WorldWideScience

Sample records for providing indirect patient

  1. Indirect Calorimetry in Mechanically Ventilated Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Matilde Jo; Kondrup, Jens; Perner, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: The 2 currently available indirect calorimeters, CCM Express Indirect Calorimeter (MedGraphics, St Paul, MN) and Quark RMR ICU Indirect Calorimeter (COSMED, Rome, Italy), have not been validated against a gold standard in mechanically ventilated patients. Our aim was to do so...

  2. Indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography in patients with lymphedema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohrmann, Christian [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 55, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany)]. E-mail: lohrmann@mrs1.ukl.uni-freiburg.de; Foeldi, Etelka [Foeldi Clinic for Lymphology, Hinterzarten, Roesslehofweg 2-6, D-79856 Hinterzarten (Germany); Langer, Mathias [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Freiburg, Hugstetter Strasse 55, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of indirect magnetic resonance (MR) lymphangiography with intracutaneous injection of gadodiamide, a commercially available, non-ionic, extracellular paramagnetic contrast agent for the detection of lymphatic vessels in patients with lymphedema. Materials and methods: In 2005, three patients with lymphedema of the lower extremities (1 primary, 2 secondary) were referred by the Foeldi Clinic for Lymphology for indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography. 4.5 mL of gadodiamide and 0.5 mL of mepivacainhydrochloride 1% were injected intracutaneously into the dorsal aspect of each foot. MR imaging was performed with a 1.5-T system equipped with high-performance gradients. For indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography, a 3D Fast Low Angle Shot (FLASH) sequence (TR/TE: 5.1/1.23; flip angle: 25; matrix: 448 x 448; bandwidth: 330 Hz/pixel; 6/8 rectangular field of view with a maximum dimension of 500 mm; slices: 88; voxel size: 2.0 mm x 1.0 mm x 1.0 mm; acquisition time: 0 min 31 s) was used. Results: Indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography depicted lymphatic vessels of the lower and upper leg, and inguinal lymph nodes in all three patients. After 5 min of contrast material application, concomitant venous enhancement was detected. Collateral vessels with dermal back-flow were seen in two patients. A lymphocele in the inguinal region with the afferent lymphatic vessel was depicted in one patient. Conclusion: In the presented small study group, indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography was technically feasible, and no complications were observed after intracutaneous injection of gadodiamide. Visualizing the lymphatic vessels and accompanying complications non-invasively and without the use of radiation, the presented method has the capability to become a routine diagnostic imaging tool in patients with primary and secondary lymphedema. The method is not able to characterize lymph node morphology, but could provide additional

  3. Understanding the direct and indirect costs of patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima-Pozo, Kazuhiro; de Castro Oller, María Jesús; Lewczuk, Adrian; Montañes-Rada, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Background : Schizophrenia is a disabling mental disorder with high prevalence and that usually  requires long-term follow-up and expensive lifelong treatment. The cost of schizophrenia treatment consumes a significant amount of the health services' budget in western countries. Objective : The aim of the study was to find out about the costs related to schizophrenia across different european countries and compare them. Results : Schizophrenia treatment costs an estimated 18 billion euros annually worldwide. The direct costs associated with medical help are only part of the total expenditure. The indirect costs are an equally (or even more)important part of the total cost. These expenses are related to the lack of productivity of schizophrenic patients and the cost that relatives have to bear as a result of taking care of their affected relatives. Conclusions : Although data on the cost of schizophrenia may vary slightly between different european countries, the general conclusion that can be drawn is that schizophrenia is a very costly disorder. Not only because of direct costs related to medical procedures, but also due to the non-medical (indirect) costs. Together this suggests the need to investigate cost-efficient strategies that could provide a better outcome for schizophrenic patients, as well as the people who care for them.

  4. Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Patients with Indirect Hyperbilirubinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Meltem Kayahan Ulu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI changes in the patients with indirect hyperbilirubinemia. Methods: MRI findings of eighteen neonates with indirect hyperbilirubinemia were reported by us. The differences in imaging, clinical and biochemical data between three groups were evaluated statistically. Results: Peak bilirubin levels were between 20 and 24 mg per deciliter in 5 of the newborns (group 1, 25 and 29 mg per deciliter in 6 of the newborns (group 2 and 30 mg per deciliter or more in 7 newborns (group 3. There was statistically significant difference between the neurological findings and MRI findings of the patients between three groups. Conclusion: We always demonstrated MRI changes in the patients with kernicterus. Firstly, T1 weighted changes were described in patients with hyperbilirubinemia despite normal neurological examinations. Larger studies with clinical follow up are needed for further understanding of toxic effect of bilirubin in brain. Key words: Ozet [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(3.000: 139-145

  5. Male songbirds provide indirect parental care by guarding females during incubation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedy, B.C.; Martin, T.E.

    2009-01-01

    Across many taxa, guarding of fertile mates is a widespread tactic that enhances paternity assurance. However, guarding of mates can also occur during the nonfertile period, and the fitness benefits of this behavior are unclear. Male songbirds, for example, sometimes guard nonfertile females during foraging recesses from incubation. We hypothesized that guarding postreproductive mates may have important, but unrecognized, benefits by enhancing female foraging efficiency, thereby increasing time spent incubating eggs. We tested the hypothesis in 2 songbird species by examining female behavior during natural and experimentally induced absences of males. Male absence caused increased vigilance in foraging females that decreased their efficiency and resulted in less time spent incubating eggs. Male guarding of nonfertile females can thus provide a previously unrecognized form of indirect parental care.

  6. Do PICU patients meet technical criteria for performing indirect calorimetry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, Megan R; Garcia Guerra, Gonzalo; Larsen, Bodil M K

    2016-10-01

    Indirect calorimetry (IC) is considered gold standard for assessing energy needs of critically ill children as predictive equations and clinical status indicators are often unreliable. Accurate assessment of energy requirements in this vulnerable population is essential given the high risk of over or underfeeding and the consequences thereof. The proportion of patients and patient days in pediatric intensive care (PICU) for which energy expenditure (EE) can be measured using IC is currently unknown. In the current study, we aimed to quantify the daily proportion of consecutive PICU patients who met technical criteria to perform indirect calorimetry and describe the technical contraindications when criteria were not met. Prospective, observational, single-centre study conducted in a cardiac and general PICU. All consecutive patients admitted for at least 96 h were included in the study. Variables collected for each patient included age at admission, admission diagnosis, and if technical criteria for indirect calorimetry were met. Technical criteria variables were collected within the same 2 h each morning and include: provision of supplemental oxygen, ventilator settings, endotracheal tube (ETT) leak, diagnosis of chest tube air leak, provision of external gas support (i.e. nitric oxide), and provision of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). 288 patients were included for a total of 3590 patient days between June 2014 and February 2015. The main reasons for admission were: surgery (cardiac and non-cardiac), respiratory distress, trauma, oncology and medicine/other. The median (interquartile range) patient age was 0.7 (0.3-4.6) years. The median length of PICU stay was 7 (5-14) days. Only 34% (95% CI, 32.4-35.5%) of patient days met technical criteria for IC. For patients less than 6 months of age, technical criteria were met on significantly fewer patient days (29%, p meet technical criteria for IC on any day during their PICU stay. Most frequent reasons

  7. Patient centred care in infertility health care: direct and indirect associations with wellbeing during treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, Sofia; Canavarro, Maria Cristina; Boivin, Jacky

    2013-12-01

    To investigate whether different dimensions of patient centred care (PCC) were directly associated with wellbeing or indirectly, via lower concerns about medical procedures and/or increased tolerability of treatment. Cross-sectional study with 322 women and 111 men undergoing fertility diagnosis or treatment recruited online and in clinical setting. Participants completed questionnaires that assess PCC (PCQ-Infertility), individual (BSI Anxiety and Depression subscales) and relational wellbeing (FertiQoL Relational Domain), treatment concerns (CART Procedural Concerns scale) and tolerability (FertiQoL Tolerability Domain) and they filled a socio-demographic and fertility data file. All dimensions of PCC were positively associated with better wellbeing except for organization of care. Information provision and continuity of care were indirectly associated with better individual wellbeing, the first via lower treatment concerns and the second via higher treatment tolerability. Competence, accessibility, continuity and communication were indirectly associated with better relational wellbeing via higher treatment tolerability. Patient centred care promotes wellbeing during treatment. PCC is directly associated to wellbeing but also indirectly. The mode of action of the different PCC dimensions on wellbeing varies. To promote patients' wellbeing during treatment clinics should provide treatment related information and allow patients to establish a stable clinical relationship with a trustworthy and competent physician. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Manifestations and intensity of indirect self-destructiveness in patients with psoriasis vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Bienias

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psoriasis is a chronic systemic disease which often significantly reduces the quality of life in extreme situations can provide to severe depression and even suicide. Indirect self-destructiveness is a generalized trend of behavior consisting of taking steps to increase the likelihood of negative and reduce the likelihood of positive consequences for the entity within a general manifestations such as transgression of norms and risk, addictions, poor health maintenance, personal and social neglect, lack of planfulness, helplessness and passiveness. Polish and world literature has no publications on indirect self-destructiveness in psoriasis nor in any skin diseases. The main aim of this study was to investigate the intensity and symptoms of indirect self-destructiveness in population of patients with psoriasis vulgaris Material and methods: The material consisted of 82 patients with psoriasis vulgaris hospitalized in the Department of Dermatology, Pediatric Dermatology and Oncology in 2013-2014. For the achievement of the objectives of the research socio-demographic questionnaire (own authorship and Indirect Chronic Self-Destructiveness Scale by Kelley in Polish adaptation of Suchańska (version for men and women – each containing 52 issues was used. Results: The results showed that in a population of people with psoriasis overall severity of indirect self-destructiveness was in the lower range of the average results. The dominant class of indirect self-destructiveness was helplessness and passivity that preceded the poor health maintenance and lack of planning. Conclusions: The results will enrich the existing knowledge about the harmful conduct of psoriasis and a better approach to the patient.

  9. Direct and indirect effects of everyday emotions on food intake of elderly patients in institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Catherine; St-Arnaud-McKenzie, Danielle; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne; Ferland, Guylaine; Dubé, Laurette

    2003-02-01

    Decreased food intake is an important risk factor for malnutrition, which is highly prevalent among geriatric patients. The emotional nature of the hospitalization experience and the complex organizational setting involved in meal production and delivery services in institutions increase the risk for decreased food intake. Everyday emotions are known to have a particularly strong influence on decision-making and behavior in the elderly, and have also been shown, in younger populations, to influence food intake and its psychological antecedents, such as quality perception and satisfaction judgments. The objective of this paper is to study the direct impact of elderly patients' everyday emotions on food intake and their indirect effects mediated by quality perceptions and satisfaction judgments. Thirty patients (20 women, 10 men, 65-92 age range) in a geriatric rehabilitation unit were observed on repeated meal episodes (average of 46 care episodes per patient) where they provided self-reports for emotions (positive emotions, anger, anxiety, and mild depressed feelings), perceived meal quality, and satisfaction. Food intake was measured in terms of energy and protein content. The impact on food intake was favorable, and both direct and indirect for positive emotions, direct and negative for anxiety, direct and positive for mild depressed feelings, and indirect and negative for anger. Indirect effects were mediated by quality perception judgments but not by satisfaction, which was not significantly related to food intake. Results suggest that, given their impact on food intake, measuring and monitoring patients' everyday emotions may be an important innovative strategy to improve food intake of elderly patients in institutions.

  10. Tuberculosis patients in the Dominican Republic face severe direct and indirect costs and need social protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauch, Verena; Melgen, Ricardo; Marcelino, Belkys; Acosta, Ivelisse; Klinkenberg, Eveline; Suarez, Pedro

    2013-05-01

    To examine direct and indirect costs incurred by new, retreatment, and multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) patients in the Dominican Republic before and during diagnosis, and during treatment, to generate an evidence base and formulate recommendations. The "Tool to Estimate Patients' Costs" was adapted to the local setting, translated into Spanish, and pretested. Patients attending 32 randomly selected health facilities in six chosen study areas on the study days were interviewed. Responses from patients 18-65 years old who had received treatment for at least one month and provided signed informed consent were collected, entered into a database, and analyzed. A total of 200 patients were interviewed. For most respondents, direct and indirect costs increased while income decreased. Total costs amounted to a median of US$ 908 for new patients, US$ 432 for retreatment patients, and US$ 3 557 for MDR-TB patients. The proportion of patients without a regular income increased from 1% to 54% because of falling ill with TB. Following its review of the study results the Ministry of Health has made efforts to allocate public funds for food supplements and to include in- and outpatient TB services in the national health insurance schemes. Free TB diagnosis and treatment are not enough to alleviate the financial constraints experienced by vulnerable groups as a result of the illness. Health insurance covering TB in- and outpatient costs is critical to prevent TB-related financial hardship.

  11. A scoping review of indirect comparison methods and applications using individual patient data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areti Angeliki Veroniki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several indirect comparison methods, including network meta-analyses (NMAs, using individual patient data (IPD have been developed to synthesize evidence from a network of trials. Although IPD indirect comparisons are published with increasing frequency in health care literature, there is no guidance on selecting the appropriate methodology and on reporting the methods and results. Methods In this paper we examine the methods and reporting of indirect comparison methods using IPD. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and CINAHL from inception until October 2014. We included published and unpublished studies reporting a method, application, or review of indirect comparisons using IPD and at least three interventions. Results We identified 37 papers, including a total of 33 empirical networks. Of these, only 9 (27 % IPD-NMAs reported the existence of a study protocol, whereas 3 (9 % studies mentioned that protocols existed without providing a reference. The 33 empirical networks included 24 (73 % IPD-NMAs and 9 (27 % matching adjusted indirect comparisons (MAICs. Of the 21 (64 % networks with at least one closed loop, 19 (90 % were IPD-NMAs, 13 (68 % of which evaluated the prerequisite consistency assumption, and only 5 (38 % of the 13 IPD-NMAs used statistical approaches. The median number of trials included per network was 10 (IQR 4–19 (IPD-NMA: 15 [IQR 8–20]; MAIC: 2 [IQR 3–5], and the median number of IPD trials included in a network was 3 (IQR 1–9 (IPD-NMA: 6 [IQR 2–11]; MAIC: 2 [IQR 1–2]. Half of the networks (17; 52 % applied Bayesian hierarchical models (14 one-stage, 1 two-stage, 1 used IPD as an informative prior, 1 unclear-stage, including either IPD alone or with aggregated data (AD. Models for dichotomous and continuous outcomes were available (IPD alone or combined with AD, as were models for time-to-event data (IPD combined with AD. Conclusions One in three indirect comparison

  12. Prehospital Providers' Perceptions on Providing Patient and Family Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Emily M; Sampayo, Esther M; Shah, Manish I; Doughty, Cara B

    2017-01-01

    A gap exists in understanding a provider's approach to delivering care that is mutually beneficial to patients, families, and other providers in the prehospital setting. The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes, beliefs, and perceived barriers to providing patient and family centered care (PFCC) in the prehospital setting and to describe potential solutions for improving PFCC during critical pediatric events. We conducted a qualitative, cross-sectional study of a purposive sample of Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and paramedics from an urban, municipal, fire-based EMS system, who participated in the Pediatric Simulation Training for Emergency Prehospital Providers (PediSTEPPS) course. Two coders reviewed transcriptions of audio recordings from participants' first simulation scenario debriefings and performed constant comparison analysis to identify unifying themes. Themes were verified through member checking with two focus groups of prehospital providers. A total of 122 EMTs and paramedics participated in 16 audiotaped debriefing sessions and two focus groups. Four overarching themes emerged regarding the experience of PFCC by prehospital providers: (1) Perceived barriers included the prehospital environment, limited manpower, multi-tasking medical care, and concern for interference with patient care; (2) Providing emotional support comprised of empathetically comforting caregivers, maintaining a calm demeanor, and empowering families to feel involved; (3) Effective communication strategies consisted of designating a family point person, narration of actions, preempting the next steps, speaking in lay terms, summarizing during downtime, and conveying a positive first impression; (4) Tactics to overcome PFCC barriers were maintaining a line of sight, removing and returning a caregiver to and from the scene, and providing situational awareness. Based on debriefings from simulated scenarios, some prehospital providers identified the provision of

  13. Direct and indirect costs of tuberculosis among immigrant patients in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kik, Sandra V.; Olthof, Sandra P. J.; de Vries, Jonie T. N.; Menzies, Dick; Kincler, Naomi; van Loenhout-Rooyakkers, Joke; Burdo, Conny; Verver, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    In low tuberculosis (TB) incidence countries TB affects mostly immigrants in the productive age group. Little empirical information is available about direct and indirect TB-related costs that patients face in these high-income countries. We assessed the direct and indirect costs of immigrants with

  14. A study on indirect and intangible costs for patients with knee osteoarthritis in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Thumboo, Julian; Fong, Kok-Yong; Lo, Ngai-Nung; Yeo, Seng-Jin; Yang, Kuang-Ying; Li, Shu-Chuen

    2008-03-01

    To estimate indirect costs through human capital approach and intangible costs through willingness-to-pay (WTP), and identify factors potentially affecting these costs in multiethnic Asian patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Data were collected through face-to-face interviews among knee OA patients. Human capital approach was used to estimate indirect costs by multiplying: 1) days of absence from work because of OA, with average earnings per capita per day for working patients; or 2) productivity loss with the market price of housekeeping for retirees/homemakers. A closed-ended iterative bidding contingent valuation method was used to elicit willingness-to-pay for a hypothetical cure of OA as a proxy for intangible costs. Mann-Whitney U or Kruskal-Wallis H-tests were performed in univariate analyzes, and linear regression in multivariate analyses. Indirect costs per year and intangible costs were estimated at US$1008 and US$1200, accounting for 2.8% and 3.3% of annual household income, respectively. The indirect costs were significantly higher for male or working patients, while intangible costs were higher for Chinese, working patients, with higher income, or worse global well-being. This study demonstrated that eliciting indirect costs through human capital approach and intangible costs through WTP are acceptable and feasible in Asian patients with knee OA. Besides the direct costs, the indirect and intangible costs for the OA patients could be substantial.

  15. [Collaboration patients-health care providers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grezet-Bento de Carvalho, Angela; Griesser, Anne-Claude; Hertz, Silvana; Constantin, Michèle; Forni, Michel; Blagojevic, Stina; Bouchardy, Christine; Vlastos, Georges

    2007-10-24

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Daily suffering of patients and their relatives is often ignored or underestimated. Scientific advances focus on medical treatments and survival and very little on the psychosocial impact of the disease. The shared expertise between breast cancer patients and health care providers is an innovative and promising approach aiming to provide better quality of life and care. The participation of patients permits to bring together professionals around common goals and to promote multidisciplinary disease management, networking and global care. Focusing on very concrete problems highlighted from patients' expertise also improves research, medical training, and health policy standards.

  16. Providing Culturally Sensitive Care for Transgender Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguen, Shira; Shipherd, Jillian C.; Harris, Holly N.

    2005-01-01

    Culturally sensitive information is crucial for providing appropriate care to any minority population. This article provides an overview of important issues to consider when working with transgender patients, including clarification of transgender terminology, diagnosis issues, identity development, and appropriate pronoun use. We also review…

  17. Providing sexual information to ostomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloeckner, M R; Starling, J R

    1982-09-01

    Forty patients with a permanent colostomy, ileostomy, or ileal conduit were interviewed. Besides changes in sexual performance postoperatively, the authors specifically attempted to determine answers to other sexual variables such as attractiveness, appliance problems, and partner reactions. The extent of information provided to patients on sexuality prior to the permanent ostomy was also examined. There was a significant but predictable incidence of male impotence and female dyspareunia after surgery. Despite innumerable sexual variables, other than performance, which these patients faced postoperatively, 42 per cent received no information regarding sexuality at the time of ostomy surgery. most patients (97.5 per cent) stated that sexuality, including variables other than performance, should be discussed primarily by the surgeon prior to permanent ostomy surgery. The enterostomal therapist has an important role in the total patient adjustment in the long-term postoperative period.

  18. Tuberculosis patients in the Dominican Republic face severe direct and indirect costs and need social protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauch, V.M.C.; Melgen, R.; Marcelino, B.; Acosta, I.; Klinkenberg, E.; Suarez, P.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine direct and indirect costs incurred by new, retreatment, and multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) patients in the Dominican Republic before and during diagnosis, and during treatment, to generate an evidence base and formulate recommendations. METHODS: The "Tool to

  19. The prediction of difficult intubation in obese patients using mirror indirect laryngoscopy: A prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Arne O; Desciak, Matthew; Reddy, Venugopal; Falcucci, Octavio A; Vaida, Sonia J; Pott, Leonard M

    2013-04-01

    The incidence of difficult laryngoscopy and intubation in obese patients is higher than in the general population. Classical predictors of difficult laryngoscopy and intubation have been shown to be unreliable. We prospectively evaluated indirect mirror laryngoscopy as a predictor of difficult laryngoscopy in obese patients. 60 patients with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30, scheduled to undergo general anesthesia, were enrolled. Indirect mirror laryngoscopy was performed and was graded 1-4 according to Cormack and Lehane. A view of grade 3-4 was classified as predicting difficult laryngoscopy. Additional assessments for comparison were the Samsoon and Young modification of the Mallampati airway classification, Wilson Risk Sum Score, neck circumference, and BMI. The view obtained upon direct laryngoscopy after induction of general anesthesia was classified according to Cormack and Lehane as grade 1-4. Sixty patients met the inclusion criteria; however, 8 (13.3%) patients had an excessive gag reflex, and examination of the larynx was not possible. 15.4% of patients who underwent direct laryngoscopy had a Cormack and Lehane grade 3 or 4 view and were classified as difficult. Mirror laryngoscopy had a tendency toward statistical significance in predicting difficult laryngoscopy in these patients. This study is consistent with previous studies, which have demonstrated that no one individual traditional test has proven to be adequate in predicting difficult airways in the obese population. However, the new application of an old test - indirect mirror laryngoscopy - could be a useful additional test to predict difficult laryngoscopy in obese patients.

  20. Merging Children's Oncology Group Data with an External Administrative Database Using Indirect Patient Identifiers: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimei Li

    Full Text Available Clinical trials data from National Cancer Institute (NCI-funded cooperative oncology group trials could be enhanced by merging with external data sources. Merging without direct patient identifiers would provide additional patient privacy protections. We sought to develop and validate a matching algorithm that uses only indirect patient identifiers.We merged the data from two Phase III Children's Oncology Group (COG trials for de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML with the Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS. We developed a stepwise matching algorithm that used indirect identifiers including treatment site, gender, birth year, birth month, enrollment year and enrollment month. Results from the stepwise algorithm were compared against the direct merge method that used date of birth, treatment site, and gender. The indirect merge algorithm was developed on AAML0531 and validated on AAML1031.Of 415 patients enrolled on the AAML0531 trial at PHIS centers, we successfully matched 378 (91.1% patients using the indirect stepwise algorithm. Comparison to the direct merge result suggested that 362 (95.7% matches identified by the indirect merge algorithm were concordant with the direct merge result. When validating the indirect stepwise algorithm using the AAML1031 trial, we successfully matched 157 out of 165 patients (95.2% and 150 (95.5% of the indirectly merged matches were concordant with the directly merged matches.These data demonstrate that patients enrolled on COG clinical trials can be successfully merged with PHIS administrative data using a stepwise algorithm based on indirect patient identifiers. The merged data sets can be used as a platform for comparative effectiveness and cost effectiveness studies.

  1. Airway evaluation by indirect laryngoscopy in patients with lingual tonsillar hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Morillo, Jorge; Gómez-Diago, Lorena; Rodríguez-Gimillo, Pablo; Herrera-Collado, Raúl; Puchol-Castillo, Jorge; Mompó-Romero, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of the lingual tonsillar hypertrophy is unknown but it is believed that its presence is associated with the difficult airway. To investigate this, indirect laryngoscopy was performed on patients in the preoperative evaluation and this pathology was diagnosed. The relationship with difficulty of viewing the larynx, intubation and ventilation, under general anaesthesia and using direct laryngoscopy, was then studied. We performed the demographic variable checks and tests for predicting difficult intubation (mouth opening, thyromental distance, cervical flexion-extension, neck thickness and Mallampati test), in the preoperative step on 300 patients who were going to be submitted to general anaesthesia. We then performed indirect laryngoscopy on them using a 70° rigid laryngoscope to ascertain the frequency of appearance of lingual tonsillar hypertrophy. Next, under general anaesthesia, we carried out direct laryngoscopy to verify whether there was difficulty in viewing the larynx and intubation and ventilation. We then investigated the association of demographic predictors of difficult intubation, including indirect laryngoscopy, with the presence of this condition. Prevalence of lingual tonsillar hypertrophy was 2%. No relationship between the appearance of this entity and the difficulty of viewing the larynx, intubation and ventilation was found. Only indirect laryngoscopy was linked to the appearance of this pathology. Lingual tonsillar hypertrophy is a relatively frequent disorder, whose presence is not usually associated with difficult airway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Expulsive therapy versus early endoscopic stone removal in patients with acute renal colic: a comparison of indirect costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauw, Casey A; Kaufman, Samuel R; Hollenbeck, Brent K; Roberts, William W; Faerber, Gary J; Wolf, J Stuart; Hollingsworth, John M

    2014-03-01

    While medical expulsive therapy is associated with lower health care expenditures compared to early endoscopic stone removal in patients with renal colic, little is known about the effect of medical expulsive therapy on indirect costs. Using a previously validated claims based algorithm we identified a cohort of patients with acute renal colic. After determining the up-front treatment type (ie an initial course of medical expulsive therapy vs early endoscopic stone removal) we compared differences in rates of short-term disability filing. We used propensity score matching to account for differences between treatment groups such that patients treated with medical expulsive therapy vs early endoscopic stone removal were similar with regard to measured characteristics. In total, 257 (35.8%) and 461 (64.2%) patients were treated with medical expulsive therapy or early endoscopic stone removal, respectively. There were no differences between treatment groups after propensity score matching. In the matched cohort the patients treated with medical expulsive therapy had a 6% predicted probability of filing a claim for short-term disability compared to 16.5% in the early endoscopic stone removal cohort (p indirect costs to the patient compared to early endoscopic stone removal. These findings have implications for providers when counseling patients with acute renal colic. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Direct and indirect costs and potential cost savings of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding among obese patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Eric A; Allaire, Benjamin T; DiBonaventura, Marco DaCosta; Burgess, Somali M

    2011-09-01

    To estimate the time to breakeven and 5-year net costs for laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding among obese patients with diabetes taking direct and indirect costs into account. Indirect cost savings were generated by quantifying the cross-sectional relationship between medical expenditures and absenteeism and between medical expenditures and presenteeism (reduced on-the-job productivity) and simulating indirect cost savings based on these multipliers and reductions in direct medical costs available in the literature. Time to breakeven was estimated to be nine quarters with and without the inclusion of indirect costs. After 5 years, net savings increase from $26570 (±$9000) to $34160 (±$10 380) when indirect costs are included. This study presented a novel approach for incorporating indirect costs into cost-benefit analyses. Application to gastric banding revealed that inclusion of indirect costs improves the financial outlook for the procedure. (C)2011The American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

  4. Patient-Provider Communication: the Rise of Patient Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenerette, Coretta M; Mayer, Deborah K

    2016-05-01

    To describe the changing dynamics of patient-provider communication with proposals for optimizing this important relationship. Current research, national programs and guidelines from the National Cancer Institute, the Commission on Cancer, the Institute of Medicine, and the Oncology Nursing Society. There are important opportunities to apply evidence-based strategies to optimize patient-provider communication that will result in improved health outcomes. Oncology nurses across all areas of practice, including clinical care, research, and education, can play a significant role in achieving the goal of positive health outcomes by addressing challenges that inhibit effective patient-provider communication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Provider and patient perception of psychiatry patient health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Opal; Vandenberg, Amy; May, Meghan E

    2017-01-01

    Inadequate health literacy in adults is a nationwide issue that is associated with worse health outcomes. There is a paucity of literacy regarding rates of inadequate health literacy in psychiatric populations. The aim of the study was to identify an existing tool that would easily identify patients who had inadequate health literacy, so that a targeted intervention could be performed. Secondarily we attempted to compare rates of inadequate health literacy with providers' perception of patients' health literacy. We assessed health literacy in a psychiatric population by administering the Brief Health Literacy Survey (BHLS). Additionally, all psychiatry residents, psychiatrists, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, and social workers were surveyed to assess their perception of patient health literacy. Differences between patient health literacy and provider expectations of patient health literacy were compared. Inadequate health literacy was identified in 31 out of 61 patients (50.8%) using 2 questions from the BHLS. Only 9 (29%) of patients who were identified as having inadequate health literacy were identified by both BHLS questions. In contrast, almost 100% of providers identified their patients, in general, as having inadequate health literacy. These results identify a higher rate of health literacy in a psychiatric inpatient population than in the general population. However, providers at this institution likely over-identify health literacy. This highlights the need for a health literacy tool that can easily target patients with inadequate health literacy for an intervention.

  6. The prediction of difficult intubation in obese patients using mirror indirect laryngoscopy: A prospective pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne O Budde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of difficult laryngoscopy and intubation in obese patients is higher than in the general population. Classical predictors of difficult laryngoscopy and intubation have been shown to be unreliable. We prospectively evaluated indirect mirror laryngoscopy as a predictor of difficult laryngoscopy in obese patients. Materials and Methods: 60 patients with a body mass index (BMI greater than 30, scheduled to undergo general anesthesia, were enrolled. Indirect mirror laryngoscopy was performed and was graded 1-4 according to Cormack and Lehane. A view of grade 3-4 was classified as predicting difficult laryngoscopy. Additional assessments for comparison were the Samsoon and Young modification of the Mallampati airway classification, Wilson Risk Sum Score, neck circumference, and BMI. The view obtained upon direct laryngoscopy after induction of general anesthesia was classified according to Cormack and Lehane as grade 1-4. Results: Sixty patients met the inclusion criteria; however, 8 (13.3% patients had an excessive gag reflex, and examination of the larynx was not possible. 15.4% of patients who underwent direct laryngoscopy had a Cormack and Lehane grade 3 or 4 view and were classified as difficult. Mirror laryngoscopy had a tendency toward statistical significance in predicting difficult laryngoscopy in these patients. Conclusions: This study is consistent with previous studies, which have demonstrated that no one individual traditional test has proven to be adequate in predicting difficult airways in the obese population. However, the new application of an old test - indirect mirror laryngoscopy - could be a useful additional test to predict difficult laryngoscopy in obese patients.

  7. Direct and indirect healthcare costs of rheumatoid arthritis patients in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuryudan, Vedat; Direskeneli, Haner; Ertenli, Ihsan; Inanc, Murat; Karaaslan, Yasar; Oksel, Fahrettin; Ozbek, Suleyman; Pay, Salih; Terzioglu, Ender; Balkan Tezer, Dilara; Hacibedel, Basak; Akkoc, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    To estimate the annual cost of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Turkey by obtaining real-world data directly from patients. In this cross-sectional study, RA patients from the rheumatology outpatient clinics of 10 university hospitals were interviewed with a standardised questionnaire on RA-related healthcare care costs. The study included 689 RA patients (565 females) with a mean age of 51.2±13.2 years and mean disease duration of 9.4±7.8 years. The mean scores of the Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 and the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (5.08±2.34 and 1.08±0.68, respectively) indicated moderate disease activity and severity for the whole group. One-third of the patients were on biologic agents and 12% had co-morbid conditions. The mean number of annual outpatient visits was 11.7±9.6 per patient. Of the patients, 15% required hospitalisation and 4% underwent surgery. The mean annual direct cost was € 4,954 (median, € 1,805), whereas the mean annual indirect cost was € 2,802 (median, € 608). Pharmacy costs accounted for the highest expenditure (mean, € 2,777; median, € 791), followed by the RA-related consultations and expenses (mean, € 1,600; median, € 696). RA has a substantial economic burden in Turkey, direct costs being higher than indirect costs. Although both direct and indirect costs are lower in Turkey than in Europe with respect to nominal Euro terms, they are higher from the perspectives of purchasing power parity and gross domestic product. Early diagnosis and treatment of RA may positively affect the national economy considering the positive correlation between health care utilisations and increased cost with disease severity.

  8. How does patient-provider communication influence adherence to asthma medications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Henry N; Len-Rios, Maria E; Brown, Roger; Moreno, Megan M; Cox, Elizabeth

    2017-04-01

    To assess hypothesized pathways through which patient-provider communication impacts asthma medication adherence. A national sample of 452 adults with asthma reported assessments of patient-provider communication, proximal outcomes (understanding of asthma self-management, patient-provider agreement, trust in the clinician, involvement in care, motivation), and adherence to asthma medications. Structural equation modeling was used to examine hypothesized pathways. Significantly positive direct pathways were found between patient-provider communication and all proximal outcomes. Only positive indirect pathways, operating through trust and motivation, were found between patient-provider communication and medication adherence. Patient-provider communication influences many desirable proximal outcomes, but only influences adherence through trust and motivation. To promote better adherence to asthma medication regimens and, ultimately positive asthma outcomes, healthcare providers can focus on implementing communication strategies that strengthen patients' trust and increase patient motivation to use asthma medications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Direct and indirect costs of tuberculosis among immigrant patients in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kincler Naomi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In low tuberculosis (TB incidence countries TB affects mostly immigrants in the productive age group. Little empirical information is available about direct and indirect TB-related costs that patients face in these high-income countries. We assessed the direct and indirect costs of immigrants with TB in the Netherlands. Methods A cross-sectional survey at 14 municipal health services and 2 specialized TB hospitals was conducted. Interviews were administered to first or second generation immigrants, 18 years or older, with pulmonary or extrapulmonary TB, who were on treatment for 1–6 months. Out of pocket expenditures and time loss, related to TB, was assessed for different phases of the current TB illness. Results In total 60 patients were interviewed. Average direct costs spent by households with a TB patient amounted €353. Most costs were spent when being hospitalized. Time loss (mean 81 days was mainly due to hospitalization (19 days and additional work days lost (60 days, and corresponded with a cost estimation of €2603. Conclusion Even in a country with a good health insurance system that covers medication and consultation costs, patients do have substantial extra expenditures. Furthermore, our patients lost on average 2.7 months of productive days. TB patients are economically vulnerable.

  10. Comparison of Indirect MR Arthrography With Conventional MRI in the Diagnosis of Knee Pathologies in Patients With Knee Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei Jandaghi, Ali; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Emami-Meybodi, Mohammad Kazem; Mohammadzadeh, Solmaz; Farahmand, Maral

    2016-05-01

    Knee pain is a common problem in the general population. In order to determine the extent of the injury and the appropriate treatment, MRI provides the most accurate imaging method. This may be done through conventional MRI techniques or by injecting a contrast material (MR arthrography). The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of these two methods. The study involved the diagnostic evaluation on 60 patients with knee pain who received treatment over the course of a one-year period. Referred patients were randomly divided into two groups: indirect MR arthrography was performed on one group, and conventional MRI was performed on the other group. Both groups then underwent arthroscopy. The results from both groups were compared with the arthroscopic findings. In all of the pathologies studied, the sensitivity, specificity, and the positive and negative predictive values were evaluated. A high rate of accuracy was found between MR arthrography and arthroscopy (P < 0.05) for all knee injuries, however a similar rate of accuracy between conventional MRI and arthroscopy was only seen in patients with damage to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), the tibio-femoral articular cartilage, and patella chondromalacia (P < 0.05). The highest rate of accuracy was seen in cases where indirect MR arthrography was used for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) damage (K = 1). Our results have shown that indirect MR arthrography had greater diagnostic accuracy in regards to the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values than conventional MRI in knee pathologies.

  11. Direct and indirect influences of childhood abuse on depression symptoms in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yumi; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Takagaki, Koki; Okada, Go; Toki, Shigeru; Inoue, Takeshi; Tanabe, Hajime; Kobayakawa, Makoto; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2015-10-14

    It is known that the onset, progression, and prognosis of major depressive disorder are affected by interactions between a number of factors. This study investigated how childhood abuse, personality, and stress of life events were associated with symptoms of depression in depressed people. Patients with major depressive disorder (N = 113, 58 women and 55 men) completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), the Neuroticism Extroversion Openness Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), the Child Abuse and Trauma Scale (CATS), and the Life Experiences Survey (LES), which are self-report scales. Results were analyzed with correlation analysis and structural equation modeling (SEM), by using SPSS AMOS 21.0. Childhood abuse directly predicted the severity of depression and indirectly predicted the severity of depression through the mediation of personality. Negative life change score of the LES was affected by childhood abuse, however it did not predict the severity of depression. This study is the first to report a relationship between childhood abuse, personality, adulthood life stresses and the severity of depression in depressed patients. Childhood abuse directly and indirectly predicted the severity of depression. These results suggest the need for clinicians to be receptive to the possibility of childhood abuse in patients suffering from depression. SEM is a procedure used for hypothesis modeling and not for causal modeling. Therefore, the possibility of developing more appropriate models that include other variables cannot be excluded.

  12. Estimates of patient costs related with population morbidity: can indirect costs affect the results?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, M; García-Goñi, M; Ibern, P; Coderch, J; Vall-Llosera, L; Inoriza, J M

    2011-08-01

    A number of health economics studies require patient cost estimates as basic information input. However, the accuracy of cost estimates remains generally unspecified. We propose to investigate how the allocation of indirect costs or overheads can affect the estimation of patient costs and lead to improvements in the analysis of patient cost estimates. Instead of focussing on the costing method, this paper will highlight observed changes in variation explained by a methodology choice. We compare four overhead allocation methods for a specific Spanish population adjusted using the Clinical Risk Groups model. Our main conclusion is that the amount of global variation explained by the risk adjustment model depends mainly on direct costs, regardless of the cost allocation methodology used. Furthermore, the variation explained can be slightly increased, depending on the cost allocation methodology, and is independent of the level of aggregation in the classification system.

  13. Providing truly patient-centred care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IT

    communication, the provision of quality patient-centred care will always hang in the balance. Healthcare ... procedural aspects of the interpreting process that impacted most on the communication flow, rather than any ... in South Africa who suffer from a mental health disorder are not getting the care they need. (Kahn 2013).

  14. Relationship between patient dependence and direct medical-, social-, indirect-, and informal-care costs in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbà, Josep; Kaskens, Lisette

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this analysis were to examine how patients' dependence on others relates to costs of care and explore the incremental effects of patient dependence measured by the Dependence Scale on costs for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in Spain. The Co-Dependence in Alzheimer's Disease study is an 18 multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study among patients with AD according to the clinical dementia rating score and their caregivers in Spain. This study also gathered data on resource utilization for medical care, social care, caregiver productivity losses, and informal caregiver time reported in the Resource Utilization in Dementia Lite instrument and a complementary questionnaire. The data of 343 patients and their caregivers were collected through the completion of a clinical report form during one visit/assessment at an outpatient center or hospital, where all instruments were administered. The data collected (in addition to clinical measures) also included sociodemographic data concerning the patients and their caregivers. Cost analysis was based on resource use for medical care, social care, caregiver productivity losses, and informal caregiver time reported in the Resource Utilization in Dementia Lite instrument and a complementary questionnaire. Resource unit costs were applied to value direct medical-, social-, and indirect-care costs. A replacement cost method was used to value informal care. Patient dependence on others was measured using the Dependence Scale, and the Cumulative Index Rating Scale was administered to the patient to assess multi-morbidity. Multivariate regression analysis was used to model the effects of dependence and other sociodemographic and clinical variables on cost of care. The mean (standard deviation) costs per patient over 6 months for direct medical-, social-, indirect-, and informal-care costs were estimated at €1,028.10 (€1,655.00), €843.80 (€2,684.80), €464.20 (€1,639.00), and €33,232.20 (

  15. The absolute recommendation of chamber Neubauer method for platelets counting instead of indirect methods in severe thrombocytopenic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Raimundo Antônio Gomes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and precise platelet counting is crucial for recommending platelets transfusion for thrombocytopenic patients, principally when platelet counts are bellow 30,000/µl. As most laboratories still use the indirect methods for confirming low automated platelet counts, this work compared two indirect methods used in practice (Fonio and Nosanchunk et al. with the International Committee for Standardization in Hematology recommended direct method (Brecher and Cronkite. The obtained data show that the indirect methods present low precision and accuracy, and that the direct method should always be employed in severe thrombocytopenic samples thanks to its high precision.

  16. Extreme lateral interbody fusion relieves symptoms of spinal stenosis and low-grade spondylolisthesis by indirect decompression in complex patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Erlick A C; Farwana, Mohammad; Lam, Khai S

    2017-01-01

    Spinal stenosis and low-grade spondylolisthesis produce symptoms of neural compression that can be treated with extreme lateral lumbar interbody fusion (XLIF) via indirect decompression. This study aimed to investigate whether the restoration of disc dimensions would relieve symptoms of radiculopathy, claudication and back pain. In this retrospective study, patients undergoing XLIF surgery for relief of radicular symptoms or degenerative disc disease were included. Radiologically proven changes were used to assess the modes of degeneration. Objective measures such as the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for back and legs and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were used. Complications were collated post-operatively from clinical notes and outpatient appointments. Twenty-three consecutive patients were included, of whom 91% had spinal stenosis. The cohort presented with multiple comorbidities and 35% of the cohort had undergone previous lumbar surgery. There was a 61% improvement of coronal Cobb angle and an 11% correction of the lordosis sustained 1year after surgery. Clinical outcomes at 1year showed 39%, 50% and 60% improvements in the ODI, back and leg VAS scores respectively. 48% of patients had reduced sensation related to lumbosacral plexus manipulation and one retroperitoneal haematoma was conservatively managed. Minimally invasive spinal (MIS) XLIF resulted in effective restoration of disc dimensions via indirect decompression, providing good relief of clinical symptoms evidenced by significant improvement in clinical outcome scores. XLIF corrected scoliosis and improved lumbar lordosis significantly. Several plexopathies did not hinder long-term recovery. XLIF is highly suited to treating complex patients with multiple comorbidities and degenerative disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Indirect Treatment Comparison of Talimogene Laherparepvec Compared with Ipilimumab and Vemurafenib for the Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Casey; Ma, Qiufei; Kudlac, Amber; Palmer, Stephen; Barber, Beth; Zhao, Zhongyun

    2016-04-01

    Few randomized controlled trials have compared new treatments for metastatic melanoma. We sought to examine the relative treatment effect of talimogene laherparepvec compared with ipilimumab and vemurafenib. A systematic literature review of treatments for metastatic melanoma was undertaken but a valid network of evidence could not be established because of a lack of comparative data or studies with sufficient common comparators. A conventional adjusted indirect treatment comparison via network meta-analysis was, therefore, not feasible. Instead, a meta-analysis of absolute efficacy was undertaken, adjusting overall survival (OS) data for differences in prognostic factors between studies using a published algorithm. Four trials were included in the final indirect treatment comparison: two of ipilimumab, one of vemurafenib, and one of talimogene laherparepvec. Median OS for ipilimumab and vemurafenib increased significantly when adjustment was applied, demonstrating that variation in disease and patient characteristics was biasing OS estimates; adjusting for this made the survival data more comparable. For both ipilimumab and vemurafenib, the adjustments improved Kaplan-Meier OS curves; the observed talimogene laherparepvec OS curve remained above the adjusted OS curves for ipilimumab and vemurafenib, showing that long-term survival could differ from the observed medians. Even with limited data, talimogene laherparepvec, ipilimumab, and vemurafenib could be compared following adjustments, thereby providing a more reliable understanding of the relative effect of treatment on survival in a more comparable patient population. The results of this analysis suggest that OS with talimogene laherparepvec is at least as good as with ipilimumab and vemurafenib and improvement was more pronounced in patients with no bone, brain, lung or other visceral metastases. Amgen Inc.

  18. Provider Patient-Sharing Networks and Multiple-Provider Prescribing of Benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Mei-Sing; Olson, Karen L; Cami, Aurel; Liu, Chunfu; Tian, Fang; Selvam, Nandini; Mandl, Kenneth D

    2016-02-01

    Prescription benzodiazepine overdose continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality in the US. Multiple-provider prescribing, due to either fragmented care or "doctor-shopping," contributes to the problem. To elucidate the effect of provider professional relationships on multiple-provider prescribing of benzodiazepines, using social network analytics. A retrospective analysis of commercial healthcare claims spanning the years 2008 through 2011. Provider patient-sharing networks were modelled using social network analytics. Care team cohesion was measured using care density, defined as the ratio between the total number of patients shared by provider pairs within a patient's care team and the total number of provider pairs in the care team. Relationships within provider pairs were further quantified using a range of network metrics, including the number and proportion of patients or collaborators shared. The relationship between patient-sharing network metrics and the likelihood of multiple prescribing of benzodiazepines. Patients between the ages of 18 and 64 years who received two or more benzodiazepine prescriptions from multiple providers, with overlapping coverage of more than 14 days. A total of 5659 patients and 1448 provider pairs were included in our study. Among these, 1028 patients (18.2 %) received multiple prescriptions of benzodiazepines, involving 445 provider pairs (30.7 %). Patients whose providers rarely shared patients had a higher risk of being prescribed overlapping benzodiazepines; the median care density was 8.1 for patients who were prescribed overlapping benzodiazepines and 10.1 for those who were not (p benzodiazepines. Our findings demonstrate the importance of care team cohesion in addressing multiple-provider prescribing of controlled substances. Furthermore, we illustrate the potential of the provider network as a surveillance tool to detect and prevent adverse events that could arise due to fragmentation of care.

  19. The use of indirect composite veneers to rehabilitate patients with dental erosion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio Acevedo, Ramón; Suarez-Feito, José Maria; Suárez Tuero, Carlota; Jané, Luis; Roig, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of restorative dental materials has led to the development of more direct or indirect conservative techniques to solve both functional and esthetic problems in anterior and posterior teeth. Several authors have concluded that indirect restorations are the technique of choice in complex cases where shape and colour are difficult to achieve and function has to be restored. Even though there is no clinical evidence of the appropriateness of indirect composites in these treatments, the latest generation of composites used indirectly in the anterior teeth exhibits some interesting characteristics: it supports mechanical stress adequately, has an excellent esthetic result and can be repaired intraorally.

  20. Productivity loss and resource utilization, and associated indirect and direct costs in individuals providing care for adults with schizophrenia in the EU5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Shaloo Gupta,1 Gina Isherwood,2 Kevin Jones,3 Kristel Van Impe4 1Kantar Health, Princeton, NJ, USA; 2Kantar Health, Epsom, Surrey, UK; 3European Federation of Associations of Families of People with Mental Illness, Diestsevest, Leuven, Belgium; 4Janssen-Cilag GmbH, Neuss, Germany Objective: This study aimed to understand the impact of providing care for adults with schizophrenia on productivity, resource utilization, and costs in the EU5 (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and UK. Methods: Data from the 2010, 2011, and 2013 EU5 National Health and Wellness Survey, an online questionnaire of a nationwide sample of adults, were analyzed. Schizophrenia caregivers (n=398 were matched to noncaregivers (n=158,989 and other caregivers (n=14,341 via propensity scores. Outcome measures included health care utilization, Work Productivity and Activity Impairment questionnaire-based scores, and associated direct and indirect costs (estimated from the literature. Significant differences between schizophrenia caregivers vs noncaregivers and other caregivers (eg, cancer and Alzheimer's disease were examined. Results: After matching, schizophrenia caregivers reported greater activity impairment (38.4% vs 26.1%, provider visits (8.0 vs 5.7, emergency room visits (0.9 vs 0.2, hospitalizations (0.8 vs 0.1, and direct costs (€2,258 vs €617 than noncaregivers, all P<0.001. Employed schizophrenia caregivers reported greater absenteeism, presenteeism, overall work impairment (35.0% vs 20.7%, and indirect costs (€6,667 vs €3,795 than noncaregivers, all P<0.001. Schizophrenia caregivers (vs other caregivers reported greater activity impairment (38.4% vs 32.3% and provider visits (8.0 vs 6.6, P<0.05. A greater proportion of schizophrenia caregivers (vs other caregivers reported at least one emergency room visit (26.1% vs 20.2% and hospitalization (20.4% vs 14.3%, P<0.05. Employed schizophrenia caregivers incurred greater indirect costs than other caregivers (€6

  1. Impact of Health Care Provider's Training on Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Comprehensive patient's health care provider's (HCP) communication usually increases patients' participation in their health management on childbirth. Objective: This is a quasi interventional study for assessing impact of health care providers (HCP) training on patient- provider's communication during ...

  2. Caregiver burden, productivity loss, and indirect costs associated with caring for patients with poststroke spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy, Vaidyanathan; Graham, Glenn D; DiBonaventura, Marco D; Gillard, Patrick J; Goren, Amir; Zorowitz, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    Many stroke survivors experience poststroke spasticity and the related inability to perform basic activities, which necessitates patient management and treatment, and exerts a considerable burden on the informal caregiver. The current study aims to estimate burden, productivity loss, and indirect costs for caregivers of stroke survivors with spasticity. Internet survey data were collected from 153 caregivers of stroke survivors with spasticity including caregiving time and difficulty (Oberst Caregiver Burden Scale), Work Productivity and Activity Impairment measures, and caregiver and patient characteristics. Fractional logit models examined predictors of work-related restriction, and work losses were monetized (2012 median US wages). Mean Oberst Caregiver Burden Scale time and difficulty scores were 46.1 and 32.4, respectively. Employed caregivers (n=71) had overall work restriction (32%), absenteeism (9%), and presenteeism (27%). Caregiver characteristics, lack of nursing home coverage, and stroke survivors' disability predicted all work restriction outcomes. The mean total lost-productivity cost per employed caregiver was US$835 per month (>$10,000 per year; 72% attributable to presenteeism). These findings demonstrate the substantial burden of caring for stroke survivors with spasticity illustrating the societal and economic impact of stroke that extends beyond the stroke survivor.

  3. Provider documentation of patient education: a lean investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean P. Shipman, MSLS, AHIP, FMLA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The study evaluates how providers give patient education materials and identifies improvements to comply with Meaningful Use (MU requirements. Methods: Thirty-eight patient-provider interactions in two health care outpatient clinics were observed. Results: Providers do not uniformly know MU patient education requirements. Providers have individual preferences and find gaps in what is available. Accessing and documenting patient education varies among providers. Embedded electronic health record (EHR materials, while available, have technical access barriers. Conclusions: Providers’ EHR skills and knowledge levels contribute to non-standardized patient education delivery.

  4. Testing of a Model with Latino Patients That Explains the Links Among Patient-Perceived Provider Cultural Sensitivity, Language Preference, and Patient Treatment Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jessica D Jones; Wall, Whitney; Tucker, Carolyn M

    2016-03-01

    Disparities in treatment adherence based on race and ethnicity are well documented but poorly understood. Specifically, the causes of treatment nonadherence among Latino patients living in the USA are complex and include cultural and language barriers. The purpose of this study was to examine whether patients' perceptions in patient-provider interactions (i.e., trust in provider, patient satisfaction, and patient sense of interpersonal control in patient-provider interactions) mediate any found association between patient-perceived provider cultural sensitivity (PCS) and treatment adherence among English-preferred Latino (EPL) and Spanish-preferred Latino (SPL) patients. Data from 194 EPL patients and 361 SPL patients were obtained using questionnaires. A series of language-specific structural equation models were conducted to test the relationship between patient-perceived PCS and patient treatment adherence and the examined mediators of this relationship among the Latino patients. No significant direct effects of patient-perceived PCS on general treatment adherence were found. However, as hypothesized, several significant indirect effects emerged. Preferred language appeared to have moderating effects on the relationships between patient-perceived PCS and general treatment adherence. These results suggest that interventions to promote treatment adherence among Latino patients should likely include provider training to foster patient-defined PCS, trust in provider, and patient satisfaction with care. Furthermore, this training needs to be customized to be suitable for providing care to Latino patients who prefer speaking Spanish and Latino patients who prefer speaking English.

  5. Health Care Provider Accommodations for Patients with Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Michael I.; Baylor, Carolyn; Dudgeon, Brian J.; Starks, Helene; Yorkston, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Health care providers can experience increased diffculty communicating with adult patients during medical interactions when the patients have communication disorders. Meeting the communication needs of these patients can also create unique challenges for providers. The authors explore Communication Accommodation Theory (H. Giles, 1979) as a guide…

  6. Validity and intra- and interobserver reliability of an indirect volume measurements in patients with upper extremity lymphedema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.S.; Rietman, J.S.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Bosmans, J.C.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    We investigated a method of indirect volume measurement that utilized surface measurements and a simplified formula derived from the formula for a frustum (Sitzia's method) to determine limb volumes in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema of the upper extremity. Repeated measurements of

  7. Provider communication quality: influence of patients' weight and race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michelle S; Gudzune, Kimberly A; Bleich, Sara N

    2015-04-01

    To examine the relationship between patient weight and provider communication quality and determine whether patient race/ethnicity modifies this association. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis with 2009-2010 medical expenditures panel survey-household component (N=25,971). Our dependent variables were patient report of providers explaining well, listening, showing respect, and spending time. Our independent variables were patient weight status and patient weight-race/ethnicity groups. Using survey weights, we performed multivariate logistic regression to examine the adjusted association between patient weight and patient-provider communication measures, and whether patient race/ethnicity modifies this relationship. Compared to healthy weight whites, obese blacks were less likely to report that their providers explained things well (OR 0.78; p=0.02) or spent enough time with them (OR 0.81; p=0.04), and overweight blacks were also less likely to report that providers spent enough time with them (OR 0.78; p=0.02). Healthy weight Hispanics were also less likely to report adequate provider explanations (OR 0.74; p=0.04). Our study provides preliminary evidence that overweight/obese black and healthy weight Hispanic patients experience disparities in provider communication quality. Curricula on weight bias and cultural competency might improve communication between providers and their overweight/obese black and healthy weight Hispanic patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Caregiver burden, productivity loss, and indirect costs associated with caring for patients with poststroke spasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganapathy V

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vaidyanathan Ganapathy,1 Glenn D Graham,2 Marco D DiBonaventura,3 Patrick J Gillard,1 Amir Goren,3 Richard D Zorowitz41Allergan, Irvine, CA, USA; 2Department of Veterans Affairs, San Francisco, CA, USA; 3Health Outcomes Practice, Kantar Health, New York, NY, USA; 4Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USAObjective: Many stroke survivors experience poststroke spasticity and the related inability to perform basic activities, which necessitates patient management and treatment, and exerts a considerable burden on the informal caregiver. The current study aims to estimate burden, productivity loss, and indirect costs for caregivers of stroke survivors with spasticity.Methods: Internet survey data were collected from 153 caregivers of stroke survivors with spasticity including caregiving time and difficulty (Oberst Caregiver Burden Scale, Work Productivity and Activity Impairment measures, and caregiver and patient characteristics. Fractional logit models examined predictors of work-related restriction, and work losses were monetized (2012 median US wages.Results: Mean Oberst Caregiver Burden Scale time and difficulty scores were 46.1 and 32.4, respectively. Employed caregivers (n=71 had overall work restriction (32%, absenteeism (9%, and presenteeism (27%. Caregiver characteristics, lack of nursing home coverage, and stroke survivors’ disability predicted all work restriction outcomes. The mean total lost-productivity cost per employed caregiver was US$835 per month (>$10,000 per year; 72% attributable to presenteeism.Conclusion: These findings demonstrate the substantial burden of caring for stroke survivors with spasticity illustrating the societal and economic impact of stroke that extends beyond the stroke survivor.Keywords: burden, caregiver, productivity, spasticity, stroke

  9. Provider perspectives on patient-provider communication for adjuvant endocrine therapy symptom management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kea; Samuel, Cleo A; Donovan, Heidi As; Beckjord, Ellen; Cardy, Alexandra; Dew, Mary Amanda; van Londen, G J

    2017-04-01

    Providers' communication skills play a key role in encouraging breast cancer survivors to report symptoms and adhere to long-term treatments such as adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET). The purpose of this study was to examine provider perspectives on patient-provider communication regarding AET symptom management and to explore whether provider perspectives vary across the multi-disciplinary team of providers involved in survivorship care. We conducted three one-hour focus groups with a multi-disciplinary group of health care providers including oncology specialists, primary care physicians, and non-physician providers experienced in caring for breast cancer survivors undergoing AET (n = 13). Themes were organized using Epstein and Street's (2007) Framework for Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care. The findings of this study suggest providers' communication behaviors including managing survivors' uncertainty, responding to survivors' emotions, exchanging information, and enabling self-management influences the quality of patient-provider communication about AET symptoms. Additionally, lack of systematic symptom assessment tools for AET requires providers to use discretion in determining which symptoms to discuss with survivors resulting in approaches that vary based on providers' discipline. There may be AET-specific provider communication skills and behaviors that promote effective patient-provider communication but additional research is needed to identify practices and policies that encourage these skills and behaviors among the many providers involved in survivorship care. Efforts are also needed to coordinate AET symptom assessment across providers, clarify providers' roles in symptom assessment, and determine best practices for AET symptom communication.

  10. Providers' roles in enhancing patients' adherence to pain self management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorflinger, Lindsey; Kerns, Robert D; Auerbach, Stephen M

    2013-03-01

    Practice guidelines and empirical research related to pain management encourage clinicians to take active roles in providing education about self management and promoting adoption of a self-management approach. The purpose of the study was to review the relevant literature, summarize aspects of the patient-provider interaction that influence patient engagement in self management for chronic pain, and outline practice recommendations in this area. Review of the literature on aspects of the patient-provider interaction that promote engagement in pain self-management was used. Findings are synthesized into recommendations for providers. Patients benefit from a biopsychosocial and patient-centered approach. Patients are more likely to fully disclose when providers respond empathically, which can improve conceptualization and treatment. Patient education and motivation play important roles in engaging patients in self management. Self management is influenced in part by the patient-provider communication process. Suggestions for communication strategies to facilitate patient engagement in self-management techniques, including empathic discussion of barriers and motivation enhancement, are provided.

  11. The indirect cost due to pulmonary Tuberculosis in patients receiving treatment in Bauchi State—Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar Nisser

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To determine the time spent and income lost by patients and their households for seeking tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment in Bauchi State-Nigeria. Method A cross sectional study where 242 TB patients were sampled from 27 out of 67 facilities providing TB services in a north-eastern state of Nigeria. Sampling was stratified based on facility type, patients’ HIV status and gender. Results The income lost among the hospitalized group was estimated at $156/patient and about $114 in the non-hospitalized patients group. Age, gender, facility of diagnosis, level of education and occupation were significant (p-values Conclusion Tuberculosis poses causes tremendous burden in terms of time and productivity lost to both patients and their households in Bauchi State Nigeria.

  12. Healthcare provider and patient perspectives on diagnostic imaging investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makanjee, Chandra R; Bergh, Anne-Marie; Hoffmann, Willem A

    2015-05-20

    Much has been written about the patient-centred approach in doctor-patient consultations. Little is known about interactions and communication processes regarding healthcare providers' and patients' perspectives on expectations and experiences of diagnostic imaging investigations within the medical encounter. Patients journey through the health system from the point of referral to the imaging investigation itself and then to the post-imaging consultation. AIM AND SETTING: To explore healthcare provider and patient perspectives on interaction and communication processes during diagnostic imaging investigations as part of their clinical journey through a healthcare complex. A qualitative study was conducted, with two phases of data collection. Twenty-four patients were conveniently selected at a public district hospital complex and were followed throughout their journey in the hospital system, from admission to discharge. The second phase entailed focus group interviews conducted with providers in the district hospital and adjacent academic hospital (medical officers and family physicians, nurses, radiographers, radiology consultants and registrars). Two main themes guided our analysis: (1) provider perspectives; and (2) patient dispositions and reactions. Golden threads that cut across these themes are interactions and communication processes in the context of expectations, experiences of the imaging investigations and the outcomes thereof. Insights from this study provide a better understanding of the complexity of the processes and interactions between providers and patients during the imaging investigations conducted as part of their clinical pathway. The interactions and communication processes are provider-patient centred when a referral for a diagnostic imaging investigation is included.

  13. Direct, indirect, and intangible costs after severe trauma up to occupational reintegration - an empirical analysis of 113 seriously injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Benjamin; Ommen, Oliver; Pfaff, Holger; Lüngen, Markus; Lefering, Rolf; Thüm, Sonja; Janssen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Although seriously injured patients account for a high medical as well as socioeconomic burden of disease in the German health care system, there are only very few data describing the costs that arise between the days of accident and occupational reintegration. With this study, a comprehensive cost model is developed that describes the direct, indirect and intangible costs of an accident and their relationship with socioeconomic background of the patients. This study included 113 patients who each had at least two injuries and a total Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) greater than or equal to five. We calculated the direct, indirect and intangible costs that arose between the day of the accident and occupational reintegration. Direct costs were the treatment costs at hospitals and rehabilitation centers. Indirect costs were calculated using the human capital approach on the basis of the work days lost due to injury, including sickness allowance benefits. Intangible costs were assessed using the Short Form Survey (SF-36) and represented in non-monetary form. Following univariate analysis, a bivariate analysis of the above costs and the patients' sociodemographic and socioeconomic characteristics was performed. At an average Injury Severity Score (ISS) of 19.2, the average direct cost per patient were €35,661. An average of 185.2 work days were lost, resulting in indirect costs of €17,205. The resulting total costs per patient were €50,431. A bivariate analysis showed that the costs for hospital treatment were 58% higher in patients who graduated from lower secondary school [Hauptschule] (ISS 19.5) than in patients with qualification for university admission [Abitur] (ISS 19.4). The direct costs of treating trauma patients at the hospital appear to be lower in patients with a higher level of education than in the comparison group with a lower educational level. Because of missing data, the calculated indirect costs can merely represent a general trend, so that the

  14. Traumatic indirect carotid cavernous fistulas: angioarchitectures and results of transarterial embolization by liquid adhesives in 11 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao-Bao; Teng, Michael Mu-Huo; Chang, Feng-Chi; Chang, Cheng-Yang

    2009-02-01

    The angioarchitectures of traumatic indirect CCFs and the effectiveness and safety of transarterial liquid adhesive embolization for these fistulas remain to be evaluated. A total of 276 consecutive patients with traumatic craniofacial arteriovenous fistula were referred for embolization in the past 15 years. Eleven had traumatic indirect CCFs and were managed with transarterial liquid adhesive embolization. This group was composed of 8 men and 3 women ranging from 15 to 46 years of age. The most frequently observed symptoms were neuro-ophthalmic, followed by bruit and headache. All lesions were single fistula and fed exclusively by meningeal artery. The accessory meningeal artery was involved most often (n = 7), followed by the middle meningeal artery (n = 4). Venous drains were the ophthalmic vein (n = 11) and/or inferior petrous sinus (n = 8). No cortical vein drainage was observed. Liquid adhesives (60%) were used to obliterate all fistulas; 2 patients were also treated with detachable coils. All fistulas were totally occluded with resolutive fistula-related symptoms. Asymptomatic migration of liquid adhesives into the nearby arterial branch was observed in 1 patient. One patient had partial ocular choroidal infarction. No recurrent or residual fistula was found upon clinical follow-up. Angioarchitecture and treatment of traumatic indirect CCFs differed from the spontaneous type of fistulas. By transarterial liquid adhesive embolization, treatment of all fistulas was safe, with effective occlusion and associated low peri-procedural risk. This procedure may be considered as the primary treatment for these traumatic fistulas.

