strongly attributable to the mean annual temperature (MAT) and, to a lesser extent, on the seasons. Previous investigations report peaks in Emergency Department (ED) visits for renal colic during the summer. The aim of the present investigation is to assess the influence of day-by-day climate changes on the number of visits due to renal colic in our ED (city of Parma, located in the Po river valley, with a temperate continental climate). A total of 8,168 colic episodes were retrieved from our database during a period of 2,557 days (from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2008). Over the same period 557,990 patients were admitted to our ED, renal colic visits representing 1.46% of the total. The linear regression analysis fitting the mean number of colic visits per day and the mean daily temperature displays a very high and significant correlation (R = 0.88, p climate and, perhaps, by dietary variations during the summer. This process might trigger a sudden growth of the stone and, finally, the resulting clinical episode.

  17. Laminar-to-turbulence and relaminarization zones detection by simulation of low Reynolds number turbulent blood flow in large stenosed arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabe, Reza; Ghalichi, Farzan; Hossainpour, Siamak; Ghasemzadeh, Kamran

    2016-08-12

    Laminar, turbulent, transitional, or combine areas of all three types of viscous flow can occur downstream of a stenosis depending upon the Reynolds number and constriction shape parameter. Neither laminar flow solver nor turbulent models for instance the k-ω (k-omega), k-ε (k-epsilon), RANS or LES are opportune for this type of flow. In the present study attention has been focused vigorously on the effect of the constriction in the flow field with a unique way. It means that the laminar solver was employed from entry up to the beginning of the turbulent shear flow. The turbulent model (k-ω SST Transitional Flows) was utilized from starting of turbulence to relaminarization zone while the laminar model was applied again with onset of the relaminarization district. Stenotic flows, with 50 and 75% cross-sectional area, were simulated at Reynolds numbers range from 500 to 2000 employing FLUENT (v6.3.17). The flow was considered to be steady, axisymmetric, and incompressible. Achieving results were reported as axial velocity, disturbance velocity, wall shear stress and the outcomes were compared with previously experimental and CFD computations. The analogy of axial velocity profiles shows that they are in acceptable compliance with the empirical data. As well as disturbance velocity and wall shear stresses anticipated by this new approach, part by part simulation, are reasonably valid with the acceptable experimental studies.

  18. Implementation of genomic recursions in single-step genomic best linear unbiased predictor for US Holsteins with a large number of genotyped animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Y; Misztal, I; Tsuruta, S; Legarra, A; Aguilar, I; Lourenco, D A L; Fragomeni, B O; Lawlor, T J

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop and evaluate an efficient implementation in the computation of the inverse of genomic relationship matrix with the recursion algorithm, called the algorithm for proven and young (APY), in single-step genomic BLUP. We validated genomic predictions for young bulls with more than 500,000 genotyped animals in final score for US Holsteins. Phenotypic data included 11,626,576 final scores on 7,093,380 US Holstein cows, and genotypes were available for 569,404 animals. Daughter deviations for young bulls with no classified daughters in 2009, but at least 30 classified daughters in 2014 were computed using all the phenotypic data. Genomic predictions for the same bulls were calculated with single-step genomic BLUP using phenotypes up to 2009. We calculated the inverse of the genomic relationship matrix GAPY(-1) based on a direct inversion of genomic relationship matrix on a small subset of genotyped animals (core animals) and extended that information to noncore animals by recursion. We tested several sets of core animals including 9,406 bulls with at least 1 classified daughter, 9,406 bulls and 1,052 classified dams of bulls, 9,406 bulls and 7,422 classified cows, and random samples of 5,000 to 30,000 animals. Validation reliability was assessed by the coefficient of determination from regression of daughter deviation on genomic predictions for the predicted young bulls. The reliabilities were 0.39 with 5,000 randomly chosen core animals, 0.45 with the 9,406 bulls, and 7,422 cows as core animals, and 0.44 with the remaining sets. With phenotypes truncated in 2009 and the preconditioned conjugate gradient to solve mixed model equations, the number of rounds to convergence for core animals defined by bulls was 1,343; defined by bulls and cows, 2,066; and defined by 10,000 random animals, at most 1,629. With complete phenotype data, the number of rounds decreased to 858, 1,299, and at most 1,092, respectively. Setting up GAPY(-1

  19. A Dorsal SHH-Dependent Domain in the V-SVZ Produces Large Numbers of Oligodendroglial Lineage Cells in the Postnatal Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheuk Ka Tong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells in different locations of the postnatal mouse ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ generate different subtypes of olfactory bulb (OB interneurons. High Sonic hedgehog (SHH signaling in the ventral V-SVZ regulates the production of specific subtypes of neurons destined for the OB. Here we found a transient territory of high SHH signaling in the dorsal V-SVZ beneath the corpus callosum (CC. Using intersectional lineage tracing in neonates to label dorsal radial glial cells (RGCs expressing the SHH target gene Gli1, we demonstrate that this region produces many CC cells in the oligodendroglial lineage and specific subtypes of neurons in the OB. The number of oligodendroglial cells generated correlated with the levels of SHH signaling. This work identifies a dorsal domain of SHH signaling, which is an important source of oligodendroglial cells for the postnatal mammalian forebrain.

  20. High Frequency Design Considerations for the Large Detector Number and Small Form Factor Dual Electron Spectrometer of the Fast Plasma Investigation on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawski, Joseph T.; Gliese, Ulrik B.; Cao, N. T.; Zeuch, M. A.; White, D.; Chornay, D. J; Lobell, J. V.; Avanov, L. A.; Barrie, A. C.; Mariano, A. J.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Each half of the Dual Electron Spectrometer (DES) of the Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) on NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission utilizes a microchannel plate Chevron stack feeding 16 separate detection channels each with a dedicated anode and amplifier/discriminator chip. The desire to detect events on a single channel with a temporal spacing of 100 ns and a fixed dead-time drove our decision to use an amplifier/discriminator with a very fast (GHz class) front end. Since the inherent frequency response of each pulse in the output of the DES microchannel plate system also has frequency components above a GHz, this produced a number of design constraints not normally expected in electronic systems operating at peak speeds of 10 MHz. Additional constraints are imposed by the geometry of the instrument requiring all 16 channels along with each anode and amplifier/discriminator to be packaged in a relatively small space. We developed an electrical model for board level interactions between the detector channels to allow us to design a board topology which gave us the best detection sensitivity and lowest channel to channel crosstalk. The amplifier/discriminator output was designed to prevent the outputs from one channel from producing triggers on the inputs of other channels. A number of Radio Frequency design techniques were then applied to prevent signals from other subsystems (e.g. the high voltage power supply, command and data handling board, and Ultraviolet stimulation for the MCP) from generating false events. These techniques enabled us to operate the board at its highest sensitivity when operated in isolation and at very high sensitivity when placed into the overall system.

  1. Large Diversity of Porcine Yersinia enterocolitica 4/O:3 in Eight European Countries Assessed by Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakurtti, Sini; Keto-Timonen, Riikka; Virtanen, Sonja; Martínez, Pilar Ortiz; Laukkanen-Ninios, Riikka; Korkeala, Hannu

    2016-06-01

    A total of 253 multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) types among 634 isolates were discovered while studying the genetic diversity of porcine Yersinia enterocolitica 4/O:3 isolates from eight different European countries. Six variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci V2A, V4, V5, V6, V7, and V9 were used to study the isolates from 82 farms in Belgium (n = 93, 7 farms), England (n = 41, 8 farms), Estonia (n = 106, 12 farms), Finland (n = 70, 13 farms), Italy (n = 111, 20 farms), Latvia (n = 66, 3 farms), Russia (n = 60, 10 farms), and Spain (n = 87, 9 farms). Cluster analysis revealed mainly country-specific clusters, and only one MLVA type consisting of two isolates was found from two countries: Russia and Italy. Also, farm-specific clusters were discovered, but same MLVA types could also be found from different farms. Analysis of multiple isolates originating either from the same tonsils (n = 4) or from the same farm, but 6 months apart, revealed both identical and different MLVA types. MLVA showed a very good discriminatory ability with a Simpson's discriminatory index (DI) of 0.989. DIs for VNTR loci V2A, V4, V5, V6, V7, and V9 were 0.916, 0.791, 0.901, 0.877, 0.912, and 0.785, respectively, when studying all isolates together, but variation was evident between isolates originating from different countries. Locus V4 in the Spanish isolates and locus V9 in the Latvian isolates did not differentiate (DI 0.000), and locus V9 in the English isolates showed very low discriminatory power (DI 0.049). The porcine Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 isolates were diverse, but the variation in DI demonstrates that the well discriminating loci V2A, V5, V6, and V7 should be included in MLVA protocol when maximal discriminatory power is needed.

  2. A large number of nuclear genes in the human parasite blastocystis require mRNA polyadenylation to create functional termination codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimeš, Vladimír; Gentekaki, Eleni; Roger, Andrew J; Eliáš, Marek

    2014-07-10

    Termination codons in mRNA molecules are typically specified directly by the sequence of the corresponding gene. However, in mitochondria of a few eukaryotic groups, some mRNAs contain the termination codon UAA deriving one or both adenosines from transcript polyadenylation. Here, we show that a similar phenomenon occurs for a substantial number of nuclear genes in Blastocystis spp., divergent unicellular eukaryote gut parasites. Our analyses of published genomic data from Blastocystis sp. subtype 7 revealed that polyadenylation-mediated creation of termination codons occurs in approximately 15% of all nuclear genes. As this phenomenon has not been noticed before, the procedure previously employed to annotate the Blastocystis nuclear genome sequence failed to correctly define the structure of the 3'-ends of hundreds of genes. From sequence data we have obtained from the distantly related Blastocystis sp. subtype 1 strain, we show that this phenomenon is widespread within the Blastocystis genus. Polyadenylation in Blastocystis appears to be directed by a conserved GU-rich element located four nucleotides downstream of the polyadenylation site. Thus, the highly precise positioning of the polyadenylation in Blastocystis has allowed reduction of the 3'-untranslated regions to the point that, in many genes, only one or two nucleotides of the termination codon are left. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. The One-carbon Carrier Methylofuran from Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 Contains a Large Number of α- and γ-Linked Glutamic Acid Residues*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmann, Jethro L.; Saurel, Olivier; Ochsner, Andrea M.; Stodden, Barbara K.; Kiefer, Patrick; Milon, Alain; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 uses dedicated cofactors for one-carbon unit conversion. Based on the sequence identities of enzymes and activity determinations, a methanofuran analog was proposed to be involved in formaldehyde oxidation in Alphaproteobacteria. Here, we report the structure of the cofactor, which we termed methylofuran. Using an in vitro enzyme assay and LC-MS, methylofuran was identified in cell extracts and further purified. From the exact mass and MS-MS fragmentation pattern, the structure of the cofactor was determined to consist of a polyglutamic acid side chain linked to a core structure similar to the one present in archaeal methanofuran variants. NMR analyses showed that the core structure contains a furan ring. However, instead of the tyramine moiety that is present in methanofuran cofactors, a tyrosine residue is present in methylofuran, which was further confirmed by MS through the incorporation of a 13C-labeled precursor. Methylofuran was present as a mixture of different species with varying numbers of glutamic acid residues in the side chain ranging from 12 to 24. Notably, the glutamic acid residues were not solely γ-linked, as is the case for all known methanofurans, but were identified by NMR as a mixture of α- and γ-linked amino acids. Considering the unusual peptide chain, the elucidation of the structure presented here sets the basis for further research on this cofactor, which is probably the largest cofactor known so far. PMID:26895963

  4. Correlation between the VITEK2 system and cefoxitin disk diffusion for the daily detection of oxacillin resistance in a large number of clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, P; Juvin, M E; Le Gargasson, G; Drugeon, H; Reynaud, A; Corvec, S

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of the new VITEK2 AST-P551 card with the cefoxitin disk diffusion method for the daily detection of methicillin resistance with a high number of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates. Detection of the PBP2a protein or mecA gene was performed for each discordant case. Seventy (3.3%) isolates out of 2,107 clinical strains showed discordant results, two very major errors, four major errors and 64 minor errors. Fifty-nine (84%) discordant results were resolved, with a final overall agreement of 99.5%. Eleven (0.5%) strains remained discordant (minor error [mE]). Four of 370 MRSA strains were misclassified as susceptible in daily practice by the cefoxitin disk diffusion method. All of these strains were resistant to aminoglycosides and/or fluoroquinolones. The VITEK2 system is highly reliable for methicillin resistance detection at the routine level. Oxacillin-susceptible classified clinical strains with associated resistance patterns required attention.

  5. Extensive unusual lesions on a large number of immersed human victims found to be from cookiecutter sharks (Isistius spp.): an examination of the Yemenia plane crash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribéreau-Gayon, Agathe; Rando, Carolyn; Schuliar, Yves; Chapenoire, Stéphane; Crema, Enrico R; Claes, Julien; Seret, Bernard; Maleret, Vincent; Morgan, Ruth M

    2017-03-01

    Accurate determination of the origin and timing of trauma is key in medicolegal investigations when the cause and manner of death are unknown. However, distinction between criminal and accidental perimortem trauma and postmortem modifications can be challenging when facing unidentified trauma. Postmortem examination of the immersed victims of the Yemenia airplane crash (Comoros, 2009) demonstrated the challenges in diagnosing extensive unusual circular lesions found on the corpses. The objective of this study was to identify the origin and timing of occurrence (peri- or postmortem) of the lesions.A retrospective multidisciplinary study using autopsy reports (n = 113) and postmortem digital photos (n = 3 579) was conducted. Of the 113 victims recovered from the crash, 62 (54.9 %) presented unusual lesions (n = 560) with a median number of 7 (IQR 3 ∼ 13) and a maximum of 27 per corpse. The majority of lesions were elliptic (58 %) and had an area smaller than 10 cm2 (82.1 %). Some lesions (6.8 %) also showed clear tooth notches on their edges. These findings identified most of the lesions as consistent with postmortem bite marks from cookiecutter sharks (Isistius spp.). It suggests that cookiecutter sharks were important agents in the degradation of the corpses and thus introduced potential cognitive bias in the research of the cause and manner of death. A novel set of evidence-based identification criteria for cookiecutter bite marks on human bodies is developed to facilitate more accurate medicolegal diagnosis of cookiecutter bites.

  6. Therapy Provider Phase Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Therapy Provider Phase Information dataset is a tool for providers to search by their National Provider Identifier (NPI) number to determine their phase for...

  7. Mathematical modeling and comparison of protein size distribution in different plant, animal, fungal and microbial species reveals a negative correlation between protein size and protein number, thus providing insight into the evolution of proteomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiessen Axel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sizes of proteins are relevant to their biochemical structure and for their biological function. The statistical distribution of protein lengths across a diverse set of taxa can provide hints about the evolution of proteomes. Results Using the full genomic sequences of over 1,302 prokaryotic and 140 eukaryotic species two datasets containing 1.2 and 6.1 million proteins were generated and analyzed statistically. The lengthwise distribution of proteins can be roughly described with a gamma type or log-normal model, depending on the species. However the shape parameter of the gamma model has not a fixed value of 2, as previously suggested, but varies between 1.5 and 3 in different species. A gamma model with unrestricted shape parameter described best the distributions in ~48% of the species, whereas the log-normal distribution described better the observed protein sizes in 42% of the species. The gamma restricted function and the sum of exponentials distribution had a better fitting in only ~5% of the species. Eukaryotic proteins have an average size of 472 aa, whereas bacterial (320 aa and archaeal (283 aa proteins are significantly smaller (33-40% on average. Average protein sizes in different phylogenetic groups were: Alveolata (628 aa, Amoebozoa (533 aa, Fornicata (543 aa, Placozoa (453 aa, Eumetazoa (486 aa, Fungi (487 aa, Stramenopila (486 aa, Viridiplantae (392 aa. Amino acid composition is biased according to protein size. Protein length correlated negatively with %C, %M, %K, %F, %R, %W, %Y and positively with %D, %E, %Q, %S and %T. Prokaryotic proteins had a different protein size bias for %E, %G, %K and %M as compared to eukaryotes. Conclusions Mathematical modeling of protein length empirical distributions can be used to asses the quality of small ORFs annotation in genomic releases (detection of too many false positive small ORFs. There is a negative correlation between average protein size and total number of

  8. Transcriptome and Expression Profiling Analysis of the Hemocytes Reveals a Large Number of Immune-Related Genes in Mud Crab Scylla paramamosain during Vibrio parahaemolyticus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chuping; Chen, Yaping; Sun, Wanwei; Ding, Jun; Zhou, Lizhen; Wang, Shasha; Wang, Shuqi; Zhang, Yueling; Zhu, Dashi; Wen, Xiaobo; Hu, Songnian; Li, Shengkang

    2014-01-01

    Background Mud crab Scylla paramamosain is an economically important marine species in China. However, frequent outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by marine bacteria, such as Vibrio parahaemolyticus, result in great economic losses. Methodology/Principal Findings Comparative de novo transcriptome analysis of S. paramamosain infected with V. parahaemolyticus was carried out to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the immune response to pathogenic bacteria by using the Illumina paired-end sequencing platform. A total of 52,934,042 clean reads from the hemocytes of V. parahaemolyticus-infected mud crabs and controls were obtained and assembled into 186,193 contigs. 59,120 unigenes were identified from 81,709 consensus sequences of mud crabs and 48,934 unigenes were matched proteins in the Nr or Swissprot databases. Among these, 10,566 unigenes belong to 3 categories of Gene Ontology, 25,349 to 30 categories of KEGG, and 15,191 to 25 categories of COG database, covering almost all functional categories. By using the Solexa/Illumina's DGE platform, 1213 differentially expressed genes (P<0.05), including 538 significantly up-regulated and 675 down-regulated, were detected in V. parahaemolyticus-infected crabs as compared to that in the controls. Transcript levels of randomly-chosen genes were further measured by quantitative real-time PCR to confirm the expression profiles. Many differentially expressed genes are involved in various immune processes, including stimulation of the Toll pathway, Immune Deficiency (IMD) pathway, Ras-regulated endocytosis, and proPO-activating system. Conclusions/Significance Analysis of the expression profile of crabs under infection provides invaluable new data for biological research in S. paramamosain, such as the identification of novel genes in the hemocytes during V. parahaemolyticus infection. These results will facilitate our comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms involved in the immune response to bacterial

  9. Medicare Provider Data - Hospice Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Hospice Utilization and Payment Public Use File provides information on services provided to Medicare beneficiaries by hospice providers. The Hospice PUF...

  10. Provider Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — General information on currently active nursing homes, including number of certified beds, quality measure scores, staffing and other information used in the...

  11. Gaming the Law of Large Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Thomas R.; Snapp, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Many view mathematics as a rich and wonderfully elaborate game. In turn, games can be used to illustrate mathematical ideas. Fibber's Dice, an adaptation of the game Liar's Dice, is a fast-paced game that rewards gutsy moves and favors the underdog. It also brings to life concepts arising in the study of probability. In particular, Fibber's Dice…

  12. Number names and number understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Misfeldt, Morten

    2014-01-01

    through using mathematical names for the numbers such as one-ten-one for 11 and five-ten-six for 56. The project combines the renaming of numbers with supporting the teaching with the new number names. Our hypothesis is that Danish children have more difficulties learning and working with numbers, because...