  15. Hypogonadism and man’s infertility at patients with indirect inguinal hernia after hernioplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Sobennikov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article estimates hydrologic status and fertility prognosis of 35 year-old reproductive age men with unilateral inguinal hernioplasty in past history from the system syndrome-based approach perspective to the etiology and pathogenesis of indirect inguinal hernia and hypogonadism.

  16. Hypogonadism and man’s infertility at patients with indirect inguinal hernia after hernioplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Sobennikov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article estimates hydrologic status and fertility prognosis of 35 year-old reproductive age men with unilateral inguinal hernioplasty in past history from the system syndrome-based approach perspective to the etiology and pathogenesis of indirect inguinal hernia and hypogonadism.

  17. How Accurately Can Emergency Department Providers Estimate Patient Satisfaction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalena M. Yarris

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient satisfaction is an important measure of emergency department (ED quality of care. Little is known about providers’ ability to estimate patient satisfaction. We aimed to measure providers’ ability to assess patient satisfaction and hypothesized that providers could accurately estimate overall patient satisfaction.Methods: We surveyed ED patients regarding satisfaction with their care. Treating providers completed analogous surveys, estimating patients’ responses. Sexual assault victims and non-English-speaking or severely ill patients were excluded. Satisfaction responses were categorized as ‘‘satisfied’’ or ‘‘not satisfied.’’ Patient satisfaction scores were considered the ‘‘gold standard,’’ and providers’ perceptions of the patient satisfaction were considered tests. Measures of diagnosticaccuracy, such as positive predictive value (PPV and sensitivity, were used to assess how accurately the provider could estimate his or her patient’s satisfaction.Results: Here, 242/457 eligible patients (53% completed the survey; 227 providers (94% completed a corresponding survey. Subject-reported overall satisfaction was 96.6%, compared with a provider estimated rate of 94.4%. The sensitivity and PPV of the provider’s estimate of the patient’s satisfaction were 95.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 91.4, 97.7 and 97.5 (95% CI 94.4, 99.2, respectively, for overall patient satisfaction. The PPV was similar for clarity of communication. The PPV was 78.9 for perceived length of ED stay (99% CI 70.8, 85.6 and 82.6 for quality of pain control (95% CI 68.6, 92.2. Accuracy of attending and resident estimates of patient satisfaction did not differ significantly. The agreement between patient-reported and provider-estimated patient satisfaction was not associated with age, gender, patient disposition, or ED divert status.Conclusion: Providers are able to assess overall patient satisfaction and clarity of

  18. Satisfaction with information provided to Danish cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Johnsen, Anna Thit

    2013-01-01

    To validate five items (CPWQ-inf) regarding satisfaction with information provided to cancer patients from health care staff, assess the prevalence of dissatisfaction with this information, and identify factors predicting dissatisfaction.......To validate five items (CPWQ-inf) regarding satisfaction with information provided to cancer patients from health care staff, assess the prevalence of dissatisfaction with this information, and identify factors predicting dissatisfaction....

  19. Patient provider communication about the health effects of obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durant, Nefertiti H.; Bartman, Barbara; Person, Sharina D.; Collins, Felicia; Austin, S. Bryn

    Objective: We assessed the influence of race/ethnicity and provider Communication oil overweight and obese patients' perceptions of the damage weight causes to their health. Methods: The-study included 1071 overweight and obese patients who completed the 2002 Community Health Center (CHC) User

  20. Control and Communication in Provider-Patient Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, Peter G.

    Noting that loss of control is a major concern confronting patients experiencing an illness, this paper critically analyzes the research literature on control and clarifies the implications of this research for provider-patient communication. The paper first defines control, noting that the most frequently cited definition is the "locus of…

  1. Factors affecting Saudi hemodialysis patients' perception of healthcare providers' empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Onazi, Mariam; Al Jondeby, Mohamed; Azeem, Mubashar; Al Sayyari, Abdulla

    2011-05-01

    We aimed to assess the empathy level of healthcare providers as perceived by hemodialysis (HD) patients and its determinants. This survey included 100 hemodialysis patients from two major dialysis units in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (Units A and B). Patients were asked to score their perception of empathy by health care providers in 13 areas using 1 to 5 Likert Scale. Unit "A" contained more patients with diabetic nephropathy than unit "A". Unit "B" contained a higher number of native Arabic speaking nurses and its patients had longer mean duration on dialysis compared to unit "A". The overall score given for doctors empathy was 81.6% (84.5% for Unit "A" doctors and 78.8% for Unit "B" doctors (P=0.01). The overall score given for nurses empathy was 73.6% (76.2% for Unit "A" nurses and 70.9% for Unit "B" nurses (P=0.002). Female patients' perception of empathy was significantly greater than male patients in 8 out of 13 questions. Older patients gave higher score than younger patients. Patients with lower educational level perceived higher empathy levels than patients with higher education. Significantly lower scores were given by patients who received their dialysis treatment at night. We observed no differences in scores in relation to patients' duration on dialysis, diabetic status or Charlson Co-morbidity Index (CCI). Empathy goes beyond the language barrier. Patients dialyzed in evening shifts perceive less empathy from healthcare workers. The higher scores given by older, female and less educated patients might simply reflect their lower expectation of empathy.

  2. Provider portrayals and patient-provider communication in drama and reality medical entertainment television shows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Parul; Slater, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    Portrayals of physicians on medical dramas have been the subject of research attention. However, such research has not examined portrayals of interactions between physicians and patients, has not compared physician portrayals on medical dramas versus on medical reality programs, and has not fully examined portrayals of physicians who are members of minority groups or who received their education internationally. This study content-analyzes 101 episodes (85 hours) of such programs broadcast during the 2006-2007 viewing season. Findings indicate that women are underrepresented as physicians on reality shows, though they are no longer underrepresented as physicians on dramas. However, they are not as actively portrayed in patient-care interactions as are male physicians on medical dramas. Asians and international medical graduates are underrepresented relative to their proportion in the U.S. physician population, the latter by almost a factor of 5. Many (but certainly not all) aspects of patient-centered communication are modeled, more so on reality programs than on medical dramas. Differences in patient-provider communication portrayals by minority status and gender are reported. Implications for public perception of physicians and expectations regarding provider-patient interaction are discussed.

  3. Interactions between patients and dental care providers: does gender matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglehart, Marita R

    2013-04-01

    Research findings concerning the role of gender in patient-physician interactions can inform considerations about the role of gender in patient-dental care provider interactions. Medical research showed that gender differences in verbal and nonverbal communication in medical settings exist and that they affect the outcomes of these interactions. The process of communication is shaped by gender identities, gender stereotypes, and attitudes. Future research needs to consider the cultural complexity and diversity in which gender issues are embedded and the degree to which ongoing value change will shape gender roles and in turn interactions between dental patients and their providers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of patients ' satisfaction with quality of care provided at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The umpteenth threats to change of healthcare provider by dissatisfied patients on formal sector health insurance are well known and can be a proxy indicator for the need for quality improvement in service delivery. Objective: This study was aimed at evaluating patientsf satisfaction with quality of care provided ...

  5. Patient satisfaction with health care services provided at HIV clinics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Since the establishment of free HIV/AIDS care and treatment services in Tanzania a lot of research has been done to assess how health care providers discharge their duties in these clinics. Little research however has been done regarding satisfaction of HIV patients with free health care services provided.

  6. Awareness of Chronic Kidney Disease among Patients and Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Laura C.; Tuot, Delphine S.; Powe, Neil R.

    2010-01-01

    Earlier recognition of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could slow progression, prevent complications, and reduce cardiovascular-related outcomes. However, current estimates of CKD awareness indicate that both patient- and provider-level awareness remain unacceptably low. Many of the factors that are possibly associated with CKD awareness, which could help guide implementation of awareness efforts, have yet to be fully examined. Also, little is known regarding whether increased patient or provider awareness improves clinical outcomes or whether there are possible negative consequences of awareness for CKD patients. Further research is necessary to continue to design and refine awareness campaigns aimed at both patients and providers, but there is an immediate need for dissemination of basic CKD information, given both the high prevalence of CKD and its risk factors and the low estimated awareness of CKD. PMID:20439091

  7. Expression of patients' and providers' identities during the medical interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Juliann C; Wilson, Jacquee B; Hughes, Patrick C

    2011-08-01

    We apply the Communication Theory of Identity to investigate how patients display their ethnic identities during intercultural patient-provider interactions. Ethnic identity displays play a large part in reflecting patients' and providers' assumptions about the other, as well as their communicative needs. We collected paper-and-pencil responses from a convenience sample of providers and their patients, and conducted a constant comparative analysis of their open-ended reports of a recent intercultural medical interview. The results revealed how both parties viewed their roles in intercultural medical encounters and how they looked for accommodative behaviors from the other party. We draw implications for new applications and future developments of the Communication Theory of Identity and Communication Accommodation Theory.

  8. Direct and indirect costs of patients treated with extended-release oxymorphone HCl or controlled-release oxycodone HCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirson, Noam Y; White, Alan G; Birnbaum, Howard G; Schiller, Matt; Waldman, Tracy; Peterson, Kirsten; Ben-Joseph, Rami H; Berner, Todd; Summers, Kent H

    2012-01-01

    Compare direct and indirect costs of oxymorphone extended-release ('oxymorphone') and oxycodone controlled-release ('oxycodone') users. Patients, aged 18+, with ≥1 claim for oxymorphone/oxycodone, Q2:2006-Q4:2009, were selected from a de-identified private payer claims database and observed from the first such claim ('index date') until the earliest of: use of comparator drug; end of continuous eligibility; 12 months ('study period'). Patients with claims for any formulation of the comparator drug during the first 30 days of the study period were excluded. Direct (medical and drug) costs paid by private insurers were reported for patients aged 18-64 (n = 8354) and 65+(n = 3515), as well as sub-sets without cancer (n = 7090 and n = 2444, respectively). Indirect costs (medically-related absenteeism and disability) were reported for all employees, aged 18-64 (n = 1313), and employees without cancer (n = 1146). Multivariate models were used to estimate risk-adjusted costs controlling for patient characteristics. Oxymorphone users, aged 18-64, had lower drug costs ($693 vs $763, p = 0.0035) and similar medical costs ($1875 vs $1976, p = 0.3570) per patient-month compared with oxycodone users (mean follow-up 236 and 280 days, respectively). Indirect costs were not different ($662 vs $670, p = 0.9370). Oxymorphone users, aged 65+, had similar Medicare supplemental drug costs ($533 vs $588, p = 0.0840) and lower medical costs ($459 vs $747, p < 0.0001). Results were comparable for subsets without cancer. Patients with concomitant use of oxymorphone and oxycodone were excluded. Oxymorphone users incur lower risk-adjusted costs in several cost categories, compared with oxycodone users, and no higher costs in any of the examined categories.

  9. Measuring energy expenditure in cardiac patients using the Body Media Armband versus indirect calorimetry. A validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, P J; LeMura, L M; Klinger, T A; Strohecker, K; McConnell, T R

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare differences in energy expenditure using the newly developed SenseWear Armband body monitor to indirect calorimetry in cardiac rehabilitation patients. Twenty-four (62+/-8.1 years) patients completed steady state exercise for 8 minutes on 4 modes of exercise (arm ergometry, treadmill walking, recumbent stepping and rowing ergometry). Total cumulative kilojoules were recorded simultaneously by indirect calorimetry and the SenseWear Armband. Statistical analyses assessed the degree of agreement between the 2 measurement methods and 3 different versions of the SenseWear software. The correlations between indirect calorimetry and version 2.2 of the SenseWear armband for arm and rowing ergometry, the treadmill and recumbent stepper were r=0.90, r=0.67, r=0 .80 and r=0.74, respectively. There were no between method differences during arm ergometry (pBodyMedia SenseWear Armband appears to be exercise modality dependent in those with heart disease when using software developed for the general population. Therefore, the information should be interpreted cautiously, particularly during treadmill walking and rowing. Initial experiments with cardiac-focused software are promising, but preliminary.

  10. The Internet: friend or foe when providing patient education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Amy Shelton; Klemm, Paula

    2008-02-01

    The Internet has changed how patients with cancer learn about and cope with their disease. Newly diagnosed patients with cancer often have complex educational and informational needs related to diagnosis and treatment. Nurses frequently encounter time and work-related constraints that can interfere with the provision of patient education. They are challenged to educate patients in an environment of rapidly expanding and innovative computer technology. Barriers that hinder nurses in integrating educational Internet resources into patient care include lack of training, time constraints, and inadequate administrative support. Advantages of Internet use for patient education and support include wide-ranging and current information, a variety of teaching formats, patient empowerment, new communication options, and support 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Pitfalls associated with Internet use for patients with cancer include inaccurate information, lack of access, poor quality of online resources, and security and privacy issues. Nurses routinely use computer technology in the workplace and follow rigorous security and privacy standards to protect patient information. Those skills can provide the foundation for the use of online sources for patient teaching. Nurses play an important role in helping patients evaluate the veracity of online information and introducing them to reliable Internet resources.

  11. Determinants of patient loyalty to healthcare providers: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei-Jiao; Wan, Qiao-Qin; Liu, Cong-Ying; Feng, Xiao-Lin; Shang, Shao-Mei

    2017-08-01

    Patient loyalty is key to business success for healthcare providers and also for patient health outcomes. This study aims to identify determinants influencing patient loyalty to healthcare providers and propose an integrative conceptual model of the influencing factors. PubMed, CINAHL, OVID, ProQuest and Elsevier Science Direct databases were searched. Publications about determinants of patient loyalty to health providers were screened, and 13 articles were included. Date of publication, location of the research, sample details, objectives and findings/conclusions were extracted for 13 articles. Thirteen studies explored eight determinants: satisfaction, quality, value, hospital brand image, trust, commitment, organizational citizenship behavior and customer complaints. The integrated conceptual model comprising all the determinants demonstrated the significant positive direct impact of quality on satisfaction and value, satisfaction on trust and commitment, trust on commitment and loyalty, and brand image on quality and loyalty. This review identifies and models the determinants of patient loyalty to healthcare providers. Further studies are needed to explore the influence of trust, commitment, and switching barriers on patient loyalty.

  12. Healthcare provider and patient perspectives on diagnostic imaging investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra R. Makanjee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Much has been written about the patient-centred approach in doctor–patient consultations. Little is known about interactions and communication processes regarding healthcare providers’ and patients’ perspectives on expectations and experiences of diagnostic imaging investigations within the medical encounter. Patients journey through the health system from the point of referral to the imaging investigation itself and then to the post-imaging consultation.Aim and setting: To explore healthcare provider and patient perspectives on interaction and communication processes during diagnostic imaging investigations as part of their clinical journey through a healthcare complex.Methods: A qualitative study was conducted, with two phases of data collection. Twenty-four patients were conveniently selected at a public district hospital complex and were followed throughout their journey in the hospital system, from admission to discharge. The second phase entailed focus group interviews conducted with providers in the district hospital and adjacent academic hospital (medical officers and family physicians, nurses, radiographers, radiology consultants and registrars.Results: Two main themes guided our analysis: (1 provider perspectives; and (2 patient dispositions and reactions. Golden threads that cut across these themes are interactions and communication processes in the context of expectations, experiences of the imaging investigations and the outcomes thereof.Conclusion: Insights from this study provide a better understanding of the complexity of the processes and interactions between providers and patients during the imaging investigations conducted as part of their clinical pathway. The interactions and communication processes are provider–patient centred when a referral for a diagnostic imaging investigation is included.

  13. Primary care patient and provider preferences for diabetes care managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona S DeJesus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ramona S DeJesus1, Kristin S Vickers2, Robert J Stroebel1, Stephen S Cha31Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA; 3Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: The collaborative care model, using care managers, has been shown to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Little effort has been made to find out patient preferences for chronic disease care, hence, we conducted a study aimed at identifying these.Methods: A 20-item questionnaire, asking for patients’ and providers’ preferences and perceptions, was mailed out to 1000 randomly selected patients in Olmsted County, Minnesota, identified through a diabetes registry to have type 2 diabetes mellitus, a prototypical prevalent chronic disease. Surveys were also sent to 42 primary care providers.Results: There were 254 (25.4% patient responders and 28 (66% provider responders. The majority of patients (>70% and providers (89% expressed willingness to have various aspects of diabetes care managed by a care manager. Although 75% of providers would be comfortable expanding the care manager role to other chronic diseases, only 39.5% of patient responders would be willing to see a care manager for other chronic problems. Longer length of time from initial diagnosis of diabetes was associated with decreased patient likelihood to work with a care manager.Conclusion: Despite study limitations, such as the lack of validated measures to assess perceptions related to care management, our results suggest that patients and providers are willing to collaborate with a care manager and that both groups have similar role expectations of a care manager.Keywords: care manager, collaborative care, patient preference, diabetes care

  14. Selecting a provider: what factors influence patients' decision making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jean; Sick, Brian; Anderson, Joseph; Berg, Andrea; Dehmer, Chad; Tufano, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Each year consumers make a variety of decisions relating to their healthcare. Some experts argue that stronger consumer engagement in decisions about where to obtain medical care is an important mechanism for improving efficiency in healthcare delivery and financing. Consumers' ability and motivation to become more active decision makers are affected by several factors, including financial incentives and access to information. This study investigates the set of factors that consumers consider when selecting a provider, including attributes of the provider and the care experience and the reputation of the provider. Additionally, the study evaluates consumers awareness and use of formal sources of provider selection information. Our results from analyzing data from a survey of 467 patients at four clinics in Minnesota suggest that the factors considered of greatest importance include reputation of the physician and reputation of the healthcare organization. Contractual and logistical factors also play a role, with respondents highlighting the importance of seeing a provider affiliated with their health plan and appointment availability. Few respondents indicated that advertisements or formal sources of quality information affected their decision making. The key implication for provider organizations is to carefully manage referral sources to ensure that they consistently meet the needs of referrers. Excellent service to existing patients and to the network of referring physicians yields patient and referrer satisfaction that is critical to attracting new patients. Finally, organizations more generally may want to explore the capabilities of new media and social networking sites for building reputation.

  15. Teamwork: building healthier workplaces and providing safer patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    A changing healthcare landscape requires nurses to care for more patients with higher acuity during their shift than ever before. These more austere working conditions are leading to increased burnout. In addition, patient safety is not of the quality or level that is required. To build healthier workplaces where safe care is provided, formal teamwork training is recommended. Formal teamwork training programs, such as that provided by the MedTeams group, TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety), or participatory action research programs such as the Healthy Workplace Intervention, have decreased errors in the workplace, increased nurse satisfaction and retention rates, and decreased staff turnover. This article includes necessary determinants of teamwork, brief overviews of team-building programs, and examples of research programs that demonstrate how teamwork brings about healthier workplaces that are safer for patients. Teamwork programs can bring about these positive results when implemented and supported by the hospital system.

  16. Caring for Patients with Service Dogs: Information for Healthcare Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Michelle

    2016-11-29

    People with disabilities use various assistance devices to improve their capacity to lead independent and fulfilling lives. Service dogs can be crucial lifesaving companions for their owners. As the use of service dogs increases, nurses are more likely to encounter them in healthcare settings. Service dogs are often confused with therapy or emotional support dogs. While some of their roles overlap, service dogs have distinct protection under the American Disabilities Act (ADA). Knowing the laws and proper procedures regarding service dogs strengthens the abilities of healthcare providers to deliver holistic, patient-centered care. This article provides background information about use of dogs, and discusses benefits to patients and access challenges for providers. The author reviews ADA laws applicable to service dog use and potential challenges and risks in acute care settings. The role of the healthcare professional is illustrated with an exemplar, along with recommendations for future research and nursing implications related to care of patients with service dogs.

  17. Providing dental treatment for patients with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, B G

    1995-01-01

    patients who are potentially hypertensive should be referred for medical evaluation. A preventive approach to the treatment of these patients will serve to prevent untoward outcomes and provide safe and simple delivery of dental care for cardiovascular patients.

  18. Looking for the best immune-checkpoint inhibitor in pre-treated NSCLC patients: An indirect comparison between nivolumab, pembrolizumab and atezolizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passiglia, Francesco; Galvano, Antonio; Rizzo, Sergio; Incorvaia, Lorena; Listì, Angela; Bazan, Viviana; Russo, Antonio

    2017-10-28

    Immune-checkpoint inhibitors represent the new standard of care in patients with advanced NSCLC who progressed after first-line treatment. This work aim to assess any difference in both efficacy and safety profiles among Nivolumab, Pembrolizumab and Atezolizumab in pre-treated NSCLC patients. Randomized clinical trials comparing immune-checkpoint inhibitor versus docetaxel in pre-treated patients with advanced NSCLC were included and direct comparison meta-analysis of selected trials have been performed. Subsequently the summary estimates of Nivolumab, Pembrolizumab and Atezolizumab emerging from the direct meta-analysis were selected to provide the pooled estimates of hazard ratio (HR) and relative risk (RR) for the indirect comparisons among these agents. A total of 5 studies met the selection criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Indirect comparisons for efficacy outcomes showed the RR for ORR nivolumab versus atezolizumab 1.66 (95% CI 1.07-2.58), pembrolizumab versus atezolizumab 1.94 (95% CI 1.30-2.90). No significant differences in both PFS and OS have been observed. Indirect comparisons for safety showed the RR for G3-5 AEs nivolumab versus pembrolizumab 0.41 (95% CI 0.29-0.60), nivolumab versus atezolizumab 0.50 (95% CI 0.35-0.72). No significant differences in both pneumonitis and discontinuation rate have been observed. The results of this work revealed that nivolumab and pembrolizumab are associated with a significant increase of ORR as compared to atezolizumab and nivolumab is associated with a significant lower incidence of G3-5 AEs as compared to the other drugs. These evidences could support the oncologists to select the best drug for each patient. © 2017 UICC.

  19. Longitudinal Relationships of Religion with Posttreatment Depression Severity in Older Psychiatric Patients: Evidence of Direct and Indirect Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. David Hayward

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric patients (age 59+ were assessed before study treatment for major depressive disorder, and again after 3 months. Measures taken before study treatment included facets of religiousness (subjective religiosity, private prayer, worship attendance, and religious media use, social support, and perceived stress. Clinician-rated depression severity was assessed both before and after treatment using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS. Structural equation modeling was used to test a path model of direct and indirect effects of religious factors via psychosocial pathways. Subjective religiousness was directly related to worse initial MADRS, but indirectly related to better posttreatment MADRS via the pathway of more private prayer. Worship attendance was directly related to better initial MADRS, and indirectly related to better post-treatment MADRS via pathways of lower stress, more social support, and more private prayer. Private prayer was directly related to better post-treatment MADRS. Religious media use was related to more private prayer, but had no direct relationship with MADRS.

  20. Longitudinal relationships of religion with posttreatment depression severity in older psychiatric patients: evidence of direct and indirect effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, R David; Owen, Amy D; Koenig, Harold G; Steffens, David C; Payne, Martha E

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric patients (age 59+) were assessed before study treatment for major depressive disorder, and again after 3 months. Measures taken before study treatment included facets of religiousness (subjective religiosity, private prayer, worship attendance, and religious media use), social support, and perceived stress. Clinician-rated depression severity was assessed both before and after treatment using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Structural equation modeling was used to test a path model of direct and indirect effects of religious factors via psychosocial pathways. Subjective religiousness was directly related to worse initial MADRS, but indirectly related to better posttreatment MADRS via the pathway of more private prayer. Worship attendance was directly related to better initial MADRS, and indirectly related to better post-treatment MADRS via pathways of lower stress, more social support, and more private prayer. Private prayer was directly related to better post-treatment MADRS. Religious media use was related to more private prayer, but had no direct relationship with MADRS.

  1. Disease activity, quality of life and indirect costs of reduced productivity at work, generated by Polish patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalec, Paweł; Malinowski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the association between activity of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and decrease in quality of life as well as productivity loss of affected patients in a specified group of patients in the Polish setting. An questionnaire survey was conducted using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) to assess disease activity, as well as the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaires to assess productivity loss; quality of life was presented as utility calculated using the EuroQol 5 questionnaire and also measured on a visual analogue scale (VAS). Indirect costs were assessed with the human capital approach implying gross domestic product per capita or gross value added per worker in Poland in 2014 and were expressed in Polish zlotys (PLN) as well as in euros. Correlation was presented using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. We performed our analysis based on 78 full questionnaires collected. A mean BASDAI score of 5.91 in the analysed group of patients was detected and mean utility of 0.5135 was observed. Average quality of life measured on the visual analogue scale was 46.55. Mean number of days off work was 45.26 days per year and mean on-the-job productivity loss was 49.29%. Average annual indirect costs per patient were €4241 (17 686 PLN) calculated using gross domestic product and €10 172 (42 417 PLN) estimated using gross value added. Total productivity loss was significantly correlated with disease activity (strong correlation of 0.6005) and utility (moderate correlation of -0.3698). Ankylosing spondylitis causes a great decrease in quality of life as well as patients' productivity loss associated with both absenteeism and presenteeism. The greater the disease activity is, the lower is the utility, the lower is the quality of life measured on the VAS, and the greater are the total annual indirect costs. Total indirect costs were negatively correlated with utility; although the

  2. Effect of L-Carnitine in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis on Energy Metabolism Using Indirect Calorimetry: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Nishikawa, Hiroki; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Yoh, Kazunori; Iwata, Yoshinori; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Nakano, Chikage; Kishino, Kyohei; Shimono, Yoshihiro; Takata, Ryo; Nishimura, Takashi; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Ishii, Akio; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    Background L-carnitine supplementation has been suggested to show several favorable effects on patients with liver cirrhosis (LC). However, there have been no reports regarding the effect of L-carnitine on energy metabolism in patients with LC using indirect calorimetry which is a well-established method for assessing the degree of liver malnutrition. We examined the effect of L-carnitine in patients with LC on energy metabolism using indirect calorimetry. Methods A total of 13 LC patients who are scheduled to be treated with L-carnitine (1,800 mg/day) were analyzed in this study. None of the patients previously received L-carnitine. An evaluation of the nutritional status was performed at the initiation of L-carnitine therapy and after 4 weeks of L-carnitine therapy. We evaluated the effect of L-carnitine on the nutritional status and energy metabolism by comparing various clinical variables at these two time points. In addition, the changes in the nutritional status of the patients were also evaluated using indirect calorimetry. Results After 4 weeks of L-carnitine treatment, for all cases, the mean substrate oxidation rates of carbohydrate (%C) increased from 37.6% to 48.2%, the mean substrate oxidation rates of fat (%F) decreased from 40.2% to 31.9% and the mean substrate oxidation rates of protein (%P) decreased from 22.2% to 19.9%. In a subgroup analysis of patients with baseline non-protein respiratory quotient (npRQ) L-carnitine treatment, for all cases (n = 13), the mean value of npRQ increased in comparison with the baseline levels, although the difference was not significant (0.868 ± 0.060 vs. 0.838 ± 0.097, P = 0.19). Conversely, in patients with baseline npRQ L-carnitine compared with the baseline levels (0.827 ± 0.030 vs. 0.760 ± 0.043, P = 0.016). Conclusion L-carnitine supplementation can be useful for improving energy metabolism, especially in patients who have an advanced LC status and lower baseline npRQ values. PMID:27829952

  3. Humor as a Communication Strategy in Provider-Patient Communication in a Chronic Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpf, Andrea C; Martin, Gillian S; Keating, Mary A

    2017-02-01

    Humor is a potential communication strategy to accomplish various and potentially conflicting consultation goals. We investigated humor use and its reception in diabetes consultations by analyzing how and why humor emerges and its impact on the interaction. We did this by using an interactional sociolinguistics approach. We recorded 50 consultations in an Irish diabetes setting. Analysis of the humor events drew on framework analysis and on concepts from Conversation Analysis and pragmatics. The study also comprised interviews using tape-assisted recall. We identified 10 humor functions and two umbrella functions. A key finding is that most humor is relationship-protecting humor initiated by patients, that is, they voice serious messages and deal with emotional issues through humor. Our findings imply that patients' and providers' awareness of indirect communication strategies needs to be increased. We also recommend that researchers employ varied methods to adequately capture the interactive nature of humor.

  4. Disease activity, quality of life and indirect costs of reduced productivity at work, generated by Polish patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Kawalec

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the association between activity of ankylosing spondylitis (AS and decrease in quality of life as well as productivity loss of affected patients in a specified group of patients in the Polish setting. Material and methods : An questionnaire survey was conducted using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI to assess disease activity, as well as the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaires to assess productivity loss; quality of life was presented as utility calculated using the EuroQol 5 questionnaire and also measured on a visual analogue scale (VAS. Indirect costs were assessed with the human capital approach implying gross domestic product per capita or gross value added per worker in Poland in 2014 and were expressed in Polish zlotys (PLN as well as in euros. Correlation was presented using Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. Results : We performed our analysis based on 78 full questionnaires collected. A mean BASDAI score of 5.91 in the analysed group of patients was detected and mean utility of 0.5135 was observed. Average quality of life measured on the visual analogue scale was 46.55. Mean number of days off work was 45.26 days per year and mean on-the-job productivity loss was 49.29%. Average annual indirect costs per patient were €4241 (17 686 PLN calculated using gross domestic product and €10 172 (42 417 PLN estimated using gross value added. Total productivity loss was significantly correlated with disease activity (strong correlation of 0.6005 and utility (moderate correlation of –0.3698. Conclusions : Ankylosing spondylitis causes a great decrease in quality of life as well as patients’ productivity loss associated with both absenteeism and presenteeism. The greater the disease activity is, the lower is the utility, the lower is the quality of life measured on the VAS, and the greater are the total annual indirect costs. Total

  5. Direct and indirect costs among patients with binge-eating disorder in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, You-Li; Rascati, Karen L; Pawaskar, Manjiri

    2017-05-01

    To quantify the economic burden of binge-eating disorder (BED) in terms of work productivity loss, healthcare resource utilization, and healthcare costs. Respondents of the US National Health and Wellness Survey 2013 were invited to participate in a follow-up internet survey to identify adults with BED using DSM-5 criteria. Work productivity loss, healthcare resource utilization, and direct and indirect costs were assessed for BED respondents and matched non-BED respondents using generalized linear models or two-part models as appropriate. A total of 1,720 people were included in our analysis (N = 344 with BED; N= 1,376 without BED). BED respondents had higher levels of activity impairment than non-BED respondents (41.29% vs. 23.18%, p Eat Disord 2017; 50:523-532). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Assessment of Surgery Resident Competency Provided by Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaxin; Yan, Tingmei; Qu, Bo

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the competency of surgery residents from the patient perspective in the current healthcare environment in China. The authors performed an assessment of 508 surgery residents in Liaoning province. Seven patients were as a group to complete the self-administered questionnaires on the survey for each individual corresponding resident. A 5-point rating scale with an unable-to-evaluate category was used to assess surgery resident competency by patients. Reliability and validity were assessed by Cronbach alpha (α) and exploratory factor analysis, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 13.0. The surveys on 421 residents were valid, and the valid response rate was 82.8%. A total of 2947 questionnaires from patients were analyzed in this study. The Cronbach α coefficient was 0.92. The 4 factors emerging in the exploratory factor analysis reached a cumulative contribution rate of 66.98%. The items of "promotes health maintenance (talks about preventive care)" (206/7.0%), "tells me about any side effects of the medicine" (177/6.0%), "spends enough time with me" (189/6.4%), and "answers my questions thoroughly" (168/5.7%) were scored <4 by higher percentage of patients. The instrument provided an acceptable means for patients to evaluate the competency of Chinese surgery residents. Surgery residents should improve their competencies on preventive care, patient safety, and communication skills.

  7. Patients' perceptions of patient care providers with tattoos and/or body piercings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerfield, Heather V; Stafford, Amy B; Speroni, Karen Gabel; Daniel, Marlon G

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated patients' perceptions of patient care providers with visible tattoos and/or body piercings. As tattooing and body piercing are increasingly popular, research that informs nursing administrators regarding policies on patient care providers having visible tattoos and body piercings is warranted. A total of 150 hospitalized adult patients compared pictures of male and female patient care providers in uniform with and without tattoos and/or nonearlobe body piercings. Patient care providers with visible tattoos and/or body piercings were not perceived by patients in this study as more caring, confident, reliable, attentive, cooperative, professional, efficient, or approachable than nontattooed or nonpierced providers. Tattooed female providers were perceived as less professional than male providers with similar tattoos. Female providers with piercings were perceived as less confident, professional, efficient, and approachable than nonpierced female providers. Nursing administrators should develop and/or evaluate policies regarding patient care providers with visible tattoos and/or body piercings.

  8. Providing prenatal care to pregnant women with overweight or obesity: Differences in provider communication and ratings of the patient-provider relationship by patient body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Cole, Katie O; Gudzune, Kimberly A; Bleich, Sara N; Cheskin, Lawrence J; Bennett, Wendy L; Cooper, Lisa A; Roter, Debra L

    2017-06-01

    To examine the association of women's body weight with provider communication during prenatal care. We coded audio recordings of prenatal visits between 22 providers and 117 of their patients using the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Multivariate, multilevel Poisson models were used to examine the relationship between patient pre-pregnancy body mass index and provider communication. Compared to women with normal weight, providers asked fewer lifestyle questions (IRR 0.66, 95% CI 0.44-0.99, p=0.04) and gave less lifestyle information (IRR 0.51, 95% CI 0.32-0.82, p=0.01) to women with overweight and obesity, respectively. Providers used fewer approval (IRR 0.68, 95% CI 0.51-0.91, p=0.01) and concern statements (IRR 0.68, 95% CI 0.53-0.86, p=0.002) when caring for women with overweight and fewer self-disclosure statements caring for women with obesity (IRR 0.40, 95% CI 0.19-0.84 p=0.02). Less lifestyle and rapport building communication for women with obesity may weaken patient-provider relationship during routine prenatal care. Interventions to increase use of patient-centered communication - especially for women with overweight and obesity - may improve prenatal care quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mobile-based patient-provider communication in cancer survivors: The roles of health literacy and patient activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shaohai; Hong, Y Alicia

    2017-11-28

    Thanks to rapid penetration of mobile tools, more and more cancer survivors have adopted mobile-based patient-provider communication (MBPPC). The relationship between MBPPC and patients' health outcomes, however, remains unclear; how health literacy and patient activation interact with such relationship is unexplored. Data were drawn from National Cancer Institute's Health Information National Trends Survey 4 Cycle 3. A sample of 459 cancer survivors were included in the analysis. Based on the 3-stage model of health promotion using interactive media, this study empirically tested a moderated mediation model. MBPPC (eg, patient use of email, text message, mobile app, and social media to communicate with providers) had no direct effect on cancer survivors' emotional health. Instead, health literacy completely mediated this path. Patient activation positively moderated the effect of health literacy on emotional health and further increased the indirect effect of MBPPC on emotional health. MBPPC alone does not directly result in better emotional health outcomes; health literacy is the key to realize its health benefits; patient activation significantly strengthens the effects of MBPPC. As we embrace the mHealth movement, innovative programs are needed to promote MBPPC, and improve health literacy and activation of cancer survivors, particularly in underserved communities, to reduce health disparities. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Boundary Negotiating Artifacts in Personal Informatics: Patient-Provider Collaboration with Patient-Generated Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chia-Fang; Dew, Kristin; Cole, Allison; Zia, Jasmine; Fogarty, James; Kientz, Julie A; Munson, Sean A

    2016-02-27

    Patient-generated data is increasingly common in chronic disease care management. Smartphone applications and wearable sensors help patients more easily collect health information. However, current commercial tools often do not effectively support patients and providers in collaboration surrounding these data. This paper examines patient expectations and current collaboration practices around patient-generated data. We survey 211 patients, interview 18 patients, and re-analyze a dataset of 21 provider interviews. We find that collaboration occurs in every stage of self-tracking and that patients and providers create boundary negotiating artifacts to support the collaboration. Building upon current practices with patient-generated data, we use these theories of patient and provider collaboration to analyze misunderstandings and privacy concerns as well as identify opportunities to better support these collaborations. We reflect on the social nature of patient-provider collaboration to suggest future development of the stage-based model of personal informatics and the theory of boundary negotiating artifacts.

  11. Providing culturally congruent care for Saudi patients and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutair, Abbas Saleh Al; Plummer, Virginia; O'Brien, Anthony Paul; Clerehan, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to increase an awareness of caring for Saudi families by non-Saudi nurses to improve their understanding of culturally competent care from a Saudi perspective. Healthcare providers have a duty of a care to deliver holistic and culturally specific health care to their patients. As a consequence of 'duty of care' obligations, healthcare providers must facilitate culturally congruent care for patients of diverse cultural backgrounds. For the Saudi family considerable cultural clashes may arise when Saudi patients are hospitalized and receive care from healthcare professionals who do not understand Islamic principles and Saudi cultural beliefs and values. The healthcare workforce in Saudi Arabia is a unique multicultural workforce that is mix of Saudi and significant other nationalities. Saudi nurses for example represent only 36.3% of the workforce in the different health sectors. Whilst the different ethnic and cultural background expatriate nurses represent 63.7% (Ministry of Health, 2010). This article also could increase the awareness of healthcare professionals caring for Arab and Muslims patients in another context in the world.

  12. Employment status and indirect costs in patients with renal failure: differences between different modalities of renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Mauro, Juan C; Cuervo, Jesús; Rebollo, Pablo; Callejo, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    There are evidences of a different employment status between patients undergoing different modalities of renal replacement therapy (RRT). The present study aims to compare the indirect costs associated to morbidity in the following RRT alternatives: hemodialysis in a specialized center (HD), automated peritoneal dialysis (APD), continuous ambulatory dialysis (CAPD), and renal transplant (TX). An analysis on indirect costs was implemented following the Human Capital Theory. In total, 243 patients in working age were included (32 CAPD, 46 APD, 83 HD and 82 TX) from 8 hospitals. The potentially productive years of life lost (PPYL), the costs of lost labor productivity (LLPc) for the year 2009 and the total cost of PPYL (PPYLtc) until age of retirement were estimated. All the estimations were adjusted by age, sex rates. Non-parametric analysis (a bootstrap confidence intervals of differences in costs calculated following the simple bias-corrected percentile method -1,000 estimates-) was computed to highlight differences in costs. No significant differences were found in age or sex between groups. LLPc-2009- in HD (6,547€-95% CI: 5,727€-7,366€) was significantly higher (pindirect costs due to morbidity showing higher rates of employment than HD and requiring less disability benefits.

  13. Indirect determinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Dinu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Looking at the cognitive attitude of parsimony, culturally inculcated by operating on cognition with Occam’s razor, there are visible only the direct effects of a cause, or at most those of other collateral causes. The indirect effects of an explicit cause are, however, neglected.

  14. Understanding the direct and indirect costs of patients with schizophrenia [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5ow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Tajima-Pozo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Schizophrenia is a disabling mental disorder with high prevalence and that usually  requires long-term follow-up and expensive lifelong treatment. The cost of schizophrenia treatment consumes a significant amount of the health services' budget in western countries. Objective: The aim of the study was to find out about the costs related to schizophrenia across different european countries and compare them. Results: Schizophrenia treatment costs an estimated 18 billion euros annually worldwide. The direct costs associated with medical help are only part of the total expenditure. The indirect costs are an equally (or even moreimportant part of the total cost. These expenses are related to the lack of productivity of schizophrenic patients and the cost that relatives have to bear as a result of taking care of their affected relatives. Conclusions: Although data on the cost of schizophrenia may vary slightly between different european countries, the general conclusion that can be drawn is that schizophrenia is a very costly disorder. Not only because of direct costs related to medical procedures, but also due to the non-medical (indirect costs. Together this suggests the need to investigate cost-efficient strategies that could provide a better outcome for schizophrenic patients, as well as the people who care for them.

  15. Patient choice of provider type in the emergency department: perceptions and factors relating to accommodation of requests for care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I; Schneider, Sandra M; He, Hua; Ali, Zarina; Richardson, Thomas M

    2010-06-01

    Patient satisfaction is related to the perception of care. Some patients prefer, and are more satisfied with, providers of the same gender, race or religious faith. This study examined emergency medical provider attitudes towards, as well as patient and provider characteristics that are associated with, accommodating such requests. A survey administered to a convenience sample of participants at the 2007 American College of Emergency Physicians Scientific Assembly. The nine-question survey ascertained Likert-type responses to the likelihood of accommodating patient requests for specific provider types. Statistical analyses used Wilcoxon rank-sum, Wilcoxon signed-rank and Cochran's Q tests. The 176 respondents were predominantly white (83%) and male (74%), with a mean age of 42 y. Nearly a third of providers felt that patients perceive better care from providers of shared demographics with racial matching perceived as more important than gender or religion (p=0.02). Female providers supported patient requests for same gender providers more so than males (prequesting like providers, female patients had higher accommodation scores than male patients (prequests for providers of specific demographics within the emergency department may be related to provider characteristics. When patients ask for same gender providers, female providers are more likely to accommodate such a request than male providers. Female, non-white and Muslim patients may be more likely to have their requests honoured for matched providers.

  16. Patient-provider conversations about sterilization: A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimport, Katrina; Dehlendorf, Christine; Borrero, Sonya

    2017-03-01

    Although female sterilization is the second most commonly used contraceptive method in the US, research suggests that providers may serve as barriers to desired sterilization. We conducted a modified grounded theory analysis of audio-recorded contraceptive counseling visits with 52 women who specified on a previsit survey that they wanted no future children and a supplemental analysis of visits with 14 women who wanted or were unsure about future children in which sterilization was mentioned. Sterilization was discussed in only 19 of the 52 visits, primarily with patients who were older women with children. Although some framed sterilization positively, many clinicians discouraged patients from pursuing sterilization, encouraging them instead to use long-acting reversible methods and framing the permanence of sterilization as undesirable. In the 33 remaining sessions, sterilization was not mentioned, and clinicians largely failed to solicit patients' future reproductive intentions. We found no clear patterns regarding discussion of sterilization in the 14 supplemental cases. Clinicians did not discuss sterilization with all patients for whom it might have been appropriate and thus missed opportunities to discuss sterilization as part of the full range of appropriate methods. When they did discuss sterilization, they only infrequently presented the method in positive ways and more commonly encouraged patients to choose a long-acting reversible method instead. Clinicians may want to reflect on their counseling practices around sterilization to ensure that counseling is centered on patient preferences, rather than driven by their own assumptions about the desirability of reversibility. Clinicians often fail to discuss sterilization as a contraceptive option with potentially appropriate candidates and, when they do, often discourage its selection. Clinicians should consider assessing reproductive intentions to ensure that potentially relevant methods are included in

  17. Health-related quality of life, work productivity, and indirect costs among patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Jessica L; Carson, Robyn T; Flores, Natalia M

    2017-02-14

    activities, and higher indirect costs, imposing a substantial burden on patients and employers. These findings suggest a significant unmet need exists for effective IBS-D treatments.

  18. [Comprehensibility of patient education in orthopaedic rehabilitation: a qualitative study on patients and providers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagl, M; Ullrich, A; Farin, E

    2013-02-01

    An important requirement for achieving postulated goals in the context of patient education is that patient education be conducted in a way that the patients can understand it. It is the objective of this explorative study to examine how patients and providers evaluate the comprehensibility and patients' comprehension of patient education under routine conditions during orthopaedic rehabilitation. Furthermore, we aim to explore the influencing factors that patients and providers describe as conducive and counterproductive to the comprehensibility of patient education, and the ideas or desires they have as to how patient education can be made more comprehensible. We conducted guided focus groups with 50 patients with chronic back pain or osteoarthritis aged between 22 and 71 years (M=50.4, SD=9.4) and 35 patient education providers aged between 26 and 61 years (M=44.9, SD=9.8) in a total of 9 orthopaedic rehabilitation centres. Qualitative analyses of the interview transcripts were conducted according to Mayring's content analytic approach using Atlas.ti software. Patients and providers evaluate patient education as generally comprehensible. The involvement of patients in patient education is reported by both patients and providers as the main conducive factor. Patients describe poor (e. g. superficial or contradictory) information as counterproductive regarding comprehensibility, while providers tend to mention patients' lack of motivation and of taking personal responsibility as hindering patients' comprehension. Patients' and providers' proposals and ideas can be organized in the topics patient education (e. g. stronger reference to patients' everyday life), providers (e. g. improving providers' tutoring skills), information (e. g. more information), patient involvement (e. g. stronger consideration of patients' interests), organization (e. g. smaller groups), and goal clarification (e. g. consideration of patients' expectations). Our results reveal that good

  19. Practice nurses mental health provide space to patients to discuss unpleasant emotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, E.C.; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van

    2016-01-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: A core skill of practice nurses' mental health is to recognize and explore patients' unpleasant emotions. Patients rarely express their unpleasant emotions directly and spontaneously, but instead give indirect signs that something is worrying them. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS

  20. Practice nurses mental health provide space to patients to discuss unpleasant emotions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, E.C.M.; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, A.M. van

    2016-01-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? A core skill of practice nurses' mental health is to recognize and explore patients' unpleasant emotions. Patients rarely express their unpleasant emotions directly and spontaneously, but instead give indirect signs that something is worrying them.

  1. Indirect laminate veneers as an indirect bonding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Ken; Miwa, Hideyuki; Goto, Shigemi; Kondo, Takamasa

    2004-01-01

    Indirect bracket bonding methods that use individual tooth transfer trays offer several benefits compared to direct bonding techniques, as well as to indirect bonding systems that use transfer trays that include all of the teeth. Precise and correct bracket position presents the most significant advantage of all indirect bonding procedures, but this new indirect bracket bonding technique also provides unprecedented enamel protection and caries prevention. In addition, it provides accuracy for the recementation of any loose, broken, or lost brackets at their previous sites. This article presents the rationale and a step-by-step guide for implementing this indirect bracket bonding system.

  2. Comparative effectiveness of delayed-release dimethyl fumarate versus glatiramer acetate in multiple sclerosis patients: results of a matching-adjusted indirect comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Andrew; Cutter, Gary; Fox, Robert J; Xiao, James; Lewin, James B; Edwards, Michael R

    2017-06-01

    Using matching-adjusted indirect comparison, we compared efficacy outcomes in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis treated with delayed-release dimethyl fumarate (DMF) or glatiramer acetate (GA). An indirect comparison of DMF (patient-level data) and GA (aggregate data) was conducted, with average baseline characteristics of DMF patients weighted to match those for GA patients. Direct comparison of DMF and GA was conducted in CONFIRM. Final results pooled the indirect and direct comparisons using meta-analysis. After matching, baseline characteristics were balanced between DMF and GA patients. Compared with GA, efficacy was significantly in favor of DMF as measured by annualized relapse rate (rate ratio: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.57-1.00; p = 0.0474) and 12-week confirmed disability progression (risk ratio: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.46-0.76; p < 0.0001). DMF demonstrated superior clinical efficacy versus GA.

  3. Patient-specific indirectly 3D printed mitral valves for pre-operative surgical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginty, Olivia; Moore, John; Xia, Wenyao; Bainbridge, Dan; Peters, Terry

    2017-03-01

    Significant mitral valve regurgitation affects over 2% of the population. Over the past few decades, mitral valve (MV) repair has become the preferred treatment option, producing better patient outcomes than MV replacement, but requiring more expertise. Recently, 3D printing has been used to assist surgeons in planning optimal treatments for complex surgery, thus increasing the experience of surgeons and the success of MV repairs. However, while commercially available 3D printers are capable of printing soft, tissue-like material, they cannot replicate the demanding combination of echogenicity, physical flexibility and strength of the mitral valve. In this work, we propose the use of trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE) 3D image data and inexpensive 3D printing technology to create patient specific mitral valve models. Patient specific 3D TEE images were segmented and used to generate a profile of the mitral valve leaflets. This profile was 3D printed and integrated into a mold to generate a silicone valve model that was placed in a dynamic heart phantom. Our primary goal is to use silicone models to assess different repair options prior to surgery, in the hope of optimizing patient outcomes. As a corollary, a database of patient specific models can then be used as a trainer for new surgeons, using a beating heart simulator to assess success. The current work reports preliminary results, quantifying basic morphological properties. The models were assessed using 3D TEE images, as well as 2D and 3D Doppler images for comparison to the original patient TEE data.

  4. Work productivity loss and indirect costs associated with new cardiovascular events in high-risk patients with hyperlipidemia: estimates from population-based register data in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banefelt, J; Hallberg, S; Fox, K M; Mesterton, J; Paoli, C J; Johansson, G; Levin, L-Å; Sobocki, P; Gandra, S R

    2016-12-01

    To estimate productivity loss and associated indirect costs in high-risk patients treated for hyperlipidemia who experience cardiovascular (CV) events. Retrospective population-based cohort study conducted using Swedish medical records linked to national registers. Patients were included based on prescriptions of lipid-lowering therapy between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2011 and followed until 31 December 2012 for identification of CV events and estimation of work productivity loss (sick leave and disability pension) and indirect costs. Patients were stratified into two cohorts based on CV risk level: history of major cardiovascular disease (CVD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent. Propensity score matching was applied to compare patients with new events (cases) to patients without new events (controls). The incremental effect of CV events was estimated using a difference-in-differences design, comparing productivity loss among cases and controls during the year before and the year after the cases' event. The incremental effect on indirect costs was largest in the CHD risk equivalent cohort (n = 2946) at €3119 (P value indirect costs. Myocardial infarction (€3465), unstable angina (€2733) and, most notably, ischemic stroke (€6784) yielded substantial incremental cost estimates (P values Indirect costs related to work productivity losses of CV events are substantial in Swedish high-risk patients treated for hyperlipidemia and vary considerably by type of event.

  5. Indirect measurement of lymphatic absorption with inulin in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, D. G.; Krediet, R. T.; Koomen, G. C.; Boeschoten, E. W.; vd Reijden, H. J.; Arisz, L.

    1990-01-01

    To elucidate the importance of possible trapping of macromolecules in peritoneal tissue on the calculation of peritoneal lymphatic drainage, we compared the transport of inulin administered i.v. and i.p. in nine continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients on two separate days. In the

  6. Patient, provider, and clinic characteristics associated with public STD clinic patient satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, S.; Zenilman, J; Erbelding, E

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: There is a lack of information describing levels of patient satisfaction among patients seeking sexually transmitted diseases (STD) care in a public clinic setting. We sought to identify patient, provider, and clinic characteristics associated with patient satisfaction within public STD clinics.

  7. Clinical management apps: creating partnerships between providers and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silow-Carroll, Sharon; Smith, Barbara

    2013-11-01

    The market for health applications, or apps, on mobile devices is growing rap­idly, with over 40,000 currently in use. One type of app technology--clinical manage­ment apps--enable patients and providers to work together to manage chronic conditions, particularly diabetes and asthma. These apps are mostly used by health plans and large health care organizations with an interest in improving outcomes and controlling costs. Challenges to broader adoption of apps include the lack of objective research to evalu­ate outcomes, uncertainty about how to pay for and encourage the use of cost-effective apps, and the absence of a regulatory framework that standardizes development to ensure performance. If this infrastructure is developed, apps may serve as a catalyst to stimulate the transformation of health care generally and target low-income populations to expand access to care and help reduce health disparities.

  8. Smartphone medication adherence apps: potential benefits to patients and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayer, Lindsey; Heldenbrand, Seth; Anderson, Paul; Gubbins, Paul O; Martin, Bradley C

    2013-01-01

    To provide an overview of medication adherence, discuss the potential for smartphone medication adherence applications (adherence apps) to improve medication nonadherence, evaluate features of adherence apps across operating systems (OSs), and identify future opportunities and barriers facing adherence apps. Medication nonadherence is a common, complex, and costly problem that contributes to poor treatment outcomes and consumes health care resources. Nonadherence is difficult to measure precisely, and interventions to mitigate it have been largely unsuccessful. Using smartphone adherence apps represents a novel approach to improving adherence. This readily available technology offers many features that can be designed to help patients and health care providers improve medication-taking behavior. Currently available apps were identified from the three main smartphone OSs (Apple, Android, and Blackberry). In addition, desirable features for adherence apps were identified and ranked by perceived importance to user desirability using a three-point rating system: 1, modest; 2, moderate; or 3, high. The 10 highest-rated apps were installed and subjected to user testing to assess app attributes using a standard medication regimen. RESULTS 160 adherence apps were identified and ranked. These apps were most prevalent for the Android OS. Adherence apps with advanced functionality were more prevalent on the Apple iPhone OS. Among all apps, MyMedSchedule, MyMeds, and RxmindMe rated the highest because of their basic medication reminder features coupled with their enhanced levels of functionality. Despite being untested, medication apps represent a possible strategy that pharmacists can recommend to nonadherent patients and incorporate into their practice.

  9. Low validity of the Sensewear Pro3 activity monitor compared to indirect calorimetry during simulated free living in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Andreas; Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Jensen, Andreas Emil Kryger

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To validate physical activity estimates by the Sensewear Pro3 activity monitor compared with indirect calorimetry during simulated free living in patients diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the hip pre or post total hip arthroplasty. METHODS: Twenty patients diagnosed with hip osteoarth...

  10. Permutation Disalignment Index as an Indirect, EEG-Based, Measure of Brain Connectivity in MCI and AD Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammone, Nadia; Bonanno, Lilla; Salvo, Simona De; Marino, Silvia; Bramanti, Placido; Bramanti, Alessia; Morabito, Francesco C

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we introduce Permutation Disalignment Index (PDI) as a novel nonlinear, amplitude independent, robust to noise metric of coupling strength between time series, with the aim of applying it to electroencephalographic (EEG) signals recorded longitudinally from Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impaired (MCI) patients. The goal is to indirectly estimate the connectivity between the cortical areas, through the quantification of the coupling strength between the corresponding EEG signals, in order to find a possible matching with the disease's progression. PDI is first defined and tested on simulated interacting dynamic systems. PDI is then applied to real EEG recorded from 8 amnestic MCI subjects and 7 AD patients, who were longitudinally evaluated at time [Formula: see text]0 and 3 months later (time [Formula: see text]1). At time [Formula: see text]1, 5 out of 8 MCI patients were still diagnosed MCI (stable MCI) whereas the remaining 3 exhibited a conversion from MCI to AD (prodromal AD). PDI was compared to the Spectral Coherence and the Dissimilarity Index. Limited to the size of the analyzed dataset, both Coherence and PDI resulted sensitive to the conversion from MCI to AD, even though only PDI resulted specific. In particular, the intrasubject variability study showed that the three patients who converted to AD exhibited a significantly ([Formula: see text]) increased PDI (reduced coupling strength) in delta and theta bands. As regards Coherence, even though it significantly decreased in the three converted patients, in delta and theta bands, such a behavior was also detectable in one stable MCI patient, in delta band, thus making Coherence not specific. From the Dissimilarity Index point of view, the converted MCI showed no peculiar behavior. PDI significantly increased, in delta and theta bands, specifically in the MCI subjects who converted to AD. The increase of PDI reflects a reduced coupling strength among the brain areas, which is

  11. Direct and indirect health economic impact of hypoglycaemia in a global population of patients with insulin-treated diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Ronnie; Galstyan, Gagik; Goldfracht, Margalit; Al Sifri, Saud; Elliott, Lisa; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2018-01-17

    The Hypoglycaemia Assessment Tool (HAT) study investigated the health economic impact of hypoglycaemic events in 24 countries, including countries without previously published data on hypoglycaemia. Self-assessment questionnaires and patient diaries (4-week prospective period) were completed by adults with type 1 (T1D) or type 2 diabetes (T2D) treated with insulin for more than 12 months (N=27,585). Direct economic impacts of hypoglycaemia during the 4-week prospective period, included increased blood glucose monitoring (reported by 69.7% [T1D] and 60.9% [T2D] of patients), hospitalisation (T1D 2.1%; T2D 3.4% of patients) and medical contact (clinic or telephone; T1D 3.8%; T2D 6.8% of patients). Regional variation in medical contact and hospitalisation was found, with the highest usage in Russia (T1D 17.1%; T2D 17.3%), and Latin America (T1D 5.2%; T2D 6.8%) respectively. Indirect economic impacts following hypoglycaemia included loss of productivity due to absence from work or study; 3.9% (T1D) and 6.2% (T2D) of patients. Regional differences in work productivity were noted among patients with T2D, with a low prevalence in Northern Europe and Canada (0.9%) and high in Southeast Asia (14.6%). This study shows that hypoglycaemia has a significant but variable impact on the economics of diabetes healthcare globally. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Indirect usage of miniscrew anchorage to intrude overerupted mandibular incisors in a Class II patient with a deep overbite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Yoshihito; Kuroda, Shingo; Sugawara, Yasuyo; Balam, Tarek A; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    Vertical dentoalveolar discrepancies are a common problem in orthodontic patients but are often difficult to treat with traditional mechanics. This case report illustrates the successful treatment of overerupted mandibular incisors via the indirect use of miniscrew anchorage. A woman (age, 22 years 9 months) had chief complaints of maxillary incisor protrusion and crooked teeth. An excessive curve of Spee caused by elongation of the mandibular incisors was also found. The patient was diagnosed with a severe Class II Division 1 malocclusion and a deep overbite. After extraction of the mandibular first premolars and the subsequent leveling phase, the elongated incisors were intruded with a novel method, which involved the combined use of sectional archwires and miniscrews placed in the premolar areas. After the procedure, the mandibular incisors had been intruded by 6.5 mm with no undesirable side effects. The total active treatment period was 42 months. The resultant occlusion and satisfactory facial profile were maintained after 30 months of retention. Our novel intrusion approach shows potential for correcting a deep overbite. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Patient Satisfaction Is Associated With Time With Provider But Not Clinic Wait Time Among Orthopedic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Brendan M; Eskildsen, Scott M; Clement, R Carter; Lin, Feng-Chang; Olcott, Christopher W; Del Gaizo, Daniel J; Tennant, Joshua N

    2017-01-01

    Clinic wait time is considered an important predictor of patient satisfaction. The goal of this study was to determine whether patient satisfaction among orthopedic patients is associated with clinic wait time and time with the provider. The authors prospectively enrolled 182 patients at their outpatient orthopedic clinic. Clinic wait time was defined as the time between patient check-in and being seen by the surgeon. Time spent with the provider was defined as the total time the patient spent in the examination room with the surgeon. The Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey was used to measure patient satisfaction. Factors associated with increased patient satisfaction included patient age and increased time with the surgeon (P=.024 and P=.037, respectively), but not clinic wait time (P=.625). Perceived wait time was subject to a high level of error, and most patients did not accurately report whether they had been waiting longer than 15 minutes to see a provider until they had waited at least 60 minutes (P=.007). If the results of the current study are generalizable, time with the surgeon is associated with patient satisfaction in orthopedic clinics, but wait time is not. Further, the study findings showed that patients in this setting did not have an accurate perception of actual wait time, with many patients underestimating the time they waited to see a provider. Thus, a potential strategy for improving patient satisfaction is to spend more time with each patient, even at the expense of increased wait time. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):43-48.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Interventions for providers to promote a patient-centred approach in clinical consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwamena, Francesca; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Gaulden, Carolyn M; Jorgenson, Sarah; Sadigh, Gelareh; Sikorskii, Alla; Lewin, Simon; Smith, Robert C; Coffey, John; Olomu, Adesuwa

    2012-12-12

    Communication problems in health care may arise as a result of healthcare providers focusing on diseases and their management, rather than people, their lives and their health problems. Patient-centred approaches to care delivery in the patient encounter are increasingly advocated by consumers and clinicians and incorporated into training for healthcare providers. However, the impact of these interventions directly on clinical encounters and indirectly on patient satisfaction, healthcare behaviour and health status has not been adequately evaluated. To assess the effects of interventions for healthcare providers that aim to promote patient-centred care (PCC) approaches in clinical consultations. For this update, we searched: MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), PsycINFO (OvidSP), and CINAHL (EbscoHOST) from January 2000 to June 2010. The earlier version of this review searched MEDLINE (1966 to December 1999), EMBASE (1985 to December 1999), PsycLIT (1987 to December 1999), CINAHL (1982 to December 1999) and HEALTH STAR (1975 to December 1999). We searched the bibliographies of studies assessed for inclusion and contacted study authors to identify other relevant studies. Any study authors who were contacted for further information on their studies were also asked if they were aware of any other published or ongoing studies that would meet our inclusion criteria. In the original review, study designs included randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series studies of interventions for healthcare providers that promote patient-centred care in clinical consultations. In the present update, we were able to limit the studies to randomized controlled trials, thus limiting the likelihood of sampling error. This is especially important because the providers who volunteer for studies of PCC methods are likely to be different from the general population of providers. Patient-centred care was defined as a

  15. Involving Medical Students in Providing Patient Education for Real Patients: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijn, Thomas W; Fluit, Cornelia R M G; Kremer, Jan A M; Beune, Thimpe; Faber, Marjan J; Wollersheim, Hub

    2017-09-01

    Studies suggest that involving students in patient education can contribute to the quality of care and medical education. Interventions and outcomes in this field, however, have not yet been systematically reviewed. The authors examined the scientific literature for studies on interventions and outcomes of student-provided patient education. Four databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, ERIC, PsycINFO) were searched for studies reporting patient education, undergraduate medical students, and outcomes of patient education, published between January 1990 and October 2015. Facilitators of and barriers to educational interventions were assessed using the Learning Transfer System Inventory. The learning yield, impact on quality of care, and practical feasibility of the interventions were rated by patients, care professionals, researchers, and education professionals. The search resulted in 4991 hits. Eighteen studies were included in the final synthesis. Studies suggested that student-provided patient education improved patients' health knowledge, attitude, and behavior (nine studies), disease management (three studies), medication adherence (one study), and shared decision-making (one study). In addition, involving students in patient education was reported to enhance students' patient education self-efficacy (four studies), skills (two studies), and behavior (one study), their relationships with patients (two studies), and communication skills (two studies). Our findings suggest that student-provided patient education-specifically, student-run patient education clinics, student-provided outreach programs, student health coaching, and clerkships on patient education-has the potential to improve quality of care and medical education. To enhance the learning effectiveness and quality of student-provided patient education, factors including professional roles for students, training preparation, constructive supervision, peer support on organizational and individual levels, and

  16. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of anchorage loss during en-masse retraction with indirectly loaded miniscrews in patients with bimaxillary protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monga, Nitika; Kharbanda, Om Prakash; Samrit, Vilas

    2016-08-01

    This study provides vital insight in assessing anchorage loss when miniscrews are indirectly loaded. The study sample comprised 18 patients with bimaxillary protrusion (14 girls, 4 boys; mean age, 17.3 ± 4.6 years) selected from a database of 89 patients treated with miniscrews. All subjects who were selected required extraction of all first premolars and maximum anchorage. After initial leveling and aligning, miniscrews were placed between the first molar and the second premolar in all 4 quadrants and loaded by the indirect method at 3 weeks after placement with 200-g nickel-titanium alloy closed-coil springs for en-masse retraction. Mean treatment duration was 29.7 ± 6.8 months. Pretreatment and posttreatment lateral cephalograms were analyzed to measure the amount of anchorage loss, incisor retraction, and the incisors' angular change in reference to the pterygoid vertical reference line and were evaluated by the structural superimposition method. The ratio of incisor retraction to molar protraction was 4.2 in the maxilla and 4.7 in the mandible. The first molars showed mean extrusion of 0.20 mm in the maxilla and 0.57 mm in the mandible; these were statistically insignificant. The mean angular change of the first molars was -2.43° in the maxilla and -0.03° in the mandible. The mean anchorage loss in reference to the pterygoid vertical was 1.3 mm in the maxilla and 1.1 mm in the mandible; these were statistically significant. Structural superimpositions showed mean change in molar position of 0.83 mm in the maxilla and 0.87 mm in the mandible, and 5.77 mm in the maxillary incisor and 5.43 mm in the mandibular incisor. These results were compared with the direct anchorage method reported in the literature. Indirect miniscrew anchorage can be a viable alternative to direct anchorage. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Role of Self-Efficacy in the Relationship Between Patient-Provider Relationships and Psychological Insulin Resistance Among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Soohyun; Nam, Soohyun; Song, Youngshin

    Psychological insulin resistance (PIR) affects patients' self-care behaviors and quality of life due to the delay of insulin treatment for optimal glycemic control. Although effective patient-provider communication and relationships have been shown to improve patients' overall treatment adherence and attitude toward treatment, little is known about the potential mechanisms by which effective patient-provider communication and relationships decrease PIR and whether these relationships are mediated by diabetes self-efficacy. The purpose of this study is to examine whether diabetes self-efficacy among patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) mediates the relationships between PIR and perceived patient-provider relationships. A total of 178 patients with T2D participated in a cross-sectional study. Data were obtained by patient interview using validated measures of diabetes attitude, diabetes knowledge, self-efficacy, and patient-provider communication. PIR was measured by using a validated measure, Barriers to Insulin Treatment. A structural equation model was developed to estimate direct and indirect effects of patient-provider relationship on PIR when self-efficacy was controlled as a mediator. Diabetes knowledge and attitude were not significantly associated with PIR. Better patient-provider relationship was directly associated with lower PIR (β = -.40, p = 0.008). When diabetes self-efficacy was included as a mediator, the direct effect between patient-provider relationship and PIR changed (β = -.27, p = 0.034), indicating that better patient-provider relationship that reduces PIR is due to greater diabetes self-efficacy. The findings suggest that development of intervention programs aimed at improving diabetes self-efficacy-which may be positively correlated with better patient-provider relationship-is needed to reduce PIR.

  18. The importance of pharmacist providing patient education in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Mia; Williams, Felecia

    2015-02-01

    The world's increasing diversity requires health care professionals to adjust delivery methods of teaching to accommodate different cultural values and beliefs. The ability to communicate effectively across languages and various cultural practices directly affects patient education outcomes. Pharmacist should be aware of varying modalities and considerations when counseling a patient diagnosed with cancer and undergoing chemotherapy. In more recent years, the medical profession has seen an increase in patient outcomes due to using the multidisciplinary team approach and has benefited by implementing Medication Therapy Management (MTM) programs at various institutions. For the clinical pharmacist, this would mean documentation for these services should be precise and accurate based on the specific patients needs. There are several factors involved in the care and therapy of the patient with cancer. Clinical oncology pharmacist should be aware of the ever-changing role in oncology and be able to implement new practices at their facility for better patient outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. The patient-provider discordance in patients' needs assessment: a qualitative study in breast cancer patients receiving oral chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chunlan; Nengliang, Yao; Yan, Wang; Qiong, Fang; Yuan, Changrong

    2017-01-01

    To explore the differing perspectives of patients and providers and their assessment of supportive care needs in breast cancer patients receiving oral chemotherapy. The patient-provider concordance in patients' needs assessment is critical to the effective management of cancer. Self-administered oral chemotherapy greatly shifts responsibilities for side-effect monitoring, symptom management and dose adjustments from the provider to the patient. Home-based care plans will be central to the effective management of these patients. A descriptive qualitative design was used. A purposive sample of nine breast cancer patients, four oncologists and four oncology nurses were recruited in Shanghai, China. Semi-structured and in-depth interviews were conducted to collect data. A qualitative content analysis aimed at finding manifest and latent meanings of data was applied to analyse the information. Four themes of needs emerged from the interviews with patients and providers: information/knowledge, communication, social support and symptom management, but patients and providers only agreed on the assessment of symptom and side-effects management needs. Patients want more positive encouraging information from providers, but providers think patients need more information of efficacy and safety. Patients appreciate support from other peer patients with similar experiences, but providers think the support from families and friends are readily available to them. Patients discussed their spiritual needs, while oncologists see the need to improve patient adherence to medication. Breast cancer patients differed from their providers in assessment of healthcare needs. Further investigation of the relationships between patient-provider discordance and patient outcomes may guide interventions to improve care for cancer patients receiving oral chemotherapy. Oncology nurses should develop a holistic home-based care plan by exploring and integrating the discordance of needs assessment of

  20. Longitudinal study of the indirect immunofluorescence and complement fixation tests for diagnosis of chagas' disease in immunosuppressed patients submitted to renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fernando de Castro Figueiredo

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and serological follow-up of 7 patients submitted to renal transplantation and presenting positive serological reactions to Chagas 'disease before immunossupression did not show significant changes in indirect immunofluorescence and complement fixation titres for Chagas ' disease, or signs and symptoms indicating exacerbation of the disease during follow- up. In addition, 18 of 66 recipients of renal transplants considered to be non-chagasic before immunosuppression showed at least one positive result to the indirect immunofluorescence test for Chagas ' disease during the study period. The results suggest that the immunosuppression State induced in chagasic patients submitted to renal transplant did notpromoted exacerbation of the chronic infection in these patients and not interfere with the serological response of chronic chagasics, thus permitting the use of these serologic reactions for diagnostic purposes in these cases. However, the positive results ofthe indirect immunofluorescence test in non- chagasic patients indicate the needforjudicious interpretation ofthe indirect immunofluorescence test for the diagnosis of Chagas' disease in renal transplanted patients.

  1. Should doctors provide futile medical treatment if patients or their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    not be discounted', implying that it is justified to prescribe a placebo if it improves a patient's quality of life. Such treatment plays a palliative care role, which differs from futile treatment.[4]. Palliative care aims at alleviating the patient's pain or suffering – not curing their condition – and becomes futile if it can no longer.

  2. The Quality of Care Provided to Patients with Chronic Non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases are among the major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, access to and quality of health care for patients is very low in developing countries including Ethiopia. Hospitals and Health Centers are the main sources of health care for such patients in ...

  3. Patients' satisfaction with dental care provided by public dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Tanzania, patient satisfaction with dental services has received only minor attention. Objective: To assess patients' satisfaction with public dental health services in Dar es Salaam. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Five public dental clinics randomly selected from a list of all the nine public dental ...

  4. Blood Products Provided to Patients Receiving Futile Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Thanh H; Ziman, Alyssa; Wenger, Neil S

    2017-09-01

    The number of hospitalized patients receiving treatment perceived to be futile is not insignificant. Blood products are valuable resources that are donated to help others in need. We aimed to quantify the amount of blood transfused into patients who were receiving treatment that the critical care physician treating them perceived to be futile. During a 3-month period, critical care physicians in 5 adult intensive care units completed a daily questionnaire to identify patients perceived as receiving futile treatment. Of 1136 critically ill patients, physicians assessed 123 patients (11%) as receiving futile treatment. Fifty-nine (48%) of the 123 patients received blood products after they were assessed to be receiving futile treatment: 242 units of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) (7.6% of all PRBC units transfused into critical care patients during the 3-month study period); 161 (9.9%) units of plasma, 137 (12.1%) units of platelets, and 21 (10.5%) units of cryoprecipitate. Explicit guidelines on the use of blood products should be developed to ensure that the use of this precious resource achieves meaningful goals. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  5. Barriers to diabetes management: patient and provider factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Soohyun; Chesla, Catherine; Stotts, Nancy A; Kroon, Lisa; Janson, Susan L

    2011-07-01

    Despite significant advances in diagnosis and treatment, the persistence of inadequate metabolic control continues. Poor glycemic control may be reflected by both the failure of diabetes self-management by patients as well as inadequate intervention strategies by clinicians. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize existing knowledge regarding various barriers of diabetes management from the perspectives of both patients and clinicians. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, ERIC, and PsycINFO identified 1454 articles in English published between 1990 and 2009, addressing type 2 diabetes, patient's barriers, clinician's barriers, and self-management. Patients' adherence, attitude, beliefs, and knowledge about diabetes may affect diabetes self-management. Culture and language capabilities influence the patient's health beliefs, attitudes, health literacy, thereby affecting diabetes self-management. Other influential factors include the patient's financial resources, co-morbidities, and social support. Clinician's attitude, beliefs and knowledge about diabetes also influence diabetes management. Clinicians may further influence the patient's perception through effective communication skills and by having a well-integrated health care system. Identifying barriers to diabetes management is necessary to improve the quality of diabetes care, including the improvement of metabolic control, and diabetes self-management. Further research that considers these barriers is necessary for developing interventions for individuals with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Introducing a new generation indirect calorimeter for estimating energy requirements in adult intensive care unit patients: feasibility, practical considerations, and comparison with a mathematical equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Elisabeth; Spapen, Herbert; Honoré, Patrick M; Mattens, Sabrina; Van Gorp, Viola; Diltoer, Marc; Huyghens, Luc

    2013-10-01

    Indirect calorimetry (IC) is increasingly advocated for individualizing nutritional therapy in critically ill adult patients, but questions remain regarding its practical implementation. During 12 weeks, we prospectively assessed utility and practical aspects of IC use. Adult medico-surgical intensive care unit (ICU) patients were daily screened for malnutrition. Indirect calorimetry was planned in subjects considered unable to meet energy requirements on day 3 after admission. Measured energy expenditure (MEE) was compared with calculated (resting/total) energy expenditure. A total of 940 evaluations were performed in 266 patients (age, 63±16 years; 59% males; Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, 14±8). A total of 230 patients (86.5%) were at risk for malnutrition, and in 118 of them, IC was indicated. Practical considerations precluded measurements in 72 cases (61%). Forty-six calorimetric evaluations revealed an MEE of 1649±544 kcal per 24 hours that poorly correlated with calculated resting energy expenditure (r2=0.19) and calculated total energy expenditure (r2=0.20). Indirect calorimetry measurements were not time-consuming. Indirect calorimetry was indicated in half but effectively performed in only 20% of a representative intensive care unit population at risk for malnutrition. Correlation between MEE and CEE was poor. Indirect calorimetry is increasingly advocated for individualizing nutritional therapy in critically ill adult patients. Practical feasibility is tested in this study. Large differences between measured and calculated energy expenditure are observed. Together with patients' characteristics, feasibility results can guide clinicians or institutes in using IC in their daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Patients' and providers' perceptions of the preventability of hospital readmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Galen, Louise S; Brabrand, Mikkel; Cooksley, Tim

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Because of fundamental differences in healthcare systems, US readmission data cannot be extrapolated to the European setting: To investigate the opinions of readmitted patients, their carers, nurses and physicians on predictability and preventability of readmissions and using majority...

  8. Two-year follow-up of indirect posterior composite restorations of permanent teeth with excessive material loss in pediatric patients: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuturk, Alp Erdin; Ozmen, Bilal; Tokay, Ugur; Tuloglu, Nuray; Sari, M Erhan; Sonmez, T Taha

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of indirect composite restorations in permanent molars with excessive substance loss in pediatric patients who have undergone root canal treatments. Molars of 29 pediatric patients underwent endodontic treatment. Sixteen molars were restored with an indirect posterior composite resin restoration and 13 molars were restored with a direct posterior composite resin restoration. The success of the restorations was evaluated for 2 years based on United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria, photographs after staining with basic fuchsine, and radiographic data. Data obtained from both groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Evaluation of the clinical and radiographic data revealed no observable, statistically significant differences between the posterior and the indirect posterior composites (p > 0.05). However, evaluation of photos taken of the patients' molars after staining with basic fuchsin revealed that direct posterior composites showed increased staining on the margins of the restorations after six months (p restoring endodontically treated permanent teeth with excessive substance loss in child patients, indirect restorations may be seen as a better option.

  9. Labral and cartilage abnormalities in young patients with hip pain: accuracy of 3-Tesla indirect MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petchprapa, Catherine N.; Rybak, Leon D. [NYU Langone Medical Center-Hospital for Joint Diseases, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Dunham, Kevin S.; Recht, Michael P. [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Lattanzi, Riccardo [NYU Langone Medical Center, The Bernard and Irene Schwartz Center for Biomedical Imaging, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Assess the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T indirect magnetic resonance arthrography (iMRA) for hip cartilage and labral pathology detection using arthroscopy as the reference standard and compare it to the published performance of direct magnetic resonance arthrography (dMRA). Between 2009 and 2011, 290 patients suspected of having femoroacetabular impingement underwent iMRA. Our study group consisted of 41 of these patients (17 males, mean age 35 years; 24 females, mean age 33 years) who did not have a prior history of hip surgery and who subsequently underwent arthroscopy. Two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists separately evaluated the randomized and anonymized studies for the presence and quadrant location of labral and cartilage pathology. These recorded data were compared to arthroscopic reports. Forty-one patients had labral pathology, 34 patients had acetabular and 5 patients had femoral cartilage pathology at arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, negative- and positive-predictive values for labral lesion detection were respectively 98, 99, 99, 99 and 98 %; for acetabular cartilage lesion detection they were 69, 98, 89, 87 and 95 %; for femoral cartilage lesion detection they were 69, 95, 93 and 39 %. Sensitivities of iMRA by quadrant (anteroinferior, anterosuperior, posteroinferior, posterosuperior) for the labrum were 100.0, 95.0, NA and 85.7 %, for acetabular cartilage were NA, 58.8, NA and 39.5 % and for femoral cartilage were 50.0, 33.3, 75.0 and 75.0 %. NA indicates results not available because of the absence of findings in those quadrants. Specificities of iMRA by quadrant (anteroinferior, anterosuperior, posteroinferior, posterosuperior) for the labrum (95.0, 100.0, 95.1, 67.5 %), acetabular (100.0, 85.7, 92.6, 79.5 %) and femoral cartilage (100.0, 94.7, 96.2, 85.9 %). iMRA at 3 T is accurate in detecting labral pathology suggesting that it is a viable alternative to dMRA. (orig.)

  10. Interrelation between Patient Satisfaction and Patient-Provider Communication in Diabetes Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Basak Cinar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to assess how patient satisfaction with medical provider-patient communication can affect oral health, diabetes, and psychobehavioural measures among type 2 diabetes (T2DM patients. It is part of a prospective intervention study among randomly selected T2DM patients, in Turkey. The data analyzed were Community Periodontal Need Index (CPI, HbA1c, patient satisfaction with communication, and psychobehavioural variables. Data was collected initially and at the end of the intervention. The participants were allocated to either health coaching (HC or health education (HE. At baseline, there were no statistical differences between the HC and the HE groups on any of the measures (P>0.05. Patients in both the HC and the HE groups had low satisfaction with communication. At postintervention, the increase in patient satisfaction with communication in the HC group was significantly higher than that in the HE group (P=0.001. Principal component analysis revealed that patient satisfaction with communication shared the same cluster with clinical measures (CPI and HbA1c and quality of life in the HC group. In conclusion, the present study showed, to our knowledge for the first time, that overall patient satisfaction with medical care provider-patient communication, empowered by HC approach, was interrelated with well-being of T2DM patients, in terms of psychobehavioural and clinical measures.

  11. Diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy: Perceptions of patients and providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, Mirjam P.; Beune, Erik J. A. J.; Baim-Lance, Abigail M.; Bruessing, Raynold C.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore perceptions and strategies of health care providers regarding diabetes self-management support for patients with low health literacy (LHL), and to compare their self-management support with the needs of patients with LHL and type 2 diabetes. This study

  12. Providing dental care for the patient with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, H Barry; Perlman, Steven P; Wong, Allen

    2008-09-01

    The increasing number of children and adults with autism spectrum disorders highlights the need to provide a full range of services, including dental care. A review of the autism spectrum, the magnitude of the problem, and approaches to providing services by dental practitioners are presented.

  13. Implementing and Using a Patient Portal: A qualitative exploration of patient and provider perspectives on engaging patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Bridget L; Brown, Judith Belle; Terry, Amanda; Cejic, Sonny; Stewart, Moira; Thind, Amardeep

    2016-07-04

    The use of portals might be expected to rise; however, adoption has been slow. Development of portals has occurred with limited patient involvement. This paper fills a need for literature concerning perspectives regarding the value of portals, how best to organize and provide portals, and critically how to seek patient involvement in implementation.ObjectiveThe objective was to explore the feelings, ideas, and expectations of patients and primary care providers concerning the implementation and use of patient portals. The study employed a descriptive qualitative design interviewing seven patients and four providers from an interdisciplinary primary health care clinic in Ontario, Canada. Patients were older with at least one chronic condition. Interviews were analysed independently by three coders who then met to synthesize the findings. There was limited experience of portals and substantial convergence between patients and providers regarding concerns and potential benefits with an overall positive view. Four themes emerged: 1) the Context in which patient portal use takes place; 2) the Necessary conditions for use of a patient portal; 3) the Implementation of a patient portal; and 4) the Use of a patient portal for care. Findings highlight that it is not sufficient to engage patients in the use of a portal; it is critical that patients be engaged in the early stages of implementation. With many health and fitness electronic tools available (e.g. Fitbit©), this study remind us that tools are not enough. Patient engagement requires patient-centred partnerships between patients and health care providers.

  14. Critical thinking at the bedside: providing safe passage to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Ruth R; Petersen, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    The critical thinking ability of health care professionals can affect patient safety directly (Buerhaus, Donelan, Ulrich, Norman, & Dittus, 2005). The National League for Nursing (NLN, 2006) expects nursing graduates to be able to demonstrate critical thinking. Nursing programs are required to measure critical thinking as an outcome criterion for accreditation. This process of program accreditation is considered an indicator that a professional program offers a quality product. Based on NLN expectations, health care disciplines should diligently seek opportunities to enhance critical thinking by promoting qualitative and quantitative research that focuses on curriculum evaluation, enhancing educators' and faculty knowledge, and improving patient care outcomes.

  15. Providing truly patient-centred care: Harnessing the pragmatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Healthcare professionals in South Africa have to improvise when treating patients who do not speak their language – generally by using ad-hoc interpreters, who may be nurses, refugees, family members, or even children. A number of studies (Cambridge 1999, Meyer et al. 2003, Penn 2007) have found that using ad-hoc ...

  16. Patient Satisfaction with Care Provided at the Antiretroviral Clinic of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Nigeria, there is a dearth of information on patient satisfaction with HIV/AIDS care. ... Questionnaire Long Form was used to assess seven dimensions of care: general satisfaction, technical quality, interpersonal manner, communication, financial aspects, time spent with doctor, and access/availability/convenience.

  17. Evaluation of Care Provided to Terminally Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Margaret T.; Williams, T. Franklin

    1983-01-01

    Studied the quality of terminal care in 40 patients in an acute care facility and a chronic care facility. Minimial difficulty was observed in making the transition from active to comfort care. An evaluation method and a model of terminal care emphasizing improved communication and emotional support are proposed. (Author/JAC)

  18. Provider and Patient Directed Financial Incentives to Improve Care and Outcomes for Patients with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorincz, Ilona S.; Lawson, Brittany C. T.

    2012-01-01

    Incentive programs directed at both providers and patients have become increasingly widespread. Pay-for-performance (P4P) where providers receive financial incentives to carry out specific care or improve clinical outcomes has been widely implemented. The existing literature indicates they probably spur initial gains which then level off or partially revert if incentives are withdrawn. The literature also indicates that process measures are easier to influence through P4P programs but that intermediate outcomes such as glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol control are harder to influence, and the long term impact of P4P programs on health is largely unknown. Programs directed at patients show greater promise as a means to influence patient behavior and intermediate outcomes such as weight loss; however, the evidence for long term effects are lacking. In combination, both patient and provider incentives are potentially powerful tools but whether they are cost-effective has yet to be determined. PMID:23225214

  19. Email Between Patient and Provider: Assessing the Attitudes and Perspectives of 624 Primary Health Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Puneet; Abu-Abed, Mohamed Ismail; Kapoor, Vikram; Nicholson, Kathryn; Agarwal, Gina

    2016-12-22

    Email between patients and their health care providers can serve as a continuous and collaborative forum to improve access to care, enhance convenience of communication, reduce administrative costs and missed appointments, and improve satisfaction with the patient-provider relationship. The main objective of this study was to investigate the attitudes of patients aged 16 years and older toward receiving email communication for health-related purposes from an academic inner-city family health team in Southern Ontario. In addition to exploring the proportion of patients with a functioning email address and interest in email communication with their health care provider, we also examined patient-level predictors of interest in email communication. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered, 1-page survey of attitudes toward electronic communication for health purposes. Participants were recruited from attending patients at the McMaster Family Practice in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. These patients were aged 16 years and older and were approached consecutively to complete the self-administered survey (N=624). Descriptive analyses were conducted using the Pearson chi-square test to examine correlations between variables. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine statistically significant predictors of interest in email communication (yes or no). The majority of respondents (73.2%, 457/624) reported that they would be willing to have their health care provider (from the McMaster Family Practice) contact them via email to communicate health-related information. Those respondents who checked their personal email more frequently were less likely to want to engage in this electronic communication. Among respondents who check their email less frequently (fewer than every 3 days), 46% (37/81) preferred to communicate with the McMaster Family Practice via email. Online applications, including email, are emerging as a viable avenue for patient

  20. Regulating Abortion: Impact on Patients and Providers in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Silvie; Joyce, Ted

    2011-01-01

    The State of Texas began enforcement of the Woman's Right to Know (WRTK) Act on January 1, 2004. The law requires that all abortions at or after 16 weeks' gestation be performed in an ambulatory surgical center (ASC). In the month the law went into effect, not one of Texas's 54 nonhospital abortion providers met the requirements of a surgical…

  1. Do health care providers discuss HIV with older female patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether older women could recall receiving HIV-related information from health care providers. ... difference (p = 0.003; odds ratio [OR]: 0.26; 95% CI: 0.09–0.69) between their age stratification of 50 to 59 years and 60 to 80 years with respect to receiving information regarding HIV.

  2. Patients' and providers' perspectives on bibliotherapy in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Grainne; Hevey, David; Martin, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    Bibliotherapy is a form of self-administered treatment in which structured materials provide a means to alleviate distress. Although the treatment has evidence of effectiveness, evaluations of bibliotherapy have typically focused on outcomes, and the perspectives of both the client and the service provider have been understudied. In the present study, eleven users of a bibliotherapy scheme were interviewed regarding their experiences of bibliotherapy. In addition, five referring practitioners to the scheme were also interviewed. Thematic analyses revealed three super-ordinate themes in the transcripts: participants' personal experiences of the bibliotherapy scheme factors that facilitate change and the influence of the professionals involved. The implications of these findings for bibliotherapy schemes are considered. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Recruiting former melanoma patients via hospitals in comparison to office-based dermatologists in a register-based cohort study that required indirect contact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Zeissig

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are detailed reviews about different recruitment strategies, but not with regard to differences between recruitment of hospital-based versus office-based physicians. Within this study, the two different recruitment schemes are compared. Advantages and disadvantages of different ways of recruitment in registry-based studies are discussed. Methods In a cross-sectional cancer-registry-based study, long-term melanoma patients were contacted by dermatologists rather than directly by the registry on the basis of the legal situation. Logistic regression models and generalized estimating equations were used to assess effects of various patient and physician characteristics on participation and data quality. Especially differences between hospital-based versus office-based dermatologists are evaluated. Results Seventy two out of 112 contacted dermatologists took part in the study (64.3%. The cooperation proportion was 52.2% (689 participants/1320 contacted patients. Participants and non-participants differed regarding age and sex, but not regarding other social demographic factors and cancer stage. We did not observe a difference in patient participation between hospital-based versus office-based dermatologists (OR 1.08 [CI 0.84–1.39]; p = 0.57. However, medical data provided by the cancer registry were better for participants registered and recruited by hospitals. Conclusions In cohort studies with epidemiological cancer registries, recruitment via physicians has potential disadvantages and is more complex. If this indirect way of contact is mandatory, we recommend recruitment procedures including hospital-based rather than office-based physicians. However, physician characteristics were not associated with outcome.

  4. Complementary and conventional providers in cancer care: experience of communication with patients and steps to improve communication with other providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stub, Trine; Quandt, Sara A; Arcury, Thomas A; Sandberg, Joanne C; Kristoffersen, Agnete E

    2017-06-08

    Effective interdisciplinary communication is important to achieve better quality in health care. The aims of this study were to compare conventional and complementary providers' experience of communication about complementary therapies and conventional medicine with their cancer patients, and to investigate how they experience interdisciplinary communication and cooperation. This study analyzed data from a self-administrated questionnaire. A total of 606 different health care providers, from four counties in Norway, completed the questionnaire. The survey was developed to describe aspects of the communication pattern among oncology doctors, nurses, family physicians and complementary therapists (acupuncturists, massage therapists and reflexologists/zone-therapists). Between-group differences were analyzed using chi-square, ANOVA and Fisher's exact tests. Significance level was defined as p cancer patients regarding complementary therapies. While complementary therapists advised their patients to apply both complementary and conventional modalities, medical doctors were less supportive of their patients' use of complementary therapies. Of conventional providers, nurses expressed more positive attitudes toward complementary therapies. Opportunities to improve communication between conventional and complementary providers were most strongly supported by complementary providers and nurses; medical doctors were less supportive of such attempts. A number of doctors showed lack of respect for complementary therapists, but asked for more research, guidelines for complementary modalities and training in conventional medicine for complementary therapists. For better quality of care, greater communication about complementary therapy use is needed between cancer patients and their conventional and complementary providers. In addition, more communication between conventional and complementary providers is needed. Nurses may have a crucial role in facilitating communication, as

  5. Nursing students' practice in providing oral hygiene for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Ann

    To explore and identify precedent factors that may influence nursing students' oral hygiene practice in hospitalised patients, by using an adaptation of the Precede Model. A quantitative approach with a descriptive design was adopted in this pilot study. A questionnaire was designed and implemented as a self-report method of data collection. A convenience sample of 37 second-year diploma nursing students in an Irish teaching hospital participated in the study. The clinical area and the practices within it are influential factors in the provision of oral hygiene. Students are exposed to and influenced by outdated and non-research-based practices. Role modelling is an effective means of motivating and reinforcing student practices. However, qualified nurses' practices need to be critically reviewed before assuming that they can act as role models in assisting students to implement research-based oral hygiene. Formal education, current practices, socialisation and role modelling may influence students' behaviour in relation to oral hygiene. The results should be tentatively reviewed by clinical staff as an indication of current practices.

  6. Direct, indirect, and intangible costs after severe trauma up to occupational reintegration – an empirical analysis of 113 seriously injured patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Benjamin; Ommen, Oliver; Pfaff, Holger; Lüngen, Markus; Lefering, Rolf; Thüm, Sonja; Janssen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Although seriously injured patients account for a high medical as well as socioeconomic burden of disease in the German health care system, there are only very few data describing the costs that arise between the days of accident and occupational reintegration. With this study, a comprehensive cost model is developed that describes the direct, indirect and intangible costs of an accident and their relationship with socioeconomic background of the patients. Methods: This study included 113 patients who each had at least two injuries and a total Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) greater than or equal to five. We calculated the direct, indirect and intangible costs that arose between the day of the accident and occupational reintegration. Direct costs were the treatment costs at hospitals and rehabilitation centers. Indirect costs were calculated using the human capital approach on the basis of the work days lost due to injury, including sickness allowance benefits. Intangible costs were assessed using the Short Form Survey (SF-36) and represented in non-monetary form. Following univariate analysis, a bivariate analysis of the above costs and the patients’ sociodemographic and socioeconomic characteristics was performed. Results: At an average Injury Severity Score (ISS) of 19.2, the average direct cost per patient were €35,661. An average of 185.2 work days were lost, resulting in indirect costs of €17,205. The resulting total costs per patient were €50,431. A bivariate analysis showed that the costs for hospital treatment were 58% higher in patients who graduated from lower secondary school [Hauptschule] (ISS 19.5) than in patients with qualification for university admission [Abitur] (ISS 19.4). Conclusions: The direct costs of treating trauma patients at the hospital appear to be lower in patients with a higher level of education than in the comparison group with a lower educational level. Because of missing data, the calculated indirect costs can merely

  7. New look for Ortho OCs aids patients, providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    This article presents an update on the Dialpak oral contraceptive dispenser from Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical in Raritan, New Jersey. This innovation is ready for instant use with any day start and a one-day dial to help minimize the possibility of mistakes. Its clearly numbered pills and days of the week help women keep track throughout the month. Pills are enclosed in a sleek, refillable, reusable, and recyclable dispenser case that resembles a makeup compact. When opened, the case displays the pills, which are packaged to fit around a dial ring. Refill packs can be inserted into the case each month. The discreet design of the Dialpack allows it to blend in with other personal items, so women would feel more at ease keeping it during the day. While packaging can aid in successful pill taking, the providers continue to play a crucial role in encouraging compliance. The report suggests that counseling should be focused on the transience of most side effects and there is a need to identify a backup should there be problems with the pills.

  8. Identifying barriers and improving communication between cancer service providers and Aboriginal patients and their families: the perspective of service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Shaouli; Durey, Angela; Bessarab, Dawn; Aoun, Samar M; Thompson, Sandra C

    2013-11-04

    Aboriginal Australians experience poorer outcomes from cancer compared to the non-Aboriginal population. Some progress has been made in understanding Aboriginal Australians' perspectives about cancer and their experiences with cancer services. However, little is known of cancer service providers' (CSPs) thoughts and perceptions regarding Aboriginal patients and their experiences providing optimal cancer care to Aboriginal people. Communication between Aboriginal patients and non-Aboriginal health service providers has been identified as an impediment to good Aboriginal health outcomes. This paper reports on CSPs' views about the factors impairing communication and offers practical strategies for promoting effective communication with Aboriginal patients in Western Australia (WA). A qualitative study involving in-depth interviews with 62 Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal CSPs from across WA was conducted between March 2006-September 2007 and April-October 2011. CSPs were asked to share their experiences with Aboriginal patients and families experiencing cancer. Thematic analysis was carried out. Our analysis was primarily underpinned by the socio-ecological model, but concepts of Whiteness and privilege, and cultural security also guided our analysis. CSPs' lack of knowledge about the needs of Aboriginal people with cancer and Aboriginal patients' limited understanding of the Western medical system were identified as the two major impediments to communication. For effective patient-provider communication, attention is needed to language, communication style, knowledge and use of medical terminology and cross-cultural differences in the concept of time. Aboriginal marginalization within mainstream society and Aboriginal people's distrust of the health system were also key issues impacting on communication. Potential solutions to effective Aboriginal patient-provider communication included recruiting more Aboriginal staff, providing appropriate cultural training for CSPs

  9. Patient, provider, and clinic characteristics associated with public STD clinic patient satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S; Zenilman, J; Erbelding, E

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: There is a lack of information describing levels of patient satisfaction among patients seeking sexually transmitted diseases (STD) care in a public clinic setting. We sought to identify patient, provider, and clinic characteristics associated with patient satisfaction within public STD clinics. Methods: A cross sectional survey with random sampling was conducted among patients attending two public STD clinics. Satisfaction was assessed using questions from validated national surveys. Outcomes for multivariate logistic regression analysis were ratings of overall health care and clinician. Results: 499/605 (82%) patients were enrolled. Patients were mean age 29 years, 51% male, 94% black. Lower rating of clinician technical skills (OR = 15.6 clinic A, OR = 7.9 clinic B) and clinic environment (OR = 3.9 clinic A, OR = 9.6 clinic B) were associated with lower healthcare rating, as was lower rating of television/video in waiting room (OR = 10.2, clinic A) and dysuria (OR = 4.2, clinic B). Higher clinician rating (OR = 0.58, clinic A) and receiving written materials (OR = 0.44, clinic B) were protective of lower healthcare rating. Risks for lower clinician rating at clinic A were greater pain, problems getting care, lower rating of clinician technical skill, and overall health care, while receiving written materials was protective. At clinic B, lower rating of clinician technical skill and clinic environment were risks for lower clinician rating. Conclusions: Patient satisfaction was associated with modifiable provider and clinic characteristics. Results from our study indicate a need to examine whether health outcomes of STD management vary by patient satisfaction. PMID:15800094

  10. Antibodies from Patients with Melioidosis Recognize Burkholderia mallei but Not Burkholderia thailandensis Antigens in the Indirect Hemagglutination Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Tiyawisutsri, Rachaneeporn; Peacock, Sharon J.; Langa, Sayan; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Allen C Cheng; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Chaowagul, Wipada; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn

    2005-01-01

    The indirect hemagglutination assay routinely used to detect antibodies to Burkholderia pseudomallei was modified to detect cross-reactivity of antibodies to B. pseudomallei, B. mallei, and B. thailandensis antigens. We demonstrate a lack of cross-reactivity between B. pseudomallei and B. thailandensis but marked cross-reactivity between B. pseudomallei and B. mallei.

  11. Brief Training on Patient Anger Increases Oncology Providers' Self-Efficacy in Communicating With Angry Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart, James I; Sanchez Varela, Veronica; Burns, John W

    2017-09-01

    Anger is a common reaction to pain and life-limiting and life-threatening illness, is linked to higher levels of pain, and may disrupt communication with medical providers. Anger is understudied compared with other emotions in mental health and health care contexts, and many providers have limited formal training in addressing anger. The objective of this study was to assess if a brief provider training program is a feasible method for increasing providers' self-efficacy in responding to patient anger. Providers working in stem cell transplant and oncology units attending a brief training session on responding to patient anger. The program was informed by cognitive behavioral models of anger and included didactics, discussion, and experiential training on communication and stress management. Provider-rated self-efficacy was significantly higher for nine of 10 skill outcomes (P didactics, and experiential exercises can support provider awareness of anger, shape adaptive communication, and foster stress management skills. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dark Matter Indirect Signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Lavalle, Julien; Salati, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The astronomical dark matter could be made of weakly interacting and massive particles. If so, these species would be abundant inside the Milky Way, where they would continuously annihilate and produce cosmic rays. Those annihilation products are potentially detectable at the Earth, and could provide indirect clues for the presence of dark matter species within the Galaxy. We will review here the various cosmic radiations which the dark matter can produce. We will examine how they propagate t...

  13. Does patient choice of healthcare providers lead to better patient experiences in the Netherlands? A cross-sectional questionnaire study .

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Victoor, A.; Reitsma-van Rooijen, M.; Jong, J. de; Delnoij, D.; Friele, R.; Rademakers, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Various European healthcare systems encourage patients to make an active choice of healthcare provider, both as a worthwhile effort for patients and an instrument to encourage competition between providers. In previous research, patient groups were distinguished

  14. Influenza Vaccination among Pregnant Women: Patient Beliefs and Medical Provider Practices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stark, Lauren M; Power, Michael L; Turrentine, Mark; Samelson, Renee; Siddiqui, Maryam M; Paglia, Michael J; Strassberg, Emmie R; Kelly, Elizabeth; Murtough, Katie L; Schulkin, Jay

    2016-01-01

    ...% of patients reported receiving a recommendation. Age, education, a medical provider's recommendation, and educational materials were found to positively influence patient beliefs about the influenza...

  15. Group consultations in antenatal care: Patients’ perspectives on what patient-patient communication provides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Matilde Nisbeth; Fage-Butler, Antoinette Mary

    in our understanding of the group consultation. Our specific focus is on interpersonal communication in group consultations, with specific focus on patient-patient communication. This paper presents findings from a research project on pregnant women’s experiences of group consultations with a midwife...... in the Danish setting. Methods: Using a sequential mixed methods design, we first performed a discourse analysis of the written materials provided to the women about the group consultations. In the second step, we interview the women about their experiences of the group consultations. Findings: The analysis...... of the written materials found the juxtaposition of biomedical and patient empowerment discourses; these findings form the backdrop to the interviews, which are currently being undertaken. Conclusions: This study not only presents empirical findings on a relatively new, but increasingly used, setting for client...

  16. The direct and indirect effects of the negative affectivity trait on self reported physical function among patients with upper extremity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaei-Khoei, Mojtaba; Mohamadi, Amin; Mellema, Jos J; Tourjee, Stephen M; Ring, David; Vranceanu, Ana-Maria

    2016-12-30

    Negative affectivity is a personality trait that predisposes people to psychological distress and low life satisfaction. Negative affectivity may also affect pain intensity and physical function in patients with musculoskeletal conditions. We explored the association of negative affectivity to pain intensity and self-reported physical function, and tested whether pain intensity mediates the effect of negative affectivity on physical function. In a cross-sectional study, 102 patients with upper extremity musculoskeletal conditions presenting to an orthopedic surgeon completed self-report measures of negative affectivity, pain intensity, and physical function in addition to demographic and injury information. We used the Preacher and Hayes' bootstrapping approach to quantify the indirect effect of negative affectivity on physical function through pain intensity. Negative affectivity correlated with greater pain intensity and lower self-reported physical function significantly. Also, pain intensity mediated the association of negative affectivity with physical function. The indirect effect accounted for one-third of the total effect. To conclude, negative affectivity is associated with decreased engagement in daily life activities both directly, but also indirectly through increased pain intensity. Treatments targeting negative affectivity may be more economical and efficient for alleviation of pain and limitations associated with musculoskeletal illness than those addressing coping strategies or psychological distress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Indirect vs direct bonding of mandibular fixed retainers in orthodontic patients: a single-center randomized controlled trial comparing placement time and failure over a 6-month period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovali, Efstathia; Kiliaridis, Stavros; Cornelis, Marie A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this 2-arm parallel single-center trial was to compare placement time and numbers of failures of mandibular lingual retainers bonded with an indirect procedure vs a direct bonding procedure. Sixty-four consecutive patients at the postgraduate orthodontic clinic of the University of Geneva in Switzerland scheduled for debonding and mandibular fixed retainer placement were randomly allocated to either an indirect bonding procedure or a traditional direct bonding procedure. Eligibility criteria were the presence of the 4 mandibular incisors and the 2 mandibular canines, and no active caries, restorations, fractures, or periodontal disease of these teeth. The patients were randomized in blocks of 4; the randomization sequence was generated using an online randomization service (www.randomization.com). Allocation concealment was secured by contacting the sequence generator for treatment assignment; blinding was possible for outcome assessment only. Bonding time was measured for each procedure. Unpaired t tests were used to assess differences in time. Patients were recalled at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months after bonding. Mandibular fixed retainers having at least 1 composite pad debonded were considered as failures. The log-rank test was used to compare the Kaplan-Meier survival curves of both procedures. A test of proportion was applied to compare the failures at 6 months between the treatment groups. Sixty-four patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio. One patient dropped out at baseline after the bonding procedure, and 3 patients did not attend the recalls at 4 and 6 months. Bonding time was significantly shorter for the indirect procedure (321 ± 31 seconds, mean ± SD) than for the direct procedure (401 ± 40 seconds) (per protocol analysis of 63 patients: mean difference = 80 seconds; 95% CI = 62.4-98.1; P technique and 7 of 29 (24%) with the direct technique (log rank: P = 0.35; test of proportions: risk difference = 0.08; 95% CI = -0.15 to

  18. Efficacy of anti-leishmania therapy in visceral leishmaniasis among HIV infected patients: a systematic review with indirect comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia F Cota

    Full Text Available We conducted a systematic literature review with indirect comparison of studies evaluating therapeutic efficacy and toxicity associated to visceral leishmaniasis (VL therapy among HIV infected individuals.The outcomes of interest were clinical and parasitological cure, mortality, and adverse events.PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews and Cochrane manual were followed. Sources were MEDLINE, LILACS, EMBASE, Web of Knowledge databases and manual search of references from evaluated studies. We included all studies reporting outcomes after VL treatment, regardless of their design. Study quality was evaluated systematically by using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS for assessing the quality of nonrandomized studies in meta-analyses. Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software v.2.2.048 was used to perform one-group meta-analysis of study arms with the same drug to estimate global rates of success and adverse events with each drug. These estimates were used, when possible, to indirectly compare treatment options, adjusted for CD4 count. Direct comparison was pooled when available.Seventeen studies reporting five treatment regimens and outcome of 920 VL episodes occurring in HIV infected individuals were included. The main outstanding difference in outcome among the treatment regimens was observed in mortality rate: it was around 3 times higher with high-dose antimony use (18.4%, CI 95% 13.3-25%, indirectly compared to lipid formulations of amphotericin B treatment (6.1%, CI 95% 3.9-9.4%. It was observed, also by indirect comparison, higher rates of clinical improvement in study arms using amphotericin B than in study arms using pentavalent antimonial therapy (Sb(v. The parasitological cure, an outcome that presented some degree of risk of selection and verification bias, had rates that varied widely within the same treatment arm, with high heterogeneity, hampering any formal comparison among drugs. One direct comparison of amphotericin and antimoniate was

  19. Race/Ethnicity and Health Care Communication: Does Patient-Provider Concordance Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Casey F; Zinner, Darren; Rust, George; Fryer, George E

    2016-11-01

    Although many minority patients would prefer a provider of their own race/ethnicity, the influence of this relationship on patient-provider communication remains unknown. This analysis examined the effect of patient-provider race/ethnicity concordance on patient-reported provider communication quality using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey years 2002-2012. Ordinary least squares regressions were executed on communication rating, measured by the Consumer Assessment of Health Providers and Systems. Only 13.8% of black, non-Hispanic patients reported their usual source of care provider matched their race/ethnicity, compared with 94.4% of white, non-Hispanic patients and 43.8% of Hispanic patients. Differences in communication ratings were driven by patient race, rather than provider race. Although black, non-Hispanic patients rate their communication significantly higher than their counterparts overall, there was no significant influence of patient-provider racial concordance on ratings of communication when controlling for other sociodemographic variables. Minorities may seek the services of minority providers, but they are not more satisfied with patient-provider communication experience than when in race-discordant provider arrangements.

  20. Indirect evaporative cooling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, M.J.; Chapman, H.L.; Pescod, D.

    1976-01-01

    Characteristics and applications of three indirect evaporative cooling systems are described. The rock bed regenerative unit is now in licensed production and some operational experience is available, while the plastic plate heat exchanger unit has been demonstrated to be effective. A third system, based on a rotary heat exchanger is included. Although less development has been done on it, several successful applications of the heat exchanger are operational. All systems provide comfort cooling in which building indoor temperature varies over the day at an operating cost less than 50% of that of a comparable refrigerated cooling system.

  1. Patients' perceptions of the interpersonal sensitivity of their healthcare providers: the potential role of patient-provider racial/ethnic concordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Karon L; Chiriboga, David A; Jang, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary studies have revealed an association between cultural competence and an improvement in the quality of healthcare services, increased patient satisfaction, and increased effectiveness of services. This study examined factors that helped to explain patients' perceptions of their providers' interpersonal sensitivity - one component of cultural competence. The respondents were 2075 racially/ethnically diverse adults, aged 50 years and older, who responded to a national telephone survey. Results indicate that one of the main factors predicting interpersonal sensitivity is self-rated physical health: those who reported better health were more likely to see their provider as exhibiting higher levels of sensitivity. This was true for Hispanic/Latino patients. The results also suggest that having a provider of the same race/ethnicity was a significant factor only for Hispanic/Latino patients. Despite findings from previous research, racial/ethnic concordance may not be universally effective in improving interpersonal sensitivity in healthcare settings for all racial/ethnic groups.

  2. A mixed methods study of patient-provider communication about opioid analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Helen Kinsman; Korthuis, Philip Todd; Saha, Somnath; Eggly, Susan; Sharp, Victoria; Cohn, Jonathan; Moore, Richard; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2015-04-01

    To describe patient-provider communication about opioid pain medicine and explore how these discussions affect provider attitudes toward patients. We audio-recorded 45 HIV providers and 423 patients in routine outpatient encounters at four sites across the country. Providers completed post-visit questionnaires assessing their attitudes toward patients. We identified discussions about opioid pain management and analyzed them qualitatively. We used logistic regression to assess the association between opioid discussion and providers' attitudes toward patients. 48 encounters (11% of the total sample) contained substantive discussion of opioid-related pain management. Most conversations were initiated by patients (n=28, 58%) and ended by the providers (n=36, 75%). Twelve encounters (25%) contained dialog suggesting a difference of opinion or conflict. Providers more often agreed than disagreed to give the prescription (50% vs. 23%), sometimes reluctantly; in 27% (n=13) of encounters, no decision was made. Fewer than half of providers (n=20, 42%) acknowledged the patient's experience of pain. Providers had a lower odds of positive regard for the patient (adjusted OR=0.51, 95% CI: 0.27-0.95) when opioids were discussed. Pain management discussions are common in routine outpatient HIV encounters and providers may regard patients less favorably if opioids are discussed during visits. The sometimes-adversarial nature of these discussions may negatively affect provider attitudes toward patients. Empathy and pain acknowledgment are tools that clinicians can use to facilitate productive discussions of pain management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. How Infertility Patients and Providers View and Confront Religious and Spiritual Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzman, Robert

    2018-02-01

    Questions arise concerning whether and how religion affects infertility treatment decisions. Thirty-seven infertility providers and patients were interviewed. Patients confront religious, spiritual, and metaphysical issues coping with treatment failures and religious opposition from clergy and others. Religion can provide meaning and support, but poses questions and objections that patients may try to avoid or negotiate-e.g., concealing treatment or changing clergy. Differences exist within and between religions. Whether and how much providers discuss these issues with patients varies. These data, the first to examine several key aspects of how infertility providers and patients confront religious/spiritual issues, have important implications for practice, research, guidelines, and education.

  4. Patient-Centred Communication and Provider Avoidance: Does Body Mass Index Modify the Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phibbs, Sandi Cleveland; Faith, Jennifer; Thorburn, Sheryl

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Poor quality communication with healthcare providers has been associated with provider avoidance. Because obesity is stigmatised in healthcare settings, this association may differ for patients who are overweight or obese compared to patients who are normal weight. Our objective was to determine if associations between patient-centred…

  5. Comparing perceptions of cancer fatalism among African American patients and their providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powe, Barbara D; Daniels, Elvan C; Finnie, Ramona

    2005-08-01

    To describe perceptions of cancer fatalism and identify demographic correlates; to explore whether providers believe their patients are fatalistic about cancer and compare these views to the patients' views. Both patients (n= 52) and providers (n= 35) were recruited at federally funded, community primary care centers. Data were collected using the Powe Fatalism Inventory, the Perceived Patient Fatalism Inventory, and a demographic data questionnaire. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlations, and t-test. The majority of patients were African American women. The majority of providers were physicians and nurses. Patients indicated low perceptions of cancer fatalism, but providers believed patients were highly fatalistic. As the patients' educational level increased, perceptions of cancer fatalism decreased. The providers' belief that patients are fatalistic about cancer may influence patient-provider communication. They may be less likely to recommend screening, and patients may be less likely to initiate a discussion about cancer. Strategies are needed that target providers and their patients to address actual and/or perceived perceptions and their influence on cancer screening.

  6. The Association of Perceived Provider-Patient Communication and Relationship Quality with Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Meghan L.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Two-thirds of adults aged 50 years and older are adherent to recommendations for colorectal cancer screening. Provider-patient communication and characteristics of the patient-provider relationship may relate to screening behavior. Methods: The association of provider communication quality, relationship, and colorectal cancer screening…

  7. Dexmedetomidine provides optimum conditions during awake fiberoptic intubation in simulated cervical spine injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Chopra

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine provides optimum sedation without compromising airway or hemodynamic instability with better patient tolerance and satisfaction for AFOI. It also preserves patient arousability for the postintubation neurological assessment.

  8. Provider-patient in-office discussions of response to hepatitis C antiviral therapy and impact on patient comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Heidi E; Nelson, Meaghan; Martin, Paul; Cotler, Scott J

    2006-04-01

    Providers need to communicate projected response rates effectively to enable patients with hepatitis C virus to make informed decisions about therapy. This study used interactional sociolinguistics (1) to evaluate how gastroenterologists and allied health professionals communicate information regarding response rates to antiviral therapy, (2) to determine how these discussions relate to where the patient is in the continuum of evaluation and treatment, (3) to assess whether patients were aligned with providers in their perceptions of response rates after office visits, and (4) to identify factors that improve provider-patient alignment. Gastroenterologists, allied health professionals, and patients with hepatitis C virus were videotaped and audiotaped during regularly scheduled visits. Postvisit interviews were conducted separately with patients and providers. Visits and postvisits were transcribed and analyzed using validated sociolinguistic techniques. The phase of hepatitis C virus treatment shaped the benchmarks of response talk, although across the treatment continuum providers overwhelmingly made strategic use of positive statistics, providing motivation. In postvisit interviews, 55% of providers and patients were aligned on response rates. Patients with a favorable outcome and patients who asked response-related questions in the visit were more likely to be aligned with providers. Areas identified for improvement included the tendency to discuss response rates before an individualized assessment could be made, balancing motivation and accuracy, and assessing the patient's perspective before delivering any bad news, if necessary. Sociolinguistic analysis provides a powerful tool to evaluate provider-patient interactions and to identify ways to improve in-office communication regarding antiviral therapy.

  9. Glaucoma patient-provider communication about vision quality-of-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleath, Betsy; Sayner, Robyn; Vitko, Michelle; Carpenter, Delesha M; Blalock, Susan J; Muir, Kelly W; Giangiacomo, Annette L; Hartnett, Mary Elizabeth; Robin, Alan L

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (a) describe the extent to which ophthalmologists and glaucoma patients discuss vision quality-of-life during office visits, and (b) examine the association between patient and ophthalmologist characteristics and provider-patient communication about vision quality-of-life. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients' visits were video-tape recorded and quality-of-life communication variables were coded. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Specific glaucoma quality-of-life domains were discussed during only 13% of visits. Older patients were significantly more likely to discuss one or more vision quality-of-life domains than younger patients. African American patients were significantly less likely to make statements about their vision quality-of-life and providers were less likely to ask them one or more vision quality-of-life questions than non-African American patients. Eye care providers and patients infrequently discussed the patient's vision quality-of-life during glaucoma visits. African American patients were less likely to communicate about vision quality-of-life than non-African American patients. Eye care providers should make sure to discuss vision quality-of-life with glaucoma patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Perception of risk and communication among conventional and complementary health care providers involving cancer patients' use of complementary therapies: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stub, Trine; Quandt, Sara A; Arcury, Thomas A; Sandberg, Joanne C; Kristoffersen, Agnete E; Musial, Frauke; Salamonsen, Anita

    2016-09-08

    Communication between different health care providers (conventional and complementary) and cancer patients about their use of complementary therapies affects the health and safety of the patients. The aim of this study was to examine the qualitative research literature on the perception of and communication about the risk of complementary therapies between different health care providers and cancer patients. Systematic searches in six medical databases covering literature from 2000 to 2015 were performed. The studies were accessed according to the level of evidence and summarized into different risk situations. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the text data, and the codes were defined before and during the data analysis. Twenty-nine papers were included in the primary analysis and five main themes were identified and discussed. The main risk situations identified were 1. Differences in treatment concepts and philosophical values among complementary and conventional health care providers. 2. Adverse effects from complementary products and herbs due to their contamination/toxicity and interactions with conventional cancer treatment. 3. Health care physicians and oncologists find it difficult to recommend many complementary modalities due to the lack of scientific evidence for their effect. 4. Lack of knowledge and information about complementary and conventional cancer treatments among different health care providers. The risk of consuming herbs and products containing high level of toxins is a considerable threat to patient safety (direct risk). At the same time, the lack of scientific evidence of effect for many complementary therapies and differences in treatment philosophy among complementary and conventional health care providers potentially hinder effective communication about these threats with mutual patients (indirect risk). As such, indirect risk may pose an additional risk to patients who want to combine complementary therapies with

  11. Gender differences in patient-provider symptom agreement in reporting respiratory complaints on a questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaris, Gay J; Tape, Thomas G; Smith, Lynette M; Nickol, Devin R; Wigton, Robert S

    2008-06-01

    Men and women communicate differently, but it is unclear whether this influences health care outcomes. Because women patients frequently choose women health care providers, we examined whether this preference was affected by communication styles. We focused on communication of disease-specific symptoms, hypothesizing that symptom agreement between women patients and women health care providers would be greater than between other patient-provider gender combinations. Patients attending outpatient clinics were recruited as part of a study of respiratory illness at 7 university-affiliated sites during 3 consecutive influenza seasons (2000-2003). Individuals aged > or = 19 years were offered enrollment if they sought care for cold or flu symptoms at a participating study site. Patients were eligible to participate in the study if they reported any 1 of 6 symptoms: cough, runny nose, fever (subjective), muscle aches, sore throat, and/or exhaustion. Using separate questionnaires, patients and their health care providers recorded the patients' respiratory symptoms (as present or absent). Patients recorded their symptoms before visiting their health care provider, and providers recorded patient symptoms after the visit. Symptom agreement was compared using general estimating equations across all gender combinations. A total of 327 patients (220 women, 107 men) and 84 health care providers (37 women, 47 men) participated in the study. Overall symptom agreement for all patient-provider gender combinations was 81.9% (95% CI, 79.6%-84.2%). For each symptom, the observed agreement significantly exceeded the agreement expected by chance alone (P difference in symptom agreement for most symptoms between the male-male and female-female patient-provider combinations. Based on these findings, symptom agreement alone does not explain why women patients select women health care providers.

  12. [Out-Patient Psychosocial Cancer Counseling Centers and their Clients - Services Provided and Service Utilization by Patients and Patients' Relatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesler, JürgenM; Weis, Joachim; Schreib, Melanie; Eichhorn, Svenja; Kuhnt, Susanne; Faust, Tanja; Mehnert, Anja; Ernst, Jochen

    2015-12-01

    Psychosocial cancer counseling centers represent an increasingly important part of comprehensive psychosocial cancer care. Research on the services provided by those centers is sparse, however, as is research on person-, disease-, and treatment-related characteristics of their clients. Therefore, the present study analyzes the services provided by 26 psychosocial cancer counseling centers temporarily being funded by the German Cancer Aid as well as selected characteristics of their clients. Analyses are based on data collected during 2011 by means of a documentation system specifically designed for the purposes of psychosocial cancer counseling. Testing focuses on whether cancer patients and cancer patients' relatives differ with respect to various characteristics and the services used. The results show that psychosocial and benefit counseling represent a major part of counseling services, followed by giving information and employing relaxation techniques. Clients seek counseling primarily in early phases of disease and treatment. Women with breast cancer are over-represented among clients. Analyses also reveal significant differences between cancer patients and patients' relatives. Psychotherapeutic interventions and grief-counseling are more frequent in counseling relatives, whereas benefit counseling is more frequent in working with patients. The results emphasize the relevance of outpatient psychosocial cancer counseling. They may also help support initiatives aiming at establishing psychosocial cancer counseling targeted to the needs of each individual client. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Differences in the rates of patient safety events by payer: implications for providers and policymakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Christine S; Roberts, Eric T; Gaskin, Darrell J

    2015-06-01

    The reduction of adverse patient safety events and the equitable treatment of patients in hospitals are clinical and policy priorities. Health services researchers have identified disparities in the quality of care provided to patients, both by demographic characteristics and insurance status. However, less is known about the extent to which disparities reflect differences in the places where patients obtain care, versus disparities in the quality of care provided to different groups of patients in the same hospital. In this study, we examine whether the rate of adverse patient safety events differs by the insurance status of patients within the same hospital. Using discharge data from hospitals in 11 states, we compared risk-adjusted rates for 13 AHRQ Patient Safety Indicators by Medicare, Medicaid, and Private payer insurance status, within the same hospitals. We used multivariate regression to assess the relationship between insurance status and rates of adverse patient safety events within hospitals. Medicare and Medicaid patients experienced significantly more adverse safety events than private pay patients for 12 and 7 Patient Safety Indicators, respectively (at P patients had significantly lower event rates than private payers on 2 Patient Safety Indicators. Risk-adjusted Patient Safety Indicator rates varied with patients' insurance within the same hospital. More research is needed to determine the cause of differences in care quality received by patients at the same hospital, especially if quality measures are to be used for payment.

  14. Patients' and providers' perceptions of the impact of health literacy on communication in pulmonary rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Shiva; Brooks, Dina; Goldstein, Roger S

    2013-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the most prevalent form of chronic respiratory diseases worldwide. Pulmonary rehabilitation, including self-management education, highlights the importance of good patient-provider communication in establishing optimal care. There is a growing awareness of the potential impact of health literacy (HL) on the patients' access to and understanding of medical information. This study was designed to explore the patients' and health care professionals' (HCPs) perceptions of the role of HL in health communication. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with 12 patients and 20 HCPs at a Pulmonary Rehabilitation Center in Metropolitan Toronto. Although the term health literacy was not familiar to many patients, the contribution of knowledge to patient well-being was consistently identified by patients and HCPs. Barriers to communication included provider time constraints and the use of medical jargon. For providers they also included patient characteristics, language, culture and awareness of health resources. Approaches that might improve communication incorporated family support, peer support, better print and visual teaching material and a trusting empathic patient-provider relationship. The findings provide an increased understanding of patients' and providers' perceptions of HL as a barrier to effective communication of medical information to patients with COPD as well as approaches that might improve this communication.

  15. Effective patient-provider communication about sexual concerns in breast cancer: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jennifer Barsky; Beach, Mary Catherine; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Bantug, Elissa T; Casale, Kristen E; Porter, Laura S; Bober, Sharon L; Tulsky, James A; Daly, Mary B; Lepore, Stephen J

    2017-04-27

    Breast cancer patients commonly experience sexual concerns, yet rarely discuss them with clinicians. The study examined patient and provider experiences and preferences related to communication about breast cancer-related sexual concerns with the goal of informing intervention development. Patient data (n = 28) were derived from focus groups and interviews with partnered and unpartnered women treated for breast cancer reporting sexual concerns. Provider data (n = 11) came from interviews with breast cancer oncologists and nurse practitioners. Patient and provider data were analyzed separately using the framework method of qualitative analysis. Findings revealed individual and institutional barriers to effective communication about sexual concerns and highlighted key communication facilitators (e.g., a positive patient-provider relationship, patient communication as a driver of provider communication, and vice versa). Patients expressed preferences for open, collaborative communication; providers expressed preferences for focused intervention targets (identifying concerns, offering resources/referrals) and convenient format. A model of effective communication of sexual concerns was developed to inform communication interventions. Findings suggest that to improve patient-provider communication about sexual concerns, knowledge and skills-based interventions that activate patients and that equip providers for effective discussions about sexual concerns are needed, as are institutional changes that could incentivize such discussions.

  16. Patient race and perceived illness responsibility: effects on provider helping and bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazione, Samantha; Silk, Kami J

    2013-08-01

    Health care disparities represent a major issue impacting the quality of care in the USA. Provider biases have been identified as contributing to health care disparities. This study examined the helping intentions and biases reported by medical students based on patient race and perceived patient responsibility. The study was guided by the responsibility-affect-helping model (RAHM), which proposes that helping behaviour is a function of perceived responsibility and affect. In a 2 × 3 online experiment, medical students (n = 231) viewed a health chart and dialogue for either a Black or a White patient, in which the dialogue included a manipulation of the patient's rationales for his non-compliance with diet recommendations (responsible, not responsible, no responsibility assigned). After viewing the manipulation, medical students completed measures regarding perceived patient responsibility, affect, intention to help, perceptions of the patient and ethnocentrism. The RAHM was supported, such that increased perceived patient responsibility led to increased provider anger and reduced provider helping intentions, whereas decreased perceived patient responsibility led to increased provider empathy and helping intentions. Additionally, an interaction effect between race and perceived patient responsibility occurred such that bias toward the Black patient was most likely to occur in the control condition. Perceived patient responsibility affects provider helping intentions and interacts with patient race to influence provider perceptions of patient characteristics. Communication on rationales for non-compliance as associated with perceived responsibility may lead to better or worse patient care as providers make attributions about patients based on these factors. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Patient and provider perceptions of care for diabetes: results of the cross-national DAWN Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peyrol, Mark; Rubin, Richard R.; Lauritzen, Torsten

    2006-01-01

    , Europe and North America. Participants were randomly selected adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes (n=5,104), and randomly selected diabetes-care providers, including primary-care physicians (n=2,070), diabetes specialist physicians (n=635) and nurses (n=1,122). Multivariate analysis was used to examine....... Patients reported moderate levels of collaboration among providers, and providers indicated that several specialist disciplines were not readily available to them. Patients reported high levels of collaboration with providers in their own care. Provider endorsement of primary prevention strategies for type......Aims/hypothesis We assessed country-level and individual-level patterns in patient and provider perceptions of diabetes care. Methods The study used a cross-sectional design with face-to-face or telephone interviews of diabetic patients and healthcare providers in 13 countries from Asia, Australia...