  13. Proth Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzweller Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we introduce Proth numbers and prove two theorems on such numbers being prime [3]. We also give revised versions of Pocklington’s theorem and of the Legendre symbol. Finally, we prove Pepin’s theorem and that the fifth Fermat number is not prime.

  14. Fibonacci numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Vorob'ev, Nikolai Nikolaevich

    2011-01-01

    Fibonacci numbers date back to an 800-year-old problem concerning the number of offspring born in a single year to a pair of rabbits. This book offers the solution and explores the occurrence of Fibonacci numbers in number theory, continued fractions, and geometry. A discussion of the ""golden section"" rectangle, in which the lengths of the sides can be expressed as a ration of two successive Fibonacci numbers, draws upon attempts by ancient and medieval thinkers to base aesthetic and philosophical principles on the beauty of these figures. Recreational readers as well as students and teacher

  15. Sagan numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonça, J. Ricardo G.

    2012-01-01

    We define a new class of numbers based on the first occurrence of certain patterns of zeros and ones in the expansion of irracional numbers in a given basis and call them Sagan numbers, since they were first mentioned, in a special case, by the North-american astronomer Carl E. Sagan in his science-fiction novel "Contact." Sagan numbers hold connections with a wealth of mathematical ideas. We describe some properties of the newly defined numbers and indicate directions for further amusement.

  16. Eulerian numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, T Kyle

    2015-01-01

    This text presents the Eulerian numbers in the context of modern enumerative, algebraic, and geometric combinatorics. The book first studies Eulerian numbers from a purely combinatorial point of view, then embarks on a tour of how these numbers arise in the study of hyperplane arrangements, polytopes, and simplicial complexes. Some topics include a thorough discussion of gamma-nonnegativity and real-rootedness for Eulerian polynomials, as well as the weak order and the shard intersection order of the symmetric group. The book also includes a parallel story of Catalan combinatorics, wherein the Eulerian numbers are replaced with Narayana numbers. Again there is a progression from combinatorics to geometry, including discussion of the associahedron and the lattice of noncrossing partitions. The final chapters discuss how both the Eulerian and Narayana numbers have analogues in any finite Coxeter group, with many of the same enumerative and geometric properties. There are four supplemental chapters throughout, ...

  17. Making decisions from numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, E.

    1987-03-01

    Regulatory agencies require numbers to provide health protection. The manner in which these numbers are derived from animal experiments and human epidemiology is considered together with the limitations and inadequacies of these numbers. Some recent examples of risk assessment in Canada are given including asbestos, drinking water, and indoor air quality. The value of these numbers in providing a measure of the hazard in a wider perspective is stressed, although they can never be the sole determinant of public policy.

  18. Algebraic number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Jarvis, Frazer

    2014-01-01

    The technical difficulties of algebraic number theory often make this subject appear difficult to beginners. This undergraduate textbook provides a welcome solution to these problems as it provides an approachable and thorough introduction to the topic. Algebraic Number Theory takes the reader from unique factorisation in the integers through to the modern-day number field sieve. The first few chapters consider the importance of arithmetic in fields larger than the rational numbers. Whilst some results generalise well, the unique factorisation of the integers in these more general number fields often fail. Algebraic number theory aims to overcome this problem. Most examples are taken from quadratic fields, for which calculations are easy to perform. The middle section considers more general theory and results for number fields, and the book concludes with some topics which are more likely to be suitable for advanced students, namely, the analytic class number formula and the number field sieve. This is the fi...

  19. A Priori Direct Numerical Simulation Modelling of the Curvature Term of the Flame Surface Density Transport Equation for Nonunity Lewis Number Flames in the Context of Large Eddy Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Katragadda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS database of freely propagating statistically planar turbulent premixed flames with Lewis numbers Le ranging from 0.34 to 1.2 has been used to analyse the statistical behaviours of the curvature term of the generalised Flame surface Density (FSD transport equation, in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation (LES. Lewis number is shown to have significant influences on the statistical behaviours of the resolved and sub-grid parts of the FSD curvature term. It has been found that the existing models for the sub-grid curvature term Csg do not capture the qualitative behaviour of this term extracted from the DNS database for flames with Le<<1. The existing models of Csg only predict negative values, whereas the sub-grid curvature term is shown to assume positive values within the flame brush for the Le=0.34 and 0.6 flames. Here the sub-grid curvature terms arising from combined reaction and normal diffusion and tangential diffusion components of displacement speed are individually modelled, and the new model of the sub-grid curvature term has been found to capture Csg extracted from DNS data satisfactorily for all the different Lewis number flames considered here for a wide range of filter widths.

  20. Transfinite Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    How many points are there on a line? Which is more in number- points on a line or lines in a plane? These are some natural questions that have occurred to us sometime or the other. It is interesting to note the difference between the two questions. Do we have to know how many points and lines there are to answer.

  1. Triangular Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    Left: Anuradha S Garge completed her PhD from. Pune University in 2008 under the supervision of Prof. S A Katre. Her research interests include K-theory and number theory. Besides mathematics, she is interested in (singing) indian classical music and yoga. Right: Shailesh Shirali is. Director of Sahyadri School.

  2. Thunderstorms and flooding of August 17, 2007, with a context provided by a history of other large storm and flood events in the Black Hills area of South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Daniel G.; Bunkers, Matthew J.; Carter, Janet M.; Stamm, John F.; Williamson, Joyce E.

    2010-01-01

    The Black Hills area of western South Dakota has a history of damaging flash floods that have resulted primarily from exceptionally strong rain-producing thunderstorms. The best known example is the catastrophic storm system of June 9-10, 1972, which caused severe flooding in several major drainages near Rapid City and resulted in 238 deaths. More recently, severe thunderstorms caused flash flooding near Piedmont and Hermosa on August 17, 2007. Obtaining a thorough understanding of peak-flow characteristics for low-probability floods will require a comprehensive long-term approach involving (1) documentation of scientific information for extreme events such as these; (2) long-term collection of systematic peak-flow records; and (3) regional assessments of a wide variety of peak-flow information. To that end, the U.S. Geological Survey cooperated with the South Dakota Department of Transportation and National Weather Service to produce this report, which provides documentation regarding the August 17, 2007, storm and associated flooding and provides a context through examination of other large storm and flood events in the Black Hills area. The area affected by the August 17, 2007, storms and associated flooding generally was within the area affected by the larger storm of June 9-10, 1972. The maximum observed 2007 precipitation totals of between 10.00 and 10.50 inches occurred within about 2-3 hours in a small area about 5 miles west of Hermosa. The maximum documented precipitation amount in 1972 was 15.0 inches, and precipitation totals of 10.0 inches or more were documented for 34 locations within an area of about 76 square miles. A peak flow of less than 1 cubic foot per second occurred upstream from the 2007 storm extent for streamflow-gaging station 06404000 (Battle Creek near Keystone); whereas, the 1972 peak flow of 26,200 cubic feet per second was large, relative to the drainage area of only 58.6 square miles. Farther downstream along Battle Creek, a 2007

  3. Number names and number understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Misfeldt, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns the results from the first year of a three-year research project involving the relationship between Danish number names and their corresponding digits in the canonical base 10 system. The project aims to develop a system to help the students’ understanding of the base 10 syste...

  4. Large deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Varadhan, S R S

    2016-01-01

    The theory of large deviations deals with rates at which probabilities of certain events decay as a natural parameter in the problem varies. This book, which is based on a graduate course on large deviations at the Courant Institute, focuses on three concrete sets of examples: (i) diffusions with small noise and the exit problem, (ii) large time behavior of Markov processes and their connection to the Feynman-Kac formula and the related large deviation behavior of the number of distinct sites visited by a random walk, and (iii) interacting particle systems, their scaling limits, and large deviations from their expected limits. For the most part the examples are worked out in detail, and in the process the subject of large deviations is developed. The book will give the reader a flavor of how large deviation theory can help in problems that are not posed directly in terms of large deviations. The reader is assumed to have some familiarity with probability, Markov processes, and interacting particle systems.

  5. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) provides survival factors to EBV+diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) lines and modulates cytokine induced specific chemotaxis in EBV+ DLBCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang; Ehlin-Henriksson, Barbro; Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhu, Hong; Ernberg, Ingemar; Kis, Lorand L; Klein, George

    2017-12-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of malignant lymphoma, accounts for 30% of adult non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) -positive DLBCL of the elderly is a newly recognized subtype that accounts for 8-10% of DLBCLs in Asian countries, but is less common in Western populations. Five DLBCL-derived cell lines were employed to characterize patterns of EBV latent gene expression, as well as response to cytokines and chemotaxis. Interleukin-4 and interleukin-21 modified LMP1, EBNA1 and EBNA2 expression depending on cell phenotype and type of EBV latent programme (type I, II or III). These cytokines also affected CXCR4- or CCR7-mediated chemotaxis in two of the cell lines, Farage (type III) and Val (type II). Further, we investigated the effect of EBV by using dominant-negative EBV nuclear antigen 1(dnEBNA1) to eliminate EBV genomes. This resulted in decreased chemotaxis. By employing an alternative way to eliminate EBV genomes, Roscovitine, we show an increase of apoptosis in the EBV-positive lines. These results show that EBV plays an important role in EBV-positive DLBCL lines with regard to survival and chemotactic response. Our findings provide evidence for the impact of microenvironment on EBV-carrying DLBCL cells and might have therapeutic implications. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Large deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Hollander, Frank den

    2008-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the theory and applications of large deviations, a branch of probability theory that describes the probability of rare events in terms of variational problems. By focusing the theory, in Part A of the book, on random sequences, the author succeeds in conveying the main ideas behind large deviations without a need for technicalities, thus providing a concise and accessible entry to this challenging and captivating subject. The selection of modern applications, described in Part B of the book, offers a good sample of what large deviation theory is able to achieve

  7. Beurling generalized numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Diamond, Harold G; Cheung, Man Ping

    2016-01-01

    "Generalized numbers" is a multiplicative structure introduced by A. Beurling to study how independent prime number theory is from the additivity of the natural numbers. The results and techniques of this theory apply to other systems having the character of prime numbers and integers; for example, it is used in the study of the prime number theorem (PNT) for ideals of algebraic number fields. Using both analytic and elementary methods, this book presents many old and new theorems, including several of the authors' results, and many examples of extremal behavior of g-number systems. Also, the authors give detailed accounts of the L^2 PNT theorem of J. P. Kahane and of the example created with H. L. Montgomery, showing that additive structure is needed for proving the Riemann hypothesis. Other interesting topics discussed are propositions "equivalent" to the PNT, the role of multiplicative convolution and Chebyshev's prime number formula for g-numbers, and how Beurling theory provides an interpretation of the ...

  8. Sample Size Growth with an Increasing Number of Comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hong Tseng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An appropriate sample size is crucial for the success of many studies that involve a large number of comparisons. Sample size formulas for testing multiple hypotheses are provided in this paper. They can be used to determine the sample sizes required to provide adequate power while controlling familywise error rate or false discovery rate, to derive the growth rate of sample size with respect to an increasing number of comparisons or decrease in effect size, and to assess reliability of study designs. It is demonstrated that practical sample sizes can often be achieved even when adjustments for a large number of comparisons are made as in many genomewide studies.

  9. Earthquake number forecasts testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Yan Y.

    2017-10-01

    We study the distributions of earthquake numbers in two global earthquake catalogues: Global Centroid-Moment Tensor and Preliminary Determinations of Epicenters. The properties of these distributions are especially required to develop the number test for our forecasts of future seismic activity rate, tested by the Collaboratory for Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP). A common assumption, as used in the CSEP tests, is that the numbers are described by the Poisson distribution. It is clear, however, that the Poisson assumption for the earthquake number distribution is incorrect, especially for the catalogues with a lower magnitude threshold. In contrast to the one-parameter Poisson distribution so widely used to describe earthquake occurrences, the negative-binomial distribution (NBD) has two parameters. The second parameter can be used to characterize the clustering or overdispersion of a process. We also introduce and study a more complex three-parameter beta negative-binomial distribution. We investigate the dependence of parameters for both Poisson and NBD distributions on the catalogue magnitude threshold and on temporal subdivision of catalogue duration. First, we study whether the Poisson law can be statistically rejected for various catalogue subdivisions. We find that for most cases of interest, the Poisson distribution can be shown to be rejected statistically at a high significance level in favour of the NBD. Thereafter, we investigate whether these distributions fit the observed distributions of seismicity. For this purpose, we study upper statistical moments of earthquake numbers (skewness and kurtosis) and compare them to the theoretical values for both distributions. Empirical values for the skewness and the kurtosis increase for the smaller magnitude threshold and increase with even greater intensity for small temporal subdivision of catalogues. The Poisson distribution for large rate values approaches the Gaussian law, therefore its skewness

  10. THE DESIGN OF AN RF ANTENNA FOR A LARGE-BORE, HIGH POWER, STEADY STATE PLASMA PROCESSING CHAMBER FOR MATERIAL SEPARATION - CRADA FINAL REPORT for CRADA Number ORNL00-0585

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, D. A. [ORNL; Freeman, R. L. [Archimedes Technology Group

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC, (Contractor), and Archimedes Technology Group, (Participant) is to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure. The project objectives are to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure.

  11. Investigating the Randomness of Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Kenn L.

    2009-01-01

    The use of random numbers is pervasive in today's world. Random numbers have practical applications in such far-flung arenas as computer simulations, cryptography, gambling, the legal system, statistical sampling, and even the war on terrorism. Evaluating the randomness of extremely large samples is a complex, intricate process. However, the…

  12. The Brothel Phone Number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsby, Trine Mygind

    2017-01-01

    -infrastructure in its own right, providing an entry point into the wider infrastructure of transnational pimping. The pimps’ embodied certainty of how to operate successfully in their neighbourhood in Romania is produced in resonance with the local, urban materiality. This interplay generates body techniques, which...... in turn cultivate and maximize uncertainty about themselves in others. When making the move to go abroad into unknown terrains, accessing the infrastructure generated by the phone number can provide certainty and consolidate one’s position within criminal networks abroad. However, at the same time...

  13. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) screening for exon copy number variation in the calcium sensing receptor gene: no large rearrangements identified in patients with calcium metabolic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Peter H; Christensen, Signe E; Wallace, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background. Mutation screening of the CASR by DNA sequencing is commonly used in the diagnosis of disorders of calcium metabolism, such as familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia (FHH). Exon copy number variation is not detected by currently used molecular genetic screening methods, and might....... Patients and methods. The study included 257 patient samples referred to our laboratory for molecular genetic analysis of the CASR gene. A total of 245 were patients suspected to have FHH, while the remaining 12 samples represent patients with a phenotype of idiopathic hypocalcaemia/hypoparathyroidism. All...

  14. Report number codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

    1985-05-01

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  15. The refugee crisis challenges national health care systems: Countries accepting large numbers of refugees are struggling to meet their health care needs, which range from infectious to chronic diseases to mental illnesses

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing refugee crisis is a major challenge for many countries that have to provide adequate health care for those arriving at their borders. This includes dealing with both infectious and chronic diseases and with the severe mental health problems from which many refugees suffer.

  16. Large superconducting wind turbine generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Magnusson, Niklas; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2012-01-01

    To realize large (>10 MW) direct-driven off-shore wind turbines, a number of steps are needed to reduce weight and cost compared to on-shore technologies. One of the major challenges is to provide drive trains which can comply with the large torque as the turbine rotor diameter is scaled up...... and thereby having a smaller size and weight [1, 2]. A 5 MW superconducting wind turbine generator forms the basics for the feasibility considerations, particularly for the YBCO and MgB2 superconductors entering the commercial market. Initial results indicate that a 5 MW generator with an active weight of 34...

  17. Elementary number theory with programming

    CERN Document Server

    Lewinter, Marty

    2015-01-01

    A successful presentation of the fundamental concepts of number theory and computer programming Bridging an existing gap between mathematics and programming, Elementary Number Theory with Programming provides a unique introduction to elementary number theory with fundamental coverage of computer programming. Written by highly-qualified experts in the fields of computer science and mathematics, the book features accessible coverage for readers with various levels of experience and explores number theory in the context of programming without relying on advanced prerequisite knowledge and con

  18. Thanks to CERN's team of surveyors, the Organization's stand at the Night of Science attracted a large number of visitors : the technology and tools used by the surveyors, such as the Terrameter shown here, attracted many visitors to the CERN stand

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Thanks to CERN's team of surveyors, the Organization's stand at the Night of Science attracted a large number of visitors : the technology and tools used by the surveyors, such as the Terrameter shown here, attracted many visitors to the CERN stand

  19. Physical Activity at Daycare: Childcare Providers' Perspectives for Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Patricia; van Zandvoort, Melissa M.; Burke, Shauna M.; Irwin, Jennifer D.

    2011-01-01

    In London, Ontario, approximately 45 percent of preschoolers are insufficiently active.With the large number of preschoolers who attend childcare (54%), and the low levels of physical activity among preschool-aged children, daycare centers may be an appropriate avenue to intervene. This study sought to collect childcare providers' suggestions for…

  20. A large electrically excited synchronous generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    This invention relates to a large electrically excited synchronous generator (100), comprising a stator (101), and a rotor or rotor coreback (102) comprising an excitation coil (103) generating a magnetic field during use, wherein the rotor or rotor coreback (102) further comprises a plurality...... adjacent neighbouring poles. In this way, a large electrically excited synchronous generator (EESG) is provided that readily enables a relatively large number of poles, compared to a traditional EESG, since the excitation coil in this design provides MMF for all the poles, whereas in a traditional EESG...

  1. Children, everyday numbers and school numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clélia Maria Ignatius Nogueira

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Relationship made by school children between “daily” numbers, or rather, numbers deployed outside the school, and numbers worked out in school under various circumstances, or rather, orally and in writing, is investigated. Analysis has been undertaken with ten six-year-old children by means of a clinical and critical method. Research results show that children interact with the environment and recognized the figures, name them, conjecture on their written mode and give coherent meaning to the figures. Analysis also demonstrates that children use numbers outside the school. They understand and exemplify the number’s different meanings in an out-class context. Since the children do not give a weighty meaning to “school” numbers, pedagogical activity with numbers fails to put into practice the recommendations of the official policy.

  2. Experimental studies of Reynolds number dependence of turbulent mixing & transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warhaft, Z. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    An overview of recent experiments, in which the author generated high Reynolds number homogeneous grid turbulence, is provided. The author shows that in a small wind tunnel, Reynolds numbers that are sufficiently high (R{sub {lambda}} {approximately} 800, R{sub {ell}} {approximately} 36, 000) such that many of the aspects of turbulence that hitherto have only been observed in large scale anisotropic shear flows, are obtained. In particular the author studied the evolution of the spectrum with Reynolds number, the Kolmogorov constant and the internal intermittency, showing the way they tend to their high Reynolds number asymptotes. Thus the author links previous low Reynolds number laboratory experiments with large scale environmental measurements.

  3. Number-unconstrained quantum sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2017-12-01

    Quantum sensing is commonly described as a constrained optimization problem: maximize the information gained about an unknown quantity using a limited number of particles. Important sensors including gravitational wave interferometers and some atomic sensors do not appear to fit this description, because there is no external constraint on particle number. Here, we develop the theory of particle-number-unconstrained quantum sensing, and describe how optimal particle numbers emerge from the competition of particle-environment and particle-particle interactions. We apply the theory to optical probing of an atomic medium modeled as a resonant, saturable absorber, and observe the emergence of well-defined finite optima without external constraints. The results contradict some expectations from number-constrained quantum sensing and show that probing with squeezed beams can give a large sensitivity advantage over classical strategies when each is optimized for particle number.

  4. Chunking of Large Multidimensional Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotem, Doron; Otoo, Ekow J.; Seshadri, Sridhar

    2007-02-28

    Data intensive scientific computations as well on-lineanalytical processing applications as are done on very large datasetsthat are modeled as k-dimensional arrays. The storage organization ofsuch arrays on disks is done by partitioning the large global array intofixed size hyper-rectangular sub-arrays called chunks or tiles that formthe units of data transfer between disk and memory. Typical queriesinvolve the retrieval of sub-arrays in a manner that accesses all chunksthat overlap the query results. An important metric of the storageefficiency is the expected number of chunks retrieved over all suchqueries. The question that immediately arises is "what shapes of arraychunks give the minimum expected number of chunks over a query workload?"In this paper we develop two probabilistic mathematical models of theproblem and provide exact solutions using steepest descent and geometricprogramming methods. Experimental results, using synthetic workloads onreal life data sets, show that our chunking is much more efficient thanthe existing approximate solutions.

  5. Optical iconic filters for large class recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, D; Mahalamobis, A

    1987-06-01

    Approaches are advanced for pattern recognition when a large number of classes must be identified. Multilevel encoded multiple-iconic filters are considered for this problem. Hierarchical arrangements of iconic filters and/or preprocessing stages are described. A theoretical basis for the sidelobe level and noise effects of filters designed for large class problems is advanced. Experimental data are provided for an optical character recognition case study.

  6. Delannoy numbers and Legendre polytopes

    OpenAIRE

    Hetyei, Gábor

    2008-01-01

    International audience; We construct an $n$-dimensional polytope whose boundary complex is compressed and whose face numbers for any pulling triangulation are the coefficients of the powers of $(x-1)/2$ in the $n$-th Legendre polynomial. We show that the non-central Delannoy numbers count all faces in the lexicographic pulling triangulation that contain a point in a given open quadrant. We thus provide a geometric interpretation of a relation between the central Delannoy numbers and Legendre ...

  7. Counting copy number and calories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) at several genomic loci has been associated with different human traits and diseases, but in many cases the findings could not be replicated. A new study provides insights into the degree of variation present at the amylase locus and calls into question a previous association between amylase copy number and body mass index.

  8. Number words and number symbols a cultural history of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Menninger, Karl

    1992-01-01

    Classic study discusses number sequence and language and explores written numerals and computations in many cultures. "The historian of mathematics will find much to interest him here both in the contents and viewpoint, while the casual reader is likely to be intrigued by the author's superior narrative ability.

  9. Outpatient Provider Concentration and Commercial Colonoscopy Prices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Pozen PhD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to evaluate the magnitude of various contributors to outpatient commercial colonoscopy prices, including market- and provider-level factors, especially market share. We used adjudicated fee-for-service facility claims from a large commercial insurer for colonoscopies occurring in hospital outpatient department or ambulatory surgery center from October 2005 to December 2012. Claims were matched to provider- and market-level data. Linear fixed effects regressions of negotiated colonoscopy price were run on provider, system, and market characteristics. Markets were defined as counties. There were 178 433 claims from 169 providers (104 systems. The mean system market share was 76% (SD = 0.34 and the mean real (deflated price was US$1363 (SD = 374, ranging from US$169 to US$2748. For every percentage point increase in a system or individual facility’s bed share, relative price increased by 2 to 4 percentage points; this result was stable across a number of specifications. Market population and price were also consistently positively related, though this relation was small in magnitude. No other factor explained price as strongly as market share. Price variation for colonoscopy was driven primarily by market share, of particular concern as the number of mergers increases in wake of the recession and the Affordable Care Act. Whether variation is justified by better quality care requires further research to determine whether quality is subsumed in prices.

  10. Essays on the theory of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Dedekind, Richard

    1963-01-01

    Two classic essays by great German mathematician: one provides an arithmetic, rigorous foundation for the irrational numbers, the other is an attempt to give the logical basis for transfinite numbers and properties of the natural numbers.

  11. Rabi-vibronic resonance with large number of vibrational quanta

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn, R.; Raikh, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    We study theoretically the Rabi oscillations of a resonantly driven two-level system linearly coupled to a harmonic oscillator (vibrational mode) with frequency, \\omega_0. We show that for weak coupling, \\omega_p \\ll \\omega_0, where \\omega_p is the polaronic shift, Rabi oscillations are strongly modified in the vicinity of the Rabi-vibronic resonance \\Omega_R = \\omega_0, where \\Omega_R is the Rabi frequency. The width of the resonance is (\\Omega_R-\\omega_0) \\sim \\omega_p^{2/3} \\omega_0^{1/3} ...

  12. Large numbers hypothesis. IV - The cosmological constant and quantum physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    In standard physics quantum field theory is based on a flat vacuum space-time. This quantum field theory predicts a nonzero cosmological constant. Hence the gravitational field equations do not admit a flat vacuum space-time. This dilemma is resolved using the units covariant gravitational field equations. This paper shows that the field equations admit a flat vacuum space-time with nonzero cosmological constant if and only if the canonical LNH is valid. This allows an interpretation of the LNH phenomena in terms of a time-dependent vacuum state. If this is correct then the cosmological constant must be positive.

  13. Our prescription drugs kill us in large numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Our prescription drugs are the third leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer in the United States and Europe. Around half of those who die have taken their drugs correctly; the other half die because of errors, such as too high a dose or use of a drug despite contraindications. Our......, widespread crime that includes corruption of the scientific evidence about drugs and bribery of doctors, and lies in drug marketing, which is as harmful as tobacco marketing and, therefore, should be banned. We should take far fewer drugs, and patients should carefully study the package inserts of the drugs...

  14. Powerball, Expected Value, and the Law of (Very) Large Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecklin, Christopher J.; Donnelly, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we consider some combinatorial and statistical aspects of the popular "Powerball" lottery game. It is not difficult for students in an introductory statistics course to compute the probabilities of winning various prizes, including the "jackpot" in the Powerball game. Assuming a unique jackpot winner, it is not difficult to find the…

  15. Periodic response of nonlinear dynamical system with large number ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Additional computational cost is due to matrix multiplication on the right hand side and forward/back substitution which is quite straight forward for parallelization. For obtaining the complete forcing frequency versus response amplitude curve, the analysis is carried out in two phases: (i) first starting from far enough from ...

  16. Our prescription drugs kill us in large numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Our prescription drugs are the third leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer in the United States and Europe. Around half of those who die have taken their drugs correctly; the other half die because of errors, such as too high a dose or use of a drug despite contraindications. Our ...

  17. EDITORIAL CLINICAL DRUG INTERACTIONS A large number of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    inconsequential, harmful, life-threatening/fatal or beneficial. An understanding ofthis classification is useful ... pharmacological effect 7 of the drug and; (ii). Pharmacodynamic interactions are those that involve ... the use of probenecid with penicillin, and the alteration of urine pH in cases of poisoning with weakly acidic or ...

  18. Analysis of inter-provider conflicts among healthcare providers

    OpenAIRE

    Stecker, Mona; Epstein, Nancy; Mark M Stecker; Ausman, James I.; Harrigan, Noyes

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patient safety is a top priority of healthcare organizations. The Joint Commission (TJC) is now requiring that healthcare organizations promulgate polices to investigate and resolve disruptive behavior among employees. Methods: Our aims in this investigation utilizing the Provider Conflict Questionnaire (PCQ: Appendix A) included; determining what conflicts exist among a large sample of healthcare providers, how to assess the extent and frequency of disruptive behaviors, and what ...

  19. From Calculus to Number Theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Raghuram

    2016-11-04

    Nov 4, 2016 ... diverges to infinity. This means given any number M, however large, we can add sufficiently many terms in the above series to make the sum larger than M. This was first proved by Nicole Oresme (1323-1382), a brilliant. French philosopher of his times.

  20. Introduction to number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Vazzana, Anthony; Garth, David

    2007-01-01

    One of the oldest branches of mathematics, number theory is a vast field devoted to studying the properties of whole numbers. Offering a flexible format for a one- or two-semester course, Introduction to Number Theory uses worked examples, numerous exercises, and two popular software packages to describe a diverse array of number theory topics.

  1. Tropical Real Hurwitz numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Markwig, Hannah; Rau, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we define tropical analogues of real Hurwitz numbers, i.e. numbers of covers of surfaces with compatible involutions satisfying prescribed ramification properties. We prove a correspondence theorem stating the equality of the tropical numbers with their real counterparts. We apply this theorem to the case of double Hurwitz numbers (which generalizes our result from arXiv:1409.8095).

  2. Graspable objects shape number processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariagrazia eRanzini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The field of numerical cognition represents an interesting case for action-based theories of cognition, since number is a special kind of abstract concept. Several studies have shown that within the parietal lobes adjacent neural regions code numerical magnitude and grasping-related information. This anatomical proximity between brain areas involved in number and sensorimotor processes may account for interactions between numerical magnitude and action. In particular, recent studies has demonstrated a causal role of action perception on numerical magnitude processing. If objects are represented in terms of actions (affordances, the causal role of action on number processing should extend to the case of objects affordances. This study investigates the relationship between numbers and objects affordances in two experiments, without (Experiment 1 or with (Experiment 2 a motor action execution (i.e., participants were asked to hold an object in their hands during the task. The task consisted in repeating aloud the odd or even digit within a pair depending on the type of the preceding or following object. Order of presentation (object-number vs. number-object, object type (graspable vs. ungraspable, object size (small vs. large, and Numerical magnitude (small vs. large were manipulated for each experiment. Experiment 1 showed a facilitation – in terms of quicker responses - for graspable over ungraspable objects preceded by numbers, and an effect of numerical magnitude after the presentation of graspable objects. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the action execution enhanced overall the sensitivity to numerical magnitude, however interfering with the effects of objects affordances on number processing. Overall, these findings demonstrate that numbers and graspable objects communicate with each other, supporting the view that abstract concepts may be grounded in motor experience.

  3. Vacuum Fluctuations, Cosmogenesis and Prime Number Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2002-10-01

    Starting from E.Tryon (1973), idea of cosmogenesis through quantum tunnelling "from nothing" became popular. Both complimentary streams of it, inflationary models (Guth, Linde) and quantum parallelism (Everett, Deutsch), require some starting point as, e.g., concretisation of Leibnitz Principle (Omnibus ex nihil decendis sufficit unum). This leads to propositional conjecture (axiom?) that (meta)physical "Platonic Pressure" of infinitude of numbers and Cantor "alephs" becomes an engine for self-generation of physical universe directly out of mathematics: inexhaustibility of Number Theory (NT) drives cosmogenesis. While physics in other quantum branches of inflating universe (Megaverse) can be (arbitrary) different from ours, NT is not (it is unique, absolute, immutable and infinitely resourceful). Energy-time uncertainty principle (UP) allows indefinite lifetime provided we start from total zero energy. Analogue of UP in NT is theorem by H.Maier (1981) stating the existence of arbitrary long trails of isolated primes such that each next gap is arbitrary greater than average gap (logN). On physical level these arbitrary large deviations from Prime Number Theorem translate into permissiveness of (arbitrary) large quantum fluctuations.

  4. Condition number estimation of preconditioned matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushida, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    The present paper introduces a condition number estimation method for preconditioned matrices. The newly developed method provides reasonable results, while the conventional method which is based on the Lanczos connection gives meaningless results. The Lanczos connection based method provides the condition numbers of coefficient matrices of systems of linear equations with information obtained through the preconditioned conjugate gradient method. Estimating the condition number of preconditioned matrices is sometimes important when describing the effectiveness of new preconditionerers or selecting adequate preconditioners. Operating a preconditioner on a coefficient matrix is the simplest method of estimation. However, this is not possible for large-scale computing, especially if computation is performed on distributed memory parallel computers. This is because, the preconditioned matrices become dense, even if the original matrices are sparse. Although the Lanczos connection method can be used to calculate the condition number of preconditioned matrices, it is not considered to be applicable to large-scale problems because of its weakness with respect to numerical errors. Therefore, we have developed a robust and parallelizable method based on Hager's method. The feasibility studies are curried out for the diagonal scaling preconditioner and the SSOR preconditioner with a diagonal matrix, a tri-daigonal matrix and Pei's matrix. As a result, the Lanczos connection method contains around 10% error in the results even with a simple problem. On the other hand, the new method contains negligible errors. In addition, the newly developed method returns reasonable solutions when the Lanczos connection method fails with Pei's matrix, and matrices generated with the finite element method.

  5. Condition number estimation of preconditioned matrices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Kushida

    Full Text Available The present paper introduces a condition number estimation method for preconditioned matrices. The newly developed method provides reasonable results, while the conventional method which is based on the Lanczos connection gives meaningless results. The Lanczos connection based method provides the condition numbers of coefficient matrices of systems of linear equations with information obtained through the preconditioned conjugate gradient method. Estimating the condition number of preconditioned matrices is sometimes important when describing the effectiveness of new preconditionerers or selecting adequate preconditioners. Operating a preconditioner on a coefficient matrix is the simplest method of estimation. However, this is not possible for large-scale computing, especially if computation is performed on distributed memory parallel computers. This is because, the preconditioned matrices become dense, even if the original matrices are sparse. Although the Lanczos connection method can be used to calculate the condition number of preconditioned matrices, it is not considered to be applicable to large-scale problems because of its weakness with respect to numerical errors. Therefore, we have developed a robust and parallelizable method based on Hager's method. The feasibility studies are curried out for the diagonal scaling preconditioner and the SSOR preconditioner with a diagonal matrix, a tri-daigonal matrix and Pei's matrix. As a result, the Lanczos connection method contains around 10% error in the results even with a simple problem. On the other hand, the new method contains negligible errors. In addition, the newly developed method returns reasonable solutions when the Lanczos connection method fails with Pei's matrix, and matrices generated with the finite element method.

  6. Factors Explaining Growth of Small and Medium-Large Food­ Manufacturing Businesses in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Asiseh, Fafanyo; Bolotova, Yuliya; Devadoss, Stephen; Foltz, John; Haggerty, Robert

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzes factors influencing growth of small and medium-large food-manufacturing establishments in the United States. The results provide evidence suggesting that small food manufacturing establishments tend to grow in areas with a relatively low per-capita income and in areas where the number of small establishments is large relative to the number of medium-large establishments. Incontrast, the number of medium-large establishments tends to increase in areas with a relatively high...

  7. Classical theory of algebraic numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Ribenboim, Paulo

    2001-01-01

    Gauss created the theory of binary quadratic forms in "Disquisitiones Arithmeticae" and Kummer invented ideals and the theory of cyclotomic fields in his attempt to prove Fermat's Last Theorem These were the starting points for the theory of algebraic numbers, developed in the classical papers of Dedekind, Dirichlet, Eisenstein, Hermite and many others This theory, enriched with more recent contributions, is of basic importance in the study of diophantine equations and arithmetic algebraic geometry, including methods in cryptography This book has a clear and thorough exposition of the classical theory of algebraic numbers, and contains a large number of exercises as well as worked out numerical examples The Introduction is a recapitulation of results about principal ideal domains, unique factorization domains and commutative fields Part One is devoted to residue classes and quadratic residues In Part Two one finds the study of algebraic integers, ideals, units, class numbers, the theory of decomposition, iner...

  8. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanowitz, Janet [Ecoengineering, Sharonville, OH (United States); Ratcliff, Matthew A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McCormick, Robert L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Taylor, J. D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Murphy, M. J. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-02-22

    This report is an updated version of the 2014 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single-compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until December 2016 as well as a number of previously unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This version of the compendium contains cetane values for 496 pure compounds, including 204 hydrocarbons and 292 oxygenates. 176 individual measurements are new to this version of the compendium, all of them collected using ASTM Method D6890, which utilizes an Ignition Quality Tester (IQT) a type of constant-volume combustion chamber. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. The text of this document is unchanged from the 2014 version, except for the numbers of compounds in Section 3.1, the Appendices, Table 1. Primary Cetane Number Data Sources and Table 2. Number of Measurements Included in Compendium. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines. It is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant-volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane number has been expanded, and the data have been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

  9. p-adic numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Grešak, Rozalija

    2015-01-01

    The field of real numbers is usually constructed using Dedekind cuts. In these thesis we focus on the construction of the field of real numbers using metric completion of rational numbers using Cauchy sequences. In a similar manner we construct the field of p-adic numbers, describe some of their basic and topological properties. We follow by a construction of complex p-adic numbers and we compare them with the ordinary complex numbers. We conclude the thesis by giving a motivation for the int...

  10. Safety-in-numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvik, Rune; Bjørnskau, Torkel

    2017-01-01

    Highlights •26 studies of the safety-in-numbers effect are reviewed. •The existence of a safety-in-numbers effect is confirmed. •Results are consistent. •Causes of the safety-in-numbers effect are incompletely known.......Highlights •26 studies of the safety-in-numbers effect are reviewed. •The existence of a safety-in-numbers effect is confirmed. •Results are consistent. •Causes of the safety-in-numbers effect are incompletely known....

  11. Local democracy in large municipalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Annette Aagaard

    2017-01-01

    development plans. Based on a concrete study of plan development by two sub-municipal local councils in two Danish municipalities, drawing upon insights from outcome-oriented deliberate democratic theory, this article provides recommendations for a potential structure for sub-municipal democracy in large......Municipal amalgamations in Denmark in 2007 led to concern for local rural democracy, as the number of politicians from rural areas dropped after the reform. To preserve rural democracy, local councils at the village level were established in some municipalities, and they have begun to prepare local...

  12. On the number of special numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We now apply the theory of the Thue equation to obtain an effective bound on m. Indeed, by Lemma 3.2, we can write m2 = ba3 and m2 − 4 = cd3 with b, c cubefree. By the above, both b, c are bounded since they are cubefree and all their prime factors are less than e63727. Now we have a finite number of. Thue equations:.

  13. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

  14. Survey on fusible numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Junyan

    2012-01-01

    We point out that the recursive formula that appears in Erickson's presentation "Fusible Numbers" is incorrect, and pose an alternate conjecture about the structure of fusible numbers. Although we are unable to solve the conjecture, we succeed in establishing some basic properties of fusible numbers. We suggest some possible approaches to the conjecture, and list further problems in the final chapter.