  18. Communication at an online infertility expert forum: provider responses to patients' emotional and informational cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, J W M; van Oers, A M; Faber, M J; Cohlen, B J; Nelen, W L D M; Kremer, J A M; van Dulmen, A M

    2015-01-01

    Online patient-provider communication has become increasingly popular in fertility care. However, it is not known to what extent patients express cues or concerns and how providers respond. In this study, we investigated cues and responses that occur in online patient-provider communication at an infertility-specific expert forum. We extracted 106 threads from the multidisciplinary expert forum of two Dutch IVF clinics. We performed the following analyses: (1) thematic analysis of patients' questions; and (2) rating patients' emotional and informational cues and subsequent professionals' responses using an adaptation of the validated Medical Interview Aural Rating Scale. Frequencies of themes, frequencies of cues and responses, and sequences (what cue is followed by what response) were extracted. Sixty-five infertile patients and 19 providers participated. The most common themes included medication and lifestyle. Patients gave more informational than emotional cues (106 versus 64). Responses to informational cues were mostly adequate (61%). The most common response to emotional cues was empathic acknowledgment (72%). Results indicate that an online expert forum could have a positive effect on patient outcomes, which should guide future research. Offering infertile patients an expert forum to communicate with providers can be a promising supplement to usual care in both providing information and addressing patients' concerns.

  19. Health care providers underestimate symptom intensities of cancer patients: A multicenter European study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laugsand, E.A.; Sprangers, M.A.G.; Bjordal, K.; Skorpen, F.; Kaasa, S.; Klepstad, P.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Many patients with advanced cancer depend upon health care providers for symptom assessment. The extent of agreement between patient and provider symptom assessments and the association of agreement with demographic- and disease-related factors was examined. METHODS: This

  20. Health Care Providers and Dying Patients: Critical Issues in Terminal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint

    1988-01-01

    Identifies three major areas of concern in relationship between health care providers and dying patients: (1) nature of difficulties and stresses associated with terminal care; (2) education of providers for work; and (3) influence of organizational structure and institutionalized values on services for dying patients and families. Reviews…

  1. Enhancing Shared Decision Making Through Carefully Designed Interventions That Target Patient And Provider Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tai-Seale, M.; Elwyn, G.; Wilson, C.J.; Stults, C.; Dillon, E.C.; Li, M.; Chuang, J.; Meehan, A.; Frosch, D.L.

    2016-01-01

    Patient-provider communication and shared decision making are essential for primary care delivery and are vital contributors to patient experience and health outcomes. To alleviate communication shortfalls, we designed a novel, multidimensional intervention aimed at nudging both patients and primary

  2. The relative effect of health literacy and patient activation on provider choice in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademakers, J.; Nijman, J.; Brabers, A.E.M.; Jong, J.D. de; Hendriks, M.

    2014-01-01

    Active provider choice by patients has become an important policy theme in western, countries over the last decades. However, not many patients and consumers exercise their rightto, choose. Both health literacy and patient activation are likely to have an impact on the choiceprocess.In,this article

  3. Elements of patient-health-care provider communication related to cardiovascular rehabilitation referral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhabib, Sanam; Chessex, Caroline; Murray, Judy; Grace, Sherry L

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular rehabilitation has been designed to decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease. This study described (1) patient-health-care provider interactions regarding cardiovascular rehabilitation and (2) which discussion elements were related to patient referral. This was a prospective study of cardiovascular patients and their health-care providers. Discussion utterances were coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Discussion between 26 health-care providers and 50 patients were recorded. Cardiovascular rehabilitation referral was related to greater health-care provider interactivity (odds ratio = 2.82, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-7.86) and less patient concern and worry (odds ratio = 0.64, 95% confidence interval = 0.45-0.89). Taking time for reciprocal discussion and allaying patient anxiety may promote greater referral. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Increasing Patient / Provider Communications about Colorectal Cancer Screening In Rural Primary Care Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Berta M.; Skelly, Joan M.; Dorwaldt, Anne L.; Howe, Kathleen D.; Dana, Greg S.; Flynn, Brian S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Rural populations as well as less educated people in the U.S. are less likely to receive colorectal cancer (CRC) screening than people living in urban areas and more educated people. Methods We tested a computer tablet, Patient/Provider Communication Assistant (PPCA), which collected data, educated patients, and printed personalized notes to patients and providers encouraging conversation about CRC screening. Mixed model analyses using a pre-post quasi-experimental design compared patient results during the comparison and intervention periods in 5 rural primary care practices on provider discussion about CRC screening, provider recommendation, and patient intention to be screened. Models including age, education and literacy measures as covariates were examined. Results Providers talked with patients about CRC screening in general, and colonoscopy specifically more frequently after the PPCA than with the comparison group (p values =.04 and .01, respectively). Providers recommended CRC screening more often to patients in the intervention group than to the comparison group (p=.02). Patients planned to be screened and specifically with colonoscopy more frequently following the intervention than in the comparison group (p=.003). There were no interactions between group and any of the covariates. Ninety-five percent of the patients regardless of age or education found the PPCA easy to use. Conclusion Results indicated increased provider discussion and recommendation, and patients' intentions to obtain CRC screening, and in particular colonoscopy, for patients exposed to the intervention, regardless of the patients' age or literacy levels. The PPCA is a promising intervention method that is acceptable to rural patients. PMID:18725831

  5. Addressing Barriers to Shared Decision Making Among Latino LGBTQ Patients and Healthcare Providers in Clinical Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Fanny Y.; DeMeester, Rachel H.; Jia, Justin L.; Peek, Monica E.; Vela, Monica B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Effective shared decision making (SDM) between patients and healthcare providers has been positively associated with health outcomes. However, little is known about the SDM process between Latino patients who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ), and their healthcare providers. Our review of the literature identified unique aspects of Latino LGBTQ persons’ culture, health beliefs, and experiences that may affect their ability to engage in SDM with their healthcare providers. Further research needs to examine Latino LGBTQ patient–provider experiences with SDM and develop tools that can better facilitate SDM in this patient population. PMID:27617356

  6. Patients who feel judged about their weight have lower trust in their primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudzune, Kimberly A; Bennett, Wendy L; Cooper, Lisa A; Bleich, Sara N

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate whether overweight and obese patients have less trust in their primary care providers (PCPs) if they feel judged about their weight by these PCPs. We conducted a national internet-based survey of 600 adults engaged in primary care with a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) in 2012. Our dependent variable was high patient trust in their PCP (score ≥ 8/10). Our independent variable was "feeling judged about my weight by my PCP" dichotomized as "often/sometimes" versus "never." We conducted a multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for patient and PCP factors using survey weights. Overall, 21% felt that their PCP judged them about their weight. Respondents who perceived judgment were significantly less likely to report high trust in their PCP [OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.31-0.98]. While only a fifth of overweight and obese patients perceived weight-related judgment from their PCPs, these patients were significantly less likely to report high trust in these providers. Given patients' decreased trust in providers who convey weight-related judgment, our results raise concerns about potential effects on the doctor-patient relationship and patient outcomes. Addressing provider stigma toward patients with obesity could help build trust in these patient-provider relationships and improve quality of care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 48 CFR 342.705 - Final indirect cost rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION Indirect Cost Rates 342.705 Final indirect cost rates. (a) The Division of Cost Allocation, PSC, shall establish indirect cost rates, research patient care rates, and, as... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Final indirect cost rates...

  8. Rheumatologist and Primary Care Management of Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Patient and Provider Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Christie M; Roberts, Tonya J; Hansen, Karen E; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Gilmore, Andrea; Maxcy, Courtney; Bowers, Barbara J

    2016-04-01

    Despite increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients often lack CVD preventive care. We examined CVD preventive care processes from RA patient and provider perspectives to develop a process map for identifying targets for future interventions to improve CVD preventive care. Thirty-one participants (15 patients, 7 rheumatologists, and 9 primary care physicians [PCPs]) participated in interviews that were coded using NVivo software and analyzed using grounded theory techniques. Patients and providers reported that receipt of preventive care depends upon identifying and acting on risk factors, although most noted that both processes rarely occurred. Engagement in these processes was influenced by various provider-, system-, visit-, and patient-related conditions, such as patient activation or patients' knowledge about their risk. While nearly half of patients and PCPs were unaware of RA-CVD risk, all rheumatologists were aware of risk. Rheumatologists reported not systematically identifying risk factors, or, if identified, they described communicating about CVD risk factors via clinic notes to PCPs instead of acting directly due to perceived role boundaries. PCPs suggested that scheduling PCP visits could improve CVD risk management, and all participants viewed comanagement positively. Findings from this study illustrate important gaps and opportunities to support identifying and acting on CVD risk factors in RA patients from the provider, system, visit, and patient levels. Future work should investigate professional role support through improved guidelines, patient activation, and system-based RA-CVD preventive care strategies. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Energy and Protein in Critically Ill Patients with AKI: A Prospective, Multicenter Observational Study Using Indirect Calorimetry and Protein Catabolic Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Sabatino

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The optimal nutritional support in Acute Kidney Injury (AKI still remains an open issue. The present study was aimed at evaluating the validity of conventional predictive formulas for the calculation of both energy expenditure and protein needs in critically ill patients with AKI. A prospective, multicenter, observational study was conducted on adult patients hospitalized with AKI in three different intensive care units (ICU. Nutrient needs were estimated by different methods: the Guidelines of the European Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ESPEN for both calories and proteins, the Harris-Benedict equation, the Penn-State and Faisy-Fagon equations for energy. Actual energy and protein needs were repeatedly measured by indirect calorimetry (IC and protein catabolic rate (PCR until oral nutrition start, hospital discharge or renal function recovery. Forty-two patients with AKI were enrolled, with 130 IC and 123 PCR measurements obtained over 654 days of artificial nutrition. No predictive formula was precise enough, and Bland-Altman plots wide limits of agreement for all equations highlight the potential to under- or overfeed individual patients. Conventional predictive formulas may frequently lead to incorrect energy and protein need estimation. In critically ill patients with AKI an increased risk for under- or overfeeding is likely when nutrient needs are estimated instead of measured.

  10. Indirect Reciprocity; A Field Experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobien van Apeldoorn

    Full Text Available Indirect reciprocity involves cooperative acts towards strangers, either in response to their kindness to third parties (downstream or after receiving kindness from others oneself (upstream. It is considered to be important for the evolution of cooperative behavior amongst humans. Though it has been widely studied theoretically, the empirical evidence of indirect reciprocity has thus far been limited and based solely on behavior in laboratory experiments. We provide evidence from an online environment where members can repeatedly ask and offer services to each other, free of charge. For the purpose of this study we created several new member profiles, which differ only in terms of their serving history. We then sent out a large number of service requests to different members from all over the world. We observe that a service request is more likely to be rewarded for those with a profile history of offering the service (to third parties in the past. This provides clear evidence of (downstream indirect reciprocity. We find no support for upstream indirect reciprocity (in this case, rewarding the service request after having previously received the service from third parties, however. Our evidence of downstream indirect reciprocity cannot be attributed to reputational effects concerning one's trustworthiness as a service user.

  11. Indirect Reciprocity; A Field Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Apeldoorn, Jacobien; Schram, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Indirect reciprocity involves cooperative acts towards strangers, either in response to their kindness to third parties (downstream) or after receiving kindness from others oneself (upstream). It is considered to be important for the evolution of cooperative behavior amongst humans. Though it has been widely studied theoretically, the empirical evidence of indirect reciprocity has thus far been limited and based solely on behavior in laboratory experiments. We provide evidence from an online environment where members can repeatedly ask and offer services to each other, free of charge. For the purpose of this study we created several new member profiles, which differ only in terms of their serving history. We then sent out a large number of service requests to different members from all over the world. We observe that a service request is more likely to be rewarded for those with a profile history of offering the service (to third parties) in the past. This provides clear evidence of (downstream) indirect reciprocity. We find no support for upstream indirect reciprocity (in this case, rewarding the service request after having previously received the service from third parties), however. Our evidence of downstream indirect reciprocity cannot be attributed to reputational effects concerning one's trustworthiness as a service user.

  12. An indirect veneer technique for simple and esthetic treatment of anterior hypoplastic teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Khatri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a technique for treating anterior hypoplastic teeth using indirect nanocomposite veneer restoration. The prime advantage of an indirect veneer technique is that it provides an esthetic and conservative result. One of the most frequent reasons that patients seek dental care is discolored anterior teeth. Although treatment options such as removal of surface stains, bleaching, microabrasion or macroabrasion, veneering, and placement of porcelain crowns are available, conservative approach such as veneer preserves the natural tooth as much as possible. Full veneers are recommended for the restoration of localized defects or areas of intrinsic discoloration, which are caused by deeper internal stains or enamel defects. Indirectly fabricated veneers are much less sensitive compared to a operator′s technique and if multiple teeth are to be veneered, indirect veneers can be usually placed much more expeditiously. Indirect veneers last much longer than the direct veneers. Therefore, indirectly fabricated veneers are more advantageous than directly fabricated veneers in many cases.

  13. [Serologic cross-reactions to Leishmania infantum using indirect immunofluorescence in HIV+ and HIV- patients with active tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vélez, R; Turientes, M C; Gómez-Mampaso, E

    1998-03-01

    Clinical presentation of disseminated tuberculosis and visceral leishmaniosis can be very similar, mainly in those infected with HIV, being serology a useful tool in making a differential diagnosis. Cross-reactions of IFAT serodiagnosis of visceral leishmaniosis with other diseases are well known, but few data is available with tuberculosis. Detection of serum antibodies against Leishmania, using a commercial IFAT kit, was attempted in sera of 51 patients with active pulmonar and/or extrapulmonar tuberculosis (25 HIV+ and 26 HIV-). Overall cross-reactions was found in 19.6% patients without significative differences in between 2 groups, but differences in positive serum titres was observed: one at 1/256, three at 1/160, and one at 1/80 dilution, in the HIV+ group, whereas all 5 patients in HIV- group cross-reacted at 1/80 dilution. Recognition of specific leishmanial antigenic bands by serum antibodies of patients with tuberculosis were not clearly defined by Western-blot. IFAT technique for leishmaniosis cross-react in 20% of patients with tuberculosis.

  14. [Review of drug information provided to patients from the viewpoint of hospital pharmacists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orii, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Risks for patients and consumers can be minimized depending on how they are provided appropriate drug information. Therefore, from the viewpoint of hospital pharmacists, I would like to report on how information should be provided in order to minimize patient risk. For example, there is an ongoing opinion that the provision of easy-to-understand drug information to patients and consumers "does not appear necessary". The reasons for this include the following: Because the level of understanding varies greatly among patients, it is difficult to define what "easy-to-understand" information entails; rather, it may cause misunderstanding. These problems occur repeatedly if they are resolved by individual institutions. Therefore, it is essential to standardize the drug information provided to patients, that is, to establish a system to transmit drug information to patients and consumers. Regardless of whether the development of a hospital information system is in progress or not, it can be said that the development of such information systems is gradually spreading outside of hospitals and the situation is changing. From the viewpoint of patients, medical services are not limited to those from hospitals. Patient-centered collaboration between hospitals/clinics and pharmacies (but not the collaboration between hospital pharmacists and community pharmacists (why not?)) can provide good medical services only if patient information is shared. It is essential to establish a system for providing a drug guide for patients, in order to have patients understand drug information. The preparation of Drug Information for Patients would provide health care specialists a communication tool that helps minimize patient risk.

  15. Exploring sensitive boundaries in nursing education: attitudes of undergraduate student nurses providing intimate care to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossan, M; Mathew, T K

    2013-07-01

    Nursing students often feel challenged and intimidated to provide intimate care to patients in the health care setting. Student nurses in particular are faced with social, professional, academic and peer expectations and experience high levels of stress when providing this intimate care. Explore student nurses attitudes to providing intimate care. Year two and year three students of a three year undergraduate nursing programme completed a descriptive Nursing Students Intimate Care (NSIC) survey with open ended questions. This study discusses student responses to the question: Did you feel it was appropriate for a nurse to provide intimate care to a patient of the opposite sex? Three major themes were identified: societal and self-determined role expectations, comfort and discomfort providing intimate care, and age and gender of the carer and recipient. Student nurses face numerous challenges when having to provide intimate care to patients. These challenges are influenced by the age, gender, levels of comfort of the nurse and the patient and is related to the nature of intimate care being provided. Student nurses will benefit from pre-clinical simulated training experiences in providing intimate care. This training needs to specifically consider being sensitive to the needs of the patient, maintaining patient dignity, negotiating, accommodating and implementing plan of care while being competent and professional in their approach to providing intimate care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Indirection and computer security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    The discipline of computer science is built on indirection. David Wheeler famously said, 'All problems in computer science can be solved by another layer of indirection. But that usually will create another problem'. We propose that every computer security vulnerability is yet another problem created by the indirections in system designs and that focusing on the indirections involved is a better way to design, evaluate, and compare security solutions. We are not proposing that indirection be avoided when solving problems, but that understanding the relationships between indirections and vulnerabilities is key to securing computer systems. Using this perspective, we analyze common vulnerabilities that plague our computer systems, consider the effectiveness of currently available security solutions, and propose several new security solutions.

  17. Content of Orthopedic Patient Education Provided by Nurses in Seven European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, Andreas; Papastavrou, E; Valkeapää, K; Zabalegui, A; Ingadóttir, B; Lemonidou, C; Fatkulina, N; Jouko, K; Leino-Kilpi, H

    2017-07-01

    Patients' and their significant others' education during the perioperative phase is an important and challenging aspect of care. This study explored the content of education provided by nurses to arthroplasty patients and their significant others. Data were collected with the Education of Patients-NURSE content (EPNURSE-Content), Received Knowledge of Hospital Patient (RKhp), and Received Knowledge of Significant Other (RKso) scales. The results showed that the content of education emphasized biophysiological and functional needs, differed between countries, and was related to how physically demanding nurses found their job to be and the amount of education provided. There is congruence between the received knowledge of patients and their significant others in relation to the content of education provided by nurses. The findings can support nurses in developing aid material for patients and significant others explaining the nature of education and advising them what to expect and how to optimize their participation in the process.

  18. Differences between patient and provider perceptions of informed decision making about epidural analgesia use during childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Holly Bianca; Shorten, Allison

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether differences exist between patient and provider perceptions regarding the decision-making process around use of epidural analgesia during childbirth. The dyadic patient-provider Decisional Conflict Scale was modified to measure first-time mother (n = 35) and maternity care provider (n = 52) perceptions. Providers perceived a greater degree of informed decision making than patients (84.97 vs. 79.41, p = .04) and were more likely to recall they upheld patients' rights to make informed choices than patients were to perceive their rights had been upheld (85.95 vs. 71.73, p < .01). This incongruity highlights the need to align legal principles with practice to create mutual agreement between stakeholder perceptions of informed decision making.

  19. Evaluating Patient Preferences for Different Incentive Programs to Optimize Pharmacist-Provided Patient Care Program Enrollment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Daniel; Cernohous, Tim; Vaidyanathan, Rajiv

    2017-11-01

    Employers have increased efforts to engage employees in health and wellness programs. Providing employees with incentives to participate in these programs has been shown to improve overall enrollment and engagement. One program that has had challenges with enrollment and engagement is medication therapy management (MTM). To (a) determine how individuals evaluate different financial incentives to improve participation in an MTM program and (b) measure the effect of participant characteristics on incentive preference. This study was composed of a paper-based survey administered to participants after focus group sessions. Participants included MTM-eligible beneficiaries from 2 employer groups and included MTM-naive and MTM-experienced participants. Incentive preference was measured based on 3 bipolar scales that compared 3 incentives: $100 gift certificates, $8 copay reduction for 6 months, and $100 added to paycheck. A total of 72 participants completed the survey: 34 participants were MTM experienced, and 38 were MTM naive. Overall participant preference reporting resulted in inconsistencies. Copay reduction was preferred to a gift certificate (55.6% vs. 37.5%); money in paycheck was preferred over copay reduction (48.6% vs. 40.3%); and gift certificates were preferred over money in paycheck (56.9% vs. 22.2%). However, subgroup analysis resulted in a more consistent preference reporting, with MTM-experienced participants consistently preferring copay reduction over gift certificates (67.6% vs. 23.5%) and money in paycheck (55.9% vs. 29.4%). MTM-naive participants preferred a gift certificate over copay reduction (51.4% vs. 44.7%) and cash in paycheck (68.4% vs. 23.7%). The results of this study suggest that gift certificates were preferred by MTM-naive participants, which supports the use of gift certificates as an incentive for MTM-naive patients to enroll in an MTM program. Conversely, the use of a copay reduction program was preferred by MTM

  20. Treating patients with traumatic life experiences: providing trauma-informed care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Sheela; Hoersch, Michelle; Rajagopalan, Chelsea F; Chang, Priscilla

    2014-03-01

    and Overview Dentists frequently treat patients who have a history of traumatic events. These traumatic events (including childhood sexual abuse, domestic violence, elder abuse and combat history) may influence how patients experience oral health care and may interfere with patients' engagement in preventive care. The purpose of this article is to provide a framework for how dentists can interact sensitively with patients who have survived traumatic events. The authors propose the trauma-informed care pyramid to help engage traumatized patients in oral health care. Evidence indicates that all of the following play an important role in treating traumatized patients: demonstrating strong behavioral and communication skills, understanding the health effects of trauma, engaging in interprofessional collaboration, understanding the provider's own trauma-related experiences and understanding when trauma screening should be used in oral health practice. Dental patients with a history of traumatic experiences are more likely to engage in negative health habits and to display fear of routine dental care. Although not all patients disclose a trauma history to their dentists, some patients might. The trauma-informed care pyramid provides a framework to guide dental care providers in interactions with many types of traumatized patients, including those who choose not to disclose their trauma history in the context of oral health care.

  1. Are patients discharged with care? A qualitative study of perceptions and experiences of patients, family members and care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselink, Gijs; Flink, Maria; Olsson, Mariann; Barach, Paul; Dudzik-Urbaniak, Ewa; Orrego, Carola; Toccafondi, Giulio; Kalkman, Cor; Johnson, Julie K; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra; Wollersheim, Hub

    2012-12-01

    Advocates for quality and safety have called for healthcare that is patient-centred and decision-making that involves patients. The aim of the paper is to explore the barriers and facilitators to patient-centred care in the hospital discharge process. A qualitative study using purposive sampling of 192 individual interviews and 26 focus group interviews was conducted in five European Union countries with patients and/or family members, hospital physicians and nurses, and community general practitioners and nurses. A modified Grounded Theory approach was used to analyse the data. The barriers and facilitators were classified into 15 categories from which four themes emerged: (1) healthcare providers do not sufficiently prioritise discharge consultations with patients and family members due to time restraints and competing care obligations; (2) discharge communication varied from instructing patients and family members to shared decision-making; (3) patients often feel unprepared for discharge, and postdischarge care is not tailored to individual patient needs and preferences; and (4) pressure on available hospital beds and community resources affect the discharge process. Our findings suggest that involvement of patients and families in the preparations for discharge is determined by the extent to which care providers are willing and able to accommodate patients' and families' capabilities, needs and preferences. Future interventions should be directed at healthcare providers' attitudes and their organisation's leadership, with a focus on improving communication among care providers, patients and families, and between hospital and community care providers.

  2. Applying justice and commitment constructs to patient-health care provider relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmvall, Camilla; Twohig, Peter; Francis, Lori; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2012-03-01

    To examine patients' experiences of fairness and commitment in the health care context with an emphasis on primary care providers. Qualitative, semistructured, individual interviews were used to gather evidence for the justice and commitment frameworks across a variety of settings with an emphasis on primary care relationships. Rural, urban, and semiurban communities in Nova Scotia. Patients (ages ranged from 19 to 80 years) with varying health care needs and views on their health care providers. Participants were recruited through a variety of means, including posters in practice settings and communication with administrative staff in clinics. Individual interviews were conducted and were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. A modified grounded theory approach was used to interpret the data. Current conceptualizations of justice (distributive, procedural, interpersonal, informational) and commitment (affective, normative, continuance) capture important elements of patient-health care provider interactions and relationships. Justice and commitment frameworks developed in other contexts encompass important dimensions of the patient-health care provider relationship with some exceptions. For example, commonly understood subcomponents of justice (eg, procedural consistency) might require modification to apply fully to patient-health care provider relationships. Moreover, the results suggest that factors outside the patient-health care provider dyad (eg, familial connections) might also influence the patient's commitment to his or her health care provider.

  3. Determining a patient's comfort in inquiring about healthcare providers' hand-washing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Camille A; Afzal, Omara; Knapp, Kenneth; Viola, Deborah

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether a patient's level of assertiveness and other factors influences her comfort level in asking her provider to wash his or her hands. In this pilot study, we developed a survey to gather cross-sectional information on a variety of factors that might explain patient willingness to ask her health-care provider to wash his or her hands. Three primary predictor variables are analyzed: (1) patient assertiveness; (2) patient familiarity with her healthcare provider; and (3) whether the patient has observed hand-washing behavior. Fifty patients participated from the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of Metropolitan Hospital Center. Less assertive patients are much less likely than assertive patients to ask physicians to wash hands (25% versus 68%; Fisher's exact test P = 0.0427). Among the 3 assertiveness questions included in the survey, the ability to ask physicians questions during visits is most strongly indicative of willingness to ask about hand washing. Familiarity with the names of regular health-care providers has a statistically significant impact on willingness to ask about hand washing. Evidence suggests that observing hand washing behavior affects willingness to ask, but differences are not statistically significant. Results by socioeconomic status such as age, education, income, and race/ethnicity are inconclusive. A patient's level of assertiveness alone is not sufficient to determine her willingness to inquire about the hand-washing behavior of her provider. A high percentage of patients did not see their provider engaging in adequate hand washing behavior. If patients feel comfortable with their provider to inquire about their care and request hand-washing behavior, health outcomes are affected by reducing the rates of health care-associated infections.

  4. Patient-provider perceptions on engagement in HIV care in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bofill, Lina Margarita; Lopez, Maria; Dorigo, Analia; Bordato, Alejandra; Lucas, Mar; Cabanillas, Graciela Fernandez; Sued, Omar; Cahn, Pedro; Cassetti, Isabel; Weiss, Stephen; Jones, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30% of patients participating in the national antiretroviral therapy (ART) program in Argentina fail to achieve an undetectable viral load, and approximately 25% are not retained in care. This qualitative study was designed to explore and identify factors associated with engagement and retention in public and private health care in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Qualitative data from key informants (n = 12) and focus groups (n = 4 groups) of patients and providers from private and public HIV treatment facilities were recorded and transcribed. Predetermined and arising themes related to adherence, engagement, and retention in care were coded and analyzed using qualitative data analysis software. Reasons identified for patients' lack of adherence or engagement in care differed between patients and providers, and patients attributed limitations to low self-efficacy, fear and concerns about HIV, and lack of provider involvement in treatment. In contrast, providers viewed themselves as decision-makers in patient care and patients as responsible for their own nonadherence due to lack of commitment to their own health or due to medication side effects. Patients reported health care system limitations and HIV concerns contributed to a lack of engagement, and providers identified limited HIV literacy and stigma as additional problems. Both agreed that chronic illness and substance addiction impacted adherence and retention, and agreed on the importance of trust, honesty, and communication in the patient-provider relationship. Results support the incorporation of system-, provider-, and patient-focused components into interventions to facilitate patient engagement, adherence, and retention in public and private settings in Argentina.

  5. "Delivering knowledge and advice": Healthcare providers' experiences of their interaction with patients' management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsten, Ulrika; Bergman, Stefan; Fridlund, Bengt; Arvidsson, Barbro

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases are often chronic and involve a lifetime of suffering. The focus of rheumatology care is to support patients to manage their lives and master their disease. Healthcare providers and patients have different views on the consequences of living with rheumatic diseases and patients are reporting unmet healthcare needs. There is a need to integrate providers' perspective to develop the quality of rheumatology care. The aim was to explore healthcare providers' experiences of their interaction with patients in their management of RA. Interviews with 18 providers from different clinical settings were analysed in accordance with the grounded theory method. A core category; Delivering knowledge and advice was found to be the most important task and involved providing the patient with information about the disease and appropriate forms of treatment. Healthcare providers' attitudes and patients' responses influenced the outcome of the delivery of knowledge and advice and three dimensions emerged; completed delivery, adjusted delivery and failed delivery. There were differences in the providers' experiences in their interaction with patients as well as in reflections on their role as the delivering part. There could be difficulties in the interaction when patients' expectations and preferences were not taken into account when giving advice. These findings highlight the importance of developing rheumatology care, as no provider or patient benefits if the delivery of knowledge and advice becomes a failed delivery. The healthcare organization must acknowledge the difficulties involved in the interaction with patients in their management of RA and find methods to develop a more person-centred approach to care.

  6. [Development of Internet-based system to collect and provide drug information for patients/consumers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurimoto, Fuki; Hori, Satoko; Satoh, Hiroki; Miki, Akiko; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2013-01-01

    For drug fostering and evolution, it is important to collect information directly from patients on the efficacy and safety of drugs as well as patient needs. At present, however, information gathered by healthcare professionals, pharmaceutical companies, or governments is not sufficient. There is concern that patients may fail to recognize the importance of providing information voluntarily. The present study was conducted to provide drug information to patients/consumers, to enlighten them on the importance of providing drug information by themselves, and to develop an Internet website, called "Minkusu," for collecting drug information from patients. This website is based on a registration system (free of charge). It is designed to provide information on proper drug use, and to collect opinions about drugs. As of May 31, 2012, a total of 1149 people had been registered. The male/female ratio of registered members was approximately 1:1, and patients/consumers accounted for 23%. According to the results of a questionnaire survey, several patient/consumer members appreciated the usefulness of the information service, and they took an opportunity to know of the concepts of drug development and evolution (Ikuyaku, in Japanese) through the information services provided by this site. In conclusion, the developed information system would contribute to the proper use of drugs by patients/consumers and to the promotion of drug development and evolution.

  7. Perception of therapeutic patient education in heart failure by healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacz, Laure; Juillière, Yves; Alla, François; Jourdain, Patrick; Guyon, Gaëlle; Coudane, Henry; Hervé, Christian; Claudot, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    Care provider support for therapeutic patient education (TPE), its results and relationships with patients are factors in the setting up and sustainability of this practice. With a view to understanding the factors determining TPE care provider participation and favouring its development, the aim of this study was to describe the perception healthcare providers have of TPE in heart failure. A national survey by self-administered questionnaire was performed in 2013 in 61 Observatoire de l'INsuffisance cardiaque (ODIN; Heart Failure Observatory) centres participating in the I-CARE programme. The cardiologist in charge of each centre received five questionnaires: one for him/herself and four for other healthcare providers working with him/her. We received 116 responses out of the 305 questionnaires sent (38.0%). Almost all of the responders stated that the patients were more observant after TPE sessions (91.4%). According to the responders, patients were better informed thanks to TPE (53.9%); they stated that TPE had changed their relationships with patients (81.9%); they also felt that they were educating the patient's close family/friends at the same time as the patients (86.2%). The survey showed that TPE improves care relationships. Healthcare providers recognize that they have been working differently since the programme was set up, and want the patient's close family/friends to be involved in treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Health literacy in the "oral exchange": an important element of patient-provider communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Sarah S; Rudd, Rima E

    2015-05-01

    Oral communication between health care providers and patients--the "oral exchange"--greatly impacts patient health outcomes; however, only recently have health literacy inquiries been incorporated into this field. This review examines the intersection between oral and aural literacy and the oral exchange. A systematic literature search was carried out. Papers published in English since 2003 that specifically examine oral/aural literacy and oral patient-provider communication were included. The search yielded 999 articles, 12 of which were included in this review. Three tools have been developed to measure either patient or provider oral/aural literacy. There is a discrepancy between patient and provider oral/aural literacy levels, and high literacy demand is associated with reduced patient learning. Low patient oral/aural literacy is associated with poor health outcomes. Two interventions have been developed to reduce literacy demand. This review demonstrates the critical role of oral and aural literacy in the oral exchange, the importance of reducing literacy demand, and the need for future research in this field. Recommendations include the use of plain language and teach-back by providers, as well as incorporation of awareness of oral and aural literacy into community programs and health care provider education and training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. E-mail in patient-provider communication: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jiali; Rust, George; Fry-Johnson, Yvonne; Strothers, Harry

    2010-08-01

    To review systematically the role of e-mails in patient-provider communication in terms of e-mail content, and perspectives of providers and patients on e-mail communication in health care. A systematic review of studies on e-mail communication between patients and health providers in regular health care published from 2000 to 2008. A total of 24 studies were included in the review. Among these studies, 21 studies examined e-mail communication between patients and providers, and three studies examined the e-mail communication between parents of patients in pediatric primary care and pediatricians. In the content analyses of e-mail messages, topics well represented were medical information exchange, medical condition or update, medication information, and subspecialty evaluation. A number of personal and institutional features were associated with the likelihood of e-mail use between patients and providers. While benefits of e-mails in enhancing communication were recognized by both patients and providers, concerns about confidentiality and security were also expressed. The e-mail is transforming the relationship between patients and providers. The rigorous exploration of pros and cons of electronic interaction in health care settings will help make e-mail communication a more powerful, mutually beneficial health care provision tool. It is important to develop an electronic communication system for the clinical practice that can address a range of concerns. More efforts need to be made to educate patients and providers to appropriately and effectively use e-mail for communication. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Patient, Provider, and Combined Interventions for Managing Osteoarthritis in Primary Care: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kelli D; Oddone, Eugene Z; Coffman, Cynthia J; Jeffreys, Amy S; Bosworth, Hayden B; Chatterjee, Ranee; McDuffie, Jennifer; Strauss, Jennifer L; Yancy, William S; Datta, Santanu K; Corsino, Leonor; Dolor, Rowena J

    2017-03-21

    A single-site study showed that a combined patient and provider intervention improved outcomes for patients with knee osteoarthritis, but it did not assess separate effects of the interventions. To examine whether patient-based, provider-based, and patient-provider interventions improve osteoarthritis outcomes. Cluster randomized trial with assignment to patient, provider, and patient-provider interventions or usual care. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01435109). 10 Duke University Health System community-based primary care clinics. 537 outpatients with symptomatic hip or knee osteoarthritis. The telephone-based patient intervention focused on weight management, physical activity, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involved electronic delivery of patient-specific osteoarthritis treatment recommendations to providers. The primary outcome was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) total score at 12 months. Secondary outcomes were objective physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery) and depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire). Linear mixed models assessed the difference in improvement among groups. No difference was observed in WOMAC score changes from baseline to 12 months in the patient (-1.5 [95% CI, -5.1 to 2.0]; P = 0.40), provider (2.5 [CI, -0.9 to 5.9]; P = 0.152), or patient-provider (-0.7 [CI, -4.2 to 2.8]; P = 0.69) intervention groups compared with usual care. All groups had improvements in WOMAC scores at 12 months (range, -3.7 to -7.7). In addition, no differences were seen in objective physical function or depressive symptoms at 12 months in any of the intervention groups compared with usual care. The study involved 1 health care network. Data on provider referrals were not collected. Contrary to a previous study of a combined patient and provider intervention for osteoarthritis in a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center, this study found no statistically

  11. High-fidelity multiactor emergency preparedness training for patient care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lancer A; Maddux, P Tim; Schnellmann, Jennifer; Hayes, Lauren; Tolley, Jessica; Wahlquist, Amy E

    2012-01-01

    Providing comprehensive emergency preparedness training (EPT) for patient care providers is important to the future success of emergency preparedness operations in the United States. Disasters are rare, complex events involving many patients and environmental factors that are difficult to reproduce in a training environment. Few EPT programs possess both competency-driven goals and metrics to measure life-saving performance during a multiactor simulated disaster. The development of an EPT curriculum for patient care providers-provided first to medical students, then to a group of experienced disaster medical providers-that recreates a simulated clinical disaster using a combination of up to 15 live actors and six high-fidelity human simulators is described. Specifically, the authors detail the Center for Health Professional Training and Emergency Response's (CHPTER's) 1-day clinical EPT course including its organization, core competency development, medical student self-evaluation, and course assessment. Two 1-day courses hosted by CHPTER were conducted in a university simulation center. Students who completed the course improved their overall knowledge and comfort level with EPT skills. The authors believe this is the first published description of a curriculum method that combines high-fidelity, multiactor scenarios to measure the life-saving performance of patient care providers utilizing a clinical disaster scenario with > 10 patients at once. A larger scale study, or preferably a multicenter trial, is needed to further study the impact of this curriculum and its potential to protect provider and patient lives.

  12. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo, Ana Beatriz Cordeiro; Ferraz, Marcos Bosi; Ciconelli, Rozana Mesquita

    2008-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a sample of patients followed at a public health-care facility in Brazil. Factors potentially associated with higher indirect costs in these patients were also investigated. This cross-sectional study included patients between 18 and 65 years old with RA according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Patients who were working, on sick leave or retired early due to RA were invited to participate in the survey. A systematic structured interview was conducted in all patients including demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical variables and an experienced rheumatologist examined all patients. Estimates of the indirect costs in the preceding 12 months were performed using the human-capital approach based on the society perspective. Multiple linear regression models were used to determine the variables associated with higher indirect costs. A total of 192 patients were included in the study. Forty-seven of them (24.5%) had retired early due to RA, 62 others (32.3%) were on sick leave due to RA while 83 patients (43.2%) were working at the time of the interview. Estimated indirect cost for this population was US$ 466,107.81 or US$ 2,423.51 per patient per year. Factors associated with higher costs were RA poor functional class, high socioeconomic status and male patients (p Indirect costs were higher in patients with poor functional classes, high socioeconomic status, and men.

  13. Communication training improves patient-centered provider behavior and screening for soldiers' mental health concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Susan R; Vides de Andrade, Ana Regina; Boyd, Stephanie; Leslie, Melanie; Webb, Lynn; Davis, Lauren; Fraine, Melissa; Frazer, Nicole L; Hargraves, Ryan; Bickman, Leonard

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of patient-centered communication training for military providers who conduct post-deployment health screening. The half-day interactive workshop included simulated Soldier patients using video technology. Using a quasi-experimental design, all health care providers at four military treatment facilities were recruited for data collection during a four- to nine-day site visit (23 trained providers, 28 providers in the control group, and one provider declined to participate). All Soldiers were eligible to participate and were blinded to provider training status. Immediately after screening encounters, providers reported on their identification of mental health concerns and Soldiers reported on provider communication behaviors resulting in 1,400 matched pairs. Electronic health records were also available for 26,005 Soldiers. The workshop was found to increase (1) providers' patient-centered communication behaviors as evaluated by Soldiers; (2) provider identification of Soldier mental health concerns; and (3), related health outcomes including provision of education and referral to a confidential counseling resource. Results are promising, but with small effect sizes and study limitations, further research is warranted. A brief intensive workshop on patient-centered communication tailored to the military screening context is feasible and may improve key outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development and Validation of Quality Criteria for Providing Patient- and Family-centered Injury Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jamie M; Burton, Rachael; Butler, Barb L; Dyer, Dianne; Evans, David C; Felteau, Melissa; Gruen, Russell L; Jaffe, Kenneth M; Kortbeek, John; Lang, Eddy; Lougheed, Val; Moore, Lynne; Narciso, Michelle; Oxland, Peter; Rivara, Frederick P; Roberts, Derek; Sarakbi, Diana; Vine, Karen; Stelfox, Henry T

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the content validity of quality criteria for providing patient- and family-centered injury care. Quality criteria have been developed for clinical injury care, but not patient- and family-centered injury care. Using a modified Research AND Development Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Methodology, a panel of 16 patients, family members, injury and quality of care experts serially rated and revised criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care identified from patient and family focus groups. The criteria were then sent to 384 verified trauma centers in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand for evaluation. A total of 46 criteria were rated and revised by the panel over 4 rounds of review producing 14 criteria related to clinical care (n = 4; transitions of care, pain management, patient safety, provider competence), communication (n = 3; information for patients/families; communication of discharge plans to patients/families, communication between hospital and community providers), holistic care (n = 4; patient hygiene, kindness and respect, family access to patient, social and spiritual support) and end-of-life care (n = 3; decision making, end-of-life care, family follow-up). Medical directors, managers, or coordinators representing 254 trauma centers (66% response rate) rated 12 criteria to be important (95% of responses) for patient- and family-centered injury care. Fewer centers rated family access to the patient (80%) and family follow-up after patient death (65%) to be important criteria. Fourteen-candidate quality criteria for patient- and family-centered injury care were developed and shown to have content validity. These may be used to guide quality improvement practices.

  15. Occupational stress in intensive care nurses who provide direct care to critical patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Inoue, Kelly Cristina; Versa, Gelena Lucinéia Gomes da Silva; Murassaki, Ana Cláudia Yassuko; Melo, Willian Augusto de; Matsuda, Laura Misue

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify the stress level of nurses that provide direct care to critically ill patients, it was carried out a descriptive and exploratory study in five hospitals of the western region of the state of Paraná...

  16. Providing Dental Care to Pregnant Patients: A Survey of Oregon General Dentists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huebner, Colleen E; Milgrom, Peter; Conrad, Douglas; Lee, Rosanna Shuk Yin

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of studies and reports indicate preventive, routine and emergency dental procedures can be provided safely to pregnant patients to alleviate dental problems and promote oral health...

  17. Functional Recovery in Major Depressive Disorder: Providing Early Optimal Treatment for the Individual Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Martin A; Habert, Jeffrey; McIntosh, Diane; MacQueen, Glenda M; Milev, Roumen V; McIntyre, Roger S; Blier, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Major depressive disorder is an often chronic and recurring illness. Left untreated, major depressive disorder may result in progressive alterations in brain morphometry and circuit function. Recent findings, however, suggest that pharmacotherapy may halt and possibly reverse those effects. These findings, together with evidence that a delay in treatment is associated with poorer clinical outcomes, underscore the urgency of rapidly treating depression to full recovery. Early optimized treatment, using measurement-based care and customizing treatment to the individual patient, may afford the best possible outcomes for each patient. The aim of this article is to present recommendations for using a patient-centered approach to rapidly provide optimal pharmacological treatment to patients with major depressive disorder. Offering major depressive disorder treatment determined by individual patient characteristics (e.g., predominant symptoms, medical history, comorbidities), patient preferences and expectations, and, critically, their own definition of wellness provides the best opportunity for full functional recovery. PMID:29024974

  18. Dr. Google and Premature Consent: Patients Who Trust the Internet More Than They Trust Their Provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, John K

    2017-10-24

    A growing number of patients make up their minds about some medical issue before they see their provider, either by googling their symptoms or asking a friend. They've made up their minds before coming in, and they resist their provider's recommendations even after receiving information and advice from their provider. This is a new kind of medical autonomy problem; it differs from cases of standard consent, futility, or conscientious refusal. Providers sometimes call this problem "Dr. Google." I call it premature consent. Providers may wonder whether these patient decisions command the same deference and respect as other patient decisions. The answer is "no," for these patients are neither fully competent nor properly informed. They typically appear to be competent, but competence includes the ability to deliberate, and they are not deliberating well when they make up their minds before consulting a qualified provider. They seem informed, especially after talking to their provider, but they are misinformed about what sources of medical advice to trust. Moreover, being informed requires believing the information one has received, and these patients sometimes don't believe the information their provider gives them.

  19. Editorial: Advances in healthcare provider and patient training to improve the quality and safety of patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Borycki

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the Knowledge Management & E-Learning: An International Journal is dedicated to describing “Advances in Healthcare Provider and Patient Training to Improve the Quality and Safety of Patient Care.” Patient safety is an important and fundamental requirement of ensuring the quality of patient care. Training and education has been identified as a key to improving healthcare provider patient safety competencies especially when working with new technologies such as electronic health records and mobile health applications. Such technologies can be harnessed to improve patient safety; however, if not used properly they can negatively impact on patient safety. In this issue we focus on advances in training that can improve patient safety and the optimal use of new technologies in healthcare. For example, use of clinical simulations and online computer based training can be employed both to facilitate learning about new clinical discoveries as well as to integrate technology into day to day healthcare practices. In this issue we are publishing papers that describe advances in healthcare provider and patient training to improve patient safety as it relates to the use of educational technologies, health information technology and on-line health resources. In addition, in the special issue we describe new approaches to training and patient safety including, online communities, clinical simulations, on-the-job training, computer based training and health information systems that educate about and support safer patient care in real-time (i.e. when health professionals are providing care to patients. These educational and technological initiatives can be aimed at health professionals (i.e. students and those who are currently working in the field. The outcomes of this work are significant as they lead to safer care for patients and their family members. The issue has both theoretical and applied papers that describe advances in patient

  20. Attitudes and perceptions of patients, caregivers, and health care providers toward background music in patient care areas: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cruz, Pedro; Nguyen, Linh; Rhondali, Wadih; Hui, David; Palmer, J Lynn; Sevy, Ingrid; Richardson, Michael; Bruera, Eduardo

    2012-10-01

    Background music can be used to distract from ordinary sounds and improve wellbeing in patient care areas. Little is known about individuals' attitudes and beliefs about music versus ordinary sound in this setting. To assess the preferences of patients, caregivers and healthcare providers regarding background music or ordinary sound in outpatient and inpatient care areas, and to explore their attitudes and perceptions towards music in general. All participants were exposed to background music in outpatient or inpatient clinical settings. 99 consecutive patients, 101 caregivers and 65 out of 70 eligible healthcare providers (93%) completed a survey about music attitudes and preferences. The primary outcome was a preference for background music over ordinary sound in patient care areas. Preference for background music was high and similar across groups (70 patients (71%), 71 caregivers (71%) and 46 providers (71%), p=0.58). The three groups had very low disapproval for background music in patient care areas (10%, 9% and 12%, respectively; p=0.91). Black ethnicity independently predicted lower preference for background music (OR: 0.47, 95%CI: 0.23, 0.98). Patients, caregivers and providers reported recent use of music for themselves for the purpose of enjoyment (69%, 80% and 86% respectively p=0.02). Age, gender, religion and education level significantly predicted preferences for specific music styles. Background music in patient care areas was preferred to ordinary sound by patients, caregivers and providers. Demographics of the population are strong determinants of music style preferences.

  1. Older hospitalized patients' experiences of dialogue with healthcare providers in hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gitte; Larsen, Karen Lyng; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE:: The objective is to identify and synthesize findings from qualitative studies of older (over 65 years) hospitalized patients' experiences of the barriers and facilitators to their dialogues with healthcare providers (HCPs) concerning their health and well-being.Specifi......REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE:: The objective is to identify and synthesize findings from qualitative studies of older (over 65 years) hospitalized patients' experiences of the barriers and facilitators to their dialogues with healthcare providers (HCPs) concerning their health and well...

  2. [The Internet and shared decision-making between patients and healthcare providers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Denise

    2009-10-01

    Insurance companies like Kaiser Permanente in the United States remunerate physicians for their email correspondence with patients, increasing the efficiency of office visits. A survey by the French National Board of Physicians regarding the computerization of medical practices in April 2009, confirms that both physicians and patients in France are very favorable to the development of these tools. When patients can manage and/or access their medical files and determine which providers can access them, they become a true partner.

  3. Negotiating substance use stigma: the role of cultural health capital in provider-patient interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jamie; Dubbin, Leslie; Shim, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Diverse aspects of life and lifestyles, including stigmatised attributes and behaviors are revealed as providers and patients discuss health. In this article, we examine how the stigma associated with substance use issues shapes clinical interactions. We use the theoretical framework of cultural health capital (CHC) to explain how substance use stigma is created, reinforced and sometimes negotiated as providers and patients engage in health interactions. We present two main findings using examples. First, two theoretical concepts--habitus and field--set the social position and expectations of providers and patients in ways that facilitate the stigmatisation of substance use. Second, we found both providers and patients actively exchanged CHC as a key strategy to reduce the negative effects of stigma. In some clinical encounters, patients possessed and activated CHC, providers acknowledged patient's CHC and CHC was successfully exchanged. These interactions were productive and mutually satisfying, even when patients were actively using substances. However, when CHC was not activated, acknowledged and exchanged, stigma was unchallenged and dominated the interaction. The CHC theoretical framework allows us to examine how the stigma process is operationalized and potentially even counteracted in clinical interactions. © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  4. Hospital-community interface: a qualitative study on patients with cancer and health care providers' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admi, Hanna; Muller, Ella; Ungar, Lea; Reis, Shmuel; Kaffman, Michael; Naveh, Nurit; Shadmi, Efrat

    2013-10-01

    Patients with cancer must deal with complex and fragmented healthcare systems in addition to coping with the burden of their illness. To improve oncology treatment along the care continuum, the barriers and facilitators for streamlined oncologic care need to be better understood. This study sought to gain insight into the hospital-community interface from the point of view of patients with cancer, their families, and health care providers on both sides of the interface i.e., the community and hospital settings. The sample comprised 37 cancer patients, their family members, and 40 multidisciplinary health care providers. Twelve participants were interviewed individually and 65 took part in 10 focus groups. Based on the grounded theory approach, theoretical sampling and constant comparative analyses were used. Two major concepts emerged: "ambivalence and confusion" and "overcoming healthcare system barriers." Ambiguity was expressed regarding the roles of health care providers in the community and in the hospital. We identified three main strategies by which these patients and their families overcame barriers within the system: patients and families became their own case managers; patients and health care providers used informal routes of communication; and nurse specialists played a significant role in managing care. The heavy reliance on informal routes of communication and integration by patients and providers emphasizes the urgent need for change in order to improve coordinating mechanisms for hospital-community oncologic care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The transversus abdominis plane block provides effective postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carney, John

    2008-12-01

    Patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy suffer significant postoperative pain. The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a recently described approach to providing analgesia to the anterior abdominal wall. We evaluated the analgesic efficacy of the TAP block in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy via a transverse lower abdominal wall incision, in a randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

  6. [Patients, clients, doctors and providers: is it just a question of terminology?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuzo Del Valle, Cipatli

    2016-01-01

    With the modernization of healthcare and management of a Hospital as a bussiness, There is the risk of changing the words "patient" and "doctor" into "client" and "provider", risking the humanitarian care, thrustworthiness, and doctor-patient relationship. Using first and last names could be an option for communication.

  7. Qualities of care managers in chronic disease management: patients and providers' expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejesus, Ramona S; Vickers, Kristin S; Howell, Lisa A; Stroebel, Robert J

    2012-10-01

    The collaborative care model has been shown in studies to be effective in achieving sustained treatment outcomes in chronic disease management. Its success is highly dependent on active patient engagement, provider endorsement and effective care management. This study sought to ask patients and providers what qualities they look for in a care manager. A questionnaire with 3 open ended questions was mailed out randomly to 1000 patients residing in Olmsted County, MN identified through the registry to have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Forty-two primary care providers received similar questionnaire with 2 open ended questions. Answers were qualitatively analyzed using coding and identification of major themes. One hundred seventy-five patients and 22 providers responded. Both groups listed being knowledgeable, having good communication skills and certain personality traits as common themes on what are desirable qualities in a care manager. Patients felt that a care manager would be most helpful by being accessible. Providers listed undesirable qualities to include not being a team player and not knowing practice limitations. Both patients and providers have clear expectations of a care manager which carry significant implications in recruiting and training care managers for chronic disease management. Copyright © 2012 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The meaning of providing caring to obese patients to a group of nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilly Souza Marques

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study was performed with six nurses of a public hospital, with the objective to describe their view of the meaning of providing care to obese patients. Interviews were conducted using a semi-structured script. The data were organized under themes extracted from the subjects’ statements, after being thoroughly read. Symbolic Interactionism was adopted to interpret the findings. The results from the analysis were organized under the following themes: Being obese is excessive, it is not healthy; Providing care to the obese is a structural issue; Obese patients are troublesome, they require care, no big deal; Providing care to the obese requires teamwork. The grasped meanings can interfere in the care provided. The nurses, however, recognize the need to work as a team to deliver comprehensive care. Making positive changes to the meanings found in this study is possible, thus, contributing to providing prejudice-free nursing care to obese patients. Descriptors: Obesity; Nursing Care; Hospital Care.

  9. Compassion training in healthcare: what are patients' perspectives on training healthcare providers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Shane; Torres, Mia-Bernadine; Raffin-Bouchal, Shelley; Hack, Thomas F; McClement, Susan; Hagen, Neil A; Chochinov, Harvey M

    2016-07-11

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate advanced cancer patients' perspectives on the importance, feasibility, teaching methods, and issues associated with training healthcare providers in compassionate care. This study utilized grounded theory, a qualitative research method, to develop an empirical understanding of compassion education rooted in direct patient reports. Audio-recorded semi-structured interviews were conducted to obtain an in-depth understanding of compassion training from the perspectives of hospitalized advanced cancer patients (n = 53). Data were analyzed in accordance with grounded theory to determine the key elements of the underlying theory. Three overarching categories and associated themes emerged from the data: compassion aptitude, cultivating compassion, and training methods. Participants spoke of compassion as an innate quality embedded in the character of learners prior to their healthcare training, which could be nurtured through experiential learning and reflective practices. Patients felt that the innate qualities that learners possessed at baseline were further fashioned by personal and practice experiences, and vocational motivators. Participants also provided recommendations for compassion training, including developing an interpersonal relationship with patients, seeing the patient as a person, and developing a human connection. Teaching methods that patients suggested in compassion training included patient-centered communication, self-reflection exercises, and compassionate role modeling. This study provides insight on compassion training for both current and future healthcare providers, from the perspectives of the end recipients of healthcare provider training - patients. Developing a theoretical base for patient centred, evidence-informed, compassion training is a crucial initial step toward the further development of this core healthcare competency.

  10. Barriers of healthcare providers against end-of-life discussions with pediatric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Saran; Shimizu, Ken; Kobayashi, Mariko; Inoguchi, Hironobu; Oshima, Yoshio; Dotani, Chikako; Nakahara, Rika; Takahashi, Tomomi; Kato, Masashi

    2014-08-01

    End-of-life discussions with patients can be one of the most difficult and stressful tasks for the oncologist. However, little is known about the discussions that healthcare providers have with patients in such situations and the difficulties they face. The primary end points of this study were to describe the contents of end-of-life discussion in the pediatric setting and the barriers to end-of-life discussion for pediatric patients, as perceived by pediatric healthcare providers. Participants were 10 healthcare providers. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, and the KJ method was performed to analyze the data. We found 23 barriers against end-of-life discussion with pediatric cancer patients. These barriers were classified as follows: healthcare provider factors, patient factors, parent factors and institutional or cultural factors. In addition to barriers found in previous studies, some unique barriers were uncovered such as, 'Lack of confidence to face the patient after the discussion', 'Uncertain responsibility for treatment decision-making' and 'No compelling reason to discuss'. Healthcare providers actively discussed the purpose of treatment and the patients' wishes and concerns; however, they were reluctant to deal with the patients' own impending death and their estimated prognosis. End-of-life discussion with pediatric patients differs from that with adult patients. Further studies are required to analyze pediatric cases associated with end-of-life discussion and carefully discuss its adequacy, pros and cons. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Patient and Referring Provider Characteristics Associated With the Likelihood of Undergoing Bariatric Surgery: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Luke M.; Jolles, Sally; Fischer, Laura E.; Voils, Corrine I

    2016-01-01

    Importance Although bariatric surgery is the most cost-effective treatment for severe obesity, less than 1% of severely obese patients undergo it. Reasons for low utilization are unclear. Objectives To identify patient and referring provider characteristics associated with the likelihood of undergoing bariatric surgery. Evidence Review PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane databases were searched for reports published between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2014. Reports were eligible if they presented descriptive data regarding facilitators or barriers to bariatric surgery or if they reported statistical associations between patient or provider characteristics and referral to or receipt of bariatric surgery. Frequency effect sizes were calculated as the proportion of studies reporting a finding. Findings Of the 7,212 reports identified in the initial search, 53 were included in full-text review. Nine reports met our inclusion criteria and were included in analyses. Of those, four included descriptive findings, six reported statistical associations, and one included both. One report included providers as study participants, whereas eight included patients. Four of nine studies identified an association between female gender and a greater willingness to undergo bariatric surgery. Lack of knowledge about bariatric surgery was a barrier in two studies. Five of nine cited patient concerns about the outcomes and safety of bariatric surgery as a barrier to undergoing it. Patients were more likely to pursue bariatric surgery when it was recommended by referring providers. Providers who believed that obesity treatment should be covered by insurance were more likely to recommend bariatric surgery. Conclusions and Relevance Limited patient and referring provider knowledge about the safety and effectiveness of bariatric surgery are important barriers to bariatric surgery utilization. Future efforts focused on improving knowledge and identification of the critical

  12. Patient-provider discussions about colorectal cancer screening: who initiates elements of informed decision making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Mira L; Broder-Oldach, Ben; Fisher, James L; King, Justin; Eubanks, Kathy; Fleming, Kelly; Paskett, Electra D

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates remain low among low-income minority populations. To evaluate informed decision making (IDM) elements about CRC screening among low-income minority patients. Observational data were collected as part of a patient-level randomized controlled trial to improve CRC screening rates. Medical visits (November 2007 to May 2010) were audio-taped and coded for IDM elements about CRC screening. Near the end of the study one provider refused recording of patients' visits (33 of 270 patients). Among all patients in the trial, agreement to be audio taped was 43.5 % (103/237). Evaluable patient (n = 100) visits were assessed for CRC screening discussion occurrence, IDM elements, and who initiated discussion of each IDM element. Patients were African American (72.2 %), female (63.7 %), with annual household incomes IDM elements was five; however, only two visits included five elements. The most common IDM element discussed in addition to the nature of the decision was the assessment of the patient's understanding in 16 (33.3 %) of the visits that included a CRC discussion. A patient activation intervention initiated CRC screening discussions with health care providers; however, limited IDM occurred about CRC screening during medical visits of minority and low-income patients.

  13. Providing physicians with feedback on how they supervise students during patient contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmans, D H J M; Wolfhagen, H A P; Gerver, W J; De Grave, W; Scherpbier, A J J A

    2004-08-01

    In this descriptive study an instrument is presented that has been developed to provide physicians with feedback about their strengths and weaknesses in facilitating student learning during patient contacts. The instrument is strongly theory based, i.e. it is based on current general theories of context-bound learning environments, and forms of facilitation promoting transfer of knowledge to actual professional practice. In addition, it has been developed in cooperation with physicians supervising students during patient contacts. The authors have shown how physicians can be provided with individualized feedback on their performance in supervising students during patient contacts.

  14. Misdiagnosis of obstetrical cases and the clinical and cost consequences to patients: a cross-sectional study of urban providers in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riti Shimkhada

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Misdiagnosis may be a significant and under-recognized quality of care problem. In birthing facilities located in anurban Philippine setting, we investigated the diagnostic accuracy for three obstetric conditions: cephalopelvic disproportion (CPD, post-partum hemorrhage (PPH, and pre-eclampsia. Design: Identical simulated cases were used to measure diagnostic accuracy for every provider (n=103. We linked misdiagnosis – identified by the simulated cases – to obstetrical complications of the patients at the participating facilities. Patient-level data on health outcomes and costs were obtained from medical records and follow-home in-person interviews. Results: The prevalence of misdiagnosis among obstetric providers was 29.8% overall, 25% for CPD, 33% for PPH, and 31% for pre-eclampsia. Linking provider decision-making to patients, we found those who misdiagnosed the simulated cases were more likely to have patients with a complication (OR 2.96; 95% CI 1.39–3.77 compared with those who did not misdiagnose. Complicated patients were significantly less likely to be referred to a hospital immediately, were more likely to be readmitted to a hospital after delivery, had significantly higher medical costs, and lost more income than non-complicated patients. Conclusion: Diagnosis is arguably the most important task a clinician performs because it determines the subsequent course of evaluation and treatment, with the direct and indirect costs of diagnostic error, placing large financial burdens on the patient.