  15. Discovery: Prime Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mestre, Neville

    2008-01-01

    Prime numbers are important as the building blocks for the set of all natural numbers, because prime factorisation is an important and useful property of all natural numbers. Students can discover them by using the method known as the Sieve of Eratosthenes, named after the Greek geographer and astronomer who lived from c. 276-194 BC. Eratosthenes…

  16. Analytic number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Kohji

    2002-01-01

    The book includes several survey articles on prime numbers, divisor problems, and Diophantine equations, as well as research papers on various aspects of analytic number theory such as additive problems, Diophantine approximations and the theory of zeta and L-function Audience Researchers and graduate students interested in recent development of number theory

  17. Observer variability in estimating numbers: An experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    Census estimates of bird populations provide an essential framework for a host of research and management questions. However, with some exceptions, the reliability of numerical estimates and the factors influencing them have received insufficient attention. Independent of the problems associated with habitat type, weather conditions, cryptic coloration, ete., estimates may vary widely due only to intrinsic differences in observers? abilities to estimate numbers. Lessons learned in the field of perceptual psychology may be usefully applied to 'real world' problems in field ornithology. Based largely on dot discrimination tests in the laboratory, it was found that numerical abundance, density of objects, spatial configuration, color, background, and other variables influence individual accuracy in estimating numbers. The primary purpose of the present experiment was to assess the effects of observer, prior experience, and numerical range on accuracy in estimating numbers of waterfowl from black-and-white photographs. By using photographs of animals rather than black dots, I felt the results could be applied more meaningfully to field situations. Further, reinforcement was provided throughout some experiments to examine the influence of training on accuracy.

  18. CERN experiment provides first glimpse inside cold antihydrogen

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "The ATRAP experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator at CERN has detected and measured large numbers of cold antihydrogen atoms. Relying on ionization of the cold antiatoms when they pass through a strong electric field gradient, the ATRAP measurement provides the first glimpse inside an antiatom, and the first information about the physics of antihydrogen. The results have been accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters" (1 page).

  19. Applied number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Niederreiter, Harald

    2015-01-01

    This textbook effectively builds a bridge from basic number theory to recent advances in applied number theory. It presents the first unified account of the four major areas of application where number theory plays a fundamental role, namely cryptography, coding theory, quasi-Monte Carlo methods, and pseudorandom number generation, allowing the authors to delineate the manifold links and interrelations between these areas.  Number theory, which Carl-Friedrich Gauss famously dubbed the queen of mathematics, has always been considered a very beautiful field of mathematics, producing lovely results and elegant proofs. While only very few real-life applications were known in the past, today number theory can be found in everyday life: in supermarket bar code scanners, in our cars’ GPS systems, in online banking, etc.  Starting with a brief introductory course on number theory in Chapter 1, which makes the book more accessible for undergraduates, the authors describe the four main application areas in Chapters...

  20. Large deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Deuschel, Jean-Dominique; Deuschel, Jean-Dominique

    2001-01-01

    This is the second printing of the book first published in 1988. The first four chapters of the volume are based on lectures given by Stroock at MIT in 1987. They form an introduction to the basic ideas of the theory of large deviations and make a suitable package on which to base a semester-length course for advanced graduate students with a strong background in analysis and some probability theory. A large selection of exercises presents important material and many applications. The last two chapters present various non-uniform results (Chapter 5) and outline the analytic approach that allow

  1. A Numbering System for MFS Transporter Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joanna; Sands, Zara A; Biggin, Philip C

    2016-01-01

    The Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest classes of secondary active transporters and is widely expressed in many domains of life. It is characterized by a common 12-transmembrane helix motif that allows the selective transport of a vast range of diverse substrates across the membrane. MFS transporters play a central role in many physiological processes and are increasingly recognized as potential drug targets. Despite intensive efforts, there are still only a handful of crystal structures and therefore homology modeling is likely to be a necessary process for providing models to interpret experiments for many years to come. However, the diversity of sequences and the multiple conformational states these proteins can exist in makes the process significantly more complicated, especially for sequences for which there is very little sequence identity to known templates. Inspired by the approach adopted many years ago for GPCRs, we have analyzed the large number of MFS sequences now available alongside the current structural information to propose a series of conserved contact points that can provide additional guidance for the homology modeling process. To enable cross-comparison across MFS models we also present a numbering scheme that can be used to provide a point of reference within each of the 12 transmembrane regions.

  2. Preferred provider organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, J D

    1984-05-01

    The 1980s has marked the beginning of a new alternative health care delivery system: the preferred provider organization ( PPO ). This system has developed from the health maintenance organization model and is predominant in California and Colorado. A PPO is a group of providers, usually hospitals and doctors, who agree to provide health care to subscribers for a negotiated fee that is usually discounted. Preferred provider organizations are subject to peer review and strict use controls in exchange for a consistent volume of patients and speedy turnaround on claims payments. This article describes the factors leading to the development of PPOs and the implications for occupational therapy.

  3. Unification and local baryon number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fileviez Pérez, Pavel; Ohmer, Sebastian

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the possibility to find an ultraviolet completion of the simple extensions of the Standard Model where baryon number is a local symmetry. In the context of such theories one can understand the spontaneous breaking of baryon number at the low scale and the proton stability. We find a simple theory based on SU(4)C ⊗ SU(3)L ⊗ SU(3)R where baryon number is embedded in a non-Abelian gauge symmetry. We discuss the main features of the theory and the possible implications for experiments. This theory predicts stable colored and/or fractional electric charged fields which can give rise to very exotic signatures at the Large Hadron Collider experiments such as CMS and ATLAS. We further discuss the embedding in a gauge theory based on SU(4)C ⊗ SU(4)L ⊗ SU(4)R which could define the way to achieve the unification of the gauge interactions at the low scale.

  4. REVIEW OF IRRATIONAL NUMBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafnani Hafnani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Study of the set properties is simple and rarely investigated at the Department of Mathematics. This paper examines some set properties on the irrational numbers. The study is about the properties applying to the real numbers which are a complete ordered field. However, the results of this study show that those properties do not imply to the irrational numbers, but the ordered property. The prove of the irrational numberby some examples is demonstrated in this study.

  5. The simple complex numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Zalesny, Jaroslaw

    2008-01-01

    A new simple geometrical interpretation of complex numbers is presented. It differs from their usual interpretation as points in the complex plane. From the new point of view the complex numbers are rather operations on vectors than points. Moreover, in this approach the real, imaginary and complex numbers have similar interpretation. They are simply some operations on vectors. The presented interpretation is simpler, more natural, and better adjusted to possible applications in geometry and ...

  6. Numbers, sequences and series

    CERN Document Server

    Hirst, Keith

    1994-01-01

    Number and geometry are the foundations upon which mathematics has been built over some 3000 years. This book is concerned with the logical foundations of number systems from integers to complex numbers. The author has chosen to develop the ideas by illustrating the techniques used throughout mathematics rather than using a self-contained logical treatise. The idea of proof has been emphasised, as has the illustration of concepts from a graphical, numerical and algebraic point of view. Having laid the foundations of the number system, the author has then turned to the analysis of infinite proc

  7. Predicting Lotto Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Jorgensen, C.B.; Suetens, S.; Tyran, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the "law of small numbers" using a unique panel data set on lotto gambling. Because we can track individual players over time, we can measure how they react to outcomes of recent lotto drawings. We can therefore test whether they behave as if they believe they can predict lotto numbers based on recent drawings. While most players pick the same set of numbers week after week without regards of numbers drawn or anything else, we find that those who do change, act on average in th...

  8. The adventure of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Godefroy, Gilles

    2004-01-01

    Numbers are fascinating. The fascination begins in childhood, when we first learn to count. It continues as we learn arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and so on. Eventually, we learn that numbers not only help us to measure the world, but also to understand it and, to some extent, to control it. In The Adventure of Numbers, Gilles Godefroy follows the thread of our expanding understanding of numbers to lead us through the history of mathematics. His goal is to share the joy of discovering and understanding this great adventure of the mind. The development of mathematics has been punctuated by a n

  9. Predicting Lotto Numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus Bjørn; Suetens, Sigrid; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    We investigate the “law of small numbers” using a unique panel data set on lotto gambling. Because we can track individual players over time, we can measure how they react to outcomes of recent lotto drawings. We can therefore test whether they behave as if they believe they can predict lotto...... numbers based on recent drawings. While most players pick the same set of numbers week after week without regards of numbers drawn or anything else, we find that those who do change, act on average in the way predicted by the law of small numbers as formalized in recent behavioral theory. In particular...

  10. Intuitive numbers guide decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Peters

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Measuring reaction times to number comparisons is thought to reveal a processing stage in elementary numerical cognition linked to internal, imprecise representations of number magnitudes. These intuitive representations of the mental number line have been demonstrated across species and human development but have been little explored in decision making. This paper develops and tests hypotheses about the influence of such evolutionarily ancient, intuitive numbers on human decisions. We demonstrate that individuals with more precise mental-number-line representations are higher in numeracy (number skills consistent with previous research with children. Individuals with more precise representations (compared to those with less precise representations also were more likely to choose larger, later amounts over smaller, immediate amounts, particularly with a larger proportional difference between the two monetary outcomes. In addition, they were more likely to choose an option with a larger proportional but smaller absolute difference compared to those with less precise representations. These results are consistent with intuitive number representations underlying: a perceived differences between numbers, b the extent to which proportional differences are weighed in decisions, and, ultimately, c the valuation of decision options. Human decision processes involving numbers important to health and financial matters may be rooted in elementary, biological processes shared with other species.

  11. Building Service Provider Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandl, Kristin; Jaura, Manya; Ørberg Jensen, Peter D.

    In this paper we study whether and how the interaction between clients and the service providers contributes to the development of capabilities in service provider firms. In situations where such a contribution occurs, we analyze how different types of activities in the production process...

  12. Providing free autopoweroff plugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten Lynge; Hansen, Lars Gårn; Fjordbak, Troels

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidence of the effect of providing households with cheap energy saving technology is sparse. We present results from a field experiment in which autopoweroff plugs were provided free of charge to randomly selected households. We use propensity score matching to find treatment effects...

  13. Lepton family number violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herczeg, P.

    1999-03-01

    At present there is evidence from neutrino oscillation searches that the neutrinos are in fact massive particles and that they mix. If confirmed, this would imply that the conservation of LFN is not exact. Lepton family number violation (LFNV) has been searched for with impressive sensitivities in many processes involving charged leptons. The present experimental limits on some of them (those which the author shall consider here) are shown in Table 1. These stringent limits are not inconsistent with the neutrino oscillation results since, given the experimental bounds on the masses of the known neutrinos and the neutrino mass squared differences required by the oscillation results, the effects of LFNV from neutrino mixing would be too small to be seen elsewhere (see Section 2). The purpose of experiments searching for LFNV involving the charged leptons is to probe the existence of other sources of LFNV. Such sources are present in many extensions of the SM. In this lecture the author shall discuss some of the possibilities, focusing on processes that require muon beams. Other LFNV processes, such as the decays of the kaons and of the {tau}, provide complementary information. In the next Section he shall consider some sources of LFNV that do not require an extension of the gauge group of the SM (the added leptons or Higgs bosons may of course originate from models with extended gauge groups). In Section 3 he discusses LFNV in left-right symmetric models. In Section 4 he considers LFNV in supersymmetric models, first in R-parity conserving supersymmetric grand unified models, and then in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation. The last section is a brief summary of the author`s conclusions.

  14. monachus numbers in Kampala, Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-09-02

    Sep 2, 2005 ... few horns and more hooves are also dumped at other nearby localities. Both areas provide abundant food for Hooded Vultures and the site is known to be the largest roost site of the species in Kampala (see: Pomeroy. 1975, Chemonges 1991, Amuno 2001). Numbers of Hooded Vultures roosting here.

  15. Calculating the Number of Tunnels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Fajie; Klette, Reinhard; RuizShulcloper, J; Kropatsch, WG

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers 2-regions of grid cubes and proposes an algorithm for calculating the number of tunnels of such a. region. The graph-theoretical algorithm proceeds layer by layer; a proof of its correctness is provided, and its time complexity is also given.

  16. Pinning of fermionic occupation numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Christian; Gross, David; Christandl, Matthias

    2013-01-25

    The Pauli exclusion principle is a constraint on the natural occupation numbers of fermionic states. It has been suspected since at least the 1970s, and only proved very recently, that there is a multitude of further constraints on these numbers, generalizing the Pauli principle. Here, we provide the first analytic analysis of the physical relevance of these constraints. We compute the natural occupation numbers for the ground states of a family of interacting fermions in a harmonic potential. Intriguingly, we find that the occupation numbers are almost, but not exactly, pinned to the boundary of the allowed region (quasipinned). The result suggests that the physics behind the phenomenon is richer than previously appreciated. In particular, it shows that for some models, the generalized Pauli constraints play a role for the ground state, even though they do not limit the ground-state energy. Our findings suggest a generalization of the Hartree-Fock approximation.

  17. Littlewood and Number Theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    doctoral thesis, R Balasubramanian [8] improved this further and showed that one can take θ = 1/3. 4. Littlewood's Problem on Diophantine Ap- proximation. For any real number x, let ||x|| denote the distance of x to the nearest integer. For any pair of real numbers α, β, Littlewood conjectured that lim inf n→∞ n||nα||||nβ|| = 0.

  18. The Class Number Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 7. The Class Number Problem - An Introduction to Algebraic Number Theory. Rajat Tandon. General Article Volume 3 Issue 7 July 1998 pp 28-37. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Predicting Lotto Numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetens, Sigrid; Galbo-Jørgensen, Claus B.; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the ‘law of small numbers’ using a data set on lotto gambling that allows us to measure players’ reactions to draws. While most players pick the same set of numbers week after week, we find that those who do change react on average as predicted by the law of small numbers...

  20. The Congruent Number Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In Mathematics, especially number theory, one of- .... pear on the list. Continuing in this way ·would exhaust one's computing resources, not to mention one's patience! Also, this procedure is of no avail if n is not a congruent number. ..... If p and q are odd primes, then the Legendre symbol (p/q) is 1 if P is a quadratic residue.

  1. Avogadro's Number Ferromagnetically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houari, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Avogadro's number, usually denoted by N[subscript A], plays a fundamental role in both physics and chemistry. It defines the extremely useful concept of the mole, which is the base unit of the amount of matter in the international system of units. The fundamental character of this number can also be illustrated by its appearance in the definitions…

  2. Dimensioning large call centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Borst (Sem); A. Mandelbaum; M.I. Reiman

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe develop a framework for asymptotic optimization of a queueing system. The motivation is the staffing problem of call centers with 100's of agents (or more). Such a call center is modeled as an M/M/N queue, where the number of agents~$N$ is large. Within our framework, we determine the

  3. Source-Independent Quantum Random Number Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhu; Zhou, Hongyi; Yuan, Xiao; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Quantum random number generators can provide genuine randomness by appealing to the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics. In general, a physical generator contains two parts—a randomness source and its readout. The source is essential to the quality of the resulting random numbers; hence, it needs to be carefully calibrated and modeled to achieve information-theoretical provable randomness. However, in practice, the source is a complicated physical system, such as a light source or an atomic ensemble, and any deviations in the real-life implementation from the theoretical model may affect the randomness of the output. To close this gap, we propose a source-independent scheme for quantum random number generation in which output randomness can be certified, even when the source is uncharacterized and untrusted. In our randomness analysis, we make no assumptions about the dimension of the source. For instance, multiphoton emissions are allowed in optical implementations. Our analysis takes into account the finite-key effect with the composable security definition. In the limit of large data size, the length of the input random seed is exponentially small compared to that of the output random bit. In addition, by modifying a quantum key distribution system, we experimentally demonstrate our scheme and achieve a randomness generation rate of over 5 ×103 bit /s .

  4. Advanced number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cohn, Harvey

    1980-01-01

    ""A very stimulating book ... in a class by itself."" - American Mathematical MonthlyAdvanced students, mathematicians and number theorists will welcome this stimulating treatment of advanced number theory, which approaches the complex topic of algebraic number theory from a historical standpoint, taking pains to show the reader how concepts, definitions and theories have evolved during the last two centuries. Moreover, the book abounds with numerical examples and more concrete, specific theorems than are found in most contemporary treatments of the subject.The book is divided into three parts

  5. Elementary theory of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Sierpinski, Waclaw

    1988-01-01

    Since the publication of the first edition of this work, considerable progress has been made in many of the questions examined. This edition has been updated and enlarged, and the bibliography has been revised.The variety of topics covered here includes divisibility, diophantine equations, prime numbers (especially Mersenne and Fermat primes), the basic arithmetic functions, congruences, the quadratic reciprocity law, expansion of real numbers into decimal fractions, decomposition of integers into sums of powers, some other problems of the additive theory of numbers and the theory of Gaussian

  6. Elementary number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dudley, Underwood

    2008-01-01

    Ideal for a first course in number theory, this lively, engaging text requires only a familiarity with elementary algebra and the properties of real numbers. Author Underwood Dudley, who has written a series of popular mathematics books, maintains that the best way to learn mathematics is by solving problems. In keeping with this philosophy, the text includes nearly 1,000 exercises and problems-some computational and some classical, many original, and some with complete solutions. The opening chapters offer sound explanations of the basics of elementary number theory and develop the fundamenta

  7. The emergence of number

    CERN Document Server

    Crossley, John N

    1987-01-01

    This book presents detailed studies of the development of three kinds of number. In the first part the development of the natural numbers from Stone-Age times right up to the present day is examined not only from the point of view of pure history but also taking into account archaeological, anthropological and linguistic evidence. The dramatic change caused by the introduction of logical theories of number in the 19th century is also treated and this part ends with a non-technical account of the very latest developments in the area of Gödel's theorem. The second part is concerned with the deve

  8. Numbers and computers

    CERN Document Server

    Kneusel, Ronald T

    2015-01-01

    This is a book about numbers and how those numbers are represented in and operated on by computers. It is crucial that developers understand this area because the numerical operations allowed by computers, and the limitations of those operations, especially in the area of floating point math, affect virtually everything people try to do with computers. This book aims to fill this gap by exploring, in sufficient but not overwhelming detail, just what it is that computers do with numbers. Divided into two parts, the first deals with standard representations of integers and floating point numb

  9. Supersymmetric Displaced Number States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredy R. Zypman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We introduce, generate and study a family of supersymmetric displaced number states (SDNS that can be considered generalized coherent states of the supersymmetric harmonic oscillator. The family is created from the seminal supersymmetric boson-fermion entangling annihilation operator introduced by Aragone and Zypman and later expanded by Kornbluth and Zypman. Using the momentum representation, the states are obtained analytically in compact form as displaced supersymmetric number states. We study their position-momentum uncertainties, and their bunchiness by classifying them according to their Mandel Q-parameter in phase space. We were also able to find closed form analytical representations in the space and number basis.

  10. Algebraic number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Edwin

    1998-01-01

    Careful organization and clear, detailed proofs characterize this methodical, self-contained exposition of basic results of classical algebraic number theory from a relatively modem point of view. This volume presents most of the number-theoretic prerequisites for a study of either class field theory (as formulated by Artin and Tate) or the contemporary treatment of analytical questions (as found, for example, in Tate's thesis).Although concerned exclusively with algebraic number fields, this treatment features axiomatic formulations with a considerable range of applications. Modem abstract te

  11. Fundamentals of number theory

    CERN Document Server

    LeVeque, William J

    1996-01-01

    This excellent textbook introduces the basics of number theory, incorporating the language of abstract algebra. A knowledge of such algebraic concepts as group, ring, field, and domain is not assumed, however; all terms are defined and examples are given - making the book self-contained in this respect.The author begins with an introductory chapter on number theory and its early history. Subsequent chapters deal with unique factorization and the GCD, quadratic residues, number-theoretic functions and the distribution of primes, sums of squares, quadratic equations and quadratic fields, diopha

  12. Brief history of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Corry, Leo

    2015-01-01

    The world around us is saturated with numbers. They are a fundamental pillar of our modern society, and accepted and used with hardly a second thought. But how did this state of affairs come to be? In this book, Leo Corry tells the story behind the idea of number from the early days of the Pythagoreans, up until the turn of the twentieth century. He presents an overview of how numbers were handled and conceived in classical Greek mathematics, in the mathematics of Islam, in European mathematics of the middle ages and the Renaissance, during the scientific revolution, all the way through to the

  13. Graph pegging numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Helleloid, Geir; Khalid, Madeeha; Moulton, David Petrie; Wood, Philip Matchett

    2008-01-01

    In graph pegging, we view each vertex of a graph as a hole into which a peg can be placed, with checker-like ``pegging moves'' allowed. Motivated by well-studied questions in graph pebbling, we introduce two pegging quantities. The pegging number (respectively, the optimal pegging number) of a graph is the minimum number of pegs such that for every (respectively, some) distribution of that many pegs on the graph, any vertex can be reached by a sequence of pegging moves. We prove several basic...

  14. Professor Stewart's incredible numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Ian Stewart explores the astonishing properties of numbers from 1 to10 to zero and infinity, including one figure that, if you wrote it out, would span the universe. He looks at every kind of number you can think of - real, imaginary, rational, irrational, positive and negative - along with several you might have thought you couldn't think of. He explains the insights of the ancient mathematicians, shows how numbers have evolved through the ages, and reveals the way numerical theory enables everyday life. Under Professor Stewart's guidance you will discover the mathematics of codes,

  15. Really big numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Richard Evan

    2014-01-01

    In the American Mathematical Society's first-ever book for kids (and kids at heart), mathematician and author Richard Evan Schwartz leads math lovers of all ages on an innovative and strikingly illustrated journey through the infinite number system. By means of engaging, imaginative visuals and endearing narration, Schwartz manages the monumental task of presenting the complex concept of Big Numbers in fresh and relatable ways. The book begins with small, easily observable numbers before building up to truly gigantic ones, like a nonillion, a tredecillion, a googol, and even ones too huge for names! Any person, regardless of age, can benefit from reading this book. Readers will find themselves returning to its pages for a very long time, perpetually learning from and growing with the narrative as their knowledge deepens. Really Big Numbers is a wonderful enrichment for any math education program and is enthusiastically recommended to every teacher, parent and grandparent, student, child, or other individual i...

  16. Quantum random number generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Collantes, Miguel; Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Random numbers are a fundamental resource in science and engineering with important applications in simulation and cryptography. The inherent randomness at the core of quantum mechanics makes quantum systems a perfect source of entropy. Quantum random number generation is one of the most mature quantum technologies with many alternative generation methods. This review discusses the different technologies in quantum random number generation from the early devices based on radioactive decay to the multiple ways to use the quantum states of light to gather entropy from a quantum origin. Randomness extraction and amplification and the notable possibility of generating trusted random numbers even with untrusted hardware using device-independent generation protocols are also discussed.

  17. Solar Indices - Sunspot Numbers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  18. Drawing a random number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanscher, Jørgen Bundgaard; Sørensen, Majken Vildrik

    2006-01-01

    highly uniform multidimensional draws, which are highly relevant for todays traffic models. This paper shows among others combined shuffling and scrambling seems needless, that scrambling gives the lowest correlation and that there are detectable differences between random numbers, dependent...

  19. Copy number variation and mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian; Weidner, Jacob; Wabick, Kevin

    2009-11-01

    Until very recently, the standard model of DNA included two genes for each trait. This dated model has given way to a model that includes copies of some genes well in excess of the canonical two. Copy number variations in the human genome play critical roles in causing or aggravating a number of syndromes and diseases while providing increased resistance to others. We explore the role of mutation, crossover, inversion, and reproduction in determining copy number variations in a numerical simulation of a population. The numerical model consists of a population of individuals, where each individual is represented by a single strand of DNA with the same number of genes. Each gene is initially assigned to one of two traits. Fitness of the individual is determined by the two most fit genes for trait one, and trait two genetic material is treated as a reservoir of junk DNA. After a sufficient number of generations, during which the genetic distribution is allowed to reach a steady-state, the mean numberof genes per trait and the copy number variation are recorded. Here, we focus on the role of mutation and compare simulation results to theory.

  20. Provider of Services File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The POS file consists of two data files, one for CLIA labs and one for 18 other provider types. The file names are CLIA and OTHER. If downloading the file, note it...

  1. The Provident Principal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, John R.

    This monograph offers leadership approaches for school principals. Discussion applies the business leadership theory of Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus to the role of the principal. Each of the booklet's three parts concludes with discussion questions. Part 1, "Visions and Values for the Provident Principal," demonstrates the importance of…

  2. What HERA may provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); De Roeck, Albert [CERN, Genf (Switzerland); Bartles, Jochen [Univ. Hamburg (DE). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II] (and others)

    2008-09-15

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. (orig.)

  3. care Providers in Ibadan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and eighty six respondents (77.7%) were aware of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT). Awareness ... Key Words: malaria in pregnancy, intermittent preventive treatment, malaria control, health care providers. Department of Obstetrics .... Auxiliary nurses do not have formal training prior to employment.

  4. Internet Medline providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, D L; Coady, T R

    1998-01-01

    Each database in this review has features that will appeal to some users. Each provides a credible interface to information available within the Medline database. The major differences are pricing and interface design. In this context, features that cost more and might seem trivial to the occasional searcher may actually save time and money when used by the professional. Internet Grateful Med is free, but Ms. Coady and I agree the availability of only three ANDable search fields is a major functional limitation. PubMed is also free but much more powerful. The command line interface that permits very sophisticated searches requires a commitment that casual users will find intimidating. Ms. Coady did not believe the feedback currently provided during a search was sufficient for sustained professional use. Paper Chase and Knowledge Finder are mature, modestly priced Medline search services. Paper Chase provides a menu-driven interface that is very easy to use, yet permits the user to search virtually all of Medline's data fields. Knowledge Finder emphasizes the use of natural language queries but fully supports more traditional search strategies. The impact of the tradeoff between fuzzy and Boolean strategies offered by Knowledge Finder is unclear and beyond the scope of this review. Additional software must be downloaded to use all of Knowledge Finders' features. Other providers required no software beyond the basic Internet browser, and this requirement prevented Ms. Coady from evaluating Knowledge Finder. Ovid and Silver Platter offer well-designed interfaces that simplify the construction of complex queries. These are clearly services designed for professional users. While pricing eliminates these for casual use, it should be emphasized that Medline citation access is only a portion of the service provided by these high-end vendors. Finally, we should comment that each of the vendors and government-sponsored services provided prompt and useful feedback to e

  5. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Yu, Zhenzhen

    2017-04-11

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  6. The elephant brain in numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Avelino-de-Souza, Kamilla; Neves, Kleber; Porfírio, Jairo; Messeder, Débora; Mattos Feijó, Larissa; Maldonado, José; Manger, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    What explains the superior cognitive abilities of the human brain compared to other, larger brains? Here we investigate the possibility that the human brain has a larger number of neurons than even larger brains by determining the cellular composition of the brain of the African elephant. We find that the African elephant brain, which is about three times larger than the human brain, contains 257 billion (109) neurons, three times more than the average human brain; however, 97.5% of the neurons in the elephant brain (251 billion) are found in the cerebellum. This makes the elephant an outlier in regard to the number of cerebellar neurons compared to other mammals, which might be related to sensorimotor specializations. In contrast, the elephant cerebral cortex, which has twice the mass of the human cerebral cortex, holds only 5.6 billion neurons, about one third of the number of neurons found in the human cerebral cortex. This finding supports the hypothesis that the larger absolute number of neurons in the human cerebral cortex (but not in the whole brain) is correlated with the superior cognitive abilities of humans compared to elephants and other large-brained mammals. PMID:24971054

  7. Large Deviations for Random Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtin, Yuri; Heitsch, Christine

    2008-08-01

    We consider large random trees under Gibbs distributions and prove a Large Deviation Principle (LDP) for the distribution of degrees of vertices of the tree. The LDP rate function is given explicitly. An immediate consequence is a Law of Large Numbers for the distribution of vertex degrees in a large random tree. Our motivation for this study comes from the analysis of RNA secondary structures.

  8. The LHC in numbers

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    What makes the LHC the biggest particle accelerator in the world? Here are some of the numbers that characterise the LHC, and their equivalents in terms that are easier for us to imagine.   Feature Number Equivalent Circumference ~ 27 km   Distance covered by beam in 10 hours ~ 10 billion km a round trip to Neptune Number of times a single proton travels around the ring each second 11 245   Speed of protons first entering the LHC 299 732 500 m/s 99.9998 % of the speed of light Speed of protons when they collide 299 789 760 m/s 99.9999991 % of the speed of light Collision temperature ~ 1016 °C ove...

  9. New magic numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Kruecken, R

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear shell model is a benchmark for the description of the structure of atomic nuclei. The magic numbers associated with closed shells have long been assumed to be valid across the whole nuclear chart. Investigations in recent years of nuclei far away from nuclear stability at facilities for radioactive ion beams have revealed that the magic numbers may change locally in those exotic nuclei leading to the disappearance of classic shell gaps and the appearance of new magic numbers. These changes in shell structure also have important implications for the synthesis of heavy elements in stars and stellar explosions. In this review a brief overview of the basics of the nuclear shell model will be given together with a summary of recent theoretical and experimental activities investigating these changes in the nuclear shell structure.

  10. The development of the number field sieve

    CERN Document Server

    Lenstra, Hendrik

    1993-01-01

    The number field sieve is an algorithm for finding the prime factors of large integers. It depends on algebraic number theory. Proposed by John Pollard in 1988, the method was used in 1990 to factor the ninth Fermat number, a 155-digit integer. The algorithm is most suited to numbers of a special form, but there is a promising variant that applies in general. This volume contains six research papers that describe the operation of the number field sieve, from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Pollard's original manuscript is included. In addition, there is an annotated bibliography of directly related literature.

  11. Algebraic theory of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Samuel, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Algebraic number theory introduces students not only to new algebraic notions but also to related concepts: groups, rings, fields, ideals, quotient rings and quotient fields, homomorphisms and isomorphisms, modules, and vector spaces. Author Pierre Samuel notes that students benefit from their studies of algebraic number theory by encountering many concepts fundamental to other branches of mathematics - algebraic geometry, in particular.This book assumes a knowledge of basic algebra but supplements its teachings with brief, clear explanations of integrality, algebraic extensions of fields, Gal

  12. Geometry of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, Peter M

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains a fairly complete picture of the geometry of numbers, including relations to other branches of mathematics such as analytic number theory, diophantine approximation, coding and numerical analysis. It deals with convex or non-convex bodies and lattices in euclidean space, etc.This second edition was prepared jointly by P.M. Gruber and the author of the first edition. The authors have retained the existing text (with minor corrections) while adding to each chapter supplementary sections on the more recent developments. While this method may have drawbacks, it has the definit

  13. CONFUSION WITH TELEPHONE NUMBERS

    CERN Multimedia

    Telecom Service

    2002-01-01

    The area code is now required for all telephone calls within Switzerland. Unfortunately this is causing some confusion. CERN has received complaints that incoming calls intended for CERN mobile phones are being directed to private subscribers. This is caused by mistakenly dialing the WRONG code (e.g. 022) in front of the mobile number. In order to avoid these problems, please inform your correspondents that the correct numbers are: 079 201 XXXX from Switzerland; 0041 79 201 XXXX from other countries. Telecom Service  

  14. CONFUSION WITH TELEPHONE NUMBERS

    CERN Multimedia

    Telecom Service

    2002-01-01

    he area code is now required for all telephone calls within Switzerland. Unfortunately this is causing some confusion. CERN has received complaints that incoming calls intended for CERN mobile phones are being directed to private subscribers. This is caused by mistakenly dialing the WRONG code (e.g. 022) in front of the mobile number. In order to avoid these problems, please inform your correspondents that the correct numbers are: 079 201 XXXX from Switzerland; 0041 79 201 XXXX from other countries. Telecom Service

  15. Analytic number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Iwaniec, Henryk

    2004-01-01

    Analytic Number Theory distinguishes itself by the variety of tools it uses to establish results, many of which belong to the mainstream of arithmetic. One of the main attractions of analytic number theory is the vast diversity of concepts and methods it includes. The main goal of the book is to show the scope of the theory, both in classical and modern directions, and to exhibit its wealth and prospects, its beautiful theorems and powerful techniques. The book is written with graduate students in mind, and the authors tried to balance between clarity, completeness, and generality. The exercis

  16. An introduction to Catalan numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Roman, Steven

    2015-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to the Catalan numbers and their remarkable properties, along with their various applications in combinatorics.  Intended to be accessible to students new to the subject, the book begins with more elementary topics before progressing to more mathematically sophisticated topics.  Each chapter focuses on a specific combinatorial object counted by these numbers, including paths, trees, tilings of a staircase, null sums in Zn+1, interval structures, partitions, permutations, semiorders, and more.  Exercises are included at the end of book, along with hints and solutions, to help students obtain a better grasp of the material.  The text is ideal for undergraduate students studying combinatorics, but will also appeal to anyone with a mathematical background who has an interest in learning about the Catalan numbers. “Roman does an admirable job of providing an introduction to Catalan numbers of a different nature from the previous ones.  He has made an excellent choice o...

  17. Providing Compassion through Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Royeen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Meg Kral, MS, OTR/L, CLT, is the cover artist for the Summer 2015 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. Her untitled piece of art is an oil painting and is a re-creation of a photograph taken while on vacation. Meg is currently supervisor of outpatient services at Rush University Medical Center. She is lymphedema certified and has a specific interest in breast cancer lymphedema. Art and occupational therapy serve similar purposes for Meg: both provide a sense of flow. She values the outcomes, whether it is a piece of art or improved functional status

  18. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ysla S. Catalina & Providence

    OpenAIRE

    Diazgranados, Carlos Nicolás; Torres Carreño, Guillermo Andrés; Castell, Edmon; Moreno, Santiago; Ramirez, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    Esta Hoja de Mano pertenece a la exposición temporal "Ysla S. Catalina & Providence". Contiene un resumen histórico de las Islas de Santa Catalina y Providencia en los idiomas inglés y español y un mapa del siglo VI que lo hace más didáctico apoyado por figuras recortables. Esta muestra hace parte del proyecto IDA y VUELTA del Sistema de Patrimonio Cultural y Museos SPM que gestiona la descentralización del patrimonio cultural de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia a otras ciudades del pa...

  20. The algebras of large N matrix mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halpern, M.B.; Schwartz, C.

    1999-09-16

    Extending early work, we formulate the large N matrix mechanics of general bosonic, fermionic and supersymmetric matrix models, including Matrix theory: The Hamiltonian framework of large N matrix mechanics provides a natural setting in which to study the algebras of the large N limit, including (reduced) Lie algebras, (reduced) supersymmetry algebras and free algebras. We find in particular a broad array of new free algebras which we call symmetric Cuntz algebras, interacting symmetric Cuntz algebras, symmetric Bose/Fermi/Cuntz algebras and symmetric Cuntz superalgebras, and we discuss the role of these algebras in solving the large N theory. Most important, the interacting Cuntz algebras are associated to a set of new (hidden!) local quantities which are generically conserved only at large N. A number of other new large N phenomena are also observed, including the intrinsic nonlocality of the (reduced) trace class operators of the theory and a closely related large N field identification phenomenon which is associated to another set (this time nonlocal) of new conserved quantities at large N.

  1. Large litter sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandøe, Peter; Rutherford, K.M.D.; Berg, Peer

    2012-01-01

    possible to achieve a drop in relative piglet mortality and the related welfare problems. However, there will be a growing problem with the need to use foster or nurse sows which may have negative effects on both sows and piglets. This gives rise to new challenges for management....... adverse consequences for animal welfare of Danish breeding for large litter sizes due to increased piglet mortality and the subsequent attempts to reverse these consequences by breeding for number of live piglets at day five rather than number of piglets born. By this change of breeding goal it seems...

  2. Volume 9 Number 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWOLE

    CLOTHING INDUSTRY IN NIGERIA. Iloeje1, C.I. and Anyakoha2, E.U. ... categories- small, medium and large as well as test the fit of the garments constructed from the blocks. The area of study was Enugu State. ... Key words: Block, Pattern, Technology, Clothing Industry, Nigerian's economy. INTRODUCTION. The clothing ...

  3. Number theoretical foundations in cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atan, Kamel Ariffin Mohd

    2017-08-01

    In recent times the hazards in relationships among entities in different establishments worldwide have generated exciting developments in cryptography. Central to this is the theory of numbers. This area of mathematics provides very rich source of fundamental materials for constructing secret codes. Some number theoretical concepts that have been very actively used in designing crypto systems will be highlighted in this presentation. This paper will begin with introduction to basic number theoretical concepts which for many years have been thought to have no practical applications. This will include several theoretical assertions that were discovered much earlier in the historical development of number theory. This will be followed by discussion on the "hidden" properties of these assertions that were later exploited by designers of cryptosystems in their quest for developing secret codes. This paper also highlights some earlier and existing cryptosystems and the role played by number theoretical concepts in their constructions. The role played by cryptanalysts in detecting weaknesses in the systems developed by cryptographers concludes this presentation.

  4. Safety in glomerular numbers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    A low nephron number is, according to Brenner's hyperfiltration hypothesis, associated with hypertension, glomerular damage and proteinuria, and starts a vicious cycle that ends in renal failure over the long term. Nephron endowment is set during foetal life, and there is no formation of nephrons

  5. Predicting Lotto Numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorgensen, C.B.; Suetens, S.; Tyran, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the "law of small numbers" using a unique panel data set on lotto gambling. Because we can track individual players over time, we can measure how they react to outcomes of recent lotto drawings. We can therefore test whether they behave as if they believe they can predict lotto

  6. The magic of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Eric Temple

    1991-01-01

    From one of the foremost interpreters for lay readers of the history and meaning of mathematics: a stimulating account of the origins of mathematical thought and the development of numerical theory. It probes the work of Pythagoras, Galileo, Berkeley, Einstein, and others, exploring how ""number magic"" has influenced religion, philosophy, science, and mathematics

  7. Paint by Numbers Revived!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Nic

    2012-01-01

    Remember paint by numbers? This revived trend was a perfect solution to teaching geometric shapes to the author's first-grade students. Geometric shapes are identified and used in early elementary art classrooms, but this lesson gives students a deeper understanding of shape, encourages problem-solving, and makes a strong correlation between math…

  8. Littlewood and Number Theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 9. Littlewood and Number Theory. M Ram Murty. General Article Volume 18 Issue 9 September 2013 pp 789-798. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/018/09/0789-0798. Keywords.