  15. The periodic health examination provided to asymptomatic older women: an assessment using standardized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, P A; Dietrich, A J; Freeman, D H; Mott, L A

    1993-07-15

    To describe physical examination and cancer prevention services provided by primary care physicians in response to the request for a "checkup" by an asymptomatic 55-year-old woman seeking to establish ongoing care; to assess the effects of two interventions (education and office organization) intended to improve these services; and to assess the feasibility of using "standardized" patients to evaluate physician responses to such a request. Northern New England. Fifty-nine primary care physicians who were accepting new patients and were participating in a study of early detection and prevention of cancer. Cross sectional; observations of patient visits. Actresses trained to portray a specific patient role ("standardized" or "simulated" patients) visited each physician once. Physicians were blinded to the simulated patients' true identities. Actresses reported the components of the general physical examination and the cancer-related "checkup." Most interactions were audiotaped. Fourteen physical examination components were measured, ranging from assessment of vibratory sense (5%) to measurement of blood pressure (98%). Provision of 10 services recommended by the National Cancer Institute to standardized patients included 16% being advised to reduce dietary fat; 53% to do monthly breast self-examination; 74% to quit smoking; and 89% to obtain a mammogram. Physicians spent from 5 to 60 minutes with the patients. Two physicians did not charge, whereas others charged from $24 to $108. Study group assignment was not associated with statistical differences in provider performance. Two standardized patients (3%) were detected by physicians. Audiotapes were used to verify the actresses' ability to replicate their scenario (consistently repeat their performance) and to verify physician performance. Physician responses to an identical patient request varied widely in terms of time spent with the patient, the services provided, and the cost of the visit. Using standardized

  16. Communication about sexual health with breast cancer survivors: Variation among patient and provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canzona, Mollie Rose; Garcia, David; Fisher, Carla L; Raleigh, Meghan; Kalish, Virginia; Ledford, Christy J W

    2016-11-01

    Breast cancer survivors experience a range of sexual health (SH) issues. Communication problems between patient and provider can prevent survivors from pursuing SH goals and can negatively influence biopsychosocial outcomes. The primary aims of this study were to identify provider communication behaviors that facilitate or impede clinical interactions regarding SH (according to survivors and providers) and to highlight discrepancies that affect care. Forty breast cancer survivors and forty health care providers from a variety of specialties participated in semi-structured interviews informed by the Critical Incident Technique. Transcripts were thematically analyzed using the constant comparative method. Survivors and providers discussed the importance of honoring individual patient needs and conveying compassionate messages. However, accounts varied significantly regarding the appropriate timing and method of initiating SH discussions and the helpfulness of certain support behaviors and linguistic devices. Provider and survivor accounts of what constitutes helpful and unhelpful provider communication behaviors when discussing SH concerns are misaligned in nuanced and meaningful ways. These discrepancies reveal potential areas for educational intervention. SH discussions require providers to examine assumptions about patients' communication preferences and information needs. Patients may benefit from frank yet sensitive discussions earlier in the cancer continuum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Patient satisfaction with the quality of dental treatment provided by interns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Tsung Lee

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Medical centers should guide interns in clinical cases and provide structured training. These measures could enhance the public's confidence in interns and improve patient satisfaction with interns through improved clinical skills, and provide an excellent work force for the dental field.

  18. Impact of increased patient choice of providers in Sweden: cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Marianne; Åhs, Annika; Winblad, Ulrika; Lundström, Mats

    2012-04-01

    Choice of provider was introduced in Sweden in 2001. Our aim was to describe the scope and character of patient flows and to analyze any differences between patients who chose to move outside of their home county (movers) and those who did not (non-movers) with regard to age, sex, waiting time and level of need. Use of cataract operations between 2005 and 2008 based on data from the National Cataract Register. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, odds ratios and multivariate regression analysis to compare movers and non-movers. Information on contracting between county councils and providers in other counties was obtained from a survey. Only 4% of cataract patients were treated by a provider outside their home county. Patient flows were mainly determined by contracts between county councils and providers, and only 1% were considered to be 'true' movers (i.e. patients who were not part of any special contracting agreement). Movers differed from non-movers in that they were on average younger, had less serious visual problems and had shorter waiting times. Though patient flows are minor in scope, the possibility of changing provider has probably been important in tackling long waits in some counties. However, the reform may threaten the equity of health care use.

  19. Patient greeting preferences for themselves and their providers in a military family medicine clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, John E; Tolentino, Jerlyn C; Gray, Cynthia

    2013-10-01

    Using the proper greeting may be important to help establish rapport between health care providers and their patients. It may be particularly useful for family medicine physicians working in a military medical facility, where military rank and traditions are important. A total of 259 anonymous surveys were collected from patients treated at a military family medicine clinic. Most of the patients who completed the survey preferred to shake hands with their provider, be greeted using only their first name, and preferred that the provider introduce themselves using their last name only. Active duty patients were more likely than civilians to prefer a handshake (odds ratio [OR] 3.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.46-6.39) and officers were more likely to prefer a handshake compared to enlisted service members (OR 3.29; 95% CI 1.18-9.20). Respondents who were older were more likely to prefer a formal introduction by their provider compared to respondents under 35 years old (OR 2.92, 95% CI 1.35-6.31). Although most patients in this facility expressed a preference for how they would like to be greeted, providers are still encouraged to ask their patients how they would prefer to be addressed. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. Internet and electronic resources for inflammatory bowel disease: a primer for providers and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortinsky, Kyle J; Fournier, Marc R; Benchimol, Eric I

    2012-06-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly turning to the Internet to research their condition and engage in discourse on their experiences. This has resulted in new dynamics in the relationship between providers and their patients, with misinformation and advertising potentially presenting barriers to the cooperative patient-provider partnership. This article addresses important issues of online IBD-related health information and social media activity, such as quality, reliability, objectivity, and privacy. We reviewed the medical literature on the quality of online information provided to IBD patients, and summarized the most commonly accessed Websites related to IBD. We also assessed the activity on popular social media sites (such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube), and evaluated currently available applications for use by IBD patients and providers on mobile phones and tablets. Through our review of the literature and currently available resources, we developed a list of recommended online resources to strengthen patient participation in their care by providing reliable, comprehensive educational material. Copyright © 2011 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  1. Patient and provider perspectives on the relationship between multiple morbidity management and disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Nancy E; Tarasenko, Yelena N; Bardach, Shoshana H; Fleming, Steven T

    2015-04-01

    Despite competing demands of multiple morbidity (MM) management and disease prevention, our recent survey of 1,153 Appalachian residents aged 50 to 76 documented that individuals with MM were more likely to obtain colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) than those without MM. Nearly two thirds of respondents obtained CRCS, and the more MM, the greater the likelihood of screening. To gain insight into this relationship, we conducted nine focus groups, six with providers and three with patients. Three main explanations emerged: (a) patients' MM increases providers' vigilance for other health vulnerabilities; (b) having MM increases patients' own vigilance; and (c) patients' vigilance may stem from experiencing more symptoms, having a family history of cancer, and having successfully obtained health care. More frequent contact with health care providers appears to encourage preventive referral, especially in low-income populations that otherwise may not receive such counselling. We highlight participant recommendations to improve MM management and prevention. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Characteristics of electronic patient-provider messaging system utilisation in an urban health care organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Patrick Mikles

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Research suggests that electronic messaging can improve patient engagement. Studies indicate that a ‘digital divide’ may exist, where certain patient populations may be using electronic messaging less frequently. This study aims to determine which patient characteristics are associated with different levels of usage of an electronic patient-provider messaging system in a diverse urban population.Methods Cross-sectional electronic health record data were extracted for patients 10 years of age or older who live in New York City and who visited a set of clinics between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2012. Regression analyses determined which participant characteristics were associated with the sending of electronic messages.Results Older, female, English-speaking participants of white race who received more messages, had any diagnoses, more office visits and a provider who sent messages were more likely to send more messages. Non-Millennial, non-white participants who received fewer messages, had more office visits, any diagnoses, a provider who saw fewer patients with patient portal accounts, lived in a low socioeconomic status neighbourhood, and did not have private insurance were more likely to send zero messages.Conclusion This study found significant differences in electronic messaging usage based on demographic, socioeconomic and health-related patient characteristics. Future studies are needed to support these results and determine the causes of observed associations.

  3. Transitions from hospital to community care: the role of patient-provider language concordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Nosaiba; Admi, Hanna; Shadmi, Efrat

    2014-01-01

    Cultural and language discordance between patients and providers constitutes a significant challenge to provision of quality healthcare. This study aims to evaluate minority patients' discharge from hospital to community care, specifically examining the relationship between patient-provider language concordance and the quality of transitional care. This was a multi-method prospective study of care transitions of 92 patients: native Hebrew, Russian or Arabic speakers, with a pre-discharge questionnaire and structured observations examining discharge preparation from a large Israeli teaching hospital. Two weeks post-discharge patients were surveyed by phone, on the transition from hospital to community care (the Care Transition Measure (CTM-15, 0-100 scale)) and on the primary-care post-discharge visit. Overall, ratings on the CTM indicated fair quality of the transition process (scores of 51.8 to 58.8). Patient-provider language concordance was present in 49% of minority patients' discharge briefings. Language concordance was associated with higher CTM scores among minority groups (64.1 in language-concordant versus 49.8 in non-language-concordant discharges, P <0.001). Other aspects significantly associated with CTM scores: extent of discharge explanations (P <0.05), quality of discharge briefing (P <0.001), and post-discharge explanations by the primary care physician (P <0.01). Language-concordant care, coupled with extensive discharge briefings and post-discharge explanations for ongoing care, are important contributors to the quality of care transitions of ethnic minority patients.

  4. Generating demand for pharmacist-provided medication therapy management: identifying patient-preferred marketing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Gladys M; Snyder, Margie E; McGrath, Stephanie Harriman; Smith, Randall B; McGivney, Melissa Somma

    2009-01-01

    To identify effective strategies for marketing pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) services to patients in a self-insured employer setting. Qualitative study. University of Pittsburgh during March through May 2008. 26 university employees taking at least one chronic medication. Three focus group sessions were conducted using a semistructured topic guide to facilitate the discussion. Employees' perceived medication-related needs, perceived benefits of pharmacist-provided MTM, potential barriers for employee participation in MTM, and effective strategies for marketing MTM. Participants reported concerns with timing of doses, medication costs, access, and ensuring adherence. Participants generally felt positively toward pharmacists; however, the level of reported patient contact with pharmacists varied among participants. Some participants questioned pharmacists' education and qualifications for this enhanced role in patient care. Perceived benefits of MTM noted by participants included the opportunity to obtain personalized information about their medications and the potential for improved communication among their health providers. Barriers to patient participation were out-of-pocket costs and lack of time for MTM visits. Participants suggested use of alternative words to describe MTM and marketing approaches that involve personal contact. Pharmacists should emphasize parts of MTM that patients feel are most beneficial (i.e., provision of a personal medication record) and use patient-friendly language to describe MTM when marketing their practice. Patients will need greater exposure to the concept of MTM and the pharmacists' role in order to correctly describe and assign value to this type of pharmacist patient care practice.

  5. The Role of Safety Culture in Influencing Provider Perceptions of Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Andrea C; Boyle, Todd A

    2016-12-01

    To determine how provider perceptions of safety culture influence their involvement in patient safety practices. Health-care providers were surveyed in 2 tertiary hospitals located in Atlantic Canada, composed of 4 units in total. The partial least squares (PLS) approach to structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data. Latent variables provider PLS model encompassed the hypothesized relationships between provider characteristics, safety culture, perceptions of patient safety practices, and actual performance of patient safety practices, using the Health Belief Model (HBM) as a guide. Data analysis was conducted using SmartPLS. A total of 113 health-care providers completed a survey out of an eligible 318, representing a response rate of 35.5%. The final PLS model showed acceptable internal consistency with all four latent variables having a composite reliability score above the recommended 0.70 cutoff value (safety culture = 0.86, threat = 0.76, expectations = 0.83, PS practices = 0.75). Discriminant validity was established, and all path coefficients were found to be significant at the α = 0.05 level using nonparametric bootstrapping. The survey results show that safety culture accounted for 34% of the variance in perceptions of threat and 42% of the variance in expectations. This research supports the role that safety culture plays in the promotion and maintenance of patient safety activities for health-care providers. As such, it is recommended that the introduction of new patient safety strategies follow a thorough exploration of an organization's safety culture.

  6. Nurses' attitude and practice in providing tobacco cessation care to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedharan, J; Muttappallymyalil, J; Venkatramana, M

    2010-06-01

    Patients respond very positively with nurses when they talk to them about their health related problems. This cross sectional study was carried out among nurses working in Gulf Medical College hospital and Research centre, Ajman, UAE to assess the their attitude in providing tobacco cessation counselling or advise to their patients and potential barriers they face in providing tobacco cessation care. 108 nurses participated in the study. Among the nurses 87% were females, the majority were aged between 25 and 34 years, and 46.3% had a work experience of less than 5 years. Among the nurses who participated in the survey, 99.1% felt that the hospital stay was a suitable time for nurses to create awareness on tobacco and health to the patients and had a positive attitude towards creating awareness on tobacco and health to the patients. Only 0.9% had a negative attitude towards creating awareness on tobacco and health and they felt that patients might not listen to them. All nurses, irrespective of their socio-demographic characteristics had a positive attitude to motivating patients to quit tobacco use. Currently, 70.4% regularly advise their patients to avoid tobacco products. Potential barriers pointed out by nurses were: lack of time (6.3%) patients may not appreciate it (90.6%) and not part of their job (3.1%). The study concludes that nurses have a positive attitude in providing tobacco cessation care to their patients and they can utilize their unique knowledge and know-how to promote tobacco cessation and prevent the spread of this public health crisis. Providing advice and support for tobacco cessation by nurses would increase the chance of patients stopping tobacco use. This will create an enabling environment and greater potential for public health persons to fight the epidemic with greater vigour

  7. Patients' and Health Care Providers' Perception of Stressors in the Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuatiq, Alham

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study is first, to investigate intensive care patients' perceptions of stressors; second, to investigate the health care provider's perception of what constitutes a stressor from the patient's perspective; and third, to describe how health care providers manage their patients' stressors. This was a mixed-methods study; the quantitative section replicated Cornock's 1998 study of stress in the intensive care unit (ICU), with difference in sampling to include all health care providers in the ICU, in addition to nurses. The qualitative section added information to the current literature by describing how health care providers manage their patient's stressors. This article reports the quantitative findings of this study, as the qualitative section is presented in a separate article. It is important to describe ICU patients' stressful experiences to assess patient's stressors, provide holistic care to eliminate stressors, and provide feedback to health care providers. There is a need to describe the clinical practice related to stress perception and management of stressors in the critical care environment. A mixed-methods comparative descriptive design was used for the quantitative section, and a phenomenological approach guided the qualitative section. Lazarus and Folkman's theory formed the bases for integrating all variables investigated in this study. The sample included 70 ICU patients and 70 ICU health care providers. After consenting to participate in this study, subjects were given a demographic form and a paper-based tool, the Environmental Stressors graphic data form Questionnaire. Questionnaires were filled out by subjects anonymously in the ICU and returned to the researcher in the same setting. Descriptive statistics were analyzed using SPSS data analysis software. The top 3 most stressful items ranked by the patients included "being in pain," followed by "not being able to sleep" and "financial worries"; on the other hand, health care

  8. Attitudes of patients and care providers to enhanced recovery after surgery programs after major abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael; Coolsen, Marielle M E; Aahlin, Eirik K; Harrison, Ewen M; McNally, Stephen J; Dejong, C H C; Lassen, Kristoffer; Wigmore, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) is a well-established pathway of perioperative care in surgery in an increasing number of specialties. To implement protocols and maintain high levels of compliance, continued support from care providers and patients is vital. This survey aimed to assess the perceptions of care providers and patients of the relevance and importance of the ERAS targets and strategies. Pre- and post-operative surveys were completed by patients who underwent major hepatic, colorectal, or oesophagogastric surgery in three major centers in Scotland, Norway, and The Netherlands. Anonymous web-based and article surveys were also sent to surgeons, anesthetists, and nurses experienced in delivering enhanced recovery protocols. Each questionnaire asked the responder to rate a selection of enhanced recovery targets and strategies in terms of perceived importance. One hundred nine patients and 57 care providers completed the preoperative survey. Overall, both patients and care providers rated the majority of items as important and supported ERAS principles. Freedom from nausea (median, 10; interquartile range [IQR], 8-10) and pain at rest (median, 10; IQR, 8-10) were the care components rated the highest by both patients and care providers. Early return of bowel function (median, 7; IQR, 5-8) and avoiding preanesthetic sedation (median, 6; IQR, 3.75-8) were scored the lowest by care providers. ERAS principles are supported by both patients and care providers. This is important when attempting to implement and maintain an ERAS program. Controversies still remain regarding the relative importance of individual ERAS components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Combined Patient and Provider Intervention for Management of Osteoarthritis in Veterans: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kelli D; Yancy, William S; Bosworth, Hayden B; Coffman, Cynthia J; Jeffreys, Amy S; Datta, Santanu K; McDuffie, Jennifer; Strauss, Jennifer L; Oddone, Eugene Z

    2016-01-19

    Management of osteoarthritis requires both medical and behavioral strategies, but some recommended therapies are underused. To examine the effectiveness of a combined patient and provider intervention for improving osteoarthritis outcomes. Cluster randomized clinical trial with assignment to osteoarthritis intervention and usual care groups. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01130740). Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina. 30 providers (clusters) and 300 outpatients with symptomatic hip or knee osteoarthritis. The telephone-based patient intervention focused on weight management, physical activity, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involved delivery of patient-specific osteoarthritis treatment recommendations to primary care providers through the electronic medical record. The primary outcome was total score on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) at 12 months. Secondary outcomes were WOMAC function and pain subscale scores, physical performance (Short Physical Performance Battery), and depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-8). Linear mixed models that were adjusted for clustering of providers assessed between-group differences in improvement in outcomes. At 12 months, WOMAC scores were 4.1 points lower (indicating improvement) in the osteoarthritis intervention group versus usual care (95% CI, -7.2 to -1.1 points; P = 0.009). WOMAC function subscale scores were 3.3 points lower in the intervention group (CI, -5.7 to -1.0 points; P = 0.005). WOMAC pain subscale scores (P = 0.126), physical performance, and depressive symptoms did not differ between groups. Although more patients in the osteoarthritis intervention group received provider referral for recommended osteoarthritis treatments, the numbers who received them did not differ. The study was conducted in a single Veterans Affairs medical center. The combined patient and provider intervention resulted in

  10. Opening cultural doors: providing culturally sensitive healthcare to Arab American and American Muslim patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Maya M; White, Casey B; Fetters, Michael D

    2005-10-01

    Differences in the social and religious cultures of Arab Americans and American Muslims raise challenges to healthcare access and delivery. These challenges go far beyond language to encompass entire world views, concepts of health, illness, and recovery and even death. Medical professionals need a more informed understanding and consideration of the rich and diverse array of beliefs, expectations, preferences, and behavioral make up of the social cultures of these patients to ensure that they are providing the best and most comprehensive care possible. Improved understanding will enhance a provider's ability to offer quality healthcare and to build trusting relationships with patients. Here, we provide a broad overview of Arab culture and Islamic religious beliefs that will assist providers in delivering culturally sensitive healthcare to these groups. We offer insight into the behaviors, requirements, and preferences of Arab American and American Muslim patients, especially as they apply to women's health.

  11. Communication during patient-provider encounters regarding diabetes self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Robin L; Olsberg, Joshua E; Shigaki, Cheryl L; Parker Oliver, Debra R; Vetter-Smith, Molly J; Day, Tamara M; LeMaster, Joseph W

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a common chronic illness with potentially severe complications. The risk of complications is reduced through controlling blood sugar, lipids, and blood pressure. While medical intervention is important, substantial self-management on the part of patients is required to achieve good control. Patients often find self-management difficult, particularly diet and exercise modification. Clinicians face barriers as well, including lack of time, poor reimbursement, and difficulty changing their clinical practice patterns. We hypothesized that a strong focus on readily measured disease indicators competes with patients' agendas relating to symptoms and their day-to-day social context. We recorded clinical encounters to study communication about self-management in context. Recordings were transcribed verbatim and analyzed, primarily using a grounded theory approach. We found that clinicians often focused their communication on quantitative measures such as blood pressure and glycosylated hemoglobin but that patients found it difficult to relate these measures to how they were feeling physically. Patients' social contexts influenced their self-management activities, in particular heavy caregiving responsibilities and work schedules. Supporting self-management of patients with diabetes requires providers to link clinical measurements to patients' symptoms and likely outcomes. It is difficult for providers to know what support or assistance their patients need without knowledge of patients' social contexts.

  12. Patient and provider interventions for managing osteoarthritis in primary care: protocols for two randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Kelli D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA of the hip and knee are among the most common chronic conditions, resulting in substantial pain and functional limitations. Adequate management of OA requires a combination of medical and behavioral strategies. However, some recommended therapies are under-utilized in clinical settings, and the majority of patients with hip and knee OA are overweight and physically inactive. Consequently, interventions at the provider-level and patient-level both have potential for improving outcomes. This manuscript describes two ongoing randomized clinical trials being conducted in two different health care systems, examining patient-based and provider-based interventions for managing hip and knee OA in primary care. Methods / Design One study is being conducted within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA health care system and will compare a Combined Patient and Provider intervention relative to usual care among n = 300 patients (10 from each of 30 primary care providers. Another study is being conducted within the Duke Primary Care Research Consortium and will compare Patient Only, Provider Only, and Combined (Patient + Provider interventions relative to usual care among n = 560 patients across 10 clinics. Participants in these studies have clinical and / or radiographic evidence of hip or knee osteoarthritis, are overweight, and do not meet current physical activity guidelines. The 12-month, telephone-based patient intervention focuses on physical activity, weight management, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involves provision of patient-specific recommendations for care (e.g., referral to physical therapy, knee brace, joint injection, based on evidence-based guidelines. Outcomes are collected at baseline, 6-months, and 12-months. The primary outcome is the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (self-reported pain, stiffness, and function, and

  13. Discharge communication practices and healthcare provider and patient preferences, satisfaction and comprehension: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, Harvey; Barker, Anna; Ritchie, Edward; Hitchcock, Karen; Gibbs, Harry; Holton, Sara

    2017-09-07

    To systematically review the available evidence about hospital discharge communication practices and identify which practices were preferred by patients and healthcare providers, improved patient and provider satisfaction, and increased patients' understanding of their medical condition. OVID Medline, Web of Science, ProQuest, PubMed and CINAHL plus. Databases were searched for peer-reviewed, English-language papers, published to August 2016, of empirical research using quantitative or qualitative methods. Reference lists in the papers meeting inclusion criteria were searched to identify further papers. Of the 3489 articles identified, 30 met inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Much research to date has focused on the use of printed material and person-based discharge communication methods including verbal instructions (either in person or via telephone calls). Several studies have examined the use of information technology (IT) such as computer-generated and video-based discharge communication practices. Utilizing technology to deliver discharge information is preferred by healthcare providers and patients, and improves patients' understanding of their medical condition and discharge instructions. Well-designed IT solutions may improve communication, coordination and retention of information, and lead to improved outcomes for patients, their families, caregivers and primary healthcare providers as well as expediting the task for hospital staff.

  14. Indirect bonding technique in orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kübra Yıldırım

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ‘Direct Bonding Technique’ which allows the fixed orthodontic appliances to be directly bonded to teeth without using bands decreased the clinic time for bracket bonding and increased esthetics and oral hygiene during orthodontic treatment. However, mistakes in bracket positioning were observed due to decreased direct visual sight and access to posterior teeth. ‘Indirect Bonding Technique’ was developed for eliminating these problems. Initially, decreased bond strength, higher bond failure rate, periodontal tissue irritation, compromised oral hygiene and increased laboratory time were the main disadvantages of this technique when compared to direct bonding. The newly developed materials and modified techniques help to eliminate these negative consequences. Today, the brackets bonded with indirect technique have similar bond strength with brackets bonded directly. Moreover, indirect and direct bonding techniques have similar effects on periodontal tissues. However, indirect bonding technique requires more attention and precision in laboratory and clinical stage, and has higher cost. Orthodontist's preference between these two bonding techniques may differ according to time spent in laboratory and clinic, cost, patient comfort and personal opinion.

  15. Postdischarge community pharmacist-provided home services for patients after hospitalization for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalista, Tom; Lemay, Virginia; Cohen, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    To establish a community pharmacist-provided home health service to improve medication adherence and reduce 30-day heart failure-related hospital readmissions. Visiting Nurse Services of Newport and Bristol Counties located in Portsmouth, RI, from December 2013 to April 2014. Each patient received one in-home visit provided by a Postgraduate Year 1 community pharmacy resident within 1 week of admission to visiting nurse services followed by two follow-up telephone calls, 1 week and 4 weeks after the visit. The in-home visit consisted of a baseline assessment of medication adherence using the Morisky 8-Item Medication Adherence Questionnaire as well as pharmacist-provided education regarding chronic heart failure management. The follow-up telephone calls were used to reassess patient adherence and to monitor for hospital readmission within 30 days of the initial in-home visit. Community pharmacist-provided in-home medication reconciliation and medication teaching has not been described in the literature previously. In addition, pharmacists are often not included on home health care teams placing patients undergoing transitions in care at risk for potential medication-related errors. Improvement in medication adherence and reduction in 30-day heart failure-related hospital readmission rates. Ten patients were enrolled from December 2013 through April 2014. Following intervention, all patients saw improvements in adherence questionnaire scores during follow-up. Hospital readmission rates for patients seen by the pharmacist were lower compared with agencywide figures over a similar time period. A community pharmacist-provided in-home medication teaching service for patients following recent hospital discharge helps facilitate successful transitions of care from an inpatient to outpatient setting, improves medication adherence and has produced lower observed 30-day heart failure-related hospital readmission rates. Expansion of this or a similar service within the

  16. Impact of patient requests on provider-perceived visit difficulty in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Joshua J; Franks, Peter; Feldman, Mitchell D; Jerant, Anthony; Henry, Stephen G; Paterniti, Debora A; Kravitz, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    "Difficult visits" are common in primary care and may contribute to primary care provider (PCP) career dissatisfaction and burnout. Patient requests occur in approximately half of primary care visits and may be a source of clinician-patient miscommunication or conflict, contributing to perceived visit difficulty. We aimed to determine associations between types of patient requests and PCP-perceived visit difficulty. This was an observational study, nested in a multicenter randomized trial of depression engagement interventions. We included 824 patient visits within 135 PCP practices in Northern California occurring from June 2010 to March 2012. PCP-perceived visit difficulty was quantified using a three-item scale (relative visit difficulty, amount of effort required, and amount of time required; Cronbach's α = 0.81). Using linear regression, the difficulty scale (score range 0-2 from least to most difficult) was modeled as a function of: patient requests for diagnostics tests, pain medications, and specialist referrals; PCP perception of likely depression or likely substance abuse; patient sociodemographics, comorbidity, depression; PCP characteristics and practice setting. Patients requested diagnostic tests, pain medications, and specialist referrals in 37.2, 20.0 and 30.0 % of visits, respectively. After adjustment for patient medical and psychiatric complexity, perceived difficulty was significantly higher when patients requested diagnostic tests [parameter estimate (PE) 0.11, (95 % CI: 0.03, 0.20)] but not when patients requested pain medications [PE -0.04 (95 % CI: -0.15, 0.08)] or referrals [PE 0.04 (95 % CI: -0.07, 0.25)]. PCP-perceived visit difficulty is associated with patient requests for diagnostic tests, but not requests for pain medications or specialist referrals. In this era of "choosing wisely," PCPs may be challenged to respond to diagnostic test requests in an evidence-based manner, while maintaining the provider-patient relationship

  17. Patient-Provider Communication: Does Electronic Messaging Reduce Incoming Telephone Calls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Eve N; Fields, Scott; Rdesinski, Rebecca E; Sachdeva, Bhavaya; Yamashita, Daisuke; Marino, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Internet-based patient portals are increasingly being implemented throughout health care organizations to enhance health and optimize communication between patients and health professionals. The decision to adopt a patient portal requires careful examination of the advantages and disadvantages of implementation. This study aims to investigate 1 proposed advantage of implementation: alleviating some of the clinical workload faced by employees. A retrospective time-series analysis of the correlation between the rate of electronic patient-to-provider messages-a common attribute of Internet-based patient portals-and incoming telephone calls. The rate of electronic messages and incoming telephone calls were monitored from February 2009 to June 2014 at 4 economically diverse clinics (a federally qualified health center, a rural health clinic, a community-based clinic, and a university-based clinic) related to 1 university hospital. All 4 clinics showed an increase in the rate of portal use as measured by electronic patient-to-provider messaging during the study period. Electronic patient-to-provider messaging was significantly positively correlated with incoming telephone calls at 2 of the clinics (r = 0.546, P < .001 and r = 0.543, P < .001). The remaining clinics were not significantly correlated but demonstrated a weak positive correlation (r = 0.098, P = .560 and r = 0.069, P = .671). Implementation and increased use of electronic patient-to-provider messaging was associated with increased use of telephone calls in 2 of the study clinics. While practices are increasingly making the decision of whether to implement a patient portal as part of their system of care, it is important that the motivation behind such a change not be based on the idea that it will alleviate clinical workload. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  18. Multiple sclerosis patients need and want information on exercise promotion from healthcare providers: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learmonth, Yvonne C; Adamson, Brynn C; Balto, Julia M; Chiu, Chung-Yi; Molina-Guzman, Isabel; Finlayson, Marcia; Riskin, Barry J; Motl, Robert W

    2017-08-01

    There is growing recognition of the benefits and safety of exercise and its importance in the comprehensive care of persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), yet uptake is low. We explored the needs and wants of patients with MS regarding exercise promotion through healthcare providers. Participants were adults with MS who had mild-or-moderate disability and a range of exercise levels. All participants lived in the Midwest of the United States. Fifty semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using thematic analysis. Two themes emerged, namely interactions between patients and healthcare providers and needs and wants of patients. Analysis of participant accounts illustrate that current exercise promotion by healthcare providers does not meet patient needs and wants. The identified needs and wants of persons with MS involved (i) information and knowledge on the benefits of exercise and exercise prescription, (ii) materials to allow home and community exercise and (iii) tools for initiating and maintaining exercise behaviour. Patients with MS frequently interact with healthcare providers and are generally unsatisfied with exercise promotion during interactions. Healthcare providers can address the low uptake of exercise among persons with MS by acting upon the identified unmet needs involving materials, knowledge and behaviour change strategies for exercise. © 2016 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Understanding the cost of dermatologic care: A survey study of dermatology providers, residents, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Aaron J; Mann, Julianne A; Carlberg, Valerie M; Kimball, Alexa B; Musty, Michael J; Simpson, Eric L

    2017-04-01

    The American Academy of Dermatology recommends dermatologists understand the costs of dermatologic care. This study sought to measure dermatology providers' understanding of the cost of dermatologic care and how those costs are communicated to patients. We also aimed to understand the perspectives of patients and dermatological trainees on how cost information enters into the care they receive or provide. Surveys were systematically developed and distributed to 3 study populations: dermatology providers, residents, and patients. Response rates were over 95% in all 3 populations. Dermatology providers and residents consistently underestimated the costs of commonly recommended dermatologic medications but accurately predicted the cost of common dermatologic procedures. Dermatology patients preferred to know the cost of procedures and medications, even when covered by insurance. In this population, the costs of dermatologic medications frequently interfered with patients' ability to properly adhere to prescribed regimens. The surveyed population was limited to the northwestern United States and findings may not be generalizable. Cost estimations were based on average reimbursement rates, which vary by insurer. Improving dermatology providers' awareness and communication of the costs of dermatologic care might enhance medical decision-making, improve adherence and outcomes, and potentially reduce overall health care expenditures. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of provider specialties in the treatment of patients with clinically diagnosed back and joint problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Fernando A; Licciardone, John C; Kearns, Cathleen M; Akuoko, Mathias

    2015-10-01

    Although several studies have compared patient outcomes by provider specialty in the treatment of back and joint pain, little is known about the cost-effectiveness of improving patient outcomes across specialties. This study uses a large-scale, nationally representative database to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of being treated by specific provider specialists for back and joint pain in the United States. The 2002-2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys were used to examine patients diagnosed with back and/or joint problems seeking treatment from doctors (internal medicine, family/general, osteopathic medicine, orthopaedics, rheumatology, neurology) or other providers (chiropractor, physical therapist, acupuncturist, massage therapist). A total of 16,546 respondents aged 18 to 85 and clinically diagnosed with back/joint pain were examined. Self-reported measures of physical and mental health and general quality of life (measured by the EuroQol-5D) were compared with average total costs of treatment across medical providers. Total annual treatment costs per person ranged from $397 for family/general doctors to $1205 for rheumatologists. Cost-effectiveness analysis suggests that osteopathic, family/general, internal medicine doctors and chiropractors and massage therapists were more cost-effective than other specialties in improving physical function to back pain patients. For mental health measures, family/general and orthopaedic doctors and physical therapists were more cost-effective compared with other specialties. Similar to results on physical function, family/general, osteopathic and internal medicine doctors dominated other specialties. However, only massage therapy was cost-effective among non-doctor providers in improving quality of life measures. Patients seeking care for back and joint-related health problems face a wide range of treatments, costs and outcomes depending on which specialist provider they see. This study provides important insight on the

  1. Indirect Costs of University Research: Background Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Tony Vander

    This paper is intended to provide a solid base of information about the treatment of indirect university research costs in various jurisdictions and to highlight some of the factors that have contributed to increased interest in the issues surrounding the funding of indirect costs of research. University research in Ontario has continued to evolve…

  2. Conflict and Care: Israeli Healthcare Providers and Syrian Patients and Caregivers in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Savannah S; Lewis, Denise C; Gilbey, Peter; Eisenman, Arie; Schuster, Richard; Seponski, Desiree M

    2016-01-01

    Israel has provided immediate healthcare to Syrian children, civilians and fighters since early 2013 despite being in an official state of war with Syria since 1973. We present qualitative findings from a larger mixed-methods phenomenological study to understand how the geopolitical and social history of Israel and Syria influences healthcare providers and Syrian patient caregivers in northern Israel. Theories of humanization and cognitive dissonance guided this study and frame the beliefs and experiences of healthcare providers who treated wounded Syrians in Israeli hospitals. Findings indicate healthcare providers and Syrian caregivers adjusted their beliefs to allow for positive healthcare experiences. Qualitative analysis revealed two major themes: supportive and hindering systemic elements contributing to the healthcare provider-patient-caregiver relationship. Internal psychological developments, contextual factors, and relational processes influenced humanization of the other within the relationship. This study illuminates unique ethical and humanitarian demands relevant for healthcare workers and those with whom they interact.

  3. Communication Between Low Income Hispanic Patients and Their Healthcare Providers Regarding Physical Activity and Healthy Eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauri, Aliyah; Rodriguez, Xeniamaria; Gaona, Patricia; Maestri, Stephanie; Dietz, Noella; Stoutenberg, Mark

    2017-05-20

    U.S. Hispanics disproportionately show health burdens that may be decreased by discussing physical activity (PA) and healthy eating with their healthcare providers (HCPs). We examined the perceptions of both HCPs and low-income Hispanic patients regarding the dynamics of these communications. We surveyed 295 low-income Hispanic patients and interviewed 14 HCPs at three community health clinics. Patients were asked about their comfort level with HCPs, how often their HCP discussed PA and healthy eating, and the likelihood of following advice on PA and healthy eating. HCPs were asked about their delivery (frequency/duration) and perceived effectiveness in providing such advice. Patients reported feeling "most comfortable" with their physicians (57%) with a lower proportion (19%) feeling "most comfortable" with nurses. Nearly all patients (95%) reported being very likely to follow the advice of their physician. On average, HCPs (physicians and nurses) reported discussing PA and healthy eating with 85% and 80% of their patients, respectively. In contrast, a fewer proportion of patients (65.8%) reported that their physician discussed PA and healthy eating "some" or "a lot" of the time. Overall, physicians reported discussing PA and healthy eating for an average of 5 and 6 min, respectively; whereas nurses reported discussing PA and healthy eating for an average of 12 and 19 min, respectively. Further study on the content and delivery of conversations between HCPs and their low-income Hispanic patients regarding PA and healthy eating could be vital to optimally impact health behaviors.

  4. Variation in patient perceptions of healthcare provider endorsement of cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Courtney Kwan-Yee; Shanmugasegaram, Shamila; Jamnik, Veronica; Wu, Gilbert; Grace, Sherry L

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is significantly underutilized. However, physician endorsement promotes greater patient utilization. This study examined perceptions of provider endorsement by patients (1) of sociodemographic groups who are often less represented in CR and by clinical indication and (2) by type of healthcare provider and place of referral. Referred cardiac (N = 1156) inpatients from 11 hospitals across Ontario completed a sociodemographic survey inhospital and a mailed followup survey 1 year later. Respondents self-reported perceived healthcare provider endorsement of CR on a 5-point Likert scale, type of referring healthcare provider, and where the referral was initiated. The overall perceived strength of healthcare provider endorsement to CR was 3.75 ± 1.15. Patients who perceived greater endorsement were significantly more likely to enrol (OR = 2.07) and attend a greater percentage of CR sessions (P endorsement of CR than their respective counterparts. Perception of CR endorsement did not differ significantly on the basis of location of referral initiation (P ≥ .05), but those who discussed CR with family doctors (P endorsement than those discussing CR with nurses. Given the proven benefits of CR, all healthcare providers are recommended to universally and strongly encourage CR participation among their patients in order to optimize utilization and subsequent recovery.

  5. Perceptions of health care providers concerning patient and health care provider strategies to limit out-of-pocket costs for cancer care

    OpenAIRE

    Mathews, M.; Buehler, S.; West, R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We aimed to describe the perceptions of health care providers concerning patient and health care provider strategies to limit out-of-pocket costs for cancer care. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with 21 cancer care providers (nurses, social workers, oncologists, surgeons, pharmacists, and dieticians) in Newfoundland and Labrador. Results Patients try to minimize costs by substituting or rationing medications, choosing radical treatments, lengthening the time between ...

  6. Effects of handholding and providing information on anxiety in patients undergoing percutaneous vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong-Hee; Kang, Hee-Young; Choi, Eun-Young

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of handholding and spoken information provided on the anxiety of patients undergoing percutaneous vertebroplasty under local anaesthesia. A surgical intervention usually entails physical discomfort and psychological burden. Furthermore, patients under local anaesthesia are conscious during the surgical intervention, which leads to more anxiety, as patients are aware of their surroundings in the operating theatre. A quasi-experimental design with a nonequivalent control group was utilised. Amsterdam preoperative anxiety scale assessed psychological anxiety, while blood pressure and pulse were measured to evaluate physiological anxiety. Participants were 94 patients undergoing percutaneous vertebroplasty in a spine hospital in Gwangju Metropolitan City, South Korea. Thirty patients were assigned to Experimental Group I, 34 to the Experimental Group II and 30 to the control group. During a surgical intervention, nurses held the hands of those in Experimental Group I and provided them with spoken information. Patients in Experimental Group II experienced only handholding. Psychological anxiety in Experimental Group I was low compared to those in Experimental Group II and the control group. In addition, there were significant decreases in systolic blood pressure in both Experimental Groups compared to the control group. Handholding and spoken information provided during a surgical intervention to mitigate psychological anxiety, and handholding to mitigate physiological anxiety can be used in nursing interventions with patients undergoing percutaneous vertebroplasty. Handholding and providing nursing information are possibly very useful interventions that are easily implemented by circulating nurses during a surgical intervention. In particular, handholding is a simple, economical and appropriate way to help patient in the operating theatre. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Enhancing provider knowledge and patient screening for palliative care needs in chronic multimorbid patients receiving home-based primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Tracy; Manu, Erika; Vitale, Caroline A

    2015-02-01

    This article describes a pilot model to increase palliative care (PC) knowledge and collaboration among providers and to systematically identify chronic multimorbid home care patients who would benefit from focused discussion of potential PC needs. Thirty health care providers from a home-based primary care team attended interdisciplinary trainings. The Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) tool was used to trigger discussions of potential palliative needs at team rounds for patients who scored below a cutoff point on the tool. Palliative Performance Scale implementation added little burden on nurses and triggered a discussion in 51 flagged patients. The tool successfully identified 75% of patients who died or were discharged. Screening was systematic and consistent and resulted in targeted discussions about PC needs without generating additional burden on our PC consult service. This model shows promise for enhancing collaborative patient care and access to PC. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Attitudes and Perceptions of Patients, Caregivers, and Health Care Providers toward Background Music in Patient Care Areas: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cruz, Pedro; Nguyen, Linh; Rhondali, Wadih; Hui, David; Palmer, J. Lynn; Sevy, Ingrid; Richardson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Background music can be used to distract from ordinary sounds and improve wellbeing in patient care areas. Little is known about individuals' attitudes and beliefs about music versus ordinary sound in this setting. Objectives To assess the preferences of patients, caregivers and healthcare providers regarding background music or ordinary sound in outpatient and inpatient care areas, and to explore their attitudes and perceptions towards music in general. Methods All participants were exposed to background music in outpatient or inpatient clinical settings. 99 consecutive patients, 101 caregivers and 65 out of 70 eligible healthcare providers (93%) completed a survey about music attitudes and preferences. The primary outcome was a preference for background music over ordinary sound in patient care areas. Results Preference for background music was high and similar across groups (70 patients (71%), 71 caregivers (71%) and 46 providers (71%), p=0.58). The three groups had very low disapproval for background music in patient care areas (10%, 9% and 12%, respectively; p=0.91). Black ethnicity independently predicted lower preference for background music (OR: 0.47, 95%CI: 0.23, 0.98). Patients, caregivers and providers reported recent use of music for themselves for the purpose of enjoyment (69%, 80% and 86% respectively p=0.02). Age, gender, religion and education level significantly predicted preferences for specific music styles. Conclusion Background music in patient care areas was preferred to ordinary sound by patients, caregivers and providers. Demographics of the population are strong determinants of music style preferences. PMID:22957677

  9. Patients' and nurses' views on providing psychological support within cardiac rehabilitation programmes: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Katrina M; Winder, Rachel; Campbell, John L; Richards, David A; Gandhi, Manish; Dickens, Chris M; Richards, Suzanne

    2017-09-01

    To explore patients' and nurses' views on the feasibility and acceptability of providing psychological care within cardiac rehabilitation services. In-depth interviews analysed thematically. 18 patients and 7 cardiac nurses taking part in a pilot trial (CADENCE) of an enhanced psychological care intervention delivered within cardiac rehabilitation programmes by nurses to patients with symptoms of depression. Cardiac services based in the South West of England and the East Midlands, UK. Patients and nurses viewed psychological support as central to good cardiac rehabilitation. Patients' accounts highlighted the significant and immediate adverse effect a cardiac event can have on an individual's mental well-being. They also showed that patients valued nurses attending to both their mental and physical health, and felt this was essential to their overall recovery. Nurses were committed to providing psychological support, believed it benefited patients, and advocated for this support to be delivered within cardiac rehabilitation programmes rather than within a parallel healthcare service. However, nurses were time-constrained and found it challenging to provide psychological care within their existing workloads. Both patients and nurses highly value psychological support being delivered within cardiac rehabilitation programmes but resource constraints raise barriers to implementation. Consideration, therefore, should be given to alternative forms of delivery which do not rely solely on nurses to enable patients to receive psychological support during cardiac rehabilitation. ISCTRN34701576. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Social cognition of indirect speech: Evidence from Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Patrick; Holtgraves, Thomas; Durso, Raymon; Harris, Erica

    2010-03-01

    We examined potential neurocognitive mechanisms of indirect speech in support of face management in 28 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 32 elderly controls with chronic disease. In experiment 1, we demonstrated automatic activation of indirect meanings of particularized implicatures in controls but not in PD patients. Failure to automatically engage comprehension of indirect meanings of indirect speech acts in PD patients was correlated with a measure of prefrontal dysfunction. In experiment 2, we showed that while PD patients and controls offered similar interpretations of indirect speech acts, PD participants were overly confident in their interpretations and unaware of errors of interpretation. Efficient reputational adjustment mechanisms apparently require intact striatal-prefrontal networks.

  11. Measuring the quality of provided services for patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Heidari Jamebozorgi, Majid; Salesi, Mahmood; Ravangard, Ramin

    2014-09-01

    The healthcare organizations need to develop and implement quality improvement plans for their survival and success. Measuring quality in the healthcare competitive environment is an undeniable necessity for these organizations and will lead to improved patient satisfaction. This study aimed to measure the quality of provided services for patients with chronic kidney disease in Kerman in 2014. This cross-sectional, descriptive-analytic study was performed from 23 January 2014 to 14 February 2014 in four hemodialysis centers in Kerman. All of the patients on chronic hemodialysis (n = 195) who were referred to these four centers were selected and studied using census method. The required data were collected using the SERVQUAL questionnaire, consisting of two parts: questions related to the patients' demographic characteristics, and 28 items to measure the patients' expectations and perceptions of the five dimensions of service quality, including tangibility, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 21.0 through some statistical tests, including independent-samples t test, one-way ANOVA, and paired-samples t test. The results showed that the means of patients' expectations were more than their perceptions of the quality of provided services in all dimensions, which indicated that there were gaps in all dimensions. The highest and lowest means of negative gaps were related to empathy (-0.52 ± 0.48) and tangibility (-0.29 ± 0.51). In addition, among the studied patients' demographic characteristics and the five dimensions of service quality, only the difference between the patients' income levels and the gap in assurance were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Overall, the results of the present study showed that the expectations of patients on hemodialysis were more than their perceptions of provided services. The healthcare providers and employees should pay more attention to the patients' opinions and

  12. Will electronic personal health records benefit providers and patients in rural America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, John S

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to educate stakeholders (e.g., providers, patients, insurers, government) in the healthcare industry about electronic personal health records (PHRs) and their potential application in rural America. Extensive research was performed on PHRs through standard literature search, product demonstrations, educational webinars, and fact finding via news releases. Various stakeholders are eager to transform the healthcare industry into the digital age like other industries (i.e., banking, retail). Despite low adoption of PHRs in 2008 (2.7% of U.S. adults), patients are interested in secure messaging and eVisits with their physicians, online appointment scheduling and reminders, and online access to their laboratory and radiology results. Federal agencies (e.g., Health and Human Services, Department of Defense, Veterans Affairs [VA]), popular information technology (IT) vendors (e.g., Google, Microsoft), and large insurers (e.g., Aetna) have energized the industry through pilot programs and new product announcements. It remains to be seen if barriers to adoption, including privacy concerns, lack of interoperability standards and funding, and provider resistance, can be overcome to enable PHRs to become a critical tool in the creation of a more efficient and less costly U.S. healthcare industry. Electronic PHRs hold great promise to enhance access and improve the quality of care provided to patients in rural America. Government, vendors, and insurers should create incentives for providers and patients to implement PHRs. Likewise, patients need to become more aware of PHRs and their ability to improve health outcomes.

  13. Stigmatized Attitude of Healthcare Providers: A Barrier for Delivering Health Services to HIV Positive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooshin Zarei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Despite the success of developed countries in preventing the spread of HIV/AIDS, the disease is expanding in developing countries where an unfavorable attitude exists among people, health professionals and employees. This study aimed to assess the stigmatized attitude among health care providers toward people living with HIV (PLWHA. Methods: The study is a cross-sectional survey. The data were gathered using a structured questionnaire. The study sample included 575 health care providers of public and private hospitals in Shiraz. The data were gathered using a structured questionnaire in spring 2014. Data analysis was carried out using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences, version 21. Results: The most dominant attitude of the health care providers toward HIV/AIDS patients was related to fear (42.42%. According to the results of this study, there was a significant relationship between stigmatized attitude of the health care providers and their religious beliefs, society stigmatized attitude, and knowledge of transmission routes. The relationship between social stigmatized attitude of health care providers and their knowledge of transmission routes, with their willingness to provide services to patients is significant, as well (P<0.05. 39.6% and 46.2% of the respondents preferred not to provide services to the prostitutes and homosexual patients. Conclusion: Fear of contamination and social stigmatized attitude are the main impediments to dealing with patients and providing services to them. Hence, it seems that creating an effective knowledge about transmission and correcting the socio-cultural beliefs of health providers are two key strategies to tackle this problem.

  14. It Takes Two to Tango: Engaging Patients and Providers With Portals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sachin D; Liebovitz, David

    2017-05-01

    Patient portals are designed to be tools to more fully engage patients in their health care and help enable them to better manage their own health information. As the U.S. health care system rapidly adopted electronic health records (EHRs) over the past decade, many with linked patient portals, enthusiasm and expectations for this new technology as a means to engage and empower patients grew. Most patient portals have a set of core features designed to facilitate health care transactions, information tracking, and communication with care team members. The evidence supporting the anticipated benefits of patient portals on patient outcomes, however, remains mixed and incomplete. Moreover, a paradox exists in that, despite a high consumer interest in patient portals, widespread adoption remains relatively low. Potential reasons include the need for greater provider endorsement, examination and adaptation of clinical workflows, and the recognition of patient engagement as a reciprocal process. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Physician and medical psychologist: complementary approaches in providing psychological care to cancer patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulkova, V A; Pesterëva, E V

    2014-01-01

    In providing psychological care to an oncological patient a physician and a medical psychologist come from a variety of professional positions that require different approaches and methods. It is proposed a three-phase model of the dynamics of the psychological state of the person in the situation of cancer reflecting the process of psychological adaptation of a particular patient. Focusing on this model, the authors conclude that psychological care to cancer patient, performed by a doctor and a medical psychologist, are different kinds of psychological care that does not replace but complement each other.

  16. Perception of primary care doctors and nurses about care provided to sickle cell disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier Gomes, Ludmila Mourão; de Andrade Barbosa, Thiago Luis; Souza Vieira, Elen Débora; Caldeira, Antônio Prates; de Carvalho Torres, Heloísa; Viana, Marcos Borato

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the perception of primary care physicians and nurses about access to services and routine health care provided to sickle cell disease patients. Methods This descriptive exploratory study took a qualitative approach by surveying thirteen primary care health professionals who participated in a focus group to discuss access to services and assistance provided to sickle cell disease patients. The data were submitted to thematic content analysis. Results Access to primary care services and routine care for sickle cell disease patients were the categories that emerged from the analysis. Interaction between people with sickle cell disease and primary care health clinics was found to be minimal and limited mainly to scheduling appointments. Patients sought care from the primary care health clinics only in some situations, such as for pain episodes and vaccinations. The professionals noted that patients do not recognize primary care as the gateway to the system, and reported that they feel unprepared to assist sickle cell disease patients. Conclusion In the perception of these professionals, there are restrictions to accessing primary care health clinics and the primary care assistance for sickle cell disease patients is affected. PMID:26190428

  17. Narrative in interprofessional education and practice: implications for professional identity, provider-patient communication and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Phillip G

    2014-01-01

    Health and social care professionals increasingly use narrative approaches to focus on the patient and to communicate with each other. Both effective interprofessional education (IPE) and practice (IPP) require recognizing the various values and voices of different professions, how they relate to the patient's life story, and how they interact with each other at the level of the healthcare team. This article analyzes and integrates the literature on narrative to explore: self-narrative as an expression of one's professional identity; the co-creation of the patient's narrative by the professional and the patient; and the interprofessional multi-vocal narrative discourse as co-constructed by members of the healthcare team. Using a narrative approach to thinking about professional identity, provider-patient communication, and interprofessional teamwork expands our thinking about both IPE and IPP by providing new insights into the nature of professional practice based on relationships to oneself, the patient, and others on the team. How professionals define themselves, gather and present information from the patient, and communicate as members of a clinical team all have important dimensions that can be revealed by a narrative approach. Implications and conclusions for the further development of the narrative approach in IPE and IPP are offered.

  18. Perspectives of Primary Care Providers Toward Palliative Care for Their Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowels, David; Jones, Jacqueline; Nowels, Carolyn T; Matlock, Daniel

    The need for all providers to deliver basic palliative care has emerged as patients' needs outstrip the capacity of specialty palliative care. Many patients with complex illnesses have unmet needs and are seen in primary care more than other settings. We explore primary care providers' willingness and perceived capacity to provide basic palliative care, and their concerns and perceived barriers. We performed semistructured telephone interviews with 20 primary care providers about their perceptions of palliative care, including needs, practices, experiences, access, and what would be helpful for their practices to systematically provide basic palliative care. We identified 3 major themes: (1) Participants recognize palliative needs in patients with complex problems. (2) They reactively respond to those needs using practice and community resources, believing that meeting those needs at a basic level is within the scope of primary care. (3) They can identify opportunities to improve the delivery of a basic palliative approach in primary care through practice change and redesign strategies used in enhanced primary care environments. Systematic attention along the multidimensional domains of basic palliative care might allow practices to address unmet needs in patients with complex illnesses by using existing practice improvement models, strategies, and prioritization. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  19. Dentist preferences for patients: dimensions and associations with provider, practice, and service characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, David S; Spencer, A John

    2006-01-01

    Provider-patient relations may influence the nature of care provided. The aim of this study was to examine dentist preferences for patients, relate these to characteristics of dentists and practices, and to services provided. A random sample of Australian dentists completed mailed questionnaires (response = 60.3%). Four factor-based subscales and an overall scale (Selectivity) were derived from a 37-item battery. The 4 subscales comprised treatment adherence (behavior relevant to the treatment situation), personal adaptability (willingness to cooperate when expected to do so), social interactiveness (positive affect, communicativeness, and appreciativeness), and enabling characteristics (willing and able to pay, and good dental knowledge). Reliability was adequate (Cronbach's alpha = 0.71-0.90). Treatment adherence was associated with higher orthodontic rates, but a lower extraction rate; social interactiveness was associated with higher extraction and denture rates; personal adaptability was associated with higher orthodontic rates, but lower general/miscellaneous service rates; enabling characteristics was associated with higher endodontic and crown and bridge rates; selectivity was associated with higher rates of diagnostic, preventive, and total services per visit. The associations with service rates indicated that provider preferences were related to treatment behavior that could affect the mix of services, indicating that the nature of care provided may be influenced by the provider-patient relation.

  20. Healthcare Providers' Formative Experiences with Race and Black Male Patients in Urban Hospital Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisime, Marie V; Malebranche, David J; Davis, Andrea L; Taylor, Jennifer A

    2017-12-01

    We explored health providers' formative personal and professional experiences with race and Black men as a way to assess their potential influence on interactions with Black male patients. Utilizing convenience sampling with snowballing techniques, we identified healthcare providers in two urban university hospitals. We compared Black and White providers' experiences based on race and level of training. We used the Gardener's Tale to conceptualize how racism may lead to racial health disparities. A semi-structured interview guide was used to conduct in-person interviews (n = 16). Using the grounded theory approach, we conducted three types of coding to examine data patterns. We found two themes reflective of personally mediated racism: (1) perception of Black males accompanied by two subthemes (a) biased care and (b) fear and discomfort and (2) cognitive dissonance. While this latter theme is more reflective of Jones's internalized racism level, we present its results because its novelty is compelling. Perception of Black males and cognitive dissonance appear to influence providers' approaches with Black male patients. This study suggests the need to develop initiatives and curricula in health professional schools that address provider racial bias. Understanding the dynamics operating in the patient-provider encounter enhances the ability to address and reduce health disparities.

  1. Improvement in latent variable indirect response modeling of multiple categorical clinical endpoints: application to modeling of guselkumab treatment effects in psoriatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuanpu; Randazzo, Bruce; Sharma, Amarnath; Zhou, Honghui

    2017-10-01

    Exposure-response modeling plays an important role in optimizing dose and dosing regimens during clinical drug development. The modeling of multiple endpoints is made possible in part by recent progress in latent variable indirect response (IDR) modeling for ordered categorical endpoints. This manuscript aims to investigate the level of improvement achievable by jointly modeling two such endpoints in the latent variable IDR modeling framework through the sharing of model parameters. This is illustrated with an application to the exposure-response of guselkumab, a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody in clinical development that blocks IL-23. A Phase 2b study was conducted in 238 patients with psoriasis for which disease severity was assessed using Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) scores. A latent variable Type I IDR model was developed to evaluate the therapeutic effect of guselkumab dosing on 75, 90 and 100% improvement of PASI scores from baseline and PGA scores, with placebo effect empirically modeled. The results showed that the joint model is able to describe the observed data better with fewer parameters compared with the common approach of separately modeling the endpoints.

  2. Challenging obesity: Patient, provider, and expert perspectives on the roles of available and emerging nonsurgical therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apovian, Caroline M; Garvey, W Timothy; Ryan, Donna H

    2015-07-01

    Adult obesity is recognized as a chronic disease. According to principles of chronic disease management, healthcare professionals should work collaboratively with patients to determine appropriate therapeutic strategies that address overweight and obesity, specifically considering a patient's disease status in addition to their individual needs, preferences, and attitudes regarding treatment. A central role and responsibility of healthcare professionals in this process is to inform and educate patients about their treatment options. Although current recommendations for the management of adult obesity provide general guidance regarding safe and proper implementation of lifestyle, pharmacological, and surgical interventions, healthcare professionals need awareness of specific evidence-based information that supports individualized clinical application of these therapies. More specifically, healthcare professionals should be up-to-date on approaches that promote successful lifestyle management and be knowledgeable about newer weight loss pharmacotherapies, so they can offer patients with obesity a wide range of options to personalize their treatment. Accordingly, this educational activity has been developed to provide participants with the latest information on treatment recommendations and therapeutic advances in lifestyle intervention and pharmacotherapy for adult obesity management. This supplement is based on the content presented at a live CME symposium held in conjunction with ObesityWeek 2014. This supplement provides an expert summary of current treatment recommendations and recent advances in nonsurgical therapies for the management of adult obesity. Patient and provider perspectives on obesity management are highlighted in embedded video clips available via QR codes, and new evidence will be applied using clinically relevant case studies. This supplement provides a topical update of obesity management, including clinical practice examples, for healthcare

  3. Patients' perspectives on providing a stool sample to their GP: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecky, Donna M; Hawking, Meredith K D; McNulty, Cliodna A M

    2014-11-01

    Stool specimen collection is challenging and informal feedback has indicated that participants find the process difficult. Increasing stool specimen returns would improve the investigation of outbreaks of diarrhoeal and food-borne disease. To explore the barriers to stool sample collection and specimen return to ascertain which factors may help to improve the process. Qualitative patient interview study in Gloucester, UK. A two-stage purposive sampling process was used to identify patients who had either previous experience or no experience of collecting a stool sample. The interview schedule, based on the theory of planned behaviour, was used to facilitate interviews with 26 patients. Interview transcripts were analysed using a modified framework analysis. Barriers to collection included embarrassment, fear of results, concerns around hygiene and contamination, discretion and privacy, and lack of information. Personal gain was identified as the main incentive to collecting and returning a stool sample. The need for an information leaflet on stool collection was emphasised by most patients. GPs could make a number of small changes that could make a big difference for patients and potentially increase stool sample return. If they, rather than receptionists, distributed collection kits it may be easier for patients to ask any questions they had regarding collection. In addition, the provision of a stool-collection information leaflet could increase patients' confidence regarding collecting the sample, and providing drop-off boxes for specimens could help prevent patients' embarrassment regarding handing their stool over to a receptionist. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  4. Patient satisfaction with breast cancer follow-up care provided by family physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thind, Amardeep; Liu, Yihang; Maly, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Purpose There is little evidence to document patient satisfaction with follow up care provided by family physicians/general practitioners (FP/GP) to breast cancer patients. We aimed to identify determinants of satisfaction with such care in low-income medically underserved women with breast cancer. Methods Cross sectional study of 145 women who reported receiving follow up care from a FP/GP. Women were enrolled in California’s Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Program and were interviewed by phone 3 years after breast cancer diagnosis. Cleary and McNeil’s model, which states that patient satisfaction is a function of patient characteristics, structure of care, and processes of care, was used to understand the determinants of satisfaction. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify significant predictors. Results 73.4% reported that they were extremely satisfied with their treatment by the family physician/general practitioner. Women who were able to ask their family physicians questions about their breast cancer had six times greater odds of being extremely satisfied compared to women who were not able to ask any questions. Women who scored the family physician higher on the ability to explain things in a way she could understand had a higher odds of being extremely satisfied compared to women who scored their family physicians lower. Conclusions FP/GPs providing follow up care for breast cancer patients should encourage patients to ask questions, and must communicate in a way that patients understand. These recommendations are congruent with the characteristics of patient centered communication for cancer patients enunciated in a recent NCI monograph. PMID:22086814

  5. Medical travel facilitators: connecting patients and providers in a globalized world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalstrom, Matthew

    2013-04-01

    International medical travel is a rapidly developing phenomenon that promises patients cheap and affordable medical care abroad. However, the logistics of making travel arrangements, selecting a medical provider, and evaluating quality can be a daunting task for even the most experienced traveler. At the nexus, connecting patients and providers are medical travel facilitators (MTFs), who are individuals and companies that market foreign medical care to patients. While the services that MTFs offer vary, they primarily focus on making foreign medical care more accessible to patients through commodifying the medical experience and providing logistical support. Although they are an important part of international medical travel they are often overlooked, especially along the US/Mexico border. This paper contributes to the discussion on medical travel by focusing on MTFs and the methods they employ through (1) discussing the characteristics and logistical challenges of medical travel; (2) identifying the different types of medical travel facilitators; and (3) addressing how MTFs remake patients into consumers. Findings suggest that while MTFs operate on a variety of different scales, and market their services differently, they all emphasize the consumer experience through advertising quality assurances and logistical support.

  6. A method to provide integrated care for complex medically ill patients: The INTERMED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latour-Delfgaauw, C.H.M.; Huyse, F.J.; Vos, R.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2007-01-01

    A growing number of nursing subspecializations have been developed in recent decades. Topics of concern are that care is not tailored to cope with the growing number of patients with more than one chronic disease, there is an increase in co-ordination problems in the care that is provided for this

  7. A method to provide integrated care for complex medically ill patients : The INTERMED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latour, Cornelia H. M.; Huyse, Frederik J.; de Vos, Rien; Stalman, Wilhelmus A. B.

    A growing number of nursing subspecializations have been developed in recent decades. Topics of concern are that care is not tailored to cope with the growing number of patients with more than one chronic disease, there is an increase in co-ordination problems in the care that is provided for this

  8. A method to provide integrated care for complex medically ill patients: the INTERMED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latour, Cornelia H. M.; Huyse, Frederik J.; de Vos, Rien; Stalman, Wilhelmus A. B.

    2007-01-01

    A growing number of nursing subspecializations have been developed in recent decades. Topics of concern are that care is not tailored to cope with the growing number of patients with more than one chronic disease, there is an increase in co-ordination problems in the care that is provided for this

  9. Educating Healthcare Providers Regarding LGBT Patients and Health Issues: The Special Case of Physician Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, David A.; Whitehead, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Much is written about the availability of healthcare services among elements of the U.S. population, with a large proportion of the literature focusing on access. Although physical access is an overarching issue for many, educators must remember that a key factor in providing complete and competent healthcare is to understand the patient and any…

  10. Providing dental care to pregnant patients: a survey of Oregon general dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Colleen E; Milgrom, Peter; Conrad, Douglas; Lee, Rosanna Shuk Yin

    2009-02-01

    A growing number of studies and reports indicate preventive, routine and emergency dental procedures can be provided safely to pregnant patients to alleviate dental problems and promote oral health of mothers and children. In 2006 and 2007, the authors conducted a survey of 1,604 general dentists in Oregon. The survey asked dentists about their attitudes, beliefs and practices regarding dental care for pregnant patients. The authors compared the responses with 2006 guidelines from a New York State Department of Health expert panel. The response rate was 55.2 percent. Most respondents (91.7 percent) agreed that dental treatment should be part of prenatal care. Two-thirds of respondents (67.7 percent) were interested in receiving continuing dental education (CDE) regarding the care of pregnant patients. Comparisons of self-reported knowledge and practice with the aforementioned guidelines revealed several points of difference; the greatest regarded obtaining full-mouth radiographs, providing nitrous oxide, administering long-acting anesthetic injections and use of over-the-counter pain medications. Dentists need pregnancy-specific education to provide up-to-date preventive and curative care to pregnant patients. The results of the study identified specific skills and misinformation that could be addressed through CDE. Comprehensive dental care provided during pregnancy is needed to ensure the oral health of all women at risk of experiencing pregnancy-specific problems, as well as the prevention of early childhood caries.