  9. Context and Number Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Irwin W.

    1979-01-01

    A replication study was conducted to determine whether conservation-of-number performance would be improved by questioning the subject only after the transformation is performed, rather than before and after the transformation, as is done in the standard conservation test. Subjects were preschoolers, aged 0-4 to 5-7. (Author/MP)

  10. Surveys in Number Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Alladi, Krishnaswami

    2008-01-01

    Contains chapters on number theory and related topics. This title covers topics that focus on multipartitions, congruences and identities, the formulas of Koshliakov and Guinand in Ramanujan's "Lost Notebook", alternating sign matrices and the Weyl character formulas, theta functions in complex analysis, and elliptic functions

  11. Volume 9 Number 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWOLE

    Volume 9 Number 2 May 2010 PP. 131 – 136 ... The study assessed the effectiveness of Songhai-Delta fish culture training programme. A structured ..... The high adoption of these technologies might be due to the fact that these farmers are fish farmers and would like to adopt improved technologies that would meet their ...

  12. Introducing Complex Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudgian, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    One of the difficulties in any teaching of mathematics is to bridge the divide between the abstract and the intuitive. Throughout school one encounters increasingly abstract notions, which are more and more difficult to relate to everyday experiences. This article examines a familiar approach to thinking about negative numbers, that is an…

  13. The Class Number Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JX) over Q, and Q is a subfield of Q( .JX). This process can easily be generalised. For in- stance, let p be a prime and ( = e27ri/p. Let Q(() be the set of complex numbers of the form XO+Xl( +X2(2+ .. '+Xp_2(p-2 with Xi rational. Note that 1 + ( + (2 ...

  14. Volume 9 Number 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OLUWOLE

    for egg-laying industry in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria utilizing Cobb-Douglas production function based on .... machinery, equipment, implements, cost of machine hire, transportation, interest, charges on loan. X2 = Farm size measured by total number of birds housed. л1*, л2* ... using the computer software frontier version.

  15. Physical Constraints of Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Mueckenheim, W.

    2005-01-01

    All sciences need and many arts apply mathematics whereas mathematics seems to be independent of all of them, but only based upon logic. This conservative concept, however, needs to be revised because, contrary to Platonic idealism (frequently called "realism" by mathematicians), mathematical ideas, notions, and, in particular, numbers are not at all independent of physical laws and prerequisites.

  16. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  17. Smoothed analysis of complex conic condition numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Buergisser, Peter; Cucker, Felipe; Lotz, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Smoothed analysis of complexity bounds and condition numbers has been done, so far, on a case by case basis. In this paper we consider a reasonably large class of condition numbers for problems over the complex numbers and we obtain smoothed analysis estimates for elements in this class depending only on geometric invariants of the corresponding sets of ill-posed inputs. These estimates are for a version of smoothed analysis proposed in this paper which, to the best of our knowledge, appears ...

  18. Numbers and sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ruffino

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I discuss the intuition behind Frege's and Russell's definitions of numbers as sets, as well as Benacerraf's criticism of it. I argue that Benacerraf's argument is not as strong as some philosophers tend to think. Moreover, I examine an alternative to the Fregean-Russellian definition of numbers proposed by Maddy, and point out some problems faced by it.Neste artigo discuto a intuição subjacente à definição de n∨meros como conjuntos proposta por Frege e Russell, assim como a crítica de Benacerraf a esta definição. Eu tento mostrar que o argumento de Benacerraf não é tão forte como alguns filósofos o tomaram. Adicionalmente, examino uma alternativa à definição de Frege e Russell proposta por Maddy, e indico algumas dificuldades encontrada pela mesma.

  19. From Natural Numbers to Numbers and Curves in Nature - I

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    According to Kronecker, a famous European mathematician, only natural numbers, i.e., positive integers like 1, 2, 3, ... are given by God or belong to the nature. All other numbers like negative numbers, fractional numbers, irrational numbers, tran- scendental numbers, complex numbers, etc., are a creation of the.

  20. Averaged number of visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydn, N; Lunedei, E; Vaienti, S

    2007-09-01

    We introduce a new indicator for dynamical systems, namely the averaged number of visits, to estimate the frequency of visits in small regions when a map is iterated up to the inverse of the measure of this region. We compute this quantity analytically and numerically for various systems and we show that it depends on the ergodic properties of the systems and on their topological properties, such as the presence of periodic points.

  1. Low Reynolds Number Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    of the blade . The Darrieus VAWT has more complex aerodynamics. This type of wind turbine produces power as a result of the tangential thrust as... Wind turbine blades also require high aerodynamic efficiency and all-weather capabilities. The need for efficient low Reynolds number airfoils which...application. The design of this type of propeller is similar to the design of low solidity wind turbine blades and will be discussed in the next

  2. The occurrence of prime numbers revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Tapia Moore

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on an arithmetical and autocatalytic approach, the authors propose a solution for the occurrence of prime numbers. Exact arithmetical calculations are provided for: the closest prime to any given positive integer (or any number of bigger or smaller primes from that integer; the quantity of prime (and composite numbers between 1 and any positive integer; the quantity of prime (and composite numbers between any two positive integers.

  3. What HERA May Provide?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hannes; /DESY; De Roeck, Albert; /CERN; Bartels, Jochen; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II; Behnke, Olaf; Blumlein, Johannes; /DESY; Brodsky, Stanley; /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; /Oxford U.; Deak, Michal; /DESY; Devenish, Robin; /Oxford U.; Diehl, Markus; /DESY; Gehrmann, Thomas; /Zurich U.; Grindhammer, Guenter; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Gustafson, Gosta; /CERN /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Khoze, Valery; /Durham U., IPPP; Knutsson, Albert; /DESY; Klein, Max; /Liverpool U.; Krauss, Frank; /Durham U., IPPP; Kutak, Krzysztof; /DESY; Laenen, Eric; /NIKHEF, Amsterdam; Lonnblad, Leif; /Lund U., Dept. Theor. Phys.; Motyka, Leszek; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II /Birmingham U. /Southern Methodist U. /DESY /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /CERN /Paris, LPTHE /Hamburg U. /Penn State U.

    2011-11-10

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. The HERA accelerator and the HERA experiments H1, HERMES and ZEUS stopped running in the end of June 2007. This was after 15 years of very successful operation since the first collisions in 1992. A total luminosity of {approx} 500 pb{sup -1} has been accumulated by each of the collider experiments H1 and ZEUS. During the years the increasingly better understood and upgraded detectors and HERA accelerator have contributed significantly to this success. The physics program remains in full swing and plenty of new results were presented at DIS08 which are approaching the anticipated final precision, fulfilling and exceeding the physics plans and the previsions of the upgrade program. Most of the analyses presented at DIS08 were still based on the so called HERA I data sample, i.e. data taken until 2000, before the shutdown for the luminosity upgrade. This sample has an integrated luminosity of {approx} 100 pb{sup -1}, and the four times larger statistics sample from HERA II is still in the process of being analyzed.

  4. Number Needed To… $ave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocker, Graeme M; Verma, Jennifer Y; Demmons, Jillian; Mittmann, Nicole

    2015-02-06

    The 'Number Needed to Treat' (NNT) is a useful measure for estimating the number of patients that would need to receive a therapeutic intervention to avoid one of the adverse events that the treatment is designed to prevent. We explored the possibility of an adaption of NNT to estimate the 'Number Needed to $ave' (NN$) as a new, conceptual systems metric to estimate potential cost-savings to the health system from implementation of a treatment, or in this case, a program. We used the outcomes of the INSPIRED COPD Outreach ProgramTM to calculate that 26 patients would need to complete the program to avoid healthcare expenditures of $100,000, based on hospital bed days avoided. The NN$ does not translate into 'cost savings' per se, but redirection of resource expenditures for other purposes. We propose that the NN$ metric, if further developed, could help to inform system-level resource allocation decisions in a manner similar to the way that the NNT metric helps to inform individual-level treatment decisions.

  5. LHCb: Managing Large Data Productions in LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Tsaregorodtsev, A

    2009-01-01

    LHC experiments are producing very large volumes of data either accumulated from the detectors or generated via the Monte-Carlo modeling. The data should be processed as quickly as possible to provide users with the input for their analysis. Processing of multiple hundreds of terabytes of data necessitates generation, submission and following a huge number of grid jobs running all over the Computing Grid. Manipulation of these large and complex workloads is impossible without powerful production management tools. In LHCb, the DIRAC Production Management System (PMS) is used to accomplish this task. It enables production managers and end-users to deal with all kinds of data generation, processing and storage. Application workflow tools allow to define jobs as complex sequences of elementary application steps expressed as Directed Acyclic Graphs. Specialized databases and a number of dedicated software agents ensure automated data driven job creation and submission. The productions are accomplished by thorough ...

  6. Threatened corals provide underexplored microbial habitats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Sunagawa

    Full Text Available Contemporary in-depth sequencing of environmental samples has provided novel insights into microbial community structures, revealing that their diversity had been previously underestimated. Communities in marine environments are commonly composed of a few dominant taxa and a high number of taxonomically diverse, low-abundance organisms. However, studying the roles and genomic information of these "rare" organisms remains challenging, because little is known about their ecological niches and the environmental conditions to which they respond. Given the current threat to coral reef ecosystems, we investigated the potential of corals to provide highly specialized habitats for bacterial taxa including those that are rarely detected or absent in surrounding reef waters. The analysis of more than 350,000 small subunit ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA sequence tags and almost 2,000 nearly full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that rare seawater biosphere members are highly abundant or even dominant in diverse Caribbean corals. Closely related corals (in the same genus/family harbored similar bacterial communities. At higher taxonomic levels, however, the similarities of these communities did not correlate with the phylogenetic relationships among corals, opening novel questions about the evolutionary stability of coral-microbial associations. Large proportions of OTUs (28.7-49.1% were unique to the coral species of origin. Analysis of the most dominant ribotypes suggests that many uncovered bacterial taxa exist in coral habitats and await future exploration. Our results indicate that coral species, and by extension other animal hosts, act as specialized habitats of otherwise rare microbes in marine ecosystems. Here, deep sequencing provided insights into coral microbiota at an unparalleled resolution and revealed that corals harbor many bacterial taxa previously not known. Given that two of the coral species investigated are listed as threatened under

  7. A course in mathematical statistics and large sample theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Rabi; Patrangenaru, Victor

    2016-01-01

    This graduate-level textbook is primarily aimed at graduate students of statistics, mathematics, science, and engineering who have had an undergraduate course in statistics, an upper division course in analysis, and some acquaintance with measure theoretic probability. It provides a rigorous presentation of the core of mathematical statistics. Part I of this book constitutes a one-semester course on basic parametric mathematical statistics. Part II deals with the large sample theory of statistics — parametric and nonparametric, and its contents may be covered in one semester as well. Part III provides brief accounts of a number of topics of current interest for practitioners and other disciplines whose work involves statistical methods. Large Sample theory with many worked examples, numerical calculations, and simulations to illustrate theory Appendices provide ready access to a number of standard results, with many proofs Solutions given to a number of selected exercises from Part I Part II exercises with ...

  8. The number system

    CERN Document Server

    Thurston, H A

    2007-01-01

    The teaching of mathematics has undergone extensive changes in approach, with a shift in emphasis from rote memorization to acquiring an understanding of the logical foundations and methodology of problem solving. This book offers guidance in that direction, exploring arithmetic's underlying concepts and their logical development.This volume's great merit lies in its wealth of explanatory material, designed to promote an informal and intuitive understanding of the rigorous logical approach to the number system. The first part explains and comments on axioms and definitions, making their subseq

  9. Topics in number theory

    CERN Document Server

    LeVeque, William J

    2002-01-01

    Classic two-part work now available in a single volume assumes no prior theoretical knowledge on reader's part and develops the subject fully. Volume I is a suitable first course text for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students. Volume II requires a much higher level of mathematical maturity, including a working knowledge of the theory of analytic functions. Contents range from chapters on binary quadratic forms to the Thue-Siegel-Roth Theorem and the Prime Number Theorem. Includes numerous problems and hints for their solutions. 1956 edition. Supplementary Reading. List of Symb

  10. Summing large-N towers in colour flow evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaetzer, Simon

    2013-12-15

    We consider soft gluon evolution in the colour flow basis. We give explicit expressions for the colour structure of the (one-loop) soft anomalous dimension matrix for an arbitrary number of partons, and show how the successive exponentiation of classes of large-N contributions can be achieved to provide a systematic expansion of the evolution in terms of colour supressed contributions.

  11. Method for providing oxygen ion vacancies in lanthanide oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, D. Alan R.; Wilson, William G.

    1989-12-05

    A method for desulfurization of fuel gases resulting from the incomplete combustion of sulfur containing hydrocarbons whereby the gases are treated with lanthanide oxides containing large numbers of oxygen-ion vacancies providing ionic porosity which enhances the ability of the lanthanide oxides to react more rapidly and completely with the sulfur in the fuel gases whereby the sulfur in such gases is reduced to low levels suitable for fuels for firing into boilers of power plants generating electricity with steam turbine driven generators, gas turbines, fuel cells and precursors for liquid fuels such as methanol and the like.

  12. State estimation for large ensembles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gill, R.D.; Massar, S.

    2000-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating the state of a large but nite number N of identical quantum systems. As N becomes large the problem simplies dramatically. The only relevant measure of the quality of estimation becomes the mean quadratic error matrix. Here we present a bound on this quantity: a

  13. State estimation for large ensembles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gill, R.D.; Massar, S.

    1999-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating the state of a large but nite number N of identical quantum systems In the limit of large N the problem simplies In particular the only relevant measure of the quality of the estimation is the mean quadratic error matrix Here we present a bound on the mean

  14. Plurality and number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jette Hedegaard; Lackner, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Singularis is the marking of the noun if it refers to an entity only. Often languages distinguish between singularis and non-singularis. The term used for these two forms are singular and plural. While singular is generally the unmarked form, plural is usually marked. Depending on the morphosynta......Singularis is the marking of the noun if it refers to an entity only. Often languages distinguish between singularis and non-singularis. The term used for these two forms are singular and plural. While singular is generally the unmarked form, plural is usually marked. Depending...... on the morphosyntactic properties of the language under investigation, plural can be expressed on various lexical items such as nouns [Lexicon – Section 3.1], verbs [Lexicon – Section 3.2], adjectives [Lexicon – Section 3.4], number words [Lexicon – Section 3.10.1], quantifiers [Lexicon – Section 3.10.2] or classifier...

  15. Hypergeometric Euler numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Komatsu, Takao; Zhu, Huilin

    2016-01-01

    For a nonnegative integer $N$, define hypergeometric Euler numbers $E_{N,n}$ by $$ \\frac{1}{{}_1 F_2(1;N+1,(2 N+1)/2;t^2/4)}=\\sum_{n=0}^\\infty E_{N,n}\\frac{t^n}{n!}\\,, $$ where ${}_1 F_2(a;b,c;z)$ is the hypergeometric function defined by $$ {}_1 F_2(a;b,c;z)=\\sum_{n=0}^\\infty\\frac{(a)^{(n)}}{(b)^{(n)}(c)^{(n)}}\\frac{z^n}{n!}\\,. $$ Here, $(x)^{(n)}$ is the rising factorial, defined by $(x)^{(n)}=x(x+1)\\cdots(x+n-1)$ ($n\\ge 1$) with $(x)^{(0)}=1$. When $N=0$, then $E_n=E_{0,n}$ are classical E...

  16. The perspective of rural physicians providing abortion in Canada: qualitative findings of the BC Abortion Providers Survey (BCAPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Jennifer; Maughn, Nanamma; Soon, Judith A; Norman, Wendy V

    2013-01-01

    An increasing proportion of Canadian induced abortions are performed in large urban areas. For unknown reasons the number of rural abortion providers in Canadian provinces, such as British Columbia (BC), has declined substantially. This study explored the experiences of BC rural and urban physicians providing abortion services. The mixed methods BC Abortion Providers Survey employed self-administered questionnaires, distributed to all known current and some past BC abortion providers in 2011. The optional semi-structured interviews are the focus of this analysis. Interview questions probed the experiences, facilitators and challenges faced by abortion providers, and their future intentions. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using cross-case and thematic analysis. Twenty interviews were completed and transcribed, representing 13/27 (48.1%) rural abortion providers, and 7/19 (36.8%) of urban providers in BC. Emerging themes differed between urban and rural providers. Most urban providers worked within clinics and reported a supportive environment. Rural physicians, all providing surgical abortions within hospitals, reported challenging barriers to provision including operating room scheduling, anesthetist and nursing logistical issues, high demand for services, professional isolation, and scarcity of replacement abortion providers. Many rural providers identified a need to "fly under the radar" in their small community. This first study of experiences among rural and urban abortion providers in Canada identifies addressable challenges faced by rural physicians. Rural providers expressed a need for increased support from hospital administration and policy. Further challenges identified include a desire for continuing professional education opportunities, and for available replacement providers.

  17. The perspective of rural physicians providing abortion in Canada: qualitative findings of the BC Abortion Providers Survey (BCAPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Dressler

    Full Text Available An increasing proportion of Canadian induced abortions are performed in large urban areas. For unknown reasons the number of rural abortion providers in Canadian provinces, such as British Columbia (BC, has declined substantially. This study explored the experiences of BC rural and urban physicians providing abortion services.The mixed methods BC Abortion Providers Survey employed self-administered questionnaires, distributed to all known current and some past BC abortion providers in 2011. The optional semi-structured interviews are the focus of this analysis. Interview questions probed the experiences, facilitators and challenges faced by abortion providers, and their future intentions. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using cross-case and thematic analysis.Twenty interviews were completed and transcribed, representing 13/27 (48.1% rural abortion providers, and 7/19 (36.8% of urban providers in BC. Emerging themes differed between urban and rural providers. Most urban providers worked within clinics and reported a supportive environment. Rural physicians, all providing surgical abortions within hospitals, reported challenging barriers to provision including operating room scheduling, anesthetist and nursing logistical issues, high demand for services, professional isolation, and scarcity of replacement abortion providers. Many rural providers identified a need to "fly under the radar" in their small community.This first study of experiences among rural and urban abortion providers in Canada identifies addressable challenges faced by rural physicians. Rural providers expressed a need for increased support from hospital administration and policy. Further challenges identified include a desire for continuing professional education opportunities, and for available replacement providers.

  18. Energy detection using very large antenna array receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveras Martínez, Àlex; De Carvalho, Elisabeth; Popovski, Petar

    2014-01-01

    and millimeter wave communications are limited to short ranges due respectively to noise sensitivity and propagation attenuation, processing by a large number of receive antennas overcomes those shortcomings to provide significant reach extension. This processing is solely based on long-term statistics......We propose the use of energy detection for single stream transmission and reception by a very large number of antennas, with primary application to millimeter wave communications. The reason for applying energy detection is low complexity, cost and power efficiency. While both energy detection...

  19. Providing traceability for neuroimaging analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClatchey, Richard; Branson, Andrew; Anjum, Ashiq; Bloodsworth, Peter; Habib, Irfan; Munir, Kamran; Shamdasani, Jetendr; Soomro, Kamran

    2013-09-01

    With the increasingly digital nature of biomedical data and as the complexity of analyses in medical research increases, the need for accurate information capture, traceability and accessibility has become crucial to medical researchers in the pursuance of their research goals. Grid- or Cloud-based technologies, often based on so-called Service Oriented Architectures (SOA), are increasingly being seen as viable solutions for managing distributed data and algorithms in the bio-medical domain. For neuroscientific analyses, especially those centred on complex image analysis, traceability of processes and datasets is essential but up to now this has not been captured in a manner that facilitates collaborative study. Few examples exist, of deployed medical systems based on Grids that provide the traceability of research data needed to facilitate complex analyses and none have been evaluated in practice. Over the past decade, we have been working with mammographers, paediatricians and neuroscientists in three generations of projects to provide the data management and provenance services now required for 21st century medical research. This paper outlines the finding of a requirements study and a resulting system architecture for the production of services to support neuroscientific studies of biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. The paper proposes a software infrastructure and services that provide the foundation for such support. It introduces the use of the CRISTAL software to provide provenance management as one of a number of services delivered on a SOA, deployed to manage neuroimaging projects that have been studying biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. In the neuGRID and N4U projects a Provenance Service has been delivered that captures and reconstructs the workflow information needed to facilitate researchers in conducting neuroimaging analyses. The software enables neuroscientists to track the evolution of workflows and datasets. It also tracks the outcomes of

  20. Developing Large Web Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Loudon, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    How do you create a mission-critical site that provides exceptional performance while remaining flexible, adaptable, and reliable 24/7? Written by the manager of a UI group at Yahoo!, Developing Large Web Applications offers practical steps for building rock-solid applications that remain effective even as you add features, functions, and users. You'll learn how to develop large web applications with the extreme precision required for other types of software. Avoid common coding and maintenance headaches as small websites add more pages, more code, and more programmersGet comprehensive soluti

  1. Signals of lepton number violation

    CERN Document Server

    Panella, O; Srivastava, Y N

    1999-01-01

    The production of like-sign-dileptons (LSD), in the high energy lepton number violating ( Delta L=+2) reaction, pp to 2jets+l/sup +/l /sup +/, (l=e, mu , tau ), of interest for the experiments to be performed at the forthcoming Large Hadron Collider (LHC), is reported, taking up a composite model scenario in which the exchanged virtual composite neutrino is assumed to be a Majorana particle. Numerical estimates of the corresponding signal cross-section that implement kinematical cuts needed to suppress the standard model background, are presented which show that in some regions of the parameter space the total number of LSD events is well above the background. Assuming non-observation of the LSD signal it is found that LHC would exclude a composite Majorana neutrino up to 700 GeV (if one requires 10 events for discovery). The sensitivity of LHC experiments to the parameter space is then compared to that of the next generation of neutrinoless double beta decay ( beta beta /sub 0 nu /) experiment, GENIUS, and i...

  2. Large-D gravity and low-D strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emparan, Roberto; Grumiller, Daniel; Tanabe, Kentaro

    2013-06-21

    We show that in the limit of a large number of dimensions a wide class of nonextremal neutral black holes has a universal near-horizon limit. The limiting geometry is the two-dimensional black hole of string theory with a two-dimensional target space. Its conformal symmetry explains the properties of massless scalars found recently in the large-D limit. For black branes with string charges, the near-horizon geometry is that of the three-dimensional black strings of Horne and Horowitz. The analogies between the α' expansion in string theory and the large-D expansion in gravity suggest a possible effective string description of the large-D limit of black holes. We comment on applications to several subjects, in particular to the problem of critical collapse.

  3. Turbulent pipe flow at extreme Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultmark, M; Vallikivi, M; Bailey, S C C; Smits, A J

    2012-03-02

    Both the inherent intractability and complex beauty of turbulence reside in its large range of physical and temporal scales. This range of scales is captured by the Reynolds number, which in nature and in many engineering applications can be as large as 10(5)-10(6). Here, we report turbulence measurements over an unprecedented range of Reynolds numbers using a unique combination of a high-pressure air facility and a new nanoscale anemometry probe. The results reveal previously unknown universal scaling behavior for the turbulent velocity fluctuations, which is remarkably similar to the well-known scaling behavior of the mean velocity distribution.

  4. YBYRÁ facilitates comparison of large phylogenetic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Denis Jacob

    2015-07-01

    The number and size of tree topologies that are being compared by phylogenetic systematists is increasing due to technological advancements in high-throughput DNA sequencing. However, we still lack tools to facilitate comparison among phylogenetic trees with a large number of terminals. The "YBYRÁ" project integrates software solutions for data analysis in phylogenetics. It comprises tools for (1) topological distance calculation based on the number of shared splits or clades, (2) sensitivity analysis and automatic generation of sensitivity plots and (3) clade diagnoses based on different categories of synapomorphies. YBYRÁ also provides (4) an original framework to facilitate the search for potential rogue taxa based on how much they affect average matching split distances (using MSdist). YBYRÁ facilitates comparison of large phylogenetic trees and outperforms competing software in terms of usability and time efficiency, specially for large data sets. The programs that comprises this toolkit are written in Python, hence they do not require installation and have minimum dependencies. The entire project is available under an open-source licence at http://www.ib.usp.br/grant/anfibios/researchSoftware.html .

  5. Large-Scale Sequence Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Devi; Verma, Mansi

    2017-01-01

    There are millions of sequences deposited in genomic databases, and it is an important task to categorize them according to their structural and functional roles. Sequence comparison is a prerequisite for proper categorization of both DNA and protein sequences, and helps in assigning a putative or hypothetical structure and function to a given sequence. There are various methods available for comparing sequences, alignment being first and foremost for sequences with a small number of base pairs as well as for large-scale genome comparison. Various tools are available for performing pairwise large sequence comparison. The best known tools either perform global alignment or generate local alignments between the two sequences. In this chapter we first provide basic information regarding sequence comparison. This is followed by the description of the PAM and BLOSUM matrices that form the basis of sequence comparison. We also give a practical overview of currently available methods such as BLAST and FASTA, followed by a description and overview of tools available for genome comparison including LAGAN, MumMER, BLASTZ, and AVID.

  6. Reynolds number effect on VIV: from subcritical to supercritical flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triantafyllou, M.S.; Hover, F.S.; Techet, A.H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Dept. of Ocean Engineering, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Vortex Induced Vibrations in flexibly supported rigid cylinders and long, flexible slender structures, such as cables and risers, are caused by the formation of large-scale vortices, whose dynamics are controlled to a large extend by inviscid mechanisms. Reynolds number remains a very important parameter, however, because it influences the formation and shedding mechanisms of the vortical patterns. For low Reynolds numbers, below a few thousand, a nearly complete understanding has been obtained in recent years, at least for flexibly mounted rigid cylinders. This is not the case, though, for VIV above Re=10,000 and - especially - above the critical Reynolds number of about Re=250,000 for smooth cylinders. The talk provides observed WV trends of flexibly mounted cylinders, obtained in recent experiments as function of the Reynolds number, from Re about 1,000 up to 1,000,000. In particular, similarities and differences between subcritical and supercritical force and motion data will be discussed, and conclusions on the governing principal mechanisms will be drawn, including transitions in the arrangement of vortical patterns and effects of correlation length. (authors)

  7. Implementação de um sistema Collaborative Planning, Forecasting, and Replenishment em uma grande rede de fast food por meio de um prestador de serviços logísticos Implementation of a Collaborative Planning, Forecasting, and Replenishment system in a large fast food company through a logistics provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Vivaldini

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A gestão colaborativa é, atualmente, um elemento-chave no contexto da gestão da cadeia de suprimentos. Neste artigo, o tema é abordado mediante a análise de um caso real, em que uma grande rede mundial de fast-food e seu prestador de serviço logístico (PSL trabalharam conjuntamente no Brasil em um projeto-piloto para a implementação de um collaborative planning, forecasting, and replenishment (CPFR. O trabalho faz uso de uma metodologia de pesquisa-ação e apresenta as principais variáveis que influenciaram o projeto, abordando os processos necessários para a implementação e os pontos que favorecem o CPFR. Com base no caso estudado, o trabalho apresenta um conjunto de propostas sobre o papel dos agentes da cadeia em projetos dessa natureza. A gestão da cadeia de suprimentos por intermédio da coordenação direta de um PSL também permite demonstrar as possibilidades e dificuldades desse sistema, contribuindo com a visão colaborativa na cadeia de suprimentos a partir da relação entre seus agentes.Nowadays, Collaborative Planning has been considered a key element in the Supply Chain Management context. In this article, this topic is addressed by a real case where a large worldwide fast-food network and its logistics provider worked together in Brazil in a pilot project in order to implement a Collaborative Planning, Forecasting, and Replenishment (CPFR system. Based on an action research approach, this paper presents the main variables that influenced the real project embracing the necessary processes, and it points out those that leveraged the CPFR implementation. Based on the case studied, a set of proposals about the role of the supply chain agents in similar projects is presented. Moreover, the case of conducting the supply chain management by a direct coordination of a logistics provider also allows to highlight the possibilities and difficulties of the CPFR system and to contribute towards a supply chain agents

  8. Clifford numbers and spinors

    CERN Document Server

    Lounesto, Pertti

    1993-01-01

    This volume contains a facsimile reproduction of Marcel Riesz's notes of a set of lectures he delivered at the University of Maryland, College Park, between October 1957 and January 1958, which has not been formally published to date This seminal material (arranged in four chapters), which contributed greatly to the start of modern research on Clifford algebras, is supplemented in this book by notes which Riesz dictated to E Folke Bolinder in the following year and which were intended to be a fifth chapter of the Riesz lecture notes In addition, Riesz's work on Clifford algebra is put into an historical perspective in a separate review by P Lounesto As well as providing an introduction to Clifford algebra, this volume will be of value to those interested in the history of mathematics

  9. Evaluación de daño de gorgojos en poblaciones de alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. con alto número de raíces laterales Evaluation of root curculio/weevil damage in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. populations with large numbers of lateral roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Odorizzi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El aumento del número de raíces laterales a través del mejoramiento puede ser importante para reducir el daño provocado por el complejo de gorgojos de la alfalfa. El objetivo fue evaluar, en cuatro ambientes (siembras de otoño y primavera con y sin riego, el comportamiento de 10 poblaciones seleccionadas por alto número de raíces laterales. Los caracteres evaluados fueron: categoría (Cat de daño de gorgojos (de 1 = sin daño a 5 = daño severo, rendimiento promedio de forraje (BP, número de raíces secundarias (NRLR y diámetro de raíces laterales (DRLR. Las poblaciones s755, s545 y s614 presentaron los mayores valores de DRLR y NRLR, el menor daño de gorgojos (Cat 2+3 y la mayor variabilidad para los caracteres estudiados. Las poblaciones s545 y s616 exhibieron el mayor DRLR y el menor NRLR, respectivamente. Las condiciones de riego propiciaron un menor daño, y fueron menos afectadas en estos ambientes las poblaciones s545, s614 y s617; por el contrario, las poblaciones s461, s755, s463 resultaron las más afectadas. Los daños más severos (Cat 4+5 se observaron en secano y las poblaciones s618 y s616 fueron las más afectadas; sólo bajo estas condiciones el mayor daño se correlacionó con menor BP.Increasing the number of lateral roots through breeding may be important to reduce the damage caused by the root curculio complex in alfalfa in Argentina. The objective was to evaluate the performance of ten alfalfa experimental populations selected for their large number of lateral roots under four environmental conditions (fall and spring planting with or without irrigation. The evaluated traits were curculio damage (Categories (Cat 1 = no damage to 5 = very severe damage, dry matter yield (BP, number of secondary roots (NRLR, and diameter of lateral roots (DRLR. Populations s755, s545 and s614 had the highest values for DRLR and NRLR, the least damage from weevil (Cat 2 +3, and the largest variability (mean square for all the

  10. Novel large aperture EBCCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Atsumu; Aoki, Shigeki; Haba, Junji; Sakuda, Makoto; Suyama, Motohiro

    2011-02-01

    A novel large aperture electron bombardment charge coupled device (EBCCD) has been developed. The diameter of its photocathode is 10 cm and it is the first EBCCD with such a large aperture. Its gain shows good linearity as a function of applied voltage up to -12 kV, where the gain is 2400. The spatial resolution was measured using ladder pattern charts. It is better than 2 line pairs/mm, which corresponds to 3.5 times the CCD pixel size. The spatial resolution was also measured with a copper foil pattern on a fluorescent screen irradiated with X-rays (14 and 18 keV) and a 60 keV gamma-ray from an americium source. The result was consistent with the measurement using ladder pattern charts. The output signal as a function of input light intensity shows better linearity than that of image intensifier tubes (IIT) as expected. We could detect cosmic rays passing through a scintillating fiber block and a plastic scintillator as a demonstration for a practical use in particle physics experiments. This kind of large aperture EBCCD can, for example, be used as an image sensor for a detector with a large number of readout channels and is expected to be additionally applied to other physics experiments.

  11. Beyond the Numbers Making Sense of Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Christmann, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Statistics is required coursework within most teacher certification programs. Beyond the Numbers presents a nonthreatening, practical approach to statistics, providing step-by-step instructions for understanding and implementing the essential components of the subject.The basic and understandable explanations in Beyond the Numbers break down complex statistical processes to simple arithmetic computations that can be applied with the confidence that accompanies understanding.

  12. Number generation bias after action observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badets, Arnaud; Bouquet, Cédric A; Ric, François; Pesenti, Mauro

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that conceptual and abstract knowledge could rely on and could be influenced by sensory-motor processing of usual goal-directed actions. In line with this, interactions have been reported between number magnitude and finger grip with, for example, small-magnitude numbers priming grip closure and large-magnitude numbers priming grip aperture. Here, we assessed whether observing a closing or opening grip was able to influence the magnitude of the numbers produced in a random number generation task, and we tested whether this effect was specific to biological hand actions by using non-biological fake hands with the same closure or aperture amplitude. The participants were asked to produce as randomly as possible numbers between 1 and 10 after they observed a change in posture (i.e. grip closing or grip opening) or in colour (i.e. red or blue hand). The results revealed that the participants produced more often small numbers than large ones after observing a grip closing, whereas they produced equally often small and large numbers after observing a grip opening or colour changes. Importantly, this effect was only present for the biological hands but not for the non-biological fake hands. This finding demonstrates that observing a biological grip closing conveys small-magnitude information, which, in turn, influences the mental selection of a numerical response. We discuss our results in the light of the internal random generator process proposed in the domain of numerical cognition and argue that number semantics is stored with a code governed by sensory-motor mechanisms.

  13. High Rayleigh number convection numerical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzicco, Roberto

    2002-03-01

    Numerical experiments on the flow developing in a cylindrical cell of aspect ratio Γ = 1/2 heated from below and cooled from above, are conducted for Rayleigh numbers (Ra) ranging from 2 x 10^6 up to 2 x 10^11. The aim of the present study is to numerically replicate the experiments by Roche et al. (2001) and Niemela et al. (2000) performed using gaseous helium close to the critical point as working fluid (Pr = 0.7). The numerical simulation permitted us to generate a large data base which was validated by the experimental results and, on the other hand, provided physical insights which are missed by the experimental approaches usually limited to pointwise temperature and global heat exchange measurements. Attention is focussed on the presence of large-scale structures whose characterization is important owing to the introduction of constant `winds' sweeping the plates and generating viscous and thermal boundary layers. The analysis of instantaneous snapshots clearly indicates that the topology of the recirculating large scale structures is quite different with respect to what is commonly observed in Γ = 1 cells where a unique large scale recirculation structure completely fills the fluid volume (e.g. Verzicco & Camussi, 1999). It is shown that a transition occurs at about Ra = 10^9; at lower Ra the flow is characterized by the presence of two counter-rotating toroidal rings attached to the horizontal plates. At larger Ra, in contrast, the most intense structure consists of two counter-rotating rolls of unitary aspect ratio. The two types of flow, which co-exists in the range 10^9 thermal and the viscous boundary layers. Indeed, even if the limited range of Ra analyzed in the present simulation does not allow the presence of a transition to be clearly observed in the Nu vs Ra diagram, the proposed scenario is confirmed by the direct analysis of the boundary layer thicknesses and of the kinetic energy and temperature variance dissipations. The achieved results

  14. The future of large old trees in urban landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Darren S; Ikin, Karen; Lindenmayer, David B; Manning, Adrian D; Gibbons, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Large old trees are disproportionate providers of structural elements (e.g. hollows, coarse woody debris), which are crucial habitat resources for many species. The decline of large old trees in modified landscapes is of global conservation concern. Once large old trees are removed, they are difficult to replace in the short term due to typically prolonged time periods needed for trees to mature (i.e. centuries). Few studies have investigated the decline of large old trees in urban landscapes. Using a simulation model, we predicted the future availability of native hollow-bearing trees (a surrogate for large old trees) in an expanding city in southeastern Australia. In urban greenspace, we predicted that the number of hollow-bearing trees is likely to decline by 87% over 300 years under existing management practices. Under a worst case scenario, hollow-bearing trees may be completely lost within 115 years. Conversely, we predicted that the number of hollow-bearing trees will likely remain stable in semi-natural nature reserves. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the number of hollow-bearing trees perpetuated in urban greenspace over the long term is most sensitive to the: (1) maximum standing life of trees; (2) number of regenerating seedlings ha(-1); and (3) rate of hollow formation. We tested the efficacy of alternative urban management strategies and found that the only way to arrest the decline of large old trees requires a collective management strategy that ensures: (1) trees remain standing for at least 40% longer than currently tolerated lifespans; (2) the number of seedlings established is increased by at least 60%; and (3) the formation of habitat structures provided by large old trees is accelerated by at least 30% (e.g. artificial structures) to compensate for short term deficits in habitat resources. Immediate implementation of these recommendations is needed to avert long term risk to urban biodiversity.

  15. Induction Motor with Switchable Number of Poles and Toroidal Winding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNTEANU, A.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of an induction motor provided with toroidal stator winding. The ring-type coils offer a higher versatility in obtaining a different number of pole pairs by means of delta/star and series/parallel connections respectively. As consequence, the developed torque can vary within large limits and the motor can be utilized for applications that require, for example, high load torque values for a short time. The study involves experimental tests and FEM simulation for an induction machine with three configurations of pole pairs. The conclusions attest the superiority of the toroidal winding for certain applications such as electric vehicles or lifting machines.