  11. Empowering Nurses in Providing Palliative Care to Cancer Patients: Action Research Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleghani, Fariba; Shahriari, Mohsen; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2018-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as cancer would lead to various health needs in patients and their families. To meet needs, developing new educational nursing courses is necessary. Therefore this study was conducted to empower nurses through designing and conducting short-term educational courses for training palliative care nurses. This study was a community-based action research which was conducted at Isfahan hospitals that provide services for cancer patients during 2015 at four stages (planning, acting, reflection, and evaluation). Participants (33 samples) included nurses, head nurses, managers of nursing services, nursing professors and professors of oncology department. Data were gathered through individual and group interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis resulted in 3 categories of "professional development of nursing in palliative care" which included subcategories of: knowledge-based performance and positive change in attitude, "obstacles to provide palliative care" with subcategories of: insufficient professional responsibility, insufficient ability in managing some of patients' symptoms and inappropriate interaction between nurses and physicians and "strategies for improving provision of palliative care" with subcategories of: improving the interactions between physicians and nurses, continuous trainings for palliative care and the necessity of developing palliative care in the country. To facilitate the process of providing palliative care to cancer patients, necessary actions and measures must be conducted including improvement of interaction between the members of health team, organizing continuing educational courses on palliative care and development of providing palliative care all over the country by managers of health centers.

  12. [Training future nurses in providing care for patients who committed criminal acts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvest, Karina; Royer, Gilles Ripaille-Le; Dugardin, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Providing care for patients who have carried out criminal acts is a source of questioning for caregivers, who must position themselves in this specific care relationship. For three years, the nursing training institute (IFSI) in Orthez has offered students an optional module in criminology. Through discussions and critical reflection, its aim is to enable future nurses to be better prepared.

  13. Empowering nurses in providing palliative care to cancer patients: Action research study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Taleghani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic diseases such as cancer would lead to various health needs in patients and their families. To meet needs, developing new educational nursing courses is necessary. Therefore this study was conducted to empower nurses through designing and conducting short-term educational courses for training palliative care nurses. Materials and Methods: This study was a community-based action research which was conducted at Isfahan hospitals that provide services for cancer patients during 2015 at four stages (planning, acting, reflection, and evaluation. Participants (33 samples included nurses, head nurses, managers of nursing services, nursing professors and professors of oncology department. Data were gathered through individual and group interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Results: Data analysis resulted in 3 categories of "professional development of nursing in palliative care" which included subcategories of: knowledge-based performance and positive change in attitude, "obstacles to provide palliative care" with subcategories of: insufficient professional responsibility, insufficient ability in managing some of patients' symptoms and inappropriate interaction between nurses and physicians and "strategies for improving provision of palliative care" with subcategories of: improving the interactions between physicians and nurses, continuous trainings for palliative care and the necessity of developing palliative care in the country. Conclusions: To facilitate the process of providing palliative care to cancer patients, necessary actions and measures must be conducted including improvement of interaction between the members of health team, organizing continuing educational courses on palliative care and development of providing palliative care all over the country by managers of health centers.

  14. Standardized Patients Provide a Reliable Assessment of Athletic Training Students' Clinical Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kirk J.; Jarriel, Amanda J.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Providing students reliable objective feedback regarding their clinical performance is of great value for ongoing clinical skill assessment. Since a standardized patient (SP) is trained to consistently portray the case, students can be assessed and receive immediate feedback within the same clinical encounter; however, no research, to our…

  15. Consultations of health service providers amongst patients of pulmonary tuberculosis from an urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geeta S. Pardeshi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To describe the number, types and reasons of consultations amongst patients of pulmonary tuberculosis from an urban area. Settings and Design Cross sectional study was conducted amongst new patients of pulmonary tuberculosis initiated on DOTS at District Tuberculosis Centre (DTC, Yavatmal from January to June 2006. Material and Methods: The data regarding consultations were collected along a time line. The reasons for consultations were studied by in-depth interviews. Statistical analysis: Logistic regression analysis and transcripts of interviews. Results and Conclusions A total of 55 patients were studied in whom median duration between first consultation to treatment initiation was 15 days. A majority of cases (87.27% had first consulted a private practitioner. A total of 32 patients reported more than two consultations and 19 had consulted more than two private health service providers. Amongst the movements between consultations, a majority were from private to government. Only four patients had come to DTC without any prior consultation. Many patients came to government health service provider on their own when the symptomatic treatment prescribed by the private practitioners did not relieve their symptoms.

  16. Existential distress among healthcare providers caring for patients at the end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessin, Hayley; Fenn, Natalie; Hendriksen, Ellen; DeRosa, Antonio P; Applebaum, Allison

    2015-03-01

    Existential distress is well documented among patients at end of life (EOL) and increasingly recognized among informal caregivers. However, less information is known about existential concerns among healthcare providers working with patients at EOL, and the impact that such concerns may have on professionals. Recent literature documents five key existential themes for professionals working in EOL care: (1) opportunity for introspection; (2) death anxiety and potential to compromise patient care; (3) risk factors and negative impact of existential distress; (4) positive effects such as enhanced meaning and personal growth; and (5) the importance of interventions and self-care. EOL work can be taxing, yet also highly rewarding. It is critical for healthcare providers to make time for reflection and prioritize self-care in order to effectively cope with the emotional, physical, and existential demands that EOL care precipitates.

  17. Does the anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibody provide additional information in patients with thrombosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Chang-Keun; Lee, Tae Hoon; Chung, Son Mi; Kim, Seong Ho; Cho, You Sook; Yoo, Bin; Moon, Hee-Bom

    2003-01-01

    To investigate whether the anti-beta(2)-glycoprotein I (anti-beta(2)GPI) antibody may provide additional information in patients with thrombosis in conjunction with the lupus anticoagulant (LAC) or anticardiolipin (aCL) antibody. We selected 235 patients whose plasma were tested for the presence of all three antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies (LAC, aCL, and anti-beta(2)GPI) and were positive for at least one aPL antibody from January 2000 to December 2001. The LAC test was performed using dilute activated thromboplastin time reagent (dAPTT) and dilute Russell viper venom time reagent (dRVVT). ACL (IgG/IgM) and anti-beta(2)GPI (IgG/IgM) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Clinical data were collected and analysed in all patients with aPL antibody. Of the 235 patients with aPL, thrombosis was detected in 76 patients (28.0%). Of the 76 patients with thrombosis, 29 were positive for LAC, 9 for aCL, 7 for anti-beta(2)GPI, 3 for LAC+aCL, 9 for aCL+anti-beta(2)GPI, 11 for LAC+anti-beta(2)GPI, and 8 for LAC+aCL+anti-beta(2)GPI. The rate of thrombosis was significantly different (p=0.01) among single positive patients (45/163, 27.6%), double positive patients (23/60, 38.3%), and triple positive patients (8/12, 66.7%). In single positive patients, the rate of thrombosis was highest in LAC positive patients (29/85, 34.1%). In double positive patients, the LAC+anti-beta(2)GPI positive group (11/24, 45.8%) and aCL+anti-beta(2)GPI positive group (9/22, 40.9%) had higher rates of thrombosis than the LAC+aCL positive group (3/14, 21.4%). Single positivity for anti-beta(2)GPI explained 9.2% of thrombotic events in the absence of LAC or aCL. Double or triple positivity for aPLs were associated with a higher rate of thrombosis than single positivity for aPL. Our results suggest that anti-beta(2)GPI provides additional information in patients with thrombosis in conjunction with LAC or aCL.

  18. Care of the dialysis patient: Primary provider involvement and resource utilization patterns - a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Bjorg; Ramar, Priya; Hickson, LaTonya J; Reinalda, Megan S; Albright, Robert C; Tilburt, Jon C; Williams, Amy W; Takahashi, Paul Y; Jeffery, Molly M; Shah, Nilay D

    2017-10-25

    Efficient and safe delivery of care to dialysis patients is essential. Concerns have been raised regarding the ability of accountable care organizations to adequately serve this high-risk population. Little is known about primary care involvement in the care of dialysis patients. This study sought to describe the extent of primary care provider (PCP) involvement in the care of hemodialysis patients and the outcomes associated with that involvement. In a retrospective cohort study, patients accessing a Midwestern dialysis network from 2001 to 2010 linked to United States Renal Database System and with >90 days follow up were identified (n = 2985). Outpatient visits were identified using Current Procedural Terminology (CPT)-4 codes, provider specialty, and grouped into quartiles-based on proportion of PCP visits per person-year (ppy). Top and bottom quartiles represented patients with high primary care (HPC) or low primary care (LPC), respectively. Patient characteristics and health care utilization were measured and compared across patient groups. Dialysis patients had an overall average of 4.5 PCP visits ppy, ranging from 0.6 in the LPC group to 6.9 in the HPC group. HPC patients were more likely female (43.4% vs. 35.3%), older (64.0 yrs. vs. 60.0 yrs), and with more comorbidities (Charlson 7.0 vs 6.0). HPC patients had higher utilization (hospitalizations 2.2 vs. 1.8 ppy; emergency department visits 1.6 vs 1.2 ppy) and worse survival (3.9 vs 4.3 yrs) and transplant rates (16.3 vs. 31.5). PCPs are significantly involved in the care of hemodialysis patients. Patients with HPC are older, sicker, and utilize more resources than those managed primarily by nephrologists. After adjusting for confounders, there is no difference in outcomes between the groups. Further studies are needed to better understand whether there is causal impact of primary care involvement on patient survival.

  19. Harm reduction interventions in HIV care: a qualitative exploration of patient and provider perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Carlberg-Racich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. A culture of stringent drug policy, one-size-fits-all treatment approaches, and drug-related stigma has clouded clinical HIV practice in the United States. The result is a series of missed opportunities in the HIV care environment. An approach which may address the broken relationship between patient and provider is harm reduction—which removes judgment and operates at the patient’s stage of readiness. Harm reduction is not a routine part of care; rather, it exists outside clinic walls, exacerbating the divide between compassionate, stigma-free services and the medical system. Methods. Qualitative, phenomenological, semi-structured, individual interviews with patients and providers were conducted in three publicly-funded clinics in Chicago, located in areas of high HIV prevalence and drug use and serving African-American patients (N = 38. A deductive thematic analysis guided the process, including: the creation of an index code list, transcription and verification of interviews, manual coding, notation of emerging themes and refinement of code definitions, two more rounds of coding within AtlasTi, calculation of Cohen’s Kappa for interrater reliability, queries of major codes and analysis of additional common themes. Results. Thematic analysis of findings indicated that the majority of patients felt receptive to harm reduction interventions (safer injection counseling, safer stimulant use counseling, overdose prevention information, supply provision from their provider, and expressed anticipated gratitude for harm reduction information and/or supplies within the HIV care visit, although some were reluctant to talk openly about their drug use. Provider results were mixed, with more receptivity reported by advanced practice nurses, and more barriers cited by physicians. Notable barriers included: role-perceptions, limited time, inadequate training, and the patients themselves. Discussion. Patients are willing to receive harm

  20. Community Pharmacist-Provided Osteoporosis Screening and Education: Impact on Patient Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L. Brookhart

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the impact pharmacist-provided screening and education had on patient knowledge of osteoporosis and preventive strategies. Methods: A prospective, randomized, controlled study was conducted at 16 locations of a national supermarket chain pharmacy in the Richmond, Virginia area. Women 30 years and older with no history of osteoporosis were enrolled in the study. Patients self-selected into the study by agreeing to the bone density screening, pharmacist-provided education, and completion of a knowledge survey. Subjects were randomized to complete the osteoporosis-related knowledge survey either before (Group A or after (Group B the screening and education session. The survey was developed after guideline and literature evaluation and was pretested with a group of patients for content and clarity. The survey evaluated knowledge of osteoporosis, risk factors for the disease, appropriate age for testing, and preventive strategies. Groups A and B were compared using t-tests. Results: A total of 110 women were enrolled in the study. The mean (±SD age was 52.5 ± 13.1 years in Group A (n=52 and 52.7 ± 11.5 years in Group B (n=58. Knowledge scores were higher in the group who received pharmacist-provided education prior to completing the survey in each category (knowledge of the disease, risk factors, preventive strategies, and appropriate age for testing and overall (p<0.001. Conclusions: Community pharmacist-provided osteoporosis screening and education increased patient knowledge about osteoporosis and preventive strategies. Community pharmacist involvement with increasing patient knowledge may empower patients to engage in prevention strategies to improve bone mass.   Type: Original Research

  1. Do Primary Care Provider Strategies Improve Patient Participation in Colorectal Cancer Screening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Nancy N; Sutradhar, Rinku; Li, Qing; Daly, Corinne; Honein-AbouHaidar, Gladys N; Richardson, Devon P; Del Giudice, Lisa; Tinmouth, Jill; Paszat, Lawrence; Rabeneck, Linda

    2017-04-01

    Screening rates for colorectal cancer (CRC) remain suboptimal. The impact of provider strategies to enhance screening participation in the population is uncertain. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of provider strategies to increase screening in a single-payer system. A population-based survey was conducted in primary care providers (PCPs) linked to patients using administrative data in Ontario, Canada. Patients were due for CRC screening from April 2012 to March 2013. Patients were followed up until 31 March 2014. We determined time to become up-to-date with CRC screening. Cox proportional hazards models examined the association between PCP strategies and uptake of screening, adjusted for physician and patient factors. A total of 717 PCPs and their 147,834 rostered patients due for CRC screening were included. Most physicians employed strategies to enhance screening participation, including electronic medical record use, reminders, generation of lists, audit and feedback reports, or designating staff responsible for screening. No single strategy was strongly associated with screening. For those >1 year overdue, a systematic approach to generate lists of patients overdue for screening was weakly associated with screening uptake (hazard ratio (HR)=1.14, 95% CI: 1.03-1.26, P=0.04 >5 years overdue vs. <1 year overdue). The use of multiple PCP strategies was associated with screening participation (HR=1.27, 95% CI: 1.16-1.39, P<0.0001 for PCPs using 4-5 vs. 0-1 strategies). Practice-based strategies were self-reported. In practice, while individual PCP strategies have little effect, the use of multiple strategies to enhance screening appears to improve CRC screening uptake in patients.

  2. Influence of english proficiency on patient-provider communication and shared decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Anghela Z; Idrees, Jay J; Beal, Eliza W; Chen, Qinyu; Cerier, Emily; Okunrintemi, Victor; Olsen, Griffin; Sun, Steven; Cloyd, Jordan M; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2018-02-23

    The number of patients in the United States (US) who speak a language other than English is increasing. We evaluated the impact of English proficiency on self-reported patient-provider communication and shared decision-making. The 2013-2014 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey database was utilized to identify respondents who spoke a language other than English. Patient-provider communication (PPC) and shared decision-making (SDM) scores from 4-12 were categorized as "poor" (4-7), "average" (8-11), and "optimal." The relationship between PPC, SDM, and English proficiency was analyzed. Among 13,880 respondents, most were white (n = 10,281, 75%), age 18-39 (n = 6,677, 48%), male (n = 7,275, 52%), middle income (n = 4,125, 30%), and born outside of the US (n = 9,125, 65%). English proficiency was rated as "very well" (n = 7,221, 52%), "well" (n = 2,378, 17%), "not well" (n = 2,820, 20%), or "not at all" (n = 1,463, 10%). On multivariable analysis, patients who rated their English as "well" (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.37-2.18) or "not well" (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.10-2.14) were more likely to report "poor" PPC (both P English proficiency as "not well" (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.04-1.65, P = .02). Decreased English proficiency was associated with worse self-reported patient-provider communication and shared decision-making. Attention to patients' language needs is critical to patient satisfaction and improved perception of care. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Toward Optimal Decision Making among Vulnerable Patients Referred for Cardiac Surgery: A Qualitative Analysis of Patient and Provider Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainer, Ryan A; Curran, Janet; Buth, Karen J; David, Jennie G; Légaré, Jean-Francois; Hirsch, Gregory M

    2017-07-01

    Comprehension of risks, benefits, and alternative treatment options has been shown to be poor among patients referred for cardiac interventions. Patients' values and preferences are rarely explicitly sought. An increasing proportion of frail and older patients are undergoing complex cardiac surgical procedures with increased risk of both mortality and prolonged institutional care. We sought input from patients and caregivers to determine the optimal approach to decision making in this vulnerable patient population. Focus groups were held with both providers and former patients. Three focus groups were convened for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG), Valve, or CABG +Valve patients ≥ 70 y old (2-y post-op, ≤ 8-wk post-op, complicated post-op course) (n = 15). Three focus groups were convened for Intermediate Medical Care Unit (IMCU) nurses, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) nurses, surgeons, anesthesiologists and cardiac intensivists (n = 20). We used a semi-structured interview format to ask questions surrounding the informed consent process. Transcribed audio data was analyzed to develop consistent and comprehensive themes. We identified 5 main themes that influence the decision making process: educational barriers, educational facilitators, patient autonomy and perceived autonomy, patient and family expectations of care, and decision making advocates. All themes were influenced by time constraints experienced in the current consent process. Patient groups expressed a desire to receive information earlier in their care to allow time to identify personal values and preferences in developing plans for treatment. Both groups strongly supported a formal approach for shared decision making with a decisional coach to provide information and facilitate communication with the care team. Identifying the barriers and facilitators to patient and caretaker engagement in decision making is a key step in the development of a structured, patient-centered SDM approach. Intervention

  4. Healthcare providers' beliefs and attitudes about electronic cigarettes and preventive counseling for adolescent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Jessica K; McRee, Annie-Laurie; Gilkey, Melissa B

    2014-06-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are battery-powered nicotine delivery systems that may serve as a "gateway" to tobacco use by adolescents. Use of e-cigarettes by U.S. adolescents rose from 3% in 2011 to 7% in 2012. We sought to describe healthcare providers' awareness of e-cigarettes and to assess their comfort with and attitudes toward discussing e-cigarettes with adolescent patients and their parents. A statewide sample (n = 561) of Minnesota healthcare providers (46% family medicine physicians, 20% pediatricians, and 34% nurse practitioners) who treat adolescents completed an online survey in April 2013. Nearly all providers (92%) were aware of e-cigarettes, and 11% reported having treated an adolescent patient who had used them. The most frequently cited sources of information about e-cigarettes were patients, news stories, and advertisements, rather than professional sources. Providers expressed considerable concern that e-cigarettes could be a gateway to tobacco use but had moderately low levels of knowledge about and comfort discussing e-cigarettes with adolescent patients and their parents. Compared with pediatricians and nurse practitioners, family medicine physicians reported knowing more about e-cigarettes and being more comfortable discussing them with patients (both p adolescents may need to incorporate screening and counseling about e-cigarettes into routine preventive services, particularly if the prevalence of use continues to increase in this population. Education about e-cigarettes could help providers deliver comprehensive preventive services to adolescents at risk of tobacco use. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Patient-provider communication over social media: perspectives of adolescents with psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, Samuel H; Klingensmith, Katherine; McLaughlin, Paige; Qayyum, Zheala; van Schalkwyk, Gerrit I

    2016-02-01

    Social media is an increasingly dominant platform for communication, especially among adolescents. Statements from professional bodies and a growing body of empirical evidence support a role for social media in improving provider-patient interactions. In psychiatry, particular concerns exist about the suitability of this style of communication. Very limited data are available exploring how patients would like to incorporate social media into their communication with their psychiatric providers. We conducted a qualitative study with 20 adolescents attending the Yale Psychiatric Hospital Intensive Outpatient Programme. Interviews were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Participants highlighted how social media could allow for constant access to a mental health provider, provide a less anxiety-provoking mode of communication, and allow for them to be monitored in a more on-going fashion. However, participants also identified many potential risks associated with these applications, including the potential for anxiety if a provider was not able to respond immediately, and a sense that online interactions would be less rich overall. Our findings suggest that adolescents are open to the idea of communicating with mental health providers over social media and are able to describe a number of instances where this could be of value. The risks participants described, as well as concerns raised by existing literature, indicate the need for further work and protocol development in order for social media to be a feasible tool for communication between providers and adolescents with psychiatric illness. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Accuracy of indirect haemagglutination and western blot assays for the detection of anti-Schistosoma antibodies in non-severe febrile patients in two Tanzanian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Nazario; Pane, Stefania; Vairo, Francesco; Nicastri, Emanuele; Paglia, Maria G; Ame, Shaali M; Schepisi, Monica Sañé; Kitua, Andrew; Mangi, Sabina; Racalbuto, Vincenzo; Meschi, Silvia; Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2012-06-01

    The diagnosis of schistosomiasis is usually based on clinical data associated with the detection of eggs in stool, urine, and/or rectal and bladder biopsy specimens. However antibody detection can be useful to indicate Schistosoma infection in those for whom eggs cannot be demonstrated. The aim of this study was to assess the seroprevalence of schistosomiasis and to evaluate the accuracy of indirect haemagglutination (IHA) and Western blot (WB) assays for the detection of anti-Schistosoma antibodies in 2 peripheral hospitals of the United Republic of Tanzania. Between February and March 2007 blood samples were collected from 297 non-severe febrile outpatients who attended Chake Chake Hospital, Pemba Island and Tosamaganga Hospital, Iringa region in Tanzania. The samples were processed for Schistosoma antibodies by IHA and WB assays in Italy. Two hundred and sixty-two of 297 patients were schistosomiasis antibody-positive by IHA (88.2%). Of 142 patients positive by IHA, only 22 (12.4%) cases were confirmed by WB assay. The WB assay confirmed all 35 negative cases previously identified by IHA. The seroprevalence of Schistosoma at Chake Chake Hospital was lower than in Tosamaganga Hospital (9/97, 9.3% vs 13/80, 16.2%). Schistosomiasis is endemic in Tanzania, being more prevalent on the mainland than on Pemba Island. The implications of this study are of public health relevance and suggest the need for increased efforts in large-scale chemotherapy-based morbidity control programmes, integrated with those for other soil-transmitted helminthiases, in these 2 peripheral areas of the United Republic of Tanzania.

  7. Adverse Effects of Tattoos and Piercing on Parent/Patient Confidence in Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Scarlett C; Doi, Maegan L M; Yamamoto, Loren G

    2016-09-01

    First impressions based on practitioner appearance often form the basis for preliminary assumptions regarding trust, confidence, and competence, especially in situations where patients or family members do not have an established relationship with the physician. Given their growing prevalence, we strove to further investigate whether visible tattoos or piercings on a medical provider affects a patient's perception of the provider's capabilities and their trust in the care that would be provided. A survey using photographs of simulated practitioners was administered to 314 participants split between rural and urban locations. Study volunteers rated tattooed practitioners with lower confidence ratings when compared with nontattooed practitioners and reported greater degrees of discomfort with greater degrees of facial piercing. We concluded that these factors adversely affect the clinical confidence ratings of practitioners, regardless of the gender, age group, or location of participants. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Using interactive theatre to help fertility providers better understand sexual and gender minority patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasoff, Lesley A; Epstein, Rachel; Green, Datejie C; Anderson, Scott; Ross, Lori E

    2014-12-01

    To determine the effectiveness of interactive theatre as a knowledge translation and exchange (KTE) method to educate assisted human reproduction (AHR) service providers about lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ) patients. We transformed data from the 'Creating Our Families' study, a qualitative, community-based study of LGBTQ peoples' experiences accessing AHR services, into a script for an interactive theatre workshop for AHR service providers. Based on forum theatre principles, our workshop included five scenes illustrating LGBTQ people interacting with service providers, followed by audience interventions to these scenes. Before and after the workshop, service providers completed surveys to assess their knowledge and comfort concerning LGBTQ patients, as well as the modality of the interactive theatre workshop as a KTE strategy. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to determine changes in preworkshop and postworkshop knowledge and comfort scores. Thirty AHR service providers attended the workshop. Twenty-three service providers (76.7%) fully completed the preworkshop and postworkshop evaluation forms. Service providers' knowledge scores significantly improved after the workshop, while their comfort scores minimally decreased. Most agreed that the interactive workshop was an effective KTE method. In comparison with traditional forms of KTE, interactive theatre may be particularly effective in engaging service providers and addressing their attitudes towards marginalised patient populations. Although the evaluation results of our interactive workshop were mostly positive, the long-term impact of the workshop is unknown. Long-term evaluations are needed to determine the effectiveness of arts-based KTE efforts. Other considerations for developing effective arts-based KTE strategies include adequate funding, institutional support, attention to power dynamics and thoughtful collaboration with forum theatre experts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  9. Coping of health care providers with the death of a patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Mlinšek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available RQ: With an aging population, health care professionals are often faced with the death of a patient in acute hospitals. The experience of dying patients’ to health care professionals and to the health care system brings many challenges that need to be faced.Purpose: The present study was to determine how health care providers are faced with the death of a patient, what is the care needed for the dying patient and how to participate in interdisciplinary team care of among themselves and family members of dying patients.Method: We conducted a small-scale quantitative survey of nursing care in a Slovenian acute hospital. To analyze the results, we used frequency statistics and Pearson's correlation coefficient.Results: Health care providers need additional skills needed to care for a dying patient as well as to the family of the dying patient.They try to control distress of the dying experience reasonably and less with conversation. The effect on the loss of a patient affects work experience, but we did not notice any other effects. Theinvolvement of an interdisciplinary team in the care of the dying patient is satisfactory; family members are under-involved in the care.Organization: Health organizations that are more focused on acute treatment have to become aware of palliative care that needs to be included in nursing care as an integral process of care for the terminally ill. Health care staff need to communicate more with one another and go through additional training.Society: Attitudes to death in a broader cultural environment also affects the attitude of health workers towards death. Involvement of the social environment, especially family members, is very important.Originality: The survey was conducted on the basis of comparing two surveys.Limitations: The survey was conducted on a small sample size.

  10. Provider communication and patient understanding of life-limiting illness and their relationship to patient communication of treatment preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Glenn J; Riopelle, Deborah; Steckart, Jillisa; Lorenz, Karl A; Rosenfeld, Kenneth E

    2010-03-01

    Medical decision making in the context of serious illness ideally involves a patient who understands his or her condition and prognosis and can effectively formulate and communicate his or her care preferences. To understand the relationships among these care processes, we analyzed baseline interview data from veterans enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of a palliative care intervention. Participants were 400 inpatient veterans admitted with a physician-estimated risk of one-year mortality more than 25%; 260 (65%) had cancer as the primary diagnosis. Patients who believed that they had a life-limiting illness (89% of sample) reported that their provider had communicated this to them more frequently than those who did not share that belief (78% vs. 22%, Pcommunication with patients regarding prognosis. Because functional decline may prompt physicians to discuss prognosis with patients, patients with relatively preserved function may particularly need such communication. (c) 2010 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnosis of Pregnancy and Providing Options Counseling for the Adolescent Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Laurie L

    2017-09-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement "Options Counseling for the Pregnant Adolescent Patient" recommends the basic content of the pediatrician's counseling for an adolescent facing a new diagnosis of pregnancy. However, options counseling is just one aspect of what may be one of the more challenging scenarios in the pediatric office. Pediatricians must remain alert to the possibility of pregnancy among their adolescent female patients. When discovering symptoms suggestive of pregnancy, pediatricians must obtain a relevant history, perform diagnostic testing and properly interpret the results, and understand the significance of the results from the patient perspective and reveal them to the patient in a sensitive manner. If the patient is indeed pregnant, the pediatrician, in addition to providing comprehensive options counseling, may need to help recruit adult support for the patient and should offer continued assistance to the adolescent and her family after the office visit. All pediatricians should be aware of the legal aspects of adolescent reproductive care and the resources for pregnant adolescents in their communities. This clinical report presents a more comprehensive view of the evaluation and management of pregnancy in the adolescent patient and a context for options counseling. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Challenging Obesity: Patient, Provider, and Expert Perspectives on the Roles of Available and Emerging Nonsurgical Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apovian, Caroline M.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Ryan, Donna H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adult obesity is recognized as a chronic disease. According to principles of chronic disease management, healthcare professionals should work collaboratively with patients to determine appropriate therapeutic strategies that address overweight and obesity, specifically considering a patient’s disease status in addition to their individual needs, preferences, and attitudes regarding treatment. A central role and responsibility of healthcare professionals in this process is to inform and educate patients about their treatment options. Although current recommendations for the management of adult obesity provide general guidance regarding safe and proper implementation of lifestyle, pharmacological, and surgical interventions, healthcare professionals need awareness of specific evidence-based information that supports individualized clinical application of these therapies. More specifically, healthcare professionals should be up-to-date on approaches that promote successful lifestyle management and be knowledgeable about newer weight loss pharmacotherapies, so they can offer patients with obesity a wide range of options to personalize their treatment. Accordingly, this educational activity has been developed to provide participants with the latest information on treatment recommendations and therapeutic advances in lifestyle intervention and pharmacotherapy for adult obesity management. Design and Methods This supplement is based on the content presented at a live CME symposium held in conjunction with ObesityWeek 2014. Results This supplement provides an expert summary of current treatment recommendations and recent advances in nonsurgical therapies for the management of adult obesity. Patient and provider perspectives on obesity management are highlighted in embedded video clips available via QR codes, and new evidence will be applied using clinically relevant case studies. Conclusions This supplement provides a topical update of obesity management

  13. Understanding recurrent readmission after major surgery among patients with employer-provided health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yuhree; Ejaz, Aslam; Xu, Li; Gani, Faiz; Canner, Joseph K; Schneider, Eric B; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2016-08-01

    Most studies on readmission only report data on first readmission within 30 days. These data may underestimate the true impact of readmission, as recurrent readmissions are common among patients undergoing major surgery. We therefore sought to define characteristics and readmission patterns of patients recurrently readmitted after major surgery. A total of 81,769 patients discharged after 10 major surgical procedures (coronary artery bypass graft, abdominal aortic aneurysm, carotid endarterectomy, aortic valve replacement, esophagectomy, gastrectomy, pancreatectomy, pulmonary resection, hepatectomy, and colorectal resection) between 2010 and 2012 were identified from a large employer-provided health plan. Maximum number of unplanned readmissions experienced within 365 days of discharge was measured. Median patient age was 55 years, and a slight majority (55.4%) was male. Comorbidities were common as 36.9% had a Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) of ≥2. Median length of stay was 5 (interquartile range, 3 and 8) days. Among 24,344 (29.8%) patients who experienced readmission, 64.0% experienced 1 readmission, whereas 36.0% experienced recurrent readmissions within 365 day of a prior discharge. Compared with patients experiencing 1 readmission, patients with ≥2 readmissions were more likely to be female (47.3% vs 44.2%) and have more comorbidities (Charlson comorbidity index ≥2, 49.5% vs 42.5%; both P < .001). Complications during the index hospitalization were more common among patients experiencing recurrent readmissions (35.5% vs 30.7%, P < .001). Although median length of stay during index hospitalization was longer among patients with recurrent readmissions (6 vs 7 days), median time to first readmission was shorter (97 vs 40 days, both P < .001). Among study cohort, 4.5% experienced 3 or more readmissions; these patients accounted for 14.8% of all admissions and 13.7% of hospital charges for the study cohort during the entire follow-up period. Among

  14. Are internet sites providing evidence-based information for patients suffering with Trigeminal Neuralgia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetriades, Andreas K; Alg, Varinder Singh; Hardwidge, Carl

    2014-05-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia has a variety of treatments with variable efficacy. Sufferers present to a spectrum of disciplines. While traditional delivery of medical information has been by oral/printed communication, up to 50-80% patients access the internet for information. Confusion, therefore, may arise when seeking treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. We evaluated the quality of information on the internet for trigeminal neuralgia using the DISCERN© instrument. Only 54% websites had clear objectives; 42% delivered on these. A total of 71% provided relevant information on trigeminal neuralgia, 54% being biased/unbalanced; 71% not providing clear sources of information. No website detailed the side-effect profile of treatments; 79% did not inform patients of the consequences/natural history if no treatment was undertaken; it was unclear if patients could anticipate symptoms settling or when treatment would be indicated. Internet information on trigeminal neuralgia is of variable quality; 83% of sites assessed were of low-to-moderate quality, 29% having 'serious shortcomings.' Only two sites scored highly, only one being in the top 10 search results. Websites on trigeminal neuralgia need to appreciate areas highlighted in the DISCERN© instrument, in order to provide balanced, reliable, evidence-based information. To advise patients who may be misguided from such sources, neurosurgeons should be aware of the quality of information on the internet.

  15. 'Quality signposting': the role of online information prescription in providing patient information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, Liz; Sen, Barbara

    2011-03-01

      Information prescriptions (IPs) are part of a Department of Health (DH) initiative to improve patient care. IPs aim to meet health information needs by providing personalised, high quality patient information about conditions and treatment.   This paper identifies current online IP provision and evaluates a sample of IP websites against the original DH aims of IP provision; British Medical Association usability criteria; and information seeking vignettes.   Five UK and one international IP website were randomly selected as a sample. Two checklists designed to appraise the websites were used to review each IP provider. Two patient information seeking vignettes were developed to enable the websites to be assessed from a patient-centred perspective.   Information prescriptions currently vary in content, accessibility and quality. National IP websites score more highly than local IP websites, which are often weak on content for specific conditions and poorly designed but strong on signposting to local services.   Guidelines for IP provision need to be improved to ensure higher quality, more easily accessible information is available. A synthesis of expertise included in national and local websites would improve usability for patients. IP websites should conform to standards of web design and accessibility. © 2010 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2010 Health Libraries Group.

  16. Little congruence between health care provider and patient perceptions of counselling on gestational weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutsiv, Olha; Bracken, Keyna; Pullenayegum, Eleanor; Sword, Wendy; Taylor, Valerie H; McDonald, Sarah D

    2012-06-01

    To determine the self-reported counselling practices of health care providers with regard to prenatal weight gain and the risks of inappropriate gain. We conducted a cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire at obstetrician, midwifery, and family medicine clinics in Hamilton, Ontario. Health care providers were eligible to participate if they provided prenatal care and could read English sufficiently well to complete the survey. Forty-two health care providers completed the survey; of these, 95% reported counselling women to gain a specific amount of weight, and 81% reported that they recommended values that were in accordance with the 2009 Institute of Medicine/Health Canada guidelines. The risks of excess and inadequate gain were reported as being discussed with their patients by 87% and 76% of health care providers, respectively. In this first study to the best of our knowledge of gestational weight gain counselling since the publication of the 2009 guidelines, most health care providers reported discussing weight gain and the risks of inappropriate gain, which is incongruent with previously published information on their patients' reports of counselling.

  17. Differences in referral and use of complementary and alternative medicine between pediatric providers and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Brooke N; Vincent, Nicole; Fortier, Michelle A

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this study was to compare pediatric complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use and pediatric health care provider CAM referral as well as identify predictors of use and referral. Surveys were administered to 283 parents/caregivers of pediatric patients and 200 pediatric health care providers (HCP). This study took place at the Children's Hospital of Orange County (CHOC Children's) in Orange, CA. Caregivers and HCP were provided a list of 32 CAM interventions and asked to indicate which treatments their child had ever used or which they would consider using for their child and which treatments they had ever referred or which they would consider referring, respectively. The main outcome variables were the number and type of CAM therapies endorsed by participants. Providers referred the majority of CAM therapies significantly more often than patients used each therapy and more often than caregivers would consider each therapy for their child. In addition, children from families with higher incomes, whose parents were older and had more education, who were White, and whose primary language spoken at home was English were more likely to use CAM therapies, all p'spediatric patients needs to be explored. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Providing cell phone numbers and email addresses to Patients: the physician's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Roni; Avdalimov, Angelika; Freud, Tamar

    2011-03-23

    The provision of cell phone numbers and email addresses enhances the accessibility of medical consultations, but can add to the burden of physicians' routine clinical practice and affect their free time. The objective was to assess the attitudes of physicians to providing their telephone number or email address to patients. Primary care physicians in the southern region of Israel completed a structured questionnaire that related to the study objective. The study population included 120 primary care physicians with a mean age of 41.2 ± 8.5, 88 of them women (73.3%). Physicians preferred to provide their cell phone number rather than their email address (P = 0.0007). They preferred to answer their cell phones only during the daytime and at predetermined times, but would answer email most hours of the day, including weekends and holidays (P = 0.001). More physicians (79.7%) would have preferred allotted time for email communication than allotted time for cell phone communication (50%). However, they felt that email communication was more likely to lead to miscommunication than telephone calls (P = 0.0001). There were no differences between male and female physicians on the provision of cell phone numbers or email addresses to patients. Older physicians were more prepared to provide cell phone numbers that younger ones (P = 0.039). The attitude of participating physicians was to provide their cell phone number or email address to some of their patients, but most of them preferred to give out their cell phone number.

  19. Travelling abroad for aesthetic surgery: Informing healthcare practitioners and providers while improving patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevan, R; Birch, J; Armstrong, A P

    2011-02-01

    Travelling abroad for surgery is a phenomenon reported internationally. It is particularly likely for aesthetic procedures not undertaken routinely by national health services. We assessed the impact of these patients presenting to the UK National Health Service (NHS) with concerns or complications on their return. All 326 UK consultant members of the British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS) were asked to complete a short questionnaire about patients that had presented to the NHS with complications or concerns following surgery abroad. The results were subsequently presented to the Department of Health (DH). 203 (62%) UK consultant plastic surgeons responded. 76 (37%) of the 203 respondents had seen such patients in their NHS practice, most commonly following breast or abdominal procedures. A quarter underwent emergency surgery, a third out-patient treatment and a third elective surgical revision. In response to these findings, the DH clarified that NHS teams should provide emergency care to such patients but should not undertake any elective revision procedures. Travelling abroad for aesthetic surgery may reduce its cost. However, aesthetic procedures have high minor complication rates, and peri-operative travel is associated with increased risks. Fully informed consent is unlikely when patients do not meet their surgeon prior to paying and travelling for surgery, and national health services are used to provide a free safety net on their return. To help minimise the potential risks, BAPRAS has clarified the responsibilities of the NHS and is acting to better inform UK patients considering travelling abroad. Copyright © 2010 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel combined patient instruction and discharge summary tool improves timeliness of documentation and outpatient provider satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Meredith; Krein, Sarah L; Belanger, Karen; Fowler, Karen E; Dimcheff, Derek E; Solomon, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Incomplete or delayed access to discharge information by outpatient providers and patients contributes to discontinuity of care and poor outcomes. Objective: To evaluate the effect of a new electronic discharge summary tool on the timeliness of documentation and communication with outpatient providers. Methods: In June 2012, we implemented an electronic discharge summary tool at our 145-bed university-affiliated Veterans Affairs hospital. The tool facilitates completion of a comprehensive discharge summary note that is available for patients and outpatient medical providers at the time of hospital discharge. Discharge summary note availability, outpatient provider satisfaction, and time between the decision to discharge a patient and discharge note completion were all evaluated before and after implementation of the tool. Results: The percentage of discharge summary notes completed by the time of first post-discharge clinical contact improved from 43% in February 2012 to 100% in September 2012 and was maintained at 100% in 2014. A survey of 22 outpatient providers showed that 90% preferred the new summary and 86% found it comprehensive. Despite increasing required documentation, the time required to discharge a patient, from physician decision to discharge note completion, improved from 5.6 h in 2010 to 4.1 h in 2012 (p = 0.04), and to 2.8 h in 2015 (p discharge summary tool improved the timeliness and comprehensiveness of discharge information as needed for the delivery of appropriate, high-quality follow-up care, without adversely affecting the efficiency of the discharge process. PMID:28491308

  1. Adult Spasticity International Registry Study: methodology and baseline patient, healthcare provider, and caregiver characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard E. Francisco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The main aim of this study was to determine the utilization patterns and effectiveness of onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox® for treatment of spasticity in clinical practice. Design: An international, multicentre, prospective, observational study at selected sites in North America, Europe, and Asia. Patients: Adult patients with newly diagnosed or established focal spasticity, including those who had previously received treatment with onabotulinum-toxin A. Methods: Patients were treated with onabotulinumtoxinA, approximately every 12 weeks, according to their physician’s usual clinical practice over a period of up to 96 weeks, with a final follow-up interview at 108 weeks. Patient, physician and caregiver data were collected. Results: Baseline characteristics are reported. Of the 745 patients enrolled by 75 healthcare providers from 54 sites, 474 patients had previously received onabotulinumtoxinA treatment for spasticity. Lower limb spasticity was more common than upper limb spasticity, with stroke the most common underlying aetiology. The Short-Form 12 (SF-12 health survey scores showed that patients’ spasticity had a greater perceived impact on physical rather than mental aspects. Conclusion: The data collected in this study will guide the development of administration strategies to optimize the effectiveness of onabotulinumtoxinA in the management of spasticity of various underlying aetiologies.

  2. Providing written information increases patient satisfaction: a web-based questionnaire survey of Japanese cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hitomi; Katsumata, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Miyako

    2017-07-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the United States recommends that all cancer survivors be provided with a survivorship care plan (SCP), which includes a patient treatment summary and a follow-up care plan. However, SCPs have not been widely adopted in Japan. To provide basic data necessary for implementing SCPs in Japan, we aimed to investigate the forms of clinical and survivorship-related information that Japanese cancer survivors receive from their healthcare providers, and to examine whether written information increases their satisfaction. We performed a cross-sectional online survey of cancer survivors who underwent acute cancer treatment and had at least one follow-up with a physician in the past year. Cancer survivors provided the elements and forms (verbally and/or written) of information they received, as well as the degree of satisfaction with the information provided. Responses were obtained from 545 cancer survivors. Information elements such as surgical procedure (98.3%), surgical outcome (98.1%), and names of administered chemotherapy agents (97.8%) were commonly provided, whereas mental care resources and providers (29.7%), effects on marital relationship and sexual health (35.7%), and effects on fertility (43.4%) were less common. A large proportion of cancer survivors received verbal information only. For 18 of 20 elements, except for effects on fertility and duration of hormonal therapy, satisfaction was significantly higher when both forms of information were provided (P information can better meet the needs of Japanese cancer survivors.

  3. Hospice providers' key approaches to support informal caregivers in managing medications for patients in private residences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Denys T; Joyce, Brian; Clayman, Marla L; Dy, Sydney; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Emanuel, Linda; Hauser, Joshua; Paice, Judith; Shega, Joseph W

    2012-06-01

    Managing and administering medications to relieve pain and symptoms are common, important responsibilities for informal caregivers of patients receiving end-of-life care at home. However, little is known about how hospice providers prepare and support caregivers with medication-related tasks. This qualitative study explores the key approaches that hospice providers use to facilitate medication management for caregivers. Semistructured, open-ended interviews were conducted with 22 providers (14 nurses, four physicians, and four social workers) from four hospice organizations around an urban setting in the midwestern U.S. Based on the interviews, the following five key approaches emerged, constituting how the hospice team collectively helped caregivers manage medications: 1) establishing trust; 2) providing information; 3) promoting self-confidence; 4) offering relief (e.g., provided in-home medication assistance, mobilized supportive resources, and simplified prescriptions); and 5) assessing understanding and performance. Each hospice discipline used multiple approaches. Nurses emphasized tailoring information to individual caregivers and patients, providing in-home assistance to help relieve caregivers, and assessing caregivers' understanding and performance of medication management during home visits. Physicians simplified medication prescriptions to alleviate burden and reassured caregivers using their perceived medical authority. Social workers facilitated medication management by providing emotional support to promote self-confidence and mobilizing resources in caregivers' support networks and the community at large. Hospice nurses, physicians, and social workers identified distinct, yet overlapping, approaches in aiding caregivers with medication management. These findings emphasize the importance of interdisciplinary teamwork among hospice providers. Future research should investigate how common, standardized, effective, and efficient these approaches are in

  4. The Role of Primary Care Providers in Encouraging Older Patients to Change Their Lifestyle Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardach, Shoshana H; Schoenberg, Nancy E

    2017-09-08

    This study sought to identify older patients' perceptions of primary care providers' influence on their likelihood of improving diet and physical activity. 104 adults ages 65 and older were interviewed immediately following a routine primary care visit about their plans and motivations for behavior change and how their clinic visit would influence their likelihood of making lifestyle changes. All interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using a constant comparison approach. Participants reported that their providers influence their health behaviors by developing strong relationships, addressing concerns and encouraging change, and providing concrete instruction. When providers did not discuss diet or physical activity, or mentioned these topics only briefly, participants often perceived the message that they should continue their current behaviors. Whether and how diet and physical activity are discussed in primary care influences the likelihood that older adults will make changes in these behaviors. These findings highlight the need for a patient-centered counseling approach and caution providers to think twice before omitting discussion of the need for lifestyle change.

  5. Measuring value at the provider level in the management of cleft lip and palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Megan M; Rosen, Heather; Kupfer, Philipp; Meara, John G

    2014-03-01

    "Value" has become a buzzword in current health-care discussions. This study demonstrates a provider-led strategy to measuring costs, an understudied component of the value equation, for a complex diagnosis for the purposes of improvement. A retrospective, microcosting methodology was used to measure costs for all hospital and physician services and costs to the patient over 18 months of multidisciplinary care for patients with cleft lip and palate. Short-term outcomes were also recorded. Overall costs to all parts of the system ranged from $35,826 to $56,611 for different subtypes, and insight was gained into major cost drivers and variations in care that will drive internal improvement efforts. It is critical that providers learn to work together and become familiar with their own costs in conjunction with outcomes as insurers increase pressure to reduce payments or accept alternative payments so that well-informed decisions can be made.

  6. Approaches based on behavioral economics could help nudge patients and providers toward lower health spending growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Dominic; Greaves, Felix; Vlaev, Ivo; Darzi, Ara

    2013-04-01

    Policies that change the environment or context in which decisions are made and "nudge" people toward particular choices have been relatively ignored in health care. This article examines the role that approaches based on behavioral economics could play in "nudging" providers and patients in ways that could slow health care spending growth. The basic insight of behavioral economics is that behavior is guided by the very fallible human brain and greatly influenced by the environment or context in which choices are made. In policy arenas such as pensions and personal savings, approaches based on behavioral economics have provided notable results. In health care, such approaches have been used successfully but in limited ways, as in the use of surgical checklists that have increased patient safety and reduced costs. With health care spending climbing at unsustainable rates, we review the role that approaches based on behavioral economics could play in offering policy makers a potential set of new tools to slow spending growth.

  7. Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems: An Ethical Leadership Dilemma to Satisfy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Llewellyn E; Tallman, Erin

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the parameters and the dynamics of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) that create an ethical leadership dilemma to satisfy patients in the hospital setting while still ensuring appropriate care for quality clinical outcomes. Under the Affordable Care Act, hospitals and health care systems are in a high-stakes struggle of winners and losers based on HCAHPS scores. This high-stakes struggle creates unintended consequences of an ethical dilemma of doing what is right for the patient versus doing whatever it takes to please the patient in order to achieve high scores of satisfaction that are tied to better reimbursements. This article also reports the results of a national survey of 500 chief executive officers by the authors about the attitudes and frustrations of chief executive officers confronting the wild unrest caused by HCAHPS.

  8. Comparing the risk identification and management behaviors between oral health providers for patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efurd, Mitzi G; Bray, Kimberly Krust; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando; Williams, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Evidence supporting the link between periodontal disease and systemic disease continues to grow. To date, little is known about how dental professionals incorporate this information into managing diabetic patients. This study examines the risk identification and practice behaviors regarding diabetic patients among dentists, hygienists and specialists. Responses were received from 383 currently practicing oral health professionals in Arkansas. The electronic survey consisted of 35 open and closed-ended or Likert-type items. Principal components factor analysis using varimax rotation was used to explore underlying dimensions of the questionnaire in order to provide a more parsimonious view of the outcomes. Logistic models were fitted to determine best practice outcome as a function of knowledge and professional and social norms. Neither knowledge about diabetes (pdental hygienist. Results indicate oral health professionals in Arkansas need to improve the treatment and management of patients with diabetes and periodontal disease.

  9. From cradle to commencement: transitioning pediatric sickle cell disease patients to adult providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulton, Donna M

    2010-01-01

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are surviving past childhood and well into adulthood. Concerns are raised as to who is going to care for these children as they reach adulthood. We have developed a 2-part transition program. We have transitioned 20 of our 18- to 27-year-old patients to adult providers recognizing that early preparation is essential. At the newborn's initial visit or transfer from another clinic the transition program is explained to the family. At age 13 years, all our patients are given a "Preparation for Transition" binder. This binder is reviewed in detail with the patient and parent on a regular basis. At 18 years of age, coordinating with the milestone of graduating from high school and depending on developmental age, the transition is completed. The goal is a continuum of care in the transition process.

  10. Perceptions of Provider Communication Among Vulnerable Patients With Diabetes: Influences of Medical Mistrust and Health Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard O; Chakkalakal, Rosette J; Presley, Caroline A; Bian, Aihua; Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Wallston, Kenneth A; Barto, Shari; Kripalani, Sunil; Rothman, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Patient-provider communication is modifiable and is linked to diabetes outcomes. The association of communication quality with medical mistrust is unknown. We examined these factors within the context of a low-literacy/numeracy-focused intervention to improve diabetes care, using baseline data from diverse patients enrolled in a randomized trial of a health communication intervention. Demographics, measures of health communication (Communication Assessment Tool [CAT], Interpersonal Processes of Care survey [IPC-18]), health literacy (Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults), depression, medical mistrust, and glycemic control were ascertained. Adjusted proportional odds models were used to test the association of mistrust with patient-reported communication quality. The interaction effect of health literacy on mistrust and communication quality was also assessed. A total of 410 patients were analyzed. High levels of mistrust were observed. In multivariable modeling, patients with higher mistrust had lower adjusted odds of reporting a higher CAT score (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.52, 0.86], p = .003) and higher scores on the Communication (AOR = 0.69, 95% CI [0.55, 0.88], p = .008), Decided Together (AOR = 0.74, 95% CI [0.59, 0.93], p = .02), and Interpersonal Style (AOR = 0.69, 95% CI [0.53, 0.90], p = .015) subscales of the IPC-18. We observed evidence of an interaction effect of health literacy for the association between mistrust and the Decided Together subscale of the IPC-18 such that patients with higher mistrust and lower literacy perceived worse communication relative to mistrustful patients with higher literacy. In conclusion, medical mistrust was associated with poorer communication with providers in this public health setting. Patients' health literacy level may vary the effect of mistrust on interactional aspects of communication. Providers should consider the impact of mistrust on communication

  11. Perceived quality in a dementia unit: patients' caregivers as information providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Picazo, J J; de Dios Cánovas-García, J; Antúnez, C; Marín, J; Antequera, M M; Vivancos, L; Martínez, B; Legaz, A; Navarro, D; Leal, M

    2016-10-22

    Dementia units (DU) provide comprehensive and specialised care to patients with dementia. However, assessment in these units normally focuses on patient management. The aim of this study was to determine satisfaction of the caregivers of patients managed in a DU and how they rated DU care. We created a self-administered questionnaire which was completed by 236 caregivers visiting the DU in 2015. The questionnaire included 6 dimensions (accessibility, organisation, professionalism, relationship with staff, information, and facilities); data were analysed using problem rates. A total of 53.4% caregivers completed the questionnaire; most were women, patients' spouses, or first-degree relatives. The overall problem rates was 15.0% (95% CI, 13.9-16.1), with sizeable differences between dimensions: from 0.1% (95% CI, 0.0-0.4) for 'relationship with staff' and 'professionalism' to 49.3% (95% CI, 45.4-53.2) for 'information'. Waiting times over 30minutes were perceived as excessive. Information problems were not directly related to patient management. Satisfaction was scored 8.29/10 (median 8; SD 1.45); 77.3% (95% CI, 69.8-74.8) of respondents were highly satisfied. Ninety-nine percent of the caregivers stated that they would recommend the DU. This questionnaire provides interesting data on care quality as perceived by patients' caregivers. Our results have allowed us to identify problems and implement corrective actions. Our questionnaire has proved to be a useful tool for evaluating and improving care quality in DUs. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Patient satisfaction with inpatient care provided by the Sydney Gynecological Oncology Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Arora

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Vivek Arora, Shannon Philp, Kathryn Nattress, Selvan Pather, Christopher Dalrymple, Kenneth Atkinson, Sofia Smirnova, Stephen Cotterell, Jonathan CarterSydney Gynecological Oncology Group, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, AustraliaPurpose: Patient satisfaction with the provision of hospital oncology services can have a significant impact on their overall treatment experience.Aims: To assess patient satisfaction with the inpatient hospital services in the gynecological oncology setting using the IN-PATSAT32 questionnaire developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC.Methods: A modified version of the IN-PATSAT32 questionnaire with additional 16 items was administered to 52 adult surgical inpatients admitted with the Sydney Gynecological Oncology Group. All participants were provided with an information leaflet regarding the survey and written consent obtained.Results: A high response rate (100% from patients with varied social, ethnic, and educational backgrounds confirmed the acceptability of the survey. Standard of medical care provided, frequency of doctors’ visits, exchange of information with doctors, friendliness of the staff, and state of the room ranked highly (>95% on the patient satisfaction scales. Problems were identified with ease of access to and within the hospital, quality of food, and exchange of information with other hospital staff.Conclusions: Overall the satisfaction with inpatient care was rated very highly in most areas. Deficiencies in certain elements of provision of medical care to the patients were identified and steps have been taken to improve upon these shortcomings.Keywords: patient satisfaction, EORTC, IN-PATSAT32, gynecological oncology, survey

  13. Providing palliative care to patients with cancer: Addressing the needs in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pam Malloy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is the third highest cause of death in Kenya, preceded by infectious and cardiovascular diseases, and in most cases, diagnosed in later stages. Nurses are the primary caregivers, assessing and managing these patients in the clinic, in inpatient settings, and in rural and remote communities. While cancer rates remain high, the burden to the patient, the caregiver, and society as a whole continues to rise. Kenya's poverty complicates cancer even further. Many Kenyans are unaware of cancer's signs and symptoms, and limited diagnostic and treatment centers are available. Despite these barriers, there is still hope and help for those in Kenya, who suffer from cancer. The World Health Organization has stated that palliative care is a basic human right and nurses providing this care in Kenya are making efforts to support cancer patients' ongoing needs, in order to promote compassionate palliative care and prevent suffering. The purpose of this paper is to address the palliative care needs of patients with cancer in Kenya by providing education to nurses and influencing health-care policy and education at micro and macro levels. A case study weaved throughout will highlight these issues.

  14. The acceptability of humor between palliative care patients and health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Julia; Dance, Derry; Pare, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Humor frequently occurs in palliative care environments; however, the acceptability of humor, particularly between patients and health care providers has not been previously examined. To explore the importance and acceptability of humor to participants who are patients in a palliative care context, the study determines if demographics are correlated with the degree of acceptability, and examines the acceptance of humor by patients with advanced illness when interacting with nurses or physicians. One hundred participants admitted to a palliative care unit or residential hospice were surveyed. Basic demographic data were collected, as well as responses on a five-point Likert scale to a variety of questions regarding the participants' attitudes about humor before and after their illness and the acceptability of humor in a palliative setting. Participants were also given the opportunity to comment freely on the topic of humor and the palliative experience. A large majority of participants valued humor highly both prior to (77%) and during (76%) their illness experience. Despite this valuation, the frequency of laughter in their daily lives diminished significantly as patients' illness progressed. Most participants remembered laughing with a nurse (87%) and a doctor (67%) in the week prior to the survey, and found humor with their doctors (75%) and nurses appropriate (88%). The vast majority of participants found humorous interactions with their health care providers acceptable and appropriate, and this may indicate a opportunity for enhanced and more effective end-of-life care in the future.

  15. Patients' reported reasons for non-use of an internet-based patient-provider communication service: qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsi, Cecilie; Gammon, Deede; Wibe, Torunn; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2013-11-11

    The adoption of Internet-based patient-provider communication services (IPPC) in health care has been slow. Patients want electronic communication, and the quality of health care can be improved by offering such IPPCs. However, the rate of enrollment in such services remains low, and the reasons for this are unclear. Knowledge about the barriers to use is valuable during implementation of IPPCs in the health care services, and it can help timing, targeting, and tailoring IPPCs to different groups of patients. The goal of our study was to investigate patients' views of an IPPC that they could use from home to pose questions to nurses and physicians at their treatment facility, and their reported reasons for non-use of the service. This qualitative study was based on individual interviews with 22 patients who signed up for, but did not use, the IPPC. Patients appreciated the availability and the possibility of using the IPPC as needed, even if they did not use it. Their reported reasons for not using the IPPC fell into three main categories: (1) they felt that they did not need the IPPC and had sufficient access to information elsewhere, (2) they preferred other types of communication such as telephone or face-to-face contact, or (3) they were hindered by IPPC attributes such as login problems. Patients were satisfied with having the opportunity to send messages to health care providers through an IPPC, even if they did not use the service. IPPCs should be offered to the patients at an appropriate time in the illness trajectory, both when they need the service and when they are receptive to information about the service. A live demonstration of the IPPC at the point of enrollment might have increased its use. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00971139; http://clinicaltrial.gov/ct2/show/NCT00971139 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6KlOiYJrW).

  16. Provider Perception of Pharmacy Services in the Patient-Centered Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Nicole P; Pignato, Alyssa M; Monte, Scott V

    2017-12-01

    Despite the positive data on clinical outcomes, cost savings, and provider experience, no study has surveyed providers to evaluate what pharmacy services they find to be worthwhile. To determine what clinical, cost/access, and educational pharmacy services providers in a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) consider worthwhile and the perceived barriers to successful pharmacist incorporation. A cross-sectional online survey was distributed to primary care physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants in a PCMH physician group. The survey response rate was 78%. Top-tier clinical services were identified as medication counseling, reconciliation, adherence assessment, polypharmacy assessment, and drug information. Formulary review was the only top-tier cost- or access-related service. Top-tier educational services included new black-boxed warnings, drug market withdrawals, and new drug reviews. Ninety-one percent of providers were comfortable referring to a pharmacist for diabetes medication selection and dose titration, but no other disease state eclipsed 75%. More than twice as many providers found the pharmacy service to be very or extremely valuable when the pharmacist is physically located in the office versus virtual interactions (70% vs 34%). Top-tier clinical, cost/access, and educational services considered worthwhile by providers in a PCMH have been identified. In addition to these services, when developing or evaluating a pharmacy service, special attention should be paid to provider preference for physical location in the office and perceived barriers to the pharmacist availability, concern over complex disease management competency and patient confusion as to the role of the pharmacist.

  17. Patient and referring health care provider satisfaction with a physiotherapy spinal triage assessment service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, Brenna; Janzen, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate participant and referring care provider satisfaction associated with a spinal triage assessment service delivered by physiotherapists in collaboration with orthopedic surgeons. People with low back-related complaints were recruited from those referred to a spinal triage assessment program delivered by physiotherapists. Measures of patient and provider satisfaction were completed at approximately 4 weeks after the assessment. The satisfaction surveys were analyzed quantitatively with descriptive statistics and qualitatively with an inductive thematic approach of open and axial coding. A total of 108/115 participants completed the posttest satisfaction survey. Sixty-six percent of participants were "very satisfied" with the service and 55% were "very satisfied" with the recommendations that were made. Only 18% of referring care providers completed the satisfaction survey and 90.5% of those were "very satisfied" with the recommendations. Sixty-one participants and 14 care providers provided comments which revealed a diverse range of themes which were coded into positive (ie, understanding the problem, communication, customer service, efficiency, and management direction), negative (ie, lack of detail, time to follow-up, cost) and neutral related to the triage service, and an "other" category unrelated to the service (ie, chronic symptoms, comorbidities, and limited access to health care.) The quantitative results of the participant survey demonstrated very high levels of satisfaction with the service and slightly less satisfaction with the recommendations that were made. Satisfaction of referring care providers with the recommendations and report was also high, but given the low response rate, these results should be interpreted with caution. Qualitative analysis of participant and provider comments revealed a diverse range of themes. These other issues may be important contextual factors that have the potential to impact patient relevant outcomes.

  18. Pulmonary rehabilitation and COPD: providing patients a good environment for optimizing therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corhay JL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Louis Corhay, Delphine Nguyen Dang, Hélène Van Cauwenberge, Renaud Louis Department of Pneumology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire du Sart-Tilman Liège, Liège, Belgium Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is an obstructive and progressive airway disease associated with an important reduction in daily physical activity and psychological problems that contribute to the patient's disability and poor health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Nowadays, pulmonary rehabilitation (PR plays an essential role in the management of symptomatic patients with COPD, by breaking the vicious circle of dyspnea–decreased activity–deconditioning–isolation. Indeed the main benefits of comprehensive PR programs for patients with COPD include a decrease in symptoms (dyspnea and fatigue, improvements in exercise tolerance and HRQoL, reduction of health care utilization (particularly bed-days, as well as an increase in physical activity. Several randomized studies and meta-analyses greatly established the benefits of PR, which additionally, is recommended in a number of influential guidelines. This review aimed to highlight the impact of PR on COPD patients, focusing on the clinical usefulness of PR, which provides patients a good support for change. Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, exercise training, physical activity, quality of life

  19. Oncology and Palliative Medicine: Providing Comprehensive Care for Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Laura; Green, Alva Roche; Malhotra, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Despite the evidence for the fundamental need for palliative medicine services in the practice of oncology, integration of these medical specialties remains a clinical challenge. We reviewed the current literature regarding the practice of palliative medicine in the field of oncology, examining randomized clinical trials of palliative medicine services in advanced cancer, models of palliative medicine delivery, studies of cost effectiveness, and national palliative medicine practice and referral guidelines. In this review, we describe the role of palliative medicine in oncology, including the timing of palliative medicine consultation, models of care delivery, and improvements in patient outcomes. Randomized controlled trials and national guidelines support early referral of patients with cancer to palliative medicine. Palliative medicine has a fundamental role in symptom management, distress relief, family and caregiver support, and advance care planning. Integration of palliative medicine in oncology improves patient outcomes and decreases healthcare costs. Early involvement of palliative medicine after the cancer diagnosis is supported by national guidelines, but barriers include variable referral patterns among oncologists and the need for an expanded palliative medicine workforce. Palliative medicine has a wide-ranging role in the spectrum of comprehensive cancer care-from patient diagnosis to survivorship. The entire multidisciplinary care team has a role in providing palliative care in inpatient and outpatient settings. An effective palliative medicine and oncology collaboration improves patient care and quality of life, has broad research and guideline support, and is cost effective.

  20. Enhancing patient-provider communication for long-term post-stroke spasticity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnerhagen, K S; Francisco, G E

    2013-11-01

    Stroke is a major public health concern, with estimated 16 million people worldwide experiencing first-time strokes each year, a number that is expected to rise. Two-thirds of those experiencing a stroke are younger than 70 years of age. Stroke is a leading cause of disability in adults as a result of major sequelae that include spasticity, cognitive impairment, paresis, and depression. Disabling spasticity, defined as spasticity severe enough to require intervention, occurs in 4% of stroke survivors within 1 year of first-time stroke. The aim of this report is to focus instead on a discussion of patient-provider communication, and its role in post-stroke spasticity (PSS) rehabilitation within the context of patient-centered health care. A discussion based on a review of the literature, mainly since 2000. Problems within communication are identified and suggestion to enhance communication are proposed thus improving patient-centered goal setting/goal achievement for the effective management of spasticity rehabilitation. These are as follows: (i) involving family members, (ii) educating patients and family members on stroke and rehabilitation, and (iii) establishing a common definition for long-term goals. Increased communication among physicians, patients, and payers may bridge some of the gaps and increase the effectiveness of PSS rehabilitation and management. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Internet use and e-mail communications between patients and providers: a survey of rheumatology outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siva, Chokkalingam; Smarr, Karen L; Hanson, Kathleen Donovan; Parikh, Meghal; Lawlor, Kenneth; Ge, Bin

    2008-12-01

    As health care costs rise in the United States and elsewhere, adopting health information technology is being advocated to reduce costs and improve efficiency. Physician e-mail communication is a frequently proposed tool in this strategy. We examined the interest of rheumatology outpatients in using E-mail for communication with their rheumatologist. We sought to identify their privacy and cost concerns on this issue, and examine the patients' demographics, internet usage, and preferences. An anonymous survey was given to 150 consecutive patients. Patients responded to questions on demographics, rheumatic diseases, comorbidities, computer/internet access, E-mail use, privacy concerns, payment issues, and preferences regarding communication with their rheumatologist. Statistical analyses on the relationships between demographics and patient preferences on communications with their rheumatologist were conducted. There were 145 respondents; the mean age was 52.3 years, mean education level was 13.6 years. The sample tended to be women (74%), retired/disabled (46%) or employed full time (35%). Most had internet access (74.5%). Differences were found based on gender, age, education, and income levels. Younger adults were more likely to desire E-mail communication with their rheumatologists, especially if paid by insurance. More men than women had concerns about privacy; persons with higher income levels were more willing to self-pay for E-mail. As a significant number of patients with rheumatic diseases express interest in E-mail communication with their providers, rheumatologists need to be cognizant of patients' preferences. To deliver patient-centered care, rheumatology practices might consider incorporating E-mail communication into their practices.

  2. Sympathetic Blocks Provided Sustained Pain Relief in a Patient with Refractory Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic nervous system has been implicated in pain associated with painful diabetic neuropathy. However, therapeutic intervention targeted at the sympathetic nervous system has not been established. We thus tested the hypothesis that sympathetic nerve blocks significantly reduce pain in a patient with painful diabetic neuropathy who has failed multiple pharmacological treatments. The diagnosis of small fiber sensory neuropathy was based on clinical presentations and confirmed by skin biopsies. A series of 9 lumbar sympathetic blocks over a 26-month period provided sustained pain relief in his legs. Additional thoracic paravertebral blocks further provided control of the pain in the trunk which can occasionally be seen in severe diabetic neuropathy cases, consequent to extensive involvement of the intercostal nerves. These blocks provided sustained and significant pain relief and improvement of quality of life over a period of more than two years. We thus provided the first clinical evidence supporting the notion that sympathetic nervous system plays a critical role in painful diabetic neuropathy and sympathetic blocks can be an effective management modality of painful diabetic neuropathy. We concluded that the sympathetic nervous system is a valuable therapeutic target of pharmacological and interventional modalities of treatments in painful diabetic neuropathy patients.

  3. Using Press Ganey Provider Feedback to Improve Patient Satisfaction: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newgard, Craig D; Fu, Rongwei; Heilman, James; Tanski, Mary; John Ma, O; Lines, Alan; Keith French, L

    2017-09-01

    The objective was to conduct a pilot randomized controlled trial to assess the feasibility, logistics, and potential effect of monthly provider funnel plot feedback reports from Press Ganey data and semiannual face-to-face coaching sessions to improve patient satisfaction scores. This was a pilot randomized controlled trial of 25 emergency medicine faculty providers in one urban academic emergency department. We enrolled full-time clinical faculty with at least 12 months of baseline Press Ganey data, who anticipated working in the ED for at least 12 additional months. Providers were randomized into intervention or control groups in a 1:1 ratio. The intervention group had an initial 20-minute meeting to introduce the funnel plot feedback tool and standardized feedback based on their baseline Press Ganey scores and then received a monthly e-mail with their individualized funnel plot depicting cumulative Press Ganey scores (compared to their baseline score and the mean score of all providers) for 12 months. The primary outcome was the difference in Press Ganey "doctor-overall" scores between treatment groups at 12 months. We used a weighted analysis of covariance model to analyze the study groups, accounting for variation in the number of surveys by provider and baseline scores. Of 36 eligible faculty, we enrolled 25 providers, 13 of whom were randomized to the intervention group and 12 to the control group. During the study period, there were 815 Press Ganey surveys returned, ranging from four to 71 surveys per provider. For the standardized overall doctor score over 12 months (primary outcome), there was no difference between the intervention and control groups (difference = 1.3 points, 95% confidence interval = -2.4 to 5.9, p = 0.47). Similarly, there was no difference between groups when evaluating the four categories of doctor-specific patient satisfaction scores from the Press Ganey survey (all p > 0.05). In this pilot trial of monthly provider funnel plot

  4. Providing reviews of evidence to COPD patients: qualitative study of barriers and facilitating factors to patient-mediated practice change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Melanie; Wildgoose, Deborah; Veale, Antony J; Smith, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to identify barriers and facilitating factors to people with COPD performing the following actions: (a) reading a manual that contained summaries of evidence on treatments used in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and (b) at a medical consultation, asking questions that were provided in the manual and were designed to prompt doctors to review current treatments in the light of evidence. The manual was developed using current best practice and was designed to facilitate reading and discussion with doctors. In-depth interviews were held with patients who had received the manual. Of 125 intervention participants from a controlled clinical trial of the manual, 16 were interviewed in their homes in and around Adelaide, South Australia. Plain language writing and a simple layout facilitated reading of the manual by participants. Where the content matched the interests of participants this also facilitated reading. On the other hand, some participants showed limited interest in the evidence summaries. Participant comments indicated that they did not see it as possible or acceptable for patients to master research evidence or initiate discussions of evidence with doctors. These appeared to be the main barriers to effectiveness of the manual. If evidence summaries for patients are to be used in disease management, they should be understandable and relevant to patients and provide a basis for discussion between patients and doctors. Work is now needed so that we can both present evidence summaries in a way that is relevant to patients and reduce the barriers to patient-initiated discussions of evidence.

  5. Patient Experience Of Provider Refusal Of Medicaid Coverage And Its Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Neeraj; Shi, Yunfeng; Jung, Kyoungrae

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies show that many physicians do not accept new patients with Medicaid coverage, but no study has examined Medicaid enrollees' actual experience of provider refusal of their coverage and its implications. Using the 2012 National Health Interview Survey, we estimate provider refusal of health insurance coverage reported by 23,992 adults with continuous coverage for the past 12 months. We find that among Medicaid enrollees, 6.73% reported their coverage being refused by a provider in 2012, a rate higher than that in Medicare and private insurance by 4.07 (p<.01) and 3.68 (p<.001) percentage points, respectively. Refusal of Medicaid coverage is associated with delaying needed care, using emergency room (ER) as a usual source of care, and perceiving current coverage as worse than last year. In view of the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) Medicaid expansion, future studies should continue monitoring enrollees' experience of coverage refusal.

  6. eHealth patient-provider communication in the United States: interest, inequalities, and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Kiara K; Salemi, Jason L; Salihu, Hamisu M; Zoorob, Roger J

    2017-04-01

    Health-related Internet use and eHealth technologies, including online patient-provider communication (PPC), are continually being integrated into health care environments. This study aimed to describe sociodemographic and health- and Internet-related correlates that influence adult patients' interest in and electronic exchange of medical information with health care providers in the United States. Nationally representative cross-sectional data from the 2014 Health Information National Trends Survey ( N  = 3677) were analyzed. Descriptive statistics and multivariable regression analyses were performed to examine associations between patient-level characteristics and online PPC behavior and interests. Most respondents were Internet users (82.8%), and 61.5% of information seekers designated the Internet as their first source for health information. Younger respondents (Internet users (odds ratio, OR = 2.87, 95% CI, 1.35-6.08), college graduates (OR = 2.92, 95% CI, 1.42-5.99), and those with frequent provider visits (OR = 1.94, 95% CI, 1.02-3.71) had a higher likelihood of online PPC via email or fax, while Hispanics and those from higher-income households were 2-3 times more likely to communicate via text messaging or phone/mobile apps. Patients' interest in and display of online PPC-related behaviors vary by age, race/ethnicity, education, income, Internet access/behaviors, and information type. These findings can inform efforts aimed at improving the use and adoption of eHealth technologies, which may contribute to a reduction in communication inequalities and health care disparities.

  7. Self-fill oxygen technology: benefits for patients, healthcare providers and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphie, Phyllis; Hex, Nick; Setters, Jo; Little, Stuart

    2016-06-01

    "Non-delivery" home oxygen technologies that allow self-filling of ambulatory oxygen cylinders are emerging. They can offer a relatively unlimited supply of ambulatory oxygen in suitably assessed people who require long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT), providing they can use these systems safely and effectively. This allows users to be self-sufficient and facilitates longer periods of time away from home. The evolution and evidence base of this technology is reported with the experience of a national service review in Scotland (UK). Given that domiciliary oxygen services represent a significant cost to healthcare providers globally, these systems offer potential cost savings, are appealing to remote and rural regions due to the avoidance of cylinder delivery and have additional lower environmental impact due to reduced fossil fuel consumption and subsequently reduced carbon emissions. Evidence is emerging that self-fill/non-delivery oxygen systems can meet the ambulatory oxygen needs of many patients using LTOT and can have a positive impact on quality of life, increase time spent away from home and offer significant financial savings to healthcare providers. Provide update for oxygen prescribers on options for home oxygen provision.Provide update on the evidence base for available self-fill oxygen technologies.Provide and update for healthcare commissioners on the potential cost-effective and environmental benefits of increased utilisation of self-fill oxygen systems.

  8. Providing cell phone numbers and email addresses to Patients: the physician's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freud Tamar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The provision of cell phone numbers and email addresses enhances the accessibility of medical consultations, but can add to the burden of physicians' routine clinical practice and affect their free time. The objective was to assess the attitudes of physicians to providing their telephone number or email address to patients. Methods Primary care physicians in the southern region of Israel completed a structured questionnaire that related to the study objective. Results The study population included 120 primary care physicians with a mean age of 41.2 ± 8.5, 88 of them women (73.3%. Physicians preferred to provide their cell phone number rather than their email address (P = 0.0007. They preferred to answer their cell phones only during the daytime and at predetermined times, but would answer email most hours of the day, including weekends and holidays (P = 0.001. More physicians (79.7% would have preferred allotted time for email communication than allotted time for cell phone communication (50%. However, they felt that email communication was more likely to lead to miscommunication than telephone calls (P = 0.0001. There were no differences between male and female physicians on the provision of cell phone numbers or email addresses to patients. Older physicians were more prepared to provide cell phone numbers that younger ones (P = 0.039. Conclusions The attitude of participating physicians was to provide their cell phone number or email address to some of their patients, but most of them preferred to give out their cell phone number.

  9. Does Provider Self-Reporting of Etiquette Behaviors Improve Patient Experience? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Zishan; Qayyum, Rehan; Bertram, Amanda; Durkin, Nowella; Kebede, Sosena; Ponor, Lucia; Oduyebo, Ibironke; Allen, Lisa; Brotman, Daniel J

    2017-06-01

    There is a glaring lack of published evidence-based strategies to improve the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) patient experience scores on the physician domain. Strategies that have been used are resource intensive and difficult to sustain. We hypothesized that prompting providers to assess their own etiquette-based practices every 2 weeks over the course of 1 year would improve patient experience on the physician domain. Randomized controlled trial. 4 acute care hospitals. Hospitalists. Hospitalists were randomized to the study or the control arm. The study arm was prompted every 2 weeks for 12 months to report how frequently they engaged in 7 best-practice bedside etiquette behaviors. Control arm participants received similarly worded questions on quality improvement behaviors. Provider experience scores were calculated from the physician HCAHPS and Press Ganey survey provider items. Physicians reported high rates of etiquette-based behavior at baseline, and this changed modestly over the study period. Self-reported etiquette behaviors were not associated with experience scores. The difference in difference analysis of the baseline and postintervention physician experience scores between the intervention arm and the control arm was not statistically significant (P = 0.71). In this 12-month study, biweekly reflection and reporting of best-practice bedside etiquette behaviors did not result in significant improvement on physician domain experience scores. It is likely that hospitalists' self-assessment of their bedside etiquette may not reflect patient perception of these behaviors. Furthermore, hospitalists may be resistant to improvement in this area since they rate themselves highly at baseline. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2017;12:402-406.

  10. Prescription errors related to the use of computerized provider order-entry system for pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhanout, Kamel; Bun, Sok-Siya; Retornaz, Karine; Chiche, Laurent; Colombini, Nathalie

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the nature and frequency of medication errors resulting from the use of a computerized provider order-entry (CPOE) system in a pediatric department. We conducted a retrospective study to examine errors related to computerized orders using the software Pharma® (Computer Engineering, France) in pediatric department between 31/05/2015 to 01/12/2015. These errors were signaled by pharmacists who examine CPOEs daily. A total of 302 pharmacist interventions (PharmInt) were carried out by clinical pharmacists during the study period. Of the 302 PharmInts, a total of 95 (31.5%) contained no data on the patient's bodyweight, which should have been provided by the prescriber (Table 1). After the PharmInt, information on bodyweight was then provided in 47 of these cases (15.6%). Incomplete information about administration frequency accounted for 19.9% of total PharmInts. Prescribing an excessive dose occurred in 17.6% of PharmInts, inappropriate modifications of prescription unit accounted for 9.9% of PharmInts, and incorrect dosage was prescribed in 8.3% of PharmInts. Of the 302 PharmInts, 255 concerned prescription errors and bodyweight missing not provided after PharmInt. Paracetamol, in its different forms (injectable, solid or liquid oral forms) accounted for 35.7% of total PharmInts. Noted errors for paracetamol included an incorrect dosage form, co-administration of two paracetamol-containing drugs, modification of the prescription unit, incorrect frequency of administrations, and absence of the patient's bodyweight. Inconsistent use of a contradicted or a non-used drug for pediatric patients was noted along with prescriptions for inadequate dosages. Our work revealed several error types in prescribing for pediatric patients, mainly absence of bodyweight, incorrect frequency of administration and excessive doses. Information on bodyweight is crucial in pediatric patients: our study highlights the need to make it mandatory to complete prescriptions via CPOE

  11. Indirect estimators in US federal programs

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    In 1991, a subcommittee of the Federal Committee on Statistical Methodology met to document the use of indirect estimators - that is, estimators which use data drawn from a domain or time different from the domain or time for which an estimate is required. This volume comprises the eight reports which describe the use of indirect estimators and they are based on case studies from a variety of federal programs. As a result, many researchers will find this book provides a valuable survey of how indirect estimators are used in practice and which addresses some of the pitfalls of these methods.

  12. What do patients think about the role of optometrists in providing advice about smoking and nutrition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, Laura E; Douglass, Amanda; Guest, Daryl; Keller, Peter R

    2017-03-01

    Tobacco smoking and nutrition are key lifestyle factors with long-term effects on eye health. However, little is known about patients' perceptions and experiences in these areas in relation to the care received from optometrists. The main aim was to survey patients' perceptions and prior experience regarding the role of optometrists in enquiring and providing advice about tobacco smoking and nutrition. An anonymous, paper-based survey was distributed to a convenience sample of 225 adults attending the University of Melbourne eye care clinic. Respondents provided demographic and other information (age, sex, length of time since last eye examination, country of most recent eye examination, smoking status and intake of nutritional supplements) and indicated their level of agreement (using a five-step Likert scale) with a series of statements relating to the care provided by optometrists in the areas of health, smoking and nutrition. The statements were designed to assess the perceived scope of practice of optometrists and the extent to which patients expect, and feel comfortable, discussing these issues with their optometrist. 220 completed surveys were returned. Most respondents (>80%) agreed that they visit their optometrist to quantify their refractive error and to examine their eye health. About two-thirds of respondents indicated that they expect their optometrist to ask about their general health, with almost half expecting their optometrist to communicate with their general medical practitioner. Approximately one-third of respondents indicated having been routinely questioned about their smoking status, diet and nutritional supplement intake by their optometrist. This was despite about half expecting their optometrist to question them about these factors and almost three out of four respondents indicating that they felt comfortable talking with their optometrist about these lifestyle behaviours. This study provides novel insight into patients' perceptions and

  13. Comparing the performance of English mental health providers in achieving patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Valerie; Jacobs, Rowena

    2015-09-01

    Evidence on provider payment systems that incorporate patient outcomes is limited for mental health care. In England, funding for mental health care services is changing to a prospective payment system with a future objective of linking some part of provider payment to outcomes. This research examines performance of mental health providers offering hospital and community services, in order to investigate if some are delivering better outcomes. Outcomes are measured using the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) - a clinician-rated routine outcome measure (CROM) mandated for national use. We use data from the Mental Health Minimum Data Set (MHMDS) - a dataset on specialist mental health care with national coverage - for the years 2011/12 and 2012/13 with a final estimation sample of 305,960 observations with follow-up HoNOS scores. A hierarchical ordered probit model is used and outcomes are risk adjusted with independent variables reflecting demographic, need, severity and social indicators. A hierarchical linear model is also estimated with the follow-up total HoNOS score as the dependent variable and the baseline total HoNOS score included as a risk-adjuster. Provider performance is captured by a random effect that is quantified using Empirical Bayes methods. We find that worse outcomes are associated with severity and better outcomes with older age and social support. After adjusting outcomes for various risk factors, variations in performance are still evident across providers. This suggests that if the intention to link some element of provider payment to outcomes becomes a reality, some providers may gain financially whilst others may lose. The paper contributes to the limited literature on risk adjustment of outcomes and performance assessment of providers in mental health in the context of prospective activity-based payment systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Information Expensiveness Perceived by Vietnamese Patients with Respect to Healthcare Provider's Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan-Hoang, Vuong

    2016-10-01

    Patients have to acquire information to support their decision on choosing a suitable healthcare provider. But in developing countries like Vietnam, accessibility issues remain an obstacle, thus adversely affect both quality and costliness of healthcare information. Vietnamese use both sources from health professionals and friends/relatives, especially when quality of the Internet-based cheaper sources appear to be still questionable. The search of information from both professionals and friends/relatives incurs some cost, which can be viewed as low or high depending low or high accessibility to the sources. These views potentially affect their choices. To investigate the effects that medical/health services information on perceived expensiveness of patients' labor costs. Two related objectives are a) establishing empirical relations between accessibility to sources and expensiveness; and, b) probabilistic trends of probabilities for perceived expensiveness. There is evidence for established relations among the variables "Convexp" and "Convrel" (all p's information sources (experts and friends/relatives) have influence on patients perception of information expensiveness. The use of experts source tends to increase the probability of perceived expensiveness. a) Probabilistic trends show Vietnamese patients have propensity to value healthcare information highly and do not see it as "expensive"; b) The majority of Vietnamese households still take non-professional advices at their own risks; c) There is more for the public healthcare information system to do to reduce costliness and risk of information. The Internet-based health service users communities cannot replace this system.

  15. Impact of video technology on efficiency of pharmacist-provided anticoagulation counseling and patient comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sarah J; Blair, Elizabeth A; Steeb, David R; Reed, Brent N; Hull, J Heyward; Rodgers, Jo Ellen

    2015-06-01

    Discharge anticoagulation counseling is important for ensuring patient comprehension and optimizing clinical outcomes. As pharmacy resources become increasingly limited, the impact of informational videos on the counseling process becomes more relevant. To evaluate differences in pharmacist time spent counseling and patient comprehension (measured by the Oral Anticoagulation Knowledge [OAK] test) between informational videos and traditional face-to-face (oral) counseling. This prospective, open, parallel-group study at an academic medical center randomized 40 individuals-17 warfarin-naïve ("New Start") and 23 with prior warfarin use ("Restart")-to receive warfarin discharge education by video or face-to-face counseling. "Teach-back" questions were used in both groups. Although overall pharmacist time was reduced in the video counseling group (P counseling method (P = 0.012) suggests the difference between counseling methods was smaller in New Start participants. Following adjustment, mean total time was reduced 8.71 (95% CI = 5.15-12.26) minutes (adjusted P counseling. Postcounseling OAK test scores did not differ. Age, gender, socioeconomic status, and years of education were not predictive of total time or OAK test score. Use of informational videos coupled with teach-back questions significantly reduced pharmacist time spent on anticoagulation counseling without compromising short-term patient comprehension, primarily in patients with prior warfarin use. Study results demonstrate that video technology provides an efficient method of anticoagulation counseling while achieving similar comprehension. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Indirect MR arthrography: optimization and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahlensieck, M; Peterfy, C G; Wischer, T; Sommer, T; Lang, P; Schlippert, U; Genant, H K; Schild, H H

    1996-07-01

    To evaluate and optimize a method for producing magnetic resonance (MR) images similar to MR arthrograms of multiple synovial joints with intravenous gadopentetate dimeglumine injection. The authors examined the effects of joint motion, dose of gadopentetate dimeglumine (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mmol/kg), and fat saturation on the enhancement rate of the joint cavity and the degree of image contrast generated among articular structures on MR images in 14 healthy volunteers. Shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle joints of 10 volunteers were imaged with optimized parameters. Indirect MR arthrographic findings in 17 patients with joint disorders (eg, rotator-cuff tears, meniscal tears, and osteoarthritis) were compared with arthroscopic findings. Fat-saturated images obtained after 10 minutes of exercise and administration of 0.1 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine were similar to those obtained after intraarticular injection of contrast medium. Exercising the joint yielded the strongest joint-cavity enhancement. Increasing the dose of contrast medium in the unexercised joint did not statistically significantly improve the contrast-to-noise ratio. Rotator cuff tears, meniscal tears, and cartilage defects were better delineated with this method than with unenhanced MR imaging and showed good correlation with arthroscopic results. Indirect MR arthrography of an exercised joint provides homogeneous enhancement and improved delineation of soft-tissue structures.

  17. Disparities in collaborative patient-provider communication about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Jennifer L; Gilkey, Melissa B; Rimer, Barbara K; Brewer, Noel T

    2016-06-02

    Healthcare providers may vary their communications with different patients, which could give rise to differences in vaccination coverage. We examined demographic disparities in parental report of collaborative provider communication and implications for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. Participants were 4,124 parents who completed the National Immunization Survey-Teen about daughters ages 13-17. We analyzed disparities in collaborative communication (mutual information exchange, deliberation, and decision) and whether they mediated the relationship between demographic characteristics and HPV vaccine initiation. Half of parents (53%) in the survey reported collaborative communication. Poor, less educated, Spanish-speaking, Southern, and rural parents, and parents of non-privately insured and Hispanic adolescents, were least likely to report collaborative communication (all pcommunication accounted for geographic variation in HPV vaccination, specifically, the higher rates of uptake in the Northeast versus the South (mediation z=2.31, pcommunication showed widespread disparities, being least common among underserved groups. Collaborative communication helped account for differences-and lack of differences-in HPV vaccination among some subgroups of adolescent girls. Leveraging patient-provider communication, especially for underserved demographic groups, could improve HPV vaccination coverage.

  18. Providing a harmonious smile with laminate veneers for a patient with peg-shaped lateral incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberton, Simone Beatriz; Alberton, Victória; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Varella

    2017-01-01

    The most common discrepancy concerning tooth size is the presence of peg-shaped lateral incisors, which can cause teeth with reduced size, anterior diastema, and consequently an unpleasant smile. The development of the adhesive dentistry and ceramic veneers allowed all ceramic-bonded restorations to become an esthetic and functional approach to reestablish the smile harmony. The purpose of this clinical report is to describe a conservative treatment approach to recover an esthetic disharmony caused by bilateral peg-shaped lateral incisors. A 30-year-old female patient was seeking treatment to solve an esthetic disharmony of her smile. Lithium disilicate veneers were planned and build-up with the help of diagnostic models, wax-up, mock-up, and silicone guides, to restore the morphology, size, function, and esthetic of upper lateral incisors and smile. The lithium disilicate veneers were able to provide the harmonization of the patient's smile, recovering the teeth size, shape, and anatomic characteristics.

  19. Educational and therapeutic behavioral approaches to providing dental care for patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Travis M; Sheller, Barbara; Friedman, Clive S; Bernier, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a condition which most dentists will encounter in their practices. Contemporary educational and behavioral approaches may facilitate successful dental care. A literature review was conducted for relevant information on dental care for children with ASD. Educational principles used for children with ASD can be applied in the dental setting. Examples include: parent involvement in identifying strengths, sensitivities, and goal setting; using stories or video modeling in advance of the appointment; dividing dental treatment into sequential components; and modification of the environment to minimize sensory triggers. Patients with ASD are more capable of tolerating procedures that they are familiar with, and therefore should be exposed to new environments and stimuli in small incremental steps. By taking time to understand children with ASD as individuals and employing principles of learning, clinicians can provide high quality dental care for the majority of patients with ASD. © 2014 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Providing a harmonious smile with laminate veneers for a patient with peg-shaped lateral incisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberton, Simone Beatriz; Alberton, Victória; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Varella

    2017-01-01

    The most common discrepancy concerning tooth size is the presence of peg-shaped lateral incisors, which can cause teeth with reduced size, anterior diastema, and consequently an unpleasant smile. The development of the adhesive dentistry and ceramic veneers allowed all ceramic-bonded restorations to become an esthetic and functional approach to reestablish the smile harmony. The purpose of this clinical report is to describe a conservative treatment approach to recover an esthetic disharmony caused by bilateral peg-shaped lateral incisors. A 30-year-old female patient was seeking treatment to solve an esthetic disharmony of her smile. Lithium disilicate veneers were planned and build-up with the help of diagnostic models, wax-up, mock-up, and silicone guides, to restore the morphology, size, function, and esthetic of upper lateral incisors and smile. The lithium disilicate veneers were able to provide the harmonization of the patient's smile, recovering the teeth size, shape, and anatomic characteristics. PMID:29279628

  1. Primary Health Care Providers' Perspectives: Facilitating Older Patients' Access to Community Support Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeg, Jenny; Denton, Margaret; Hutchison, Brian; McAiney, Carrie; Moore, Ainsley; Brazil, Kevin; Tindale, Joseph; Wu, Amina; Lam, Annie

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study examined in this article was to understand how non-physician health care professionals working in Canadian primary health care settings facilitate older persons' access to community support services (CSSs). The use of CSSs has positive impacts for clients, yet they are underused from lack of awareness. Using a qualitative description approach, we interviewed 20 health care professionals from various disciplines and primary health care models about the processes they use to link older patients to CSSs. Participants collaborated extensively with interprofessional colleagues within and outside their organizations to find relevant CSSs. They actively engaged patients and families in making these linkages and ensured follow-up. It was troubling to find that they relied on out-of-date resources and inefficient search strategies to find CSSs. Our findings can be used to develop resources and approaches to better support primary health care providers in linking older adults to relevant CSSs.

  2. Trends in Provider Management of Patients with Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhawt, Matthew; Bird, J Andrew; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna H

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) is a non-IgE-mediated food allergy. To better understand provider-level variation in FPIES knowledge and management. A 23-question online survey was administered to AAAAI members during the spring and summer of 2014. Among 470 respondents, 64% reported "full understanding" of FPIES diagnosis/management; 78.8% reported managing 1 or more patient with FPIES; and 80.4% correctly identified an FPIES case vignette. FPIES was correctly differentiated from infantile colic or food protein-induced allergic proctocolitis by 82.5% and 71.3%, respectively. Among providers currently managing patients with FPIES, 47.5% indicated soy formula, 73.8% breast milk, and 94.5% elemental formula as appropriate substitutes in cow milk (CM)-FPIES. Skin testing is performed by 73.4%; 62.2% obtain serum food-specific IgE testing, 12.7% patch testing, 36.8% oral challenge, and 28% perform no tests. Eighty-four percent provide patients with FPIES with allergy action plans, 72.8% provide a personalized action plan, and 21% prescribe epinephrine autoinjectors. Odds of prescribing epinephrine were lower among those reporting "full understanding" of FPIES (odds ratio [OR], 0.41; 95% CI, 0.21-0.79). Academic providers had higher odds of providing an action plan (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.17-4.98) and performing diagnostic oral food challenge (OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.99-3.25), but not of correct vignette differentiation of FPIES from other conditions, correct identification of appropriate CM-FPIES substitutes, or timing for food reintroduction. More years in practice were associated with lower odds of reporting full understanding of FPIES diagnosis/management (OR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94-0.99). Nearly one-third of respondents reported poor familiarity with FPIES. Considerable variation exists in the use of diagnostic tests, management, and choice of "safe" nutrition, indicating a strong need for FPIES practice guidelines. Copyright © 2017. Published by

  3. Indirect Control and Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesarino Bertini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine who has the power within a stock corporate company can be a quite complex problem, especially when control is achieved through alliances between shareholders. This problem arises especially in cases of indirect control of corporations, that is, in situations involving shareholders and companies with cross-shareholdings. The first to solve the problem of measuring power in the case of indirect share control were Gianfranco Gambarelli and Guillermo Owen in [10]. In the following years, numerous other models were introduced. In this paper, we critically examine the models of: Gambarelli and Owen, Denti and Prati, Crama and Leruth, Karos and Peters, as well as Mercik and Lobos, taking into account two well-known, illustrative examples, one with an acyclic corporate structure and the other with a cyclic structure. (original abstract

  4. Perception and Practice Among Emergency Medicine Health Care Providers Regarding Discharging Patients After Opioid Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmaitis, Ryan M; Amaducci, Alexandra; Henry, Kathryn; Jong, Michael; Kiernan, Emily A; Kincaid, Hope; Houck, Lindsay J; Sabbatini, Sandra J; Greenberg, Marna Rayl; Katz, Kenneth D

    2018-01-19

    This study aimed to determine the current attitudes, perceptions, and practices of emergency medicine providers and nurses (RNs) regarding the discharge of adult patients from the emergency department (ED) after administration of opioid analgesics. A cross-sectional survey was administered at 3 hospital sites with a combined annual ED census of >180,000 visits per year. All 59 attending emergency physicians (EPs), 233 RNs, and 23 advanced practice clinicians (APCs) who worked at these sites were eligible to participate. Thirty-five EPs (59.3%), 88 RNs (37.8%), and 14 APCs (60.9%) completed the survey for an overall response rate of 51.75%. Most respondents were female (95 [69.9%]). The factor ranked most important to consider when discharging a patient from the ED after administration of opioids was the patient's functional status and vital signs (median, 2.00; interquartile range, 2.00-3.50). More RNs (84 [96.6%]) than EPs (29 [82.9%]) reported that developing an ED policy or guideline for safe discharge after administration of opioids is important to clinical practice (P = 0.02). Only 8 physicians (23.5%) reported that they did not prescribe intramuscular morphine, and 15 (42.9%) reported that they did not prescribe intramuscular hydromorphone. EPs (7 [20.0%]) and RNs (3 [3.4%]) differed in regard to whether they were aware if any patients to whom they administered an opioid had experienced an adverse drug-related event (P = 0.01). Most EPs (24 [68.6%]) and RNs (54 [61.4%]) believed that the decision for patient discharge should be left to both the emergency medicine provider and the RN. Most study participants believed that developing a policy or guideline for safe discharge after administration opioids in the ED is important to clinical practice. Only a few physicians reported that they did not prescribe intramuscular hydromorphone or morphine. Most participants believed the discharge decision after administration of opioids in the ED should be primarily

  5. Pedal indirect lymphangiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kil Woo; Hong, Myung Sun; Kim, In Jae [College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    Recently, indirect lymphangiography has been developed as a relatively good and noninvasive imaging modality of the lymphatic system at extremities. But the disadvantage of the indirect lymphangiography is a low contrast ratio between the surrounding tissues and the contrast media in lymphatic vessels, because dimeric nonionic contrast media is water soluble and diluted in the proximal leg lymphatic vessels. We could have relatively better image than previously published images for the leg lymphatic system, when we injected contrast media with adequate high pressure in intradermal space of the interdigital areas at the foot dorsum. So, we would like to report the results. We could study all 9 lymphedemas(primary: 6, secondary: 3) from April 1990 to May 1993 on outpatient base. They were diagnosed as lymphedema clinically and radiologically. Ten ml of dimeric nonionic aget, iotrolan(Isovist 300) was injected into intradermal space with five 30-gauge needles. The injection speed was more than 0.2 ml/min. We have done one side pedal lymphangiogram in 30 minutes. The evaluation of the anterior superficial lymphatics was according to the criteria of the Weissleder. The results were as follows: 1. All lymphatic vessels from foot to inguinal area could be visualized. 2. Two or three inferior inguinal lymph nodes could be visualized about 42%. 3. The most common abnormal finding of the lymphedma was the neovascularization of the lymphatics on indirect pedal lymphangiogram. If we use adequate technique relatively high pressure injection, correct intradermal needle insertion, adequate soft tissue exposure technique indirect lymphangiography is considered to be a safe and noninvasive imaging modality for the evaluation of the lymphedema of lower extremity lymphatics including inferior inguinal lymph nodes.

  6. Providing high-quality care for limited English proficient patients: the importance of language concordance and interpreter use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Sorkin, Dara H; Phillips, Russell S; Greenfield, Sheldon; Massagli, Michael P; Clarridge, Brian; Kaplan, Sherrie H

    2007-11-01

    Provider-patient language discordance is related to worse quality care for limited English proficient (LEP) patients who speak Spanish. However, little is known about language barriers among LEP Asian-American patients. We examined the effects of language discordance on the degree of health education and the quality of interpersonal care that patients received, and examined its effect on patient satisfaction. We also evaluated how the presence/absence of a clinic interpreter affected these outcomes. Cross-sectional survey, response rate 74%. A total of 2,746 Chinese and Vietnamese patients receiving care at 11 health centers in 8 cities. Provider-patient language concordance, health education received, quality of interpersonal care, patient ratings of providers, and the presence/absence of a clinic interpreter. Regression analyses were used to adjust for potential confounding. Patients with language-discordant providers reported receiving less health education (beta = 0.17, p interpreter. Patients with language-discordant providers also reported worse interpersonal care (beta = 0.28, p interpreter did not mitigate these effects and in fact exacerbated disparities in patients' perceptions of their providers. Language barriers are associated with less health education, worse interpersonal care, and lower patient satisfaction. Having access to a clinic interpreter can facilitate the transmission of health education. However, in terms of patients' ratings of their providers and the quality of interpersonal care, having an interpreter present does not serve as a substitute for language concordance between patient and provider.

  7. Prior doctor shopping resulting from differential treatment correlates with differences in current patient-provider relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudzune, Kimberly A; Bennett, Wendy L; Cooper, Lisa A; Clark, Jeanne M; Bleich, Sara N

    2014-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of doctor shopping resulting from differential treatment and to examine associations between this shopping and current primary care relationships. In 2012, a national internet-based survey of 600 adults receiving primary care in the past year with a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) was conducted. Our independent variable was "switching doctors because I felt treated differently because of my weight." Logistic regression models to examine the association of prior doctor shopping with characteristics of current primary care relationships: duration, trust in primary care provider (PCP), and perceived PCP weight-related judgment, adjusted for patient factors were used. Overall, 13% of adults with overweight/obesity reported previously doctor shopping resulting from differential treatment. Prior shoppers were more likely to report shorter durations of their current relationships [73% vs. 52%; p = 0.01] or perceive that their current PCP judged them because of their weight [74% vs. 11%; p shop resulting from perceived differential treatment. These prior negative experiences have no association with trust in current relationships, but our results suggest that patients may remain sensitive to provider weight bias. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  8. A Multi-Center Assessment of Nutrient Levels and Foods Provided by Hospital Patient Menus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, Susan; Fraser, Jackie; Wilkinson, Lori; Steckham, Katherine; Oliphant, Heather; Fletcher, Heather; Tzianetas, Roula; Arcand, JoAnne

    2015-11-11

    Diets of high nutritional quality can aid in the prevention and management of malnutrition in hospitalized patients. This study evaluated the nutritional quality of hospital patient menus. At three large acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada, 84 standard menus were evaluated, which included regular and carbohydrate-controlled diets and 3000 mg and 2000 mg sodium diets. Mean levels of calories, macronutrients and vitamins and minerals provided were calculated. Comparisons were made with the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) and Canada's Food Guide (CFG) recommendations. Calorie levels ranged from 1281 to 3007 kcal, with 45% of menus below 1600 kcal. Protein ranged from 49 to 159 g (0.9-1.1 g/kg/day). Energy and protein levels were highest in carbohydrate-controlled menus. All regular and carbohydrate-controlled menus provided macronutrients within the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges. The proportion of regular diet menus meeting the DRIs: 0% for fiber; 7% for calcium; 57% for vitamin C; and 100% for iron. Compared to CFG recommended servings, 35% met vegetables and fruit and milk and alternatives, 11% met grain products and 8% met meat and alternatives. These data support the need for frequent monitoring and evaluation of menus, food procurement and menu planning policies and for sufficient resources to ensure menu quality.

  9. A Multi-Center Assessment of Nutrient Levels and Foods Provided by Hospital Patient Menus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Trang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Diets of high nutritional quality can aid in the prevention and management of malnutrition in hospitalized patients. This study evaluated the nutritional quality of hospital patient menus. At three large acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada, 84 standard menus were evaluated, which included regular and carbohydrate-controlled diets and 3000 mg and 2000 mg sodium diets. Mean levels of calories, macronutrients and vitamins and minerals provided were calculated. Comparisons were made with the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI and Canada’s Food Guide (CFG recommendations. Calorie levels ranged from 1281 to 3007 kcal, with 45% of menus below 1600 kcal. Protein ranged from 49 to 159 g (0.9–1.1 g/kg/day. Energy and protein levels were highest in carbohydrate-controlled menus. All regular and carbohydrate-controlled menus provided macronutrients within the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges. The proportion of regular diet menus meeting the DRIs: 0% for fiber; 7% for calcium; 57% for vitamin C; and 100% for iron. Compared to CFG recommended servings, 35% met vegetables and fruit and milk and alternatives, 11% met grain products and 8% met meat and alternatives. These data support the need for frequent monitoring and evaluation of menus, food procurement and menu planning policies and for sufficient resources to ensure menu quality.

  10. Perspectives of Never-in-Care HIV-Positive Patients and Providers in Rakai, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertrude Nakigozi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Early entry into HIV care is low in Sub-Saharan Africa. In Rakai, about a third (31.5% of HIV-positive clients who knew their serostatus did not enroll into free care services. This qualitative study explored barriers to entry into care from HIV-positive clients who had never enrolled in care and HIV care providers. Methods. We conducted 48 in-depth interviews among HIV-infected individuals aged 15–49 years, who had not entered care within six months of result receipt and referral for free care. Key-informant interviews were conducted with 12 providers. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcripts subjected to thematic content analysis based on the health belief model. Results. Barriers to using HIV care included fear of stigma and HIV disclosure, women’s lack of support from male partners, demanding work schedules, and high transport costs. Programmatic barriers included fear of antiretroviral drug side effects, long waiting and travel times, and inadequate staff respect for patients. Denial of HIV status, belief in spiritual healing, and absence of AIDS symptoms were also barriers. Conclusion. Targeted interventions to combat stigma, strengthen couple counseling and health education programs, address gender inequalities, and implement patient-friendly and flexible clinic service hours are needed to address barriers to HIV care.

  11. [Quality of service provided to heart surgery patients of the Unified Health System-SUS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Juliana Bassalobre Carvalho; Carvalho, Sebastião Marcos Ribeiro de; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the service quality provided to heart surgery patients during their hospital stay, identifying the patient's expectations and perceptions. To associate service quality with: gender, age and the use of extracorporeal circulation. We studied 82 elective heart surgery patients (52.4% females and 47.6% males), operated by midsternal thoracotomy, age: 31 to 83 years (60.4 +/- 13.2 years); period: March to September 2006. Service quality was evaluated in two instances: the expectations at pre-operative and the perceptions of the service received on the 6th post-operative; through the application of the modified SERVQUAL scale (SERVQUAL-Card). The result was obtained by the difference of the sum of the scores on perception minus those of the expectations, and through statistical analysis. The SERVQUAL-Card scale was statistically validated, showing adequate level of internal consistency. We found a higher frequency of myocardial revascularization 55 (67.0%); first heart surgery 72 (87.8%) and the use of ECC 69 (84.1%). We noticed high mean values for expectations and perceptions with significant results (PSERVQUAL scale.

  12. Smoking quit rates among patients receiving pharmacist-provided pharmacotherapy and telephonic smoking cessation counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Jill M; Taylor, Ann M; Pelger, Martin; Schiefer, Danielle; Warholak, Terri L

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco use is the nation's leading cause of preventable illness and death, causing a significant burden on the health care system. Many cessation pharmacotherapy treatment options are available to help smokers quit, including nicotine replacement therapies (NRTs) and prescription medications. Research indicates that pharmacists are able to provide a positive benefit to smokers who want to quit through pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions. The aim of the present work was to examine the quit rates among participants who received smoking cessation pharmacotherapy and pharmacist-provided telephone-based quit counseling services. Retrospective database review of enrolled participants. Telephone-based pharmacotherapy and medication counseling services offered from a medication management center. State employees who voluntarily contacted a medication management center for smoking cessation services after receiving promotional flyers. Long-term quit rates at 7 and 13 months were determined by means of patient self-report in response to questioning. Smoking cessation was considered to be a success if the patient reported not smoking for the past 30 days. A total of 238 participants were included in the review. Thirty-nine participants completed the program after the first treatment, 12 participants after the second treatment, and 4 participants after the third treatment. Two patients completed the program more than once. Eighty-five participants (36%) reported results at 7-month follow-up; of these, 43 (51%) were smoking free. A total of 44 participants (18%) reported results at 13-month follow-up; of these, 24 participants (55%) reported being smoking free. There were no significant differences in the percentages of smoking-free participants at 7 or 13 months, regardless of their first treatment (P = 0.06 and 0.345, respectively). Successful quit rates were higher than previously demonstrated with other telephone-based smoking cessation programs. Therefore

  13. International experience in controlling pharmaceutical expenditure: influencing patients and providers and regulating industry - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Iyn-Hyang; Bloor, Karen; Hewitt, Catherine; Maynard, Alan

    2015-01-01

    To review international policies to control expenditure on pharmaceuticals by influencing the behaviour of patients and providers and regulating the pharmaceutical industry. Systematic review of experimental and quasi-experimental studies. Published studies were identified with an electronic search strategy using MEDLINE and EMBASE from 1980 to May 2012. Studies were eligible if they assessed the effect of policies aimed at influencing the behaviour of patients and providers, and regulating the pharmaceutical industry. Outcome measures included pharmaceutical expenditure, prices or utilization; other resource use relating to pharmaceuticals; and health outcomes and patients' or providers' behaviour relating to pharmaceutical use. Quality assessment criteria for each study design were developed based on the standard criteria recommended by the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) group. The review includes studies based on randomized controlled trials and rigorous quasi-experimental designs (interrupted time-series and controlled before-and-after studies). Studies were excluded if they were conducted within a single hospital or practice; related to pharmaceutical care services or disease management; had less than 6 months of follow-up period (or less than 12 months overall for interrupted time series); if data in controlled before-and-after studies were not collected contemporaneously or if no rationale was stated for the choice of control group; or if relevant and interpretable data were not presented. A total of 255 studies met the inclusion criteria for this review. The majority of the studies relating to patients evaluated cost sharing interventions such as user charges (52 studies). User charges do reduce utilization of pharmaceuticals, and reduce public expenditure by shifting costs to patients. But they reduce the use of essential as well as non-essential drugs, and without adequate exemptions they affect vulnerable groups

  14. Health care services provided to type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A. Al-Rubeaan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess health care services provided to type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and diabetes health care expenditure in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA. Methods: This study was part of a nationwide, household, population based cross-sectional survey conducted at the University Diabetes Center, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2007 and December 2009 covering 13 administrative regions of the Kingdom. Using patients’ interview questionnaires, health care services data were collected by trained staff. Results: A total of 5,983 diabetic patients were chosen to assess health care services and expenditure. Approximately 92.2% of health services were governmental and the remaining 7.8% were in private services. The mean annual number of visits to physicians was 6.5±3.9 and laboratories was 5.1±3.9. Diabetic patients required one admission every 3 years with a mean admission duration of 13.3±28.3 days. General practitioners managed 85.9% of diabetic cases alone, or shared with internists and/or endocrinologists. Health care expenditure was governmental in 90% of cases, while it was personal in 7.7% or based on insurance payment in 2.3%. Conclusion: Health services and its expenditure provided to diabetic citizens in Saudi Arabia are mainly governmental. Empowerment of the role of both the private sector and health insurance system is badly needed, aside from implementing proper management guidelines to deliver good services at different levels.

  15. Meta-Analyses of the Effects of Standardized Handoff Protocols on Patient, Provider, and Organizational Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keebler, Joseph R; Lazzara, Elizabeth H; Patzer, Brady S; Palmer, Evan M; Plummer, John P; Smith, Dustin C; Lew, Victoria; Fouquet, Sarah; Chan, Y Raymond; Riss, Robert

    2016-12-01

    The overall purpose was to understand the effects of handoff protocols using meta-analytic approaches. Standardized protocols have been required by the Joint Commission, but meta-analytic integration of handoff protocol research has not been conducted. The primary outcomes investigated were handoff information passed during transitions of care, patient outcomes, provider outcomes, and organizational outcomes. Sources included Medline, SAGE, Embase, PsycINFO, and PubMed, searched from the earliest date available through March 30th, 2015. Initially 4,556 articles were identified, with 4,520 removed. This process left a final set of 36 articles, all which included pre-/postintervention designs implemented in live clinical/hospital settings. We also conducted a moderation analysis based on the number of items contained in each protocol to understand if the length of a protocol led to systematic changes in effect sizes of the outcome variables. Meta-analyses were conducted on 34,527 pre- and 30,072 postintervention data points. Results indicate positive effects on all four outcomes: handoff information (g = .71, 95% confidence interval [CI] [.63, .79]), patient outcomes (g = .53, 95% CI [.41, .65]), provider outcomes (g = .51, 95% CI [.41, .60]), and organizational outcomes (g = .29, 95% CI [.23, .35]). We found protocols to be effective, but there is significant publication bias and heterogeneity in the literature. Due to publication bias, we further searched the gray literature through greylit.org and found another 347 articles, although none were relevant to this research. Our moderation analysis demonstrates that for handoff information, protocols using 12 or more items led to a significantly higher proportion of information passed compared with protocols using 11 or fewer items. Further, there were numerous negative outcomes found throughout this meta-analysis, with trends demonstrating that protocols can increase the time for handover and the rate of errors of

  16. Flexibility Predicts Curve Progression in Providence Nighttime Bracing of Patients With Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrt-Nissen, Søren; Hallager, Dennis W; Gehrchen, Martin; Dahl, Benny

    2016-11-15

    Retrospective cohort study. To determine treatment outcome with providence brace (PB) and to assess the ability of pretreatment supine lateral bending radiographs (SLBR) in predicting curve progression. Results from treatment with the PB for adolescent idiopathic ccoliosis (AIS) have been inconsistent and further research is needed. The association between flexibility, as determined by pretreatment SLBR, and curve progression has not previously been examined. All patients treated with the PB from 2006 to 2011 who met Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) bracing criteria were included. Flexibility of the curve was determined based on SLBR and radiographic variables were registered at beginning of treatment and at skeletal maturity (SM) or before surgery. An increase in standing Cobb angle by more than 5 degrees was considered progression. Follow-up SRS-22 scores were compared with a control group with minor AIS. Analysis included multiple linear and logistic regression. A total of 63 patients were included. Mean age was 13.3 years (SD: 1.5) and mean standing Cobb angle was 34° (SD: 5°). Radiographic progression was observed in 43% of patients at SM and surgical rate was 27% and 37% at SM and 2-year follow up, respectively. SRS-22 total scores were similar but the mental health score was significantly better in the control group (P = 0.042). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that decreased flexibility adjusted for age, Cobb angle, and menarchal status was significantly associated with curve progression (P flexibility was associated with a decrease in risk of curve progression ≥6° (odds ratio = 0.95; 95% confidence interval 0.90-0.98; P = 0.013). Progression was seen in 43% of AIS patients treated with the PB. Increase in flexibility was independently associated with a decreased risk of progression. 3.

  17. Linking and retaining HIV patients in care: the importance of provider attitudes and behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Manya; Herwehe, Jane; Murtaza-Rossini, Michelli; Reine, Petera; Cuffie, Damien; Gruber, DeAnn; Kaiser, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Retention in HIV treatment may reduce morbidity and mortality, as well as slow the epidemic. Myriad barriers to retention include stigma, homophobia, structural barriers, transportation, and insurance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient perceptions of provider attitudes among HIV-infected persons within a state-wide public hospital system in Louisiana. A convenience sample of patients attending HIV clinics throughout the state participated in an anonymous interview. Factors associated with negative perceptions of care were evaluated in conjunction with a validated stigma measure. Factors associated with having a delayed entry into or break in care were evaluated in conjunction with perceived stigma. Between 2/1/09 and 7/31/11, 479 participants were interviewed and had sufficient data available, of whom 53.4% were male, 79.3% were African American, and 29.4% reported a break or delayed entry into HIV care of >1 year. A break in care was associated with perceiving that the doctor or health professionals do not listen carefully most or all of the time (p<0.01), having an elevated stigma score (p<0.05), and indicating that providers dislike caring for HIV-infected people (p<0.01). Women were more likely to have an elevated stigma score than men (p<0.01), as were participants over 30 (p<0.01); those with a gay/bisexual orientation (p<0.05) were less likely to have an elevated stigma score. Those with a break in care were less likely to have Medicaid (p<0.05). Providers play a key role in the retention of HIV-infected persons in care and are critical to improving outcomes and slowing the epidemic. Development of novel approaches to reduce stigma are imperative in improving retention.

  18. [Hospital-based psychological first aid provided to patients injured in the Lushan earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Min; Li, Xiao-Lin; Li, Jing; Huang, Xue-Hua; Tao, Qing-Lan; Luo, Xi

    2015-04-01

    In the aftermath of the 7.0 earthquake that struck Lushan in China's Sichuan Province on April 20, 2013, a psychological crisis intervention working group was established in a hospital that was treating earthquake victims. Patients at this hospital received psychological first aid that was delivered in accordance with scientific, systematic, and standardized principles. This first aid employed a "rooting mode" methodology and was designed as a supportive psychological intervention. Mental assessment results showed that the general mental health, acute stress reactions, and anxiety and depression status of all of the 131 injured who received the psychological intervention had significantly improved (p < .05) during the two-week intervention period. This paper introduces the basic principles used to develop and provide this first aid, the approach used to organize the working groups, the main contents of the intervention, specific methods used, and intervention outcomes. This information is provided as a reference for providing localized psychological assistance in the aftermath of a disaster incident.

  19. Experience of providing cultural safety in mental health to Aboriginal patients: A grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, Shirley; Wynaden, Dianne; Wright, Michael

    2017-02-06

    The need for mental health clinicians to practice cultural safety is vital in ensuring meaningful care and in moving towards improving the mental health outcomes for Aboriginal people. The concept of cultural safety is particularly relevant to mental health professionals as it seeks to promote cultural integrity and the promotion of social justice, equity and respect. A substantive theory that explained the experience of providing cultural safety in mental health care to Aboriginal patients was developed using grounded theory methodology. Mental health professionals engaged in a social psychological process, called seeking solutions by navigating the labyrinth to overcome the experience of being unprepared. During this process participants moved from a state of being unprepared to one where they began to navigate the pathway of cultural safety. The findings of this research suggest health professionals have a limited understanding of the concept of cultural safety. The experience of providing cultural safety has not been adequately addressed by organizations, health services, governments, educational providers and policy makers. Health services, organizations and government agencies must work with Aboriginal people to progress strategies that inform and empower staff to practice cultural safety. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  20. Chinese Internet Searches Provide Inaccurate and Misleading Information to Epilepsy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Ming; Xu, Ru-Xiang; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Ren, Lian-Kun; Qiao, Hui; Ding, Hu; Liu, Zhi-Liang

    2015-12-20

    Most patients with epilepsy want to learn as much as possible about the disease, and many have turned to the internet for information. Patients are likely to use information obtained from the internet to control their epilepsy, but little is known about the accuracy of this information. In this survey, we have assessed the feasibility and usability of internet-based interventions for the treatment of epilepsy. Data were collected from an internet search. Different search terms were used to obtain general information on epilepsy together with information about medication, types of epilepsy, treatment, women's health, and other information. The accuracy of the information was evaluated by a group of experts. A total of 1320 web pages were assessed. The majority were websites related to health. A large number (80.2%) of web pages contained content related to the search term. A significant number of web pages 450/1058 (42.5%) claimed to provide information from a credible source; however, only 206/1058 (19.5%) of the information was accurate and complete; 326/1058 (30.8%) was accurate but incomplete; 328/1058 (31.0%) was correct but nonstandard, and 198/1058 (18.8%) was inaccurate. The authenticity of the information was not significantly different between the two search engines (χ2 = 0.009, P = 0.924). No significant difference was observed in the information obtained from a specialist or nonspecialist source (χ2 = 7.538, P = 0.057). There was also no correlation between the quality of the information and the priority (χ2 = 6.880, P = 0.076). Searching for information about epilepsy on the internet is convenient, but the information provided is not reliable. Too much information is inaccurate or for advertisement purposes, and it is difficult for patients to find the useful information. Turning to the internet for medical knowledge may be harmful. Physicians should be aware that their patients may search for information on the internet and guide them to safe

  1. Chinese Internet Searches Provide Inaccurate and Misleading Information to Epilepsy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Ming Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most patients with epilepsy want to learn as much as possible about the disease, and many have turned to the internet for information. Patients are likely to use information obtained from the internet to control their epilepsy, but little is known about the accuracy of this information. In this survey, we have assessed the feasibility and usability of internet-based interventions for the treatment of epilepsy. Methods: Data were collected from an internet search. Different search terms were used to obtain general information on epilepsy together with information about medication, types of epilepsy, treatment, women′s health, and other information. The accuracy of the information was evaluated by a group of experts. Results: A total of 1320 web pages were assessed. The majority were websites related to health. A large number (80.2% of web pages contained content related to the search term. A significant number of web pages 450/1058 (42.5% claimed to provide information from a credible source; however, only 206/1058 (19.5% of the information was accurate and complete; 326/1058 (30.8% was accurate but incomplete; 328/1058 (31.0% was correct but nonstandard, and 198/1058 (18.8% was inaccurate. The authenticity of the information was not significantly different between the two search engines (χ2 = 0.009, P = 0.924. No significant difference was observed in the information obtained from a specialist or nonspecialist source (χ2 = 7.538, P = 0.057. There was also no correlation between the quality of the information and the priority (χ2 = 6.880, P = 0.076. Conclusions: Searching for information about epilepsy on the internet is convenient, but the information provided is not reliable. Too much information is inaccurate or for advertisement purposes, and it is difficult for patients to find the useful information. Turning to the internet for medical knowledge may be harmful. Physicians should be aware that their patients may search for

  2. Indirect punishment and generosity toward strangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ule, Aljaz; Schram, Arthur; Riedl, Arno; Cason, Timothy N

    2009-12-18

    Many people incur costs to reward strangers who have been kind to others. Theoretical and experimental evidence suggests that such "indirect rewarding" sustains cooperation between unrelated humans. Its emergence is surprising, because rewarders incur costs but receive no immediate benefits. It can prevail in the long run only if rewarders earn higher payoffs than "defectors" who ignore strangers' kindness. We provide experimental evidence regarding the payoffs received by individuals who employ these and other strategies, such as "indirect punishment," by imposing costs on unkind strangers. We find that if unkind strangers cannot be punished, defection earns most. If they can be punished, however, then indirect rewarding earns most. Indirect punishment plays this important role, even if it gives a low payoff and is rarely implemented.

  3. Socioeconomic burden of psoriatic arthritis in Hong Kong: direct and indirect costs and the influence of disease pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tracy Y; Tam, Lai-Shan; Leung, Ying-Ying; Kwok, Lai-Wa; Wong, Kong-Chiu; Yu, Tracy; Kun, Emily W; Li, Edmund K

    2010-06-01

    To estimate the direct costs and indirect costs of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in Hong Kong. A retrospective cost-of-illness study was performed on 125 patients with PsA. Participants completed questionnaires on demographics, employment status, and out of pocket expenses. Health resources consumption was recorded by chart review and patient self-report questionnaire. Patients were grouped according to disease pattern, i.e., peripheral and axial disease. Multiple regression was used to determine the predictors of the costs. The average annual direct costs were $4,141 (2006 US dollars) per patient. Costs of inpatient care accounted for 27% of direct costs, followed by costs of visits to healthcare providers (25%). The estimated average indirect costs were $3,127 per patient-year. Forty-eight (42%) patients had no indirect costs. Sixty percent of patients with peripheral disease were still employed, compared to 39% of patients with axial disease. Patients with axial disease had almost twice the indirect costs compared to those with peripheral disease (p = 0.005). Increased pain and poor function were independently associated with increased direct costs. Worse physical health status, determined by indirect costs borne by the patient, and poor function and old age predicted high costs. PsA imposes substantial economic burden. Pain and function are significantly associated with costs. Improvements in treatments to reduce pain and restore function are likely to reduce the costs incurred by these patients.

  4. Developing Indicators of Service Quality Provided for Cardiovascular Patients Hospitalized in Cardiac Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Azami-Aghdash

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases are among the most prevalent chronic diseases leading to high degrees of mortality and morbidity worldwide and in Iran. The aim of the current study was to determine and develop appropriate indicators for evaluating provided service quality for cardiovascular patients admitted to Cardiac Care Units (CCU in Iran. Methods: In order to determine the indicators for evaluating provided service quality, a four-stage process including reviewing systematic review articles in premier bibliographic databases, interview, performing two rounds of Delphi technique, and holding experts panel by attendance of experts in different fields was adopted. Finally, after recognizing relevant indicators in resources, these indicators were finalized during various stages using ideas of 27 experts in different fields. Results: Among 2800 found articles in the text reviewing phase, 21 articles, which had completely mentioned relevant indicators, were studied and 48 related indicators were extracted. After two interviews with a cardiologist and an epidemiologist, 32 items of the indicators were omitted and replaced by 27 indicators coping with the conditions of Iranian hospitals. Finally, 43 indicators were added into the Delphi phase and after 2 rounds of Delphi with 18 specialists, 7 cases were excluded due to their low scores of applicability. In the experts’ panel stage, 6 items were also omitted and 10 new indicators were developed to replace them. Eventually, 40 indicators were finalized. Conclusion: In this study, some proper indicators for evaluating provided service quality for CCU admissions in Iran were determined. Considering the informative richness of these indicators, they can be used by managers, policy makers, health service providers, and also insurance agencies in order to improve the quality of services, decisions, and policies.

  5. Collaborative engagement with colleagues may provide better care for 'heart-sink' patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Niels Kristian; Stolberg, Bent; Coles, Colin

    2015-01-01

    and ways of working, which appear to have secured the long-lasting sustainability of the group, have been identified. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: This group of Danish GPs experienced personal and professional growth through collaborative engagement. They have apparently learned to embrace and even value......, uncertainty, enabling them to provide patient-centred care. METHODS: A relatively fixed group of Danish GPs have met regularly for more than 14 years, discussing difficult and complex cases. Their experiences were researched through two focus group interviews using semi-structured interviews comprising open...... and closed questions, which were audiotaped and transcribed. The qualitative findings were analysed employing grounded theory principles. RESULTS: Participation in the GP group was perceived to have had a positive impact on participants' personal and professional lives by reducing the number of 'heart...