  16. Using Visual Images To Support Young Children's Number Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasoni, Ann

    1999-01-01

    Provides opportunities for children to develop visual images of the number situations they are exploring in order to develop powerful number sense. Illustrates two visual teaching aids to help young children develop number images. (ASK)

  17. Comparison of quantitative flow cytometric data provided by panels with lower and increased color number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocsi, József; Mittag, Anja; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Baumgartner, Adolf; Dähnert, Ingo; Tárnok, Attila

    2012-03-01

    To date the flow cytometry (FCM) industry is booming with new generations of commercial clinical instruments. Long-term clinical studies have the dilemma that moving to new instruments being capable of more complex cell-analysis makes it difficult to compare new data with those obtained on older instruments with less complex analysis panels. Since 15 years we conduct follow-up studies on children with congenital heart diseases. In this period we moved from 2- to 3- and now to 10-color FCM immunophenotyping panels. Questions arise how to compare and transfer data from lower to higher level of complexity. Two comparable antibody panels for leukocyte immunophenotyping (12-tube 2-colors, and 9-tube 4-colors) were measured on a BD FACScalibur FCM (calibration: Spherotech beads) in 19 blood samples from children with congenital heart disease. This increase of colors was accompanied by moving antibodies that were in the 2-color panel either FITC or PE labeled to red dyes such as PerCP or APC. Algorithms were developed for bridging data for quantitative characterization of antigen expression (mean fluorescence intensity) and frequency of different cell subpopulations in combination with rainbow bead standard data. This approach worked for the most relevant antibodies (CD3, CD4, CD8 etc.) well, but rendered substantial uncertainty for activation markers (CD69 etc.). Our techniques are particularly well suited to the analysis in long-term studies and have the potential to compare older and recent results in a standardized way.

  18. Drinking in social groups. Does 'groupdrink' provide safety in numbers when deciding about risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopthrow, Tim; Randsley de Moura, Georgina; Meleady, Rose; Abrams, Dominic; Swift, Hannah J

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the impact of alcohol consumption on risk decisions taken both individually and while part of a four- to six-person ad-hoc group. A 2 (alcohol: consuming versus not consuming alcohol) × 2 (decision: individual, group) mixed-model design; decision was a repeated measure. The dependent variable was risk preference, measured using choice dilemmas. Opportunity sampling in campus bars and a music event at a campus-based university in the United Kingdom. A total of 101 individuals were recruited from groups of four to six people who either were or were not consuming alcohol. Participants privately opted for a level of risk in response to a choice dilemma and then, as a group, responded to a second choice dilemma. The choice dilemmas asked participants the level of accident risk at which they would recommend someone could drive while intoxicated. Five three-level multi-level models were specified in the software program HLM 7. Decisions made in groups were less risky than those made individually (B = -0.73, P < 0.001). Individual alcohol consumers opted for higher risk than non-consumers (B = 1.27, P = 0.025). A significant alcohol × decision interaction (B = -2.79, P = 0.001) showed that individual consumers privately opted for higher risk than non-consumers, whereas risk judgements made in groups of either consumers or non-consumers were lower. Decisions made by groups of consumers were less risky than those made by groups of non-consumers (B = 1.23, P < 0.001). Moderate alcohol consumption appears to produce a propensity among individuals towards increased risk-taking in deciding to drive while intoxicated, which can be mitigated by group monitoring processes within small (four- to six-person) groups. © 2014 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

  19. Every even number greater than 2 is the sum of two primes provided Riemann hypothesis holds

    OpenAIRE

    Sabihi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    We solve Goldbach's conjecture for all the evens greater than 2. This solution is based upon the proof of Sabihi's first and second conjectures (my own conjectures on Goldbach's one) and Riemann Hypothesis is supposed to be correct. Our essential method goes through compleax integral analysis. The first conjecture states that $L(N(k))-D(N(k))\\geq K(N(k),m)\\geq 2$ and $N(k)\\geq 120$, but since the proof can be exhaustive for special case $N(k)=n$, we therefore prove it in such a case. The seco...

  20. Small-scale dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S

    2012-12-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude, fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(ℓ)∝ℓ^{ϑ}, where v(ℓ) is the eddy velocity at a scale ℓ. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with ϑ=1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with ϑ=1/2. In this work, we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the evolution of the small-scale magnetic field, using the WKB approximation. In the limit of low magnetic Prandtl numbers, the growth rate is proportional to Rm^{(1-ϑ)/(1+ϑ)}. We furthermore discuss the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{crit}, which is required for small-scale dynamo action. The value of Rm_{crit} is roughly 100 for Kolmogorov turbulence and 2700 for Burgers. Furthermore, we discuss that Rm_{crit} provides a stronger constraint in the limit of low Pm than it does for large Pm. We conclude that the small-scale dynamo can operate in the regime of low magnetic Prandtl numbers if the magnetic Reynolds number is large enough. Thus, the magnetic field amplification on small scales can take place in a broad range of physical environments and amplify week magnetic seed fields on short time scales.

  1. Design Tools for Large Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Panikashvili, E; 15th IEEE Real Time Conference 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Atlas TDAQ network consists of four separate networks which together total over 4000 ports at 1Gb/s, 40 ports at 10Gbps, 200 Ethernet switches at the edge of the network, 6 multiblade chassis switches at the core and over 20 km of copper and fiber cabling. The NetDesign suite was developed to provide a comprehensive set of design tools that permits the generation of a navigable circuit design, automates a number of routine tasks and provides the user with a powerful and flexible reporting system. Netdesign is an addon extension to the basic functionality of the Microsoft Visio CAD tool. It features: automatic labeling of cables, media / port connection validation, navigation along a cable, schematic hierarchical, cross-page and vertical navigation, overall verification of network diagram and hyperlinks to other equipment databases. The internal network structure can be exported to a 3rd party database from which a user-friendly meta-language is used to process a large variety of reports on the network des...

  2. Accelerating Seismic Computations Using Customized Number Representations on FPGAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haohuan Fu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The oil and gas industry has an increasingly large demand for high-performance computation over huge volume of data. Compared to common processors, field-programable gate arrays (FPGAs can boost the computation performance with a streaming computation architecture and the support for application-specific number representation. With hardware support for reconfigurable number format and bit width, reduced precision can greatly decrease the area cost and I/O bandwidth of the design, thus multiplying the performance with concurrent processing cores on an FPGA. In this paper, we present a tool to determine the minimum number precision that still provides acceptable accuracy for seismic applications. By using the minimized number format, we implement core algorithms in seismic applications (the FK step in forward continued-based migration and 3D convolution in reverse time migration on FPGA and show speedups ranging from 5 to 7 by including the transfer time to and from the processors. Provided sufficient bandwidth between CPU and FPGA, we show that a further increase to 48X speedup is possible.

  3. Accelerating Seismic Computations Using Customized Number Representations on FPGAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clapp RobertG

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The oil and gas industry has an increasingly large demand for high-performance computation over huge volume of data. Compared to common processors, field-programable gate arrays (FPGAs can boost the computation performance with a streaming computation architecture and the support for application-specific number representation. With hardware support for reconfigurable number format and bit width, reduced precision can greatly decrease the area cost and I/O bandwidth of the design, thus multiplying the performance with concurrent processing cores on an FPGA. In this paper, we present a tool to determine the minimum number precision that still provides acceptable accuracy for seismic applications. By using the minimized number format, we implement core algorithms in seismic applications (the FK step in forward continued-based migration and 3D convolution in reverse time migration on FPGA and show speedups ranging from 5 to 7 by including the transfer time to and from the processors. Provided sufficient bandwidth between CPU and FPGA, we show that a further increase to 48X speedup is possible.

  4. 76 FR 79607 - Local Number Portability Porting Interval and Validation Requirements; Telephone Number Portability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ... information when the new service provider requests a CSR: any working telephone number associated with the... requests a Customer Service Record (CSR). Best Practice 70 provides that the transferring service provider may only require the following information when the new service provider requests a CSR: any working...

  5. An implementation of the number field sieve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.M. de Jong; J.A.J. Metz; M. Elkenbracht-Huizing; O. Diekmann (Odo)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe Number Field Sieve (NFS) is the asymptotically fastest known factoring algorithm for large integers. This article describes an implementation of the NFS, including the choice of two quadratic polynomials, both classical and lattice sieving, the block Lanczos method and a new square

  6. The number of expats is rather stable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    aggregate data from the Danish economist’s and the engineer’s trade unions show that during the last decade there has been stagnation in the number of expatriates. Taking into consideration that the three trade unions cover the very large majority of Danish knowledge workers occupying foreign job...

  7. European Scientific Notes. Volume 35, Number 10,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-31

    and particle distribution in orn imagery obtained by remote sensing devices, area cannot be safely or correctly extrap - Since large numbers of...phenomenon ent that the picture of hydroxyl ion is, of course, of importance in reactors disbondment is too simple, and complex where a potential build-up of

  8. Provider barriers to family planning access in urban Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumlinson, Katherine; Okigbo, Chinelo C; Speizer, Ilene S

    2015-08-01

    A better understanding of the prevalence of service provider-imposed barriers to family planning can inform programs intended to increase contraceptive use. This study, based on data from urban Kenya, describes the frequency of provider self-reported restrictions related to clients' age, parity, marital status, and third-party consent, and considers the impact of facility type and training on restrictive practices. Trained data collectors interviewed 676 service providers at 273 health care facilities in five Kenyan cities. Service providers were asked questions about their background and training and were also asked about age, marital, parity, or consent requirements for providing family planning services. More than half of providers (58%) reported imposing minimum age restrictions on one or more methods. These restrictions were commonly imposed on clients seeking injectables, a popular method in urban Kenya, with large numbers refusing to offer injectables to women younger than 20 years. Forty-one percent of providers reported that they would not offer one or more methods to nulliparous women and more than one in four providers reported that they would not offer the injectable to women without at least one child. Providers at private facilities were significantly more likely to impose barriers, across all method types, and those without in-service training on family planning provision had a significantly higher prevalence of imposing parity, marital, and consent barriers across most methods. Programs need to address provider-imposed barriers that reduce access to contraceptive methods particularly among young, lower parity, and single women. Promising strategies include targeting private facility providers and increasing the prevalence of in-service training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Competing features influence children's attention to number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jenny Yun-Chen; Mazzocco, Michèle M M

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous focus on numerosity (SFON), an attentional process that some consider distinct from number knowledge, predicts later mathematical skills. Here we assessed the "spontaneity" and malleability of SFON using a picture-matching task. We asked children to view a target picture and to choose which of four other pictures matched the target. We tested whether attention to number (defined as number-based matches) was affected by (a) age, (b) the presence of very noticeable (or salient) features among alternative match choices, and (c) the examiner's use of motor actions to emphasize numerosity. Although adults attended to number more frequently than did preschoolers, the salience of competing features affected responses to number in both age groups. Specifically, number-based matches were more likely when alternative choices matched the target on features of low versus high salience (e.g., the relative location within a picture frame vs. color). In addition, adults' attention to number was more frequent if their first exposure to number-based matches occurred with alternative choices that matched the target on low salience features. This order by salience interaction was not observed among children. Simply observing motor actions that emphasized number (i.e., tapping stimuli) did not enhance children's attention to number. The results extend previous findings on SFON and provide evidence for the contextual influences on, and malleability of, attention to number. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Topics in Number Theory Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, George; Ono, Ken

    1999-01-01

    From July 31 through August 3,1997, the Pennsylvania State University hosted the Topics in Number Theory Conference. The conference was organized by Ken Ono and myself. By writing the preface, I am afforded the opportunity to express my gratitude to Ken for beng the inspiring and driving force behind the whole conference. Without his energy, enthusiasm and skill the entire event would never have occurred. We are extremely grateful to the sponsors of the conference: The National Sci­ ence Foundation, The Penn State Conference Center and the Penn State Depart­ ment of Mathematics. The object in this conference was to provide a variety of presentations giving a current picture of recent, significant work in number theory. There were eight plenary lectures: H. Darmon (McGill University), "Non-vanishing of L-functions and their derivatives modulo p. " A. Granville (University of Georgia), "Mean values of multiplicative functions. " C. Pomerance (University of Georgia), "Recent results in primality testing. " C. ...

  11. Estimation of copy number alterations from exome sequencing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Valdés-Mas

    Full Text Available Exome sequencing constitutes an important technology for the study of human hereditary diseases and cancer. However, the ability of this approach to identify copy number alterations in primary tumor samples has not been fully addressed. Here we show that somatic copy number alterations can be reliably estimated using exome sequencing data through a strategy that we have termed exome2cnv. Using data from 86 paired normal and primary tumor samples, we identified losses and gains of complete chromosomes or large genomic regions, as well as smaller regions affecting a minimum of one gene. Comparison with high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization (CGH arrays revealed a high sensitivity and a low number of false positives in the copy number estimation between both approaches. We explore the main factors affecting sensitivity and false positives with real data, and provide a side by side comparison with CGH arrays. Together, these results underscore the utility of exome sequencing to study cancer samples by allowing not only the identification of substitutions and indels, but also the accurate estimation of copy number alterations.

  12. GASPRNG: GPU accelerated scalable parallel random number generator library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuang; Peterson, Gregory D.

    2013-04-01

    workstation with NVIDIA GPU (Tested on Fermi GTX480, Tesla C1060, Tesla M2070). Operating system: Linux with CUDA version 4.0 or later. Should also run on MacOS, Windows, or UNIX. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. Parallelized using MPI directives. RAM: 512 MB˜ 732 MB (main memory on host CPU, depending on the data type of random numbers.) / 512 MB (GPU global memory) Classification: 4.13, 6.5. Nature of problem: Many computational science applications are able to consume large numbers of random numbers. For example, Monte Carlo simulations are able to consume limitless random numbers for the computation as long as resources for the computing are supported. Moreover, parallel computational science applications require independent streams of random numbers to attain statistically significant results. The SPRNG library provides this capability, but at a significant computational cost. The GASPRNG library presented here accelerates the generators of independent streams of random numbers using graphical processing units (GPUs). Solution method: Multiple copies of random number generators in GPUs allow a computational science application to consume large numbers of random numbers from independent, parallel streams. GASPRNG is a random number generators library to allow a computational science application to employ multiple copies of random number generators to boost performance. Users can interface GASPRNG with software code executing on microprocessors and/or GPUs. Running time: The tests provided take a few minutes to run.

  13. Large scale tracking algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Ross L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Love, Joshua Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Melgaard, David Kennett [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Karelitz, David B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pitts, Todd Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zollweg, Joshua David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, Dylan Z. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nandy, Prabal [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whitlow, Gary L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bender, Daniel A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Byrne, Raymond Harry [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  14. Cordial Languages and Cordial Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Baskar BABUJEE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of cordial labeling in graphs motivated us to introduce cordial words, cordial languages and cordial numbers. We interpret the notion of cordial labeling in Automata and thereby study the corresponding languages. In this paper we develop a new sequence of numbers called the cordial numbers in number theory using the labeling techniques in graph theory on automata theory.

  15. Self-correcting random number generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humble, Travis S.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2016-09-06

    A system and method for generating random numbers. The system may include a random number generator (RNG), such as a quantum random number generator (QRNG) configured to self-correct or adapt in order to substantially achieve randomness from the output of the RNG. By adapting, the RNG may generate a random number that may be considered random regardless of whether the random number itself is tested as such. As an example, the RNG may include components to monitor one or more characteristics of the RNG during operation, and may use the monitored characteristics as a basis for adapting, or self-correcting, to provide a random number according to one or more performance criteria.

  16. Baryon number fluctuations in quasi-particle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ameng [Southeast University Chengxian College, Department of Foundation, Nanjing (China); Luo, Xiaofeng [Central China Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE), Institute of Particle Physics, Wuhan (China); Zong, Hongshi [Nanjing University, Department of Physics, Nanjing (China); Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology, Nanjing (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, CAS, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-04-15

    Baryon number fluctuations are sensitive to the QCD phase transition and the QCD critical point. According to the Feynman rules of finite-temperature field theory, we calculated various order moments and cumulants of the baryon number distributions in the quasi-particle model of the quark-gluon plasma. Furthermore, we compared our results with the experimental data measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. It is found that the experimental data can be well described by the model for the colliding energies above 30 GeV and show large discrepancies at low energies. This puts a new constraint on the qQGP model and also provides a baseline for the QCD critical point search in heavy-ion collisions at low energies. (orig.)

  17. JMBR VOLUME 14 Number 2.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FINEPRINT

    methods . In addition spousal disagreements can serve as deterrent because women might fear initiating a ... at which births occur in relation to the ages of the parents and to determine the. 10, 11 number of children in ... Teaching Hospital Zaria-Nigeria that provides Family planning services. The centre provides general ...

  18. Optimization of MIMO Systems Capacity Using Large Random Matrix Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Loubaton

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a comprehensive introduction of large random matrix methods for input covariance matrix optimization of mutual information of MIMO systems. It is first recalled informally how large system approximations of mutual information can be derived. Then, the optimization of the approximations is discussed, and important methodological points that are not necessarily covered by the existing literature are addressed, including the strict concavity of the approximation, the structure of the argument of its maximum, the accuracy of the large system approach with regard to the number of antennas, or the justification of iterative water-filling optimization algorithms. While the existing papers have developed methods adapted to a specific model, this contribution tries to provide a unified view of the large system approximation approach.

  19. Optimizing the number of steps in learning tasks for complex skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadolski, Rob J; Kirschner, Paul A; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J G

    2005-06-01

    Carrying out whole tasks is often too difficult for novice learners attempting to acquire complex skills. The common solution is to split up the tasks into a number of smaller steps. The number of steps must be optimized for efficient and effective learning. The aim of the study is to investigate the relation between the number of steps provided to learners and the quality of their learning of complex skills. It is hypothesized that students receiving an optimized number of steps will learn better than those receiving either the whole task in only one step or those receiving a large number of steps. Participants were 35 sophomore law students studying at Dutch universities, mean age=22.8 years (SD=3.5), 63% were female. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 computer-delivered versions of a multimedia programme on how to prepare and carry out a law plea. The versions differed only in the number of learning steps provided. Videotaped plea-performance results were determined, various related learning measures were acquired and all computer actions were logged and analyzed. Participants exposed to an intermediate (i.e. optimized) number of steps outperformed all others on the compulsory learning task. No differences in performance on a transfer task were found. A high number of steps proved to be less efficient for carrying out the learning task. An intermediate number of steps is the most effective, proving that the number of steps can be optimized for improving learning.

  20. Investor reaction to strategic emphasis on earnings numbers: An empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shibley Sadique

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the earnings information and stock prices of S&P500 firms and find that investors following S&P500 stocks (i respond more to pro forma earnings than to GAAP earnings, (ii respond to an emphasis on pro forma earnings, and (iii are fixated on pro forma earnings. We provide the first direct evidence that a strategic emphasis on earnings numbers may affect return volatility. Further, our results do not support the argument that a larger investor response to Street earnings might be driven by large differences between the Street numbers and GAAP numbers.