  6. Developing a patient satisfaction questionnaire for services provided in Iranian community pharmacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoubifard, Saeed; Rashidian, Arash; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas; Sheidaei, Ali; Varmaghani, Mehdi; Hashemi-Meshkini, Amir; Zekri, Hedieh-Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop a valid and reliable instrument in the Persian language for evaluating patient satisfaction with services provided in community pharmacies. Methods: We selected a valid and reliable instrument from the literature and translated it to the Persian language. Some new items were added to the first draft based on the special characteristics of the Iranian health system. Then, the feasibility of utilizing the new instrument was assessed. In the third step, we conducted a formal content validity study to calculate content validity indices. Having completed the content validity study, the factorial structure of new instruments was determined by implementing a factorial analysis. Finally, the reliability of the instrument was assessed by assessment of Cronbach's alpha coefficient and test-retest reliability. Findings: The developed instrument demonstrated suitable validity and reliability. The final instrument showed desirable content validity, with inter-rater agreement of 94% and 97% for relevance and clarity, respectively. Scale content validity indices for relevance and clarity were calculated as 96% and 92%, respectively, and comprehensiveness was calculated as 100%. Factor analysis resulted in seven factors with a cumulative variance of 62.14%. In internal consistency reliability, Cronbach's alpha for the whole instrument was 0.912. About test-retest reliability, six items showed almost perfect agreement, 18 items showed substantial agreement, and three items showed moderate agreement. Therefore, test-retest reliability assessment too demonstrated appropriate results. Conclusion: The instrument demonstrated excellent validity and reliability for application in Iran. This instrument is useful for evaluating patient satisfaction with services provided in community pharmacies in the Persian-speaking communities. PMID:27162804

  7. Patient and provider determinants of nephrology referral in older adults with severe chronic kidney disease: a survey of provider decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Hare Ann M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although chronic kidney disease (CKD disproportionately affects older adults, they are less likely to be referred to a nephrologist. Factors that influence the referral decisions of primary care providers (PCPs specifically for older CKD patients have been incompletely described. Patient factors such as dementia, functional disability, and co-morbidity may complicate the decision to refer an older adult. This study evaluated the role of patient and PCP factors in the referral decisions for older adults with stage 4 CKD. Methods We administered a two-part survey to study the decisions of practicing PCPs. First, using a blocked factorial design, vignettes systematically varied 6 patient characteristics: age, race, gender, co-morbidity, functional status, and cognitive status. CKD severity, patient preferences, and degree of anemia were held constant. Second, covariates from a standard questionnaire included PCP estimates of life expectancy, demographics, reaction to clinical uncertainty, and risk aversion. The main outcome was the decision to refer to the nephrologist. Random effects logistic regression models tested independent associations of predictor variables with the referral decision. Results More than half (62.5% of all PCP decisions (n = 680 were to refer to a nephrologist. Vignette-based factors that independently decreased referral included older patient age (OR = 0.27; 95% CI, 0.15 to 0.48 and having moderate dementia (OR = 0.14; 95%CI, 0.07 to 0.25. There were no associations between co-morbidity or impaired functional activity with the referral decision. Survey-based PCP factors that significantly increased the referral likelihood include female gender (OR = 7.75; 95%CI, 2.07 to 28.93, non-white race (OR = 30.29; 95%CI, 1.30 to 703.73, those who expect nephrologists to discuss goals of care (OR = 53.13; 95%CI, 2.42 to 1168.00, those with higher levels of anxiety about uncertainty (OR = 1.28; 95%CI, 1.04 to 1

  8. Providing oral care in haematological oncology patients: nurses' knowledge and skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potting, Carin M J; Mank, Arno; Blijlevens, Nicole M A; Donnelly, J Peter; van Achterberg, Theo

    2008-09-01

    In the international literature, the most commonly recommended intervention for managing oral mucositis is good oral care, assuming that nurses have sufficient knowledge and skills to perform oral care correctly. The aim of the present study was to investigate if knowledge and skills about oral care improve when education in oral care is provided to nurses in charge of patients who are at risk of oral mucositis. This intervention study consists of a baseline test on the knowledge and skills of nurses of the haematology wards of two different hospitals. Oral care education sessions were given in one hospital and follow-up tests were performed in both hospitals. Nursing records were examined and observations of nurses performing oral care were made at baseline as well as at follow-up. The results show significant differences in the scores for knowledge and skills before and after the education, whereas there was no difference in scores at the two points in time for the comparison hospital, where no education had taken place. The records test showed no differences at baseline or follow-up for the two groups. Observations showed that nurses who followed the education session implemented the oral care protocol considerably better than those who did not attended. Education in oral care has a positive influence on the knowledge and skills of nurses who care for patient at risk of oral mucositis, but not on the quality of oral care documentation.

  9. A panel of oxidative stress assays does not provide supplementary diagnostic information in Behcet's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akcay Yasemin D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent findings suggest a role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of Behcet's disease (BD, but the utility of oxidative stress-associated assays in offering diagnostic information or in the monitoring of disease activity is largely unassessed. Objective and methods We aimed to measure oxidative and inflammatory markers, along with the markers of reactive nitrogen species, S-nitrosothiols and 3-nitrotyrosine, in BD patients (n = 100 and healthy volunteers (n = 50. These markers were evaluated in regard to their role in the pathogenesis of BD as well as their relation to clinical presentation, disease activity and duration. Results Median values for erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein, leukocyte count, and IL-18 levels, as well as myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, were statistically higher in the patient group compared to controls. Some inflammation markers (ESR, neutrophil and leukocyte counts were statistically higher (p 0.05 in all statistical comparisons, nor was there any difference in median levels of these oxidative stress markers in active disease versus disease remission. S-nitrosothiols and 3-nitrotyrosine were undetectable in BD plasma. Conclusions The application of oxidative stress-associated measures to BD blood samples offered no supplemental diagnostic or disease activity information to that provided by standard laboratory measures of inflammation. S-nitrosothiols and 3-nitrotyrosine appeared not to be markers for active BD; thus the search for biochemical markers that will indicate the active period should be continued with larger studies.

  10. Use of on-demand video to provide patient education on spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jeanne; Salzman, Cynthia; Garbaccio, Chris; Burns, Stephen P; Crane, Deborah; Bombardier, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Persons with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) have a high lifetime need for ongoing patient education to reduce the risk of serious and costly medical conditions. We have addressed this need through monthly in-person public education programs called SCI Forums. More recently, we began videotaping these programs for streaming on our website to reach a geographically diverse audience of patients, caregivers, and providers. We compared information from the in-person forums to that of the same forums shown streaming on our website during a 1-year period. Both the in-person and Internet versions of the forums received high overall ratings from individuals who completed evaluation forms. Eighty-eight percent of online evaluators and 96% of in-person evaluators reported that they gained new information from the forum; 52 and 64% said they changed their attitude, and 61 and 68% said they would probably change their behavior or take some kind of action based on information they learned. Ninety-one percent of online evaluators reported that video is better than text for presenting this kind of information. Online video is an accessible, effective, and well-accepted way to present ongoing SCI education and can reach a wider geographical audience than in-person presentations.

  11. Quality and safety of hospital discharge: a study on experiences and perceptions of patients, relatives and care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, G.J.; Schoonhoven, L.; Plas, M. van der; Wollersheim, H.C.H.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify barriers experienced and perceived at discharge by physicians, nurses, patients and relatives. DESIGN: We developed questionnaires based on focus group interviews with hospital and community care providers, and individual interviews with patients and relatives. A survey was

  12. A metasynthesis of patient-provider communication in hospital for patients with severe communication disabilities: informing new translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Bronwyn; Balandin, Susan

    2014-12-01

    Poor patient-provider communication in hospital continues to be cited as a possible causal factor in preventable adverse events for patients with severe communication disabilities. Yet to date there are no reports of empirical interventions that investigate or demonstrate an improvement in communication in hospital for these patients. The aim of this review was to synthesize the findings of research into communication in hospital for people with severe communication disabilities arising from lifelong and acquired stable conditions including cerebral palsy, autism, intellectual disability, aphasia following stroke, but excluding progressive conditions and those solely related to sensory impairments of hearing or vision. Results revealed six core strategies suggested to improve communication in hospital: (a) develop services, systems, and policies that support improved communication, (b) devote enough time to communication, (c) ensure adequate access to communication tools (nurse call systems and communication aids), (d) access personally held written health information, (e) collaborate effectively with carers, spouses, and parents, and (f) increase the communicative competence of hospital staff. Currently there are no reports that trial or validate any of these strategies specifically in hospital settings. Observational and evaluative research is needed to investigate the ecological validity of strategies proposed to improve communication.

  13. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Raciborski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5–1%. According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000–157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems: M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment.

  14. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciborski, Filip; Kłak, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5-1%). According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000-157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems): M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment.

  15. Adherence to Hypertension Management Recommendations for Patient Follow-Up Care and Lifestyle Modifications Made by Military Healthcare Providers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Collins, Timothy

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe military healthcare providers adherence to nationally recognized hypertensive patient guidelines concerning lifestyle modifications and follow-up instructions...

  16. Empowering patients undergoing in vitro fertilization by providing Internet access to medical data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuil, W.S.; Verhaak, C.M.; Braat, D.D.M.; Vries Robbé, P.F. de; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of an Internet-based personal health record on the empowerment of patients undergoing IVF. DESIGN: Randomized clinical trial. SETTING: Patients undergoing IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in an academic research environment. PATIENT(S): We selected

  17. Indirect Instruments of Prudential Supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Dardac

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The qualifying of supervision as “prudential” is used to differentiate it from other forms of supervision, which regards issues related to banking consumer protection. In order to achieve its goal, prudential supervision needs relevant information, provided mostly by the credit institutions their selves. Hence, the existence of a reporting system is essential, a system capable to insure, on the one hand, homogenity of the provided data and, on the other hand, its efficient processing. One indirect instrument which was used more and more during the last decade in banking supervision is represented by credit registers. The first system is directly associated either to the central bank or the supervision authority, and is, in most of cases, managed by the latter. The second system, the so called credit bureau, is mostly operated by private banks.

  18. A Metasynthesis of Patient-Provider Communication in Hospital for Patients with Severe Communication Disabilities: Informing New Translational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandin, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Poor patient–provider communication in hospital continues to be cited as a possible causal factor in preventable adverse events for patients with severe communication disabilities. Yet to date there are no reports of empirical interventions that investigate or demonstrate an improvement in communication in hospital for these patients. The aim of this review was to synthesize the findings of research into communication in hospital for people with severe communication disabilities arising from lifelong and acquired stable conditions including cerebral palsy, autism, intellectual disability, aphasia following stroke, but excluding progressive conditions and those solely related to sensory impairments of hearing or vision. Results revealed six core strategies suggested to improve communication in hospital: (a) develop services, systems, and policies that support improved communication, (b) devote enough time to communication, (c) ensure adequate access to communication tools (nurse call systems and communication aids), (d) access personally held written health information, (e) collaborate effectively with carers, spouses, and parents, and (f) increase the communicative competence of hospital staff. Currently there are no reports that trial or validate any of these strategies specifically in hospital settings. Observational and evaluative research is needed to investigate the ecological validity of strategies proposed to improve communication. PMID:25229213

  19. Estimating the national cost of treating people with HIV disease: patient, payer, and provider data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinger, F J; Fleishman, J A

    2000-06-01

    Existing estimates of the national cost of treating all people with HIV disease use data from a sample of people with HIV disease to extrapolate the cost of treating all people with HIV disease (patient-based approach). This study derives estimates using two novel approaches (i.e., payer-based and provider-based) and compares these with existing estimates. These include the Health Insurance Association of American and the American Council of Life Insurance 1996 HIV survey, the 1996 State Inpatient Databases (SID) maintained by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the IMS America Ltd. survey of independent and chain drugstores. The cost of treating all people with HIV disease in 1996 was between $6.7 and $7.8 billion U.S., and the average annual cost of treating a person with HIV disease was between $20,000 and $24,700 U.S. Analysts should derive estimates of the cost of treating people with HIV disease using several different approaches. K

  20. Influence of N-acetylcysteine on indirect indicators of tissue oxygenation in septic shock patients: results from a prospective, randomized, double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, C D; Reinhart, K; Witt, I; Meier-Hellmann, A; Hannemann, L; Bredle, D L; Schaffartzik, W

    1994-11-01

    ventricular stroke work index, as well as a significant decrease in systemic vascular resistance in comparison to baseline. The N-acetylcysteine nonresponders, as well as the patients in the placebo group, did not show any significant changes in any of these variables. The N-acetylcysteine responders had a higher survival rate (69%) than the non-responders (19%) and were studied earlier after onset of sepsis (37 hrs) than the nonresponders (61 hrs). The only significant difference between the entire N-acetylcysteine group (which included responders plus nonresponders) and the placebo group was an increased VO2 in the entire N-acetylcysteine group during infusion measurements. N-acetylcysteine provided a transient improvement in tissue oxygenation in about half of the septic shock patients, as indicated by an increase in VO2 and gastric intramucosal pH and a decrease in veno-arterial PCO2. The higher survival rate in the N-acetylcysteine responders and the fact that half of the patients receiving N-acetylcysteine did not respond, suggests that, in some patients, sepsis irreversibly damages the microvasculature to the extent that N-acetylcysteine has no effect. If analyzed by intention to treat, the N-acetylcysteine did not produce effects that were significantly different from the placebo. Whether the N-acetylcysteine challenge was merely diagnostic or whether N-acetylcysteine can be effective in the treatment of sepsis deserves further investigation.

  1. The impact of pharmacists providing direct patient care as members of interprofessional teams on diabetes management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamah M. Alfayez

    2017-11-01

    The results suggest that involvement of pharmacists in direct patient care as members of interprofessional team in our specialty ambulatory care clinic is associated with a positive impact on the glycemic control in patients with diabetes.

  2. Knowledge and affective traits of physiotherapy students to provide care for patients living with AIDS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyeyemi Y. Adetoyeje

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This  study  aimed  to  assess  Nigerian physiotherapy students’ knowledge and their affective traits in caring for patients living with AIDS (PWA.Methods: Nigerian students (N=104 in four training programs were surveyed using a 43-item questionnaire that elicited information on the  students’  demographics  characteristics,  knowledge  levels  on AIDS transmission, universal precaution and pathophysiology, their feeling  of  preparedness,  comfort,  ethical  disposition  for  PWA  and their  willingness  to  evaluate  and  provide  care  to  PWA  in  different clinical scenarios.Results: Overall  the  students  showed  unsatisfactory  know ledge  of universal  precaution  and  AIDS  pathophysiology  and  did  not  feel comfortable or prepared to care for PWA. The students did not also show  satisfactory  ethical  disposition  and  may  be  unwilling  to  care for PWA. The students’ knowledge levels on AIDS transmission and willingness were influenced by religious affiliation while feeling of comfort and ethical disposition were influenced by gender and knowing someone living with AIDS. They were more unwilling to provide whirlpool wound care procedures and chest physiotherapy compared to providing gait training, therapeutic exercise and activities of daily living training for PWA.Conclusion: The study identified the need to improve the curriculum on AIDS and recommends clinical clerkship and a methodical and sequential exposure of students to cases during clinical rotations.

  3. Patient-Provider Engagement and Chronic Pain in Drug-Using, Primarily African American Persons Living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mary M; Nguyen, Trang Q; Maragh-Bass, Allysha C; Isenberg, Sarina R; Beach, Mary Catherine; Knowlton, Amy R

    2017-06-01

    Among disadvantaged persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV), patient-provider engagement, which has been defined as patient-provider relationships that promote the use of health care services and are characterized by active listening and supportive decision making, has been associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) maintenance and viral suppression. However, chronic pain, depression, and substance use, all of which are prevalent in this population, can reduce the quality of patient-provider engagement. We hypothesized a model in which chronic pain, depression, and substance use would be associated with poorer patient-provider engagement, which would be positively associated with adherence, with the latter associated positively with viral suppression. We analyzed data from the BEACON study, which included surveys from 383 PLHIV who were primarily African American, on ART, and had histories of drug use. Due to six missing cases on the chronic pain variable, we used data from 377 respondents in a structural equation model. Chronic pain and depressive symptoms were significantly associated with poorer patient-provider engagement, while substance use was associated with better engagement. Patient-provider engagement in turn was associated with better ART adherence, which was associated with higher viral suppression. Results suggest the role of chronic pain in poor patient-physician engagement in this population, which has potential implications for quality of HIV patient care and health outcomes. Findings suggest the need for attention to patient-provider engagement in PLHIV.

  4. Pediatrics Education in an AHEC Setting: Preparing Students to Provide Patient Centered Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Steven Owens

    2012-01-01

    Patient centered medicine is a paradigm of health care that seeks to treat the whole person, rather than only the illness. The physician must understand the patient as a whole by considering the patient's individual needs, social structure, socioeconomic status, and educational background. Medical education includes ways to train students in this…

  5. Care provided by general practitioners to patients with psychotic disorders: a cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, M.J.T.; Schuling, J.; Groenier, K.H.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Slooff, C.J.; Dekker, J.H.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Patients suffering from psychotic disorders have an increased risk of comorbid somatic diseases such as cardiovascular disorders and diabetes mellitus. Doctor-related factors, such as unfamiliarity with these patients, as well as patient-related factors, such as cognitive disturbance and

  6. Care provided by general practitioners to patients with psychotic disorders : a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, Marian J. T.; Schuling, Jan; Groenier, Klaas H.; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; Slooff, Cees J.; Dekker, Janny H.; Meyboom-de Jong, Betty

    2010-01-01

    Background: Patients suffering from psychotic disorders have an increased risk of comorbid somatic diseases such as cardiovascular disorders and diabetes mellitus. Doctor-related factors, such as unfamiliarity with these patients, as well as patient-related factors, such as cognitive disturbance and

  7. Is Distance to Provider a Barrier to Care for Medicaid Patients with Breast, Colorectal, or Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoggins, John F.; Fedorenko, Catherine R.; Donahue, Sara M. A.; Buchwald, Dedra; Blough, David K.; Ramsey, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Distance to provider might be an important barrier to timely diagnosis and treatment for cancer patients who qualify for Medicaid coverage. Whether driving time or driving distance is a better indicator of travel burden is also of interest. Methods: Driving distances and times from patient residence to primary care provider were…

  8. Satisfaction of osteoarthritis patients with provided care is not related to the disease-specific quality of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosemann, T.J.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Szecsenyi, J.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA) has a high prevalence in primary care. Patient satisfaction is an important indicator for the quality of care provided to OA patients. Little is known about satisfaction of patients with this condition in a primary care setting in Germany. The aim of the study was to

  9. Who Is Providing and Who Is Getting Asthma Patient Education: An Analysis of 2001 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shaival S.; Lutfiyya, May Nawal; McCullough, Joel Emery; Henley, Eric; Zeitz, Howard Jerome; Lipsky, Martin S.

    2008-01-01

    Patient education in asthma management is important; however, there is little known about the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education or how often primary care physicians provide it. The objective of the study was to identify the characteristics of patients receiving asthma education. It was a cross-sectional study using 2001…

  10. Giving rheumatology patients online home access to their electronic medical record (EMR): advantages, drawbacks and preconditions according to care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vaart, Rosalie; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-09-01

    Technology enables patients home access to their electronic medical record (EMR), via a patient portal. This study aims to analyse (dis)advantages, preconditions and suitable content for this service, according to rheumatology health professionals. A two-phase policy Delphi study was conducted. First, interviews were performed with nurses/nurse practitioners (n = 9) and rheumatologists (n = 13). Subsequently, collected responses were quantified, using a questionnaire among the interviewees. The following advantages of patient home access to the EMR were reported: (1) enhancement of patient participation in treatment, (2) increased knowledge and self-management, (3) improved patient-provider interaction, (4) increased patient safety, and (5) better communication with others. Foreseen disadvantages of the service included: (1) problems with interpretation of data, (2) extra workload, (3) a change in consultation content, and (4) disturbing the patient-provider interaction. Also, the following preconditions emerged from the data: (1) optimal security, (2) no extra record, but a patient-accessible section, (3) no access to clinical notes, and (4) a lag time on the release of lab data. Most respondents reported that data on diagnosis, medication, treatment plan and consultations could be released to patients. On releasing more complex data, such as bodily examinations, lab results and radiological images the opinions differed considerably. Providing patients home access to their medical record might be a valuable next step into patient empowerment and in service towards the patient, provided that security is optimal and content and presentation of data are carefully considered.

  11. Can chronic disease management programs for patients with type 2 diabetes reduce productivity-related indirect costs of the disease? Evidence from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adepoju, Omolola E; Bolin, Jane N; Ohsfeldt, Robert L; Phillips, Charles D; Zhao, Hongwei; Ory, Marcia G; Forjuoh, Samuel N

    2014-04-01

    The objective was to assess the impacts of diabetes self-management programs on productivity-related indirect costs of the disease. Using an employer's perspective, this study estimated the productivity losses associated with: (1) employee absence on the job, (2) diabetes-related disability, (3) employee presence on the job, and (4) early mortality. Data were obtained from electronic medical records and survey responses of 376 adults aged ≥18 years who were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of type 2 diabetes self-management programs. All study participants had uncontrolled diabetes and were randomized into one of 4 study arms: personal digital assistant (PDA), chronic disease self-management program (CDSMP), combined PDA and CDSMP, and usual care (UC). The human-capital approach was used to estimate lost productivity resulting from 1, 2, 3, and 4 above, which are summed to obtain total productivity loss. Using robust regression, total productivity loss was modeled as a function of the diabetes self-management programs and other identified demographic and clinical characteristics. Compared to subjects in the UC arm, there were no statistically significant differences in productivity losses among persons undergoing any of the 3 diabetes management interventions. Males were associated with higher productivity losses (+$708/year; Pmanagement programs examined in this trial affect indirect productivity losses.

  12. A Digital Framework to Support Providers and Patients in Diabetes Related Behavior Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Samina; Vallis, Michael; Piccinini-Vallis, Helena; Imran, Syed Ali; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    2017-01-01

    We present Diabetes Web-Centric Information and Support Environment (D-WISE) that features: (a) Decision support tool to assist family physicians to administer Behavior Modification (BM) strategies to patients; and (b) Patient BM application that offers BM strategies and motivational interventions to engage patients. We take a knowledge management approach, using semantic web technologies, to model the social cognition theory constructs, Canadian diabetes guidelines and BM protocols used locally, in terms of a BM ontology that drives the BM decision support to physicians and BM strategy adherence monitoring and messaging to patients. We present the qualitative analysis of D-WISE usability by both physicians and patients.

  13. Patient-provider relationship predicts mental and physical health indicators for HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankoff, Sarah M; McCullough, Mary B; Pantalone, David W

    2013-06-01

    We used secondary data analysis to examine associations among aspects of patient-provider relationships and mental and physical health indicators. Positive patient perceptions of patient-provider relationships were associated with fewer mental health symptoms in this outpatient sample of HIV-positive men who have sex with men (N = 171). Regression analyses revealed the role of anxiety and depression in explaining associations between two aspects of patient-provider relationships (i.e. quality of information offered and provider interactional style) and health-related quality of life. The findings demonstrated the importance of patient-provider relationships to improving physical health and functioning and maintaining engagement in care, among HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

  14. The absent discourse of communication: understanding ethics of provider-patient relationship in six hospitals in urban India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Rakhi; Madhiwalla, Neha; Jesani, Amar; Samant, Padmaja; Badhwar, Vijaya; Surve, Sweta

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the complexities of a provider-patient relationship is considered to be of critical importance especially in medical ethics. It is important to understand this relation from the perspectives of all stakeholders. This article derives from a qualitative study conducted across six obstetric care providing institutions in the cities of Mumbai and Navi Mumbai, India, over a period of 10 months. Thirty obstetricians were interviewed in-depth to understand what they perceived as the most important aspect in developing a good provider-patient relationship. The study found that while most providers highlighted the point of communication as the most critical part of the provider-patient relationship, they admitted that they could not engage in communication with the patients for various reasons. Obstetric consultants and residents said that they were too overburdened to spend time communicating with patients; providers working in public hospitals added that the lack of education of their patients posed a hindrance in effective communication. However, providers practicing in private institutions explained that they faced a challenge in communicating with patients because their patients came from educated families who tended to trust the provider less and were generally more critical of the provider's clinical judgement. The article shows how provider-patient communication exists as an idea among medical providers but is absent in daily clinical practice. This gives rise to a discourse shaped around an absence. The authors conclude by decoding the term 'communication' - they read the word against the context of its use in the interviews, and argue that for the providers 'communication' was not intended to be a trope towards setting up a dialogue-based, egalitarian provider-patient relationship. Providers used the word in lieu of 'counselling', 'guiding', 'talking to'. It concludes that, despite the providers' insisting on the significance of communication and

  15. Trust in the health-care provider-patient relationship: a systematic mapping review of the evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Nicola; Barnes, Rebecca; Calnan, Mike; Corrigan, Oonagh; Dieppe, Paul; Entwistle, Vikki

    2013-12-01

    Trust is important for patients and may be used as an indicator and potential 'marker' for how patients evaluate the quality of health care. The review aimed to classify the current evidence base on trust in the patient-provider relationship in order to identify strengths and weaknesses and to point towards areas for future research. Nine electronic databases were searched from 2004 onwards using text and subject heading keywords relating to 'trust' and 'health care' and 'relationships'. Abstracts were identified for empirical studies carried out in health-care settings that explicitly examined trust or reported trust-related findings as a secondary outcome. Data extraction Two review authors assessed the relevance of abstracts and extracted data relating to year published, country of study, clinical speciality, and participants. Five hundred and ninety-six abstracts were included. Most reported on patients' trust in providers; were carried out in the USA; collected data in family care or oncology/palliative care settings; used questionnaires and interviews and elicited patients' perspectives. Only one study explicitly set out to examine providers' trust in patients and patients. Providers' trust in patients remains a neglected area on the trust research agenda. Empirical studies examining the factors that influence providers' trust in patients and how this might affect the quality of care and patient health-related behaviours are urgently needed to readdress this imbalance. Further exploration of this area using observational methods is recommended.

  16. Forced-Air Warming Provides Better Control of Body Temperature in Porcine Surgical Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T. Dent

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Maintaining normothermia during porcine surgery is critical in ensuring subject welfare and recovery, reducing the risk of immune system compromise and surgical-site infection that can result from hypothermia. In humans, various methods of patient heating have been demonstrated to be useful, but less evaluation has been performed in techniques to prevent hypothermia perioperatively in pigs. Methods: We compared body temperature regulation during surgery before and after modification of the ambient temperature of the operating laboratories. Three different methods of heating were then compared; a standard circulating water mattress, a resistive fabric blanket, and a forced hot air system. The primary measure was percentage of temperature readings outside a specification range of 36.7–40.0 °C. Results: Tighter control of the ambient temperature while using a circulating water mattress reduced the occurrence of out-of-specification body temperature readings from 20.8% to 5.0%, with most of these the result of hypothermia. Use of a resistive fabric blanket further reduced out-of-specification readings to 1.5%, with a slight increase in the occurrence of hyperthermia. Use of a forced air system reduced out-of-specification readings to less 0.1%. Conclusions: Maintenance of normothermia perioperatively in pig can be improved by tightly controlling ambient temperatures. Use of a resistive blanket or a forced air system can lead to better control than a circulating water mattress, with the forced air system providing a faster response to temperature variations and less chance of hyperthermia.

  17. Forced-Air Warming Provides Better Control of Body Temperature in Porcine Surgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Brian T; Stevens, Karla A; Clymer, Jeffrey W

    2016-09-09

    Background: Maintaining normothermia during porcine surgery is critical in ensuring subject welfare and recovery, reducing the risk of immune system compromise and surgical-site infection that can result from hypothermia. In humans, various methods of patient heating have been demonstrated to be useful, but less evaluation has been performed in techniques to prevent hypothermia perioperatively in pigs. Methods: We compared body temperature regulation during surgery before and after modification of the ambient temperature of the operating laboratories. Three different methods of heating were then compared; a standard circulating water mattress, a resistive fabric blanket, and a forced hot air system. The primary measure was percentage of temperature readings outside a specification range of 36.7-40.0 °C. Results: Tighter control of the ambient temperature while using a circulating water mattress reduced the occurrence of out-of-specification body temperature readings from 20.8% to 5.0%, with most of these the result of hypothermia. Use of a resistive fabric blanket further reduced out-of-specification readings to 1.5%, with a slight increase in the occurrence of hyperthermia. Use of a forced air system reduced out-of-specification readings to less 0.1%. Conclusions: Maintenance of normothermia perioperatively in pig can be improved by tightly controlling ambient temperatures. Use of a resistive blanket or a forced air system can lead to better control than a circulating water mattress, with the forced air system providing a faster response to temperature variations and less chance of hyperthermia.

  18. Patient and Provider Perceptions of Weight Gain, Physical Activity, and Nutrition Counseling during Pregnancy: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Kara M; Wilcox, Sara; Liu, Jihong; Blair, Steven N; Pate, Russell R

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated patient and provider perceptions of weight gain, physical activity, and nutrition counseling during prenatal care visits. Individual qualitative interviews were conducted with 30 pregnant women between 20 and 30 weeks gestation (15 African American, 15 White) and 11 prenatal care providers (5 attending physicians, 5 residents, 1 nurse practitioner) in 2014. The majority of patients and providers reported receiving or giving advice on weight gain (87% and 100%, respectively), physical activity (87% and 91%), and nutrition (100% and 91%) during a prenatal visit. Discussion of counseling content was largely consistent between patients and providers. However, counseling was limited and not fully consistent with current weight gain, physical activity, or dietary guidelines during pregnancy. Most patients viewed provider advice positively, but some wanted more detailed information. Providers discussed many barriers to lifestyle counseling, including lack of time, inadequate training, concern about the sensitivity of the topic, lower education or income level of the patient, cultural differences, and lack of patient interest. Providers discussed weight gain, physical activity, and nutrition during prenatal care visits and patients accurately recalled this advice. However, counseling was limited and not fully consistent with guidelines. Future studies are needed to develop and evaluate the efficacy of interventions to help providers overcome perceived barriers and more effectively counsel women on weight and healthy lifestyles during pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Is patient education helpful in providing care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis? A qualitative study involving French nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Estelle; Chakroun, Nadia; Dalle, Nathalie; Izaute, Marie

    2013-09-01

    This French study explored nurses' involvement in patient education for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study design was qualitative. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 16 hospital nurses. Data analysis was performed according to Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological method, and supported by specific qualitative analysis software (Sphinx). The results showed the important role of hospital nurses in rheumatoid arthritis care. Patient education is a core part of nurses' work, allowing them to give patients information and emotional support. The interviewees displayed skills in helping patients learn to care for themselves. However, patient education mostly concerned patients who are already committed to their health care. Non-adherent patients warrant special attention; their acceptance of their disease, perceptions about disease and treatment, motivation, and autonomy should be specifically addressed. French nurses could benefit from more training, and could be aided by psychologists. Ambulatory services could also be developed for patient education in France, based on examples from other countries. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Discrepancies between sources providing the medication histories of acutely hospitalised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karkov, Louise Lindved; Schytte-Hansen, Simon; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig

    2010-01-01

    in the Orthopaedic Surgery Ward at Amager Hospital. Data were collected from four sources. All information was counted, and the potential clinical significance of discrepancies was evaluated on a five-point scale. The four sources are: patients, the Personal Electronic Medication Profile (PEM), the general......Objective The aim of this study was to clarify the number and type of discrepancies between four medication sources as well as their potential clinical significance to the patient. Method The study was conducted as a cross-sectional study comprising all patients hospitalised with hip fractures...... sources. Results A total of 69 medications were registered for nine patients or an average of 7.7 medications per patient. 10.1 discrepancies per patient and 1.3 discrepancies per drug were registered. Two discrepancies were assessed as having potentially lethal clinical significance. Forty...

  1. Ethical considerations in providing an upper limb exoskeleton device for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulboacă, Adriana E; Bolboacă, Sorana D; Bulboacă, Angelo C

    2017-04-01

    The health care system needs to face new and advanced medical technologies that can improve the patients' quality of life by replacing lost or decreased functions. In stroke patients, the disabilities that follow cerebral lesions may impair the mandatory daily activities of an independent life. These activities are dependent mostly on the patient's upper limb function so that they can carry out most of the common activities associated with a normal life. Therefore, an upper limb exoskeleton device for stroke patients can contribute a real improvement of quality of their life. The ethical problems that need to be considered are linked to the correct adjustment of the upper limb skills in order to satisfy the patient's expectations, but within physiological limits. The debate regarding the medical devices dedicated to neurorehabilitation is focused on their ability to be beneficial to the patient's life, keeping away damages, injustice, and risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Management of pain induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs: views of patients and care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rannou François

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expectations of patients for managing pain induced by exercise and mobilization (PIEM have seldom been investigated. We identified the views of patients and care providers regarding pain management induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs. Methods We performed a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with a stratified sample of 12 patients (7 women and 14 care providers (6 women: 4 general practitioners [GPs], 1 rheumatologist, 1 physical medicine physician, 1 geriatrician, 2 orthopedic surgeons, and 5 physical therapists. Results Patients and care providers have differing views on PIEM in the overall management of the state of disease. Patients' descriptions of PIEM were polymorphic, and they experienced it as decreased health-related quality of life. The impact of PIEM was complex, and patient views were sometimes ambivalent, ranging from denial of symptoms to discontinuation of therapy. Care providers agreed that PIEM is generally not integrated in management strategies. Care providers more often emphasized the positive and less often the negative dimensions of PIEM than did patients. However, the consequences of PIEM cited included worsened patient clinical condition, fears about physical therapy, rejection of the physical therapist and refusal of care. PIEM follow-up is not optimal and is characterized by poor transmission of information. Patients expected education on how better to prevent stress and anxiety generated by pain, education on mobilization, and adaptations of physical therapy programs according to pain intensity. Conclusion PIEM management could be optimized by alerting care providers to the situation, improving communication among care providers, and providing education to patients and care providers.

  3. Metaboli-Net: online groupware system providing counseling guidance for patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwata, Shigeki; Taniguchi, Shin-ichi; Kato, Atsuko; Inoue, Kazuoki; Yamamoto, Naoya; Ohkura, Tsuyoshi; Teramoto, Kei; Shigemasa, Chiaki; Kondoh, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    This study presented a newly developed online groupware system, Metaboli-Net, to yield counseling guidance on diet and exercise to patients with metabolic syndrome. A distinctive feature adopted in the system to maintain the retention rate of patients was the social network service (SNS) that enables the patients to share their dietary and relevant health information with other participants in the same group on the network. A pilot study was conducted to prove the effectiveness of the system in improving the patient's lifestyle and dietary health awareness. SNS also contributed to the participant's adherence to intervention programs.

  4. Cognitive Adaptation Training Provided to Chronically Hospitalized Patients with Schizophrenia in The Netherlands: Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr J. Quee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive adaptation training (CAT improves functional outcome in outpatients with schizophrenia living in the United States of America. The efficacy of CAT has never been demonstrated for patients living in a residential facility. We describe how CAT was delivered to two chronically hospitalized patients with schizophrenia living in The Netherlands. CAT was delivered for 8 months, and consisted of weekly home visits by a psychiatric nurse. Both patients improved on measures of functional outcome used in the US studies. These results indicate that CAT may improve outcomes, even in patients that have been hospitalized for several years.

  5. Patient-Provider Communication About Prostate Cancer Screening and Treatment: New Evidence From the Health Information National Trends Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuyan, Soumitra S; Chandak, Aastha; Gupta, Niodita; Isharwal, Sudhir; LaGrange, Chad; Mahmood, Asos; Gentry, Dan

    2015-11-26

    The American Urological Association, American Cancer Society, and American College of Physicians recommend that patients and providers make a shared decision with respect to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing for prostate cancer (PCa). The goal of this study is to determine the extent of patient-provider communication for PSA testing and treatment of PCa and to examine the patient specific factors associated with this communication. Using recent data from the Health Information National Trends Survey, this study examined the association of patient characteristics with four domains of patient-provider communication regarding PSA test and PCa treatment: (1) expert opinion of PSA test, (2) accuracy of PSA test, (3) side effects of PCa treatment, and (4) treatment need of PCa. The current results suggested low level of communication for PSA testing and treatment of PCa across four domains. Less than 10% of the respondents report having communication about all four domains. Patient characteristics like recent medical check-up, regular healthcare provider, global health status, age group, marital status, race, annual household income, and already having undergone a PSA test are associated with patient-provider communication. There are few discussions about PSA testing and PCa treatment options between healthcare providers and their patients, which limits the shared decision-making process for PCa screening and treatment as recommended by the current best practice guidelines. This study helps identify implications for changes in physician practice to adhere with the PSA screening guidelines. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Patient satisfaction with healthcare provided by family doctors: primary dimensions and an attempt at typology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinowicz, Ludmila; Chlabicz, Slawomir; Grebowski, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is a complex and difficult concept to measure, thus precluding the use of exclusively quantitative methods for its description. The purpose of this survey was firstly to identify particular healthcare dimensions that determine a patient's satisfaction or dissatisfaction; and secondly to attempt to typologise the patients' responses based on their evaluation of healthcare. Methods Using a qualitative research design, thirty-six in-depth interviews with patients of family physicians were conducted: four patients from each of 9 family practices in different regions of Poland were interviewed. The main outcome measure was factors associated with patient satisfaction/dissatisfaction. Results In their evaluations of their contacts with family doctors, the patients cited mostly issues concerning interpersonal relationships with the doctor. Nearly 40% of the statements referred to this aspect of healthcare, with nearly equal proportions of positive and negative comments. The second most frequent category of responses concerned contextual factors (21%) that related to conditions of medical service, with two-thirds of the evaluations being negative. Statements concerning the doctor's competencies (12.9%) and personal qualities (10.5%) were less common. Conclusion To improve the quality of healthcare, family doctors should take special care to ensure the quality of their interactions with patients. PMID:19371417

  7. Patient satisfaction with healthcare provided by family doctors: primary dimensions and an attempt at typology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grebowski Ryszard

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient satisfaction is a complex and difficult concept to measure, thus precluding the use of exclusively quantitative methods for its description. The purpose of this survey was firstly to identify particular healthcare dimensions that determine a patient's satisfaction or dissatisfaction; and secondly to attempt to typologise the patients' responses based on their evaluation of healthcare. Methods Using a qualitative research design, thirty-six in-depth interviews with patients of family physicians were conducted: four patients from each of 9 family practices in different regions of Poland were interviewed. The main outcome measure was factors associated with patient satisfaction/dissatisfaction. Results In their evaluations of their contacts with family doctors, the patients cited mostly issues concerning interpersonal relationships with the doctor. Nearly 40% of the statements referred to this aspect of healthcare, with nearly equal proportions of positive and negative comments. The second most frequent category of responses concerned contextual factors (21% that related to conditions of medical service, with two-thirds of the evaluations being negative. Statements concerning the doctor's competencies (12.9% and personal qualities (10.5% were less common. Conclusion To improve the quality of healthcare, family doctors should take special care to ensure the quality of their interactions with patients.

  8. Feasibility of Providing Web-Based Information to Breast Cancer Patients Prior to a Surgical Consult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Jordan G; Tucholka, Jennifer L; Steffens, Nicole M; Mahoney, Jane E; Neuman, Heather B

    2017-03-30

    Patients facing decisions for breast cancer surgery commonly search the internet. Directing patients to high-quality websites prior to the surgeon consultation may be one way of supporting patients' informational needs. The objective was to test an approach for delivering web-based information to breast cancer patients. The implementation strategy was developed using the Replicating Effective Programs framework. Pilot testing measured the proportion that accepted the web-based information. A pre-consultation survey assessed whether the information was reviewed and the acceptability to stakeholders. Reasons for declining guided refinement to the implementation package. Eighty-two percent (309/377) accepted the web-based information. Of the 309 that accepted, 244 completed the pre-consultation survey. Participants were a median 59 years, white (98%), and highly educated (>50% with a college degree). Most patients who completed the questionnaire reported reviewing the website (85%), and nearly all found it helpful. Surgeons thought implementation increased visit efficiency (5/6) and would result in patients making more informed decisions (6/6). The most common reasons patients declined information were limited internet comfort or access (n = 36), emotional distress (n = 14), and preference to receive information directly from the surgeon (n = 7). Routine delivery of web-based information to breast cancer patients prior to the surgeon consultation is feasible. High stakeholder acceptability combined with the low implementation burden means that these findings have immediate relevance for improving care quality.

  9. A review of cost communication in oncology: Patient attitude, provider acceptance, and outcome assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Chien, Chun-Ru

    2017-05-15

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology released its first guidance statement on the cost of cancer care in August 2009, affirming that patient-physician cost communication is a critical component of high-quality care. This forward-thinking recommendation has grown increasingly important in oncology practice today as the high costs of cancer care impose tremendous financial burden to patients, their families, and the health care system. For the current review, a literature search was conducted using the PubMed and Web of Science databases to identify articles that covered 3 topics related to patient-physician cost communication: patient attitude, physician acceptance, and the associated outcomes; and 15 articles from 12 distinct studies were identified. Although most articles that addressed patient attitude suggested that cost communication is desired by >50% of patients in the respective study cohorts, only communication. When asked about whether cost communication actually took place in their practice, percentages reported by physicians varied widely from 60%. The data suggested that cost communication was associated with improved patient satisfaction, lower out-of-pocket expenses, and a higher likelihood of medication nonadherence; none of the studies established causality. Both patients and physicians expressed a strong need for accurate, accessible, and transparent information about the cost of cancer care. Cancer 2017;123:928-39. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  10. Strategizing EHR use to achieve patient-centered care in exam rooms: a qualitative study on primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Chen, Yunan; Ashfaq, Shazia; Bell, Kristin; Calvitti, Alan; Farber, Neil J; Gabuzda, Mark T; Gray, Barbara; Liu, Lin; Rick, Steven; Street, Richard L; Zheng, Kai; Zuest, Danielle; Agha, Zia

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have great potential to improve quality of care. However, their use may diminish "patient-centeredness" in exam rooms by distracting the healthcare provider from focusing on direct patient interaction. The authors conducted a qualitative interview study to understand the magnitude of this issue, and the strategies that primary care providers devised to mitigate the unintended adverse effect associated with EHR use. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 healthcare providers at 4 Veterans Affairs (VAs) outpatient primary care clinics in San Diego County. Data analysis was performed using the grounded theory approach. The results show that providers face demands from both patients and the EHR system. To cope with these demands, and to provide patient-centered care, providers attempt to perform EHR work outside of patient encounters and create templates to streamline documentation work. Providers also attempt to use the EHR to engage patients, establish patient buy-in for EHR use, and multitask between communicating with patients and using the EHR. This study has uncovered the challenges that primary care providers face in integrating the EHR into their work practice, and the strategies they use to overcome these challenges in order to maintain patient-centered care. These findings illuminate the importance of developing "best" practices to improve patient-centered care in today's highly "wired" health environment. These findings also show that more user-centered EHR design is needed to improve system usability. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. The role of provider-patient communication and trust in online sources in Internet use for health-related activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiran; Shim, Minsun

    2010-01-01

    Provider-patient communication is an important factor influencing patients' satisfaction and health outcomes. This study draws upon the uses and gratification theory to examine how individuals' perception of communication with healthcare providers is associated with their Internet use for health-related activities. Using the data from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), we found that as individuals perceived their communication with providers to be less patient-centered, they were more likely to engage in various types of online health activities, such as using websites for healthy lifestyles, searching for healthcare providers, and seeking health information. Trust in online health information was also found to be a significant predictor of online health activities. The results of this study emphasized the important role of provider-patient communication in motivating individuals to turn to the Internet for health purposes.

  12. Explaining unexplained pain to fibromyalgia patients: finding a narrative that is acceptable to patients and provides a rationale for evidence based interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Hyland, ME; Hinton, C.; Hill, C.; Whalley, B; Jones,RC; Davies, AF

    2016-01-01

    As the cause of fibromyalgia is controversial, communicating with patients can be challenging, particularly if the patient adopts the narrative ‘I am damaged and so I need a more powerful pain killer’. Research shows that providing patients with alternative narratives can be helpful, but it remains unclear what particular narratives are most acceptable to patients and at the same time provide a rationale for evidence based psychological and exercise interventions. This article described the d...

  13. Fluid resuscitation practices in cardiac surgery patients in the USA: a survey of health care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Aronson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluid resuscitation during cardiac surgery is common with significant variability in clinical practice. Our goal was to investigate current practice patterns of fluid volume expansion in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries in the USA. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of 124 cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiovascular anesthesiologists, and perfusionists. Survey questions were designed to assess clinical decision-making patterns of intravenous (IV fluid utilization in cardiovascular surgery for five types of patients who need volume expansion: (1 patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB without bleeding, (2 patients undergoing CPB with bleeding, (3 patients undergoing acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH, (4 patients requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO or use of a ventricular assist device (VAD, and (5 patients undergoing either off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCABG surgery or transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. First-choice fluid used in fluid boluses for these five patient types was requested. Descriptive statistics were performed using Kruskal-Wallis test and follow-up tests, including t tests, to evaluate differences among respondent groups. Results The most commonly preferred indicators of volume status were blood pressure, urine output, cardiac output, central venous pressure, and heart rate. The first choice of fluid for patients needing volume expansion during CPB without bleeding was crystalloids, whereas 5% albumin was the most preferred first choice of fluid for bleeding patients. For volume expansion during ECMO or VAD, the respondents were equally likely to prefer 5% albumin or crystalloids as a first choice of IV fluid, with 5% albumin being the most frequently used adjunct fluid to crystalloids. Surgeons, as a group, more often chose starches as an adjunct fluid to crystalloids for patients needing volume expansion during CPB without bleeding. Surgeons

  14. Indirect constraints on composite Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niehoff, Christoph; Stangl, Peter; Straub, David [Excellence Cluster Universe, Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Models in which the Higgs boson is implemented as a composite pseudo Nambu-Goldstone boson of a new strongly interaction sector provide an elegant solution to the hierarchy problem and the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking. In this talk we present ways to constrain these kinds of models indirectly using flavour observables as well as Higgs physics.

  15. The nurse's role in providing information to surgical patients and family members in Turkey: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayin, Yazile; Aksoy, Güler

    2012-06-01

    In 2008, we conducted a nonexperimental, cross-sectional, descriptive study in the surgical services department of a hospital in Istanbul, Turkey, with the aim of determining how much information was required by perioperative patients and their family members, the extent to which this information was provided, and the role that nurses play in this process. We included a total of 394 outpatients and inpatients and their family members (ie, 197 patients, 197 family members) and 30 nurses in the study. We collected the research data by using one questionnaire for patients, a second for family members of patients, and a third for nurses. We discovered that the patients and their family members wanted to be given more information about the surgical process than they had received. Patients wanted more information about the intraoperative period, whereas their family members wanted more information about the postoperative period. We also found that nurses were aware that they did not play an effective role in providing information to patients and their family members because of a lack of knowledge about what information they were responsible for providing and insufficient staffing. We concluded that nurses should know what education they are responsible for providing, put more effort into understanding patient and family member information needs, and plan a better means of providing information to meet those needs. Copyright © 2012 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Separate patient serum sodium medians from males and females provide independent information on analytical bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steen Ingemann; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Lund, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During monitoring of monthly medians of results from patients undertaken to assess analytical stability in routine laboratory performance, the medians for serum sodium for male and female patients were found to be significantly related. METHODS: Daily, weekly and monthly patient medians...... of serum sodium for both male and female patients were calculated from results obtained on samples from the population >18 years on three analysers in the hospital laboratory. The half-range of medians was applied as an estimate of the maximum bias. Further, the ratios between the two medians were...... calculated. RESULTS: The medians of both genders demonstrated dispersions over time, but they were closely connected in like patterns, which were confirmed by the half-range of the ratios of medians for males and females that varied from 0.36% for daily, 0.14% for weekly and 0.036% for monthly ratios over...

  17. Interviews with Patients and Providers on Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Health Data Collection in the Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, M J; Raynor, Lewis A; Cottrell, Erika K; Pinnock, William J A

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Meaningful use (MU) and Uniform Data Systems (UDSs) are calling for the collection of gender identity (GI) in electronic health record (EHR) systems; however, many transgender and nonconforming (TGNC) patients may not feel safe disclosing their GI and the data collection is not designed to guide care provision. This study explores the complexities surrounding the inclusion of GI in EHR data collection and how it can best serve patients and providers. Methods: Using a semistructured interview format, TGNC patients (n=7) and providers (n=5) who care for TGNC patients were asked about data collection procedures and the use of these data within community health centers in Oregon. Using a constant comparative data analysis methodology, interview transcripts were coded for emergent concepts until overlapping themes were identified. Results: Both patients and providers expressed a need for the EHR to expand upon MU and UDS-recommended fields to include current pronouns and name and gender identifiers in a forward-facing display to prevent misgendering by clinic staff and providers. Furthermore, they both cited the need for a broader range of birth-assigned sex and gender options. TGNC patients and providers disagreed on the scope of health information to be collected as well as who should be tasked with the data collection. Conclusion: These interviews offer us a glimpse into the structural difficulties of creating an EHR system that serves the needs of clinicians while providing safe and culturally competent care to TGNC patients.

  18. Tinzaparin Provides Lower Lipid Profiles in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsien Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a low-molecular-weight heparin, tinzaparin has effectively been used as an anticoagulant during hemodialysis sessions. However, the impact of different heparin types on dyslipidemia is still controversial. In our study, 434 chronic hemodialysis patients were evaluated. The mean age was 65 ± 13. Forty-eight patients (11% and 386 patients (89% were in the tinzaparin and unfractionated heparin (UFH groups, respectively. Triglyceride had significant difference between the two groups (P=0.001 but total cholesterol, HDL, or LDL did not. In the univariate analysis, the triglyceride level was significantly associated with tinzaparin use [β: −39.9, 95% confidence interval (CI: −76.7 to −3.0], and this association remained following the multivariate analysis (β: −40.8, 95% CI: −75.1 to −6.5. The difference in serum total cholesterol level between tinzaparin and UFH became significant (β: −13, 95% CI: −24.5 to −1.56 after adjustment in the multivariate analysis. Moreover, in a subgroup analysis, male diabetic patients showed lower serum triglyceride levels with the use of tinzaparin, while older, nondiabetic, male patients showed significant advantages in total cholesterol levels with the use of tinzaparin. Based on our findings, tinzaparin shows a significant association with a lower lipid profile in patients with chronic hemodialysis when compared to UFH.

  19. Single-Center Experience Providing Palliative Care to Pediatric Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Patricia; Lehmann, Katie; Shanley, Maureen; Woloszyk, Tara; Khang, Erin; Luckritz, Kera; Saul, D'Anna

    2017-08-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) affects nearly 1400 new children each year in the United States. Morbidity and mortality rates remain high for pediatric patients with ESRD, including those that have received a renal transplant. To better understand ESRD patients referred to palliative care, including their physical symptoms, topics discussed, and themes emerging during initial palliative care consultation. This study is a retrospective chart review of pediatric ESRD patients who received a palliative care consult. Physical symptoms, core topics, and themes were identified by the interprofessional study team. The study team found 35 patients met inclusion criteria during the study period. The most common standard palliative care metric noted was "complex or time-intensive communication and interdisciplinary social support." Pain was the most common physical symptom addressed with goals of care and communication the most common topics discussed. Themes emerging described the emotional distress of patients and parents as well as prognostic discussions. This study demonstrates one institution's experience with pediatric ESRD patients undergoing consultation with the pediatric palliative care service. More research is necessary in this population to better describe the best focus for palliative care teams.

  20. Beyond vulnerability: how the dual role of patient-health care provider can inform health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Paula; Kuper, Ayelet

    2017-04-29

    In order to prepare fully competent health care professionals, health professions education must be concerned with the relational space between patients and providers. Compassion and compassionate care are fundamental elements of this relational space. Traditionally, health professions educators and leaders have gone to two narrative sources when attempting to better under constructs of compassion: patients or providers. Rarely have there been explorations of the perspectives of those who consider themselves as both patients and providers. In this study, we interviewed nineteen health care providers who self-disclosed as having had a substantive patient experience in the health care system. We engaged with these participants to better understand their experience of having these dual roles. Anchored in Foucault's concepts of subjectivity and Goffman's symbolic interactionism, the interviews in this study reveal practices of moving between the two roles of patient and provider. Through this exploration, we consider how it is that providers who have been patients understand themselves to be more compassionate whilst in their provider roles. Rather than describing compassion as a learnable behaviour or an innate virtue, we theoretically engage with one proposed mechanism of how compassion is produced. In particular, we highlight the role of critical reflexivity as an underexplored construct in the enactment of compassion. We discuss these findings in light of their implications for health professions education.

  1. Indirect cost burden of migraine in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Kevin; Wang, Sara; Rupnow, Marcia F T

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the indirect cost burden associated with migraine. Data were obtained from Thomson-Medstat's Health and Productivity Management (HPM) database for the 2002 through 2003 calendar years. The migraine cohort was composed of patients who had a diagnosis of migraine or migraine-specific abortive prescription medication, or both. A control cohort of patients without migraine was matched to patients in the migraine cohort. The average annual indirect burden of illness (BOI) of migraine and a national indirect BOI were estimated. Annual indirect expenditures were significantly higher in the migraine group compared with the control group ($4453 vs $1619; Ppresenteeism, was estimated to be $12 billion (mostly attributed to absenteeism). Migraine imparts a substantial indirect cost burden. Projected to a national level, this amounts to an annual cost to US employers of approximately $12 billion.

  2. Evaluation of quality of life in caregivers who are providing home care to cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubukcu, Mahcube

    2017-11-21

    The author aimed to evaluate the quality of life and the factors affecting the caregivers of cancer patients receiving home care. This cross-sectional descriptive study was performed in 48 cancer patients who were served from home care unit and 48 caregivers between 01 and 28 February 2014. Patients' functional status was evaluated with Katz Index for Activities of Daily Living and the Lawton Scale for Instrumental Activities of Daily Living. The levels of quality of life of caregivers of patients with cancer were determined with Caregiver Quality of Life Index-Cancer (CQOLC). The mean age of forty-eight patients was 69.79 ± 16.09 years; 62.5% of them were female. The mean duration of home care was 5.99 ± 5.26 years; 25% of patients were fully dependent on the bed. 83.3% of caregivers were female, mean age of caregivers was 50.75 ± 14.89 years, and 77.1% of them were family members. The mean CQOLC score was 74.43 ± 24.45. The highest score was detected in the financial distress and the lowest score was detected in the positive adaptation. The quality of life is increasing as the length of care is reduced and income status increased. The quality of life of caregivers is very low. Each characteristic of the caregiver will affect the care he/she gives. From this point of view, it is important to consider the characteristics of caregivers in improving the care given to cancer patients. In this respect, there is a need to support caregivers both materially and spiritually.

  3. Acupuncture provides short-term pain relief for patients in a total joint replacement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespin, Daniel J; Griffin, Kristen H; Johnson, Jill R; Miller, Cynthia; Finch, Michael D; Rivard, Rachael L; Anseth, Scott; Dusek, Jeffery A

    2015-06-01

    Given the risks of opioid medications, nonpharmacological strategies should be considered for total joint replacement patients. We investigated acupuncture as an adjunct therapy for postsurgical pain management in a total joint replacement program by examining which total hip and knee replacement patients elected to receive acupuncture and the effect of acupuncture on short-term pain. A total joint replacement program using fast-track physiotherapy offered elective postsurgical acupuncture to all patients, at no additional cost, as an adjunct therapy to opioids for pain management. The Joint Replacement Center at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, a 630-bed teaching and specialty hospital in Minneapolis, Minnesota from 2010 to 2012. Our sample included 2,500 admissions of total hip (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) patients. Self-reported pain was assessed before and after acupuncture using a 0-10 scale and categorized as none/mild (0-4) and moderate/severe pain (5-10). Seventy-five percent of admissions included acupuncture. Women (Odds Ratio: 1.48, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.22, 1.81) had higher odds of receiving acupuncture compared to men, and nonwhite patients (Odds Ratio: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.39, 0.78) had lower odds of receiving acupuncture compared to white patients. Average short-term pain reduction was 1.91 points (95% CI: 1.83, 1.99), a 45% reduction from the mean prepain score. Forty-one percent of patients reported moderate/severe pain prior to receiving acupuncture, while only 15% indicated moderate/severe pain after acupuncture. Acupuncture may be a viable adjunct to pharmacological approaches for pain management after THR or TKR. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Patients with continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices provide insight in human baroreflex physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tank, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Malehsa, Doris; Hegemann, Katrin; Haufe, Sven; Brinkmann, Julia; Tegtbur, Uwe; Diedrich, André; Bara, Christoph; Jordan, Jens; Strüber, Martin

    2012-09-01

    The superior clinical outcome of new continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) challenges the physiological dogma that cardiovascular autonomic homeostasis requires pulsatile blood flow and pressure. We tested the hypothesis that continuous-flow LVADs impair baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve traffic, thus further exacerbating sympathetic excitation. We included 9 male heart failure patients (26-61 years; 18.9-28.3 kg/m(2)) implanted with a continuous-flow LVAD. We recorded ECG, respiration, finger blood pressure, brachial blood pressure, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. After baseline measurements had been taken, patients underwent autonomic function testing including deep breathing, a Valsalva maneuver, and 15° head-up tilt. Finally, we increased the LVAD speed in 7 patients. Spontaneous sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity was analyzed. Brachial blood pressure was 99±4 mm Hg with 14±2 mm Hg finger pulse pressure. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity bursts showed a normal morphology, were linked to the cardiac cycle, and were suppressed during blood pressure increases. Mean burst frequency was lower compared with age- and body mass index-matched controls in 2 patients, slightly increased in 4 patients, and increased in 2 patients (P=0.11). Muscle sympathetic nerve activity burst latency and the median values of the burst amplitude distribution were similar between groups. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity increased 4±1 bursts per minute with head-up tilt (P<0.0003) and decreased 3±4 bursts per minute (P<0.031) when LVAD speed was raised. The mean sympathetic baroreflex slope was -3.75±0.79%/mm Hg in patients and -3.80±0.55%/mm Hg in controls. We conclude that low pulse pressure levels are sufficient to restrain sympathetic nervous system activity through baroreflex mechanisms.

  5. Assessment of the Nurses Performance in Providing Care to Patients Undergoing Nasogastric Tube in Suez Canal University Hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Magda Abdelaziz Mohammed; Mahmoud el Prince Mahmoud; Hamdy A Sleem; Mariam Sabry Shehab

    2017-01-01

    .... In general, tube feeding is a technique used for those who are unable to eat on their own. The aim of the present study is to assess nurses' performance in providing care to patients undergoing nasogastric tube...

  6. Use of electronic personal health record systems to encourage HIV screening: an exploratory study of patient and provider perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McInnes D Keith

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When detected, HIV can be effectively treated with antiretroviral therapy. Nevertheless in the U.S. approximately 25% of those who are HIV-infected do not know it. Much remains unknown about how to increase HIV testing rates. New Internet outreach methods have the potential to increase disease awareness and screening among patients, especially as electronic personal health records (PHRs become more widely available. In the US Department of Veterans' Affairs medical care system, 900,000 veterans have indicated an interest in receiving electronic health-related communications through the PHR. Therefore we sought to evaluate the optimal circumstances and conditions for outreach about HIV screening. In an exploratory, qualitative research study we examined patient and provider perceptions of Internet-based outreach to increase HIV screening among veterans who use the Veterans Health Administration (VHA health care system. Findings We conducted two rounds of focus groups with veterans and healthcare providers at VHA medical centers. The study's first phase elicited general perceptions of an electronic outreach program to increase screening for HIV, diabetes, and high cholesterol. Using phase 1 results, outreach message texts were drafted and then presented to participants in the second phase. Analysis followed modified grounded theory. Patients and providers indicated that electronic outreach through a PHR would provide useful information and would motivate patients to be screened for HIV. Patients believed that electronic information would be more convenient and understandable than information provided verbally. Patients saw little difference between messages about HIV versus about diabetes and cholesterol. Providers, however, felt patients would disapprove of HIV-related messages due to stigma. Providers expected increased workload from the electronic outreach, and thus suggested adding primary care resources and devising

  7. Use of electronic personal health record systems to encourage HIV screening: an exploratory study of patient and provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, D Keith; Solomon, Jeffrey L; Bokhour, Barbara G; Asch, Steven M; Ross, David; Nazi, Kim M; Gifford, Allen L

    2011-08-15

    When detected, HIV can be effectively treated with antiretroviral therapy. Nevertheless in the U.S. approximately 25% of those who are HIV-infected do not know it. Much remains unknown about how to increase HIV testing rates. New Internet outreach methods have the potential to increase disease awareness and screening among patients, especially as electronic personal health records (PHRs) become more widely available. In the US Department of Veterans' Affairs medical care system, 900,000 veterans have indicated an interest in receiving electronic health-related communications through the PHR. Therefore we sought to evaluate the optimal circumstances and conditions for outreach about HIV screening. In an exploratory, qualitative research study we examined patient and provider perceptions of Internet-based outreach to increase HIV screening among veterans who use the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) health care system. We conducted two rounds of focus groups with veterans and healthcare providers at VHA medical centers. The study's first phase elicited general perceptions of an electronic outreach program to increase screening for HIV, diabetes, and high cholesterol. Using phase 1 results, outreach message texts were drafted and then presented to participants in the second phase. Analysis followed modified grounded theory.Patients and providers indicated that electronic outreach through a PHR would provide useful information and would motivate patients to be screened for HIV. Patients believed that electronic information would be more convenient and understandable than information provided verbally. Patients saw little difference between messages about HIV versus about diabetes and cholesterol. Providers, however, felt patients would disapprove of HIV-related messages due to stigma. Providers expected increased workload from the electronic outreach, and thus suggested adding primary care resources and devising methods to smooth the flow of patients getting

  8. An Evaluation of the Quality of Nursing Care Provided for Vascular Access in Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Chamanzari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Care for vascular access of patients undergoing hemodialysis is a critical issue. Inflammation and subsequent infection are the major factors which threaten patients' health and diminish effectiveness of hemodialysis. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the severity and incidence of inflammation of vascular access in hemodialysis patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 90 patients undergoing hemodialysis in Emam Reza and Montazerie Hospitals in Mashhad, June, 2014. Evaluation of inflammation severity over the course of one month (12 hemodialysis sessions was performed by means of an inflammation tool designed by the Board of Nursing. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16, and performing descriptive and Chi-square tests.  Results:The mean and standard deviation of incidence of inflammation in the first session of hemodialysis was 3.2±1.3 cases. The mean and standard deviation of the intensity of inflammation was 12.5±4.7. Conclusion: Since inflammation of vascular access in hemodialysis patients impairs their safety and health improvement, necessary measures to reduce this complication must be taken.